Science.gov

Sample records for mm-thick cdte detectors

  1. Optimizing timing performance of CdTe detectors for PET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakhostin, M.

    2017-10-01

    Despite several attractive properties, the poor timing performance of compound semiconductor detectors such as CdTe and CdZnTe has hindered their use in commercial PET imaging systems. The standard method of pulse timing with such detectors is to employ a constant-fraction discriminator at the output of a timing filter which is fed by the pulses from a charge-sensitive preamplifier. The method has led to a time resolution of about 10 ns at full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) with 1 mm thick CdTe detectors. This paper presents a detailed investigation on the parameters limiting the timing performance of Ohmic contact planar CdTe detectors with the standard pulse timing method. The jitter and time-walk errors are studied through simulation and experimental measurements and it is revealed that the best timing results obtained with the standard timing method suffer from a significant loss of coincidence events (~50%). In order to improve the performance of the detectors with full detection efficiency, a new digital pulse timing method based on a simple pattern recognition technique was developed. A time resolution of 3.29  ±  0.10 ns (FWHM) in the energy range of 300–650 keV was achieved with an Ohmic contact planar CdTe detector (5  ×  5  ×  1 mm3). The digital pulse processing method was also used to correct for the charge-trapping effect and an improvement in the energy resolution from 4.83  ±  0.66% to 2.780  ±  0.002% (FWHM) at 511 keV was achieved. Further improvement of time resolution through a moderate cooling of the detector and the application of the method to other detector structures are also discussed.

  2. Simulation of 1.5-mm-thick and 15-cm-diameter gated silicon drift X-ray detector operated with a single high-voltage source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuura, Hideharu

    2015-04-01

    High-resolution silicon X-ray detectors with a large active area are required for effectively detecting traces of hazardous elements in food and soil through the measurement of the energies and counts of X-ray fluorescence photons radially emitted from these elements. The thicknesses and areas of commercial silicon drift detectors (SDDs) are up to 0.5 mm and 1.5 cm2, respectively. We describe 1.5-mm-thick gated SDDs (GSDDs) that can detect photons with energies up to 50 keV. We simulated the electric potential distributions in GSDDs with a Si thickness of 1.5 mm and areas from 0.18 to 168 cm2 at a single high reverse bias. The area of a GSDD could be enlarged simply by increasing all the gate widths by the same multiple, and the capacitance of the GSDD remained small and its X-ray count rate remained high.

  3. High-resolution CdTe detectors with application to various fields (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, Shin'ichiro; Orita, Tadashi; Arai, Yasuo; Sugawara, Hirotaka; Tomaru, Ryota; Katsuragawa, Miho; Sato, Goro; Watanabe, Shin; Ikeda, Hirokazu; Takahashi, Tadayuki; Furenlid, Lars R.; Barber, H. Bradford

    2016-10-01

    High-quality CdTe semiconductor detectors with both fine position resolution and high energy resolution hold great promise to improve measurement in various hard X-ray and gamma-ray imaging fields. ISAS/JAXA has been developing CdTe imaging detectors to meet scientific demands in latest celestial observation and severe environmental limitation (power consumption, vibration, radiation) in space for over 15 years. The energy resolution of imaging detectors with a CdTe Schottky diode of In/CdTe/Pt or Al/CdTe/Pt contact is a highlight of our development. We can extremely reduce a leakage current of devises, meaning it allows us to supply higher bias voltage to collect charges. The 3.2cm-wide and 0.75mm-thick CdTe double-sided strip detector with a strip pitch of 250 µm has been successfully established and was mounted in the latest Japanese X-ray satellite. The energy resolution measured in the test on ground was 2.1 keV (FWHM) at 59.5 keV. The detector with much finer resolution of 60 µm is ready, and it was actually used in the FOXSI rocket mission to observe hard X-ray from the sun. In this talk, we will focus on our research activities to apply space sensor technologies to such various imaging fields as medical imaging. Recent development of CdTe detectors, imaging module with pinhole and coded-mask collimators, and experimental study of response to hard X-rays and gamma-rays are presented. The talk also includes research of the Compton camera which has a configuration of accumulated Si and CdTe imaging detectors.

  4. Energy and coincidence time resolution measurements of CdTe detectors for PET

    PubMed Central

    Ariño, G.; Chmeissani, M.; De Lorenzo, G.; Puigdengoles, C.; Cabruja, E.; Calderón, Y.; Kolstein, M.; Macias-Montero, J.G.; Martinez, R.; Mikhaylova, E.; Uzun, D.

    2013-01-01

    We report on the characterization of 2 mm thick CdTe diode detector with Schottky contacts to be employed in a novel conceptual design of PET scanner. Results at −8°C with an applied bias voltage of −1000 V/mm show a 1.2% FWHM energy resolution at 511 keV. Coincidence time resolution has been measured by triggering on the preamplifier output signal to improve the timing resolution of the detector. Results at the same bias and temperature conditions show a FWHM of 6 ns with a minimum acceptance energy of 500 keV. These results show that pixelated CdTe Schottky diode is an excellent candidate for the development of next generation nuclear medical imaging devices such as PET, Compton gamma cameras, and especially PET-MRI hybrid systems when used in a magnetic field immune configuration. PMID:23750177

  5. Energy and coincidence time resolution measurements of CdTe detectors for PET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ariño, G.; Chmeissani, M.; De Lorenzo, G.; Puigdengoles, C.; Cabruja, E.; Calderón, Y.; Kolstein, M.; Macias-Montero, J. G.; Martinez, R.; Mikhaylova, E.; Uzun, D.

    2013-02-01

    We report on the characterization of 2 mm thick CdTe diode detector with Schottky contacts to be employed in a novel conceptual design of PET scanner. Results at -8°C with an applied bias voltage of -1000 V/mm show a 1.2% FWHM energy resolution at 511 keV. Coincidence time resolution has been measured by triggering on the preamplifier output signal to improve the timing resolution of the detector. Results at the same bias and temperature conditions show a FWHM of 6 ns with a minimum acceptance energy of 500 keV. These results show that pixelated CdTe Schottky diode is an excellent candidate for the development of next generation nuclear medical imaging devices such as PET, Compton gamma cameras, and especially PET-MRI hybrid systems when used in a magnetic field immune configuration.

  6. Energy and coincidence time resolution measurements of CdTe detectors for PET.

    PubMed

    Ariño, G; Chmeissani, M; De Lorenzo, G; Puigdengoles, C; Cabruja, E; Calderón, Y; Kolstein, M; Macias-Montero, J G; Martinez, R; Mikhaylova, E; Uzun, D

    2013-02-01

    We report on the characterization of 2 mm thick CdTe diode detector with Schottky contacts to be employed in a novel conceptual design of PET scanner. Results at -8°C with an applied bias voltage of -1000 V/mm show a 1.2% FWHM energy resolution at 511 keV. Coincidence time resolution has been measured by triggering on the preamplifier output signal to improve the timing resolution of the detector. Results at the same bias and temperature conditions show a FWHM of 6 ns with a minimum acceptance energy of 500 keV. These results show that pixelated CdTe Schottky diode is an excellent candidate for the development of next generation nuclear medical imaging devices such as PET, Compton gamma cameras, and especially PET-MRI hybrid systems when used in a magnetic field immune configuration.

  7. Characterization of a pixelated CdTe Timepix detector operated in ToT mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billoud, T.; Leroy, C.; Papadatos, C.; Pichotka, M.; Pospisil, S.; Roux, J. S.

    2017-01-01

    A 1 mm thick CdTe sensor bump-bonded to a Timepix readout chip operating in Time-over-Threshold (ToT) mode has been characterized in view of possible applications in particle and medical physics. The CdTe sensor layer was segmented into 256 × 256 pixels, with a pixel pitch of 55 μm. This CdTe Timepix device, of ohmic contact type, has been exposed to alpha-particles and photons from an 241Am source, photons from a 137Cs source, and protons of different energies (0.8–10 MeV) delivered by the University of Montreal Tandem Accelerator. The device was irradiated on the negatively biased backside electrode. An X-ray per-pixel calibration commonly used for this type of detector was done and its accuracy and resolution were assessed and compared to those of a 300 μm thick silicon Timepix device. The electron mobility-lifetime product (μeτe) of CdTe for protons of low energy has been obtained from the Hecht equation. Possible polarization effects have been also investigated. Finally, information about the homogeneity of the detector was obtained from X-ray irradiation.

  8. Spectrometric characteristic improvement of CdTe detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, V.I.; Garbusin, V.A.; Dorogov, P.G.; Loutchanski, A.E.; Kondrashov, V.V.

    1995-08-01

    A new pulse shape correction method combined with a pulse shape selection method has been proposed for a CdTe detectors energy resolution improvement and increasing the total absorption peak efficiency. The capabilities of the new technique for the spectrometric characteristic improvement are based on using specific features of the CdTe detectors output pulses. The energy resolution of about 1% FWHM at 662 keV has been achieved with planar CdTe detector under room temperature without decrease of peak efficiency. Standard measurement techniques give 3.7% FWHM. A significant spectrometric characteristic improvement of other room temperature semiconductor detectors such as HgI{sub 2} and CdZnTe detectors was also obtained.

  9. Evaluation of Compton gamma camera prototype based on pixelated CdTe detectors

    PubMed Central

    Calderón, Y.; Chmeissani, M.; Kolstein, M.; De Lorenzo, G.

    2014-01-01

    A proposed Compton camera prototype based on pixelated CdTe is simulated and evaluated in order to establish its feasibility and expected performance in real laboratory tests. The system is based on module units containing a 2×4 array of square CdTe detectors of 10×10 mm2 area and 2 mm thickness. The detectors are pixelated and stacked forming a 3D detector with voxel sizes of 2 × 1 × 2 mm3. The camera performance is simulated with Geant4-based Architecture for Medicine-Oriented Simulations(GAMOS) and the Origin Ensemble(OE) algorithm is used for the image reconstruction. The simulation shows that the camera can operate with up to 104 Bq source activities with equal efficiency and is completely saturated at 109 Bq. The efficiency of the system is evaluated using a simulated 18F point source phantom in the center of the Field-of-View (FOV) achieving an intrinsic efficiency of 0.4 counts per second per kilobecquerel. The spatial resolution measured from the point spread function (PSF) shows a FWHM of 1.5 mm along the direction perpendicular to the scatterer, making it possible to distinguish two points at 3 mm separation with a peak-to-valley ratio of 8. PMID:24932209

  10. Evaluation of Compton gamma camera prototype based on pixelated CdTe detectors.

    PubMed

    Calderón, Y; Chmeissani, M; Kolstein, M; De Lorenzo, G

    2014-06-01

    A proposed Compton camera prototype based on pixelated CdTe is simulated and evaluated in order to establish its feasibility and expected performance in real laboratory tests. The system is based on module units containing a 2×4 array of square CdTe detectors of 10×10 mm(2) area and 2 mm thickness. The detectors are pixelated and stacked forming a 3D detector with voxel sizes of 2 × 1 × 2 mm(3). The camera performance is simulated with Geant4-based Architecture for Medicine-Oriented Simulations(GAMOS) and the Origin Ensemble(OE) algorithm is used for the image reconstruction. The simulation shows that the camera can operate with up to 10(4) Bq source activities with equal efficiency and is completely saturated at 10(9) Bq. The efficiency of the system is evaluated using a simulated (18)F point source phantom in the center of the Field-of-View (FOV) achieving an intrinsic efficiency of 0.4 counts per second per kilobecquerel. The spatial resolution measured from the point spread function (PSF) shows a FWHM of 1.5 mm along the direction perpendicular to the scatterer, making it possible to distinguish two points at 3 mm separation with a peak-to-valley ratio of 8.

  11. CdTe focal plane detector for hard x-ray focusing optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seller, Paul; Wilson, Matthew D.; Veale, Matthew C.; Schneider, Andreas; Gaskin, Jessica; Wilson-Hodge, Colleen; Christe, Steven; Shih, Albert Y.; Gregory, Kyle; Inglis, Andrew; Panessa, Marco

    2015-08-01

    The demand for higher resolution x-ray optics (a few arcseconds or better) in the areas of astrophysics and solar science has, in turn, driven the development of complementary detectors. These detectors should have fine pixels, necessary to appropriately oversample the optics at a given focal length, and an energy response also matched to that of the optics. Rutherford Appleton Laboratory have developed a 3-side buttable, 20 mm x 20 mm CdTe-based detector with 250 μm square pixels (80x80 pixels) which achieves 1 keV FWHM @ 60 keV and gives full spectroscopy between 5 keV and 200 keV. An added advantage of these detectors is that they have a full-frame readout rate of 10 kHz. Working with NASA Goddard Space Flight Center and Marshall Space Flight Center, 4 of these 1mm-thick CdTe detectors are tiled into a 2x2 array for use at the focal plane of a balloon-borne hard-x-ray telescope, and a similar configuration could be suitable for astrophysics and solar space-based missions. This effort encompasses the fabrication and testing of flightsuitable front-end electronics and calibration of the assembled detector arrays. We explain the operation of the pixelated ASIC readout and measurements, front-end electronics development, preliminary X-ray imaging and spectral performance, and plans for full calibration of the detector assemblies. Work done in conjunction with the NASA Centers is funded through the NASA Science Mission Directorate Astrophysics Research and Analysis Program.

  12. Hard-X and gamma-ray imaging detector for astrophysics based on pixelated CdTe semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gálvez, J.-L.; Hernanz, M.; Álvarez, L.; Artigues, B.; Ullán, M.; Lozano, M.; Pellegrini, G.; Cabruja, E.; Martínez, R.; Chmeissani, M.; Puigdengoles, C.

    2016-01-01

    Stellar explosions are astrophysical phenomena of great importance and interest. Instruments with high sensitivities are essential to perform detailed studies of cosmic explosions and cosmic accelerators. In order to achieve the needed performance, a hard-X and gamma-ray imaging detector with mm spatial resolution and large enough efficiency is required. We present a detector module which consists of a single CdTe crystal of 12.5 × 12.5mm 2 and 2mm thick with a planar cathode and with the anode segmented in an 11x11 pixel array with a pixel pitch of 1 mm attached to the readout chip. Two possible detector module configurations are considered: the so-called Planar Transverse Field (PTF) and the Parallel Planar Field (PPF). The combination of several modules in PTF or PPF configuration will achieve the desired performance of the imaging detector. The sum energy resolution of all pixels of the CdTe module measured at 122 keV and 356 keV is 3.8% and 2% respectively, in the following operating conditions: PPF irradiation, bias voltage -500 V and temperature -10̂ C.

  13. Performance characteristics of CdTe drift ring detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alruhaili, A.; Sellin, P. J.; Lohstroh, A.; Veeramani, P.; Kazemi, S.; Veale, M. C.; Sawhney, K. J. S.; Kachkanov, V.

    2014-03-01

    CdTe and CdZnTe material is an excellent candidate for the fabrication of high energy X-ray spectroscopic detectors due to their good quantum efficiency and room temperature operation. The main material limitation is associated with the poor charge transport properties of holes. The motivation of this work is to investigate the performance characteristics of a detector fabricated with a drift ring geometry that is insensitive to the transport of holes. The performance of a prototype Ohmic CdTe drift ring detector fabricated by Acrorad with 3 drift rings is reported; measurements include room temperature current voltage characteristics (IV) and spectroscopic performance. The data shows that the energy resolution of the detector is limited by leakage current which is a combination of bulk and surface leakage currents. The energy resolution was studied as a function of incident X-ray position with an X-ray microbeam at the Diamond Light Source. Different ring biasing schemes were investigated and the results show that by increasing the lateral field (i.e. the bias gradient across the rings) the active area, evaluated by the detected count rate, increased significantly.

  14. Charge-sharing observations with a CdTe pixel detector irradiated with a 57Co source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maiorino, M.; Pellegrini, G.; Blanchot, G.; Chmeissani, M.; Garcia, J.; Martinez, R.; Lozano, M.; Puigdengoles, C.; Ullan, M.

    2006-07-01

    Charge sharing is a limiting factor of detector spatial resolution and contrast in photon counting imaging devices because multiple counts can be induced in adjacent pixels as a result of the spread of the charge cloud generated from a single X-ray photon of high energy in the detector bulk. Although this topic has been debated for a long time, the full impact of charge sharing has not been completely assessed. In this work, we look at the importance of charge sharing in CdTe pixel detectors by exposing such a device to a low-activity (37 kBq) 57Co source, whose main emission line is at 122 keV.The detectors used are 1 mm thick with a pixel pitch of 55 μm. These detectors are bump-bonded to Medipix2 photon-counting chips. This study gives an insight of the impact on the design and operation of pixel detectors coupled to photon-counting devices for imaging applications.

  15. Position-sensitive CdTe detector using improved crystal growth method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The feasibility of developing a position-sensitive CdTe detector array for astronomical observations in the hard X-ray, soft gamma ray region is demonstrated. In principle, it was possible to improve the resolution capability for imaging measurements in this region by orders of magnitude over what is now possible through the use of CdTe detector arrays. The objective was to show that CdTe crystals of the quality, size and uniformity required for this application can be obtained with a new high pressure growth technique. The approach was to fabricate, characterize and analyze a 100 element square array and several single-element detectors using crystals from the new growth process. Results show that detectors fabricated from transversely sliced, 7 cm diameter wafers of CdTe exhibit efficient counting capability and a high degree of uniformity over their entire areas. A 100 element square array of 1 sq mm detectors was fabricated and operated.

  16. The CdTe detector module and its imaging performance.

    PubMed

    Mori, I; Takayama, T; Motomura, N

    2001-12-01

    In recent years investigations into the application of semiconductor detector technology in gamma cameras have become active world-wide. The reason for this burst of activity is the expectation that the semiconductor-based gamma camera would outperform the conventional Anger-type gamma camera with a large scintillator and photomultipliers. Nevertheless, to date, it cannot be said that this expectation has been met. While most of the studies have used CZT (Cadmium Zinc Telluride) as the semiconductor material, we designed and fabricated an experimental detector module of CdTe (Cadmium Telluride). The module consists of 512 elements and its pixel pitch is 1.6 mm. We have evaluated its energy resolution, planar image performance, single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) image performance and time resolution for coincidence detection. The average energy resolution was 5.5% FWHM at 140 keV. The intrinsic spatial resolution was 1.6 mm. The quality of the phantom images, both planar and SPECT, was visually superior to that of the Anger-type gamma camera. The quantitative assessment of SPECT images showed accuracy far better than that of the Anger-type camera. The coincidence time resolution was 8.6 ns. All measurements were done at room temperature, and the polarization effect that had been the biggest concern for CdTe was not significant. The results indicated that the semiconductor-based gamma camera is superior in performance to the Anger-type and has the possibility of being used as a positron emission computed tomography (PET) scanner.

  17. CdTe detector based PIXE mapping of geological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaves, P. C.; Taborda, A.; de Oliveira, D. P. S.; Reis, M. A.

    2014-01-01

    A sample collected from a borehole drilled approximately 10 km ESE of Bragança, Trás-os-Montes, was analysed by standard and high energy PIXE at both CTN (previous ITN) PIXE setups. The sample is a fine-grained metapyroxenite grading to coarse-grained in the base with disseminated sulphides and fine veinlets of pyrrhotite and pyrite. Matrix composition was obtained at the standard PIXE setup using a 1.25 MeV H+ beam at three different spots. Medium and high Z elemental concentrations were then determined using the DT2fit and DT2simul codes (Reis et al., 2008, 2013 [1,2]), on the spectra obtained in the High Resolution and High Energy (HRHE)-PIXE setup (Chaves et al., 2013 [3]) by irradiation of the sample with a 3.8 MeV proton beam provided by the CTN 3 MV Tandetron accelerator. In this paper we present results, discuss detection limits of the method and the added value of the use of the CdTe detector in this context.

  18. Detector response function of an energy-resolved CdTe single photon counting detector.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xin; Lee, Hyoung Koo

    2014-01-01

    While spectral CT using single photon counting detector has shown a number of advantages in diagnostic imaging, knowledge of the detector response function of an energy-resolved detector is needed to correct the signal bias and reconstruct the image more accurately. The objective of this paper is to study the photo counting detector response function using laboratory sources, and investigate the signal bias correction method. Our approach is to model the detector response function over the entire diagnostic energy range (20 keV detector response function at six photon energies. The 12 parameters are obtained by non-linear least-square fitting with the measured detector response functions at the six energies. The correlations of the 12 parameters with energy are also investigated with the measured data. The analytical model generally describes the detector response function and is in good agreement with the measured data. The trend lines of the 12 parameters indicate higher energies tend to cause grater spectrum distortion. The spectrum distortion caused by the detector response function on spectral CT reconstruction is analyzed theoretically, and a solution to correct this spectrum distortion is also proposed. In spectral and fluorescence CT, the spectrum distortion caused by detector response function poses a problem and cannot be ignored in any quantitative analysis. The detector response function of a CdTe detector can be obtained by a semi-analytical method.

  19. Si and CdTe pixel detector developments at SPring-8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyokawa, H.; Furukawa, Y.; Hirono, T.; Ikeda, H.; Kajiwara, K.; Kawase, M.; Ohata, T.; Sato, G.; Sato, M.; Takahashi, T.; Tanida, H.; Uruga, T.; Watanabe, S.

    2011-04-01

    Single X-ray photon counting pixel detectors have become the most advanced detector technology in synchrotron radiation experiments recently. In particular, the PILATUS detector based on a silicon sensor has reached a very mature state and represents the world’s largest detector in this field. This paper first reports on threshold energy calibrations and the capability of applying an energy-resolved X-ray imaging with PILATUS. Second the design of a cadmium telluride (CdTe) pixel detector is described. A high density and high-atomic number sensor material is required in high energy X-ray applications available at SPring-8. For this purpose we are developing a CdTe pixel detector with the SP8-01 readout ASIC covering a wide dynamic range between 10 and 100 keV and containing lower and upper discriminators.

  20. Simulation of active-edge pixelated CdTe radiation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duarte, D. D.; Lipp, J. D.; Schneider, A.; Seller, P.; Veale, M. C.; Wilson, M. D.; Baker, M. A.; Sellin, P. J.

    2016-01-01

    The edge surfaces of single crystal CdTe play an important role in the electronic properties and performance of this material as an X-ray and γ-ray radiation detector. Edge effects have previously been reported to reduce the spectroscopic performance of the edge pixels in pixelated CdTe radiation detectors without guard bands. A novel Technology Computer Aided Design (TCAD) model based on experimental data has been developed to investigate these effects. The results presented in this paper show how localized low resistivity surfaces modify the internal electric field of CdTe creating potential wells. These result in a reduction of charge collection efficiency of the edge pixels, which compares well with experimental data.

  1. WE-G-204-03: Photon-Counting Hexagonal Pixel Array CdTe Detector: Optimal Resampling to Square Pixels

    SciTech Connect

    Shrestha, S; Vedantham, S; Karellas, A; Bellazzini, R; Spandre, G; Brez, A

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Detectors with hexagonal pixels require resampling to square pixels for distortion-free display of acquired images. In this work, the presampling modulation transfer function (MTF) of a hexagonal pixel array photon-counting CdTe detector for region-of-interest fluoroscopy was measured and the optimal square pixel size for resampling was determined. Methods: A 0.65mm thick CdTe Schottky sensor capable of concurrently acquiring up to 3 energy-windowed images was operated in a single energy-window mode to include ≥10 KeV photons. The detector had hexagonal pixels with apothem of 30 microns resulting in pixel spacing of 60 and 51.96 microns along the two orthogonal directions. Images of a tungsten edge test device acquired under IEC RQA5 conditions were double Hough transformed to identify the edge and numerically differentiated. The presampling MTF was determined from the finely sampled line spread function that accounted for the hexagonal sampling. The optimal square pixel size was determined in two ways; the square pixel size for which the aperture function evaluated at the Nyquist frequencies along the two orthogonal directions matched that from the hexagonal pixel aperture functions, and the square pixel size for which the mean absolute difference between the square and hexagonal aperture functions was minimized over all frequencies up to the Nyquist limit. Results: Evaluation of the aperture functions over the entire frequency range resulted in square pixel size of 53 microns with less than 2% difference from the hexagonal pixel. Evaluation of the aperture functions at Nyquist frequencies alone resulted in 54 microns square pixels. For the photon-counting CdTe detector and after resampling to 53 microns square pixels using quadratic interpolation, the presampling MTF at Nyquist frequency of 9.434 cycles/mm along the two directions were 0.501 and 0.507. Conclusion: Hexagonal pixel array photon-counting CdTe detector after resampling to square pixels

  2. Portable γ- and X-ray analyzers based on CdTe p-i-n detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khusainov, A. K.; Antonova, T. A.; Bahlanov, S. V.; Derbin, A. V.; Ivanov, V. V.; Lysenko, V. V.; Morozov, F.; Mouratov, V. G.; Muratova, V. N.; Petukhov, Y. A.; Pirogov, A. M.; Polytsia, O. P.; Saveliev, V. D.; Solovei, V. A.; Yegorov, K. A.; Zhucov, M. P.

    1999-06-01

    Several portable instruments are designed using previously reported CdTe detector technology. These can be divided into three groups according to their energy ranges: (1) 3-30 keV XRF analyzers, (2) 5-120 keV wide range XRF analyzers and (3) γ-ray spectrometers for operation up to 1500 keV. These instruments are used to inspect several hundreds of samples in situ during a working day in applications such as a metal alloy verification at customs control. Heavy metals are identified through a 3-100 mm thick package with these instruments. Surface contamination by heavy metals (for example toxins such as Hg, Th and Pb in housing environmental control), the determination of Pb concentration in gasoline, geophysical control in mining, or nuclear material control are other applications. The weight of these XRF probes is about 1 kg and two electronic designs are used: one with embedded computer and another based on a standard portable PC. The instruments have good precision and high productivity for measurements in situ. The detection limit of Ce is about 0.03% when measured in the presence of 10% barium for 15 s. The detection limit when measuring K-shell X-ray of heavy metals contamination is about 0.1 mg/cm 2 for 15 s. Two types of probes for γ-spectrometry with small and large (>30 mm 3) detector volumes provide both high- and low-activity of nuclear fuel analysis. The maximum distance between the probes and electronics unit is 20 m. The γ-spectrometers are equipped with electronics to correct signal distortion due to slow carrier effects. This allows the instrument to achieve an energy resolution of about 2.5 keV at 662 keV. Several modes to process spectra are possible including semiquantitative and total real-shape fitting.

  3. [Feasibility study of SPECT quantification using CdTe semiconductor detector].

    PubMed

    Takayama, T; Hiwatashi, K; Nakamura, N; Motomura, N; Mori, I; Ohno, R

    2000-07-01

    Quantification of SPECT using CdTe semiconductors as a detector head in nuclear medicine equipment was investigated. A prototype of semiconductor detectors with an effective field-of-view as small as 2.54 cm x 5.08 cm was constructed, and a cylindrical phantom containing four spherical phantoms with capacities 71, 56, 42, and 15 ml, was used. Water was placed in three of these spherical phantoms (71, 56, and 42 ml), and 8.362 MBq of 99mTc was poured into the remaining 15 ml phantom. In the outer cylindrical phantom, 925 MBq (6200 ml) of 99mTc was placed. A Toshiba LEHR (Low Energy High Resolution) collimator was attached to the semiconductor detectors, and SPECT acquisition with a rotation radius 132 mm was performed. It was found that in the data thus acquired using the semiconductor detector, the amount of scattered gamma-rays decreased by 33% as compared to data acquired using NaI(Tl) scintillators under the same condition. Moreover, when attenuation correction was applied to SPECT data from the CdTe semiconductor detector, the measurement accuracy of radioactivity improved by 16% as compared to SPECT data from NaI(Tl) scintillators with the same acquisition and post-correction conditions. Finally, the CdTe detector data with only attenuation correction was found to have almost the same grade of accuracy as NaI scintillator data with both attenuation and TEW scatter corrections.

  4. Vapor phase epitaxy growth of CdTe epilayers for RT x-ray detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovergine, Nico; Mancini, A. M.; Prete, P.; Cola, Adriano; Tapfer, Leander

    2000-11-01

    We report on the growth of thick CdTe layers on ZnTe/(100) GaAs hybrid substrates by the novel H2 transport vapor phase epitaxy (H2T-VPE) method. High crystalline quality (100)-oriented CdTe single crystal epilayers can be fabricated under atmospheric pressure and at growth temperatures (TD) in the 600 - 800 degree Celsius interval. Double crystal X-ray diffraction measurements performed on epilayers thicker than 30 micrometer show CdTe (400) peaks with FWHM < 59 arcsec. Samples grown under optimized conditions exhibit mirror-like surfaces. Nominally undoped epilayers grown < 650 degrees Celsius are p-type and low resistive, but they turn n-type above 650 degrees Celsius, as a result of donor (likely Ga) diffusion from the substrate. RT resistivities ((rho) ) approximately 106 (Omega) (DOT)cm are obtained for 675 degrees Celsius < TD < 700 degrees Celsius, but (rho) decreases for higher temperatures and thinner samples. Layers grown under these conditions show RT electron concentrations in the 1014 - 1011 cm-3 range. The detection capability of H2T-VPE grown CdTe is demonstrated by time- of-flight measurements performed at RT on Au/n-CdTe/n+- GaAs diode structures under reverse bias conditions. The present results show the potentials of H2T-VPE for the growth of detector-grade CdTe.

  5. Local polarization phenomena in In-doped CdTe x-ray detector arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Toshiyuki; Sato, Kenji; Ishida, Shinichiro; Kiri, Motosada; Hirooka, Megumi; Yamada, Masayoshi; Kanamori, Hitoshi

    1995-10-01

    Local polarization phenomena have been studied in detector arrays with the detector element size of 500 {micro}m x 500 {micro}m, which are fabricated from high-resistivity In-doped CdTe crystals grown by the vertical Bridgman technique. It has been found for the first time that a polarization effect, which is characterized by a progressive decrease of the pulse counting rate with increasing photon fluence, strongly depends on the detector elements, that is, the portion of crystals used. The influence of several parameters, such as the applied electric field strength, time, and temperature, on this local polarization effect is also investigated. From the photoluminescence measurements of the inhomogeneity of In dopant, it is concluded that the local polarization effect observed here originates from a deep level associated with In dopant in CdTe crystals.

  6. Evaluation of XRI-UNO CdTe detector for nuclear medical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jambi, L. K.; Lees, J. E.; Bugby, S. L.; Tipper, S.; Alqahtani, M. S.; Perkins, A. C.

    2015-06-01

    Over the last two decades advances in semiconductor detector technology have reached the point where they are sufficiently sensitive to become an alternative to scintillators for high energy gamma ray detection for application in fields such as medical imaging. This paper assessed the Cadmium-Telluride (CdTe) XRI-UNO semiconductor detector produced by X-RAY Imatek for photon energies of interest in nuclear imaging. The XRI-UNO detector was found to have an intrinsic spatial resolution of <0.5mm and a high incident count rate capability up to at least 1680cps. The system spatial resolution, uniformity and sensitivity characteristics are also reported.

  7. Imaging detector development for nuclear astrophysics using pixelated CdTe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Álvarez, J. M.; Gálvez, J. L.; Hernanz, M.; Isern, J.; Llopis, M.; Lozano, M.; Pellegrini, G.; Chmeissani, M.

    2010-11-01

    The concept of focusing telescopes in the energy range of lines of astrophysical interest (i.e., of energies around 1 MeV) should allow to reach unprecedented sensitivities, essential to perform detailed studies of cosmic explosions and cosmic accelerators. Our research and development activities aim to study a detector suited for the focal plane of a γ-ray telescope mission. A CdTe/CdZnTe detector operating at room temperature, that combines high detection efficiency with good spatial and spectral resolution is being studied in recent years as a focal plane detector, with the interesting option of also operating as a Compton telescope monitor. We present the current status of the design and development of a γ-ray imaging spectrometer in the MeV range, for nuclear astrophysics, consisting of a stack of CdTe pixel detectors with increasing thicknesses. We have developed an initial prototype based on CdTe ohmic detector. The detector has 11×11 pixels, with a pixel pitch of 1 mm and a thickness of 2 mm. Each pixel is stud bonded to a fanout board and routed to an front end ASIC to measure pulse height and rise time information for each incident γ-ray photon. First measurements of a 133Ba and 241Am source are reported here.

  8. X-ray micro-beam characterization of a small pixel spectroscopic CdTe detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veale, M. C.; Bell, S. J.; Seller, P.; Wilson, M. D.; Kachkanov, V.

    2012-07-01

    A small pixel, spectroscopic, CdTe detector has been developed at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL) for X-ray imaging applications. The detector consists of 80 × 80 pixels on a 250 μm pitch with 50 μm inter-pixel spacing. Measurements with an 241Am γ-source demonstrated that 96% of all pixels have a FWHM of better than 1 keV while the majority of the remaining pixels have FWHM of less than 4 keV. Using the Diamond Light Source synchrotron, a 10 μm collimated beam of monochromatic 20 keV X-rays has been used to map the spatial variation in the detector response and the effects of charge sharing corrections on detector efficiency and resolution. The mapping measurements revealed the presence of inclusions in the detector and quantified their effect on the spectroscopic resolution of pixels.

  9. Characterization of a 2-mm thick, 16x16 Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride Pixel Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaskin, Jessica; Richardson, Georgia; Mitchell, Shannon; Ramsey, Brian; Seller, Paul; Sharma, Dharma

    2003-01-01

    The detector under study is a 2-mm-thick, 16x16 Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride pixel array with a pixel pitch of 300 microns and inter-pixel gap of 50 microns. This detector is a precursor to that which will be used at the focal plane of the High Energy Replicated Optics (HERO) telescope currently being developed at Marshall Space Flight Center. With a telescope focal length of 6 meters, the detector needs to have a spatial resolution of around 200 microns in order to take full advantage of the HERO angular resolution. We discuss to what degree charge sharing will degrade energy resolution but will improve our spatial resolution through position interpolation. In addition, we discuss electric field modeling for this specific detector geometry and the role this mapping will play in terms of charge sharing and charge loss in the detector.

  10. Characterization of a 2-mm thick, 16x16 Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride Pixel Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaskin, Jessica; Richardson, Georgia; Mitchell, Shannon; Ramsey, Brian; Seller, Paul; Sharma, Dharma

    2003-01-01

    The detector under study is a 2-mm-thick, 16x16 Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride pixel array with a pixel pitch of 300 microns and inter-pixel gap of 50 microns. This detector is a precursor to that which will be used at the focal plane of the High Energy Replicated Optics (HERO) telescope currently being developed at Marshall Space Flight Center. With a telescope focal length of 6 meters, the detector needs to have a spatial resolution of around 200 microns in order to take full advantage of the HERO angular resolution. We discuss to what degree charge sharing will degrade energy resolution but will improve our spatial resolution through position interpolation. In addition, we discuss electric field modeling for this specific detector geometry and the role this mapping will play in terms of charge sharing and charge loss in the detector.

  11. Imaging and spectroscopic performance studies of pixellated CdTe Timepix detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maneuski, D.; Astromskas, V.; Fröjdh, E.; Fröjdh, C.; Gimenez, E. N.; Marchal, J.; O'Shea, V.; Stewart, G.; Tartoni, N.; Wilhelm, H.; Wraight, K.; Zain, R. M.

    2012-01-01

    In this work the results on imaging and spectroscopic performances of 14 × 14 × 1 mm CdTe detectors with 55 × 55 μm and 110 × 110 μm pixel pitch bump-bonded to a Timepix chip are presented. The performance of the 110 × 110 μm pixel detector was evaluated at the extreme conditions beam line I15 of the Diamond Light Source. The energy of X-rays was set between 25 and 77 keV. The beam was collimated through the edge slits to 20 μm FWHM incident in the middle of the pixel. The detector was operated in the time-over-threshold mode, allowing direct energy measurement. Energy in the neighbouring pixels was summed for spectra reconstruction. Energy resolution at 77 keV was found to be ΔE/E = 3.9%. Comparative imaging and energy resolution studies were carried out between two pixel size detectors with a fluorescence target X-ray tube and radioactive sources. The 110 × 110 μm pixel detector exhibited systematically better energy resolution in comparison to 55 × 55 μm. An imaging performance of 55 × 55 μm pixellated CdTe detector was assessed using the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) technique and compared to the larger pixel. A considerable degradation in MTF was observed for bias voltages below -300 V. Significant room for improvement of the detector performance was identified both for imaging and spectroscopy and is discussed.

  12. Component Overpressure Growth and Characterization of High Resistivity CdTe Crystals for Radiation Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Mandal, Krishna; Kang, Sung Hoon; Choi, Michael; Wei, Jiuan; Zheng, Lili; Zhang, Hui; Jellison Jr, Gerald Earle; Groza, Michael; Burger, Arnold

    2007-01-01

    Spectrometer-grade CdTe single crystals with resistivities higher than 10{sup 9} {Omega} cm have been grown by the modified Bridgman method using zone-refined precursor materials (Cd and Te) under a Cd overpressure. The grown CdTe crystals had good charge-transport properties ({mu}{tau}{sub e} = 2 x 10{sup -3} cm{sup 2} V{sup -1}, {mu}{tau}{sub h} = 8 x 10{sup -5} cm{sup 2} V{sup -1}) and significantly reduced Te precipitates compared with crystals grown without Cd overpressure. The crystal growth conditions for the Bridgman system were optimized by computer modeling and simulation, using modified MASTRAPP program, and applied to crystal diameters of 14 mm (0.55'), 38 mm (1.5'), and 76 mm (3'). Details of the CdTe crystal growth operation, structural, electrical, and optical characterization measurements, detector fabrication, and testing using {sup 241}Am (60 keV) and {sup 137}Cs (662 keV) sources are presented.

  13. CdTe detectors in medicine: a review of current applications and future perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheiber, C.; Chambron, J.

    1992-11-01

    Cadmium telluride (CdTe) semiconductor sensors have been evaluated for medical applications for 15 years owing to their high stopping power, convenient energy resolution and operating conditions at room temperature. Most of the applications herein reviewed concern medical imaging procedures, i.e., nuclear medicine, including positron emission tomography and radiology with computerized tomography (XCT). Despite their attractive physical characteristics, their preliminary commercial development has been slowed down in the early 80s because of technical problems, particularly when large arrays were considered, and because of the competition with the more available and less expensive scintillators or xenon chambers which are still mounted in most modern medical imaging systems. Nowadays the characteristics of new materials have allowed the development of restricted but more specific domains of CdTe medical applications i.e. miniaturized nuclear probes dedicated to per-operative tumor detection or ambulatory monitoring of physiological (renal, cardiac) functions and bone absorptiometry using either planar or miniature tomographic systems. Supported by these features and encouraged by the growing competition between ionising and non-ionizing imaging modalities (US, MRI), research work is presently conducted with a view to using CdTe detectors in XCT.

  14. Prompt gamma and neutron detection in BNCT utilizing a CdTe detector.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Alexander; Koivunoro, Hanna; Reijonen, Vappu; Auterinen, Iiro; Savolainen, Sauli

    2015-12-01

    In this work, a novel sensor technology based on CdTe detectors was tested for prompt gamma and neutron detection using boronated targets in (epi)thermal neutron beam at FiR1 research reactor in Espoo, Finland. Dedicated neutron filter structures were omitted to enable simultaneous measurement of both gamma and neutron radiation at low reactor power (2.5 kW). Spectra were collected and analyzed in four different setups in order to study the feasibility of the detector to measure 478 keV prompt gamma photons released from the neutron capture reaction of boron-10. The detector proved to have the required sensitivity to detect and separate the signals from both boron neutron and cadmium neutron capture reactions, which makes it a promising candidate for monitoring the spatial and temporal development of in vivo boron distribution in boron neutron capture therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Study of the effect of the stress on CdTe nuclear detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Ayoub, M.; Radley, I.; Mullins, J. T.; Hage-Ali, M.

    2013-09-14

    CdTe detectors are commonly used for X and γ ray applications. The performance of these detectors is strongly affected by different types of mechanical stress; such as that caused by differential expansion between the semiconductor and its intimate metallic contacts and that caused by applied pressure during the bonding process. The aim of this work was to study the effects of stress on the performance of CdTe detectors. A difference in expansion coefficients induces transverse stress under the metallic contact, while contact pressure induces longitudinal stress. These stresses have been simulated by applying known static pressures. For the longitudinal case, the pressure was applied directly to the metallic contact; while in the transverse case, it was applied to the side. We have studied the effect of longitudinal and transverse stresses on the electrical characteristics including leakage current measurements and γ-ray detection performance. We have also investigated induced defects, their nature, activation energies, cross sections, and concentrations under the applied stress by using photo-induced current transient spectroscopy and thermoelectric effect spectroscopy techniques. The operational stress limit is also given.

  16. Pixelated CdTe detectors to overcome intrinsic limitations of crystal based positron emission mammographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Lorenzo, G.; Chmeissani, M.; Uzun, D.; Kolstein, M.; Ozsahin, I.; Mikhaylova, E.; Arce, P.; Cañadas, M.; Ariño, G.; Calderón, Y.

    2013-01-01

    A positron emission mammograph (PEM) is an organ dedicated positron emission tomography (PET) scanner for breast cancer detection. State-of-the-art PEMs employing scintillating crystals as detection medium can provide metabolic images of the breast with significantly higher sensitivity and specificity with respect to standard whole body PET scanners. Over the past few years, crystal PEMs have dramatically increased their importance in the diagnosis and treatment of early stage breast cancer. Nevertheless, designs based on scintillators are characterized by an intrinsic deficiency of the depth of interaction (DOI) information from relatively thick crystals constraining the size of the smallest detectable tumor. This work shows how to overcome such intrinsic limitation by substituting scintillating crystals with pixelated CdTe detectors. The proposed novel design is developed within the Voxel Imaging PET (VIP) Pathfinder project and evaluated via Monte Carlo simulation. The volumetric spatial resolution of the VIP-PEM is expected to be up to 6 times better than standard commercial devices with a point spread function of 1 mm full width at half maximum (FWHM) in all directions. Pixelated CdTe detectors can also provide an energy resolution as low as 1.5% FWHM at 511 keV for a virtually pure signal with negligible contribution from scattered events.

  17. Pixelated CdTe detectors to overcome intrinsic limitations of crystal based positron emission mammographs.

    PubMed

    De Lorenzo, G; Chmeissani, M; Uzun, D; Kolstein, M; Ozsahin, I; Mikhaylova, E; Arce, P; Cañadas, M; Ariño, G; Calderón, Y

    2013-01-01

    A positron emission mammograph (PEM) is an organ dedicated positron emission tomography (PET) scanner for breast cancer detection. State-of-the-art PEMs employing scintillating crystals as detection medium can provide metabolic images of the breast with significantly higher sensitivity and specificity with respect to standard whole body PET scanners. Over the past few years, crystal PEMs have dramatically increased their importance in the diagnosis and treatment of early stage breast cancer. Nevertheless, designs based on scintillators are characterized by an intrinsic deficiency of the depth of interaction (DOI) information from relatively thick crystals constraining the size of the smallest detectable tumor. This work shows how to overcome such intrinsic limitation by substituting scintillating crystals with pixelated CdTe detectors. The proposed novel design is developed within the Voxel Imaging PET (VIP) Pathfinder project and evaluated via Monte Carlo simulation. The volumetric spatial resolution of the VIP-PEM is expected to be up to 6 times better than standard commercial devices with a point spread function of 1 mm full width at half maximum (FWHM) in all directions. Pixelated CdTe detectors can also provide an energy resolution as low as 1.5% FWHM at 511 keV for a virtually pure signal with negligible contribution from scattered events.

  18. Pixelated CdTe detectors to overcome intrinsic limitations of crystal based positron emission mammographs

    PubMed Central

    De Lorenzo, G.; Chmeissani, M.; Uzun, D.; Kolstein, M.; Ozsahin, I.; Mikhaylova, E.; Arce, P.; Cañadas, M.; Ariño, G.; Calderón, Y.

    2013-01-01

    A positron emission mammograph (PEM) is an organ dedicated positron emission tomography (PET) scanner for breast cancer detection. State-of-the-art PEMs employing scintillating crystals as detection medium can provide metabolic images of the breast with significantly higher sensitivity and specificity with respect to standard whole body PET scanners. Over the past few years, crystal PEMs have dramatically increased their importance in the diagnosis and treatment of early stage breast cancer. Nevertheless, designs based on scintillators are characterized by an intrinsic deficiency of the depth of interaction (DOI) information from relatively thick crystals constraining the size of the smallest detectable tumor. This work shows how to overcome such intrinsic limitation by substituting scintillating crystals with pixelated CdTe detectors. The proposed novel design is developed within the Voxel Imaging PET (VIP) Pathfinder project and evaluated via Monte Carlo simulation. The volumetric spatial resolution of the VIP-PEM is expected to be up to 6 times better than standard commercial devices with a point spread function of 1 mm full width at half maximum (FWHM) in all directions. Pixelated CdTe detectors can also provide an energy resolution as low as 1.5% FWHM at 511 keV for a virtually pure signal with negligible contribution from scattered events. PMID:23750176

  19. Observation of solar flare hard x-ray spectra using CdTe detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, K.; Tsuneta, S.; Tamura, T.; Kumagai, K.; Katsukawa, Y.; Kubo, M.; Sakamoto, Y.; Yamagami, T.; Saito, Y.; Mori, K.

    We present the design and flight results of a balloon-borne hard X-ray detector system for observing high-resolution spectra of solar flares. The instrument is designed to achieve a 3 keV energy resolution over the energy range of 15-120 keV. The instrument uses sixteen 10 × 10 × 0.5 mm cadmium telluride (CdTe) detectors with indium electrodes that act as Schottky barriers to minimize leak current and allow a high bias voltage. Pre-flight tests confirmed that all detectors exceeded the target 3 keV resolution. The pressurized detector vessel uses a low-density (0.1 g/cm^2) CFRP/Rohacell window. The detectors are passively shielded by 2 mm of lead, and field of view is constrained with a graded-Z collimator. The vertical angle of the detectors are fixed at 45 degrees, and the azimuth angle of the entire gondola is controlled using a signal from a sun position sensor. Specially developed electronics accumulate a 128 channel spectrum for each detector, which is read through telemetry every 0.54 seconds. These detectors need to be cooled down to 0 degrees C for optimal performance; due to weight constraints this was achieved purely by radiative cooling, using the detector enclosure surface as a radiator and by placing shields that minimize radiative heat input from the sun and earth while maximizing heat loss to the sky. The first flight of the instrument took place on August 29, 2001 and while no major flares were observed, we succeeded in detecting a small brightening (microflare). Detector temperature of -13 degrees C was achieved, and all systems performed as expected. The instrument was recovered successfully after the flight and a second flight is planned for May 2002.

  20. Large dynamic range 64-channel ASIC for CZT or CdTe detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glasser, F.; Villard, P.; Rostaing, J. P.; Accensi, M.; Baffert, N.; Girard, J. L.

    2003-08-01

    We present a customized 64-channel ASIC, named ALIX, developed in a 0.8 μm CMOS technology. This circuit is dedicated to measure charges from semi-conductor X-ray detectors like Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) or Cadmium Telluride CdTe. The specificity of ALIX is to be able to measure charges over a very large dynamic range (from 10 fC to 3 nC), and to store eight measurements in a very short time (from every 250 ns to a few ms). Up to eight images are stored inside the ASIC and each image can be read out in 64 μs. A new acquisition sequence can then be started. Two analog readouts are available, one for the X-ray signal and one for the offset and afterglow measurement in case of pulsed X-rays. The outputs are converted into digital values by two off-chip 14 bits Analog-to-Digital Converters (ADC). A first version of ALIX has been tested with CZT and CdTe detectors under high-energy pulsed X-ray photons (20 MeV, 60 ns pulses every 250 ns). We will present the different results of linearity and signal-to-noise ratio. A second version of ALIX has been designed with some corrections. Electrical tests performed on 85 ASICS showed that the corrections were successful. We are now able to integrate them behind a 64×32 pixels 1 mm pitch CZT detector. Such an ASIC could also be used for strip detectors where a large dynamic range and a fast response are necessary.

  1. Development of a Schottky CdTe Medipix3RX hybrid photon counting detector with spatial and energy resolving capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gimenez, E. N.; Astromskas, V.; Horswell, I.; Omar, D.; Spiers, J.; Tartoni, N.

    2016-07-01

    A multichip CdTe-Medipix3RX detector system was developed in order to bring the advantages of photon-counting detectors to applications in the hard X-ray range of energies. The detector head consisted of 2×2 Medipix3RX ASICs bump-bonded to a 28 mm×28 mm e- collection Schottky contact CdTe sensor. Schottky CdTe sensors undergo performance degrading polarization which increases with temperature, flux and the longer the HV is applied. Keeping the temperature stable and periodically refreshing the high voltage bias supply was used to minimize the polarization and achieve a stable and reproducible detector response. This leads to good quality images and successful results on the energy resolving capabilities of the system.

  2. Study on measuring device arrangement of array-type CdTe detector for BNCT-SPECT

    PubMed Central

    Manabe, Masanobu; Nakamura, Soichiro; Murata, Isao

    2016-01-01

    Aim To design the measuring device arrangement of array-type CdTe detector for BNCT-SPECT. Background In a boron neutron capture therapy, a very serious unsolved problem exists, namely that the treatment effect for BNCT cannot be known during irradiation in real time. Therefore, we have been developing a so-called BNCT-SPECT with a CdTe detector, which can obtain a three-dimensional image for the BNCT treatment effect by measuring 478 keV gamma-rays emitted from the excited state of 7Li nucleus created by the 10B(n,α) reaction. However, no practical uses were realized at present, because BNCT-SPECT requires very severe conditions for spatial resolution, measuring time, statistical accuracy and energy resolution. Materials and methods The design study was performed with numerical simulations carried out by a 3-dimenaional transport code, MCNP5 considering the detector assembly, irradiation room and even arrangement of arrayed CdTe crystals. Results The estimated count rate of 478 keV gamma-rays was sufficiently large being more than the target value of over 1000 counts/h. However, the S/N ratio did not meet the target of S/N > 1. We confirmed that deterioration of the S/N ratio was caused by the influence of Compton scattering especially due to capture gamma-rays of hydrogen. Theoretical calculations were thereafter carried out to find out whether anti-Compton measurement in an array-type CdTe detector could decrease the noise due to Compton scatterings. Conclusions The calculation result showed that the anti-coincidence would possibly increase the S/N ratio. In the next phase, an arrayed detector with two CdTe crystals will be produced to test removal possibility of the anti-coincident event. PMID:26933391

  3. A pixellated γ-camera based on CdTe detectors clinical interests and performances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambron, J.; Arntz, Y.; Eclancher, B.; Scheiber, Ch; Siffert, P.; Hage Hali, M.; Regal, R.; Kazandjian, A.; Prat, V.; Thomas, S.; Warren, S.; Matz, R.; Jahnke, A.; Karman, M.; Pszota, A.; Nemeth, L.

    2000-07-01

    A mobile gamma camera dedicated to nuclear cardiology, based on a 15 cm×15 cm detection matrix of 2304 CdTe detector elements, 2.83 mm×2.83 mm×2 mm, has been developed with a European Community support to academic and industrial research centres. The intrinsic properties of the semiconductor crystals - low-ionisation energy, high-energy resolution, high attenuation coefficient - are potentially attractive to improve the γ-camera performances. But their use as γ detectors for medical imaging at high resolution requires production of high-grade materials and large quantities of sophisticated read-out electronics. The decision was taken to use CdTe rather than CdZnTe, because the manufacturer (Eurorad, France) has a large experience for producing high-grade materials, with a good homogeneity and stability and whose transport properties, characterised by the mobility-lifetime product, are at least 5 times greater than that of CdZnTe. The detector matrix is divided in 9 square units, each unit is composed of 256 detectors shared in 16 modules. Each module consists in a thin ceramic plate holding a line of 16 detectors, in four groups of four for an easy replacement, and holding a special 16 channels integrated circuit designed by CLRC (UK). A detection and acquisition logic based on a DSP card and a PC has been programmed by Eurorad for spectral and counting acquisition modes. Collimators LEAP and LEHR from commercial design, mobile gantry and clinical software were provided by Siemens (Germany). The γ-camera head housing, its general mounting and the electric connections were performed by Phase Laboratory (CNRS, France). The compactness of the γ-camera head, thin detectors matrix, electronic readout and collimator, facilitates the detection of close γ sources with the advantage of a high spatial resolution. Such an equipment is intended to bedside explorations. There is a growing clinical requirement in nuclear cardiology to early assess the extent of an

  4. CdTe Focal Plane Detector for Hard X-Ray Focusing Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seller, Paul; Wilson, Matthew D.; Veale, Matthew C.; Schneider, Andreas; Gaskin, Jessica; Wilson-Hodge, Colleen; Christe, Steven; Shih, Albert Y.; Inglis, Andrew; Panessa, Marco

    2015-01-01

    The demand for higher resolution x-ray optics (a few arcseconds or better) in the areas of astrophysics and solar science has, in turn, driven the development of complementary detectors. These detectors should have fine pixels, necessary to appropriately oversample the optics at a given focal length, and an energy response also matched to that of the optics. Rutherford Appleton Laboratory have developed a 3-side buttable, 20 millimeter x 20 millimeter CdTe-based detector with 250 micrometer square pixels (80 x 80 pixels) which achieves 1 kiloelectronvolt FWHM (Full-Width Half-Maximum) @ 60 kiloelectronvolts and gives full spectroscopy between 5 kiloelectronvolts and 200 kiloelectronvolts. An added advantage of these detectors is that they have a full-frame readout rate of 10 kilohertz. Working with NASA Goddard Space Flight Center and Marshall Space Flight Center, 4 of these 1 millimeter-thick CdTe detectors are tiled into a 2 x 2 array for use at the focal plane of a balloon-borne hard-x-ray telescope, and a similar configuration could be suitable for astrophysics and solar space-based missions. This effort encompasses the fabrication and testing of flight-suitable front-end electronics and calibration of the assembled detector arrays. We explain the operation of the pixelated ASIC readout and measurements, front-end electronics development, preliminary X-ray imaging and spectral performance, and plans for full calibration of the detector assemblies. Work done in conjunction with the NASA Centers is funded through the NASA Science Mission Directorate Astrophysics Research and Analysis Program.

  5. Thin film CdTe based neutron detectors with high thermal neutron efficiency and gamma rejection for security applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, L.; Murphy, J. W.; Kim, J.; Rozhdestvenskyy, S.; Mejia, I.; Park, H.; Allee, D. R.; Quevedo-Lopez, M.; Gnade, B.

    2016-12-01

    Solid-state neutron detectors offer an alternative to 3He based detectors, but suffer from limited neutron efficiencies that make their use in security applications impractical. Solid-state neutron detectors based on single crystal silicon also have relatively high gamma-ray efficiencies that lead to false positives. Thin film polycrystalline CdTe based detectors require less complex processing with significantly lower gamma-ray efficiencies. Advanced geometries can also be implemented to achieve high thermal neutron efficiencies competitive with silicon based technology. This study evaluates these strategies by simulation and experimentation and demonstrates an approach to achieve >10% intrinsic efficiency with <10-6 gamma-ray efficiency.

  6. Imaging of Ra-223 with a small-pixel CdTe detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scuffham, J. W.; Pani, S.; Seller, P.; Sellin, P. J.; Veale, M. C.; Wilson, M. D.; Cernik, R. J.

    2015-01-01

    Ra-223 Dichloride (Xofigo™) is a promising new radiopharmaceutical offering survival benefit and palliation of painful bone metastases in patients with hormone-refractory prostate cancer [1]. The response to radionuclide therapy and toxicity are directly linked to the absorbed radiation doses to the tumour and organs at risk respectively. Accurate dosimetry necessitates quantitative imaging of the biodistribution and kinetics of the radiopharmaceutical. Although primarily an alpha-emitter, Ra-223 also has some low-abundance X-ray and gamma emissions, which enable imaging of the biodistribution in the patient. However, the low spectral resolution of conventional gamma camera detectors makes in-vivo imaging of Ra-223 challenging. In this work, we present spectra and image data of anthropomorphic phantoms containing Ra-223 acquired with a small-pixel CdTe detector (HEXITEC) [2] with a pinhole collimator. Comparison is made with similar data acquired using a clinical gamma camera. The results demonstrate the advantages of the solid state detector in terms of scatter rejection and quantitative accuracy of the images. However, optimised collimation is needed in order for the sensitivity to rival current clinical systems. As different dosage levels and administration regimens for this drug are explored in current clinical trials, there is a clear need to develop improved imaging technologies that will enable personalised treatments to be designed for patients.

  7. Depth of interaction and bias voltage depenence of the spectral response in a pixellated CdTe detector operating in time-over-threshold mode subjected to monochromatic X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fröjdh, E.; Fröjdh, C.; Gimenez, E. N.; Maneuski, D.; Marchal, J.; Norlin, B.; O'Shea, V.; Stewart, G.; Wilhelm, H.; Modh Zain, R.; Thungström, G.

    2012-03-01

    High stopping power is one of the most important figures of merit for X-ray detectors. CdTe is a promising material but suffers from: material defects, non-ideal charge transport and long range X-ray fluorescence. Those factors reduce the image quality and deteriorate spectral information. In this project we used a monochromatic pencil beam collimated through a 20μm pinhole to measure the detector spectral response in dependance on the depth of interaction. The sensor was a 1mm thick CdTe detector with a pixel pitch of 110μm, bump bonded to a Timepix readout chip operating in Time-Over-Threshold mode. The measurements were carried out at the Extreme Conditions beamline I15 of the Diamond Light Source. The beam was entering the sensor at an angle of \\texttildelow20 degrees to the surface and then passed through \\texttildelow25 pixels before leaving through the bottom of the sensor. The photon energy was tuned to 77keV giving a variation in the beam intensity of about three orders of magnitude along the beam path. Spectra in Time-over-Threshold (ToT) mode were recorded showing each individual interaction. The bias voltage was varied between -30V and -300V to investigate how the electric field affected the spectral information. For this setup it is worth noticing the large impact of fluorescence. At -300V the photo peak and escape peak are of similar height. For high bias voltages the spectra remains clear throughout the whole depth but for lower voltages as -50V, only the bottom part of the sensor carries spectral information. This is an effect of the low hole mobility and the longer range the electrons have to travel in a low field.

  8. Developing fine-pixel CdTe detectors for the next generation of high-resolution hard x-ray telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christe, Steven

    Over the past decade, the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has been improving the angular resolution of hard X-ray (HXR; 20 "70 keV) optics to the point that we now routinely manufacture optics modules with an angular resolution of 20 arcsec Half Power Diameter (HDP), almost three times the performance of NuSTAR optics (Ramsey et al. 2013; Gubarev et al. 2013a; Atkins et al. 2013). New techniques are currently being developed to provide even higher angular resolution. High angular resolution HXR optics require detectors with a large number of fine pixels in order to adequately sample the telescope point spread function (PSF) over the entire field of view. Excessively over-sampling the PSF will increase readout noise and require more processing with no appreciable increase in image quality. An appropriate level of over-sampling is to have 3 pixels within the HPD. For the HERO mirrors, where the HPD is 26 arcsec over a 6-m focal length converts to 750 μm, the optimum pixel size is around 250 μm. At a 10-m focal length these detectors can support a 16 arcsec HPD. Of course, the detectors must also have high efficiency in the HXR region, good energy resolution, low background, low power requirements, and low sensitivity to radiation damage (Ramsey 2001). The ability to handle high counting rates is also desirable for efficient calibration. A collaboration between Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), MSFC, and Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL) in the UK is developing precisely such detectors under an ongoing, funded APRA program (FY2015 to FY2017). The detectors use the RALdeveloped Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC) dubbed HEXITEC, for High Energy X-Ray Imaging Technology. These HEXITEC ASICs can be bonded to 1- or 2- mm-thick Cadmium Telluride (CdTe) or Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride (CZT) to create a fine (250 μm pitch) HXR detector (Jones et al. 2009; Seller et al. 2011). The objectives of this funded effort are to develop and test a HEXITEC

  9. Possible use of CdTe detectors in kVp monitoring of diagnostic x-ray tubes

    PubMed Central

    Krmar, M.; Bucalović, N.; Baucal, M.; Jovančević, N.

    2010-01-01

    It has been suggested that kVp of diagnostic X-ray devices (or maximal energy of x-ray photon spectra) should be monitored routinely; however a standardized noninvasive technique has yet to be developed and proposed. It is well known that the integral number of Compton scattered photons and the intensities of fluorescent x-ray lines registered after irradiation of some material by an x-ray beam are a function of the maximal beam energy. CdTe detectors have sufficient energy resolution to distinguish individual x-ray fluorescence lines and high efficiency for the photon energies in the diagnostic region. Our initial measurements have demonstrated that the different ratios of the integral number of Compton scattered photons and intensities of K and L fluorescent lines detected by CdTe detector are sensitive function of maximal photon energy and could be successfully applied for kVp monitoring. PMID:21037976

  10. Development of a CdTe pixel detector with a window comparator ASIC for high energy X-ray applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirono, T.; Toyokawa, H.; Furukawa, Y.; Honma, T.; Ikeda, H.; Kawase, M.; Koganezawa, T.; Ohata, T.; Sato, M.; Sato, G.; Takagaki, M.; Takahashi, T.; Watanabe, S.

    2011-09-01

    We have developed a photon-counting-type CdTe pixel detector (SP8-01). SP8-01 was designed as a prototype of a high-energy X-ray imaging detector for experiments using synchrotron radiation. SP8-01 has a CdTe sensor of 500 μm thickness, which has an absorption efficiency of almost 100% up to 50 keV and 45% even at 100 keV. A full-custom application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) was designed as a readout circuit of SP8-01, which is equipped with a window-type discriminator. The upper discriminator realizes a low-background measurement, because X-ray beams from the monochromator contain higher-order components beside the fundamental X-rays in general. ASIC chips were fabricated with a TSMC 0.25 μm CMOS process, and CdTe sensors were bump-bonded to the ASIC chips by a gold-stud bonding technique. Beam tests were performed at SPring-8. SP8-01 detected X-rays up to 120 keV. The capability of SP8-01 as an imaging detector for high-energy X-ray synchrotron radiation was evaluated with its performance characteristics.

  11. Design and optimization of large area thin-film CdTe detector for radiation therapy imaging applications

    SciTech Connect

    Parsai, E. Ishmael; Shvydka, Diana; Kang, Jun

    2010-08-15

    Purpose: The authors investigate performance of thin-film cadmium telluride (CdTe) in detecting high-energy (6 MV) x rays. The utilization of this material has become technologically feasible only in recent years due to significant development in large area photovoltaic applications. Methods: The CdTe film is combined with a metal plate, facilitating conversion of incoming photons into secondary electrons. The system modeling is based on the Monte Carlo simulations performed to determine the optimized CdTe layer thickness in combination with various converter materials. Results: The authors establish a range of optimal parameters producing the highest DQE due to energy absorption, as well as signal and noise spatial spreading. The authors also analyze the influence of the patient scatter on image formation for a set of detector configurations. The results of absorbed energy simulation are used in device operation modeling to predict the detector output signal. Finally, the authors verify modeling results experimentally for the lowest considered device thickness. Conclusions: The proposed CdTe-based large area thin-film detector has a potential of becoming an efficient low-cost electronic portal imaging device for radiation therapy applications.

  12. Progress in the Development of CdTe and CdZnTe Semiconductor Radiation Detectors for Astrophysical and Medical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Sordo, Stefano Del; Abbene, Leonardo; Caroli, Ezio; Mancini, Anna Maria; Zappettini, Andrea; Ubertini, Pietro

    2009-01-01

    Over the last decade, cadmium telluride (CdTe) and cadmium zinc telluride (CdZnTe) wide band gap semiconductors have attracted increasing interest as X-ray and gamma ray detectors. Among the traditional high performance spectrometers based on silicon (Si) and germanium (Ge), CdTe and CdZnTe detectors show high detection efficiency and good room temperature performance and are well suited for the development of compact and reliable detection systems. In this paper, we review the current status of research in the development of CdTe and CdZnTe detectors by a comprehensive survey on the material properties, the device characteristics, the different techniques for improving the overall detector performance and some major applications. Astrophysical and medical applications are discussed, pointing out the ongoing Italian research activities on the development of these detectors. PMID:22412323

  13. Progress in the Development of CdTe and CdZnTe Semiconductor Radiation Detectors for Astrophysical and Medical Applications.

    PubMed

    Sordo, Stefano Del; Abbene, Leonardo; Caroli, Ezio; Mancini, Anna Maria; Zappettini, Andrea; Ubertini, Pietro

    2009-01-01

    Over the last decade, cadmium telluride (CdTe) and cadmium zinc telluride (CdZnTe) wide band gap semiconductors have attracted increasing interest as X-ray and gamma ray detectors. Among the traditional high performance spectrometers based on silicon (Si) and germanium (Ge), CdTe and CdZnTe detectors show high detection efficiency and good room temperature performance and are well suited for the development of compact and reliable detection systems. In this paper, we review the current status of research in the development of CdTe and CdZnTe detectors by a comprehensive survey on the material properties, the device characteristics, the different techniques for improving the overall detector performance and some major applications. Astrophysical and medical applications are discussed, pointing out the ongoing Italian research activities on the development of these detectors.

  14. Evaluation of a miniature CdTe detector for monitoring left ventricular function.

    PubMed

    Harrison, K S; Liu, X; Han, S T; Camargo, E E; Wagner, H N

    1982-01-01

    A miniature CdTe probe interfaced to a microcomputer was used to measure left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) in 25 patients. LVEF obtained with the CdTe module, in the beat-to-beat mode, or the integrated gated mode agreed well with LVEF obtained with a gamma camera (r = 0.80; r = 0.82 respectively). Similarly, LVEF by CdTe probe agreed with LVEF obtained by gated equilibrium studies performed with a computerized NaI probe. The CdTe probe can provide comparable measurement of LVEF at a fraction of the cost of a camera-computer system and, being small and lightweight, the CdTe probe is adaptable for monitoring patients in intensive care facilities.

  15. K-edge imaging with the XPAD3 hybrid pixel detector, direct comparison of CdTe and Si sensors.

    PubMed

    Cassol, F; Portal, L; Graber-Bolis, J; Perez-Ponce, H; Dupont, M; Kronland, C; Boursier, Y; Blanc, N; Bompard, F; Boudet, N; Buton, C; Clémens, J C; Dawiec, A; Debarbieux, F; Delpierre, P; Hustache, S; Vigeolas, E; Morel, C

    2015-07-21

    We investigate the improvement from the use of high-Z CdTe sensors for pre-clinical K-edge imaging with the hybrid pixel detectors XPAD3. We compare XPAD3 chips bump bonded to Si or CdTe sensors in identical experimental conditions. Image performance for narrow energy bin acquisitions and contrast-to-noise ratios of K-edge images are presented and compared. CdTe sensors achieve signal-to-noise ratios at least three times higher than Si sensors within narrow energy bins, thanks to their much higher detection efficiency. Nevertheless Si sensors provide better contrast-to-noise ratios in K-edge imaging when working at equivalent counting statistics, due to their better estimation of the attenuation coefficient of the contrast agent. Results are compared to simulated data in the case of the XPAD3/Si detector. Good agreement is observed when including charge sharing between pixels, which have a strong impact on contrast-to-noise ratios in K-edge images.

  16. A CdTe position sensitive detector for a hard X- and gamma-ray wide field camera

    SciTech Connect

    Caroli, E.; Cesare, G. de; Donati, A.; Dusi, W.; Landini, G.; Stephen, J.B.; Perotti, F.

    1998-12-31

    An important region of the electromagnetic spectrum for astrophysics is the hard X- and gamma ray band between 10 keV and a few MeV, where several processes occur in a wide variety of objects and with different spatial distribution and time scales. In order to fulfill the observational requirements in this energy range and taking into account the opportunities given by small/medium size missions (e.g., on the ISS), the authors have proposed a compact, wide field camera based on a thick (1 cm) position sensitive CdTe detector (PSD). The detector is made of an array of 128x96 CdTe microspectrometers with a pixel size of 2x2 mm{sup 2}. The basic element of the PSD is the linear module that is an independent detection unit with 32 CdTe crystals and monolithic front-electronics (ASIC) supported by a thin (300 {micro}m) ceramic layer. The expected performance of the PSD over the operative energy range and some of the required ASIC functionality are presented and discussed.

  17. Characterization of a module with pixelated CdTe detectors for possible PET, PEM and compton camera applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ariño-Estrada, G.; Chmeissani, M.; de Lorenzo, G.; Puigdengoles, C.; Martínez, R.; Cabruja, E.

    2014-05-01

    We present the measurement of the energy resolution and the impact of charge sharing for a pixel CdTe detector. This detector will be used in a novel conceptual design for diagnostic systems in the field of nuclear medicine such as positron emission tomography (PET), positron emission mammography (PEM) and Compton camera. The detector dimensions are 10 mm × 10 mm × 2 mm and with a pixel pitch of 1 mm × 1 mm. The pixel CdTe detector is a Schottky diode and it was tested at a bias of -1000 V. The VATAGP7.1 frontend ASIC was used for the readout of the pixel detector and the corresponding single channel electronic noise was found to be σ < 2 keV for all the pixels. We have achieved an energy resolution, FWHM/Epeak, of 7.1%, 4.5% and 0.98% for 59.5, 122 and 511 keV respectively. The study of the charge sharing shows that 16% of the events deposit part of their energy in the adjacent pixel.

  18. Estimation of mammary gland composition using CdTe series detector developed for photon-counting mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ihori, Akiko; Okamoto, Chizuru; Yamakawa, Tsutomu; Yamamoto, Shuichiro; Okada, Masahiro; Nakajima, Ai; Kato, Misa; Kodera, Yoshie

    2016-03-01

    Energy resolved photon-counting mammography is a new technology, which counts the number of photons that passes through an object, and presents it as a pixel value in an image of the object. Silicon semiconductor detectors are currently used in commercial mammography. However, the disadvantage of silicon is the low absorption efficiency for high X-ray energies. A cadmium telluride (CdTe) series detector has a high absorption efficiency over a wide energy range. In this study, we proposed a method to estimate the composition of the mammary gland using a CdTe series detector as a photon-counting detector. The fact that the detection rate of breast cancer in mammography is affected by mammary gland composition is now widely accepted. Assessment of composition of the mammary gland has important implications. An important advantage of our proposed technique is its ability to discriminate photons using three energy bins. We designed the CdTe series detector system using the MATLAB simulation software. The phantom contains nine regions with the ratio of glandular tissue and adipose varying in increments of 10%. The attenuation coefficient for each bin's energy was calculated from the number of input and output photons possessed by each. The evaluation results obtained by plotting the attenuation coefficient μ in a three-dimensional (3D) scatter plot show that the plots had a regular composition order congruent with that of the mammary gland. Consequently, we believe that our proposed method can be used to estimate the composition of the mammary gland.

  19. CdTe and CdZnTe detectors in nuclear medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheiber, C.

    2000-07-01

    Nuclear medicine diagnostic applications are growing in search for more disease specific or more physiologically relevant imaging. The data are obtained non-invasively from large field γ cameras or from miniaturised probes. As far as single photon emitters are concerned, often labelled with 99mTc (140 keV, γ), nuclear instrumentation deals with poor counting statistics due to the method of spatial localisation and low contrast to noise due to scatter in the body. Since the 1960s attempts have been made to replace the NaI scintillator by semiconductor detectors with better spectrometric characteristics to improve contrast and quantitative measurements. They allow direct conversion of energy and thus more compact sensors. Room-temperature semiconductor detectors such as cadmium tellure and cadmium zinc tellure have favourable physical characteristics for medical applications which have been investigated in the 1980s. During one decade, they have been used in miniaturised probes such as for inter-operative surgery guidance which is today in a fast growing phase. This material suffers from charge transport problems which has slowed down imaging applications. Owing to a considerable research work on material, contacts and dedicated electronics small field of view compact pixellated γ cameras have been prototyped and one already marketed. Although extended clinical evaluation has to be conducted and long-term reliability assesed, the available data already confirm the expected gain in image contrast. Medical interest for dedicated imaging systems is greater than it was in the 1980s when the first mobile γ cameras were marketed. The future of CdTe or CdZnTe-based imager for routine use now relies at first on industrial costs.

  20. Discrimination between normal breast tissue and tumor tissue using CdTe series detector developed for photon-counting mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, Chizuru; Ihori, Akiko; Yamakawa, Tsutomu; Yamamoto, Shuichiro; Okada, Masahiro; Kato, Misa; Nakajima, Ai; Kodera, Yoshie

    2016-03-01

    We propose a new mammography system using a cadmium telluride (CdTe) series photon-counting detector, having high absorption efficiency over a wide energy range. In a previous study, we showed that the use of high X-ray energy in digital mammography is useful from the viewpoint of exposure dose and image quality. In addition, the CdTe series detector can acquire X-ray spectrum information following transmission through a subject. This study focused on the tissue composition identified using spectral information obtained by a new photon-counting detector. Normal breast tissue consists entirely of adipose and glandular tissues. However, it is very difficult to find tumor tissue in the region of glandular tissue via a conventional mammogram, especially in dense breast because the attenuation coefficients of glandular tissue and tumor tissue are very close. As a fundamental examination, we considered a simulation phantom and showed the difference between normal breast tissue and tumor tissue of various thicknesses in a three-dimensional (3D) scatter plot. We were able to discriminate between both types of tissues. In addition, there was a tendency for the distribution to depend on the thickness of the tumor tissue. Thinner tumor tissues were shown to be closer in appearance to normal breast tissue. This study also demonstrated that the difference between these tissues could be made obvious by using a CdTe series detector. We believe that this differentiation is important, and therefore, expect this technology to be applied to new tumor detection systems in the future.

  1. Design of a high-resolution small-animal SPECT-CT system sharing a CdTe semiconductor detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Hyun-Ju; Lee, Young-Jin; Lee, Seung-Wan; Cho, Hyo-Min; Choi, Yu-Na; Kim, Hee-Joung

    2012-07-01

    A single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) system with a co-registered X-y computed tomography (CT) system allows the convergence of functional information and morphologic information. The localization of radiopharmaceuticals on a SPECT can be enhanced by combining the SPECT with an anatomical modality, such as X-ray CT. Gamma-ray imaging for nuclear medicine devices and X-ray imaging systems for diagnostics has recently been developed based on semiconductor detectors, and semiconductor detector materials such as cadmium telluride (CdTe) or cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) are available for both X-ray and gamma-ray systems for small-animal imaging. CdTe or CZT detectors provide strong absorption and high detection efficiency of high energy X-ray and gamma-ray photons because of their large atomic numbers. In this study, a pinhole collimator SPECT system sharing a cadmium telluride (CdTe) detector with a CT was designed. The GEANT4 application for tomographic emission (GATE) v.6.1 was used for the simulation. The pinhole collimator was designed to obtain a high spatial resolution of the SPECT system. The acquisition time for each projection was 40 seconds, and 60 projections were obtained for tomographic image acquisition. The reconstruction was performed using ordered subset expectation maximization (OS-EM) algorithms. The sensitivity and the spatial resolution were measured on the GATE simulation to evaluate the system characteristics. The spatial resolution of the system calculated from the FWHM of Gaussian fitted PSF curve was 0.69 mm, and the sensitivity of the system was measured to be 0.354 cps/kBq by using a Tc-99m point source of 1 MBq for 800 seconds. A phantom study was performed to verify the design of the dual imaging modality system. The system will be built as designed, and it can be applied as a pre-clinical imaging system.

  2. Hybrid Pixel-Waveform (HPWF) Enabled CdTe Detectors for Small Animal Gamma-Ray Imaging Applications

    PubMed Central

    Groll, A.; Kim, K.; Bhatia, H.; Zhang, J. C.; Wang, J. H.; Shen, Z. M.; Cai, L.; Dutta, J.; Li, Q.; Meng, L. J.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the design and preliminary evaluation of small-pixel CdTe gamma ray detectors equipped with a hybrid pixel-waveform (HPWF) readout system for gamma ray imaging applications with additional discussion on CZT due to its similarity. The HPWF readout system utilizes a pixelated anode readout circuitry which is designed to only provide the pixel address. This readout circuitry works in coincidence with a high-speed digitizer to sample the cathode waveform which provides the energy, timing, and depth-of-interaction (DOI) information. This work focuses on the developed and experimentally evaluated prototype HPWF-CdTe detectors with a custom CMOS pixel-ASIC to readout small anode pixels of 350 μm in size, and a discrete waveform sampling circuitry to digitize the signal waveform induced on the large cathode. The intrinsic timing, energy, and spatial resolution were experimentally evaluated in this paper in conjunction with methods for depth of interaction (DOI) partitioning of the CdTe crystal. While the experimental studies discussed in this paper are primarily for evaluating HPWF detectors for small animal PET imaging, these detectors could find their applications for ultrahigh-resolution SPECT and other imaging modalities. PMID:28516169

  3. Development of an ultra-high resolution SPECT system with a CdTe semiconductor detector.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Koichi; Ohmura, Naoka; Iida, Hirokazu; Nakamura, Kayoko; Nakahara, Tadaki; Kubo, Atsushi

    2009-10-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate an ultra-high spatial resolution SPECT system with a semiconductor detector and a high-resolution parallel-hole collimator or a pinhole collimator for small animal imaging. We evaluated an ultra-high spatial resolution SPECT system with a high-resolution parallel-hole collimator attached to a cadmium telluride (CdTe) semiconductor detector for small animal imaging. The sizes of an active area and a pixel in the semiconductor detector were 44 x 44 and 0.5 x 0.5 mm(2), respectively. In the high-resolution parallel-hole collimator the size of a hole was 0.4 x 0.4 mm(2), the thickness of a septum 0.1 mm, and the hole-length 30 mm. We also used a high-resolution pinhole collimator with a hole size of 0.3 or 0.5 mmvarphi. The physical performance of this SPECT system was evaluated with some experiments with phantoms filled with (99m)Tc-pertechnatate solution. In addition ideal performance and limitations of the system were evaluated with Monte Carlo simulations under the same geometrical conditions as in the experiments. In the evaluation for small animal imaging, we used mice that were administered with (99m)Tc-MDP. We also conducted an ultra-high resolution X-ray CT of the mice to verify the accumulated location of (99m)Tc-MDP using the bone CT images of the mice. The results of the phantom experiments showed that we could resolve 1 mmvarphi hot-channels and 1.6 mmvarphi cold-rods with the high-resolution parallel-hole collimator and pinhole collimators. We could image 0.3 mmvarphi hot-channels with the high-resolution pinhole collimators. The results of the simulations showed that the resolution limit in the pinhole imaging was about 0.6 mm FWHM. And the results of experiments with mice showed that we could reconstruct high-resolution images of (99m)Tc-MDP. Furthermore, the distribution of (99m)Tc-MDP in a mouse was found to correspond closely to the location of the bones of the mouse in reconstructions made with the ultra

  4. Pixel CdTe semiconductor module to implement a sub-MeV imaging detector for astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gálvez, J.-L.; Hernanz, M.; Álvarez, L.; Artigues, B.; Álvarez, J.-M.; Ullán, M.; Pellegrini, G.; Lozano, M.; Cabruja, E.; Martínez, R.; Chmeissani, M.; Puigdengoles, C.

    2017-03-01

    Stellar explosions are relevant and interesting astrophysical phenomena. Since long ago we have been working on the characterization of nova and supernova explosions in X and gamma rays, with the use of space missions such as INTEGRAL, XMM-Newton and Swift. We have been also involved in feasibility studies of future instruments in the energy range from several keV up to a few MeV, in collaboration with other research institutes, such as GRI, DUAL and e-ASTROGAM. High sensitivities are essential to perform detailed studies of cosmic explosions and cosmic accelerators, e.g., Supernovae, Classical Novae, Supernova Remnants (SNRs), Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs). In order to fulfil the combined requirement of high detection efficiency with good spatial and energy resolution, an initial module prototype based on CdTe pixel detectors is being developed. The detector dimensions are 12.5mm x 12.5mm x 2mm, with a pixel pitch of 1mm x 1mm. Each pixel is bump bonded to a fanout board made of Sapphire substrate and routed to the corresponding input channel of the readout ASIC, to measure pixel position and pulse height for each incident gamma-ray photon. An ohmic CdTe pixel detector has been characterised by means of 57Co, 133Ba and 22Na sources. Based on this, its spectroscopic performance and the influence of charge sharing is reported here. The pixel study is complemented by the simulation of the CdTe module performance using the GEANT 4 and MEGALIB tools, which will help us to optimise the pixel size selection.

  5. New developments in CdTe and CdZnTe detectors for X and γ-ray applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verger, L.; Bonnefoy, J. P.; Glasser, F.; Ouvrier-Buffet, P.

    1997-06-01

    There has been considerable recent progress in II-VI semiconductor material and in methods for improving performance of the associated radiation detectors. New high resistivity CdZnTe material, new contact technologies, new detector structures, new electronic correction methods have opened the field of nuclear and x-ray imaging for industrial and medical applications. The purpose of this paper is to review new developments in several of these fields. In addition, we will present some recent results at LETI concerning first the CdTe 2-D imaging system (20 × 30 mm2 with 400 × 600 pixels) for dental radiology and second the CdZnTe fast pulse correction method applied to a 5 × 5 × 5 mm3 CdZnTe detector (energy resolution = 5% for detection efficiency of 85% at 122 keV) for medical imaging.

  6. Electric Field and Current Transport Mechanisms in Schottky CdTe X-ray Detectors under Perturbing Optical Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Cola, Adriano; Farella, Isabella

    2013-01-01

    Schottky CdTe X-ray detectors exhibit excellent spectroscopic performance but suffer from instabilities. Hence it is of extreme relevance to investigate their electrical properties. A systematic study of the electric field distribution and the current flowing in such detectors under optical perturbations is presented here. The detector response is explored by varying experimental parameters, such as voltage, temperature, and radiation wavelength. The strongest perturbation is observed under 850 nm irradiation, bulk carrier recombination becoming effective there. Cathode and anode irradiations evidence the crucial role of the contacts, the cathode being Ohmic and the anode blocking. In particular, under irradiation of the cathode, charge injection occurs and peculiar kinks, typical of trap filling, are observed both in the current-voltage characteristic and during transients. The simultaneous access to the electric field and the current highlights the correlation between free and fixed charges, and unveils carrier transport/collection mechanisms otherwise hidden. PMID:23881140

  7. High-sensitivity brain SPECT system using cadmium telluride (CdTe) semiconductor detector and 4-pixel matched collimator.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Atsuro; Takeuchi, Wataru; Ishitsu, Takafumi; Tsuchiya, Katsutoshi; Morimoto, Yuichi; Ueno, Yuichiro; Kobashi, Keiji; Kubo, Naoki; Shiga, Tohru; Tamaki, Nagara

    2013-11-07

    For high-sensitivity brain imaging, we have developed a two-head single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) system using a CdTe semiconductor detector and 4-pixel matched collimator (4-PMC). The term, '4-PMC' indicates that the collimator hole size is matched to a 2 × 2 array of detector pixels. By contrast, a 1-pixel matched collimator (1-PMC) is defined as a collimator whose hole size is matched to one detector pixel. The performance of the higher-sensitivity 4-PMC was experimentally compared with that of the 1-PMC. The sensitivities of the 1-PMC and 4-PMC were 70 cps/MBq/head and 220 cps/MBq/head, respectively. The SPECT system using the 4-PMC provides superior image resolution in cold and hot rods phantom with the same activity and scan time to that of the 1-PMC. In addition, with half the usual scan time the 4-PMC provides comparable image quality to that of the 1-PMC. Furthermore, (99m)Tc-ECD brain perfusion images of healthy volunteers obtained using the 4-PMC demonstrated acceptable image quality for clinical diagnosis. In conclusion, our CdTe SPECT system equipped with the higher-sensitivity 4-PMC can provide better spatial resolution than the 1-PMC either in half the imaging time with the same administered activity, or alternatively, in the same imaging time with half the activity.

  8. High-sensitivity brain SPECT system using cadmium telluride (CdTe) semiconductor detector and 4-pixel matched collimator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Atsuro; Takeuchi, Wataru; Ishitsu, Takafumi; Tsuchiya, Katsutoshi; Morimoto, Yuichi; Ueno, Yuichiro; Kobashi, Keiji; Kubo, Naoki; Shiga, Tohru; Tamaki, Nagara

    2013-11-01

    For high-sensitivity brain imaging, we have developed a two-head single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) system using a CdTe semiconductor detector and 4-pixel matched collimator (4-PMC). The term, ‘4-PMC’ indicates that the collimator hole size is matched to a 2 × 2 array of detector pixels. By contrast, a 1-pixel matched collimator (1-PMC) is defined as a collimator whose hole size is matched to one detector pixel. The performance of the higher-sensitivity 4-PMC was experimentally compared with that of the 1-PMC. The sensitivities of the 1-PMC and 4-PMC were 70 cps/MBq/head and 220 cps/MBq/head, respectively. The SPECT system using the 4-PMC provides superior image resolution in cold and hot rods phantom with the same activity and scan time to that of the 1-PMC. In addition, with half the usual scan time the 4-PMC provides comparable image quality to that of the 1-PMC. Furthermore, 99mTc-ECD brain perfusion images of healthy volunteers obtained using the 4-PMC demonstrated acceptable image quality for clinical diagnosis. In conclusion, our CdTe SPECT system equipped with the higher-sensitivity 4-PMC can provide better spatial resolution than the 1-PMC either in half the imaging time with the same administered activity, or alternatively, in the same imaging time with half the activity.

  9. Development of a pixelated CdTe detector module for a hard-x and gamma-ray imaging spectrometer application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galvèz, J.-L.; Hernanz, M.; Álvarez, L.; Artigues, B.; Álvarez, J.-M.; Ullán, M.; Lozano, M.; Pellegrini, G.; Cabruja, E.; Martínez, R.; Chmeissani, M.; Puigdengoles, C.

    2016-07-01

    Stellar explosions are relevant and interesting astrophysical phenomena. Since long ago we have been working on the characterization of novae and supernovae in X and gamma-rays, with the use of space missions. We have also been involved in feasibility studies of future instruments in the energy range from several keV up to a few MeV, in collaboration with other research institutes. High sensitivities are essential to perform detailed studies of cosmic explosions and cosmic accelerators, e.g., Supernovae and Classical Novae. In order to fulfil the combined requirement of high detection efficiency with good spatial and energy resolution, an initial module prototype based on CdTe pixel detectors is being developed. The detector dimensions are 12.5mm x 12.5mm x 2mm with a pixel pitch of 1mm x 1mm. Two kinds of CdTe pixel detectors with different contacts have been tested: ohmic and Schottky. Each pixel is bump bonded to a fanout board made of Sapphire substrate and routed to the corresponding input channel of the readout VATAGP7.1 ASIC, to measure pixel position and pulse height for each incident gamma-ray photon. The study is complemented by the simulation of the CdTe module performance using the GEANT 4 and MEGALIB tools, which will help us to optimise the detector design. We will report on the spectroscopy characterisation of the CdTe detector module as well as the study of charge sharing.

  10. Long-Term Stable Surface Treatments on CdTe and CdZnTe Radiation Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pekarek, Jakub; Belas, Eduard; Zazvorka, Jakub

    2016-12-01

    The spectral resolution and charge collection efficiency (CCE) of cadmium telluride (CdTe) and cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) room-temperature x-ray and gamma-ray detectors are often limited by high surface leakage current due to conducting surface species created during detector fabrication. Surface treatments play a major role in reduction of this surface leakage current. The effect of various types of surface etching and passivation on the leakage current and thereby the spectral energy resolution, CCE, and internal electric field profile of CdTe/CZT detectors has been studied. The main aim of this work is preparation of long-term stable detectors with strongly reduced leakage current. The time stability of the current-voltage characteristic and spectral resolution was investigated during 21 days and 1 year, respectively, after performing surface treatments. Our results suggest that the optimal detector preparation method is chemomechanical polishing in bromine-ethylene glycol solution followed by chemical etching in bromine-methanol solution then surface passivation in potassium hydroxide or ammonium fluoride (NH4F/H2O2). Detectors prepared using this optimal treatment exhibited low leakage current, high spectral resolution, and long-term stability compared with those subjected to other surface preparation methods.

  11. Long-Term Stable Surface Treatments on CdTe and CdZnTe Radiation Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pekarek, Jakub; Belas, Eduard; Zazvorka, Jakub

    2017-04-01

    The spectral resolution and charge collection efficiency (CCE) of cadmium telluride (CdTe) and cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) room-temperature x-ray and gamma-ray detectors are often limited by high surface leakage current due to conducting surface species created during detector fabrication. Surface treatments play a major role in reduction of this surface leakage current. The effect of various types of surface etching and passivation on the leakage current and thereby the spectral energy resolution, CCE, and internal electric field profile of CdTe/CZT detectors has been studied. The main aim of this work is preparation of long-term stable detectors with strongly reduced leakage current. The time stability of the current-voltage characteristic and spectral resolution was investigated during 21 days and 1 year, respectively, after performing surface treatments. Our results suggest that the optimal detector preparation method is chemomechanical polishing in bromine-ethylene glycol solution followed by chemical etching in bromine-methanol solution then surface passivation in potassium hydroxide or ammonium fluoride (NH4F/H2O2). Detectors prepared using this optimal treatment exhibited low leakage current, high spectral resolution, and long-term stability compared with those subjected to other surface preparation methods.

  12. Dynamic defectoscopy with flat panel and CdTe Timepix X-ray detectors combined with an optical camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vavrik, D.; Fauler, A.; Fiederle, M.; Jandejsek, I.; Jakubek, M.; Turecek, D.; Zwerger, A.

    2013-04-01

    Damage of gradually loaded ductile materials involves a number of physical processes which are highly nonlinear and have different intensity and extent. Dynamic defectoscopy (i.e. defectoscopy of time changing damage processes) combining an X-ray/optical imaging system is proposed for online visualization and analysis of the complex behaviour of such materials. A large area flat panel detector with rather long read out time is used for overall observation of slow damage processes. On the other hand, a semiconductor CdTe Timepix detector with small active area allows following the rapid damage processes occurring in the final phase of specimen failure. Optical imaging of the specimen surface was utilized for analysing the specimen deformations.

  13. Compton-scattering measurement of diagnostic x-ray spectrum using high-resolution Schottky CdTe detector.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Koji; Matsumoto, Masao; Taniguchi, Akira

    2005-06-01

    The analysis of x-ray spectra is important for quality assurance (QA) and quality control (QC) of radiographic systems. The aim of this study is to measure the diagnostic x-ray spectra under clinical conditions using a high-resolution Schottky CdTe detector. Under clinical conditions, the direct measurement of a diagnostic spectrum is difficult because of the high photon fluence rates that cause significant detector photon pile-up. An alternative way of measuring the output spectra from a tube is first to measure the 90 deg Compton scattered photons from a given sample. With this set-up detector, pile-up is not a problem. From the scattered spectrum one can then use an energy correction and the Klein-Nishina function to reconstruct the actual spectrum incident upon the scattering sample. The verification of whether our spectra measured by the Compton method are accurate was accomplished by comparing exposure rates calculated from the reconstructed spectra to those measured with an ionization chamber. We used aluminum (Al) filtration ranging in thickness from 0 to 6 mm. The half value layers (HVLs) obtained for a 70 kV beam were 2.78 mm via the ionization chamber measurements and 2.93 mm via the spectral measurements. For a 100 kV beam we obtained 3.98 and 4.32 mm. The small differences in HVLs obtained by both techniques suggest that Compton scatter spectroscopy with a Schottky CdTe detector is suitable for measuring the diagnostic x-ray spectra and useful for QA and QC of clinical x-ray equipment.

  14. Compton-scattering measurement of diagnostic x-ray spectrum using high-resolution Schottky CdTe detector.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Koji; Matsumoto, Masao; Taniguchi, Akira

    2005-06-01

    The analysis of x-ray spectra is important for quality assurance (QA) and quality control (QC) of radiographic systems. The aim of this study is to measure the diagnostic x-ray spectra under clinical conditions using a high-resolution Schottky CdTe detector. Under clinical conditions, the direct measurement of a diagnostic spectrum is difficult because of the high photon fluence rates that cause significant detector photon pile-up. An alternative way of measuring the output spectra from a tube is first to measure the 90 deg Compton scattered photons from a given sample. With this set-up detector, pile-up is not a problem. From the scattered spectrum one can then use an energy correction and the Klein-Nishina function to reconstruct the actual spectrum incident upon the scattering sample. The verification of whether our spectra measured by the Compton method are accurate was accomplished by comparing exposure rates calculated from the reconstructed spectra to those measured with an ionization chamber. We used aluminum (Al) filtration ranging in thickness from 0 to 6 mm. The half value layers (HVLs) obtained for a 70 kV beam were 2.78 mm via the ionization chamber measurements and 2.93 mm via the spectral measurements. For a 100 kV beam we obtained 3.98 and 4.32 mm. The small differences in HVLs obtained by both techniques suggest that Compton scatter spectroscopy with a Schottky CdTe detector is suitable for measuring the diagnostic x-ray spectra and useful for QA and QC of clinical x-ray equipment. © 2005 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  15. Modelling and 3D optimisation of CdTe pixels detector array geometry - Extension to small pixels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zumbiehl, A.; Hage-Ali, M.; Fougeres, P.; Koebel, J. M.; Regal, R.; Rit, C.; Ayoub, M.; Siffert, P.

    2001-08-01

    CdTe and CdZnTe pixel detectors offer great interest for many applications, especially for medical and industrial imaging. Up to now, the material, generally, used and investigated for pixel arrays was CZT (Hamel et al., IEEE Trans. Nucl. Sci. 43 (3) (1996) 1422; Barrett et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 75 (1) (1995) 156; Bennett et al., Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 392 (1997) 260; Eskin et al., J. Appl. Phys. 85 (2) (1999) 647; Brunett et al., J. Appl. Phys. 86 (7) (1999) 3926; Luke, Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 380 (1996) 232), but cadmium telluride can also be an appropriate choice, as shown here. However, we clearly demonstrate here that the optimal pixel configuration is highly dependent on the electrical transport properties of the material. Depending on the field of primary interest, either energy resolution or counting rate efficiency in the photopeak, the geometry for each case has to be optimised. For that purpose, we have developed a calculation of the signal induced onto the pixel. Two distinct parts are used: after showing our approach for the weighting potential calculation, we present our results performed by a "pseudo-Monte Carlo" simulation. Results are supported by a few experimental comparisons. We argue about the optimum sizes with clarifying the problems caused by too small and too large pixel sizes. The study field is chosen to be vast, i.e. pixel size to detector thickness ratios ( W/ L) of 1/8-1, and detector thickness of 1.0-8.0 mm. In addition, several electrical transport properties are used. Since efficiency is often of primary interest, thick detectors could be very attractive, which are shown to be really feasible even on CdTe.

  16. Thin-film CdTe detector for microdosimetric study of radiation dose enhancement at gold-tissue interface.

    PubMed

    Paudel, Nava Raj; Shvydka, Diana; Parsai, E Ishmael

    2016-09-01

    Presence of interfaces between high and low atomic number (Z) materials, often encountered in diagnostic imaging and radiation therapy, leads to radiation dose perturbation. It is characterized by a very narrow region of sharp dose enhancement at the interface. A rapid falloff of the dose enhancement over a very short distance from the interface makes the experimental dosimetry nontrivial. We use an in-house-built inexpensive thin-film Cadmium Telluride (CdTe) photodetector to study this effect at the gold-tissue interface and verify our experimental results with Monte Carlo (MC) modeling. Three-micron thick thin-film CdTe photodetectors were fabricated in our lab. One-, ten- or one hundred-micron thick gold foils placed in a tissue-equivalent-phantom were irradiated with a clinical Ir-192 high-dose-rate (HDR) source and current measured with a CdTe detector in each case was compared with the current measured for all uniform tissue-equivalent phantom. Percentage signal enhancement (PSE) due to each gold foil was then compared against MC modeled percentage dose enhancement (PDE), obtained from the geometry mimicking the experimental setup. The experimental PSEs due to 1, 10, and 100 μm thick gold foils at the closest measured distance of 12.5 μm from the interface were 42.6±10.8, 137.0±11.9, and 203.0±15.4, respectively. The corresponding MC modeled PDEs were 38.1±1., 164±1, and 249±1, respectively. The experimental and MC modeled values showed a closer agreement at the larger distances from the interface. The dose enhancement in the vicinity of gold-tissue interface was successfully measured using an in-house-built, high-resolution CdTe-based photodetector and validated with MC simulations. A close agreement between experimental and the MC modeled results shows that CdTe detector can be utilized for mapping interface dose distribution encountered in the application of ionizing radiation. PACS number(s): 29.40.Wk, 73.50.Pz, 87.53.Jw, 87.55.K.

  17. Thin-film CdTe detector for microdosimetric study of radiation dose enhancement at gold-tissue interface.

    PubMed

    Paudel, Nava Raj; Shvydka, Diana; Parsai, E Ishmael

    2016-09-08

    Presence of interfaces between high and low atomic number (Z) materials, often encountered in diagnostic imaging and radiation therapy, leads to radiation dose perturbation. It is characterized by a very narrow region of sharp dose enhancement at the interface. A rapid falloff of dose enhancement over a very short distance from the interface makes the experimental dosimetry nontrivial. We use an in-house-built inexpensive thin-film Cadmium Telluride (CdTe) photodetector to study this effect at the gold-tissue interface and verify our experimental results with Monte Carlo (MC) modeling. Three-micron thick thin-film CdTe photodetectors were fabricated in our lab. One-, ten- or one hundred-micron thick gold foils placed in a tissue-equivalent-phantom were irradiated with a clinical Ir-192 high-dose-rate (HDR) source and current measured with a CdTe detector in each case was compared with the current measured for all uniform tissue-equivalent phantom. Percentage signal enhancement (PSE) due to each gold foil was then compared against MC modeled percentage dose enhancement (PDE), obtained from the geometry mimicking the experimental setup. The experimental PSEs due to 1, 10, and 100 μm thick gold foils at the closest measured distance of 12.5μm from the interface were 42.6 ± 10.8 , 137.0 ± 11.9, and 203.0 ± 15.4, respectively. The corresponding MC modeled PDEs were 38.1 ± 1, 164 ± 1, and 249 ± 1, respectively. The experimental and MC modeled values showed a closer agreement at the larger distances from the interface. The dose enhancement in the vicinity of gold-tissue interface was successfully measured using an in-house-built, high-resolution CdTe-based photodetector and validated with MC simulations. A close agreement between experimental and the MC modeled results shows that CdTe detector can be utilized for mapping interface dose distribution encountered in the application of ionizing radiation.

  18. Nano scale doping in CdTe for radiation detector (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, Toru; Zelenska, Kateryna; Gnatyuk, Volodymyr; Koike, Akifumi

    2017-06-01

    Irradiation of high resistivity p-like CdTe crystals pre-coated with an In dopant film from the CdTe side by nanosecond laser pulses with wavelength that is not absorbed by the semiconductor made it possible to directly affect the CdTe-In interface because radiation was strongly absorbed by a thin layer of the In film adjoining to the CdTe crystal. The doping mechanism was associated with the action of laser-induced stress wave which was generated under extreme conditions in the confined area at the CdTe-In interface under laser irradiation. The developed technique allowed avoiding evaporation of In dopant and resulted in the formation of the In-doped CdTe region and thus, creation of a built-in p-n junction. The temperature distribution inside the three layer CdTe-In-Water structure was calculated and correlations between the characteristics of the fabricated In/CdTe/Au diodes and laser processing conditions were obtained.

  19. Development of a 32-detector CdTe matrix for the SVOM ECLAIRs X/Gamma camera: Preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacombe, K.; Nasser, G.; Amoros, C.; Atteia, J.-L.; Barret, D.; Billot, M.; Cordier, B.; Gevin, O.; Godet, O.; Gonzalez, F.; Houret, B.; Landé, J.; Lugiez, F.; Mandrou, P.; Martin, J.-A.; Marty, W.; Mercier, K.; Pons, R.; Rambaud, D.; Ramon, P.; Rouaix, G.; Waegebaert, V.

    2013-12-01

    ECLAIRs, a 2D coded-mask imaging telescope on the Sino-French SVOM space mission, will detect and locate gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) between 4 and 150 keV. The detector array is an assembly of 6400 Schottky CdTe detectors of size 4×4×1 mm3, biased from -100 V to -600 V and operated at -20 °C to minimize the leakage current and maximize the polarization time. The remarkable low-energy threshold is achieved through various steps: an extensive detectors selection, a low-noise 32 channels ASIC study, and the design of an innovative detection module called XRDPIX formed by a thick film ceramic holding 32 detectors, a high voltage grid and an HTCC substrate housing the ASIC within a hermetic cavity. In this paper, we describe the XRDPIX module and explain the results of first tests to measure the linearity and compare the sources of noise, such as leakage currents and the Equivalent Noise Charge (ENC) measured on ASIC Ceramics. We confront these values with the energy threshold and spectral resolution made with dedicated test benches. Finally, we present the superposition of 32 calibrated spectra of one XRDPIX module, showing the excellent homogeneity of the 32 detectors and the achievement of a detection threshold at 4 keV over the entire module.

  20. Photon-counting hexagonal pixel array CdTe detector: Spatial resolution characteristics for image-guided interventional applications.

    PubMed

    Vedantham, Srinivasan; Shrestha, Suman; Karellas, Andrew; Shi, Linxi; Gounis, Matthew J; Bellazzini, Ronaldo; Spandre, Gloria; Brez, Alessandro; Minuti, Massimo

    2016-05-01

    High-resolution, photon-counting, energy-resolved detector with fast-framing capability can facilitate simultaneous acquisition of precontrast and postcontrast images for subtraction angiography without pixel registration artifacts and can facilitate high-resolution real-time imaging during image-guided interventions. Hence, this study was conducted to determine the spatial resolution characteristics of a hexagonal pixel array photon-counting cadmium telluride (CdTe) detector. A 650 μm thick CdTe Schottky photon-counting detector capable of concurrently acquiring up to two energy-windowed images was operated in a single energy-window mode to include photons of 10 keV or higher. The detector had hexagonal pixels with apothem of 30 μm resulting in pixel pitch of 60 and 51.96 μm along the two orthogonal directions. The detector was characterized at IEC-RQA5 spectral conditions. Linear response of the detector was determined over the air kerma rate relevant to image-guided interventional procedures ranging from 1.3 nGy/frame to 91.4 μGy/frame. Presampled modulation transfer was determined using a tungsten edge test device. The edge-spread function and the finely sampled line spread function accounted for hexagonal sampling, from which the presampled modulation transfer function (MTF) was determined. Since detectors with hexagonal pixels require resampling to square pixels for distortion-free display, the optimal square pixel size was determined by minimizing the root-mean-squared-error of the aperture functions for the square and hexagonal pixels up to the Nyquist limit. At Nyquist frequencies of 8.33 and 9.62 cycles/mm along the apothem and orthogonal to the apothem directions, the modulation factors were 0.397 and 0.228, respectively. For the corresponding axis, the limiting resolution defined as 10% MTF occurred at 13.3 and 12 cycles/mm, respectively. Evaluation of the aperture functions yielded an optimal square pixel size of 54 μm. After resampling to 54

  1. Photon-counting hexagonal pixel array CdTe detector: Spatial resolution characteristics for image-guided interventional applications

    SciTech Connect

    Vedantham, Srinivasan; Shrestha, Suman; Karellas, Andrew Shi, Linxi; Gounis, Matthew J.; Bellazzini, Ronaldo; Spandre, Gloria; Brez, Alessandro; Minuti, Massimo

    2016-05-15

    Purpose: High-resolution, photon-counting, energy-resolved detector with fast-framing capability can facilitate simultaneous acquisition of precontrast and postcontrast images for subtraction angiography without pixel registration artifacts and can facilitate high-resolution real-time imaging during image-guided interventions. Hence, this study was conducted to determine the spatial resolution characteristics of a hexagonal pixel array photon-counting cadmium telluride (CdTe) detector. Methods: A 650 μm thick CdTe Schottky photon-counting detector capable of concurrently acquiring up to two energy-windowed images was operated in a single energy-window mode to include photons of 10 keV or higher. The detector had hexagonal pixels with apothem of 30 μm resulting in pixel pitch of 60 and 51.96 μm along the two orthogonal directions. The detector was characterized at IEC-RQA5 spectral conditions. Linear response of the detector was determined over the air kerma rate relevant to image-guided interventional procedures ranging from 1.3 nGy/frame to 91.4 μGy/frame. Presampled modulation transfer was determined using a tungsten edge test device. The edge-spread function and the finely sampled line spread function accounted for hexagonal sampling, from which the presampled modulation transfer function (MTF) was determined. Since detectors with hexagonal pixels require resampling to square pixels for distortion-free display, the optimal square pixel size was determined by minimizing the root-mean-squared-error of the aperture functions for the square and hexagonal pixels up to the Nyquist limit. Results: At Nyquist frequencies of 8.33 and 9.62 cycles/mm along the apothem and orthogonal to the apothem directions, the modulation factors were 0.397 and 0.228, respectively. For the corresponding axis, the limiting resolution defined as 10% MTF occurred at 13.3 and 12 cycles/mm, respectively. Evaluation of the aperture functions yielded an optimal square pixel size of 54

  2. Photon-counting hexagonal pixel array CdTe detector: Spatial resolution characteristics for image-guided interventional applications

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Suman; Karellas, Andrew; Shi, Linxi; Gounis, Matthew J.; Bellazzini, Ronaldo; Spandre, Gloria; Brez, Alessandro; Minuti, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: High-resolution, photon-counting, energy-resolved detector with fast-framing capability can facilitate simultaneous acquisition of precontrast and postcontrast images for subtraction angiography without pixel registration artifacts and can facilitate high-resolution real-time imaging during image-guided interventions. Hence, this study was conducted to determine the spatial resolution characteristics of a hexagonal pixel array photon-counting cadmium telluride (CdTe) detector. Methods: A 650 μm thick CdTe Schottky photon-counting detector capable of concurrently acquiring up to two energy-windowed images was operated in a single energy-window mode to include photons of 10 keV or higher. The detector had hexagonal pixels with apothem of 30 μm resulting in pixel pitch of 60 and 51.96 μm along the two orthogonal directions. The detector was characterized at IEC-RQA5 spectral conditions. Linear response of the detector was determined over the air kerma rate relevant to image-guided interventional procedures ranging from 1.3 nGy/frame to 91.4 μGy/frame. Presampled modulation transfer was determined using a tungsten edge test device. The edge-spread function and the finely sampled line spread function accounted for hexagonal sampling, from which the presampled modulation transfer function (MTF) was determined. Since detectors with hexagonal pixels require resampling to square pixels for distortion-free display, the optimal square pixel size was determined by minimizing the root-mean-squared-error of the aperture functions for the square and hexagonal pixels up to the Nyquist limit. Results: At Nyquist frequencies of 8.33 and 9.62 cycles/mm along the apothem and orthogonal to the apothem directions, the modulation factors were 0.397 and 0.228, respectively. For the corresponding axis, the limiting resolution defined as 10% MTF occurred at 13.3 and 12 cycles/mm, respectively. Evaluation of the aperture functions yielded an optimal square pixel size of 54

  3. Comparing performances of a CdTe X-ray spectroscopic detector and an X-ray dual-energy sandwich detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorecki, A.; Brambilla, A.; Moulin, V.; Gaborieau, E.; Radisson, P.; Verger, L.

    2013-11-01

    Multi-energy (ME) detectors are becoming a serious alternative to classical dual-energy sandwich (DE-S) detectors for X-ray applications such as medical imaging or explosive detection. They can use the full X-ray spectrum of irradiated materials, rather than disposing only of low and high energy measurements, which may be mixed. In this article, we intend to compare both simulated and real industrial detection systems, operating at a high count rate, independently of the dimensions of the measurements and independently of any signal processing methods. Simulations or prototypes of similar detectors have already been compared (see [1] for instance), but never independently of estimation methods and never with real detectors. We have simulated both an ME detector made of CdTe - based on the characteristics of the MultiX ME100 and - a DE-S detector - based on the characteristics of the Detection Technology's X-Card 1.5-64DE model. These detectors were compared to a perfect spectroscopic detector and an optimal DE-S detector. For comparison purposes, two approaches were investigated. The first approach addresses how to distinguise signals, while the second relates to identifying materials. Performance criteria were defined and comparisons were made over a range of material thicknesses and with different photon statistics. Experimental measurements in a specific configuration were acquired to checks simulations. Results showed good agreement between the ME simulation and the ME100 detector. Both criteria seem to be equivalent, and the ME detector performs 3.5 times better than the DE-S detector with same photon statistics based on simulations and experimental measurements. Regardless of the photon statistics ME detectors appeared more efficient than DE-S detectors for all material thicknesses between 1 and 9 cm when measuring plastics with an attenuation signature close that of explosive materials. This translates into an improved false detection rate (FDR): DE

  4. Design and optimization of an analog filter with a CdTe detector for X-ray fluorescence applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Hyojeong; Kim, Hui Su; Kim, Young Soo; Ha, Jang Ho; Chai, Jong-Seo

    2016-10-01

    An analog pre-filter circuit for digital pulse processing is designed and optimized for X-ray fluorescence (XRF) applications to replace traditional analog shaping amplifiers. To optimize the pre-filter performance, we characterized noise electrons as a function of the input pulse rise time and decay time of the output pulse by using the full width at half maximum. In addition, gamma-ray energy measurements at room temperature showed that the commercially available CdTe Schottky-type radiation detector with our newly designed and optimized pre-filter circuit exhibited full widths at half maxima of 4.97 (Ba-133, at 53 keV) and 5.56 keV (Am-241, at 59.5 keV), respectively.

  5. Sub-microsecond x-ray imaging using hole-collecting Schottky type CdTe with charge-integrating pixel array detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, J.; Tate, M. W.; Shanks, K. S.; Philipp, H. T.; Weiss, J. T.; Purohit, P.; Chamberlain, D.; Gruner, S. M.

    2017-06-01

    CdTe is increasingly being used as the x-ray sensing material in imaging pixel array detectors for x-rays, generally above 20 keV, where silicon sensors become unacceptably transparent. Unfortunately CdTe suffers from polarization, which can alter the response of the material over time and with accumulated dose. Most prior studies used long integration times or CdTe that was not of the hole-collecting Schottky type. We investigated the temporal response of hole-collecting Schottky type CdTe sensors on timescales ranging from tens of nanoseconds to several seconds. We found that the material shows signal persistence on the timescale of hundreds of milliseconds attributed to the detrapping of a shallow trap, and additional persistence on sub-microsecond timescales after polarization. The results show that this type of CdTe can be used for time resolved studies down to approximately 100 ns. However quantitative interpretation of the signal requires careful attention to bias voltages, polarization and exposure history.

  6. Characterization of paraffin based breast tissue equivalent phantom using a CdTe detector pulse height analysis.

    PubMed

    Cubukcu, Solen; Yücel, Haluk

    2016-12-01

    In this study, paraffin was selected as a base material and mixed with different amounts of CaSO4·2H2O and H3BO3 compounds in order to mimic breast tissue. Slab phantoms were produced with suitable mixture ratios of the additives in the melted paraffin. Subsequently, these were characterized in terms of first half-value layer (HVL) in the mammographic X-ray range using a pulse-height spectroscopic analysis with a CdTe detector. Irradiations were performed in the energy range of 23-35 kVp under broad beam conditions from Mo/Mo and Mo/Rh target/filter combinations. X-ray spectra were acquired with a CdTe detector without and with phantom material interposition in increments of 1 cm thickness and then evaluated to obtain the transmission data. The net integral areas of the spectra for the slabs were used to plot the transmission curves and these curves were fitted to the Archer model function. The results obtained for the slabs were compared with those of standard mammographic phantoms such as CIRS BR series phantoms and polymethylmethacrylate plates (PMMA). From the evaluated transmission curves, the mass attenuation coefficients and HVLs of some mixtures are close to those of the commercially available standard mammography phantoms. Results indicated that when a suitable proportion of H3BO3 and CaSO4·2H2O is added to the paraffin, the resulting material may be a good candidate for a breast tissue equivalent phantom.

  7. Development of CdTe pixel detectors combined with an aluminum Schottky diode sensor and photon-counting ASICs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyokawa, H.; Saji, C.; Kawase, M.; Wu, S.; Furukawa, Y.; Kajiwara, K.; Sato, M.; Hirono, T.; Shiro, A.; Shobu, T.; Suenaga, A.; Ikeda, H.

    2017-01-01

    We have been developing CdTe pixel detectors combined with a Schottky diode sensor and photon-counting ASICs. The hybrid pixel detector was designed with a pixel size of 200 μ m by 200 μm and an area of 19 mm by 20 mm or 38.2 mm by 40.2 mm. The photon-counting ASIC, SP8-04F10K, has a preamplifier, a shaper, 3-level window-type discriminators and a 24-bits counter in each pixel. The single-chip detector with 100 by 95 pixels successfully operated with a photon-counting mode selecting X-ray energy with the window comparator and stable operation was realized at 20 degrees C. We have performed a feasibility study for a white X-ray microbeam experiment. Laue diffraction patterns were measured during the scan of the irradiated position in a silicon steel sample. The grain boundaries were identified by using the differentials between adjacent images at each position.

  8. Energy Calibration of a CdTe Photon Counting Spectral Detector with Consideration of its Non-Convergent Behavior.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeong Seok; Kang, Dong-Goo; Jin, Seung Oh; Kim, Insoo; Lee, Soo Yeol

    2016-04-11

    Fast and accurate energy calibration of photon counting spectral detectors (PCSDs) is essential for their biomedical applications to identify and characterize bio-components or contrast agents in tissues. Using the x-ray tube voltage as a reference for energy calibration is known to be an efficient method, but there has been no consideration in the energy calibration of non-convergent behavior of PCSDs. We observed that a single pixel mode (SPM) CdTe PCSD based on Medipix-2 shows some non-convergent behaviors in turning off the detector elements when a high enough threshold is applied to the comparator that produces a binary photon count pulse. More specifically, the detector elements are supposed to stop producing photon count pulses once the threshold reaches a point of the highest photon energy determined by the tube voltage. However, as the x-ray exposure time increases, the threshold giving 50% of off pixels also increases without converging to a point. We established a method to take account of the non-convergent behavior in the energy calibration. With the threshold-to-photon energy mapping function established by the proposed method, we could better identify iodine component in a phantom consisting of iodine and other components.

  9. A study on friction stir welding of 12mm thick aluminum alloy plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Deepati Anil; Biswas, Pankaj; Tikader, Sujoy; Mahapatra, M. M.; Mandal, N. R.

    2013-12-01

    Most of the investigations regarding friction stir welding (FSW) of aluminum alloy plates have been limited to about 5 to 6 mm thick plates. In prior work conducted the various aspects concerning the process parameters and the FSW tool geometry were studied utilizing friction stir welding of 12 mm thick commercial grade aluminum alloy. Two different simple-to-manufacture tool geometries were used. The effect of varying welding parameters and dwell time of FSW tool on mechanical properties and weld quality was examined. It was observed that in order to achieve a defect free welding on such thick aluminum alloy plates, tool having trapezoidal pin geometry was suitable. Adequate tensile strength and ductility can be achieved utilizing a combination of high tool rotational speed of about 2000 r/min and low speed of welding around 28 mm/min. At very low and high dwell time the ductility of welded joints are reduced significantly.

  10. New developments in clinical applications of CdTe and CdZnTe detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheiber, C.

    1996-10-01

    This review about the medical applications of CdTe and CdZnTe is an update on the 1992 paper [1]. This new paper is legitimized by the recent progress which has been made in this field. First of all, the usefulness of a new material, i.e. CdZnTe, has been demonstrated. While the two materials are still being improved, it seems as yet too early to debate which of CdTe:Cl or CdZnTe will be the best choice. Historical applications span over the past 18 years, involving devices like miniature probes for per-operative scintigraphy or the monitoring of physiological functions and, closer to us, appliances dedicated to bone densitometry, and have been expanding as such devices have become commercially available, for many years now. Newly available microelectronic circuitry allows 2D-arrays to be built for digital quantitative X-ray (chest, dental …) and for high-resolution gamma cameras. The clinical demand is very high, especially in the field of nuclear medicine. Although there already exist clinical demonstrators, the future of such CdTe applications depends on further reduction in material and device mounting costs. New perspectives concern XCT applications, but the data resulting from research work are kept for restricted use within industrial R&D laboratories.

  11. Characterization of high-resistivity CdTe and Cd0.9Zn0.1Te crystals grown by Bridgman method for radiation detector applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Krishna C.; Krishna, Ramesh M.; Pak, Rahmi O.; Mannan, Mohammad A.

    2014-09-01

    CdTe and Cd0.9Zn0.1Te (CZT) crystals have been studied extensively for various applications including x- and γ-ray imaging and high energy radiation detectors. The crystals were grown from zone refined ultra-pure precursor materials using a vertical Bridgman furnace. The growth process has been monitored, controlled, and optimized by a computer simulation and modeling program developed in our laboratory. The grown crystals were thoroughly characterized after cutting wafers from the ingots and processed by chemo-mechanical polishing (CMP). The infrared (IR) transmission images of the post-treated CdTe and CZT crystals showed average Te inclusion size of ~10 μm for CdTe and ~8 μm for CZT crystal. The etch pit density was ≤ 5×104 cm-2 for CdTe and ≤ 3×104 cm-2 for CZT. Various planar and Frisch collar detectors were fabricated and evaluated. From the current-voltage measurements, the electrical resistivity was estimated to be ~ 1.5×1010 Ω-cm for CdTe and 2-5×1011 Ω-cm for CZT. The Hecht analysis of electron and hole mobility-lifetime products (μτe and μτh) showed μτe = 2×10-3 cm2/V (μτh = 8×10-5 cm2/V) and 3-6×10-3 cm2/V (μτh = 4- 6×10-5 cm2/V) for CdTe and CZT, respectively. Detectors in single pixel, Frisch collar, and coplanar grid geometries were fabricated. Detectors in Frisch grid and guard-ring configuration were found to exhibit energy resolution of 1.4% and 2.6 %, respectively, for 662 keV gamma rays. Assessments of the detector performance have been carried out also using 241Am (60 keV) showing energy resolution of 4.2% FWHM.

  12. Fine-Pitch CdTe Detector for Hard X-Ray Imaging and Spectroscopy of the Sun with the FOXSI Rocket Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ishikawa, Shin-nosuke; Katsuragawa, Miho; Watanabe, Shin; Uchida, Yuusuke; Takeda, Shin'lchiro; Takahashi, Tadayuki; Saito, Shinya; Glesener, Lindsay; Bultrago-Casas, Juan Camilo; Krucker, Sam; hide

    2016-01-01

    We have developed a fine-pitch hard X-ray (HXR) detector using a cadmium telluride (CdTe) semiconductor for imaging and spectroscopy for the second launch of the Focusing Optics Solar X-ray Imager (FOXSI). FOXSI is a rocket experiment to perform high sensitivity HXR observations from 4 to 15 keV using the new technique of HXR focusing optics. The focal plane detector requires less than 100 micrometers position resolution (to take advantage of the angular resolution of the optics) and approximately equals 1 keV energy resolution (full width at half maximum (FWHM)) for spectroscopy down to 4 keV, with moderate cooling (greater than -30 C). Double-sided silicon strip detectors were used for the first FOXSI flight in 2012 to meet these criteria. To improve the detectors' efficiency (66% at 15 keV for the silicon detectors) and position resolution of 75 micrometers for the second launch, we fabricated double-sided CdTe strip detectors with a position resolution of 60 micrometers and almost 100% efficiency for the FOXSI energy range. The sensitive area is 7.67 mm x 7.67 mm, corresponding to the field of view of 791'' x 791''. An energy resolution of 1 keV (FWHM) and low-energy threshold of approximately equals 4 keV were achieved in laboratory calibrations. The second launch of FOXSI was performed on 11 December 2014, and images from the Sun were successfully obtained with the CdTe detector. Therefore, we successfully demonstrated the detector concept and the usefulness of this technique for future HXR observations of the Sun.

  13. Fine-pitch CdTe detector for hard X-ray imaging and spectroscopy of the Sun with the FOXSI rocket experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, Shin-nosuke; Katsuragawa, Miho; Watanabe, Shin; Uchida, Yuusuke; Takeda, Shin'ichiro; Takahashi, Tadayuki; Saito, Shinya; Glesener, Lindsay; Buitrago-Casas, Juan Camilo; Krucker, Säm.; Christe, Steven

    2016-07-01

    We have developed a fine-pitch hard X-ray (HXR) detector using a cadmium telluride (CdTe) semiconductor for imaging and spectroscopy for the second launch of the Focusing Optics Solar X-ray Imager (FOXSI). FOXSI is a rocket experiment to perform high sensitivity HXR observations from 4 to 15 keV using the new technique of HXR focusing optics. The focal plane detector requires <100μm position resolution (to take advantage of the angular resolution of the optics) and ≈1 keV energy resolution (full width at half maximum (FWHM)) for spectroscopy down to 4 keV, with moderate cooling (>-30°C). Double-sided silicon strip detectors were used for the first FOXSI flight in 2012 to meet these criteria. To improve the detectors' efficiency (66% at 15 keV for the silicon detectors) and position resolution of 75 μm for the second launch, we fabricated double-sided CdTe strip detectors with a position resolution of 60 μm and almost 100% efficiency for the FOXSI energy range. The sensitive area is 7.67 mm × 7.67 mm, corresponding to the field of view of 791'' × 791''. An energy resolution of 1 keV (FWHM) and low-energy threshold of ≈4 keV were achieved in laboratory calibrations. The second launch of FOXSI was performed on 11 December 2014, and images from the Sun were successfully obtained with the CdTe detector. Therefore, we successfully demonstrated the detector concept and the usefulness of this technique for future HXR observations of the Sun.

  14. A 2D 4×4 Channel Readout ASIC for Pixelated CdTe Detectors for Medical Imaging Applications

    PubMed Central

    Macias-Montero, Jose-Gabriel; Sarraj, Maher; Chmeissani, Mokhtar; Martínez, Ricardo; Puigdengoles, Carles

    2015-01-01

    We present a 16-channel readout integrated circuit (ROIC) with nanosecond-resolution time to digital converter (TDC) for pixelated Cadmium Telluride (CdTe) gamma-ray detectors. The 4 × 4 pixel array ROIC is the proof of concept of the 10 × 10 pixel array readout ASIC for positron-emission tomography (PET) scanner, positron-emission mammography (PEM) scanner, and Compton gamma camera. The electronics of each individual pixel integrates an analog front-end with switchable gain, an analog to digital converter (ADC), configuration registers, and a 4-state digital controller. For every detected photon, the pixel electronics provides the energy deposited in the detector with 10-bit resolution, and a fast trigger signal for time stamp. The ASIC contains the 16-pixel matrix electronics, a digital controller, five global voltage references, a TDC, a temperature sensor, and a band-gap based current reference. The ASIC has been fabricated with TSMC 0.25 μm mixed-signal CMOS technology and occupies an area of 5.3 mm × 6.8 mm. The TDC shows a resolution of 95.5 ps, a precision of 600 ps at full width half maximum (FWHM), and a power consumption of 130 μW. In acquisition mode, the total power consumption of every pixel is 200 μW. An equivalent noise charge (ENC) of 160 e−RMS at maximum gain and negative polarity conditions has been measured at room temperature. PMID:26744545

  15. A 2D 4×4 Channel Readout ASIC for Pixelated CdTe Detectors for Medical Imaging Applications.

    PubMed

    Macias-Montero, Jose-Gabriel; Sarraj, Maher; Chmeissani, Mokhtar; Martínez, Ricardo; Puigdengoles, Carles

    2015-10-01

    We present a 16-channel readout integrated circuit (ROIC) with nanosecond-resolution time to digital converter (TDC) for pixelated Cadmium Telluride (CdTe) gamma-ray detectors. The 4 × 4 pixel array ROIC is the proof of concept of the 10 × 10 pixel array readout ASIC for positron-emission tomography (PET) scanner, positron-emission mammography (PEM) scanner, and Compton gamma camera. The electronics of each individual pixel integrates an analog front-end with switchable gain, an analog to digital converter (ADC), configuration registers, and a 4-state digital controller. For every detected photon, the pixel electronics provides the energy deposited in the detector with 10-bit resolution, and a fast trigger signal for time stamp. The ASIC contains the 16-pixel matrix electronics, a digital controller, five global voltage references, a TDC, a temperature sensor, and a band-gap based current reference. The ASIC has been fabricated with TSMC 0.25 μm mixed-signal CMOS technology and occupies an area of 5.3 mm × 6.8 mm. The TDC shows a resolution of 95.5 ps, a precision of 600 ps at full width half maximum (FWHM), and a power consumption of 130 μW. In acquisition mode, the total power consumption of every pixel is 200 μW. An equivalent noise charge (ENC) of 160 e(-)RMS at maximum gain and negative polarity conditions has been measured at room temperature.

  16. Energy dispersive CdTe and CdZnTe detectors for spectral clinical CT and NDT applications.

    PubMed

    Barber, W C; Wessel, J C; Nygard, E; Iwanczyk, J S

    2015-06-01

    We are developing room temperature compound semiconductor detectors for applications in energy-resolved high-flux single x-ray photon-counting spectral computed tomography (CT), including functional imaging with nanoparticle contrast agents for medical applications and non destructive testing (NDT) for security applications. Energy-resolved photon-counting can provide reduced patient dose through optimal energy weighting for a particular imaging task in CT, functional contrast enhancement through spectroscopic imaging of metal nanoparticles in CT, and compositional analysis through multiple basis function material decomposition in CT and NDT. These applications produce high input count rates from an x-ray generator delivered to the detector. Therefore, in order to achieve energy-resolved single photon counting in these applications, a high output count rate (OCR) for an energy-dispersive detector must be achieved at the required spatial resolution and across the required dynamic range for the application. The required performance in terms of the OCR, spatial resolution, and dynamic range must be obtained with sufficient field of view (FOV) for the application thus requiring the tiling of pixel arrays and scanning techniques. Room temperature cadmium telluride (CdTe) and cadmium zinc telluride (CdZnTe) compound semiconductors, operating as direct conversion x-ray sensors, can provide the required speed when connected to application specific integrated circuits (ASICs) operating at fast peaking times with multiple fixed thresholds per pixel provided the sensors are designed for rapid signal formation across the x-ray energy ranges of the application at the required energy and spatial resolutions, and at a sufficiently high detective quantum efficiency (DQE). We have developed high-flux energy-resolved photon-counting x-ray imaging array sensors using pixellated CdTe and CdZnTe semiconductors optimized for clinical CT and security NDT. We have also fabricated high

  17. Energy dispersive CdTe and CdZnTe detectors for spectral clinical CT and NDT applications

    PubMed Central

    Barber, W. C.; Wessel, J. C.; Nygard, E.; Iwanczyk, J. S.

    2014-01-01

    We are developing room temperature compound semiconductor detectors for applications in energy-resolved high-flux single x-ray photon-counting spectral computed tomography (CT), including functional imaging with nanoparticle contrast agents for medical applications and non destructive testing (NDT) for security applications. Energy-resolved photon-counting can provide reduced patient dose through optimal energy weighting for a particular imaging task in CT, functional contrast enhancement through spectroscopic imaging of metal nanoparticles in CT, and compositional analysis through multiple basis function material decomposition in CT and NDT. These applications produce high input count rates from an x-ray generator delivered to the detector. Therefore, in order to achieve energy-resolved single photon counting in these applications, a high output count rate (OCR) for an energy-dispersive detector must be achieved at the required spatial resolution and across the required dynamic range for the application. The required performance in terms of the OCR, spatial resolution, and dynamic range must be obtained with sufficient field of view (FOV) for the application thus requiring the tiling of pixel arrays and scanning techniques. Room temperature cadmium telluride (CdTe) and cadmium zinc telluride (CdZnTe) compound semiconductors, operating as direct conversion x-ray sensors, can provide the required speed when connected to application specific integrated circuits (ASICs) operating at fast peaking times with multiple fixed thresholds per pixel provided the sensors are designed for rapid signal formation across the x-ray energy ranges of the application at the required energy and spatial resolutions, and at a sufficiently high detective quantum efficiency (DQE). We have developed high-flux energy-resolved photon-counting x-ray imaging array sensors using pixellated CdTe and CdZnTe semiconductors optimized for clinical CT and security NDT. We have also fabricated high

  18. Energy dispersive CdTe and CdZnTe detectors for spectral clinical CT and NDT applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barber, W. C.; Wessel, J. C.; Nygard, E.; Iwanczyk, J. S.

    2015-06-01

    We are developing room temperature compound semiconductor detectors for applications in energy-resolved high-flux single x-ray photon-counting spectral computed tomography (CT), including functional imaging with nanoparticle contrast agents for medical applications and non-destructive testing (NDT) for security applications. Energy-resolved photon-counting can provide reduced patient dose through optimal energy weighting for a particular imaging task in CT, functional contrast enhancement through spectroscopic imaging of metal nanoparticles in CT, and compositional analysis through multiple basis function material decomposition in CT and NDT. These applications produce high input count rates from an x-ray generator delivered to the detector. Therefore, in order to achieve energy-resolved single photon counting in these applications, a high output count rate (OCR) for an energy-dispersive detector must be achieved at the required spatial resolution and across the required dynamic range for the application. The required performance in terms of the OCR, spatial resolution, and dynamic range must be obtained with sufficient field of view (FOV) for the application thus requiring the tiling of pixel arrays and scanning techniques. Room temperature cadmium telluride (CdTe) and cadmium zinc telluride (CdZnTe) compound semiconductors, operating as direct conversion x-ray sensors, can provide the required speed when connected to application specific integrated circuits (ASICs) operating at fast peaking times with multiple fixed thresholds per pixel provided the sensors are designed for rapid signal formation across the x-ray energy ranges of the application at the required energy and spatial resolutions, and at a sufficiently high detective quantum efficiency (DQE). We have developed high-flux energy-resolved photon-counting x-ray imaging array sensors using pixellated CdTe and CdZnTe semiconductors optimized for clinical CT and security NDT. We have also fabricated high

  19. Simulation of the Expected Performance of a Seamless Scanner for Brain PET Based on Highly Pixelated CdTe Detectors

    PubMed Central

    Mikhaylova, Ekaterina; De Lorenzo, Gianluca; Chmeissani, Mokhtar; Kolstein, Machiel; Cañadas, Mario; Arce, Pedro; Calderón, Yonatan; Uzun, Dilber; Ariño, Gerard; Macias-Montero, José Gabriel; Martinez, Ricardo; Puigdengoles, Carles; Cabruja, Enric

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this work is the evaluation of the design for a nonconventional PET scanner, the voxel imaging PET (VIP), based on pixelated room-temperature CdTe detectors yielding a true 3-D impact point with a density of 450 channels cm3, for a total 6 336 000 channels in a seamless ring shaped volume. The system is simulated and evaluated following the prescriptions of the NEMA NU 2-2001 and the NEMA NU 4-2008 standards. Results show that the excellent energy resolution of the CdTe detectors (1.6% for 511 keV photons), together with the small voxel pitch (1×1×2 mm3), and the crack-free ring geometry, give the design the potential to overcome the current limitations of PET scanners and to approach the intrinsic image resolution limits set by physics. The VIP is expected to reach a competitive sensitivity and a superior signal purity with respect to values commonly quoted for state-of-the-art scintillating crystal PETs. The system can provide 14 cps/kBq with a scatter fraction of 3.95% and 21 cps/kBq with a scatter fraction of 0.73% according to NEMA NU 2-2001 and NEMA NU 4-2008, respectively. The calculated NEC curve has a peak value of 122 kcps at 5.3 kBq/mL for NEMA NU 2-2001 and 908 kcps at 1.6 MBq/mL for NEMA NU 4-2008. The proposed scanner can achieve an image resolution of ~ 1 mm full-width at half-maximum in all directions. The virtually noise-free data sample leads to direct positive impact on the quality of the reconstructed images. As a consequence, high-quality high-resolution images can be obtained with significantly lower number of events compared to conventional scanners. Overall, simulation results suggest the VIP scanner can be operated either at normal dose for fast scanning and high patient throughput, or at low dose to decrease the patient radioactivity exposure. The design evaluation presented in this work is driving the development and the optimization of a fully operative prototype to prove the feasibility of the VIP concept. PMID:24108750

  20. Simulation of the expected performance of a seamless scanner for brain PET based on highly pixelated CdTe detectors.

    PubMed

    Mikhaylova, Ekaterina; De Lorenzo, Gianluca; Chmeissani, Mokhtar; Kolstein, Machiel; Cañadas, Mario; Arce, Pedro; Calderón, Yonatan; Uzun, Dilber; Ariño, Gerard; Macias-Montero, José Gabriel; Martinez, Ricardo; Puigdengoles, Carles; Cabruja, Enric

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this work is the evaluation of the design for a nonconventional PET scanner, the voxel imaging PET (VIP), based on pixelated room-temperature CdTe detectors yielding a true 3-D impact point with a density of 450 channels/cm(3), for a total 6 336 000 channels in a seamless ring shaped volume. The system is simulated and evaluated following the prescriptions of the NEMA NU 2-2001 and the NEMA NU 4-2008 standards. Results show that the excellent energy resolution of the CdTe detectors (1.6% for 511 keV photons), together with the small voxel pitch (1 × 1 × 2 mm(3)), and the crack-free ring geometry, give the design the potential to overcome the current limitations of PET scanners and to approach the intrinsic image resolution limits set by physics. The VIP is expected to reach a competitive sensitivity and a superior signal purity with respect to values commonly quoted for state-of-the-art scintillating crystal PETs. The system can provide 14 cps/kBq with a scatter fraction of 3.95% and 21 cps/kBq with a scatter fraction of 0.73% according to NEMA NU 2-2001 and NEMA NU 4-2008, respectively. The calculated NEC curve has a peak value of 122 kcps at 5.3 kBq/mL for NEMA NU 2-2001 and 908 kcps at 1.6 MBq/mL for NEMA NU 4-2008. The proposed scanner can achieve an image resolution of ~ 1 mm full-width at half-maximum in all directions. The virtually noise-free data sample leads to direct positive impact on the quality of the reconstructed images. As a consequence, high-quality high-resolution images can be obtained with significantly lower number of events compared to conventional scanners. Overall, simulation results suggest the VIP scanner can be operated either at normal dose for fast scanning and high patient throughput, or at low dose to decrease the patient radioactivity exposure. The design evaluation presented in this work is driving the development and the optimization of a fully operative prototype to prove the feasibility of the VIP concept.

  1. The use of Schottky CdTe detectors for high-energy astronomy: application to the detection plane of the instrument SVOM/ECLAIRs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasser, G.; Godet, O.; Atteia, J.-L.; Amoros, C.; Barret, D.; Bordon, S.; Cordier, B.; Gevin, O.; Gonzalez, F.; Houret, B.; Lacombe, K.; Mandrou, P.; Marty, W.; Mercier, K.; Pons, R.; Rambaud, D.; Ramon, P.; Rouaix, G.; Waegebaert, V.

    2014-07-01

    Ohmic CdZnTe and CdTe detectors have been successfully used in high-energy missions such as IBIS on-board INTEGRAL and the Swift-BAT in the past two decades. Such detectors provide very good quantum efficiency in the hard X-ray band. For the future generation of hard X-ray coded mask detectors, a higher sensitivity will be required. A way to achieve this is to increase the effective area of the pixilated detection plane, to change the mask pattern and/or the properties of the semi-conductors paving the detection plane. For the future Chinese-French Gamma-ray burst mission SVOM, the GRB trigger camera ECLAIRs will make use of a new type of high-energy detectors, the Schottky CdTe detectors. Such detectors, when reversely biased, are known to present very low leakage current, resulting in lower values of the low-energy threshold (down to 4 keV or less) than for previous missions (i.e. > 10 keV for the Swift-BAT and INTEGRAL/IBIS). Such low values will enable ECLAIRs with a moderate geometrical area of 1024 cm2 and a low-energy threshold of 4 keV to be more sensitive to high-redshift GRBs (emitting mainly in X-rays) than the Swift-BAT with a higher effective area and low-energy threshold. However, the spectral performance of such detectors are known to degrade over time, once polarized, due to the polarization effect that strongly depends on the temperature and the bias voltage applied to the detectors. In this paper, we present an intensive study of the properties of Schottky CdTe detectors as used on SVOM/ECLAIRs such as I-V characteristics, polarization effect, activation energy and low temperature annealing effects. We discuss the implications of these measurements on the use of this type of detectors in future high-energy instruments.

  2. Polarization in CdTe radiation detectors at high X-ray photon fluxes (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franc, Jan; Dědič, Václav; Pekárek, Jakub; Belas, Eduard; Touš, Jan

    2016-09-01

    In this contribution we show an improvement of a spectroscopic response of CZT X-ray detector operating at high fluxes of X-ray tube by simultaneous infrared light illumination with a wavelength of 1200 nm. CZT detectors usually suffer from a polarization effect while their internal electric field can be strongly deformed due to a trapping of photogenerated holes. We describe a mechanism of an optically induced depolarization peaking at photon energy of about 1 eV ( 1240 nm) due to an optical transition of electrons from the valence band to the deep level. The depolarization effect is accompanied by a decrease of the detector current which results in a lower noise entering the preamplifier of detector readout circuit. We have observed that it is possible to restore originally distorted X-ray spectra using additional 1200 nm LED illumination with a photon flux of 10^16 cm^-2s^-1 at approximately two times higher X-ray flux than without LED. The number of detected counts was in the range of 10^5-10^6mm^2s^-1. The restoration of the spectrum by continuous infrared light is accompanied by decrease of dark current. We explain this effect by light induced changes of profile of the electric filed that leads to decrease of the electron current injected from the cathode.

  3. CdTe imaging device driven by current integration mode (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, Toru; Koike, Akifumi; Okunoyama, Takaharu; Morii, Hisashi; Takagi, Katsuyuki; Nishizawa, Junichi

    2016-09-01

    We have developed the current integration mode CdTe imaging device with 100fps movie mode. The pixel pitch is 100um, and detector size is about 50mm x 45 mm with 4-CdTe-ASIC units and 1mm thick-CdTe. The data correction algorithms were developed and installed in FPGA and MPU with real time collection. We can find clear image with high contrast as direct conversion, for example, pipe-edge thickness detection, penetration image and movie of mechanical watch and so on. We can observe detail connection in printed circuit board by using rotation movie mode. Also it has high sensitivity in high energy region, so we can apply to get real-time movie in operation. We will show the demonstration movie and detail of this detector.

  4. Development of a 32-detector CdTe matrix for the SVOM ECLAIRs x/gamma camera: tests results of first flight models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacombe, K.; Dezalay, J.-P.; Houret, B.; Amoros, C.; Atteia, J.-L.; Aubaret, K.; Billot, M.; Bordon, S.; Cordier, B.; Delaigue, S.; Galliano, M.; Gevin, O.; Godet, O.; Gonzalez, F.; Guillemot, Ph.; Limousin, O.; Mercier, K.; Nasser, G.; Pons, R.; Rambaud, D.; Ramon, P.; Waegebaert, V.

    2016-07-01

    ECLAIRs, a 2-D coded-mask imaging camera on-board the Sino-French SVOM space mission, will detect and locate gamma-ray bursts in near real time in the 4 - 150 keV energy band in a large field of view. The design of ECLAIRs has been driven by the objective to reach an unprecedented low-energy threshold of 4 keV. The detection plane is an assembly of 6400 Schottky CdTe detectors of size 4x4x1 mm3, biased from -200V to -500V and operated at -20°C. The low-energy threshold is achieved thanks to an innovative hybrid module composed of a thick film ceramic holding 32 CdTe detectors ("Detectors Ceramics"), associated to an HTCC ceramic housing a low-noise 32-channel ASIC ("ASIC Ceramics"). We manage the coupling between Detectors Ceramics and ASIC Ceramics in order to achieve the best performance and ensure the uniformity of the detection plane. In this paper, we describe the complete hybrid XRDPIX, of which 50 flight models have been manufactured by the SAGEM company. Afterwards, we show test results obtained on Detectors Ceramics, on ASIC Ceramics and on the modules once assembled. Then, we compare and confront detectors leakage currents and ASIC ENC with the energy threshold values and FWHM measured on XRDPIX modules at the temperature of -20°C by using a calibrated radioactive source of 241Am. Finally, we study the homogeneity of the spectral properties of the 32-detector hybrid matrices and we conclude on general performance of more than 1000 detection channels which may reach the lowenergy threshold of 4 keV required for the future ECLAIRs space camera.

  5. Signal formation and decay in CdTe x-ray detectors under intense irradiation.

    PubMed

    Jahnke, A; Matz, R

    1999-01-01

    The response of Cd(Zn)Te Schottky and resistive detectors to intense x-rays is investigated in a commercial computed tomography (CT) system to assess their potential for medical diagnostics. To describe their signal height, responsivity, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and detective quantum efficiency the devices are modeled as solid-state ionization chambers with spatially varying electric field and charge collection efficiency. The thicknesses and pixel areas of the discrete detector elements are 0.5-2 mm and a few mm2, respectively. The incident spectrum extends from 26 to 120 keV and comprises 10(10) quanta/s cm2. It photogenerates a carrier concentration in the semiconductor that is two to three orders of magnitude above the intrinsic concentration, but remains to a similar extent below the charge densities on the device electrodes. Stable linear operation is achieved with the Schottky-type devices under high bias. Their behavior can be modeled well if negatively charged near-midgap bulk defects with a concentration of 10(11)-10(13) cm-3 are assumed. The bulk defects explain the amount and time constant (about 100 ms) of the detrapping current measured after x-ray pulses (afterglow). To avoid screening by the trapped space charge the bias voltage should exceed 100(V) x [detector thickness/mm]2. Dark currents are of the order of the generation-recombination current, i.e., 300 pA/mm3 detector volume. With proper device design the signal height approaches the theoretical maximum of 0.2 A/W. This high responsivity, however, is not exploited in CT since the SNR is determined here by the incident quantum noise. As a consequence of the detrapping current, the response speed does not meet CT requirements. A medium-term effort for crystal growth appears necessary to achieve the required reduction of the trap density by an order of magnitude. Scintillation based detectors are, therefore, still preferred in fast operating medical diagnostic systems.

  6. Evaluation of the mobility-lifetime product in CdTe and CdZnTe detectors by the transient-current technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uxa, Štěpán; Grill, Roman; Belas, Eduard

    2013-09-01

    New methods for evaluation of mobility-lifetime product (μτ) in polarized planar CdTe and CdZnTe detectors are presented. We combined the transient-current technique measurements with the measurements of the charge-collection efficiency and developed two iterative procedures for calculating μτ and mobility, μ, both taking into account the actual profile of the electric field in a detector. Their applicability is demonstrated on both the simulated and existing experimental data. The cases in which these methods are preferred to the common procedures based on the Hecht equation are widely discussed. We demonstrate that neglecting the detector's polarization can lead to underestimation of real μτ, thus negatively affecting the interpretation of particular measurements.

  7. Spectroscopy of low energy solar neutrinos using CdTe detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuber, K.

    2003-10-01

    The usage of a large amount of CdTe(CdZnTe) semiconductor detectors for solar neutrino spectroscopy in the low energy region is investigated. Several different coincidence signals can be formed on five different isotopes to measure the 7Be neutrino line at 862 keV in real-time. The most promising one is the usage of 116Cd resulting in 227 SNU. The presence of 125Te permits even the real-time detection of pp-neutrinos. A possible antineutrino flux above 713 keV might be detected by capture on 106Cd.

  8. Energy-windowed, pixellated X-ray diffraction using the Pixirad CdTe detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Flynn, D.; Bellazzini, R.; Minuti, M.; Brez, A.; Pinchera, M.; Spandre, G.; Moss, R.; Speller, R. D.

    2017-01-01

    X-ray diffraction (XRD) is a powerful tool for material identification. In order to interpret XRD data, knowledge is required of the scattering angles and energies of X-rays which interact with the sample. By using a pixellated, energy-resolving detector, this knowledge can be gained when using a spectrum of unfiltered X-rays, and without the need to collimate the scattered radiation. Here we present results of XRD measurements taken with the Pixirad detector and a laboratory-based X-ray source. The cadmium telluride sensor allows energy windows to be selected, and the 62 μm pixel pitch enables accurate spatial information to be preserved for XRD measurements, in addition to the ability to take high resolution radiographic images. Diffraction data are presented for a variety of samples to demonstrate the capability of the technique for materials discrimination in laboratory, security and pharmaceutical environments. Distinct diffraction patterns were obtained, from which details on the molecular structures of the items under study were determined.

  9. Analysis of stable tearing in a 7.6 mm thick aluminum plate alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Dawicke, D.S.; Piascik, R.S.; Newman, J.C. Jr.

    1997-12-31

    The behavior of a 7.6 mm thick 2000 series aluminum plate alloy was investigated. Fracture tests were conducted on 304.8 mm and 101.6 mm wide M(T) specimens and 152.4 mm and 101.6 C(T) specimens. Two-dimensional and three-dimensional, elastic-plastic finite element simulations used the critical CTOA criterion to simulate the fracture behavior. A plane strain core was used in the two-dimensional analyses to approximate the three-dimensional constraint. The results from this study indicate: (A) The three-dimensional finite element analyses required a critical CTOA of 5.75{degree} to simulate the fracture behavior of the 101.6 mm and 304.8 mm wide M(T) specimen with side grooves. This angle was about the upper limit of the surface CTOA measurements. (B) The three-dimensional finite element analyses required a critical CTOA of 3.6{degree} to simulate the fracture behavior of the 101.6 mm C(T) specimen with side grooves. This angle was about the upper limit of the microtopography through-thickness CTOA measurements. (C) A plane strain core height of PSC = 4 mm was required for the two-dimensional analyses to match the fracture behavior obtained from the three-dimensional analyses. This height agreed with the distance that a three-dimensional analysis indicated was the start of plane strain like behavior. (D) For large M(T) specimens (W > 1,000 mm) the two-dimensional plane strain core analysis predicted a failure stress between the plane stress and plane strain conditions and provided a good approximation of the three-dimensional analyses. (E) The experimental measurements and analytical results show good agreement when the specimens sizes meet the uncracked ligament to thickness ratio (b/B > 4) determined by Newman et al. This indicates that there is a minimum size laboratory specimen that can be used to determine the material behavior needed to predict fracture in large specimens and structures.

  10. Medipix2 based CdTe microprobe for dental imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vykydal, Z.; Fauler, A.; Fiederle, M.; Jakubek, J.; Svestkova, M.; Zwerger, A.

    2011-12-01

    Medical imaging devices and techniques are demanded to provide high resolution and low dose images of samples or patients. Hybrid semiconductor single photon counting devices together with suitable sensor materials and advanced techniques of image reconstruction fulfil these requirements. In particular cases such as the direct observation of dental implants also the size of the imaging device itself plays a critical role. This work presents the comparison of 2D radiographs of tooth provided by a standard commercial dental imaging system (Gendex 765DC X-ray tube with VisualiX scintillation detector) and two Medipix2 USB Lite detectors one equipped with a Si sensor (300 μm thick) and one with a CdTe sensor (1 mm thick). Single photon counting capability of the Medipix2 device allows virtually unlimited dynamic range of the images and thus increases the contrast significantly. The dimensions of the whole USB Lite device are only 15 mm × 60 mm of which 25% consists of the sensitive area. Detector of this compact size can be used directly inside the patients' mouth.

  11. Continued Development of Small-Pixel CZT and CdTe Detectors for Future High-Angular-Resolution Hard X-ray Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krawczynski, Henric

    The Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) Small Explorer Mission was launched in June 2012 and has demonstrated the technical feasibility and high scientific impact of hard X-ray astronomy. We propose to continue our current R&D program to develop finely pixelated semiconductor detectors and the associated readout electronics for the focal plane of a NuSTAR follow-up mission. The detector-ASIC (Application Specific Integrated Circuit) package will be ideally matched to the new generation of low-cost, low-mass X-ray mirrors which achieve an order of magnitude better angular resolution than the NuSTAR mirrors. As part of this program, the Washington University group will optimize the contacts of 2x2 cm^2 footprint Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) and Cadmium Telluride (CdTe) detectors contacted with 100x116 hexagonal pixels at a next-neighbor pitch of 200 microns. The Brookhaven National Laboratory group will design, fabricate, and test the next generation of the HEXID ASIC matched to the new X-ray mirrors and the detectors, providing a low-power 100x116 channel ASIC with extremely low readout noise (i.e. with a root mean square noise of 13 electrons). The detectors will be tested with radioactive sources and in the focal plane of high-angular-resolution X-ray mirrors at the X-ray beam facilities at the Goddard and Marshall Space Flight Centers.

  12. Laser-Assisted Stir Welding of 25-mm-Thick HSLA-65 Plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, Keith M.

    2002-12-01

    Laser-assisted stir welding is a hybrid process that combines energy from a laser with functional heating and mechanical energy to join materials in the solid state. The technology is an adaptation of friction stir welding which is particularly suited for joining thick plates. Aluminum plates up to 75 mm thick have been successfully joined using friction stir welding. Since joining occurs in the solid state, stir technology offers the capability for fabricating full penetration joints in thick plates with better mechanical properties and less weld distortion than is possible by fusion processes. Currently friction stir welding is being used in several industries to improve productivity, reduce weight, and increase the strength of welded structures. Examples include: (a) the aircraft/aerospace industry where stir technology is currently being used to fabricate the space shuttle's external tank as well as components of the Delta family of rockets; (b) the shipping industry where container manufacturers are using stir technology to produce lighter containers with more payload capacity; and (c) the oil industry where offshore platform manufactures are using automated stir welding plants to fabricate large panels and structures up to 16 meters long with widths as required. In all these cases, stir technology has been restricted to aluminum alloys; however, stainless and HSLA 65 steels have been recently stir welded with friction as the primary heat source. One of the difficulties in adapting stir welding to steel is tool wear aggravated by the high tool rubbing velocities needed to provide frictional heat input into the material. Early work showed that the tool shoulder reached temperatures above 1000 C and the weld seam behind the tool stayed within this temperature range for up to 25 mm behind the tool. Cross sections of stir welded samples showed that the heat-affected zone is relatively wide and follows the profile of the tool shoulder. Besides minimizing the tool

  13. A noninvasive dose estimation system for clinical BNCT based on PG-SPECT--conceptual study and fundamental experiments using HPGe and CdTe semiconductor detectors.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, T; Sakurai, Y; Ishikawa, M

    2000-09-01

    A noninvasive method for measuring the absorbed dose distribution during the administration of clinical boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) using an online three-dimensional (3D) imaging system is presented. This system is designed to provide more accurate information for treatment planning and dosimetry. The single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) technique is combined with prompt gamma-ray analysis (PGA) to provide an ideal dose estimation system for BNCT. This system is termed PG-SPECT. The fundamental feasibility of the PG-SPECT system for BNCT is confirmed under the following conditions: (1) a voxel size of 1 x 1 x 1 cm3, comparable to the spatial resolution of our standard dosimetric technique using gold wire activation, where data are available for every 5-10 mm of wire length; (2) a reaction rate of 10B(n,alpha)7Li within the measurement volume is greater than 1.1 x l0(6) interactions/cm3/s, corresponding to a thermal neutron flux of 5 x 10(8) n/cm2/s and a 10B concentration of greater than 10 ppm for the deepest part of the tumor volume under typical BNCT clinical conditions; (3) statistical uncertainty of the count rate for 10B(n,alpha)7Li prompt gamma rays is 10% or less. The desirable characteristics of a detector for the PG-SPECT system were determined by basic experiments using both HPGe and CdTe semiconductor detectors. The CdTe semiconductor detector has the greatest potential for this system because of its compactness and simplicity of maintenance.

  14. Development of a CZT drift ring detector for X and γ ray spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alruhaili, A.; Sellin, P. J.; Lohstroh, A.; Boothman, V.; Veeramani, P.; Veale, M. C.; Sawhney, K. J. S.; Kachkanov, V.

    2015-04-01

    CdTe and CZT detectors are considered better choices for high energy γ and X-ray spectroscopy in comparison to Si and HPGe detectors due to their good quantum efficiency and room temperature operation. The performance limitations in CdTe and CZT detectors are mainly associated with poor hole transport and trapping phenomena. Among many techniques that can be used to eliminate the effect of the poor charge transport properties of holes in CdTe and CZT material, the drift ring technique shows promising results. In this work, the performance of a 2.3 mm thick CZT drift ring detector is investigated. Spatially resolved measurements were carried out with an X-ray microbeam (25 and 75 keV) at the Diamond Light Source synchrotron to study the response uniformity and extent of the active area. Higher energy photon irradiation was also carried out at up to 662 keV using different radioisotopes to complement the microbeam data. Different biasing schemes were investigated in terms of biasing the cathode rear electrode (bulk field) and the ring electrodes (lateral fields). The results show that increasing the bulk field with fixed-ratio ring biases and lateral fields with fixed bulk fields increase the active area of the device significantly, which contrasts with previous studies in CdTe, where only an increasing lateral field resulted in an improvement of device performance. This difference is attributed to the larger thickness of the CZT device reported here.

  15. Investigations on Nd:YAG laser welding of 1.55mm thick Al1050A alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Xingbo; Bai Peikang; Guo Juzhu; Hu Jiandong; Shang Tiepin; Wang Qingchao; Chung, T.E.

    1996-12-31

    The paper deals with experimental and theoretical analyses of butt welding of 1.55mm thick Al1050A alloy using a 1kW pulsed Nd:YAG laser. The butt welded joints are investigated for tensile strength and microhardness. Then the authors discuss effects of some main normalized welding parameters on the surface quality of welded seams and penetration depth.

  16. Dynamics of native oxide growth on CdTe and CdZnTe X-ray and gamma-ray detectors

    PubMed Central

    Zázvorka, Jakub; Franc, Jan; Beran, Lukáš; Moravec, Pavel; Pekárek, Jakub; Veis, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We studied the growth of the surface oxide layer on four different CdTe and CdZnTe X-ray and gamma-ray detector-grade samples using spectroscopic ellipsometry. We observed gradual oxidization of CdTe and CdZnTe after chemical etching in bromine solutions. From X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements, we found that the oxide consists only of oxygen bound to tellurium. We applied a refined theoretical model of the surface layer to evaluate the spectroscopic ellipsometry measurements. In this way we studied the dynamics and growth rate of the oxide layer within a month after chemical etching of the samples. We observed two phases in the evolution of the oxide layer on all studied samples. A rapid growth was visible within five days after the chemical treatment followed by semi-saturation and a decrease in the growth rate after the first week. After one month all the samples showed an oxide layer about 3 nm thick. The oxide thickness was correlated with leakage current degradation with time after surface preparation. PMID:27933118

  17. [Development of an experimental apparatus for energy calibration of a CdTe detector by means of diagnostic X-ray equipment].

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Ikuma; Hayashi, Hiroaki; Takegami, Kazuki; Konishi, Yuki

    2013-09-01

    Diagnostic X-ray equipment was used to develop an experimental apparatus for calibrating a CdTe detector. Powder-type samples were irradiated with collimated X-rays. On excitation of the atoms, characteristic X-rays were emitted. We prepared Nb2O5, SnO2, La2O3, Gd2O3, and WO3 metal oxide samples. Experiments using the diagnostic X-ray equipment were carried out to verify the practicality of our apparatus. First, we verified that the collimators involving the apparatus worked well. Second, the X-ray spectra were measured using the prepared samples. Finally, we analyzed the spectra, which indicated that the energy calibration curve had been obtained at an accuracy of ±0.06 keV. The developed apparatus could be used conveniently, suggesting it to be useful for the practical training of beginners and researchers.

  18. High-speed imaging at high x-ray energy: CdTe sensors coupled to charge-integrating pixel array detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, Julian; Tate, Mark W.; Shanks, Katherine S.; Philipp, Hugh T.; Weiss, Joel T.; Purohit, Prafull; Chamberlain, Darol; Gruner, Sol M.

    2016-07-27

    Pixel Array Detectors (PADs) consist of an x-ray sensor layer bonded pixel-by-pixel to an underlying readout chip. This approach allows both the sensor and the custom pixel electronics to be tailored independently to best match the x-ray imaging requirements. Here we describe the hybridization of CdTe sensors to two different charge-integrating readout chips, the Keck PAD and the Mixed-Mode PAD (MM-PAD), both developed previously in our laboratory. The charge-integrating architecture of each of these PADs extends the instantaneous counting rate by many orders of magnitude beyond that obtainable with photon counting architectures. The Keck PAD chip consists of rapid, 8-frame, in-pixel storage elements with framing periods <150 ns. The second detector, the MM-PAD, has an extended dynamic range by utilizing an in-pixel overflow counter coupled with charge removal circuitry activated at each overflow. This allows the recording of signals from the single-photon level to tens of millions of x-rays/pixel/frame while framing at 1 kHz. Both detector chips consist of a 128×128 pixel array with (150 µm){sup 2} pixels.

  19. Characterization of CdTe sensors with Schottky contacts coupled to charge-integrating pixel array detectors for X-ray science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, J.; Tate, M. W.; Shanks, K. S.; Philipp, H. T.; Weiss, J. T.; Purohit, P.; Chamberlain, D.; Ruff, J. P. C.; Gruner, S. M.

    2016-12-01

    Pixel Array Detectors (PADs) consist of an x-ray sensor layer bonded pixel-by-pixel to an underlying readout chip. This approach allows both the sensor and the custom pixel electronics to be tailored independently to best match the x-ray imaging requirements. Here we present characterizations of CdTe sensors hybridized with two different charge-integrating readout chips, the Keck PAD and the Mixed-Mode PAD (MM-PAD), both developed previously in our laboratory. The charge-integrating architecture of each of these PADs extends the instantaneous counting rate by many orders of magnitude beyond that obtainable with photon counting architectures. The Keck PAD chip consists of rapid, 8-frame, in-pixel storage elements with framing periods < 150 ns. The second detector, the MM-PAD, has an extended dynamic range by utilizing an in-pixel overflow counter coupled with charge removal circuitry activated at each overflow. This allows the recording of signals from the single-photon level to tens of millions of x-rays/pixel/frame while framing at 1 kHz. Both detector chips consist of a 128 × 128 pixel array with (150 μm)2 pixels.

  20. Experimental results from Al/p-CdTe/Pt X-ray detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbene, L.; Gerardi, G.; Turturici, A. A.; Del Sordo, S.; Principato, F.

    2013-12-01

    Recently, Al/CdTe/Pt detectors have been proposed for the development of high resolution X-ray spectrometers. Due to the low leakage currents, these detectors allow high electric fields and the pixellization of anodes with the possibility to realize single charge carrier sensing detectors. In this work, we report on the results of electrical and spectroscopic investigations on CdTe diode detectors with Al/CdTe/Pt electrode configuration (4.1×4.1×0.75 and 4.1×4.1×2 mm3). The detectors are characterized by very low leakage currents in the reverse bias operation: 0.3 nA at 25 °C and 2.4 pA at -25 °C under a bias voltage of -1000 V. The spectroscopic performance of the detectors at both low and high photon counting rates were also investigated with a focus on the minimization of time instability, generally termed as polarization, looking for the optimum bias voltage and temperature. Good time stability, during a long-term operation of 10 h, was observed for both detectors at -25 °C and by using an electric field of 5000 V/cm. The 2 mm thick detector exhibited good energy resolution of 6.1%, 2.5% and 2.0% (FWHM) at 22.1 keV, 59.5 and 122.1 keV, respectively. Performance enhancements were obtained by using digital pulse processing techniques, especially at high photon counting rates (300 kcps). The 2 mm thick detector, after a digital pulse shape correction (PSC), is characterized by similar performance to the thin detector ones, opening up to the use of thick CdTe detectors without excessive performance degradations. This work was carried out in the framework of the development of portable X-ray spectrometers for both laboratory research and medical applications.

  1. Toward VIP-PIX: A Low Noise Readout ASIC for Pixelated CdTe Gamma-Ray Detectors for Use in the Next Generation of PET Scanners.

    PubMed

    Macias-Montero, Jose-Gabriel; Sarraj, Maher; Chmeissani, Mokhtar; Puigdengoles, Carles; Lorenzo, Gianluca De; Martínez, Ricardo

    2013-08-01

    VIP-PIX will be a low noise and low power pixel readout electronics with digital output for pixelated Cadmium Telluride (CdTe) detectors. The proposed pixel will be part of a 2D pixel-array detector for various types of nuclear medicine imaging devices such as positron-emission tomography (PET) scanners, Compton gamma cameras, and positron-emission mammography (PEM) scanners. Each pixel will include a SAR ADC that provides the energy deposited with 10-bit resolution. Simultaneously, the self-triggered pixel which will be connected to a global time-to-digital converter (TDC) with 1 ns resolution will provide the event's time stamp. The analog part of the readout chain and the ADC have been fabricated with TSMC 0.25 μm mixed-signal CMOS technology and characterized with an external test pulse. The power consumption of these parts is 200 μW from a 2.5 V supply. It offers 4 switchable gains from ±10 mV/fC to ±40 mV/fC and an input charge dynamic range of up to ±70 fC for the minimum gain for both polarities. Based on noise measurements, the expected equivalent noise charge (ENC) is 65 e(-) RMS at room temperature.

  2. Toward VIP-PIX: A Low Noise Readout ASIC for Pixelated CdTe Gamma-Ray Detectors for Use in the Next Generation of PET Scanners

    PubMed Central

    Macias-Montero, Jose-Gabriel; Sarraj, Maher; Chmeissani, Mokhtar; Puigdengoles, Carles; Lorenzo, Gianluca De; Martínez, Ricardo

    2013-01-01

    VIP-PIX will be a low noise and low power pixel readout electronics with digital output for pixelated Cadmium Telluride (CdTe) detectors. The proposed pixel will be part of a 2D pixel-array detector for various types of nuclear medicine imaging devices such as positron-emission tomography (PET) scanners, Compton gamma cameras, and positron-emission mammography (PEM) scanners. Each pixel will include a SAR ADC that provides the energy deposited with 10-bit resolution. Simultaneously, the self-triggered pixel which will be connected to a global time-to-digital converter (TDC) with 1 ns resolution will provide the event’s time stamp. The analog part of the readout chain and the ADC have been fabricated with TSMC 0.25 μm mixed-signal CMOS technology and characterized with an external test pulse. The power consumption of these parts is 200 μW from a 2.5 V supply. It offers 4 switchable gains from ±10 mV/fC to ±40 mV/fC and an input charge dynamic range of up to ±70 fC for the minimum gain for both polarities. Based on noise measurements, the expected equivalent noise charge (ENC) is 65 e− RMS at room temperature. PMID:24187382

  3. Response functions of multi-pixel-type CdTe detector: toward development of precise material identification on diagnostic x-ray images by means of photon counting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Hiroaki; Asahara, Takashi; Kimoto, Natsumi; Kanazawa, Yuki; Yamakawa, Tsutomu; Yamamoto, Shuichiro; Yamasaki, Masashi; Okada, Masahiro

    2017-03-01

    Currently, an X-ray imaging system which can produced information used to identify various materials has been developed based on photon counting. It is important to estimate the response function of the detector in order to accomplish highly accurate material identification. Our aim is to simulate the response function of a CdTe detector using Monte-Carlo simulation; at this time, the transportation of incident and scattered photons and secondary produced electrons were precisely simulated without taking into consideration the charge spread in the collecting process of the produced charges (charge sharing effect). First, we set pixel sizes of 50-500μm, the minimum irradiation fields which produce equilibrium conditions were determined. Then, observed peaks in the response function were analyzed with consideration paid to the interactions between incident X-rays and the detector components, Cd and Te. The secondary produced characteristic X-rays play an important role. Accordingly ratios of full energy peak (FEP), scattering X-rays and penetrating X-rays in the calculated response functions were analyzed. When the pixel size of 200μm was used the scattered X-rays were saturated at equilibrium with relatively small fields and efficiency of FEP was kept at a high value (<50%). Finally, we demonstrated the X-ray spectrum which is folded by the response function. Even if the charge sharing effect is not completely corrected when using the electric circuit, there is a possibility that disturbed portions in the measured X-ray spectra can be corrected by using proper calibration, in which the above considerations are taken into account.

  4. Red meat and fruit intake is prognostic among patients with localized cutaneous melanomas more than 1 mm thick

    PubMed Central

    Gould Rothberg, Bonnie E.; Bulloch, Kaleigh J.; Fine, Judith A.; Barnhill, Raymond L.; Berwick, Marianne

    2014-01-01

    Background As the 10-year mortality for localized cutaneous melanoma more than 1.00 mm thick approaches 40% following complete resection, non-therapeutic interventions that can supplement recommended active surveillance are needed. Although guidelines recommending nutrition, physical activity and tobacco cessation for cancer survivors have been published, data describing their associations with melanoma survivorship are lacking. Methods Analysis of modifiable lifestyle behaviors collected on the 249 cases with melanomas more than 1.00 mm thick enrolled in the Connecticut Case-Control Study of Skin Self-Examination study was conducted. Independent associations with melanoma-specific survival were evaluated through Cox proportional hazards modeling adjusting for age, gender, Breslow thickness, ulceration and the presence of microsatellites. Independently significant variables were then combined into a single model and backwards elimination was employed until all remaining variables were significant at p<0.05. Results Following adjustment for age, Breslow thickness and anatomic site of the index melanoma, daily fruit consumption was associated with improved melanoma-specific survival (HR=0.54; 95% CI: 0.34–0.86) whereas at least weekly red meat consumption was associated with worse outcomes (HR=1.84; 95% CI: 1.02–3.30). Natural red (HR=0.44; 95% CI: 0.22–0.88) or blond (HR=0.52; 95% CI: 0.29–0.94) hair were also favorably prognostic. Higher fish consumption was of borderline significance for improved survival only when considered independently (HR=0.65; 95% CI: 0.40–1.05); no association was seen following adjustment for red meat and fruit consumption (p>0.10). Conclusions Dietary choices at the time of diagnosis are associated with melanoma-specific survival in patients with melanomas more than 1.00 mm thick. Further validation of our findings in larger cohorts with repeated post-diagnostic measures is warranted to further evaluate whether dietary

  5. [Measurement of response function of CdTe detector using diagnostic X-ray equipment and evaluation of Monte Carlo simulation code].

    PubMed

    Okino, Hiroki; Hayashi, Hiroaki; Nakagawa, Kohei; Takegami, Kazuki

    2014-12-01

    An X-ray spectrum measured with CdTe detector has to be corrected with response function, because the spectrum is composed of full energy peaks (FEP) and escape peaks (EP). Recently, various simulation codes were developed, and using them the response functions can be calculated easily. The aim of this study is to propose a new method for measuring the response function and to compare it with the calculated value by the Monte Carlo simulation code. In this study, characteristic X-rays were used for measuring the response function. These X-rays were produced by the irradiation of diagnostic X-rays with metallic atoms. In the measured spectrum, there was a background contamination, which was caused by the Compton scattering of the irradiated X-ray in the sample material. Therefore, we thought of a new experimental methodology to reduce this background. The experimentally derived spectrum was analyzed and then the ratios of EP divided by FEP (EP/FEP) were calculated to compare the simulated values. In this article, we showed the property of the measured response functions and the analysis accuracy of the EP/FEP, and we indicated that the values calculated by Monte Carlo simulation code could be evaluated by using our method.

  6. Measurements of Ultra-Fast single photon counting chip with energy window and 75 μm pixel pitch with Si and CdTe detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maj, P.; Grybos, P.; Kasinski, K.; Koziol, A.; Krzyzanowska, A.; Kmon, P.; Szczygiel, R.; Zoladz, M.

    2017-03-01

    Single photon counting pixel detectors become increasingly popular in various 2-D X-ray imaging techniques and scientific experiments mainly in solid state physics, material science and medicine. This paper presents architecture and measurement results of the UFXC32k chip designed in a CMOS 130 nm process. The chip consists of about 50 million transistors and has an area of 9.64 mm × 20.15 mm. The core of the IC is a matrix of 128 × 256 pixels of 75 μm pitch. Each pixel contains a CSA, a shaper with tunable gain, two discriminators with correction circuits and two 14-bit ripple counters operating in a normal mode (with energy window), a long counter mode (one 28-bit counter) and a zero-dead time mode. Gain and noise performance were verified with X-ray radiation and with the chip connected to Si (320 μm thick) and CdTe (750 μ m thick) sensors.

  7. MediSPECT: Single photon emission computed tomography system for small field of view small animal imaging based on a CdTe hybrid pixel detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Accorsi, R.; Autiero, M.; Celentano, L.; Chmeissani, M.; Cozzolino, R.; Curion, A. S.; Frallicciardi, P.; Laccetti, P.; Lanza, R. C.; Lauria, A.; Maiorino, M.; Marotta, M.; Mettivier, G.; Montesi, M. C.; Riccio, P.; Roberti, G.; Russo, P.

    2007-02-01

    We describe MediSPECT, a new scanner developed at University and INFN Napoli, for SPECT studies on small animals with a small field of view (FOV) and high spatial resolution. The CdTe pixel detector (a 256×256 matrix of 55 μm square pixels) operating in single photon counting for detection of gamma-rays with low and medium energy (e.g. 125I, 27-35 keV, 99mTc, 140 keV), is bump bonded to the Medipix2 readout chip. The FOV of the MediSPECT scanner with a coded aperture mask collimator ranges from 6.3 mm (system spatial resolution 110 μm at 27-35 keV) to 24.3 mm. With a 0.30 mm pinhole the FOV ranges from 2.4 to 29 mm (where the system spatial resolution is 1.0 mm at 27-35 keV and 2.0 mm at 140 keV). MediSPECT will be used for in vivo imaging of small organs or tissue structures in mouse, e.g., brain, thyroid, heart or tumor.

  8. Experimental study of the response of CZT and CdTe detectors of various thicknesses in strong magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, J. W.; Cai, L.; Meng, L. J.

    2011-10-01

    In this paper, we used a combined experimental and Monte Carlo simulation approach to investigate the detailed charge collection process within thick CdTe/CZT detectors operated inside a strong magnetic field. As one of the key objectives, we quantitatively assessed the effect of the Lorenz force on the migration of charge carriers inside the detector bulk. This information would allow an accurate modeling of the detector's response to gamma ray interactions and therefore help to compensate for the event-positioning error induced by the strong magnetic field. In this study, a pixilated ERPC detector with 350 μm square pixels was set on a non-magnetic gantry and operated inside a 3 T Siemens MRI scanner. Multiple studies, with similar geometries, were performed using the same detector setup with and without the presence of the magnetic field to investigate the effect on the charge collection behavior from the strong magnetic field. The experimental results were used to validate the Monte Carlo simulation package that models both photon transportation and charge collection process inside the detector.

  9. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Narrow Gap Laser-Arc Hybrid Welded 40 mm Thick Mild Steel

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chen; Li, Geng; Gao, Ming; Zeng, XiaoYan

    2017-01-01

    Both laser-arc hybrid welding and narrow gap welding have potential for the fabrication of thick sections, but their combination has been seldom studied. In this research, 40 mm thick mild steel was welded by narrow gap laser-arc hybrid welding. A weld with smooth layer transition, free of visible defects, was obtained by nine passes at a 6 mm width narrow gap. The lower part of the weld has the lowest mechanical properties because of the lowest amount of acicular ferrite, but its ultimate tensile strength and impact absorbing energy is still 49% and 60% higher than those of base metal, respectively. The microhardness deviation of all filler layers along weld thickness direction is no more than 15 HV0.2, indicating that no temper softening appeared during multiple heat cycles. The results provide an alternative technique for improving the efficiency and quality of welding thick sections. PMID:28772469

  10. A Monte Carlo simulation study of an improved K-edge log-subtraction X-ray imaging using a photon counting CdTe detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Youngjin; Lee, Amy Candy; Kim, Hee-Joung

    2016-09-01

    Recently, significant effort has been spent on the development of photons counting detector (PCD) based on a CdTe for applications in X-ray imaging system. The motivation of developing PCDs is higher image quality. Especially, the K-edge subtraction (KES) imaging technique using a PCD is able to improve image quality and useful for increasing the contrast resolution of a target material by utilizing contrast agent. Based on above-mentioned technique, we presented an idea for an improved K-edge log-subtraction (KELS) imaging technique. The KELS imaging technique based on the PCDs can be realized by using different subtraction energy width of the energy window. In this study, the effects of the KELS imaging technique and subtraction energy width of the energy window was investigated with respect to the contrast, standard deviation, and CNR with a Monte Carlo simulation. We simulated the PCD X-ray imaging system based on a CdTe and polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) phantom which consists of the various iodine contrast agents. To acquired KELS images, images of the phantom using above and below the iodine contrast agent K-edge absorption energy (33.2 keV) have been acquired at different energy range. According to the results, the contrast and standard deviation were decreased, when subtraction energy width of the energy window is increased. Also, the CNR using a KELS imaging technique is higher than that of the images acquired by using whole energy range. Especially, the maximum differences of CNR between whole energy range and KELS images using a 1, 2, and 3 mm diameter iodine contrast agent were acquired 11.33, 8.73, and 8.29 times, respectively. Additionally, the optimum subtraction energy width of the energy window can be acquired at 5, 4, and 3 keV for the 1, 2, and 3 mm diameter iodine contrast agent, respectively. In conclusion, we successfully established an improved KELS imaging technique and optimized subtraction energy width of the energy window, and based on

  11. Characterization of CdTe and CdZnTe detectors for gamma-ray imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verger, L.; Boitel, M.; Gentet, M. C.; Hamelin, R.; Mestais, C.; Mongellaz, F.; Rustique, J.; Sanchez, G.

    2001-02-01

    CEA-LETI in association with Bicron and Crismatec has been developing solid-state gamma camera technology based on CZT. The project included gamma camera head systems development including front-end electronics with an integrated circuit (ASIC), material growth, and detector fabrication and characterization. One feature of the work is the use of linear correlation between the amplitude and the fast rise time of the signal - which corresponds to the electron transit time in the detector, a development that was reported previously and which allows more than 80% of the 122 keV γ-photons incident on HPBM material to be recovered in a ±6.5% 2D window. In the current work, we summarize other methods to improve CZT detector performance and compare them with the Bi-Parametric Spectrum (BPS) method. The BPS method can also be applied as a diagnositic. BPS curve shapes are shown to vary with electric field, and with electron transport properties, and the correction algorithims are seen to be robust over a range of values. In addition, the technique is found to improve detectors from a variety of sources including some with special electrode geometries. In all cases, the BPS method improves efficiency (>75%) without degrading energy resolution (± 6.5% 2D window) even for a monolithic detector. The method does not overcome bulk inhomogeneity nor noise which comes from low resistivity.

  12. Evaluation of a CdTe semiconductor based compact gamma camera for sentinel lymph node imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Russo, Paolo; Curion, Assunta S.; Mettivier, Giovanni; Esposito, Michela; Aurilio, Michela; Caraco, Corradina; Aloj, Luigi; Lastoria, Secondo

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: The authors assembled a prototype compact gamma-ray imaging probe (MediPROBE) for sentinel lymph node (SLN) localization. This probe is based on a semiconductor pixel detector. Its basic performance was assessed in the laboratory and clinically in comparison with a conventional gamma camera. Methods: The room-temperature CdTe pixel detector (1 mm thick) has 256x256 square pixels arranged with a 55 {mu}m pitch (sensitive area 14.08x14.08 mm{sup 2}), coupled pixel-by-pixel via bump-bonding to the Medipix2 photon-counting readout CMOS integrated circuit. The imaging probe is equipped with a set of three interchangeable knife-edge pinhole collimators (0.94, 1.2, or 2.1 mm effective diameter at 140 keV) and its focal distance can be regulated in order to set a given field of view (FOV). A typical FOV of 70 mm at 50 mm skin-to-collimator distance corresponds to a minification factor 1:5. The detector is operated at a single low-energy threshold of about 20 keV. Results: For {sup 99m}Tc, at 50 mm distance, a background-subtracted sensitivity of 6.5x10{sup -3} cps/kBq and a system spatial resolution of 5.5 mm FWHM were obtained for the 0.94 mm pinhole; corresponding values for the 2.1 mm pinhole were 3.3x10{sup -2} cps/kBq and 12.6 mm. The dark count rate was 0.71 cps. Clinical images in three patients with melanoma indicate detection of the SLNs with acquisition times between 60 and 410 s with an injected activity of 26 MBq {sup 99m}Tc and prior localization with standard gamma camera lymphoscintigraphy. Conclusions: The laboratory performance of this imaging probe is limited by the pinhole collimator performance and the necessity of working in minification due to the limited detector size. However, in clinical operative conditions, the CdTe imaging probe was effective in detecting SLNs with adequate resolution and an acceptable sensitivity. Sensitivity is expected to improve with the future availability of a larger CdTe detector permitting operation at shorter

  13. Microhardness of light- and dual-polymerizable luting resins polymerized through 7.5-mm-thick endocrowns.

    PubMed

    Gregor, Ladislav; Bouillaguet, Serge; Onisor, Ioana; Ardu, Stefano; Krejci, Ivo; Rocca, Giovanni Tommaso

    2014-10-01

    The complete polymerization of luting resins through thick indirect restorations is still questioned. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the degree of polymerization of light- and dual-polymerizable luting resins under thick indirect composite resin and ceramic endocrowns by means of Vickers microhardness measurements. The Vickers microhardness measurements of a light-polymerizable microhybrid composite resin and a dual-polymerizable luting cement directly polymerized in a natural tooth mold for 40 seconds with a high-power light-emitting diode lamp (control) were compared with measurements after indirect irradiation through 7.5-mm-thick composite resin and ceramic endocrowns for 3 × 90 seconds. A test-to-control microhardness values ratio of 0.80 at a depth of 0.5 mm below the surface was assumed as the criterion for adequate conversion. For the Vickers microhardness measurements of a dual-polymerizable luting cement, no differences (P>.05) were found between Vickers microhardness control values and values reported after polymerization through composite resin and ceramic endocrowns. For The Vickers microhardness measurements (±SD) of a light-polymerizable microhybrid composite resin, control values were significantly (P<.05) higher (111 ±3.3) than those reported after polymerization through composite resin (100.5 ±3.8) and ceramic (99.7 ±2.3) endocrowns. However, the hardness values of The Vickers microhardness measurements of a light-polymerizable microhybrid composite resin polymerized through the endocrowns were approximately 10% to 12% lower than those of the control values. Two-way ANOVA showed the influence of the luting material on the Vickers microhardness values (P<.05). The effect of endocrown material was not significant (P>.05). Under the conditions of this in vitro study, Vickers microhardness values of the dual-polymerizable resin cement and the light-polymerizable restorative composite resin irradiated for 3 × 90 seconds with a high

  14. Imaging performance of phase-contrast breast computed tomography with synchrotron radiation and a CdTe photon-counting detector.

    PubMed

    Sarno, A; Mettivier, G; Golosio, B; Oliva, P; Spandre, G; Di Lillo, F; Fedon, C; Longo, R; Russo, P

    2016-05-01

    Within the SYRMA-CT collaboration based at the ELETTRA synchrotron radiation (SR) facility the authors investigated the imaging performance of the phase-contrast computed tomography (CT) system dedicated to monochromatic in vivo 3D imaging of the female breast, for breast cancer diagnosis. Test objects were imaged at 38keV using monochromatic SR and a high-resolution CdTe photon-counting detector. Signal and noise performance were evaluated using modulation transfer function (MTF) and noise power spectrum. The analysis was performed on the images obtained with the application of a phase retrieval algorithm as well as on those obtained without phase retrieval. The contrast to noise ratio (CNR) and the capability of detecting test microcalcification clusters and soft masses were investigated. For a voxel size of (60μm)(3), images without phase retrieval showed higher spatial resolution (6.7mm(-1) at 10% MTF) than corresponding images with phase retrieval (2.5mm(-1)). Phase retrieval produced a reduction of the noise level and an increase of the CNR by more than one order of magnitude, compared to raw phase-contrast images. Microcalcifications with a diameter down to 130μm could be detected in both types of images. The investigation on test objects indicates that breast CT with a monochromatic SR source is technically feasible in terms of spatial resolution, image noise and contrast, for in vivo 3D imaging with a dose comparable to that of two-view mammography. Images obtained with the phase retrieval algorithm showed the best performance in the trade-off between spatial resolution and image noise. Copyright © 2016 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Effects of heat input on mechanical properties of metal inert gas welded 1.6 mm thick galvanized steel sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafiqul, M. I.; Ishak, M.; Rahman, M. M.

    2012-09-01

    It is usually a lot easier and less expensive to galvanize steel before it is welded into useful products. Galvanizing afterwards is almost impossible. In this research work, Galvanized Steel was welded by using the ER 308L stainless steel filler material. This work was done to find out an alternative way of welding and investigate the effects of heat input on the mechanical properties of butt welded joints of Galvanized Steel. A 13.7 kW maximum capacity MIG welding machine was used to join 1.6 mm thick sheet of galvanized steel with V groove and no gap between mm. Heat inputs was gradually increased from 21.06 to 25.07 joules/mm in this study. The result shows almost macro defects free welding and with increasing heat input the ultimate tensile strength and welding efficiency decrease. The Vickers hardness also decreases at HAZ with increasing heat input and for each individual specimen; hardness was lowest in heat affected zone (HAZ), intermediate in base metal and maximum in welded zone. The fracture for all specimens was in the heat affected zone while testing in the universal testing machine.

  16. The Dosepix detector—an energy-resolving photon-counting pixel detector for spectrometric measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zang, A.; Anton, G.; Ballabriga, R.; Bisello, F.; Campbell, M.; Celi, J. C.; Fauler, A.; Fiederle, M.; Jensch, M.; Kochanski, N.; Llopart, X.; Michel, N.; Mollenhauer, U.; Ritter, I.; Tennert, F.; Wölfel, S.; Wong, W.; Michel, T.

    2015-04-01

    The Dosepix detector is a hybrid photon-counting pixel detector based on ideas of the Medipix and Timepix detector family. 1 mm thick cadmium telluride and 300 μm thick silicon were used as sensor material. The pixel matrix of the Dosepix consists of 16 x 16 square pixels with 12 rows of (200 μm)2 and 4 rows of (55 μm)2 sensitive area for the silicon sensor layer and 16 rows of pixels with 220 μm pixel pitch for CdTe. Besides digital energy integration and photon-counting mode, a novel concept of energy binning is included in the pixel electronics, allowing energy-resolved measurements in 16 energy bins within one acquisition. The possibilities of this detector concept range from applications in personal dosimetry and energy-resolved imaging to quality assurance of medical X-ray sources by analysis of the emitted photon spectrum. In this contribution the Dosepix detector, its response to X-rays as well as spectrum measurements with Si and CdTe sensor layer are presented. Furthermore, a first evaluation was carried out to use the Dosepix detector as a kVp-meter, that means to determine the applied acceleration voltage from measured X-ray tubes spectra.

  17. Development of a (Hg, Cd)Te photodiode detector, Phase 2. [for 10.6 micron spectral region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    High speed sensitive (Hg,Cd)Te photodiode detectors operating in the 77 to 90 K temperature range have been developed for the 10.6 micron spectral region. P-N junctions formed by impurity (gold) diffusion in p-type (Hg, Cd) Te have been investigated. It is shown that the bandwidth and quantum efficiency of a diode are a constant for a fixed ratio of mobility/lifetime ratio of minority carriers. The minority carrier mobility and lifetime uniquely determine the bandwidth and quantum efficiency and indicate the shallow n on p (Hg,Cd) Te diodes are preferable as high performance, high frequency devices.

  18. Using a CdTe detector for 125Te Mössbauer Spectroscopy: Application to the f-factor in Mg3TeO6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bargholtz, Chr; Blomquist, J.; Fumero, E.; Mårtensson, L.; Einarsson, L.; Wäppling, R.

    2000-09-01

    An apparatus for Mössbauer spectroscopy has been developed with a cadmium telluride (CdTe) γ-ray detector. Complete data regarding γ-ray energy, source velocity, temperature and real time are stored for off-line analysis. The apparatus has been used to study the spectrum of 125Te in Mg 3TeO 6 at room temperature. The 35.5 keV transition of 125Te in Mg 3TeO 6 was found to have a recoil-free fraction f=0.392(5) corresponding to a Debye temperature θ=352(3) K.

  19. Effect of laser incidence angle on cut quality of 4 mm thick stainless steel sheet using fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullick, Suvradip; Agrawal, Arpit Kumar; Nath, Ashish Kumar

    2016-07-01

    Fiber laser has potential to outperform the more traditionally used CO2 lasers in sheet metal cutting applications due to its higher efficiency, better beam quality, reliability and ease of beam delivery through optical fiber. It has been however, reported that the higher focusability and shorter wavelength are advantageous for cutting thin metal sheets up to about 2 mm only. Better focasability results in narrower kerf-width, which leads to an earlier flow separation in the flow of assist gas within the kerf, resulting in uncontrolled material removal and poor cut quality. However, the advarse effect of tight focusability can be taken care by shifting the focal point position towards the bottom surface of work-piece, which results in a wider kerf size. This results in a more stable flow within the kerf for a longer depth, which improves the cut quality. It has also been reported that fiber laser has an unfavourable angle of incidence during cutting of thick sections, resulting in poor absorption at the metal surface. Therefore, the effect of laser incidence angle, along with other process parameters, viz. cutting speed and assist gas pressure on the cut quality of 4 mm thick steel sheet has been investigated. The change in laser incidence angle has been incorporated by inclining the beam towards and away from the cut front, and the quality factors are taken as the ratio of kerf width and the striation depth. Besides the absorption of laser radiation, beam inclination is also expected to influence the gas flow characteristics inside the kerf, shear force phenomena on the molten pool, laser beam coupling and laser power distribution at the inclined cut surface. Design of experiment has been used by implementing response surface methodology (RSM) to study the parametric dependence of cut quality, as well as to find out the optimum cut quality. An improvement in quality has been observed for both the inclination due to the combined effect of multiple phenomena.

  20. a New Method for the Growth of CdTe Crystals for RT X-Ray Photon Detectors in the 1-100 keV Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovergine, N.; Mancini, A. M.; Cola, A.; Prete, P.; Mazzer, M.; Quaranta, F.; Tapfer, L.

    2000-12-01

    We report on the growth of thick CdTe layers on ZnTe/(100)GaAs hybrid substrates by the novel H2 transport vapour phase epitaxy (H2T-VPE) method. High crystalline quality (100)-oriented CdTe single crystal epilayers can be fabricated under atmospheric pressure and at growth temperatures (TD) in the 600-800°C interval. Double crystal X-ray diffraction measurements performed on epilayers thicker than 30 μm show CdTe (400) peaks with FWHM<59 arcsec. CdTe samples grown under optimised conditions have mirror-like surfaces. Epilayers grown below 650°C are p-type and low resistive, but they turn n-type above 650°C, likely as a result of donor diffusion from the substrate. RT resistivities (ρ) ~ 106 Ω·cm are obtained for 675°C < TD < 700°C, but ρ decreases for higher temperatures and thinner samples. Layers grown under these conditions show RT electron concentrations in the 1014-1011 cm-3 range. The detection capability of H2T-VPE grown CdTe is demonstrated by the results of time-of-flight measurements performed at RT on Au/n-CdTe/n+-GaAs diode structures under reverse bias conditions.

  1. Stable operation with gain of a double phase Liquid Argon LEM-TPC with a 1 mm thick segmented LEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resnati, F.; Badertscher, A.; Curioni, A.; Horikawa, S.; Knecht, L.; Lussi, D.; Marchionni, A.; Natterer, G.; Rubbia, A.; Viant, T.

    2011-07-01

    In this paper we present results from a test of a small Liquid Argon Large Electron Multiplier Time Projection Chamber (LAr LEM-TPC). This detector concept provides a 3D-tracking and calorimetric device capable of charge amplification, suited for next-generation neutrino detectors and possibly direct Dark Matter searches. During a test of a 3 lt chamber equipped with a 10×10 cm2 readout, cosmic muon data was recorded during three weeks of data taking. A maximum gain of 6.5 was achieved and the liquid argon was kept pure enough to ensure 20 cm drift (O(ppb) O2 equivalent).

  2. Development of a stacked detector system for the x-ray range and its possible applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maier, Daniel; Limousin, Olivier; Meuris, Aline; Pürckhauer, Sabina; Santangelo, Andrea; Schanz, Thomas; Tenzer, Christoph

    2014-07-01

    We have constructed a stacked detector system operating in the X-ray range from 0.5 keV to 250 keV that consists of a Si-based 64×64 DePFET-Matrix in front of a CdTe hybrid detector called Caliste-64. The setup is operated under laboratory conditions that approximate the expected environment of a space-borne observatory. The DePFET detector is an active pixel matrix that provides high count-rate capabilities with a near Fanolimited spectral resolution at energies up to 15 keV. The Caliste-64 hard X-ray camera consists of a 1mm thick CdTe crystal combined with very compact integrated readout electronics, constituting a high performance spectro-imager with event-triggered time-tagging capability in the energy range between 2 keV and 200 keV. In this combined geometry the DePFET detector works as the Low Energy Detector (LED) while the Caliste-64 - as the High Energy Detector (HED) - detects predominantly the high energetic photons that have passed the LED. In addition to the individual optimization of both detectors, we use the setup to test and optimize the performance of the combined detector system. Side-effects like X-ray fluorescence photons, electrical crosstalk, and mutual heating have negative impacts on the data quality and will be investigated. Besides the primary application as a combined imaging detector system with high sensitivity across a broad energy range, additional applications become feasible. Via the analysis of coincident events in both detectors we can estimate the capabilities of the setup to be used as a Compton camera and as an X-ray polarimeter - both desirable functionalities for use in the lab as well as for future X-ray missions.

  3. Si/CdTe Compton Telescope combined with Active Collimator as the Soft Gamma-ray Detector for the 'NeXT' mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazuhiro, N.; Tadayuki, T.; Shin, W.; Tune, K.; Greg, M.; Hiroyasu, T.; Yasushi, F.; Masaharu, N.; Motohide, K.; Kazuo, M.; Makoto, T.; Yukikatsu, T.; Jun, K.; NeXT SGD Collaboration

    2004-08-01

    The Soft Gamma-ray Detector (SGD) is a new generation compton telescope aiming at an order of magnitude improvement of sensitivity at the energy band of 80-1000 keV. The SGD is proposed to be launched at 2010-11, onboard the Japanese new astronomy satellite ``NeXT." Novel idea of the SGD is to use a Si/CdTe semiconductor multi-layer compton telescope within the low background environment achieved by the deep active shield with a narrow opening angle. Because compton telescope hosts an imaging capability, any residual backgrounds, such as the activation of the main detector itself, can by rejected by requiring the compton scattering angle to be consistent with the opening angle of the shield, which is about 4 degree with current design. The key technologies of the SGD are the deep active shield which is a direct heritage of the Hard X-ray Detector onboard Astro-E2 mission, and the newly developed Si/CdTe compton telescope. Current design of the Si/CdTe compton telescope consists of 24 layers of 0.5 mm thick double-sided-silicon-strip-detector (DSSD) as a scatterer, surrounded by thin and thick CdTe pixel detectors with a total thickness of 5 mm as an absorber. The design is optimized for detecting gamma-rays at about 100-700 keV when operated at compton mode. We present the results from the first prototype of Si/CdTe compton telescope, made of a 300 um thick DSSD and 0.5 mm thick CdTe pixel detectors. We also present the estimated performance of the SGD with current design, and possible improvements in the future.

  4. Half-joule output optical-parametric oscillation by using 10-mm-thick periodically poled Mg-doped congruent LiNbO3.

    PubMed

    Ishizuki, Hideki; Taira, Takunori

    2012-08-27

    We present a next generation of large-aperture periodically poled Mg-doped LiNbO3 (PPMgLN) device with 10-mm thickness. Efficient optical parametric oscillation with 540 mJ output energy at 709 mJ pumping by 1.064 µm laser in 10 nanoseconds operation could be demonstrated using the 10-mm-thick PPMgLN with an inversion period of 32.2 µm at total conversion efficiency > 76%. We also confirmed that degradation effect of conversion-efficiency distribution by wedged-inversion structures, which is inevitable in current poling condition of the large-aperture PPMgLN, can be ignored in high-intensity operation.

  5. Tungsten Inert Gas and Friction Stir Welding Characteristics of 4-mm-Thick 2219-T87 Plates at Room Temperature and -196 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Xuefeng; Deng, Ying; Yin, Zhimin; Xu, Guofu

    2014-06-01

    2219-T87 aluminum alloy is widely used for fabricating liquid rocket propellant storage tank, due to its admirable cryogenic property. Welding is the dominant joining method in the manufacturing process of aerospace components. In this study, the tungsten inert gas welding and friction stir welding (FSW) characteristics of 4-mm-thick 2219-T87 alloy plate at room temperature (25 °C) and deep cryogenic temperature (-196 °C) were investigated by property measurements and microscopy methods. The studied 2219 base alloy exhibits a low strength plane anisotropy and excellent room temperature and cryogenic mechanical properties. The ultimate tensile strength values of TIG and FSW welding joints can reach 265 and 353 MPa at room temperature, and 342 and 438 MPa at -196 °C, respectively. The base metal consists of elongated deformed grains and many nano-scaled θ (Al2Cu) aging precipitates. Fusion zone and heat-affected zone (HAZ) of the TIG joint are characterized by coarsening dendritic grains and equiaxed recrystallized grains, respectively. The FSW-welded joint consists of the weld nugget zone, thermo-mechanically affected zone (TMAZ), and HAZ. In the weld nugget zone, a micro-scaled sub-grain structure is the main microstructure characteristic. The TMAZ and HAZ are both characterized by coarsened aging precipitates and elongated deformed grains. The excellent FSW welding properties are attributed to the preservation of the working structures and homogenous chemical compositions.

  6. Assessment of delta ferrite in multipass TIG welds of 40 mm thick SS 316L: A comparative study of ferrite number (FN) prediction and measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buddu, Ramesh Kumar; Raole, P. M.; Sarkar, B.

    2017-04-01

    Austenitic stainless steels are widely used in the fabrication of fusion reactor major systems like vacuum vessel, divertor, cryostat and other structural components development. Multipass welding is used for the development of thick plates for the structural components fabrication. Due to the repeated weld thermal cycles, the microstructure adversely alters owing to the presence of complex phases like austenite, ferrite and delta ferrite and subsequently influences the mechanical properties like tensile and impact toughness of joints. The present paper reports the detail analysis of delta ferrite phase in welded region of 40 mm thick SS316L plates welded by special design multipass narrow groove TIG welding process under three different heat input conditions. The correlation of delta ferrite microstructure of different type structures acicular and vermicular is observed. The chemical composition of weld samples was used to predict the Ferrite Number (FN), which is representative form of delta ferrite in welds, with Schaeffler’s, WRC-1992 diagram and DeLong techniques by calculating the Creq and Nieq ratios and compared with experimental data of FN from Feritescope measurements. The low heat input conditions (1.67 kJ/mm) have produced higher FN (7.28), medium heat input (1.72 kJ/mm) shown FN (7.04) where as high heat input (1.87 kJ/mm) conditions has shown FN (6.68) decreasing trend and FN data is compared with the prediction methods.

  7. Applications of CdTe to nuclear medicine. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Entine, G.

    1985-05-07

    Uses of cadmium telluride (CdTe) nuclear detectors in medicine are briefly described. They include surgical probes and a system for measuring cerebral blood flow in the intensive care unit. Other uses include nuclear dentistry, x-ray exposure control, cardiology, diabetes, and the testing of new pharmaceuticals. (ACR)

  8. Hybrid pixel-waveform CdTe/CZT detector for use in an ultrahigh resolution MRI compatible SPECT system.

    PubMed

    Cai, Liang; Meng, Ling-Jian

    2013-02-01

    In this paper, we will present a new small pixel CdTe/CZT detector for sub-500 μm resolution SPECT imaging application inside MR scanner based on a recently developed hybrid pixel-waveform (HPWF) readout circuitry. The HPWF readout system consists of a 2-D multi-pixel circuitry attached to the anode pixels to provide the X-Y positions of interactions, and a high-speed digitizer to read out the pulse-waveform induced on the cathode. The digitized cathode waveform could provide energy deposition information, precise timing and depth-of-interaction information for gamma ray interactions. Several attractive features with this HPWF detector system will be discussed in this paper. To demonstrate the performance, we constructed several prototype HPWF detectors with pixelated CZT and CdTe detectors of 2-5 mm thicknesses, connected to a prototype readout system consisting of energy-resolved photon-counting ASIC for readout anode pixels and an Agilent high-speed digitizer for digitizing the cathode signals. The performances of these detectors based on HPWF are discussed in this paper.

  9. Hybrid pixel-waveform CdTe/CZT detector for use in an ultrahigh resolution MRI compatible SPECT system

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Liang; Meng, Ling-Jian

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we will present a new small pixel CdTe/CZT detector for sub-500 μm resolution SPECT imaging application inside MR scanner based on a recently developed hybrid pixel-waveform (HPWF) readout circuitry. The HPWF readout system consists of a 2-D multi-pixel circuitry attached to the anode pixels to provide the X–Y positions of interactions, and a high-speed digitizer to read out the pulse-waveform induced on the cathode. The digitized cathode waveform could provide energy deposition information, precise timing and depth-of-interaction information for gamma ray interactions. Several attractive features with this HPWF detector system will be discussed in this paper. To demonstrate the performance, we constructed several prototype HPWF detectors with pixelated CZT and CdTe detectors of 2–5 mm thicknesses, connected to a prototype readout system consisting of energy-resolved photon-counting ASIC for readout anode pixels and an Agilent high-speed digitizer for digitizing the cathode signals. The performances of these detectors based on HPWF are discussed in this paper. PMID:24371365

  10. Hybrid pixel-waveform CdTe/CZT detector for use in an ultrahigh resolution MRI compatible SPECT system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Liang; Meng, Ling-Jian

    2013-02-01

    In this paper, we will present a new small pixel CdTe/CZT detector for sub-500 μm resolution SPECT imaging application inside MR scanner based on a recently developed hybrid pixel-waveform (HPWF) readout circuitry. The HPWF readout system consists of a 2-D multi-pixel circuitry attached to the anode pixels to provide the X-Y positions of interactions, and a high-speed digitizer to read out the pulse-waveform induced on the cathode. The digitized cathode waveform could provide energy deposition information, precise timing and depth-of-interaction information for gamma ray interactions. Several attractive features with this HPWF detector system will be discussed in this paper. To demonstrate the performance, we constructed several prototype HPWF detectors with pixelated CZT and CdTe detectors of 2-5 mm thicknesses, connected to a prototype readout system consisting of energy-resolved photon-counting ASIC for readout anode pixels and an Agilent high-speed digitizer for digitizing the cathode signals. The performances of these detectors based on HPWF are discussed in this paper.

  11. CdTe Timepix detectors for single-photon spectroscopy and linear polarimetry of high-flux hard x-ray radiation.

    PubMed

    Hahn, C; Weber, G; Märtin, R; Höfer, S; Kämpfer, T; Stöhlker, Th

    2016-04-01

    Single-photon spectroscopy of pulsed, high-intensity sources of hard X-rays - such as laser-generated plasmas - is often hampered by the pileup of several photons absorbed by the unsegmented, large-volume sensors routinely used for the detection of high-energy radiation. Detectors based on the Timepix chip, with a segmentation pitch of 55 μm and the possibility to be equipped with high-Z sensor chips, constitute an attractive alternative to commonly used passive solutions such as image plates. In this report, we present energy calibration and characterization measurements of such devices. The achievable energy resolution is comparable to that of scintillators for γ spectroscopy. Moreover, we also introduce a simple two-detector Compton polarimeter setup with a polarimeter quality of (98 ± 1)%. Finally, a proof-of-principle polarimetry experiment is discussed, where we studied the linear polarization of bremsstrahlung emitted by a laser-driven plasma and found an indication of the X-ray polarization direction depending on the polarization state of the incident laser pulse.

  12. CdTe Timepix detectors for single-photon spectroscopy and linear polarimetry of high-flux hard x-ray radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, C. Höfer, S.; Kämpfer, T.; Weber, G.; Märtin, R.; Stöhlker, Th.

    2016-04-15

    Single-photon spectroscopy of pulsed, high-intensity sources of hard X-rays — such as laser-generated plasmas — is often hampered by the pileup of several photons absorbed by the unsegmented, large-volume sensors routinely used for the detection of high-energy radiation. Detectors based on the Timepix chip, with a segmentation pitch of 55 μm and the possibility to be equipped with high-Z sensor chips, constitute an attractive alternative to commonly used passive solutions such as image plates. In this report, we present energy calibration and characterization measurements of such devices. The achievable energy resolution is comparable to that of scintillators for γ spectroscopy. Moreover, we also introduce a simple two-detector Compton polarimeter setup with a polarimeter quality of (98 ± 1)%. Finally, a proof-of-principle polarimetry experiment is discussed, where we studied the linear polarization of bremsstrahlung emitted by a laser-driven plasma and found an indication of the X-ray polarization direction depending on the polarization state of the incident laser pulse.

  13. Simulation of charge transport in pixelated CdTe

    PubMed Central

    Kolstein, M.; Ariño, G.; Chmeissani, M.; De Lorenzo, G.

    2014-01-01

    The Voxel Imaging PET (VIP) Pathfinder project intends to show the advantages of using pixelated semiconductor technology for nuclear medicine applications to achieve an improved image reconstruction without efficiency loss. It proposes designs for Positron Emission Tomography (PET), Positron Emission Mammography (PEM) and Compton gamma camera detectors with a large number of signal channels (of the order of 106). The design is based on the use of a pixelated CdTe Schottky detector to have optimal energy and spatial resolution. An individual read-out channel is dedicated for each detector voxel of size 1 × 1 × 2 mm3 using an application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) which the VIP project has designed, developed and is currently evaluating experimentally. The behaviour of the signal charge carriers in CdTe should be well understood because it has an impact on the performance of the readout channels. For this purpose the Finite Element Method (FEM) Multiphysics COMSOL software package has been used to simulate the behaviour of signal charge carriers in CdTe and extract values for the expected charge sharing depending on the impact point and bias voltage. The results on charge sharing obtained with COMSOL are combined with GAMOS, a Geant based particle tracking Monte Carlo software package, to get a full evaluation of the amount of charge sharing in pixelated CdTe for different gamma impact points. PMID:25729404

  14. Simulation of charge transport in pixelated CdTe.

    PubMed

    Kolstein, M; Ariño, G; Chmeissani, M; De Lorenzo, G

    2014-12-01

    The Voxel Imaging PET (VIP) Pathfinder project intends to show the advantages of using pixelated semiconductor technology for nuclear medicine applications to achieve an improved image reconstruction without efficiency loss. It proposes designs for Positron Emission Tomography (PET), Positron Emission Mammography (PEM) and Compton gamma camera detectors with a large number of signal channels (of the order of 10(6)). The design is based on the use of a pixelated CdTe Schottky detector to have optimal energy and spatial resolution. An individual read-out channel is dedicated for each detector voxel of size 1 × 1 × 2 mm(3) using an application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) which the VIP project has designed, developed and is currently evaluating experimentally. The behaviour of the signal charge carriers in CdTe should be well understood because it has an impact on the performance of the readout channels. For this purpose the Finite Element Method (FEM) Multiphysics COMSOL software package has been used to simulate the behaviour of signal charge carriers in CdTe and extract values for the expected charge sharing depending on the impact point and bias voltage. The results on charge sharing obtained with COMSOL are combined with GAMOS, a Geant based particle tracking Monte Carlo software package, to get a full evaluation of the amount of charge sharing in pixelated CdTe for different gamma impact points.

  15. Simulation of charge transport in pixelated CdTe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolstein, M.; Ariño, G.; Chmeissani, M.; De Lorenzo, G.

    2014-12-01

    The Voxel Imaging PET (VIP) Pathfinder project intends to show the advantages of using pixelated semiconductor technology for nuclear medicine applications to achieve an improved image reconstruction without efficiency loss. It proposes designs for Positron Emission Tomography (PET), Positron Emission Mammography (PEM) and Compton gamma camera detectors with a large number of signal channels (of the order of 106). The design is based on the use of a pixelated CdTe Schottky detector to have optimal energy and spatial resolution. An individual read-out channel is dedicated for each detector voxel of size 1 × 1 × 2 mm3 using an application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) which the VIP project has designed, developed and is currently evaluating experimentally. The behaviour of the signal charge carriers in CdTe should be well understood because it has an impact on the performance of the readout channels. For this purpose the Finite Element Method (FEM) Multiphysics COMSOL software package has been used to simulate the behaviour of signal charge carriers in CdTe and extract values for the expected charge sharing depending on the impact point and bias voltage. The results on charge sharing obtained with COMSOL are combined with GAMOS, a Geant based particle tracking Monte Carlo software package, to get a full evaluation of the amount of charge sharing in pixelated CdTe for different gamma impact points.

  16. Development of Small-Pixel CZT Detectors for Future High-Resolution Hard X-ray Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beilicke, Matthias

    Owing to recent breakthroughs in grazing incidence mirror technology, next-generation hard X-ray telescopes will achieve angular resolutions of between 5 and 10 arc seconds - about an order of magnitude better than that of the NuSTAR hard X-ray telescope. As a consequence, the next generation of hard X-ray telescopes will require pixelated hard X- ray detectors with pixels on a grid with a lattice constant of between 120 and 240 um. Additional detector requirements include a low energy threshold of less than 5 keV and an energy resolution of less than 1 keV. The science drivers for a high angular-resolution hard X-ray mission include studies and measurements of black hole spins, the cosmic evolution of super-massive black holes, AGN feedback, and the behavior of matter at very high densities. We propose a R&D research program to develop, optimize and study the performance of 100-200 um pixel pitch CdTe and Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) detectors of 1-2 mm thickness. Our program aims at a comparison of the performance achieved with CdTe and CZT detectors, and the optimization of the pixel, steering grid, and guard ring anode patterns. Although these studies will use existing ASICs (Application Specific Integrated Circuits), our program also includes modest funds for the development of an ultra-low noise ASIC with a 2-D grid of readout pads that can be directly bonded to the 100-200 um pixel pitch CdTe and CZT detectors. The team includes the Washington University group (Prof. M. Beilicke and Co-I Prof. H.S.W. Krawczynski et al.), and co-investigator G. De Geronimo at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The Washington University group has a 10 year track record of innovative CZT detector R&D sponsored by the NASA Astronomy and Physics Research and Analysis (APRA) program. The accomplishments to date include the development of CZT detectors with pixel pitches between 350 um and 2.5 mm for the ProtoExist, EXIST, and X-Calibur hard X-ray missions with some of the best

  17. Detectors

    DOEpatents

    Orr, Christopher Henry; Luff, Craig Janson; Dockray, Thomas; Macarthur, Duncan Whittemore; Bounds, John Alan; Allander, Krag

    2002-01-01

    The apparatus and method provide techniques through which both alpha and beta emission determinations can be made simultaneously using a simple detector structure. The technique uses a beta detector covered in an electrically conducting material, the electrically conducting material discharging ions generated by alpha emissions, and as a consequence providing a measure of those alpha emissions. The technique also offers improved mountings for alpha detectors and other forms of detectors against vibration and the consequential effects vibration has on measurement accuracy.

  18. HEXITEC: A next generation hard X-ray Detector for Solar Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panessa, M.; Christe, S.; Shih, A.; Gaskin, J.; Wilson, M. D.; Seller, P.; Baumgartner, W.; Inglis, A. R.

    2015-12-01

    High angular resolution HXR optics require detectors with a large number of fine pixels in order to adequately sample the telescope point spread function (PSF) over the entire field of view. Recent developments at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL) have resulted in a new hard X-ray (HXR) detector system with the smallest independent pixels currently available, 250 microns. This matches perfectly with the best angular resolution currently achievable by HXR focusing optics which is about 5 arcsec (FWHM). For a SMEX mission with a 15 meter focal length each pixel would cover an angular size of about 3 arcsec thereby subsampling the PSF. Dubbed HEXITEC, for High Energy X-Ray Imaging Technology, this Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC), can be bonded to 1- or 2- mm-thick Cadmium Telluride (CdTe) or Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride (CZT) which provide high efficiency in the HXR region, good energy resolution, low background, low power, and low sensitivity to radiation damage. For solar observations, the ability to handle high counting rates is also extremely desirable. This ASIC can read each pixel 10,000 times per second. The NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) has been working with RAL over the past few years to develop these detectors to be used with HXR focusing telescopes. We present recent progress on this development effort and its capabilities as applied to solar observations.

  19. SU-E-T-231: Measurements of Gold Nanoparticle-Mediated Proton Dose Enhancement Due to Particle-Induced X-Ray Emission and Activation Products Using Radiochromic Films and CdTe Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, J; Cho, S; Manohar, N; Krishnan, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: There have been several reports of enhanced cell-killing and tumor regression when tumor cells and mouse tumors were loaded with gold nanoparticles (GNPs) prior to proton irradiation. While particle-induced xray emission (PIXE), Auger electrons, secondary electrons, free radicals, and biological effects have been suggested as potential mechanisms responsible for the observed GNP-mediated dose enhancement/radiosensitization, there is a lack of quantitative analysis regarding the contribution from each mechanism. Here, we report our experimental effort to quantify some of these effects. Methods: 5-cm-long cylindrical plastic vials were filled with 1.8 mL of either water or water mixed with cylindrical GNPs at the same gold concentration (0.3 mg Au/g) as used in previous animal studies. A piece of EBT2 radiochromic film (30-µm active-layer sandwiched between 80/175-µm outer-layers) was inserted along the long axis of each vial and used to measure dose enhancement due to PIXE from GNPs. Vials were placed at center-of-modulation (COM) and 3-cm up-/down-stream from COM and irradiated with 5 different doses (2–10 Gy) using 10-cm-SOBP 160-MeV protons. After irradiation, films were cleaned and read to determine the delivered dose. A vial containing spherical GNPs (20 mg Au/g) was also irradiated, and gamma-rays from activation products were measured using a cadmium-telluride (CdTe) detector. Results: Film measurements showed no significant dose enhancement beyond the experimental uncertainty (∼2%). There was a detectable activation product from GNPs, but it appeared to contribute to dose enhancement minimally (<0.01%). Conclusion: Considering the composition of EBT2 film, it can be inferred that gold characteristic x-rays from PIXE and their secondary electrons make insignificant contribution to dose enhancement. The current investigation also suggests negligible dose enhancement due to activation products. Thus, previously-reported GNP-mediated proton dose

  20. Per-pixel energy calibration of photon counting detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atharifard, A.; Healy, J. L.; Goulter, B. P.; Ramyar, M.; Vanden Broeke, L.; Walsh, M. F.; Onyema, C. C.; Panta, R. K.; Aamir, R.; Smithies, D. J.; Doesburg, R.; Anjomrouz, M.; Shamshad, M.; Bheesette, S.; Rajendran, K.; de Ruiter, N. J. A.; Knight, D.; Chernoglazov, A.; Mandalika, H.; Bell, S. T.; Bateman, C. J.; Butler, A. P. H.; Butler, P. H.

    2017-03-01

    Energy resolving performance of spectral CT systems is influenced by the accuracy of the detector's energy calibration. Global energy calibration maps a given threshold to the average energy response of all pixels of the detector. Variations arising from CMOS manufacturing processes and properties of the sensor cause different pixels to respond differently to photons of the same energy. Threshold dispersion adversely affects spectral imaging by degrading energy resolution, which contributes to blurring of the energy information. In this paper, we present a technique for per-pixel energy calibration of photon-counting x-ray detectors (PCXDs) that quantifies the energy response of individual pixels relative to the average response. This technique takes advantage of the measurements made by an equalized chip. It uses a known global energy map to quantify the effect of threshold dispersion on the energy response of the detector pixels across an energy range of interest. The proposed technique was assessed using a MARS scanner with an equalized Medipix3RX chip flip-bonded to 2 mm thick CdTe semiconductor crystal at a pitch of 110 μ m. Measurements were made of characteristic x-rays of a molybdenum foil. Results were compared between the case that the global calibration was used on its own and the case of using it in conjunction with our per-pixel calibration technique. The proposed technique quantified up to 1.87 keV error in energy response of 100 pixels of a selected region of interest (ROI). It made an improvement of 28.3% in average FWHM. The additional information provided by this per-pixel calibration technique can be used to improve spectral reconstruction.

  1. Photon Counting Energy Dispersive Detector Arrays for X-ray Imaging.

    PubMed

    Iwanczyk, Jan S; Nygård, Einar; Meirav, Oded; Arenson, Jerry; Barber, William C; Hartsough, Neal E; Malakhov, Nail; Wessel, Jan C

    2009-01-01

    The development of an innovative detector technology for photon-counting in X-ray imaging is reported. This new generation of detectors, based on pixellated cadmium telluride (CdTe) and cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detector arrays electrically connected to application specific integrated circuits (ASICs) for readout, will produce fast and highly efficient photon-counting and energy-dispersive X-ray imaging. There are a number of applications that can greatly benefit from these novel imagers including mammography, planar radiography, and computed tomography (CT). Systems based on this new detector technology can provide compositional analysis of tissue through spectroscopic X-ray imaging, significantly improve overall image quality, and may significantly reduce X-ray dose to the patient. A very high X-ray flux is utilized in many of these applications. For example, CT scanners can produce ~100 Mphotons/mm(2)/s in the unattenuated beam. High flux is required in order to collect sufficient photon statistics in the measurement of the transmitted flux (attenuated beam) during the very short time frame of a CT scan. This high count rate combined with a need for high detection efficiency requires the development of detector structures that can provide a response signal much faster than the transit time of carriers over the whole detector thickness. We have developed CdTe and CZT detector array structures which are 3 mm thick with 16×16 pixels and a 1 mm pixel pitch. These structures, in the two different implementations presented here, utilize either a small pixel effect or a drift phenomenon. An energy resolution of 4.75% at 122 keV has been obtained with a 30 ns peaking time using discrete electronics and a (57)Co source. An output rate of 6×10(6) counts per second per individual pixel has been obtained with our ASIC readout electronics and a clinical CT X-ray tube. Additionally, the first clinical CT images, taken with several of our prototype photon-counting and

  2. Photon Counting Energy Dispersive Detector Arrays for X-ray Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Iwanczyk, Jan S.; Nygård, Einar; Meirav, Oded; Arenson, Jerry; Barber, William C.; Hartsough, Neal E.; Malakhov, Nail; Wessel, Jan C.

    2009-01-01

    The development of an innovative detector technology for photon-counting in X-ray imaging is reported. This new generation of detectors, based on pixellated cadmium telluride (CdTe) and cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detector arrays electrically connected to application specific integrated circuits (ASICs) for readout, will produce fast and highly efficient photon-counting and energy-dispersive X-ray imaging. There are a number of applications that can greatly benefit from these novel imagers including mammography, planar radiography, and computed tomography (CT). Systems based on this new detector technology can provide compositional analysis of tissue through spectroscopic X-ray imaging, significantly improve overall image quality, and may significantly reduce X-ray dose to the patient. A very high X-ray flux is utilized in many of these applications. For example, CT scanners can produce ~100 Mphotons/mm2/s in the unattenuated beam. High flux is required in order to collect sufficient photon statistics in the measurement of the transmitted flux (attenuated beam) during the very short time frame of a CT scan. This high count rate combined with a need for high detection efficiency requires the development of detector structures that can provide a response signal much faster than the transit time of carriers over the whole detector thickness. We have developed CdTe and CZT detector array structures which are 3 mm thick with 16×16 pixels and a 1 mm pixel pitch. These structures, in the two different implementations presented here, utilize either a small pixel effect or a drift phenomenon. An energy resolution of 4.75% at 122 keV has been obtained with a 30 ns peaking time using discrete electronics and a 57Co source. An output rate of 6×106 counts per second per individual pixel has been obtained with our ASIC readout electronics and a clinical CT X-ray tube. Additionally, the first clinical CT images, taken with several of our prototype photon-counting and energy

  3. Material utilisation when depositing CdTe layers by inline AP-MOCVD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrioz, V.; Kartopu, G.; Irvine, S. J. C.; Monir, S.; Yang, X.

    2012-09-01

    A study was undertaken to assess the efficiency of precursors' usage during deposition of cadmium telluride (CdTe) layers via atmospheric pressure metal organic chemical vapour deposition (AP-MOCVD) for thin film photovoltaic solar cells. Precursors were released from a showerhead assembly normal to the glass substrate 0.7 mm thick (5×7.5 cm2) being deposited which was kept stationary or moved under the showerhead assembly, with speed of upto 2.25 cm/min. In order to estimate the effective precursor utilisation, the weight deposit (layer) was compared against the theoretical values calculated for ideal molar supply. The layer thickness, composition, morphology, and crystallinity were also measured using profilometry, energy dispersive X-ray (EDX), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and X-ray diffraction (XRD), respectively. It is shown that over 40% material utilisation can be achieved depending on the deposition parameters of substrate temperature and speed, partial pressure of precursors and total gas flow. The activation energy derived from an Arrhenius plot of deposition rate equals 49 kJ mol-1 and is consistent with previous reports of MOCVD CdTe using a horizontal reactor. This confirms that, despite the very different reactor geometry, the alkyl radical homolysis and reaction mechanism applies in the case of the inline injector geometry in the work presented here. These results demonstrate an alternative path to high throughput processing of CdTe thin film solar cells by inline AP-MOCVD.

  4. CDTE CERAMICS BASED ON COMPRESSION OF NANOCRYSTAL POWDER.

    SciTech Connect

    KOLESNIKOV, N.N.; BORISENKO, E.B.; BORISENKO, D.N.; JAMES, R.B.; KVEDER, V.V.; GARTMAN, V.K.; GNESIN, G.A.

    2005-07-01

    Wide-gap II-VI semiconductor crystalline materials are conventionally used in laser optics, light emitting devices, and nuclear detectors. The advances made in the studies of nanocrystals and in the associated technologies have created great interest in the design of semiconductor devices based on these new materials. The objectives of this work are to study the microstructure and the properties of the new material produced through CdTe nanopowder compression and to consider the prospects of its use in the design of ionizing-radiation detectors and in laser optics. Highly dense material produced of 7-10 nm CdTe particles under pressure of 20-600 MPa at temperatures from 20 to 200 C was analyzed using x-ray diffractometry, texture analysis; light and scanning electron microscopy, and optical spectrophotometry. The mechanical and electrical properties of the compacted material were measured and compared with similar characteristics of the conventionally grown single crystals. Phase transformation from metastable to stable crystal structure caused by deformation was observed in the material. Sharp crystallographic texture {l_brace}001{r_brace} that apparently affects specific mechanical, electrical and optical characteristics of compacted CdTe was observed. The specific resistivity calculated from the linear current-voltage characteristics was about 10{sup 10} Ohm x cm, which is a promisingly high value regarding the possibility of using this material in the design of semiconductor radiation detectors. The optical spectra show that the transmittance in the infrared region is sufficient to consider the prospects of possible applications of CdTe ceramics in laser optics.

  5. What causes high resistivity in CdTe

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, Koushik; Du, Mao-Hua

    2012-01-01

    Shallow donors are often introduced into semiconductor materials to enhance n-type conductivity. However, they can sometimes also be used to obtain compensation between donors and acceptors, resulting in high resistivity in semiconductors. For example, CdTe can be made semi-insulating by shallow donor doping. This is routinely done to obtain high resistivity in CdTe-based radiation detectors. However, it is widely believed that the shallow donor alone cannot be responsible for the high resistivity in CdTe. This is based on the argument that it is practically impossible to control the shallow donor doping level so precisely that the free carrier density can be brought below the desired value suitable for radiation detection applications. Therefore, a deep native donor is usually assumed to exist in CdTe and pin the Fermi level near midgap. In this paper, we present our calculations on carrier statistics and energetics of shallow donors and native defects in CdTe and illustrate different donor-specific mechanisms for achieving carrier compensation. Our results show that the shallow donor can be used to reliably obtain high resistivity in CdTe without requiring additional deep donors. Since radiation detection applications require both high resistivity and good carrier transport, one should generally use shallow donors and shallow acceptors for carrier compensation and avoid deep centers that are effective carrier traps. This study highlights how the interaction between impurities and native defects intricately affects the Fermi level pinning in the semiconductor band gap and the associated resistivity of the material.

  6. Solid state detectors in nuclear medicine.

    PubMed

    Darambara, D G; Todd-Pokropek, A

    2002-03-01

    Since Nuclear Medicine diagnostic applications are growing fast, room temperature semiconductor detectors such CdTe and CdZnTe either in the form of single detectors or as segmented monolithic detectors have been investigated aiming to replace the NaI scintillator. These detectors have inherently better energy resolution that scintillators coupled to photodiodes or photomultiplier tubes leading to compact imaging systems with higher spatial resolution and enhanced contrast. Advantages and disadvantages of CdTe and CdZnTe detectors in imaging systems are discussed and efforts to develop semiconductor-based planar and tomographic cameras as well as nuclear probes are presented.

  7. Results of a Si/Cdte Compton Telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Oonuki, Kousuke; Tanaka, Takaaki; Watanabe, Shin; Takeda, Shin'ichiro; Nakazawa, Kazuhiro; Mitani, Takefumi; Takahashi, Tadayuki; Tajima, Hiroyasu; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Nomachi, Masaharu; /Sagamihara, Inst. Space Astron. Sci. /Tokyo U. /SLAC /Hiroshima U. /Osaka U.

    2005-09-23

    We have been developing a semiconductor Compton telescope to explore the universe in the energy band from several tens of keV to a few MeV. We use a Si strip and CdTe pixel detector for the Compton telescope to cover an energy range from 60 keV. For energies above several hundred keV, the higher efficiency of CdTe semiconductor in comparison with Si is expected to play an important role as an absorber and a scatterer. In order to demonstrate the spectral and imaging capability of a CdTe-based Compton Telescope, we have developed a Compton telescope consisting of a stack of CdTe pixel detectors as a small scale prototype. With this prototype, we succeeded in reconstructing images and spectra by solving the Compton equation from 122 keV to 662 keV. The energy resolution (FWHM) of reconstructed spectra is 7.3 keV at 511 keV and 3.1 keV at 122 keV, respectively. The angular resolution obtained at 511 keV is measured to be 12.2{sup o}(FWHM).

  8. Improvement in the energy resolving capabilities of photon counting detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, D.; Lim, K. T.; Park, K.; Cho, G.

    2016-12-01

    Patterned pixel array was proposed to increase the number of energy bins in a single pixel of photon counting detectors without adding more comparators and counters. The pixels were grouped into four different types and each pixel has a common threshold and a specific threshold assigned to each pixel type. The common threshold in every pixel records the total number of incident photons regardless of its pixel type and the specific thresholds classify incident photon energies. The patterned pixel array was evaluated with the pinhole gamma camera system based on the XRI-UNO detector flip-chip bonded with a 1mm thick CdTe sensor. The experimental data was acquired with time-over-threshold mode to avoid the charge sharing problem. The shared total charges created by one photon can be found by summing all pixels within the cluster. To correct the different response to the same energy of photon, the energy calibration of the time-over-threshold value was perfomed independently depending on the cluster size. The time-over-threshold values were separated into two energy bins since we assumed that each pixel has two thresholds. Although each pixel has only two thresholds, five images from different energy windows were obtained by sharing the spectal information from four adjacent pixels. Thus, degradation of the spatial resolution in the image occured in each energy window. The image of the entire energy, however, was not degraded since all four different types of pixels have a common threshold just above the noise level. In addition, the number of steps for the threshold scan method can be drastically reduced with the increased number of effective thresholds in a single pixel.

  9. Static and dynamic fracture toughness of 25mm thick single edge notch bend (SENB) specimen of C-Mn pressure vessel submerged arc weld metal and flaw assessment under dynamic loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, W.; Wiesner, C. S.

    2003-09-01

    Although there are well established procedures for assessing the significance of defects in welded structures in a number of countries, such as BS7910 and R6 procedures in the UK, the Japanese WES 2807 procedure, the API and MPC procedures in the USA and the recently completed SINT AP procedure resulting from European collaboration, there are no clear guidelines for assessment of the effects of dynamic loading. In principle, the standard procedure can be applied for any rate of loading but there is little or no experience of how to allow for the effects of dynamic loading on load magnitude and material properties. Submerge arc weldments of 100mm thick have been manufactured. The effect of loading rate was investigated by testing 25mm thick SENB specimens. The fracture toughness of the weld metal exhibited marked loading rate sensitivity; shift in fracture toughness transition temperature for high loading rate tests of up to 115^{circ}C for 25mm specimens. Finite element (FE) analyses have been carried out to obtain plastic collapse load solutions for SENB fracture mechanics test piece. A simple equation for estimate of dynamic plastic yielding load has been suggested. Flaw assessment under dynamic loading has been demonstrated using the results of dynamic fracture toughness and plastic yiending load. The general methods of assessment of the significance of defects in BS7910 is shown to be applicable to assessments under dynamic loading up to impact.

  10. Edge effects in a small pixel CdTe for X-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duarte, D. D.; Bell, S. J.; Lipp, J.; Schneider, A.; Seller, P.; Veale, M. C.; Wilson, M. D.; Baker, M. A.; Sellin, P. J.; Kachkanov, V.; Sawhney, K. J. S.

    2013-10-01

    Large area detectors capable of operating with high detection efficiency at energies above 30 keV are required in many contemporary X-ray imaging applications. The properties of high Z compound semiconductors, such as CdTe, make them ideally suitable to these applications. The STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory has developed a small pixel CdTe detector with 80 × 80 pixels on a 250 μm pitch. Historically, these detectors have included a 200 μm wide guard band around the pixelated anode to reduce the effect of defects in the crystal edge. The latest version of the detector ASIC is capable of four-side butting that allows the tiling of N × N flat panel arrays. To limit the dead space between modules to the width of one pixel, edgeless detector geometries have been developed where the active volume of the detector extends to the physical edge of the crystal. The spectroscopic performance of an edgeless CdTe detector bump bonded to the HEXITEC ASIC was tested with sealed radiation sources and compared with a monochromatic X-ray micro-beam mapping measurements made at the Diamond Light Source, U.K. The average energy resolution at 59.54 keV of bulk and edge pixels was 1.23 keV and 1.58 keV, respectively. 87% of the edge pixels present fully spectroscopic performance demonstrating that edgeless CdTe detectors are a promising technology for the production of large panel radiation detectors for X-ray imaging.

  11. Imaging properties of small-pixel spectroscopic x-ray detectors based on cadmium telluride sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenig, Thomas; Schulze, Julia; Zuber, Marcus; Rink, Kristian; Butzer, Jochen; Hamann, Elias; Cecilia, Angelica; Zwerger, Andreas; Fauler, Alex; Fiederle, Michael; Oelfke, Uwe

    2012-11-01

    Spectroscopic x-ray imaging by means of photon counting detectors has received growing interest during the past years. Critical to the image quality of such devices is their pixel pitch and the sensor material employed. This paper describes the imaging properties of Medipix2 MXR multi-chip assemblies bump bonded to 1 mm thick CdTe sensors. Two systems were investigated with pixel pitches of 110 and 165 μm, which are in the order of the mean free path lengths of the characteristic x-rays produced in their sensors. Peak widths were found to be almost constant across the energy range of 10 to 60 keV, with values of 2.3 and 2.2 keV (FWHM) for the two pixel pitches. The average number of pixels responding to a single incoming photon are about 1.85 and 1.45 at 60 keV, amounting to detective quantum efficiencies of 0.77 and 0.84 at a spatial frequency of zero. Energy selective CT acquisitions are presented, and the two pixel pitches' abilities to discriminate between iodine and gadolinium contrast agents are examined. It is shown that the choice of the pixel pitch translates into a minimum contrast agent concentration for which material discrimination is still possible. We finally investigate saturation effects at high x-ray fluxes and conclude with the finding that higher maximum count rates come at the cost of a reduced energy resolution.

  12. High voltage optimization in CdZnTe detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awadalla, S. A.; Al-Grafi, M.; Iniewski, K.

    2014-11-01

    The focus of this paper is to investigate, experimentally and theoretical, the optimum operating bias, in cadmium zinc telluride Cd 0.9Zn0.1Te (CZT) crystals grown using the traveling heater method (THM), required to achieve maximum energy resolution. It was found that 5 mm thick detectors that have low electron trapping, (μτ)e≥1×10-2 cm2/V, operates efficiently at relatively low applied bias, 200 V; while detectors with high electron trapping, (μτ)e≤5×10-3 cm2/V, required relative high voltage: as high as 1000 V for 5 mm thick detectors. Similarly 10 mm thick detectors can be operated at as low as 500 V. Moreover, both charge collection efficiency (CCE) and energy resolution(ER) were found to follow the same trend.

  13. Silicon-Gas Pixel Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bashindzhagyan, G.; Korotkova, N.; Romaniouk, A.; Sinev, N.; Tikhomirov, V.

    2017-01-01

    The proposed Silicon-Gas Pixel Detector (SGPD) combines the advantages of Silicon and Gas-pixel detectors (GPD). 7 micron space resolution and down to 0.2 degree both angles measurements are inside 10 mm thick and very low material detector. Silicon pixels implemented directly into electronic chip structure allow to know exact time when particle crossed the detector and to use SGPD as a completely self-triggered device. Binary readout, advanced data collection and analysis on hardware level allow to obtain all the information in less than 1 microsecond and to use SGPD for the fast trigger generation.

  14. K-edge EXAFS and XANES studies of Cu in CdTe thin-film solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiangxin; Gupta, Akhlesh; Compaan, Alvin D.; Leyarovska, Nadia; Terry, Jeff

    2002-03-01

    Copper has been identified as a very important dopant element in CdTe thin-film solar cells. Cu is a deep acceptor in CdTe and is commonly used to obtain a heavily doped, low resistance back contact to polycrystalline CdTe. Cu also helps to increase the open circuit voltage of the cell. However, Cu is also a fast diffuser in CdTe, especially along grain boundaries, and can accumulate at the CdS/CdTe junction. It is suspected of leading to cell performance degradation in some cases. The present study is designed to help identify the lattice location of the Cu in CdTe. Cu K-edge, x-ray absorption (XAS) measurements were conducted on Cu in thin films of CdTe. Experiments were performed at the MR-CAT beamline at the Advanced Photon Source. The 3 mm CdTe layers were magnetron sputtered onto fused silica substrates. Some films were diffused with Cu from a 200 Å layer of evaporated Cu. XAS spectra were collected in fluorescence geometry with a 13 elements Ge detector. Quantitative fluorescence spectroscopy measurements were also performed. Details of the Cu environment and possible changes with time will be reported.

  15. CdTe devices and method of manufacturing same

    DOEpatents

    Gessert, Timothy A.; Noufi, Rommel; Dhere, Ramesh G.; Albin, David S.; Barnes, Teresa; Burst, James; Duenow, Joel N.; Reese, Matthew

    2015-09-29

    A method of producing polycrystalline CdTe materials and devices that incorporate the polycrystalline CdTe materials are provided. In particular, a method of producing polycrystalline p-doped CdTe thin films for use in CdTe solar cells in which the CdTe thin films possess enhanced acceptor densities and minority carrier lifetimes, resulting in enhanced efficiency of the solar cells containing the CdTe material are provided.

  16. Applications of CdTe to nuclear medicine. Annual report, February 1, 1979-January 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Entine, G

    1980-01-01

    The application of CdTe gamma detectors in nuclear medicine is reported on. An internal probe was developed which can be inserted into the heart to measure the efficiency of various radiopharmaceuticals in the treatment of heart attacks. A second application is an array of detectors which is light enough to be worn by ambulatory patients and can measure the change in cardiac output over an eight hour period during heart attack treatment. The instrument includes an on board tape recorder. (ACR)

  17. Carrier compensation in semi-insulating CdTe: First-principles calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Mao-Hua; Singh, David J

    2008-01-01

    Carrier compensation in semi-insulating CdTe has been attributed to the compensation of surplus shallow acceptors by deep donors, usually assumed to be Te antisites. However, our first-principles calculations show that intrinsic defects should not have a significant effect on the carrier compensation due either to lack of deep levels near midgap or to low defect concentration. We demonstrate that an extrinsic defect, OTe-H complex, may play an important role in the carrier compensation in CdTe because of its amphoteric character and reasonably high concentration. Our findings have important consequences for improving device performance in CdTe-based radiation detectors and solar cells.

  18. Surface passivation for CdTe devices

    DOEpatents

    Reese, Matthew O.; Perkins, Craig L.; Burst, James M.; Gessert, Timothy A.; Barnes, Teresa M.; Metzger, Wyatt K.

    2017-08-01

    In one embodiment, a method for surface passivation for CdTe devices is provided. The method includes adjusting a stoichiometry of a surface of a CdTe material layer such that the surface becomes at least one of stoichiometric or Cd-rich; and reconstructing a crystalline lattice at the surface of the CdTe material layer by annealing the adjusted surface.

  19. A position sensitive phoswich hard X-ray detector system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, A. J.; Hanson, C. G.; Hopkins, C. J.; Lewis, R. A.; Fraser-Mitchell, J.

    1985-01-01

    A prototype position sensitive phoswich hard X-ray detector, designed for eventual astronomical usage, was tested in the laboratory. The scintillation crystal geometry was designed on the basis of a Monte Carlo simulation of the internal optics and includes a 3mm thick NaI(T1) primary X-ray detector which is actively shielded by a 20 mm thick CsI(T1) scintillation crystal. This phoswich arrangement is viewed by a number two inch photomultipliers. Measured values of the positional and spectral resolution of incident X-ray photons are compared with calculation.

  20. CdTe quantum dots for an application in the life sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thi Dieu Thuy, Ung; Toan, Pham Song; Chi, Tran Thi Kim; Duy Khang, Dinh; Quang Liem, Nguyen

    2010-12-01

    This report highlights the results of the preparation of semiconductor CdTe quantum dots (QDs) in the aqueous phase. The small size of a few nm and a very high luminescence quantum yield exceeding 60% of these materials make them promisingly applicable to bio-medicine labeling. Their strong, two-photon excitation luminescence is also a good characteristic for biolabeling without interference with the cell fluorescence. The primary results for the pH-sensitive CdTe QDs are presented in that fluorescence of CdTe QDs was used as a proton sensor to detect proton flux driven by adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthesis in chromatophores. In other words, these QDs could work as pH-sensitive detectors. Therefore, the system of CdTe QDs on chromatophores prepared from the cells of Rhodospirillum rubrum and the antibodies against the beta-subunit of F0F1-ATPase could be a sensitive detector for the avian influenza virus subtype A/H5N1.

  1. Development of Cadmium Telluride Detectors for Hard X-ray Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pike, Sean; Harrison, Fiona; Burnham, Jill; Cook, Rick; Grefenstette, Brian; Madsen, Kristin; Miyasaka, Hiromasa; Rana, Vikram

    2017-08-01

    We present findings on the development of hybrid Cadmium Telluride (CdTe) detectors for applications in space-based X-ray astronomy. In addition to presenting the components and design of the detectors, which consist of 2cm × 2cm × 2mm CdTe crystals mounted on a custom ASIC, we also determine their viability for scientific applications. We present results of spectral calibration using 57Co, 155Eu, and 241Am sources, noise calibration, as well as optimal operating conditions including temperature, guard ring voltage, and bias voltage. By comparing these CdTe detectors to previous generations of detectors, in particular the Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) detectors launched onboard NuSTAR in 2012, we hope to show that hybrid CdTe detectors are uniquely suited to high-resolution X-ray astronomy above the energy ranges of current comparable observatories.

  2. Detector, collimator and real-time reconstructor for a new scanning-beam digital x-ray (SBDX) prototype

    PubMed Central

    Speidel, Michael A.; Tomkowiak, Michael T.; Raval, Amish N.; Dunkerley, David A. P.; Slagowski, Jordan M.; Kahn, Paul; Ku, Jamie; Funk, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    Scanning-beam digital x-ray (SBDX) is an inverse geometry fluoroscopy system for low dose cardiac imaging. The use of a narrow scanned x-ray beam in SBDX reduces detected x-ray scatter and improves dose efficiency, however the tight beam collimation also limits the maximum achievable x-ray fluence. To increase the fluence available for imaging, we have constructed a new SBDX prototype with a wider x-ray beam, larger-area detector, and new real-time image reconstructor. Imaging is performed with a scanning source that generates 40,328 narrow overlapping projections from 71 × 71 focal spot positions for every 1/15 s scan period. A high speed 2-mm thick CdTe photon counting detector was constructed with 320×160 elements and 10.6 cm × 5.3 cm area (full readout every 1.28 μs), providing an 86% increase in area over the previous SBDX prototype. A matching multihole collimator was fabricated from layers of tungsten, brass, and lead, and a multi-GPU reconstructor was assembled to reconstruct the stream of captured detector images into full field-of-view images in real time. Thirty-two tomosynthetic planes spaced by 5 mm plus a multiplane composite image are produced for each scan frame. Noise equivalent quanta on the new SBDX prototype measured 63%–71% higher than the previous prototype. X-ray scatter fraction was 3.9–7.8% when imaging 23.3–32.6 cm acrylic phantoms, versus 2.3–4.2% with the previous prototype. Coronary angiographic imaging at 15 frame/s was successfully performed on the new SBDX prototype, with live display of either a multiplane composite or single plane image. PMID:26236071

  3. Detector, collimator and real-time reconstructor for a new scanning-beam digital x-ray (SBDX) prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speidel, Michael A.; Tomkowiak, Michael T.; Raval, Amish N.; Dunkerley, David A. P.; Slagowski, Jordan M.; Kahn, Paul; Ku, Jamie; Funk, Tobias

    2015-03-01

    Scanning-beam digital x-ray (SBDX) is an inverse geometry fluoroscopy system for low dose cardiac imaging. The use of a narrow scanned x-ray beam in SBDX reduces detected x-ray scatter and improves dose efficiency, however the tight beam collimation also limits the maximum achievable x-ray fluence. To increase the fluence available for imaging, we have constructed a new SBDX prototype with a wider x-ray beam, larger-area detector, and new real-time image reconstructor. Imaging is performed with a scanning source that generates 40,328 narrow overlapping projections from 71 x 71 focal spot positions for every 1/15 s scan period. A high speed 2-mm thick CdTe photon counting detector was constructed with 320x160 elements and 10.6 cm x 5.3 cm area (full readout every 1.28 μs), providing an 86% increase in area over the previous SBDX prototype. A matching multihole collimator was fabricated from layers of tungsten, brass, and lead, and a multi-GPU reconstructor was assembled to reconstruct the stream of captured detector images into full field-of-view images in real time. Thirty-two tomosynthetic planes spaced by 5 mm plus a multiplane composite image are produced for each scan frame. Noise equivalent quanta on the new SBDX prototype measured 63%-71% higher than the previous prototype. X-ray scatter fraction was 3.9-7.8% when imaging 23.3-32.6 cm acrylic phantoms, versus 2.3- 4.2% with the previous prototype. Coronary angiographic imaging at 15 frame/s was successfully performed on the new SBDX prototype, with live display of either a multiplane composite or single plane image.

  4. Antimony diffusion in CdTe

    DOE PAGES

    Colegrove, Eric; Harvey, Steven P.; Yang, Ji -Hui; ...

    2017-02-08

    Group V dopants may be used for next-generation high-voltage cadmium telluride (CdTe) solar photovoltaics, but fundamental defect energetics and kinetics need to be understood. Here, antimony (Sb) diffusion is studied in single-crystal and polycrystalline CdTe under Cd-rich conditions. Diffusion profiles are determined by dynamic secondary ion mass spectroscopy and analyzed with analytical bulk and grain-boundary diffusion models. Slow bulk and fast grain-boundary diffusion are found. Density functional theory is used to understand formation energy and mechanisms. Lastly, the theory and experimental results create new understanding of group V defect kinetics in CdTe.

  5. Radiation detection with CdTe quantum dots in sol-gel glass and polymer nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manickaraj, Kavin; Wagner, Brent K.; Kang, Zhitao

    2013-05-01

    Optically based radiation detectors in various fields of science still suffer from low resolution, sensitivity and efficiency that restrict their overall performance. Quantum dots (QD) are well-suited for such detectors due to their unique optical properties. CdTe QDs show fast luminescence decay times, high conversion efficiencies, and have band gaps strongly dependent on the particle radius. Since QD particle sizes are well below the wavelengths of their emissions, they remain optically transparent when incorporated in both polymer and sol-gel based silica glass due to negligible optical scattering. In addition, as these composite materials can greatly improve the mechanical robustness of alpha-particle detectors, conventionally known to have delicate components, CdTe QDs show high promise for radiation sensing applications. These properties are especially advantageous for alpha-particle and potentially neutron detection. In this work, CdTe QD-based glass or polymer matrix nanocomposites were synthesized for use as alpha-particle detection scintillators.. The fast photo-response and decay times provide excellent time resolution. The radiation responses of such nanocomposites in polymer or glass matrices were investigated.

  6. CdTe and Cd 0.9Zn 0.1Te crystal growth and characterization for nuclear spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Krishna C.; Kang, Sung H.; Choi, Michael; Wright, Gomez; Jellison, Gerald E., Jr.

    2006-08-01

    Large volume single crystals of CdTe and Cd 0.9Zn 0.1Te (CZT) have been grown by a controlled vertical Bridgman technique using in-house zone refined precursors and characterized through structural, electrical, optical, and spectroscopic methods. The grown crystals (diameter greater than or equal to 2.5 cm and length >10 cm) have shown promising characteristics for high-resolution room temperature solid-state radiation detectors due to their high resistivity (~1010 Ω-cm for CdTe, and >1011 Ω-cm for CZT) and good charge transport properties [μτ e ~ (2-5)x10-3 cm2/V]. The fabricated detectors in planar single element and Frisch collar configurations have shown very low leakage currents and high count rates for various sources, including Am-241, and Cs-137. The grown crystals have been further characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), infrared spectroscopy (IR), and transmission two-modulator generalized ellipsometry (2-MGE). Details of the CdTe and CZT characterization results, detector fabrication steps, and testing with radiation sources are presented. The CdTe and CZT crystals have shown high prospects for low power rating solid-state nuclear spectrometers and medical imaging devices.

  7. Growth and characterization of CdTe, Mn(x)Cd(1-x)Te, Zn(x)Cd(1-x)Te, and CdSe(y)Te(1-y) crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lay, K. Y.; Giles-Taylor, N. C.; Schetzina, J. F.; Bachmann, K. J.

    1986-05-01

    Structures and growth characteristics of crystals based on the Cd-Te lattice, which are potentially useful in infrared radiation detectors, are described. Single crystals of CdTe, Mn(x)Cd(1-x)Te, and CdSe(y)Te(1-y) have been grown by the vertical Bridgman method and those of Zn(x)Cd(1-l)Te by zone leveling. Photoluminescence (PL) spectra were used to determine the quality and uniformity of composition. From the probing of small areas, allowed by this PL characterization technique, the uniform incorporation of Mn, Zn, and Se into the CdTe lattice was determined.

  8. Growth and characterization of CdTe, Mn(x)Cd(1-x)Te, Zn(x)Cd(1-x)Te, and CdSe(y)Te(1-y) crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Lay, K.Y.; Giles-Taylor, N.C.; Schetzina, J.F.; Bachmann, K.J.

    1986-05-01

    Structures and growth characteristics of crystals based on the Cd-Te lattice, which are potentially useful in infrared radiation detectors, are described. Single crystals of CdTe, Mn(x)Cd(1-x)Te, and CdSe(y)Te(1-y) have been grown by the vertical Bridgman method and those of Zn(x)Cd(1-l)Te by zone leveling. Photoluminescence (PL) spectra were used to determine the quality and uniformity of composition. From the probing of small areas, allowed by this PL characterization technique, the uniform incorporation of Mn, Zn, and Se into the CdTe lattice was determined. 15 references.

  9. Cadmium Telluride Semiconductor Detector for Improved Spatial and Energy Resolution Radioisotopic Imaging.

    PubMed

    Abbaspour, Samira; Mahmoudian, Babak; Islamian, Jalil Pirayesh

    2017-01-01

    The detector in single-photon emission computed tomography has played a key role in the quality of the images. Over the past few decades, developments in semiconductor detector technology provided an appropriate substitution for scintillation detectors in terms of high sensitivity, better energy resolution, and also high spatial resolution. One of the considered detectors is cadmium telluride (CdTe). The purpose of this paper is to review the CdTe semiconductor detector used in preclinical studies, small organ and small animal imaging, also research in nuclear medicine and other medical imaging modalities by a complete inspect on the material characteristics, irradiation principles, applications, and epitaxial growth method.

  10. Cadmium Telluride Semiconductor Detector for Improved Spatial and Energy Resolution Radioisotopic Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Abbaspour, Samira; Mahmoudian, Babak; Islamian, Jalil Pirayesh

    2017-01-01

    The detector in single-photon emission computed tomography has played a key role in the quality of the images. Over the past few decades, developments in semiconductor detector technology provided an appropriate substitution for scintillation detectors in terms of high sensitivity, better energy resolution, and also high spatial resolution. One of the considered detectors is cadmium telluride (CdTe). The purpose of this paper is to review the CdTe semiconductor detector used in preclinical studies, small organ and small animal imaging, also research in nuclear medicine and other medical imaging modalities by a complete inspect on the material characteristics, irradiation principles, applications, and epitaxial growth method. PMID:28553175

  11. Imaging properties of small-pixel spectroscopic x-ray detectors based on cadmium telluride sensors.

    PubMed

    Koenig, Thomas; Schulze, Julia; Zuber, Marcus; Rink, Kristian; Butzer, Jochen; Hamann, Elias; Cecilia, Angelica; Zwerger, Andreas; Fauler, Alex; Fiederle, Michael; Oelfke, Uwe

    2012-11-07

    Spectroscopic x-ray imaging by means of photon counting detectors has received growing interest during the past years. Critical to the image quality of such devices is their pixel pitch and the sensor material employed. This paper describes the imaging properties of Medipix2 MXR multi-chip assemblies bump bonded to 1 mm thick CdTe sensors. Two systems were investigated with pixel pitches of 110 and 165 μm, which are in the order of the mean free path lengths of the characteristic x-rays produced in their sensors. Peak widths were found to be almost constant across the energy range of 10 to 60 keV, with values of 2.3 and 2.2 keV (FWHM) for the two pixel pitches. The average number of pixels responding to a single incoming photon are about 1.85 and 1.45 at 60 keV, amounting to detective quantum efficiencies of 0.77 and 0.84 at a spatial frequency of zero. Energy selective CT acquisitions are presented, and the two pixel pitches' abilities to discriminate between iodine and gadolinium contrast agents are examined. It is shown that the choice of the pixel pitch translates into a minimum contrast agent concentration for which material discrimination is still possible. We finally investigate saturation effects at high x-ray fluxes and conclude with the finding that higher maximum count rates come at the cost of a reduced energy resolution.

  12. CdTe quantum dots@luminol as signal amplification system for chrysoidine with chemiluminescence-chitosan/graphene oxide-magnetite-molecularly imprinting sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Huimin; Li, Leilei; Wang, Xiaojiao; Wang, Yanhui; Li, Jianbo; Luo, Chuannan

    2016-01-01

    A sensitive chemiluminescence (CL) sensor based on chemiluminescence resonance energy transfer (CRET) in CdTe quantum dots@luminol (CdTe QDs@luminol) nanomaterials combined with chitosan/graphene oxide-magnetite-molecularly imprinted polymer (Cs/GM-MIP) for sensing chrysoidine was developed. CdTe QDs@luminol was designed to not only amplify the signal of CL but also reduce luminol consumption in the detection of chrysoidine. On the basis of the abundant hydroxy and amino, Cs and graphene oxide were introduced into the GM-MIP to improve the adsorption ability. The adsorption capacities of chrysoidine by both Cs/GM-MIP and non-imprinted polymer (Cs/GM-NIP) were investigated, and the CdTe QDs@luminol and Cs/GM-MIP were characterized by UV-vis, FTIR, SEM and TEM. The proposed sensor can detect chrysoidine within a linear range of 1.0 × 10- 7 - 1.0 × 10- 5 mol/L with a detection limit of 3.2 × 10- 8 mol/L (3δ) due to considerable chemiluminescence signal enhancement of the CdTe quantum dots@luminol detector and the high selectivity of the Cs/GM-MIP system. Under the optimal conditions of CL, the CdTe QDs@luminol-Cs/GM-MIP-CL sensor was used for chrysoidine determination in samples with satisfactory recoveries in the range of 90-107%.

  13. Approaching cryogenic Ge performance with Peltier-cooled CdTe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khusainov, Abdurakhman; Iwanczyk, Jan S.; Patt, Bradley E.; Pirogov, Alexandre M.; Vo, Duc T.; Russo, Phyllis A.

    2001-12-01

    A new class of hand-held, portable spectrometers based on large area (1cm2) CdTe detectors of thickness up to 3mm has been demonstrated to produce energy resolution of between 0.3 and 0.5% FWHM at 662 keV. The system uses a charge loss correction circuit for improved efficiency, and detector temperature stabilization to ensure consistent operation of the detector during field measurements over a wide range of ambient temperature. The system can operate continuously for up to 8hrs on rechargeable batteries. The signal output from the charge loss corrector is compatible with most analog and digital spectroscopy amplifiers and multi channel analyzers. Using a detector measuring 11.2 by 9.1 by 2.13 mm3, we have recently been able to obtain the first wide-range plutonium gamma-ray isotopic analysis with other than a cryogenically cooled germanium spectrometer. The CdTe spectrometer is capable of measuring small plutonium reference samples in about one hour, covering the range from low to high burnup. The isotopic analysis software used to obtain these results was FRAM Version 4 from LANL. The new spectrometer is expected to be useful for low-grade assay, as well as for some in-situ plutonium gamma-ray isotopics in lieu of cryogenically cooled Ge.

  14. Ruggedization of CdZnTe detectors and detector assemblies for radiation detection applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, P. H.; Gomolchuk, P.; Chen, H.; Beitz, D.; Grosser, A. W.

    2015-06-01

    This paper described improvements in the ruggedization of CdZnTe detectors and detector assemblies for use in radiation detection applications. Research included experimenting with various conductive and underfill adhesive material systems suitable for CZT substrates. A detector design with encapsulation patterning was developed to protect detector surfaces and to control spacing between CZT anode and PCB carrier. Robustness of bare detectors was evaluated through temperature cycling and metallization shear testing. Attachment processes using well-chosen adhesives and PCB carrier materials were optimized to improve reliability of detector assemblies, resulted in Improved Attachment Detector Assembly. These detector assemblies were subjected to aggressive temperature cycling, and varying levels of drop/shock and vibration, in accordance with modified JEDEC, ANSI and FedEx testing standards, to assess their ruggedness. Further enhanced detector assembly ruggedization methods were investigated involving adhesive conformal coating, potting and dam filling on detector assemblies, which resulted in the Enhanced Ruggedization Detector Assembly. Large numbers of CZT detectors and detector assemblies with 5 mm and 15 mm thick, over 200 in total, were tested. Their performance was evaluated by exposure to various radioactive sources using comprehensive predefined detector specifications and testing protocols. Detector assemblies from improved attachment and enhanced ruggedization showed stable performances during the harsh environmental condition tests. In conclusion, significant progress has been made in improving the reliability and enhancing the ruggedness of CZT detector assemblies for radiation detection applications deployed in operational environments.

  15. Synthesis and characterization of CdTe nanostructures grown by RF magnetron sputtering method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbarnejad, Elaheh; Ghoranneviss, Mahmood; Hantehzadeh, Mohammad Reza

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, we synthesize Cadmium Telluride nanostructures by radio frequency (RF) magnetron sputtering system on soda lime glass at various thicknesses. The effect of CdTe nanostructures thickness on crystalline, optical and morphological properties has been studied by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD), UV-VIS-NIR spectrophotometry, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM), respectively. The XRD parameters of CdTe nanostructures such as microstrain, dislocation density, and crystal size have been examined. From XRD analysis, it could be assumed that increasing deposition time caused the formation of the wurtzite hexagonal structure of the sputtered films. Optical properties of the grown nanostructures as a function of film thickness have been observed. All the films indicate more than 60% transmission over a wide range of wavelengths. The optical band gap values of the films have obtained in the range of 1.62-1.45 eV. The results indicate that an RF sputtering method succeeded in depositing of CdTe nanostructures with high purity and controllable physical properties, which is appropriate for photovoltaic and nuclear detector applications.

  16. Characterisation of an electron collecting CdTe strip sensor using the MYTHEN readout chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elbracht-Leong, S.; Bergamaschi, A.; Greiffenberg, D.; Peake, D.; Rassool, R.; Schmitt, B.; Toyokawa, H.; Sobbott, B.

    2015-01-01

    MYTHEN is a single photon counting hybrid strip X-ray detector that has found application in x-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) experiments at synchrotrons worldwide. Originally designed to operate with hole collecting silicon sensors, MYTHEN is suited for detecting X-rays above 5 keV, however many PD beamlines have been designed for energies above 50 keV where silicon sensors have an efficiency of only few percent. In order to adapt MYTHEN to meet these energies the absorption efficiency of the sensor must be substantially increased. Cadmium-Telluride (CdTe) has an absorption efficiency approximately 30 times that of silicon at 50 keV, and is therefore a very promising replacement candidate for silicon. Furthermore, the large dynamic range of the pre-amplifier of MYTHEN and its double polarity capability has enabled the characterisation of an electron collecting Schottky type CdTe sensor. A CdTe MYTHEN system has undergone a series of characterisation experiments including stress test of bias and radiation induced polarizations. The performance of this system will be presented and discussed.

  17. High-Resolution 125I Small Animal Imaging With a Coded Aperture and a Hybrid Pixel Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Accorsi, Roberto; Celentano, Luigi; Laccetti, Paolo; Lanza, Richard C.; Marotta, Marcello; Mettivier, Giovanni; Montesi, Maria Cristina; Roberti, Giuseppe; Russo, Paolo

    2008-02-01

    We report on tests of a radionuclide imaging system for in vivo investigations in small animals with low-energy photons as from 125I (27-35 keV). Imaging optics features a high-resolution coded aperture mask and a fine pitch hybrid pixel detector (silicon 300-mum or 700-mum thick, or CdTe 1 mm thick) of the Medipix2 series (55 mum pitch, 256 x 256 pixels). The coded aperture had 480 70-mum holes in 100-mum-thick tungsten. Laboratory tests with a 109Cd 22 keV source and a microfocus X-ray tube (35 kVp, Mo anode) show a system resolution of about 110 mum at magnification m = 2.12 and a sensitivity improvement of 30:1 as compared to a 300-mum pinhole collimator. The field of view also depends on magnification: in the experiments presented, it varied from 6 mm (m = 2.12) to 21 mm (m = 0.66). 125I in vivo mouse thyroid imaging with the 70 mum coded aperture, a 300 mum pinhole and a 100 mum parallel hole collimator was also performed to obtain a qualitative comparison. This low energy, semiconductor-based, compact gamma-ray imaging system can be used as a gamma-ray sub-millimeter resolution imager for energies below about 35 keV and it is the basic imaging unit of a small animal Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography system (MediSPECT) built at University of Napoli Federico II and Istituto Nazionale Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Napoli.

  18. Comparison of NaI(Tl), CdTe, and HgI2 surgical probes: physical characterization.

    PubMed

    Barber, H B; Barrett, H H; Hickernell, T S; Kwo, D P; Woolfenden, J M; Entine, G; Ortale Baccash, C

    1991-01-01

    The physical properties of three surgical probes containing different radiation detectors are compared: a NaI(Tl) scintillator with a flexible, fiber-optic light guide, and two semiconductor detectors that operate at room temperature, CdTe and HgI2. Also compared are spectra, energy resolutions, and counting efficiencies measured at a variety of gamma-ray energies between 30 and 1000 keV. The energy resolution of the NaI probe is substantially poorer than that of either semiconductor probe due in part to light losses in coupling the scintillator to the fiber optics. The semiconductor probes have complex spectral response due to charge-carrier trapping and K x-ray escape, and not all photoelectric interactions in these detectors contribute to the useful part of the photopeak. Above 120 keV the counting efficiency for the NaI probe is an order of magnitude higher than for the CdTe and HgI2 probes. Both energy resolution and counting efficiency are slightly better for the HgI2 probe than for the CdTe probe.

  19. Recycling of CdTe photovoltaic waste

    DOEpatents

    Goozner, Robert E.; Long, Mark O.; Drinkard, Jr., William F.

    1999-01-01

    A method for extracting and reclaiming metals from scrap CdTe photovoltaic cells and manufacturing waste by leaching the waste with a leaching solution comprising nitric acid and water, skimming any plastic material from the top of the leaching solution, separating the glass substrate from the liquid leachate and electrolyzing the leachate to separate Cd from Te, wherein the Te is deposits onto a cathode while the Cd remains in solution.

  20. Design optimization of liquid scintillator cosmic-ray veto detector with BBQ shifter

    SciTech Connect

    Kruse, H.W.; Egdorf, S.S.; Simmons, D.F.

    1981-10-01

    Certain design characteristics of a liquid scintillator detector for charged cosmic particles, have been studied. These include evaluation of scintillator emission spectra, absorption in various thicknesses of BBQ shifter bars and effective transmission in long lengths of BBQ acrylic. For our BBQ sample, 12.5 mm thick with semicircular shape, the shifted light was transmitted with 2.0 m absorption length.

  1. Gamma ray detector modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Capote, M. Albert (Inventor); Lenos, Howard A. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A radiation detector assembly has a semiconductor detector array substrate of CdZnTe or CdTe, having a plurality of detector cell pads on a first surface thereof, the pads having a contact metallization and a solder barrier metallization. An interposer card has planar dimensions no larger than planar dimensions of the semiconductor detector array substrate, a plurality of interconnect pads on a first surface thereof, at least one readout semiconductor chip and at least one connector on a second surface thereof, each having planar dimensions no larger than the planar dimensions of the interposer card. Solder columns extend from contacts on the interposer first surface to the plurality of pads on the semiconductor detector array substrate first surface, the solder columns having at least one solder having a melting point or liquidus less than 120 degrees C. An encapsulant is disposed between the interposer circuit card first surface and the semiconductor detector array substrate first surface, encapsulating the solder columns, the encapsulant curing at a temperature no greater than 120 degrees C.

  2. Light-weight spherical mirrors for Cherenkov detectors

    SciTech Connect

    E. Cisbani; S. Colilli; R. Crateri; F. Cusanno; R. Fratoni; S. Frullani; F. Garibaldi; F. Giuliani; M. Gricia; M. Iodice; R. Iommi; M. Lucentini; A. Mostarda; L. Pierangeli; F. Santavenere; G.M. Urciuoli; R. De Leo; L. Lagamba; E. Nappi; A. Braem; P. Vernin

    2003-03-01

    Light-weight spherical mirrors have been appositely designed and built for the gas threshold Cherenkov detectors of the two Hall A spectrometers. The mirrors are made of a 1mm thick aluminized plexiglass sheet, reinforced by a rigid backing consisting of a phenolic honeycomb sandwiched between two carbon fiber mats epoxy glued. The produced mirrors have a thickness equivalent to 0.55% of radiation length, and an optical slope error of about 5.5mrad. These characteristics make these mirrors suitable for the implementation in Cherenkov threshold detectors. Ways to improve the mirror features are also discussed in view of their possible employment in RICH detectors.

  3. Estimate interaction timing in a large volume HgI2 detector using cathode pulse waveforms

    PubMed Central

    Meng, L.J.; He, Z.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents experimental results on the timing resolution achieved with a 5 mm thick HgI2 detector. The timing information was derived based on the cathode pre-amplifier pulse waveform, measured using a digital oscilloscope. The times of interaction were estimated by fitting the measured pulse waveforms to pre-defined waveform models. With this approach, problems related to the conventional leading edge or constant fraction triggering, such as slow charge carrier mobility, pulse shape variation and depth-dependent detector response can be greatly reduced. As a result, we showed a 13 ns timing resolution measured using the 5 mm thick HgI2 detector and a BaF2 coincidence detector with 511 keV full energy events. In this paper, we discuss several waveform models and the results achieved using these models. PMID:28260824

  4. Development of Large Cryogenic Semiconductor Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Mandic, Vuk

    2016-12-09

    This project aims at developing large cryogenic semiconductor detectors for applications in particle physics and more broadly. We have developed a 150 mm diameter, 43 mm thick, Si-based detector that measures ionization released in an interaction of a particle inside the silicon crystal of high purity, operated at 30 mK temperature. We demonstrated that such a detector can be used to measure recoil energies on the keV scale, and that its stable operation can be maintained indefinitely. Detectors of this type could therefore be used in the fields of direct dark matter searches, coherent neutrino scattering measurements, X-ray observations, as well as in broader applications such as homeland security.

  5. Recycling of CdTe photovoltaic waste

    DOEpatents

    Goozner, Robert E.; Long, Mark O.; Drinkard, Jr., William F.

    1999-04-27

    A method for extracting and reclaiming metals from scrap CdTe photovoltaic cells and manufacturing waste by leaching the metals in dilute nitric acid, leaching the waste with a leaching solution comprising nitric acid and water, skimming any plastic material from the top of the leaching solution, separating the glass substrate from the liquid leachate, adding a calcium containing base to the leachate to precipitate Cd and Te, separating the precipitated Cd and Te from the leachate, and recovering the calcium-containing base.

  6. Recycling of CdTe photovoltaic waste

    DOEpatents

    Goozner, R.E.; Long, M.O.; Drinkard, W.F. Jr.

    1999-04-27

    A method for extracting and reclaiming metals from scrap CdTe photovoltaic cells and manufacturing waste by leaching the metals in dilute nitric acid, leaching the waste with a leaching solution comprising nitric acid and water, skimming any plastic material from the top of the leaching solution, separating the glass substrate from the liquid leachate, adding a calcium containing base to the leachate to precipitate Cd and Te, separating the precipitated Cd and Te from the leachate, and recovering the calcium-containing base. 3 figs.

  7. The HEXITEC Hard X-Ray Pixelated CdTe Imager for Fast Solar Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumgartner, Wayne H.; Christe, Steven D.; Ryan, Daniel; Inglis, Andrew R.; Shih, Albert Y.; Gregory, Kyle; Wilson, Matt; Seller, Paul; Gaskin, Jessica; Wilson-Hodge, Colleen

    2016-01-01

    There is an increasing demand in solar and astrophysics for high resolution X-ray spectroscopic imaging. Such observations would present ground breaking opportunities to study the poorly understood high energy processes in our solar system and beyond, such as solar flares, X-ray binaries, and active galactic nuclei. However, such observations require a new breed of solid state detectors sensitive to high energy X-rays with fine independent pixels to sub-sample the point spread function (PSF) of the X-ray optics. For solar observations in particular, they must also be capable of handling very high count rates as photon fluxes from solar flares often cause pile up and saturation in present generation detectors. The Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL) has recently developed a new cadmium telluride (CdTe) detector system, called HEXITEC (High Energy X-ray Imaging Technology). It is an 80 x 80 array of 250 micron independent pixels sensitive in the 2-200 keV band and capable of a high full frame read out rate of 10 kHz. HEXITEC provides the smallest independently read out CdTe pixels currently available, and are well matched to the few arcsecond PSF produced by current and next generation hard X-ray focusing optics. NASA's Goddard and Marshall Space Flight Centers are collaborating with RAL to develop these detectors for use on future space borne hard X-ray focusing telescopes. We show the latest results on HEXITEC's imaging capability, energy resolution, high read out rate, and reveal it to be ideal for such future instruments.

  8. The HEXITEC hard x-ray pixelated CdTe imager for fast solar observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgartner, Wayne H.; Christe, Steven D.; Ryan, Daniel F.; Inglis, Andrew R.; Shih, Albert Y.; Gregory, Kyle; Wilson, Matt; Seller, Paul; Gaskin, Jessica; Wilson-Hodge, Colleen

    2016-08-01

    There is an increasing demand in solar and astrophysics for high resolution X-ray spectroscopic imaging. Such observations would present ground breaking opportunities to study the poorly understood high energy processes in our solar system and beyond, such as solar flares, X-ray binaries, and active galactic nuclei. However, such observations require a new breed of solid state detectors sensitive to high energy X-rays with fine independent pixels to sub-sample the point spread function (PSF) of the X-ray optics. For solar observations in particular, they must also be capable of handling very high count rates as photon fluxes from solar flares often cause pile up and saturation in present generation detectors. The Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL) has recently developed a new cadmium telluride (CdTe) detector system, called HEXITEC (High Energy X-ray Imaging Technology). It is an 8080 array of 250 μm independent pixels sensitive in the 2-200 keV band and capable of a high full frame read out rate of 10 kHz. HEXITEC provides the smallest independently read out CdTe pixels currently available, and are well matched to the few arcsecond PSF produced by current and next generation hard X-ray focusing optics. NASA's Goddard and Marshall Space Flight Centers are collaborating with RAL to develop these detectors for use on future space borne hard X-ray focusing telescopes. We show the latest results on HEXITEC's imaging capability, energy resolution, high read out rate, and reveal it to be ideal for such future instruments.

  9. Discrimination of charged particles in a neutral beam line by using a solid scintillation detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, Jong-Kwan; Ko, Jewou; Liu, Dong

    2017-01-01

    In the past several decades, many studies have been conducted to search for non-baryonic dark matter, such as weakly interactive massive particles (WIMPs). In the search for WIMPs, charged particles incident on the detector are background particles because WIMPs are neutral. Charged particles originate from various sources, such as cosmic rays and laboratory materials surrounding the main detector. Therefore, a veto that discriminates charged particles can improve the particle-detection efficiency of the entire experiment for detecting WIMPs. Here, we investigate in the thickness range of 1 mm to 5 mm, the optimal thickness of a polystyrene scintillator as a chargedparticle veto detector. We found that 3-mm-thick polystyrene provides the best performance to veto charged particles and the charged-particle background in the search for the WIMP signal. Furthermore, we fabricated 3-mm-thick and 5-mm-thick polystyrene charged particle veto detectors that will be used in an underground laboratory in the search for WIMP dark matter. After exposing those detectors are the actual beam line, we compared the rate of charged particles measured using those detectors and the rate simulated through a Monte Carlo simulation.

  10. Spent-fuel characterization with small CZT detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berndt, R.; Mortreau, P.

    2006-08-01

    CdTe detectors may be utilised as miniature instruments for the measurement of gamma spectra in safeguards applications [R. Arlt, V. Gryshchuk, P. Sumah, Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 428 (1999) 127]. This is applicable for measurements both to fresh fuel and irradiated nuclear fuel. The spectrum analysis, however, is more complicated than with Ge detectors. Some reasons are: the peaks are asymmetric, the peak/Compton ratio is low, peak parameters depend on the count rate and on the properties of individual detector crystals. We developed a spectrum-unfolding code for spectra obtained with CdTe detectors. The code makes use of a series of pattern spectra of the individual instrument. It is applied to fission-product spectra and allows the coarse characterisation of the spent fuel in safeguards inspections.

  11. Issues Involving Infrared Detector Material Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-28

    on the ferroelectric properties of thin film ferroelectric (211) Si substrate 1 1 1 1 Area 2 CdTe SiOx (211) Si substrate (110) direction 7 PZT...to develop textured template for growth of epitaxial thin film ferroelectric (TFFE) IR detectors on polyimide coated Si. The commercial TFFE has a...due to limitation of characterization capability on small sample spot on our ARL collaborator side. This project also involved a strong educational

  12. Process Development for High Voc CdTe Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ferekides, C. S.; Morel, D. L.

    2011-05-01

    This is a cumulative and final report for Phases I, II and III of this NREL funded project (subcontract # XXL-5-44205-10). The main research activities of this project focused on the open-circuit voltage of the CdTe thin film solar cells. Although, thin film CdTe continues to be one of the leading materials for large-scale cost-effective production of photovoltaics, the efficiency of the CdTe solar cells have been stagnant for the last few years. This report describes and summarizes the results for this 3-year research project.

  13. CdTe Photovoltaic Devices for Solar Cell Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-12-01

    falls between the end points of HgTe (Eg= -0.3 eV) and CdTe (Eg =1.5 eV). Because of its bandgap tunability with the Cd composition, Hg1-xCdxTe alloy...a bandgap energy that falls between the end points of HgTe (Eg= -0.3 eV) and CdTe (Eg =1.5 eV). Because of its bandgap tunability with the Cd ...theoretical efficiency of CdTe . These include removing recombination centers in the grain boundaries, improving crystal quality, and increasing doping

  14. Cu Migration in Polycrystalline CdTe Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Da; Akis, Richard; Brinkman, Daniel; Sankin, Igor; Fang, Tian; Vasileska, Dragica; Ringhofer, Christian

    2014-03-12

    An impurity reaction-diffusion model is applied to Cu defects and related intrinsic defects in polycrystalline CdTe for a better understanding of Cu’s role in the cell level reliability of CdTe PV devices. The simulation yields transient Cu distributions in polycrystalline CdTe during solar cell processing and stressing. Preliminary results for Cu migration using available diffusivity and solubility data show that Cu accumulates near the back contact, a phenomena that is commonly observed in devices after back-contact processing or stress conditions.

  15. CdTe quantum dots@luminol as signal amplification system for chrysoidine with chemiluminescence-chitosan/graphene oxide-magnetite-molecularly imprinting sensor.

    PubMed

    Duan, Huimin; Li, Leilei; Wang, Xiaojiao; Wang, Yanhui; Li, Jianbo; Luo, Chuannan

    2016-01-15

    A sensitive chemiluminescence (CL) sensor based on chemiluminescence resonance energy transfer (CRET) in CdTe quantum dots@luminol (CdTe QDs@luminol) nanomaterials combined with chitosan/graphene oxide-magnetite-molecularly imprinted polymer (Cs/GM-MIP) for sensing chrysoidine was developed. CdTe QDs@luminol was designed to not only amplify the signal of CL but also reduce luminol consumption in the detection of chrysoidine. On the basis of the abundant hydroxy and amino, Cs and graphene oxide were introduced into the GM-MIP to improve the adsorption ability. The adsorption capacities of chrysoidine by both Cs/GM-MIP and non-imprinted polymer (Cs/GM-NIP) were investigated, and the CdTe QDs@luminol and Cs/GM-MIP were characterized by UV-vis, FTIR, SEM and TEM. The proposed sensor can detect chrysoidine within a linear range of 1.0×10(-7) - 1.0×10(-5) mol/L with a detection limit of 3.2×10(-8) mol/L (3δ) due to considerable chemiluminescence signal enhancement of the CdTe quantum dots@luminol detector and the high selectivity of the Cs/GM-MIP system. Under the optimal conditions of CL, the CdTe QDs@luminol-Cs/GM-MIP-CL sensor was used for chrysoidine determination in samples with satisfactory recoveries in the range of 90-107%. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Plastic scintillator centrality detector for BRAHMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Y. K.; Debbe, R.; Lee, J. H.; Ito, Hironori; Sanders, S. J.

    2004-01-01

    An array of 40 tiles of thin plastic scintillators is used to construct the outer layer of the charged particle multiplicity detector for the BRAHMS experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). Each tile is a square with 12 cm long sides and 5 mm thickness. The light from each of the scintillators is collected by wavelength shifting fibers embedded on the periphery. The light collection is uniform within 5% over the tile with the edge effect limited to 4 mm along the edge. The response is found to be linear in the high-multiplicity environment at RHIC with Au+Au beams at s NN of 200 GeV.

  17. Time of flight experimental studies of CdZnTe radiation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erickson, J. C.; Yao, H. W.; James, R. B.; Hermon, H.; Greaves, M.

    2000-06-01

    A time of flight technique was used to study the carrier trapping time, τ, and mobility, μ, in CdZnTe (CZT) and CdTe radiation detectors. Carriers were generated near the surface of the detector by a nitrogen-pumped pulsed dye laser with wavelength ˜500 nm. Signals from generated electrons or holes were measured by a fast oscilloscope and analyzed to determine the trapping time and mobility of carriers. Electron mobility was observed to change with temperature from 1200 cm2/Vs to 2400 cm2/Vs between 293 K and 138 K, respectively. Electron mobilities were observed between 900 cm2/Vs and 1350 cm2/Vs at room temperature for various CZT detectors. Electron mobilities in various CdTe detectors at room temperature were observed between 740 cm2/Vs and 1260 cm2/Vs. Average electron mobility was calculated to be 1120 cm2/Vs and 945 cm2/Vs for CZT and CdTe, respectively. Hole mobilities in both CZT and CdTe were found to vary between 27 cm2/Vs and 66 cm2/Vs. Electron trapping times in CZT at room temperature varied from 1.60 µs to 4.18 µs with an average value of about 2.5 µs. Electron trapping time in CdTe at room temperature varied between 1.7 µs and 4.15 µs with an average value of about 3.1 µs.

  18. Accuracy of existing atomic potentials for the CdTe semiconductor compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, D. K.; Zhou, X. W.; Wong, B. M.; Doty, F. P.; Zimmerman, J. A.

    2011-06-01

    CdTe and CdTe-based Cd1-xZnxTe (CZT) alloys are important semiconductor compounds that are used in a variety of technologies including solar cells, radiation detectors, and medical imaging devices. Performance of such systems, however, is limited due to the propensity of nano- and micro-scale defects that form during crystal growth and manufacturing processes. Molecular dynamics simulations offer an effective approach to study the formation and interaction of atomic scale defects in these crystals, and provide insight on how to minimize their concentrations. The success of such a modeling effort relies on the accuracy and transferability of the underlying interatomic potential used in simulations. Such a potential must not only predict a correct trend of structures and energies of a variety of elemental and compound lattices, defects, and surfaces but also capture correct melting behavior and should be capable of simulating crystalline growth during vapor deposition as these processes sample a variety of local configurations. In this paper, we perform a detailed evaluation of the performance of two literature potentials for CdTe, one having the Stillinger-Weber form and the other possessing the Tersoff form. We examine simulations of structures and the corresponding energies of a variety of elemental and compound lattices, defects, and surfaces compared to those obtained from ab initio calculations and experiments. We also perform melting temperature calculations and vapor deposition simulations. Our calculations show that the Stillinger-Weber parameterization produces the correct lowest energy structure. This potential, however, is not sufficiently transferrable for defect studies. Origins of the problems of these potentials are discussed and insights leading to the development of a more transferrable potential suitable for molecular dynamics simulations of defects in CdTe crystals are provided.

  19. Device Fabrication using Crystalline CdTe and CdTe Ternary Alloys Grown by MBE

    SciTech Connect

    Zaunbrecher, Katherine; Burst, James; Seyedmohammadi, Shahram; Malik, Roger; Li, Jian V.; Gessert, Timothy A.; Barnes, Teresa

    2015-06-14

    We fabricated epitaxial CdTe:In/CdTe:As homojunction and CdZnTe/CdTe and CdMgTe/CdTe heterojunction devices grown on bulk CdTe substrates in order to study the fundamental device physics of CdTe solar cells. Selection of emitter-layer alloys was based on passivation studies using double heterostructures as well as band alignment. Initial results show significant device integration challenges, including low dopant activation, high resistivity substrates and the development of low-resistance contacts. To date, the highest open-circuit voltage is 715 mV in a CdZnTe/CdTe heterojunction following anneal, while the highest fill factor of 52% was attained in an annealed CdTe homojunction. In general, all currentvoltage measurements show high series resistance, capacitancevoltages measurements show variable doping, and quantum efficiency measurements show low collection. Ongoing work includes overcoming the high resistance in these devices and addressing other possible device limitations such as non-optimum junction depth, interface recombination, and reduced bulk lifetime due to structural defects.

  20. CdTe Solar Cells: The Role of Copper

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Da; Akis, Richard; Brinkman, Daniel; Sankin, Igor; Fang, Tian; Vasileska, Dragica; Ringhofer, Christain

    2014-06-06

    In this work, we report on developing 1D reaction-diffusion solver to understand the kinetics of p-type doping formation in CdTe absorbers and to shine some light on underlying causes of metastabilities observed in CdTe PV devices. Evolution of intrinsic and Cu-related defects in CdTe solar cell has been studied in time-space domain self-consistently with free carrier transport and Poisson equation. Resulting device performance was simulated as a function of Cu diffusion anneal time showing pronounced effect the evolution of associated acceptor and donor states can cause on device characteristics. Although 1D simulation has intrinsic limitations when applied to poly-crystalline films, the results suggest strong potential of the approach in better understanding of the performance and metastabilities of CdTe photovoltaic device.

  1. Modeling Copper Diffusion in Polycrystalline CdTe Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Akis, Richard; Brinkman, Daniel; Sankin, Igor; Fang, Tian; Guo, Da; Vasileska, Dragica; Ringhofer, Christain

    2014-06-06

    It is well known that Cu plays an important role in CdTe solar cell performance as a dopant. In this work, a finite-difference method is developed and used to simulate Cu diffusion in CdTe solar cells. In the simulations, which are done on a two-dimensional (2D) domain, the CdTe is assumed to be polycrystalline, with the individual grains separated by grain boundaries. When used to fit experimental Cu concentration data, bulk and grain boundary diffusion coefficients and activation energies for CdTe can be extracted. In the past, diffusion coefficients have been typically obtained by fitting data to simple functional forms of limited validity. By doing full simulations, the simplifying assumptions used in those analytical models are avoided and diffusion parameters can thus be determined more accurately

  2. Extracting Cu Diffusion Parameters in Polycrystalline CdTe

    SciTech Connect

    Akis, Richard; Brinkman, Daniel; Sankin, Igor; Fang, Tian; Guo, Da; Dragica, Vasileska; Ringhofer, Christian

    2014-06-13

    It is well known that Cu plays an important role in CdTe solar cell performance as a dopant. In this work, a finite-difference method is developed and used to simulate Cu diffusion in CdTe solar cells. In the simulations, which are done on a two-dimensional (2D) domain, the CdTe is assumed to be polycrystal-line, with the individual grains separated by grain boundaries. When used to fit experimental Cu concentration data, bulk and grain boundary diffusion coefficients and activation energies for CdTe can be extracted. In the past, diffusion coefficients have been typically obtained by fitting data to simple functional forms of limited validity. By doing full simulations, the simplifying assumptions used in those analytical models are avoided and diffusion parameters can thus be determined more accurately.

  3. Interaction of porphyrins with CdTe quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xing; Liu, Zhongxin; Ma, Lun; Hossu, Marius; Chen, Wei

    2011-05-13

    Porphyrins may be used as photosensitizers for photodynamic therapy, photocatalysts for organic pollutant dissociation, agents for medical imaging and diagnostics, applications in luminescence and electronics. The detection of porphyrins is significantly important and here the interaction of protoporphyrin-IX (PPIX) with CdTe quantum dots was studied. It was observed that the luminescence of CdTe quantum dots was quenched dramatically in the presence of PPIX. When CdTe quantum dots were embedded into silica layers, almost no quenching by PPIX was observed. This indicates that PPIX may interact and alter CdTe quantum dots and thus quench their luminescence. The oxidation of the stabilizers such as thioglycolic acid (TGA) as well as the nanoparticles by the singlet oxygen generated from PPIX is most likely responsible for the luminescence quenching. The quenching of quantum dot luminescence by porphyrins may provide a new method for photosensitizer detection.

  4. Spatial Distribution of Dopant Incorporation in CdTe

    SciTech Connect

    Guthrey, Harvey; Moseley, John; Colegrove, Eric; Burst, James; Albin, David; Metzger, Wyatt; Al-Jassim, Mowafak

    2016-11-21

    In this work we use state-of-the-art cathodoluminescence (CL) spectrum imaging that provides spectrum-per-pixel mapping of the CL emission to examine how dopant elements are incorporated into CdTe. Emission spectra and intensity are used to monitor the spatial distribution of additional charge carriers through characteristic variations in the CL emission based on theoretical modeling. Our results show that grain boundaries play a role in the incorporation of dopants in CdTe, whether intrinsic or extrinsic. This type of analysis is crucial for providing feedback to design different processing schedules that optimize dopant incorporation in CdTe photovoltaic material, which has struggled to reach high carrier concentration values. Here, we present results on CdTe films exposed to copper, phosphorus, and intrinsic doping treatments.

  5. Strategies for recycling CdTe photovoltaic modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eberspacher, Chris; Gay, Charles F.; Moskowitz, Paul D.

    1994-12-01

    Recycling end-of-life cadmium telluride (CdTe) photovoltaic (PV) modules may enhance the competitive advantage of CdTe PV in the marketplace, but the experiences of industries with comparable Environmental, Health and Safety (EH&S) challenges suggest that collection and recycling costs can impose significant economic burdens. Customer cooperation and pending changes to US Federal law may improve recycling economics.

  6. CdTe Photovoltaics for Sustainable Electricity Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munshi, Amit; Sampath, Walajabad

    2016-09-01

    Thin film CdTe (cadmium telluride) is an important technology in the development of sustainable and affordable electricity generation. More than 10 GW of installations have been carried out using this technology around the globe. It has been demonstrated as a sustainable, green, renewable, affordable and abundant source of electricity. An advanced sublimation tool has been developed that allows highly controlled deposition of CdTe films onto commercial soda lime glass substrates. All deposition and treatment steps can be performed without breaking the vacuum within a single chamber in an inline process that can be conveniently scaled to a commercial process. In addition, an advanced cosublimation source has been developed to allow the deposition of ternary alloys such as Cd x Mg1- x Te to form an electron reflector layer which is expected to address the voltage deficits in current CdTe devices and to achieve very high efficiency. Extensive materials characterization, including but not limited to scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy and electron back-scatter diffraction, has been performed to get a better understanding of the effects of processing conditions on CdTe thin film photovoltaics. This combined with computer modeling such as density function theory modeling gives a new insight into the mechanism of CdTe photovoltaic function. With all these efforts, CdTe photovoltaics has seen great progress in the last few years. Currently, it has been recorded as the cheapest source of electricity in the USA on a commercial scale, and further improvements are predicted to further reduce the cost while increasing its utilization. Here, we give an overview of the advantages of thin film CdTe photovoltaics as well as a brief review of the challenges that need to be addressed. Some fundamental studies of processing conditions for thin film CdTe are also presented

  7. High-quality CdTe films from nanoparticle precursors

    SciTech Connect

    Schulz, D.L.; Pehnt, M.; Urgiles, E.

    1996-05-01

    In this paper the authors demonstrate that nanoparticulate precursors coupled with spray deposition offers an attractive route into electronic materials with improved smoothness, density, and lower processing temperatures. Employing a metathesis approach, cadmium iodide was reacted with sodium telluride in methanol solvent, resulting in the formation of soluble NaI and insoluble CdTe nanoparticles. After appropriate chemical workup, methanol-capped CdTe colloids were isolated. CdTe thin film formation was achieved by spray depositing the nanoparticle colloids (25-75 {Angstrom} diameter) onto substrates at elevated temperatures (T = 280-440{degrees}C) with no further thermal treatment. These films were characterized by x-ray diffraction (XRD), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Cubic CdTe phase formation was observed by XRD, with a contaminant oxide phase also detected. XPS analysis showed that CdTe films produced by this one-step method contained no Na or C and substantial O. AFM gave CdTe grain sizes of {approx}0.1-0.3 {mu}m for film sprayed at 400{degrees}C. A layer-by-layer film growth mechanism proposed for the one-step spray deposition of nanoparticle precursors will be discussed.

  8. Imaging performance comparison between a LaBr3: Ce scintillator based and a CdTe semiconductor based photon counting compact gamma camera.

    PubMed

    Russo, P; Mettivier, G; Pani, R; Pellegrini, R; Cinti, M N; Bennati, P

    2009-04-01

    The authors report on the performance of two small field of view, compact gamma cameras working in single photon counting in planar imaging tests at 122 and 140 keV. The first camera is based on a LaBr3: Ce scintillator continuous crystal (49 x 49 x 5 mm3) assembled with a flat panel multianode photomultiplier tube with parallel readout. The second one belongs to the class of semiconductor hybrid pixel detectors, specifically, a CdTe pixel detector (14 x 14 x 1 mm3) with 256 x 256 square pixels and a pitch of 55 microm, read out by a CMOS single photon counting integrated circuit of the Medipix2 series. The scintillation camera was operated with selectable energy window while the CdTe camera was operated with a single low-energy detection threshold of about 20 keV, i.e., without energy discrimination. The detectors were coupled to pinhole or parallel-hole high-resolution collimators. The evaluation of their overall performance in basic imaging tasks is presented through measurements of their detection efficiency, intrinsic spatial resolution, noise, image SNR, and contrast recovery. The scintillation and CdTe cameras showed, respectively, detection efficiencies at 122 keV of 83% and 45%, intrinsic spatial resolutions of 0.9 mm and 75 microm, and total background noises of 40.5 and 1.6 cps. Imaging tests with high-resolution parallel-hole and pinhole collimators are also reported.

  9. Investigation of MBE grown polycrystalline CdTe films on the Medipix readout chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schütt, S.; Vogt, A.; Frei, K.; Fischer, F.; Fiederle, M.

    2017-06-01

    Cadmium Telluride (CdTe) films are directly deposited on a CMOS (complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor) based readout chip as sensor layer for X-ray detection. This is performed by using a modified Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE) setup with a carbon collimator enabling growth rates up to 10 μm/h. To obtain a good contacting behaviour of the 25-50 μm thick CdTe films, Te and Sb2Te3 are additionally evaporated during the process. The investigation of polycrystalline sensor layers deposited at 400 °C with SEM (scanning electron microscopy) and XRD (X-ray diffraction) reveals a columnar growth of the individual grains oriented predominantly in (111). By PES (photoelectron spectroscopy) measurements the chemical composition of the different layers is identified in a depth profile and changes in work function along the contact structure are observed. Detector properties reveal a linear behaviour of the count rate with increasing radiation intensity as well as sensibility to holes and electrons. Spatial resolution measurements result in a resolution of 5 lp/mm, which is a mandatory requirement for medical applications.

  10. CdTe Based Hard X-ray Imager Technology For Space Borne Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limousin, Olivier; Delagnes, E.; Laurent, P.; Lugiez, F.; Gevin, O.; Meuris, A.

    2009-01-01

    CEA Saclay has recently developed an innovative technology for CdTe based Pixelated Hard X-Ray Imagers with high spectral performance and high timing resolution for efficient background rejection when the camera is coupled to an active veto shield. This development has been done in a R&D program supported by CNES (French National Space Agency) and has been optimized towards the Simbol-X mission requirements. In the latter telescope, the hard X-Ray imager is 64 cm² and is equipped with 625µm pitch pixels (16384 independent channels) operating at -40°C in the range of 4 to 80 keV. The camera we demonstrate in this paper consists of a mosaic of 64 independent cameras, divided in 8 independent sectors. Each elementary detection unit, called Caliste, is the hybridization of a 256-pixel Cadmium Telluride (CdTe) detector with full custom front-end electronics into a unique 1 cm² component, juxtaposable on its four sides. Recently, promising results have been obtained from the first micro-camera prototypes called Caliste 64 and will be presented to illustrate the capabilities of the device as well as the expected performance of an instrument based on it. The modular design of Caliste enables to consider extended developments toward IXO type mission, according to its specific scientific requirements.

  11. Evaluation of the efficiency curve of a Cadmiun Telluride detector for low-energy photon spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Correia, Amanda Ribeiro; Iwahara, Akira; da Cruz, Paulo Alberto Lima; da Silva, Carlos José; Tauhata, Luiz; Poledna, Roberto; da Silva, Ronaldo Lins; de Queiroz Filho, Pedro Pacheco; Lopes, Ricardo Tadeu

    2016-10-01

    The performance of a Cadmiun Telluride (CdTe) detector for low energy photon spectrometry was evaluated. Collected data were analyzed using the basic software package available with the CdTe detector system and the COLEGRAM code developed for photopeak deconvolution at LNHB/France. Several calibrated point sources were used to determine the energy versus efficiency curve. The efficiency curve was used in the determination of main X-ray intensities of (153)Sm and (177)Lu. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Comparison of photon counting and conventional scintillation detectors in a pinhole SPECT system for small animal imaging: Monte carlo simulation studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Young-Jin; Park, Su-Jin; Lee, Seung-Wan; Kim, Dae-Hong; Kim, Ye-Seul; Kim, Hee-Joung

    2013-05-01

    The photon counting detector based on cadmium telluride (CdTe) or cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) is a promising imaging modality that provides many benefits compared to conventional scintillation detectors. By using a pinhole collimator with the photon counting detector, we were able to improve both the spatial resolution and the sensitivity. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the photon counting and conventional scintillation detectors in a pinhole single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) system. We designed five pinhole SPECT systems of two types: one type with a CdTe photon counting detector and the other with a conventional NaI(Tl) scintillation detector. We conducted simulation studies and evaluated imaging performance. The results demonstrated that the spatial resolution of the CdTe photon counting detector was 0.38 mm, with a sensitivity 1.40 times greater than that of a conventional NaI(Tl) scintillation detector for the same detector thickness. Also, the average scatter fractions of the CdTe photon counting and the conventional NaI(Tl) scintillation detectors were 1.93% and 2.44%, respectively. In conclusion, we successfully evaluated various pinhole SPECT systems for small animal imaging.

  13. CdTe Thin Film Solar Cells and Modules Tutorial; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect

    Albin, David S.

    2015-06-13

    This is a tutorial presented at the 42nd IEEE Photovoltaics Specialists Conference to cover the introduction, background, and updates on CdTe cell and module technology, including CdTe cell and module structure and fabrication.

  14. High-temporal-resolution CdTe nuclear stethoscope for cardiac γ-ventriculography: preclinical evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eclancher, Bernard; Arntz, Y.; Chambron, Jacques; Prat, Vincent; Perret, C.; Karman, Miklos; Pszota, Agnes; Nemeth, Laszlo

    1999-10-01

    A hand-size probe including 64 elementary 5 X 5 X 2 mm CdTe detectors has been optimized to detect the (gamma) tracer 99Tc in the heart left ventricle. The system, has been developed, not for imaging, allowing acquisitions at 33 Hz to describe the labeled blood volume variations. The (gamma) -counts variations were found accurately proportional to the known volume variations of an artificial ventricle paced at variable rate and systolic volume. Softwares for on line data monitoring and for post-processing have been developed for beat to beat assessment of cardiac performance at rest and during physical exercise. The evaluation of this probe has been performed on 5 subjects in the Nucl Dep of Balatonfured Cardiology Hospital. It appears that the probe needs to be better shielded to work properly in the hot environment of the ventricle, but can provide reliable ventriculography, even under heavy exercise load, although the ventricle volume itself is unknown.

  15. Measurement of mobility and lifetime of electrons and holes in a Schottky CdTe diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ariño-Estrada, G.; Chmeissani, M.; de Lorenzo, G.; Kolstein, M.; Puigdengoles, C.; García, J.; Cabruja, E.

    2014-12-01

    We report on the measurement of drift properties of electrons and holes in a CdTe diode grown by the travelling heating method (THM). Mobility and lifetime of both charge carriers has been measured independently at room temperature and fixed bias voltage using charge integration readout electronics. Both electrode sides of the detector have been exposed to a 241Am source in order to obtain events with full contributions of either electrons or holes. The drift time has been measured to obtain the mobility for each charge carrier. The Hecht equation has been employed to evaluate the lifetime. The measured values for μτe/h (mobility-lifetime product) are in agreement with earlier published data.

  16. Measurement of mobility and lifetime of electrons and holes in a Schottky CdTe diode.

    PubMed

    Ariño-Estrada, G; Chmeissani, M; de Lorenzo, G; Kolstein, M; Puigdengoles, C; García, J; Cabruja, E

    2014-12-01

    We report on the measurement of drift properties of electrons and holes in a CdTe diode grown by the travelling heating method (THM). Mobility and lifetime of both charge carriers has been measured independently at room temperature and fixed bias voltage using charge integration readout electronics. Both electrode sides of the detector have been exposed to a (241)Am source in order to obtain events with full contributions of either electrons or holes. The drift time has been measured to obtain the mobility for each charge carrier. The Hecht equation has been employed to evaluate the lifetime. The measured values for μτe/h (mobility-lifetime product) are in agreement with earlier published data.

  17. Measurement of mobility and lifetime of electrons and holes in a Schottky CdTe diode

    PubMed Central

    Ariño-Estrada, G.; Chmeissani, M.; de Lorenzo, G.; Kolstein, M.; Puigdengoles, C.; García, J.; Cabruja, E.

    2014-01-01

    We report on the measurement of drift properties of electrons and holes in a CdTe diode grown by the travelling heating method (THM). Mobility and lifetime of both charge carriers has been measured independently at room temperature and fixed bias voltage using charge integration readout electronics. Both electrode sides of the detector have been exposed to a 241Am source in order to obtain events with full contributions of either electrons or holes. The drift time has been measured to obtain the mobility for each charge carrier. The Hecht equation has been employed to evaluate the lifetime. The measured values for μτe/h (mobility-lifetime product) are in agreement with earlier published data. PMID:25729405

  18. Comparison of three types of XPAD3.2/CdTe single chip hybrids for hard X-ray applications in material science and biomedical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buton, C.; Dawiec, A.; Graber-Bolis, J.; Arnaud, K.; Bérar, J. F.; Blanc, N.; Boudet, N.; Clémens, J. C.; Debarbieux, F.; Delpierre, P.; Dinkespiler, B.; Gastaldi, T.; Hustache, S.; Morel, C.; Pangaud, P.; Perez-Ponce, H.; Vigeolas, E.

    2014-09-01

    The CHIPSPECT consortium aims at building a large multi-modules CdTe based photon counting detector for hard X-ray applications. For this purpose, we tested nine XPAD3.2 single chip hybrids in various configurations (i.e. Ohmic vs. Schottky contacts or electrons vs. holes collection mode) in order to select the most performing and best suited configuration for our experimental requirements. Measurements have been done using both X-ray synchrotron beams and 241Am source. Preliminary results on the image quality, calibration, stability, homogeneity and linearity of the different types of detectors are presented.

  19. Direct measurement of clinical mammographic x-ray spectra using a CdTe spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Santos, Josilene C; Tomal, Alessandra; Furquim, Tânia A; Fausto, Agnes M F; Nogueira, Maria S; Costa, Paulo R

    2017-07-01

    To introduce and evaluate a method developed for the direct measurement of mammographic x-ray spectra using a CdTe spectrometer. The assembly of a positioning system and the design of a simple and customized alignment device for this application is described. A positioning system was developed to easily and accurately locate the CdTe detector in the x-ray beam. Additionally, an alignment device to line up the detector with the central axis of the radiation beam was designed. Direct x-ray spectra measurements were performed in two different clinical mammography units and the measured x-ray spectra were compared with computer-generated spectra. In addition, the spectrometer misalignment effect was evaluated by comparing the measured spectra when this device is aligned relatively to when it is misaligned. The positioning and alignment of the spectrometer have allowed the measurements of direct mammographic x-ray spectra in agreement with computer-generated spectra. The most accurate x-ray spectral shape, related with the minimal HVL value, and high photon fluence for measured spectra was found with the spectrometer aligned according to the proposed method. The HVL values derived from both simulated and measured x-ray spectra differ at most 1.3 and 4.5% for two mammography devices evaluated in this study. The experimental method developed in this work allows simple positioning and alignment of a spectrometer for x-ray spectra measurements given the geometrical constraints and maintenance of the original configurations of mammography machines. © 2017 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  20. Hard X-ray polarimetry with Caliste, a high performance CdTe based imaging spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antier, S.; Ferrando, P.; Limousin, O.; Caroli, E.; Curado da Silva, R. M.; Blondel, C.; Chipaux, R.; Honkimaki, V.; Horeau, B.; Laurent, P.; Maia, J. M.; Meuris, A.; Del Sordo, S.; Stephen, J. B.

    2015-06-01

    Since the initial exploration of the X- and soft γ-ray sky in the 60's, high-energy celestial sources have been mainly characterized through imaging, spectroscopy and timing analysis. Despite tremendous progress in the field, the radiation mechanisms at work in sources such as neutrons stars, black holes, and Active Galactic Nuclei are still unclear. The polarization state of the radiation is an observational parameter which brings key additional information about the physical processes in these high energy sources, allowing the discrimination between competing models which may otherwise all be consistent with other types of measurement. This is why most of the projects for the next generation of space missions covering the few tens of keV to the MeV region require a polarization measurement capability. A key element enabling this capability, in this energy range, is a detector system allowing the identification and characterization of Compton interactions as they are the main process at play. The compact hard X-ray imaging spectrometer module, developed in CEA with the generic name of "Caliste" module, is such a detector. In this paper, we present experimental results for two types of Caliste-256 modules, one based on a CdTe crystal, the other one on a CdZnTe crystal, which have been exposed to linearly polarized beams at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF). These results, obtained at 200 and 300 keV, demonstrate the capability of these modules to detect Compton events and to give an accurate determination of the polarization parameters (polarization angle and fraction) of the incoming beam. For example, applying an optimized selection to our data set, equivalent to select 90° Compton scattered interactions in the detector plane, we find a modulation factor Q of 0.78 ± 0.06 in the 200-300 keV range. The polarization angle and fraction are derived with accuracies of approximately 1° and 5 % respectively for both CdZnTe and CdTe crystals. The

  1. Thin film cadmium telluride charged particle sensors for large area neutron detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, J. W.; Smith, L.; Calkins, J.; Mejia, I.; Cantley, K. D.; Chapman, R. A.; Quevedo-Lopez, M.; Gnade, B.; Kunnen, G. R.; Allee, D. R.; Sastré-Hernández, J.; Contreras-Puente, G.; Mendoza-Pérez, R.

    2014-09-15

    Thin film semiconductor neutron detectors are an attractive candidate to replace {sup 3}He neutron detectors, due to the possibility of low cost manufacturing and the potential for large areas. Polycrystalline CdTe is found to be an excellent material for thin film charged particle detectors—an integral component of a thin film neutron detector. The devices presented here are characterized in terms of their response to alpha and gamma radiation. Individual alpha particles are detected with an intrinsic efficiency of >80%, while the devices are largely insensitive to gamma rays, which is desirable so that the detector does not give false positive counts from gamma rays. The capacitance-voltage behavior of the devices is studied and correlated to the response due to alpha radiation. When coupled with a boron-based neutron converting material, the CdTe detectors are capable of detecting thermal neutrons.

  2. New thermal-neutron solid-state electronic detector based on HgI/sub 2/ single crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Melamud, M.; Burshtein, Z.; Levi, A.; Schieber, M.M.

    1983-08-01

    The use of HgI/sub 2/ as a thermal-neutron solid-state electronic detector, in particular its application for neutron diffractometry, is demonstrated for the first time. A single crystal HgI/sub 2/ detector is used to count prompt gamma emissions (0.2--5 MeV) from (n,..gamma..) nuclear reactions in Gd or Cd foils. The neutron counting efficiency depends on the HgI/sub 2/ detector thickness. For a 1-mm thickness of HgI/sub 2/ the efficiency is about 10% compared to the efficiency of a /sup 10/BF/sub 3/ gas detector.

  3. Investigation of the peak shape parameter of CdZnTe detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartley, I.; Arlt, R.

    2001-02-01

    There is a need to define the magnitude of the asymmetry of the peak shapes (the tailing fraction) of CdTe and CdZnTe detectors. Since this tailing parameter determines to a large extent, the performance of peak fitting programs used to extract the peak areas from gamma spectra taken for the verification of nuclear material, a well-defined knowledge of this parameter is an important factor in such programs. The magnitude of the asymmetry of this tailing fraction was investigated for different models of CdTe and CdZnTe detectors. The gamma peak analysis program PkCheck (R. Gunnink, R. Arlt, Proceedings of 11th International Workshop on room temperature Semiconductor X- and gamma-ray detectors and associated electronics, 11-15 October 1999, Vienna, Austria, Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 485 (2001) 196, This issue) was used to determine the tailing fraction as a function of detector type, high voltage and other operational parameters. Although there are considerable individual differences between different detector units of the same model, a general trend towards the growing of the tailing fraction with increasing detector volume was clearly observed. The lowest fractions are observed for electrically cooled planar pin CdTe detectors operated with a charge loss corrector, followed by small size hemispheric CdZnTe detectors.

  4. A 4 π charged-particle detector array for light-ion-induced nuclear fragmentation studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwiatkowski, K.; Alexander, A.; Bracken, D. S.; Brzychczyk, J.; Dorsett, J.; Ensman, R.; Renshaw Foxford, E.; Hamilton, T.; Komisarcik, K.; McDonald, K. N.; Morley, K. B.; Poehlman, J.; Powell, C.; Viola, V. E.; Yoder, N. R.; Ottarson, J.; Madden, N.

    1994-12-01

    Operating characteristics of the Indiana Silicon Sphere 4 π detector array are outlined. The detector geometry is spherical, with 90 telescopes in the forward hemisphere and 72 at backward angles, covering a total solid angle of 74% of 4π. Each telescope consists of a simple gas-ion chamber, operated with C3F8 gas, followed by a 0.5 mm thick ion-implanted silicon detector and a 28 mm CsI(Tl) crystal, readout by a photodiode. Custom-built bias supplies and NIM preamp/shaper modules were used in conjunction with commercial CFD, TDC and ADC CAMAC units.

  5. ART-XC/SRG: status of the x-ray focal plane detector development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, Vasily; Pavlinsky, Mikhail; Akimov, Valeriy; Kuznetsova, Maria; Rotin, Alexey; Krivchenko, Alexander; Lapshov, Igor; Oleinikov, Vladimir

    2014-07-01

    The Russian Space Research Institute (IKI) has developed CdTe detectors for the focal plane of the ART-XC/SRG instrument. The CdTe crystal has dimensions about 30 × 30 × 1 mm. Top and bottom sides of the detector each contain 48 strips and a guard ring. The ASIC VA64TA1 is connected to the CdTe crystal by AC-coupling for both DSSD sides. This approach allows one to have the same ground level for both electronic parts and to operate detectors with different leakage currents without reconfiguration of the VA64TA1 chips. One CdTe crystal and two ASICs are integrated with thermal sensors and Peltier cooler in a big hybrid integrated circuit. This detector is hermetically sealed by a cover with beryllium window. For ground testing the detector volume is filled with dry nitrogen. Peltier cooler is used during ground tests only. Together with the hermetic case package it allows us to operate the detector at low temperature during all ART-XC telescope development tests. When in space, the detector cooling will be provided by a radiator and heat pipes. Polarization rate temperature and voltage dependences as well as splitting charges between electrodes are being studied. IKI manufactured dozen X-ray cameras with detectors and supporting electronics for EM, QM and flight model of the ART-XC telescope. Spectroscopic and imaging performances of the detectors were tested on the IKI's X-Ray Calibration Facility. Current status of the focal plane detector development and testing will be presented.

  6. Resetting the Defect Chemistry in CdTe

    SciTech Connect

    Metzger, Wyatt K.; Burst, James; Albin, David; Colegrove, Eric; Moseley, John; Duenow, Joel; Farrell, Stuart; Moutinho, Helio; Reese, Matt; Johnston, Steve; Barnes, Teresa; Perkins, Craig; Guthrey, Harvey; Al-Jassim, Mowafak

    2015-06-14

    CdTe cell efficiencies have increased from 17% to 21% in the past three years and now rival polycrystalline Si [1]. Research is now targeting 25% to displace Si, attain costs less than 40 cents/W, and reach grid parity. Recent efficiency gains have come largely from greater photocurrent. There is still headroom to lower costs and improve performance by increasing open-circuit voltage (Voc) and fill factor. Record-efficiency CdTe cells have been limited to Voc <; 880 mV, whereas GaAs can attain Voc of 1.10 V with a slightly smaller bandgap [2,3]. To overcome this barrier, we seek to understand and increase lifetime and carrier concentration in CdTe. In polycrystalline structures, lifetime can be limited by interface and grain-boundary recombination, and attaining high carrier concentration is complicated by morphology.

  7. Shockley-Read-Hall lifetimes in CdTe

    SciTech Connect

    Buurma, C.; Sivananthan, S.; Krishnamurthy, S.

    2014-07-07

    A combination of first principles electronic structure calculations, Green's function method, and empirical tight-binding Hamiltonian method is used to evaluate the minority carrier lifetimes of CdTe due to recombination via native point defects in CdTe. For defect energy levels near mid-gap, our calculated value of the Shockley-Read-Hall capture cross section for both electrons and holes is ~10⁻¹³ cm², which is considerably different from the most commonly employed values. We further find that minority carrier lifetimes in doped CdTe are affected more by defect levels closer to the Fermi level than those in the mid-gap.

  8. Advances in CdTe R&D at NREL

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, X.; Zhou, J.; Keane, J. C.; Dhere, R. G.; Albin, D. S.; Gessert, T. A.; DeHart, C.; Duda, A.; Ward, J. J.; Yan, Y.; Teeter, G.; Levi, D. H.; Asher, S.; Perkins, C.; Moutinho, H. R.; To, B.

    2005-11-01

    This paper summarizes the following R&D accomplishments at National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL): (1) Developed several novel materials and world-record high-efficiency CdTe solar cell, (2) Developed "one heat-up step" manufacturing processes, and (3) Demonstrated 13.9% transparent CdTe cell and 15.3% CdTe/CIS polycrystalline tandem solar cell. Cadmium telluride has been well recognized as a promising photovoltaic material for thin-film solar cells because of its near-optimum bandgap of ~1.5 eV and its high absorption coefficient. Impressive results have been achieved in the past few years for polycrystalline CdTe thin-film solar cells at NREL. In this paper, we summarize some recent R&D activities at NREL.

  9. Recent advances in thin film CdTe solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ferekides, C.S.; Ceekala, V.; Dugan, K.; Killian, L.; Oman, D.; Swaminathan, R.; Morel, D.

    1996-01-01

    CdTe thin film solar cells have been fabricated on a variety of glass substrates (borosilicate and soda lime). The CdS films were deposited to a thickness of 500{endash}2000 A by the chemical bath deposition (CBD), rf sputtering, or close spaced sublimation (CSS) processes. The CdTe films were deposited by CSS in the temperature range of 450{endash}625{degree}C. The main objective of this work is to fabricate high efficiency solar cells using processes that can meet low cost manufacturing requirements. In an attempt to enhance the blue response of the CdTe cells, ZnS films have also been prepared (CBD, rf sputtering, CSS) as an alternative window layer to CdS. Device behavior has been found to be consistent with a recombination model. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  10. Optical measurements for excitation of CdTe quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vladescu, Marian; Feies, Valentin; Schiopu, Paul; Craciun, Alexandru; Grosu, Neculai; Manea, Adrian

    2016-12-01

    The paper presents the experimental results obtained using a laboratory setup installation for fluorescence excitation of CdTe QDs used as biomarkers for clinical diagnostics. Quantum Dots (QDs) made of Cadmium Telluride (CdTe), are highly fluorescent and they are used as robust biomarkers. Generally, QDs are referred to as the zero-dimensional colloidal crystals that possess strong size dependence and multi-colored luminescence properties. Along with its intrinsic features, such as sharp and symmetric emission, photo-stability and high quantum yields, QDs play a vital role in various applications, namely the identification of the chemical moieties, clinical diagnostics, optoelectronics, bio-imaging and bio-sensing1.

  11. Electrical properties of single CdTe nanowires.

    PubMed

    Matei, Elena; Florica, Camelia; Costas, Andreea; Toimil-Molares, María Eugenia; Enculescu, Ionut

    2015-01-01

    Ion track, nanoporous membranes were employed as templates for the preparation of CdTe nanowires. For this purpose, electrochemical deposition from a bath containing Cd and Te ions was employed. This process leads to high aspect ratio CdTe nanowires, which were harvested and placed on a substrate with lithographically patterned, interdigitated electrodes. Focused ion beam-induced metallization was used to produce individual nanowires with electrical contacts and electrical measurements were performed on these individual nanowires. The influence of a bottom gate was investigated and it was found that surface passivation leads to improved transport properties.

  12. Electrical properties of single CdTe nanowires

    PubMed Central

    Matei, Elena; Florica, Camelia; Costas, Andreea; Toimil-Molares, María Eugenia

    2015-01-01

    Summary Ion track, nanoporous membranes were employed as templates for the preparation of CdTe nanowires. For this purpose, electrochemical deposition from a bath containing Cd and Te ions was employed. This process leads to high aspect ratio CdTe nanowires, which were harvested and placed on a substrate with lithographically patterned, interdigitated electrodes. Focused ion beam-induced metallization was used to produce individual nanowires with electrical contacts and electrical measurements were performed on these individual nanowires. The influence of a bottom gate was investigated and it was found that surface passivation leads to improved transport properties. PMID:25821685

  13. Test of Prototype Detector for Retrospective Neutron Dosimetry of Reactor Internals and Vessel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Katsumi; Nemezawa, Shigeki; Kubota, Isamu; Hayashi, Haruhisa

    2009-08-01

    A prototype detector for simple and non-destructive retrospective neutron dosimetry was made. A Cadmium Telluride (CdTe) detector was used as a detector to measure the nuclides 54Mn, 58Co, and 60Co that were generated in reactor internals and vessels. The detector is surrounded by a tungsten collimator which shields background gamma-rays and detects gamma-rays originating from the measuring point. Neutron fluence is calculated using the pre-calculated response, measuring time, decay time and reactor power history. The applicability of this detector was tested by measuring parts of irradiated reactor internals.

  14. Portable electro-mechanically cooled high-resolution germanium detector

    SciTech Connect

    Neufeld, K.W.; Ruhter, W.D.

    1995-05-01

    We have integrated a small, highly-reliable, electro-mechanical cryo-cooler with a high-resolution germanium detector for portable/field applications. The system weighs 6.8 kg and requires 40 watts of power to operate once the detector is cooled to its operating temperature. the detector is a 500 mm{sup 2} by 20-mm thick low-energy configuration that gives a full-width at half maximum (FWHM) energy resolution of 523 eV at 122 keV, when cooled with liquid nitrogen. The energy resolution of the detector, when cooled with the electro-mechanical cooler, is 570 eV at 122 keV. We have field tested this system in measurements of plutonium and uranium for isotopic and enrichment information using the MGA and MGAU analysis programs without any noticeable effects on the results.

  15. Development and performance of a gamma-ray imaging detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gálvez, J. L.; Hernanz, M.; Álvarez, J. M.; La Torre, M.; Álvarez, L.; Karelin, D.; Lozano, M.; Pellegrini, G.; Ullán, M.; Cabruja, E.; Martínez, R.; Chmeissani, M.; Puigdengoles, C.

    2012-09-01

    In the last few years we have been working on feasibility studies of future instruments in the gamma-ray range, from several keV up to a few MeV. The innovative concept of focusing gamma-ray telescopes in this energy range, should allow reaching unprecedented sensitivities and angular resolution, thanks to the decoupling of collecting area and detector volume. High sensitivities are essential to perform detailed studies of cosmic explosions and cosmic accelerators, e.g., Supernovae, Classical Novae, Supernova Remnants (SNRs), Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs), Pulsars, Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN). In order to achieve the needed performance, a gamma-ray imaging detector with mm spatial resolution and large enough efficiency is required. In order to fulfill the combined requirement of high detection efficiency with good spatial and energy resolution, an initial prototype of a gamma-ray imaging detector based on CdTe pixel detectors is being developed. It consists of a stack of several layers of CdTe detectors with increasing thickness, in order to enhance the gamma-ray absorption in the Compton regime. A CdTe module detector lies in a 11 x 11 pixel detector with a pixel pitch of 1mm attached to the readout chip. Each pixel is bump bonded to a fan-out board made of alumina (Al2O3) substrate and routed to the corresponding input channel of the readout ASIC to measure pixel position and pulse height for each incident gamma-ray photon. We will report the main features of the gamma-ray imaging detector performance such as the energy resolution for a set of radiation sources at different operating temperatures.

  16. A method to improve spectral resolution in planar semiconductor gamma-ray detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Keele, B.D.; Addleman, R.S.; Troyer, G.L.

    1995-05-01

    This paper describes an empirically derived algorithm to compensate for charge trapping in CdTe, CdZnTe, and other planar semiconductor detectors. The method is demonstrated to be an improvement over available systems and application to experimental data is shown.

  17. High-Resolution PET Detector. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Karp, Joel

    2014-03-26

    The objective of this project was to develop an understanding of the limits of performance for a high resolution PET detector using an approach based on continuous scintillation crystals rather than pixelated crystals. The overall goal was to design a high-resolution detector, which requires both high spatial resolution and high sensitivity for 511 keV gammas. Continuous scintillation detectors (Anger cameras) have been used extensively for both single-photon and PET scanners, however, these instruments were based on NaI(Tl) scintillators using relatively large, individual photo-multipliers. In this project we investigated the potential of this type of detector technology to achieve higher spatial resolution through the use of improved scintillator materials and photo-sensors, and modification of the detector surface to optimize the light response function.We achieved an average spatial resolution of 3-mm for a 25-mm thick, LYSO continuous detector using a maximum likelihood position algorithm and shallow slots cut into the entrance surface.

  18. Characterization of Pixelated Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride Detectors for Astrophysical Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaskin, Jessica; Sharma, Dharma; Ramsey, Brian; Seller, Paul

    2003-01-01

    Comparisons of charge sharing and charge loss measurements between two pixelated Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride (CdZnTe) detectors are discussed. These properties along with the detector geometry help to define the limiting energy resolution and spatial resolution of the detector in question. The first detector consists of a 1-mm-thick piece of CdZnTe sputtered with a 4x4 array of pixels with pixel pitch of 750 microns (inter-pixel gap is 100 microns). Signal readout is via discrete ultra-low-noise preamplifiers, one for each of the 16 pixels. The second detector consists of a 2-mm-thick piece of CdZnTe sputtered with a 16x16 array of pixels with a pixel pitch of 300 microns (inter-pixel gap is 50 microns). This crystal is bonded to a custom-built readout chip (ASIC) providing all front-end electronics to each of the 256 independent pixels. These detectors act as precursors to that which will be used at the focal plane of the High Energy Replicated Optics (HERO) telescope currently being developed at Marshall Space Flight Center. With a telescope focal length of 6 meters, the detector needs to have a spatial resolution of around 200 microns in order to take full advantage of the HERO angular resolution. We discuss to what degree charge sharing will degrade energy resolution but will improve our spatial resolution through position interpolation.

  19. Characterization of Pixelated Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride Detectors for Astrophysical Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaskin, Jessica; Sharma, Dharma; Ramsey, Brian; Seller, Paul

    2003-01-01

    Comparisons of charge sharing and charge loss measurements between two pixelated Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride (CdZnTe) detectors are discussed. These properties along with the detector geometry help to define the limiting energy resolution and spatial resolution of the detector in question. The first detector consists of a 1-mm-thick piece of CdZnTe sputtered with a 4x4 array of pixels with pixel pitch of 750 microns (inter-pixel gap is 100 microns). Signal readout is via discrete ultra-low-noise preamplifiers, one for each of the 16 pixels. The second detector consists of a 2-mm-thick piece of CdZnTe sputtered with a 16x16 array of pixels with a pixel pitch of 300 microns (inter-pixel gap is 50 microns). This crystal is bonded to a custom-built readout chip (ASIC) providing all front-end electronics to each of the 256 independent pixels. These detectors act as precursors to that which will be used at the focal plane of the High Energy Replicated Optics (HERO) telescope currently being developed at Marshall Space Flight Center. With a telescope focal length of 6 meters, the detector needs to have a spatial resolution of around 200 microns in order to take full advantage of the HERO angular resolution. We discuss to what degree charge sharing will degrade energy resolution but will improve our spatial resolution through position interpolation.

  20. Size controlled preparation of CdTe nanoparticles by apoferritin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Shasha; Kim, Ji Hyeon; Park, Sang Joon

    2017-06-01

    Cadmium telluride quantum dots (CdTe QDs) were synthesized in the cavity of horse spleen apoferritin and CdTe-apoferritin complex was fluorescent. Apoferritin is a popular bio-template to prepare various nanoparticles with narrow size distribution due to the confinement of the hollow protein shell. In this work, we controlled the diameters of CdTe NPs by changing the reaction conditions. Altering the molar ratio of Cd to Te from 1:0.05 to 1:0.2 and pH can change the diameters of NPs cores. The synthesized QDs were characterized by photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy, UV-vis spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The results showed that the PL intensity decreased when the Cd/Te molar ratio was decreased from 1:0.05 to 1:0.3 and pH was increased from 9.01 to 9.96. In addition, it was proven that the existence of apoferritin is necessary for the present synthetic method and the formation of CdTe QDs in the inner cavity of apoferritin.

  1. Radiative and interfacial recombination in CdTe heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Swartz, C. H. Edirisooriya, M.; LeBlanc, E. G.; Noriega, O. C.; Jayathilaka, P. A. R. D.; Ogedengbe, O. S.; Hancock, B. L.; Holtz, M.; Myers, T. H.; Zaunbrecher, K. N.

    2014-12-01

    Double heterostructures (DH) were produced consisting of a CdTe film between two wide band gap barriers of CdMgTe alloy. A combined method was developed to quantify radiative and non-radiative recombination rates by examining the dependence of photoluminescence (PL) on both excitation intensity and time. The measured PL characteristics, and the interface state density extracted by modeling, indicate that the radiative efficiency of CdMgTe/CdTe DHs is comparable to that of AlGaAs/GaAs DHs, with interface state densities in the low 10{sup 10 }cm{sup −2} and carrier lifetimes as long as 240 ns. The radiative recombination coefficient of CdTe is found to be near 10{sup −10} cm{sup 3}s{sup −1}. CdTe film growth on bulk CdTe substrates resulted in a homoepitaxial interface layer with a high non-radiative recombination rate.

  2. Self-compensation in arsenic doping of CdTe

    DOE PAGES

    Ablekim, Tursun; Swain, Santosh K.; Yin, Wan -Jian; ...

    2017-07-04

    Efficient p-type doping in CdTe has remained a critical challenge for decades, limiting the performance of CdTe-based semiconductor devices. Arsenic is a promising p-type dopant; however, reproducible doping with high concentration is difficult and carrier lifetime is low. We systematically studied defect structures in As-doped CdTe using high-purity single crystal wafers to investigate the mechanisms that limit p-type doping. Two As-doped CdTe with varying acceptor density and two undoped CdTe were grown in Cd-rich and Te-rich environments. The defect structures were investigated by thermoelectric-effect spectroscopy (TEES), and first-principles calculations were used for identifying and assigning the experimentally observed defects. Measurementsmore » revealed activation of As is very low in both As-doped samples with very short lifetimes indicating strong compensation and the presence of significant carrier trapping defects. Defect studies suggest two acceptors and one donor level were introduced by As doping with activation energies at ~88 meV, ~293 meV and ~377 meV. In particular, the peak shown at ~162 K in the TEES spectra is very prominent in both As-doped samples, indicating a signature of AX-center donors. In conclusion, the AX-centers are believed to be responsible for most of the compensation because of their low formation energy and very prominent peak intensity in TEES spectra.« less

  3. Two-dimensional CdTe photon counting imager for hard x-ray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, Toru; Morii, Hisashi; Ohashi, Gosuke; Tomita, Yasuhiro; Hatanaka, Yoshinori

    2006-08-01

    Two dimension real-time radiation imaging device for the hard ray with photon-counting type CdTe radiation detector was researched and developed. It is a device with the 35×35 arranged 1225 pixels including a virtual pixel in pixel pitch 1/10-inch pitch. All pixels are independently connected by original ASIC, and it has the energy distinction ability with five energy thresholds. The desecrated CdTe diodes were adopted in the photoelectric conversion elements by using eight ASIC of original development with maximum count rate 2Mcps / pixel and 5 energy distinction thresholds in this prototype. This prototype is a portable type device that can be the room temperature operation, it is possible to connect it with the laptop computer as a camera device of two dimension type to be able to take move of a real-time scene (an actual frame rate depends on signal conditioning PC) via USB2.0. The imaging area is about 3.5-inch corner. This time, it has been understood to be able to detect slight information that has tended to be overlooked up to now because it is possible to take picture of Am241, Co57, and Cs137 simultaneously, to try the animation taking picture that distinguishes three isotopes, and to set the best range of each at the same time as being able to distinguish these three kinds by the energy distinction clearly. It characterizes in corresponding to an incidence rate at the X-ray tube level, and it corresponds to taking picture of the animation of the penetration image that uses X rays.

  4. Electrostatic assembles and optical properties of Au CdTe QDs and Ag/Au CdTe QDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Dongzhi; Wang, Wenxing; Chen, Qifan; Huang, Yuping; Xu, Shukun

    2008-09-01

    Au-CdTe and Ag/Au-CdTe assembles were firstly investigated through the static interaction between positively charged cysteamine-stabilized CdTe quantum dots (QDs) and negatively charged Au or core/shell Ag/Au nano-particles (NCs). The CdTe QDs synthesized in aqueous solution were capped with cysteamine which endowed them positive charges on the surface. Both Au and Ag/Au NCs were prepared through reducing precursors with gallic acid obtained from the hydrolysis of natural plant poly-phenols and favored negative charges on the surface of NCs. The fluorescence spectra of CdTe QDs exhibited strong quenching with the increase of added Au or Ag/Au NCs. Railey resonance scattering spectra of Au or Ag/Au NCs increased firstly and decreased latter with the concentration of CdTe QDs, accompanied with the solution color changing from red to purple and colorless at last. Experimental results on the effects of gallic acid, chloroauric acid tetrahydrate and other reagents demonstrated the static interaction occurred between QDs and NCs. This finding reveals the possibilities to design and control optical process and electromagnetic coupling in hybrid structures.

  5. Data-Processing Strategies for Crossed-Strip Gamma-Ray Detectors

    PubMed Central

    Durko, Heather L.; McDonald, Benjamin S.; Shokouhi, Sepideh; Furenlid, Lars R.; Barrett, Harrison H.; Peterson, Todd E.

    2015-01-01

    Crossed-strip gamma-ray detectors are an attractive option for small-animal SPECT imagers due to their high space-bandwidth product. In systems with independent triggering of the two sides of the detector, advanced data-processing techniques are required to accurately determine gamma-ray interaction locations and energy deposition. Optimal detector operation further relies on rigorous detector characterization in order to achieve detector triggering uniformity and best timing resolution and to permit position and energy estimation with maximum-likelihood methods. We describe algorithms and methods developed for calibrating and characterizing a recently fabricated system based on 1024-strips-per-side 1-mm-thick silicon detectors. PMID:26778912

  6. Data-Processing Strategies for Crossed-Strip Gamma-Ray Detectors.

    PubMed

    Durko, Heather L; McDonald, Benjamin S; Shokouhi, Sepideh; Furenlid, Lars R; Barrett, Harrison H; Peterson, Todd E

    2008-10-01

    Crossed-strip gamma-ray detectors are an attractive option for small-animal SPECT imagers due to their high space-bandwidth product. In systems with independent triggering of the two sides of the detector, advanced data-processing techniques are required to accurately determine gamma-ray interaction locations and energy deposition. Optimal detector operation further relies on rigorous detector characterization in order to achieve detector triggering uniformity and best timing resolution and to permit position and energy estimation with maximum-likelihood methods. We describe algorithms and methods developed for calibrating and characterizing a recently fabricated system based on 1024-strips-per-side 1-mm-thick silicon detectors.

  7. Comparative investigation of the detective quantum efficiency of direct and indirect conversion detector technologies in dedicated breast CT.

    PubMed

    Kuttig, Jan D; Steiding, Christian; Kolditz, Daniel; Hupfer, Martin; Karolczak, Marek; Kalender, Willi A

    2015-06-01

    To investigate the dose saving potential of direct-converting CdTe photon-counting detector technology for dedicated breast CT. We analyzed the modulation transfer function (MTF), the noise power spectrum (NPS) and the detective quantum efficiency (DQE) of two detector technologies, suitable for breast CT (BCT): a flat-panel energy-integrating detector with a 70 μm and a 208 μm thick gadolinium oxysulfide (GOS) and a 150 μm thick cesium iodide (CsI) scintillator and a photon-counting detector with a 1000 μm thick CdTe sensor. The measurements for GOS scintillator thicknesses of 70 μm and 208 μm delivered 10% pre-sampled MTF values of 6.6 mm(-1) and 3.2 mm(-1), and DQE(0) values of 23% and 61%. The 10% pre-sampled MTF value for the 150 μm thick CsI scintillator 6.9 mm(-1), and the DQE(0) value was 49%. The CdTe sensor reached a 10% pre-sampled MTF value of 8.5 mm(-1) and a DQE(0) value of 85%. The photon-counting CdTe detector technology allows for significant dose reduction compared to the energy-integrating scintillation detector technology used in BCT today. Our comparative evaluation indicates that a high potential dose saving may be possible for BCT by using CdTe detectors, without loss of spatial resolution. Copyright © 2015 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. TFTR alpha extraction and measurement: Development and testing of advanced alpha detectors: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Wehring, B.W.

    1988-02-15

    Advanced alpha-particle detectors made of heavy elements were investigated as alternatives to silicon surface-barrier detectors for the ''foil-neutralization technique'' of alpha-particle diagnostics in fusion reactors with high neutron backgrounds. From an extensive literature review, it was decided that HgI/sub 2/ would make a more suitable detector for alpha-particle diagnostics than other heavy element detectors such as CdTe. Thus, HgI/sub 2/ detectors were designed and fabricated. Experimental tests were performed to determine detector characteristics and detector responses to alpha particles. Radiation noise measurements were also performed using the North Carolina State University PULSTAR nuclear reactor for both the HgI/sub 2/ detectors and commercial Si(Au) surface barrier detectors. 15 refs., 1 fig.

  9. Direct Measurement of Mammographic X-Ray Spectra with a Digital CdTe Detection System

    PubMed Central

    Abbene, Leonardo; Gerardi, Gaetano; Principato, Fabio; Sordo, Stefano Del; Raso, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    In this work we present a detection system, based on a CdTe detector and an innovative digital pulse processing (DPP) system, for high-rate X-ray spectroscopy in mammography (1–30 keV). The DPP system performs a height and shape analysis of the detector pulses, sampled and digitized by a 14-bit, 100 MHz ADC. We show the results of the characterization of the detection system both at low and high photon counting rates by using monoenergetic X-ray sources and a nonclinical X-ray tube. The detection system exhibits excellent performance up to 830 kcps with an energy resolution of 4.5% FWHM at 22.1 keV. Direct measurements of clinical molybdenum X-ray spectra were carried out by using a pinhole collimator and a custom alignment device. A comparison with the attenuation curves and the half value layer values, obtained from the measured and simulated spectra, from an ionization chamber and from a solid state dosimeter, also shows the accuracy of the measurements. These results make the proposed detection system a very attractive tool for both laboratory research, calibration of dosimeters and advanced quality controls in mammography. PMID:22969406

  10. First-principles study of roles of Cu and Cl in polycrystalline CdTe

    DOE PAGES

    Yang, Ji -Hui; Yin, Wan -Jian; Park, Ji -Sang; ...

    2016-01-25

    In this study, Cu and Cl treatments are important processes to achieve high efficiency polycrystalline cadmium telluride (CdTe) solar cells, thus it will be beneficial to understand the roles they play in both bulk CdTe and CdTe grain boundaries (GBs). Using first-principles calculations, we systematically study Cu and Cl-related defects in bulk CdTe. We find that Cl has only a limited effect on improving p-type doping and too much Cl can induce deep traps in bulk CdTe, whereas Cu can enhance ptype doping of bulk CdTe. In the presence of GBs, we find that, in general, Cl and Cu willmore » prefer to stay at GBs, especially for those with Te-Te wrong bonds, in agreement with experimental observations.« less

  11. First-principles study of roles of Cu and Cl in polycrystalline CdTe

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Ji -Hui; Yin, Wan -Jian; Park, Ji -Sang; Metzger, Wyatt; Wei, Su -Huai

    2016-01-25

    In this study, Cu and Cl treatments are important processes to achieve high efficiency polycrystalline cadmium telluride (CdTe) solar cells, thus it will be beneficial to understand the roles they play in both bulk CdTe and CdTe grain boundaries (GBs). Using first-principles calculations, we systematically study Cu and Cl-related defects in bulk CdTe. We find that Cl has only a limited effect on improving p-type doping and too much Cl can induce deep traps in bulk CdTe, whereas Cu can enhance ptype doping of bulk CdTe. In the presence of GBs, we find that, in general, Cl and Cu will prefer to stay at GBs, especially for those with Te-Te wrong bonds, in agreement with experimental observations.

  12. Characterization of CdTe films deposited at various bath temperatures and concentrations using electrophoretic deposition.

    PubMed

    Daud, Mohd Norizam Md; Zakaria, Azmi; Jafari, Atefeh; Ghazali, Mohd Sabri Mohd; Abdullah, Wan Rafizah Wan; Zainal, Zulkarnain

    2012-01-01

    CdTe film was deposited using the electrophoretic deposition technique onto an ITO glass at various bath temperatures. Four batch film compositions were used by mixing 1 to 4 wt% concentration of CdTe powder with 10 mL of a solution of methanol and toluene. X-ray Diffraction analysis showed that the films exhibited polycrystalline nature of zinc-blende structure with the (111) orientation as the most prominent peak. From the Atomic Force Microscopy, the thickness and surface roughness of the CdTe film increased with the increase of CdTe concentration. The optical energy band gap of film decreased with the increase of CdTe concentration, and with the increase of isothermal bath temperature. The film thickness increased with respect to the increase of CdTe concentration and bath temperature, and following, the numerical expression for the film thickness with respect to these two variables has been established.

  13. Characterization of CdTe Films Deposited at Various Bath Temperatures and Concentrations Using Electrophoretic Deposition

    PubMed Central

    Daud, Mohd Norizam Md; Zakaria, Azmi; Jafari, Atefeh; Ghazali, Mohd Sabri Mohd; Abdullah, Wan Rafizah Wan; Zainal, Zulkarnain

    2012-01-01

    CdTe film was deposited using the electrophoretic deposition technique onto an ITO glass at various bath temperatures. Four batch film compositions were used by mixing 1 to 4 wt% concentration of CdTe powder with 10 mL of a solution of methanol and toluene. X-ray Diffraction analysis showed that the films exhibited polycrystalline nature of zinc-blende structure with the (111) orientation as the most prominent peak. From the Atomic Force Microscopy, the thickness and surface roughness of the CdTe film increased with the increase of CdTe concentration. The optical energy band gap of film decreased with the increase of CdTe concentration, and with the increase of isothermal bath temperature. The film thickness increased with respect to the increase of CdTe concentration and bath temperature, and following, the numerical expression for the film thickness with respect to these two variables has been established. PMID:22754325

  14. Fabrication of CdTe quantum dots-apoferritin arrays for detection of dopamine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Thi Hoa; Kim, Ji Hyeon; Park, Sang Joon

    2017-06-01

    A method was proposed for detecting dopamine using a two-dimensional CdTe quantum dots (QDs)-apoferritin array fabricated on a modified silicon (Si) surface. First, CdTe QDs were synthesized in the cavity of horse spleen apoferritin (HsAFr). Then, the characterization of CdTe QDs in apoferritin was performed using photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. Transmission electron microscopy was used to analyze the size and structure of CdTe QDs. An atomic force microscopy image was obtained to evaluate the topography of the Si surface. In addition, the PL change resulting from the conjugation reaction of the CdTe QDs-apoferritin array with dopamine was investigated. When the array was linked to dopamine, a significant quenching of fluorescence was observed. Accordingly, the CdTe QDs-apoferritin arrays could be employed as useful sensing media for dopamine detection.

  15. First-principles study of roles of Cu and Cl in polycrystalline CdTe

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Ji-Hui; Park, Ji-Sang; Metzger, Wyatt; Yin, Wan-Jian; Wei, Su-Huai

    2016-01-28

    Cu and Cl treatments are important processes to achieve high efficiency polycrystalline cadmium telluride (CdTe) solar cells, thus it will be beneficial to understand the roles they play in both bulk CdTe and CdTe grain boundaries (GBs). Using first-principles calculations, we systematically study Cu and Cl-related defects in bulk CdTe. We find that Cl has only a limited effect on improving p-type doping and too much Cl can induce deep traps in bulk CdTe, whereas Cu can enhance p-type doping of bulk CdTe. In the presence of GBs, we find that, in general, Cl and Cu will prefer to stay at GBs, especially for those with Te-Te wrong bonds, in agreement with experimental observations.

  16. Hard x-ray response of pixellated CdZnTe detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Abbene, L.; Caccia, S.; Bertuccio, G.

    2009-06-15

    In recent years, the development of cadmium zinc telluride (CdZnTe) detectors for x-ray and gamma ray spectrometry has grown rapidly. The good room temperature performance and the high spatial resolution of pixellated CdZnTe detectors make them very attractive in space-borne x-ray astronomy, mainly as focal plane detectors for the new generation of hard x-ray focusing telescopes. In this work, we investigated on the spectroscopic performance of two pixellated CdZnTe detectors coupled with a custom low noise and low power readout application specific integrated circuit (ASIC). The detectors (10x10x1 and 10x10x2 mm{sup 3} single crystals) have an anode layout based on an array of 256 pixels with a geometric pitch of 0.5 mm. The ASIC, fabricated in 0.8 mum BiCMOS technology, is equipped with eight independent channels (preamplifier and shaper) and characterized by low power consumption (0.5 mW/channel) and low noise (150-500 electrons rms). The spectroscopic results point out the good energy resolution of both detectors at room temperature [5.8% full width at half maximum (FWHM) at 59.5 keV for the 1 mm thick detector; 5.5% FWHM at 59.5 keV for the 2 mm thick detector) and low tailing in the measured spectra, confirming the single charge carrier sensing properties of the CdZnTe detectors equipped with a pixellated anode layout. Temperature measurements show optimum performance of the system (detector and electronics) at T=10 deg.C and performance degradation at lower temperatures. The detectors and the ASIC were developed by our collaboration as two small focal plane detector prototypes for hard x-ray multilayer telescopes operating in the 20-70 keV energy range.

  17. Hard x-ray response of pixellated CdZnTe detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbene, L.; Del Sordo, S.; Caroli, E.; Gerardi, G.; Raso, G.; Caccia, S.; Bertuccio, G.

    2009-06-01

    In recent years, the development of cadmium zinc telluride (CdZnTe) detectors for x-ray and gamma ray spectrometry has grown rapidly. The good room temperature performance and the high spatial resolution of pixellated CdZnTe detectors make them very attractive in space-borne x-ray astronomy, mainly as focal plane detectors for the new generation of hard x-ray focusing telescopes. In this work, we investigated on the spectroscopic performance of two pixellated CdZnTe detectors coupled with a custom low noise and low power readout application specific integrated circuit (ASIC). The detectors (10×10×1 and 10×10×2 mm3 single crystals) have an anode layout based on an array of 256 pixels with a geometric pitch of 0.5 mm. The ASIC, fabricated in 0.8 μm BiCMOS technology, is equipped with eight independent channels (preamplifier and shaper) and characterized by low power consumption (0.5 mW/channel) and low noise (150-500 electrons rms). The spectroscopic results point out the good energy resolution of both detectors at room temperature [5.8% full width at half maximum (FWHM) at 59.5 keV for the 1 mm thick detector; 5.5% FWHM at 59.5 keV for the 2 mm thick detector) and low tailing in the measured spectra, confirming the single charge carrier sensing properties of the CdZnTe detectors equipped with a pixellated anode layout. Temperature measurements show optimum performance of the system (detector and electronics) at T =10 °C and performance degradation at lower temperatures. The detectors and the ASIC were developed by our collaboration as two small focal plane detector prototypes for hard x-ray multilayer telescopes operating in the 20-70 keV energy range.

  18. High resolution gamma detector for small-animal positron emission tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Tao

    In this study, the performance of continuous miniature crystal element (cMiCE) detectors with LYSO crystals of different thickness were investigated. Potential designs of a cMiCE small animal positron emission tomography scanner were also evaluated by an analytical simulation approach. The cMiCE detector was proposed as a high sensitivity, low cost alternative to the prevailing discrete crystal detectors. A statistics based positioning (SBP) algorithm was developed to solve the scintillation position estimation problem and proved to be successful on a cMiCE detector with a 4 mm thick crystal. By assuming a Gaussian distribution, the distributions of the photomultiplier signals could be characterized by mean and variance, which are functions of scintillation position. After calibrating the detector on a grid of locations, a 2D table of the mean and variance can be built. The SBP algorithm searches the tables to find the location that maximizes the likelihood between the mean and variance of known positions and the incoming scintillation event. In this work, the performance of the SBP algorithm on cMiCE detectors with thicker crystals (6 and 8 mm) was studied. The stopping power of a cMiCE detector is 40% and 49% for 6 and 8 mm thick crystals respectively. The intrinsic spatial resolution is 1.2 mm and 1.4 mm FWHM for the center and corner sections of a 6 mm thick crystal detector, and 1.3 mm and 1.6 mm for center and corner of an 8 mm thick crystal detector. These results demonstrate that the cMiCE detector is a promising candidate for high resolution, high sensitivity PET applications. A maximum-likelihood (ML) clustering method was developed to empirically separate the experimental data set into two to four subgroups according to the depth-of-interaction of the detected photons. This method enabled us to build 2-DOI lookup tables (LUT) (mean and variance lookup tables for front group and back group). Using the 2-DOI SBP LUTs, the scintillation position and DOI

  19. Optimization of multiplanar reformations from isotropic data sets acquired with 16-detector row helical CT scanner.

    PubMed

    Jaffe, Tracy A; Nelson, Rendon C; Johnson, G Allan; Lee, Ellie R; Yoshizumi, Terry T; Lowry, Carolyn R; Bullard, Anthony B; DeLong, David M; Paulson, Erik K

    2006-01-01

    Institutional review board approval and waiver of consent were obtained for the patient component of this retrospective HIPAA-compliant study. By using an anthropomorphic phantom and metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor detectors, radiation dose was determined for one eight-detector row and two 16-detector row computed tomographic (CT) protocols. A custom phantom was scanned by using the three protocols to identify isotropy. Contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs) were determined for the same protocols by using a third phantom. Seven patients had undergone isotropic 16-detector row CT of the abdomen and pelvis. Anonymized coronal reformations at various thicknesses were ranked qualitatively by three radiologists. Effective dose equivalents were similar for the eight- and 16-detector row protocols. When transverse and coronal reformations of data acquired in the custom phantom were compared, coronal reformations obtained with the 16-detector row and 0.625-mm section thickness protocol were found to be nearly identical to the transverse image for all sets of line pairs. CNRs were consistently highest on 5-mm-thick coronal reformations (CNR range, 1.2-3.3). For qualitative assessment, 2- and 3-mm-thick coronal reformations were consistently preferred.

  20. Choice of Substrate Material for Epitaxial CdTe Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Tao; Kanevce, Ana; Sites, James R.

    2015-06-14

    Epitaxial CdTe with high quality, low defect density, and high carrier concentration should in principle yield high-efficiency photovoltaic devices. However, insufficient effort has been given to explore the choice of substrate for high-efficiency epitaxial CdTe solar cells. In this paper, we use numerical simulations to investigate three crystalline substrates: silicon (Si), InSb, and CdTe each substrate material are generally discussed.

  1. Imaging performance comparison between a LaBr{sub 3}:Ce scintillator based and a CdTe semiconductor based photon counting compact gamma camera

    SciTech Connect

    Russo, P.; Mettivier, G.; Pani, R.; Pellegrini, R.; Cinti, M. N.; Bennati, P.

    2009-04-15

    The authors report on the performance of two small field of view, compact gamma cameras working in single photon counting in planar imaging tests at 122 and 140 keV. The first camera is based on a LaBr{sub 3}:Ce scintillator continuous crystal (49x49x5 mm{sup 3}) assembled with a flat panel multianode photomultiplier tube with parallel readout. The second one belongs to the class of semiconductor hybrid pixel detectors, specifically, a CdTe pixel detector (14x14x1 mm{sup 3}) with 256x256 square pixels and a pitch of 55 {mu}m, read out by a CMOS single photon counting integrated circuit of the Medipix2 series. The scintillation camera was operated with selectable energy window while the CdTe camera was operated with a single low-energy detection threshold of about 20 keV, i.e., without energy discrimination. The detectors were coupled to pinhole or parallel-hole high-resolution collimators. The evaluation of their overall performance in basic imaging tasks is presented through measurements of their detection efficiency, intrinsic spatial resolution, noise, image SNR, and contrast recovery. The scintillation and CdTe cameras showed, respectively, detection efficiencies at 122 keV of 83% and 45%, intrinsic spatial resolutions of 0.9 mm and 75 {mu}m, and total background noises of 40.5 and 1.6 cps. Imaging tests with high-resolution parallel-hole and pinhole collimators are also reported.

  2. Radiation detectors: needs and prospects

    SciTech Connect

    Armantrout, G.A.

    1981-01-01

    Important applications for x- and ..gamma..-ray spectroscopy are found in prospecting, materials characterization, environmental monitoring, the life sciences, and nuclear physics. The specific requirements vary for each application with varying degrees of emphasis on either spectrometer resolution, detection efficiency, or both. Since no one spectrometer is ideally suited to this wide range of needs, compromises are usually required. Gas and scintillation spectrometers have reached a level of maturity, and recent interest has concentrated on semiconductor spectrometers. Germanium detectors are showing continuing refinement and are the spectrometers of choice for high resolution applications. The new high-Z semiconductors, such as CdTe and HgI/sub 2/, have shown steady improvement but are limited in both resolution and size and will likely be used only in applications which require their unique properties.

  3. Review of Photovoltaic Energy Production Using CdTe Thin-Film Modules: Extended Abstract Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Gessert, T. A.

    2008-09-01

    CdTe has near-optimum bandgap, excellent deposition traits, and leads other technologies in commercial PV module production volume. Better understanding materials properties will accelerate deployment.

  4. Thermodynamic analysis of vapor-phase epitaxy of CdTe using a metallic Cd source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iso, Kenji; Murakami, Hisashi; Koukitu, Akinori

    2017-07-01

    Thermodynamic analysis of CdTe growth using cost-effective metallic Cd and dialkyl telluride was performed. The major vapor species at source zone in equilibrium were gaseous Cd for the group-II precursor, and Te2 and H2Te for the group-VI precursors. The driving force for the CdTe deposition was still positive even at 650 °C. This indicates that CdTe formation from gaseous Cd can proceed thermodynamically. Furthermore, the calculations showed that CdTe decomposes at higher temperature and increasing the II/VI ratio increases the limit of the growth temperature, which coincides with the experimental results.

  5. Effects of CdTe growth conditions and techniques on the efficiency limiting defects and mechanisms in CdTe solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohatgi, A.; Chou, H. C.; Jokerst, N. M.; Thomas, E. W.; Ferekides, C.; Kamra, S.; Feng, Z. C.; Dugan, K. M.

    1996-01-01

    CdTe solar cells were fabricated by depositing CdTe films on CdS/SnO2/glass substrates using close-spaced sublimation (CSS) and metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). Te/Cd mole ratio was varied in the range of 0.02 to 6 in the MOCVD growth ambient in an attempt to vary the native defect concentration. Polycrystalline CdTe layers grown by MOCVD and CSS both showed average grain size of about 2 μm. However, the CdTe films grown by CSS were found to be less faceted and more dense compared to the CdTe grown by MOCVD. CdTe growth techniques and conditions had a significant impact on the electrical characteristics of the cells. The CdTe solar cells grown by MOCVD in the Te-rich growth condition and by the CSS technique gave high cell efficiencies of 11.5% and 12.4%, respectively, compared to 6.6% efficient MOCVD cells grown in Cd-rich conditions. This large difference in efficiency is explained on the basis of (a) XRD measurements which showed a higher degree of atomic interdiffusion at the CdS/CdTe interface in high performance devices, (b) Raman measurements which endorsed more uniform and preferred grain orientation by revealing a sharp CdTe TO mode in the high efficiency cells, and (c) carrier transport mechanism which switched from tunneling/interface recombination to depletion region recombination in the high efficiency cells. In this study, Cu/Au layers were evaporated on CdTe for the back contact. Lower efficiency of the Te-rich MOCVD cells, compared to the CSS cells, was attributed to contact related additional loss mechanisms, such as Cd pile-up near Cu/CdTe interface which can give rise to Cd-vacancy defects in the bulk, and higher Cu concentration in the CdTe layer which can cause shunts in the device. Finally, SIMS measurements on the CdTe films of different crystallinity and grain size confirmed that grain boundaries are the main conduits for Cu migration into the CdTe film. Thus larger CdTe grain size or lower grain boundary area per unit volume

  6. Detective quantum efficiency, modulation transfer function and energy resolution comparison between CdTe and silicon sensors bump-bonded to XPAD3S.

    PubMed

    Medjoubi, Kadda; Bucaille, Thierry; Hustache, Stéphanie; Bérar, Jean François; Boudet, Nathalie; Clemens, Jean Claude; Delpierre, Pierre; Dinkespiler, Bernard

    2010-07-01

    XPAD3S is a single-photon-counting chip developed in collaboration by SOLEIL Synchrotron, the Institut Louis Néel and the Centre de Physique de Particules de Marseille. The circuit, designed in the 0.25 microm IBM technology, contains 9600 square pixels with 130 microm side giving a total size of 1 cm x 1.5 cm. The main features of each pixel are: single threshold adjustable from 4.5 keV up to 35 keV, 2 ms frame rate, 10(7) photons s(-1) mm(-2) maximum local count rate, and a 12-bit internal counter with overflow allowing a full 27-bit dynamic range to be reached. The XPAD3S was hybridized using the flip-chip technology with both a 500 microm silicon sensor and a 700 microm CdTe sensor with Schottky contacts. Imaging performances of both detectors were evaluated using X-rays from 6 keV up to 35 keV. The detective quantum efficiency at zero line-pairs mm(-1) for a silicon sensor follows the absorption law whereas for CdTe a strong deficit at low photon energy, produced by an inefficient entrance layer, is measured. The modulation transfer function was evaluated and it was shown that both detectors present an ideal modulation transfer function at 26 keV, limited only by the pixel size. The influence of the Cd and Te K-edges of the CdTe sensor was measured and simulated, establishing that fluorescence photons reduce the contrast transfer at the Nyquist frequency from 60% to 40% which remains acceptable. The energy resolution was evaluated at 6% with silicon using 16 keV X-rays, and 8% with CdTe using 35 keV X-rays. A 7 cm x 12 cm XPAD3 imager, built with eight silicon modules (seven circuits per module) tiled together, was successfully used for X-ray diffraction experiments. A first result recently obtained with a new 2 cm x 3 cm CdTe imager is also presented.

  7. Compton imager using room temperature silicon detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurfess, James D.; Novikova, Elena I.; Phlips, Bernard F.; Wulf, Eric A.

    2007-08-01

    We have been developing a multi-layer Compton Gamma Ray Imager using position-sensitive, intrinsic silicon detectors. Advantages of this approach include room temperature operation, reduced Doppler broadening, and use of conventional silicon fabrication technologies. We have obtained results on the imaging performance of a multi-layer instrument where each layer consists of a 2×2 array of double-sided strip detectors. Each detector is 63 mm×63 mm×2 mm thick and has 64 strips providing a strip pitch of approximately 0.9 mm. The detectors were fabricated by SINTEF ICT (Oslo Norway) from 100 mm diameter wafers. The use of large arrays of silicon detectors appears especially advantageous for applications that require excellent sensitivity, spectral resolution and imaging such as gamma ray astrophysics, detection of special nuclear materials, and medical imaging. The multiple Compton interactions (three or more) in the low-Z silicon enable the energy and direction of the incident gamma ray to be determined without full deposition of the incident gamma-ray energy in the detector. The performance of large volume instruments for various applications are presented, including an instrument under consideration for NASA's Advanced Compton Telescope (ACT) mission and applications to Homeland Security. Technology developments that could further extend the sensitivity and performance of silicon Compton Imagers are presented, including the use of low-energy (few hundred keV) electron tracking within novel silicon detectors and the potential for a wafer-bonding approach to produce thicker, position-sensitive silicon detectors with an associated reduction of required electronics and instrument cost.

  8. Cathode depth sensing in CZT detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, JaeSub; Bellm, Eric C.; Grindlay, Jonathan E.; Narita, Tomohiko

    2004-02-01

    Measuring the depth of interaction in thick Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride (CZT) detectors allows improved imaging and spectroscopy for hard X-ray imaging above 100 keV. The Energetic X-ray Imaging Survey Telescope (EXIST) will employ relatively thick (5 - 10 mm) CZT detectors, which are required to perform the broad energy-band sky survey. Interaction depth information is needed to correct events to the detector "focal plane" for correct imaging and can be used to improve the energy resolution of the detector at high energies by allowing event-based corrections for incomplete charge collection. Background rejection is also improved by allowing low energy events from the rear and sides of the detector to be rejected. We present experimental results of intereaction depth sensing in a 5 mm thick pixellated Au-contact IMARAD CZT detector. The depth sensing was done by making simultaneous measurements of cathode and anode signals, where the interaction depth at a given energy is proportional to the ratio of cathode/anode signals. We demonstrate how a simple empirical formula describing the event distributions in the cathode/anode signal space can dramatically improve the energy resolution. We also estimate the energy and depth resolution of the detector as a function of the energy and the interaction depth. We also show a depth-sensing prototype system currently under development for EXIST in which cathode signals from 8, 16 or 32 crystals can be read-out by a small multi-channel ASIC board that is vertically edge-mounted on the cathode electrode along every second CZT crystal boundary. This allows CZT crystals to be tiled contiguously with minimum impact on throughput of incoming photons. The robust packaging is crucial in EXIST, which will employ very large area imaging CZT detector arrays.

  9. Phosphorus Doping of Polycrystalline CdTe by Diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Colegrove, Eric; Albin, David S.; Guthrey, Harvey; Harvey, Steve; Burst, James; Moutinho, Helio; Farrell, Stuart; Al-Jassim, Mowafak; Metzger, Wyatt K.

    2015-06-14

    Phosphorus diffusion in single crystal and polycrystalline CdTe material is explored using various methods. Dynamic secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) is used to determine 1D P diffusion profiles. A 2D diffusion model is used to determine the expected cross-sectional distribution of P in CdTe after diffusion anneals. Time of flight SIMS and cross-sectional cathodoluminescence corroborates expected P distributions. Devices fabricated with diffused P exhibit hole concentrations up to low 1015 cm-3, however a subsequent activation anneal enabled hole concentrations greater than 1016 cm-3. CdCl2 treatments and Cu based contacts were also explored in conjunction with the P doping process.

  10. Melt-growth dynamics in CdTe crystals

    DOE PAGES

    Zhou, X. W.; Ward, D. K.; Wong, B. M.; ...

    2012-06-01

    We use a new, quantum-mechanics-based bond-order potential (BOP) to reveal melt growth dynamics and fine scale defect formation mechanisms in CdTe crystals. Previous molecular dynamics simulations of semiconductors have shown qualitatively incorrect behavior due to the lack of an interatomic potential capable of predicting both crystalline growth and property trends of many transitional structures encountered during the melt → crystal transformation. Here, we demonstrate successful molecular dynamics simulations of melt growth in CdTe using a BOP that significantly improves over other potentials on property trends of different phases. Our simulations result in a detailed understanding of defect formation during themore » melt growth process. Equally important, we show that the new BOP enables defect formation mechanisms to be studied at a scale level comparable to empirical molecular dynamics simulation methods with a fidelity level approaching quantum-mechanical methods.« less

  11. Native defects in MBE-grown CdTe

    SciTech Connect

    Olender, Karolina; Wosinski, Tadeusz; Makosa, Andrzej; Tkaczyk, Zbigniew; Kolkovsky, Valery; Karczewski, Grzegorz

    2013-12-04

    Deep-level traps in both n- and p-type CdTe layers, grown by molecular-beam epitaxy on GaAs substrates, have been investigated by means of deep-level transient spectroscopy (DLTS). Four of the traps revealed in the DLTS spectra, which displayed exponential kinetics for capture of charge carriers into the trap states, have been assigned to native point defects: Cd interstitial, Cd vacancy, Te antisite defect and a complex formed of the Te antisite and Cd vacancy. Three further traps, displaying logarithmic capture kinetics, have been ascribed to electron states of treading dislocations generated at the mismatched interface with the substrate and propagated through the CdTe layer.

  12. Dependence of CdTe response of bias history

    SciTech Connect

    Sites, J.R.; Sasala, R.A.; Eisgruber, I.L.

    1995-11-01

    Several time-dependent effect have been observed in CdTe cells and modules in recent years. Some appear to be related to degradation at the back contact, some to changes in temperature at the thin-film junction, and some to the bias history of the cell or module. Back-contact difficulties only occur in some cases, and the other two effects are reversible. Nevertheless, confusion in data interpretation can arise when these effects are not characterized. This confusion can be particularly acute when more than one time-dependent effect occurs during the same measurement cycle. The purpose of this presentation is to help categorize time-dependent effects in CdTe and other thin-film cells to elucidate those related to bias history, and to note differences between cell and module analysis.

  13. Low cost sprayed CdTe solar cell research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Squillante, M.; Turcotte, R.; Lis, S.; Serreze, H. B.; Entine, G.

    1980-06-01

    Experiments were carried out to optimize the conditions of the chemical reaction and the physical parameters of the spray process in order to produce high quality CdTe thin films. Films containing 95% or more of CdTe were produced by the reaction of (MH4) 2TeO4 with cadmium salts in the presence of a reducing agent. The physical quality of the films improved so that recent ones have been smoother and more uniform. Furthermore, photoconductive effects were observed in many of the films. This progress is partly due to the removal of oxygen by an efficient purge of the spray box and partly due to an increased understanding and control of the spray pyrolysis process.

  14. CdTe nanoparticles synthesized by laser ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Semaltianos, N. G.; Logothetidis, S.; Perrie, W.; Romani, S.; Potter, R. J.; Dearden, G.; Watkins, K. G.; Sharp, M.

    2009-07-20

    Nanoparticle generation by laser ablation of a solid target in a liquid environment is an easy, fast, and 'green' method for a large scale production of nanomaterials with tailored properties. In this letter we report the synthesis of CdTe nanoparticles by femtosecond laser [387 nm, 180 fs, 1 kHz, pulse energy=6 {mu}J (fluence=1.7 J/cm{sup 2})] ablation of the target material. Nanoparticles with diameters from {approx}2 up to {approx}25 nm were observed to be formed in the colloidal solution. Their size distribution follows the log-normal function with a statistical median diameter of {approx_equal}7.1 nm. Their crystal structure is the same as that of the bulk material (cubic zincblende) and they are slightly Cd-rich (Cd:Te percentage ratio {approx}1:0.9). Photoluminescence emission from the produced nanoparticles was detected in the deep red ({approx}652 nm)

  15. An NMR quantum computer of the semiconductor CdTe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, T.; Goto, A.; Hashi, K.; Ohki, S.

    2002-12-01

    We propose a method to implement a quantum computer by solid-state NMR. We can use the J-coupling for the quantum gate in CdTe. Both Cd and Te have two isotopes with spin 1/2, then we can have 4-qubits. The decoherence by dipole interaction may be minimized by preparing the isotope superlattice grown in the order of— 111Cd- 123Te- 113Cd- 125Te—in the [111] direction and by applying the magnetic field in the direction of [100], the magic angle of the dipole interaction. The optical pumping technique can be used in CdTe to make the initialization of the qubits.

  16. Optical modeling of graphene contacted CdTe solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldosari, Marouf; Sohrabpoor, Hamed; Gorji, Nima E.

    2016-04-01

    For the first time, an optical model is applied on CdS/CdTe thin film solar cells with graphene front or back contact. Graphene is highly conductive and is as thin as a single atom which reduces the light reflection and absorption, and thus enhances the light transmission to CdTe layer for a wide range of wavelengths including IR. Graphene as front electrode of CdTe devices led to loss in short circuit current density of 10% ΔJsc ≤ 15% compared to the conventional electrodes of TCO and ITO at CdS thickness of dCdS = 100 nm. In addition, all the multilayer graphene electrodes with 2, 4, and 7 graphene layers led to Jsc ≤ 20 mA/cm2. Therefore, we conclude that a single monolayer graphene with hexagonal carbon network reduces optical losses and enhances the carrier collection measured as Jsc. In another structure design, we applied the optical model to graphene back contacted CdS/CdTe device. This scheme allows double side irradiation of the cell which is expected to enhance the Jsc. We obtained 1 ∼ 6 , 23, and 38 mA/cm2 for back, front and bifacial illumination of graphene contacted CdTe cell with CdS = 100 nm. The bifacial irradiated cell, to be efficient, requires an ultrathin CdTe film with dCdTe ≤ 1 μm. In this case, the junction electric field extends to the back region and collects out the generated carriers efficiently. This was modelled by absorptivity rather than transmission rate and optical losses. Since the literature suggest that ZnO can increase the graphene conductivity and enhance the Jsc, we performed our simulations for a graphene/ZnO electrode (ZnO = 100 nm) instead of a single graphene layer.

  17. Spin relaxation of electrons in bulk CdTe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprinzl, Daniel; Nahalkova, Petra; Kunc, Jan; Maly, Petr; Horodysky, Petr; Grill, Roman; Belas, Eduard; Franc, Jan; Nemec, Petr

    2007-03-01

    We report on the measurements of the spin relaxation time T1 of photo-excited electrons in bulk CdTe. The carrier dynamics were investigated by transient absorption experiments using 80 fs circularly polarized laser pulses at sample temperatures from 20 to 300 K. We studied both p and n type doped CdTe samples, which were prepared in the form of thin platelets from the crystals grown by the modified Bridgman method. The obtained results are compared with the spin relaxation times reported for other semiconductors with the same crystal structure (e.g., GaAs [1]). Finally, the relative contributions of the D'yakonov-Perel, Elliott-Yafet, Bir-Aronov-Pikus, and other mechanisms to the measured spin relaxation times in CdTe are discussed. This work was supported by the Grant Agency of the Czech Republic (grant 202/03/H003), by the Ministry of Education of the Czech Republic in the framework of the research centre LC510 and the research plan MSM 0021620834. [1] J. M. Kikkawa and D. D. Awschalom, Phys. Rev. Lett. 80, 4313 (1998).

  18. Challenges in p-type Doping of CdTe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCoy, Jedidiah; Swain, Santosh; Lynn, Kelvin

    We have made progress in defect identification of arsenic and phosphorous doped CdTe to understand the self-compensation mechanism which will help improve minority bulk carrier lifetime and net acceptor density. Combining previous measurements of un-doped CdTe, we performed a systematic comparison of defects between different types of crystals and confirmed the defects impacting the doping efficiency. CdTe bulk crystals have been grown via vertical Bridgman based melt growth technique with varying arsenic and phosphorous dopant schemes to attain p-type material. Furnace temperature profiles were varied to influence dopant solubility. Large carrier densities have been reproducibly obtained from these boules indicating successful incorporation of dopants into the lattice. However, these values are orders of magnitude lower than theoretical solubility values. Infrared Microscopy has revealed a plethora of geometrically abnormal second phase defects and X-ray Fluorescence has been used to identify the elemental composition of these defects. We believe that dopants become incorporated into these second phase defects as Cd compounds which act to inhibit dopant solubility in the lattice.

  19. CdTe Feedstock Development and Validation: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-08-00280

    SciTech Connect

    Albin, D.

    2011-05-01

    The goal of this work was to evaluate different CdTe feedstock formulations (feedstock provided by Redlen) to determine if they would significantly improve CdTe performance with ancillary benefits associated with whether changes in feedstock would affect CdTe cell processing and possibly reliability of cells. Feedstock also included attempts to intentionally dope the CdTe with pre-selected elements.

  20. Design and Performance of the Soft Gamma-ray Detector for the NeXT mission

    SciTech Connect

    Tajima, Hiroyasu; Kamae, T.; Madejski, G.; Mitani, T.; Nakazawa, K.; Tanaka, T.; Takahashi, T.; Watanabe, S.; Fukazawa, Y.; Ikagawa, T.; Kataoka, J.; Kokubun, M.; Makishima, K.; Terada, Y.; Nomachi, M.; Tashiro, M.; /SLAC /Sagamihara, Inst. Space Astron. Sci. /Tokyo U. /Hiroshima U. /Tokyo Inst. Tech. /Wako, RIKEN /Osaka U. /Saitama U.

    2006-04-19

    The Soft Gamma-ray Detector (SGD) on board the NeXT (Japanese future high energy astrophysics mission) is a Compton telescope with narrow field of view (FOV), which utilizes Compton kinematics to enhance its background rejection capabilities. It is realized as a hybrid semiconductor gamma-ray detector which consists of silicon and CdTe (cadmium telluride) detectors. It can detect photons in a wide energy band (0.05-1 MeV) at a background level of 5 x 10{sup -7} counts/s/cm{sup 2}/keV; the silicon layers are required to improve the performance at a lower energy band (<0.3 MeV). Excellent energy resolution is the key feature of the SGD, allowing it to achieve both high angular resolution and good background rejection capability. An additional capability of the SGD, its ability to measure gamma-ray polarization, opens up a new window to study properties of astronomical objects. We will present the development of key technologies to realize the SGD: high quality CdTe, low noise front-end ASIC and bump bonding technology. Energy resolutions of 1.7 keV (FWHM) for CdTe pixel detectors and 1.1 keV for Si strip detectors have been measured. We also present the validation of Monte Carlo simulation used to evaluate the performance of the SGD.

  1. Design and performance of soft gamma-ray detector for NeXT mission

    SciTech Connect

    Tajima, H.; Kamae, T.; Madejski, G.; Takahashi, T.; Nakazawa, K.; Watanabe, S.; Mitani, T.; Tanaka, T.; Fukazawa, Y.; Kataoka, J.; Ikagawa, T.; Kokubun, M.; Makishima, K.; Terada, Y.; Nomachi, M.; Tashiro, M.; /Saitama U.

    2005-05-04

    The Soft Gamma-ray Detector (SGD) on board NeXT (Japanese future high energy astrophysics mission) is a Compton telescope with narrow field of view, which utilizes Compton kinematics to enhance its background rejection capabilities. It is realized as a hybrid semiconductor gamma-ray detector which consists of silicon and Cadmium Telluride (CdTe) detectors. It can detect photons in an energy band 0.05-1 MeV at a background level of 5 x 10{sup -7} counts/s/cm{sup 2}/keV; the silicon layers are required to improve the performance at a lower energy band (<0.3 MeV). Excellent energy resolution is the key feature of the SGD to achieve both high angular resolution and good background rejection capability. Its ability to measure gamma-ray polarization opens up a new window to study gamma-ray emission in the universe. We will present the development of key technologies to realize the SGD; high quality CdTe, low noise front-end VLSI and bump bonding technology. Energy resolutions of 1.7 keV (FWHM) for CdTe pixel detectors and 1.1 keV for silicon strip detectors have been measured. We also present the validation of Monte Carlo simulation used to evaluate the performance of the SGD.

  2. Single-Crystal CdTe Homojunction Structures for Solar Cell Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Peng-Yu; Dahal, Rajendra; Wang, Gwo-Ching; Zhang, Shengbai; Lu, Toh-Ming; Bhat, Ishwara B.

    2015-09-01

    We report two different CdTe homojunction solar cell structures. Single-crystal CdTe homojunction solar cells were grown on GaAs single-crystal substrates by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition. Arsenic and iodine were used as dopants for p-type and n-type CdTe, respectively. Another homojunction solar cell structure was fabricated by growing n-type CdTe directly on bulk p-type CdTe single-crystal substrates. The electrical properties of the different layers were characterized by Hall measurements. When arsine was used as arsenic source, the highest hole concentration was ~6 × 1016 cm-3 and the activation efficiency was ~3%. Very abrupt arsenic doping profiles were observed by secondary ion mass spectrometry. For n-type CdTe with a growth temperature of 250°C and a high Cd/Te ratio the electron concentration was ~4.5 × 1016 cm-3. Because of the 300 nm thick n-type CdTe layer, the short circuit current of the solar cell grown on the bulk CdTe substrate was less than 10 mA/cm2. The open circuit voltage of the device was 0.86 V. According to a prediction based on measurement of short circuit current density ( J sc) as a function of open circuit voltage ( V oc), an open circuit voltage of 0.92 V could be achieved by growing CdTe solar cells on bulk CdTe substrates.

  3. 300-element silicon-lithium position-sensitive imaging detector for angiography

    SciTech Connect

    Walton, J.T.; Sommer, H.A.; Thompson, A.C.; Hughes, E.B.; Zeman, H.D.

    1985-10-01

    Silicon lithium-drifted (Si(Li)) detectors 150 mm long, 10 mm wide and 5 mm thick with 300 individual elements have been fabricated as imaging detectors for noninvasive studies of human coronary arteries using 33 keV x-rays from a synchrotron radiation beamline. This detector is an extension of earlier work on 30 mm long devices with initially 30 and later 60 elements. The detector fabrication details are discussed highlighting problems in uniform lithium-ion compensation. The device structure is examined and measurements on the interelement impedances presented. Finally an angiograph of the coronary arteries in an excised pig's heart obtained with this 300-element detector is presented. 14 refs., 6 figs.

  4. Large area silicon drift detectors for x-rays -- New results

    SciTech Connect

    Iwanczyk, J.S.; Patt, B.E.; Tull, C.R.; Segal, J.D.; Kenney, C.J.; Bradley, J.; Hedman, B.; Hodgson, K.O.

    1998-12-31

    Large area silicon drift detectors, consisting of 8 mm and 12 mm diameter hexagons, were fabricated on 0.35 mm thick high resistivity n-type silicon. An external FET and a low-noise charge sensitive preamplifier were used for testing the prototype detectors. The detector performance was measured in the range 75 to 25 C using Peltier cooling, and from 0.125 to 6 {micro}s amplifier shaping time. Measured energy resolutions were 159 eV FWHM and 263 eV FWHM for the 0.5 cm{sup 2} and 1 cm{sup 2} detectors, respectively (at 5.9 keV, {minus}75 C, 6 {micro}s shaping time). The uniformity of the detector response over the entire active area (measured using 560 nm light) was < 0.5%.

  5. Absorber-coupled lumped element kinetic inductance detectors for gamma-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naruse, Masato; Miyamoto, Noriaki; Taino, Tohru; Myoren, Hiroaki

    2017-10-01

    We propose gamma-ray detectors based on superconducting resonators that can be largely multiplexed and show potential for quick response time, high spatial resolution, and high energy resolution. The resonators were fabricated with a niobium film on a silicon wafer. Eight out of ten detectors could be operated at 0.3 K. The detectors were coupled to a 2-mm-thick lead absorber and examined with a cesium 137 source. The pulse decay time was 3.6 μs and energy resolution was 3.8 keV at 662 keV. We also describe the resonant properties of each detector. The proposed detectors are suitable for use as food-screening systems.

  6. CDTE alloys and their application for increasing solar cell performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanson, Drew E.

    Cadmium Telluride (CdTe) thin film solar is the largest manufactured solar cell technology in the United States and is responsible for one of the lowest costs of utility scale solar electricity at a purchase agreement of $0.0387/kWh. However, this cost could be further reduced by increasing the cell efficiency. To bridge the gap between the high efficiency technology and low cost manufacturing, a research and development tool and process was built and tested. This fully automated single vacuum PV manufacturing tool utilizes multiple inline close space sublimation (CSS) sources with automated substrate control. This maintains the proven scalability of the CSS technology and CSS source design but with the added versatility of independent substrate motion. This combination of a scalable deposition technology with increased cell fabrication flexibility has allowed for high efficiency cells to be manufactured and studied. The record efficiency of CdTe solar cells is lower than fundamental limitations due to a significant deficit in voltage. It has been modeled that there are two potential methods of decreasing this voltage deficiency. The first method is the incorporation of a high band gap film at the back contact to induce a conduction-band barrier that can reduce recombination by reflecting electrons from the back surface. The addition of a Cd1-x MgxTe (CMT) layer at the back of a CdTe solar cell should induce this desired offset and reflect both photoelectrons and forward-current electrons away from the rear surface. Higher collection of photoelectrons will increase the cells current and the reduction of forward current will increase the cells voltage. To have the optimal effect, CdTe must have reasonable carrier lifetimes and be fully depleted. To achieve this experimentally, CdTe layers have been grown sufficiently thin to help produce a fully depleted cell. A variety of measurements including performance curves, transmission electron microscopy, x

  7. Design of epitaxial CdTe solar cells on InSb substrates

    DOE PAGES

    Song, Tao; Kanevce, Ana; Sites, James R.

    2015-11-01

    Epitaxial CdTe has been shown by others to have a radiative recombination rate approaching unity, high carrier concentration, and low defect density. It has, therefore, become an attractive candidate for high-efficiency solar cells, perhaps becoming competitive with GaAs. The choice of substrate is a key design feature for epitaxial CdTe solar cells, and several possibilities (CdTe, Si, GaAs, and InSb) have been investigated by others. All have challenges, and these have generally been addressed through the addition of intermediate layers between the substrate and CdTe absorber. InSb is an attractive substrate choice for CdTe devices, because it has a closemore » lattice match with CdTe, it has low resistivity, and it is easy to contact. However, the valence-band alignment between InSb and p-type CdTe, which can both impede hole current and enhance forward electron current, is not favorable. Three strategies to address the band-offset problem are investigated by numerical simulation: heavy doping of the back part of the CdTe layer, incorporation of an intermediate CdMgTe or CdZnTe layer, and the formation of an InSb tunnel junction. Lastly, wach of these strategies is predicted to be helpful for higher cell performance, but a combination of the first two should be most effective.« less

  8. Metalorganic Vapor Phase Epitaxial Growth of (211)B CdTe on Nanopatterned (211)Si

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-15

    SUBJECT TERMS CdTe Epitaxy, Molecular Transfer Lithography, Dislocation Reduction Shashidhar Shintri*,1, , Sunil Rao2, , Charles Schaper3, , Witold...2012) / DOI 10.1002/pssc.201100653 Metalorganic vapor phase epitaxial growth of (211)B CdTe on nanopatterned (211)Si Shashidhar Shintri*,1, Sunil

  9. Design of epitaxial CdTe solar cells on InSb substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Tao; Kanevce, Ana; Sites, James R.

    2015-11-01

    Epitaxial CdTe has been shown by others to have a radiative recombination rate approaching unity, high carrier concentration, and low defect density. It has, therefore, become an attractive candidate for high-efficiency solar cells, perhaps becoming competitive with GaAs. The choice of substrate is a key design feature for epitaxial CdTe solar cells, and several possibilities (CdTe, Si, GaAs, and InSb) have been investigated by others. All have challenges, and these have generally been addressed through the addition of intermediate layers between the substrate and CdTe absorber. InSb is an attractive substrate choice for CdTe devices, because it has a close lattice match with CdTe, it has low resistivity, and it is easy to contact. However, the valence-band alignment between InSb and p-type CdTe, which can both impede hole current and enhance forward electron current, is not favorable. Three strategies to address the band-offset problem are investigated by numerical simulation: heavy doping of the back part of the CdTe layer, incorporation of an intermediate CdMgTe or CdZnTe layer, and the formation of an InSb tunnel junction. Lastly, wach of these strategies is predicted to be helpful for higher cell performance, but a combination of the first two should be most effective.

  10. Fractal features of CdTe thin films grown by RF magnetron sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseinpanahi, Fayegh; Raoufi, Davood; Ranjbarghanei, Khadijeh; Karimi, Bayan; Babaei, Reza; Hasani, Ebrahim

    2015-12-01

    Cadmium telluride (CdTe) thin films were prepared by RF magnetron sputtering on glass substrates at room temperature (RT). The film deposition was performed for 5, 10, and 15 min at power of 30 W with a frequency of 13.56 MHz. The crystal structure of the prepared CdTe thin films was studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD) technique. XRD analyses indicate that the CdTe films are polycrystalline, having zinc blende structure of CdTe irrespective of their deposition time. All CdTe films showed a preferred orientation along (1 1 1) crystalline plane. The surface morphology characterization of the films was studied using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The quantitative AFM characterization shows that the RMS surface roughness of the prepared CdTe thin films increases with increasing the deposition time. The detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) and also multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis (MFDFA) methods showed that prepared CdTe thin films have multifractal nature. The complexity, roughness of the CdTe thin films and strength of the multifractality increase as deposition time increases.

  11. Spectroscopic studies on the interaction between CdTe nanoparticles and lysozyme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yun-Li; He, Fei; He, Xi-Wen; Li, Wen-You; Zhang, Yu-Kui

    2008-12-01

    Nanoparticles of cadmium telluride (CdTe) coated with thioglycolic acid (TGA) were prepared in the water phase. The interaction between CdTe nanoparticles (NPs) and lysozyme (Lyz) was investigated by fluorescence and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy at pH 7.40. It was proved that the fluorescence quenching of Lyz by CdTe NPs was mainly a result of the formation of CdTe-Lyz complex. By the fluorescence quenching results, the Stern-Volmer quenching constant ( KSV), binding constant ( Ka) and binding sites ( n) were calculated. The binding distance ( r) between Lyz (the donor) and CdTe NPs (the acceptor) was obtained according to fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). Gradual addition of CdTe NPs to the solution of Lyz led to a marked increase in fluorescence polarization ( P) of Lyz, which indicated that CdTe NPs were located in a restricted environment of Lyz. The effect of CdTe NPs on the conformation of Lyz has been analyzed by means of synchronous fluorescence spectra and CD spectra, which provided the evidence that the secondary structure of Lyz has been changed by the interaction of CdTe NPs with Lyz.

  12. Health and environmental hazards of CdTe photovoltaic module production, use and decommissioning

    SciTech Connect

    Moskowitz, P.D.; Steinberger, H.; Thumm, W.

    1995-02-01

    Health and environmental (H&E) risks presented by CdTe photovoltaic module production, use and decommissioning have been reviewed and discussed by several authors. Several H&E concerns exit. The estimated risks are based on extrapolations of toxicity, environmental mobility, and bioavailability data for other inorganic cadmium compounds. Little information, however, is available about CdTe itself. In response to the increased interest in CdTe, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has been engaged in a cooperative research program with the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS), the Fraunhofer Institute for Solid State Technology (IFT), and the GSF Institute of Chemical Ecology to develop fundamental toxicological and environmental data for CdTe. This paper describes the results of these studies, and their potential implications with respect to the H&E hazards presented by CdTe module production, use and decommissioning.

  13. NREL Collaboration Breaks 1-Volt Barrier in CdTe Solar Technology

    SciTech Connect

    2016-05-01

    NREL scientists have worked with Washington State University and the University of Tennessee to improve the maximum voltage available from CdTe solar cells. Changes in dopants, stoichiometry, interface design, and defect chemistry improved the CdTe conductivity and carrier lifetime by orders of magnitude, thus enabling CdTe solar cells with open-circuit voltages exceeding 1 volt for the first time. Values of current density and fill factor for CdTe solar cells are already at high levels, but sub-par voltages has been a barrier to improved efficiencies. With voltages pushed beyond 1 volt, CdTe cells have a path to produce electricity at costs less than fossil fuels.

  14. Aqueous phase synthesis of CdTe quantum dots for biophotonics.

    PubMed

    Yong, Ken-Tye; Law, Wing-Cheung; Roy, Indrajit; Jing, Zhu; Huang, Huijie; Swihart, Mark T; Prasad, Paras N

    2011-01-01

    Over the past few years, CdTe quantum dots have been demonstrated as powerful probes for biophotonics applications. The aqueous phase synthesis technique remains the best approach to make high quality CdTe QDs in a single-pot process. CdTe QDs prepared directly in the aqueous phase can have quantum yield as high as 80%. In addition, the surface of CdTe QDs prepared using the aqueous phase technique is functionalized with reactive groups that enable them to be directly conjugated with specific ligands for targeted delivery and sensing. In this contribution, we review recent progress in fabricating aqueous CdTe QDs and exploiting their optical properties in novel approaches to biomedical imaging and sensing applications. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Impact of detector design on imaging performance of a long axial field-of-view, whole-body PET scanner

    PubMed Central

    Surti, S; Karp, J S

    2015-01-01

    Current generation of commercial time-of-flight (TOF) PET scanners utilize 20–25 mm thick LSO or LYSO crystals and have an axial FOV (AFOV) in the range of 16–22 mm. Longer AFOV scanners would provide increased intrinsic sensitivity and require fewer bed positions for whole-body imaging. Recent simulation work has investigated the sensitivity gains that can be achieved with these long AFOV scanners, and has motivated new areas of investigation such as imaging with very low dose of injected activity as well as providing whole-body dynamic imaging capability in one bed position. In this simulation work we model a 72 cm long scanner and prioritize the detector design choices in terms of timing resolution, crystal size (spatial resolution), crystal thickness (detector sensitivity), and depth-of-interaction (DOI) measurement capability. The generated list data are reconstructed with a list-mode OSEM algorithm using a Gaussian TOF kernel that depends on the timing resolution and blob basis functions for regularization. We use lesion phantoms and clinically relevant metrics for lesion detectability and contrast measurement. The scan time was fixed at 10 minutes for imaging a 100 cm long object assuming a 50% overlap between adjacent bed positions. Results show that a 72 cm long scanner can provide a factor of ten reduction in injected activity compared to an identical 18 cm long scanner to get equivalent lesion detectability. While improved timing resolution leads to further gains, using 3 mm (as opposed to 4 mm) wide crystals does not show any significant benefits for lesion detectability. A detector providing 2-level DOI information with equal crystal thickness also does not show significant gains. Finally, a 15 mm thick crystal leads to lower lesion detectability than a 20 mm thick crystal when keeping all other detector parameters (crystal width, timing resolution, and DOI capability) the same. However, improved timing performance with 15 mm thick crystals can

  16. Impact of detector design on imaging performance of a long axial field-of-view, whole-body PET scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surti, S.; Karp, J. S.

    2015-07-01

    Current generation of commercial time-of-flight (TOF) PET scanners utilize 20-25 mm thick LSO or LYSO crystals and have an axial FOV (AFOV) in the range of 16-22 mm. Longer AFOV scanners would provide increased intrinsic sensitivity and require fewer bed positions for whole-body imaging. Recent simulation work has investigated the sensitivity gains that can be achieved with these long AFOV scanners, and has motivated new areas of investigation such as imaging with a very low dose of injected activity as well as providing whole-body dynamic imaging capability in one bed position. In this simulation work we model a 72 cm long scanner and prioritize the detector design choices in terms of timing resolution, crystal size (spatial resolution), crystal thickness (detector sensitivity), and depth-of-interaction (DOI) measurement capability. The generated list data are reconstructed with a list-mode OSEM algorithm using a Gaussian TOF kernel that depends on the timing resolution and blob basis functions for regularization. We use lesion phantoms and clinically relevant metrics for lesion detectability and contrast measurement. The scan time was fixed at 10 min for imaging a 100 cm long object assuming a 50% overlap between adjacent bed positions. Results show that a 72 cm long scanner can provide a factor of ten reduction in injected activity compared to an identical 18 cm long scanner to get equivalent lesion detectability. While improved timing resolution leads to further gains, using 3 mm (as opposed to 4 mm) wide crystals does not show any significant benefits for lesion detectability. A detector providing 2-level DOI information with equal crystal thickness also does not show significant gains. Finally, a 15 mm thick crystal leads to lower lesion detectability than a 20 mm thick crystal when keeping all other detector parameters (crystal width, timing resolution, and DOI capability) the same. However, improved timing performance with 15 mm

  17. Impact of detector design on imaging performance of a long axial field-of-view, whole-body PET scanner.

    PubMed

    Surti, S; Karp, J S

    2015-07-07

    Current generation of commercial time-of-flight (TOF) PET scanners utilize 20-25 mm thick LSO or LYSO crystals and have an axial FOV (AFOV) in the range of 16-22 mm. Longer AFOV scanners would provide increased intrinsic sensitivity and require fewer bed positions for whole-body imaging. Recent simulation work has investigated the sensitivity gains that can be achieved with these long AFOV scanners, and has motivated new areas of investigation such as imaging with a very low dose of injected activity as well as providing whole-body dynamic imaging capability in one bed position. In this simulation work we model a 72 cm long scanner and prioritize the detector design choices in terms of timing resolution, crystal size (spatial resolution), crystal thickness (detector sensitivity), and depth-of-interaction (DOI) measurement capability. The generated list data are reconstructed with a list-mode OSEM algorithm using a Gaussian TOF kernel that depends on the timing resolution and blob basis functions for regularization. We use lesion phantoms and clinically relevant metrics for lesion detectability and contrast measurement. The scan time was fixed at 10 min for imaging a 100 cm long object assuming a 50% overlap between adjacent bed positions. Results show that a 72 cm long scanner can provide a factor of ten reduction in injected activity compared to an identical 18 cm long scanner to get equivalent lesion detectability. While improved timing resolution leads to further gains, using 3 mm (as opposed to 4 mm) wide crystals does not show any significant benefits for lesion detectability. A detector providing 2-level DOI information with equal crystal thickness also does not show significant gains. Finally, a 15 mm thick crystal leads to lower lesion detectability than a 20 mm thick crystal when keeping all other detector parameters (crystal width, timing resolution, and DOI capability) the same. However, improved timing performance with 15 mm

  18. Influence of EDTA{sup 2-} on the hydrothermal synthesis of CdTe nanocrystallites

    SciTech Connect

    Gong Haibo; Hao Xiaopeng; Xu Xiangang

    2011-12-15

    Transformation from Te nanorods to CdTe nanoparticles was achieved with the assistance of EDTA as a ligand under hydrothermal conditions. Experimental results showed that at the beginning of reaction Te nucleated and grew into nanorods. With the proceeding of reaction, CdTe nucleus began to emerge on the surface, especially on the tips of Te nanorods. Finally, nearly monodispersed hexagonal CdTe nanoparticles with diameters of about 200 nm were obtained. The effects of EDTA on the morphology and formation of CdTe nanoparticles were discussed in consideration of the strong ligand-effect of EDTA, which greatly decreased the concentration of Cd{sup 2+}. Furthermore, the possible formation process of CdTe nanoparticles from Te nanorods was further proposed. The crystal structure and morphology of the products were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). - Graphical Abstract: Firstly, Te nucleated and grew into nanorods in the presence of EDTA{sup 2-}. Then CdTe nucleus began to emerge on Te nanorods and finally monodispersed CdTe nanoparticles were obtained. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EDTA serves as a strong ligand with Cd{sup 2+}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The existence of EDTA constrains the nucleation of CdTe and promotes the formation of Te nanorods. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer With the proceeding of reaction, CdTe nucleus began to emerge on the surface, especially on the tips of Te nanorods. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nearly monodispersed hexagonal CdTe nanoparticles with diameters of about 200 nm were finally obtained.

  19. Detector motion method to increase spatial resolution in photon-counting detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Daehee; Park, Kyeongjin; Lim, Kyung Taek; Cho, Gyuseong

    2017-03-01

    Medical imaging requires high spatial resolution of an image to identify fine lesions. Photon-counting detectors in medical imaging have recently been rapidly replacing energy-integrating detectors due to the former`s high spatial resolution, high efficiency and low noise. Spatial resolution in a photon counting image is determined by the pixel size. Therefore, the smaller the pixel size, the higher the spatial resolution that can be obtained in an image. However, detector redesigning is required to reduce pixel size, and an expensive fine process is required to integrate a signal processing unit with reduced pixel size. Furthermore, as the pixel size decreases, charge sharing severely deteriorates spatial resolution. To increase spatial resolution, we propose a detector motion method using a large pixel detector that is less affected by charge sharing. To verify the proposed method, we utilized a UNO-XRI photon-counting detector (1-mm CdTe, Timepix chip) at the maximum X-ray tube voltage of 80 kVp. A similar spatial resolution of a 55- μm-pixel image was achieved by application of the proposed method to a 110- μm-pixel detector with a higher signal-to-noise ratio. The proposed method could be a way to increase spatial resolution without a pixel redesign when pixels severely suffer from charge sharing as pixel size is reduced.

  20. The High Energy Detector of Simbol-X

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meuris, A.; Limousin, O.; Lugiez, F.; Gevin, O.; Blondel, C.; Le Mer, I.; Pinsard, F.; Cara, C.; Goetschy, A.; Martignac, J.; Tauzin, G.; Hervé, S.; Laurent, P.; Chipaux, R.; Rio, Y.; Fontignie, J.; Horeau, B.; Authier, M.; Ferrando, P.

    2009-05-01

    The High Energy Detector (HED) is one of the three detection units on board the Simbol-X detector spacecraft. It is placed below the Low Energy Detector so as to collect focused photons in the energy range from 8 to 80 keV. It consists of a mosaic of 64 independent cameras, divided in 8 sectors. Each elementary detection unit, called Caliste, is the hybridization of a 256-pixel Cadmium Telluride (CdTe) detector with full custom front-end electronics into a unique component. The status of the HED design will be reported. The promising results obtained from the first micro-camera prototypes called Caliste 64 and Caliste 256 will be presented to illustrate the expected performance of the instrument.

  1. The High Energy Detector of Simbol-X

    SciTech Connect

    Meuris, A.; Limousin, O.; Blondel, C.; Le Mer, I.; Pinsard, F.; Cara, C.; Goetschy, A.; Martignac, J.; Laurent, P.; Chipaux, R.; Rio, Y.; Fontignie, J.; Horeau, B.; Ferrando, P.; Lugiez, F.; Gevin, O.; Tauzin, G.; Herve, S.; Authier, M.

    2009-05-11

    The High Energy Detector (HED) is one of the three detection units on board the Simbol-X detector spacecraft. It is placed below the Low Energy Detector so as to collect focused photons in the energy range from 8 to 80 keV. It consists of a mosaic of 64 independent cameras, divided in 8 sectors. Each elementary detection unit, called Caliste, is the hybridization of a 256-pixel Cadmium Telluride (CdTe) detector with full custom front-end electronics into a unique component. The status of the HED design will be reported. The promising results obtained from the first micro-camera prototypes called Caliste 64 and Caliste 256 will be presented to illustrate the expected performance of the instrument.

  2. Possibility of gated silicon drift detector detecting hard x-ray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuura, Hideharu; Fukushima, Shinya; Sakurai, Shungo; Ishikawa, Shohei; Takeshita, Akinobu; Hidaka, Atsuki

    2015-08-01

    One of the authors has proposed a simple-structure silicon X-ray detector (gated silicon drift detector: GSDD), whose structure is much simpler than commercial silicon drift detectors (SDDs). SDDs contain multiple built-in metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs) or implanted resistors, whose fabrication processes lower the yield rate of detectors, and also require at least two high-voltage sources. On the other hand, GSDDs do not contain built-in MOSFETs or implanted resistors. Moreover, GSDDs require only one high-voltage source. Therefore, GSDDs greatly reduce the cost of the X-ray detection system. We fabricated prototype GSDDs that contained 0.625-mm-thick Si substrates with an active area of 18 mm2, operated by Peltier cooling and a single voltage source. Its energy resolution at 5.9 keV from an 55Fe source was 145 eV at -38°C and -90°V. Thicker Si substrates are required to enhance its absorption of X-rays. To detect X-ray photons with energies up to 77 keV for X-ray absorbance higher than 15%, we simulate the electric potential distribution in GSDDs with Si thicknesses from 0.625 to 3.0 mm. We obtain an adequate electric potential distribution in the thicknesses of up to 3.0 mm, and the capacitance of the GSDD remains small and its X-ray count rate remain high. The high reverse bias required in the 3-mm-thick GSDD was a third of that in a 3-mm-thick pin diode.

  3. RADIATION DETECTOR

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, H.N.; Glass, F.M.

    1960-05-10

    A radiation detector of the type is described wherein a condenser is directly connected to the electrodes for the purpose of performing the dual function of a guard ring and to provide capacitance coupling for resetting the detector system.

  4. Development of gamma-ray detector for lunar and planetary landing mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitani, Takefumi; Inoue, Yousuke; Kobayashi, Shingo; Iijima, Yuichi; Takashima, Takeshi

    For a study of the origin and eveolution of a planet, its chemical composition holds an important information. The abundances of certain elements with different condensation temperature and with various types of geochemical behavior can provide valuable information for its history. Gamma-ray lines from the planet are generally used to determine the chemical composition of a planet without atmosphere. These gamma-ray lines are produded by the decay of nat-ural radionuclides or nuclear-reactions between planetary material and galactic cosmic rays. Abundance of elements is determined by measuring the intensity of gamma-ray lines specific to each element. From a orbital remote-sensing observation, global distribution of elements is acquired but its spatial resolution is limited, sim 10s km, because of difficulty of collimation of gamma-rays. Therefore in-situ gamma-ray observation is necessary to measure the elemental abundances in meter-scale topography. To survey the gamma-ray flux, a gamma-ray detec-tor aboard a rover on a planet is desired. Because of its limited electrical power and weight resources, we are developing small gamma-ray detector using a Cadmium Telluride (CdTe) semiconductor. CdTe has been regarded as a promising semiconductor material for gamma-ray detector because of such features as room temperature operation and large band-gap energy. The high atomic number of the materials gives a high absorption efficiency. On the surface of the moon, CdTe must be used in high temperature condition without any cooling system. Since CdTe spectral performance above room temperature is not established, we have examined the detector property in detail up to 40 degrees Celsius. Based on the results, we design total observation system and estimate the sensitivity of specific elements. Here we present the development status of gamma-ray detector system and the sensitivty estimate for the lunar observation.

  5. Results of ground tests and calibration of x-ray focal plane detectors for ART-XC/SRG instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, Vasily; Pavlinsky, Mikhail; Akimov, Valery; Kuznetsova, Maria; Rotin, Alexey; Krivchenko, Aleksandr; Lapshov, Igor; Oleynikov, Vladimir

    2016-07-01

    The Russian Space Research Institute (IKI) has developed seven flight models and three spare models of the X-ray detectors for the ART-XC/SRG telescope. Each detector situated in the focal plane of ART-XC X-ray optics and includes CdTe die, front-end electronics, data processing, storage and telemetry units. In the Space Research Institute performed a vibration, thermal cycling and thermal vacuum tests of X-ray detectors. During this tests have been studied the leakage current stability, polarization rate, spectroscopic and imaging performance in the working temperature range. The current status of the X-ray detectors development and testing presented.

  6. Degradation and capacitance: voltage hysteresis in CdTe devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albin, D. S.; Dhere, R. G.; Glynn, S. C.; del Cueto, J. A.; Metzger, W. K.

    2009-08-01

    CdS/CdTe photovoltaic solar cells were made on two different transparent conducting oxide (TCO) structures in order to identify differences in fabrication, performance, and reliability. In one set of cells, chemical vapor deposition (CVD) was used to deposit a bi-layer TCO on Corning 7059 borosilicate glass consisting of a F-doped, conductive tin-oxide (cSnO2) layer capped by an insulating (undoped), buffer (iSnO2) layer. In the other set, a more advanced bi-layer structure consisting of sputtered cadmium stannate (Cd2SnO4; CTO) as the conducting layer and zinc stannate (Zn2SnO4; ZTO) as the buffer layer was used. CTO/ZTO substrates yielded higher performance devices however performance uniformity was worse due to possible strain effects associated with TCO layer fabrication. Cells using the SnO2-based structure were only slightly lower in performance, but exhibited considerably greater performance uniformity. When subjected to accelerated lifetime testing (ALT) at 85 - 100 °C under 1-sun illumination and open-circuit bias, more degradation was observed in CdTe cells deposited on the CTO/ZTO substrates. Considerable C-V hysteresis, defined as the depletion width difference between reverse and forward direction scans, was observed in all Cu-doped CdTe cells. These same effects can also be observed in thin-film modules. Hysteresis was observed to increase with increasing stress and degradation. The mechanism for hysteresis is discussed in terms of both an ionic-drift model and one involving majority carrier emission in the space-charge region (SCR). The increased generation of hysteresis observed in CdTe cells deposited on CTO/ZTO substrates suggests potential decomposition of these latter oxides when subjected to stress testing.

  7. Semiconductor detectors for soft γ-ray astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebrun, François

    2006-07-01

    The study of γ-ray bursts, compact objects, nucleosynthesis and supernova remnants triggers the most interest today in the soft γ-ray domain. These topics have various experimental requirements with emphasis either on imaging or on spectroscopy. Recent progress has shown the great potential of semiconductor detectors for both applications at the expense of classical scintillators such as NaI or CsI. They also gave insight into their long-term in-orbit behaviour. Room temperature semiconductor detectors, particularly CdTe and CdZnTe, are confirmed as the best choice for imaging applications. As illustrated by the INTEGRAL/ISGRI camera, the CdTe stability is better than expected; its internal background is comparable to that of scintillators, and the spectroscopic degradation in space is slow with a lifetime of about 40 years on an eccentric orbit. Cooled germanium detectors offer the best energy resolution but degrade more rapidly under the cosmic-ray irradiation. However, the INTEGRAL/SPI spectrometer has demonstrated that periodic in-orbit annealings, allowing for a full recovery of the energy resolution, can maintain the spectroscopic performance over several years. Most future projects, focussing on coded mask or Compton telescopes, will take advantage of the semiconductor technology, particularly that related to the ambient temperature detectors.

  8. A new cylindrical photon-veto detector for the KOTO experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Togawa, Manabu

    2017-01-01

    The KOTO experiment at the J-PARC laboratory seeks to obtain the first observation of the decay. The branching ratio is calculated in the Standard Model (SM) to be 3 × 10-11. This is a good probe to explore new physics beyond the SM with small theoretical uncertainty of ˜2%. We installed a new barrel-shaped photon veto detector, named the Inner Barrel, inside the KOTO detector to improve detection efficiency of photons from the major background of KL → 2π0 decay. The Inner Barrel detector is a sampling calorimeter, consisting of 25 layers of 5-mm-thick scintillators and 24 layers of 1-mm-thick lead plates, corresponding to 5 radiation lengths. The volume is 3 m long along the beam direction, and inner and outer diameters are 1.5 m and 1.9 m, respectively. Scintillation light is read out by a photomultiplier at both ends via wavelength shifting fibers. The Inner Barrel was installed in April, 2016 and the performance was demonstrated at the beam time in June. In this paper, the detector design, construction and performance evaluated with the neutral beam are presented.

  9. High-Efficiency, Commercial Ready CdTe Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sites, James R.

    2015-11-19

    Colorado State’s F-PACE project explored several ways to increase the efficiency of CdTe solar cells and to better understand the device physics of those cells under study. Increases in voltage, current, and fill factor resulted in efficiencies above 17%. The three project tasks and additional studies are described in detail in the final report. Most cells studied were fabricated at Colorado State using an industry-compatible single-vacuum closed-space-sublimation (CSS) chamber for deposition of the key semiconductor layers. Additionally, some cells were supplied by First Solar for comparison purposes, and a small number of modules were supplied by Abound Solar.

  10. Synthesis and Properties of CdTe Films

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-06-20

    34Growth and Characterization of CdTe, Mn.Cdl.,Te, ZnxCdl.iTe, and CdSe Tel.y Crystals", K.Y. Lay, N.C. Giles-Taylor, K.J. Bachmann, and J.F. Schet.Jna, J...Characterization of High Quality, Low Defect, Subgrain Free Cadmium Telluride by a Modified Horizontal Bridgman Technique", W.P. Allred, A.A. Khan, C.J. Johnson, N.C...Characterization of High Quality, Low Defect, Subgrain Free Cadmium Telluride by a Modified Horizontal Bridgman Technique", W.P. Allred, A.A. Khan, C.J

  11. Study of tellurium precipitates in CdTe crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jayatirtha, H. N.; Henderson, D. O.; Burger, A.; Volz, M. P.

    1993-01-01

    The effect of tellurium precipitates was studied in medium resistivity (10 exp 3-10 exp 6 ohm cm) undoped and Cl-doped CdTe using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and mid-infrared spectroscopy and the results were correlated with near-infrared microscopy photographs. When present in a significant quantity (about 0.25 wt pct), we show that Te precipitates are detectable using DSC measurements. In the mid-infrared, the contribution of the absorption by free-carriers is negligible, and therefore, the effect of the Te precipitates in these crystals can be considered uncoupled from the effects of Cd vacancies.

  12. Metal Contacts to Cadmium Telluride (CdTe).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-10-01

    WILLIAMS, I.M. DHARMADASA, M.H. PATTERSON’, C. MAANI** and N.M. FORSYTH Physics Deparment, University College, PO Box 78, Cardiff, UK Received 10 June 1985...North-Holland Physics Publishing Division) -43- 324 R. H. Williams et al. / Metal contacts to InP and CdTe considerations of local charge neutrality near...support. References Ill L.J. Brillson. Surface Sci. Rept. 2 (1982) 123. 121 R.H. Williams. Proc. 17th Intern. Conf. on the Physics of Semiconductors

  13. Comparison of NaI(T1), CdTe, and HgI2 surgical probes: effect of scatter compensation on probe performance.

    PubMed

    Kwo, D P; Barber, H B; Barrett, H H; Hickernell, T S; Woolfenden, J M

    1991-01-01

    Spatial variation in the background source distribution makes tumor detection difficult for single-detector probes. Using a single energy window that brackets the photopeak helps discriminate against background events dominated by Compton scattering. Another approach is to use the information provided by an additional window in the Compton region. The performances of NaI(T1), CdTe, and HgI2 surgical probes have been compared under realistic simulations of a tumor-staging procedure using optimal single-sided energy windows and a two-window scatter-subtraction technique. Results showed that despite the differences in energy resolution of the detectors, the performances of the probes in a variable background were similar when optimal single energy windows were used. When the background variations were large, using information provided by a second window improved probe performance.

  14. Building a multi-cathode-gas-filled scintillator detector for fission fragments

    SciTech Connect

    Mahgoub, M.

    2016-06-10

    Radiation cannot be detected directly by human senses, indeed detecting and identifying the fission products or decay yield with high accuracy is a great challenge for experimental physicist. In this work we are building a Multi-Cathode-Gas-filled Scintillator MCGS detector. The detector consists of two parts. First: anode-wire proportional chamber and cathode strip foil, which measure the energy loss of the particles in the gas, due to the ionization, and identifies the position of the products on the detector plane depending on their energy with the presence of a magnetic field. Second: a 7 mm thick scintillator attached to a photomultiplier tube in the back end of the detector. This part measures the rest energy of the particles. A data acquisition system records the events and the particles infonnation. The yields are identified from the energy loss to rest energy ratio.

  15. The Effect of Twin Boundaries on the Spectroscopic Performance of CdZnTe Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Bradford H.; Stahle, C. M.; Roth, D.; Babu, S.; Tueller, Jack; Powers, Edward I. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Most single grains in cadmium zinc telluride (CdZnTe) grown by the high-pressure Bridgman (HPB) technique contain multiple twin boundaries. As a consequence, twin boundaries are one of the most common macroscopic material defects found in large area (400 to 700 sq mm) CdZnTe specimens obtained from HPB ingots. Due to the prevalence of twin boundaries, understanding their effect on detector performance is key to the material selection process. Twin boundaries in several 2 mm thick large area specimens were first, documented using infrared transmission imaging. These specimens were then fabricated into either 2 mm pixel or planar detectors in order to examine the effect of the twin boundaries on detector performance. Preliminary results show that twin boundaries, which are decorated with tellurium inclusions, produce a reduction in detector efficiency and a degradation in resolution. The extent of the degradation appears to be a function of the density of tellurium inclusions.

  16. Imaging performance of the hybrid pixel detectors XPAD3-S

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunner, F. Cassol; Clemens, J. C.; Hemmer, C.; Morel, C.

    2009-03-01

    Hybrid pixel detectors, originally developed for tracking particles in high-energy physics experiments, have recently been used in material sciences and macromolecular crystallography. Their capability to count single photons and to apply a threshold on the photon energy suggests that they could be optimal digital x-ray detectors in low energy beams such as for small animal computed tomography (CT). To investigate this issue, we have studied the imaging performance of photon counting hybrid pixel detectors based on the XPAD3-S chip. Two detectors are considered, connected either to a Si or to a CdTe sensor, the latter being of interest for its higher efficiency. Both a standard 'International Electrotechnical Commission' (IEC) mammography beam and a beam used for mouse CT results published in the literature are employed. The detector stability, linearity and noise are investigated as a function of the dose for several imaging exposures (~0.1-400 µGy). The perfect linearity of both detectors is confirmed, but an increase in internal noise for counting statistics higher than ~5000 photons has been found, corresponding to exposures above ~110 µGy and ~50 µGy for the Si and CdTe sensors, respectively. The noise power spectrum (NPS), the modulation transfer function (MTF) and the detective quantum efficiency (DQE) are then measured for two energy threshold configurations (5 keV and 18 keV) and three doses (~3, 30 and 300 µGy), in order to obtain a complete estimation of the detector performances. In general, the CdTe sensor shows a clear superiority with a maximal DQE(0) of ~1, thanks to its high efficiency (~100%). The DQE of the Si sensor is more dependent on the radiation quality, due to the energy dependence of its efficiency its maximum is ~0.4 with respect to the softer radiation. Finally, we compare the XPAD3-S DQE with published curves of other digital devices in a similar radiation condition. The XPAD3-S/CdTe detector appears to be the best with the highest

  17. Imaging performance of the hybrid pixel detectors XPAD3-S.

    PubMed

    Brunner, F Cassol; Clemens, J C; Hemmer, C; Morel, C

    2009-03-21

    Hybrid pixel detectors, originally developed for tracking particles in high-energy physics experiments, have recently been used in material sciences and macromolecular crystallography. Their capability to count single photons and to apply a threshold on the photon energy suggests that they could be optimal digital x-ray detectors in low energy beams such as for small animal computed tomography (CT). To investigate this issue, we have studied the imaging performance of photon counting hybrid pixel detectors based on the XPAD3-S chip. Two detectors are considered, connected either to a Si or to a CdTe sensor, the latter being of interest for its higher efficiency. Both a standard 'International Electrotechnical Commission' (IEC) mammography beam and a beam used for mouse CT results published in the literature are employed. The detector stability, linearity and noise are investigated as a function of the dose for several imaging exposures ( approximately 0.1-400 microGy). The perfect linearity of both detectors is confirmed, but an increase in internal noise for counting statistics higher than approximately 5000 photons has been found, corresponding to exposures above approximately 110 microGy and approximately 50 microGy for the Si and CdTe sensors, respectively. The noise power spectrum (NPS), the modulation transfer function (MTF) and the detective quantum efficiency (DQE) are then measured for two energy threshold configurations (5 keV and 18 keV) and three doses ( approximately 3, 30 and 300 microGy), in order to obtain a complete estimation of the detector performances. In general, the CdTe sensor shows a clear superiority with a maximal DQE(0) of approximately 1, thanks to its high efficiency ( approximately 100%). The DQE of the Si sensor is more dependent on the radiation quality, due to the energy dependence of its efficiency its maximum is approximately 0.4 with respect to the softer radiation. Finally, we compare the XPAD3-S DQE with published curves of

  18. Doping of polycrystalline CdTe for high-efficiency solar cells on flexible metal foil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kranz, Lukas; Gretener, Christina; Perrenoud, Julian; Schmitt, Rafael; Pianezzi, Fabian; La Mattina, Fabio; Blösch, Patrick; Cheah, Erik; Chirilă, Adrian; Fella, Carolin M.; Hagendorfer, Harald; Jäger, Timo; Nishiwaki, Shiro; Uhl, Alexander R.; Buecheler, Stephan; Tiwari, Ayodhya N.

    2013-08-01

    Roll-to-roll manufacturing of CdTe solar cells on flexible metal foil substrates is one of the most attractive options for low-cost photovoltaic module production. However, various efforts to grow CdTe solar cells on metal foil have resulted in low efficiencies. This is caused by the fact that the conventional device structure must be inverted, which imposes severe restrictions on device processing and consequently limits the electronic quality of the CdTe layer. Here we introduce an innovative concept for the controlled doping of the CdTe layer in the inverted device structure by means of evaporation of sub-monolayer amounts of Cu and subsequent annealing, which enables breakthrough efficiencies up to 13.6%. For the first time, CdTe solar cells on metal foil exceed the 10% efficiency threshold for industrialization. The controlled doping of CdTe with Cu leads to increased hole density, enhanced carrier lifetime and improved carrier collection in the solar cell. Our results offer new research directions for solving persistent challenges of CdTe photovoltaics.

  19. Effects of Various RF Powers on CdTe Thin Film Growth Using RF Magnetron Sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alibakhshi, Mohammad; Ghorannevis, Zohreh

    2016-09-01

    Cadmium telluride (CdTe) film was deposited using the magnetron sputtering system onto a glass substrate at various deposition times and radio frequency (RF) powers. Ar gas was used to generate plasma to sputter the CdTe atoms from CdTe target. Effects of two experimental parameters of deposition time and RF power were investigated on the physical properties of the CdTe films. X-ray Diffraction (XRD) analysis showed that the films exhibited polycrystalline nature of CdTe structure with the (111) orientation as the most prominent peak. Optimum condition to grow the CdTe film was obtained and it was found that increasing the deposition time and RF power increases the crystallinity of the films. From the profilometer and XRD data's, the thicknesses and crystal sizes of the CdTe films increased at the higher RF power and the longer deposition time, which results in affecting the band gap as well. From atomic force microscopy (AFM) analysis we found that roughnesses of the films depend on the deposition time and is independent of the RF power.

  20. Doping of polycrystalline CdTe for high-efficiency solar cells on flexible metal foil.

    PubMed

    Kranz, Lukas; Gretener, Christina; Perrenoud, Julian; Schmitt, Rafael; Pianezzi, Fabian; La Mattina, Fabio; Blösch, Patrick; Cheah, Erik; Chirilă, Adrian; Fella, Carolin M; Hagendorfer, Harald; Jäger, Timo; Nishiwaki, Shiro; Uhl, Alexander R; Buecheler, Stephan; Tiwari, Ayodhya N

    2013-01-01

    Roll-to-roll manufacturing of CdTe solar cells on flexible metal foil substrates is one of the most attractive options for low-cost photovoltaic module production. However, various efforts to grow CdTe solar cells on metal foil have resulted in low efficiencies. This is caused by the fact that the conventional device structure must be inverted, which imposes severe restrictions on device processing and consequently limits the electronic quality of the CdTe layer. Here we introduce an innovative concept for the controlled doping of the CdTe layer in the inverted device structure by means of evaporation of sub-monolayer amounts of Cu and subsequent annealing, which enables breakthrough efficiencies up to 13.6%. For the first time, CdTe solar cells on metal foil exceed the 10% efficiency threshold for industrialization. The controlled doping of CdTe with Cu leads to increased hole density, enhanced carrier lifetime and improved carrier collection in the solar cell. Our results offer new research directions for solving persistent challenges of CdTe photovoltaics.

  1. Growth and characterization of CdTe on GaAs/Si substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radhakrishnan, G.; Nouhi, A.; Liu, J.

    1988-01-01

    Epitaxial CdTe has been grown on both (100) GaAs/Si and (111) GaAs/Si substrates. A combination of molecular beam epitaxy and metal organic chemical vapor deposition have been employed to achieve this growth. The GaAs layers are grown in Si substrates by molecular beam epitaxy, followed by the growth of CdTe on GaAs/Si substra by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition. X-ray diffraction, photoluminescence, and scanning electron microscopy have been used to characterize the CdTe films.

  2. Effect of low energy ion irradiation on CdTe crystals: Luminescence enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    Olvera, J.; Plaza, J. L.; Dios, S. de; Dieguez, E.; Martinez, O.; Avella, M.

    2010-12-15

    In this work we show that low energy ion sputtering is a very efficient technique as a cleaning process for CdTe substrates. We demonstrate, by using several techniques like grazing-angle x-ray diffraction, cathodoluminescence, microluminescence, and micro-Raman spectroscopy that the luminescent properties of CdTe substrates can be very much increased when CdTe surfaces are irradiated with low energy Argon ions. We postulate that this enhancement is mainly due to the removal of surface damage induced by the cutting and polishing processes. The formation of a low density of nonluminescent aggregates after the sputtering process has also been observed.

  3. Advanced CdTe Photovoltaic Technology: September 2007 - March 2009

    SciTech Connect

    Barth, K.

    2011-05-01

    During the last eighteen months, Abound Solar (formerly AVA Solar) has enjoyed significant success under the SAI program. During this time, a fully automated manufacturing line has been developed, fabricated and commissioned in Longmont, Colorado. The facility is fully integrated, converting glass and semiconductor materials into complete modules beneath its roof. At capacity, a glass panel will enter the factory every 10 seconds and emerge as a completed module two hours later. This facility is currently undergoing trials in preparation for large volume production of 120 x 60 cm thin film CdTe modules. Preceding the development of the large volume manufacturing capability, Abound Solar demonstrated long duration processing with excellent materials utilization for the manufacture of high efficiency 42 cm square modules. Abound Solar prototype modules have been measured with over 9% aperture area efficiency by NREL. Abound Solar demonstrated the ability to produce modules at industry leading low costs to NREL representatives. Costing models show manufacturing costs below $1/Watt and capital equipment costs below $1.50 per watt of annual manufacturing capacity. Under this SAI program, Abound Solar supported a significant research and development program at Colorado State University. The CSU team continues to make progress on device and materials analysis. Modeling for increased device performance and the effects of processing conditions on properties of CdTe PV were investigated.

  4. ISGRI: a CdTe array imager for INTEGRAL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebrun, Francois; Blondel, Claire; Fondeur, Irene; Goldwurm, Andrea; Laurent, Phillipe; Leray, Jean P.

    1996-10-01

    The INTEGRAL soft gamma-ray imager (ISGRI) is a large and thin CdTe array. Operating at room temperature, this gamma camera covers the lower part (below 200 keV) of the energy domain (20 keV - 10 MeV) of the imager on board the INTEGRAL Satellite (IBIS). The ASIC's front-end electronics features particularly a low noise preamplifier, allowing a threshold below 20 keV and a pulse rise-time measurement which permits a charge loss correction. The charge loss correction and its performances are presented as well as the results of various studies on CdTe thermal behavior and radiation hardness. At higher energy (above 200 keV) ISGRI will operate in conjunction with PICsIT, the IBIS CsI gamma camera. A selection among the events in coincidence performed on the basis of the Compton scattering properties reduces strongly the background. This allows an improvement of the sensitivity and permits short term imaging and spectral studies (high energy pulsars) which otherwise would not have fit within the IBIS telemetry allocation.

  5. Preparation and properties of evaporated CdTe films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bube, R. H.; Fahrenbruch, A. L.; Chien, K. F.

    1987-07-01

    Previous work on evaporated CdTe films for photovoltaics showed no clear path to successful p-type doping of CdTe during deposition. Post-deposition annealing of the films in various ambients thus was examined as a means of doping. Anneals were done in Te, Cd, P, and As vapors and in vacuum, air and Ar, all of which showed large effects on series resistance and diode parameters. With As, series resistance values of In/p-CdTe/graphite structures decreased markedly. This decrease was due to a decrease in grain boundary and/or back contact barrier height, and thus was due to large increases in mobility; the carrier density was not altered substantially. Although the series-resistance decreases were substantial, the diode characteristics became worse. The decreases were not observed when CdS/CdTe cells were fabricated on Te vapor-annealed films. Preparation of ZnO films by reactive evaporation yielded promising results. Deposition of p-ZnTe films by hot-wall vapor evaporation, using conventional techniques, yielded acceptable specimens.

  6. Crystallisation of CdTe and related materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiederle, M.; Benz, K. W.; Duffar, T.; Launay, J. C.; Roosen, G.; Dieguez, E.; Zanotti, L.

    2005-10-01

    Cadmium telluride (CdTe) and related compounds are promising materials for radiation sensors and photorefractive devices. Their commercial use is still limited owing to the problems in growing them. This MAP project is a close collaboration of scientists and industry to improve the growth of these materials and to demonstrate the potential for different applications. The activities concentrate on growth from the melt using "dewetting". The phenomenon of dewetting had been observed in various experiments under microgravity and it has an enormous influence on the quality of the material. The theoretical understanding of this mechanism opened the possibility of dewetting not only under microgravity but also on Earth by controlling pressure. Remarkable results have been achieved by dewetting growth on Earth, showing an improvement in crystal quality. The goal is to establish dewetting growth for industrial production under terrestrial conditions. This will be achieved by a combination of experiments under microgravity (STS-95, Foton-M2, International Space Station), a laboratory research programme, building a theory of the dewetting mechanism and close collaboration with industry partners to develop CdTe-Based devices. Important milestones include the first CdTe crystal grown by dewetting on Earth and the development of CdTe-based devices.

  7. Emitter Choice for Epitaxial CdTe Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Tao; Kanevce, Ana; Sites, James R.

    2016-11-21

    High-quality epitaxial CdTe layers with low defect density and high carrier concentration have been demonstrated by several research groups. Nevertheless, one primary challenge for high-performance epitaxial CdTe solar cells is how to choose a suitable emitter partner for the junction formation. The numerical simulations show that a type I heterojunction with small conduction band offset (0.1 eV = ..delta..Ec = 0.3 eV) is necessary to maintain a good cell efficiency even with large interface recombination. Otherwise, a small 'cliff' can assist interface recombination causing smaller Voc, and a large 'spike' (..delta..Ec = 0.4 eV) can impede the photo current and lead to a reduction of JSC and FF. Among the three possible emitters, CdS, CdMgTe, and MgZnO, CdMgTe (with ~30% Mg) and MgZnO (with ~ 20% Mg) are likely to be a better choice since their type-I junction can tolerate a larger density of interface defects.

  8. Apparent quantum efficiency effects in CdTe solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gloeckler, M.; Sites, J. R.

    2004-04-01

    Quantum efficiency measurements of n-CdS/p-CdTe solar cells performed under nonstandard illumination, voltage bias, or both can be severely distorted by photogeneration and contact-barrier effects. In this work we will discuss the effects that are typically observed, the requirements needed to reproduce these effects with modeling tools, and the potential applications of apparent quantum efficiency analysis. Recently published experimental results are interpreted and reproduced using numerical simulation tools. The suggested model explains large negative apparent quantum efficiencies (≫100%) seen in the spectral range of 350-550 nm, modestly large negative apparent quantum efficiencies (>100%) in the spectral range of 800-850 nm, enhanced positive or negative response observed under red, blue, and white light bias, and photocurrent gain significantly different from unity. Some of these effects originate from the photogeneration in the highly compensated CdS window layer, some from photogeneration within the CdTe, and some are further modified by the height of the CdTe back-contact barrier.

  9. Direct charge sharing observation in single-photon-counting pixel detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellegrini, G.; Maiorino, M.; Blanchot, G.; Chmeissani, M.; Garcia, J.; Lozano, M.; Martinez, R.; Puigdengoles, C.; Ullan, M.

    2007-04-01

    In photon-counting imaging devices, charge sharing can limit the detector spatial resolution and contrast, as multiple counts can be induced in adjacent pixels as a result of the spread of the charge cloud generated from a single X-ray photon of high energy in the detector bulk. Although debated for a long time, the full impact of charge sharing has not been completely assessed. In this work, the importance of charge sharing in pixellated CdTe and silicon detectors is studied by exposing imaging devices to different low activity sources. These devices are made of Si and CdTe pixel detector bump-bonded to Medipix2 single-photon-counting chips with a 55 μm pixel pitch. We will show how charge sharing affects the spatial detector resolution depending on incident particle type (alpha, beta and gamma), detector bias voltage and read-out chip threshold. This study will give an insight on the impact on the design and operation of pixel detectors coupled to photon-counting devices for imaging applications.

  10. A Si-PIN-stack detector for 14 MeV pulsed neutrons measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xianpeng; Ouyang, Xiaoping; Chen, Yanli; Zhang, Zhongbing; Tian, Geng; Chen, Liang; Liu, Jinliang

    2012-11-01

    We have developed a high-sensitivity fast neutron stack detector for use in the current mode by introducing a readout circuit that is capable of operating with a single detector's time response, while its neutron sensitivity, statistics, and n-γ sensitivity ratio are greatly improved compared to the single detector. The neutron stack detector sandwiches large-area Si-PIN semiconductor detectors and 2-mm-thick polyethylene disks used as the n-p converter and sensitivity enhancement medium. A neutron stack detector composed of 9 ∅80 mm×0.8 mm Si-PIN detectors has been built and used to measure a pulsed 14 MeV neutron flux of dense plasma focus devices (DPF). We have acquired its sensitivity to 14 MeV neutrons and 1.25 MeV γ-rays, the n-γ sensitivity ratio, and time response experimentally or theoretically. The study shows that this neutron stack detector can be applied for the diagnosis of DPF and neutron tubes. The results of this investigation also suggest a general model for developing high-sensitivity detectors based on a single radiation detector of another type.

  11. Facile preparation of highly luminescent CdTe quantum dots within hyperbranched poly(amidoamine)s and their application in bio-imaging

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    A new strategy for facile preparation of highly luminescent CdTe quantum dots (QDs) within amine-terminated hyperbranched poly(amidoamine)s (HPAMAM) was proposed in this paper. CdTe precursors were first prepared by adding NaHTe to aqueous Cd2+ chelated by 3-mercaptopropionic sodium (MPA-Na), and then HPAMAM was introduced to stabilize the CdTe precursors. After microwave irradiation, highly fluorescent and stable CdTe QDs stabilized by MPA-Na and HPAMAM were obtained. The CdTe QDs showed a high quantum yield (QY) up to 58%. By preparing CdTe QDs within HPAMAM, the biocompatibility properties of HPAMAM and the optical, electrical properties of CdTe QDs can be combined, endowing the CdTe QDs with biocompatibility. The resulting CdTe QDs can be directly used in biomedical fields, and their potential application in bio-imaging was investigated. PMID:24624925

  12. Smoke Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    In the photo, Fire Chief Jay Stout of Safety Harbor, Florida, is explaining to young Richard Davis the workings of the Honeywell smoke and fire detector which probably saved Richard's life and that of his teen-age brother. Alerted by the detector's warning, the pair were able to escape their burning home. The detector in the Davis home was one of 1,500 installed in Safety Harbor residences in a cooperative program conducted by the city and Honeywell Inc.

  13. New detector array - the HRIBF Modular Total Absorption Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolinska-Cichocka, Marzena; Rykaczewski, Krzysztof; Karny, Marek; Kuzniak, Aleksandra; Grzywacz, Robert; Rasco, Charlie; Miller, David; Gross, Carl J.; Johnson, Jim

    2011-10-01

    The construction of a new Modular Total Absorption Spectrometer (MTAS) at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory will be presented. The total absorption gamma spectra measured with MTAS will be used to derive a true beta-feeding pattern and resulting beta strength function for fission products. In particular, the measurements of decay heat released by radioactive nuclei produced in nuclear fuels at power reactors will be performed. MTAS is made up of 19 large NaI(Tl) crystals each encapsulated with a 0.8-mm-thick carbon fiber. There are also two 1-mm- thick Silicon Strip Detectors surrounding a moving tape collector that count beta-energy loss signals. The structure is shielded by more than 1-inch of lead around MTAS which reduces background radiation significantly. MTAS efficiency for full energy deposition of gamma ray approaches nearly 90% for 300 keV gammas and over 75% for a 5 MeV gamma transition. Research supported by the DOE Office of Nuclear Physics.

  14. Energy-discriminating X-ray computed tomography system utilizing a cadmium telluride detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Eiichi; Abderyim, Purkhet; Enomoto, Toshiyuki; Watanabe, Manabu; Hitomi, Keitaro; Takahasi, Kiyomi; Sato, Shigehiro; Ogawae, Akira; Onagawa, Jun

    2010-07-01

    An energy-discriminating K-edge X-ray computed tomography (CT) system is useful for increasing contrast resolution of a target region utilizing contrast media and for reducing the absorbed dose for patients. The CT system is of the first-generation type with a cadmium telluride (CdTe) detector, and a projection curve is obtained by translation scanning using the CdTe detector in conjunction with an x-stage. An object is rotated by the rotation step angle using a turntable between the translation scans. Thus, CT is carried out by repeating the translation scanning and the rotation of an object. Penetrating X-ray photons from the object are detected by the CdTe detector, and event signals of X-ray photons are produced using charge-sensitive and shaping amplifiers. Both the photon energy and the energy width are selected by use of a multi-channel analyzer, and the number of photons is counted by a counter card. Demonstration of enhanced iodine K-edge X-ray CT was carried out by selecting photons with energies just beyond the iodine K-edge energy of 33.2 keV.

  15. Laser ablation synthesis route of CdTe colloidal quantum dots for biological applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida, D. B.; Rodriguez, E.; Moreira, R. S.; Agouram, S.; Barbosa, L. C.; Jimenez, E.; Cesar, C. L.

    2009-07-01

    In this work we report a novel technique for obtain thiol capped CdTe colloidal quantum dots in one step. These nanoparticles are compatible for silica capping indicating their possible use as fluorescent markers.

  16. APT mass spectrometry and SEM data for CdTe solar cells

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Chen; Paudel, Naba R.; Yan, Yanfa; ...

    2016-03-16

    Atom probe tomography (APT) data acquired from a CAMECA LEAP 4000 XHR for the CdS/CdTe interface for a non-CdCl2 treated CdTe solar cell as well as the mass spectrum of an APT data set including a GB in a CdCl2-treated CdTe solar cell are presented. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) data showing the evolution of sample preparation for APT and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) electron beam induced current (EBIC) are also presented. As a result, these data show mass spectrometry peak decomposition of Cu and Te within an APT dataset, the CdS/CdTe interface of an untreated CdTe solar cell, preparationmore » of APT needles from the CdS/CdTe interface in superstrate grown CdTe solar cells, and the preparation of a cross-sectional STEM EBIC sample.« less

  17. Enhanced Specificity of Multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction via CdTe Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Gaofeng; Ma, Chao; Zhu, Yanliang; Li, Shuchun; Shao, Youhua; Wang, Yong; Xiao, Zhongdang

    2011-12-01

    Nanoparticles were recently reported to be able to improve both efficiency and specificity in polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Here, CdTe QDs were introduced into multi-PCR systems. It was found that an appropriate concentration of CdTe QDs could enhance the performance of multi-PCR by reducing the formation of nonspecific products in the complex system, but an excessive amount of CdTe QDs could suppress the PCR. The effects of QDs on PCR can be reversed by increasing the polymerase concentration or by adding bovine serum albumin (BSA). The mechanisms underlying these effects were also discussed. The results indicated that CdTe QDs could be used to optimize the amplification products of the PCR, especially in the multi-PCR system with different primers annealing temperatures, which is of great significance for molecular diagnosis.

  18. Characterization of CdTe Nanoparticles Fabricated by Pulsed Electron Deposition Technique at Different Ablation Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, E.; Aga, R.; Steigerwald, A.; Ueda, A.; Pan, Z.; Collins, W. E.; Mu, R.

    2008-03-01

    Telluride (CdTe) is a front-runner photovoltaic (PV) material because it has already attained efficiencies above 16%. The fabrication of CdTe nanoparticles has aroused considerable interest because of their potential application as active layer in organic/inorganic hybrid solar cells. They can also be used for sensitisation of wide band gap semiconductors. In this work, we explore pulsed electron beam deposition (PED) technique to fabricate CdTe nanoparticles. Two ablation parameters, namely background gas pressure and electron energy were varied to investigate their effects on the nanoparticle formation. AFM and optical transmission measurements indicate that we have fabricated CdTe nanocrystalline films exhibiting quantum confinement effect. These films contain scattered nanoparticles with diameters varying from 40 nm to 500 nm, which contribute to the optical absorption near the bulk bandgap energy. However, increasing the background pressure to 19 mTorr improves the nanocrystalline film uniformity.

  19. First-Principles Study of Back Contact Effects on CdTe Thin Film Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Mao-Hua

    2009-01-01

    Forming a chemically stable low-resistance back contact for CdTe thin-film solar cells is critically important to the cell performance. This paper reports theoretical study of the effects of the back-contact material, Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3}, on the performance of the CdTe solar cells. First-principles calculations show that Sb impurities in p-type CdTe are donors and can diffuse with low diffusion barrier. There properties are clearly detrimental to the solar-cell performance. The Sb segregation into the grain boundaries may be required to explain the good efficiencies for the CdTe solar cells with Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} back contacts.

  20. Spatial luminescence imaging of dopant incorporation in CdTe Films

    DOE PAGES

    Guthrey, Harvey; Moseley, John; Colegrove, Eric; ...

    2017-01-25

    State-of-the-art cathodoluminescence (CL) spectrum imaging with spectrum-per-pixel CL emission mapping is applied to spatially profile how dopant elements are incorporated into Cadmium telluride (CdTe). Emission spectra and intensity monitor the spatial distribution of additional charge carriers through characteristic variations in the CL emission based on computational modeling. Our results show that grain boundaries play a role in incorporating dopants in CdTe exposed to copper, phosphorus, and intrinsic point defects in CdTe. Furthermore, the image analysis provides critical, unique feedback to understand dopant incorporation and activation in the inhomogeneous CdTe material, which has struggled to reach high levels of hole density.

  1. A prototype small CdTe gamma camera for radioguided surgery and other imaging applications.

    PubMed

    Tsuchimochi, Makoto; Sakahara, Harumi; Hayama, Kazuhide; Funaki, Minoru; Ohno, Ryoichi; Shirahata, Takashi; Orskaug, Terje; Maehlum, Gunnar; Yoshioka, Koki; Nygard, Einar

    2003-12-01

    Gamma probes have been used for sentinel lymph node biopsy in melanoma and breast cancer. However, these probes can provide only radioactivity counts and variable pitch audio output based on the intensity of the detected radioactivity. We have developed a small semiconductor gamma camera (SSGC) that allows visualisation of the size, shape and location of the target tissues. This study is designed to characterise the performance of the SSGC for radioguided surgery of metastatic lesions and for other imaging applications amenable to the smaller format of this prototype imaging system. The detector head had 32 cadmium telluride semiconductor arrays with a total of 1,024 pixels, and with application-specific integrated circuits (ASICs) and a tungsten collimator. The entire assembly was encased in a lead housing measuring 152 mmx166 mmx65 mm. The effective visual field was 44.8 mmx44.8 mm. The energy resolution and imaging aspects were tested. Two spherical 5-mm- and 15-mm-diameter technetium-99m radioactive sources that had activities of 0.15 MBq and 100 MBq, respectively, were used to simulate a sentinel lymph node and an injection site. The relative detectability of these foci by the new detector and a conventional scintillation camera was studied. The prototype was also examined in a variety of clinical applications. Energy resolution [full-width at half-maximum (FWHM)] for a single element at the centre of the field of view was 4.2% at 140 keV (99mTc), and the mean energy resolution of the CdTe detector arrays was approximately 7.8%. The spatial resolution, represented by FWHM, had a mean value of 1.56 +/- 0.05 mm. Simulated node foci could be visualised clearly by the SSGC using a 15-s acquisition time. In preliminary clinical tests, the SSGC successfully imaged diseases in a variety of tissues, including salivary and thyroid glands, temporomandibular joints and sentinel lymph nodes. The SSGC has significant potential for diagnosing diseases and facilitating

  2. Caliste 64, a new CdTe micro-camera for hard X-ray spectro-imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meuris, A.; Limousin, O.; Lugiez, F.; Gevin, O.; Blondel, C.; Pinsard, F.; Vassal, M. C.; Soufflet, F.; Le Mer, I.

    2009-10-01

    In the frame of the Simbol-X mission of hard X-ray astrophysics, a prototype of micro-camera with 64 pixels called Caliste 64 has been designed and several samples have been tested. The device integrates ultra-low-noise IDeF-X V1.1 ASICs from CEA and a 1 cm 2 Al Schottky CdTe detector from Acrorad because of its high uniformity and spectroscopic performance. The process of hybridization, mastered by the 3D Plus company, respects space applications standards. The camera is a spectro-imager with time-tagging capability. Each photon interacting in the semiconductor is tagged with a time, a position and an energy. Time resolution is better than 100 ns rms for energy deposits greater than 20 keV, taking into account electronic noise and technological dispersal of the front-end electronics. The spectrum summed across the 64 pixels results in an energy resolution of 664 eV fwhm at 13.94 keV and 842 eV fwhm at 59.54 keV, when the detector is cooled down to -10 °C and biased at -500 V.

  3. Dynamic Curvature and Stress Studies for MBE CdTe on Si and GaAs Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, R. N.; Jaime Vasquez, M.; Lennon, C. M.; Nozaki, C.; Almeida, L. A.; Pellegrino, J.; Arias, J.; Taylor, C.; Wissman, B.

    2015-09-01

    Infrared focal plane arrays (IRFPA) based on HgCdTe semiconductor alloys have been shown to be ideal for tactical and strategic applications. High density (>1 M pixel), high operability HgCdTe detectors on large area, low-cost composite substrates, such as CdTe-buffered Si or GaAs, are envisioned for next-generation IRFPAs. Thermal expansion mismatch is among various material parameters that govern the structural properties of the final detector layer. It has previously been shown that thermal expansion mismatch plays the dominant role in the residual stress characteristics of these heteroepitaxial structures (Jacobs et al. in J Electron Mater 37:1480, 2008). The wafer curvature (bowing) resulting from residual stress, is a likely source of problems that may occur during subsequent processing. This includes cracking of the film and substrate during post-growth annealing processes or even certain characterization techniques. In this work, we examine dynamic curvature and stress during molecular beam epitaxy (MBE), of CdTe on Si and GaAs substrates. The effect of temperature changes on wafer curvature throughout the growth sequence is documented using a multi-beam optical sensor developed by K-Space Associates. This monitoring technique makes possible the study of growth sequences which employ annealing schemes and/or interlayers to influence the final residual stress state of the heteroepitaxial structures.

  4. Measurement of radon progenies using the Timepix detector.

    PubMed

    Bulanek, Boris; Jilek, Karel; Cermak, Pavel

    2014-07-01

    After an introduction of Timepix detector, results of these detectors with silicon and cadmium telluride detection layer in assessment of activity of short-lived radon decay products are presented. They were collected on an open-face filter by means of one-grab sampling method from the NRPI radon chamber. Activity of short-lived radon decay products was estimated from measured alpha decays of 218,214Po. The results indicate very good agreement between the use of both Timepix detectors and an NRPI reference instrument, continuous monitor Fritra 4. Low-level detection limit for EEC was estimated to be 41 Bq m(-3) for silicon detection layer and 184 Bq m(-3) for CdTe detection layer, respectively.

  5. Multisector scintillation detector with fiber-optic light collection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ampilogov, N. V.; Denisov, S. P.; Kokoulin, R. P.; Petrukhin, A. A.; Prokopenko, N. N.; Shulzhenko, I. A.; Unatlokov, I. B.; Yashin, I. I.

    2017-07-01

    A new type of scintillation detector for the use in high energy physics is described. The octagonal detector consists of eight triangular scintillator sectors with total area of 1 m2. Each sector represents two plates of 2 cm thick plastic scintillator. Seven 1 mm thick WLS fibers are laid evenly between the plates. The space between the fibers is filled with silicone compound to provide better light collection. Fiber ends from all eight sectors are gathered in the central part of the detector into a bunch and docked to the cathode of a FEU-115m photomultiplier. The read-out of the counter signals is carried out from 7th and 12th dynodes, providing a wide dynamic range up to about 10000 particles. The front-end electronics of the detector is based on the flash-ADC with a sampling frequency of 200 MHz. The features of detecting and recording systems of the multisector scintillation detector (MSD) and the results of its testing are discussed.

  6. Fire Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    An early warning fire detection sensor developed for NASA's Space Shuttle Orbiter is being evaluated as a possible hazard prevention system for mining operations. The incipient Fire Detector represents an advancement over commercially available smoke detectors in that it senses and signals the presence of a fire condition before the appearance of flame and smoke, offering an extra margin of safety.

  7. Metal Detectors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrington-Lueker, Donna

    1992-01-01

    Schools that count on metal detectors to stem the flow of weapons into the schools create a false sense of security. Recommendations include investing in personnel rather than hardware, cultivating the confidence of law-abiding students, and enforcing discipline. Metal detectors can be quite effective at afterschool events. (MLF)

  8. Vapor Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waddell, H. M.; Garrard, G. C.; Houston, D. W.

    1982-01-01

    Detector eliminates need for removing covers to take samples. Detector is canister consisting of screw-in base and clear plastic tube that contains two colors of silica gel. Monoethylhydrazine and nitrogen tetroxide vapors are visually monitored with canister containing color-changing gels.

  9. The TORCH time-of-flight detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harnew, N.; Brook, N.; Castillo García, L.; Cussans, D.; Föhl, K.; Forty, R.; Frei, C.; Gao, R.; Gys, T.; Piedigrossi, D.; Rademacker, J.; Ros Garcia, A.; van Dijk, M.

    2016-07-01

    The TORCH time-of-flight detector is being developed to provide particle identification between 2 and 10 GeV/c momentum over a flight distance of 10 m. TORCH is designed for large-area coverage, up to 30 m2, and has a DIRC-like construction. The goal is to achieve a 15 ps time-of-flight resolution per incident particle by combining arrival times from multiple Cherenkov photons produced within quartz radiator plates of 10 mm thickness. A four-year R&D programme is underway with an industrial partner (Photek, UK) to produce 53×53 mm2 Micro-Channel Plate (MCP) detectors for the TORCH application. The MCP-PMT will provide a timing accuracy of 40 ps per photon and it will have a lifetime of up to at least 5 Ccm-2 of integrated anode charge by utilizing an Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) coating. The MCP will be read out using charge division with customised electronics incorporating the NINO chipset. Laboratory results on prototype MCPs are presented. The construction of a prototype TORCH module and its simulated performance are also described.

  10. Substrate preparation effects on defect density in molecular beam epitaxial growth of CdTe on CdTe (100) and (211)B

    DOE PAGES

    Perkins, Craig; Barnes, Teresa M; Burton, George L.; ...

    2017-07-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that growth of CdTe on CdTe (100) and (211)B substrates via molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) results in planar defect densities 2 and 3 orders of magnitude higher than growth on InSb (100) substrates, respectively. To understand this shortcoming, MBE growth on CdTe substrates with a variety of substrate preparation methods is studied by scanning electron microscopy, secondary ion mass spectrometry, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, cross sectional transmission electron microscopy, and atom probe tomography (APT). Prior to growth, carbon is shown to remain on substrate surfaces even after atomic hydrogen cleaning. APT revealed that following the growth ofmore » films, trace amounts of carbon remained at the substrate/film interface. This residual carbon may lead to structural degradation, which was determined as the main cause of higher defect density.« less

  11. Phosphorus Diffusion Mechanisms and Deep Incorporation in Polycrystalline and Single-Crystalline CdTe

    SciTech Connect

    Colegrove, Eric; Harvey, Steven P.; Yang, Ji-Hui; Burst, James M.; Albin, David S.; Wei, Su-Huai; Metzger, Wyatt K.

    2016-05-01

    A key challenge in cadmium telluride (CdTe) semiconductors is obtaining stable and high hole density. Group I elements substituting Cd can form ideal acceptors but easily self-compensate and diffuse quickly. For example, CdTe photovoltaics have relied on copper as a dopant, but copper creates stability problems and hole density that has not exceeded 1015 cm-3. If hole density can be increased beyond 10^16 cm-3, CdTe solar technology can exceed multicrystalline silicon and provide levelized costs of electricity below conventional energy sources. Group V elements substituting Te offer a solution, but are very difficult to incorporate. Using time-of-flight secondary-ion mass spectrometry, we examine bulk and grain boundary (GB) diffusion of phosphorous (P) in CdTe in Cd-rich conditions. We find that in addition to slow bulk diffusion and fast GB diffusion, there is a fast bulk diffusion component that enables deep P incorporation in CdTe. Detailed first-principles calculations indicate the slow bulk diffusion component is caused by substitutional P diffusion through the Te sublattice, whereas the fast bulk diffusion component is caused by P diffusing through interstitial lattice sites following the combination of a kick-out step and two rotation steps. The latter is limited in magnitude by high formation energy, but is sufficient to manipulate P incorporation. In addition to an increased physical understanding, this result opens up new experimental possibilities for Group V doping in CdTe materials.

  12. Oxygen Incorporation During Fabrication of Substrate CdTe Photovoltaic Devices: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Duenow, J. N.; Dhere, R. G.; Kuciauskas, D.; Li, J. V.; Pankow, J. W.; DeHart, C. M.; Gessert, T. A.

    2012-06-01

    Recently, CdTe photovoltaic (PV) devices fabricated in the nonstandard substrate configuration have attracted increasing interest because of their potential compatibility with flexible substrates such as metal foils and polymer films. This compatibility could lead to the suitability of CdTe for roll-to-roll processing and building-integrated PV. Currently, however, the efficiencies of substrate CdTe devices reported in the literature are significantly lower ({approx}6%-8%) than those of high-performance superstrate devices ({approx}17%) because of significantly lower open-circuit voltage (Voc) and fill factor (FF). In our recent device development efforts, we have found that processing parameters required to fabricate high-efficiency substrate CdTe PV devices differ from those necessary for traditional superstrate CdTe devices. Here, we investigate how oxygen incorporation in the CdTe deposition, CdCl2 heat treatment, CdS deposition, and post-deposition heat treatment affect device characteristics through their effects on the junction. By adjusting whether oxygen is incorporated during these processing steps, we have achieved Voc values greater than 860 mV and efficiencies greater than 10%.

  13. Iodine Doping of CdTe and CdMgTe for Photovoltaic Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogedengbe, O. S.; Swartz, C. H.; Jayathilaka, P. A. R. D.; Petersen, J. E.; Sohal, S.; LeBlanc, E. G.; Edirisooriya, M.; Zaunbrecher, K. N.; Wang, A.; Barnes, T. M.; Myers, T. H.

    2017-09-01

    Iodine-doped CdTe and Cd1- x Mg x Te layers were grown by molecular beam epitaxy. Secondary ion mass spectrometry characterization was used to measure dopant concentration, while Hall measurement was used for determining carrier concentration. Photoluminescence intensity and time-resolved photoluminescence techniques were used for optical characterization. Maximum n-typ e carrier concentrations of 7.4 × 1018 cm-3 for CdTe and 3 × 1017 cm-3 for Cd0.65Mg0.35Te were achieved. Studies suggest that electrically active doping with iodine is limited with dopant concentration much above these values. Dopant activation of about 80% was observed in most of the CdTe samples. The estimated activation energy is about 6 meV for CdTe and the value for Cd0.65Mg0.35Te is about 58 meV. Iodine-doped samples exhibit long lifetimes with no evidence of photoluminescence degradation with doping as high as 2 × 1018 cm-3, while indium shows substantial non-radiative recombination at carrier concentrations above 5 × 1016 cm-3. Iodine was shown to be thermally stable in CdTe at temperatures up to 600°C. Results suggest iodine may be a preferred n-type dopant compared to indium in achieving heavily doped n-type CdTe.

  14. Properties of RF sputtered cadmium telluride (CdTe) thin films: Influence of deposition pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Kulkarni, R. R.; Pawbake, A. S.; Waykar, R. G.; Rondiya, S. R.; Jadhavar, A. A.; Pandharkar, S. M.; Karpe, S. D.; Diwate, K. D.; Jadkar, S. R.

    2016-04-13

    Influence of deposition pressure on structural, morphology, electrical and optical properties of CdTe thin films deposited at low substrate temperature (100°C) by RF magnetron sputtering was investigated. The formation of CdTe was confirmed by low angle XRD and Raman spectroscopy. The low angle XRD analysis revealed that the CdTe films have zinc blende (cubic) structure with crystallites having preferred orientation in (111) direction. Raman spectra show the longitudinal optical (LO) phonon mode peak ∼ 165.4 cm{sup -1} suggesting high quality CdTe film were obtained over the entire range of deposition pressure studied. Scanning electron microscopy analysis showed that films are smooth, homogenous, and crack-free with no evidence of voids. The EDAX data revealed that CdTe films deposited at low deposition pressure are high-quality stoichiometric. However, for all deposition pressures, films are rich in Cd relative to Te. The UV-Visible spectroscopy analysis show the blue shift in absorption edge with increasing the deposition pressure while the band gap show decreasing trend. The highest electrical conductivity was obtained for the film deposited at deposition pressure 1 Pa which indicates that the optimized deposition pressure for our sputtering unit is 1 Pa. Based on the experimental results, these CdTe films can be useful for the application in the flexible solar cells and other opto-electronic devices.

  15. Study of Cu-related Defect States in Single-crystal CdTe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corwine, Caroline; Sites, James; Gessert, Timothy; Metzger, Wyatt; Dippo, Pat; Duda, Anna

    2003-10-01

    We have studied single-crystal CdTe using low-temperature photoluminescence (PL) in an effort to understand the effects of copper on the deep levels, as well as the effect of a bromine methanol (BrMe) etch on subsequent copper diffusion into CdTe. In present polycrystalline CdS/CdTe solar cell technology, the use of a back contact that contains Cu is necessary to produce high-efficiency cells. However, it is not generally understood why Cu is necessary for these devices to function well. In order to obtain further advances in the efficiencies of these solar cells, it is important to know how the back contact process may affect the defect states in CdTe. PL is one tool used to study defect states. However, before PL can be used effectively for polycrystalline CdTe solar cells, relevant spectral features first must be interpreted for single-crystal CdTe. All PL in this study was taken at 4.5 K. We report on PL peaks at 1.40 and 1.45 eV, which are seen only after Cu is diffused into single-crystal CdTe.

  16. Properties of RF sputtered cadmium telluride (CdTe) thin films: Influence of deposition pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, R. R.; Pawbake, A. S.; Waykar, R. G.; Rondiya, S. R.; Jadhavar, A. A.; Pandharkar, S. M.; Karpe, S. D.; Diwate, K. D.; Jadkar, S. R.

    2016-04-01

    Influence of deposition pressure on structural, morphology, electrical and optical properties of CdTe thin films deposited at low substrate temperature (100°C) by RF magnetron sputtering was investigated. The formation of CdTe was confirmed by low angle XRD and Raman spectroscopy. The low angle XRD analysis revealed that the CdTe films have zinc blende (cubic) structure with crystallites having preferred orientation in (111) direction. Raman spectra show the longitudinal optical (LO) phonon mode peak ˜ 165.4 cm-1 suggesting high quality CdTe film were obtained over the entire range of deposition pressure studied. Scanning electron microscopy analysis showed that films are smooth, homogenous, and crack-free with no evidence of voids. The EDAX data revealed that CdTe films deposited at low deposition pressure are high-quality stoichiometric. However, for all deposition pressures, films are rich in Cd relative to Te. The UV-Visible spectroscopy analysis show the blue shift in absorption edge with increasing the deposition pressure while the band gap show decreasing trend. The highest electrical conductivity was obtained for the film deposited at deposition pressure 1 Pa which indicates that the optimized deposition pressure for our sputtering unit is 1 Pa. Based on the experimental results, these CdTe films can be useful for the application in the flexible solar cells and other opto-electronic devices.

  17. Iodine Doping of CdTe and CdMgTe for Photovoltaic Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogedengbe, O. S.; Swartz, C. H.; Jayathilaka, P. A. R. D.; Petersen, J. E.; Sohal, S.; LeBlanc, E. G.; Edirisooriya, M.; Zaunbrecher, K. N.; Wang, A.; Barnes, T. M.; Myers, T. H.

    2017-06-01

    Iodine-doped CdTe and Cd1-x Mg x Te layers were grown by molecular beam epitaxy. Secondary ion mass spectrometry characterization was used to measure dopant concentration, while Hall measurement was used for determining carrier concentration. Photoluminescence intensity and time-resolved photoluminescence techniques were used for optical characterization. Maximum n-type carrier concentrations of 7.4 × 1018 cm-3 for CdTe and 3 × 1017 cm-3 for Cd0.65Mg0.35Te were achieved. Studies suggest that electrically active doping with iodine is limited with dopant concentration much above these values. Dopant activation of about 80% was observed in most of the CdTe samples. The estimated activation energy is about 6 meV for CdTe and the value for Cd0.65Mg0.35Te is about 58 meV. Iodine-doped samples exhibit long lifetimes with no evidence of photoluminescence degradation with doping as high as 2 × 1018 cm-3, while indium shows substantial non-radiative recombination at carrier concentrations above 5 × 1016 cm-3. Iodine was shown to be thermally stable in CdTe at temperatures up to 600°C. Results suggest iodine may be a preferred n-type dopant compared to indium in achieving heavily doped n-type CdTe.

  18. Indium donor complexes with cation vacancies in CdTe and ZnSe

    SciTech Connect

    Griffith, J.W.; Lundquist, R.; Platzer, R.; Gardner, J.A.; Karczewski, G.; Furdyna, J.K.

    1993-11-01

    Very dilute (10{sub 12} cm{sup {minus}3}) indium donors in CdTe and ZnSe powders and in CdTe single crystals were investigated using {sup 111}In Perturbed angular correlation spectroscopy. Most indium atoms are in uncomplexed sites but can form weakly-bound complexes with native defects in very defective material. The only complex observed in CdTe is an indium-Cd vacancy pair. The CdTe in which these pairs occur is apparently n-type, most Cd vacancies are free and doubly-charged, and the binding energy with indium is 0.15 eV. In ZnSe, indium can pair with a Zn vacancy or with some other presently unidentified defect. These complexes form in ZnSe containing large concentrations of both free Zn vacancies and complexes of Zn vacancies with other defects. In CdTe, the pair formation equilibration time constant is two days at 15C,an implication that Cd vacancies are mobile at room temperature. Lattice relaxation around a Cd vacancy in CdTe was probed by single crystal PAC experiments.

  19. Optical properties and charge carrier dynamics of CdTe quantum dots in silicate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenke; Zhang, Wenchao; Xia, Mengling; Liu, Chao; Wang, Jing

    2017-05-01

    CdTe quantum dots (QDs) in silicate glasses were fabricated through conventional melt-quenching and heat-treatment; steady-state and transient optical properties of CdTe QDs were investigated. CdTe QDs with diameters of 2.3-5.9 nm with photoluminescence in the range of 553-768 nm were precipitated in the glasses. Time-resolved photoluminescence and transient absorption analysis showed that photoluminescence of CdTe QDs was composed of intrinsic emission and defect emission. Oxidation of Te2- and formation of Te2 during thermal treatment led to the unpassivated Cd2+ on the surface of CdTe QDs and formation of shallow trapping states. The photo-generated electrons were trapped by the shallow surface states of CdTe QDs within 0.4±0.03 ps, and Auger recombination processes occurred within a timescale of 3.2±0.35 ps. Both intrinsic emission and defect emission with effective lifetimes of several nanoseconds and dozens of nanoseconds were observed.

  20. Glutathione-capped CdTe nanocrystals as probe for the determination of fenbendazole.

    PubMed

    Li, Qin; Tan, Xuanping; Li, Jin; Pan, Li; Liu, Xiaorong

    2015-04-15

    Water-soluble glutathione (GSH)-capped CdTe quantum dots (QDs) were synthesized. In pH 7.1 PBS buffer solution, the interaction between GSH-capped CdTe QDs and fenbendazole (FBZ) was investigated by spectroscopic methods, including fluorescence spectroscopy, ultraviolet-visible absorption spectroscopy, and resonance Rayleigh scattering (RRS) spectroscopy. In GSH-capped CdTe QDs solution, the addition of FBZ results in the fluorescence quenching and RRS enhancement of GSH-capped CdTe QDs. And the quenching intensity (enhanced RRS intensity) was proportional to the concentration of FBZ in a certain range. Investigation of the interaction mechanism, proved that the fluorescence quenching and RRS enhancement of GSH-capped CdTe QDs by FBZ is the result of electrostatic attraction. Based on the quenching of fluorescence (enhancement of RRS) of GSH-capped CdTe QDs by FBZ, a novel, simple, rapid and specific method for FBZ determination was proposed. The detection limit for FBZ was 42 ng mL(-1) (3.4 ng mL(-1)) and the quantitative determination range was 0-2.8 μg mL(-1) with a correlation of 0.9985 (0.9979). The method has been applied to detect FBZ in real simples and with satisfactory results.

  1. Glutathione-capped CdTe nanocrystals as probe for the determination of fenbendazole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qin; Tan, Xuanping; Li, Jin; Pan, Li; Liu, Xiaorong

    2015-04-01

    Water-soluble glutathione (GSH)-capped CdTe quantum dots (QDs) were synthesized. In pH 7.1 PBS buffer solution, the interaction between GSH-capped CdTe QDs and fenbendazole (FBZ) was investigated by spectroscopic methods, including fluorescence spectroscopy, ultraviolet-visible absorption spectroscopy, and resonance Rayleigh scattering (RRS) spectroscopy. In GSH-capped CdTe QDs solution, the addition of FBZ results in the fluorescence quenching and RRS enhancement of GSH-capped CdTe QDs. And the quenching intensity (enhanced RRS intensity) was proportional to the concentration of FBZ in a certain range. Investigation of the interaction mechanism, proved that the fluorescence quenching and RRS enhancement of GSH-capped CdTe QDs by FBZ is the result of electrostatic attraction. Based on the quenching of fluorescence (enhancement of RRS) of GSH-capped CdTe QDs by FBZ, a novel, simple, rapid and specific method for FBZ determination was proposed. The detection limit for FBZ was 42 ng mL-1 (3.4 ng mL-1) and the quantitative determination range was 0-2.8 μg mL-1 with a correlation of 0.9985 (0.9979). The method has been applied to detect FBZ in real simples and with satisfactory results.

  2. Growth and fabrication method of CdTe and its performance as a radiation detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Soojeong; Kim, Hyojin; Kim, Dojin

    2015-01-01

    We report the nitrogen-monoxide (NO) gas-sensing properties of transparent p-type copper-oxide (CuO) nanorod arrays synthesized by using the hydrothermal method with a CuO nanoparticle seed layer deposited on a glass substrate via sputtering process. We synthesized polycrystalline CuO nanorods measuring 200 to 300 nm in length and 20 to 30 nm in diameter for three controlled molarity ratios of 1:1, 1:2 and 1:4 between copper nitrate trihydrate [Cu(NO2)2·3H2O] and hexamethylenetetramine (C6H12N4). The crystal structures and morphologies of the synthesized CuO nanorod arrays were examined using grazing incidence X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. The gas-sensing measurements for NO gas in dry air indicated that the CuO nanorodarray-based gas sensors synthesized under hydrothermal condition at a molarity ratio of 1:2 showed the best gas sensing response to NO gas. These CuO nanorod-array gas sensors exhibited a highly sensitive response to NO gas, with a maximum sensitivity of about 650% for 10 ppm NO in dry air at an operating temperature of 100 ℃. These transparent p-type CuO nanorod-array gas sensors have shown a reversible and reliable response to NO gas over a range of operating temperatures. These results indicate certain potential use of p-type oxide semiconductor CuO nanorods as sensing materials for several types of gas sensors, including p — n junction gas sensors.

  3. CdTe thin films grown by pulsed laser deposition using powder as target: Effect of substrate temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Moure-Flores, F.; Quiñones-Galván, J. G.; Guillén-Cervantes, A.; Arias-Cerón, J. S.; Hernández-Hernández, A.; Santoyo-Salazar, J.; Santos-Cruz, J.; Mayén-Hernández, S. A.; de la L. Olvera, M.; Mendoza-Álvarez, J. G.; Meléndez-Lira, M.; Contreras-Puente, G.

    2014-01-01

    CdTe thin films were deposited by pulsed laser deposition on Corning glass slides using CdTe powder as target. Films were grown at substrate temperatures ranging from room temperature (~25 °C) to 300 °C. The structural, compositional and optical properties were analyzed as a function of substrate temperature. X-ray diffraction shows that CdTe films grown at room temperature have hexagonal phase, while for higher temperatures the films have cubic phase. Raman and EDS indicate that films grew with Te excess, which suggests that CdTe films have p-type conductivity.

  4. Semiconductor P-I-N detector

    DOEpatents

    Sudharsanan, Rengarajan; Karam, Nasser H.

    2001-01-01

    A semiconductor P-I-N detector including an intrinsic wafer, a P-doped layer, an N-doped layer, and a boundary layer for reducing the diffusion of dopants into the intrinsic wafer. The boundary layer is positioned between one of the doped regions and the intrinsic wafer. The intrinsic wafer can be composed of CdZnTe or CdTe, the P-doped layer can be composed of ZnTe doped with copper, and the N-doped layer can be composed of CdS doped with indium. The boundary layers is formed of an undoped semiconductor material. The boundary layer can be deposited onto the underlying intrinsic wafer. The doped regions are then typically formed by a deposition process or by doping a section of the deposited boundary layer.

  5. Gaseous Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titov, Maxim

    Since long time, the compelling scientific goals of future high-energy physics experiments were a driving factor in the development of advanced detector technologies. A true innovation in detector instrumentation concepts came in 1968, with the development of a fully parallel readout for a large array of sensing elements - the Multi-Wire Proportional Chamber (MWPC), which earned Georges Charpak a Nobel prize in physics in 1992. Since that time radiation detection and imaging with fast gaseous detectors, capable of economically covering large detection volumes with low mass budget, have been playing an important role in many fields of physics. Advances in photolithography and microprocessing techniques in the chip industry during the past decade triggered a major transition in the field of gas detectors from wire structures to Micro-Pattern Gas Detector (MPGD) concepts, revolutionizing cell-size limitations for many gas detector applications. The high radiation resistance and excellent spatial and time resolution make them an invaluable tool to confront future detector challenges at the next generation of colliders. The design of the new micro-pattern devices appears suitable for industrial production. Novel structures where MPGDs are directly coupled to the CMOS pixel readout represent an exciting field allowing timing and charge measurements as well as precise spatial information in 3D. Originally developed for the high-energy physics, MPGD applications have expanded to nuclear physics, photon detection, astroparticle and neutrino physics, neutron detection, and medical imaging.

  6. Simulation of CdTe:Ge crystal properties for nuclear radiation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sochinskii, N. V.; Lozano, M.; Pellegrini, G.; Ullan, M.

    2006-11-01

    We report on the simulation results of the electrical properties of a coplanar detector made from Ge-doped CdTe crystals. The simulations have been performed using the commercial modeling package MEDICI. The detailed models of material behavior have been created by varying the concentration of three standard traps associated with CdTe:Ge crystals. These traps are the A-center related to Cd vacancy-residual impurity complex, the Te vacancy defect and the Ge impurity. Their energetic positions were measured by photoluminescence technique. The simulation has revealed the effects of the traps on several important detector characteristics such as leakage current and electric field distribution.

  7. MS Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Koppenaal, David W.; Barinaga, Charles J.; Denton, M Bonner B.; Sperline, Roger P.; Hieftje, Gary M.; Schilling, G. D.; Andrade, Francisco J.; Barnes IV., James H.

    2005-11-01

    Good eyesight is often taken for granted, a situation that everyone appreciates once vision begins to fade with age. New eyeglasses or contact lenses are traditional ways to improve vision, but recent new technology, i.e. LASIK laser eye surgery, provides a new and exciting means for marked vision restoration and improvement. In mass spectrometry, detectors are the 'eyes' of the MS instrument. These 'eyes' have also been taken for granted. New detectors and new technologies are likewise needed to correct, improve, and extend ion detection and hence, our 'chemical vision'. The purpose of this report is to review and assess current MS detector technology and to provide a glimpse towards future detector technologies. It is hoped that the report will also serve to motivate interest, prompt ideas, and inspire new visions for ion detection research.

  8. van der Waals epitaxy of CdTe thin film on graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohanty, Dibyajyoti; Xie, Weiyu; Wang, Yiping; Lu, Zonghuan; Shi, Jian; Zhang, Shengbai; Wang, Gwo-Ching; Lu, Toh-Ming; Bhat, Ishwara B.

    2016-10-01

    van der Waals epitaxy (vdWE) facilitates the epitaxial growth of materials having a large lattice mismatch with the substrate. Although vdWE of two-dimensional (2D) materials on 2D materials have been extensively studied, the vdWE for three-dimensional (3D) materials on 2D substrates remains a challenge. It is perceived that a 2D substrate passes little information to dictate the 3D growth. In this article, we demonstrated the vdWE growth of the CdTe(111) thin film on a graphene buffered SiO2/Si substrate using metalorganic chemical vapor deposition technique, despite a 46% large lattice mismatch between CdTe and graphene and a symmetry change from cubic to hexagonal. Our CdTe films produce a very narrow X-ray rocking curve, and the X-ray pole figure analysis showed 12 CdTe (111) peaks at a chi angle of 70°. This was attributed to two sets of parallel epitaxy of CdTe on graphene with a 30° relative orientation giving rise to a 12-fold symmetry in the pole figure. First-principles calculations reveal that, despite the relatively small energy differences, the graphene buffer layer does pass epitaxial information to CdTe as the parallel epitaxy, obtained in the experiment, is energetically favored. The work paves a way for the growth of high quality CdTe film on a large area as well as on the amorphous substrates.

  9. Monte Carlo and least-squares methods applied in unfolding of X-ray spectra measured with cadmium telluride detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moralles, M.; Bonifácio, D. A. B.; Bottaro, M.; Pereira, M. A. G.

    2007-09-01

    Spectra of calibration sources and X-ray beams were measured with a cadmium telluride (CdTe) detector. The response function of the detector was simulated using the GEANT4 Monte Carlo toolkit. Trapping of charge carriers were taken into account using the Hecht equation in the active zone of the CdTe crystal associated with a continuous function to produce drop of charge collection efficiency near the metallic contacts and borders. The rise time discrimination is approximated by a cut in the depth of the interaction relative to cathode and corrections that depend on the pulse amplitude. The least-squares method with truncation was employed to unfold X-ray spectra typically used in medical diagnostics and the results were compared with reference data.

  10. Experimental evaluation and simulation of multi-pixel cadmium-zinc-telluride hard-X-ray detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaskin, Jessica Anne

    2004-08-01

    This dissertation describes the evaluation of many-pixel Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride (CdZnTe) hard-X-ray detectors for future use with the High Energy Replicated Optics (HERO) telescope being developed at Marshall Space Flight Center. The detector requirements for the HERO application are good energy resolution (sufficient to resolve cyclotron features and nuclear lines), spatial resolution of ˜200 μm, minimal charge loss of absorbed X rays, and minimal sensitivity to the background environment. This research concentrates on assessing the suitability of these detectors for the focus of HERO, and includes the development of a simulation of the physics involved in an X-ray-detector interaction, a study of the intrinsic material properties, measurements with prototype detectors such as the energy and spatial resolution, charge loss, and X-ray background reduction through 3-dimensional depth sensing. Two types of detectors were available for evaluation. The first type includes 1-mm and 2-mm thick 4 x 4 pixel arrays, developed by Metorex Inc. and Baltic Scientific Instruments. The pixel size is 650 μm with inter-pixel gap of 100 μm. Each of the 16 pixels is wired to a charge sensitive preamplifier and then fed to external electronics. The second detector type includes 1-mm and 2-mm thick 16 x 16 pixel arrays with pixel size of 250 μm square and 50 μm inter-pixel gap. Each array is bonded to an Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC) readout chip, developed by Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL) and fabricated by Metorex Inc. The best energy resolution for both detector types is ˜2% at 60 keV. However, the energy resolution across the 16 x 16 pixel arrays varies dramatically, possibly due to the bonding technique used between the CdZnTe crystal and the ASIC. Position interpolation through charge sharing improves spatial resolution on the 16 x 16 pixel arrays from 300 μm to ˜250 μm. Minimal charge loss was measured for the 16 x 16 pixel arrays. Preliminary

  11. Photon detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Va`vra, J.

    1995-10-01

    J. Seguinot and T. Ypsilantis have recently described the theory and history of Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) detectors. In this paper, I will expand on these excellent review papers, by covering the various photon detector designs in greater detail, and by including discussion of mistakes made, and detector problems encountered, along the way. Photon detectors are among the most difficult devices used in physics experiments, because they must achieve high efficiency for photon transport and for the detection of single photo-electrons. For gaseous devices, this requires the correct choice of gas gain in order to prevent breakdown and wire aging, together with the use of low noise electronics having the maximum possible amplification. In addition, the detector must be constructed of materials which resist corrosion due to photosensitive materials such as, the detector enclosure must be tightly sealed in order to prevent oxygen leaks, etc. The most critical step is the selection of the photocathode material. Typically, a choice must be made between a solid (CsI) or gaseous photocathode (TMAE, TEA). A conservative approach favors a gaseous photocathode, since it is continuously being replaced by flushing, and permits the photon detectors to be easily serviced (the air sensitive photocathode can be removed at any time). In addition, it can be argued that we now know how to handle TMAE, which, as is generally accepted, is the best photocathode material available as far as quantum efficiency is concerned. However, it is a very fragile molecule, and therefore its use may result in relatively fast wire aging. A possible alternative is TEA, which, in the early days, was rejected because it requires expensive CaF{sub 2} windows, which could be contaminated easily in the region of 8.3 eV and thus lose their UV transmission.

  12. FOXSI: Properties of optics and detectors for hard-X rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camilo Buitrago-Casas, Juan; Glesener, Lindsay; Christe, Steven; Krucker, Sam; Ishikawa, Shin-nosuke; Foster, Natalie

    2015-04-01

    The Focusing Optics X-ray Solar Imager (FOXSI) is a state-of-the-art direct focusing X-ray telescope designed to observe the Sun. This experiment completed its second flight onboard a sounding rocket last December 11, 2014 from the White Sands Missile Range in New Mexico. The optics use a set of iridium-coated nickel/cobalt mirrors made using a replication technique based on an electroformed perfect polished surface. Since this technique creates full shells that no need to be co-aligned with other segments, an angular resolution of up to ~5 arcsec is gotten. The FOXSI focal plane consists of seven double-sided strip detectors. Five Silicon and 2 CdTe detectors were used during the second flight.We present on various properties of Wolter-I optics that are applicable to solar HXR observation, including ray-tracing simulations of the single-bounce (“ghost ray”) patterns from sources outside the field of view and angular resolution for different source angles and effective area measurements of the FOXSI optics. We also present the detectors calibration results, paying attention to energy resolution (~0.5 keV), energy thresholds (~4-15 keV for Silicon and ~4-20 keV for CdTe detectors), and spatial coherence of these values over the entire detector.

  13. Geant4 simulations of STIX Caliste-SO detector's response to solar X-ray radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barylak, Jaromir; Barylak, Aleksandra; Mrozek, Tomasz; Steślicki, Marek; Podgórski, Piotr; Netzel, Henryka

    Spectrometer/Telescope for Imaging X-rays (STIX) is a part of Solar Orbiter (SO) science payload. SO will be launched in October 2018, and after three years of cruise phase, it will reach orbit with perihelion distance of 0.3 a.u. STIX is a Fourier imager equipped with pairs of grids that comprise the flare hard X-ray tomograph. Similar imager types were already used in the past (eq. RHESSI, Yohkoh/HXT), but STIX will incorporate Moiré modulation and a new type of pixelized detectors with CdTe sensor. We developed a method of modeling these detectors' response matrix (DRM) using the Geant4 simulations of X-ray photons interactions with CdTe crystals. Taking into account known detector effects (Fano noise, hole tailing etc.) we modeled the resulting spectra with high accuracy. Comparison of Caliste-SO laboratory measurements of 241Am decay spectrum with our results shows a very good agreement. The modeling based on the Geant4 simulations significantly improves our understanding of detector response to X-ray photons. Developed methodology gives opportunity for detailed simulation of whole instrument response with complicated geometry and secondary radiation from cosmic ray particles taken into account. Moreover, we are developing the Geant4 simulations of aging effects which decrease detector's performance.

  14. Precision timing detectors with cadmium-telluride sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bornheim, A.; Pena, C.; Spiropulu, M.; Xie, S.; Zhang, Z.

    2017-09-01

    Precision timing detectors for high energy physics experiments with temporal resolutions of a few 10 ps are of pivotal importance to master the challenges posed by the highest energy particle accelerators such as the LHC. Calorimetric timing measurements have been a focus of recent research, enabled by exploiting the temporal coherence of electromagnetic showers. Scintillating crystals with high light yield as well as silicon sensors are viable sensitive materials for sampling calorimeters. Silicon sensors have very high efficiency for charged particles. However, their sensitivity to photons, which comprise a large fraction of the electromagnetic shower, is limited. To enhance the efficiency of detecting photons, materials with higher atomic numbers than silicon are preferable. In this paper we present test beam measurements with a Cadmium-Telluride (CdTe) sensor as the active element of a secondary emission calorimeter with focus on the timing performance of the detector. A Schottky type CdTe sensor with an active area of 1cm2 and a thickness of 1 mm is used in an arrangement with tungsten and lead absorbers. Measurements are performed with electron beams in the energy range from 2 GeV to 200 GeV. A timing resolution of 20 ps is achieved under the best conditions.

  15. Emitter/absorber interface of CdTe solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Tao; Kanevce, Ana; Sites, James R.

    2016-06-17

    The performance of CdTe solar cells can be very sensitive to their emitter/absorber interfaces, especially for high-efficiency cells with improved bulk properties. When interface defect states are located at efficient recombination energies, performance losses from acceptor-type interface defects can be significant. Numerical simulations show that the emitter/absorber band alignment, the emitter doping and thickness, and the defect properties of the interface (i.e. defect density, defect type, and defect energy) can all play significant roles in the interface recombination. In particular, a type I heterojunction with small conduction-band offset (0.1 eV /= 0.4 eV), however, can impede electron transport and lead to a reduction of photocurrent and fill-factor. In contrast to the spike, a 'cliff' (.delta..EC < 0 eV) is likely to allow many holes in the vicinity of the interface, which will assist interface recombination and result in a reduced open-circuit voltage. In addition, a thin and highly-doped emitter can invert the absorber, form a large hole barrier, and decrease device performance losses due to high interface defect density. CdS is the most common emitter material used in CdTe solar cells, but the CdS/CdTe interface is in the cliff category and is not favorable from the band-offset perspective. Other n-type emitter choices, such as (Mg,Zn)O, Cd(S,O), or (Cd,Mg)Te, can be tuned by varying the elemental ratio for an optimal positive value of ..delta..EC. These materials are predicted to yield higher

  16. Emitter/absorber interface of CdTe solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Tao; Kanevce, Ana; Sites, James R.

    2016-06-01

    The performance of CdTe solar cells can be very sensitive to the emitter/absorber interface, especially for high-efficiency cells with high bulk lifetime. Performance losses from acceptor-type interface defects can be significant when interface defect states are located near mid-gap energies. Numerical simulations show that the emitter/absorber band alignment, the emitter doping and thickness, and the defect properties of the interface (i.e., defect density, defect type, and defect energy) can all play significant roles in the interface recombination. In particular, a type I heterojunction with small conduction-band offset (0.1 eV ≤ ΔEC ≤ 0.3 eV) can help maintain good cell efficiency in spite of high interface defect density, much like with Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) cells. The basic principle is that positive ΔEC, often referred to as a "spike," creates an absorber inversion and hence a large hole barrier adjacent to the interface. As a result, the electron-hole recombination is suppressed due to an insufficient hole supply at the interface. A large spike (ΔEC ≥ 0.4 eV), however, can impede electron transport and lead to a reduction of photocurrent and fill-factor. In contrast to the spike, a "cliff" (ΔEC < 0 eV) allows high hole concentration in the vicinity of the interface, which will assist interface recombination and result in a reduced open-circuit voltage. Another way to mitigate performance losses due to interface defects is to use a thin and highly doped emitter, which can invert the absorber and form a large hole barrier at the interface. CdS is the most common emitter material used in CdTe solar cells, but the CdS/CdTe interface is in the cliff category and is not favorable from the band-offset perspective. The ΔEC of other n-type emitter choices, such as (Mg,Zn)O, Cd(S,O), or (Cd,Mg)Te, can be tuned by varying the elemental ratio for an optimal positive value of ΔEC. These materials are predicted to yield higher voltages and would therefore be

  17. Emitter/absorber interface of CdTe solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Tao Sites, James R.; Kanevce, Ana

    2016-06-21

    The performance of CdTe solar cells can be very sensitive to the emitter/absorber interface, especially for high-efficiency cells with high bulk lifetime. Performance losses from acceptor-type interface defects can be significant when interface defect states are located near mid-gap energies. Numerical simulations show that the emitter/absorber band alignment, the emitter doping and thickness, and the defect properties of the interface (i.e., defect density, defect type, and defect energy) can all play significant roles in the interface recombination. In particular, a type I heterojunction with small conduction-band offset (0.1 eV ≤ ΔE{sub C} ≤ 0.3 eV) can help maintain good cell efficiency in spite of high interface defect density, much like with Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} (CIGS) cells. The basic principle is that positive ΔE{sub C}, often referred to as a “spike,” creates an absorber inversion and hence a large hole barrier adjacent to the interface. As a result, the electron-hole recombination is suppressed due to an insufficient hole supply at the interface. A large spike (ΔE{sub C} ≥ 0.4 eV), however, can impede electron transport and lead to a reduction of photocurrent and fill-factor. In contrast to the spike, a “cliff” (ΔE{sub C} < 0 eV) allows high hole concentration in the vicinity of the interface, which will assist interface recombination and result in a reduced open-circuit voltage. Another way to mitigate performance losses due to interface defects is to use a thin and highly doped emitter, which can invert the absorber and form a large hole barrier at the interface. CdS is the most common emitter material used in CdTe solar cells, but the CdS/CdTe interface is in the cliff category and is not favorable from the band-offset perspective. The ΔE{sub C} of other n-type emitter choices, such as (Mg,Zn)O, Cd(S,O), or (Cd,Mg)Te, can be tuned by varying the elemental ratio for an optimal positive value of ΔE{sub C}. These

  18. Pyroelectric detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haller, Eugene E.; Beeman, Jeffrey; Hansen, William L.; Hubbard, G. Scott; Mcmurray, Robert E., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The multi-agency, long-term Global Change programs, and specifically NASA's Earth Observing system, will require some new and advanced photon detector technology which must be specifically tailored for long-term stability, broad spectral range, cooling constraints, and other parameters. Whereas MCT and GaAs alloy based photovoltaic detectors and detector arrays reach most impressive results to wavelengths as long as 12 microns when cooled to below 70 K, other materials, such as ferroelectrics and pyroelectrics, appear to offer special opportunities beyond 12 microns and above 70 K. These materials have found very broad use in a wide variety of room temperature applications. Little is known about these classes of materials at sub-room temperatures and no photon detector results have been reported. From the limited information available, researchers conclude that the room temperature values of D asterisk greater than or equal to 10(exp 9) cm Hz(exp 1/2)/W may be improved by one to two orders of magnitude upon cooling to temperatures around 70 K. Improvements of up to one order of magnitude appear feasible for temperatures achievable by passive cooling. The flat detector response over a wavelength range reaching from the visible to beyond 50 microns, which is an intrinsic advantage of bolometric devices, makes for easy calibration. The fact that these materials have been developed for reduced temperature applications makes ferro- and pyroelectric materials most attractive candidates for serious exploration.

  19. Intruder Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The shadowy prowler is attempting a break-in, unaware that his presence has already been detected and reported by the device in the lower left corner of the photo. It is part of a three-element ntruder Detecti on System developed by NASA's Ames Research Center from technology acquired in the Apollo lunar exploration program. Apollo astronauts left behind on the moon small portable seismic (shock) detectors to record subsurface vibrations and transmit to Earth data on the moon's density and thickness. A similar seismic detector is the key component of the lntruder Detection System. Encased in a stainless steel tube, the detector is implanted in the ground outside the facility being protected-home, bank, industrial or other facilities. The vibration-sensing detector picks up the footstep of anyone within a preset range. The detector is connected by cable to the transmitter, which relays the warning to a portable radio receiver. The radio alerts plant guards or home occupants by emitting an audible tone burst for each footstep.

  20. Investigation of High-Voltage Photovoltaic Effect and Piezoeffect in Thin CdTe Films Depending on Their State,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The article studies the dependence of the high-voltage photovoltaic effect (HVPVE) and piezoeffect on the state of the thin CdTe film crystalline ... structures . The properties of the macro- and microstructure of thin CdTe films with different polarities of the HVPVE are established. The change of

  1. Photodegradation of Mercaptopropionic Acid- and Thioglycollic Acid-Capped CdTe Quantum Dots in Buffer Solutions.

    PubMed

    Miao, Yanping; Yang, Ping; Zhao, Jie; Du, Yingying; He, Haiyan; Liu, Yunshi

    2015-06-01

    CdTe quantum dots (QDs) were synthesized by 3-mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) and thioglycollic acid (TGA) as capping agents. It is confirmed that TGA and MPA molecules were attached on the surface of the QDs using Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectra. The movement of the QDs in agarose gel electrophoresis indicated that MPA-capped CdTe QDs had small hydrodynamic diameter. The photoluminescence (PL) intensity of TGA-capped QDs is higher than that of MPA-capped QDs at same QD concentration because of the surface passivation of TGA. To systemically investigate the photodegradation, CdTe QDs with various PL peak wavelengths were dispersed in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) and Tris-borate-ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (TBE) buffer solutions. It was found that the PL intensity of the QDs in PBS decreased with time. The PL peak wavelengths of the QDs in PBS solutions remained unchanged. As for TGA-capped CdTe QDs, the results of PL peak wavelengths in TBE buffer solutions indicated that S(2-) released by TGA attached to Cd(2+) and formed CdS-like clusters layer on the surface of aqueous CdTe QDs. In addition, the number of TGA on the CdTe QDs surface was more than that of MPA. When the QDs were added to buffer solutions, agents were removed from the surface of CdTe QDs, which decreased the passivation of agents thus resulted in photodegradation of CdTe QDs in buffer solutions.

  2. {CdTe(111) B}/{Si(100) } structure grown by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy with Te adsorption and annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishino, Hironori; Nishijima, Yoshito

    1996-10-01

    We studied the crystal structure of CdTe(111)B layers directly grown on Si(100) by MOVPE using a new pre-growth process, which includes a metalorganic Te adsorption and an annealing process. In this paper, we discussed the CdTe structure from the three aspects of antiphase, twinning and tilt. We investigated the dependence of the antiphase content in CdTe(111)B on the anneal temperature and the Si misorientation angle. From the results, we assume that the origin of the antiphase formation is the difference in the arrangement of adsorbed Te atoms. Te arrangement leading to antiphase formation occurs on Si terraces away from steps at relatively low temperatures. We reduced most of the twinning in epilayers by optimizing the {VI}/{II} ratio. We think the remaining twinning was confined to near the interface and it nucleated from the Te arrangement on terraces. We found that the Si(100)-CdTe(111) tilt was much smaller than that expected from the well-known Nagai model. We propose that a negative tilt is induced to reduce the lateral mismatch. To adjust the lateral distance of unit cells, 30 CdTe lattices match to 31 Si lattices. CdTe(111)B planes are inclined to reduce the remaining mismatch between two lattices. This initial tilt also causes wider CdTe terraces. We modified Nagai's tilting model for this reconstructed CdTe surface. The total tilt angle is defined by these two tilting mechanisms.

  3. The growth of high quality CdTe on GaAs by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Reno, J.L.; Carr, M.J.; Gourley, P.L. )

    1990-03-01

    We have grown CdTe (111) on oriented and misoriented GaAs (100) and have characterized the layers by photoluminescence microscopy (PLM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Photoluminescence microscopy showed a totally different type of defect structure for the oriented substrate than for the misoriented substrates. The CdTe grown on the misoriented substrates exhibited only threading dislocations. The CdTe grown on oriented GaAs showed fewer threading dislocations but exhibited a random structure of loops. The loop structure observed by PLM has been identified by TEM as the boundary between twinned crystallites which extend from the CdTe/GaAs interface to the CdTe surface. When viewed along the growth axis, these boundaries between the columnar twins appear as loops and segments. Surface roughness of the GaAs substrate contributes to the initial growth of twinned material. This leads to competitive growth between the twins and the creation of the observed columnar twins. We present for the first time the growth of CdTe on patterned GaAs substrates. By growing on oriented GaAs(100) substrates that had been patterned prior to growth with 12 {mu}m mesas, it is possible to grow material on the mesa top that is twin free and has a low dislocation density.

  4. Iodine Doping of CdTe and CdMgTe for Photovoltaic Applications

    DOE PAGES

    Ogedengbe, O. S.; Swartz, C. H.; Jayathilaka, P. A. R. D.; ...

    2017-06-06

    Here, iodine-doped CdTe and Cd1-xMgxTe layers were grown by molecular beam epitaxy. Secondary ion mass spectrometry characterization was used to measure dopant concentration, while Hall measurement was used for determining carrier concentration. Photoluminescence intensity and time-resolved photoluminescence techniques were used for optical characterization. Maximum n-type carrier concentrations of 7.4 x 1018 cm-3 for CdTe and 3 x 1017 cm-3 for Cd0.65Mg0.35Te were achieved. Studies suggest that electrically active doping with iodine is limited with dopant concentration much above these values. Dopant activation of about 80% was observed in most of the CdTe samples. The estimated activation energy is about 6more » meV for CdTe and the value for Cd0.65Mg0.35Te is about 58 meV. Iodine-doped samples exhibit long lifetimes with no evidence of photoluminescence degradation with doping as high as 2 x 1018 cm-3, while indium shows substantial non-radiative recombination at carrier concentrations above 5 x 1016 cm-3. Iodine was shown to be thermally stable in CdTe at temperatures up to 600 °C. Results suggest iodine may be a preferred n-type dopant compared to indium in achieving heavily doped n-type CdTe.« less

  5. A Simple Sb2Te3 Back-Contact Process for CdTe Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siepchen, B.; Späth, B.; Drost, C.; Krishnakumar, V.; Kraft, C.; Winkler, M.; König, J.; Bartholomé, K.; Peng, S.

    2015-10-01

    CdTe solar technology has proved to be a cost-efficient solution for energy production. Formation of the back contact is an important and critical step in preparing high-efficiency, stable CdTe solar cells. In this paper we report a simple CdTe solar cell (Sb2Te3) back contact-formation process. The CdS and CdTe layers were deposited by close-space sublimation. After CdCl2 annealing treatment, the CdTe surface was etched by use of a mixture of nitric and phosphoric acids to obtain a Te-rich surface. Elemental Sb was sputtered on the etched surface and successive post-annealing treatment induced Sb2Te3 alloy formation. Structural characterization by x-ray diffraction analysis confirmed formation of the Sb2Te3 phase. The performance of solar cells with nanoalloyed Sb2Te3 back contacts was comparable with that of reference solar cells prepared with sputtered Sb2Te3 back contact from a compound sputter target.

  6. Studying nanotoxic effects of CdTe quantum dots in Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Cecilia Stahl; Almeida, Diogo Burigo; de Thomaz, André Alexandre; Menna-Barreto, Rubem Figueredo Sadok; dos Santos-Mallet, Jacenir Reis; Cesar, Carlos Lenz; Gomes, Suzete Araujo Oliveira; Feder, Denise

    2011-03-01

    Semiconductor nanoparticles, such as quantum dots (QDs), were used to carry out experiments in vivo and ex vivo with Trypanosoma cruzi. However, questions have been raised regarding the nanotoxicity of QDs in living cells, microorganisms, tissues and whole animals. The objective of this paper was to conduct a QD nanotoxicity study on living T. cruzi protozoa using analytical methods. This was accomplished using in vitro experiments to test the interference of the QDs on parasite development, morphology and viability. Our results show that after 72 h, a 200 μM cadmium telluride (CdTe) QD solution induced important morphological alterations in T. cruzi, such as DNA damage, plasma membrane blebbing and mitochondrial swelling. Flow cytometry assays showed no damage to the plasma membrane when incubated with 200 μM CdTe QDs for up to 72 h (propidium iodide cells), giving no evidence of classical necrosis. Parasites incubated with 2 μM CdTe QDs still proliferated after seven days. In summary, a low concentration of CdTe QDs (2 μM) is optimal for bioimaging, whereas a high concentration (200 μM CdTe) could be toxic to cells. Taken together, our data indicate that 2 μM QD can be used for the successful long-term study of the parasite-vector interaction in real time.

  7. PHASE DETECTOR

    DOEpatents

    Kippenhan, D.O.

    1959-09-01

    A phase detector circuit is described for use at very high frequencies of the order of 50 megacycles. The detector circuit includes a pair of rectifiers inverted relative to each other. One voltage to be compared is applied to the two rectifiers in phase opposition and the other voltage to be compared is commonly applied to the two rectifiers. The two result:ng d-c voltages derived from the rectifiers are combined in phase opposition to produce a single d-c voltage having amplitude and polarity characteristics dependent upon the phase relation between the signals to be compared. Principal novelty resides in the employment of a half-wave transmission line to derive the phase opposing signals from the first voltage to be compared for application to the two rectifiers in place of the transformer commonly utilized for such purpose in phase detector circuits for operation at lower frequency.

  8. MAMA Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowyer, Stuart

    1998-01-01

    Work carried out under this grant led to fundamental discoveries and over one hundred publications in the scientific literature. Fundamental developments in instrumentation were made including all the instrumentation on the EUVE satellite, the invention of a whole new type of grazing instrument spectrometer and the development of fundamentally new photon counting detectors including the Wedge and Strip used on EUVE and many other missions and the Time Delay detector used on OREFUS and FUSE. The Wedge and Strip and Time Delay detectors were developed under this grant for less than two million dollars and have been used in numerous missions most recently for the FUSE mission. In addition, a fundamentally new type of diffuse spectrometer has been developed under this grant which has been used in instrumentation on the MMSAT spacecraft and the Lewis spacecraft. Plans are underway to use this instrumentation on several other missions as well.

  9. Development of a novel scintillation-trigger detector for the MTV experiment using aluminum-metallized film tapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, S.; Ozaki, S.; Sakamoto, Y.; Tanuma, R.; Yoshida, T.; Murata, J.

    2014-07-01

    A new type of a trigger-scintillation counter array designed for the MTV experiment at TRIUMF-ISAC has been developed, which uses aluminum-metallized film tape for wrapping to achieve the required assembling precision of ±0.5 mm. The MTV experiment uses a cylindrical drift chamber (CDC) as the main electron-tracking detector. The barrel-type trigger counter is placed inside the CDC to generate a trigger signal using 1 mm thick, 300 mm long thin plastic scintillation counters. Detection efficiency and light attenuation compared with conventional wrapping materials are studied.

  10. Hydrogen detector

    DOEpatents

    Kanegae, Naomichi; Ikemoto, Ichiro

    1980-01-01

    A hydrogen detector of the type in which the interior of the detector is partitioned by a metal membrane into a fluid section and a vacuum section. Two units of the metal membrane are provided and vacuum pipes are provided independently in connection to the respective units of the metal membrane. One of the vacuum pipes is connected to a vacuum gauge for static equilibrium operation while the other vacuum pipe is connected to an ion pump or a set of an ion pump and a vacuum gauge both designed for dynamic equilibrium operation.

  11. Microwave detector

    DOEpatents

    Meldner, Heiner W.; Cusson, Ronald Y.; Johnson, Ray M.

    1986-01-01

    A microwave detector (10) is provided for measuring the envelope shape of a microwave pulse comprised of high-frequency oscillations. A biased ferrite (26, 28) produces a magnetization field flux that links a B-dot loop (16, 20). The magnetic field of the microwave pulse participates in the formation of the magnetization field flux. High-frequency insensitive means (18, 22) are provided for measuring electric voltage or current induced in the B-dot loop. The recorded output of the detector is proportional to the time derivative of the square of the envelope shape of the microwave pulse.

  12. Microwave detector

    DOEpatents

    Meldner, H.W.; Cusson, R.Y.; Johnson, R.M.

    1985-02-08

    A microwave detector is provided for measuring the envelope shape of a microwave pulse comprised of high-frequency oscillations. A biased ferrite produces a magnetization field flux that links a B-dot loop. The magnetic field of the microwave pulse participates in the formation of the magnetization field flux. High-frequency insensitive means are provided for measuring electric voltage or current induced in the B-dot loop. The recorded output of the detector is proportional to the time derivative of the square of the envelope shape of the microwave pulse.

  13. Microwave detector

    SciTech Connect

    Meldner, H.W.; Cusson, R.Y.; Johnson, R.M.

    1986-12-02

    A detector is described for measuring the envelope shape of a microwave pulse comprised of high-frequency oscillations, the detector comprising: a B-dot loop linking the magnetic field of the microwave pulse; a biased ferrite, that produces a magnetization field flux that links the B-dot loop. The ferrite is positioned within the B-dot loop so that the magnetic field of the microwave pulse interacts with the ferrite and thereby participates in the formation of the magnetization field flux; and high-frequency insensitive means for measuring electric voltage or current induced in the B-dot loop.

  14. Silicon Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadrozinski, Hartmut

    2014-03-01

    The use of silicon detectors has experienced an exponential growth in accelerator and space based experiments, similar to trends in the semiconductor industry as a whole, usually paraphrased as ``Moore's Law.'' Some of the essentials for this phenomenon will be presented, together with examples of the exciting science results which it enabled. With the establishment of a ``semiconductor culture'' in universities and laboratories around the world, an increased understanding of the sensors results in thinner, faster, more radiation-resistant detectors, spawning an amazing wealth of new technologies and applications, which will be the main subject of the presentation.

  15. Monte Carlo Simulations of Background Spectra in Integral Imager Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, T. W.; Colborn, B. L.; Dietz, K. L.; Ramsey, B. D.; Weisskopf, M. C.

    1998-01-01

    Predictions of the expected gamma-ray backgrounds in the ISGRI (CdTe) and PiCsIT (Csl) detectors on INTEGRAL due to cosmic-ray interactions and the diffuse gamma-ray background have been made using a coupled set of Monte Carlo radiation transport codes (HETC, FLUKA, EGS4, and MORSE) and a detailed, 3-D mass model of the spacecraft and detector assemblies. The simulations include both the prompt background component from induced hadronic and electromagnetic cascades and the delayed component due to emissions from induced radioactivity. Background spectra have been obtained with and without the use of active (BGO) shielding and charged particle rejection to evaluate the effectiveness of anticoincidence counting on background rejection.

  16. Monte Carlo Simulations of Background Spectra in Integral Imager Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, T. W.; Colborn, B. L.; Dietz, K. L.; Ramsey, B. D.; Weisskopf, M. C.

    1998-01-01

    Predictions of the expected gamma-ray backgrounds in the ISGRI (CdTe) and PiCsIT (Csl) detectors on INTEGRAL due to cosmic-ray interactions and the diffuse gamma-ray background have been made using a coupled set of Monte Carlo radiation transport codes (HETC, FLUKA, EGS4, and MORSE) and a detailed, 3-D mass model of the spacecraft and detector assemblies. The simulations include both the prompt background component from induced hadronic and electromagnetic cascades and the delayed component due to emissions from induced radioactivity. Background spectra have been obtained with and without the use of active (BGO) shielding and charged particle rejection to evaluate the effectiveness of anticoincidence counting on background rejection.

  17. Recombination by grain-boundary type in CdTe

    SciTech Connect

    Moseley, John Ahrenkiel, Richard K.; Metzger, Wyatt K.; Moutinho, Helio R.; Guthrey, Harvey L.; Al-Jassim, Mowafak M.; Paudel, Naba; Yan, Yanfa

    2015-07-14

    We conducted cathodoluminescence (CL) spectrum imaging and electron backscatter diffraction on the same microscopic areas of CdTe thin films to correlate grain-boundary (GB) recombination by GB “type.” We examined misorientation-based GB types, including coincident site lattice (CSL) Σ = 3, other-CSL (Σ = 5–49), and general GBs (Σ > 49), which make up ∼47%–48%, ∼6%–8%, and ∼44%–47%, respectively, of the GB length at the film back surfaces. Statistically averaged CL total intensities were calculated for each GB type from sample sizes of ≥97 GBs per type and were compared to the average grain-interior CL intensity. We find that only ∼16%–18% of Σ = 3 GBs are active non-radiative recombination centers. In contrast, all other-CSL and general GBs are observed to be strong non-radiative centers and, interestingly, these GB types have about the same CL intensity. Both as-deposited and CdCl{sub 2}-treated films were studied. The CdCl{sub 2} treatment reduces non-radiative recombination at both other-CSL and general GBs, but GBs are still recombination centers after the CdCl{sub 2} treatment.

  18. Recombination by grain-boundary type in CdTe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moseley, John; Metzger, Wyatt K.; Moutinho, Helio R.; Paudel, Naba; Guthrey, Harvey L.; Yan, Yanfa; Ahrenkiel, Richard K.; Al-Jassim, Mowafak M.

    2015-07-01

    We conducted cathodoluminescence (CL) spectrum imaging and electron backscatter diffraction on the same microscopic areas of CdTe thin films to correlate grain-boundary (GB) recombination by GB "type." We examined misorientation-based GB types, including coincident site lattice (CSL) Σ = 3, other-CSL (Σ = 5-49), and general GBs (Σ > 49), which make up ˜47%-48%, ˜6%-8%, and ˜44%-47%, respectively, of the GB length at the film back surfaces. Statistically averaged CL total intensities were calculated for each GB type from sample sizes of ≥97 GBs per type and were compared to the average grain-interior CL intensity. We find that only ˜16%-18% of Σ = 3 GBs are active non-radiative recombination centers. In contrast, all other-CSL and general GBs are observed to be strong non-radiative centers and, interestingly, these GB types have about the same CL intensity. Both as-deposited and CdCl2-treated films were studied. The CdCl2 treatment reduces non-radiative recombination at both other-CSL and general GBs, but GBs are still recombination centers after the CdCl2 treatment.

  19. Ion implantation of CdTe single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiecek, Tomasz; Popovich, Volodymir; Bester, Mariusz; Kuzma, Marian

    2016-12-01

    Ion implantation is a technique which is widely used in industry for unique modification of metal surface for medical applications. In semiconductor silicon technology ion implantation is also widely used for thin layer electronic or optoelectronic devices production. For other semiconductor materials this technique is still at an early stage. In this paper based on literature data we present the main features of the implantation of CdTe single crystals as well as some of the major problems which are likely to occur when dealing with them. The most unexpected feature is the high resistance of these crystals against the amorphization caused by ion implantation even at high doses (1017 1/cm2). The second property is the disposal of defects much deeper in the sample then it follows from the modeling calculations. The outline of principles of the ion implantation is included in the paper. The data based on RBS measurements and modeling results obtained by using SRIM software were taken into account.

  20. Development of a mercuric iodide detector array for in-vivo x-ray imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Patt, B.E.; Iwanczyk, J.S.; Tornai, M.P.; Levin, C.S.; Hoffman, E.J.

    1995-12-31

    A nineteen element mercuric iodide (HgI{sub 2}) detector array has been developed in order to investigate the potential of using this technology for in-vivo x-ray and gamma-ray imaging. A prototype cross-grid detector array was constructed with hexagonal pixels of 1.9 mm diameter (active area = 3.28 mm{sup 2}) and 0.2 mm thick septa. The overall detector active area is roughly 65 mm{sup 2}. A detector thickness of 1.2 mm was used to achieve about 100% efficiency at 60 keV and 67% efficiency at 140 keV The detector fabrication, geometry and structure were optimized for charge collection and to minimize crosstalk between elements. A section of a standard high resolution cast-lead gamma-camera collimator was incorporated into the detector to provide collimation matching the discrete pixel geometry. Measurements of spectral and spatial performance of the array were made using 241-Am and 99m-Tc sources. These measurements were compared with similar measurements made using an optimized single HgI{sub 2} x-ray detector with active area of about 3 mm{sup 2} and thickness of 500 {mu}m.

  1. Development of CZT detectors for x-ray and gamma-ray astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kuen; Martin, J. W.; Garson, A., III; Guo, Q.; Matteson, J.; Groza, M.; Beilicke, M.; Burger, A.; de Geronimo, G.; Krawczynski, H.

    2011-09-01

    Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) is the detector material of choice for the detection of X-rays in the 10 keV-1MeV energy band with excellent spatial and energy resolutions and without cryogenic cooling. In this contribution, we report on recent results of the CZT detector development program and several astrophysical experiments which make use of CZT detectors. In the first part of the paper, we discuss the performance of pixel and cross-strip CZT detectors read out with an ASIC developed at the Brookhaven National Laboratory. Our pixel detectors achieve some of the best energy resolutions reported in the literature. Cross-strip detectors are found to give an inferior performance and we investigate the reason for this performance difference. We also present results from a precision measurement of the effect of a steering grid on multi-pixel events obtained with a 200 micrometer collimator. In the second part of the paper, we describe the design and performance of the hard X-ray polarimeter X-Calibur. The polarimeter uses a 14 cm long scintillator scatterer, surrounded by an assembly of 32 2-5 mm thick CZT detectors. We discuss the sensitivity of the polarimeter to measure the linear polarization of 10 keV-80 keV X-rays on short and long balloon flights and results from testing the polarimeter in the laboratory.

  2. Design Strategies for High-Efficiency CdTe Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Tao

    With continuous technology advances over the past years, CdTe solar cells have surged to be a leading contributor in thin-film photovoltaic (PV) field. While empirical material and device optimization has led to considerable progress, further device optimization requires accurate device models that are able to provide an in-depth understanding of CdTe device physics. Consequently, this thesis is intended to develop a comprehensive model system for high-efficiency CdTe devices through applying basic design principles of solar cells with numerical modeling and comparing results with experimental CdTe devices. The CdTe absorber is central to cell performance. Numerical simulation has shown the feasibility of high energy-conversion efficiency, which requires both high carrier density and long minority carrier lifetime. As the minority carrier lifetime increases, the carrier recombination at the back surface becomes a limitation for cell performance with absorber thickness < 3 microm. Hence, either a thicker absorber or an appropriate back-surface-field layer is a requisite for reducing the back-surface recombination. When integrating layers into devices, more careful design of interfaces is needed. One consideration is the emitter/absorber interface. It is shown that a positive conduction-band offset DeltaEC ("spike") at the interface is beneficial to cell performance, since it can induce a large valence-band bending which suppresses the hole injection near the interface for the electron-hole recombination, but too large a spike is detrimental to photocurrent transport. In a heterojunction device with many defects at the emitter/absorber interface (high SIF), a thin and highly-doped emitter can induce strong absorber inversion and hence help maintain good cell performance. Performance losses from acceptor-type interface defects can be significant when interface defect states are located near mid-gap energies. In terms of specific emitter materials, the calculations

  3. Caliste-SO, a CdTe based spectrometer for bright solar event observations in hard X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meuris, A.; Limousin, O.; Gevin, O.; Blondel, C.; Martignac, J.; Vassal, M.-C.; Soufflet, F.; Fiant, N.; Bednarzik, M.; Stutz, S.; Grimm, O.; Commichau, V.

    2015-07-01

    Caliste-SO is a CdTe hybrid detector designed to be used as a spectrometer for a hard X-ray Fourier telescope. The imaging technique was implemented in the Yohkoh satellite in 1991 and the RHESSI satellite in 2002 to achieve arc-second angular resolution images of solar flares with spectroscopic capabilities. The next generation of such instruments will be the Spectrometer Telescope Imaging X-rays (STIX) on-board the Solar Orbiter mission adopted by the European Space Agency in 2011 for launch in 2017. The design and performance of Caliste-SO allows both high spectral resolution and high count rate measurements from 4 to 150 keV with limited demands on spacecraft resources such as mass, power and volume (critical for interplanetary missions). The paper reports on the flight production of the Caliste-SO devices for STIX, describing the test facilities built-up in Switzerland and France. It illustrates some results obtained with the first production samples that will be mounted in the STIX engineering model.

  4. Preliminary characterisation of CdTe M-π-n diode structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greiffenberg, D.; Fauler, A.; Zwerger, A.; Baumbach, T.; Fiederle, M.

    2011-05-01

    Due to the high Z, 1 mm CdTe (Z=52, 48) offers a high absorption probability for photons with energies up to 100 keV [1] (Zwerger and Fiederle, 2007). In order to further reduce the dark current flowing through the sensor when applying high voltage, CdTe diode structures (M-π-n) have been processed at the Freiburg Materials Research Center (FMF). As comparison, CdTe sensors with ohmic contacts, working as photoresistors have also been produced. The different sensor structures have been flip-chip bonded on Medipix2 readout electronics [5] (Llopart and Campbell, 2002). This work reports on the I-V characteristics of the different sensor structures, confirming the improved leakage current flowing through the diode structure. Furthermore, the imaging capabilities of the diode structures with respect to their spatial resolution are presented.

  5. Carrier density and lifetime for different dopants in single-crystal and polycrystalline CdTe

    DOE PAGES

    Burst, James M.; Farrell, Stuart B.; Albin, David S.; ...

    2016-11-01

    CdTe defect chemistry is adjusted by annealing samples with excess Cd or Te vapor with and without extrinsic dopants. We observe that Group I (Cu and Na) elements can increase hole density above 1016 cm-3, but compromise lifetime and stability. By post-deposition incorporation of a Group V dopant (P) in a Cd-rich ambient, lifetimes of 30 ns with 1016 cm-3 hole density are achieved in single-crystal and polycrystalline CdTe without CdCl2 or Cu. Furthermore, phosphorus doping appears to be thermally stable. In conclusion, this combination of long lifetime, high carrier concentration, and improved stability can help overcome historic barriers formore » CdTe solar cell development.« less

  6. Role of polycrystallinity in CdTe and CuInSe sub 2 photovoltaic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sites, J.R. )

    1991-01-01

    The polycrystalline nature of thin-film CdTe and CuInSe{sub 2} solar cells continues to be a major factor in several individual losses that limit overall cell efficiency. This report describes progress in the quantitative separation of these losses, including both measurement and analysis procedures. It also applies these techniques to several individual cells to help document the overall progress with CdTe and CuInSe{sub 2} cells. Notably, CdTe cells from Photon Energy have reduced window photocurrent losses to 1 mA/Cm{sup 2}; those from the University of South Florida have achieved a maximum power voltage of 693 mV; and CuInSe{sub 2} cells from International Solar Electric Technology have shown a hole density as high as 7 {times} 10{sup 16} cm{sup {minus}3}, implying a significant reduction in compensation. 9 refs.

  7. Role of polycrystallinity in CdTe and CuInSe2 photovoltaic cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sites, J. R.

    The polycrystalline nature of thin-film CdTe and CuInSe2 solar cells continues to be a major factor in several individual losses that limit overall cell efficiency. This report describes progress in the quantitative separation of these losses, including both measurement and analysis procedures. It also applies these techniques to several individual cells to help document the overall progress with CdTe and CuInSe2 cells. Notably, CdTe cells from Photon Energy have reduced window photocurrent losses to 1 mA/Cm(exp 2); those from the University of South Florida have achieved a maximum power voltage of 693 mV; and CuInSe2 cells from International Solar Electric Technology have shown a hole density as high as 7 x 10(exp 16) cm(exp -3), implying a significant reduction in compensation.

  8. Optimization of material/device parameters of CdTe photovoltaic for solar cells applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wijewarnasuriya, Priyalal S.

    2016-05-01

    Cadmium telluride (CdTe) has been recognized as a promising photovoltaic material for thin-film solar cell applications due to its near optimum bandgap of ~1.5 eV and high absorption coefficient. The energy gap is near optimum for a single-junction solar cell. The high absorption coefficient allows films as thin as 2.5 μm to absorb more than 98% of the above-bandgap radiation. Cells with efficiencies near 20% have been produced with poly-CdTe materials. This paper examines n/p heterostructure device architecture. The performance limitations related to doping concentrations, minority carrier lifetimes, absorber layer thickness, and surface recombination velocities at the back and front interfaces is assessed. Ultimately, the paper explores device architectures of poly- CdTe and crystalline CdTe to achieve performance comparable to gallium arsenide (GaAs).

  9. Advances in the In-House CdTe Research Activities at NREL

    SciTech Connect

    Gessert, T.; Wu, X.; Dhere, R.; Moutinho, H.; Smith, S.; Romero, M.; Zhou, J.; Duda, A.; Corwine, C.

    2005-01-01

    NREL in-house CdTe research activities have impacted a broad range of recent program priorities. Studies aimed at industrially relevant applications have produced new materials and processes that enhance the performance of devices based on commercial materials (e.g., soda-lime glass, SnO2:F). Preliminary tests of the effectiveness of these novel components using large-scale processes have been encouraging. Similarly, electro- and nano-probe techniques have been developed and used to study the evolution and function of CdTe grain boundaries. Finally, cathodoluminescence (CL) and photoluminescence (PL) studies on single-crystal samples have yielded improved understanding of how various processes may combine to produce important defects in CdTe films.

  10. On the formation of polytypes in CdTe thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, Brajesh Kumar; Srivastava, O. N.

    1981-08-01

    The single crystal films of CdTe have been found to exhibit polytypism. Three different polytypic series have been found to result in the films prepared from the as supplied and the homogenized CdTe fluxes. The polytypes are formed when the as grown amorphous films get crystallized on electron beam pulse annealing in the electron microscope. The polytypes which are the first known polytypes of CdTe correspond to (i) 2H, 3C, 5H, 6H, 6R, 15R, (ii) 2H', 4H', 5H', and (iii) 2H''. A feasible mechanism for the polytype formation has been suggested. This is based on the interaction between the constant energy surface and the Brilllouin zone leading to a reduction in the electronic energy.

  11. The interactions of glutathione-capped CdTe quantum dots with trypsin.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bingjun; Liu, Rutao; Hao, Xiaopeng; Wu, Yongzhong; Du, Jie

    2012-06-01

    Due to their unique fluorescent properties, quantum dots present a great potential for biolabelling applications; however, the toxic interactions of quantum dots with biopolymers are little known. The toxic interactions of glutathione-capped CdTe quantum dots with trypsin were studied in this paper using synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy, fluorescence emission spectra, and UV-vis absorption spectra. The interaction between CdTe quantum dots and trypsin resulted in structure changes of trypsin and inhibited trypsin's activity. Fluorescence emission spectra revealed that the quenching mechanism of trypsin by CdTe quantum dots was a static quenching process. The binding constant and the number of binding sites at 288 and 298 K were calculated to be 1.98 × 10(6) L mol(-1) and 1.37, and 6.43 × 10(4) L mol(-1) and 1.09, respectively. Hydrogen bonds and van der Waals' forces played major roles in this process.

  12. Turn-on electrochemiluminescence sensing of Cd2+ based on CdTe quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Honglei; Yang, Miao; Fan, Xinxin; Wang, Haiyan

    2014-12-01

    A simple and sensitive method for the detection of cadmium ion was proposed based on the electrochemiluminescence (ECL) of thioglycolic acid capped-CdTe quantum dots (CdTe QDs). The ECL of CdTe QDs was firstly quenched by introduction of S2- and was restored due to following addition of Cd2+, on the basis of which, a "turn-on" ECL method for the detection of Cd2+ was demonstrated. The ECL of CdTe QDs exhibited linear response toward Cd2+ concentration in the range from 6.3 nM to 3.4 μM (R = 0.999) with a detection limit of 2.1 nM. The proposed assay was simple, sensitive, selective, and practicable in real water samples.

  13. Far-infrared spectroscopy of CdTe1-xSex(In): Phonon properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrović, M.; Romčević, N.; Trajić, J.; Dobrowolski, W. D.; Romčević, M.; Hadžić, B.; Gilić, M.; Mycielski, A.

    2014-11-01

    The far-infrared reflectivity spectra of CdTe0.97Se0.03 and CdTe0.97Se0.03(In) single crystals were measured at different temperatures. The analysis of the far-infrared spectra was carried out by a fitting procedure based on the dielectric function which includes spatial distribution of free carriers as well as their influence on the plasmon-phonon interaction. We found that the long wavelength optical phonon modes of CdTe1-xSex mixed crystals exhibit a two-mode behavior. The local In mode at about 160 cm-1 is observed. In both sample, a surface layer with a low concentration of free carriers (depleted region) are formed.

  14. Controlled optical properties of water-soluble CdTe nanocrystals via anion exchange.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Jia, Jianguang; Lin, Yuan; Zhou, Xiaowen

    2016-02-01

    We report a study on anion exchange reaction of CdTe nanocrystals with S(2-) in aqueous solution under ambient condition. We found that the optical properties of CdTe nanocrystals can be well tuned by controlling the reaction conditions, in which the reaction temperature is crucially important. At low reaction temperature, the product nanocrystals showed blue-shifts in both absorption and PL spectra, while the photoluminescence quantum yield (PLQY) was significantly enhanced. When anion exchanges were carried out at higher reaction temperature, on the other hand, obvious red shifts in absorption and PL spectra accompanied by a fast increase followed by gradual decrease in PLQY were observed. On variation of S(2-) concentration, it was found that the overall kinetics of Te(2-) for S(2-) exchanges depends also on [S(2-)] when anion exchanges were performed at higher temperature. A possible mechanism for anion exchanges in CdTe NCs was proposed.

  15. Spectrum-per-Pixel Cathodoluminescence Imaging of CdTe Thin-Film Bevels

    SciTech Connect

    Moseley, John; Al-Jassim, Mowafak M.; Burst, James; Guthrey, Harvey L.; Metzger, Wyatt K.

    2016-11-21

    We conduct T=6 K cathodoluminescence (CL) spectrum imaging with a nano-scale electron beam on beveled surfaces of CdTe thin-films at different critical stages of standard CdTe device fabrication. The through-thickness total CL intensity profiles are consistent with a reduction in grain boundary recombination due to the CdCl2 treatment. Color-coded maps of the low-temperature luminescence transition energies reveal that CdTe thin films have remarkably non-uniform opto-electronic properties, which depend strongly on sample processing history. The grain-to-grain S content in the interdiffused CdTe/CdS region is estimated from a sample size of thirty-five grains, and the S content in adjacent grains varies significantly in CdCl2-treated samples. A low-temperature luminescence model is developed to interpret spectral behavior at grain boundaries and grain interiors.

  16. CdTe quantum dots and YAG hybrid phosphors for white light-emitting diodes.

    PubMed

    Yin, Yanchun; Wang, Rongfang; Zhou, Liya

    2014-09-01

    CdTe quantum dots, 3.28 nm in size, were synthesized using a one-step method in an aqueous medium. The CdTe quantum dots were successfully employed as hybrid phosphors for white light-emitting diode (LED) devices by combining them with yellow-emitting YAG:Ce phosphor. The color-rendering index value and International Commission on illumination coordinates for hybrid phosphor white LEDs were 75 and (x = 0.30, y = 0.29), respectively. Compared with conventional phosphors, semiconductor quantum dots have larger band gap energy and broader absorption features, and can be excited more efficiently by optical pumping sources. The results confirmed that the high color-rendering index value of the white LED was due to the CdTe quantum dots introduced in the hybrid phosphor system.

  17. Vertex detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Lueth, V.

    1992-07-01

    The purpose of a vertex detector is to measure position and angles of charged particle tracks to sufficient precision so as to be able to separate tracks originating from decay vertices from those produced at the interaction vertex. Such measurements are interesting because they permit the detection of weakly decaying particles with lifetimes down to 10{sup {minus}13} s, among them the {tau} lepton and charm and beauty hadrons. These two lectures are intended to introduce the reader to the different techniques for the detection of secondary vertices that have been developed over the past decades. The first lecture includes a brief introduction to the methods used to detect secondary vertices and to estimate particle lifetimes. It describes the traditional technologies, based on photographic recording in emulsions and on film of bubble chambers, and introduces fast electronic registration of signals derived from scintillating fibers, drift chambers and gaseous micro-strip chambers. The second lecture is devoted to solid state detectors. It begins with a brief introduction into semiconductor devices, and then describes the application of large arrays of strip and pixel diodes for charged particle tracking. These lectures can only serve as an introduction the topic of vertex detectors. Time and space do not allow for an in-depth coverage of many of the interesting aspects of vertex detector design and operation.

  18. A Prototype PET Scanner with DOI-Encoding Detectors

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yongfeng; Wu, Yibao; Qi, Jinyi; St. James, Sara; Du, Huini; Dokhale, Purushottam A.; Shah, Kanai S.; Farrell, Richard; Cherry, Simon R.

    2009-01-01

    this detector design offer the prospect of high and uniform spatial resolution (crystal size ~1 mm, DOI resolution ~ 2 mm), high sensitivity (20 mm thick detectors), and compact size (DOI encoding permits detectors to be tightly packed around the subject and minimizes number of detectors needed). PMID:18552140

  19. Development of Substrate Structure CdTe Photovoltaic Devices with Performance Exceeding 10%: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Dhere, R. G.; Duenow, J. N.; DeHart, C. M.; Li, J. V.; Kuciauskas, D.; Gessert, T. A.

    2012-08-01

    Most work on CdTe-based solar cells has focused on devices with a superstrate structure. This focus is due to the early success of the superstrate structure in producing high-efficiency cells, problems of suitable ohmic contacts for lightly doped CdTe, and the simplicity of the structure for manufacturing. The development of the CdCl2 heat treatment boosted CdTe technology and perpetuated the use of the superstrate structure. However, despite the beneficial attributes of the superstrate structure, devices with a substrate structure are attractive both commercially and scientifically. The substrate structure eliminates the need for transparent superstrates and thus allows the use of flexible metal and possibly plastic substrates. From a scientific perspective, it allows better control in forming the junction and direct access to the junction for detailed analysis. Research on such devices has been limited. The efficiency of these devices has been limited to around 8% due to low open-circuit voltage (Voc) and fill factor. In this paper, we present our recent device development efforts at NREL on substrate-structure CdTe devices. We have found that processing parameters required to fabricate high-efficiency substrate CdTe PV devices differ from those necessary for traditional superstrate CdTe devices. We have worked on a variety of contact materials including Cu-doped ZnTe and CuxTe. We will present a comparative analysis of the performance of these contacts. In addition, we have studied the influence of fabrication parameters on junction properties. We will present an overview of our development work, which has led to CdTe devices with Voc values of more than 860 mV and NREL-confirmed efficiencies approaching 11%.

  20. Studies on optoelectronic properties of DC reactive magnetron sputtered CdTe thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, B. Rajesh; Hymavathi, B.; Rao, T. Subba

    2014-01-28

    Cadmium telluride continues to be a leading candidate for the development of cost effective photovoltaics for terrestrial applications. In the present work two individual metallic targets of Cd and Te were used for the deposition of CdTe thin films on mica substrates from room temperature to 300 °C by DC reactive magnetron sputtering method. XRD patterns of CdTe thin films deposited on mica substrates exhibit peaks at 2θ = 27.7°, 46.1° and 54.6°, which corresponds to reflection on (1 1 1), (2 2 0) and (3 1 1) planes of CdTe cubic structure. The intensities of XRD patterns increases with the increase of substrate temperature upto 150 °C and then it decreases at higher substrate temperatures. The conductivity of CdTe thin films measured from four probe method increases with the increase of substrate temperature. The activation energies (ΔE) are found to be decrease with the increase of substrate temperature. The optical transmittance spectra of CdTe thin films deposited on mica have a clear interference pattern in the longer wavelength region. The films have good transparency (T > 85 %) exhibiting interference pattern in the spectral region between 1200 – 2500 nm. The optical band gap of CdTe thin films are found to be in the range of 1.48 – 1.57. The refractive index, n decreases with the increase of wavelength, λ. The value of n and k increases with the increase of substrate temperature.

  1. Phosphorus Diffusion Mechanisms and Deep Incorporation in Polycrystalline and Single-Crystalline CdTe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colegrove, Eric; Harvey, Steven P.; Yang, Ji-Hui; Burst, James M.; Albin, David S.; Wei, Su-Huai; Metzger, Wyatt K.

    2016-05-01

    A key challenge in cadmium-telluride (CdTe) semiconductors is obtaining stable and high hole density. Group-I elements substituting Cd can form acceptors but easily self-compensate and diffuse quickly. For example, CdTe photovoltaics have relied on copper as a dopant, but this creates stability problems and hole density that has not exceeded 1015 cm-3 . If hole density can be increased beyond 1016 cm-3 , CdTe solar technology can exceed multicrystalline silicon performance and provide levelized costs of electricity below conventional energy sources. Group-V elements substituting Te offer a solution, but they are very difficult to incorporate. Using time-of-flight secondary-ion mass spectrometry, we examine bulk and grain-boundary diffusion of phosphorus (P) in CdTe in Cd-rich conditions. We find that in addition to slow bulk diffusion and fast grain-boundary diffusion, there is a critical fast bulk-diffusion component that enables deep P incorporation in CdTe. Detailed first-principle calculations indicate the slow bulk-diffusion component is caused by substitutional P diffusion through the Te sublattice, whereas the fast bulk-diffusion component is caused by P diffusing through interstitial lattice sites following the combination of a kick-out step and two rotation steps. The latter is limited in magnitude by high formation energy, but is sufficient to manipulate P incorporation. In addition to an increased physical understanding, these results open up experimental possibilities for group-V doping in CdTe applications.

  2. The influence of electron track lengths on the γ-ray response of compound semiconductor detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakhostin, M.; Esmaili-Torshabi, A.

    2015-10-01

    The charge-trapping effect in compound semiconductor γ-ray detectors in the presence of a uniform electric field is commonly described by Hecht's relation. However, Hecht's relation ignores the geometrical spread of charge carriers caused by the finite range of primary and secondary electrons (δ-rays) in the detector. In this paper, a method based on the Shockley-Ramo theorem is developed to calculate γ-ray induced charge pulses by taking into account the charge-trapping effect associated with the geometrical spread of charge carriers. The method is then used to calculate the response of a planar CdTe detector to energetic γ-rays by which the influence of electron track lengths on the γ-ray response of the detectors is clearly shown.

  3. Radiometric and dosimetric characteristics of HgI/sub 2/ detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Zaletin, V.M.; Krivozubov, O.V.; Torlin, M.A.; Fomin, V.I.

    1988-04-01

    The characteristics of HgI/sub 2/ detectors in x-ray and gamma detection in applications to radiometric and dosimetric monitoring and as portable instruments for such purposes was considered. Blocks with mosaic and sandwich structures were prepared and tested against each other and, for comparative purposes, against CdTe detectors for relative sensitivities at various gamma-quanta energies. Sensitivity dependencies on gamma radiation energy were plotted for the detector materials and structures as were current dependencies on the dose rate of x rays. Results indicated that the mercury iodide detectors could be used in radiometric and dosimetric measurements at gamma quantum energies up to and in excess of 1000 KeV.

  4. Characterization of polarizing semiconductor radiation detectors by laser-induced transient currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musiienko, A.; Grill, R.; Pekárek, J.; Belas, E.; Praus, P.; Pipek, J.; Dědič, V.; Elhadidy, H.

    2017-08-01

    A method is presented for the determination of the carrier drift mobility, lifetime, electric field distribution, and the dynamics of space charge formation, including the detrapping energy and capture cross-section of the dominant trap level in polarizing semiconductor radiation detectors. The procedure stems from the laser-induced transient current measurements done at a steady-state and pulsed biasing and at variable temperature. The approach allows us the direct determination of detector parameters from measured data without a complex mathematical treatment. The detrimental effect of surface carrier recombination often hampering the evaluation of detector properties is eliminated. Lifetime worsening caused by the space charge formation is included. The usefulness of the procedure is demonstrated on a CdTe radiation detector.

  5. Determination of dispersion parameters of thermally deposited CdTe thin film

    SciTech Connect

    Dhimmar, J. M. Desai, H. N.; Modi, B. P.

    2016-05-23

    Cadmium Telluride (CdTe) thin film was deposited onto glass substrates under a vacuum of 5 × 10{sup −6} torr by using thermal evaporation technique. The prepared film was characterized for dispersion analysis from reflectance spectra within the wavelength range of 300 nm – 1100 nm which was recorded by using UV-Visible spectrophotometer. The dispersion parameters (oscillator strength, oscillator wavelength, high frequency dielectric constant, long wavelength refractive index, lattice dielectric constant and plasma resonance frequency) of CdTe thin film were investigated using single sellimeir oscillator model.

  6. The role of stress in CdTe quantum dot doped glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Thomaz, A. A.; Almeida, D. B.; Pelegati, V. B.; Carvalho, H. F.; Moreira, S. G. C.; Barbosa, L. C.; Cesar, C. L.

    2016-11-01

    In this work, we unequivocally demonstrate the influence of matrix-related stresses on quantum dots by measuring, side by side, a CdTe quantum dot doped glass and a colloidal sample with similar sizes. We measured the fluorescence spectra and fluorescence lifetime for both samples as a function of the temperature. We show that the expansion coefficient mismatch between CdTe quantum dots and the glass host causes stresses and drastically changes its behavior compared to its colloidal counterpart, even leading to phase transitions. This finding indicates that most experimental data on glass-doped quantum dots used to validate confinement models should be revised, taking stress into account.

  7. Characterizing Recombination in CdTe Solar Cells with Time-Resolved Photoluminescence: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Metzger, W. K.; Romero, M. J.; Dippo, P.; Young, M.

    2006-05-01

    Time-resolved photoluminescence (TRPL) computer simulations demonstrate that under certain experimental conditions it is possible to assess recombination in CdTe solar cells in spite of the junction. This is supported by experimental findings that open-circuit voltage (Voc) is dependent on lifetime in a manner consistent with device theory. Measurements on inverted structures show that the CdCl2 treatment significantly reduces recombination in the CdTe layer without S diffusion. However, S diffusion is required for lifetimes comparable to those observed in high-efficiency solar cells. The results indicate that substrate solar cells can be fabricated with recombination lifetimes similar to superstrate cells.

  8. Characterization of point defects in CdTe by positron annihilation spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Elsharkawy, M. R. M.; Kanda, G. S.; Keeble, D. J.; Abdel-Hady, E. E.

    2016-06-13

    Positron lifetime measurements on CdTe 0.15% Zn-doped by weight are presented, trapping to monovacancy defects is observed. At low temperatures, localization at shallow binding energy positron traps dominates. To aid defect identification density functional theory, calculated positron lifetimes and momentum distributions are obtained using relaxed geometry configurations of the monovacancy defects and the Te antisite. These calculations provide evidence that combined positron lifetime and coincidence Doppler spectroscopy measurements have the capability to identify neutral or negative charge states of the monovacancies, the Te antisite, A-centers, and divacancy defects in CdTe.

  9. Induced Recrystallization of CdTe Thin Films Deposited by Close-Spaced Sublimation

    SciTech Connect

    Moutinho, H. R.; Dhere, R. G.; Al-Jassim, M. M.; Levi, D. H.; Kazmerski, L. L.; Mayo, B.

    1998-10-26

    We have deposited CdTe thin films by close-spaced sublimation at two different temperature ranges. The films deposited at the lower temperature partially recrystallized after CdCl2 treatment at 350 C and completely recrystallized after the same treatment at 400 C. The films deposited at higher temperature did not recrystallize at these two temperatures. These results confirmed that the mechanisms responsible for changes in physical properties of CdTe films treated with CdCl2 are recrystallization and grain growth, and provided an alternative method to deposit CSS films using lower temperatures.

  10. A 1200 element detector system for synchrotron-based coronary angiography

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, A.C.; Lavender, W.M.; Rubenstein, E.; Giacomini, J.C.; Rosso, V.; Schulze, C.; Chapman, D.; Thomlinson, W.

    1993-08-23

    A 1200 channel Si(Li) detector system has been developed for transvenous coronary angiography experiments using synchrotron radiation. It is part of the synchrotron medical imaging facility at the National Synchrotron Light Source. The detector is made from a single crystal of lithium-drifted silicon with an active area 150 mm long {times} 11 mm high {times} 5 mm thick. The elements are arranged in two parallel rows of 600 elements with a center-to-center spacing of 0.25 mm. All 1200 elements are read out simultaneously every 4 ms. A Intel 80486 based computer with a high speed digital signal processing interface is used to control the beamline hardware and to acquire a series of images. The signal-to-noise, linearity and resolution of the system have been measured. Human images have been taken with this system.

  11. Studying Spatial Resolution of CZT Detectors Using Sub-Pixel Positioning for SPECT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montémont, Guillaume; Lux, Silvère; Monnet, Olivier; Stanchina, Sylvain; Verger, Loïck

    2014-10-01

    CZT detectors are the basic building block of a variety of new SPECT systems. Their modularity allows adapting system architecture to specific applications such as cardiac, breast, brain or small animal imaging. In semiconductors, a high number of electron-hole pairs is produced by a single interaction. This direct conversion process allows better energy and spatial resolutions than usual scintillation detectors based on NaI(Tl). However, it remains often unclear if SPECT imaging can really benefit of that performance gain. We investigate the system performance of a detection module, which is based on 5 mm thick CZT with a segmented anode having a 2.5 mm pitch by simulation and experimentation. This pitch allows an easy assembly of the crystal on the readout board and limits the space occupied by electronics without significantly degrading energy and spatial resolution.

  12. 0.25mm-thick CCD packaging for the Dark Energy Survey Camera array

    SciTech Connect

    Derylo, Greg; Diehl, H.Thomas; Estrada, Juan; /Fermilab

    2006-06-01

    The Dark Energy Survey Camera focal plane array will consist of 62 2k x 4k CCDs with a pixel size of 15 microns and a silicon thickness of 250 microns for use at wavelengths between 400 and 1000 nm. Bare CCD die will be received from the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). At the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, the bare die will be packaged into a custom back-side-illuminated module design. Cold probe data from LBNL will be used to select the CCDs to be packaged. The module design utilizes an aluminum nitride readout board and spacer and an Invar foot. A module flatness of 3 microns over small (1 sqcm) areas and less than 10 microns over neighboring areas on a CCD are required for uniform images over the focal plane. A confocal chromatic inspection system is being developed to precisely measure flatness over a grid up to 300 x 300 mm. This system will be utilized to inspect not only room-temperature modules, but also cold individual modules and partial arrays through flat dewar windows.

  13. Femtoseconds-picoseconds nonlinear optics with nearly-mm thick cholesteric liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoo, I. C.; Chen, Chun-Wei; Ho, Tsung-Jui; Lin, Tsung-Hsien

    2017-02-01

    We have succeeded in fabricating unusually thick (up to 550 microns), well aligned cholesteric liquid crystals that possess low scattering loss, large operating temperature range and well-defined photonic bandgap in the visible - near infrared regime. These CLC's possess sufficiently large ultrafast (sub-picosecond) electronic optical nonlinearity needed for direct compression, stretching and recompression of femtoseconds-picoseconds laser pulses without additional optics, as demonstrated by theory and experiments. Despite such world-record setting thickness, these CLC's are extremely compact in comparison to other state-of-the-art materials/devices used for similar operations. They are therefore highly promising for miniaturization and reduced complexity of photonic platform/systems for ultrafast pulse modulations.

  14. Growth of MM-Thick Orientation-Patterned GaAs for IR and THZ Generation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-08-30

    21| K. Gruter, M. Deschler. H. Jurgensen . R . Beccard. p. Balk. J. Crystal Growth 94 (1989)607. [221 S- Lourdudoss. 0. Kjebon. IEEE J. Sel. Top...J. Napierala. D. Castelluci. A . Pimpinelli. R . Cadoret. B. Gerard. J. Crystal Growth 222 (2001) 482. ...Journal of Crystal Growth 310 (2008) 5241 -5247 i-;-’" ;*;--’ r ! I SI \\’ll R Contents lists available at ScienceDirect Journal of Crystal Growth

  15. Mechanical Properties of Laser Heat Treated 6 mm Thick UHSS-Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Jaervenpaeae, Antti; Maentyjaervi, Kari; Maeaettae, Antti; Hietala, Mikko; Merklein, Marion; Karjalainen, Jussi

    2011-05-04

    In this work abrasion resistant (AR) steel with a sheet thickness of 6 mm was heat treated by a 4 kW Nd:YAG and a 4 kW Yb:Yag-laser, followed by self-quenching. In the delivered condition, test material blank (B27S) is water quenched from 920 deg. C. In this condition, fully martensitic microstructure provides excellent hardness of over 500 HB. The test material is referred to AR500 from now onwards. Laser heat treatment was carried out only on top surface of the AR500 sheet: the achieved maximum temperature in the cross-section varies as a function of the depth. Consequently, the microstructure and mechanical properties differ between the surfaces and the centre of the cross-section (layered microstructure). For better understanding, all layers were tested in tensile tests. For a wide heat treatment track, the laser beam was moved by scanning. Temperatures were measured using thermographic camera and thermocouples. Laser heat treated AR500 samples were tested in hardness tests and by air bending using a press brake machine. Microstructures were studied using a light microscope and FE-SEM/SEM-EBSD. At least three kind of microstructure layers were observed: 1) Dual-Phase ferritic/martensitic (T = A{sub C1}-A{sub C3}), 2) ferritic (T{approx}A{sub C3}) and 3) bainitic/martensitic (T>A{sub C3}).

  16. Polycrystalline scintillators for large area detectors in HEP experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dosovitskiy, G.; Fedorov, A.; Karpyuk, P.; Kuznetsova, D.; Mikhlin, A.; Kozlov, D.; Dosovitskiy, A.; Korjik, M.

    2017-06-01

    After significant increase of the accelerator luminosity throughout the High Luminosity phase of LHC, charged hadrons and neutrons with fluences higher than 1014 p/cm2 per year in the largest pseudo-rapidity regions of the detectors will cause increased radiation damage of materials. Increasing activation of the experimental equipment will make periodical maintenance and replacement of detector components difficult. Therefore, the selected materials for new detectors should be tolerant to radiation damage. Y3Al5O12:Ce (YAG:Ce) crystal was found to be one of the most radiation hard scintillation materials. However, production of YAG:Ce in a single crystalline form is costly, because crystal growth is performed at temperature near 1900°C with a very low rate of transformation of a raw material into a crystal. We propose translucent YAG:Ce ceramics as an alternative cheaper solution. Ceramic samples were sintered up to density ~98% of the theoretical value and were translucent. The samples have demonstrated light yield of 2200 phot./MeV under 662 keV γ-quanta, which gives the expected response to minimum ionizing particle around 3000 phot. for 2 mm thick plate. Scintillation light yield, registered under surface layer excitation with α-particles, was 50-70% higher than for the reference single crystal YAG:Ce.

  17. Dual-sided microstructured semiconductor neutron detectors (DSMSNDs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fronk, Ryan G.; Bellinger, Steven L.; Henson, Luke C.; Ochs, Taylor R.; Smith, Colten T.; Kenneth Shultis, J.; McGregor, Douglas S.

    2015-12-01

    Microstructured semiconductor neutron detectors (MSNDs) have in recent years received much interest as high-efficiency replacements for thin-film-coated thermal neutron detectors. The basic device structure of the MSND involves micro-sized trenches that are etched into a vertically-oriented pvn-junction diode that are backfilled with a neutron converting material. Neutrons absorbed within the converting material induce fission of the parent nucleus, producing a pair of energetic charged-particle reaction products that can be counted by the diode. The MSND deep-etched microstructures produce good neutron-absorption and reaction-product counting efficiencies, offering a 10× improvement in intrinsic thermal neutron detection efficiency over thin-film-coated devices. Performance of present-day MSNDs are nearing theoretical limits; streaming paths between the conversion-material backfilled trenches, allow a considerable fraction of neutrons to pass undetected through the device. Dual-sided microstructured semiconductor neutron detectors (DSMSNDs) have been developed that utilize a complementary second set of trenches on the back-side of the device to count streaming neutrons. DSMSND devices are theoretically capable of greater than 80% intrinsic thermal neutron detection efficiency for a 1-mm thick device. The first such prototype DSMSNDs, presented here, have achieved 29.48±0.29% nearly 2× better than MSNDs with similar microstructure dimensions.

  18. Hard X-ray and γ-ray detectors for the NeXT mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Tadayuki; Makishima, Kazuo; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Kokubun, Motohide; Nakazawa, Kazuhiro; Nomachi, Masaharu; Tajima, Hiroyasu; Tashiro, Makoto; Terada, Yukikatsu

    2004-02-01

    When compared with X-ray astronomy, the γ-ray astronomy, especially in the energy band from 10 keV to several MeV, is still immature and significant improvements should be done to obtain sensitivity comparable to that achieved in the energy band below 10 keV. In order to fill this "sensitivity gap", the NeXT (New X-ray Telescope) mission has been proposed as a successor of the Astro-E2 mission. The high-energy response of the super mirror will enable us to perform first sensitive imaging observation up to 80 keV. One idea for the focal plane detector is to combine a fully depleted X-ray imaging device (soft X-ray detector) and a pixelated CdTe (cadmium telluride) detector. In the soft γ-ray band upto ˜1 MeV, a narrow field-of-view Compton γ-ray telescope utilizing several tens of layers of thin Si or CdTe detector has been proposed to obtain much higher sensitivity than present instruments.

  19. Flame Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Scientific Instruments, Inc. has now developed a second generation, commercially available instrument to detect flames in hazardous environments, typically refineries, chemical plants and offshore drilling platforms. The Model 74000 detector incorporates a sensing circuit that detects UV radiation in a 100 degree conical field of view extending as far as 250 feet from the instrument. It operates in a bandwidth that makes it virtually 'blind' to solar radiation while affording extremely high sensitivity to ultraviolet flame detection. A 'windowing' technique accurately discriminates between background UV radiation and ultraviolet emitted from an actual flame, hence the user is assured of no false alarms. Model 7410CP is a combination controller and annunciator panel designed to monitor and control as many as 24 flame detectors. *Model 74000 is no longer being manufactured.

  20. Angle detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parra, G. T. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    An angle detector for determining a transducer's angular disposition to a capacitive pickup element is described. The transducer comprises a pendulum mounted inductive element moving past the capacitive pickup element. The capacitive pickup element divides the inductive element into two parts L sub 1 and L sub 2 which form the arms of one side of an a-c bridge. Two networks R sub 1 and R sub 2 having a plurality of binary weighted resistors and an equal number of digitally controlled switches for removing resistors from the networks form the arms of the other side of the a-c bridge. A binary counter, controlled by a phase detector, balances the bridge by adjusting the resistance of R sub 1 and R sub 2. The binary output of the counter is representative of the angle.

  1. Neutron detector

    DOEpatents

    Stephan, Andrew C.; Jardret; Vincent D.

    2011-04-05

    A neutron detector has a volume of neutron moderating material and a plurality of individual neutron sensing elements dispersed at selected locations throughout the moderator, and particularly arranged so that some of the detecting elements are closer to the surface of the moderator assembly and others are more deeply embedded. The arrangement captures some thermalized neutrons that might otherwise be scattered away from a single, centrally located detector element. Different geometrical arrangements may be used while preserving its fundamental characteristics. Different types of neutron sensing elements may be used, which may operate on any of a number of physical principles to perform the function of sensing a neutron, either by a capture or a scattering reaction, and converting that reaction to a detectable signal. High detection efficiency, an ability to acquire spectral information, and directional sensitivity may be obtained.

  2. Fabrication of an Absorber-Coupled MKID Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Ari; Hsieh, Wen-Ting; Moseley, Samuel; Stevenson, Thomas; U-Yen, Kongpop; Wollack, Edward

    2012-01-01

    Absorber-coupled microwave kinetic inductance detector (MKID) arrays were developed for submillimeter and far-infrared astronomy. These sensors comprise arrays of lambda/2 stepped microwave impedance resonators patterned on a 1.5-mm-thick silicon membrane, which is optimized for optical coupling. The detector elements are supported on a 380-mm-thick micro-machined silicon wafer. The resonators consist of parallel plate aluminum transmission lines coupled to low-impedance Nb microstrip traces of variable length, which set the resonant frequency of each resonator. This allows for multiplexed microwave readout and, consequently, good spatial discrimination between pixels in the array. The transmission lines simultaneously act to absorb optical power and employ an appropriate surface impedance and effective filling fraction. The fabrication techniques demonstrate high-fabrication yield of MKID arrays on large, single-crystal membranes and sub-micron front-to-back alignment of the micro strip circuit. An MKID is a detector that operates upon the principle that a superconducting material s kinetic inductance and surface resistance will change in response to being exposed to radiation with a power density sufficient to break its Cooper pairs. When integrated as part of a resonant circuit, the change in surface impedance will result in a shift in its resonance frequency and a decrease of its quality factor. In this approach, incident power creates quasiparticles inside a superconducting resonator, which is configured to match the impedance of free space in order to absorb the radiation being detected. For this reason MKIDs are attractive for use in large-format focal plane arrays, because they are easily multiplexed in the frequency domain and their fabrication is straightforward. The fabrication process can be summarized in seven steps: (1) Alignment marks are lithographically patterned and etched all the way through a silicon on insulator (SOI) wafer, which consists of a

  3. CdTe quantum dot-based fluorescent probes for selective detection of Hg (II): The effect of particle size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jian; Zhao, Zhu-Jun; Li, Jian-Jun; Zhao, Jun-Wu

    2017-04-01

    Mercury ions-induced fluorescence quenching properties of CdTe quantum dots (QDs) have been studied using the fluorescence spectroscopic techniques. By using the hydrothermal method, the CdTe QDs with different particles sizes from 1.98 to 3.68 nm have been prepared, and the corresponding fluorescence emission wavelength is changed from 518 to 620 nm. The fluorescence of QDs is enhanced after linking Bovine serum albumin (BSA) onto the surface of the QDs. Experimental results show that the fluorescence intensity of BSA-coated CdTe QDs could be effectively quenched when Hg2 + react with BSA-coated CdTe QDs. Interestingly, both the sensing sensitivity and selectivity of this fluorescence probe could be improved when the particle size of the QDs decreases. Thus the BSA-coated CdTe QDs with green fluorescence emission have better advantages than the BSA-coated CdTe QDs with red fluorescence for Hg2 + detection. Interference experiment results indicate that the influence from other metal ions could be neglected in the detection, and the Hg2 + could be specifically detected. By using this BSA-coated CdTe QDs-based fluorescence probe, the Hg2 + could be detected with an ultra-low detection limit of nanomole level, and the linear range spans a scope from 0.001 to 1 μmol/L.

  4. Linear and non-linear optical properties of capped CdTe nanocrystals prepared by mechanical alloying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, G. L.; Yang, Q.; Hömmerich, U.; Seo, J. T.; Temple, D.

    2004-12-01

    CdTe nanocrystals were prepared by mechanical alloying the elemental Cd and Te powders. The formation of CdTe with a single cubic phase after 20 h of ball milling was confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD). The surface of as-milled CdTe nanoparticles was then capped with polarization TOP/TOPO or (Na3PO4)n organic ligand, which resulted in colorful dispersion solution with optical absorption peaks located at 573 nm and 525 nm, respectively. The third-order non-linearity, namely, the non-linear refraction and two-photon absorption (TPA) coefficient, of the capped CdTe dispersion samples were evaluated using Z-scan technique. The fitting of Z-scan experimental data with a special equation demonstrated that the capped CdTe nanocrystals possess large third-order susceptibilities at resonant wavelength. The non-linear figure of merit (γ/β) for 20 h as-milled CdTe nanocrystals after capping with TOP/TOPO was determined to be ∼ -2 × 10-5 m, which is nearly 215 times larger than the value reported for bulk CdTe crystals.

  5. Structural, optical and photovoltaic properties of co-doped CdTe QDs for quantum dots sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayyaswamy, Arivarasan; Ganapathy, Sasikala; Alsalme, Ali; Alghamdi, Abdulaziz; Ramasamy, Jayavel

    2015-12-01

    Zinc and sulfur alloyed CdTe quantum dots (QDs) sensitized TiO2 photoelectrodes have been fabricated for quantum dots sensitized solar cells. Alloyed CdTe QDs were prepared in aqueous phase using mercaptosuccinic acid (MSA) as a capping agent. The influence of co-doping on the structural property of CdTe QDs was studied by XRD analysis. The enhanced optical absorption of alloyed CdTe QDs was studied using UV-vis absorption and fluorescence emission spectra. The capping of MSA molecules over CdTe QDs was confirmed by the FTIR and XPS analyses. Thermogravimetric analysis confirms that the prepared QDs were thermally stable up to 600 °C. The photovoltaic performance of alloyed CdTe QDs sensitized TiO2 photoelectrodes were studied using J-V characteristics under the illumination of light with 1 Sun intensity. These results show the highest photo conversion efficiency of η = 1.21%-5% Zn & S alloyed CdTe QDs.

  6. Neutrino Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Feilitzsch, Franz; Lanfranchi, Jean-Côme; Wurm, Michael

    The neutrino was postulated by Wolfgang Pauli in the early 1930s, but could only be detected for the first time in the 1950s. Ever since scientists all around the world have worked on the detection and understanding of this particle which so scarcely interacts with matter. Depending on the origin and nature of the neutrino, various types of experiments have been developed and operated. In this entry, we will review neutrino detectors in terms of neutrino energy and associated detection technique as well as the scientific outcome of some selected examples. After a brief historical introduction, the detection of low-energy neutrinos originating from nuclear reactors or from the Earth is used to illustrate the principles and difficulties which are encountered in detecting neutrinos. In the context of solar neutrino spectroscopy, where the neutrino is used as a probe for astrophysics, three different types of neutrino detectors are presented - water Čerenkov, radiochemical, and liquid-scintillator detectors. Moving to higher neutrino energies, we discuss neutrinos produced by astrophysical sources and from accelerators. The entry concludes with an overview of a selection of future neutrino experiments and their scientific goals.

  7. Characterization of pixelated cadmium-zinc-telluride detectors for astrophysical application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaskin, Jessica A.; Sharma, Dharma P.; Ramsey, Brian D.; Mitchell, Shannon; Seller, Paul

    2004-02-01

    Charge sharing and charge loss measurements for a many-pixel, Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride (CdZnTe) detector are discussed. These properties that are set by the material characteristics and the detector geometry help to define the limiting energy resolution and spatial resolution of the detector in question. The detector consists of a 1-mm-thick piece of CdZnTe sputtered with a 16x16 array of pixels with a 300 micron pixel pitch (inter-pixel gap is 50 microns). This crystal is bonded to a custom-built readout chip (ASIC) providing all front-end electronics to each of the 256 independent pixels. These types of detectors act as precursors to that which will be used at the focal plane of the High Energy Replicated Optics (HERO) telescope currently being developed at Marshall Space Flight Center. With a telescope focal length of 6 meters, the detector needs to have a spatial resolution of around 200 microns in order to take full advantage of the HERO angular resolution. We discuss to what degree charge sharing degrades energy resolution through charge loss and improves spatial resolution through position interpolation.

  8. Development of GAGG depth-of-interaction (DOI) block detectors based on pulse shape analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi; Kobayashi, Takahiro; Yeol Yeom, Jung; Morishita, Yuki; Sato, Hiroki; Endo, Takanori; Usuki, Yoshiyuki; Kamada, Kei; Yoshikawa, Akira

    2014-12-01

    A depth-of-interaction (DOI) detector is required for developing a high resolution and high sensitivity PET system. Ce-doped Gd3Al2Ga3O12 (GAGG fast: GAGG-F) is a promising scintillator for PET applications with high light output, no natural radioisotope and suitable light emission wavelength for semiconductor based photodetectors. However, no DOI detector based on pulse shape analysis with GAGG-F has been developed to date, due to the lack of appropriate scintillators of pairing. Recently a new variation of this scintillator with different Al/Ga ratios-Ce-doped Gd3Al2.6Ga2.4O12 (GAGG slow: GAGG-S), which has slower decay time was developed. The combination of GAGG-F and GAGG-S may allow us to realize high resolution DOI detectors based on pulse shape analysis. We developed and tested two GAGG phoswich DOI block detectors comprised of pixelated GAGG-F and GAGG-S scintillation crystals. One phoswich block detector comprised of 2×2×5 mm pixel that were assembled into a 5×5 matrix. The DOI block was optically coupled to a silicon photomultiplier (Si-PM) array (Hamamatsu MPPC S11064-050P) with a 2-mm thick light guide. The other phoswich block detector comprised of 0.5×0.5×5 mm (GAGG-F) and 0.5×0.5×6 mm3 (GAGG-S) pixels that were assembled into a 20×20 matrix. The DOI block was also optically coupled to the same Si-PM array with a 2-mm thick light guide. In the block detector of 2-mm crystal pixels (5×5 matrix), the 2-dimensional histogram revealed excellent separation with an average energy resolution of 14.1% for 662-keV gamma photons. The pulse shape spectrum displayed good separation with a peak-to-valley ratio of 8.7. In the block detector that used 0.5-mm crystal pixels (20×20 matrix), the 2-dimensional histogram also showed good separation with energy resolution of 27.5% for the 662-keV gamma photons. The pulse shape spectrum displayed good separation with a peak-to-valley ratio of 6.5. These results indicate that phoswich DOI detectors with the two

  9. Quantifying electron-phonon coupling in CdTe1-xSex nanocrystals via coherent phonon manipulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spann, B. T.; Xu, X.

    2014-08-01

    We employ ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy with temporal pulse shaping to manipulate coherent phonon excitation and quantify the strength of electron-phonon coupling in CdTe1-xSex nanocrystals (NCs). Raman active CdSe and CdTe longitudinal optical phonon (LO) modes are excited and probed in the time domain. By temporally controlling pump pulse pairs to coherently excite and cancel coherent phonons in the CdTe1-xSex NCs, we estimate the relative amount of optical energy that is coupled to the coherent CdSe LO mode.

  10. Assembly of light-emitting diode based on hydrophilic CdTe quantum dots incorporating dehydrated silica gel.

    PubMed

    Du, Jinhua; Wang, Chunlei; Xu, Xiaojing; Wang, Zhuyuan; Xu, Shuhong; Cui, Yiping

    2016-03-01

    Stable photoluminescence QD light-emitting diodes (QD-LEDs) were made based on hydrophilic CdTe quantum dots (QDs). A quantum dot-inorganic nanocomposite (hydrophilic CdTe QDs incorporating dehydrated silica gel) was prepared by two methods (rotary evaporation and freeze drying). Taking advantage of its viscosity, plasticity and transparency, dehydrated silica gel could be coated on the surface of ultraviolet (UV) light LEDs to make photoluminescence QD-LEDs. This new photoluminescence QD-LED, which is stable, environmentally non-toxic, easy to operate and low cost, could expand the applications of hydrophilic CdTe QDs in photoluminescence.

  11. Investigation of deep level defects in CdTe thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Shankar, H.; Castaldini, A.; Dauksta, E.; Medvid, A.; Cavallini, A.

    2014-02-21

    In the past few years, a large body of work has been dedicated to CdTe thin film semiconductors, as the electronic and optical properties of CdTe nanostructures make them desirable for photovoltaic applications. The performance of semiconductor devices is greatly influenced by the deep levels. Knowledge of parameters of deep levels present in as-grown materials and the identification of their origin is the key factor in the development of photovoltaic device performance. Photo Induced Current Transient Spectroscopy technique (PICTS) has proven to be a very powerful method for the study of deep levels enabling us to identify the type of traps, their activation energy and apparent capture cross section. In the present work, we report the effect of growth parameters and LASER irradiation intensity on the photo-electric and transport properties of CdTe thin films prepared by Close-Space Sublimation method using SiC electrical heating element. CdTe thin films were grown at three different source temperatures (630, 650 and 700 °C). The grown films were irradiated with Nd:YAG LASER and characterized by Photo-Induced Current Transient Spectroscopy, Photocurrent measurementand Current Voltage measurements. The defect levels are found to be significantly influenced by the growth temperature.

  12. Controllable synthesis of thiol-capped CdTe nanoparticles for optical sensing of triethylenetetramine dihydrochloride.

    PubMed

    Huy, Bui The; Kumar, Avvaru Praveen; Seo, Min-Ho; Kim, Jan-Di; Lee, Yong-Ill

    2014-10-01

    Highly luminescent CdTe quantum dots (QDs) were synthesized through a co-precipitation route in aqueous salt solutions using different thiols as stabilizers. The synthetic procedure was simple, efficient, and stable. It could also allow controlling the emission wavelength by varying the experimental conditions such as reaction time and pH values. The strong luminescence of the QDs was observed under UV-excitation and emission colors could be adjusted. The interaction between CdTe QDs and triethylenetetramine dihydrochloride (TETA) which is a candidate treatment for diabetic cardiovascular complication was investigated by fluorescence spectroscopy. Based on the quenching effect on CdTe photoluminescence intensity by TETA, a simple assay system for analyzing the content of TETA in aqueous samples was developed. The linearity was maintained in the range of 0.2 μM to 1.2 μM (R2 = 0.994) with a limit of detection (LOD; S/N = 3) at 28 nM. The results showed that CdTe QDs capped with diverse thiols has a potential for the quantitative analysis of TETA in urine samples.

  13. Interfacial charge transfer between CdTe quantum dots and Gram negative vs. Gram positive bacteria.

    SciTech Connect

    Dumas, E.; Gao, C.; Suffern, D.; Bradforth, S. E.; Dimitrejevic, N. M.; Nadeau, J. L.; McGill Univ.; Univ. of Southern California

    2010-01-01

    Oxidative toxicity of semiconductor and metal nanomaterials to cells has been well established. However, it may result from many different mechanisms, some requiring direct cell contact and others resulting from the diffusion of reactive species in solution. Published results are contradictory due to differences in particle preparation, bacterial strain, and experimental conditions. It has been recently found that C{sub 60} nanoparticles can cause direct oxidative damage to bacterial proteins and membranes, including causing a loss of cell membrane potential (depolarization). However, this did not correlate with toxicity. In this study we perform a similar analysis using fluorescent CdTe quantum dots, adapting our tools to make use of the particles fluorescence. We find that two Gram positive strains show direct electron transfer to CdTe, resulting in changes in CdTe fluorescence lifetimes. These two strains also show changes in membrane potential upon nanoparticle binding. Two Gram negative strains do not show these effects - nevertheless, they are over 10-fold more sensitive to CdTe than the Gram positives. We find subtoxic levels of Cd{sup 2+} release from the particles upon irradiation of the particles, but significant production of hydroxyl radicals, suggesting that the latter is a major source of toxicity. These results help establish mechanisms of toxicity and also provide caveats for use of certain reporter dyes with fluorescent nanoparticles which will be of use to anyone performing these assays. The findings also suggest future avenues of inquiry into electron transfer processes between nanomaterials and bacteria.

  14. Transparent ohmic contacts for solution-processed, ultrathin CdTe solar cells

    DOE PAGES

    Kurley, J. Matthew; Panthani, Matthew G.; Crisp, Ryan W.; ...

    2016-12-19

    Recently, solution-processing became a viable route for depositing CdTe for use in photovoltaics. Ultrathin (~500 nm) solar cells have been made using colloidal CdTe nanocrystals with efficiencies exceeding 12% power conversion efficiency (PCE) demonstrated by using very simple device stacks. Further progress requires an effective method for extracting charge carriers generated during light harvesting. Here, we explored solution-based methods for creating transparent Ohmic contacts to the solution-deposited CdTe absorber layer and demonstrated molecular and nanocrystal approaches to Ohmic hole-extracting contacts at the ITO/CdTe interface. Furthermore, we used scanning Kelvin probe microscopy to further show how the above approaches improved carriermore » collection by reducing the potential drop under reverse bias across the ITO/CdTe interface. Other methods, such as spin-coating CdTe/A2CdTe2 (A = Na, K, Cs, N2H5), can be used in conjunction with current/light soaking to improve PCE further.« less

  15. Long Carrier Lifetimes in Large-Grain Polycrystalline CdTe Without CdCl2

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, Soren A.; Burst, James M.; Duenow, Joel N.; Guthrey, Harvey L.; Moseley, John; Moutinho, Helio R.; Johnston, Steve W.; Kanevce, Ana; Al-Jassim, Mowafak M.; Metzger, Wyatt K.

    2016-06-27

    For decades, polycrystalline CdTe thin films for solar applications have been restricted to grain sizes of microns or less whereas other semiconductors such as silicon and perovskites have produced devices with grains ranging from less than a micron to more than 1 mm. Because the lifetimes in as-deposited polycrystalline CdTe films are typically limited to less than a few hundred picoseconds, a CdCl2 treatment is generally used to improve the lifetime; but this treatment may limit the achievable hole density by compensation. Here, we establish methods to produce CdTe films with grain sizes ranging from hundreds of nanometers to several hundred microns by close-spaced sublimation at industrial manufacturing growth rates. Two-photon excitation photoluminescence spectroscopy shows a positive correlation of lifetime with grain size. Large-grain, as-deposited CdTe exhibits lifetimes exceeding 10 ns without Cl, S, O, or Cu. This uncompensated material allows dopants such as P to achieve a hole density of 1016 cm-3, which is an order of magnitude higher than standard CdCl2-treated devices, without compromising the lifetime.

  16. Spray Deposition of High Quality CuInSe2 and CdTe Films: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, C. J.; van Hest, M.; Miedaner, A.; Leisch, J.; Hersh, P.; Nekuda, J.; Ginley, D. S.

    2008-05-01

    A number of different ink and deposition approaches have been used for the deposition of CuInSe2 (CIS), Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS), and CdTe films. For CIS and CIGS, soluble precursors containing Cu, In, and Ga have been developed and used in two ways to produce CIS films. In the first, In-containing precursor films were sprayed on Mo-coated glass substrates and converted by rapid thermal processing (RTP) to In2Se3. Then a Cu-containing film was sprayed down on top of the In2Se3 and the stacked films were again thermally processed to give CIS. In the second approach, the Cu-, In-, and Ga-containing inks were combined in the proper ratio to produce a mixed Cu-In-Ga ink that was sprayed on substrates and thermally processed to give CIGS films directly. For CdTe deposition, ink consisting of CdTe nanoparticles dispersed in methanol was prepared and used to spray precursor films. Annealing these precursor films in the presence of CdCl2 produced large-grained CdTe films. The films were characterized by x-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Optimized spray and processing conditions are crucial to obtain dense, crystalline films.

  17. Novel synthesis of β-cyclodextrin functionalized CdTe quantum dots as luminescent probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiao-Feng; Zhou, Min; Chang, Yan-Ping; Ren, Cui-Ling; Chen, Hong-Li; Chen, Xing-Guo

    2012-12-01

    A novel, inexpensive procedure for the preparation of highly fluorescent and water-soluble CdTe quantum dots (QDs) using β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) as surface-coating agents was fabricated through the substitution reaction at the C-6 position of mono-6-deoxy-6-(p-tolylsulfonyl)-cyclodextrin (6-TsO-β-CD) by the sbnd NH2 of (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane-coated CdTe QDs (APTES/CdTe QDs) under mild conditions. X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectra (FT-IR), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high-resolution TEM (HRTEM), ultraviolet and visible (UV-vis) spectrophotometer, and fluorescence (FL) spectrophotometer were used to characterize the obtained nanoparticles, which proved that the CdTe QDs have been effectively modified by β-CD. The quantum yields (QYs) of CdTe QDs, APTES/CdTe QDs and β-CD/APTES/CdTe QDs in water comparative to Rhodamine 6G were about 17%, 12%, and 9%, respectively. A pair of isomer o,p'-DDT and p,p'-DDT was chosen as the template molecules to evaluate the molecular recognition properties of β-CD/APTES/CdTe QDs. The results revealed that β-CD/APTES/CdTe QDs simultaneously possessed unique optical properties of QDs and excellent molecules recognition ability of β-CD through combining their individual distinct advantages.

  18. Effects of heat treatment on diffusion of Cu atoms into CdTe single crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Soo, Y. L.; Huang, S.; Kim, S.; Kioseoglou, G.; Kao, Y. H.; Compaan, A. D.; Grecu, D.; Albin, D.

    2000-06-19

    Angular dependence of x-ray fluorescence and x-ray absorption fine structure techniques have been used to study the diffusion of Cu atoms into the photovoltaic material CdTe. Depth profile, effective valency, and local structure of Cu atoms in a Cu-doped single crystal of CdTe were investigated before and after a second heat treatment. Enhanced Cu diffusion into the CdTe single crystal was observed as a result of heating at a moderate temperature around 200 degree sign C, resulting in a redistribution of the Cu impurities through a broader depth profile. Some of the Cu atoms are believed either to form small complexes with Te or occupy interstitial sites in the host but accompanied by a large local lattice distortion while others substitute for Cd on the cation sites. The results thus demonstrate that these nondestructive x-ray characterization methods are useful for probing microstructural changes in CdTe photovoltaic materials/devices in which some Cu-containing compounds are used as back contacts. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  19. A direct solution deposition approach to CdTe thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Miskin, Caleb K.; Dubois-Camacho, Angela; Reese, Matthew O.; Agrawal, Rakesh

    2016-01-01

    A direct solution deposition approach to CdTe thin films is presented. The difficulty of co-dissolving Te and desirable Cd salts is overcome through a diamine-thiol solvent mixture. Thin films of densely-packed, micron-sized grains are achieved after annealing without the need for chalcogen or CdCl2 vapor treatments.

  20. 14%-efficient flexible CdTe solar cells on ultra-thin glass substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Rance, W. L.; Burst, J. M.; Reese, M. O.; Gessert, T. A.; Metzger, W. K.; Barnes, T. M.; Meysing, D. M.; Wolden, C. A.; Garner, S.; Cimo, P.

    2014-04-07

    Flexible glass enables high-temperature, roll-to-roll processing of superstrate devices with higher photocurrents than flexible polymer foils because of its higher optical transmission. Using flexible glass in our high-temperature CdTe process, we achieved a certified record conversion efficiency of 14.05% for a flexible CdTe solar cell. Little has been reported on the flexibility of CdTe devices, so we investigated the effects of three different static bending conditions on device performance. We observed a consistent trend of increased short-circuit current and fill factor, whereas the open-circuit voltage consistently dropped. The quantum efficiency under the same static bend condition showed no change in the response. After storage in a flexed state for 24 h, there was very little change in device efficiency relative to its unflexed state. This indicates that flexible glass is a suitable replacement for rigid glass substrates, and that CdTe solar cells can tolerate bending without a decrease in device performance.

  1. A simple and sensitive label-free fluorescence sensing of heparin based on Cdte quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Rezaei, B; Shahshahanipour, M; Ensafi, Ali A

    2016-06-01

    A rapid, simple and sensitive label-free fluorescence method was developed for the determination of trace amounts of an important drug, heparin. This new method was based on water-soluble glutathione-capped CdTe quantum dots (CdTe QDs) as the luminescent probe. CdTe QDs were prepared according to the published protocol and the sizes of these nanoparticles were verified through transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) with an average particle size of about 7 nm. The fluorescence intensity of glutathione-capped CdTe QDs increased with increasing heparin concentration. These changes were followed as the analytical signal. Effective variables such as pH, QD concentration and incubation time were optimized. At the optimum conditions, with this optical method, heparin could be measured within the range 10.0-200.0 ng mL(-1) with a low limit of detection, 2.0 ng mL(-1) . The constructed fluorescence sensor was also applied successfully for the determination of heparin in human serum. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Fluorescence Quenching of CdTe Nanocrystals by Bound Gold Nanoparticles in Aqueous Solution

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jian; Badugu, Ramachandram; Lakowicz, Joseph R.

    2009-01-01

    Water-soluble gold nanoparticles with an average diameter of 5 nm were prepared with carboxylic acid terminated thiol ligands. These ligands contain zero to eight methylene moieties. CdTe nanocrystals with an average diameter of 5 nm were synthesized with aminoethanethiol capping. These nanocrystals displayed characteristic absorption and emission spectra of quantum dots. The amine terminated CdTe nanocrystals and carboxylic-acid-terminated gold nanoparticles were conjugated in aqueous solution at pH 5.0 by electrostatic interaction, and the conjugation was monitored with fluorescence spectroscopy. The CdTe nanocrystals were significantly quenched upon binding with gold nanoparticles. The quenching efficiency was affected by both the concentration of gold nanoparticles in the complex and the length of spacer between the CdTe nanocrystal and Au nanoparticle. The observed quenching was explained using Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) mechanism, and the Förster distance was estimated to be 3.8 nm between the donor-acceptor pair. PMID:19890452

  3. Application of Lithium Chloride Dopant in Fabrication of CdTe Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Hang; Zeng, Guanggen; Feng, Lianghuan; Wu, Lili; Liu, Cai; Ren, Shengqiang; Li, Kang; Li, Bing; Li, Wei; Wang, Wenwu; Zhang, Jingquan

    2017-02-01

    We report use of lithium chloride (LiCl) as a non-Cd dopant to deal with the environmental issues associated with use of traditional CdCl2 dopant in CdTe solar cells. It has been found that, after LiCl treatment, device performance parameters including external quantum efficiency and conversion efficiency were improved considerably, being comparable to those of a counterpart treated with CdCl2. The optimal efficiency of 9.58% was obtained at 405°C, and V oc as high as ˜737.3 mV was obtained at 385°C. Thorough study of the properties of the CdTe film treated by LiCl by x-ray diffraction analysis, scanning electron microscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and secondary-ion mass spectroscopy further verified the feasibility of posttreatment with nontoxic LiCl for fabrication of CdTe photovoltaic devices. The doping level of p-type CdTe thin film was improved by lithium. This represents a nontoxic approach for fabrication of commercial CdS/CdTe thin-film solar cells with better performance.

  4. Long carrier lifetimes in large-grain polycrystalline CdTe without CdCl2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, S. A.; Burst, J. M.; Duenow, J. N.; Guthrey, H. L.; Moseley, J.; Moutinho, H. R.; Johnston, S. W.; Kanevce, A.; Al-Jassim, M. M.; Metzger, W. K.

    2016-06-01

    For decades, polycrystalline CdTe thin films for solar applications have been restricted to grain sizes of microns or less whereas other semiconductors such as silicon and perovskites have produced devices with grains ranging from less than a micron to more than 1 mm. Because the lifetimes in as-deposited polycrystalline CdTe films are typically limited to less than a few hundred picoseconds, a CdCl2 treatment is generally used to improve the lifetime; but this treatment may limit the achievable hole density by compensation. Here, we establish methods to produce CdTe films with grain sizes ranging from hundreds of nanometers to several hundred microns by close-spaced sublimation at industrial manufacturing growth rates. Two-photon excitation photoluminescence spectroscopy shows a positive correlation of lifetime with grain size. Large-grain, as-deposited CdTe exhibits lifetimes exceeding 10 ns without Cl, S, O, or Cu. This uncompensated material allows dopants such as P to achieve a hole density of 1016 cm-3, which is an order of magnitude higher than standard CdCl2-treated devices, without compromising the lifetime.

  5. Basic physics of phototransport as manifested in thin films of In-doped CdTe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balberg, I.; Dover, Y.; Savir, E.; von Huth, P.

    2010-11-01

    Recognizing the interesting effects associated with deep centers in II-VI semiconductors, we reveal the recombination centers map in In-doped CdTe thin films by introducing a systematic and comprehensive phototransport spectroscopy method. The method is more reliable than previous phototransport methods as it is based on a stringent self-consistency of the temperature dependencies of four phototransport properties with a given model. This limits the number of scenarios and narrows the parameter space that can account for the experimental data. We suggest that the deep centers that can account for the data in the studied CdTe system lie both above and below the Fermi level, and that their special distribution can account for some of the “exotic” or “puzzling” phenomena observed in n -type CdTe. However, the main purpose of this work is to use the analysis of the In-doped CdTe system as a vehicle for a quantitative comprehensive test of the qualitative physical-analytic ideas of Rose that have guided numerous studies of phototransport in semiconductors. Introducing here the concept of the “center of gravity” of the density of states distribution further extends these basic ideas.

  6. Preparation of bioconjugates of CdTe nanocrystals for cancer marker detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Fengqin; Ran, Yuliang; Zhou, Zhuan; Gao, Mingyuan

    2006-06-01

    Highly fluorescent CdTe quantum dots (Q-dots) stabilized by 3-mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) were prepared by an aqueous solution approach and used as fluorescent labels in detecting a cancer marker, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), expressed on human colon carcinoma cell line LS 180. Nonspecific adsorptions of CdTe Q-dots on carcinoma cells were observed and effectively eliminated by replacing MPA with a thiolated PEG (poly(ethylene glycol), Mn = 750) synthesized according to literature. It was unexpectedly found out that the PEG-coated CdTe Q-dots exhibited very strong and specific affinity to anti-CEA monoclonal antibody rch 24 (rch 24 mAb). The resultant CdTe-(rch 24 mAb) conjugates were successfully used in detections of CEA expressed on the surface of cell line LS 180. Further experiments demonstrated that the fluorescent CdTe Q-dots exhibited much better photostability and a brighter fluorescence than FITC, which consequently led to a higher efficiency in the cancer marker detection.

  7. Nanoscale Imaging of Band Gap and Defects in Polycrystalline CdTe Photovoltaic Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhitenev, Nikolai; Yoon, Yohan; Chae, Jungseok; Katzenmeyer, Aaron; Yoon, Heayoung; An, Sangmin; Shumacher, Joshua; Centrone, Andrea

    To further increase the power efficiency of polycrystalline thin film photovoltaic (PV) technology, a detailed understanding of microstructural properties of the devices is required. In this work, we investigate the microstructure of CdTe PV devices using two optical spectroscopies. Sub-micron thickness lamella samples were cut out from a PV device, either in cross-section or in-plane, by focused ion beam. The first technique is the photothermal induced resonance (PTIR) used to obtain absorption spectra over a broad range of wavelengths. In PTIR, a wavelength tunable pulsed laser is combined with an atomic force microscope to detect the local thermal expansion of lamella CdTe sample induced by light absorption. The second technique based on a near-field scanning optical microscope maps the local absorption at fixed near-IR wavelengths with energies at or below CdTe band-gap energy. The variation of the band gap throughout the CdTe absorber determined from PTIR spectra is ~ 20 meV. Both techniques detect strong spatial variation of shallow defects over different grains. The spatial distribution of mid-gap defects appears to be more uniform. The resolution, the sensitivity and the applicability of these two approaches are compared.

  8. Static atomic displacements in a CdTe epitaxial layer on a GaAs substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horning, R. D.; Staudenmann, J.-L.

    1987-05-01

    A (001)CdTe epitaxial layer on a (001)GaAs substrate was studied by x-ray diffraction between 10 and 360 K. The CdTe growth took place at 380 °C in a vertical gas flow metalorganic chemical vapor deposition reactor. Lattice parameters and integrated intensities of both the substrate and the epitaxial layer using the (00l) and (hhh) Bragg reflections reveal three important features. Firstly, the GaAs substrate does not exhibit severe strain after deposition and it is as perfect as a bulk GaAs. Secondly, the CdTe unit cell distorts tetragonally with a⊥>a∥ below 300 K. The decay of the (00l) reflection intensities as a function of the temperature yields a Debye temperature of 142 K, the same value as for bulk CdTe. Thirdly, a temperature-dependent isotropic static displacement of the Cd and the Te atoms is introduced to account for the anomalous behavior of the (hhh) intensities.

  9. Static atomic displacements in a CdTe epitaxial layer on a GaAs substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Horning, R.D.; Staudenmann, J.

    1987-05-25

    A (001)CdTe epitaxial layer on a (001)GaAs substrate was studied by x-ray diffraction between 10 and 360 K. The CdTe growth took place at 380 /sup 0/C in a vertical gas flow metalorganic chemical vapor deposition reactor. Lattice parameters and integrated intensities of both the substrate and the epitaxial layer using the (00l) and (hhh) Bragg reflections reveal three important features. Firstly, the GaAs substrate does not exhibit severe strain after deposition and it is as perfect as a bulk GaAs. Secondly, the CdTe unit cell distorts tetragonally with a/sub perpendicular/>a/sub parallel/ below 300 K. The decay of the (00l) reflection intensities as a function of the temperature yields a Debye temperature of 142 K, the same value as for bulk CdTe. Thirdly, a temperature-dependent isotropic static displacement of the Cd and the Te atoms is introduced to account for the anomalous behavior of the (hhh) intensities.

  10. Synthesis and enhanced fluorescence of Ag doped CdTe semiconductor quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Ding, Si-Jing; Liang, Shan; Nan, Fan; Liu, Xiao-Li; Wang, Jia-Hong; Zhou, Li; Yu, Xue-Feng; Hao, Zhong-Hua; Wang, Qu-Quan

    2015-02-07

    Doping with intentional impurities is an intriguing way to tune the properties of semiconductor nanocrystals. However, the synthesis of some specific doped semiconductor nanocrystals remains a challenge and the doping mechanism in this strongly confined system is still not clearly understood. In this work, we report, for the first time, the synthesis of stable and water-soluble Ag-doped CdTe semiconductor quantum dots (SQDs) via a facile aqueous approach. Experimental characterization demonstrated the efficient doping of the Ag impurities into the CdTe SQDs with an appropriate reaction time. By doping 0.3% Ag impurities, the Stokes shift is decreased by 120 meV, the fluorescence intensity is enhanced more than 3 times, the radiative rate is enhanced 4.2 times, and the non-radiative rate is efficiently suppressed. These observations reveal that the fluorescence enhancement in Ag-doped CdTe SQDs is mainly attributed to the minimization of surface defects, filling of the trap states, and the enhancement of the radiative rate by the silver dopants. Our results suggest that the silver doping is an efficient method for tuning the optical properties of the CdTe SQDs.

  11. Synthesis and optical characterization of nanocrystalline CdTe thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Ghamdi, A. A.; Khan, Shamshad A.; Nagat, A.; Abd El-Sadek, M. S.

    2010-11-01

    From several years the study of binary compounds has been intensified in order to find new materials for solar photocells. The development of thin film solar cells is an active area of research at this time. Much attention has been paid to the development of low cost, high efficiency thin film solar cells. CdTe is one of the suitable candidates for the production of thin film solar cells due to its ideal band gap, high absorption coefficient. The present work deals with thickness dependent study of CdTe thin films. Nanocrystalline CdTe bulk powder was synthesized by wet chemical route at pH≈11.2 using cadmium chloride and potassium telluride as starting materials. The product sample was characterized by transmission electron microscope, X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscope. The structural characteristics studied by X-ray diffraction showed that the films are polycrystalline in nature. CdTe thin films with thickness 40, 60, 80 and 100 nm were prepared on glass substrates by using thermal evaporation onto glass substrate under a vacuum of 10 -6 Torr. The optical constants (absorption coefficient, optical band gap, refractive index, extinction coefficient, real and imaginary part of dielectric constant) of CdTe thin films was studied as a function of photon energy in the wavelength region 400-2000 nm. Analysis of the optical absorption data shows that the rule of direct transitions predominates. It has been found that the absorption coefficient, refractive index ( n) and extinction coefficient ( k) decreases while the values of optical band gap increase with an increase in thickness from 40 to 100 nm, which can be explained qualitatively by a thickness dependence of the grain size through decrease in grain boundary barrier height with grain size.

  12. Cathodic stripping synthesis and cytotoxity studies of glutathione-capped CdTe quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Ge, Cunwang; Zhao, Yu; Hui, Jie; Zhang, Tianyi; Miao, Wujian; Yu, Wei

    2011-08-01

    A cathodic stripping of Te precursor in the presence of Cd2+ and biocompatible glutathione (GSH) was reported for facile synthesis of lowly cytotoxic and highly luminescent CdTe quantum dots (QDs) in aqueous solution. The photoluminescence, electrogenerated chemiluminescence (ECL), toxicity, and cyto-osmosis of the QDs were evaluated to reveal their potential bio-applications. The morphology and composition of as-prepared QDs were investigated by HRTEM and powder XRD spectroscopy, which indicated that the QDs consisted of a CdTe core coated with a CdS shell. The obtained CdTe/CdS core/shell QDs possessed good crystallinity, narrow monodispersity and long-term stability. These QDs showed high fluorescence quantum yields of 49% to 63% over a broad spectral range of 540-650 nm. Efficient and stable ECL of QDs was observed on the anodic potential region upon the electrode potential cycled between 1.5 and -2.0 V versus Ag/AgCl. Furthermore, human liver cancer HepG2 cells were chosen as model cells for toxicity assay of QDs. Effects of the concentration, size, and incubation time of CdTe QDs capped with GSH or mercaptoacetic acid (MAA) on the cell metabolic viability and cyto-osmosis were evaluated. GSH-capped CdTe QDs could infiltrate cytomembrane and karyothecas, and were less cytotoxic than MAA-capped ones under the same experimental conditions. The reported CdTe QDs could be good candidates of fluorescent and ECL probes for biosensing and cell imaging.

  13. Comparison of a pixelated semiconductor detector and a non-pixelated scintillation detector in pinhole SPECT system for small animal study.

    PubMed

    Iida, Hirokazu; Ogawa, Koichi

    2011-02-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate a pixelated semiconductor detector and non-pixelated scintillation detector in a pinhole SPECT system for small animal imaging. We assumed two pixelated CdTe semiconductor detectors (a monolithic type and a modular type) and two non-pixelated NaI(Tl) scintillation detectors (a conventional type and a large detector field type). For the monolithic semiconductor detector we assumed that the size of a pixel was 1.0 × 1.0 mm², the thickness 1 mm, and an effective detector field 128 × 128 mm². For the modular-type semiconductor detector we assumed that the size of a pixel was 2.5 × 2.5 mm², the thickness 5 mm, and an effective detector field 320 × 320 mm². For the two scintillation detectors we assumed that the size of a pixel was 1.4 × 1.4 mm² and the intrinsic spatial resolution 4.0 mm FWHM, and the thickness 9 mm. For the conventional scintillation detector we assumed that the effective detector field was 179.2 × 179.2 mm², and for the large field scintillation detector 358.2 × 358.2 mm² and the magnification factor two. In the simulation we used a pinhole collimator with a pinhole size of 0.3 mm. We reconstructed SPECT images of hot-rod and cold-channel phantoms with projection data calculated with a Monte Carlo method assuming a fixed data acquisition time, and evaluated the image quality with respect to contrast and spatial resolution. In addition, we calculated the scatter fraction to compare the amount of scattered photons between the pixelated and non-pixelated detectors. The image quality of the modular-type pixelated detector was similar to that of the non-pixelated detector operated with a twofold magnified data acquisition. The scattered photons and the parallax effect in the pixelated detector were small and similar to those in the non-pixelated detector. The performance of a modular-type pixelated semiconductor detector was almost the same as that of a non-pixelated scintillation detector with a magnified

  14. PbSe/CdTe single quantum well infrared detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chusnutdinow, S.; Szot, M.; Wojtowicz, T.; Karczewski, G.

    2017-03-01

    We report on the fabrication and characterization of a new type of mid-infrared photodetector. The infrared sensitive element of the detector is a PbSe single quantum well (SQW) embedded in an intrinsic region of a CdTe p-i-n diode. Electron-beam-induced current (EBIC) measurements confirm the location of the PbSe SQW near the middle of the intrinsic CdTe layer. The measured diffusion length of minority carriers of about 0.5 μm allows effective collecting of the photoexcited carriers in the highly doped regions of the diodes. The PbSe/CdTe heterostructures exhibit a strong photosensitivity in the mid-infrared spectral region. Photo-response measurements show abnormal temperature dependence of the photosensitivity. The photo-response signal increases with decreasing temperature reaching a maximum at about 170 K and upon a further decrease in temperature the signal weakens and vanishes at about 100 K. Current-voltage measurements demonstrate very good junction characteristics with a rectifying ratio of 585 at ± 0.5 V and an ideality factor of 1.05 at room temperature. Possible mechanisms of carrier transport trough the junction are discussed.

  15. Position-Sensitive CZT Detectors for High Energy X-Ray Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matteson, J.; Coburn, W.; Heindl, W.; Peterson, L.; Pelling, M.; Rothschild, R.; Skelton, R.; Hink, P.; Slavis, K.

    1998-05-01

    We report recent progress on CZT (Cadmium Zinc Telluride) detectors by the UCSD/WU collaboration. CZT, a room- temperature semiconductor, is a very promising detector material for high energy X-ray astronomy. It can operate from <10 keV to >200 keV, and give sub-keV energy resolution and sub-mm spatial resolution. We have developed an advanced CZT detector that uses two innovations to improve spectral response, give it 3-D localization of energy loss events, and reduce background at high altitudes and in space. The detector measures 12 x 12 x 2 mm(3) and was manufactured by eV Products. Each face has a strip readouts with 500 micron pitch electrodes. The 2 faces' strips are orthogonal, which provides x-y localization into 500 micron pixels. One innovation is "steering electrodes", which are located between the anode strips. They improve the anode charge collection and energy resolution, and tailing due to hole trapping is nearly totally eliminated. The energy resolution at 60 keV is 4 keV and the peak to valley ratio is 50. The other innovation is 3-D localization of energy losses. This is done by comparing the signals from the anode strips, cathode strips, and steering electrodes. There is a strong depth of interaction signature, which can be used to accept events which interact close to the cathode strips (where X-rays of interest are incident) and reject deeper interactions (which are likely to be background). The detector was tested in a balloon flight at 108,000 feet in October 1997. Background was reduced by passive shielding, consisting of lead graded with tin and copper. The lead thickness was changed by command during the flight, and was 7, 2, and 0 mm thick. With the 2 mm thickness the 20 - 40 keV background for the central 30 pixels was 8x10(-4) c/cm(2) -s-keV when the depth of interaction signature was used to reject background, and 7 times greater when this information was not used. The lower background is 12 times less than other workers have obtained

  16. Effects of Detector Thickness on Geometric Sensitivity and Event Positioning Errors in the Rectangular PET/X Scanner

    PubMed Central

    MacDonald, Lawrence R.; Hunter, William C. J.; Kinahan, Paul E.; Miyaoka, Robert S.

    2015-01-01

    We used simulations to investigate the relationship between sensitivity and spatial resolution as a function of crystal thickness in a rectangular PET scanner intended for quantitative assessment of breast cancers. The system had two 20 × 15-cm2 and two 10 × 15-cm2 flat detectors forming a box, with the larger detectors separated by 4 or 8 cm. Depth-of-interaction (DOI) resolution was modeled as a function of crystal thickness based on prior measurements. Spatial resolution was evaluated independent of image reconstruction by deriving and validating a surrogate metric from list-mode data (dFWHM). When increasing crystal thickness from 5 to 40 mm, and without using DOI information, the dFWHM for a centered point source increased from 0.72 to 1.6 mm. Including DOI information improved dFWHM by 12% and 27% for 5- and 40-mm-thick crystals, respectively. For a point source in the corner of the FOV, use of DOI information improved dFWHM by 20% (5-mm crystal) and 44% (40-mm crystal). Sensitivity was 7.7% for 10-mm-thick crystals (8-cm object). Increasing crystal thickness on the smaller side detectors from 10 to 20 mm (keeping 10-mm crystals on the larger detectors) boosted sensitivity by 24% (relative) and degraded dFWHM by only ~3%/8% with/without DOI information. The benefits of measuring DOI must be evaluated in terms of the intended clinical task of assessing tracer uptake in small lesions. Increasing crystal thickness on the smaller side detectors provides substantial sensitivity increase with minimal accompanying loss in resolution. PMID:26160982

  17. Simulation study comparing high-purity germanium and cadmium zinc telluride detectors for breast imaging

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, DL; Peterson, TE

    2014-01-01

    We conducted simulations to compare the potential imaging performance for breast cancer detection with High-Purity Germanium (HPGe) and Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) systems with 1% and 3.8% energy resolution at 140 keV, respectively. Using the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP5) simulation package, we modelled both 5 mm-thick CZT and 10 mm-thick HPGe detectors with the same parallel-hole collimator for the imaging of a breast/torso phantom. Simulated energy spectra were generated, and planar images were created for various energy windows around the 140-keV photopeak. Relative sensitivity and scatter and the torso fractions were calculated along with tumour contrast and signal-to-noise ratios (SNR). Simulations showed that utilizing a ±1.25% energy window with an HPGe system better suppressed torso background and small-angle scattered photons than a comparable CZT system using a −5%/+10% energy window. Both systems provided statistically similar contrast and SNR, with HPGe providing higher relative sensitivity. Lowering the counts of HPGe images to match CZT count density still yielded equivalent contrast between HPGe and CZT. Thus, an HPGe system may provide equivalent breast imaging capability at lower injected radioactivity levels when acquiring for equal imaging time. PMID:25360792

  18. Simulation study comparing high-purity germanium and cadmium zinc telluride detectors for breast imaging.

    PubMed

    Campbell, D L; Peterson, T E

    2014-11-21

    We conducted simulations to compare the potential imaging performance for breast cancer detection with High-Purity Germanium (HPGe) and Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) systems with 1% and 3.8% energy resolution at 140 keV, respectively. Using the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP5) simulation package, we modelled both 5 mm-thick CZT and 10 mm-thick HPGe detectors with the same parallel-hole collimator for the imaging of a breast/torso phantom. Simulated energy spectra were generated, and planar images were created for various energy windows around the 140 keV photopeak. Relative sensitivity and scatter and the torso fractions were calculated along with tumour contrast and signal-to-noise ratios (SNR). Simulations showed that utilizing a ±1.25% energy window with an HPGe system better suppressed torso background and small-angle scattered photons than a comparable CZT system using a -5%/+10% energy window. Both systems provided statistically similar contrast and SNR, with HPGe providing higher relative sensitivity. Lowering the counts of HPGe images to match CZT count density still yielded equivalent contrast between HPGe and CZT. Thus, an HPGe system may provide equivalent breast imaging capability at lower injected radioactivity levels when acquiring for equal imaging time.

  19. Simulation study comparing high-purity germanium and cadmium zinc telluride detectors for breast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, D. L.; Peterson, T. E.

    2014-11-01

    We conducted simulations to compare the potential imaging performance for breast cancer detection with High-Purity Germanium (HPGe) and Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) systems with 1% and 3.8% energy resolution at 140 keV, respectively. Using the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP5) simulation package, we modelled both 5 mm-thick CZT and 10 mm-thick HPGe detectors with the same parallel-hole collimator for the imaging of a breast/torso phantom. Simulated energy spectra were generated, and planar images were created for various energy windows around the 140 keV photopeak. Relative sensitivity and scatter and the torso fractions were calculated along with tumour contrast and signal-to-noise ratios (SNR). Simulations showed that utilizing a ±1.25% energy window with an HPGe system better suppressed torso background and small-angle scattered photons than a comparable CZT system using a -5%/+10% energy window. Both systems provided statistically similar contrast and SNR, with HPGe providing higher relative sensitivity. Lowering the counts of HPGe images to match CZT count density still yielded equivalent contrast between HPGe and CZT. Thus, an HPGe system may provide equivalent breast imaging capability at lower injected radioactivity levels when acquiring for equal imaging time.

  20. Optimizing ZnS/6LiF scintillators for wavelength-shifting-fiber neutron detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Crow, Lowell; Funk, Loren L; Hannan, Bruce W; Hodges, Jason P; Riedel, Richard A; Wang, Cai-Lin

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we compare the performance of grooved and flat ZnS/6LiF scintillators in a wavelength shifting-fiber (WLSF) detector. Flat ZnS/6LiF scintillators with the thickness L=0.2-0.8 mm were characterized using photon counting and pulse-height analysis and compared to a grooved scintillator of approximately 0.8 mm thick. While a grooved scintillator considerably increases the apparent thickness of the scintillator to neutrons for a given coating thickness, we find that the flat scintillators perform better than the grooved scintillators in terms of both light yield and neutron detection efficiency. The flat 0.8-mm-thick scintillator has the highest light output, and it is 52% higher compared with a grooved scintillator of same thickness. The lower light output of the grooved scintillator as compared to the flat scintillator is consistent with the greater scintillator-WLSF separation and the much larger average emission angle of the grooved scintillator. We also find that the average light cone width, or photon travel-length as measured using time-of-flight powder diffraction of diamond and vanadium, decreases with increasing L in the range of L=0.6-0.8 mm. This result contrasts with the traditional Swank diffusion model for micro-composite scintillators, and could be explained by a decrease in photon diffusion-coefficient or an increase in micro-particle content in the flat scintillator matrix for the thicker scintillators.