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Sample records for mo-99 irradiation target

  1. Update On The Development, Testing, And Manufacture Of High Density LEU-Foil Targets For The Production Of Mo-99

    SciTech Connect

    Creasy, John T

    2015-05-12

    This project has the objective to reduce and/or eliminate the use of HEU in commerce. Steps in the process include developing a target testing methodology that is bounding for all Mo-99 target irradiators, establishing a maximum target LEU-foil mass, developing a LEU-foil target qualification document, developing a bounding target failure analysis methodology (failure in reactor containment), optimizing safety vs. economics (goal is to manufacture a safe, but relatively inexpensive target to offset the inherent economic disadvantage of using LEU in place of HEU), and developing target material specifications and manufacturing QC test criteria. The slide presentation is organized under the following topics: Objective, Process Overview, Background, Team Structure, Key Achievements, Experiment and Activity Descriptions, and Conclusions. The High Density Target project has demonstrated: approx. 50 targets irradiated through domestic and international partners; proof of concept for two front end processing methods; fabrication of uranium foils for target manufacture; quality control procedures and steps for manufacture; multiple target assembly techniques; multiple target disassembly devices; welding of targets; thermal, hydraulic, and mechanical modeling; robust target assembly parametric studies; and target qualification analysis for insertion into very high flux environment. The High Density Target project has tested and proven several technologies that will benefit current and future Mo-99 producers.

  2. Preliminary investigations on the use of uranium silicide targets for fission Mo-99 production

    SciTech Connect

    Cols, H.; Cristini, P.; Marques, R.

    1997-08-01

    The National Atomic Energy Commission (CNEA) of Argentine Republic owns and operates an installation for production of molybdenum-99 from fission products since 1985, and, since 1991, covers the whole national demand of this nuclide, carrying out a program of weekly productions, achieving an average activity of 13 terabecquerel per week. At present they are finishing an enlargement of the production plant that will allow an increase in the volume of production to about one hundred of terabecquerel. Irradiation targets are uranium/aluminium alloy with 90% enriched uranium with aluminium cladding. In view of international trends held at present for replacing high enrichment uranium (HEU) for enrichment values lower than 20 % (LEU), since 1990 the authors are in contact with the RERTR program, beginning with tests to adapt their separation process to new irradiation target conditions. Uranium silicide (U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}) was chosen as the testing material, because it has an uranium mass per volume unit, so that it allows to reduce enrichment to a value of 20%. CNEA has the technology for manufacturing miniplates of uranium silicide for their purposes. In this way, equivalent amounts of Molybdenum-99 could be obtained with no substantial changes in target parameters and irradiation conditions established for the current process with Al/U alloy. This paper shows results achieved on the use of this new target.

  3. A Solution-Based Approach for Mo-99 Production: Considerations for Nitrate versus Sulfate Media

    DOE PAGES

    Youker, Amanda J.; Chemerisov, Sergey D.; Kalensky, Michael; Tkac, Peter; Bowers, Delbert L.; Vandegrift, George F.

    2013-01-01

    Molybdenum-99 is the parent of Technetium-99m, which is used in nearly 80% of all nuclear medicine procedures. The medical community has been plagued by Mo-99 shortages due to aging reactors, such as the NRU (National Research Universal) reactor in Canada. There are currently no US producers of Mo-99, and NRU is scheduled for shutdown in 2016, which means that another Mo-99 shortage is imminent unless a potential domestic Mo-99 producer fills the void. Argonne National Laboratory is assisting two potential domestic suppliers of Mo-99 by examining the effects of a uranyl nitrate versus a uranyl sulfate target solution configuration onmore » Mo-99 production. Uranyl nitrate solutions are easier to prepare and do not generate detectable amounts of peroxide upon irradiation, but a high radiation field can lead to a large increase in pH, which can lead to the precipitation of fission products and uranyl hydroxides. Uranyl sulfate solutions are more difficult to prepare, and enough peroxide is generated during irradiation to cause precipitation of uranyl peroxide, but this can be prevented by adding a catalyst to the solution. A titania sorbent can be used to recover Mo-99 from a highly concentrated uranyl nitrate or uranyl sulfate solution; however, different approaches must be taken to prevent precipitation during Mo-99 production.« less

  4. Solid target irradiation and transfer system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelbart, W.; Johnson, R. R.; Abeysekera, B.

    2012-12-01

    A compact, fully automated solid target irradiation, handling and transfer system was developed for the 100Mo/99m Tc production; however, it can be used for any solid target material. All the target handling is fully automated. The target is pneumatically transferred to the irradiation station where it is removed from the carrier, placed in the irradiation chamber and the cooling water connected. At the end of irradiation the target is returned to the carrier and transferred to the processing hot cell where it is automatically placed in a distillation unit. 100 Mo targets are prepared by plasma spraying or laser cladding of the copper target.

  5. Mo99 Production Plant Layout

    SciTech Connect

    Woloshun, Keith Albert; Dale, Gregory E.; Naranjo, Angela Carol

    2015-06-25

    The NorthStar Medical Technologies 99Mo production facility configuration is envisioned to be 8 accelerator pairs irradiating 7 100Mo targets (one spare accelerator pair undergoing maintenance while the other 7 pairs are irradiating targets). The required shielding in every direction for the accelerators is initially estimated to be 10 feet of concrete. With the accelerator pairs on one (ground) level and spaced with the required shielding between adjacent pairs, the only practical path for target insertion and removal while minimizing floor space is vertical. The current scheme then requires a target vertical lift of nominally 10 feet through a shield stack. It is envisioned that the lift will be directly into a hot cell where an activated target can be removed from its holder and a new target attached and lowered. The hot cell is on a rail system so that a single hot cell can service all active target locations, as well as deliver the ready targets to the separations lab. On this rail system, coupled to the hot cell, will be a helium recovery and clean-up system. All helium coolant equipment is located on the upper level near to the target removal point.

  6. Production of Mo-99 using low-enriched uranium silicide

    SciTech Connect

    Hutter, J. C.; Srinivasan, B.; Vicek, M.; Vandegrift, G. F.

    1994-09-01

    Over the last several years, uranium silicide fuels have been under development as low-enriched uranium (LEU) targets for Mo-99. The use of LEU silicide is aimed at replacing the UAl{sub x} alloy in the highly-enriched uranium dissolution process. A process to recover Mo-99 from low-enriched uranium silicide is being developed at Argonne National Laboratory. The uranium silicide is dissolved in alkaline hydrogen peroxide. Experiments performed to determine the optimum dissolution procedure are discussed, and the results of dissolving a portion of a high-burnup (>40%) U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} miniplate are presented. Future work related to Mo-99 separation and waste disposal are also discussed.

  7. Mo-99/Tc-99m Separation: An Assessment of Technical Options

    SciTech Connect

    Dash, A; Pillai, M R A; Knapp Jr, Russ F

    2013-01-01

    Several strategies for the effective separation of 99mTc from 99Mo have been developed and validated. Due to the success of column chromatographic separation using acidic alumina coupled with high specific activity fission 99Mo (F 99Mo) for production of 99Mo/99mTc generators, however, most technologies until recently have generated little interest. The reduced availability of F 99Mo and consequently the shortage of 99Mo/99mTc column generators in the recent past have resurrected interest in the production of 99Mo as well as 99mTc by alternate routes. Most of these alternative production processes require separation techniques capable of providing clinical grade 99mTc from low specific activity 99Mo or irradiated Mo targets. For this reason there has been renewed interest in alternate separation routes. This paper reviews the reported separation technologies which include column chromatography, solvent extraction, sublimation and gel systems that have been traditionally used for the fabrication of 99Mo/99mTc generator systems. The comparative advantage, disadvantage, and technical challenges toward adapting the emerging requirements are discussed. New developments such as solid-phase column extraction, electrochemical separation, extraction chromatography, supported liquid membrane (SLM) and thermochromatographic techniques are also being evaluated for their potential application in the changed scenario of providing 99mTc from alternate routes. Based on the analysis provided in this review, it appears that some proven separation technologies can be quickly resurrected for the separation of clinical grade 99mTc from macroscopic levels of reactor or cyclotron irradiated molybdenum targets. Furthermore, emerging technologies can be developed further to respond to the expected changing modes of 99mTc production.

  8. Identification of a high-spin isomer in Mo99

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, G. A.; Regan, P. H.; Walker, P. M.; Podolyák, Zs.; Stevenson, P. D.; Carpenter, M. P.; Carroll, J. J.; Chakrawarthy, R. S.; Chowdhury, P.; Garnsworthy, A. B.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Khoo, T. L.; Kondev, F. G.; Lane, G. J.; Liu, Z.; Seweryniak, D.; Thompson, N. J.; Zhu, S.; Williams, S. J.

    2007-10-01

    A previously unreported isomer has been identified in Mo99 at an excitation energy of Ex=3010 keV, decaying with a half-life of T1/2=8(2) ns. The nucleus of interest was produced following fusion-fission reactions between a thick Al27 target frame and a Hf178 beam at a laboratory energy of 1150 MeV. This isomeric state is interpreted as an energetically favored, maximally aligned configuration of νh(11)/(2)⊗π(g(9)/(2))2.

  9. Progress and status of the IAEA coordinated research project: production of Mo-99 using LEU fission or neutron activation

    SciTech Connect

    Goldman, Ira N.; Adelfang, Pablo E-mail: P.Adelfang@iaea.org; Ramamoorthy, Natesan

    2008-07-15

    Since late 2004, the IAEA has developed and implemented a Coordinated Research Project (CRP) to assist countries interested in initiating indigenous, small-scale production of Mo-99 to meet local nuclear medicine requirements. The objective of the CRP is to provide interested countries with access to non-proprietary technologies and methods to produce Mo-99 using LEU foil or LEU mini-plate targets, or for the utilization of n,gamma neutron activation, e.g. through the use of gel generators. The project has made further progress since the RERTR 2006 meeting, with a Technical Workshop on Operational Aspects of Mo99 Production held 28-30 November 2006 in Vienna and the Second Research Coordination Meeting held in Bucharest, Romania 16-20 April 2007. The paper describes activities carried out as noted above, and as well as the provision of LEU foils to a number of participants, and the progress by a number of groups in preparing for LEU target assembly and disassembly, irradiation, chemical processing, and waste management. The participants' progress in particular on thermal hydraulics computations required for using LEU targets is notable, as also the progress in gel generator plant operations in India and Kazakhstan. Poland has joined as a new research agreement holder and an application by Egypt to be a contract holder is undergoing internal review in the IAEA and is expected to be approved. The IAEA has also participated in several open meetings of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences Study on Producing Medical Radioisotopes without HEU, which will also be discussed in the paper. (author)

  10. Radioactive equilibrium: 99Mo/99mTc decay characteristics.

    PubMed

    Chechev, Valery P; Bé, Marie-Martine

    2014-05-01

    Within the Decay Data Evaluation Project, as an example of a radioactive equilibrium with isomer, the (99)Mo/(99m)Tc equilibrium mixture decay characteristics are examined. The results of a new decay data evaluation are presented for (99)Mo/(99m)Tc decay to nuclear levels in (99)Tc. These evaluated data have been obtained using information published up to 2013.

  11. Photo-production of (99)Mo/(99m)Tc with electron linear accelerator beam.

    PubMed

    Avagyan, R; Avetisyan, A; Kerobyan, I; Dallakyan, R

    2014-09-01

    We report on the development of a relatively new method for the production of (99)Mo/(99m)Tc. The method involves the irradiation of natural molybdenum using high-intensity bremsstrahlung photons from the electron beam of the LUE50 linear electron accelerator located at the Yerevan Physics Institute (YerPhi). The production method has been developed and shown to be successful. The linear electron accelerator at YerPhi was upgraded to allow for significant increases of the beam intensity and spatial density. The LUE50 was also instrumented by a remote control system for ease of operation. We have developed and tested the (99m)Tc extraction from the irradiation of natural MoO3. This paper reports on the optimal conditions of our method of (99)Mo production. We show the success of this method with the production and separation of the first usable amounts of (99m)Tc.

  12. Conceptual design of a new homogeneous reactor for medical radioisotope Mo-99/Tc-99m production

    SciTech Connect

    Liem, Peng Hong; Tran, Hoai Nam; Sembiring, Tagor Malem; Arbie, Bakri

    2014-09-30

    To partly solve the global and regional shortages of Mo-99 supply, a conceptual design of a nitrate-fuel-solution based homogeneous reactor dedicated for Mo-99/Tc-99m medical radioisotope production is proposed. The modified LEU Cintichem process for Mo-99 extraction which has been licensed and demonstrated commercially for decades by BATAN is taken into account as a key design consideration. The design characteristics and main parameters are identified and the advantageous aspects are shown by comparing with the BATAN's existing Mo-99 supply chain which uses a heterogeneous reactor (RSG GAS multipurpose reactor)

  13. Conversion of Molybdenum-99 production process to low enriched uranium: Neutronic and thermal hydraulic analyses of HEU and LEU target plates for irradiation in Pakistan Research Reactor-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mushtaq, Ahmad; Iqbal, Masood; Bokhari, Ishtiaq Hussain; Mahmood, Tayyab; Muhammad, Atta

    2012-09-01

    Technetium-99m, the daughter product of Molybdenum-99 is the most widely needed radionuclide for diagnostic studies in Pakistan. Molybdenum-99 Production Facility has been established at PINSTECH. Highly enriched uranium (93% 235U) U/Al alloy targets have been irradiated in Pakistan Research Reactor-1 (PARR-1) for the generation of fission Mo-99, while basic dissolution technique is used for separation of Mo-99 from target matrix activity. In line with the international objective of minimizing and eventually eliminating the use of HEU in civil commerce, national and international efforts have been underway to shift the production of medical isotopes from HEU to LEU (LEU; <20% 235U enrichment) targets. To achieve the equivalent amount of 99Mo with LEU targets, approximately 5 times uranium is needed. LEU aluminum uranium dispersion target has been developed, which may replace existing HEU aluminum/uranium alloy targets for production of 99Mo using basic dissolution technique. Neutronic and thermal hydraulic calculations were performed for safe irradiation of targets in the core of PARR-1.

  14. Magnesium-Molybate Compounds as Matrix for 99Mo/99mTc Generators

    PubMed Central

    Monroy-Guzman, Fabiola; Jimenez Martinez, Thania Susana; Arriola, Humberto; Longoria Gandara, Luis Carlos

    2011-01-01

    This work reports the preparation of a 99mTc generator based on conversion of 99Mo produced by neutron irradiation, into insoluble magnesium 99Mo-molybdates compounds as matrix. The effect of magnesium salt types and concentration, Mg:Mo molar ratios, pH of molybdate solutions, eluate volume as well as the addition order of molybdate and magnesium solutions' influences on the final 99mTc were evaluated. Polymetalates and polymolybdates salts either crystallized or amorphous were obtained depending on the magnesium salt and Mg:Mo molar ratio used in matrix preparation. 99Mo/99mTc generator production based on magnesium-99Mo molybdate compounds allow reduction of preparation time and eliminates the use of specialized installations. The best generator performances were attained using matrices prepared from 0.1 mol/L MgCl2·6H2O solutions, ammonium molybdate solutions at pH 7 and at a Mg:Mo molar ratio of 1:1.

  15. A Network Model and Computational Approach for the Mo-99 Supply Chain for Nuclear Medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagurney, Ladimer; Nagurney, Anna

    2011-11-01

    Technetium-99m, produced from the decay of Molybdenum-99, is the most commonly used radioisotope for medical imaging, specifically in cardiac and cancer diagnostics. The MO-99 is produced in a small number of reactors and is processed and distributed worldwide. We have developed a tractable network model and computational approach for the design and redesign of the MO-99 supply chains. This topic is of special relevance to medical physics given the product's widespread use and the aging of the nuclear reactors where it is produced. This generalized network model, for which we derived formulae for the arc and path multipliers that capture the underlying physics of radioisotope decay, includes total operational cost minimization, and the minimization of cost associated with nuclear waste disposal, coupled with capacity investment (or disinvestment) costs. Its solution yields the optimal link capacities as well as the optimal MO-99 flows so that demand at the medical facilities is satisfied. We illustrate the framework with a Western Hemisphere case study. The framework provides the foundation for further empirical research and the basis for the modeling and analysis of supply chain networks for other very time-sensitive medical products.

  16. Separation of sodium-22 from irradiated targets

    DOEpatents

    Taylor, Wayne A.; Jamriska, David

    1996-01-01

    A process for selective separation of sodium-22 from an irradiated target including dissolving an irradiated target to form a first solution, contacting the first solution with hydrated antimony pentoxide to selectively separate sodium-22 from the first solution, separating the hydrated antimony pentoxide including the separated sodium-22 from the first solution, dissolving the hydrated antimony pentoxide including the separated sodium-22 in a mineral acid to form a second solution, and, separating the antimony from the sodium-22 in the second solution.

  17. Parallel computation safety analysis irradiation targets fission product molybdenum in neutronic aspect using the successive over-relaxation algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Susmikanti, Mike; Dewayatna, Winter; Sulistyo, Yos

    2014-09-01

    One of the research activities in support of commercial radioisotope production program is a safety research on target FPM (Fission Product Molybdenum) irradiation. FPM targets form a tube made of stainless steel which contains nuclear-grade high-enrichment uranium. The FPM irradiation tube is intended to obtain fission products. Fission materials such as Mo99 used widely the form of kits in the medical world. The neutronics problem is solved using first-order perturbation theory derived from the diffusion equation for four groups. In contrast, Mo isotopes have longer half-lives, about 3 days (66 hours), so the delivery of radioisotopes to consumer centers and storage is possible though still limited. The production of this isotope potentially gives significant economic value. The criticality and flux in multigroup diffusion model was calculated for various irradiation positions and uranium contents. This model involves complex computation, with large and sparse matrix system. Several parallel algorithms have been developed for the sparse and large matrix solution. In this paper, a successive over-relaxation (SOR) algorithm was implemented for the calculation of reactivity coefficients which can be done in parallel. Previous works performed reactivity calculations serially with Gauss-Seidel iteratives. The parallel method can be used to solve multigroup diffusion equation system and calculate the criticality and reactivity coefficients. In this research a computer code was developed to exploit parallel processing to perform reactivity calculations which were to be used in safety analysis. The parallel processing in the multicore computer system allows the calculation to be performed more quickly. This code was applied for the safety limits calculation of irradiated FPM targets containing highly enriched uranium. The results of calculations neutron show that for uranium contents of 1.7676 g and 6.1866 g (× 106 cm-1) in a tube, their delta reactivities are the still

  18. Study on Shielding Requirements for Radioactive Waste Transportation in a Mo-99 Production Plant - 13382

    SciTech Connect

    Melo Rego, Maria Eugenia de; Kazumi Sakata, Solange; Vicente, Roberto; Hiromoto, Goro

    2013-07-01

    Brazil is currently planning to produce {sup 99}Mo from fission of low enriched uranium (LEU) targets. The planned end of irradiation activity of {sup 99}Mo is about 185 TBq (5 kCi) per week to meet the present domestic demand of {sup 99m}Tc generators. The radioactive wastes from the production plant will be transferred to a waste treatment facility at the same site. The total activity of the actinides, fission and activation products present in the wastes can be predicted based on the yields of fission and activation data for the irradiation conditions, such as composition and mass of uranium targets, irradiation time, neutron flux, production schedule, etc., which were in principle already established by the project management. The transportation of the wastes from the production plant to the treatment facility will be done by means of special shielded packages. An assessment of the shielding required for the packages has been done and the results are presented here, aiming at contributing to the design of the waste management facility for the {sup 99}Mo production plant. (authors)

  19. WEBEXPIR: Windowless target electron beam experimental irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dierckx, Marc; Schuurmans, Paul; Heyse, Jan; Rosseel, Kris; Van Tichelen, Katrien; Nactergal, Benoit; Vandeplassche, Dirk; Aoust, Thierry; Abs, Michel; Guertin, Arnaud; Buhour, Jean-Michel; Cadiou, Arnaud; Abderrahim, Hamid Aït

    2008-06-01

    The windowless target electron beam experimental irradiation (WEBEXPIR) program was set-up as part of the MYRRHA/XT-ADS R&D effort on the spallation target design to investigate the interaction of a proton beam with a liquid lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) free surface. In particular, possible free surface distortion or shockwave effects in nominal conditions and during sudden beam on/off transient situations, as well as possible enhanced evaporation were assessed. An experiment was conceived at the IBA TT-1000 Rhodotron, where a 7 MeV electron beam was used to simulate the high power deposition at the MYRRHA/XT-ADS LBE free surface. The geometry and the LBE flow characteristics in the WEBEXPIR set-up were made as representative as possible of the actual situation in the MYRRHA/XT-ADS spallation target. Irradiation experiments were carried out at beam currents of up to 10 mA, corresponding to 40 times the nominal beam current necessary to reproduce the MYRRHA/XT-ADS conditions. Preliminary analyses show that the WEBEXPIR free surface flow was not disturbed by the interaction with the electron beam and that vacuum conditions stayed well within the design specifications.

  20. Development of an Immobilisation Technology for Radioactive Waste Solution from Mo-99 Production

    SciTech Connect

    Sizgek, G.D.; Sizgek, E.

    2006-07-01

    Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) developed a method to immobilize the Intermediate Level Liquid Waste (ILLW) arising from its Mo-99 production process. The immobilisation process involves impregnation of waste solution into ceramic precursor powders, drying, calcining and consolidation (Hot Isostatic Pressing, HIP) to produce final ceramic waste form. Ceramic precursor powder is produced by spray drying of a sol-gel based colloidal dispersion. These free-flowing, microspherical, 20-80 microns, precursors have porosity of 40-50%. An in-house custom designed and manufactured microwave-heated and mechanically fluidized mixer-drier was used for impregnation of the precursor powder with the simulated waste (Depleted Uranyl Nitrate Hexahydrate, DUNH, and inactive Cs, Sr nitrates as fission products) and drying. During impregnation an evaporation rate of 1 l/h water per kW microwave energy in steady state was achieved by matching the feed rate of DUNH to produce equivalent of 35% UO{sub 2} loading. It was demonstrated that the tuned microwave energy can be delivered to the mixer-drier during the entire impregnation process within very low reflection values. The samples of the waste loaded free-flowing powder were subsequently calcined at 750 deg. C under reducing atmosphere for thermal denitration and mineral phase nucleation. Calcined powders were filled into cans. After evacuation and sealing, the cans were isostatically pressed at 1260 deg. C. The consolidated ceramic waste form produced from the DUNH run has been assessed by durability and material characterization tests. Successful confirmation of each processing step at pilot and/or plant scale, has led to the design and construction of the overall process at full scale (equivalent of processing 8 kg U per batch) in a simulated hot-cell mock-up plant. The constructed plant mainly consists of a Microwave-heated Mechanical Fluidized Bed (MWMFB) mixer-drier a fluidized bed calciner, an off

  1. Separation of transuranium elements from irradiated targets

    SciTech Connect

    Wham, R.M.; Benker, D.E.; Felker, L.K.; Chattin, F.R.

    1993-12-31

    Aluminum targets containing curium/americium oxide are irradiated to produce the transcurium actinides einsteinium, fermium, berkelium, and californium. Recovery of recycle curium/americium and the transcurium elements involves several chemical processing steps to selectively recover those elements and remove fission products. Chemical processing steps developed at the Radiochemical Engineering Development Center (REDC) include aluminum dejacketing, solvent extraction to remove bulk impurities, solvent extraction to remove plutonium, anion exchange to partition curium and transcurium elements from the rare earths, and a second anion exchange cycle to separate americium/curium from the transcurium elements.

  2. Recovery of niobium from irradiated targets

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, Dennis R.; Jamriska, Sr., David J.; Hamilton, Virginia T.

    1994-01-01

    A process for selective separation of niobium from proton irradiated molybdenum targets is provided and includes dissolving the molybdenum target in a hydrogen peroxide solution to form a first ion-containing solution, contacting the first ion-containing solution with a cationic resin whereby ions selected form the group consisting of molybdenum, biobium, technetium, selenium, vanadium, arsenic, germanium, zirconium and rubidium remain in a second ion-containing solution while ions selected from the group consisting of rubidium, zinc, beryllium, cobalt, iron, manganese, chromium, strontium, yttrium and zirconium are selectively adsorbed by the cationic resin; adjusting the pH of the second ion-containing solution to within a range of from about 5.0 to about 6.0; contacting the pH adjusting second ion-containing solution with a dextran-based material for a time to selectively separate niobium from the solution and recovering the niobium from the dextran-based material.

  3. Removal of Radioactive Nuclides from Mo-99 Acidic Liquid Waste - 13027

    SciTech Connect

    Hsiao, Hsien-Ming; Pen, Ben-Li

    2013-07-01

    About 200 liters highly radioactive acidic liquid waste originating from Mo-99 production was stored at INER (Institute of Nuclear Energy Research). A study regarding the treatment of the radioactive acidic liquid waste was conducted to solve storage-related issues and allow discharge of the waste while avoiding environmental pollution. Before discharging the liquid waste, the acidity, NO{sub 3}{sup -} and Hg ions in high concentrations, and radionuclides must comply with environmental regulations. Therefore, the treatment plan was to neutralize the acidic liquid waste, remove key radionuclides to reduce the dose rate, and then remove the nitrate and mercury ions. Bench tests revealed that NaOH is the preferred solution to neutralize the high acidic waste solution and the pH of solution must be adjusted to 9∼11 prior to the removal of nuclides. Significant precipitation was produced when the pH of solution reached 9. NaNO{sub 3} was the major content in the precipitate and part of NaNO{sub 3} was too fine to be completely collected by filter paper with a pore size of approximately 3 μm. The residual fine particles remaining in solution therefore blocked the adsorption column during operation. Two kinds of adsorbents were employed for Cs-137 and a third for Sr-90 removal to minimize cost. For personnel radiation protection, significant lead shielding was required at a number of points in the process. The final process design and treatment facilities successfully treated the waste solutions and allowed for environmentally compliant discharge. (authors)

  4. Recovery of germanium-68 from irradiated targets

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, Dennis R.; Jamriska, Sr., David J.; Hamilton, Virginia T.

    1993-01-01

    A process for selective separation of germanium-68 from proton irradiated molybdenum targets is provided and includes dissolving the molybdenum target in a hydrogen peroxide solution to form a first ion-containing solution, contacting the first ion-containing solution with a cationic resin whereby ions selected from the group consisting of molybdenum, niobium, technetium, selenium, vanadium, arsenic, germanium, zirconium and rubidium remain in a second ion-containing solution while ions selected from the group consisting of rubidium, zinc, beryllium, cobalt, iron, manganese, chromium, strontium, yttrium and zirconium are selectively adsorbed by the first resin, adjusting the pH of the second ion-containing solution to within a range of from about 0.7 to about 3.0, adjusting the soluble metal halide concentration in the second ion-containing solution to a level adapted for subsequent separation of germanium, contacting the pH-adjusted, soluble metal halide-containing second ion-containing solution with a dextran-based material whereby germanium ions are separated by the dextran-based material, and recovering the germanium from the dextran-based material, preferably by distillation.

  5. Method for mounting laser fusion targets for irradiation

    DOEpatents

    Fries, R. Jay; Farnum, Eugene H.; McCall, Gene H.

    1977-07-26

    Methods for preparing laser fusion targets of the ball-and-disk type are disclosed. Such targets are suitable for irradiation with one or two laser beams to produce the requisite uniform compression of the fuel material.

  6. Vacuum aperture isolator for retroreflection from laser-irradiated target

    DOEpatents

    Benjamin, Robert F.; Mitchell, Kenneth B.

    1980-01-01

    The disclosure is directed to a vacuum aperture isolator for retroreflection of a laser-irradiated target. Within a vacuum chamber are disposed a beam focusing element, a disc having an aperture and a recollimating element. The edge of the focused beam impinges on the edge of the aperture to produce a plasma which refracts any retroreflected light from the laser's target.

  7. Molybdenum-99 production from reactor irradiation of molybdenum targets: a viable strategy for enhanced availability of technetium-99m.

    PubMed

    Pillai, M R A; Knapp, F F Russ

    2012-08-01

    Fission-produced 99Mo (F 99Mo) is traditionally used for fabrication of 99Mo/99mTc alumina-based column generators. In this paper, several emerging strategies are discussed which are being pursued or have been suggested to overcome the continuing shortages of F 99Mo. In addition to the hopeful eventual success of these proposed new 99Mo and 99mTc production technologies, an additional attractive strategy is the alternative production and use of low specific activity (LSA) 99Mo. This strategy avoids fission and is accomplished by direct activation of molybdenum targets in nuclear reactors, which would preclude sole continued reliance on F 99Mo. The principal focus of this paper is a detailed discussion on the advantages and strategies for enhanced production of LSA 99Mo using an international network of research reactors. Several effective strategies are discussed to obtain 99mTc from LSA 99Mo as well as more efficient use of the alumina-based generator system. The delayed time period between 99Mo production and traditional 99Mo/99mTc alumina column generator manufacture and distribution to user sites results in the loss of more than 50% of 99Mo activity. Another strategy is a paradigm shift in the use of 99Mo by recovering clinical-grade 99mTc from 99Mo solution as an alternative to use of 99Mo/99mTc column generators, thereby avoiding substantial decreased availability of 99Mo from radioactive decay. Implementation of the suggested strategies would be expected to increase availability of 99mTc to the clinical user community by several fold. Additional important advantages for the use of LSA 99Mo include eliminating the need for fission product waste management and precluding proliferation concerns by phasing out the need for high (HEU)- and low (LEU)-enriched uranium targets required for F 99Mo production.

  8. Post-Irradiation Examination of Array Targets - Part I

    SciTech Connect

    Icenhour, A.S.

    2004-01-23

    During FY 2001, two arrays, each containing seven neptunium-loaded targets, were irradiated at the Advanced Test Reactor in Idaho to examine the influence of multi-target self-shielding on {sup 236}Pu content and to evaluate fission product release data. One array consisted of seven targets that contained 10 vol% NpO{sub 2} pellets, while the other array consisted of seven targets that contained 20 vol % NpO{sub 2} pellets. The arrays were located in the same irradiation facility but were axially separated to minimize the influence of one array on the other. Each target also contained a dosimeter package, which consisted of a small NpO{sub 2} wire that was inside a vanadium container. After completion of irradiation and shipment back to the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, nine of the targets (four from the 10 vol% array and five from the 20 vol% array) were punctured for pressure measurement and measurement of {sup 85}Kr. These nine targets and the associated dosimeters were then chemically processed to measure the residual neptunium, total plutonium production, {sup 238}Pu production, and {sup 236}Pu concentration at discharge. The amount and isotopic composition of fission products were also measured. This report provides the results of the processing and analysis of the nine targets.

  9. Design and experimental activities supporting commercial U.S. electron accelerator production of Mo-99

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dale, Gregory E.; Chemerisov, Sergey D.; Vandegrift, George F.; Woloshun, Keith A.; Kelsey, Charles T., IV; Tkac, Peter; Makarashvili, Vakho; Jonah, Charles D.; Olivas, Eric R.; Holloway, Michael A.; Hurtle, Ken P.; Romero, Frank P.; Dalmas, Dale A.; Harvey, James T.

    2013-04-01

    99mTc, the daughter isotope of 99Mo, is the most commonly used radioisotope for nuclear medicine in the United States. Under the direction of the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) are partnering with North Star Medical Technologies to demonstrate the viability of large-scale 99Mo production using electron accelerators. In this process, 99Mo is produced in an enriched 100Mo target through the 100Mo(γ,n)99Mo reaction. Five experiments have been performed to date at ANL to demonstrate this process. This paper reviews the current status of these activities, specifically the design and performance of the helium gas target cooling system.

  10. Target Material Irradiation Studies for High-Intensity Accelerator Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Simos, N.; Kirk, H.; Ludewig, H.; Thieberger, P.; Weng, W.T.; McDonald, K.; Sheppard, J.; Evangelakis, G.; Yoshimura, K.; /KEK, Tsukuba

    2005-08-16

    This paper presents results of recent experimental studies focusing on the behavior of special materials and composites under irradiation conditions and their potential use as accelerator targets. The paper also discusses the approach and goals of on-going investigations on an expanded material matrix geared toward the neutrino superbeam and muon collider initiatives.

  11. A solid target system with remote handling of irradiated targets for PET cyclotrons.

    PubMed

    Siikanen, J; Tran, T A; Olsson, T G; Strand, S-E; Sandell, A

    2014-12-01

    A solid target system was developed for a PET cyclotron. The system is compatible with many different target materials in the form of foils and electroplated/sputtered targets which makes it useful for production of a wide variety of different PET radionuclides. The target material is manually loaded into the system. Remote handling of irradiated target material is managed with a pneumatic piston and a vacuum technique which allows the targets to be dropped into a shielded transport container. To test the target performance, proton irradiations (12.8 MeV, 45 μA) of monoisotopic yttrium foils (0.64 mm, direct water cooling) were performed to produce 89Zr. The yields were 2200±200 MBq (1 h, n=13) and 6300±65 MBq (3 h, n=3).

  12. Sample Targeting During Single-Particle Single-Cell Irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigelow, A. W.; Randers-Pehrson, G.; Michel, K. A.; Brenner, D. J.; Dymnikov, A. D.

    2003-08-01

    An apertured microbeam is used for single-particle single-cell irradiation to study radiobiological effects at the Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF), Center for Radiological Research, Columbia University. The present sample targeting system involves imaging techniques and a stepping motor stage to sequentially position a cell nucleus above a vertical ion beam. An interest expressed by the biology research community in targeting subnuclear components has spurred the development of microbeam II, a next-generation facility to include a focused ion beam and a more precise sample manipulator, a voice coil stage. Sample positioning precision will rely on a feedback circuit incorporating linear variable differential transformer (LVDT) position measurements. In addition, post-lens electrostatic deflection is a contender for a point-and-shoot system that could speed up the cell irradiation process for cells within an image frame. Crucial to this development is that ion beam blow up must be minimal during deflection.

  13. Sample Targeting During Single-Particle Single-Cell Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Bigelow, A.W.; Randers-Pehrson, G.; Michel, K.A.; Brenner, D.J.; Dymnikov, A.D.

    2003-08-26

    An apertured microbeam is used for single-particle single-cell irradiation to study radiobiological effects at the Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF), Center for Radiological Research, Columbia University. The present sample targeting system involves imaging techniques and a stepping motor stage to sequentially position a cell nucleus above a vertical ion beam. An interest expressed by the biology research community in targeting subnuclear components has spurred the development of microbeam II, a next-generation facility to include a focused ion beam and a more precise sample manipulator, a voice coil stage. Sample positioning precision will rely on a feedback circuit incorporating linear variable differential transformer (LVDT) position measurements. In addition, post-lens electrostatic deflection is a contender for a point-and-shoot system that could speed up the cell irradiation process for cells within an image frame. Crucial to this development is that ion beam blow up must be minimal during deflection.

  14. Simulation of cosmic irradiation conditions in thick target arrangements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Theis, S.; Englert, P.; Reedy, R. C.; Arnold, J. R.

    1986-01-01

    One approach to simulate 2-pi irradiation conditions of planetary surfaces which has been widely applied in the past are bombardments of so called thick targets. A very large thick target was exposed recently to 2.1 GeV protons at the Bevatron-Bevalac in Berkeley. In a 100x100x180 cm steel-surrounded granodiorite target radioactive medium and high energy spallation products of the incident primary and of secondary particles were analyzed along the beam axis down to depths of 140 g/cm(2) in targets such as Cu, Ni, Co, Fe, T, Si, SiO2 and Al. Activities of these nuclides were exclusively determined via instrumental gamma-ray spectroscopy. Relative yields of neutron capture and spallation products induced in Co and Cu targets during the thick target bombardment are shown as a function of depth. The majority of the medium energy products such as Co-58 from Co targets exhibit a maximum at shallow depths of 40-60 g/cm(2) and then decrease exponentially. In a comparable 600 MeV proton bombarded thick target such a slight maximum for medium energy products was not observed. Rather, Co-58 activities in Co decreased steadily with the highest activity at the surface. The activities of the n-capture product Co-60 increase steadily starting at the surface. This indicates the rapidly growing flux of low energy neutrons within the target.

  15. Target volume definition and target conformal irradiation technique for breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Kiricuta, I C; Götz, U; Schwab, F; Fehn, M; Neumann, H H

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to present the target volume and irradiation technique in the most complex situation where the breast or chest wall and the locoregional lymphatics (mammaria interna lymph nodes, axillary and supraclavicular lymph nodes) have to be irradiated. The study comprised 125 breast cancer patients treated with curative intent after primary surgery in the last two years at our institute. In 62 cases the target volume included the breast or chest wall and the locoregional lymphatics, which were treated using our irradiation technique. The target conformal irradiation technique is a multiple non-opposed beams one isocenter technique developed to protect the heart and lungs. This technique, consisting of several rotation beams modulated with wedge filters and individual lung absorbers as well as additional fixed beams, was used in our study to apply a homogeneous dose of 46 to 56 Gy to the target volume; the irradiation technique was optimized by means of dose-volume histograms. After pre-localization, the patients underwent computerized tomographic scanning, with sections at 1.0 cm intervals. Contouring of target volume and organs at risk was carried out with a MULTIDATA workstation for regions of interest (mammaria interna and/or axillary and/or supraclavicular lymphatics and the breast or chest wall) as well as the organs at risk, such as heart and lung parenchyma. Planning target volume coverage was examined by three-dimensional isodose visualization for all CT axial sections for each patient. To determine the incidence of acute or late side effects on the lung parenchyma, conventional chest x-rays and CT studies were carried out at 1 month, 3 months and 6 months after completion of radiotherapy. Dose-volume histogram analysis revealed that this irradiation technique permits the application of a homogeneous dose to the target volume, conforming to the ICRU norms. The maximum dose applied to the ipsilateral lung parenchyma was less than 50-70% of

  16. Post irradiation examination of the Spallation Neutron Source target vessels

    SciTech Connect

    McClintock, David A; Ferguson, Phillip D; Mansur, Louis K

    2010-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is an accelerator-based pulsed neutron source that produces high-energy spallation neutrons by bombarding liquid mercury flowing through a stainless steel target vessel. During operation the proton beam and spallation neutrons produce radiation damage in the AISI 316L austenitic stainless steel target vessel and water-cooled shroud. The beam pulses also cause rapid heating of the liquid mercury, which may produce cavitation erosion damage on the inner surface of the target vessel. The cavitation erosion rate is thought to be highly sensitive to beam power and predicted to be the primary life-limiting factor of target vessel. Though mitigation of cavitation erosion and radiation damage to the target vessel will be a critical for successful high-power operation of the SNS facility, the effects of radiation damage and cavitation erosion to target vessels in liquid metal spallation systems are not well known. Therefore preparations are being undertaken to perform post irradiation examination (PIE) of the liquid mercury target vessel and water-cooled shroud after end-of-life occurs. An overview of the planned PIE for the SNS target vessel is presented here, including proposed techniques for specimen acquisition and subsequent material properties characterization.

  17. Final Report on MEGAPIE Target Irradiation and Post-Irradiation Examination

    SciTech Connect

    Yong, Dai

    2015-06-30

    Megawatt pilot experiment (MEGAPIE) was successfully performed in 2006. One of the important goals of MEGAPIE is to understand the behaviour of structural materials of the target components exposed to high fluxes of high-energy protons and spallation neutrons in flowing LBE (liquid lead-bismuth eutectic) environment by conducting post-irradiation examination (PIE). The PIE includes four major parts: non-destructive test, radiochemical analysis of production and distribution of radionuclides produced by spallation reaction in LBE, analysis of LBE corrosion effects on structural materials, T91 and SS 316L steels, and mechanical testing of the T91 and SS 316L steels irradiated in the lower part of the target. The non-destructive test (NDT) including visual inspection and ultrasonic measurement was performed in the proton beam window area of the T91 calotte of the LBE container, the most intensively irradiated part of the MEGAPIE target. The visual inspection showed no visible failure and the ultrasonic measurement demonstrated no detectable change in thickness in the beam window area. Gamma mapping was also performed in the proton beam window area of the AlMg3 safety-container. The gamma mapping results were used to evaluate the accumulated proton fluence distribution profile, the input data for determining irradiation parameters. Radiochemical analysis of radionuclides produced by spallation reaction in LBE is to improve the understanding of the production and distribution of radionuclides in the target. The results demonstrate that the radionuclides of noble metals, 207Bi, 194Hg/Au are rather homogeneously distributed within the target, while radionuclides of electropositive elements are found to be deposited on the steel-LBE interface. The corrosion effect of LBE on the structural components under intensive irradiation was investigated by metallography. The results show that no evident corrosion damages. However, unexpected deep

  18. Particle therapy of moving targets-the strategies for tumour motion monitoring and moving targets irradiation.

    PubMed

    Kubiak, Tomasz

    2016-10-01

    Particle therapy of moving targets is still a great challenge. The motion of organs situated in the thorax and abdomen strongly affects the precision of proton and carbon ion radiotherapy. The motion is responsible for not only the dislocation of the tumour but also the alterations in the internal density along the beam path, which influence the range of particle beams. Furthermore, in case of pencil beam scanning, there is an interference between the target movement and dynamic beam delivery. This review presents the strategies for tumour motion monitoring and moving target irradiation in the context of hadron therapy. Methods enabling the direct determination of tumour position (fluoroscopic imaging of implanted radio-opaque fiducial markers, electromagnetic detection of inserted transponders and ultrasonic tumour localization systems) are presented. Attention is also drawn to the techniques which use external surrogate motion for an indirect estimation of target displacement during irradiation. The role of respiratory-correlated CT [four-dimensional CT (4DCT)] in the determination of motion pattern prior to the particle treatment is also considered. An essential part of the article is the review of the main approaches to moving target irradiation in hadron therapy: gating, rescanning (repainting), gated rescanning and tumour tracking. The advantages, drawbacks and development trends of these methods are discussed. The new accelerators, called "cyclinacs", are presented, because their application to particle therapy will allow making a breakthrough in the 4D spot scanning treatment of moving organs.

  19. Particle therapy of moving targets-the strategies for tumour motion monitoring and moving targets irradiation.

    PubMed

    Kubiak, Tomasz

    2016-10-01

    Particle therapy of moving targets is still a great challenge. The motion of organs situated in the thorax and abdomen strongly affects the precision of proton and carbon ion radiotherapy. The motion is responsible for not only the dislocation of the tumour but also the alterations in the internal density along the beam path, which influence the range of particle beams. Furthermore, in case of pencil beam scanning, there is an interference between the target movement and dynamic beam delivery. This review presents the strategies for tumour motion monitoring and moving target irradiation in the context of hadron therapy. Methods enabling the direct determination of tumour position (fluoroscopic imaging of implanted radio-opaque fiducial markers, electromagnetic detection of inserted transponders and ultrasonic tumour localization systems) are presented. Attention is also drawn to the techniques which use external surrogate motion for an indirect estimation of target displacement during irradiation. The role of respiratory-correlated CT [four-dimensional CT (4DCT)] in the determination of motion pattern prior to the particle treatment is also considered. An essential part of the article is the review of the main approaches to moving target irradiation in hadron therapy: gating, rescanning (repainting), gated rescanning and tumour tracking. The advantages, drawbacks and development trends of these methods are discussed. The new accelerators, called "cyclinacs", are presented, because their application to particle therapy will allow making a breakthrough in the 4D spot scanning treatment of moving organs. PMID:27376637

  20. A target design for irradiation of NaI at high beam current

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blue, J. W.; Sodd, V. J.

    1972-01-01

    A solution to the targetry problems encountered when the iodine nucleus is a target for cyclotron irradiation is given as a target design. A target based on this design was used in 30 microampere irradiations of 46 MeV alpha particles for one-half hour without significant damage. Such an irradiation produces 6 to 7 mCi of Cs-129. This target should also be considered for cyclotron production of the radioisotopes Cs-127, I-123, and Xe-127.

  1. Materials characterization of irradiated spectralon from the NIF target chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chow, Robert; Frieders, Gene; Jensen, Wayne; Pearson, Mark; Datte, Phil

    2015-08-01

    The Near Backscatter Imager (NBI) participates in nearly every kind of experiment conducted at NIF and measures backscatter, the result of the interaction between incident laser light and plasma waves at a target. Large Spectralon plates, on the order of a hundreds of mm per side, are used as Lambertian scatter components for the NBI diagnostics. The plates were deployed in 2009 and replaced in April of 2014. All NBI assemblies suffered reflectivity degradation, and some of these changes were spatially localized defects observed after irradiation to a cumulative combined neutron and Υ dose of 0.038 Gy. The growth of a defect was correlated to the combined cumulative neutron and Υ radiation dose from NIF fusion shots. Spectralon plates that were irradiated to cumulative combined neutron and Υ dose of 0.74 Gy were characterized for materials and mechanical changes with the following techniques: RBS, FTIR, XPS, SEM, EDX and tensile tests. These tests indicate that the bulk Spectralon did not measurably degrade but there are discolorations that affect the reflectivity. Surface analysis indicates that the surface CF2 species re-forms to make various organic and CFx species.

  2. PLUTONIUM-238 RECOVERY FROM IRRADIATED NEPTUNIUM TARGETS USING SOLVENT EXTRACTION

    SciTech Connect

    Scott Herbst; Terry Todd; Jack Law; Bruce Mincher; Steve Frank; John Swanson

    2006-10-01

    The United States Department of Energy proposes to re-establish a domestic capability for producing plutonium-238 (238Pu) to fuel radioisotope power systems primarily in support of future space missions. A conceptual design report is currently being prepared for a new 238Pu, and neptunium-237 (237Np) target fabrication and processing facility tentatively to be built at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) in the USA. The facility would be capable of producing at least 5 kg of 238Pu-oxide powder per year. Production of 238Pu requires fabrication of 237Np targets with subsequent irradiation in the existing Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the INL. The targets are 237Np oxide dispersed in a compact of powdered aluminum and clad with aluminum metal. The 238Pu product is separated and purified from the residual 237Np, aluminum matrix, and fission products. The unconverted 237Np is also a valuable starting material and is separated, purified and recycled to the target fabrication process. The proposed baseline method for separating and purifying 238Pu and unconverted 237Np post irradiation is by anion exchange (IX). Separation of Pu from Np by IX was chosen as the baseline method because of the method’s proven ability to produce a quality Pu product and because it is amenable to the relatively small scale, batch type production methods used (small batches of ~200g 238Pu are processed at a time). Multiple IX cycles are required involving substantial volumes of nitric acid and other process solutions which must be cleaned and recycled or disposed of as waste. Acid recycle requires rather large evaporator systems, including one contained in a hot cell for remote operation. Finally, the organic based anion exchange resins are rapidly degraded due to the high a-dose and associated heat production from 238Pu decay, and must be regularly replaced (and disposed of as waste). In summary, IX is time consuming, cumbersome, and requires substantial tankage to accommodate the

  3. A target design for irradiation of NaI at high beam current.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blue, J. W.; Sodd, V. J.

    1972-01-01

    A solution to the targetry problems encountered when the iodine nucleus is a target for cyclotron irradiation is given as a new target design. A target based on this design has been used in 30 microampere irradiations of 46 MeV alpha particles for one-half hour without significant damage. Such an irradiation produces 6 to 7 mCi of Cs-129, an isotope useful in nuclear medicine. This target should also be considered for cyclotron production of the radioisotopes Cs-127, I-123, and Xe-127.

  4. Accuracy of positioning and irradiation targeting for multiple targets in intracranial image-guided radiation therapy: a phantom study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tominaga, Hirofumi; Araki, Fujio; Shimohigashi, Yoshinobu; Ishihara, Terunobu; Kawasaki, Keiichi; Kanetake, Nagisa; Sakata, Junichi; Iwashita, Yuki

    2014-12-01

    This study investigated the accuracy of positioning and irradiation targeting for multiple off-isocenter targets in intracranial image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT). A phantom with nine circular targets was created to evaluate both accuracies. First, the central point of the isocenter target was positioned with a combination of an ExacTrac x-ray (ETX) and a 6D couch. The positioning accuracy was determined from the deviations of coordinates of the central point in each target obtained from the kV-cone beam computed tomography (kV-CBCT) for IGRT and the planning CT. Similarly, the irradiation targeting accuracy was evaluated from the deviations of the coordinates between the central point of each target and the central point of each multi-leaf collimator (MLC) field for multiple targets. Secondly, the 6D couch was intentionally rotated together with both roll and pitch angles of 0.5° and 1° at the isocenter and similarly the deviations were evaluated. The positioning accuracy for all targets was less than 1 mm after 6D positioning corrections. The irradiation targeting accuracy was up to 1.3 mm in the anteroposterior (AP) direction for a target 87 mm away from isocenter. For the 6D couch rotations with both roll and pitch angles of 0.5° and 1°, the positioning accuracy was up to 1.0 mm and 2.3 mm in the AP direction for the target 87 mm away from the isocenter, respectively. The irradiation targeting accuracy was up to 2.1 mm and 2.6 mm in the AP direction for the target 87 mm away from the isocenter, respectively. The off-isocenter irradiation targeting accuracy became worse than the positioning accuracy. Both off-isocenter accuracies worsened in proportion to rotation angles and the distance from the isocenter to the targets. It is necessary to examine the set-up margin for off-isocenter multiple targets at each institution because irradiation targeting accuracy is peculiar to the linac machine.

  5. System for target irradiation in the Iskra-6 high-power laser facility

    SciTech Connect

    Bondarenko, S V; Garanin, Sergey G; Eroshenko, V A; Kochemasov, G G; L'vov, L V; Mochalov, M R

    1999-03-31

    An analysis is made of various systems for direct irradiation of a target enabling achievement of a high degree of the irradiation uniformity. The required departure from uniformity of target irradiation, {delta}I/I {<=} 1% - 2%, may be attained when the number of laser beams is N {>=} 80, the diameter of the waist is approximately equal to the target diameter, and the intensity profile in the waist is Gaussian or super-Gaussian. Various methods of forming the necessary intensity distribution in a transverse cross section of a beam are considered. (interaction of laser radiation with matter. laser plasma)

  6. Cyclotron production of NCA 99mTc and 99Mo. An alternative non-reactor supply source of instant 99mTc and 99Mo----99mTc generators.

    PubMed

    Lagunas-Solar, M C; Kiefer, P M; Carvacho, O F; Lagunas, C A; Cha, Y P

    1991-01-01

    The direct production of no-carrier-added (NCA) 6.02 h 99mTc and of 66 h 99mMo using proton beams of natural Mo targets was investigated. The major objective of this work was to evaluate the potential of utilizing high-intensity proton accelerators as a supply source of 99mTc and 99Mo for use in diagnostic nuclear medicine. The excitation functions for the production of the directly-made 99mTc via the 100Mo(p, 2n)99mTc (Q = -7.85 MeV) reaction, and of its parent 99Mo via the 100Mo(p, pn) 99Mo (Q = -8.30 MeV) and 100Mo(p, 2p)99mNb(15 s)----99Mo (Q = -11.14 MeV) reactions, were measured in the 68-8 MeV energy range. Single and cumulative yields for 99mTc and 99Mo, and for other Tc, Mo, Zr, Nb and Y radiocontaminants were also determined. The prospects of integrating the use of enriched 100Mo targets with high-intensity, dual beam, H- accelerators was analyzed. The potential of this combined method to replace or complement the current reactor-based supply sources of 99Mo----99mTc generators, is also discussed. Finally, a brief analysis is made on the potential use of this combined technology to support the anticipated expansion of nuclear medicine in developing nations.

  7. Diaphragm contractile dysfunction causes by off-target low-dose irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Chen-Hsi; Lin, Yun-Cheng; Chen, Yu-Jen; Wu, Huey-Dong; Wang, Li-Ying

    2016-01-01

    Background: Diaphragm is a primary inspiratory muscle and often receives off-target dose in patients with thoracic radiotherapy, and whether acute effect of low dose irradiation would cause contractile dysfunction of the diaphragm remains unclear. We use a rat model to investigate the effect of low-dose irradiation on diaphragm contractile function in the current study. Methods: The radiation dose distributions in patients with esophageal cancer receiving radiotherapy were calculated to determine the dose received by the off-target diaphragm area. Rats were randomly assigned to an irradiated or a non-irradiated control group (n = 10 per group). A single-fraction of 5 Gy radiation was then delivered to the diaphragms of Sprague-Dawley rats in the irradiated group. The control group received sham irradiation (0 Gy). Rats were sacrificed 24 hours after the irradiation procedures and diaphragms were removed en bloc for contractile function assessment, oxidative injury and DNA damage analysis. Oxidative injury was determined by analyzing concentration of protein carbonyls and DNA damage was determined by analyzing retention of γH2AX foci in nuclei of diaphragmatic tissue. Results: At 24 hours after delivery of a single dose of 5 Gy radiation, specific twitch (p = 0.03) and tetanus tension (p = 0.02) were significantly lower in the irradiated group than in the control group. The relative force-frequency curves showed a significant downward shift in the irradiated group. Protein carbonyl level (p < 0.01) and percentage of γH2AX-positive diaphragm muscle cells were significantly higher in the irradiated group than in the control group 24 hours after irradiation (58% vs. 30%, p = 0.01). Conclusions: Off-target low dose irradiation could induce acute contractile dysfunction of the diaphragm which was related to radiation-induced direct DNA and indirect oxidative damage. PMID:27186277

  8. Determination of the accuracy for targeted irradiations of cellular substructures at SNAKE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siebenwirth, C.; Greubel, C.; Drexler, S. E.; Girst, S.; Reindl, J.; Walsh, D. W. M.; Dollinger, G.; Friedl, A. A.; Schmid, T. E.; Drexler, G. A.

    2015-04-01

    In the last 10 years the ion microbeam SNAKE, installed at the Munich 14 MV tandem accelerator, has been successfully used for radiobiological experiments by utilizing pattern irradiation without targeting single cells. Now for targeted irradiation of cellular substructures a precise irradiation device was added to the live cell irradiation setup at SNAKE. It combines a sub-micrometer single ion irradiation facility with a high resolution optical fluorescence microscope. Most systematic errors can be reduced or avoided by using the same light path in the microscope for beam spot verification as well as for and target recognition. In addition online observation of the induced cellular responses is possible. The optical microscope and the beam delivering system are controlled by an in-house developed software which integrates the open-source image analysis software, CellProfiler, for semi-automatic target recognition. In this work the targeting accuracy was determined by irradiation of a cross pattern with 55 MeV carbon ions on nucleoli in U2OS and HeLa cells stably expressing a GFP-tagged repair protein MDC1. For target recognition, nuclei were stained with Draq5 and nucleoli were stained with Syto80 or Syto83. The damage response was determined by live-cell imaging of MDC1-GFP accumulation directly after irradiation. No systematic displacement and a random distribution of about 0.7 μm (SD) in x-direction and 0.8 μm (SD) in y-direction were observed. An independent analysis after immunofluorescence staining of the DNA damage marker yH2AX yielded similar results. With this performance a target with a size similar to that of nucleoli (i.e. a diameter of about 3 μm) is hit with a probability of more than 80%, which enables the investigation of the radiation response of cellular subcompartments after targeted ion irradiation in the future.

  9. Heavy-Ion Irradiation of Thulium(III) Oxide Targets Prepared by Polymer-Assisted Deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, Mitch A.; Ali, Mazhar N.; Chang, Noel N.; Parsons-Moss, Tashi; Ashby, Paul D.; Gates, Jacklyn M.; Stavsetra, Liv; Gregorich, Kenneth E.; Nitsche, Heino

    2008-09-15

    Thulium(III) oxide (Tm{sub 2}O{sub 3}) targets prepared by the polymer-assisted deposition (PAD) method were irradiated by heavy-ion beams to test the method's feasibility for nuclear science applications. Targets were prepared on silicon nitride backings (thickness of 1000 nm, 344 {micro}g/cm{sup 2}) and were irradiated with an {sup 40}Ar beam at laboratory frame energy of {approx}210 MeV (50 particle nA). The root mean squared (RMS) roughness prior to irradiation is 1.1 nm for a {approx}250 nm ({approx}220 {micro}g/cm{sup 2}) Tm{sub 2}O{sub 3} target, and an RMS roughness of 2.0 nm after irradiation was measured by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Scanning electron microscopy of the irradiated target reveals no significant differences in surface homogeneity when compared to imaging prior to irradiation. Target flaking was not observed from monitoring Rutherford scattered particles as a function of time.

  10. Changes in surface composition and morphology of UF 4 targets during heavy ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, P. R.; Loveland, W.; Zielinski, P. M.; Gregorich, K. E.; Nitsche, H.

    2004-12-01

    The changes in surface composition and morphology have been measured for UF4 targets subjected to high dose irradiation (5 × 1018 ions) with ∼195 MeV 37Cl (∼5.3 AMeV). Using atomic force microscopy and an electron microprobe, we observed significant morphological changes in the targets along with changes in chemical composition.

  11. Different collimators in convergent beam irradiation of irregularly shaped intracranial target volumes.

    PubMed

    Otto-Oelschläger, S; Schlegel, W; Lorenz, W

    1994-02-01

    We compare different collimator forms (circular, elliptic and multi-leaf) in 3-D multiple arc rotation therapy for irregularly shaped intracranial tumors. When homogeneous irradiation of the tumor is ensured, the efficiency of treatment is expressed by the sparing of normal tissue outside the target volume to high dose irradiation. By utilizing integral dose-volume histograms we demonstrate that the multi-leaf collimator has considerable advantages. PMID:8184118

  12. Development of two-band infrared radiometer for irradiance calibration of target simulators

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Sen; Li, Chengwei

    2015-07-15

    A detector-based spectral radiometer has been developed for the calibration of target simulator. Unlike the conventional spectral irradiance calibration method based on radiance and irradiance, the new radiometer is calibrated using image-space temperature based method. The image-space temperature based method improves the reproducibility in the calibration of radiometer and reduces the uncertainties existing in the conventional calibration methods. The calibrated radiometer is then used to establish the irradiance transfer standard for the target simulator. With the designed radiometer in this paper, a highly accurate irradiance calibration for target simulators of wavelength from 2.05 to 2.55 μm and from 3.7 to 4.8 μm can be performed with an expanded uncertainty (k = 2) of calibration of 2.18%. Last but not least, the infrared radiation of the target simulator was measured by the infrared radiometer, the effectiveness and capability of which are verified through measurement of temperature and irradiance and a comparison with the thermal imaging camera.

  13. Systems and methods for processing irradiation targets through a nuclear reactor

    DOEpatents

    Dayal, Yogeshwar; Saito, Earl F.; Berger, John F.; Brittingham, Martin W.; Morales, Stephen K.; Hare, Jeffrey M.

    2016-05-03

    Apparatuses and methods produce radioisotopes in instrumentation tubes of operating commercial nuclear reactors. Irradiation targets may be inserted and removed from instrumentation tubes during operation and converted to radioisotopes otherwise unavailable during operation of commercial nuclear reactors. Example apparatuses may continuously insert, remove, and store irradiation targets to be converted to useable radioisotopes or other desired materials at several different origin and termination points accessible outside an access barrier such as a containment building, drywell wall, or other access restriction preventing access to instrumentation tubes during operation of the nuclear plant.

  14. Diversification of 99Mo/99mTc separation: non–fission reactor production of 99Mo as a strategy for enhancing 99mTc availability.

    PubMed

    Pillai, Maroor R A; Dash, Ashutosh; Knapp, Furn F Russ

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses the benefits of obtaining (99m)Tc from non-fission reactor-produced low-specific-activity (99)Mo. This scenario is based on establishing a diversified chain of facilities for the distribution of (99m)Tc separated from reactor-produced (99)Mo by (n,γ) activation of natural or enriched Mo. Such facilities have expected lower investments than required for the proposed chain of cyclotrons for the production of (99m)Tc. Facilities can receive and process reactor-irradiated Mo targets then used for extraction of (99m)Tc over a period of 2 wk, with 3 extractions on the same day. Estimates suggest that a center receiving 1.85 TBq (50 Ci) of (99)Mo once every 4 d can provide 1.48-3.33 TBq (40-90 Ci) of (99m)Tc daily. This model can use research reactors operating in the United States to supply current (99)Mo needs by applying natural (nat)Mo targets. (99)Mo production capacity can be enhanced by using (98)Mo-enriched targets. The proposed model reduces the loss of (99)Mo by decay and avoids proliferation as well as waste management issues associated with fission-produced (99)Mo.

  15. Diversification of 99Mo/99mTc separation: non–fission reactor production of 99Mo as a strategy for enhancing 99mTc availability.

    PubMed

    Pillai, Maroor R A; Dash, Ashutosh; Knapp, Furn F Russ

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses the benefits of obtaining (99m)Tc from non-fission reactor-produced low-specific-activity (99)Mo. This scenario is based on establishing a diversified chain of facilities for the distribution of (99m)Tc separated from reactor-produced (99)Mo by (n,γ) activation of natural or enriched Mo. Such facilities have expected lower investments than required for the proposed chain of cyclotrons for the production of (99m)Tc. Facilities can receive and process reactor-irradiated Mo targets then used for extraction of (99m)Tc over a period of 2 wk, with 3 extractions on the same day. Estimates suggest that a center receiving 1.85 TBq (50 Ci) of (99)Mo once every 4 d can provide 1.48-3.33 TBq (40-90 Ci) of (99m)Tc daily. This model can use research reactors operating in the United States to supply current (99)Mo needs by applying natural (nat)Mo targets. (99)Mo production capacity can be enhanced by using (98)Mo-enriched targets. The proposed model reduces the loss of (99)Mo by decay and avoids proliferation as well as waste management issues associated with fission-produced (99)Mo. PMID:25537991

  16. Salivary gland sparing and improved target irradiation by conformal and intensity modulated irradiation of head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Eisbruch, Avraham; Ship, Jonathan A; Dawson, Laura A; Kim, Hyungjin M; Bradford, Carol R; Terrell, Jeffrey E; Chepeha, Douglas B; Teknos, Theodore N; Hogikyan, Norman D; Anzai, Yoshimi; Marsh, Lon H; Ten Haken, Randall K; Wolf, Gregory T

    2003-07-01

    The goals of this study were to facilitate sparing of the major salivary glands while adequately treating tumor targets in patients requiring comprehensive bilateral neck irradiation (RT), and to assess the potential for improved xerostomia. Since 1994 techniques of target irradiation and locoregional tumor control with conformal and intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) have been developed. In patients treated with these modalities, the salivary flow rates before and periodically after RT have been measured selectively from each major salivary gland and the residual flows correlated with glands' dose volume histograms (DVHs). In addition, subjective xerostomia questionnaires have been developed and validated. The pattern of locoregional recurrence has been examined from computed tomography (CT) scans at the time of recurrence, transferring the recurrence volumes to the planning CT scans, and regenerating the dose distributions at the recurrence sites. Treatment plans for target coverage and dose homogeneity using static, multisegmental IMRT were found to be significantly better than standard RT plans. In addition, significant parotid gland sparing was achieved in the conformal plans. The relationships among dose, irradiated volume, and the residual saliva flow rates from the parotid glands were characterized by dose and volume thresholds. A mean radiation dose of 26 Gy was found to be the threshold for preserved stimulated saliva flow. Xerostomia questionnaire scores suggested that xerostomia was significantly reduced in patients irradiated with bilateral neck, parotid-sparing RT, compared to patients with similar tumors treated with standard RT. Examination of locoregional tumor recurrence patterns revealed that the large majority of recurrences occurred inside targets, in areas that had been judged to be at high risk and that had received RT doses according to the perceived risk. Tangible gains in salivary gland sparing and target coverage are being

  17. Experimental study of radiation power flux on the target surface during high heat plasma irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litunovsky, V. N.; Ovchinnikov, I. B.; Titov, V. A.

    2001-03-01

    Some new data of the experimental study of visible radiation from the plasma shielding layer (SL) on the target surface during high heat plasma-material interaction are given in the report. The experiments were performed on the VIKA facility. Long pulse ( τp=0.36 ms) high power ( Pirr˜100 GW m -2 plasma streams were used for irradiation of graphite and tungsten samples. The target inclination ( α=0° normal irradiation; 45°; 70°) and magnetic field ( B=0 to 3 T) were varied in experiments. It is shown that the values of ( Δλ≈400 to 700 nm) visible radiation power flux (VRPF) on the target surface can be characterised by the level of PR˜1 GW m -2 for normal irradiation in the presence of a magnetic field B=2 to 3 T. Inclination of targets leads to the reduction of this flux in conformity with the corresponding decrease of the irradiation power. The material of the target does not influence sufficiently on the level of the incident radiation power flux in the performed experiments.

  18. Separation of Plutonium from Irradiated Fuels and Targets

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, Leonard W.; Holliday, Kiel S.; Murray, Alice; Thompson, Major; Thorp, Donald T.; Yarbro, Stephen; Venetz, Theodore J.

    2015-09-30

    Spent nuclear fuel from power production reactors contains moderate amounts of transuranium (TRU) actinides and fission products in addition to the still slightly enriched uranium. Originally, nuclear technology was developed to chemically separate and recover fissionable plutonium from irradiated nuclear fuel for military purposes. Military plutonium separations had essentially ceased by the mid-1990s. Reprocessing, however, can serve multiple purposes, and the relative importance has changed over time. In the 1960’s the vision of the introduction of plutonium-fueled fast-neutron breeder reactors drove the civilian separation of plutonium. More recently, reprocessing has been regarded as a means to facilitate the disposal of high-level nuclear waste, and thus requires development of radically different technical approaches. In the last decade or so, the principal reason for reprocessing has shifted to spent power reactor fuel being reprocessed (1) so that unused uranium and plutonium being recycled reduce the volume, gaining some 25% to 30% more energy from the original uranium in the process and thus contributing to energy security and (2) to reduce the volume and radioactivity of the waste by recovering all long-lived actinides and fission products followed by recycling them in fast reactors where they are transmuted to short-lived fission products; this reduces the volume to about 20%, reduces the long-term radioactivity level in the high-level waste, and complicates the possibility of the plutonium being diverted from civil use – thereby increasing the proliferation resistance of the fuel cycle. In general, reprocessing schemes can be divided into two large categories: aqueous/hydrometallurgical systems, and pyrochemical/pyrometallurgical systems. Worldwide processing schemes are dominated by the aqueous (hydrometallurgical) systems. This document provides a historical review of both categories of reprocessing.

  19. Development of a Ne gas target for 22Na production by proton irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Bidhan Ch.; Barua, Luna; Das, Sujata Saha; Pal, Gautam

    2016-03-01

    The article presents the design and development of a neon gas target for the production of 22Na using a proton beam from the room temperature cyclotron in Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, Kolkata. The target design is made to handle a beam power of 85 W (17 MeV, 5 μA). The design is based on simulation using the computer code FLUKA for the beam dump and CFD-CFX for target cooling. The target has been successfully used for the production of 22Na in a 6 day long 17 MeV, 5 μA proton irradiation run.

  20. Development of a Ne gas target for (22)Na production by proton irradiation.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Bidhan Ch; Barua, Luna; Das, Sujata Saha; Pal, Gautam

    2016-03-01

    The article presents the design and development of a neon gas target for the production of (22)Na using a proton beam from the room temperature cyclotron in Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, Kolkata. The target design is made to handle a beam power of 85 W (17 MeV, 5 μA). The design is based on simulation using the computer code FLUKA for the beam dump and CFD-CFX for target cooling. The target has been successfully used for the production of (22)Na in a 6 day long 17 MeV, 5 μA proton irradiation run. PMID:27036769

  1. Simulation of photon acceleration upon irradiation of a mylar target by femtosecond laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Andreev, Stepan N; Rukhadze, Anri A; Tarakanov, V P; Yakutov, B P

    2010-01-31

    Acceleration of protons is simulated by the particle-in-cell (PIC) method upon irradiation of mylar targets of different thicknesses by femtosecond plane-polarised pulsed laser radiation and at different angles of radiation incidence on the target. The comparison of the results of calculations with the experimental data obtained in recent experiments shows their good agreement. The optimal angle of incidence (458) at which the proton energy achieves its absolute maximum is obtained. (effects of laser radiation on matter)

  2. Investigation on Soft X-Ray Lasers with a Picosecond-Laser-Irradiated Gas Puff Target

    SciTech Connect

    Fiedorowiez, H; Bartnik, A; Jarocki, R; Rakowski, R; Dunn, J; Smith, R F; Hunter, J; Hilsen, J; Shlyaptsev, V N

    2002-10-09

    We present results of experimental studies on transient gain soft x-ray lasers with a picosecond-laser-irradiated gas puff target. The target in a form of an elongated gas sheet is formed by pulsed injection of gas through a slit nozzle using a high-pressure electromagnetic valve developed and characterized at the Institute of Optoelectronics. The x-ray laser experiments were performed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory using the tabletop Compact Multipulse Terawatt (COMET) laser to irradiate argon, krypton or xenon gas puff targets. Soft x-ray lasing in neon-like argon on the 3p-3s transition at 46.9 nm and the 3d-3p transition at 45.1 nm have been demonstrated, however, no amplification for nickel-like krypton or xenon was observed. Results of the experiments are presented and discussed.

  3. The influence of target preparation and mode of irradiation on PIXE analysis of biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galuszka, Janusz; Jarczyk, Lucjan; Rokita, Eugeniusz; Strzalkowski, Adam; Sych, Marek

    1984-04-01

    The following methods of target preparation were examined and compared: dry ashing at high temperature, low temperature ashing in plasma asher, wet ashing, lyophilization at a temperature of 35°C, cryofixation with drying in vacuum and dehydration in alcohol with drying in vacuum. All these techniques were applied to prepare targets from five different rat organs: liver, kidney, brain, lung and muscle tissue. The dried and powdered sample material was pressed into pellets or was distributed on formvar film. The evaporation of the thin carbon layer on the investigated target and placing of the thin carbon film in front of a target were also tested. The targets were irradiated in vacuum using an external beam in the air chamber. The influence of the method of target preparation on the detection limits, time requirements and escape of elements from the sample material is discussed.

  4. Targeted Cytoplasmic Irradiation with Alpha Particles Induces Mutations in Mammalian Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Li-Jun; Randers-Pehrson, Gerhard; Xu, An; Waldren, Charles A.; Geard, Charles R.; Yu, Zengliang; Hei, Tom K.

    1999-04-01

    Ever since x-rays were shown to induce mutation in Drosophila more than 70 years ago, prevailing dogma considered the genotoxic effects of ionizing radiation, such as mutations and carcinogenesis, as being due mostly to direct damage to the nucleus. Although there was indication that alpha particle traversal through cellular cytoplasm was innocuous, the full impact remained unknown. The availability of the microbeam at the Radiological Research Accelerator Facility of Columbia University made it possible to target and irradiate the cytoplasm of individual cells in a highly localized spatial region. By using dual fluorochrome dyes (Hoechst and Nile Red) to locate nucleus and cellular cytoplasm, respectively, thereby avoiding inadvertent traversal of nuclei, we show here that cytoplasmic irradiation is mutagenic at the CD59 (S1) locus of human-hamster hybrid (AL) cells, while inflicting minimal cytotoxicity. The principal class of mutations induced are similar to those of spontaneous origin and are entirely different from those of nuclear irradiation. Furthermore, experiments with radical scavenger and inhibitor of intracellular glutathione indicated that the mutagenicity of cytoplasmic irradiation depends on generation of reactive oxygen species. These findings suggest that cytoplasm is an important target for genotoxic effects of ionizing radiation, particularly radon, the second leading cause of lung cancer in the United States. In addition, cytoplasmic traversal by alpha particles may be more dangerous than nuclear traversal, because the mutagenicity is accomplished by little or no killing of the target cells.

  5. HTCAP-1: a program for calcuating operating temperatures in HFIR target irradiation experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Kania, M.J.; Howard A.M.

    1980-06-01

    The thermal modeling code, HTCAP-1, calculates in-reactor operating temperatures of fueled specimens contained in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) target irradiation experiments (HT-series). Temperature calculations are made for loose particle and bonded fuel rod specimens. Maximum particle surface temperatures are calculated for the loose particles and centerline and surface temperatures for the fuel rods. Three computational models are employed to determine fission heat generation rates, capsule heat transfer analysis, and specimen temperatures. This report is also intended to be a users' manual, and the application of HTCAP-1 to the HT-34 irradiation capsule is presented.

  6. Sensing device and method for measuring emission time delay during irradiation of targeted samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danielson, J. D. Sheldon (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    An apparatus for measuring emission time delay during irradiation of targeted samples by utilizing digital signal processing to determine the emission phase shift caused by the sample is disclosed. The apparatus includes a source of electromagnetic radiation adapted to irradiate a target sample. A mechanism generates first and second digital input signals of known frequencies with a known phase relationship, and a device then converts the first and second digital input signals to analog sinusoidal signals. An element is provided to direct the first input signal to the electromagnetic radiation source to modulate the source by the frequency thereof to irradiate the target sample and generate a target sample emission. A device detects the target sample emission and produces a corresponding first output signal having a phase shift relative to the phase of the first input signal, the phase shift being caused by the irradiation time delay in the sample. A member produces a known phase shift in the second input signal to create a second output signal. A mechanism is then provided for converting each of the first and second analog output signals to digital signals. A mixer receives the first and second digital output signals and compares the signal phase relationship therebetween to produce a signal indicative of the change in phase relationship between the first and second output signals caused by the target sample emission. Finally, a feedback arrangement alters the phase of the second input signal based on the mixer signal to ultimately place the first and second output signals in quadrature. Mechanisms for enhancing this phase comparison and adjustment technique are also disclosed.

  7. Post-Irradiation Examination of 237Np Targets for 238Pu Production

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, Robert Noel; Baldwin, Charles A; Hobbs, Randy W; Schmidlin, Joshua E

    2015-01-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory is recovering the US 238Pu production capability and the first step in the process has been to evaluate the performance of a 237Np target cermet pellet encased in an aluminum clad. The process proceeded in 3 steps; the first step was to irradiate capsules of single pellets composed of NpO2 and aluminum power to examine their shrinkage and gas release. These pellets were formed by compressing sintered NpO2 and aluminum powder in a die at high pressure followed by sintering in a vacuum furnace. Three temperatures were chosen for sintering the solution precipitated NpO2 power used for pellet fabrication. The second step was to irradiate partial targets composed of 8 pellets in a semi-prototypical arrangement at the two best performing sintering temperatures to determine which temperature gave a pellet that performed the best under the actual planned irradiation conditions. The third step was to irradiate ~50 pellets in an actual target configuration at design irradiation conditions to assess pellet shrinkage and gas release, target heat transfer, and dimensional stability. The higher sintering temperature appeared to offer the best performance after one cycle of irradiation by having the least shrinkage, thus keeping the heat transfer gap between the pellets and clad small minimizing the pellet operating temperature. The final result of the testing was a target that can meet the initial production goals, satisfy the reactor safety requirements, and can be fabricated in production quantities. The current focus of the program is to verify that the target can be remotely dissembled, the pellets dissolved, and the 238Pu recovered. Tests are being conducted to examine these concerns and to compare results to code predictions. Once the performance of the full length targets has been quantified, the pellet 237Np loading will be revisited to determine if it can be

  8. The cytoplasm as a radiation target: an in silico study of microbeam cell irradiation.

    PubMed

    Byrne, H L; Domanova, W; McNamara, A L; Incerti, S; Kuncic, Z

    2015-03-21

    We performed in silico microbeam cell irradiation modelling to quantitatively investigate ionisations resulting from soft x-ray and alpha particle microbeams targeting the cytoplasm of a realistic cell model. Our results on the spatial distribution of ionisations show that as x-rays are susceptible to scatter within a cell that can lead to ionisations in the nucleus, soft x-ray microbeams may not be suitable for investigating the DNA damage response to radiation targeting the cytoplasm alone. In contrast, ionisations from an ideal alpha microbeam are tightly confined to the cytoplasm, but a realistic alpha microbeam degrades upon interaction with components upstream of the cellular target. Thus it is difficult to completely rule out a contribution from alpha particle hits to the nucleus when investigating DNA damage response to cytoplasmic irradiation. We find that although the cytoplasm targeting efficiency of an alpha microbeam is better than that of a soft x-ray microbeam (the probability of stray alphas hitting the nucleus is 0.2% compared to 3.6% for x-rays), stray alphas produce more ionisations in the nucleus and thus have greater potential for initiating damage responses therein. Our results suggest that observed biological responses to cytoplasmic irradiation include a small component that can be attributed to stray ionisations in the nucleus resulting from the stochastic nature of particle interactions that cause out-of-beam scatter. This contribution is difficult to isolate experimentally, thus demonstrating the value of the in silico approach.

  9. The cytoplasm as a radiation target: an in silico study of microbeam cell irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrne, H. L.; Domanova, W.; McNamara, A. L.; Incerti, S.; Kuncic, Z.

    2015-03-01

    We performed in silico microbeam cell irradiation modelling to quantitatively investigate ionisations resulting from soft x-ray and alpha particle microbeams targeting the cytoplasm of a realistic cell model. Our results on the spatial distribution of ionisations show that as x-rays are susceptible to scatter within a cell that can lead to ionisations in the nucleus, soft x-ray microbeams may not be suitable for investigating the DNA damage response to radiation targeting the cytoplasm alone. In contrast, ionisations from an ideal alpha microbeam are tightly confined to the cytoplasm, but a realistic alpha microbeam degrades upon interaction with components upstream of the cellular target. Thus it is difficult to completely rule out a contribution from alpha particle hits to the nucleus when investigating DNA damage response to cytoplasmic irradiation. We find that although the cytoplasm targeting efficiency of an alpha microbeam is better than that of a soft x-ray microbeam (the probability of stray alphas hitting the nucleus is 0.2% compared to 3.6% for x-rays), stray alphas produce more ionisations in the nucleus and thus have greater potential for initiating damage responses therein. Our results suggest that observed biological responses to cytoplasmic irradiation include a small component that can be attributed to stray ionisations in the nucleus resulting from the stochastic nature of particle interactions that cause out-of-beam scatter. This contribution is difficult to isolate experimentally, thus demonstrating the value of the in silico approach.

  10. A Mitochondria-Targeted Nitroxide/Hemigramicidin S Conjugate Protects Mouse Embryonic Cells Against Gamma Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang Jianfei; Belikova, Natalia A.; Hoye, Adam T.; Zhao Qing; Epperly, Michael W.; Greenberger, Joel S.; Wipf, Peter; Kagan, Valerian E.

    2008-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the in vitro radioprotective effect of the mitochondria-targeted hemigramicidin S-conjugated 4-amino-2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-piperidine-N-oxyl (hemi-GS-TEMPO) 5-125 in {gamma}-irradiated mouse embryonic cells and adenovirus-12 SV40 hybrid virus transformed human bronchial epithelial cells BEAS-2B and explore the mechanisms involved in its radioprotective effect. Methods and Materials: Cells were incubated with 5-125 before (10 minutes) or after (1 hour) {gamma}-irradiation. Superoxide generation was determined by using dihydroethidium assay, and lipid oxidation was quantitated by using a fluorescence high-performance liquid chromatography-based Amplex Red assay. Apoptosis was characterized by evaluating the accumulation of cytochrome c in the cytosol and externalization of phosphatidylserine on the cell surface. Cell survival was measured by means of a clonogenic assay. Results: Treatment (before and after irradiation) of cells with 5-125 at low concentrations (5, 10, and 20 {mu}M) effectively suppressed {gamma}-irradiation-induced superoxide generation, cardiolipin oxidation, and delayed irradiation-induced apoptosis, evaluated by using cytochrome c release and phosphatidylserine externalization. Importantly, treatment with 5-125 increased the clonogenic survival rate of {gamma}-irradiated cells. In addition, 5-125 enhanced and prolonged {gamma}-irradiation-induced G{sub 2}/M phase arrest. Conclusions: Radioprotection/mitigation by hemi-GS-TEMPO likely is caused by its ability to act as an electron scavenger and prevent superoxide generation, attenuate cardiolipin oxidation in mitochondria, and hence prevent the release of proapoptotic factors from mitochondria. Other mechanisms, including cell-cycle arrest at the G{sub 2}/M phase, may contribute to the protection.

  11. Mechanisms of DNA damage response to targeted irradiation in organotypic 3D skin cultures.

    PubMed

    Acheva, Anna; Ghita, Mihaela; Patel, Gaurang; Prise, Kevin M; Schettino, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    DNA damage (caused by direct cellular exposure and bystander signaling) and the complex pathways involved in its repair are critical events underpinning cellular and tissue response following radiation exposures. There are limited data addressing the dynamics of DNA damage induction and repair in the skin particularly in areas not directly exposed. Here we investigate the mechanisms regulating DNA damage, repair, intracellular signalling and their impact on premature differentiation and development of inflammatory-like response in the irradiated and surrounding areas of a 3D organotypic skin model. Following localized low-LET irradiation (225 kVp X-rays), low levels of 53BP1 foci were observed in the 3D model (3.8±0.28 foci/Gy/cell) with foci persisting and increasing in size up to 48 h post irradiation. In contrast, in cell monolayers 14.2±0.6 foci/Gy/cell and biphasic repair kinetics with repair completed before 24 h was observed. These differences are linked to differences in cellular status with variable level of p21 driving apoptotic signalling in 2D and accelerated differentiation in both the directly irradiated and bystander areas of the 3D model. The signalling pathways utilized by irradiated keratinocytes to induce DNA damage in non-exposed areas of the skin involved the NF-κB transcription factor and its downstream target COX-2. PMID:24505255

  12. Ion-exchange chromatographic separation of einsteinium from irradiated californium targets

    SciTech Connect

    Elesin, A.A.; Nikolaev, V.M.; Shalimov, V.V.; Popov, Yu.S.; Kovantsev, V.N.; Tselishchev, I.V.; Filimonov, V.T.; Mishenev, V.B.; Yadovin, A.A.; Golosovskii, L.S.; Chetverikov, A.P.

    1987-07-01

    Einsteinium was obtained by preparing two experimental californium targets and subjecting them to neutron irradiation in a high-flux reactor. The einsteinium was separated from the bombarded targets on a column packed with KU-2U sulfonated cation-exchange resin (20-50 ..mu..m) and eluted at room temperature with an ammonium ..cap alpha..-hydroxyisobutyrate solution. Three successive separation cycles removed californium to produce einsteinium in 68% yield with a decontamination factor of 5.3 x 10/sup 6/. About 20% of the einsteinium was used up by analysis and 11% remained in intermediate fractions. The method developed yielded pure einsteinium with little fission products present. The contribution of the fission products to the total einsteinium gamma-irradiation dose rate was no greater than 81%, due primarily to the radioisotope terbium-160.

  13. Remotely Operated Equipment for Post Irradiation Examination of the SNS Target Vessel

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, Adam J; Graves, Van B; Dayton, Michael J; Riemer, Bernie

    2011-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source produces neutrons by accelerating protons into flowing mercury contained inside a stainless steel target vessel. During facility operation the target vessel is degraded by a combination of high-energy neutrons, the proton beam, and cavitation-induced corrosion. The degradation is primarily concentrated at the nose of the target vessel, where the proton beam passes through. Currently, the Spallation Neutron Source has replaced three target vessels and is operating the fourth. To minimize the operational costs of manufacturing and disposing of target vessels, efforts are underway to increase the operational lifetimes of the target vessels by conducting post irradiation examinations of spent vessels. This examination involves remotely removing multiple coupons from the nose of the target vessel using a single piece of equipment, called the Nose Sampling Cutter, installed inside the Spallation Neutron Source s hot cell. The Cutter produces circular coupons approximately 2 inches in diameter using a carbide-tipped hole saw. The nose of the target vessel consists of four layers of material, and the Nose Sampling Cutter is capable of cutting through the layers in a single stroke. This remote operation has been successfully completed twice. In addition to the Nose Sampling Cutter, a large reciprocation saw capable of removing a sizable section of the nose of the target vessel has been constructed and tested, but never implemented. To support this large reciprocation saw other equipment has also been designed. The details of the Nose Sampling Cutter, reciprocation saw, and associated equipment are discussed.

  14. Numerical study of the irradiation uniformity of a directly driven inertial confinement fusion target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temporal, M.; Canaud, B.; Laffite, S.; Le Garrec, B. J.; Murakami, M.

    2010-11-01

    In the Inertial Confinement Fusion the uniformity of the irradiation still represents a crucial issue. In this context a spherical capsule directly driven by laser beams have been assessed numerically [1]. Two schemes characterized by 32 and 48 directions of irradiation [2] with associated a single laser beam or a bundle of laser beams [3] characterized by a super-Gaussian intensity profile are considered. Beam imperfections as power imbalance and pointing errors have been taken into account. It is found that the focal spot that minimizes the rms deviation depends on the beam imperfections [4]. The numerical calculations show that the uniformity of the irradiation evolves in time. The results calculated considering the illumination of a spherical target will be compared with those obtained when the irradiation is taken into account. [1] M. Temporal, B. Canaud. Eur. Phys. J. D 55 139 (2009). [2] M. Murakami, N. Sarukura, H. Azechi, M. Temporal, A.J. Schmitt, in press to Phys. Plasmas (July issue, 2010). [3] M. Temporal, B. Canaud, B. J. Le Garrec, Phys. Plasmas 17 022701 (2010). [4] M. Temporal, B. Canaud, S. Laffite, B.J. Le Garrec, M. Murakami. Phys. Plasmas 17 064504 (2010).

  15. Investigation of laser ion acceleration inside irradiated solid targets by neutron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Youssef, A.; Kodama, R.; Tampo, M.

    2006-03-15

    Origins and acceleration directions of accelerated ions inside solid LiF, CH-LiF, and LiF-CH targets irradiated by a 450 fs, 20 J, 1053 nm laser at an intensity of 3x10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2} have been investigated by neutron spectroscopy. The irradiated targets generate neutrons through the reaction {sup 7}Li (p,n){sup 7}Be between accelerated protons and background {sup 7}Li ions inside the target. The produced neutron spectra observed from two different observation angles 20 deg. and 120 deg. to the target rear-side normal. From the measured and calculated spectra, by three-dimensional Monte Carlo code, the maximum energy, the total number, and the slope temperature of the accelerated ions are investigated. The results indicate that ions are not only accelerated from the front surface toward the rear surface, but also from the rear surface toward the front surface with comparable maximum energy and higher number.

  16. Gamma Knife irradiation method based on dosimetric controls to target small areas in rat brains

    SciTech Connect

    Constanzo, Julie; Paquette, Benoit; Charest, Gabriel; Masson-Côté, Laurence; Guillot, Mathieu

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: Targeted and whole-brain irradiation in humans can result in significant side effects causing decreased patient quality of life. To adequately investigate structural and functional alterations after stereotactic radiosurgery, preclinical studies are needed. The purpose of this work is to establish a robust standardized method of targeted irradiation on small regions of the rat brain. Methods: Euthanized male Fischer rats were imaged in a stereotactic bed, by computed tomography (CT), to estimate positioning variations relative to the bregma skull reference point. Using a rat brain atlas and the stereotactic bregma coordinates obtained from CT images, different regions of the brain were delimited and a treatment plan was generated. A single isocenter treatment plan delivering ≥100 Gy in 100% of the target volume was produced by Leksell GammaPlan using the 4 mm diameter collimator of sectors 4, 5, 7, and 8 of the Gamma Knife unit. Impact of positioning deviations of the rat brain on dose deposition was simulated by GammaPlan and validated with dosimetric measurements. Results: The authors’ results showed that 90% of the target volume received 100 ± 8 Gy and the maximum of deposited dose was 125 ± 0.7 Gy, which corresponds to an excellent relative standard deviation of 0.6%. This dose deposition calculated with GammaPlan was validated with dosimetric films resulting in a dose-profile agreement within 5%, both in X- and Z-axes. Conclusions: The authors’ results demonstrate the feasibility of standardizing the irradiation procedure of a small volume in the rat brain using a Gamma Knife.

  17. Post-Irradiation Properties of Candidate Materials for High-Power Targets

    SciTech Connect

    Kirk, H.G.; Ludewig, H.; Mausner, L.F.; Simos, N.; Thieberger, P.; Hayato, Y.; Yoshimura, K.; McDonald, K.T.; Sheppard, J.; Trung, L.P.; /SUNY, Stony Brook

    2006-03-15

    The desire of the high-energy-physics community for more intense secondary particle beams motivates the development of multi-megawatt, pulsed proton sources. The targets needed to produce these secondary particle beams must be sufficiently robust to withstand the intense pressure waves arising from the high peak-energy deposition which an intense pulsed beam will deliver. In addition, the materials used for the targets must continue to perform in a severe radiation environment. The effect of the beam induced pressure waves can be mitigated by use of target materials with high-yield strength and/or low coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE). We report here first results of an expanded study of the effects of irradiation on several additional candidate materials with high strength (AlBeMet, beryllium, Ti-V6-Al4) or low CTE (a carbon-carbon composite, a new Toyota ''gum'' metal alloy, Super-Invar).

  18. Production of 230U/226Th for targeted alpha therapy via proton irradiation of 231Pa.

    PubMed

    Morgenstern, Alfred; Lebeda, Ondrej; Stursa, Jan; Bruchertseifer, Frank; Capote, Roberto; McGinley, John; Rasmussen, Gert; Sin, Mihaela; Zielinska, Barbara; Apostolidis, Christos

    2008-11-15

    (230)U and its daughter nuclide (226)Th are novel therapeutic nuclides for application in targeted alpha-therapy of cancer. We have investigated the feasibility of producing (230)U/(226)Th via proton irradiation of (231)Pa according to the reaction (231)Pa(p,2n)(230)U. The experimental excitation function for this reaction is reported for the first time. Cross sections were measured using thin targets of (231)Pa prepared by electrodeposition and (230)U yields were analyzed using alpha-spectrometry. Beam parameters (energy and intensity) were determined both by calculation using a mathematical model based on measured beam orbits and beam current integrator and by parallel monitor reactions on copper foils using high-resolution gamma-spectrometry and IAEA recommended cross-section data. The measured cross sections are in good agreement with model calculations using the EMPIRE-II code and are sufficiently high for the production of (230)U/(226)Th in clinically relevant amounts. A highly effective separation process was developed to isolate clinical grade (230)U from irradiated protactinium oxide targets. Product purity was assessed using alpha- and gamma-spectrometry as well as ICPMS.

  19. Production of 230U/226Th for targeted alpha therapy via proton irradiation of 231Pa.

    PubMed

    Morgenstern, Alfred; Lebeda, Ondrej; Stursa, Jan; Bruchertseifer, Frank; Capote, Roberto; McGinley, John; Rasmussen, Gert; Sin, Mihaela; Zielinska, Barbara; Apostolidis, Christos

    2008-11-15

    (230)U and its daughter nuclide (226)Th are novel therapeutic nuclides for application in targeted alpha-therapy of cancer. We have investigated the feasibility of producing (230)U/(226)Th via proton irradiation of (231)Pa according to the reaction (231)Pa(p,2n)(230)U. The experimental excitation function for this reaction is reported for the first time. Cross sections were measured using thin targets of (231)Pa prepared by electrodeposition and (230)U yields were analyzed using alpha-spectrometry. Beam parameters (energy and intensity) were determined both by calculation using a mathematical model based on measured beam orbits and beam current integrator and by parallel monitor reactions on copper foils using high-resolution gamma-spectrometry and IAEA recommended cross-section data. The measured cross sections are in good agreement with model calculations using the EMPIRE-II code and are sufficiently high for the production of (230)U/(226)Th in clinically relevant amounts. A highly effective separation process was developed to isolate clinical grade (230)U from irradiated protactinium oxide targets. Product purity was assessed using alpha- and gamma-spectrometry as well as ICPMS. PMID:18925748

  20. The influence of target irradiation conditions on the parameters of laser-produced plasma jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasperczuk, A.; Pisarczyk, T.; Borodziuk, S.; Ullschmied, J.; Krousky, E.; Masek, K.; Pfeifer, M.; Rohlena, K.; Skala, J.; Pisarczyk, P.

    2007-03-01

    Recent experimental results demonstrate that the forming of plasma jets is a fundamental process accompanying the laser-produced plasma expansion, if a massive planar target with relatively high atomic number is irradiated by a defocused laser beam. In this paper some new results on the influence of target irradiation conditions on plasma jet parameters are presented. The experiment was carried out at the Prague Asterix Laser System (PALS) iodine laser [K. Jungwirth, A. Cejnarova, L. Juha, B. Kralikova, J. Krasa, E. Krousky, P. Krupickova, L. Laska, K. Masek, A. Prag, O. Renner, K. Rohlena, B. Rus, J. Skala, P. Straka, and J. Ullschmied, Phys. Plasmas 8, 2495 (2001)]. with the third harmonic beam of the pulse duration of 250ps. The beam energies varied in the range of 13-160J. The planar massive targets used in the experiment were made of copper. For measurements of the electron density evolution a three frame interferometric system was employed. The jets were produced in the whole range of the laser energy used. Calculations of the efficiency of the plasma jet production show that it decreases with increasing the laser energy.

  1. The influence of target irradiation conditions on the parameters of laser-produced plasma jets

    SciTech Connect

    Kasperczuk, A.; Pisarczyk, T.; Borodziuk, S.; Ullschmied, J.; Krousky, E.; Masek, K.; Pfeifer, M.; Rohlena, K.; Skala, J.; Pisarczyk, P.

    2007-03-15

    Recent experimental results demonstrate that the forming of plasma jets is a fundamental process accompanying the laser-produced plasma expansion, if a massive planar target with relatively high atomic number is irradiated by a defocused laser beam. In this paper some new results on the influence of target irradiation conditions on plasma jet parameters are presented. The experiment was carried out at the Prague Asterix Laser System (PALS) iodine laser [K. Jungwirth, A. Cejnarova, L. Juha, B. Kralikova, J. Krasa, E. Krousky, P. Krupickova, L. Laska, K. Masek, A. Prag, O. Renner, K. Rohlena, B. Rus, J. Skala, P. Straka, and J. Ullschmied, Phys. Plasmas 8, 2495 (2001)]. with the third harmonic beam of the pulse duration of 250 ps. The beam energies varied in the range of 13-160 J. The planar massive targets used in the experiment were made of copper. For measurements of the electron density evolution a three frame interferometric system was employed. The jets were produced in the whole range of the laser energy used. Calculations of the efficiency of the plasma jet production show that it decreases with increasing the laser energy.

  2. Mono-energetic ions emission by nanosecond laser solid target irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muoio, A.; Tudisco, S.; Altana, C.; Lanzalone, G.; Mascali, D.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Schillaci, F.; Trifirò, A.

    2016-09-01

    An experimental campaign aiming to investigate the acceleration mechanisms through laser-matter interaction in nanosecond domain has been carried out at the LENS (Laser Energy for Nuclear Science) laboratory of INFN-LNS, Catania. Pure Al targets were irradiated by 6 ns laser pulses at different pumping energies, up to 2 J. Advanced diagnostics tools were used to characterize the plasma plume and ion production. We show the preliminary results of this experimental campaign, and especially the ones showing the production of multicharged ions having very narrow energy spreads.

  3. Ablation dynamics of Co/ZnS targets under double pulse femtosecond laser irradiation.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Quintas, Ignacio; Loriot, Vincent; Ávila, David; Izquierdo, Jesus G; Rebollar, Esther; Bañares, Luis; Castillejo, Marta; de Nalda, Rebeca; Martin, Margarita

    2016-02-01

    Femtosecond lasers, used as tools to investigate the ablation dynamics of solids, can help to develop strategies to control the deposition of nanomaterials by pulsed laser ablation. In this work, Co/ZnS targets, potential candidates for the synthesis of diluted magnetic semiconductor materials, are irradiated by sequences of two femtosecond laser pulses delayed in the picosecond time scale. The ionic composition of the ablation plasma and the dependence of the ion signals on the interpulse delay and relative fluence are determined by time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The results show that, when pulses of different fluence are used, highly asymmetric ion yields are obtained, with more intense ion signals detected when the lower fluence pulse is temporally ahead. The comparison between asymmetric and equal fluence double pulse ablation dynamics provides some understanding of the different processes that modify the properties of the layer irradiated by the first pulse and of the mechanisms affecting the coupling of the delayed pulse into the material. The final outcome of the double pulse irradiation is characterized through the analysis of the deposits produced upon ablation. PMID:26751831

  4. Directed fast electron beams in ultraintense picosecond laser irradiated solid targets

    SciTech Connect

    Ge, X. L.; Lin, X. X.; Yuan, X. H. E-mail: ytli@iphy.ac.cn; Sheng, Z. M.; Carroll, D. C.; Neely, D.; Gray, R. J.; Tresca, O.; McKenna, P.; Yu, T. P.; Chen, M.; Liu, F.; Zhuo, H. B.; Zielbauer, B.; and others

    2015-08-31

    We report on fast electron transport and emission patterns from solid targets irradiated by s-polarized, relativistically intense, picosecond laser pulses. A beam of multi-MeV electrons is found to be transported along the target surface in the laser polarization direction. The spatial-intensity and energy distributions of this beam are compared with the beam produced along the laser propagation axis. It is shown that even for peak laser intensities an order of magnitude higher than the relativistic threshold, laser polarization still plays an important role in electron energy transport. Results from 3D particle-in-cell simulations confirm the findings. The characterization of directional beam emission is important for applications requiring efficient energy transfer, including secondary photon and ion source development.

  5. Low-Dose Irradiation Enhances Gene Targeting in Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hatada, Seigo; Subramanian, Aparna; Mandefro, Berhan; Ren, Songyang; Kim, Ho Won; Tang, Jie; Funari, Vincent; Baloh, Robert H.; Sareen, Dhruv

    2015-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) are now being used for both disease modeling and cell therapy; however, efficient homologous recombination (HR) is often crucial to develop isogenic control or reporter lines. We showed that limited low-dose irradiation (LDI) using either γ-ray or x-ray exposure (0.4 Gy) significantly enhanced HR frequency, possibly through induction of DNA repair/recombination machinery including ataxia-telangiectasia mutated, histone H2A.X and RAD51 proteins. LDI could also increase HR efficiency by more than 30-fold when combined with the targeting tools zinc finger nucleases, transcription activator-like effector nucleases, and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats. Whole-exome sequencing confirmed that the LDI administered to hPSCs did not induce gross genomic alterations or affect cellular viability. Irradiated and targeted lines were karyotypically normal and made all differentiated lineages that continued to express green fluorescent protein targeted at the AAVS1 locus. This simple method allows higher throughput of new, targeted hPSC lines that are crucial to expand the use of disease modeling and to develop novel avenues of cell therapy. Significance The simple and relevant technique described in this report uses a low level of radiation to increase desired gene modifications in human pluripotent stem cells by an order of magnitude. This higher efficiency permits greater throughput with reduced time and cost. The low level of radiation also greatly increased the recombination frequency when combined with developed engineered nucleases. Critically, the radiation did not lead to increases in DNA mutations or to reductions in overall cellular viability. This novel technique enables not only the rapid production of disease models using human stem cells but also the possibility of treating genetically based diseases by correcting patient-derived cells. PMID:26185257

  6. X-ray enhancement in a nanohole target irradiated by intense ultrashort laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Chakravarty, U.; Arora, V.; Chakera, J. A.; Naik, P. A.; Srivastava, H.; Tiwari, P.; Srivastava, A.; Gupta, P. D

    2011-03-01

    In this paper, we present a comparative study of the laser energy absorption, soft x-ray emission (in the water window region: 2.3-4.4 nm) and hard x-ray emission (in the 2-20 keV range) from planar aluminum and nanohole alumina of 40 nm average diameter, when irradiated by Ti:sapphire laser pulses. The laser pulse duration was varied from 45 to 500 fs, and the focused intensity on the target ranged from {approx}3 x 10{sup 16} W/cm{sup 2} to 3x10{sup 17} W/cm{sup 2}. The x-ray yield enhancement from the nanoholes shows an increased coupling of the laser energy to the target. The effect of laser pulse duration on the x-ray emission was also studied, where a resonance like phenomenon was observed. The laser energy absorption measurements in the nanoholes showed a marginal enhancement in absorption as compared to planar Al. The integrated keV x-ray yield, from nanohole alumina and planar Al, at an intensity of 3 x 10{sup 17} W/cm{sup 2}, was 25 and 3.5 {mu}J, respectively. The results can be explained by considering the hydrodynamic expansion of the laser irradiated structure and field enhancement in the nanoholes.

  7. A target station for plasma exposure of neutron irradiated fusion material samples to reactor relevant conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rapp, Juergen; Giuliano, Dominic; Ellis, Ronald; Howard, Richard; Lore, Jeremy; Lumsdaine, Arnold; Lessard, Timothy; McGinnis, William; Meitner, Steven; Owen, Larry; Varma, Venugopal

    2015-11-01

    The Material Plasma Exposure eXperiment (MPEX) is a device planned to address scientific and technological gaps for the development of viable plasma facing components for fusion reactor conditions (FNSF, DEMO). It will have to address the relevant plasma conditions in a reactor divertor (electron density, electron temperature, ion fluxes) and it needs to be able to expose a-priori neutron irradiated samples. A pre design of a target station able to handle activated materials will be presented. This includes detailed MCNP as well as SCALE and MAVRIC calculations for all potential plasma-facing materials to estimate dose rates. Details on the remote handling schemes for the material samples will be presented. 2 point modeling of the linear plasma transport has been used to scope out the parameter range of the anticipated power fluxes to the target. This has been used to design the cooling capability of the target. The operational conditions of surface temperatures, plasma conditions, and oblique angle of incidence of magnetic field to target surface will be discussed. ORNL is managed by UT-Battelle, LLC, for the U.S. DOE under contract DE-AC-05-00OR22725.

  8. Generation and Transport of Fast Electrons in Laser Irradiated Targets at Relativistic Intensities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amiranoff, F.; Baton, S. D.; Gremillet, L.; Guilbaud, O.; Koenig, M.; Martinolli, E.; Santos, J. J.; Le Gloahec, M. Rabec; Rousseaux, C.; Hall, T.

    2002-10-01

    The transport of relativistic electrons in solid targets irradiated by a short laser pulse at relativistic intensities has been studied both experimentally and numerically. A Monte-Carlo collision code takes into account individual collisions with the ions and electrons in the target. A 3D-hybrid code takes into account these collisions as well as the generation of electric and magnetic fields and the self-consistent motion of the electrons in these fields. It predicts a magnetic guiding of a fraction of the fast electron current over long distances and a localized heating of the material along the propagation axis. In experiments performed at LULI on the 100 TW laser facility, several diagnostics have been implemented to diagnose the geometry of the fast electron transport and the target heating. The typical conditions were: E1 less-than-or-equal 20 J, lambda = 1 mum, tau approximately 300 fs, I approximately 1018-5.1019W/cm2. The results indicate a modest heating of the target (typically 20-40 eV over 20 mum to 50 mum), consistent with an acceleration of the electrons inside a wide aperture cone along the laser axis.

  9. Design and Demonstration of a Material-Plasma Exposure Target Station for Neutron Irradiated Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Rapp, Juergen; Aaron, A. M.; Bell, Gary L.; Burgess, Thomas W.; Ellis, Ronald James; Giuliano, D.; Howard, R.; Kiggans, James O.; Lessard, Timothy L.; Ohriner, Evan Keith; Perkins, Dale E.; Varma, Venugopal Koikal

    2015-10-20

    Fusion energy is the most promising energy source for the future, and one of the most important problems to be solved progressing to a commercial fusion reactor is the identification of plasma-facing materials compatible with the extreme conditions in the fusion reactor environment. The development of plasma–material interaction (PMI) science and the technology of plasma-facing components are key elements in the development of the next step fusion device in the United States, the so-called Fusion Nuclear Science Facility (FNSF). All of these PMI issues and the uncertain impact of the 14-MeV neutron irradiation have been identified in numerous expert panel reports to the fusion community. The 2007 Greenwald report classifies reactor plasma-facing materials (PFCs) and materials as the only Tier 1 issues, requiring a “. . . major extrapolation from the current state of knowledge, need for qualitative improvements and substantial development for both the short and long term.” The Greenwald report goes on to list 19 gaps in understanding and performance related to the plasma–material interface for the technology facilities needed for DEMO-oriented R&D and DEMO itself. Of the 15 major gaps, six (G7, G9, G10, G12, G13) can possibly be addressed with ORNL’s proposal of an advanced Material Plasma Exposure eXperiment. Establishing this mid-scale plasma materials test facility at ORNL is a key element in ORNL’s strategy to secure a leadership role for decades of fusion R&D. That is to say, our end goal is to bring the “signature facility” FNSF home to ORNL. This project is related to the pre-conceptual design of an innovative target station for a future Material–Plasma Exposure eXperiment (MPEX). The target station will be designed to expose candidate fusion reactor plasma-facing materials and components (PFMs and PFCs) to conditions anticipated in fusion reactors, where PFCs will be exposed to dense high-temperature hydrogen plasmas providing steady

  10. Explosive Boiling In Carbon Target Irradiated By Third Harmonic Of Nd :YAG Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Yahiaoui, K.; Kerdja, T.; Malek, S.

    2008-09-23

    In order to identify the physical phenomena responsible to the formation of droplets onto thin films grown during laser ablation, and to correlate between the appearance of those droplets versus the laser flux, we have measured the amount of ejected matter for carbon target irradiated by a third harmonic of Nd:YAG laser by changing laser flux. The measurement was achieved by a quartz microbalance placed in front of the target. The obtained results show at first a linear increase of the ejected material followed by a saturation behavior, and then an abrupt increase of the ablated mass beyond a laser Intensity of 3,64x10{sup 10} W/cm{sup 2}. This increasing is assigned to the homogeneous nucleation of bubbles in a layer of the molten material, also called phase explosion, the surface temperature of the target will approaches the critical thermodynamic temperature (T{sub tc}). We have also measured time-of-flight (TOF) distributions of positives ions of carbons in the plasma using a charge collector. The TOF signals have been fitted with a shifted Maxwellian distribution function. This has allowed us to estimate the critical temperature T{sub tc} of the material.

  11. Target and method for the production of fission product molybdenum-99

    DOEpatents

    Vandegrift, George F.; Vissers, Donald R.; Marshall, Simon L.; Varma, Ravi

    1989-01-01

    A target for the reduction of fission product Mo-99 is prepared from uranium of low U-235 enrichment by coating a structural support member with a preparatory coating of a substantially oxide-free substrate metal. Uranium metal is electrodeposited from a molten halide electrolytic bath onto a substrate metal. The electrodeposition is performed at a predetermined direct current rate or by using pulsed plating techniques which permit relaxation of accumulated uranium ion concentrations within the melt. Layers of as much as to 600 mg/cm.sup.2 of uranium can be prepared to provide a sufficient density to produce acceptable concentrations of fission product Mo-99.

  12. Target and method for the production of fission product molybdenum-99

    DOEpatents

    Vandegrift, G.F.; Vissers, D.R.; Marshall, S.L.; Varma, R.

    1987-10-26

    A target for the reduction of fission product Mo-99 is prepared from uranium of low U-235 enrichment by coating a structural support member with a preparatory coating of a substantially oxide-free substrate metal. Uranium metal is electrodeposited from a molten halide electrolytic bath onto a substrate metal. The electrodeposition is performed at a predetermined direct current rate or by using pulsed plating techniques which permit relaxation of accumulated uranium ion concentrations within the melt. Layers of as much as to 600 mg/cm/sup 2/ of uranium can be prepared to provide a sufficient density to produce acceptable concentrations of fission product Mo-99. 2 figs.

  13. Systems and methods for managing shared-path instrumentation and irradiation targets in a nuclear reactor

    DOEpatents

    Heinold, Mark R.; Berger, John F.; Loper, Milton H.; Runkle, Gary A.

    2015-12-29

    Systems and methods permit discriminate access to nuclear reactors. Systems provide penetration pathways to irradiation target loading and offloading systems, instrumentation systems, and other external systems at desired times, while limiting such access during undesired times. Systems use selection mechanisms that can be strategically positioned for space sharing to connect only desired systems to a reactor. Selection mechanisms include distinct paths, forks, diverters, turntables, and other types of selectors. Management methods with such systems permits use of the nuclear reactor and penetration pathways between different systems and functions, simultaneously and at only distinct desired times. Existing TIP drives and other known instrumentation and plant systems are useable with access management systems and methods, which can be used in any nuclear plant with access restrictions.

  14. Systems and methods for retaining and removing irradiation targets in a nuclear reactor

    DOEpatents

    Runkle, Gary A.; Matsumoto, Jack T.; Dayal, Yogeshwar; Heinold, Mark R.

    2015-12-08

    A retainer is placed on a conduit to control movement of objects within the conduit in access-restricted areas. Retainers can prevent or allow movement in the conduit in a discriminatory fashion. A fork with variable-spacing between prongs can be a retainer and be extended or collapsed with respect to the conduit to change the size of the conduit. Different objects of different sizes may thus react to the fork differently, some passing and some being blocked. Retainers can be installed in inaccessible areas and allow selective movement in remote portions of conduit where users cannot directly interface, including below nuclear reactors. Position detectors can monitor the movement of objects through the conduit remotely as well, permitting engagement of a desired level of restriction and object movement. Retainers are useable in a variety of nuclear power plants and with irradiation target delivery, harvesting, driving, and other remote handling or robotic systems.

  15. Targeting Pro-Apoptotic TRAIL Receptors Sensitizes HeLa Cervical Cancer Cells to Irradiation-Induced Apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Maduro, John H.; Vries, Elisabeth de; Meersma, Gert-Jan; Hougardy, Brigitte; Zee, Ate G.J. van der; Jong, Steven de

    2008-10-01

    Purpose: To investigate the potential of irradiation in combination with drugs targeting the tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) death receptor (DR)4 and DR5 and their mechanism of action in a cervical cancer cell line. Methods and Materials: Recombinant human TRAIL (rhTRAIL) and the agonistic antibodies against DR4 and DR5 were added to irradiated HeLa cells. The effect was evaluated with apoptosis and cytotoxicity assays and at the protein level. Membrane receptor expression was measured with flow cytometry. Small-interfering RNA against p53, DR4, and DR5 was used to investigate their function on the combined effect. Results: rhTRAIL and the agonistic DR4 and DR5 antibodies strongly enhanced 10-Gy-induced apoptosis. This extra effect was 22%, 23%, and 29% for rhTRAIL, DR4, and DR5, respectively. Irradiation increased p53 expression and increased the membrane expression of DR5 and DR4. p53 suppression, as well as small-interfering RNA against DR5, resulted in a significant downregulation of DR5 membrane expression but did not affect apoptosis induced by irradiation and rhTRAIL. After small-interfering RNA against DR4, rhTRAIL-induced apoptosis and the additive effect of irradiation on rhTRAIL-induced apoptosis were abrogated, implicating an important role for DR4 in apoptosis induced through irradiation in combination with rhTRAIL. Conclusion: Irradiation-induced apoptosis is strongly enhanced by targeting the pro-apoptotic TRAIL receptors DR4 or DR5. Irradiation results in a p53-dependent increase in DR5 membrane expression. The sensitizing effect of rhTRAIL on irradiation in the HeLa cell line is, however especially mediated through the DR4 receptor.

  16. Synthesis of specific nanoparticles for targeting tumor angiogenesis using electron-beam irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshayes, Stéphanie; Maurizot, Victor; Clochard, Marie-Claude; Berthelot, Thomas; Baudin, Cécile; Déléris, Gérard

    2010-03-01

    Angiogenesis plays a critical role in both growth and metastasis of tumors. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is an endogenous mediator of tumor angiogenesis. Blocking associations of the VEGF with its corresponding receptors (KDR) have become critical for anti-tumor therapy. A cyclo-peptide (CBO-P11), derived from VEGF, able to inhibit the interaction between the growth factor and its receptor, was synthesized in our laboratory to provide a target for angiogenesis. We have prepared biocompatible poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) nanoparticles in order to obtain long blood circulating systems. Electron-beam (EB) irradiation was used to activate the PVDF nanoparticles. From electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) measurements, we studied the radical stability in order to optimize the radio-grafting of acrylic acid (AA). Further functionalization of PVDF-g-PAA nanoparticles with the cyclo-peptide via a spacer arm was also possible by performing coupling reactions. High resolution magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (HRMAS NMR) and MALDI mass spectrometry allowed us to follow each chemical step of this peptide immobilization. We designed a new nanodevice suggesting a great potential for targeting angiogenesis. 7727-21-1

  17. Targeting WISP1 to sensitize esophageal squamous cell carcinoma to irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Jin; Jiang, Zhenzhen; Song, Tao; Wu, Bo; Yue, Jing; Zhou, Rongjing; Xie, Ruifei; Chen, Tian; Wu, Shixiu

    2015-01-01

    Radiotherapy is a primary treatment modality for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). However, most of patients benefited little from radiotherapy due to refractory radioresistance. We found that WISP1, a downstream target gene of Wnt/β-catenin pathway, was re-expressed in 67.3 % of ESCC patients as an oncofetal gene. Expression of WISP1 predicted prognosis of ESCC patients treated with radiotherapy. Overall survival in WISP1-positive patients was significantly poorer than in WISP1-negative patients. Serum concentration of WISP1 after radiotherapy reversely correlated with relapse-free survival. Gain and loss of function studies confirmed that WISP1 mediated radioresistance both in esophageal squamous cancer cells and in xenograft tumor models. Further studies revealed that WISP1 contributed to radioresistance primarily by repressing irradiation-induced DNA damage and activating PI3K kinase. LncRNA BOKAS was up-regulated following radiation and promoted WISP1 expression and resultant radioresistance. Furthermore, WISP1 facilitated its own expression in response to radiation, creating a positive feedback loop and increased radioresistance. Our study revealed WISP1 as a potential target to overcome radioresistance in ESCC.  PMID:25749038

  18. Characterization of MeV proton acceleration from double pulse irradiation of foil targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerr, S.; Mo, M. Z.; Masud, R.; Tiedje, H. F.; Tsui, Y.; Fedosejevs, R.; Link, A.; Patel, P.; McLean, H. S.; Hazi, A.; Chen, H.; Ceurvorst, L.; Norreys, P.

    2014-10-01

    We report on the experimental characterization of proton acceleration from double-pulse irradiation of um-scale foil targets. Temporally separated sub-picosecond pulses have been shown to increase the conversion efficiency of laser energy to MeV protons. Here, two 700 fs, 1 ω pulses were separated by 1 to 5 ps; total beam energy was 100 J, with 5-20% of the total energy contained within the first pulse. In contrast to the ultraclean beams used in previous experiments, prepulse energies on the order of 10 mJ were present in the current experiments which appear to have a moderating effect on the enhancement. Proton beam measurements were made with radiochromic film stacks, as well as magnetic spectrometers. The effect on electron generation was measured using Kα emission from buried Cu tracer layers, while specular light diagnostics (FROG, reflection spectralon) indicated the laser coupling efficiency into the target. The results obtained will be presented and compared to PIC simulations. Work by LLNL was performed under the auspices of U.S. DOE under contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  19. EFFECTS OF LASER RADIATION ON MATTER: Simulation of photon acceleration upon irradiation of a mylar target by femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreev, Stepan N.; Rukhadze, Anri A.; Tarakanov, V. P.; Yakutov, B. P.

    2010-01-01

    Acceleration of protons is simulated by the particle-in-cell (PIC) method upon irradiation of mylar targets of different thicknesses by femtosecond plane-polarised pulsed laser radiation and at different angles of radiation incidence on the target. The comparison of the results of calculations with the experimental data obtained in recent experiments shows their good agreement. The optimal angle of incidence (458) at which the proton energy achieves its absolute maximum is obtained.

  20. Radiation reaction and resulting photon emission from laser-irradiated solid targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stark, David; Arefiev, Alexey; Hegelich, Manuel

    2014-10-01

    Once completed, an ongoing upgrade of the Texas-PW laser system would allow us to achieve on-target laser intensities of up to 5 ×1022 W/cm2. As experimental confirmation of the radiation reaction force and the variety of models describing it remains a challenge, here we present a scenario that would enable us to observe the effect by detecting the resulting photon emission. A laser with our planned intensity could accelerate an electron to hundreds of MeV, but the radiation reaction and thus the photon emission would be relatively weak if the electron co-propagates with the wave. We consider a solid density target irradiated by a laser beam so that strong fields are generated due to charge separation. These fields can alter the electron trajectories, leading to strong radiation reaction and photon emission in the focal spot. Simulating this interaction using the particle-in-cell code EPOCH, we perform a target density scan that allows us to optimize the fraction of the laser energy converted into photons and to determine the photon spectrum. Knowing the spectrum and the angular emission is critical for measurements in the lab, since these photons must be distinguished from those from other processes. We use HPC resources from the Texas Advanced Computing Center. This work is supported by DOD-Air Force Contract No. FA9550-14-1-0045, US DOE Contract No. DE-FG02-04ER54742, and DOE SCGF by ORISE-ORAU under Contract No. DE-AC05-06OR23100.

  1. Measured bremsstrahlung photonuclear production of 99Mo ((99m)Tc) with 34 MeV to 1.7 GeV electrons.

    PubMed

    Roberts, A D; Geddes, C G R; Matlis, N; Nakamura, K; O'Neil, J P; Shaw, B H; Steinke, S; van Tilborg, J; Leemans, W P

    2015-02-01

    (99)Mo photonuclear yield was measured using high-energy electrons from Laser Plasma Accelerators and natural molybdenum. Spectroscopically resolved electron beams allow comparisons to Monte Carlo calculations using known (100)Mo(γ,n)(99)Mo cross sections. Yields are consistent with published low-energy data, and higher energy data are well predicted from the calculations. The measured yield is (15±2)×10(-5) atoms/electron (0.92±0.11 GBq/μA) for 25 mm targets at 33.7 MeV, rising to (1391±20)×10(-5) atoms/electron (87±2 GBq/μA) for 54 mm/ 1.7 GeV, with peak power-normalized yield at 150 MeV.

  2. Analyses of the plasma generated by laser irradiation on sputtered target for determination of the thickness used for plasma generation

    SciTech Connect

    Kumaki, Masafumi; Ikeda, Shunsuke; Sekine, Megumi; Munemoto, Naoya; Fuwa, Yasuhiro; Cinquegrani, David; Kanesue, Takeshi; Okamura, Masahiro; Washio, Masakazu

    2014-02-15

    In Brookhaven National Laboratory, laser ion source has been developed to provide heavy ion beams by using plasma generation with 1064 nm Nd:YAG laser irradiation onto solid targets. The laser energy is transferred to the target material and creates a crater on the surface. However, only the partial material can be turned into plasma state and the other portion is considered to be just vaporized. Since heat propagation in the target material requires more than typical laser irradiation period, which is typically several ns, only the certain depth of the layers may contribute to form the plasma. As a result, the depth is more than 500 nm because the base material Al ions were detected. On the other hand, the result of comparing each carbon thickness case suggests that the surface carbon layer is not contributed to generate plasma.

  3. Demonstration of a neonlike argon soft-x-ray laser with a picosecond-laser-irradiated gas puff target.

    PubMed

    Fiedorowicz, H; Bartnik, A; Dunn, J; Smith, R F; Hunter, J; Nilsen, J; Osterheld, A L; Shlyaptsev, V N

    2001-09-15

    We demonstrate a neonlike argon-ion x-ray laser, using a short-pulse laser-irradiated gas puff target. The gas puff target was formed by pulsed injection of gas from a high-pressure solenoid valve through a nozzle in the form of a narrow slit and irradiated with a combination of long, 600-ps and short, 6-ps high-power laser pulses with a total of 10 J of energy in a traveling-wave excitation scheme. Lasing was observed on the 3p (1)S(0)?3s (1)P(1) transition at 46.9 nm and the 3d (1)P(1)?3p (1)P(1) transition at 45.1 nm. A gain of 11 cm(-1) was measured on these transitions for targets up to 0.9 cm long.

  4. WE-D-17A-04: Magnetically Focused Proton Irradiation of Small Volume Targets

    SciTech Connect

    McAuley, G; Slater, J; Wroe, A

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To explore the advantages of magnetic focusing for small volume proton irradiations and the potential clinical benefits for radiosurgery targets. The primary goal is to create narrow elongated proton beams of elliptical cross section with superior dose delivery characteristics compared to current delivery modalities (eg, collimated beams). In addition, more general beam shapes are also under investigation. Methods: Two prototype magnets consisting of 24 segments of samarium-cobalt (Sm2Co17) permanent magnetic material adhered into hollow cylinders were manufactured for testing. A single focusing magnet was placed on a positioning track on our Gantry 1 treatment table and 15 mm diameter proton beams with energies and modulation relevant to clinical radiosurgery applications (127 to 186 MeV, and 0 to 30 mm modulation) were delivered to a terminal water tank. Beam dose distributions were measured using a PTW diode detector and Gafchromic EBT2 film. Longitudinal and transverse dose profiles were analyzed and compared to data from Monte Carlo simulations analogous to the experimental setup. Results: The narrow elongated focused beam spots showed high elliptical symmetry indicating high magnet quality. In addition, when compared to unfocused beams, peak-to-entrance depth dose ratios were 11 to 14% larger (depending on presence or extent of modulation), and minor axis penumbras were 11 to 20% smaller (again depending on modulation) for focused beams. These results suggest that the use of rare earth magnet assemblies is practical and could improve dose-sparing of normal tissue and organs at risk while delivering enhanced dose to small proton radiosurgery targets. Conclusion: Quadrapole rare earth magnetic assemblies are a promising and inexpensive method to counteract particle out scatter that tends to degrade the peak to entrance performance of small field proton beams. Knowledge gained from current experiments will inform the design of a prototype treatment

  5. Intrafractional Target Motions and Uncertainties of Treatment Setup Reference Systems in Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Yue, Ning J.; Goyal, Sharad; Zhou Jinghao; Khan, Atif J.; Haffty, Bruce G.

    2011-04-01

    Purpose: This study investigated the magnitude of intrafractional motion and level of accuracy of various setup strategies in accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) using three-dimensional conformal external beam radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: At lumpectomy, gold fiducial markers were strategically sutured to the surrounding walls of the cavity. Weekly fluoroscopy imaging was conducted at treatment to investigate the respiration-induced target motions. Daily pre- and post-RT kV imaging was performed, and images were matched to digitally reconstructed radiographs based on bony anatomy and fiducial markers, respectively, to determine the intrafractional motion magnitudes over the course of treatment. The positioning differences of the laser tattoo- and the bony anatomy-based setups compared with those of the marker-based setup (benchmark) were also determined. The study included 21 patients. Results: Although lung exhibited significant motion, the average marker motion amplitude on the fluoroscopic image was about 1 mm. Over a typical treatment time period, average intrafractional motion magnitude was 4.2 mm and 2.6 mm based on the marker and bony anatomy matching, respectively. The bony anatomy- and laser tattoo-based interfractional setup errors, with respect to the fiducial marker-based setup, were 7.1 and 9.0 mm, respectively. Conclusions: Respiration has limited effects on the target motion during APBI. Bony anatomy-based treatment setup improves the accuracy relative to that of the laser tattoo-based setup approach. Since fiducial markers are sutured directly to the surgical cavity, the marker-based approach can further improve the interfractional setup accuracy. On average, a seroma cavity exhibits intrafractional motion of more than 4 mm, a magnitude that is larger than that which is otherwise derived based on bony anatomy matching. A seroma-specific marker-based approach has the potential to improve treatment accuracy by taking the true inter

  6. SU-D-304-02: Magnetically Focused Proton Irradiation of Small Field Targets

    SciTech Connect

    McAuley, GA; Slater, JM; Slater, JD; Wroe, AJ

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the use of magnetic focusing for small field proton irradiations. It is hypothesized that magnetic focusing will provide significant dose distribution benefits over standard collimated beams for fields less than 10 mm diameter. Methods: Magnets consisting of 24 segments of radiation hard samarium-cobalt adhered into hollow cylinders were designed and manufactured. Two focusing magnets were placed on a positioning track on our Gantry 1 treatment table. Proton beams with energies of 127 and 157 MeV, 15 and 30 mm modulation, and 8 mm initial diameters were delivered to a water tank using single-stage scattering. Depth dose distributions were measured using a PTW PR60020 diode detector and transverse profiles were measured with Gafchromic EBT3 film. Monte Carlo simulations were also performed - both for comparison with experimental data and to further explore the potential of magnetic focusing in silica. For example, beam spot areas (based on the 90% dose contour) were matched at Bragg depth between simulated 100 MeV collimated beams and simulated beams focused by two 400 T/m gradient magnets. Results: Preliminary experimental results show 23% higher peak to entrance dose ratios and flatter spread out Bragg peak plateaus for 8 mm focused beams compared with uncollimated beams. Monte Carlo simulations showed 21% larger peak to entrance ratios and a ∼9 fold more efficient dose to target delivery compared to spot-sized matched collimated beams. Our latest results will be presented. Conclusion: Our results suggest that rare earth focusing magnet assemblies could reduce skin dose and beam number while delivering dose to nominally spherical radiosurgery targets over a much shorter time compared to unfocused beams. Immediate clinical applications include those associated with proton radiosurgery and functional radiosurgery of the brain and spine, however expanded treatment sites can be also envisaged.

  7. Mitochondria-Targeted Vitamin E Protects Skin from UVB-Irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Won-Serk; Kim, Ikyon; Kim, Wang-Kyun; Choi, Ju-Yeon; Kim, Doo Yeong; Moon, Sung-Guk; Min, Hyung-Keun; Song, Min-Kyu; Sung, Jong-Hyuk

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria-targeted vitamin E (MVE) is designed to accumulate within mitochondria and is applied to decrease mitochondrial oxidative damage. However, the protective effects of MVE in skin cells have not been identified. We investigated the protective effect of MVE against UVB in dermal fibroblasts and immortalized human keratinocyte cell line (HaCaT). In addition, we studied the wound-healing effect of MVE in animal models. We found that MVE increased the proliferation and survival of fibroblasts at low concentration (i.e., nM ranges). In addition, MVE increased collagen production and downregulated matrix metalloproteinase1. MVE also increased the proliferation and survival of HaCaT cells. UVB increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in fibroblasts and HaCaT cells, while MVE decreased ROS production at low concentration. In an animal experiment, MVE accelerated wound healing from laser-induced skin damage. These results collectively suggest that low dose MVE protects skin from UVB irradiation. Therefore, MVE can be developed as a cosmetic raw material. PMID:26869457

  8. Melanosomes are a primary target of Q-switched ruby laser irradiation in guinea pig skin

    SciTech Connect

    Polla, L.L.; Margolis, R.J.; Dover, J.S.; Whitaker, D.; Murphy, G.F.; Jacques, S.L.; Anderson, R.R.

    1987-09-01

    The specific targeting of melanosomes may allow for laser therapy of pigmented cutaneous lesions. The mechanism of selective destruction of pigmented cells by various lasers, however, has not been fully clarified. Black, brown, and albino guinea pigs were exposed to optical pulses at various radiant exposure doses from a Q-switched, 40 nsec, 694 nm ruby laser. Biopsies were analyzed by light and electron microscopy (EM). Albino animals failed to develop clinical or microscopic evidence of cutaneous injury after irradiation. In both black and brown animals, the clinical threshold for gross change was 0.4 J/cm2, which produced an ash-white spot. By light microscopy, alterations appeared at 0.3 J/cm2 and included separation at the dermoepidermal junction, and the formation of vacuolated epidermal cells with a peripheral cytoplasmic condensation of pigment. By EM, enlarged melanosomes with a central lucent zone were observed within affected epidermal cells at 0.3 J/cm2. At 0.8 and 1.2 J/cm2, individual melanosomes were more intensely damaged and disruption of melanosomes deep in the hair papillae was observed. Dermal-epidermal blisters were formed precisely at the lamina lucida, leaving basal cell membranes and hemidesmosomes intact. Possible mechanisms for melanosomal injury are discussed. These observations show that the effects of the Q-switched ruby laser are melanin-specific and melanin-dependent, and may be useful in the selective destruction of pigmented as well as superficial cutaneous lesions.

  9. Sensing device and method for measuring emission time delay during irradiation of targeted samples utilizing variable phase tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danielson, J. D. Sheldon (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    An apparatus for measuring emission time delay during irradiation of targeted samples by utilizing digital signal processing to determine the emission phase shift caused by the sample is disclosed. The apparatus includes a source of electromagnetic radiation adapted to irradiate a target sample. A mechanism generates first and second digital input signals of known frequencies with a known phase relationship, and a device then converts the first and second digital input signals to analog sinusoidal signals. An element is provided to direct the first input signal to the electromagnetic radiation source to modulate the source by the frequency thereof to irradiate the target sample and generate a target sample emission. A device detects the target sample emission and produces a corresponding first output signal having a phase shift relative to the phase of the first input signal, the phase shift being caused by the irradiation time delay in the sample. A member produces a known phase shift in the second input signal to create a second output signal. A mechanism is then provided for converting each of the first and second analog output signals to digital signals. A mixer receives the first and second digital output signals and compares the signal phase relationship therebetween to produce a signal indicative of the change in phase relationship between the first and second output signals caused by the target sample emission. Finally, a feedback arrangement alters the phase of the second input signal based on the mixer signal to ultimately place the first and second output signals in quadrature. Mechanisms for enhancing this phase comparison and adjustment technique are also disclosed.

  10. Deuteron irradiation of W and WO3 for production of high specific activity (186)Re: Challenges associated with thick target preparation.

    PubMed

    Balkin, Ethan R; Gagnon, Katherine; Strong, Kevin T; Smith, Bennett E; Dorman, Eric F; Emery, Robert C; Pauzauskie, Peter J; Fassbender, Michael E; Cutler, Cathy S; Ketring, Alan R; Jurisson, Silvia S; Wilbur, D Scott

    2016-09-01

    This investigation evaluated target fabrication and beam parameters for scale-up production of high specific activity (186)Re using deuteron irradiation of enriched (186)W via the (186)W(d,2n)(186)Re reaction. Thick W and WO3 targets were prepared, characterized and evaluated in deuteron irradiations. Full-thickness targets, as determined using SRIM, were prepared by uniaxially pressing powdered natural abundance W and WO3, or 96.86% enriched (186)W, into Al target supports. Alternatively, thick targets were prepared by pressing (186)W between two layers of graphite powder or by placing pre-sintered (1105°C, 12h) natural abundance WO3 pellets into an Al target support. Assessments of structural integrity were made on each target prepared. Prior to irradiation, material composition analyses were conducted using SEM, XRD, and Raman spectroscopy. Within a minimum of 24h post irradiation, gamma-ray spectroscopy was performed on all targets to assess production yields and radionuclidic byproducts. Problems were encountered with the structural integrity of some pressed W and WO3 pellets before and during irradiation, and target material characterization results could be correlated with the structural integrity of the pressed target pellets. Under the conditions studied, the findings suggest that all WO3 targets prepared and studied were unacceptable. By contrast, (186)W metal was found to be a viable target material for (186)Re production. Thick targets prepared with powdered (186)W pressed between layers of graphite provided a particularly robust target configuration.

  11. Measurement of prompt gamma profiles in inhomogeneous targets with a knife-edge slit camera during proton irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priegnitz, M.; Helmbrecht, S.; Janssens, G.; Perali, I.; Smeets, J.; Vander Stappen, F.; Sterpin, E.; Fiedler, F.

    2015-06-01

    Proton and ion beam therapies become increasingly relevant in radiation therapy. To fully exploit the potential of this irradiation technique and to achieve maximum target volume conformality, the verification of particle ranges is highly desirable. Many research activities focus on the measurement of the spatial distributions of prompt gamma rays emitted during irradiation. A passively collimating knife-edge slit camera is a promising option to perform such measurements. In former publications, the feasibility of accurate detection of proton range shifts in homogeneous targets could be shown with such a camera. We present slit camera measurements of prompt gamma depth profiles in inhomogeneous targets. From real treatment plans and their underlying CTs, representative beam paths are selected and assembled as one-dimensional inhomogeneous targets built from tissue equivalent materials. These phantoms have been irradiated with monoenergetic proton pencil beams. The accuracy of range deviation estimation as well as the detectability of range shifts is investigated in different scenarios. In most cases, range deviations can be detected within less than 2 mm. In close vicinity to low-density regions, range detection is challenging. In particular, a minimum beam penetration depth of 7 mm beyond a cavity is required for reliable detection of a cavity filling with the present setup. Dedicated data post-processing methods may be capable of overcoming this limitation.

  12. Measurement of prompt gamma profiles in inhomogeneous targets with a knife-edge slit camera during proton irradiation.

    PubMed

    Priegnitz, M; Helmbrecht, S; Janssens, G; Perali, I; Smeets, J; Vander Stappen, F; Sterpin, E; Fiedler, F

    2015-06-21

    Proton and ion beam therapies become increasingly relevant in radiation therapy. To fully exploit the potential of this irradiation technique and to achieve maximum target volume conformality, the verification of particle ranges is highly desirable. Many research activities focus on the measurement of the spatial distributions of prompt gamma rays emitted during irradiation. A passively collimating knife-edge slit camera is a promising option to perform such measurements. In former publications, the feasibility of accurate detection of proton range shifts in homogeneous targets could be shown with such a camera. We present slit camera measurements of prompt gamma depth profiles in inhomogeneous targets. From real treatment plans and their underlying CTs, representative beam paths are selected and assembled as one-dimensional inhomogeneous targets built from tissue equivalent materials. These phantoms have been irradiated with monoenergetic proton pencil beams. The accuracy of range deviation estimation as well as the detectability of range shifts is investigated in different scenarios. In most cases, range deviations can be detected within less than 2 mm. In close vicinity to low-density regions, range detection is challenging. In particular, a minimum beam penetration depth of 7 mm beyond a cavity is required for reliable detection of a cavity filling with the present setup. Dedicated data post-processing methods may be capable of overcoming this limitation.

  13. Growth of ZnO nanostructures by femtosecond laser irradiation of polycrystalline targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escalante, G.; Ryu, Y. K.; de la Cruz, A. Ruíz; Puerto, D.; Solís, J.; Fernández, P.

    2015-11-01

    The formation of LIPSS upon irradiation with ultrashort laser pulses on the surface of polycrystalline ZnO samples and the potential use of irradiated areas as growth patterns for the production of highly ordered nanostructures upon redeposition have been studied. For this purpose, we have performed different sets of irradiation experiments including static irradiation experiments at low and high repetition rates, as well as scanned beam experiments at high repetition rate, this later in order to generate relatively large template regions for nanostructure growth by redeposition. In all cases, LIPSS formation has been achieved in the ZnO polycrystalline surface. Under appropriate irradiation conditions, the material is redeposited rendering a high density of nanostructures with high aspect ratios and good crystal quality. Given the special luminescent properties and applications of ZnO, particular attention has been paid to the luminescence properties after irradiation and after post-irradiation thermal treatments. The observed evolution has been correlated with evolution of point defects in the treated surfaces. Thermal treatments cause significant changes in both the topography and the cathodoluminescent emission, such as the development of laminar structures, the emergence of nucleation centers and the recovery of ultraviolet emission previously quenched as a consequence of irradiation. Interestingly, LIPSS remain after the luminescent recovery by thermal annealing, opening the possibility to control both luminescence properties and grain size while maintaining an ordered structure with a high effective surface area.

  14. Stressed capsules of austenitic and martensitic steels irradiated in SINQ Target-4 in contact with liquid lead bismuth eutectic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Y.; Gavillet, D.; Restani, R.

    2008-06-01

    In the MEGAPIE target, the steels used for the proton beam entrance window and other components in the spallation reaction zone suffer not only from the irradiation damage produced by protons and neutrons but also from the corrosion and embrittlement induced by liquid lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE). Although these effects have been separately studied by a number of authors, the synergistic effects of irradiation, LBE corrosion and embrittlement are little understood. This work presents detailed analyses of two stressed capsules made of the austenitic steel EC316LN and the martensitic steel 9Cr2WVTa, which were irradiated in SINQ Target-4 in contact with LBE at calculated temperatures of 315 and 225 °C, respectively. The Electron Probe Microanalysis (EPMA) on the cross-sections of the capsules showed that the stagnant LBE induced only slight corrosion on both capsules and no cracks existed in the wall of the EC316LN capsule. Some cracks were observed in the electron beam weld (EBW) and its vicinity of the 9Cr2WVTa capsule, which can be attributed to the high stress inside the wall, the hardening of the material induced by either welding (without re-tempering) or irradiation, and the effects of LBE embrittlement.

  15. Near monochromatic 20 Me V proton acceleration using fs laser irradiating Au foils in target normal sheath acceleration regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torrisi, L.; Cutroneo, M.; Ceccio, G.; Cannavò, A.; Batani, D.; Boutoux, G.; Jakubowska, K.; Ducret, J. E.

    2016-04-01

    A 200 mJ laser pulse energy, 39 fs-pulse duration, 10 μm focal spot, p-polarized radiation has been employed to irradiate thin Au foils to produce proton acceleration in the forward direction. Gold foils were employed to produce high density relativistic electrons emission in the forward direction to generate a high electric field driving the ion acceleration. Measurements were performed by changing the focal position in respect of the target surface. Proton acceleration was monitored using fast SiC detectors in time-of-flight configuration. A high proton energy, up to about 20 Me V, with a narrow energy distribution, was obtained in particular conditions depending on the laser parameters, the irradiation conditions, and a target optimization.

  16. Dry-distillation of astatine-211 from irradiated bismuth targets: a time-saving procedure with high recovery yields.

    PubMed

    Lindegren, S; Bäck, T; Jensen, H J

    2001-08-01

    Astatine-211 was produced via the 209Bi(alpha,2n) 211At reaction. The radionuclide was isolated with a novel procedure employing dry-distillation of the irradiated target material. The astatine was condensed as a dry residue in a PEEK-capillary cryotrap. Distillation was completed within 1-2 min with isolation yields of 92 +/- 3%. Subsequent work-up of the nuclide resulted in final recovery yields of 79 +/- 3%. PMID:11393754

  17. Dry-distillation of astatine-211 from irradiated bismuth targets: a time-saving procedure with high recovery yields.

    PubMed

    Lindegren, S; Bäck, T; Jensen, H J

    2001-08-01

    Astatine-211 was produced via the 209Bi(alpha,2n) 211At reaction. The radionuclide was isolated with a novel procedure employing dry-distillation of the irradiated target material. The astatine was condensed as a dry residue in a PEEK-capillary cryotrap. Distillation was completed within 1-2 min with isolation yields of 92 +/- 3%. Subsequent work-up of the nuclide resulted in final recovery yields of 79 +/- 3%.

  18. RTNS-II: irradiations at the Rotating Target Neutron Source-II. 1983 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-01-01

    This is the second annual report summarizing irradiation experiments and operations at RTNS-II. It covers calendar year 1983 and includes reports on all irradiations, non-fusion as well as fusion, and on utilization of Monbusho's transmission electron microscope (TEM) a RTNS-II. Each summary article has been submitted by the investigator and has been altered only to meet the style and format requirements of this report.

  19. Helium and hydrogen measurements on pure materials irradiated in SINQ Target 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliver, B. M.; Dai, Y.

    2009-04-01

    Several irradiations have been performed in the Swiss Spallation Neutron Source (SINQ) to establish a materials database for mixed proton and neutron fluxes for future spallation neutron and other accelerator sources. Pure metal dosimetry materials from the second irradiation (STIP-II) have been analyzed for their total helium and hydrogen contents and their release characteristics with temperature (TDS). Total helium results are similar to those observed earlier from the first irradiation experiment (STIP-I), with concentrations ranging from ˜500 to ˜1000 appm. Hydrogen contents varied over a larger range from ˜100 to ˜60 000. 3He/ 4He ratios were generally consistent with expectations, except for Ti, Nb, and Ta which showed lower values due to 3He from decay of irradiation-generated tritium. Some differences were observed in the hydrogen TDS data for the control and irradiated materials, including some evidence for additional lower-temperature release and for multiple release peaks. Additionally, differences were noted in the releases for irradiated material that been cleaned versus material that had no cleaning.

  20. Thorium silicate compound as a solid-state target for production of isomeric thorium-229 nuclei by electron beam irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisyuk, P. V.; Vasilyev, O. S.; Lebedinskii, Y. Y.; Krasavin, A. V.; Tkalya, E. V.; Troyan, V. I.; Habibulina, R. F.; Chubunova, E. V.; Yakovlev, V. P.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we discuss an idea of the experiment for excitation of the isomeric transition in thorium-229 nuclei by irradiating with electron beam targets with necessary physical characteristics. The chemical composition and bandgap of ThSi10O22 were determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and reflection electron energy loss spectroscopy. It was found that the energy gap is equal to 7.7 eV and does not change when the target is exposed to a medium energy electron beam for a long time. This indicates that the compound possesses high electron-beam resistance. A quantitative estimation of the output function of isomeric thorium-229 nuclei generated by interaction of nuclei with the secondary electron flow formed by irradiating the solid-state ThSi10O22-based target is given. The estimation shows that ThSi10O22 is a promising thorium-containing target for investigating excitation of the nuclear low-lying isomeric transition in the thorium-229 isotope using medium-energy electrons.

  1. Dominant front-side acceleration of energetic proton beams from plastic targets irradiated by an ultraintense laser pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, K.; Park, S. H.; Cha, Y.-H.; Lee, Y. W.; Jeong, Y. U.; Lee, J. Y.; Kim, K. N.

    2011-01-15

    An experimental observation has been made by using aluminum-coated Mylar foils, which strongly supports that in the case of plastic target, the energetic part of the proton beam originates from the front-side of the target. When a 30 fs laser pulse with an intensity of 1.6x10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2} was irradiated on the 12.5-{mu}m-thick Mylar side of the aluminum-coated Mylar foil, the maximum proton energy was reduced by a factor 5.5 as compared to that of 3.3 MeV observed from the single layer of the Mylar foil. With the help of a two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation, these observations can be interpreted that in the case of plastic target, the energetic proton beam originates from the front-side of the target. In the case of an aluminum-coated 6-{mu}m-thick Mylar foil, more energetic proton beams of 4.7 MeV were also observed when the laser pulse was irradiated on the aluminum side as compared to those of 3.4 MeV from the single Mylar foil.

  2. Post-irradiation analysis of an ISOLDE lead-bismuth target: Stable and long-lived noble gas nuclides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leya, I.; Grimberg, A.; David, J.-C.; Schumann, D.; Neuhausen, J.; Zanini, L.; Noah, E.

    2016-07-01

    We measured the isotopic concentrations of long-lived and stable He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe isotopes in a sample from a lead-bismuth eutectic target irradiated with 1.0 and 1.4 GeV protons. Our data indicate for most noble gases nearly complete release with retention fractions in the range of percent or less. Higher retention fractions result from the decay of long-lived radioactive progenitors from groups 1, 2, or 7 of the periodic table. From the data we can calculate a retention fraction for 3H of 2-3%. For alkaline metals we find retention fractions of about 10%, 30%, and 50% for Na, Rb, and Cs, respectively. For the alkaline earth metal Ba we found complete retention. Finally, the measured Kr and Xe concentrations indicate that there was some release of the halogens Br and I during and/or after the irradiation.

  3. Development of a Charged Particle Microbeam for Targeted and Single Particle Subcellular Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Yanch, Jacquelyn C.

    2004-03-12

    The development of a charged particle microbeam for single particle, subcellular irradiations at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Laboratory for Accelerator Beam Applications (MIT LABA) was initiated under this NEER aeard. The Microbeam apparatus makes use of a pre-existing electrostatic accelerator with a horizontal beam tube.

  4. Comparison of Irradiation and Wolbachia Based Approaches for Sterile-Male Strategies Targeting Aedes albopictus

    PubMed Central

    Atyame, Célestine M.; Labbé, Pierrick; Lebon, Cyrille; Weill, Mylène; Moretti, Riccardo; Marini, Francesca; Gouagna, Louis Clément; Calvitti, Maurizio; Tortosa, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    The global expansion of Aedes albopictus together with the absence of vaccines for most of the arboviruses transmitted by this mosquito has stimulated the development of sterile-male strategies aiming at controlling disease transmission through the suppression of natural vector populations. In this context, two environmentally friendly control strategies, namely the Sterile Insect Technique (SIT) and the Wolbachia-based Incompatible Insect Technique (IIT) are currently being developed in several laboratories worldwide. So far however, there is a lack of comparative assessment of these strategies under the same controlled conditions. Here, we compared the mating capacities, i.e. insemination capacity, sterilization capacity and mating competitiveness of irradiated (35 Gy) and incompatible Ae. albopictus males at different ages and ratios under laboratory controlled conditions. Our data show that there was no significant difference in insemination capacity of irradiated and incompatible males, both male types showing lower capacities than untreated males at 1 day but recovering full capacity within 5 days following emergence. Regarding mating competitiveness trials, a global observed trend is that incompatible males tend to induce a lower hatching rate than irradiated males in cage controlled confrontations. More specifically, incompatible males were found more competitive than irradiated males in 5:1 ratio regardless of age, while irradiated males were only found more competitive than incompatible males in the 1:1 ratio at 10 days old. Overall, under the tested conditions, IIT seemed to be slightly more effective than SIT. However, considering that a single strategy will likely not be adapted to all environments, our data stimulates the need for comparative assessments of distinct strategies in up-scaled conditions in order to identify the most suitable and safe sterilizing technology to be implemented in a specific environmental setting and to identify the

  5. Comparison of Irradiation and Wolbachia Based Approaches for Sterile-Male Strategies Targeting Aedes albopictus.

    PubMed

    Atyame, Célestine M; Labbé, Pierrick; Lebon, Cyrille; Weill, Mylène; Moretti, Riccardo; Marini, Francesca; Gouagna, Louis Clément; Calvitti, Maurizio; Tortosa, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    The global expansion of Aedes albopictus together with the absence of vaccines for most of the arboviruses transmitted by this mosquito has stimulated the development of sterile-male strategies aiming at controlling disease transmission through the suppression of natural vector populations. In this context, two environmentally friendly control strategies, namely the Sterile Insect Technique (SIT) and the Wolbachia-based Incompatible Insect Technique (IIT) are currently being developed in several laboratories worldwide. So far however, there is a lack of comparative assessment of these strategies under the same controlled conditions. Here, we compared the mating capacities, i.e. insemination capacity, sterilization capacity and mating competitiveness of irradiated (35 Gy) and incompatible Ae. albopictus males at different ages and ratios under laboratory controlled conditions. Our data show that there was no significant difference in insemination capacity of irradiated and incompatible males, both male types showing lower capacities than untreated males at 1 day but recovering full capacity within 5 days following emergence. Regarding mating competitiveness trials, a global observed trend is that incompatible males tend to induce a lower hatching rate than irradiated males in cage controlled confrontations. More specifically, incompatible males were found more competitive than irradiated males in 5:1 ratio regardless of age, while irradiated males were only found more competitive than incompatible males in the 1:1 ratio at 10 days old. Overall, under the tested conditions, IIT seemed to be slightly more effective than SIT. However, considering that a single strategy will likely not be adapted to all environments, our data stimulates the need for comparative assessments of distinct strategies in up-scaled conditions in order to identify the most suitable and safe sterilizing technology to be implemented in a specific environmental setting and to identify the

  6. Arcing and rf signal generation during target irradiation by a high-energy, pulsed neutral particle beam

    SciTech Connect

    Robiscoe, R.T.

    1988-02-01

    We present a theory describing the dynamics of arc discharges in bulk dielectric materials on board space-based vehicles. Such ''punch-through'' arcs can occur in target satellites irradiated by high-energy (250 MeV), pulsed (100 mA x 10 ms) neutral particle beams. We treat the arc as a capacitively limited avalanche current in the target dielectric material, and we find expressions for the arc duration, charge transport, currents, and discharge energy. These quantities are adjusted to be consistent with known scaling laws for the area of charge depleted by the arc. After a brief account of the statistical distribution of voltages at which the arc starts and stops, we calculate the signal strength and frequency spectrum of the electromagnetic radiation broadcast by the arc. We find that arcs from thick ()similarreverse arrowto)1 cm) targets can generate rf signals detectable up to 1000 km from the target, bu a radio receiver operating at frequency 80 MHz, bandwidth 100 kHz, and detection threshold -105 dBm. These thick-target arc signals are 10 to 20 dB above ambient noise at the receiver, and they provide target hit assessment if the signal spectrum can be sampled at several frequencies in the nominal range 30-200 MHz. Thin-target ()similarreverse arrowto)1 mm) arc signals are much weaker, but when they are detecable in conjunction with thick-target signals, target discrimination is possible by comparing the signal frequency spectra. 24 refs., 12 figs.

  7. Production of medical isotopes from a thorium target irradiated by light charged particles up to 70 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duchemin, C.; Guertin, A.; Haddad, F.; Michel, N.; Métivier, V.

    2015-02-01

    The irradiation of a thorium target by light charged particles (protons and deuterons) leads to the production of several isotopes of medical interest. Direct nuclear reaction allows the production of Protactinium-230 which decays to Uranium-230 the mother nucleus of Thorium-226, a promising isotope for alpha radionuclide therapy. The fission of Thorium-232 produces fragments of interest like Molybdenum-99, Iodine-131 and Cadmium-115g. We focus our study on the production of these isotopes, performing new cross section measurements and calculating production yields. Our new sets of data are compared with the literature and the last version of the TALYS code.

  8. Production of medical isotopes from a thorium target irradiated by light charged particles up to 70 MeV.

    PubMed

    Duchemin, C; Guertin, A; Haddad, F; Michel, N; Métivier, V

    2015-02-01

    The irradiation of a thorium target by light charged particles (protons and deuterons) leads to the production of several isotopes of medical interest. Direct nuclear reaction allows the production of Protactinium-230 which decays to Uranium-230 the mother nucleus of Thorium-226, a promising isotope for alpha radionuclide therapy. The fission of Thorium-232 produces fragments of interest like Molybdenum-99, Iodine-131 and Cadmium-115g. We focus our study on the production of these isotopes, performing new cross section measurements and calculating production yields. Our new sets of data are compared with the literature and the last version of the TALYS code.

  9. Production of medical isotopes from a thorium target irradiated by light charged particles up to 70 MeV.

    PubMed

    Duchemin, C; Guertin, A; Haddad, F; Michel, N; Métivier, V

    2015-02-01

    The irradiation of a thorium target by light charged particles (protons and deuterons) leads to the production of several isotopes of medical interest. Direct nuclear reaction allows the production of Protactinium-230 which decays to Uranium-230 the mother nucleus of Thorium-226, a promising isotope for alpha radionuclide therapy. The fission of Thorium-232 produces fragments of interest like Molybdenum-99, Iodine-131 and Cadmium-115g. We focus our study on the production of these isotopes, performing new cross section measurements and calculating production yields. Our new sets of data are compared with the literature and the last version of the TALYS code. PMID:25574934

  10. Computational study of the generation of crystal defects in a bcc metal target irradiated by short laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Zhibin; Johnson, Robert A.; Zhigilei, Leonid V.

    2008-06-01

    The generation of crystal defects in a Cr target irradiated by a short, 200 fs, laser pulse is investigated in computer simulations performed with a computational model that combines the classical molecular dynamics method with a continuum description of the laser excitation of conduction band electrons, electron-phonon coupling, and electron heat conduction. Interatomic interactions are described by the embedded atom method (EAM) potential with a parametrization designed for Cr. The potential is tested by comparing the properties of the EAM Cr material with experimental data and predictions of density functional theory calculations. The simulations are performed at laser fluences close to the threshold for surface melting. Fast temperature variation and strong thermoelastic stresses produced by the laser pulse are causing surface melting and epitaxial resolidification, transient appearance of a high density of stacking faults along the {110} planes, and generation of a large number of point defects (vacancies and self-interstitials). The stacking faults appear as a result of internal shifts in the crystal undergoing a rapid uniaxial expansion in the direction normal to the irradiated surface. The stacking faults are unstable and disappear shortly after the laser-induced tensile stress wave leaves the surface region of the target. Thermally activated generation of vacancy-interstitial pairs during the initial temperature spike and quick escape of highly mobile self-interstitials to the melting front or the free surface of the target, along with the formation of vacancies at the solid-liquid interface during the fast resolidification process, result in a high density of vacancies, on the order of 10-3 per lattice site, created in the surface region of the target. The strong supersaturation of vacancies can be related to the incubation effect in multipulse laser ablation/damage and should play an important role in mixing/alloying of multicomponent or composite

  11. Three-dimensional thermal response numerical simulation of laser irradiating simulative warhead target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Minsun; Jiang, Houman

    2015-05-01

    The thermal response of a cylindrical simulative warhead consisting of the steel casing and the TNT explosive irradiated by laser is simulated, basing on the smoothed particle hydrodynamics method. Preliminary computational simulation results show that, when the power density of 500W/cm2 continuous laser irradiation on a sealed explosive device consisting of the type 304 steel casing with thickness of 5mm and TNT explosive, compared with no airflow, the speed of 200m/s tangential airflow can reduce the thermal initiation time of 0.6s. In the case of incident laser power density is high, the convection cooling effect of tangential airflow can be neglected. The oxidation of airflow can significantly shorten the thermal initiation time of internal explosive.

  12. Proton emission from thin hydrogenated targets irradiated by laser pulses at 10{sup 16} W/cm{sup 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Torrisi, L.; Giuffrida, L.; Cirrone, P.; Cutroneo, M.; Picciotto, A.; Krasa, J.; Margarone, D.; Velyhan, A.; Laska, L.; Ullschmied, J.; Wolowski, J.; Badziak, J.; Rosinski, M.

    2012-02-15

    The iodine laser at PALS Laboratory in Prague, operating at 1315 nm fundamental harmonics and at 300 ps FWHM pulse length, is employed to irradiate thin hydrogenated targets placed in vacuum at intensities on the order of 10{sup 16} W/cm{sup 2}. The laser-generated plasma is investigated in terms of proton and ion emission in the forward and backward directions. The time-of-flight technique, using ion collectors and semiconductor detectors, is used to measure the ion currents and the corresponding velocities and energies. Thomson parabola spectrometer is employed to separate the contribution of the ion emission from single laser shots. A particular attention is given to the proton production in terms of the maximum energy, emission yield, and angular distribution as a function of the laser energy, focal position, target thickness, and composition. Metallic and polymeric targets allow to generate protons with large energy range and different yield, depending on the laser, target composition, and target geometry properties.

  13. High e+/e− Ratio Dense Pair Creation with 1021W.cm−2 Laser Irradiating Solid Targets

    PubMed Central

    Liang, E.; Clarke, T.; Henderson, A.; Fu, W.; Lo, W.; Taylor, D.; Chaguine, P.; Zhou, S.; Hua, Y.; Cen, X.; Wang, X.; Kao, J.; Hasson, H.; Dyer, G.; Serratto, K.; Riley, N.; Donovan, M.; Ditmire, T.

    2015-01-01

    We report results of new pair creation experiments using ~100 Joule pulses of the Texas Petawatt Laser to irradiate solid gold and platinum targets, with intensities up to ~1.9 × 1021 W.cm−2 and pulse durations as short as ~130 fs. Positron to electron (e+/e−) ratios >15% were observed for many thick disk and rod targets, with the highest e+/e− ratio reaching ~50% for a Pt rod. The inferred pair yield was ~ few ×1010 with emerging pair density reaching ~1015/cm3 so that the pair skin depth becomes < pair jet transverse size. These results represent major milestones towards the goal of creating a significant quantity of dense pair-dominated plasmas with e+/e− approaching 100% and pair skin depth ≪ pair plasma size, which will have wide-ranging applications to astrophysics and fundamental physics. PMID:26364764

  14. Measurement and modelling of radionuclide production in thick spherical targets irradiated isotropically with 1600 MeV protons

    SciTech Connect

    Michel, R.; Lange, H.J.; Leya, I.; Luepke, M.; Herpers, U.; Meltzow, B.; Roesel, R.; Filges, D.; Cloth, P.; Dragovitsch, P.

    1994-12-31

    Two thick spherical targets made of gabbro and of steel with radii of 25 and 10 cm, respectively, were isotropically irradiated with 1.6 GeV protons at the Saturne accelerator at Laboratoire National Saturne/Saclay in order to simulate the interactions of galactic cosmic ray (GCR) protons with stony and iron meteoroids. The artificial meteoroids contained large numbers of individual small targets of up to 27 elements, in which the depth-dependent production of residual nuclides was measured by {gamma}-, accelerator and conventional mass spectrometry. Theoretical production depth profiles were derived by folding depth-dependent spectra of primary and secondary particles calculated by the HERMES code system with experimental and theoretical production rates shortcomings of the cross section data base can be distinguished and medium-energy neutron cross sections can be improved.

  15. High e+/e– ratio dense pair creation with 1021W.cm–2 laser irradiating solid targets

    DOE PAGES

    Liang, E.; Clarke, T.; Henderson, A.; Fu, W.; Lo, W.; Taylor, D.; Chaguine, P.; Zhou, S.; Hua, Y.; Cen, X.; et al

    2015-09-14

    In this study, we report results of new pair creation experiments using ~100 Joule pulses of the Texas Petawatt Laser to irradiate solid gold and platinum targets, with intensities up to ~1.9 × 1021 W.cm–2 and pulse durations as short as ~130 fs. Positron to electron (e+/e–) ratios >15% were observed for many thick disk and rod targets, with the highest e+/e– ratio reaching ~50% for a Pt rod. The inferred pair yield was ~ few ×1010 with emerging pair density reaching ~1015/cm3 so that the pair skin depth becomes < pair jet transverse size. These results represent major milestonesmore » towards the goal of creating a significant quantity of dense pair-dominated plasmas with e+/e– approaching 100% and pair skin depth << pair plasma size, which will have wide-ranging applications to astrophysics and fundamental physics.« less

  16. High e+/e- Ratio Dense Pair Creation with 1021W.cm-2 Laser Irradiating Solid Targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, E.; Clarke, T.; Henderson, A.; Fu, W.; Lo, W.; Taylor, D.; Chaguine, P.; Zhou, S.; Hua, Y.; Cen, X.; Wang, X.; Kao, J.; Hasson, H.; Dyer, G.; Serratto, K.; Riley, N.; Donovan, M.; Ditmire, T.

    2015-09-01

    We report results of new pair creation experiments using ~100 Joule pulses of the Texas Petawatt Laser to irradiate solid gold and platinum targets, with intensities up to ~1.9 × 1021 W.cm-2 and pulse durations as short as ~130 fs. Positron to electron (e+/e-) ratios >15% were observed for many thick disk and rod targets, with the highest e+/e- ratio reaching ~50% for a Pt rod. The inferred pair yield was ~ few ×1010 with emerging pair density reaching ~1015/cm3 so that the pair skin depth becomes < pair jet transverse size. These results represent major milestones towards the goal of creating a significant quantity of dense pair-dominated plasmas with e+/e- approaching 100% and pair skin depth ≪ pair plasma size, which will have wide-ranging applications to astrophysics and fundamental physics.

  17. Optimization of x-ray emission from under-critical CH foam coated gold targets by laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Wanli; Yu, Ruizhen; Zhang, Wenhai; Yang, Jiamin

    2016-08-01

    Under-critical CH foam coated gold targets benefit laser-to-x-ray emission because CH plasma inhibits gold plasma expansion, which leads to higher gold plasma density and temperature. Conversely, the CH foam partially absorbs the incident laser energy, which lowers laser absorption into the gold plasma. An analytical model is built to solve the laser collisional deposition fraction in the CH foam layer. The optimization of x-ray emission from under-critical CH foam coated gold targets by laser irradiation is obtained numerically with different CH foam densities and thicknesses. The plasma and x-ray emission properties are investigated. It is found that different CH thicknesses lead to different increase mechanisms for x-ray emission. The x-ray spectrum distributions show that most of the x-ray emission increases occur with photon energy less than 2000 eV.

  18. Technical Note: Immunohistochemical evaluation of mouse brain irradiation targeting accuracy with 3D-printed immobilization device

    SciTech Connect

    Zarghami, Niloufar Jensen, Michael D.; Talluri, Srikanth; Dick, Frederick A.; Foster, Paula J.; Chambers, Ann F.; Wong, Eugene

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: Small animal immobilization devices facilitate positioning of animals for reproducible imaging and accurate focal radiation therapy. In this study, the authors demonstrate the use of three-dimensional (3D) printing technology to fabricate a custom-designed mouse head restraint. The authors evaluate the accuracy of this device for the purpose of mouse brain irradiation. Methods: A mouse head holder was designed for a microCT couch using CAD software and printed in an acrylic based material. Ten mice received half-brain radiation while positioned in the 3D-printed head holder. Animal placement was achieved using on-board image guidance and computerized asymmetric collimators. To evaluate the precision of beam localization for half-brain irradiation, mice were sacrificed approximately 30 min after treatment and brain sections were stained for γ-H2AX, a marker for DNA breaks. The distance and angle of the γ-H2AX radiation beam border to longitudinal fissure were measured on histological samples. Animals were monitored for any possible trauma from the device. Results: Visualization of the radiation beam on ex vivo brain sections with γ-H2AX immunohistochemical staining showed a sharp radiation field within the tissue. Measurements showed a mean irradiation targeting error of 0.14 ± 0.09 mm (standard deviation). Rotation between the beam axis and mouse head was 1.2° ± 1.0° (standard deviation). The immobilization device was easily adjusted to accommodate different sizes of mice. No signs of trauma to the mice were observed from the use of tooth block and ear bars. Conclusions: The authors designed and built a novel 3D-printed mouse head holder with many desired features for accurate and reproducible radiation targeting. The 3D printing technology was found to be practical and economical for producing a small animal imaging and radiation restraint device and allows for customization for study specific needs.

  19. Proton Imaging Of Laser Irradiated Foils And Mass-Limited Targets

    SciTech Connect

    Sokollik, T.; Schnuerer, M.; Ter-Avetisyan, S.; Steinke, S.; Nickles, P. V.; Sandner, W.; Amin, M.; Toncian, T.; Willi, O.; Andreev, A. A.

    2009-07-25

    Due to the envisioned advantages of mass-limited targets for laser driven ion beams, which are high efficiency and high cut-off energies, their field dynamics are of special interest. Micro-water droplets can be used as mass-limited targets with a high repetition rate. Our investigations show that the surrounding dilute plasma of such liquid spheres influences the interaction. We review our experimental findings together with computer simulations and conclude on the different processes in electron transport and related acceleration fields for mass-limited targets and foils, respectively.

  20. Generation of a rectangular beam distribution for irradiation of the accelerator production of tritium target

    SciTech Connect

    Blind, B.

    1990-01-01

    A scheme has been developed to produce a well-confined rectangular beam-intensity distribution of greatly enhanced uniformity from initially-peaked intensity distributions such as Gaussian or parabolic distributions without beam scraping. This scheme employs a system of linear and nonlinear transport-line elements. The linear elements prepare the beam for the nonlinear focusing and govern the beam size at the target. Uniformity is achieved with octupoles, and beam confinement is assured with duodecapoles. The scheme was applied to the target focus for the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) system. An initially Gaussian-distributed beam of 1.6-GeV protons was shaped into a rectangular 4 m by 2 m beam spot of acceptably uniform intensity at the tritium-production target. The scheme eliminates the need for sweeping the beam in a raster pattern to produce uniform target illumination. Details of the scheme are discussed.

  1. Uniform irradiation of adjustable target spots in high-power laser driver

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang Xiujuan; Li Jinghui; Li Huagang; Li Yang; Lin Zunqi

    2011-09-20

    For smoothing and shaping the on-target laser patterns flexibly in high-power laser drivers, a scheme has been developed that includes a zoom lens array and two-dimensional smoothing by spectral dispersion (SSD). The size of the target pattern can be controlled handily by adjusting the focal length of the zoom lens array, while the profile of the pattern can be shaped by fine tuning the distance between the target and the focal plane of the principal focusing lens. High-frequency stripes inside the pattern caused by beamlet interference are wiped off by spectral dispersion. Detailed simulations indicate that SSD works somewhat differently for spots of different sizes. For small spots, SSD mainly smooths the intensity modulation of low-to-middle spatial frequency, while for large spots, SSD sweeps the fine speckle structure to reduce nonuniformity of middle-to-high frequency. Spatial spectra of the target patterns are given and their uniformity is evaluated.

  2. A method to achieve rapid localised deep heating in a laser irradiated solid density target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitz, H.; Robinson, A. P. L.

    2016-09-01

    Rapid heating of small buried regions by laser generated fast electrons may be useful for applications such as extreme ultraviolet (XUV) radiation sources or as drivers for shock experiments. In non-structured targets, the heating profile possesses a global maximum near the front surface. This paper presents a new target design that uses resistive guiding to concentrate the fast electron current density at a finite depth inside the target. The choice of geometry uses principles of non-imaging optics. A global temperature maximum at depths up to 50 μ m into the target is achieved. Although theoretical calculations suggest that small source sizes should perform better than large ones, simulations show that a large angular spread at high intensities results in significant losses of the fast electrons to the sides. A systematic parameter scan suggests an optimal laser intensity. A ratio of 1.6 is demonstrated between the maximum ion temperature and the ion temperature at the front surface.

  3. The Role of Non-Targeted Effects as Mediators in the Biological Effects of Proton Irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Dicello, John F.

    2006-01-01

    In recent years, the hypothesis that non-DNA targets are primary initiators and mediators of the biological effects of ionizing radiation, such as proton beams and heavy ions, has gained much interest. These phenomena have been denoted as non-targeted or bystander effects to distinguish them from the more traditionally studied model that focuses on direct damage to DNA causing chromosomal rearrangements and mutations as causative of most biological endpoints such as cell killing, tissue damage, and cancer. We review cellular and extra-cellular structures and signal transduction pathways that have been implemented in these recent studies. Non-targeted effects of interest include oxidative damage to the cytoplasm and mitochondria, disruption of the extra-cellular matrix, and modification of cytokine signaling including TGF-beta, and gap junction communication. We present an introduction to these targets and pathways, and contrast there role with DNA damage pathways.

  4. Chemical isolation of .sup.82 Sr from proton-irradiated Mo targets

    DOEpatents

    Grant, Patrick M.; Kahn, Milton; O'Brien, Jr., Harold A.

    1976-01-01

    Spallation reactions are induced in Mo targets with 200-800 MeV protons to produce microcurie to millicurie amounts of a variety of radionuclides. A six-step radiochemical procedure, incorporating precipitation, solvent extractions, and ion exchange techniques, has been developed for the separation and purification of Sr radioactivities from other spallation products and the bulk target material. Radiostrontium can be quantitatively recovered in a sufficiently decontaminated state for use in biomedical generator development.

  5. Inter- and Intrafraction Target Motion in Highly Focused Single Vocal Cord Irradiation of T1a Larynx Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Kwa, Stefan L.S. Al-Mamgani, Abrahim; Osman, Sarah O.S.; Gangsaas, Anne; Levendag, Peter C.; Heijmen, Ben J.M.

    2015-09-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to verify clinical target volume–planning target volume (CTV-PTV) margins in single vocal cord irradiation (SVCI) of T1a larynx tumors and characterize inter- and intrafraction target motion. Methods and Materials: For 42 patients, a single vocal cord was irradiated using intensity modulated radiation therapy at a total dose of 58.1 Gy (16 fractions × 3.63 Gy). A daily cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scan was performed to online correct the setup of the thyroid cartilage after patient positioning with in-room lasers (interfraction motion correction). To monitor intrafraction motion, CBCT scans were also acquired just after patient repositioning and after dose delivery. A mixed online-offline setup correction protocol (“O2 protocol”) was designed to compensate for both inter- and intrafraction motion. Results: Observed interfraction, systematic (Σ), and random (σ) setup errors in left-right (LR), craniocaudal (CC), and anteroposterior (AP) directions were 0.9, 2.0, and 1.1 mm and 1.0, 1.6, and 1.0 mm, respectively. After correction of these errors, the following intrafraction movements derived from the CBCT acquired after dose delivery were: Σ = 0.4, 1.3, and 0.7 mm, and σ = 0.8, 1.4, and 0.8 mm. More than half of the patients showed a systematic non-zero intrafraction shift in target position, (ie, the mean intrafraction displacement over the treatment fractions was statistically significantly different from zero; P<.05). With the applied CTV-PTV margins (for most patients 3, 5, and 3 mm in LR, CC, and AP directions, respectively), the minimum CTV dose, estimated from the target displacements observed in the last CBCT, was at least 94% of the prescribed dose for all patients and more than 98% for most patients (37 of 42). The proposed O2 protocol could effectively reduce the systematic intrafraction errors observed after dose delivery to almost zero (Σ = 0.1, 0.2, 0.2 mm). Conclusions: With

  6. Suprathermal electron production in laser-irradiated Cu targets characterized by combined methods of x-ray imaging and spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renner, O.; Šmíd, M.; Batani, D.; Antonelli, L.

    2016-07-01

    In a series of experiments performed with laser-irradiated planar targets at the PALS laser facility, the generation of suprathermal electrons has been studied at conditions relevant for the development of a shock ignition approach to inertial confinement fusion. A simultaneous application of high-collection-efficiency K-shell imaging with high resolution x-ray spectroscopy offers a novel approach to hot electron diagnosis at non-coated or moderately coated, medium-atomic-number targets, where the contribution of suprathermal-electron-generated, frequency-shifted Kα emission from highly ionized atoms cannot be neglected. Based on experimental data provided by these combined techniques and their interpretation via collisional-radiative atomic codes and Monte Carlo modeling of hot electron energy deposition in heated Cu targets, the fraction of the energy converted to hot electrons at laser intensities  ≈1016 W cm‑2 was measured to be at the level of 0.1–0.8%. The higher values of conversion efficiency found for frequency tripled radiation support a theoretical conjecture of enhanced laser energy absorption by a resonance mechanism and its transport to a flow of fast electrons.

  7. Targeted radiotherapy enhancement during electronic brachytherapy of accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) using controlled release of gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Cifter, G; Chin, J; Cifter, F; Altundal, Y; Sinha, N; Sajo, E; Ngwa, W

    2015-12-01

    Several studies have demonstrated low rates of local recurrence with brachytherapy-based accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI). However, long-term outcomes on toxicity (e.g. telangiectasia) and cosmesis remain a major concern. The purpose of this study is to investigate the dosimetric feasibility of using targeted non-toxic radiosensitizing gold nanoparticles (GNPs) for localized dose enhancement to the planning target volume (PTV) during electronic brachytherapy APBI while reducing normal tissue toxicity. We propose to incorporate GNPs into a micrometer-thick polymer film on the surface of routinely used lumpectomy balloon applicators and provide subsequent treatment using a 50 kVp Xoft device. An experimentally determined diffusion coefficient was used to determine space-time customizable distribution of GNPs for feasible in-vivo concentrations of 7 mg/g and 43 mg/g. An analytical approach from previously published work was employed to estimate the dose enhancement due to GNPs as a function of distance up to 1 cm from the lumpectomy cavity surface. Clinically significant dose enhancement values of at least 1.2, due to 2 nm GNPs, were found at 1 cm away from the lumpectomy cavity wall when using electronic brachytherapy APBI. Higher customizable dose enhancement was also achieved at other distances as a function of nanoparticle size. Our preliminary results suggest that significant dose enhancement can be achieved to residual tumor cells targeted with GNPs during APBI with electronic brachytherapy.

  8. Investigations of ultrafast charge dynamics in laser-irradiated targets by a self probing technique employing laser driven protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, H.; Kar, S.; Cantono, G.; Nersisyan, G.; Brauckmann, S.; Doria, D.; Gwynne, D.; Macchi, A.; Naughton, K.; Willi, O.; Lewis, C. L. S.; Borghesi, M.

    2016-09-01

    The divergent and broadband proton beams produced by the target normal sheath acceleration mechanism provide the unique opportunity to probe, in a point-projection imaging scheme, the dynamics of the transient electric and magnetic fields produced during laser-plasma interactions. Commonly such experimental setup entails two intense laser beams, where the interaction produced by one beam is probed with the protons produced by the second. We present here experimental studies of the ultra-fast charge dynamics along a wire connected to laser irradiated target carried out by employing a 'self' proton probing arrangement - i.e. by connecting the wire to the target generating the probe protons. The experimental data shows that an electromagnetic pulse carrying a significant amount of charge is launched along the wire, which travels as a unified pulse of 10s of ps duration with a velocity close to speed of light. The experimental capabilities and the analysis procedure of this specific type of proton probing technique are discussed.

  9. Suprathermal electron production in laser-irradiated Cu targets characterized by combined methods of x-ray imaging and spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renner, O.; Šmíd, M.; Batani, D.; Antonelli, L.

    2016-07-01

    In a series of experiments performed with laser-irradiated planar targets at the PALS laser facility, the generation of suprathermal electrons has been studied at conditions relevant for the development of a shock ignition approach to inertial confinement fusion. A simultaneous application of high-collection-efficiency K-shell imaging with high resolution x-ray spectroscopy offers a novel approach to hot electron diagnosis at non-coated or moderately coated, medium-atomic-number targets, where the contribution of suprathermal-electron-generated, frequency-shifted Kα emission from highly ionized atoms cannot be neglected. Based on experimental data provided by these combined techniques and their interpretation via collisional-radiative atomic codes and Monte Carlo modeling of hot electron energy deposition in heated Cu targets, the fraction of the energy converted to hot electrons at laser intensities  ≈1016 W cm-2 was measured to be at the level of 0.1-0.8%. The higher values of conversion efficiency found for frequency tripled radiation support a theoretical conjecture of enhanced laser energy absorption by a resonance mechanism and its transport to a flow of fast electrons.

  10. Target size analysis by radiation inactivation: a large capacity tube rack for irradiation in a Gammacell 220.

    PubMed

    Beauregard, G; Giroux, S; Potier, M

    1983-07-15

    Target size analysis by radiation inactivation is now a well-established method to study structure-function relationships in biologically active macromolecules without prior purification or even solubilization. Recently, it was reported that a relatively low-dose-rate but commonly available gamma source such as the Gammacell 220 (Atomic Energy of Canada, Ltd.) can be used to carry out radiation inactivation experiments providing it is appropriately calibrated with enzymes of known radiation sensitivities (G. Beauregard and M. Potier (1982) Anal. Biochem. 122, 379-384). In this report, a tube rack designed to fit into the irradiation chamber of the Gammacell 220 which allows five experiments (at 30 tubes per experiment) to be carried out simultaneously with both standard and unknown samples is described. The dose rates delivered at different positions in the rack were determined by irradiating rat liver cytosolic neuraminidase, an enzyme of known radiation sensitivity. A better than 2.7% agreement was obtained between experimental dose rate and computed values from isodose curves previously published by other authors (O. A. Curzio and H. O. Quaranta (1982) Int. J. Appl. Radiat. Isot. 33, 1-3).

  11. Design and analysis of the lithium target system for the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF)

    SciTech Connect

    Hua, T.; Smith, D.; Hassanein, A.; Gomes, I.

    1995-09-01

    Three lithium target design options are being evaluated for the IFMIF. The impact of various requirements on material selection, lifetime, operation and maintenance are discussed. Analysis for the free jet option is presented. Key aspects include jet stability, thermal and nuclear responses.

  12. Production of isotopes and isomers with irradiation of Z = 47–50 targets by 23-MeV bremsstrahlung

    SciTech Connect

    Karamian, S. A.; Carroll, J. J.; Aksenov, N. V.; Albin, Yu. A.; Belov, A. G.; Bozhikov, G. A.; Dmitriev, S. N.; Starodub, G. Ya.

    2015-09-15

    The irradiations of Ag to Sn targets by bremsstrahlung generated with 23-MeV electron beams are performed at the MT-25 microtron. Gamma spectra of the induced activities have been measured and the yields of all detected radionuclides and isomers are carefully measured and analyzed. A regular dependence of yields versus changed reaction threshold is confirmed. Many isomers are detected and the suppression of the production probability is observed with growing product spin. Special peculiarities for the isomer-to-ground state ratios were deduced for the {sup 106m}Ag, {sup 108m}Ag, {sup 113m}In, {sup 115m}In, and {sup 123m}Sn isomers. The production of such nuclides as {sup 108m}Ag, {sup 115m}In, {sup 117g}In, and {sup 113m}Cd is of interest for applications, especially when economic methods are available.

  13. FY-15 Progress Report on Cleanup of irradiated SHINE Target Solutions Containing 140g-U/L Uranyl Sulfate

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, Megan E.; Bowers, Delbert L.; Vandegrift, George F.

    2015-09-01

    During FY 2012 and 2013, a process was developed to convert the SHINE Target Solution (STS) of irradiated uranyl sulfate (140 g U/L) to uranyl nitrate. This process is necessary so that the uranium solution can be processed by the UREX (Uranium Extraction) separation process, which will remove impurities from the uranium so that it can be recycled. The uranyl sulfate solution must contain <0.02 M SO42- so that the uranium will be extractable into the UREXsolvent. In addition, it is desired that the barium content be below 0.0007 M, as this is the limit in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA).

  14. Synergistic combination of near-infrared irradiation and targeted gold nanoheaters for enhanced photothermal neural stimulation.

    PubMed

    Eom, Kyungsik; Im, Changkyun; Hwang, Seoyoung; Eom, Seyoung; Kim, Tae-Seong; Jeong, Hae Sun; Kim, Kyung Hwan; Byun, Kyung Min; Jun, Sang Beom; Kim, Sung June

    2016-04-01

    Despite a potential of infrared neural stimulation (INS) for modulating neural activities, INS suffers from limited light confinement and bulk tissue heating. Here, a novel methodology for an advanced optical stimulation is proposed by combining near-infrared (NIR) stimulation with gold nanorods (GNRs) targeted to neuronal cell membrane. We confirmed experimentally that in vitro and in vivo neural activation is associated with a local heat generation based on NIR stimulation and GNRs. Compared with the case of NIR stimulation without an aid of GNRs, combination with cell-targeted GNRs allows photothermal stimulation with faster neural response, lower delivered energy, higher stimulation efficiency and stronger behavior change. Since the suggested method can reduce a requisite radiant exposure level and alleviate a concern of tissue damage, it is expected to open up new possibilities for applications to optical neuromodulations for diverse excitable tissues and treatments of neurological disorders. PMID:27446678

  15. Synergistic combination of near-infrared irradiation and targeted gold nanoheaters for enhanced photothermal neural stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Eom, Kyungsik; Im, Changkyun; Hwang, Seoyoung; Eom, Seyoung; Kim, Tae-Seong; Jeong, Hae Sun; Kim, Kyung Hwan; Byun, Kyung Min; Jun, Sang Beom; Kim, Sung June

    2016-01-01

    Despite a potential of infrared neural stimulation (INS) for modulating neural activities, INS suffers from limited light confinement and bulk tissue heating. Here, a novel methodology for an advanced optical stimulation is proposed by combining near-infrared (NIR) stimulation with gold nanorods (GNRs) targeted to neuronal cell membrane. We confirmed experimentally that in vitro and in vivo neural activation is associated with a local heat generation based on NIR stimulation and GNRs. Compared with the case of NIR stimulation without an aid of GNRs, combination with cell-targeted GNRs allows photothermal stimulation with faster neural response, lower delivered energy, higher stimulation efficiency and stronger behavior change. Since the suggested method can reduce a requisite radiant exposure level and alleviate a concern of tissue damage, it is expected to open up new possibilities for applications to optical neuromodulations for diverse excitable tissues and treatments of neurological disorders. PMID:27446678

  16. Treatment Optimization Using Computed Tomography-Delineated Targets Should be Used for Supraclavicular Irradiation for Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Liengsawangwong, Raweewan; Yu, T.-K.; Sun, T.-L.; Erasmus, Jeremy J.; Perkins, George H.; Tereffe, Welela; Oh, Julia L.; Woodward, Wendy A.; Strom, Eric A.; Salephour, Mohammad; Buchholz, Thomas A.

    2007-11-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to determine whether the use of optimized CT treatment planning offered better coverage of axillary level III (LIII)/supraclavicular (SC) targets than the empirically derived dose prescription that are commonly used. Materials/Methods: Thirty-two consecutive breast cancer patients who underwent CT treatment planning of a SC field were evaluated. Each patient was categorized according to body mass index (BMI) classes: normal, overweight, or obese. The SC and LIII nodal beds were contoured, and four treatment plans for each patient were generated. Three of the plans used empiric dose prescriptions, and these were compared with a CT-optimized plan. Each plan was evaluated by two criteria: whether 98% of target volume receive >90% of prescribed dose and whether < 5% of the irradiated volume received 105% of prescribed dose. Results: The mean depth of SC and LIII were 3.2 cm (range, 1.4-6.7 cm) and 3.1 (range, 1.7-5.8 cm). The depth of these targets varied according across BMI classes (p = 0.01). Among the four sets of plans, the CT-optimized plans were the most successful at achieving both of the dosimetry objectives for every BMI class (normal BMI, p = .003; overweight BMI, p < .0001; obese BMI, p < .001). Conclusions: Across all BMI classes, routine radiation prescriptions did not optimally cover intended targets for every patient. Optimized CT-based treatment planning generated the most successful plans; therefore, we recommend the use of routine CT simulation and treatment planning of SC fields in breast cancer.

  17. A quantitative and comparative study of radionuclidic and chemical impurities in water samples irradiated in a niobium target with Havar vs. niobium-sputtered Havar as entrance foils.

    PubMed

    Avila-Rodriguez, Miguel A; Wilson, John S; McQuarrie, Steve A

    2008-12-01

    Enriched and natural abundance water samples were irradiated in a niobium (Nb) chamber target with Havar and Nb-sputtered Havar foils. Irradiations were performed with 17.5MeV protons at currents from 35 to 100microA lasting for 1-2.5h. Radionuclidic and chemical (cationic) impurities were determined via gamma spectroscopy and ICP-MS, respectively. Anionic impurities were evaluated by ion chromatography. Impurities in water samples irradiated with the Havar-Nb foils were much lower than the samples irradiated with an unmodified Havar foil. No significant differences were observed in the impurity levels between samples of H(2)(18)O-enriched and natural abundance water. Radionuclidic impurities were observed to decrease after 3-4 irradiations on a fresh Havar entrance foil, and reached a constant value for subsequent irradiations with the same integrated current. For targets covered with Havar foil, radionuclidic impurities were found to be proportional to the beam-integrated current regardless of the beam power and, unexpectedly, dependant of the beam power when using a Havar-Nb foil.

  18. Ablation and transmission of thin solid targets irradiated by intense extreme ultraviolet laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aslanyan, V.; Kuznetsov, I.; Bravo, H.; Woolston, M. R.; Rossall, A. K.; Menoni, C. S.; Rocca, J. J.; Tallents, G. J.

    2016-09-01

    The interaction of an extreme ultraviolet (EUV) laser beam with a parylene foil was studied by experiments and simulation. A single EUV laser pulse of nanosecond duration focused to an intensity of 3 × 1010 W cm-2 perforated micrometer thick targets. The same laser pulse was simultaneously used to diagnose the interaction by a transmission measurement. A combination of 2-dimensional radiation-hydrodynamic and diffraction calculations was used to model the ablation, leading to good agreement with experiment. This theoretical approach allows predictive modelling of the interaction with matter of intense EUV beams over a broad range of parameters.

  19. Scattered light diagnostics of overdense plasma cavity in solid targets irradiated by an ultraintense laser pulse.

    PubMed

    Andreev, A A; Zhidkov, A G; Uesaka, M; Kinoshita, K; Platonov, K Yu

    2002-09-01

    The light scattered backward from a target illuminated by ultraintense laser pulses carries important information about the nonlinear laser-plasma interaction. We analyze the usefulness of this information by plasma corona analysis with the help of an analytical model we developed, and particle-in-cell simulation. The spectrum of scattered light is shown to be shifted, to be broadened, and to be modulated, in comparison with the initial laser spectrum, and the spectral shift is an indicator of laser pulse contrast ratio.

  20. Terahertz radiation from a wire target irradiated by an ultra-intense laser pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Li Zhichao; Zheng Jian

    2007-05-15

    When an ultra-intense laser pulse impacts the tip of a wire whose other end is grounded, a strong return current can be driven along the wire because some energetic electrons generated in ultra-intense laser matter interaction can escape from the target and an electric field builds up. The wire then behaves like a current-carrying antenna that can emit electromagnetic radiations. If the duration of the driving pulse is several tens of femtoseconds, the radiation spectrum reaches a maximum at terahertz region, and the radiation power per solid angle could be as high as 10{sup 9} W/rad.

  1. Triton Emission Spectra in Some Target Nuclei Irradiated by Ultra-Fast Neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tel, E.; Kaplan, A.; Aydın, A.; Büyükuslu, H.; Demirkol, İ.; Arasoğlu, A.

    2010-08-01

    High-current proton accelerator technologies make use of spallation neutrons produced in ( p,xn) and ( n,xn) nuclear reactions on high-Z targets. The produced neutrons are moderated by heavy water. These moderated neutrons are subsequently captured on 3He to produce tritium via the ( n,p) reaction. Tritium self-sufficiency must be maintained for a commercial power plant. So, working out the systematics of ( n,t) reaction cross sections and triton emission differential data are important for the given reaction taking place on various nuclei at different energies. In this study, triton emission spectra by using ultra-fast neutrons (incident neutron energy >50 MeV), the ( n,xt) reactions for some target nuclei as 16O, 27Al, 56Fe, 59Co, 208Pb and 209Bi have been investigated. In the calculations, the pre-equilibrium and equilibrium effects have been used. The calculated results have been compared with the experimental data taken from the literature.

  2. Creating astrophysically relevant jets from locally heated targets irradiated by a high-intensity laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitz, Holger; Robinson, Alex

    2014-10-01

    The formation mechanism of jets in the vicinity of young stellar objects has been the subject of investigations for many years. It is thought that jets are formed by the stellar wind interacting with an inhomogeneous plasma. A density gradient from the equator to the poles causes the wind to encounter the inward facing reverse shock at an oblique angle. The wind is focused into a conical flow towards the poles where it emerges as a narrow jet. This mechanism is inaccessible to direct observations due to the small scales on which it operates. Using high intensity lasers to produce comparable jets offers a way to investigate the mechanisms in the laboratory. Previous investigations of jets in the laboratory have directly generated the conical flow, skipping the first part of the formation mechanism. We present simulations of a novel method of generating jets in the laboratory by using magnetic fields generated by resistivity gradients to control the fast electron flow. The return current selectively heats a small region inside the target which drives a blast wave into the low density region behind the target. A conical high density shell focuses the outflow into a narrow jet. We find jets with aspect ratios of over 15 and Mach numbers between 2.5 and 4.3. This work is funded by the European Research Council, Grant STRUCMAGFAST.

  3. Production of 64Cu and 67Cu radiopharmaceuticals using zinc target irradiated with accelerator neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawabata, Masako; Hashimoto, Kazuyuki; Saeki, Hideya; Sato, Nozomi; Motoishi, Shoji; Nagai, Yasuki

    2014-09-01

    Copper radioisotopes have gained a lot of attention in radiopharmaceuticals owing to their unique decay characteristics. The longest half-life β emitter, 67Cu, is thought to be suitable for targeted radio-immunotherapy. Adequate production of 67Cu to meet the demands of clinical studies has not been fully established. Another attractive copper isotope, 64Cu has possible applications as a diagnostic imaging tracer combined with a therapeutic effect. This work proposes a production method using accelerator neutrons in which two copper radioisotopes can be produced: 1) 68Zn(n,x)67Cu and 2) 64Zn(n,p)64Cu using ~14 MeV neutrons generated by natC(d, n) reaction, both from natural or enriched zinc oxides. The generated 64,67Cu were separated from the target zinc oxide using a chelating and an anion exchange columns and were labelled with two widely studied chelators where the labelling efficiency was found to be acceptably good. The major advantage of this method is that a significant amount of 64,67Cu with a very few impurity radionuclides are produced which also makes the separation procedure simple. Provided an accelerator supplying an Ed = ~ 40 MeV, a wide application of 64,67Cu based drugs in nuclear medicine is feasible in the near future. We will present the characteristics of this production method using accelerator neutrons including the chemical separation processes.

  4. High-flux low-divergence positron beam generation from ultra-intense laser irradiated a tapered hollow target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jian-Xun; Ma, Yan-Yun; Zhao, Jun; Yu, Tong-Pu; Yang, Xiao-Hu; Gan, Long-Fei; Zhang, Guo-Bo; Yan, Jian-Feng; Zhuo, Hong-Bin; Liu, Jin-Jin; Zhao, Yuan; Kawata, Shigeo

    2015-10-01

    By using two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, we demonstrate high-flux dense positrons generation by irradiating an ultra-intense laser pulse onto a tapered hollow target. By using a laser with an intensity of 4 × 1023 W/cm2, it is shown that the Breit-Wheeler process dominates the positron production during the laser-target interaction and a positron beam with a total number >1015 is obtained, which is increased by five orders of magnitude than in the previous work at the same laser intensity. Due to the focusing effect of the transverse electric fields formed in the hollow cone wall, the divergence angle of the positron beam effectively decreases to ˜15° with an effective temperature of ˜674 MeV. When the laser intensity is doubled, both the positron flux (>1016) and temperature (963 MeV) increase, while the divergence angle gets smaller (˜13°). The obtained high-flux low-divergence positron beam may have diverse applications in science, medicine, and engineering.

  5. High-flux low-divergence positron beam generation from ultra-intense laser irradiated a tapered hollow target

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Jian-Xun; Ma, Yan-Yun; Zhao, Jun; Yu, Tong-Pu Yang, Xiao-Hu; Gan, Long-Fei; Zhang, Guo-Bo; Yan, Jian-Feng; Zhuo, Hong-Bin; Liu, Jin-Jin; Zhao, Yuan; Kawata, Shigeo

    2015-10-15

    By using two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, we demonstrate high-flux dense positrons generation by irradiating an ultra-intense laser pulse onto a tapered hollow target. By using a laser with an intensity of 4 × 10{sup 23 }W/cm{sup 2}, it is shown that the Breit-Wheeler process dominates the positron production during the laser-target interaction and a positron beam with a total number >10{sup 15} is obtained, which is increased by five orders of magnitude than in the previous work at the same laser intensity. Due to the focusing effect of the transverse electric fields formed in the hollow cone wall, the divergence angle of the positron beam effectively decreases to ∼15° with an effective temperature of ∼674 MeV. When the laser intensity is doubled, both the positron flux (>10{sup 16}) and temperature (963 MeV) increase, while the divergence angle gets smaller (∼13°). The obtained high-flux low-divergence positron beam may have diverse applications in science, medicine, and engineering.

  6. Characterization of microRNAs and their target genes associated with transcriptomic changes in gamma-irradiated Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Kim, J H; Go, Y S; Kim, J K; Chung, B Y

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate gene expression in response to biotic and abiotic stress in plants. We investigated gamma-ray-responsive miRNAs in Arabidopsis wild-type and cmt3-11t mutant plants using miRNA microarray analysis. miRNA expression was differentiated between the wild-type and cmt3-11t mutants. miR164a, miR169d, miR169h, miR172b*, and miR403 were identified as repressible in the wild-type and/or cmt3-11t mutant in response to gamma irradiation, while miR827, miR840, and miR850 were strongly inducible. These eight miRNA genes contain UV-B-responsive cis-elements, including G-box, I-box core, ARE, and/or MBS in the putative promoter regions. Moreover, Box 4, MBS, TCA-element, and Unnamed_4, as well as CAAT- and TATA-box, were identified in these eight miRNA genes. However, a positive correlation between the transcriptions of miRNAs and their putative target genes was only observed between miR169d and At1g30560 in the wild-type, and between miR827 and At1g70700 in the cmt3-11t mutant. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis confirmed that the transcription of miR164a, miR169d, miR169h, miR172b*, miR403, and miR827 differed after gamma irradiation depending on the genotype (wild-type, cmt3-11t, drm2, drd1-6, and ddm1-2) and developmental stage (14 or 28 days after sowing). In contrast, high transcriptional induction of miR840 and miR850 was observed in these six genotypes regardless of the developmental stage. Although the actual target genes and functions of miR840 and miR850 remain to be determined, our results indicate that these two miRNAs may be strongly induced and reproducible genetic markers in Arabidopsis plants exposed to gamma rays. PMID:27525891

  7. An Investigation into the Transportation of Irradiated Uranium/Aluminum Targets from a Foreign Nuclear Reactor to the Chalk River Laboratories Site in Ontario, Canada - 12249

    SciTech Connect

    Clough, Malcolm; Jackson, Austin

    2012-07-01

    This investigation required the selection of a suitable cask and development of a device to hold and transport irradiated targets from a foreign nuclear reactor to the Chalk River Laboratories in Ontario, Canada. The main challenge was to design and validate a target holder to protect the irradiated HEU-Al target pencils during transit. Each of the targets was estimated to have an initial decay heat of 118 W prior to transit. As the targets have little thermal mass the potential for high temperature damage and possibly melting was high. Thus, the primary design objective was to conceive a target holder to dissipate heat from the targets. Other design requirements included securing the targets during transportation and providing a simple means to load and unload the targets while submerged five metres under water. A unique target holder (patent pending) was designed and manufactured together with special purpose experimental apparatus including a representative cask. Aluminum dummy targets were fabricated to accept cartridge heaters, to simulate decay heat. Thermocouples were used to measure the temperature of the test targets and selected areas within the target holder and test cask. After obtaining test results, calculations were performed to compensate for differences between experimental and real life conditions. Taking compensation into consideration the maximum target temperature reached was 231 deg. C which was below the designated maximum of 250 deg. C. The design of the aluminum target holder also allowed generous clearance to insert and unload the targets. This clearance was designed to close up as the target holder is placed into the cavity of the transport cask. Springs served to retain and restrain the targets from movement during transportation as well as to facilitate conductive heat transfer. The target holder met the design requirements and as such provided data supporting the feasibility of transporting targets over a relatively long period of time

  8. Computational investigation of ⁹⁹Mo production yield via proton irradiation of natU and ²³²Th targets.

    PubMed

    Mirvakili, Seyed Mohammad; Alizadeh, Masoumeh; Vaziri, Atyeh Joze; Gholamzadeh, Zohreh; Davari, Amin

    2015-07-01

    Accelerators have some advantages such as safety and cheaper operating and decommissioning costs for (99)Mo production. Yield theoretical calculation using computational codes can powerfully estimate usefulness of a proposed nuclear reaction for a routine manufacturing. In this work, Monte Carlo-based code was used to compute (99)Mo yield in (232)Th and (nat)U proton-irradiated targets, as well as maximum applicable beam current. Results showed that the code well agrees with published experimental data. The targets can bear maximum beam current of 30 µA. Targets from (232)Th provides higher (99)Mo yield. PMID:25898237

  9. Membrane-Dependent Bystander Effect Contributes to Amplification of the Response to Alpha-Particle Irradiation in Targeted and Nontargeted Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hanot, Maite; Hoarau, Jim; Carriere, Marie; Angulo, Jaime F.; Khodja, Hicham

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: Free radicals are believed to play an active role in the bystander response. This study investigated their origin as well as their temporal and spatial impacts in the bystander effect. Methods and Materials: We employed a precise alpha-particle microbeam to target a small fraction of subconfluent osteoblastic cells (MC3T3-E1). gammaH2AX-53BP1 foci, oxidative metabolism changes, and micronuclei induction in targeted and bystander cells were assessed. Results: Cellular membranes and mitochondria were identified as two distinct reactive oxygen species producers. The global oxidative stress observed after irradiation was significantly attenuated after cells were treated with filipin, evidence for the primal role of membrane in the bystander effect. To determine the membrane's impact at a cellular level, micronuclei yield was measured when various fractions of the cell population were individually targeted while the dose per cell remained constant. Induction of micronuclei increased in bystander cells as well as in targeted cells and was attenuated by filipin treatment, demonstrating a role for bystander signals between irradiated cells in an autocrine/paracrine manner. Conclusions: A complex interaction of direct irradiation and bystander signals leads to a membrane-dependent amplification of cell responses that could influence therapeutic outcomes in tissues exposed to low doses or to environmental exposure.

  10. Non-targeted transcriptomic effects upon thyroid irradiation: similarity between in-field and out-of-field responses varies with tissue type

    PubMed Central

    Langen, Britta; Rudqvist, Nils; Spetz, Johan; Swanpalmer, John; Helou, Khalil; Forssell-Aronsson, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Non-targeted effects can induce responses in tissues that have not been exposed to ionizing radiation. Despite their relevance for risk assessment, few studies have investigated these effects in vivo. In particular, these effects have not been studied in context with thyroid exposure, which can occur e.g. during irradiation of head and neck tumors. To determine the similarity between in-field and out-of-field responses in normal tissue, we used a partial body irradiation setup with female mice where the thyroid region, the thorax and abdomen, or all three regions were irradiated. After 24 h, transcriptional regulation in the kidney cortex, kidney medulla, liver, lungs, spleen, and thyroid was analyzed using microarray technology. Thyroid irradiation resulted in transcriptional regulation in the kidney medulla and liver that resembled regulation upon direct exposure of these tissues regarding both strength of response and associated biological function. The kidney cortex showed fewer similarities between the setups, while the lungs and spleen showed little similarity between in-field and out-of-field responses. Interestingly, effects were generally not found to be additive. Future studies are needed to identify the molecular mechanisms that mediate these systemic effects, so that they may be used as targets to minimize detrimental side effects in radiotherapy. PMID:27779251

  11. Experimental plan and design of two experiments for graphite irradiation at temperatures up to 1500 °C in the target region of the high flux isotope reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDuffee, J. L.; Burchell, T. D.; Heatherly, D. W.; Thoms, K. R.

    2008-10-01

    Two irradiation capsules have been designed for the target region of the high flux isotope reactor (HFIR). The objective is to provide dimensional change and physical property data for four candidate next generation nuclear plant (NGNP) graphites. The capsules will reach peak doses of ˜1.59 and ˜4.76 dpa, respectively, at temperatures of 900, 1200, and 1500 °C.

  12. Comparison of line x-ray emission from solid and porous nano-layer coated targets irradiated by double laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Fazeli, R.; Mahdieh, M. H.

    2015-11-15

    Enhancement of line x-ray emission from both solid and porous iron targets induced by irradiation of single and double laser pulses is studied numerically. The line emission from laser produced plasma is calculated within the extreme ultra-violet lithography wavelength range of 13.5–13.7 nm. The effects of pre-pulse intensity and delay time between two pulses (pre-pulse and main pulse) are examined. The results show that using double pulses irradiation in the conditions of porous target can reduce the x-ray enhancement. According to the results, the use of both pre-pulse and porous target leads to efficient absorption of the laser energy. Calculations also show that such enhanced laser absorption can ionize atoms of the target material to very high degrees of ionization, leading to decrease of the density of appropriate ions that are responsible for line emission in the selected wavelength region. By increasing the target porosity, x-ray yield was more reduced.

  13. Comparison of line x-ray emission from solid and porous nano-layer coated targets irradiated by double laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazeli, R.; Mahdieh, M. H.

    2015-11-01

    Enhancement of line x-ray emission from both solid and porous iron targets induced by irradiation of single and double laser pulses is studied numerically. The line emission from laser produced plasma is calculated within the extreme ultra-violet lithography wavelength range of 13.5-13.7 nm. The effects of pre-pulse intensity and delay time between two pulses (pre-pulse and main pulse) are examined. The results show that using double pulses irradiation in the conditions of porous target can reduce the x-ray enhancement. According to the results, the use of both pre-pulse and porous target leads to efficient absorption of the laser energy. Calculations also show that such enhanced laser absorption can ionize atoms of the target material to very high degrees of ionization, leading to decrease of the density of appropriate ions that are responsible for line emission in the selected wavelength region. By increasing the target porosity, x-ray yield was more reduced.

  14. Temperature Effects on the Mechanical Properties of Candidate SNS Target Container Materials after Proton and Neutron Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Byun, T.S.

    2001-11-09

    This report presents the tensile properties of EC316LN austenitic stainless steel and 9Cr-2WVTa ferritic/martensitic steel after 800 MeV proton and spallation neutron irradiation to doses in the range 0.54 to 2.53 dpa. Irradiation temperatures were in the range 30 to 100 C. Tensile testing was performed at room temperature (20 C) and 164 C to study the effects of test temperature on the tensile properties. Test materials displayed significant radiation-induced hardening and loss of ductility due to irradiation. The EC316LN stainless steel maintained notable strain-hardening capability after irradiation, while the 9Cr-2WVTa ferritic/martensitic steel posted negative strain hardening. In the EC316LN stainless steel, increasing the test temperature from 20 C to 164 C decreased the strength by 13 to 18% and the ductility by 8 to 36%. The tensile data for the EC316LN stainless steel irradiated in spallation conditions were in line with the values in a database for 316 stainless steels for doses up to 1 dpa irradiated in fission reactors at temperatures below 200 C. However, extra strengthening induced by helium and hydrogen contents is evident in some specimens irradiated to above about 1 dpa. The effect of test temperature for the 9Cr-2WVTa ferritic/martensitic steel was less significant than for the EC316LN stainless steel. In addition, strain-hardening behaviors were analyzed for EC316LN and 316L stainless steels. The strain-hardening rate of the 316 stainless steels was largely dependent on test temperature. It was estimated that the 316 stainless steels would retain more than 1% true stains to necking at 164 C after irradiation to 5 dpa. A calculation using reduction of area (RA) measurements and stress-strain data predicted positive strain hardening during plastic instability.

  15. The Pattern of Failure after Re-Irradiation of Recurrent Squamous Cell Head and Neck Cancer: Implications for Defining the Targets

    PubMed Central

    Popovtzer, Aron; Gluck, Iris; Chepeha, Douglas B; Teknos, Theodoros N; Moyer, Jeffrey S; Prince, Mark E; Bradford, Carol R; Eisbruch, Avraham

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Re-irradiation (re-RT) of recurrent head and neck cancer (HNC) may achieve long term disease control in some patients, at the expense of high rates of late sequelae. Limiting the re-RT targets to the recurrent gross tumor volume (rGTV) would reduce the volumes of re-irradiated tissues, however, its effect on tumor recurrence pattern is unknown. Methods Retrospective review of 66 patients who underwent curative-intent re-RT for non-resectable recurrent or second primary mucosal squamous cell HNC. Treatment was delivered with 3-dimensional conformal (3D) RT or intensity modulated RT (IMRT). The targets in all patients consisted of the rGTVs with tight (0.5 cm) margins, with no intent to treat prophylactically lymph nodes or sub-clinical disease in the vicinity of the rGTVs. The sites of local-regional failures (LRFs) were determined using imaging at the time of failure, and were compared to the rGTVs. Results Median re-RT dose was 68 Gy. 47 patients (71%) received concomitant chemotherapy and 31 (47%) received hyperfractionated, accelerated RT. At a median follow up 42 month, 16 (23%) are alive and free of disease. Fifty patients (77%) had a third recurrence or persistent disease, including 47 LRFs. All LRFs occurred within the rGTVs except for two (4%) (95% C.I. 0; 11 %). Nineteen patients (29%) had grade ≥3 late complications, mostly dysphagia (12 patients). Conclusion Almost all LRFs occurred within the re-irradiated rGTVs despite avoiding prophylactic RT of tissue at risk of subclinical disease. These results support confining the re-RT targets to the rGTVs to reduce re-irradiated tissue volumes. PMID:19135312

  16. High K-alpha X-ray Conversion Efficiency From Extended Source Gas Jet Targets Irradiated by Ultra Short Laser Pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Kugland, N L; Constantin, C; Collette, A; Dewald, E; Froula, D; Glenzer, S H; Kritcher, A; Neumayer, P; Ross, J S; Niemann, C

    2007-11-01

    The absolute laser conversion efficiency to K{sub {alpha}}-like inner shell x-rays (integrated from K{sub {alpha}} to K{sub {beta}}) is observed to be an order of magnitude higher in argon gas jets than in solid targets due to enhanced emission from higher ionization stages following ultra short pulse laser irradiation. Excluding the higher ionization stages, the conversion efficiency to near-cold K{sub {alpha}} is the same in gas jets as in solid targets. These results demonstrate that gas jet targets are bright, high conversion efficiency, high repetition rate, debris-free multi-keV x-ray sources for spectrally resolved scattering and backlighting of rapidly evolving dense matter.

  17. Co-targeting Deoxyribonucleic Acid–Dependent Protein Kinase and Poly(Adenosine Diphosphate-Ribose) Polymerase-1 Promotes Accelerated Senescence of Irradiated Cancer Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Azad, Arun; Bukczynska, Patricia; Jackson, Susan; Haput, Ygal; Cullinane, Carleen; McArthur, Grant A.; Solomon, Benjamin

    2014-02-01

    Purpose: To examine the effects of combined blockade of DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) and poly(adenosine diphosphate-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) on accelerated senescence in irradiated H460 and A549 non-small cell lung cancer cells. Methods and Materials: The effects of KU5788 and AG014699 (inhibitors of DNA-PK and PARP-1, respectively) on clonogenic survival, DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), apoptosis, mitotic catastrophe, and accelerated senescence in irradiated cells were examined in vitro. For in vivo experiments, H460 xenografts established in athymic nude mice were treated with BEZ235 (a DNA-PK, ATM, and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor) and AG014699 to determine effects on proliferation, DNA DSBs, and accelerated senescence after radiation. Results: Compared with either inhibitor alone, combination treatment with KU57788 and AG014699 reduced postradiation clonogenic survival and significantly increased persistence of Gamma-H2AX (γH2AX) foci in irradiated H460 and A549 cells. Notably, these effects coincided with the induction of accelerated senescence in irradiated cells as reflected by positive β-galactosidase staining, G2-M cell-cycle arrest, enlarged and flattened cellular morphology, increased p21 expression, and senescence-associated cytokine secretion. In irradiated H460 xenografts, concurrent therapy with BEZ235 and AG014699 resulted in sustained Gamma-H2AX (γH2AX) staining and prominent β-galactosidase activity. Conclusion: Combined DNA-PK and PARP-1 blockade increased tumor cell radiosensitivity and enhanced the prosenescent properties of ionizing radiation in vitro and in vivo. These data provide a rationale for further preclinical and clinical testing of this therapeutic combination.

  18. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH TARGETS Tomographic imaging of a target directly irradiated in experiments on the Iskra-5 iodine laser facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondarenko, S. V.; Garanin, R. V.; Garanin, Sergey G.; Zhidkov, N. V.; Oreshkov, O. V.; Potapov, S. V.; Suslov, N. A.; Frolova, N. V.

    2010-12-01

    We set forth the data of experiments involving direct microtarget irradiation by the 12 second-harmonic beams (λ = 0.66 μm) of iodine laser radiation carried out on the Iskra-5 facility. For microtargets we employed glass shells ~500 μm in diameter with ~1-μm thick walls, which were filled with a DT mixture at a pressure pDT approx 3-4 atm. In one of these experiments, a tomographic image of the microtarget was recorded from the images obtained using pinhole cameras, which were arranged along seven different directions. The pinhole images were acquired in the X-ray radiation with photon energies above 1.5 keV. The procedure used for reconstructing the volume luminosity of the microtarget is described. An analysis of the tomographic image suggests that the compressed microtarget domain possesses a complex asymmetric shape; 20-30 μm sized structural elements being clearly visible. The resultant data set allowed us to estimate the initial nonuniformity of microtarget surface irradiation by the laser radiation. The rms nonuniformity of microtarget irradiance was estimated at ~60 %.

  19. X-ray spectral measurement of high-temperature plasma parameters in porous targets irradiated with high-power laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Gavrilov, V V; Gol'tsov, A Yu; Koval'skii, N G; Koptyaev, S N; Magunov, A I; Pikuz, T A; Skobelev, I Yu; Faenov, A Ya

    2001-12-31

    The X-ray spectra of multiply charged ions were recorded from planar agar (C{sub 12}H{sub 18}O{sub 9}){sub n} based targets with an average density of 2 mg cm{sup -3} irradiated by high-power laser pulses ({lambda}=1.054 {mu}m, {tau}=2.5 ns, I {approx} 5 x10{sup 13} W cm{sup -2}). The spectra were recorded with a high spectral and spatial resolution employing spherically bent (focusing) crystals of mica and quartz. An analysis of the experimental data obtained by the irradiation of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-doped agar samples allowed us to determine the main parameters of the plasma produced inside the targets. The ion temperature of plasma in low-density porous targets was estimated for the first time to be 1.5 - 2 times higher than the electron temperature. (interaction of laser radiation with matter. laser plasma)

  20. Energy transport and isochoric heating of a low-Z, reduced-mass target irradiated with a high intensity laser pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimura, H.; Nakamura, H.; Tanabe, M.; Fujiwara, T.; Yamamoto, N.; Fujioka, S.; Mima, K.; Mishra, R.; Sentoku, Y.; Mancini, R.; Hakel, P.; Ohshima, S.; Batani, D.; Veltcheva, M.; Desai, T.; Jafer, R.; Kawamura, T.; Koike, F.

    2011-02-15

    Heat transport in reduced-mass targets irradiated with a high intensity laser pulse was studied. K{alpha} lines from partially ionized chlorine embedded in the middle of a triple-layered plastic target were measured to evaluate bulk electron temperature in the tracer region inside the target. Two groups of K{alpha} lines, one from Cl{sup +}-Cl{sup 6+} (hereby called ''cold K{alpha}''), and the other from Cl{sup 9+} and Cl{sup 10+} (''shifted K{alpha}'') are observed from different regions within the target. Two-dimensional collisional particle-in-cell simulations show two distinct heating mechanisms occurring concurrently: uniform heating by refluxing electrons and local heating by diffusive electrons in the central region. These two heating processes, which made the target temperature distribution nonuniform, are responsible for producing the two groups of K{alpha} lines in the experiment. The blue-shift of cold K{alpha} lines in the experiment is the signature of higher temperatures achieved by the refluxing heating in smaller-mass targets.

  1. Methods for chemical recovery of non-carrier-added radioactive tin from irradiated intermetallic Ti-Sb targets

    DOEpatents

    Lapshina, Elena V.; Zhuikov, Boris L.; Srivastava, Suresh C.; Ermolaev, Stanislav V.; Togaeva, Natalia R.

    2012-01-17

    The invention provides a method of chemical recovery of no-carrier-added radioactive tin (NCA radiotin) from intermetallide TiSb irradiated with accelerated charged particles. An irradiated sample of TiSb can be dissolved in acidic solutions. Antimony can be removed from the solution by extraction with dibutyl ether. Titanium in the form of peroxide can be separated from tin using chromatography on strong anion-exchange resin. In another embodiment NCA radiotin can be separated from iodide solution containing titanium by extraction with benzene, toluene or chloroform. NCA radiotin can be finally purified from the remaining antimony and other impurities using chromatography on silica gel. NCA tin-117m can be obtained from this process. NCA tin-117m can be used for labeling organic compounds and biological objects to be applied in medicine for imaging and therapy of various diseases.

  2. Century-long monitoring of solar irradiance and Earth's albedo using a stable scattering target in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Judge, Philip G.; Egeland, Ricky

    2015-03-01

    An inert sphere of a few metres diameter, placed in a special stable geosynchronous orbit in perpetuo, can be used for a variety of scientific experiments. Ground-based observations of such a sphere, `GeoSphere', can resolve very difficult problems in measuring the long-term solar irradiance. GeoSphere measurements will also help us understand the evolution of Earth's albedo and climate over at least the next century.

  3. Reduction of time-averaged irradiation speckle nonuniformity in laser-driven plasmas due to target ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epstein, R.

    1997-09-01

    In inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments, irradiation uniformity is improved by passing laser beams through distributed phase plates (DPPs), which produce focused intensity profiles with well-controlled, reproducible envelopes modulated by fine random speckle. [C. B. Burckhardt, Appl. Opt. 9, 695 (1970); Y. Kato and K. Mima, Appl. Phys. B 29, 186 (1982); Y. Kato et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 53, 1057 (1984); Laboratory for Laser Energetics LLE Review 33, NTIS Document No. DOE/DP/40200-65, 1987 (unpublished), p. 1; Laboratory for Laser Energetics LLE Review 63, NTIS Document No. DOE/SF/19460-91, 1995 (unpublished), p. 1.] A uniformly ablating plasma atmosphere acts to reduce the contribution of the speckle to the time-averaged irradiation nonuniformity by causing the intensity distribution to move relative to the absorption layer of the plasma. This occurs most directly as the absorption layer in the plasma moves with the ablation-driven flow, but it is shown that the effect of the accumulating ablated plasma on the phase of the laser light also makes a quantitatively significant contribution. Analytical results are obtained using the paraxial approximation applied to the beam propagation, and a simple statistical model is assumed for the properties of DPPs. The reduction in the time-averaged spatial spectrum of the speckle due to these effects is shown to be quantitatively significant within time intervals characteristic of atmospheric hydrodynamics under typical ICF irradiation intensities.

  4. Specific features of microheterogeneous plasma produced by irradiation of a polymer aerogel target with an intense 500-ps-long laser pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Borisenko, N. G.; Merkul’ev, Yu. A.; Orekhov, A. S.; Chaurasia, S.; Tripathi, S.; Munda, D. S.; Dhareshwar, L. J.; Pimenov, V. G.; Sheveleva, E. E.

    2013-08-15

    The properties of microheterogeneous plasma produced by irradiation of a polymer aerogel target with an intense (10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 3}) short (0.5 ps) 1.064-μm laser pulse were studied. It is found that, even at plasma densities exceeding the critical density, a small fraction of the incident laser radiation penetrates through the plasma in which the processes of density and temperature equalization still take place. The intensification (as compared to plasmas produced from denser foams and solid films) of transport processes in such plasma along and across the laser beam can be caused by the initial microheterogeneity of the solid target. The replacement of a small (10% by mass) part of the polymer with copper nanoparticles leads to a nearly twofold increase in the intensity of the plasma X-ray emission.

  5. Extension of excitation functions up to 50 MeV for activation products in deuteron irradiations of Pr and Tm targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermanne, A.; Tárkányi, F.; Takács, S.; Ditrói, F.

    2016-09-01

    Extension up to 50 MeV incident deuteron energy is presented for excitation functions of activation products formed in monoisotopic Tm (169Tm) and Pr (141Pr). By stacked foil irradiations direct and/or cumulative production of 140,139m,138Nd, 138mPr, 141,139,137m,135Ce on Pr and 166,169Yb, 166,167,168Tm on Tm targets were measured. Confirmation of earlier experimental results for all investigated radionuclides is found and the influence of the higher energy on thick target yields and batch production of medically relevant radionuclides (140Nd, 139Pr (as decay product of 139mNd), 166,169Yb, 167Tm) is discussed. A comparison of experimental values with TALYS1.6 code results (predicted values from TENDL-2015 on-line library) shows a better description of the (d,pxn) reactions than older ones.

  6. Modulated drug release from the stem-and-loop structured oligodeoxynucleotide upon UV-A irradiation in the presence of target DNA.

    PubMed

    Tanabe, Kazuhito; Nakata, Hiroyuki; Mukai, Shin; Nishimoto, Sei-ichi

    2005-11-01

    o-Nitrobenzyl photochemistry as induced by UV-A irradiation was applied to a photoactivated drug releasing system based on a molecular beacon strategy. A stem-and-loop structured oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) possessing a photoreactive o-nitrobenzyl chromophore at the 3'-end and 1-aminonaphthalene quencher at the 5'-end underwent conformational change into a conventional double strand structure by hybridization with a specified target DNA. The intrinsic stem-and-loop structure suppressed photoactivated release of benzoic acid as a phantom drug from the o-nitrobenzyl chromophore because of intramolecular quenching by the 1-aminonaphthalene unit in close proximity to the chromophore. Formation of the double strand structure in the presence of perfectly matched target DNA minimized occurrence of intramolecular quenching and thereby enhanced the photoactivated drug release.

  7. Potentiating antilymphoma efficacy of chemotherapy using a liposome for integration of CD20 targeting, ultra-violet irradiation polymerizing, and controlled drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Cong; Li, Huafei; Zhao, He; Zhang, Weiwei; Chen, Yan; Yue, Zhanyi; Lu, Qiong; Wan, Yuxiang; Tian, Xiaoyu; Deng, Anmei

    2014-08-01

    Unlike most malignancies, chemotherapy but not surgery plays the most important role in treating non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). Currently, liposomes have been widely used to encapsulate chemotherapeutic drugs in treating solid tumors. However, higher in vivo stability owns a much more important position for excellent antitumor efficacy in treating hematological malignancies. In this study, we finely fabricated a rituximab Fab fragment-decorated liposome based on 1,2-bis(10,12-tricosadiynoyl)-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DC8,9PC), which can form intermolecular cross-linking through the diacetylenic group by ultra-violet (UV) irradiation. Our experimental results demonstrated that after the UV irradiation, the liposomes exhibit better serum stability and slower drug release with a decreased mean diameter of approximately 285 nm. The cellular uptake of adriamycin (ADR) by this Fab-navigated liposome was about four times of free drugs. Cytotoxicity assays against CD20+ lymphoma cells showed that the half maximal (50%) inhibitory concentration (IC50) of ADR-loaded immunoliposome was only one fourth of free ADR at the same condition. In vivo studies were evaluated in lymphoma-bearing SCID mice. With the high serum stability, finely regulated structure, active targeting strategy via antigen-antibody reaction and passive targeting strategy via enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect, our liposome exhibits durable and potent antitumor activities both in the disseminated and localized human NHL xeno-transplant models.

  8. Enhanced electron injection in laser-driven bubble acceleration by ultra-intense laser irradiating foil-gas targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guo-Bo; Ma, Yan-Yun; Xu, Han; Hafz, Nasr A. M.; Yang, Xiao-Hu; Chen, Min; Yu, Tong-Pu; Zou, De-Bin; Liu, Jian-Xun; Yan, Jian-Feng; Zhuo, Hong-Bin; Gan, Long-Fei; Tian, Li-Chao; Shao, Fu-Qiu; Yin, Yan; Kawata, S.

    2015-08-01

    A scheme for enhancing the electron injection charge in a laser-driven bubble acceleration is proposed. In this scheme, a thin foil target is placed in front of a gas target. Upon interaction with an ultra-intense laser pulse, the foil emits electrons with large longitudinal momenta, allowing them to be trapped into the transmitted shaped laser-excited bubble in the gaseous plasma target. Two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation is used to demonstrate this scheme, and an electron beam with a total electron number of 4.21 × 10 8 μ m - 1 can be produced, which is twice the number of electrons produced without the foil. Such scheme may be widely used for applications that require high electron yields such as positron and gamma ray generation from relativistic electron beams interacting with solid targets.

  9. L-shell emission from high-Z solid targets by intense 10{sup 19}W/cm{sup 2} irradiation with a 248nm laser

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, T.R.; Borisov, A.B.; Boyer, K.

    2000-01-05

    Efficient (1.2% yield) multikilovolt x-ray emission from Ba(L) (2.4--2.8{angstrom}) and Gd(L) (1.7--2.1{angstrom}) is produced by ultraviolet (248nm) laser-excited BaF{sub 2} and Gd solids. The high efficiency is attributed to an inner shell-selective collisional electron ejection. Much effort has been expended recently in attempts to develop an efficient coherent x-ray source suitable for high-resolution biological imaging. To this end, many experiments have been performed studying the x-ray emissions from high-Z materials under intense (>10{sup 18}W/cm{sup 2}) irradiation, with the most promising results coming from the irradiation of Xe clusters with a UV (248nm) laser at intensities of 10{sup 18}--10{sup 19}W/cm{sup 2}. In this paper the authors report the production of prompt x-rays with energies in excess of 5keV with efficiencies on the order of 1% as a result of intense irradiation of BaF{sub 2} and Gd targets with a terawatt 248nm laser. The efficiency is attributed to an inner shell-selective collisional electron ejection mechanism in which the previously photoionized electrons are ponderomotively driven into an ion while retaining a portion of their atomic phase and symmetry. This partial coherence of the laser-driven electrons has a pronounced effect on the collisional cross-section for the electron ion interaction.

  10. A TPD and AR based comparison of accelerator neutron irradiation fields between (7)Li and W targets for BNCT.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Kenichi; Endo, Satoru; Yonai, Shunsuke; Baba, Mamoru; Hoshi, Masaharu

    2014-06-01

    The characteristics of moderator assembly dimension was investigated for the usage of (7)Li(p,n) neutrons by 2.3-2.8MeV protons and W(p,n) neutrons by 50MeV protons. The indexes were the treatable protocol depth (TPD) and advantage depth (AD). Consequently, a configuration for W target with the Fe filter, Fluental moderator, Pb reflector showed the TPD of 5.8cm and AD of 9.3cm. Comparable indexes were found for the Li target in a geometry with the MgF2 moderator and Teflon reflector.

  11. [Margin determination from clinical to planning target volume for lung cancer treated with conformal or intensity-modulated irradiation].

    PubMed

    Berthelot, K; Thureau, S; Giraud, P

    2016-10-01

    Technological progress in radiotherapy enables more precision for treatment planning and delivery. The margin determination between the clinical target volume and the planning target volumes stem from the estimation of geometric uncertainties of the tumour localization into the radiation beam. The inner motion complexity of lung tumours has led to the use of 4D computed tomography and nurtures specific dosimetric concerns. Few strategies consisting in integrating tumour motion allow margin reduction regarding inner movements. The patient immobilization and onboard imagery improvement decrease the setup uncertainties. Each step between the initial planning imagery and treatment delivery has to be analysed as systematic or random errors to calculate the optimal planning margin. PMID:27614506

  12. [Margin determination from clinical to planning target volume for lung cancer treated with conformal or intensity-modulated irradiation].

    PubMed

    Berthelot, K; Thureau, S; Giraud, P

    2016-10-01

    Technological progress in radiotherapy enables more precision for treatment planning and delivery. The margin determination between the clinical target volume and the planning target volumes stem from the estimation of geometric uncertainties of the tumour localization into the radiation beam. The inner motion complexity of lung tumours has led to the use of 4D computed tomography and nurtures specific dosimetric concerns. Few strategies consisting in integrating tumour motion allow margin reduction regarding inner movements. The patient immobilization and onboard imagery improvement decrease the setup uncertainties. Each step between the initial planning imagery and treatment delivery has to be analysed as systematic or random errors to calculate the optimal planning margin.

  13. The role of repair in the survival of mammalian cells from heavy ion irradiation - Approximation to the ideal case of target theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lett, J. T.; Cox, A. B.; Story, M. D.

    1989-01-01

    Experiments are discussed in which the cell-cycle dependency of the repair deficiency of the S/S variant of the L5178Y murine leukemic lymphoblast was examined by treatment with the heavy ions, Ne-20, Si-28, Ar-40, Fe-56, and Nb-93. Evidence from those studies provide support for the notion that as the linear energy transfer of the incident radiation increases the ability of the S/S cell to repair radiation damage decreases until it is eliminated around 500 keV/micron. In the region of the latter linear energy transfer value, the behavior of the S/S cell approximates the ideal case of target theory where post-irradiation metabolism does not influence cell survival.

  14. LASERS: Laser stand for irradiation of targets by laser pulses from the Iskra-5 facility at a repetition rate of 100 MHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annenkov, V. I.; Garanin, Sergey G.; Eroshenko, V. A.; Zhidkov, N. V.; Zubkov, A. V.; Kalipanov, S. V.; Kalmykov, N. A.; Kovalenko, V. P.; Krotov, V. A.; Lapin, S. G.; Martynenko, S. P.; Pankratov, V. I.; Faizullin, V. S.; Khrustalev, V. A.; Khudikov, N. M.; Chebotar, V. S.

    2009-08-01

    A train of a few tens of high-power subnanosecond laser pulses with a repetition period of 10 ns is generated in the Iskra-5 facility. The laser pulse train has an energy of up to 300 J and contains up to 40 pulses (by the 0.15 intensity level), the single pulse duration in the train being ~0.5 ns. The results of experiments on conversion of a train of laser pulses to a train of X-ray pulses are presented. Upon irradiation of a tungsten target, a train of X-ray pulses is generated with the shape of an envelope in the spectral band from 0.18 to 0.28 keV similar to that of the envelope of the laser pulse train. The duration of a single X-ray pulse in the train is equal to that of a single laser pulse.

  15. Powder Metallurgy Fabrication of Molybdenum Accelerator Target Disks

    SciTech Connect

    Lowden, Richard Andrew; Kiggans Jr., James O.; Nunn, Stephen D.; Parten, Randy J.

    2015-12-01

    Powder metallurgy approaches for the fabrication of accelerator target disks are being examined to support the development of Mo-99 production by NorthStar Medical Technologies, LLC. An advantage of powder metallurgy is that very little material is wasted and at present, dense, quality parts are routinely produced from molybdenum powder. The proposed targets, however, are thin wafers, 29 mm in diameter with a thickness of 0.5 mm, with very stringent dimensional tolerances. Although tooling can be machined to very high tolerance levels, the operations of powder feed, pressing and sintering involve complicated mechanisms, each of which affects green density and shrinkage, and therefore the dimensions and shape of the final product. Combinations of powder morphology, lubricants and pressing technique have been explored to produce target disks with minimal variations in thickness and little or no distortion. In addition, sintering conditions that produce densities for optimum target dissolvability are being determined.

  16. Note: Proton irradiation at kilowatt-power and neutron production from a free-surface liquid-lithium target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halfon, S.; Arenshtam, A.; Kijel, D.; Paul, M.; Weissman, L.; Aviv, O.; Berkovits, D.; Dudovitch, O.; Eisen, Y.; Eliyahu, I.; Feinberg, G.; Haquin, G.; Hazenshprung, N.; Kreisel, A.; Mardor, I.; Shimel, G.; Shor, A.; Silverman, I.; Tessler, M.; Yungrais, Z.

    2014-05-01

    The free-surface Liquid-Lithium Target, recently developed at Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility (SARAF), was successfully used with a 1.9 MeV, 1.2 mA (2.3 kW) continuous-wave proton beam. Neutrons (˜2 × 1010 n/s having a peak energy of ˜27 keV) from the 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction were detected with a fission-chamber detector and by gold activation targets positioned in the forward direction. The setup is being used for nuclear astrophysics experiments to study neutron-induced reactions at stellar energies and to demonstrate the feasibility of accelerator-based boron neutron capture therapy.

  17. Note: Proton irradiation at kilowatt-power and neutron production from a free-surface liquid-lithium target.

    PubMed

    Halfon, S; Arenshtam, A; Kijel, D; Paul, M; Weissman, L; Aviv, O; Berkovits, D; Dudovitch, O; Eisen, Y; Eliyahu, I; Feinberg, G; Haquin, G; Hazenshprung, N; Kreisel, A; Mardor, I; Shimel, G; Shor, A; Silverman, I; Tessler, M; Yungrais, Z

    2014-05-01

    The free-surface Liquid-Lithium Target, recently developed at Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility (SARAF), was successfully used with a 1.9 MeV, 1.2 mA (2.3 kW) continuous-wave proton beam. Neutrons (~2 × 10(10) n/s having a peak energy of ~27 keV) from the (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be reaction were detected with a fission-chamber detector and by gold activation targets positioned in the forward direction. The setup is being used for nuclear astrophysics experiments to study neutron-induced reactions at stellar energies and to demonstrate the feasibility of accelerator-based boron neutron capture therapy.

  18. Multi-facet concentrator of solar setup for irradiating the objects placed in a target plane with solar light

    DOEpatents

    Lewandowski, Allan A.; Yampolskiy, Vladislav; Alekseev, Valerie; Son, Valentin

    2001-01-01

    According to the proposed invention, this technical result is achieved so that many-facet concentrator of a solar setup for exposure of objects, placed in a target plane, to the action of solar radiation containing a supporting frame and facets differing by that the facets of the concentrator are chosen with spherical focusing reflective surfaces of equal focal lengths and with selective coatings reflecting a desired spectral fraction of solar radiation, and are arranged on the supporting frame symmetrically with respect to the common axis of the concentrator, their optical axes being directed to the single point on the optical axis of the concentrator located before the nominal focus point of the concentrator and determining the position of arranging the target plane.

  19. High Resolution Monochromatic X-Ray Imaging of Targets Irradiated by the Nike KrF Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aglitskiy, Y.; Lehecka, T.; Brown, C.; Seely, J.; Feldman, U.; Obenschain, S.; Bodner, S.; Pawley, C.; Gerber, K.; Sethian, J.; Holland, G.

    1996-11-01

    Planar CH foils were accelerated by the main Nike laser driving beams and were backlit by Si plasmas. A spherically-bent quartz crystal (R=25cm, 2d=6.68703 Åimaged the radiation of He-like Si resonance line that was transmitted through the target foil. The intensity of the backlighted image (6 beams, 250 J) was 160 times greater than the self emission from a driven CH foil. The magnified (X9.6) images on DEF film had the resolution about 5 μ m (3 μ m with R=10cm). The resulting 10 μ m spatial resolution in the gated images was determined by 100 μ m resolution of the framing camera. Images of CH targets were recorded 2 nsec after the peak of the laser pulse and revealed the growth of Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities that were seeded by patterns with amplitude as small as 0.25 μ m. The image of driven smooth CH target was quite smooth compared to those of the patterned CH foil. A future imaging instrument will have multiple backlighter plasmas and better quality bent crystals that can be bent into a toroidal shape. Up to four images with higher magnification and spatial resolution of 5 μ m may be recorded on the framing camera. This work supported by the US Department of Energy

  20. Experimental Study on Fast Electrons Transport in Ultra-intense Laser Irradiated Solid Targets by Transition Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhijian, Zheng; Guangcan, Wang; Yuqiu, Gu

    2008-11-01

    The experiment was performed with SILEX laser facility(Ti-saphhire) at LFRC in China. The SILEX parameter: wavelength 0.8μm, duration 35fs, output power 280TW, contrast 5*105, The focal spot φ10μm(F/1.7), intensity on target surface 1*10^19W/cm^2(F/3). The main diagnostic equipments are the electron spectrometer, OMA spectrometer, optical streak camera. Some experimental results are given: The spectrum of optical emission from rear surface is rather narrow around some particular frequencies(1φ, 2φ, 3φ), We ascribe and confirm that the spike-like spectral line that is coherent transition radiation; The coherent light is also seen on time-integrated image with ring-patter due to Weibel instability of the fast electron transport; Obtained experimental cure of target thickness vs OTR image intensity is relative to mean free path of fast electron; The measuring optical transition radiation(OTR) duration of 171ps much longer than 1ps duration of fast electron transport target, the possible explanation is that the OTR duration to be determined magnetic diffusion time.

  1. 225Ac and 223Ra production via 800 MeV proton irradiation of natural thorium targets.

    PubMed

    Weidner, J W; Mashnik, S G; John, K D; Ballard, B; Birnbaum, E R; Bitteker, L J; Couture, A; Fassbender, M E; Goff, G S; Gritzo, R; Hemez, F M; Runde, W; Ullmann, J L; Wolfsberg, L E; Nortier, F M

    2012-11-01

    Cross sections for the formation of (225,227)Ac, (223,225)Ra, and (227)Th via the proton bombardment of natural thorium targets were measured at a nominal proton energy of 800 MeV. No earlier experimental cross section data for the production of (223,225)Ra, (227)Ac and (227)Th by this method were found in the literature. A comparison of theoretical predictions with the experimental data shows agreement within a factor of two. Results indicate that accelerator-based production of (225)Ac and (223)Ra is a viable production method.

  2. 225Ac and 223Ra production via 800 MeV proton irradiation of natural thorium targets.

    PubMed

    Weidner, J W; Mashnik, S G; John, K D; Ballard, B; Birnbaum, E R; Bitteker, L J; Couture, A; Fassbender, M E; Goff, G S; Gritzo, R; Hemez, F M; Runde, W; Ullmann, J L; Wolfsberg, L E; Nortier, F M

    2012-11-01

    Cross sections for the formation of (225,227)Ac, (223,225)Ra, and (227)Th via the proton bombardment of natural thorium targets were measured at a nominal proton energy of 800 MeV. No earlier experimental cross section data for the production of (223,225)Ra, (227)Ac and (227)Th by this method were found in the literature. A comparison of theoretical predictions with the experimental data shows agreement within a factor of two. Results indicate that accelerator-based production of (225)Ac and (223)Ra is a viable production method. PMID:22944532

  3. Efficient generation of fast ions from surface modulated nanostructure targets irradiated by high intensity short-pulse lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Andreev, Alexander; Kumar, Naveen; Pukhov, Alexander; Platonov, Konstantin

    2011-10-15

    It's shown that the imposition of sub-laser wavelength relief structures on the surface of mass-limited-targets results into several folds higher short-pulse laser absorption, and consequently the efficient generation of fast ions. The optimum relief parameters for enhanced short-pulse laser absorption and higher ion acceleration are estimated numerically by particle-in-cell simulations and then corroborated by analytical scalings. The stability of the pre-imposed surface modulation during the laser pulse foil interaction is also examined.

  4. Hot surface ionic line emission and cold K-inner shell emission from petawatt-laser irradiated Cu foil targets

    SciTech Connect

    Theobald, W; Akli, K; Clarke, R; Delettrez, J A; Freeman, R R; Glenzer, S; Green, J; Gregori, G; Heathcote, R; Izumi, N; King, J A; Koch, J A; Kuba, J; Lancaster, K; MacKinnon, A J; Key, M; Mileham, C; Myatt, J; Neely, D; Norreys, P A; Park, H; Pasely, J; Patel, P; Regan, S P; Sawada, H; Shepherd, R; Snavely, R; Stephens, R B; Stoeckl, C; Storm, M; Zhang, B; Sangster, T C

    2005-12-13

    A hot, T{sub e} {approx} 2- to 3-keV surface plasma was observed in the interaction of a 0.7-ps petawatt laser beam with solid copper-foil targets at intensities >10{sup 20} W/cm{sup 2}. Copper K-shell spectra were measured in the range of 8 to 9 keV using a single-photon-counting x-ray CCD camera. In addition to K{sub {alpha}} and K{sub {beta}} inner-shell lines, the emission contained the Cu He{sub {alpha}} and Ly{sub {alpha}} lines, allowing the temperature to be inferred. These lines have not been observed previously with ultrafast laser pulses. For intensities less than 3 x 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}, only the K{sub {alpha}} and K{sub {beta}} inner-shell emissions are detected. Measurements of the absolute K{sub {alpha}} yield as a function of the laser intensity are in agreement with a model that includes refluxing and confinement of the suprathermal electrons in the target volume.

  5. High e+/e– ratio dense pair creation with 1021W.cm–2 laser irradiating solid targets

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, E.; Clarke, T.; Henderson, A.; Fu, W.; Lo, W.; Taylor, D.; Chaguine, P.; Zhou, S.; Hua, Y.; Cen, X.; Wang, X.; Kao, J.; Hasson, H.; Dyer, G.; Serratto, K.; Riley, N.; Donovan, M.; Ditmire, T.

    2015-09-14

    In this study, we report results of new pair creation experiments using ~100 Joule pulses of the Texas Petawatt Laser to irradiate solid gold and platinum targets, with intensities up to ~1.9 × 1021 W.cm–2 and pulse durations as short as ~130 fs. Positron to electron (e+/e–) ratios >15% were observed for many thick disk and rod targets, with the highest e+/e– ratio reaching ~50% for a Pt rod. The inferred pair yield was ~ few ×1010 with emerging pair density reaching ~1015/cm3 so that the pair skin depth becomes < pair jet transverse size. These results represent major milestones towards the goal of creating a significant quantity of dense pair-dominated plasmas with e+/e– approaching 100% and pair skin depth << pair plasma size, which will have wide-ranging applications to astrophysics and fundamental physics.

  6. Effects of laser-plasma interactions on terahertz radiation from solid targets irradiated by ultrashort intense laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Li Chun; Zhou Mulin; Ding Wenjun; Du Fei; Liu Feng; Li Yutong; Wang Weimin; Ma Jinglong; Chen Liming; Lu Xin; Dong Quanli; Wang Zhaohua; Wei Zhiyi; Sheng Zhengming; Zhang Jie; Lou Zheng; Shi Shengcai

    2011-09-15

    Interactions of 100-fs laser pulses with solid targets at intensities of 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2} and resultant terahertz (THz) radiation are studied under different laser contrast ratio conditions. THz emission is measured in the specular reflection direction, which appears to decrease as the laser contrast ratio varies from 10{sup -8} to 10{sup -6}. Correspondingly, the frequency spectra of the reflected light are observed changing from second harmonic dominant, three-halves harmonic dominant, to vanishing of both harmonics. Two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation also suggests that this observation is correlated with the plasma density scale length change. The results demonstrate that the THz emission is closely related to the laser-plasma interaction processes. The emission is strong when resonance absorption is a key feature of the interaction, and becomes much weaker when parametric instabilities dominate.

  7. Sensitization of hepatocellular carcinoma cells to irradiation by miR‑34a through targeting lactate dehydrogenase‑A.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaogang; Lu, Ping; Li, Bo; Yang, Rong; Chu, Yan; Zhang, Zhiping; Wan, Hongwei; Niu, Chao; Wang, Chunxiao; Luo, Kaiyuan

    2016-04-01

    Radiation is a therapeutic strategy for the treatment of cancer, and is also used for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma. MicroRNAs (miRs) are endogenous, non‑coding single‑stranded RNA molecules, which regulate gene expression at the post‑transcriptional level. In the present study, the roles of miR‑34a‑mediated glycolysis in radiation sensitivity were investigated. By establishing a radioresistant liver cancer cell line, the present study compared the expression level of miR‑34a from radiosensitive and radioresistant cells using the reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The glucose uptake and lactate production were also compared between the two types of cells. The results demonstrated that miR‑34a acted as a tumor suppressor in human hepatocellular cancer cells. Following comparison of radiosensitive and radioresistant cancer cells, the results of the present study demonstrated that miR‑34a was negatively correlated with radiation resistance; and levels of miR‑34a were significantly downregulated in the HepG2 radioresistant cells. Furthermore, the rate of glycolysis in the radioresistant cells was elevated, and there was evidence that glucose uptake and lactate production increased. Lactate dehydrogenase A (LDHA), which is a key enzyme in the glycolysis signaling pathway, was found to be a target of miR‑34a in hepatocellular cancer cells. Notably, the overexpression of miR‑34a re‑sensitized HepG2 radioresistant cells to radiation treatment by inhibiting LDHA. The results of the present study revealed a negative correlation between miR‑34a and glycolysis, caused by the targeting of LDHA‑34a, providing a novel mechanism for miR‑34a‑mediated radioresistance. PMID:26956717

  8. Mapping of nodal disease in locally advanced prostate cancer: Rethinking the clinical target volume for pelvic nodal irradiation based on vascular rather than bony anatomy

    SciTech Connect

    Shih, Helen A. . E-mail: hshih@partners.org; Harisinghani, Mukesh; Zietman, Anthony L.; Wolfgang, John A.; Saksena, Mansi; Weissleder, Ralph

    2005-11-15

    Purpose: Toxicity from pelvic irradiation could be reduced if fields were limited to likely areas of nodal involvement rather than using the standard 'four-field box.' We employed a novel magnetic resonance lymphangiographic technique to highlight the likely sites of occult nodal metastasis from prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Eighteen prostate cancer patients with pathologically confirmed node-positive disease had a total of 69 pathologic nodes identifiable by lymphotropic nanoparticle-enhanced MRI and semiquantitative nodal analysis. Fourteen of these nodes were in the para-aortic region, and 55 were in the pelvis. The position of each of these malignant nodes was mapped to a common template based on its relation to skeletal or vascular anatomy. Results: Relative to skeletal anatomy, nodes covered a diffuse volume from the mid lumbar spine to the superior pubic ramus and along the sacrum and pelvic side walls. In contrast, the nodal metastases mapped much more tightly relative to the large pelvic vessels. A proposed pelvic clinical target volume to encompass the region at greatest risk of containing occult nodal metastases would include a 2.0-cm radial expansion volume around the distal common iliac and proximal external and internal iliac vessels that would encompass 94.5% of the pelvic nodes at risk as defined by our node-positive prostate cancer patient cohort. Conclusions: Nodal metastases from prostate cancer are largely localized along the major pelvic vasculature. Defining nodal radiation treatment portals based on vascular rather than bony anatomy may allow for a significant decrease in normal pelvic tissue irradiation and its associated toxicities.

  9. Resistance induced by normal and irradiated Schistosoma mansoni: ability of various worm stages to serve as inducers and targets in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Dean, D.A.; Cioli, D.; Bukowski, M.A.

    1981-09-01

    Lung stage schistosomula exposed to 50 kilorads of gamma irradiation induced significant resistance to challenge infection with Schistosoma mansoni following intravenous (tail or mesenteric vein), intramuscular, or intraperitoneal injection into mice. Similar or higher levels were induced with irradiated cercariae, while irradiated 3- or 4-week-old worms induced little resistance. Non-irradiated day 6 and day 12 lung schistosomula injected into mice immunized with irradiated cercariae were susceptible to elimination, though to a lesser extent than a challenge infection administered at the cercarial stage. Day 20 liver worms injected into a mesenteric vein were not susceptible to irradiated cercaria-induced resistance. In contrast, cercariae, day 6 lung schistosomula, day 12 lung schistosomula and day 20 liver worms were all susceptible to the resistance induced by a chronic (non-irradiated) infection.

  10. Performance of a new Electron-Tracking Compton Camera under intense radiations from a water target irradiated with a proton beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuoka, Y.; Tanimori, T.; Kubo, H.; Takada, A.; Parker, J. D.; Mizumoto, T.; Mizumura, Y.; Iwaki, S.; Sawano, T.; Komura, S.; Kishimoto, T.; Oda, M.; Takemura, T.; Miyamoto, S.; Sonoda, S.; Tomono, D.; Miuchi, K.; Kabuki, S.; Kurosawa, S.

    2015-01-01

    We have developed an electron-tracking Compton camera (ETCC) for use in next-generation MeV gamma ray telescopes. An ETCC consists of a gaseous time projection chamber (TPC) and pixel scintillator arrays (PSAs). Since the TPC measures the three dimensional tracks of Compton-recoil electrons, the ETCC can completely reconstruct the incident gamma rays. Moreover, the ETCC demonstrates efficient background rejection power in Compton-kinematics tests, identifies particle from the energy deposit rate (dE/dX) registered in the TPC, and provides high quality imaging by completely reconstructing the Compton scattering process. We are planning the ``Sub-MeV gamma ray Imaging Loaded-on-balloon Experiment'' (SMILE) for our proposed all-sky survey satellite. Performance tests of a mid-sized (30 cm)3 ETCC, constructed for observing the Crab nebula, are ongoing. However, observations at balloon altitudes or satellite orbits are obstructed by radiation background from the atmosphere and the detector itself [1]. The background rejection power was checked using proton accelerator experiments conducted at the Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Osaka University. To create the intense radiation fields encountered in space, which comprise gamma rays, neutrons, protons, and other energetic entities, we irradiated a water target with a 140 MeV proton beam and placed a SMILE-II ETCC near the target. In this situation, the counting rate was five times than that expected at the balloon altitude. Nonetheless, the ETCC stably operated and identified particles sufficiently to obtain a clear gamma ray image of the checking source. Here, we report the performance of our detector and demonstrate its effective background rejection based in electron tracking experiments.

  11. Pulsed Irradiation Improves Target Selectivity of Infrared Laser-Evoked Gene Operator for Single-Cell Gene Induction in the Nematode C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Motoshi; Toyoda, Naoya; Takagi, Shin

    2014-01-01

    Methods for turning on/off gene expression at the experimenter’s discretion would be useful for various biological studies. Recently, we reported on a novel microscope system utilizing an infrared laser-evoked gene operator (IR-LEGO) designed for inducing heat shock response efficiently in targeted single cells in living organisms without cell damage, thereby driving expression of a transgene under the control of a heat shock promoter. Although the original IR-LEGO can be successfully used for gene induction, several limitations hinder its wider application. Here, using the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) as a subject, we have made improvements in IR-LEGO. For better spatial control of heating, a pulsed irradiation method using an optical chopper was introduced. As a result, single cells of C. elegans embryos as early as the 2-cell stage and single neurons in ganglia can be induced to express genes selectively. In addition, the introduction of site-specific recombination systems to IR-LEGO enables the induction of gene expression controlled by constitutive and cell type-specific promoters. The strategies adopted here will be useful for future applications of IR-LEGO to other organisms. PMID:24465705

  12. Postirradiation evaluations of capsules HANS-1 and HANS-2 irradiated in the HFIR target region in support of fuel development for the advanced neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Hofman, G.L.; Snelgrove, J.L.; Copeland, G.L.

    1995-08-01

    This report describes the design, fabrication, irradiation, and evaluation of two capsule tests containing U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} fuel particles in contact with aluminum. The tests were in support of fuel qualification for the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) reactor, a high-powered research reactor that was planned for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. At the time of these tests, the fuel consisted of U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}, containing highly enriched uranium dispersed in aluminum at a volume fraction of {approximately}0.15. The extremely high thermal flux in the target region of the High Flux Isotope Reactor provided up to 90% burnup in one 23-d cycle. Temperatures up to 450{degrees}C were maintained by gamma heating. Passive SiC temperature monitors were employed. The very small specimen size allowed only microstructural examination of the fuel particles but also allowed many specimens to be tested at a range of temperatures. The determination of fission gas bubble morphology by microstructural examination has been beneficial in developing a fuel performance model that allows prediction of fuel performance under these extreme conditions. The results indicate that performance of the reference fuel would be satisfactory under the ANS conditions. In addition to U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}, particles of U{sub 3}Si, UAl{sub 2}, UAl{sub x}, and U{sub 3}O{sub 8} were tested.

  13. WE-G-BRE-09: Targeted Radiotherapy Enhancement During Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation (ABPI) Using Controlled Release of Gold Nanoparticles (GNPs)

    SciTech Connect

    Cifter, G; Ngwa, W; Chin, J; Cifter, F; Sajo, E; Sinha, N; Bellon, J

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Several studies have demonstrated low rates of local recurrence with brachytherapy-based accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI). However, long-term outcomes on toxicity (e.g. telangiectasia), and cosmesis remain a major concern. The purpose of this study is to investigate the dosimetric feasibility of using targeted non-toxic radiosensitizing gold nanoparticles (GNPs) for localized dose enhancement to the planning target volume (PTV) during APBI while reducing dose to normal tissue. Methods: Two approaches for administering the GNPs were considered. In one approach, GNPs are assumed to be incorporated in a micrometer-thick polymer film on the surface of routinely used mammosite balloon applicators, for sustained controlled in-situ release, and subsequent treatment using 50-kVp Xoft devices. In case two, GNPs are administered directly into the lumpectomy cavity e.g. via injection or using fiducials coated with the GNP-loaded polymer film. Recent studies have validated the use of fiducials for reducing the PTV margin during APBI with 6 MV beams. An experimentally determined diffusion coefficient was used to determine space-time customizable distribution of GNPs for feasible in-vivo concentrations of 43 mg/g. An analytic calculational approach from previously published work was employed to estimate the dose enhancement due to GNPs (2 and 10 nm) as a function of distance up to 1 cm from lumpectomy cavity. Results: Dose enhancement due to GNP was found to be about 130% for 50-kVp x-rays, and 110% for 6-MV external beam radiotherapy, 1 cm away from the lumpectomy cavity wall. Higher customizable dose enhancement could be achieved at other distances as a function of nanoparticle size. Conclusion: Our preliminary results suggest that significant dose enhancement can be achieved to residual tumor cells targeted with GNPs during APBI with electronic brachytherapy or external beam therapy. The findings provide a useful basis for developing nanoparticle

  14. LIQUID TARGET

    DOEpatents

    Martin, M.D.; Salsig, W.W. Jr.

    1959-01-13

    A liquid handling apparatus is presented for a liquid material which is to be irradiated. The apparatus consists essentially of a reservoir for the liquid, a target element, a drain tank and a drain lock chamber. The target is in the form of a looped tube, the upper end of which is adapted to be disposed in a beam of atomic particles. The lower end of the target tube is in communication with the liquid in the reservoir and a means is provided to continuously circulate the liquid material to be irradiated through the target tube. Means to heat the reservoir tank is provided in the event that a metal is to be used as the target material. The apparatus is provided with suitable valves and shielding to provide maximum safety in operation.

  15. Inhibition of homologous recombination repair with Pentoxifylline targets G2 cells generated by radiotherapy and induces major enhancements of the toxicity of cisplatin and melphalan given after irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Bohm, Lothar

    2006-01-01

    The presentation reviews the modus operandi of the dose modifying drug Pentoxifylline and the dose enhancement factors which can be achieved in different cell types. Preclinical and clinical data show that Pentoxifylline improves the oxygenation of hypoxic tumours and enhances tumour control by irradiation. In vitro experiments demonstrate that Pentoxifylline also operates when oxygen is not limiting and produces dose modifying factors in the region of 1.2 – 2.0. This oxygen independent effect is poorly understood. In p53 mutant cells irradiation induces a G2 block which is abrogated by Pentoxifylline. The enhancement of cell kill observed when Pentoxifylline and irradiation are given together could arise from rapid entry of damaged tumour cells into mitosis and propagation of DNA lesions as the result of curtailment of repair time. Recovery ratios and repair experiments using CFGE after high dose irradiation demonstrate that Pentoxifylline inhibits repair directly and that curtailment of repair time is not the explanation. Use of the repair defective xrs1 and the parental repair competent CHO-K1 cell line shows that Pentoxifylline inhibits homologous recombination repair which operates predominantly in the G2 phase of the cell cycle. When irradiated cells residing in G2 phase are exposed to very low doses of cisplatin at a toxic dose of 5 %. (TC: 0.05) massive toxicity enhancements up to a factor of 80 are observed in melanoma, squamous carcinoma and prostate tumour cell lines. Enhancements of radiotoxicity seen when Pentoxifylline and radiation are applied together are small and do not exceed a factor of 2.0. The capacity of Pentoxifyline to inhibit homologous recombination repair has not as yet been clinically utilized. A suitable application could be in the treatment of cervical carcinoma where irradiation and cisplatin are standard modality. In vitro data also strongly suggest that regimes where irradiation is used in combination with alkylating drugs may

  16. Defects in muscarinic receptor-coupled signal transduction in isolated parotid gland cells after in vivo irradiation: evidence for a non-DNA target of radiation

    PubMed Central

    Coppes, R P; Meter, A; Latumalea, S P; Roffel, A F; Kampinga, H H

    2005-01-01

    Radiation-induced dysfunction of normal tissue, an unwanted side effect of radiotherapeutic treatment of cancer, is usually considered to be caused by impaired loss of cell renewal due to sterilisation of stem cells. This implies that the onset of normal tissue damage is usually determined by tissue turnover rate. Salivary glands are a clear exception to this rule: they have slow turnover rates (>60 days), yet develop radiation-induced dysfunction within hours to days. We showed that this could not be explained by a hypersensitivity to radiation-induced apoptosis or necrosis of the differentiated cells. In fact, salivary cells are still capable of amylase secretion shortly after irradiation while at the same time water secretion seems specifically and severely impaired. Here, we demonstrate that salivary gland cells isolated after in vivo irradiation are impaired in their ability to mobilise calcium from intracellular stores (Ca2+i), the driving force for water secretion, after exposure to muscarinic acetylcholine receptor agonists. Using radioligand-receptor-binding assays it is shown that radiation caused no changes in receptor density, receptor affinity nor in receptor-G-protein coupling. However, muscarinic acetylcholine agonist-induced activation of protein kinase C alpha (PKCα), measured as translocation to the plasma membrane, was severely affected in irradiated cells. Also, the phorbol ester PMA could no longer induce PKCα translocation in irradiated cells. Our data hence indicate that irradiation specifically interferes with PKCα association with membranes, leading to impairment of intracellular signalling. To the best of our knowledge, these data for the first time suggest that, the cells' capacity to respond to a receptor agonist is impaired after irradiation. PMID:15668705

  17. Development of activity pencil beam algorithm using measured distribution data of positron emitter nuclei generated by proton irradiation of targets containing {sup 12}C, {sup 16}O, and {sup 40}Ca nuclei in preparation of clinical application

    SciTech Connect

    Miyatake, Aya; Nishio, Teiji; Ogino, Takashi

    2011-10-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to develop a new calculation algorithm that is satisfactory in terms of the requirements for both accuracy and calculation time for a simulation of imaging of the proton-irradiated volume in a patient body in clinical proton therapy. Methods: The activity pencil beam algorithm (APB algorithm), which is a new technique to apply the pencil beam algorithm generally used for proton dose calculations in proton therapy to the calculation of activity distributions, was developed as a calculation algorithm of the activity distributions formed by positron emitter nuclei generated from target nuclear fragment reactions. In the APB algorithm, activity distributions are calculated using an activity pencil beam kernel. In addition, the activity pencil beam kernel is constructed using measured activity distributions in the depth direction and calculations in the lateral direction. {sup 12}C, {sup 16}O, and {sup 40}Ca nuclei were determined as the major target nuclei that constitute a human body that are of relevance for calculation of activity distributions. In this study, ''virtual positron emitter nuclei'' was defined as the integral yield of various positron emitter nuclei generated from each target nucleus by target nuclear fragment reactions with irradiated proton beam. Compounds, namely, polyethylene, water (including some gelatin) and calcium oxide, which contain plenty of the target nuclei, were irradiated using a proton beam. In addition, depth activity distributions of virtual positron emitter nuclei generated in each compound from target nuclear fragment reactions were measured using a beam ON-LINE PET system mounted a rotating gantry port (BOLPs-RGp). The measured activity distributions depend on depth or, in other words, energy. The irradiated proton beam energies were 138, 179, and 223 MeV, and measurement time was about 5 h until the measured activity reached the background level. Furthermore, the activity pencil beam data

  18. Epstein-Barr virus episomes as targets for cigarette smoke- and gamma-irradiation-induced DNA damage: studies on the EBNA-1 region by a new gene-specific technique.

    PubMed

    Yang, Q; Hergenhahn, M; Bartsch, H

    1997-07-01

    Following our demonstration of cytochrome P450-independent DNA damage induced by aqueous solutions of cigarette smoke in human mucosal cells in vivo, and in a lymphoblastoid cell line, we have developed a new technique to demonstrate gene-region specific DNA damage, with the EBNA-1 gene present in multiple nuclear matrix-attached episomes in Raji cells serving as an amplified target. DNA was extracted from Raji cells treated by gamma-irradiation or aqueous solutions of cigarette smoke; adducted bases or other damage were removed chemically by depurination/alkali treatment. Single-strand breaks induced directly by cigarette smoke as well as DNA cleaved at the site of former adducts were end-labelled either with alpha-[32P]dCTP or with biotin-16-dUTP. With 32P-labelling, a dose-dependent increase in DNA labelling was seen for different concentrations of cigarette smoke; undiluted smoke produced a similar amount of damage as 22.4 Gy of gamma-irradiation. For isolation of DNA regions that contained biotin label at the sites of former damage, DNA was cut by restriction endonucleases and 3-kb-fragments including the target gene, EBV-EBNA-1, were isolated by agarose-gel electrophoresis. Those containing biotin were selected on streptavidin-coated magnetic beads. PCR amplification of the bound DNA revealed EBNA-1 DNA only when cells were pretreated with either cigarette smoke or gamma-irradiation. The presented method thus provides a new approach for detecting gene-specific damage in a readily accessible target, EBV episomes. The method is also potentially applicable for studying single-copy genes such as p53, the types of adducts involved, and quantitative aspects of DNA damage and its repair.

  19. Accelerator target

    DOEpatents

    Schlyer, D.J.; Ferrieri, R.A.; Koehler, C.

    1999-06-29

    A target includes a body having a depression in a front side for holding a sample for irradiation by a particle beam to produce a radioisotope. Cooling fins are disposed on a backside of the body opposite the depression. A foil is joined to the body front side to cover the depression and sample therein. A perforate grid is joined to the body atop the foil for supporting the foil and for transmitting the particle beam therethrough. A coolant is circulated over the fins to cool the body during the particle beam irradiation of the sample in the depression. 5 figs.

  20. Accelerator target

    DOEpatents

    Schlyer, David J.; Ferrieri, Richard A.; Koehler, Conrad

    1999-01-01

    A target includes a body having a depression in a front side for holding a sample for irradiation by a particle beam to produce a radioisotope. Cooling fins are disposed on a backside of the body opposite the depression. A foil is joined to the body front side to cover the depression and sample therein. A perforate grid is joined to the body atop the foil for supporting the foil and for transmitting the particle beam therethrough. A coolant is circulated over the fins to cool the body during the particle beam irradiation of the sample in the depression.

  1. Efficient multi-keV x-ray generation from a high-Z target irradiated with a clean ultra-short laser pulse.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Z; Nishikino, M; Nishimura, H; Kawachi, T; Pirozhkov, A S; Sagisaka, A; Orimo, S; Ogura, K; Yogo, A; Okano, Y; Ohshima, S; Fujioka, S; Kiriyama, H; Kondo, K; Shimomura, T; Kanazawa, S

    2011-02-28

    Kα line emissions from Mo and Ag plates were experimentally studied using clean, ultrahigh-intensity femtosecond laser pulses. The absolute yields of Kα x-rays at 17 keV from Mo and 22 keV from Ag were measured as a function of the laser pulse contrast ratio and irradiation intensity. Significantly enhanced Kα yields were obtained for both Mo and Ag by employing high contrast ratios and irradiances. Conversion efficiencies of 4.28×10⁻⁵/sr for Mo and 4.84×10⁻⁵/sr for Ag, the highest values obtained to date, were demonstrated with contrast ratios in the range 10⁻¹⁰ to 10⁻¹¹.

  2. Efficient multi-keV x-ray source generated by nanosecond laser pulse irradiated multi-layer thin foils target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Shao-yong; Hu, Guang-yue; Miao, Wen-yong; Zhao, Bin; Zheng, Jian; Yuan, Yong-teng; Zhan, Xia-yu; Hou, Li-fei; Jiang, Shao-en; Ding, Yong-kun

    2014-04-01

    A new target configuration is proposed to generate efficient multi-keV x-ray source using multiple thin foils as x-ray emitters. The target was constructed with several layers of thin foils, which were placed with a specific, optimized spacing. The thin foils are burned though one by one by a nanosecond-long laser pulse, which produced a very large, hot, underdense plasma. One-dimensional radiation hydrodynamic simulations show that the emission region and the multi-keV x-ray flux generated by multi-layer thin foil target are similar to that of the low-density gas or foam target, which is currently a bright multi-keV x-ray source generated by laser heating. Detailed analysis of a range of foil thicknesses showed that a layer-thickness of 0.1 μm is thin enough to generate an efficient multi-keV x-ray source. Additionally, this type of target can be easily manufactured, compared with the complex techniques for fabrication of low-density foam targets. Our preliminary experimental results also verified that the size of multi-keV x-ray emission region could be enhanced significantly by using a multi-layer Ti thin foil target.

  3. Experimental Results for Direct Electron Irradiation of a Uranyl Sulfate Solution: Bubble Formation and Thermal Hydraulics Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Chemerisov, Sergey; Gromov, R.; Makarashvili, Vakhtang; Heltemes, Thad; Sun, Zaijing; Wardle, Kent E.; Bailey, James; Stepinski, Dominique; Jerden, James; Vandegrift, George F.

    2015-01-30

    In support of the development of accelerator-driven production of fission product Mo-99 as proposed by SHINE Medical Technologies, a 35 MeV electron linac was used to irradiate depleted-uranium (DU) uranyl sulfate dissolved in pH 1 sulfuric acid at average power densities of 6 kW, 12 kW, and 15 kW. During these irradiations, gas bubbles were generated in the solution due to the radiolytic decomposition of water molecules in the solution. Multiple video cameras were used to record the behavior of bubble generation and transport in the solution. Seven six-channel thermocouples were used to record temperature gradients in the solution from self-heating. Measurements of hydrogen and oxygen concentrations in a helium sweep gas were recorded by a gas chromatograph to estimate production rates during irradiation. These data are being used to validate a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model of the experiment that includes multiphase flow and a custom bubble injection model for the solution region.

  4. Influence of the reactive atmosphere on the formation of nanoparticles in the plasma plume induced by nanosecond pulsed laser irradiation of metallic targets at atmospheric pressure and high repetition rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girault, M.; Le Garrec, J.-L.; Mitchell, J. B. A.; Jouvard, J.-M.; Carvou, E.; Menneveux, J.; Yu, J.; Ouf, F.-X.; Carles, S.; Potin, V.; Pillon, G.; Bourgeois, S.; Perez, J.; Marco de Lucas, M. C.; Lavisse, L.

    2016-06-01

    The influence of a reactive atmosphere on the formation of nanoparticles (NPs) in the plasma plume generated by nanosecond pulsed laser irradiation of metal targets (Ti, Al, Ag) was probed in situ using Small Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS). Air and different O2-N2 gas mixtures were used as reactive gas within atmospheric pressure. SAXS results showed the formation of NPs in the plasma-plume with a mean radius varying in the 2-5 nm range. A decrease of the NPs size with increasing the O2 percentage in the O2-N2 gas mixture was also showed. Ex situ observations by transmission electron microscopy and structural characterizations by X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy were also performed for powders collected in experiments done using air as ambient gas. The stability of the different metal oxides is discussed as being a key parameter influencing the formation of NPs in the plasma-plume.

  5. Study of Rayleigh–Taylor growth in laser irradiated planar SiO{sub 2} targets at ignition-relevant conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Hager, J. D.; Collins, T. J. B.; Knauer, J. P.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Sangster, T. C.; Smalyuk, V. A.

    2013-07-15

    Rayleigh–Taylor (RT) growth experiments were performed on the OMEGA laser [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] using planar SiO{sub 2} targets seeded with a single mode 60-μm wavelength perturbation driven at peak laser intensities up to 9 × 10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2}. These are the first RT measurements in SiO{sub 2} at conditions relevant to direct-drive inertial confinement fusion ignition. The measured average modulation growth rates agree with the 2-D hydrodynamics code DRACO, providing an important step in the development of target ablators that are robust to RT growth and hot- electron preheat considerations when driven at the intensities required to achieve thermonuclear ignition.

  6. High-Linear Energy Transfer Irradiation Targeted to Skeletal Metastases by the Alpha Emitter Ra-223: Adjuvant or Alternative to Conventional Modalities?

    SciTech Connect

    Bruland, Oyvind S.; Nilsson, Sten; Fisher, Darrell R.; Larsen, Roy H.

    2006-10-15

    The bone-seeking, alpha-particle emitting radiopharmaceutical Alpharadin, 223RaCl2 (t1/2 = 11.4 days) is under clinical development as a novel treatment for skeletal metastases from breast and prostate cancer. This paper summarizes the current status of preclinical and clinical research on 223RaCl2. Potential advantages of 223Ra to that of external beam irradiation or registered beta-emitting bone-seekers are discussed. Published data of 223Ra dosimetry in mice and a therapeutic study in a skeletal metastases model in nude rats have indicated significant therapeutic potential of bone-seeking alpha-emitters. This paper provides short-term and long-term results from the first clinical single dosage trial. We present data from a repeated dosage study of five consecutive injections of 50 kBq/kg bodyweight, once every third week, or two injections of 125 kBq/kg bodyweight, six weeks apart. Furthermore, preliminary results are given for a randomized phase II trial involving 64 patients with hormone-refractory prostate cancer and painful skeletal metastases who received four monthly injections of 223Ra or saline as an adjuvant to external beam radiotherapy. Also presented are preliminary dose estimates for 223Ra in humans. Results indicate that repeated dosing is feasible and that opportunities are available for combined treatment strategies.

  7. FY 2013 Summary Report: Post-Irradiation Examination of Zircaloy-4 Samples in Target Capsules and Initiation of Bending Fatigue Testing for Used Nuclear Fuel Vibration Integrity Investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, Richard H.; Yan, Yong; Wang, Jy-An John; Ott, Larry J.; Howard, Rob L.

    2013-10-01

    This report documents ongoing work performed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for the Department of Energy, Office of Fuel Cycle Technology Used Fuel Disposition Campaign (UFDC), and satisfies the deliverable for milestone M2FT-13OR0805041, “Data Report on Hydrogen Doping and Irradiation in HFIR.” This work is conducted under WBS 1.02.08.05, Work Package FT-13OR080504 ST “Storage and Transportation-Experiments – ORNL.” The objectives of work packages that make up the S&T Experiments Control Account are to conduct the separate effects tests (SET) and small-scale tests that have been identified in the Used Nuclear Fuel Storage and Transportation Data Gap Prioritization (FCRD-USED-2012-000109). In FY 2013, the R&D focused on cladding and container issues and small-scale tests as identified in Sections A-2.9 and A-2.12 of the prioritization report.

  8. Tissue irradiator

    DOEpatents

    Hungate, F.P.; Riemath, W.F.; Bunnell, L.R.

    1975-12-16

    A tissue irradiator is provided for the in-vivo irradiation of body tissue. The irradiator comprises a radiation source material contained and completely encapsulated within vitreous carbon. An embodiment for use as an in- vivo blood irradiator comprises a cylindrical body having an axial bore therethrough. A radioisotope is contained within a first portion of vitreous carbon cylindrically surrounding the axial bore, and a containment portion of vitreous carbon surrounds the radioisotope containing portion, the two portions of vitreous carbon being integrally formed as a single unit. Connecting means are provided at each end of the cylindrical body to permit connections to blood- carrying vessels and to provide for passage of blood through the bore. In a preferred embodiment, the radioisotope is thulium-170 which is present in the irradiator in the form of thulium oxide. A method of producing the preferred blood irradiator is also provided, whereby nonradioactive thulium-169 is dispersed within a polyfurfuryl alcohol resin which is carbonized and fired to form the integral vitreous carbon body and the device is activated by neutron bombardment of the thulium-169 to produce the beta-emitting thulium-170.

  9. High-Frequency Jet Ventilation for Complete Target Immobilization and Reduction of Planning Target Volume in Stereotactic High Single-Dose Irradiation of Stage I Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer and Lung Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Fritz, Peter; Kraus, Hans-Joerg; Muehlnickel, Werner; Sassmann, Volker; Hering, Werner; Strauch, Konstantin

    2010-09-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate the feasibility of complete target immobilization by means of high-frequency jet ventilation (HFJV); and to show that the saving of planning target volume (PTV) on the stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) under HFJV, compared with SBRT with respiratory motion, can be predicted with reliable accuracy by computed tomography (CT) scans at peak inspiration phase. Methods and Materials: A comparison regarding different methods for defining the PTV was carried out in 22 patients with tumors that clearly moved with respiration. A movement span of the gross tumor volume (GTV) was defined by fusing respiration-correlated CT scans. The PTV enclosed the GTV positions with a safety margin throughout the breathing cycle. To create a PTV from CT scans acquired under HFJV, the same margins were drawn around the immobilized target. In addition, peak inspiration phase CT images (PIP-CTs) were used to approximate a target immobilized by HFJV. Results: The resulting HFJV-PTVs were between 11.6% and 45.4% smaller than the baseline values calculated as respiration-correlated CT-PTVs (median volume reduction, 25.4%). Tentative planning by means of PIP-CT PTVs predicted that in 19 of 22 patients, use of HFJV would lead to a reduction in volume of {>=}20%. Using this threshold yielded a positive predictive value of 0.89, as well as a sensitivity of 0.94 and a specificity of 0.5. Conclusions: In all patients, SBRT under HFJV provided a reliable immobilization of the GTVs and achieved a reduction in PTVs, regardless of patient compliance. Tentative planning facilitated the selection of patients who could better undergo radiation in respiratory standstill, both with greater accuracy and lung protection.

  10. Influence of different data tables on neutron induced reactions in quasi-infinite 238U and 232Th targets irradiated by protons with relativistic energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhivkov, P.; Stoyanov, Ch; Tyutyunnikov, S.; Furman, W.

    2016-06-01

    The last decade saw the emergence of various theoretical analysis and developments of ADS (Accelerator Driving System). Different transport codes, nuclear models and nuclear cross sections have been used to predict and estimate the properties of ADS. The energy of the proton beam is supposed to range between 1 and 1.5 GeV, but some analyses suggest higher energy - up to 10 GeV. The recent papers examine the influence of the nuclear models on neutron induced reactions (n,f), (n,g), (n,xn), (n,el.) and (n,inel.). The experimental set-ups and the presumable ADS constructions consist of thousands of segments and details for example project Myrrha, Belgum [1]. The calculation of the above reactions depends on the neutron spectrum in each segment. There is a considerable difference in the size of these segments in ADS, which makes the estimation of the influence of the nuclear models and the cross sections on the integral number of neutron induced reactions more difficult. This article considers the influence of different cross section data tables on neutron induced reactions in 238U or 232Th targets. One nuclear model describing the high energy part of the nuclear interaction and various cross section data tagble (ENDF, ENDL, TENDL2014 and etc.) are used. All particles generated in the nuclear interaction process deposit their energy in the target volume. MCNP 6.1 transport code was used.

  11. Monte Carlo calculated microdosimetric spread for cell nucleus-sized targets exposed to brachytherapy 125I and 192Ir sources and 60Co cell irradiation.

    PubMed

    Villegas, Fernanda; Tilly, Nina; Ahnesjö, Anders

    2013-09-01

    The stochastic nature of ionizing radiation interactions causes a microdosimetric spread in energy depositions for cell or cell nucleus-sized volumes. The magnitude of the spread may be a confounding factor in dose response analysis. The aim of this work is to give values for the microdosimetric spread for a range of doses imparted by (125)I and (192)Ir brachytherapy radionuclides, and for a (60)Co source. An upgraded version of the Monte Carlo code PENELOPE was used to obtain frequency distributions of specific energy for each of these radiation qualities and for four different cell nucleus-sized volumes. The results demonstrate that the magnitude of the microdosimetric spread increases when the target size decreases or when the energy of the radiation quality is reduced. Frequency distributions calculated according to the formalism of Kellerer and Chmelevsky using full convolution of the Monte Carlo calculated single track frequency distributions confirm that at doses exceeding 0.08 Gy for (125)I, 0.1 Gy for (192)Ir, and 0.2 Gy for (60)Co, the resulting distribution can be accurately approximated with a normal distribution. A parameterization of the width of the distribution as a function of dose and target volume of interest is presented as a convenient form for the use in response modelling or similar contexts.

  12. Irradiation subassembly

    DOEpatents

    Seim, O.S.; Filewicz, E.C.; Hutter, E.

    1973-10-23

    An irradiation subassembly for use in a nuclear reactor is described which includes a bundle of slender elongated irradiation -capsules or fuel elements enclosed by a coolant tube and having yieldable retaining liner between the irradiation capsules and the coolant tube. For a hexagonal bundle surrounded by a hexagonal tube the yieldable retaining liner may consist either of six segments corresponding to the six sides of the tube or three angular segments each corresponding in two adjacent sides of the tube. The sides of adjacent segments abut and are so cut that metal-tometal contact is retained when the volume enclosed by the retaining liner is varied and Springs are provided for urging the segments toward the center of the tube to hold the capsules in a closely packed configuration. (Official Gazette)

  13. PLUTONIUM-238 PRODUCTION TARGET DESIGN STUDIES

    SciTech Connect

    Hurt, Christopher J; Wham, Robert M; Hobbs, Randall W; Owens, R Steven; Chandler, David; Freels, James D; Maldonado, G Ivan

    2014-01-01

    A new supply chain is planned for plutonium-238 using existing reactors at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and existing chemical recovery facilities at ORNL. Validation and testing activities for new irradiation target designs have been conducted in three phases over a 2 year period to provide data for scale-up to production. Target design, qualification, target fabrication, and irradiation of fully-loaded targets have been accomplished. Data from post-irradiation examination (PIE) supports safety analysis and irradiation of future target designs.

  14. Generation of a quasi-monoenergetic high energy proton beam from a vacuum-sandwiched double layer target irradiated by an ultraintense laser pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Nam Kim, Kyung; Lee, Kitae Hee Park, Seong; Young Lee, Ji; Uk Jeong, Young; Vinokurov, Nikolay; Gi Kim, Yong

    2014-04-15

    An acceleration mechanism to generate a high energy proton beam with a narrow energy spread in the laser-induced plasma acceleration of a proton beam is proposed; this mechanism employs two thin foils separated by a narrow vacuum gap. Instead of a thin sheath field at the plasma surfaces, it utilizes an electrostatic field formed in the bulk of the plasma. From a one-dimensional fluid analysis, it has been found that with an appropriate target thickness, protons on the front surface of the second layer can be fed into the plasma, in which the protons are accelerated by an electrostatic field built into the bulk of the plasma. This leads to a proton beam with higher energy and a narrower energy spread than those accelerated at the rear surface of the second layer. The acceleration mechanism is also verified by a two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation. With a 27-fs long and 2×10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2} intense laser pulse, a proton beam with an 18-MeV peak energy and a 35% energy spread is generated. The peak energy is higher than that from the rear surface of the second layer by a factor of 3.

  15. Measurement of the High Energy Neutron Flux on the Surface of the Natural Uranium Target Assembly QUINTA Irradiated by Deuterons of 4 and 8 GeV Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, J.; Baldin, A. A.; Chilap, V.; Furman, W.; Katovsky, K.; Khushvaktov, J.; Kumar, V.; Pronskikh, V.; Mar'in, I.; Solnyshkin, A.; Suchopar, M.; Tsupko-Sitnikov, V.; Tyutyunnikov, S.; Vrzalova, J.; Wagner, V.; Zavorka, L.

    Experiments with the natural uranium target assembly "QUINTA" exposed to 4 and 8 GeV deuteron beams of the Nuclotron accelerator at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Dubna) are analyzed. The reaction rates of 27Al(n,y1)24Na, 27Al(n,y2)22Na and 27Al(n,y3)7Be reactions with effective threshold energies of 5, 27, and 119 MeV were measured at both 4 GeV and 8 GeV deuteron beam energies. The average neutron fluxes between the effective threshold energies and the effective ends of the neutron spectra (which are 800 or 1000 MeV for 4 or 8 GeV deuterons) were determined. The evidence for the intensity shift of the neutron spectra to higher neutron energies with the increase of the deuteron energy from 4 GeV to 8 GeV was found from the ratios of the average neutron fluxes. The reaction rates and the average neutron fluxes were calculated with the MCNPX 2.7 code.

  16. Irradiated foods

    MedlinePlus

    ... it reduces the risk of food poisoning . Food irradiation is used in many countries. It was first approved in the U.S. to prevent sprouts on white potatoes, and to control insects on wheat and in certain spices and seasonings.

  17. Proton irradiation of simple gas mixtures: Influence of irradiation parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sack, Norbert J.; Schuster, R.; Hofmann, A.

    1990-01-01

    In order to get information about the influence of irradiation parameters on radiolysis processes of astrophysical interest, methane gas targets were irradiated with 6.5 MeV protons at a pressure of 1 bar and room temperature. Yields of higher hydrocarbons like ethane or propane were found by analysis of irradiated gas samples using gas chromatography. The handling of the proton beam was of great experimental importance for determining the irradiation parameters. In a series of experiments current density of the proton beam and total absorbed energy were shown to have a large influence on the yields of produced hydrocarbons. Mechanistic interpretations of the results are given and conclusions are drawn with regard to the chemistry and the simulation of various astrophysical systems.

  18. Backlighting prospects for ICF targets

    SciTech Connect

    Rupert, V.; Matthews, D.; Ahlstrom, H.; Attwood, D.; Price, R.; Coleman, L.; Manes, K.; Slivinsky, V.

    1981-01-01

    High energy x-ray backlighters are necessary to diagnose the implosion symmetry and stability of intermediate and high density targets. Synchronization requirements between the target irradiating pulse and the radiograph place severe constraints on the type of x-ray sources which can be used and favors laser irradiated backlighters. Data gathered on line emitters as a function of laser pulselength, wavelength and intensity in the 5 to 10 keV region are used to determine which diagnostic instruments will be feasible for ICF target experiments, and the requirements for backlighter irradiation.

  19. Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy Improves Target Coverage and Parotid Gland Sparing When Delivering Total Mucosal Irradiation in Patients With Squamous Cell Carcinoma of Head and Neck of Unknown Primary Site

    SciTech Connect

    Bhide, Shreerang Clark, Catherine; Harrington, Kevin; Nutting, Christopher M.

    2007-10-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma with occult primary site represents a controversial clinical problem. Conventional total mucosal irradiation (TMI) maximizes local control, but at the expense of xerostomia. IMRT has been shown to spare salivary tissue in head and cancer patients. This study has been performed to investigate the potential of IMRT to perform nodal and TMI and also allow parotid gland sparing in this patient group. Conventional radiotherapy (CRT) and IMRT plans were produced for six patients to treat the ipsilateral (involved) post-operative neck (PTV1) and the un-operated contralateral neck and mucosal axis (PTV2). Plans were produced with and without the inclusion of nasopharynx in the PTV2. The potential to improve target coverage and spare the parotid glands was investigated for the IMRT plans. There was no significant difference in the mean doses to the PTV1 using CRT and IMRT (59.7 and 60.0 respectively, p = 0.5). The maximum doses to PTV1 and PTV2 were lower for the IMRT technique as compared to CRT (P = 0.008 and P < 0.0001), respectively, and the minimum doses to PTV1 and PTV2 were significantly higher for IMRT as compared to CRT (P = 0.001 and P = 0.001), respectively, illustrating better dose homogeneity with IMRT. The mean dose to the parotid gland contralateral to PTV1 was significantly lower for IMRT (23.21 {+-} 0.7) as compared to CRT (50.5 {+-} 5.8) (P < 0.0001). There was a significant difference in parotid dose between plans with and without the inclusion of the nasopharynx. IMRT offers improved dose homogeneity in PTV1 and PTV2 and allows for parotid sparing.

  20. A SU-8 dish for cell irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arteaga-Marrero, N.; Auzelyte, V.; Olsson, M. G.; Pallon, J.

    2007-10-01

    The objective of the CELLION project is radiation research at low doses. The main cell responses to low dose irradiation are bystander effects, genomic instability and adaptive responses. In order to study these effects it is convenient to make the cells addressable in space and time through locking the cell position. A new alternative dish has been developed for irradiation procedures at the Lund Nuclear Probe. The versatile dish can be used both to cultivate and to hold the cells during the irradiation procedure. The irradiation dish is made of an epoxy-based photopolymer named SU-8 chosen by its flexibility, non-toxicity and biological compatibility to cell attachment. It has been fabricated using a UV lithographic technique. The irradiation dish forms a 2 × 2 mm 2 grid which contains 400 squares. Each square has 80 μm side and is separated from neighbouring ones by 20 μm wide walls. The location of each square is marked by a row letter and column number patterned outside the grid. The Cell Irradiation Facility at the Lund Nuclear Probe utilizes protons to irradiate living cells. A post-cell detection set up is used to control the applied dose, detecting the number of protons after passing through the targeted cell. The transmission requirement is fulfilled by our new irradiation dish. So far, the dish has been used to perform non-targeted irradiation of Hepatoma cells. The cells attach and grow easily on the SU-8 surface. In addition, the irradiation procedure can be performed routinely and faster since the cells are incubated and irradiated in the same surface.

  1. Use of Irradiated Foods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brynjolfsson, A.

    1985-01-01

    The safety of irradiated foods is reviewed. Guidelines and regulations for processing irradiated foods are considered. The radiolytic products formed in food when it is irradiated and its wholesomeness is discussed. It is concluded that food irradiation processing is not a panacea for all problems in food processing but when properly used will serve the space station well.

  2. Detection of irradiated liquor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shengchu, Qi; Jilan, Wu; Rongyao, Yuan

    D-2,3-butanediol is formed by irradiation processes in irradiated liquors. This radiolytic product is not formed in unirradiated liquors and its presence can therefore be used to identify whether a liquor has been irradiated or not. The relation meso/dl≈1 for 2,3-butanediol and the amount present in irradiated liquors may therefore be used as an indication of the dose used in the irradiation.

  3. Triple ion beam irradiation facility

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, M.B.; Allen, W.R.; Buhl, R.A.; Packan, N.H.; Cook, S.W.; Mansur, L.K.

    1988-12-01

    A unique ion irradiation facility consisting of three accelerators is described. The accelerators can be operated simultaneously to deliver three ion beams on one target sample. The energy ranges of the ions are 50 to 400 keV, 200 keV to 2.5 MeV, and 1.0 to 5.0 MeV. Three different ions in the appropriate mass range can be simultaneously implanted to the same depth in a target specimen as large as 100 mm/sup 2/ in area. Typical depth ranges are 0.1 to 1.0 ..mu..m. The X-Y profiles of all three ion beams are measured by a system of miniature Faraday cups. The low-voltage accelerator can periodically ramp the ion beam energy during the implantation. Three different types of target chambers are in use at this facility. The triple-beam high-vacuum chamber can hold nine transmission electron microscopy specimens at elevated temperature during a irradiation by the three simultaneous beams. A second high-vacuum chamber on the medium-voltage accelerator beamline houses a low- and high-temperature translator and a two-axis goniometer for ion channeling measurements. The third chamber on the high-energy beamline can be gas-filled for special stressed specimen irradiations. Special applications for the surface modification of materials with this facility are described. Appendixes containing operating procedures are also included. 18 refs., 27 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Cross sections for {sup 68}Ge production in natural- and enriched-germanium targets irradiated with protons of energy 100 MeV and background in experiments devoted to searches for the 2{beta}0{nu} decay of {sup 76}Ge

    SciTech Connect

    Barabanov, I. R. Bezrukov, L. B.; Kianovsky, S. V.; Kornoukhov, V. N.

    2010-11-15

    The rate of {sup 68}Ge production at sea level under the effect of the nuclear component of cosmic rays is calculated. The calculation is based on the experimental values of the cross sections for {sup 68}Ge production in natural- and enriched-germanium targets (enrichment in {sup 76}Ge) irradiated with high-energy protons. The background from the decays of {sup 68}Ge can be a serious problem in new-generation experiments devoted to searches for the 2{beta}0{nu} decay of {sup 76}Ge.

  5. Methodology for target discrimination.

    PubMed

    McNolty, F; Clow, R

    1980-03-15

    The objective is to distinguish the true target from point-target imitators and from extended-target clutter in the exoatmospheric regime. Matched filters are carefully studied from the viewpoint of SNR enhancement and pulse recognition. The matched filter structure takes into account photon noise, modulation noise, generation-recombination (GR) noise, contact noise, and various thermal noise sources. A multicolor radiant-intensity structure for target discrimination is developed by analyzing the uncertainties in such target irradiance parameters as range, temperature, projected area, and emissivity. Bias terms, variances, and other statistical descriptors are derived. Certain statistical discrimination techniques are discussed that exploit the radiant-intensity format. Helstrom's method for processing radar signals is adapted to a fourchannel pulse-recognition system for which degradation due to arrival time delays and mismatched filters is discussed.

  6. Targets and methods for target preparation for radionuclide production

    DOEpatents

    Zhuikov, Boris L; Konyakhin, Nicolai A; Kokhanyuk, Vladimir M; Srivastava, Suresh C

    2012-10-16

    The invention relates to nuclear technology, and to irradiation targets and their preparation. One embodiment of the present invention includes a method for preparation of a target containing intermetallic composition of antimony Ti--Sb, Al--Sb, Cu--Sb, or Ni--Sb in order to produce radionuclides (e.g., tin-117 m) with a beam of accelerated particles. The intermetallic compounds of antimony can be welded by means of diffusion welding to a copper backing cooled during irradiation on the beam of accelerated particles. Another target can be encapsulated into a shell made of metallic niobium, stainless steel, nickel or titanium cooled outside by water during irradiation. Titanium shell can be plated outside by nickel to avoid interaction with the cooling water.

  7. Commercial food irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Black, E.F.; Libby, L.M.

    1983-06-01

    Food irradiation is discussed. Irradiation exposes food to gamma rays from a cobalt-60 or a cesium-137 source, or to high-energy electrons emitted by an electron accelerator. A major advantage is that food can be packaged either before or after treatment. FDA regulations with regard to irradiation are discussed. Comments on an 'Advance Notice' on irradiation, published by the FDA in 1981 are summarized.

  8. Irradiation exposure modulates central opioid functions

    SciTech Connect

    Dougherty, P.M.; Dafny, N.

    1987-11-01

    Exposure to low doses of gamma irradiation results in the modification of both the antinociceptive properties of morphine and the severity of naloxone-precipitated withdrawal in morphine-dependent rats. To better define the interactions between gamma irradiation and these opiate-mediated phenomena, dose-response studies were undertaken of the effect of irradiation on morphine-induced antinociception, and on the naloxone-precipitated withdrawal syndrome of morphine-dependent rats. In addition, electrophysiologic studies were conducted in rats after irradiation exposure and morphine treatment correlating with the behavioral studies. The observations obtained demonstrated that the antinociceptive effects of morphine as well as naloxone-precipitated withdrawal were modified in a dose-dependent manner by irradiation exposure. In addition, irradiation-induced changes in the evoked responses obtained from four different brain regions demonstrated transient alterations in both baseline and morphine-treated responses that may reflect the alterations observed in the behavioral paradigms. These results suggest that the effects of irradiation on opiate activities resulted from physiologic alterations of central endogenous opioid systems due to alterations manifested within peripheral targets.

  9. Dosimetric Analyses of Single Particle Microbeam in Cell Irradiation Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yong Jian; Jiang, Jiang; Chen, Lianyun; Zhan, Furu; Yu, Zengliang

    2008-12-01

    Single particle microbeam (SPM) is uniquely capable of delivering precisely the predefined number of charged particles to determined individual cells or sub-cellular targets in situ. It has been recognized as a powerful technique for unveiling ionization irradiation mechanisms of organism. This article describes some investigations on the irradiation quality of SPM of major world laboratories by means of Monte Carlo method based on dosimetry and microdosimetry. Those parameters are helpful not only to improve SPM irradiating cell experiments but also to study the biological effects of cells irradiated by SPM.

  10. Spatially resolved nanostructural transformation in graphite under femtosecond laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcu, A.; Avotina, L.; Porosnicu, C.; Marin, A.; Grigorescu, C. E. A.; Ursescu, D.; Lungu, M.; Demitri, N.; Lungu, C. P.

    2015-11-01

    A polycrystalline graphite target was irradiated using infrared (800 nm) femtosecond (120 fs) laser pulses of different energies. Increase of sp3 bonds percentage and possible diamond crystal formation were investigated 'in-depth' and on the irradiated surfaces. Synchrotron X-ray diffraction pattern have shown the presence of a diamond peak in one of the irradiated zones while X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy investigations have shown an increasing tendency of the sp3 percent in the low power irradiated areas and similarly 'in the depth' of the higher power irradiated zones. Multiple wavelength Micro-Raman investigations have confirmed this trend along with an 'in-depth' (but not on the surface) increase of the crystallite size. Based on the wavelength dependent photon absorption into graphite, the observed effects are correlated with high density photon per atom and attributed to the melting and recrystallization processes taking place tens of nanometers below the target surface.

  11. Targets and targeting.

    PubMed

    Will, E

    2001-08-01

    Using the vocabulary of ballistics in medicine for emphasis can result in misleading exaggeration and semantic confusion. The dual meaning of target as either aiming point (aim at) or outcome (aim to achieve) creates a muddle in the efforts to comply with quality assurance initiatives. Disentangling the two meanings allows new approaches to the clinical technology required in a modern health care environment. An example can be shown in new strategies for the management of renal anemia with iron and erythropoietin. The potential to shape outcome distributions through validated, preemptive intervention thresholds offers the predictable results required by patients and payers. Using the management of patient cohorts as a platform for outcomes creates no necessary conflict with individualized clinical care. Future guideline statements should include the likely characteristics of compliant outcome populations, as a prompt to clinical goals and as an indication of the necessary cost and effort of compliance with treatment standards. Overemphasis in language is no substitute for considered clinical methodology.

  12. Development of annular targets for {sup 99}MO production.

    SciTech Connect

    Conner, C.; Lewandowski, E. F.; Snelgrove, J. L.; Liberatore, M. W.; Walker, D. E.; Wiencek, T. C.; McGann, D. J.; Hofman, G. L.; Vandegrift, G. F.

    1999-09-30

    The new annular target performed well during irradiation. The target is inexpensive and provides good heat transfer during irradiation. Based on these and previous tests, we conclude that targets with zirconium tubes and either nickel-plated or zinc-plated foils work well. We proved that we could use aluminum target tubes, which are much cheaper and easier to work with than the zirconium tubes. In aluminum target tubes nickel-plated fission-recoil barriers work well and prevent bonding of the foil to the new target tubes during irradiation. Also, zinc-plated and aluminum-foil barriers appear promising in anodized aluminum tubes. Additional tests are anticipated to address such issues as fission-recoil barrier thickness and uranium foil composition. Overall, however, the target was successful and will provide an inexpensive, efficient way to irradiate LEU metal foil for the production of {sup 99}Mo.

  13. Comminuting irradiated ferritic steel

    DOEpatents

    Bauer, Roger E.; Straalsund, Jerry L.; Chin, Bryan A.

    1985-01-01

    Disclosed is a method of comminuting irradiated ferritic steel by placing the steel in a solution of a compound selected from the group consisting of sulfamic acid, bisulfate, and mixtures thereof. The ferritic steel is used as cladding on nuclear fuel rods or other irradiated components.

  14. MASSIVE LEAKAGE IRRADIATOR

    DOEpatents

    Wigner, E.P.; Szilard, L.; Christy, R.F.; Friedman, F.L.

    1961-05-30

    An irradiator designed to utilize the neutrons that leak out of a reactor around its periphery is described. It avoids wasting neutron energy and reduces interference with the core flux to a minimum. This is done by surrounding all or most of the core with removable segments of the material to be irradiated within a matrix of reflecting material.

  15. Perspective on food irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-02-01

    Recent US Food and Drug Administration approval of irradiation treatment for fruit, vegetables and pork has stimulated considerable discussion in the popular press on the safety and efficacy of irradiation processing of food. This perspective is designed to summarize the current scientific information available on this issue.

  16. Irradiation Creep in Graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Ubic, Rick; Butt, Darryl; Windes, William

    2014-03-13

    An understanding of the underlying mechanisms of irradiation creep in graphite material is required to correctly interpret experimental data, explain micromechanical modeling results, and predict whole-core behavior. This project will focus on experimental microscopic data to demonstrate the mechanism of irradiation creep. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy should be able to image both the dislocations in graphite and the irradiation-induced interstitial clusters that pin those dislocations. The team will first prepare and characterize nanoscale samples of virgin nuclear graphite in a transmission electron microscope. Additional samples will be irradiated to varying degrees at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) facility and similarly characterized. Researchers will record microstructures and crystal defects and suggest a mechanism for irradiation creep based on the results. In addition, the purchase of a tensile holder for a transmission electron microscope will allow, for the first time, in situ observation of creep behavior on the microstructure and crystallographic defects.

  17. TH-C-12A-11: Target Correlation of a 3D Surface Surrogate for Left Breast Irradiation Using the Respiratory-Gated Deep-Inspiration Breath-Hold Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Rong, Y; Walston, S

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the use of 3D optical surface imaging as a new surrogate for respiratory motion gated deep-inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) technique for left breast cancer patients. Methods: Patients with left-sided breast cancer after lumpectomy or mastectomy were selected as candidates for DIBH technique for their external beam radiation therapy. Treatment plans were created on both free breathing (FB) and DIBH CTs to determine whether DIBH was beneficial in reducing heart doses. The Real-time Position Management (RPM) system was used to acquire patient's breathing trace during DIBH CT acquisition and treatment delivery. The reference 3D surface models from FB and DIBH CTs were generated and transferred to the “AlignRT” system for patient positioning and real-time treatment monitoring. MV Cine images were acquired for each beam as quality assurance for intra-fractional position verification. The chest wall excursions measured on these images were used to define the actual target position during treatment, and to investigate the accuracy and reproducibility of RPM and AlignRT. Results: Reduction in heart dose can be achieved for left-sided breast patients using DIBH. Results showed that RPM has poor correlation with target position, as determined by the MV Cine imaging. This indicates that RPM may not be an adequate surrogate in defining the breath-hold level when used alone. Alternatively, the AlignRT surface imaging demonstrated a better correlation with the actual CW excursion during DIBH. Both the vertical and magnitude real-time deltas (RTDs) reported by AlignRT can be used as the gating parameter, with a recommend threshold of ±3 mm and 5 mm, respectively. Conclusion: 3D optical surface imaging serves as a superior target surrogate for the left breast treatment when compared to RPM. Working together with the realtime MV Cine imaging, they ensure accurate patient setup and dose delivery, while minimizing the imaging dose to patients.

  18. Plant-Scale Concentration Column Designs for SHINE Target Solution Utilizing AG 1 Anion Exchange Resin

    SciTech Connect

    Stepinski, Dominique C.; Vandegrift, G. F.

    2015-09-30

    Argonne is assisting SHINE Medical Technologies (SHINE) in their efforts to develop SHINE, an accelerator-driven process that will utilize a uranyl-sulfate solution for the production of fission product Mo-99. An integral part of the process is the development of a column for the separation and recovery of Mo-99, followed by a concentration column to reduce the product volume from 15-25 L to <1 L. Argonne has collected data from batch studies and breakthrough column experiments to utilize the VERSE (Versatile Reaction Separation) simulation program (Purdue University) to design plant-scale product recovery and concentration processes.

  19. Aluminum-lithium target behavior

    SciTech Connect

    McDonell, W.R.

    1989-10-01

    Information on physical properties and irradiation behavior of aluminum-lithium target alloys employed for the production of tritium in Savannah River reactors has been reviewed to support development of technology for the New Production Reactor (NPR). Phase compositions and microstructures, thermal conductivity, mechanical properties, and constituent diffusion phenomena of the alloys, established in prior site studies, are presented. Irradiation behavior, including distributions of product tritium and helium and related exposure limits due to swelling and cracking of the target alloys is discussed, along with gas release processes occurring during subsequent product recovery operations. The property review supports designation of the aluminum-lithium alloys as ideally well-suited target materials for low-temperature, tritium-producing reactors, demonstrated over 35 years of Savannah River reactor operation. Low temperature irradiation and reaction with lithium in the alloy promotes tritium retention during reactor exposure, and the aluminum provides a matrix from which the product is readily recovered on heating following irradiation. 33 refs., 26 figs., 8 tabs.

  20. Tritium target manufacturing for use in accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bach, P.; Monnin, C.; Van Rompay, M.; Ballanger, A.

    2001-07-01

    As a neutron tube manufacturer, SODERN is now in charge of manufacturing tritium targets for accelerators, in cooperation with CEA/DAM/DTMN in Valduc. Specific deuterium and tritium targets are manufactured on request, according to the requirements of the users, starting from titanium target on copper substrate, and going to more sophisticated devices. A wide range of possible uses is covered, including thin targets for neutron calibration, thick targets with controlled loading of deuterium and tritium, rotating targets for higher lifetimes, or large size rotating targets for accelerators used in boron neutron therapy. Activity of targets lies in the 1 to 1000 Curie, diameter of targets being up to 30 cm. Special targets are also considered, including surface layer targets for lowering tritium desorption under irradiation, or those made from different kinds of occluders such as titanium, zirconium, erbium, scandium, with different substrates. It is then possible to optimize either neutron output, or lifetime and stability, or thermal behavior.

  1. Test reactor irradiation coordination

    SciTech Connect

    Heartherly, D.W.; Siman Tov, I.I.; Sparks, D.W.

    1995-10-01

    This task was established to supply and coordinate irradiation services needed by NRC contractors other than ORNL. These services include the design and assembly of irradiation capsules as well as arranging for their exposure, disassembly, and return of specimens. During this period, the final design of the facility and specimen baskets was determined through an iterative process involving the designers and thermal analysts. The resulting design should permit the irradiation of all test specimens to within 5{degrees}C of their desired temperature. Detailing of all parts is ongoing and should be completed during the next reporting period. Procurement of the facility will also be initiated during the next review period.

  2. Alaskan Commodities Irradiation Project

    SciTech Connect

    Zarling, J.P.; Swanson, R.B.; Logan, R.R.; Das, D.K.; Lewis, C.E.; Workman, W.G.; Tumeo, M.A.; Hok, C.I.; Birklid, C.A.; Bennett, F.L.

    1988-12-01

    The ninety-ninth US Congress commissioned a six-state food irradiation research and development program to evaluate the commercial potential of this technology. Hawaii, Washington, Iowa, Oklahoma and Florida as well as Alaska have participated in the national program; various food products including fishery products, red meats, tropical and citrus fruits and vegetables have been studied. The purpose of the Alaskan study was to review and evaluate those factors related to the technical and economic feasibility of an irradiator in Alaska. This options analysis study will serve as a basis for determining the state's further involvement in the development of food irradiation technology. 40 refs., 50 figs., 53 tabs.

  3. Economics of food irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Deitch, J.

    1982-01-01

    This article examines the cost competitiveness of the food irradiation process. An analysis of the principal factors--the product, physical plant, irradiation source, and financing--that impact on cost is made. Equations are developed and used to calculate the size of the source for planned product throughput, efficiency factors, power requirements, and operating costs of sources, radionuclides, and accelerators. Methods of financing and capital investment are discussed. A series of tables show cost breakdowns of sources, buildings, equipment, and essential support facilities for both a cobalt-60 and a 10-MeV electron accelerator facility. Additional tables present irradiation costs as functions of a number of parameters--power input, source size, dose, and hours of annual operation. The use of the numbers in the tables are explained by examples of calculations of the irradiation costs for disinfestation of grains and radicidation of feed.

  4. Sputter target

    DOEpatents

    Gates, Willard G.; Hale, Gerald J.

    1980-01-01

    The disclosure relates to an improved sputter target for use in the deposition of hard coatings. An exemplary target is given wherein titanium diboride is brazed to a tantalum backing plate using a gold-palladium-nickel braze alloy.

  5. Production Target Design Report

    SciTech Connect

    Woloshun, Keith Albert; Dale, Gregory E.; Olivas, Eric Richard

    2015-07-28

    The Northstar 99Mo production target, a cylindrical length of 100Mo rod, has evolved considerably since its first conception.  The cylinder was very early sliced into disks to increase the heat transfer area, first to 1 mm thick disks then to the current 0.5 mm thick.  The coolant was changed early in the target development from water to helium to eliminate corrosion and dissolution.  The diameter has increased from initially 6 mm to 12 mm, the current diameter of the test target now at ANL, to nominally 28 mm (26-30.6 mm, depending upon optimal beam spot size and shape).  The length has also changed to improve the production to cost ratio, so now the target is nominally 41 mm long (excluding coolant gaps between disks), and irradiated on both ends.  This report summarizes the current status of the plant target design.

  6. Double-layered target and identification method of individual target correlated with evaporation residues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaji, D.; Morimoto, K.

    2015-08-01

    A double-layered target system and an identification method (target ID) for individual targets mounted on a rotating wheel using correlation with evaporation residues were newly developed for the study of superheavy elements (SHE). The target system can be used in three modes: conventional single-layered mode, double-layered mode, and energy-degrader mode. The target ID method can be utilized for masking a target, measuring an excitation function without changing the beam energy from the accelerator, and searching for SHE nuclides using multiple targets during a single irradiation.

  7. Total lymphoid irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Sutherland, D.E.; Ferguson, R.M.; Simmons, R.L.; Kim, T.H.; Slavin, S.; Najarian, J.S.

    1983-05-01

    Total lymphoid irradiation by itself can produce sufficient immunosuppression to prolong the survival of a variety of organ allografts in experimental animals. The degree of prolongation is dose-dependent and is limited by the toxicity that occurs with higher doses. Total lymphoid irradiation is more effective before transplantation than after, but when used after transplantation can be combined with pharmacologic immunosuppression to achieve a positive effect. In some animal models, total lymphoid irradiation induces an environment in which fully allogeneic bone marrow will engraft and induce permanent chimerism in the recipients who are then tolerant to organ allografts from the donor strain. If total lymphoid irradiation is ever to have clinical applicability on a large scale, it would seem that it would have to be under circumstances in which tolerance can be induced. However, in some animal models graft-versus-host disease occurs following bone marrow transplantation, and methods to obviate its occurrence probably will be needed if this approach is to be applied clinically. In recent years, patient and graft survival rates in renal allograft recipients treated with conventional immunosuppression have improved considerably, and thus the impetus to utilize total lymphoid irradiation for its immunosuppressive effect alone is less compelling. The future of total lymphoid irradiation probably lies in devising protocols in which maintenance immunosuppression can be eliminated, or nearly eliminated, altogether. Such protocols are effective in rodents. Whether they can be applied to clinical transplantation remains to be seen.

  8. Production of radionuclide molybdenum 99 in a distributed and in situ fashion

    DOEpatents

    Gentile, Charles A.; Cohen, Adam B.; Ascione, George

    2016-04-19

    A method and apparatus for producing Mo-99 from Mo-100 for the use of the produced Mo-99 in a Tc-99m generator without the use of uranium is presented. Both the method and apparatus employ high energy gamma rays for the transformation of Mo-100 to Mo-99. The high energy gamma rays are produced by exposing a metal target to a moderated neutron output of between 6 MeV and 14 MeV. The resulting Mo-99 spontaneously decays into Tc-99m and can therefore be used in a Tc-99m generator.

  9. Effects of irradiation on Planococcus minor (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae).

    PubMed

    Ravuiwasa, Kaliova Tavou; Lu, Kuang-Hui; Shen, Tse-Chi; Hwang, Shaw-Yhi

    2009-10-01

    Irradiation has been recognized and endorsed as a potential phytosanitary measure that could be an alternative to current quarantine treatments. Dosages of 50, 100, 150, 200, and 250 Gy were used to irradiate three different life stages (eggs, immatures, and adults) of Planococcus minor (Maskell) (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae), focusing on females due to its parthenogenesis ability, with an aim to find the most tolerant stage and the most optimal dose to control P. minor. Cobalt 60 was the source of irradiation used. Irradiation of 150-250 Gy has a significant effect on all life stages of P. minor, decreasing its survival rate, percentage of adult reproduction, oviposition, and fertility rate. The adult was the most tolerant life stage in both mortality and fertility rate. All the different irradiated target life stage groups oviposited eggs, but none of the F2 eggs hatched at the most optimal dosage of 150-250 Gy.

  10. Feasibility studies towards future self-sufficient supply of the (99)Mo-(99m)Tc isotopes with Japanese accelerators.

    PubMed

    Nakai, Kozi; Takahashi, Naruto; Hatazawa, Jun; Shinohara, Atsushi; Hayashi, Yoshihiko; Ikeda, Hayato; Kanai, Yasukazu; Watabe, Tadashi; Fukuda, Mitsuhiro; Hatanaka, Kichiji

    2014-01-01

    In order to establish a self-sufficient supply of (99m)Tc, we studied feasibilities to produce its parent nucleus, (99)Mo, using Japanese accelerators. The daughter nucleus, (99m)Tc, is indispensable for medical diagnosis. (99)Mo has so far been imported from abroad, which is separated from fission products generated in nuclear reactors using enriched (235)U fuel. We investigated (99m)Tc production possibilities based on the following three scenarios: (1) (99)Mo production by the (n, 2n) reaction by spallation neutrons at the J-PARC injector, LINAC; (2) (99)Mo production by the (p, pn) reaction at Ep = 50-80 MeV proton at the RCNP cyclotron; (3) (99m)Tc direct production with a 20 MeV proton beam from the PET cyclotron. Among these three scenarios, scenario (1) is for a scheme on a global scale, scenario (2) works in a local area, and both cases take a long time for negotiations. Scenario (3) is attractive because we can use nearly 50 PET cyclotrons in Japan for (99m)Tc production. We here consider both the advantages and disadvantages among the three scenarios by taking account of the Japanese accelerator situation.

  11. Feasibility studies towards future self-sufficient supply of the 99Mo-99mTc isotopes with Japanese accelerators

    PubMed Central

    NAKAI, Kozi; TAKAHASHI, Naruto; HATAZAWA, Jun; SHINOHARA, Atsushi; HAYASHI, Yoshihiko; IKEDA, Hayato; KANAI, Yasukazu; WATABE, Tadashi; FUKUDA, Mitsuhiro; HATANAKA, Kichiji

    2014-01-01

    In order to establish a self-sufficient supply of 99mTc, we studied feasibilities to produce its parent nucleus, 99Mo, using Japanese accelerators. The daughter nucleus, 99mTc, is indispensable for medical diagnosis. 99Mo has so far been imported from abroad, which is separated from fission products generated in nuclear reactors using enriched 235U fuel. We investigated 99mTc production possibilities based on the following three scenarios: (1) 99Mo production by the (n, 2n) reaction by spallation neutrons at the J-PARC injector, LINAC; (2) 99Mo production by the (p, pn) reaction at Ep = 50–80 MeV proton at the RCNP cyclotron; (3) 99mTc direct production with a 20 MeV proton beam from the PET cyclotron. Among these three scenarios, scenario (1) is for a scheme on a global scale, scenario (2) works in a local area, and both cases take a long time for negotiations. Scenario (3) is attractive because we can use nearly 50 PET cyclotrons in Japan for 99mTc production. We here consider both the advantages and disadvantages among the three scenarios by taking account of the Japanese accelerator situation. PMID:25504230

  12. Total scalp irradiation using helical tomotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Orton, Nigel . E-mail: nporton@facstaff.wisc.edu; Jaradat, Hazim; Welsh, James; Tome, Wolfgang

    2005-09-30

    Homogeneous irradiation of the scalp poses technical and dosimetric challenges due to the extensive, superficial, curved treatment volume. Conventional treatments on a linear accelerator use multiple matched electron fields or a combination of electron and photon fields. Problems with these techniques include dose heterogeneity in the target due to varying source-to-skin distance (SSD) and angle of beam incidence, significant dose to the brain, and the potential for overdose or underdose at match lines between the fields. Linac-based intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans have similar problems. This work presents treatment plans for total scalp irradiation on a helical tomotherapy machine. Helical tomotherapy is well-suited for scalp irradiation because it has the ability to deliver beamlets that are tangential to the scalp at all points. Helical tomotherapy also avoids problems associated with field matching and use of more than one modality. Tomotherapy treatment plans were generated and are compared to plans for treatment of the same patient on a linac. The resulting tomotherapy plans show more homogeneous target dose and improved critical structure dose when compared to state-of-the-art linac techniques. Target equivalent uniform dose (EUD) for the best tomotherapy plan was slightly higher than for the linac plan, while the volume of brain tissue receiving over 30 Gy was reduced by two thirds. Furthermore, the tomotherapy plan can be more reliably delivered than linac treatments, because the patient is aligned prior to each treatment based on megavoltage computed tomography (MVCT)

  13. Tensile properties of CLAM steel irradiated up to 20.1 dpa in STIP-V

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Hongen; Peng, Lei; Dai, Yong; Huang, Qunying; Ye, Minyou

    2016-01-01

    Specimens of China low activation martensitic steel (CLAM) were irradiated in the fifth experiment of SINQ Target Irradiation Program (STIP-V) up to 20.1 dpa/1499 appm He/440 °C. Tensile tests were performed at room temperature (R.T) and irradiation temperatures (Tirr) in the range of 25-450 °C. The tensile results demonstrated strong effect of irradiation dose and irradiation temperature on hardening and embrittlement. With Tirr below ˜314 °C, CLAM steel specimens tested at R.T and Tirr showed similar evolution trend with irradiation dose, compared to other reduced activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steels in similar irradiation conditions. At higher Tirr above ˜314 °C, it is interesting that the hardening effect decreases and the ductility seems to recover, probably due to a strong effect of high irradiation temperature.

  14. Irradiation and food processing.

    PubMed

    Sigurbjörnsson, B; Loaharanu, P

    1989-01-01

    After more than four decades of research and development, food irradiation has been demonstrated to be safe, effective and versatile as a process of food preservation, decontamination or disinfection. Its various applications cover: inhibition of sprouting of root crops; insect disinfestation of stored products, fresh and dried food; shelf-life extension of fresh fruits, vegetables, meat and fish; destruction of parasites and pathogenic micro-organisms in food of animal origin; decontamination of spices and food ingredients, etc. Such applications provide consumers with the increase in variety, volume and value of food. Although regulations on food irradiation in different countries are largely unharmonized, national authorities have shown increasing recognition and acceptance of this technology based on the Codex Standard for Irradiated Foods and its associated Code of Practice. Harmonization of national legislations represents an important prerequisite to international trade in irradiated food. Consumers at large are still not aware of the safety and benefits that food irradiation has to offer. Thus, national and international organizations, food industry, trade associations and consumer unions have important roles to play in introducing this technology based on its scientific values. Public acceptance of food irradiation may be slow at the beginning, but should increase at a faster rate in the foreseeable future when consumers are well informed of the safety and benefits of this technology in comparison with existing ones. Commercial applications of food irradiation has already started in 18 countries at present. The volume of food or ingredients treated on a commercial scale varies from country to country ranging from several tons of spices to hundreds of thousands of tons of grains per annum. With the increasing interest of national authorities and the food industry in applying the process, it is anticipated that some 25 countries will use some 55 commercial

  15. Hydrogen release from irradiated elastomers measured by Nuclear Reaction Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagielski, J.; Ostaszewska, U.; Bielinski, D. M.; Grambole, D.; Romaniec, M.; Jozwik, I.; Kozinski, R.; Kosinska, A.

    2016-03-01

    Ion irradiation appears as an interesting method of modification of elastomers, especially friction and wear properties. Main structural effect caused by heavy ions is a massive loss of hydrogen from the surface layer leading to its smoothening and shrinking. The paper presents the results of hydrogen release from various elastomers upon irradiation with H+, He+ and Ar+ studied by using Nuclear Reaction Analysis (NRA) method. The analysis of the experimental data indicates that the hydrogen release is controlled by inelastic collisions between ions and target electrons. The last part of the study was focused on preliminary analysis of mechanical properties of irradiated rubbers.

  16. Ion irradiation tolerance of graphene as studied by atomistic simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Ahlgren, E. H.; Lehtinen, O.; Kotakoski, J.; Krasheninnikov, A. V.

    2012-06-04

    As impermeable to gas molecules and at the same time transparent to high-energy ions, graphene has been suggested as a window material for separating a high-vacuum ion beam system from targets kept at ambient conditions. However, accumulation of irradiation-induced damage in the graphene membrane may give rise to its mechanical failure. Using atomistic simulations, we demonstrate that irradiated graphene even with a high vacancy concentration does not show signs of such instability, indicating a considerable robustness of graphene windows. We further show that upper and lower estimates for the irradiation damage in graphene can be set using a simple model.

  17. Development of Water Target for Radioisotope Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripp, Nathan

    2011-10-01

    Ongoing studies of plant physiology at TUNL require a supply of nitrogen-13 for use as a radiotracer. Production of nitrogen-13 using a water target and a proton beam follows the nuclear reaction 16-O(p,a)13-N. Unfortunately the irradiation of trace amounts of oxygen-18 within a natural water target produces fluorine-18 by the reaction 18-O(p, n)18-F. The presence of this second radioisotope reduces the efficacy of nitrogen-13 as a radiotracer. Designing a natural water target for nitrogen-13 production at TUNL required the design of several new systems to address the problems inherent in nitrogen-13 production. A heat exchanger cools the target water after irradiation within the target cell. The resulting improved thermal regulation of the target water prevents the system from overheating and minimizes the effect of the cavitations occurring within the target. Alumina pellets within a scrubbing unit remove the fluorine-18 contamination from the irradiated water. The modular design of the water target apparatus makes the system highly adaptable, allowing for easy reuse and adaptation of the different components into future projects. The newly designed and constructed water target should meet the current and future needs of TUNL researchers in the production of nitrogen-13. This TUNL REU project was funded in part by a grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) NSF-PHY-08-51813.

  18. ORNL irradiation creep facility

    SciTech Connect

    Reiley, T.C.; Auble, R.L.; Beckers, R.M.; Bloom, E.E.; Duncan, M.G.; Saltmarsh, M.J.; Shannon, R.H.

    1980-09-01

    A machine was developed at ORNL to measure the rates of elongation observed under irradiation in stressed materials. The source of radiation is a beam of 60 MeV alpha particles from the Oak Ridge Isochronous Cyclotron (ORIC). This choice allows experiments to be performed which simulate the effects of fast neutrons. A brief review of irradiation creep and experimental constraints associated with each measurement technique is given. Factors are presented which lead to the experimental choices made for the Irradiation Creep Facility (ICF). The ICF consists of a helium-filled chamber which houses a high-precision mechanical testing device. The specimen to be tested must be thermally stabilized with respect to the temperature fluctuations imposed by the particle beam which passes through the specimen. Electrical resistance of the specimen is the temperature control parameter chosen. Very high precision in length measurement and temperature control are required to detect the small elongation rates relevant to irradiation creep in the test periods available (approx. 1 day). The apparatus components and features required for the above are presented in some detail, along with the experimental procedures. The damage processes associated with light ions are discussed and displacement rates are calculated. Recent irradiation creep results are given, demonstrating the suitability of the apparatus for high resolution experiments. Also discussed is the suitability of the ICF for making high precision thermal creep measurements.

  19. FOOD IRRADIATION REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Leyse, C.F.; Putnam, G.E.

    1961-05-01

    An irradiation apparatus is described. It comprises a pressure vessel, a neutronic reactor active portion having a substantially greater height than diameter in the pressure vessel, an annular tank surrounding and spaced from the pressure vessel containing an aqueous indium/sup 1//sup 1//sup 5/ sulfate solution of approximately 600 grams per liter concentration, means for circulating separate coolants through the active portion and the space between the annular tank and the pressure vessel, radiator means adapted to receive the materials to be irradiated, and means for flowing the indium/sup 1//sup 1//sup 5/ sulfate solution through the radiator means.

  20. Economics of food irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunstadt, Peter; Eng, P.; Steeves, Colyn; Beaulieu, Daniel; Eng, P.

    1993-07-01

    The number of products being radiation processed worldwide is constantly increasing and today includes such diverse items as medical disposables, fruits and vegetables, spices, meats, seafoods and waste products. This range of products to be processed has resulted in a wide range of irradiator designs and capital and operating cost requirements. This paper discusses the economics of low dose food irradiation applications and the effects of various parameters on unit processing costs. It provides a model for calculating specific unit processing costs by correlating known capital costs with annual operating costs and annual throughputs. It is intended to provide the reader with a general knowledge of how unit processing costs are derived.

  1. Fuel or irradiation subassembly

    DOEpatents

    Seim, O.S.; Hutter, E.

    1975-12-23

    A subassembly for use in a nuclear reactor is described which incorporates a loose bundle of fuel or irradiation pins enclosed within an inner tube which in turn is enclosed within an outer coolant tube and includes a locking comb consisting of a head extending through one side of the inner sleeve and a plurality of teeth which extend through the other side of the inner sleeve while engaging annular undercut portions in the bottom portion of the fuel or irradiation pins to prevent movement of the pins.

  2. X-ray irradiation of yeast cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masini, Alessandra; Batani, Dimitri; Previdi, Fabio; Conti, Aldo; Pisani, Francesca; Botto, Cesare; Bortolotto, Fulvia; Torsiello, Flavia; Turcu, I. C. Edmond; Allott, Ric M.; Lisi, Nicola; Milani, Marziale; Costato, Michele; Pozzi, Achille; Koenig, Michel

    1997-10-01

    Saccharomyces Cerevisiae yeast cells were irradiated using the soft X-ray laser-plasma source at Rutherford Laboratory. The aim was to produce a selective damage of enzyme metabolic activity at the wall and membrane level (responsible for fermentation) without interfering with respiration (taking place in mitochondria) and with nuclear and DNA activity. The source was calibrated by PIN diodes and X-ray spectrometers. Teflon stripes were chosen as targets for the UV laser, emitting X-rays at about 0.9 keV, characterized by a very large decay exponent in biological matter. X-ray doses to the different cell compartments were calculated following a Lambert-Bouguet-Beer law. After irradiation, the selective damage to metabolic activity at the membrane level was measured by monitoring CO2 production with pressure silicon detectors. Preliminary results gave evidence of pressure reduction for irradiated samples and non-linear response to doses. Also metabolic oscillations were evidenced in cell suspensions and it was shown that X-ray irradiation changed the oscillation frequency.

  3. PIE preparation of the MEGAPIE target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wohlmuther, Michael; Wagner, Werner

    2012-12-01

    The MEGAPIE target, after successfully operating for 4 months at a beam power of 0.77 MW, is now being prepared for post irradiation examination PIE. The lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) target was irradiated from August until December 2006, and in this period received a beam charge of 2.8 A h of 575 MeV protons. After that, the target was stored in the target storage facility of PSI, waiting for its post irradiation examination. In the meantime several campaigns of tests have been conducted by PSI and ZWILAG, the interim storage facility of Swiss nuclear power plants. In these tests the feasibility of the conditioning of the target and the extraction of sample material for the PIE has been proven. After transport to the hot cell facility at ZWILAG in June 2009, the dismantling of the MEGAPIE target started. It finally was cut into 21 pieces. Ten of these pieces will be shipped to the Hot Laboratory of PSI ('PSI hotlab') to extract samples from the structural materials as well as from the LBE. Currently it is foreseen that the sample extraction will start in the first half of 2011. The remaining parts of the MEGAPIE target were conditioned as radioactive waste. The present paper will mainly focus on the dismantling and first visual inspection of the MEGAPIE target. In addition an outlook on the PIE phase of MEGAPIE is given.

  4. METAPHIX-1 non destructive post irradiation examinations in the irradiated elements cell at Phenix

    SciTech Connect

    Breton, Laurent; Masson, M.; Garces, E.; Desjardins, S.; Fontaine, B.; Lacroix, B.; Martella, T.; Loubet, L.; Ohta, H.; Yokoo, T.; Ougier, M.; Glatz, J.P.

    2007-07-01

    Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI) has been developing minor actinide (MA) transmutation technology in homogeneous loading mode by use of metal fuel fast reactors in cooperation with Institute for Transuranium Elements (ITU) and Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA). Fast reactor metal fuel pins of Uranium- Plutonium-Zirconium (U-Pu-Zr) alloy containing 2 wt% MAs and 2 wt% rare earth elements (REs), 5 wt% MAs, and 5 wt% MAs and 5 wt% REs were irradiated in the PHENIX French fast reactor as METAPHIX experiments. In these METAPHIX experiments, three rigs each consisting of three metal fuel experimental pins and sixteen oxide fuel driver pins were irradiated. The target burnup of the three rigs is 2.4 at%, 7 at% and 11 at% which corresponds to 120, 360 and 600 equivalent full power days (EFPD) in terms of irradiation periods, respectively. The low burnup rig of 2.4 at%, METAPHIX-1, was discharged from the core in August 2004. After cooling, the non-destructive post irradiation examinations (PIEs) of the rig (visual examination, measurement of rig length and deformation) and of the metal fuel pins (visual examination, measurement of pin length and deformation, {gamma}-spectrometry and neutron radiography) were conducted in the Irradiated Elements Cell (IEC) at PHENIX. (authors)

  5. Hydrogen retention in ion irradiated steels

    SciTech Connect

    Hunn, J.D.; Lewis, M.B.; Lee, E.H.

    1998-11-01

    In the future 1--5 MW Spallation Neutron Source, target radiation damage will be accompanied by high levels of hydrogen and helium transmutation products. The authors have recently carried out investigations using simultaneous Fe/He,H multiple-ion implantations into 316 LN stainless steel between 50 and 350 C to simulate the type of radiation damage expected in spallation neutron sources. Hydrogen and helium were injected at appropriate energy and rate, while displacement damage was introduced by nuclear stopping of 3.5 MeV Fe{sup +}, 1 {micro}m below the surface. Nanoindentation measurements showed a cumulative increase in hardness as a result of hydrogen and helium injection over and above the hardness increase due to the displacement damage alone. TEM investigation indicated the presence of small bubbles of the injected gases in the irradiated area. In the current experiment, the retention of hydrogen in irradiated steel was studied in order to better understand its contribution to the observed hardening. To achieve this, the deuterium isotope ({sup 2}H) was injected in place of natural hydrogen ({sup 1}H) during the implantation. Trapped deuterium was then profiled, at room temperature, using the high cross-section nuclear resonance reaction with {sup 3}He. Results showed a surprisingly high concentration of deuterium to be retained in the irradiated steel at low temperature, especially in the presence of helium. There is indication that hydrogen retention at spallation neutron source relevant target temperatures may reach as high as 10%.

  6. NSUF Irradiated Materials Library

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, James Irvin

    2015-09-01

    The Nuclear Science User Facilities has been in the process of establishing an innovative Irradiated Materials Library concept for maximizing the value of previous and on-going materials and nuclear fuels irradiation test campaigns, including utilization of real-world components retrieved from current and decommissioned reactors. When the ATR national scientific user facility was established in 2007 one of the goals of the program was to establish a library of irradiated samples for users to access and conduct research through competitively reviewed proposal process. As part of the initial effort, staff at the user facility identified legacy materials from previous programs that are still being stored in laboratories and hot-cell facilities at the INL. In addition other materials of interest were identified that are being stored outside the INL that the current owners have volunteered to enter into the library. Finally, over the course of the last several years, the ATR NSUF has irradiated more than 3500 specimens as part of NSUF competitively awarded research projects. The Logistics of managing this large inventory of highly radioactive poses unique challenges. This document will describe materials in the library, outline the policy for accessing these materials and put forth a strategy for making new additions to the library as well as establishing guidelines for minimum pedigree needed to be included in the library to limit the amount of material stored indefinitely without identified value.

  7. Update on meat irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, D.G.

    1997-12-01

    The irradiation of meat and poultry in the United States is intended to eliminate pathogenic bacteria from raw product, preferably after packaging to prevent recontamination. Irradiation will also increase the shelf life of raw meat and poultry products approximately two to three times the normal shelf life. Current clearances in the United States are for poultry (fresh or frozen) at doses from 1.5 to 3.0 kGy and for fresh pork at doses from 0.3 to 1.0 kGy. A petition for the clearance of all red meat was submitted to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in July 1994. The petition is for clearances of fresh meat at doses from 1.5 to 4.5 kGy and for frozen meat at {approximately}2.5 to 7.5 kGy. Clearance for red meat is expected before the end of 1997. There are 28 countries that have food irradiation clearances, of which 18 countries have clearances for meat or poultry. However, there are no uniform categories or approved doses for meat and poultry among the countries that could hamper international trade of irradiated meat and poultry.

  8. Irradiating insect pests

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This is a non-technical article focusing on phytosanitary uses of irradiation. In a series of interview questions, I present information on the scope of the invasive species problem and the contribution of international trade in agricultural products to the movement of invasive insects. This is foll...

  9. Low-oxygen atmospheric treatment improves the performance of irradiation-sterilized male cactus moths used in SIT.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As part of Sterile Insect Technique (SIT) programs, irradiation can effectively induce sterility in insects by damaging genomic DNA. However, irradiation also induces other off-target side effects that reduce the quality and performance of sterilized males. Thus, treatments that reduce off-target ef...

  10. Direct drive targets for the megajoule facility UFL-2M

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozanov, V. B.; Gus'kov, S. Yu; Vergunova, G. A.; Demchenko, N. N.; Stepanov, R. V.; Doskoch, I. Ya; Yakhin, R. A.; Zmitrenko, N. V.

    2016-03-01

    Development of direct drive target schemes for the megajoule facility is a topical problem of up-to-date inertial fusion physics. The choice of possible schemes and solutions depends essentially on the irradiation conditions. The installations both running (NIF) and under construction (LMJ) are destined to the 3ω irradiation in PDD (polar direct drive) configuration. The UFL-2M installation that is under construction is based on 2ω irradiation and a symmetrical scheme of direct drive target irradiation. Under these conditions possible schemes for direct drive targets demonstrating the ignition and the achievement of gain G=10÷20 are considered in this report. At the same time, the possibilities are analyzed for the target compression and ignition with a reliability reserve at the conditions that can deviate from the standard ones, and if our understanding of the physics of the processes is not completely adequate to the physics of the real processes.

  11. Laboratory simulation of irradiation-induced dielectric breakdown in spacecraft charging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yadlowsky, E. J.; Churchill, R. J.; Hazelton, R. C.

    1980-01-01

    The discharging of dielectric samples irradiated by a beam of monoenergetic electrons is investigated. The development of a model, or models, which describe the discharge phenomena occuring on the irradiated dielectric targets is discussed. The electrical discharge characteristics of irradiated dielectric samples are discussed and the electrical discharge paths along dielectric surfaces and within the dielectric material are determined. The origin and destination of the surface emitted particles is examined and the charge and energy balance in the system is evaluated.

  12. A Longitudinal Evaluation of Partial Lung Irradiation in Mice by Using a Dedicated Image-Guided Small Animal Irradiator

    SciTech Connect

    Granton, Patrick V.; Dubois, Ludwig; Elmpt, Wouter van; Hoof, Stefan J. van; Lieuwes, Natasja G.; De Ruysscher, Dirk

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: In lung cancer radiation therapy, the dose constraints are determined mostly by healthy lung toxicity. Preclinical microirradiators are a new tool to evaluate treatment strategies closer to clinical irradiation devices. In this study, we quantified local changes in lung density symptomatic of radiation-induced lung fibrosis (RILF) after partial lung irradiation in mice by using a precision image-guided small animal irradiator integrated with micro-computed tomography (CT) imaging. Methods and Materials: C57BL/6 adult male mice (n=76) were divided into 6 groups: a control group (0 Gy) and groups irradiated with a single fraction of 4, 8, 12, 16, or 20 Gy using 5-mm circular parallel-opposed fields targeting the upper right lung. A Monte Carlo model of the small animal irradiator was used for dose calculations. Following irradiation, all mice were imaged at regular intervals over 39 weeks (10 time points total). Nonrigid deformation was used to register the initial micro-CT scan to all subsequent scans. Results: Significant differences could be observed between the 3 highest (>10 Gy) and 3 lowest irradiation (<10 Gy) dose levels. A mean difference of 120 ± 10 HU between the 0- and 20-Gy groups was observed at week 39. RILF was found to be spatially limited to the irradiated portion of the lung. Conclusions: The data suggest that the severity of RILF in partial lung irradiation compared to large field irradiation in mice for the same dose is reduced, and therefore higher doses can be tolerated.

  13. Identification of irradiated refrigerated poultry with the DNA comet assay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villavicencio, A. L. C. H.; Araújo, M. M.; Marin-Huachaca, N. S.; Mancini-Filho, J.; Delincée, H.

    2004-09-01

    Food irradiation could make a significant contribution to the reduction of food-borne diseases caused by harmful bacteria such as Salmonella and parasites. In fact these organisms cause an increasing number of diseases and eventually deaths all over the world, also in industrialized countries. Radiation processing has the advantage that in addition to eliminating pathogens, thereby enhancing food safety, it also extends shelf life through destruction of spoilage organisms. The DNA molecule because of its big size is an easy target for ionizing radiation, therefore, changes in DNA offer potential to be used as a detection method for the irradiation treatment. In our study, poultry has been irradiated and changes in DNA analyzed by the Comet Assay. Samples were packed in plastic bags and irradiated. Doses were 0, 1.5, 3.0 and 4.5kGy. Immediately after irradiation the samples were returned to the refrigerator (4°C). Samples were analyzed 1 and 10 days after irradiation. This method proved to be an inexpensive and rapid screening technique for qualitative detection of irradiation treatment.

  14. The dynamics of under surface condensed substance irradiated by intense energy stream

    SciTech Connect

    Volkov, N. B.; Leyvi, A. Ya.; Mayer, A. E.; Yalovets, A. P.; Talala, K. A.

    2006-08-03

    The new method for simulation of dynamics of target surface irradiated by electron beams. There are two irradiation regimes: precritical and supercritical. We have conducted the research of crater formation for different beam parameters. Also 3D calculations of crater interaction and evolution of craters from initial irregular perturbation are carried out.

  15. Irradiation for quarantine control of the invasive light brown apple moth, Epiphyas

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of irradiation on egg, larval, and pupal development, and adult reproduction in light brown apple moth, Epiphyas postvittana (Walker) (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae), were examined. Eggs, neonates, early instars, late instars, early pupae and late pupae were irradiated at target doses of 60, ...

  16. Understanding the Irradiation Behavior of Zirconium Carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Motta, Arthur; Sridharan, Kumar; Morgan, Dane; Szlufarska, Izabela

    2013-10-11

    -induced microstructures mapped spatially and temporally, microstructural evolution during post-irradiation annealing, and atomistic modeling of defect formation and transport energetics will provide new, critical understanding about property changes in ZrC. The behavior of materials under irradiation is determined by the balance between damage production, defect clustering, and lattice response. In order to predict those effects at high temperatures so targeted testing can be expanded and extrapolated beyond the known database, it is necessary to determine the defect energetics and mobilities as these control damage accumulation and annealing. In particular, low-temperature irradiations are invaluable for determining the regions of defect mobility. Computer simulation techniques are particularly useful for identifying basic defect properties, especially if closely coupled with a well-constructed and complete experimental database. The close coupling of calculation and experiment in this project will provide mutual benchmarking and allow us to glean a deeper understanding of the irradiation response of ZrC, which can then be applied to the prediction of its behavior in reactor conditions.

  17. SATIF-2 shielding aspects of accelerators, targets and irradiation facilities

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    Particle accelerators have evolved over the last 50 years from simple devices to powerful machines, and will continue to have an important impact on research, technology and lifestyle. Today they cover a wide range of applications, from television and computer displays in households to the investigation of the origin and structure of matter. It has become common practice to use them for material science and medical applications. In recent years, requirements from new technological and research applications have emerged, such as increased particle beams intensities, higher flexibility, etc., giving rise to new radiation shielding aspects and problems. These proceedings review recent progress in radiation shielding of accelerator facilities, and evaluate advancements with respect to international co-operation in this field.

  18. ELECTRON IRRADIATION OF SOLIDS

    DOEpatents

    Damask, A.C.

    1959-11-01

    A method is presented for altering physical properties of certain solids, such as enhancing the usefulness of solids, in which atomic interchange occurs through a vacancy mechanism, electron irradiation, and temperature control. In a centain class of metals, alloys, and semiconductors, diffusion or displacement of atoms occurs through a vacancy mechanism, i.e., an atom can only move when there exists a vacant atomic or lattice site in an adjacent position. In the process of the invention highenergy electron irradiation produces additional vacancies in a solid over those normally occurring at a given temperature and allows diffusion of the component atoms of the solid to proceed at temperatures at which it would not occur under thermal means alone in any reasonable length of time. The invention offers a precise way to increase the number of vacancies and thereby, to a controlled degree, change the physical properties of some materials, such as resistivity or hardness.

  19. Modification of surface oxide layers of titanium targets for increasing lifetime of neutron tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Zakharov, A. M. Dvoichenkova, O. A.; Evsin, A. E.

    2015-12-15

    The peculiarities of interaction of hydrogen ions with a titanium target and its surface oxide layer were studied. Two ways of modification of the surface oxide layers of titanium targets for increasing the lifetime of neutron tubes were proposed: (1) deposition of an yttrium oxide barrier layer on the target surface; (2) implementation of neutron tube work regime in which the target is irradiated with ions with energies lower than 1000 eV between high-energy ion irradiation pulses.

  20. BIOLOGICAL IRRADIATION FACILITY

    DOEpatents

    McCorkle, W.H.; Cern, H.S.

    1962-04-24

    A facility for irradiating biological specimens with neutrons is described. It includes a reactor wherein the core is off center in a reflector. A high-exposure room is located outside the reactor on the side nearest the core while a low-exposure room is located on the opposite side. Means for converting thermal neutrons to fast neutrons are movably disposed between the reactor core and the high and low-exposure rooms. (AEC)

  1. Hyperparathyroidism after neck irradiation.

    PubMed

    Christmas, T J; Chapple, C R; Noble, J G; Milroy, E J; Cowie, A G

    1988-09-01

    A retrospective review of 1550 cases of hyperparathyroidism (HPT) treated surgically over a 30-year period reveals a past history of exposure to neck irradiation in 10 cases (0.7 per cent). The indication for radiotherapy was benign disease in nine and papillary thyroid carcinoma in one case. The mean interval between radiation exposure and the detection of HPT was 32 years (range 3-63 years). Patients treated with radioactive iodine alone developed HPT after a mean of 5 years while the interval for those treated with external beam therapy alone was a mean of 44 years. The parathyroid histology was adenoma in six cases, carcinoma in three cases and nodular hyperplasia in one case. All patients had coincident benign thyroid disease apart from one that had previously had papillary carcinoma and another with follicular carcinoma. Neck irradiation has been shown to confer an increased risk of HPT due to parathyroid adenoma and carcinoma. Radiotherapy for benign disease has generally been abandoned and these cases demonstrate a further contra-indication for the use of neck irradiation.

  2. First multicharged ion irradiation results from the CUEBIT facility at Clemson University

    SciTech Connect

    Shyam, R.; Kulkarni, D. D.; Field, D. A.; Srinadhu, E. S.; Harriss, J. E.; Cutshall, D. B.; Harrell, W. R.; Sosolik, C. E.

    2015-01-09

    A new electron beam ion trap (EBIT) based ion source and beamline were recently commissioned at Clemson University to produce decelerated beams of multi- to highly-charged ions for surface and materials physics research. This user facility is the first installation of a DREEBIT-designed superconducting trap and ion source (EBIS-SC) in the U.S. and includes custom-designed target preparation and irradiation setups. An overview of the source, beamline, and other facilities as well as results from first measurements on irradiated targets are discussed here. Results include extracted charge state distributions and first data on a series of irradiated metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) device targets. For the MOS devices, we show that voltage-dependent capacitance can serve as a record of the electronic component of ion stopping power for an irradiated, encapsulated oxide target.

  3. First multicharged ion irradiation results from the CUEBIT facility at Clemson University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shyam, R.; Kulkarni, D. D.; Field, D. A.; Srinadhu, E. S.; Cutshall, D. B.; Harrell, W. R.; Harriss, J. E.; Sosolik, C. E.

    2015-01-01

    A new electron beam ion trap (EBIT) based ion source and beamline were recently commissioned at Clemson University to produce decelerated beams of multi- to highly-charged ions for surface and materials physics research. This user facility is the first installation of a DREEBIT-designed superconducting trap and ion source (EBIS-SC) in the U.S. and includes custom-designed target preparation and irradiation setups. An overview of the source, beamline, and other facilities as well as results from first measurements on irradiated targets are discussed here. Results include extracted charge state distributions and first data on a series of irradiated metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) device targets. For the MOS devices, we show that voltage-dependent capacitance can serve as a record of the electronic component of ion stopping power for an irradiated, encapsulated oxide target.

  4. Proton irradiation effects on beryllium - A macroscopic assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simos, Nikolaos; Elbakhshwan, Mohamed; Zhong, Zhong; Camino, Fernando

    2016-10-01

    Beryllium, due to its excellent neutron multiplication and moderation properties, in conjunction with its good thermal properties, is under consideration for use as plasma facing material in fusion reactors and as a very effective neutron reflector in fission reactors. While it is characterized by unique combination of structural, chemical, atomic number, and neutron absorption cross section it suffers, however, from irradiation generated transmutation gases such as helium and tritium which exhibit low solubility leading to supersaturation of the Be matrix and tend to precipitate into bubbles that coalesce and induce swelling and embrittlement thus degrading the metal and limiting its lifetime. Utilization of beryllium as a pion production low-Z target in high power proton accelerators has been sought both for its low Z and good thermal properties in an effort to mitigate thermos-mechanical shock that is expected to be induced under the multi-MW power demand. To assess irradiation-induced changes in the thermal and mechanical properties of Beryllium, a study focusing on proton irradiation damage effects has been undertaken using 200 MeV protons from the Brookhaven National Laboratory Linac and followed by a multi-faceted post-irradiation analysis that included the thermal and volumetric stability of irradiated beryllium, the stress-strain behavior and its ductility loss as a function of proton fluence and the effects of proton irradiation on the microstructure using synchrotron X-ray diffraction. The mimicking of high temperature irradiation of Beryllium via high temperature annealing schemes has been conducted as part of the post-irradiation study. This paper focuses on the thermal stability and mechanical property changes of the proton irradiated beryllium and presents results of the macroscopic property changes of Beryllium deduced from thermal and mechanical tests.

  5. Ion irradiation studies of oxide ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Zinkle, S.J.

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents the initial results of an investigation of the depth-dependent microstructures of three oxide ceramics following ion implantation to moderate doses. The implantations were performed using ion species that occur as cations in the target material; for example, Mg/sup +/ ions were used for MgO and MgAl/sub 2/O/sub 4/ (spinel) irradiations. This minimized chemical effects associated with the implantation and allowed a more direct evaluation to be made of the effects of implanted ions on the microstructure. 11 refs., 14 figs.

  6. FDA perspective on food irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Pauli, G.H.

    1994-12-31

    The Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition (CFSAN) monitors the safety of food irradiation. A few limited uses are regulated, and occasionally CFSAN receives a petition for a new use. Despite extensive studies (more than 400) showing the safety of food irradiation, a cloud of suspicion continues to hang over this issue in the mind of the public. People perceive food irradiation and direct body irradiation as having similar implications. Food irradiation is banned in two states in the United States. Food is irradiated for the following purposes: delay of ripening, prevention of sprouting, eradication of pests and sterilization, and allowing commodities to be stored unrefrigerated for long periods of time. The dosage depends on the purpose of the irradiation. Radiolytic products are formed during irradiation and during storage afterward. Most of these products are also formed during conventional preservation. In 1980, CFSAN, then the Bureau of Foods, introduced the term unique radiolytic products for compounds not identified in foods after conventional processing. Although the existence of URPs was never proven chemically, the term has caused anxiety. Irradiation of foods in the commercially useful range does not generate radioactivity above natural background. Because radiolytic products formed from beef, chicken, and pork are primarily the same, irradiated foods of similar food groups may be evaluated generically.

  7. Tackling Targets.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Further Education Unit, London (England).

    This document is designed to help British training and enterprise councils (TECs) and further education (FE) colleges develop and implement strategies for achieving the National Targets for Education and Training (NTET), which were developed by the Confederation of British Industry in 1992 and endorsed by the British government. The findings from…

  8. Nondestructive post-irradiation examination of Loop-1, S1 and B1 rods

    SciTech Connect

    Bratton, R.L.

    1997-05-01

    As a part of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory`s Tritium Target Development Program, eleven tritium target rods were irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor located at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory during 1991. Both nondestructive and destructive post-irradiation examination on all eleven rods was planned under the Tritium Target Development Program. Funding for the program was reduced in 1991 resulting in the early removal of the program experiments before reaching their irradiation goals. Post-irradiation examination was only performed on one of the irradiated rods at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory before the program was terminated in 1992. On December 6, 1995, the Secretary of Energy announced the pursuit of the Commercial Light-Water Reactor option for producing tritium establishing the Tritium Target Qualification Program at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. This program decided to pursue nondestructive and destructive post-irradiation examination of the ten remaining rods from the previous program. The ten rods comprise three experiments. The Loop-1 experiment irradiated eight target rods in a loop configuration for 217 irradiation days. The other two rods were irradiated in two separate irradiation experiments, designated as S1 and B1 for 143 effective full-power days, but at different power levels. After the ten rods were transferred from the ATR Canal to the Hot Fuels Examination Facility, the following examinations were performed: (1) visual examination and photography; (2) neutron radiography; (3) axial gamma scanning; (4) contact profilometry measurement; (5) bow and length measurements; (6) rod puncture and plenum gas analysis/measurement of plenum gas quantity; (7) void volume determination; and (8) internal pressure determination. This report presents the data collected during these examinations.

  9. Research and development on materials for the SPES target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corradetti, Stefano; Andrighetto, Alberto; Manzolaro, Mattia; Scarpa, Daniele; Vasquez, Jesus; Rossignoli, Massimo; Monetti, Alberto; Calderolla, Michele; Prete, Gianfranco

    2014-03-01

    The SPES project at INFN-LNL (Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro) is focused on the production of radioactive ion beams. The core of the SPES facility is constituted by the target, which will be irradiated with a 40 MeV, 200 µA proton beam in order to produce radioactive species. In order to efficiently produce and release isotopes, the material constituting the target should be able to work under extreme conditions (high vacuum and temperatures up to 2000 °C). Both neutron-rich and proton-rich isotopes will be produced; in the first case, carbon dispersed uranium carbide (UCx) will be used as a target, whereas to produce p-rich isotopes, several types of targets will have to be irradiated. The synthesis and characterization of different types of material will be reported. Moreover, the results of irradiation and isotopes release tests on different uranium carbide target prototypes will be discussed.

  10. [Field matching in breast irradiation

    PubMed

    Varga, Sz; Takácsi Nagy, L; Pesznyák, Cs; Lövey, K; Polgár, I

    2001-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: In this paper the authors have combined different irradiation techniques for breast and adjacent supraclavicular lymph nodes. The aim was to reduce inhomogeneity in the match-line. METHODS: The CadPlan 6.1.5 three-dimensional treatment planning system was applied in this study for CT based plan using a standard medial and lateral wedged tangential breast portals with the adjacent supraclavicular field. Isocenter is placed at depth on the match-line, where asymmetric jaws are used to produce non-divergent field edges. The tangential fields are shaped using multi-leaf collimator (MLC), by following the curvature of the thorax. In this way the cranial vertical match plane is maintaned without using the breast board. The prescribed dose was 50 Gy at the isocentre. RESULTS: The calculated dose distributions were evaluated in three dimension in the match region of supraclavicular field and the two opposing tangential fields. This method produces a more uniform dose distribution in the target volume and in the match-line. Set-up is fast, this is done without the need for table rotation, or vertical cephalad blocks. The average dose to the ipsilateral lung is reduced using the IMRT (intensity modulated radiotherapy) technique by approximately 10% compared with the conventional technique. Furthermore, this new technique has the possibility to improve the field match between the tangential fields and the parasternal field, while maintaning the field match between the tangential fields and the axillary and supraclavicular fields.

  11. Post-irradiation effects in polyethylenes irradiated under various atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suljovrujic, E.

    2013-08-01

    If a large amount of polymer free radicals remain trapped after irradiation of polymers, the post-irradiation effects may result in a significant alteration of physical properties during long-term shelf storage and use. In the case of polyethylenes (PEs) some failures are attributed to the post-irradiation oxidative degradation initiated by the reaction of residual free radicals (mainly trapped in crystal phase) with oxygen. Oxidation products such as carbonyl groups act as deep traps and introduce changes in carrier mobility and significant deterioration in the PEs electrical insulating properties. The post-irradiation behaviour of three different PEs, low density polyethylene (LDPE), linear low density polyethylene (LLDPE) and high density polyethylene (HDPE) was studied; previously, the post-irradiation behaviour of the PEs was investigated after the irradiation in air (Suljovrujic, 2010). In this paper, in order to investigate the influence of different irradiation media on the post-irradiation behaviour, the samples were irradiated in air and nitrogen gas, to an absorbed dose of 300 kGy. The annealing treatment of irradiated PEs, which can substantially reduce the concentration of free radicals, is used in this study, too. Dielectric relaxation behaviour is related to the difference in the initial structure of PEs (such as branching, crystallinity etc.), to the changes induced by irradiation in different media and to the post-irradiation changes induced by storage of the samples in air. Electron spin resonance (ESR), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), infra-red (IR) spectroscopy and gel measurements were used to determine the changes in the free radical concentration, crystal fraction, oxidation and degree of network formation, respectively.

  12. Optimal ion acceleration from ultrathin foils irradiated by a profiled laser pulse of relativistic intensity

    SciTech Connect

    Andreev, A. A.; Steinke, S.; Sokollik, T.; Schnuerer, M.; Nickles, P. V.; Avetsiyan, S. Ter; Platonov, K. Yu.

    2009-01-15

    Recent investigations of relativistic laser plasmas have shown that the energy transfer from the laser field to the kinetic ion energy and therefore the attainable maximum energy of the ions increases when ultrathin targets are irradiated by laser pulse without prepulse. In this paper, the influence of the target thickness and laser pulse contrast on the energy of the accelerated ions has been studied theoretically as well as experimentally. An optimum target was searched if a real laser pulse with a certain prepulse irradiates the target.

  13. Craniospinal irradiation techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Scarlatescu, Ioana Avram, Calin N.; Virag, Vasile

    2015-12-07

    In this paper we present one treatment plan for irradiation cases which involve a complex technique with multiple beams, using the 3D conformational technique. As the main purpose of radiotherapy is to administrate a precise dose into the tumor volume and protect as much as possible all the healthy tissues around it, for a case diagnosed with a primitive neuro ectoderm tumor, we have developed a new treatment plan, by controlling one of the two adjacent fields used at spinal field, in a way that avoids the fields superposition. Therefore, the risk of overdose is reduced by eliminating the field divergence.

  14. Craniospinal irradiation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarlatescu, Ioana; Virag, Vasile; Avram, Calin N.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper we present one treatment plan for irradiation cases which involve a complex technique with multiple beams, using the 3D conformational technique. As the main purpose of radiotherapy is to administrate a precise dose into the tumor volume and protect as much as possible all the healthy tissues around it, for a case diagnosed with a primitive neuro ectoderm tumor, we have developed a new treatment plan, by controlling one of the two adjacent fields used at spinal field, in a way that avoids the fields superposition. Therefore, the risk of overdose is reduced by eliminating the field divergence.

  15. Target assembly

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, Richard A.

    1980-01-01

    A target for a proton beam which is capable of generating neutrons for absorption in a breeding blanket includes a plurality of solid pins formed of a neutron emissive target material disposed parallel to the path of the beam and which are arranged axially in a plurality of layers so that pins in each layer are offset with respect to pins in all other layers, enough layers being used so that each proton in the beam will strike at least one pin with means being provided to cool the pins. For a 300 mA, 1 GeV beam (300 MW), stainless steel pins, 12 inches long and 0.23 inches in diameter are arranged in triangular array in six layers with one sixth of the pins in each layer, the number of pins being such that the entire cross sectional area of the beam is covered by the pins with minimum overlap of pins.

  16. Irradiation of northwest agricultural products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eakin, D. E.; Tingey, G. I.

    1985-02-01

    Irradiation of food for disinfestation and preservation is increasing in importance because of increasing restrictions on various chemical treatments. Irradiation treatment is of particular interest in the Northwest because of a growing supply of agricultural products and the need to develop new export markets. Several products have, or could potentially have, significant export markets if stringent insect ocntrol procedures are developed and followed. Due to the recognized potential benefits of irradiation, this program was conducted to evaluate the benefits of using irradiation on Northwest agricultural products. Commodities currently included in the program are cherries, apples, asparagus, spices, hay, and hides.

  17. Commercial scale irradiation for insect disinfestation preserves peach quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, Heather; McCulloch, Mary; Caporaso, Fred; Winborne, Ian; Oubichon, Michon; Rakovski, Cyril; Prakash, Anuradha

    2012-06-01

    Irradiation is approved as a generic quarantine treatment by the US Department of Agriculture, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service. Due to the effectiveness of irradiation in controlling insects on commodities, there is a growing need to understand the effects of low dose irradiation on fruit quality. The goal of this study was to determine the sensitivity of peaches (Prunus persica) to irradiation, and secondly, to determine the effect of commercial scale treatment on shelf-life, overall quality and consumer liking. Six varieties of peaches were irradiated in small batches at 0.29, 0.49, 0.69 and 0.90 kGy to observe the sensitivity of peaches at different dose levels. Changes in quality were evaluated by 8 trained panelists using descriptive analysis. Sensory characteristics (color, smoothness, aroma, touch firmness, mouth firmness, graininess, overall flavor and off-flavor) were evaluated at 2-4 day intervals and untreated samples served as control. To simulate commercial treatment, peaches were irradiated in pallet quantities at a target dose level of 0.4 kGy. The average absorbed dose was 0.66 kGy with an average dose uniformity ratio of 1.57. Commercially treated peaches were evaluated by 40-80 untrained consumers for acceptability routinely throughout the shelf life. Titratable acidity, Brix, texture and weight loss were also monitored for both commercial and small scale irradiated peaches. There was no dose effect on TA, Brix and weight loss due to irradiation. Peaches irradiated at 0.69 and 0.90 kGy were darker in flesh color, more juicy and less firm as determined by the trained panel and analytical pressure tests. Commercial scale irradiation did not adversely affect shelf life but was seen to enhance ripening. This, however, was perceived as a positive change by consumers. Overall, consumers rated the acceptability of irradiated peaches higher than untreated peaches. Statistical analysis was performed using linear mixed models to find determinates

  18. Experimental qualification of a code for optimizing gamma irradiation facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosse, D. C.; Leizier, J. J. M.; Keraron, Y.; Lallemant, T. F.; Perdriau, P. D. M.

    Dose computation codes are a prerequisite for the design of gamma irradiation facilities. Code quality is a basic factor in the achievement of sound economic and technical performance by the facility. This paper covers the validation of a code by reference dosimetry experiments. Developed by the "Société Générale pour les Techniques Nouvelles" (SGN), a supplier of irradiation facilities and member of the CEA Group, the code is currently used by that company. (ERHART, KERARON, 1986) Experimental data were obtained under conditions representative of those prevailing in the gamma irradiation of foodstuffs. Irradiation was performed in POSEIDON, a Cobalt 60 cell of ORIS-I. Several Cobalt 60 rods of known activity are arranged in a planar array typical of industrial irradiation facilities. Pallet density is uniform, ranging from 0 (air) to 0.6. Reference dosimetry measurements were performed by the "Laboratoire de Métrologie des Rayonnements Ionisants" (LMRI) of the "Bureau National de Métrologie" (BNM). The procedure is based on the positioning of more than 300 ESR/alanine dosemeters throughout the various target volumes used. The reference quantity was the absorbed dose in water. The code was validated by a comparison of experimental and computed data. It has proved to be an effective tool for the design of facilities meeting the specific requirements applicable to foodstuff irradiation, which are frequently found difficult to meet.

  19. Antitumor Immunity Induced after α Irradiation123

    PubMed Central

    Gorin, Jean-Baptiste; Ménager, Jérémie; Gouard, Sébastien; Maurel, Catherine; Guilloux, Yannick; Faivre-Chauvet, Alain; Morgenstern, Alfred; Bruchertseifer, Frank; Chérel, Michel; Davodeau, François; Gaschet, Joëlle

    2014-01-01

    Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) is a therapeutic modality that allows delivering of ionizing radiation directly to targeted cancer cells. Conventional RIT uses β-emitting radioisotopes, but recently, a growing interest has emerged for the clinical development of α particles. α emitters are ideal for killing isolated or small clusters of tumor cells, thanks to their specific characteristics (high linear energy transfer and short path in the tissue), and their effect is less dependent on dose rate, tissue oxygenation, or cell cycle status than γ and X rays. Several studies have been performed to describe α emitter radiobiology and cell death mechanisms induced after α irradiation. But so far, no investigation has been undertaken to analyze the impact of α particles on the immune system, when several studies have shown that external irradiation, using γ and X rays, can foster an antitumor immune response. Therefore, we decided to evaluate the immunogenicity of murine adenocarcinoma MC-38 after bismuth-213 (213Bi) irradiation using a vaccination approach. In vivo studies performed in immunocompetent C57Bl/6 mice induced a protective antitumor response that is mediated by tumor-specific T cells. The molecular mechanisms potentially involved in the activation of adaptative immunity were also investigated by in vitro studies. We observed that 213Bi-treated MC-38 cells release “danger signals” and activate dendritic cells. Our results demonstrate that α irradiation can stimulate adaptive immunity, elicits an efficient antitumor protection, and therefore is an immunogenic cell death inducer, which provides an attractive complement to its direct cytolytic effect on tumor cells. PMID:24862758

  20. Food irradiation and sterilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Josephson, Edward S.

    Radiation sterilization of food (radappertization) requires exposing food in sealed containers to ionizing radiation at absorbed doses high enough (25-70 kGy) to kill all organisms of food spoilage and public health significance. Radappertization is analogous to thermal canning is achieving shelf stability (long term storage without refrigeration). Except for dry products in which autolysis is negligible, the radappertization process also requires that the food be heated to an internal temperature of 70-80°C (bacon to 53°C) to inactivate autolytic enzymes which catalyze spoilage during storage without refrigeration. To minimize the occurence of irradiation induced off-flavors and odors, undesirable color changes, and textural and nutritional losses from exposure to the high doses required for radappertization, the foods are vacuum sealed and irradiated frozen (-40°C to -20°C). Radappertozed foods have the characteristic of fresh foods prepared for eating. Radappertization can substitute in whole or in part for some chemical food additives such as ethylene oxide and nitrites which are either toxic, carcinogenic, mutagenic, or teratogenic. After 27 years of testing for "wholesomeness" (safety for consumption) of radappertized foods, no confirmed evidence has been obtained of any adverse effecys of radappertization on the "wholesomeness" characteristics of these foods.

  1. Irradiation hardening of pure tungsten exposed to neutron irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Xunxiang; Koyanagi, Takaaki; Fukuda, Makoto; Kumar, N. A. P. Kiran; Snead, Lance L.; Wirth, Brian D.; Katoh, Yutai

    2016-11-01

    Pure tungsten samples have been neutron irradiated in HFIR at 90-850 °C to 0.03-2.2 dpa. A dispersed barrier hardening model informed by the available microstructure data has been used to predict the hardness. Comparison of the model predictions and the measured Vickers hardness reveals the dominant hardening contribution at various irradiation conditions. For tungsten samples irradiated in HFIR, the results indicate that voids and dislocation loops contributed to the hardness increase in the low dose region (<0.3 dpa), while the formation of intermetallic second phase precipitation, resulting from transmutation, dominates the radiation-induced strengthening beginning with a relatively modest dose (>0.6 dpa). The precipitate contribution is most pronounced for the HFIR irradiations, whereas the radiation-induced defect cluster microstructure can rationalize the entirety of the hardness increase observed in tungsten irradiated in the fast neutron spectrum of Joyo and the mixed neutron spectrum of JMTR.

  2. Identification of peptides that bind to irradiated pancreatic tumor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Canhui; Liu, Xiang Y.; Rehemtulla, Alnawaz; Lawrence, Theodore S. . E-mail: tsl@med.umich.edu

    2005-08-01

    Purpose: Peptides targeting tumor vascular cells or tumor cells themselves have the potential to be used as vectors for delivering either DNA in gene therapy or antitumor agents in chemotherapy. We wished to determine if peptides identified by phage display could be used to target irradiated pancreatic cancer cells. Methods and Materials: Irradiated Capan-2 cells were incubated with 5 x 10{sup 12} plaque-forming units of a phage display library. Internalized phage were recovered and absorbed against unirradiated cells. After five such cycles of enrichment, the recovered phage were subjected to DNA sequencing analysis and synthetic peptides made. The binding of both phage and synthetic peptides was evaluated by fluorescence staining and flow cytometry in vitro and in vivo. Results: We identified one 12-mer peptide (PA1) that binds to irradiated Capan-2 pancreatic adenocarcinoma cells but not to unirradiated cells. The binding of peptide was significant after 48 h incubation with cells. In vivo experiments with Capan-2 xenografts in nude mice demonstrated that these small peptides are able to penetrate tumor tissue after intravenous injections and bind specifically to irradiated tumor cells. Conclusion: These data suggest that peptides can be identified that target tumors with radiation-induced cell markers and may be clinically useful.

  3. Vibrational spectroscopy in sensing radiobiological effects: analyses of targeted and non-targeted effects in human keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Meade, Aidan D; Howe, Orla; Unterreiner, Valérie; Sockalingum, Ganesh D; Byrne, Hugh J; Lyng, Fiona M

    2016-06-23

    Modern models of radiobiological effects include mechanisms of damage initiation, sensing and repair, for those cells that directly absorb ionizing radiation as well as those that experience molecular signals from directly irradiated cells. In the former case, the effects are termed targeted effects while, in the latter, non-targeted effects. It has emerged that phenomena occur at low doses below 1 Gy in directly irradiated cells that are associated with cell-cycle-dependent mechanisms of DNA damage sensing and repair. Likewise in non-targeted bystander-irradiated cells the effect saturates at 0.5 Gy. Both effects at these doses challenge the limits of detection of vibrational spectroscopy. In this paper, a study of the sensing of both targeted and non-targeted effects in HaCaT human keratinocytes irradiated with gamma ray photons is conducted with vibrational spectroscopy. In the case of directly irradiated cells, it is shown that the HaCaT cell line does exhibit both hyperradiosensitivity and increased radioresistance at low doses, a transition between the two effects occurring at a dose of 200 mGy, and that cell survival and other physiological effects as a function of dose follow the induced repair model. Both Raman and FTIR signatures are shown to follow a similar model, suggesting that the spectra include signatures of DNA damage sensing and repair. In bystander-irradiated cells, pro- and anti-apoptotic signalling and mechanisms of ROS damage were inhibited in the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) transduction pathway. It is shown that Raman spectral profiles of bystander-irradiated cells are correlated with markers of bystander signalling and molecular transduction. This work demonstrates for the first time that both targeted and non-targeted effects of ionizing radiation damage are detected by vibrational spectroscopy in vitro.

  4. Vibrational spectroscopy in sensing radiobiological effects: analyses of targeted and non-targeted effects in human keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Meade, Aidan D; Howe, Orla; Unterreiner, Valérie; Sockalingum, Ganesh D; Byrne, Hugh J; Lyng, Fiona M

    2016-06-23

    Modern models of radiobiological effects include mechanisms of damage initiation, sensing and repair, for those cells that directly absorb ionizing radiation as well as those that experience molecular signals from directly irradiated cells. In the former case, the effects are termed targeted effects while, in the latter, non-targeted effects. It has emerged that phenomena occur at low doses below 1 Gy in directly irradiated cells that are associated with cell-cycle-dependent mechanisms of DNA damage sensing and repair. Likewise in non-targeted bystander-irradiated cells the effect saturates at 0.5 Gy. Both effects at these doses challenge the limits of detection of vibrational spectroscopy. In this paper, a study of the sensing of both targeted and non-targeted effects in HaCaT human keratinocytes irradiated with gamma ray photons is conducted with vibrational spectroscopy. In the case of directly irradiated cells, it is shown that the HaCaT cell line does exhibit both hyperradiosensitivity and increased radioresistance at low doses, a transition between the two effects occurring at a dose of 200 mGy, and that cell survival and other physiological effects as a function of dose follow the induced repair model. Both Raman and FTIR signatures are shown to follow a similar model, suggesting that the spectra include signatures of DNA damage sensing and repair. In bystander-irradiated cells, pro- and anti-apoptotic signalling and mechanisms of ROS damage were inhibited in the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) transduction pathway. It is shown that Raman spectral profiles of bystander-irradiated cells are correlated with markers of bystander signalling and molecular transduction. This work demonstrates for the first time that both targeted and non-targeted effects of ionizing radiation damage are detected by vibrational spectroscopy in vitro. PMID:27043923

  5. Radiochemical Determination of Polonium in Liquid Metal Spallation Targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, B.; Schumann, D.; Neuhausen, J.; Wohlmuther, M.; Türler, A.

    2014-05-01

    The MEGAPIE target, consisting of 82 litres of lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE), was irradiated close to the megawatt range (0.8 MW) from August to December 2006 in the SINQ facility at PSI. After a cooling period of 5 years, a post-irradiation examination (PIE) program was started and samples were taken from different positions in the target. In this paper we focus on the measurement of α-emitting 208-210Po in the MEGAPIE target. The experimental results are compared with theoretical predictions obtained by FLUKA and MCNPX calculations.

  6. Phytosanitary irradiation in south Asia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Irradiation has the potential to solve phytosanitary problems related to trade in south Asia. In general, it is the phytosanitary treatment most tolerated by fresh agricultural commodities. Irradiation technology is available in some countries of the region but is only used for phytosanitary purpos...

  7. Current status of JAERI spallation target material program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, K.; Sasa, T.; Ishikura, S.; Mukugi, K.; Kai, T.; Ouchi, N.; Ioka, I.

    2001-07-01

    In the joint project of spallation neutron source between JAERI and KEK, material technology has been developed for the mercury target in the neutron source facility, the lead-bismuth target in the transmutation test facility, superconducting accelerator, post-irradiation examination and the ion beam test. Design of target system is progressing for the mercury spallation target: a pressure test of moderator, an impacting test in mercury and a corrosion test have been carried out. For nuclear transmutation with ADS an engineering facility is proposed. A material corrosion test loop is built-up and SS316 and F82H steels are to be tested in a flowing Pb-Bi. Fracture toughness of superconducting cavity material was found to be considerably large at 4 K. Irradiated samples at SINQ are to be transported to JAERI Hot Laboratory. For simulating radiation damage small disk specimens were irradiated in single, dual and triple ion beam modes.

  8. Commercial implementation of food irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welt, M. A.

    In July 1981, the first specifically designed multi-purpose irradiation facility for food irradiation was put into service by the Radiation Technology, Inc. subsidiary Process Technology, Inc. in West Memphis, Arkansas. The operational experience gained, resulted in an enhanced design which was put into commercial service in Haw River, North Carolina, by another subsidiary, Process Technology (N.C.), Inc. in October 1983. These facilities have enabled the food industry to assess the commercial viability of food irradiation. Further impetus towards commercialization of food irradiation was gained in March 1981 with the filing in the Federal Register, by the FDA, of an Advanced Proposed Notice of Rulemaking for Food Irradiation. Two years later in July 1983, the FDA approved the first food additive regulation involving food irradiation in nineteen years, when they approved the Radiation Technology, Inc. petition calling for the sanitization of spices, onion powder and garlic powder at a maximum dosage of 10 kGy. Since obtaining the spice irradiation approval, the FDA has accepted four additional petitions for filing in the Federal Register. One of the petitions which extended spice irradiation to include insect disinfestation has issued into a regulation while the remaining petitions covering the sanitization of herbs, spice blends, vegetable seasonings and dry powdery enzymes as well as the petition to irradiate hog carcasses and pork products for trichinae control at 1 kGy, are expected to issue either before the end of 1984 or early in 1985. More recently, food irradiation advocates in the United States received another vote of confidence by the announcement that a joint venture food irradiation facility to be constructed in Hawaii by Radiation Technology, is backed by a contractual committment for the processing of 40 million pounds of produce per year. Another step was taken when the Port of Salem, New Jersey announced that the Radiation Technology Model RT-4104

  9. Irradiated mandibular autografts

    SciTech Connect

    Hamaker, R.C.; Singer, M.I.; Shockley, W.W.; Pugh, N.; Shidnia, H.

    1983-09-15

    The cosmetic and functional disability associated with mandibular resection has been a major problem to the patient with direct invasion of the mandible by oral cancer. Marginal resections with combined postoperative radiation therapy have frequently been substituted for the more preferred segmental resections and resultant deformities. Presented are 15 cases of oral cavity cancer involving resection of the mandible, immediate radiation to 10,000 rad, and primary reconstruction as irradiated mandibular autografts. The longest following is 4 years and 3 months, with a success rate of 66%. Morbidity is minimal as compared to autogenous bone grafting. Tumor size, previous radiation, or use of regional flaps have not been a factor in the success of this method in reconstruction of the mandible primarily.

  10. Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging of Electron Heated Targets in Petawatt Laser Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, T; MacPhee, A; Key, M; Akli, K; Mackinnon, A; Chen, C; Barbee, T; Freeman, R; King, J; Link, A; Offermann, D; Ovchinnikov, V; Patel, P; Stephens, R; VanWoerkom, L; Zhang, B; Beg, F

    2007-11-29

    The study of the transport of electrons, and the flow of energy into a solid target or dense plasma, is instrumental in the development of fast ignition inertial confinement fusion. An extreme ultraviolet (XUV) imaging diagnostic at 256 eV and 68 eV provides information about heating and energy deposition within petawatt laser-irradiated targets. XUV images of several irradiated solid targets are presented.

  11. Target plane imager for inertial confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Swift, C.D.; Bliss, E.S.; Jones, W.A.; Seppala, L.G.

    1985-01-30

    The Nova laser, completed in December 1984 at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, is being used to conduct inertial confinement fusion experiments. It is capable of focusing more than 100 kJ of energy on small fusion targets. This paper discusses an optical system called the target plane imager that is used during the beam alignment phase of these experiments. The TPI includes a three meter long periscope with a wide field of view, F/3 objective. The telescope relays images of the target focal plane to viewing optics and a video sensor located outside the target chamber. Operation of the system is possible at three wavelengths: 1.05..mu.., 0.527..mu.., and 0.351..mu... These are the three wavelengths at which the ten Nova laser beams can irradiate targets. Both nearfield and farfield images of the ten beams can be viewed with the TPI. This instrument is used to properly align the laser to the target before each target irradiation.

  12. Experimental study of swelling of irradiated solid methane during annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shabalin, E.; Fedorov, A.; Kulagin, E.; Kulikov, S.; Melikhov, V.; Shabalin, D.

    2008-12-01

    Solid methane is still widely in use at pulsed neutron sources due to its excellent neutronic performance (IPNS, KENS, Second Target Station at ISIS), notwithstanding poor radiation properties. One of the specific problems is radiolytic hydrogen gas pressure on the walls of a methane chamber during annealing of methane. In this paper results of an experimental study of this phenomenon under fast neutron irradiation with the help of a specially made low temperature irradiation rig at the IBR-2 pulsed reactor are presented. The peak pressure on the wall of the experimental capsule during heating of a sample irradiated at 23-35 K appears to have a maximum of 2.7 MPa at an absorbed dose 20 MGy and then falls down with higher doses. The pressure always reached its peak value at the temperature range 72-79 K. Generally, three phases of methane swelling during heating can be distinguished, each characterized by a proper rate and intensity.

  13. Microstructure and microhardness of CLAM steel irradiated up to 20.8 dpa in STIP-V

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Lei; Ge, Hongen; Dai, Yong; Huang, Qunying; Ye, Minyou

    2016-01-01

    Specimens of China low activation martensitic (CLAM) steel were irradiated in the fifth experiment of SINQ target irradiation program (STIP-V) up to 20.8 dpa/1564 appm He. Microhardness measurements and transmission electron microscope (TEM) observations have been performed to investigate irradiation induced hardening effects. The results of CLAM steel specimens show similar trend in microhardness and microstructure changes with irradiation dose, compared to F82H/Optimax-A steels irradiated in STIP-I/II. Defects and helium bubbles were observed in all specimens, even at a very low dose of 5.4 dpa. For defects and bubbles, the mean size and number density increased with increasing irradiation dose to 13 dpa, and then the mean size increased and number density decreased with the increasing irradiation dose to 20.8 dpa.

  14. Metabolic and diffusional limitations of photosynthesis in fluctuating irradiance in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Kaiser, Elias; Morales, Alejandro; Harbinson, Jeremy; Heuvelink, Ep; Prinzenberg, Aina E.; Marcelis, Leo F. M.

    2016-01-01

    A better understanding of the metabolic and diffusional limitations of photosynthesis in fluctuating irradiance can help identify targets for improving crop yields. We used different genotypes of Arabidopsis thaliana to characterise the importance of Rubisco activase (Rca), stomatal conductance (gs), non-photochemical quenching of chlorophyll fluorescence (NPQ) and sucrose phosphate synthase (SPS) on photosynthesis in fluctuating irradiance. Leaf gas exchange and chlorophyll fluorescence were measured in leaves exposed to stepwise increases and decreases in irradiance. rwt43, which has a constitutively active Rubisco enzyme in different irradiance intensities (except in darkness), showed faster increases than the wildtype, Colombia-0, in photosynthesis rates after step increases in irradiance. rca-2, having decreased Rca concentration, showed lower rates of increase. In aba2-1, high gs increased the rate of change after stepwise irradiance increases, while in C24, low gs tended to decrease it. Differences in rates of change between Colombia-0 and plants with low levels of NPQ (npq1-2, npq4-1) or SPS (spsa1) were negligible. In Colombia-0, the regulation of Rubisco activation and of gs were therefore limiting for photosynthesis in fluctuating irradiance, while levels of NPQ or SPS were not. This suggests Rca and gs as targets for improvement of photosynthesis of plants in fluctuating irradiance. PMID:27502328

  15. New facility for post irradiation examination of neutron irradiated beryllium

    SciTech Connect

    Ishitsuka, Etsuo; Kawamura, Hiroshi

    1995-09-01

    Beryllium is expected as a neutron multiplier and plasma facing materials in the fusion reactor, and the neutron irradiation data on properties of beryllium up to 800{degrees}C need for the engineering design. The acquisition of data on the tritium behavior, swelling, thermal and mechanical properties are first priority in ITER design. Facility for the post irradiation examination of neutron irradiated beryllium was constructed in the hot laboratory of Japan Materials Testing Reactor to get the engineering design data mentioned above. This facility consist of the four glove boxes, dry air supplier, tritium monitoring and removal system, storage box of neutron irradiated samples. Beryllium handling are restricted by the amount of tritium;7.4 GBq/day and {sup 60}Co;7.4 MBq/day.

  16. AFIP-4 Irradiation Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    Danielle M Perez; Misti A Lillo; Gray S. Chang; Glenn A Roth; Nicolas Woolstenhulme; Daniel M Wachs

    2012-01-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) Full size plate In center flux trap Position (AFIP) experiment AFIP-4 was designed to evaluate the performance of monolithic uranium-molybdenum (U-Mo) fuels at a scale prototypic of research reactor fuel plates. The AFIP-4 test further examine the fuel/clad interface and its behavior under extreme conditions. After irradiation, fission gas retention measurements will be performed during post irradiation (PIE)1,2. The following report summarizes the life of the AFIP-4 experiment through end of irradiation, including a brief description of the safety analysis, as-run neutronic analysis results, hydraulic testing results, and thermal analysis results.

  17. AFIP-4 Irradiation Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    Danielle M Perez; Misti A Lillo; Gray S. Chang; Glenn A Roth; Nicolas Woolstenhulme; Daniel M Wachs

    2011-09-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) Full size plate In center flux trap Position (AFIP) experiment AFIP-4 was designed to evaluate the performance of monolithic uranium-molybdenum (U-Mo) fuels at a scale prototypic of research reactor fuel plates. The AFIP-4 test further examine the fuel/clad interface and its behavior under extreme conditions. After irradiation, fission gas retention measurements will be performed during post irradiation (PIE). The following report summarizes the life of the AFIP-4 experiment through end of irradiation, including a brief description of the safety analysis, as-run neutronic analysis results, hydraulic testing results, and thermal analysis results.

  18. Biological studies using mammalian cell lines and the current status of the microbeam irradiation system, SPICE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konishi, T.; Ishikawa, T.; Iso, H.; Yasuda, N.; Oikawa, M.; Higuchi, Y.; Kato, T.; Hafer, K.; Kodama, K.; Hamano, T.; Suya, N.; Imaseki, H.

    2009-06-01

    The development of SPICE (single-particle irradiation system to cell), a microbeam irradiation system, has been completed at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS). The beam size has been improved to approximately 5 μm in diameter, and the cell targeting system can irradiate up to 400-500 cells per minute. Two cell dishes have been specially designed: one a Si 3N 4 plate (2.5 mm × 2.5 mm area with 1 μm thickness) supported by a 7.5 mm × 7.5 mm frame of 200 μm thickness, and the other a Mylar film stretched by pressing with a metal ring. Both dish types may be placed on a voice coil stage equipped on the cell targeting system, which includes a fluorescent microscope and a CCD camera for capturing cell images. This microscope system captures images of dyed cell nuclei, computes the location coordinates of individual cells, and synchronizes this with the voice coil motor stage and single-particle irradiation system consisting of a scintillation counter and a beam deflector. Irradiation of selected cells with a programmable number of protons is now automatable. We employed the simultaneous detection method for visualizing the position of mammalian cells and proton traversal through CR-39 to determine whether the targeted cells are actually irradiated. An immuno-assay was also performed against γ-H2AX, to confirm the induction of DNA double-strand breaks in the target cells.

  19. Process and targets for production of no-carrier-added radiotin

    DOEpatents

    Srivastava, Suresh C; Zhuikov, Boris Leonidovich; Ermolaev, Stanislav Victorovich; Konyakhin, Nikolay Alexandrovich; Kokhanyuk, Vladimir Mikhailovich; Khamyanov, Stepan Vladimirovich; Togaeva, Natalya Roaldovna

    2014-04-22

    One embodiment of the present invention includes a process for production and recovery of no-carrier-added radioactive tin (NCA radiotin). An antimony target can be irradiated with a beam of accelerated particles forming NCA radiotin, followed by separation of the NCA radiotin from the irradiated target. The target is metallic Sb in a hermetically sealed shell. The shell can be graphite, molybdenum, or stainless steel. The irradiated target can be removed from the shell by chemical or mechanical means, and dissolved in an acidic solution. Sb can be removed from the dissolved irradiated target by extraction. NCA radiotin can be separated from the remaining Sb and other impurities using chromatography on silica gel sorbent. NCA tin-117m can be obtained from this process. NCA tin-117m can be used for labeling organic compounds and biological objects to be applied in medicine for imaging and therapy of various diseases.

  20. Generic phytosanitary irradiation treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallman, Guy J.

    2012-07-01

    The history of the development of generic phytosanitary irradiation (PI) treatments is discussed beginning with its initial proposal in 1986. Generic PI treatments in use today are 150 Gy for all hosts of Tephritidae, 250 Gy for all arthropods on mango and papaya shipped from Australia to New Zealand, 300 Gy for all arthropods on mango shipped from Australia to Malaysia, 350 Gy for all arthropods on lychee shipped from Australia to New Zealand and 400 Gy for all hosts of insects other than pupae and adult Lepidoptera shipped to the United States. Efforts to develop additional generic PI treatments and reduce the dose for the 400 Gy treatment are ongoing with a broad based 5-year, 12-nation cooperative research project coordinated by the joint Food and Agricultural Organization/International Atomic Energy Agency Program on Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture. Key groups identified for further development of generic PI treatments are Lepidoptera (eggs and larvae), mealybugs and scale insects. A dose of 250 Gy may suffice for these three groups plus others, such as thrips, weevils and whiteflies.

  1. (Irradiation creep of graphite)

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, C.R.

    1990-12-21

    The traveler attended the Conference, International Symposium on Carbon, to present an invited paper, Irradiation Creep of Graphite,'' and chair one of the technical sessions. There were many papers of particular interest to ORNL and HTGR technology presented by the Japanese since they do not have a particular technology embargo and are quite open in describing their work and results. In particular, a paper describing the failure of Minor's law to predict the fatigue life of graphite was presented. Although the conference had an international flavor, it was dominated by the Japanese. This was primarily a result of geography; however, the work presented by the Japanese illustrated an internal program that is very comprehensive. This conference, a result of this program, was better than all other carbon conferences attended by the traveler. This conference emphasizes the need for US participation in international conferences in order to stay abreast of the rapidly expanding HTGR and graphite technology throughout the world. The United States is no longer a leader in some emerging technologies. The traveler was surprised by the Japanese position in their HTGR development. Their reactor is licensed and the major problem in their graphite program is how to eliminate it with the least perturbation now that most of the work has been done.

  2. Irradiation pretreatment for coal desulfurization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, G. C.

    1979-01-01

    Process using highly-penetrating nuclear radiation (Beta and Gamma radiation) from nuclear power plant radioactive waste to irradiate coal prior to conventional desulfurization procedures increases total extraction of sulfur.

  3. Irradiation of Northwest agricultural products

    SciTech Connect

    Eakin, D.E.; Tingey, G.L.

    1985-02-01

    Irradiation of food for disinfestation and preservation is increasing in importance because of increasing restrictions on various chemical treatments. Irradiation treatment is of particular interest in the Northwest because of a growing supply of agricultural products and the need to develop new export markets. Several products have, or could potentially have, significant export markets if stringent insect control procedures are developed and followed. Due to the recognized potential benefits of irradiation, Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is conducting this program to evaluate the benefits of using irradiation on Northwest agricultural products under the US Department of Energy (DOE) Defense Byproducts Production and Utilization Program. Commodities currently included in the program are cherries, apples, asparagus, spices, hay, and hides.

  4. Hydrodynamic Simulations of Unevenly Irradiated Jovian Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langton, Jonathan; Laughlin, Gregory

    2008-02-01

    We employ a two-dimensional, grid-based hydrodynamic model to simulate upper atmospheric dynamics on extrasolar giant planets. The hydrodynamic equations of motion are integrated on a rotating, irradiated sphere using a pseudospectral algorithm. We use a two-frequency, two-stream approximation of radiative transfer to model the temperature forcing. This model is well suited to simulate the dynamics of the atmospheres of planets with high orbital eccentricity, which are subject to widely varying irradiation conditions. We identify six such planets, with eccentricities between e = 0.28 and e = 0.93 and semimajor axes from a = 0.0508 AU to a = 0.432 AU, as particularly interesting. For each, we determine the temperature profile and resulting infrared light curves in the 8 μm Spitzer band. Especially notable are the results for HD 80606b, which has the largest eccentricity (e = 0.9321) of any known planet, and HAT-P-2b, which transits its parent star, so that its physical properties are well constrained. Despite the varied orbital parameters, the atmospheric dynamics of these planets display a number of interesting common properties. In all cases, the atmospheric response is primarily driven by the intense irradiation at periastron. The resulting expansion of heated air produces high-velocity turbulent flow, including long-lived circumpolar vortices. In addition, a superrotating acoustic front develops on some planets; the strength of this disturbance depends on both the eccentricity and the temperature gradient from uneven heating. The specifics of the resulting infrared light curves depend strongly on the orbital geometry. We show, however, that the variations on HD 80606b and HAT-P-2b should be readily detectable at 4.5 and 8 μm using Spitzer. These two objects present the most attractive observational targets of all known high-e exoplanets.

  5. High-irradiance reactors with unfolded aplanatic optics.

    PubMed

    Feuermann, Daniel; Gordon, Jeffrey M

    2008-11-01

    Reconstituting the intense irradiance of short-arc discharge lamps at a remote target, at high radiative efficiency, represents a central challenge in the design of high-temperature chemical reactors, heightened by the need for high numerical aperture at both the target and the source. Separating the optical system from both the source and the reactor allows pragmatic operation, monitoring, and control. We explore near-field unfolded aplanats as feasible solutions and report measurements for a prototype that constitutes a double-ellipsoid mirror. We also propose compound unfolded aplanats that collect lamp emission over all angles (in lieu of light recycling optics) and irradiate the reactor over nearly its full circumference.

  6. Production of sodium-22 from proton irradiated aluminum

    DOEpatents

    Taylor, Wayne A.; Heaton, Richard C.; Jamriska, David J.

    1996-01-01

    A process for selective separation of sodium-22 from a proton irradiated minum target including dissolving a proton irradiated aluminum target in hydrochloric acid to form a first solution including aluminum ions and sodium ions, separating a portion of the aluminum ions from the first solution by crystallization of an aluminum salt, contacting the remaining first solution with an anion exchange resin whereby ions selected from the group consisting of iron and copper are selectively absorbed by the anion exchange resin while aluminum ions and sodium ions remain in solution, contacting the solution with an cation exchange resin whereby aluminum ions and sodium ions are adsorbed by the cation exchange resin, and, contacting the cation exchange resin with an acid solution capable of selectively separating the adsorbed sodium ions from the cation exchange resin while aluminum ions remain adsorbed on the cation exchange resin is disclosed.

  7. Irradiation Induced Creep of Graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Burchell, Timothy D; Murty, Prof K.L.; Eapen, Dr. Jacob

    2010-01-01

    The current status of graphite irradiation induced creep strain prediction is reviewed and the major creep models are described. The ability of the models to quantitatively predict the irradiation induced creep strain of graphite is reported. Potential mechanisms of in-crystal creep are reviewed as are mechanisms of pore generation under stress. The case for further experimental work is made and the need for improved creep models across multi-scales is highlighted.

  8. Slag recycling of irradiated vanadium

    SciTech Connect

    Gorman, P.K.

    1995-04-05

    An experimental inductoslag apparatus to recycle irradiated vanadium was fabricated and tested. An experimental electroslag apparatus was also used to test possible slags. The testing was carried out with slag materials that were fabricated along with impurity bearing vanadium samples. Results obtained include computer simulated thermochemical calculations and experimentally determined removal efficiencies of the transmutation impurities. Analyses of the samples before and after testing were carried out to determine if the slag did indeed remove the transmutation impurities from the irradiated vanadium.

  9. Consumer attitudes toward irradiated food

    SciTech Connect

    Conley, S.

    1994-12-31

    Throughout history, new methods of food preservation have been met with skepticism and fear. Such processes as pasteurization and canning were denounced as being dangerous, detrimental to nutrients, or an excuse for dirty products. Now comes irradiation, and activists argue against this new process for the same reasons. Publicly, the perception is that consumers, distrustful of nuclear power, will never buy or accept irradiated food.

  10. Development of a focused charged particle microbeam for the irradiation of individual cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barberet, Ph.; Balana, A.; Incerti, S.; Michelet-Habchi, C.; Moretto, Ph.; Pouthier, Th.

    2005-01-01

    An irradiation facility, able to expose cellular and subcellular targets to a precise number of particles, has been developed at CENBG for applications in radiobiology. The development of this facility was based on an existing horizontal focused microbeam developed in the early 90's for material analysis. The focusing properties of the line allow the delivering of proton or alpha particle beams in the 1-3.5MeV energy range with a spatial resolution down to about 1μm under vacuum. For irradiation of living cells, a removable stage has been developed to extract the beam into air while preserving the analytical capabilities of the microbeam line under vacuum. This stage includes a high resolution epifluorescence microscope for online visualization of the cells and a motorized stage for cell positioning. Single particle control is ensured by a fast electrostatic deflector triggered by the signal induced by the particles through a transmission detector just before reaching the target. A dedicated software, based on an object-oriented architecture, has been designed to control the entire experiment. This includes semiautomatic calibration procedures (necessary to achieve the micron precision) and semiautomatic irradiation procedures used for targeting a large number of individual cells. In air irradiation of solid track detectors has permitted us to estimate that 99.5% of the particles are delivered on the target at a distance lower than 5μm from the beam center when an alpha particles beam is used. The targeting precision of the overall irradiation procedure, which reflects the alignment precision of the beam center with the target center, has been estimated to be within ±2μm. First experiments involving cells in culture have permitted to estimate an irradiation rate of 2000 cells per hour. This article presents the overall experimental facility and the tests performed for its validation for the irradiation of individual cells in their culture medium.

  11. SPICE-NIRS Microbeam: a focused vertical system for proton irradiation of a single cell for radiobiological research

    PubMed Central

    Konishi, Teruaki; Oikawa, Masakazu; Suya, Noriyoshi; Ishikawa, Takahiro; Maeda, Takeshi; Kobayashi, Alisa; Shiomi, Naoko; Kodama, Kumiko; Hamano, Tsuyoshi; Homma-Takeda, Shino; Isono, Mayu; Hieda, Kotaro; Uchihori, Yukio; Shirakawa, Yoshiyuki

    2013-01-01

    The Single Particle Irradiation system to Cell (SPICE) facility at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) is a focused vertical microbeam system designed to irradiate the nuclei of adhesive mammalian cells with a defined number of 3.4 MeV protons. The approximately 2-μm diameter proton beam is focused with a magnetic quadrupole triplet lens and traverses the cells contained in dishes from bottom to top. All procedures for irradiation, such as cell image capturing, cell recognition and position calculation, are automated. The most distinctive characteristic of the system is its stability and high throughput; i.e. 3000 cells in a 5 mm × 5 mm area in a single dish can be routinely irradiated by the 2-μm beam within 15 min (the maximum irradiation speed is 400 cells/min). The number of protons can be set as low as one, at a precision measured by CR-39 detectors to be 99.0%. A variety of targeting modes such as fractional population targeting mode, multi-position targeting mode for nucleus irradiation and cytoplasm targeting mode are available. As an example of multi-position targeting irradiation of mammalian cells, five fluorescent spots in a cell nucleus were demonstrated using the γ-H2AX immune-staining technique. The SPICE performance modes described in this paper are in routine use. SPICE is a joint-use research facility of NIRS and its beam times are distributed for collaborative research. PMID:23287773

  12. SPICE-NIRS microbeam: a focused vertical system for proton irradiation of a single cell for radiobiological research.

    PubMed

    Konishi, Teruaki; Oikawa, Masakazu; Suya, Noriyoshi; Ishikawa, Takahiro; Maeda, Takeshi; Kobayashi, Alisa; Shiomi, Naoko; Kodama, Kumiko; Hamano, Tsuyoshi; Homma-Takeda, Shino; Isono, Mayu; Hieda, Kotaro; Uchihori, Yukio; Shirakawa, Yoshiyuki

    2013-07-01

    The Single Particle Irradiation system to Cell (SPICE) facility at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) is a focused vertical microbeam system designed to irradiate the nuclei of adhesive mammalian cells with a defined number of 3.4 MeV protons. The approximately 2-μm diameter proton beam is focused with a magnetic quadrupole triplet lens and traverses the cells contained in dishes from bottom to top. All procedures for irradiation, such as cell image capturing, cell recognition and position calculation, are automated. The most distinctive characteristic of the system is its stability and high throughput; i.e. 3000 cells in a 5 mm × 5 mm area in a single dish can be routinely irradiated by the 2-μm beam within 15 min (the maximum irradiation speed is 400 cells/min). The number of protons can be set as low as one, at a precision measured by CR-39 detectors to be 99.0%. A variety of targeting modes such as fractional population targeting mode, multi-position targeting mode for nucleus irradiation and cytoplasm targeting mode are available. As an example of multi-position targeting irradiation of mammalian cells, five fluorescent spots in a cell nucleus were demonstrated using the γ-H2AX immune-staining technique. The SPICE performance modes described in this paper are in routine use. SPICE is a joint-use research facility of NIRS and its beam times are distributed for collaborative research. PMID:23287773

  13. 10 CFR 36.33 - Irradiator pools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Irradiator pools. 36.33 Section 36.33 Energy NUCLEAR... Requirements for Irradiators § 36.33 Irradiator pools. (a) For licenses initially issued after July 1, 1993, irradiator pools must either: (1) Have a water-tight stainless steel liner or a liner...

  14. 10 CFR 36.33 - Irradiator pools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Irradiator pools. 36.33 Section 36.33 Energy NUCLEAR... Requirements for Irradiators § 36.33 Irradiator pools. (a) For licenses initially issued after July 1, 1993, irradiator pools must either: (1) Have a water-tight stainless steel liner or a liner...

  15. 10 CFR 36.33 - Irradiator pools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Irradiator pools. 36.33 Section 36.33 Energy NUCLEAR... Requirements for Irradiators § 36.33 Irradiator pools. (a) For licenses initially issued after July 1, 1993, irradiator pools must either: (1) Have a water-tight stainless steel liner or a liner...

  16. Calculating Irradiance For Photosynthesis In The Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, Donald J.; Davis, Curtiss O.; Booth, C. Rockwell; Kiefer, Dale A.; Stallings, Casson

    1990-01-01

    Mathematical model predicts available and usable irradiances. Yields estimates of irradiance available for photosynthesis (Epar) and irradiance usable for photosynthesis (Epur) as functions of depth in ocean. Describes Epur and Epar in terms of spectral parameters measured remotely (from satellites or airplanes). These irradiances useful in studies of photosynthetic productivity of phytoplankton in euphotic layer.

  17. Partial irradiation of the parotid gland.

    PubMed

    Eisbruch, A; Ship, J A; Kim, H M; Ten Haken, R K

    2001-07-01

    Recent efforts to reduce xerostomia associated with irradiation (RT) of head and neck cancer include the use of conformal and intensity-modulated RT (IMRT) to partly spare the major salivary glands, notably the parotid glands, from a high radiation dose while treating adequately all the targets at risk of disease. Knowledge of the dose-volume-response relationships in the salivary glands would determine treatment planning goals and facilitate optimization of the RT plans. Recent prospective studies of salivary flows following inhomogeneous irradiation of the parotid glands have utilized dose-volume histograms (DVHs) and various models to assess these relationships. These studies found that the mean dose to the gland is correlated with the reduction of the salivary output. This is consistent with a pure parallel architecture of the functional subunits (FSUs) of the salivary glands. The range of the mean doses, which have been found in these studies to cause significant salivary flow reduction is 26 to 39 Gy. PMID:11447580

  18. Communications strategy for irradiator siting approvals: A Canadian perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swinwood, Jean F.; Fraser, Frank M.

    1995-02-01

    This paper presents a new public attitudes survey and a communications strategy developed during a 2-year period, during which a proposal for the installation of a unique cobalt 60 sourced sludge irradiator was being considered. This Sludge Recycling Facility proposal was supported by a plant that addressed knowledge needs of five target audiences - politicians, neighbours, regulatory and licensing agencies, city staff and future plant workers, and special interest groups.

  19. Cancer following medical irradiation.

    PubMed

    Boice, J D

    1981-03-01

    Several generalizations about radiation carcinogenesis can be made: 1) a single exposure is sufficient to elevate cancer incidence many years later: 2) radiation-induced cancer cannot be distinguished from naturally occurring cancer, i.e., there is not unique radiogenic cancer; 3) all cancers appear to be increased after irradiation with the exception of chronic lymphocytic leukemia, and possibly Hodgkin's disease, cervical cancer, and a few others; 4) the breast, thyroid, and bone marrow appear especially radiosensitive; 5) leukemia is the most prominent radiogenic tumor and shows a wave-like pattern of excess incidence over time, and the excess begins within two to four years, peaks about six to eight years, and decreases to normal levels about 25 years later; 6) solid tumors have a minimum latent period of about ten years, and for several cancers, the temporal pattern of incidence appears to follow the natural incidence, i.e., the cancers do not occur before the ages normally associated with increased incidence, implying that age-dependent factors influence the expression of disease; 7) age at exposure is perhaps the most important host factor influencing subsequent cancer risk; 8) the percentage increase in cancer incidence per rad is not the same for all cancers, i.e., some cancer of high natural incidence, e.g., colon, have low "relative risks" and some cancers of low natural incidence, e.g., thyroid, have high "relative risks;" 9) dose-effect curves are often linear, but curvilinearity is also observed and is possibly associated with the need for "two ionizing events" for transformation to occur at low doses, the influence of cell sterilization at moderate doses, the likelihood of "wasted" dose at high doses, and/or the influence of factors that effect the expression of disease.

  20. Liver irradiation causes distal bystander effects in the rat brain and affects animal behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Kovalchuk, Anna; Mychasiuk, Richelle; Muhammad, Arif; Hossain, Shakhawat; Ilnytskyy, Slava; Ghose, Abhijit; Kirkby, Charles; Ghasroddashti, Esmaeel; Kovalchuk, Olga; Kolb, Bryan

    2016-01-01

    Radiation therapy can not only produce effects on targeted organs, but can also influence shielded bystander organs, such as the brain in targeted liver irradiation. The brain is sensitive to radiation exposure, and irradiation causes significant neuro-cognitive deficits, including deficits in attention, concentration, memory, and executive and visuospatial functions. The mechanisms of their occurrence are not understood, although they may be related to the bystander effects. We analyzed the induction, mechanisms, and behavioural repercussions of bystander effects in the brain upon liver irradiation in a well-established rat model. Here, we show for the first time that bystander effects occur in the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus regions upon liver irradiation, where they manifest as altered gene expression and somewhat increased levels of γH2AX. We also report that bystander effects in the brain are associated with neuroanatomical and behavioural changes, and are more pronounced in females than in males. PMID:26678032

  1. Absence of CCL2 is sufficient to restore hippocampal neurogenesis following cranial irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Star W.; Haditsch, Ursula; Cord, Branden J.; Guzman, Raphael; Kim, Soo Jeong; Boettcher, Chotima; Priller, Josef; Ormerod, Brandi K.; Palmer, Theo D.

    2012-01-01

    Cranial irradiation for the treatment of brain tumors causes a delayed and progressive cognitive decline that is pronounced in young patients. Dysregulation of neural stem and progenitor cells is thought to contribute to these effects by altering early childhood brain development. Earlier work has shown that irradiation creates a chronic neuroinflammatory state that severely and selectively impairs postnatal and adult neurogenesis. Here we show that irradiation induces a transient non-classical cytokine response with selective upregulation of CCL2/monocyte chemoattractant protein–1(MCP-1). Absence of CCL2 signaling in the hours after irradiation is alone sufficient to attenuate chronic microglia activation and allow the recovery of neurogenesis in the weeks following irradiation. This identifies CCL2 signaling as a potential clinical target for moderating the long-term defects in neural stem cell function following cranial radiation in children. PMID:23041279

  2. Microstructure and fracture behavior of F82H steel under different irradiation and tensile test conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, K.; Dai, Y.; Spätig, P.

    2016-01-01

    Specimens of martensitic steel F82H were irradiated to doses ranging from 10.7 dpa/850 appm He to 19.6 dpa/1740 appm He at temperatures between 165 and 305 °C in the second experiment of SINQ Target Irradiation Program (STIP-II). Tensile tests were conducted at different temperatures and various fracture modes were observed. Microstructural changes including irradiation-induced defect clusters, dislocation loops and helium bubbles under different irradiation conditions were investigated using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The deformation microstructures of tensile tested specimens were carefully examined to understand the underlying deformation mechanisms. Deformation twinning was for the first time observed in irradiated martensitic steels. A change of deformation mechanism from dislocation channeling to deformation twinning was observed when the fracture mode changed from rather ductile (quasi-cleavage) to brittle (intergranular or cleavage and intergranular mixed).

  3. Materials considerations in accelerator targets

    SciTech Connect

    Peacock, H.B. Jr.; Iyer, N.C.; Louthan, M.R. Jr.

    1994-08-01

    Future nuclear materials production and/or the burn-up of long lived radioisotopes may be accomplished through the capture of spallation produced neutrons in accelerators. Aluminum clad-lead and/or lead alloys has been proposed as a spallation target. Aluminum was the cladding choice because of the low neutron absorption cross section, fast radioactivity decay, high thermal conductivity, and excellent fabricability. Metallic lead and lead oxide powders were considered for the target core with the fabrication options being casting or powder metallurgy (PM). Scoping tests to evaluate gravity casting, squeeze casting, and casting and swaging processes showed that, based on fabricability and heat transfer considerations, squeeze casting was the preferred option for manufacture of targets with initial core cladding contact. Thousands of aluminum clad aluminum-lithium alloy core targets and control rods for tritium production have been fabricated by coextrusion processes and successfully irradiated in the SRS reactors. Tritium retention in, and release from the coextruded product was modeled from experimental and operational data. Newly produced tritium atoms were trapped by lithium atoms to form a lithium tritide. The effective tritium pressure required for trap or tritide stability was the equilibrium decomposition pressure of tritium over a lithium tritide-aluminum mixture. The temperature dependence of tritium release was determined by the permeability of the cladding to tritium and the local equilibrium at the trap sites. The model can be used to calculate tritium release from aluminum clad, aluminum-lithium alloy targets during postulated accelerator operational and accident conditions. This paper describes the manufacturing technologies evaluated and presents the model for tritium retention in aluminum clad, aluminum-lithium alloy tritium production targets.

  4. Using Ground Spectral Irradiance for Model Correction of AVIRIS Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goetz, Alexander F. H.; Heidebrecht, Kathleen B.; Kindel, Bruce; Boardman, Joseph W.

    1998-01-01

    Over the last decade a series of techniques has been developed to correct hyperspectral imaging sensor data to apparent surface reflectance. The techniques range from the empirical line method that makes use of ground target measurements to model-based methods such as ATREM that derive parameters from the data themselves to convert radiance to reflectance, and combinations of the above. Here we describe a technique that combines ground measurements of spectral irradiance with existing radiative transfer models to derive the model equivalent of an empirical line method correction without the need for uniform ground targets of different reflectance.

  5. Irradiation hardening of pure tungsten exposed to neutron irradiation

    DOE PAGES

    Hu, Xunxiang; Koyanagi, Takaaki; Fukuda, Makoto; Kumar, N. A. P. Kiran; Snead, Lance L.; Wirth, Brian D.; Katoh, Yutai

    2016-08-26

    In this paper, pure tungsten samples have been neutron irradiated in HFIR at 90–850 °C to 0.03–2.2 dpa. A dispersed barrier hardening model informed by the available microstructure data has been used to predict the hardness. Comparison of the model predictions and the measured Vickers hardness reveals the dominant hardening contribution at various irradiation conditions. For tungsten samples irradiated in HFIR, the results indicate that voids and dislocation loops contributed to the hardness increase in the low dose region (<0.3 dpa), while the formation of intermetallic second phase precipitation, resulting from transmutation, dominates the radiation-induced strengthening beginning with a relativelymore » modest dose (>0.6 dpa). Finally, the precipitate contribution is most pronounced for the HFIR irradiations, whereas the radiation-induced defect cluster microstructure can rationalize the entirety of the hardness increase observed in tungsten irradiated in the fast neutron spectrum of Joyo and the mixed neutron spectrum of JMTR.« less

  6. Production of Molybdenum-99 using Neutron Capture Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Toth, James J; Greenwood, Lawrence R; Soderquist, Chuck Z; Wittman, Richard S; Pierson, Bruce D; Burns, Kimberly A; Lavender, Curt A; Painter, Chad L; Love, Edward F; Wall, Donald E

    2011-01-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), operated by Battelle, has identified a reference process for the production of molybdenum-99 (99Mo) for use in a chromatographic generator to separate the daughter product, technetium-99m (99mTc). The reference process uses the neutron capture reaction of natural or enriched molybdenum oxide via the reaction 98Mo(n,γ)99Mo. The irradiated molybdenum is dissolved in an alkaline solution, whereby the molybdenum, dissolved as the molybdate anion, is loaded on a proprietary ion exchange material in the chromatographic generator. The approach of this investigation is to provide a systematic collection of technologies to make the neutron capture method for Mo-99 production economically viable. This approach would result in the development of a technetium Tc99m generator and a new type of target. The target is comprised of molybdenum, either natural or enriched, and is tailored to the design of currently operating U.S. research reactors. The systematic collection of technologies requires evaluation of new metallurgical methods to produce the target, evaluation of target geometries tailored to research reactors, and chemical methods to dissolve the irradiated target materials for use in a chromatographic generator. A Technical specification for testing the target and neutron capture method in a research reactor is also required. This report includes identification of research and demonstration activities needed to enable deployment of neutron capture production method, including irradiations of prototypic targets, chemical processing of irradiated targets, and loading and extraction tests of Mo99 and Tc99m on the sorbent material in a prototypic generator design. The prototypical generator design is based on the proprietary method and systems for isotope product generation. The proprietary methods and systems described in this report are clearly delineated with footnotes. Ultimately, the Tc-99m generator solution provided by

  7. Accuracy of aperture irradiances from a resistor-array projection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flynn, David S.; Marlow, Steven A.; Sisko, R. B.; Thompson, Rhoe A.

    2005-05-01

    In seekers that never resolve targets spatially, it may be adequate to calibrate only with sources that have known aperture irradiance. In modern missile interceptors, the target becomes spatially resolved at close ranges, and the seeker's ability to accurately measure the radiance at different positions in the scene is also important. Thus, it is necessary to calibrate the seekers with extended sources of known radiance. The aperture irradiance is given by the radiance integrated over the angular extent of the target in the scene. Thus radiance calibrations and accurately presenting the targets spatially produces accurate irradiances. The accuracy of the scene radiance is also important in generating synthetic imagery for testing seeker conceptual designs and seeker algorithms, and for hardware-in-the-loop testing with imaging projection systems. The routine procedure at the Air Force Research Laboratory Munitions Directorate's AFRL/MNGG is to model and project the detailed spatial and radiometric content of the scenes. Hence, accurate depiction of the radiance in the scene is important. AFRL/MNGG calibrates the complete projection system (synthetic image generator and scene projector) with extended sources of known radiance, not unresolved sources of known irradiance. This paper demonstrates that accurate radiance calibrations and accurate spatial rendering do provide accurate aperture irradiances in the projection systems. In recent tests conducted by AFRL/MNGG, the projection system was calibrated in terms of radiance, and the aperture irradiances were determined both as they were observed in the synthetic images that drove the projection system and in the images of the projection system measured by the unit under test. The aperture irradiances were compared with the known truth data and errors were determined. This paper presents results of analyzing the errors associated with the observed aperture irradiances.

  8. Effects of Electron-Beam Irradiation on Buccal-Cell DNA

    PubMed Central

    Castle, Philip E.; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Franklin, Tracie; Chanock, Stephen; Puri, Vinita; Welch, Robert; Rothman, Nathaniel; Vaught, Jim

    2003-01-01

    Buccal cells were collected from 29 participants, by use of mouthwash rinses, and were split into equal aliquots, with one aliquot irradiated by electron-beam (E-beam) irradiation equivalent to the sterilizing dosage used by the U.S. Postal Service and the other left untreated. Aliquots were extracted and tested for DNA yields (e.g., TaqMan assay for quantifying human genomic DNA), genomic integrity, and amplification-based analysis of genetic variants (e.g., single-nucleotide polymorphisms [SNPs] and single tandem repeats [STRs]). Irradiated aliquots had lower median DNA yields (3.7 μg/aliquot) than untreated aliquots (7.6 μg/aliquot) (P<.0005) and were more likely to have smaller maximum DNA fragment size, on the basis of genomic integrity gels, than untreated aliquots (P<.0005). Irradiated aliquots showed poorer PCR amplification of a 989-bp β-globin target (97% for weak amplification and 3% for no amplification) than untreated aliquots (7% for weak amplification and 0% for no amplification) (P<.0005), but 536-bp and 268-bp β-globin targets were amplified from all aliquots. There was no detectable irradiation effect on SNP assays, but there was a significant trend for decreased detection of longer STRs (P=.01) in irradiated versus untreated aliquots. We conclude that E-beam irradiation reduced the yield and quality of buccal-cell specimens, and, although irradiated buccal-cell specimens may retain sufficient DNA integrity for some amplified analyses of many common genomic targets, assays that target longer DNA fragments (>989 bp) or require whole-genome amplification may be compromised. PMID:12917795

  9. Recent developments in zinc oxide target chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Heaton, R.C.; Taylor, W.A.; Phillips, D.R.; Jamriska, D.J. Sr.; Garcia, J.B.

    1994-04-01

    Zinc oxide targets irradiated with high energy protons at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) contain a number of radioactive spallation products in quantities large enough to warrant recovery. This paper describes methods for recovering {sup 7}Be, {sup 46}Sc, and {sup 48}V from such targets and offers suggestions on possible ways to recover additional isotopes. The proposed methods are based on traditional precipitation and ion exchange techniques, are readily adaptable to hot cell use, and produce no hazardous waste components. The products are obtained in moderate to high yields and have excellent radiopurity.

  10. Preirradiation Data summary for the GRIT-II HTGR irradiation test specimens

    SciTech Connect

    Hollenbeck, J.L.

    1995-05-01

    This document comprises a report of preirradiation data on the NPR-5 and NPR-8 fuel types tested in the GRIT-II HTGR Irradiation Test in the Advanced Test Reactor. A summary of fuel characterization, GRIT-II test fabrication data, outlines of fabrication procedures, and a discussion of the GRIT technique for individual fuel bead testing is presented. Objective of the test is to provide individual irradiated HTGR fuel beads for post-irradiation valuation with total target burnups of 25, 50, and 75% fissions of initial metal atoms (FIMA).

  11. A practical alpha particle irradiator for studying internal alpha particle exposure.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ki-Man; Lee, Ui-Seob; Kim, Eun-Hee

    2016-09-01

    An alpha particle irradiator has been built in the Radiation Bioengineering Laboratory at Seoul National University (SNU) to investigate the cellular responses to alpha emissions from radon and the progeny. This irradiator is designed to have the energy of alpha particles entering target cells similar to that of alpha emissions from the radon progeny Po-218 and Po-214 residing in the human respiratory tract. For the SNU alpha particle irradiator, an irradiation system is equipped with cell dishes of 4µm thick Mylar bottom and a special setup of cells on slide for gamma-H2AX assay. Dose calibration for the alpha particle irradiator was performed by dual approaches, detection and computer simulation, in consideration of the source-to-target distance (STD) and the size of a cell dish. The uniformity of dose among cells in a dish is achieved by keeping the STD and the size of cell dish in certain ranges. The performance of the SNU alpha particle irradiator has been proven to be reliable through the gamma-H2AX assay with the human lung epithelial cells irradiated. PMID:27475622

  12. Cyclotron production of Ac-225 for targeted alpha therapy.

    PubMed

    Apostolidis, C; Molinet, R; McGinley, J; Abbas, K; Möllenbeck, J; Morgenstern, A

    2005-03-01

    The feasibility of producing Ac-225 by proton irradiation of Ra-226 in a cyclotron through the reaction Ra-226(p,2n)Ac-225 has been experimentally demonstrated for the first time. Proton energies were varied from 8.8 to 24.8 MeV and cross-sections were determined by radiochemical analysis of reaction yields. Maximum yields were reached at incident proton energies of 16.8 MeV. Radiochemical separation of Ac-225 from the irradiated target yielded a product suitable for targeted alpha therapy of cancer.

  13. Cyclotron production of Ac-225 for targeted alpha therapy.

    PubMed

    Apostolidis, C; Molinet, R; McGinley, J; Abbas, K; Möllenbeck, J; Morgenstern, A

    2005-03-01

    The feasibility of producing Ac-225 by proton irradiation of Ra-226 in a cyclotron through the reaction Ra-226(p,2n)Ac-225 has been experimentally demonstrated for the first time. Proton energies were varied from 8.8 to 24.8 MeV and cross-sections were determined by radiochemical analysis of reaction yields. Maximum yields were reached at incident proton energies of 16.8 MeV. Radiochemical separation of Ac-225 from the irradiated target yielded a product suitable for targeted alpha therapy of cancer. PMID:15607913

  14. Low-oxygen atmospheric treatment improves the performance of irradiation-sterilized male cactus moths used in SIT.

    PubMed

    López-Martínez, Giancarlo; Carpenter, James E; Hight, Stephen D; Hahn, Daniel A

    2014-02-01

    As part of sterile insect technique (SIT) programs, irradiation can effectively induce sterility in insects by damaging genomic DNA. However, irradiation also induces other off-target side effects that reduce the quality and performance of sterilized males. Thus, treatments that reduce off-target effects of irradiation on male performance while maintaining sterility can improve the feasibility and economy of SIT programs. Exposure to ionizing radiation induces the formation of damaging free radicals in biological systems that may reduce sterile male performance. Here, we test whether exposure to an anoxic environment for 1 h before and during irradiation improves male performance, while maintaining sterility in males of the cactus moth, Cactoblastis cactorum (Berg). We show that exposure to 1 h of anoxia increases the moth's antioxidant capacity and that irradiation in anoxia after 1 h of anoxic conditioning decreases irradiation-induced oxidative damage to the moth's lipids and proteins. Anoxia treatment that reduced oxidative damage after irradiation also produced moths with greater flight performance, mating success, and longevity, while maintaining F1 male sterility at acceptable levels for SIT. We conclude that anoxia pretreatment followed by irradiation in anoxia is an efficient way to improve the quality of irradiated moths and perhaps lower the number of moths needed for release SIT moth operations.

  15. Food irradiation: Public opinion surveys

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, S.D.

    1987-01-01

    The Canadian government are discussing the legislation, regulations and practical protocol necessary for the commercialization of food irradiation. Food industry marketing, public relations and media expertise will be needed to successfully introduce this new processing choice to retailers and consumers. Consumer research to date including consumer opinion studies and market trials conducted in the Netherlands, United States, South Africa and Canada will be explored for signposts to successful approaches to the introduction of irradiated foods to retailers and consumers. Research has indicated that the terms used to describe irradiation and information designed to reduce consumer fears will be important marketing tools. Marketers will be challenged to promote old foods, which look the same to consumers, in a new light. Simple like or dislike or intention to buy surveys will not be effective tools. Consumer fears must be identified and effectively handled to support a receptive climate for irradiated food products. A cooperative government, industry, health professional, consumer association and retailer effort will be necessary for the successful introduction of irradiated foods into the marketplace. Grocery Products Manufacturers of Canada is a national trade association of more than 150 major companies engaged in the manufacture of food, non-alcoholic beverages and array of other national-brand consumer items sold through retail outlets.

  16. Rapid Annealing of Cu-In-Ga-Se Precursors by Electron Beam Irradiation Method.

    PubMed

    Lim, Seonkyoung; Kim, Young-Man; Jeong, Chaehwan

    2016-05-01

    Cu-In-Ga-Se precursors were prepared by RF- and DC-sputtering methods and then irradiated with an in-situ electron beam irradiation unit. Ternary (In,Ga)Se2 and binary CuSe targets were simultaneously used for preparation of precursors. The electron dose and irradiation time were kept constant at 300 seconds and 200 W of RF power, respectively, while intensities of accelerated electrons were varied from 2.5 to 4.5 keV. The thickness of all e-beam irradiated CuInGaSe2 (CIGS) films decreased from 1,250 nm to 470 nm. The crystalline properties of e-beam irradiated CIGS films were clearly shown on all samples and the highest intensity of (112) peak at 3.5 keV. The compositional ratio of Cu/(In + Ga) in the e-beam sample irradiated at 3.5 keV was coincident with that of the precursors. The degree of Ga content on the depth of the e-beam sample irradiated at 3.5 keV was uniformly distributed between the TCO/CdS layer and Mo back contact. Electron beam irradiation onto Cu-In-Ga-Se precursors as a rapid annealing method could be an excellent candidate for crystallization to the Cu(In,Ga)Se2 films.

  17. Rapid Annealing of Cu-In-Ga-Se Precursors by Electron Beam Irradiation Method.

    PubMed

    Lim, Seonkyoung; Kim, Young-Man; Jeong, Chaehwan

    2016-05-01

    Cu-In-Ga-Se precursors were prepared by RF- and DC-sputtering methods and then irradiated with an in-situ electron beam irradiation unit. Ternary (In,Ga)Se2 and binary CuSe targets were simultaneously used for preparation of precursors. The electron dose and irradiation time were kept constant at 300 seconds and 200 W of RF power, respectively, while intensities of accelerated electrons were varied from 2.5 to 4.5 keV. The thickness of all e-beam irradiated CuInGaSe2 (CIGS) films decreased from 1,250 nm to 470 nm. The crystalline properties of e-beam irradiated CIGS films were clearly shown on all samples and the highest intensity of (112) peak at 3.5 keV. The compositional ratio of Cu/(In + Ga) in the e-beam sample irradiated at 3.5 keV was coincident with that of the precursors. The degree of Ga content on the depth of the e-beam sample irradiated at 3.5 keV was uniformly distributed between the TCO/CdS layer and Mo back contact. Electron beam irradiation onto Cu-In-Ga-Se precursors as a rapid annealing method could be an excellent candidate for crystallization to the Cu(In,Ga)Se2 films. PMID:27483884

  18. Neutron irradiation of beryllium pebbles

    SciTech Connect

    Gelles, D.S.; Ermi, R.M.; Tsai, H.

    1998-03-01

    Seven subcapsules from the FFTF/MOTA 2B irradiation experiment containing 97 or 100% dense sintered beryllium cylindrical specimens in depleted lithium have been opened and the specimens retrieved for postirradiation examination. Irradiation conditions included 370 C to 1.6 {times} 10{sup 22} n/cm{sup 2}, 425 C to 4.8 {times} 10{sup 22} n/cm{sup 2}, and 550 C to 5.0 {times} 10{sup 22} n/cm{sup 2}. TEM specimens contained in these capsules were also retrieved, but many were broken. Density measurements of the cylindrical specimens showed as much as 1.59% swelling following irradiation at 500 C in 100% dense beryllium. Beryllium at 97% density generally gave slightly lower swelling values.

  19. Thomson scattering on inhomogeneous targets

    SciTech Connect

    Thiele, R.; Sperling, P.; Bornath, Th.; Kraeft, W.-D.; Redmer, R.; Chen, M.; Faeustlin, R. R.; Toleikis, S.; Fortmann, C.; Glenzer, S. H.; Pukhov, A.; Tschentscher, Th.

    2010-11-15

    The introduction of brilliant free-electron lasers enables new pump-probe experiments to characterize warm dense matter states. For instance, a short-pulse optical laser irradiates a liquid hydrogen jet that is subsequently probed with brilliant soft x-ray radiation. The strongly inhomogeneous plasma prepared by the optical laser is characterized with particle-in-cell simulations. The interaction of the soft x-ray probe radiation for different time delays between pump and probe with the inhomogeneous plasma is also taken into account via radiative hydrodynamic simulations. We calculate the respective scattering spectrum based on the Born-Mermin approximation for the dynamic structure factor considering the full density and temperature-dependent Thomson scattering cross section throughout the target. We can identify plasmon modes that are generated in different target regions and monitor their temporal evolution. Therefore, such pump-probe experiments are promising tools not only to measure the important plasma parameters density and temperature but also to gain valuable information about their time-dependent profile through the target. The method described here can be applied to various pump-probe scenarios by combining optical lasers and soft x ray, as well as x-ray sources.

  20. Innovative real-time and non-destructive method of beam profile measurement under large beam current irradiation for BNCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takada, M.; Kamada, S.; Suda, M.; Fujii, R.; Nakamura, M.; Hoshi, M.; Sato, H.; Endo, S.; Hamano, T.; Arai, S.; Higashimata, A.

    2012-10-01

    We developed a real-time and non-destructive method of beam profile measurement on a target under large beam current irradiation, and without any complex radiation detectors or electrical circuits. We measured the beam profiles on a target by observing the target temperature using an infrared-radiation thermometer camera. The target temperatures were increased and decreased quickly by starting and stopping the beam irradiation within 1 s in response speed. Our method could trace beam movements rapidly. The beam size and position were calibrated by measuring O-ring heat on the target. Our method has the potential to measure beam profiles at beam current over 1 mA for proton and deuteron with the energy around 3 MeV and allows accelerator operators to adjust the beam location during beam irradiation experiments without decreasing the beam current.

  1. Robust target implosion in heavy ion fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawata, Shigeo; Iizuka, Yoshifumi; Kodera, Tomohiro; Ogoyski, Alexandar

    2008-11-01

    In heavy ion inertial fusion (HIF) a robust mode of target implosion is proposed to mitigate the beam illumination non-uniformity and the Rayleigh-Taylor (R-T) instability growth. In the HIF target implosion, key issues include uniformity of heavy ion beam (HIB) illumination, target implosion symmetry, compressed fuel ignition, reduction of the R-T instability growth, etc [1]. In the robust target in HIF, an oscillating implosion acceleration is employed to reduce the R-T instability growth, and a low-density foam layer is also inserted to enhance the radiation conversion efficiency from. The oscillating acceleration can be introduced by HIB axis oscillation, which can be easily realized in an actual accelerator final element. The oscillating acceleration introduces a new method of the R-T instability growth control. In the robust foam target, the radiation converted is confined and reduces the HIB illumination non-uniformity, though the HIBs illumination scheme is spherically symmetric and the target is also spherically symmetric. Therefore, the foam target irradiated by the oscillating HIBs can serve a robust direct-indirect hybrid mode of the symmetric target implosion in HIF. [1] Phys. of Plasmas, 12 (2005) 122702; NIMA, 577 (2007) 21.

  2. Healing in the irradiated wound

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, S.H.; Rudolph, R. )

    1990-07-01

    Poor or nonhealing of irradiated wounds has been attributed to progressive obliterative endarteritis. Permanently damaged fibroblasts may also play an important part in poor healing. Regardless of the cause, the key to management of irradiated skin is careful attention to prevent its breakdown and conservative, but adequate, treatment when wounds are minor. When wounds become larger and are painful, complete excision of the wound or ulcer is called for and coverage should be provided by a well-vascularized nonparasitic distant flap.16 references.

  3. Modeling Solar Lyman Alpha Irradiance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pap, J.; Hudson, H. S.; Rottman, G. J.; Willson, R. C.; Donnelly, R. F.; London, J.

    1990-01-01

    Solar Lyman alpha irradiance is estimated from various solar indices using linear regression analyses. Models developed with multiple linear regression analysis, including daily values and 81-day running means of solar indices, predict reasonably well both the short- and long-term variations observed in Lyman alpha. It is shown that the full disk equivalent width of the He line at 1083 nm offers the best proxy for Lyman alpha, and that the total irradiance corrected for sunspot effect also has a high correlation with Lyman alpha.

  4. Death receptor pathways mediate targeted and non-targeted effects of ionizing radiations in breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Luce, Audrey; Courtin, Aurélie; Levalois, Céline; Altmeyer-Morel, Sandrine; Romeo, Paul-Henri; Lebeau, Jérôme

    2009-01-01

    Delayed cell death by mitotic catastrophe is a frequent mode of solid tumor cell death after γ-irradiation, a widely used treatment of cancer. Whereas the mechanisms that underlie the early γ-irradiation-induced cell death are well documented, those that drive the delayed cell death are largely unknown. Here we show that the Fas, tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α death receptor pathways mediate the delayed cell death observed after γ-irradiation of breast cancer cells. Early after irradiation, we observe the increased expression of Fas, TRAIL-R and TNF-R that first sensitizes cells to apoptosis. Later, the increased expression of FasL, TRAIL and TNF-α permit the apoptosis engagement linked to mitotic catastrophe. Treatments with TNF-α, TRAIL or anti-Fas antibody, early after radiation exposure, induce apoptosis, whereas the neutralization of the three death receptors pathways impairs the delayed cell death. We also show for the first time that irradiated breast cancer cells excrete soluble forms of the three ligands that can induce the death of sensitive bystander cells. Overall, these results define the molecular basis of the delayed cell death of irradiated cancer cells and identify the death receptors pathways as crucial actors in apoptosis induced by targeted as well as non-targeted effects of ionizing radiation. PMID:19126655

  5. Post Irradiation Capabilities at the Idaho National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Schulthess, J.L.

    2011-08-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) oversees the research, development, and demonstration activities that ensure nuclear energy remains a viable energy option for the United States. Fuel and material development through fabrication, irradiation, and characterization play a significant role in accomplishing the research needed to support nuclear energy. All fuel and material development requires the understanding of irradiation effects on the fuel performance and relies on irradiation experiments ranging from tests aimed at targeted scientific questions to integral effects under representative and prototypic conditions. The DOE recently emphasized a solution-driven, goal-oriented, science-based approach to nuclear energy development. Nuclear power systems and materials were initially developed during the latter half of the 20th century and greatly facilitated by the United States ability and willingness to conduct large-scale experiments. Fifty-two research and test reactors with associated facilities for performing fabrication and pre and post irradiation examinations were constructed at what is now Idaho National Laboratory (INL), another 14 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and a few more at other national laboratory sites. Building on the scientific advances of the last several decades, our understanding of fundamental nuclear science, improvements in computational platforms, and other tools now enable technological advancements with less reliance on large-scale experimentation.

  6. Post Irradiation Capabilities at the Idaho National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Schulthess, J.L.; Robert D. Mariani; Rory Kennedy; Doug Toomer

    2011-08-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) oversees the research, development, and demonstration activities that ensure nuclear energy remains a viable energy option for the United States. Fuel and material development through fabrication, irradiation, and characterization play a significant role in accomplishing the research needed to support nuclear energy. All fuel and material development requires the understanding of irradiation effects on the fuel performance and relies on irradiation experiments ranging from tests aimed at targeted scientific questions to integral effects under representative and prototypic conditions. The DOE recently emphasized a solution-driven, goal-oriented, science-based approach to nuclear energy development. Nuclear power systems and materials were initially developed during the latter half of the 20th century and greatly facilitated by the United States’ ability and willingness to conduct large-scale experiments. Fifty-two research and test reactors with associated facilities for performing fabrication and pre and post irradiation examinations were constructed at what is now Idaho National Laboratory (INL), another 14 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and a few more at other national laboratory sites. Building on the scientific advances of the last several decades, our understanding of fundamental nuclear science, improvements in computational platforms, and other tools now enable technological advancements with less reliance on large-scale experimentation.

  7. Irradiation of rainbow trout at early life stages results in trans-generational effects including the induction of a bystander effect in non-irradiated fish.

    PubMed

    Smith, Richard W; Seymour, Colin B; Moccia, Richard D; Mothersill, Carmel E

    2016-02-01

    The bystander effect, a non-targeted effect (NTE) of radiation, which describes the response by non-irradiated organisms to signals emitted by irradiated organisms, has been documented in a number of fish species. However transgenerational effects of radiation (including NTE) have yet to be studied in fish. Therefore rainbow trout, which were irradiated as eggs at 48h after fertilisation, eyed eggs, yolk sac larvae or first feeders, were bred to generate a F1 generation and these F1 fish were bred to generate a F2 generation. F1 and F2 fish were swam with non-irradiated bystander fish. Media from explants of F1 eyed eggs, F1 one year old fish gill and F1 two year old fish gill and spleen samples, and F2 two year old gill and spleen samples, as well as from bystander eggs/fish, was used to treat a reporter cell line, which was then assayed for changes in cellular survival/growth. The results were complex and dependent on irradiation history, age (in the case of the F1 generation), and were tissue specific. For example, irradiation of one parent often resulted in effects not seen with irradiation of both parents. This suggests that, unlike mammals, in certain circumstances maternal and paternal irradiation may be equally important. This study also showed that trout can induce a bystander effect 2 generations after irradiation, which further emphasises the importance of the bystander effect in aquatic radiobiology. Given the complex community structure in aquatic ecosystems, these results may have significant implications for environmental radiological protection.

  8. Irradiation of rainbow trout at early life stages results in trans-generational effects including the induction of a bystander effect in non-irradiated fish.

    PubMed

    Smith, Richard W; Seymour, Colin B; Moccia, Richard D; Mothersill, Carmel E

    2016-02-01

    The bystander effect, a non-targeted effect (NTE) of radiation, which describes the response by non-irradiated organisms to signals emitted by irradiated organisms, has been documented in a number of fish species. However transgenerational effects of radiation (including NTE) have yet to be studied in fish. Therefore rainbow trout, which were irradiated as eggs at 48h after fertilisation, eyed eggs, yolk sac larvae or first feeders, were bred to generate a F1 generation and these F1 fish were bred to generate a F2 generation. F1 and F2 fish were swam with non-irradiated bystander fish. Media from explants of F1 eyed eggs, F1 one year old fish gill and F1 two year old fish gill and spleen samples, and F2 two year old gill and spleen samples, as well as from bystander eggs/fish, was used to treat a reporter cell line, which was then assayed for changes in cellular survival/growth. The results were complex and dependent on irradiation history, age (in the case of the F1 generation), and were tissue specific. For example, irradiation of one parent often resulted in effects not seen with irradiation of both parents. This suggests that, unlike mammals, in certain circumstances maternal and paternal irradiation may be equally important. This study also showed that trout can induce a bystander effect 2 generations after irradiation, which further emphasises the importance of the bystander effect in aquatic radiobiology. Given the complex community structure in aquatic ecosystems, these results may have significant implications for environmental radiological protection. PMID:26618503

  9. Microstructural processes in irradiated materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byun, Thak Sang; Morgan, Dane; Jiao, Zhijie; Almer, Jonathan; Brown, Donald

    2016-04-01

    These proceedings contain the papers presented at two symposia, the Microstructural Processes in Irradiated Materials (MPIM) and Characterization of Nuclear Reactor Materials and Components with Neutron and Synchrotron Radiation, held in the TMS 2015, 144th Annual Meeting & Exhibition at Walt Disney World, Orlando, Florida, USA on March 15-19, 2015.

  10. Irradiation enhancement of biomass conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, G. S.; Kiesling, H. E.; Galyean, M. L.; Bader, J. R.

    The vast supply of cellulosic agricultural residues and industrial by-products that is produced each year is a prospective resource of biomass suitable for conversion to useful products such as feedstock for the chemicals industry and feedstuffs for the livestock industry. Conversions of such biomass is poor at present, and utilization is inefficient, because of physio-chemical barriers to biological degradation and (or) anti-quality components such as toxicants that restrict biological usages. Improvements in biodegradability of ligno-cellulosic materials have been accomplished by gamma-ray and electron-beam irradiation at intermediate dosage (˜ 50 Mrad; .5 MGy); but applications of the technology have been hampered by questionable interpretations of results. Recent research with organic wastes such as sewage sludge and straw suggests opportunity for important applications of irradiation technology in enhancement of biomass conversion. Data from experiments using irradiated straw as feed for ruminants are presented and discussed in relation to research on prospective usage of sewage products as feed for ruminants. Findings are discussed in regard to prospective applications in industrial fermentation processes. Possible usage of irradiation technology for destruction of toxicants in exotic plants is considered in regard to prospective new feedstuffs.

  11. Irradiance Variability of the Sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Froehlich, Claus

    1990-01-01

    Direct measurements of the solar constant--the total irradiance at mean Sun-Earth distance--during the last ten years from satellites show variations over time scales from minutes to years and decades. At high frequencies the spectral power is determined by granulation, super- and mesogranulation. In the 5-minute range, moreover, it is dominated by power from the solar p-mode oscillations. Their power and frequencies change with time, yielding information about changes in the convection zone. During periods of several hours, the power is steadily increasing and may be partly due to solar gravity modes. The most important variance is in the range from days to several months and is related to the photospheric features of solar activity, decrease of the irradiance during the appearance of sunspots, and increasing by faculae and the magnetic network. Long-term modulation by the 11-year activity cycle are observed conclusively with the irradiance being higher during solar maximum. All these variations can be explained--at least qualitatively--by their manifestation on the photosphere. For the long-term changes, the simultaneous changes of the frequencies of solar p-mode oscillations suggest a more global origin of the variations. Indeed, it seems that the observed irradiance modulation is a true luminosity change with the magnetic cycle of the Sun.

  12. Solar Spectral Irradiance and Climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pilewskie, P.; Woods, T.; Cahalan, R.

    2012-01-01

    Spectrally resolved solar irradiance is recognized as being increasingly important to improving our understanding of the manner in which the Sun influences climate. There is strong empirical evidence linking total solar irradiance to surface temperature trends - even though the Sun has likely made only a small contribution to the last half-century's global temperature anomaly - but the amplitudes cannot be explained by direct solar heating alone. The wavelength and height dependence of solar radiation deposition, for example, ozone absorption in the stratosphere, absorption in the ocean mixed layer, and water vapor absorption in the lower troposphere, contribute to the "top-down" and "bottom-up" mechanisms that have been proposed as possible amplifiers of the solar signal. New observations and models of solar spectral irradiance are needed to study these processes and to quantify their impacts on climate. Some of the most recent observations of solar spectral variability from the mid-ultraviolet to the near-infrared have revealed some unexpected behavior that was not anticipated prior to their measurement, based on an understanding from model reconstructions. The atmospheric response to the observed spectral variability, as quantified in climate model simulations, have revealed similarly surprising and in some cases, conflicting results. This talk will provide an overview on the state of our understanding of the spectrally resolved solar irradiance, its variability over many time scales, potential climate impacts, and finally, a discussion on what is required for improving our understanding of Sun-climate connections, including a look forward to future observations.

  13. Food Irradiation Research and Technology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Food Irradiation is a safe and effective U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved process that can be used to disinfest or delay the maturation of fruits and vegetables, improve the microbiological safety of shellfish, eggs, raw meat and poultry, spices, and seeds used for sprouting. FDA ap...

  14. Studying Solar Irradiance Variability with Wavelet Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vigouroux, Anne; Pap, Judit

    1995-01-01

    The detection of variations in solar irradiance by satellite-based experiments during the last 17 years stimulated modelling efforts to help to identify their causes and to provide estimates for irradiance data when no satellite observations exist.

  15. Statistical criteria for characterizing irradiance time series.

    SciTech Connect

    Stein, Joshua S.; Ellis, Abraham; Hansen, Clifford W.

    2010-10-01

    We propose and examine several statistical criteria for characterizing time series of solar irradiance. Time series of irradiance are used in analyses that seek to quantify the performance of photovoltaic (PV) power systems over time. Time series of irradiance are either measured or are simulated using models. Simulations of irradiance are often calibrated to or generated from statistics for observed irradiance and simulations are validated by comparing the simulation output to the observed irradiance. Criteria used in this comparison should derive from the context of the analyses in which the simulated irradiance is to be used. We examine three statistics that characterize time series and their use as criteria for comparing time series. We demonstrate these statistics using observed irradiance data recorded in August 2007 in Las Vegas, Nevada, and in June 2009 in Albuquerque, New Mexico.

  16. Ultrasonic Transducer Irradiation Test Results

    SciTech Connect

    Daw, Joshua; Palmer, Joe; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Keller, Paul; Montgomery, Robert; Chien, Hual-Te; Kohse, Gordon; Tittmann, Bernhard; Reinhardt, Brian; Rempe, Joy

    2015-02-01

    Ultrasonic technologies offer the potential for high-accuracy and -resolution in-pile measurement of a range of parameters, including geometry changes, temperature, crack initiation and growth, gas pressure and composition, and microstructural changes. Many Department of Energy-Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) programs are exploring the use of ultrasonic technologies to provide enhanced sensors for in-pile instrumentation during irradiation testing. For example, the ability of small diameter ultrasonic thermometers (UTs) to provide a temperature profile in candidate metallic and oxide fuel would provide much needed data for validating new fuel performance models. Other ongoing efforts include an ultrasonic technique to detect morphology changes (such as crack initiation and growth) and acoustic techniques to evaluate fission gas composition and pressure. These efforts are limited by the lack of identified ultrasonic transducer materials capable of long term performance under irradiation test conditions. For this reason, the Pennsylvania State University (PSU) was awarded an ATR NSUF project to evaluate the performance of promising magnetostrictive and piezoelectric transducers in the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Research Reactor (MITR) up to a fast fluence of at least 1021 n/cm2. The goal of this research is to characterize and demonstrate magnetostrictive and piezoelectric transducer operation during irradiation, enabling the development of novel radiation-tolerant ultrasonic sensors for use in Material Testing Reactors (MTRs). As such, this test is an instrumented lead test and real-time transducer performance data is collected along with temperature and neutron and gamma flux data. The current work bridges the gap between proven out-of-pile ultrasonic techniques and in-pile deployment of ultrasonic sensors by acquiring the data necessary to demonstrate the performance of ultrasonic transducers. To date, one piezoelectric

  17. Introduction to Radiobiology of Targeted Radionuclide Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Pouget, Jean-Pierre; Lozza, Catherine; Deshayes, Emmanuel; Boudousq, Vincent; Navarro-Teulon, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    During the last decades, new radionuclide-based targeted therapies have emerged as efficient tools for cancer treatment. Targeted radionuclide therapies (TRTs) are based on a multidisciplinary approach that involves the cooperation of specialists in several research fields. Among them, radiobiologists investigate the biological effects of ionizing radiation, specifically the molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in the radiation response. Most of the knowledge about radiation effects concerns external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) and radiobiology has then strongly contributed to the development of this therapeutic approach. Similarly, radiobiology and dosimetry are also assumed to be ways for improving TRT, in particular in the therapy of solid tumors, which are radioresistant. However, extrapolation of EBRT radiobiology to TRT is not straightforward. Indeed, the specific physical characteristics of TRT (heterogeneous and mixed irradiation, protracted exposure, and low absorbed dose rate) differ from those of conventional EBRT (homogeneous irradiation, short exposure, and high absorbed dose rate), and consequently the response of irradiated tissues might be different. Therefore, specific TRT radiobiology needs to be explored. Determining dose–effect correlation is also a prerequisite for rigorous preclinical radiobiology studies because dosimetry provides the necessary referential to all TRT situations. It is required too for developing patient-tailored TRT in the clinic in order to estimate the best dose for tumor control, while protecting the healthy tissues, thereby improving therapeutic efficacy. Finally, it will allow to determine the relative contribution of targeted effects (assumed to be dose-related) and non-targeted effects (assumed to be non-dose-related) of ionizing radiation. However, conversely to EBRT where it is routinely used, dosimetry is still challenging in TRT. Therefore, it constitutes with radiobiology, one of the main challenges of

  18. Targeted therapies for cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000902.htm Targeted therapies for cancer To use the sharing features on ... cells so they cannot spread. How Does Targeted Therapy Work? Targeted therapy drugs work in a few ...

  19. Biological effects of ultraviolet irradiation on bees

    SciTech Connect

    Es`kov, E.K.

    1995-09-01

    The influence of natural solar and artificial ultraviolet irradiation on developing bees was studied. Lethal exposures to irradiation at different stages of development were determined. The influence of irradiation on the variability of the morphometric features of bees was revealed. 5 refs., 1 fig.

  20. Schedule and status of irradiation experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Rowcliffe, A.F.; Grossbeck, M.L.

    1997-04-01

    To provide an updated summary of the status of irradiation experiments for the neutron-interactive materials program. The current status of reactor irradiation experiments is presented in tables summarizing the experimental objectives, conditions, and schedule. Currently, the program has two irradiation experiments in reactor; and 8 experiments in the planning or design stages. Postirradiation examination and testing is in progress on 18 experiments.

  1. Radiation induced cavitation: A possible phenomenon in liquid targets?

    SciTech Connect

    West, C.D.

    1998-07-01

    The proposed design of a new, short-pulse spallation neutron source includes a liquid mercury target irradiated with a 1 GeV proton beam. This paper explores the possibility that cavitation bubbles may be formed in the mercury and briefly discusses some design features that could avoid harmful effects should cavitation take place.

  2. Target Operational Experience at the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Riemer, Bernie; Janney, Jim G; Kaminskas, Saulius; McClintock, David A; Rosenblad, Peter M

    2013-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has operated at unprecedented power levels for a short-pulse spallation source. Target operations have been successful but not without difficulties. Three targets out of the eight used to date have ended life unexpectedly causing interruptions to the neutron science users. The first of a kind mercury target design experiences beam-pulse induced cavitation damage that is suspected in one of the target leaks. The two other targets suffered early failures due to defective welds. Diagnosing the causes of target leaks and understanding of the progression of cavitation erosion and radiation damage effects has made use of post-irradiation examination (PIE) capabilities. As a result of PIE, review of quality assurance practices and related investigations, design changes are being implemented and manufacturing oversight improved. This paper describes SNS target operating experience, including the more important observations and lessons learned.

  3. Scrotal irradiation in primary testicular lymphoma: review of the literature and in silico planning comparative study.

    PubMed

    Brouwer, Charlotte L; Wiesendanger, Esther M; van der Hulst, Peter C; van Imhoff, Gustaaf W; Langendijk, Johannes A; Beijert, Max

    2013-02-01

    We examined adjuvant irradiation of the scrotum in primary testicular lymphoma (PTL) by means of a literature review in MEDLINE, a telephone survey among Dutch institutes, and an in silico planning comparative study on scrotal irradiation in PTL. We did not find any uniform adjuvant irradiation technique assuring a safe planning target volume (PTV) coverage in published reports, and the definition of the clinical target volume is unclear. Histopathologic studies of PTL show a high invasion rate of the tunica albuginea, the epididymis, and the spermatic cord. In retrospective studies, a prescribed dose of at least 30 Gy involving the scrotum is associated with best survival. The majority of Dutch institutes irradiate the whole scrotum without using a planning computed tomography scan, with a single electron beam and a total dose of 30 Gy. The in silico planning comparative study showed that all evaluated approaches met a D(95%) scrotal dose of at least 85% of the prescription dose, without exceeding the dose limits of critical organs. Photon irradiation with 2 oblique beams using wedges resulted in the best PTV coverage, with a mean value of 95% of the prescribed dose, with lowest maximum dose. Adjuvant photon or electron irradiation of the whole scrotum including the contralateral testicle with a minimum dose of 30 Gy is recommended in PTL. Computed tomography-based radiation therapy treatment planning with proper patient positioning and position verification guarantees optimal dose coverage.

  4. Displacement rate and temperature equivalence in stochastic cluster dynamics simulations of irradiated pure α-Fe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunn, Aaron; Muntifering, Brittany; Dingreville, Rémi; Hattar, Khalid; Capolungo, Laurent

    2016-11-01

    Charged particle irradiation is a frequently used experimental tool to study damage accumulation in metals expected during neutron irradiation. Understanding the correspondence between displacement rate and temperature during such studies is one of several factors that must be taken into account in order to design experiments that produce equivalent damage accumulation to neutron damage conditions. In this study, spatially resolved stochastic cluster dynamics (SRSCD) is used to simulate damage evolution in α-Fe and find displacement rate/temperature pairs under 'target' and 'proxy' conditions for which the local distribution of vacancies and vacancy clusters is the same as a function of displacement damage. The SRSCD methodology is chosen for this study due to its computational efficiency and ability to simulate damage accumulation in spatially inhomogeneous materials such as thin films. Results are presented for Frenkel pair irradiation and displacement cascade damage in thin films and bulk α-Fe. Holding all other material and irradiation conditions constant, temperature adjustments are shown to successfully make up for changes in displacement rate such that defect concentrations and cluster sizes remain relatively constant. The methodology presented in this study allows for a first-order prediction of the temperature at which ion irradiation experiments ('proxy' conditions) should take place in order to approximate neutron irradiation ('target' conditions).

  5. Heating model for metals irradiated by a subpicosecond laser pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Chimier, B.; Tikhonchuk, V. T.; Hallo, L.

    2007-05-15

    We propose a model describing the heating and ablation of a metallic target irradiated by a subpicosecond laser pulse. It takes into account the temperature equilibration between the electrons and ions and the density variation of the target material during the heating process. A simple analytical equation of state is developed, which allows one to calculate the total pressure in the heated layer for different electron and ion temperatures. The thermodynamic behavior of a nonequilibrium system is discussed, and nonequilibrium spinodals and cohesion limits are introduced. The model is applied for a description of the thermal ablation process driven by a sub-ps laser pulse. Aluminum and copper targets are considered, and it is shown that the dominant ablation process is due to breaking the nonequilibrium cohesion limit. The numerical results are in good agreement with recent experimental data.

  6. Exogenous Nitric Oxide Suppresses in Vivo X-ray-Induced Targeted and Non-Targeted Effects in Zebrafish Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Kong, E.Y.; Yeung, W.K.; Chan, T.K.Y.; Cheng, S.H.; Yu, K.N.

    2016-01-01

    The present paper studied the X-ray-induced targeted effect in irradiated zebrafish embryos (Danio rerio), as well as a non-targeted effect in bystander naïve embryos partnered with irradiated embryos, and examined the influence of exogenous nitric oxide (NO) on these targeted and non-targeted effects. The exogenous NO was generated using an NO donor, S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP). The targeted and non-targeted effects, as well as the toxicity of the SNAP, were assessed using the number of apoptotic events in the zebrafish embryos at 24 h post fertilization (hpf) revealed through acridine orange (AO) staining. SNAP with concentrations of 20 and 100 µM were first confirmed to have no significant toxicity on zebrafish embryos. The targeted effect was mitigated in zebrafish embryos if they were pretreated with 100 µM SNAP prior to irradiation with an X-ray dose of 75 mGy but was not alleviated in zebrafish embryos if they were pretreated with 20 µM SNAP. On the other hand, the non-targeted effect was eliminated in the bystander naïve zebrafish embryos if they were pretreated with 20 or 100 µM SNAP prior to partnering with zebrafish embryos having been subjected to irradiation with an X-ray dose of 75 mGy. These findings revealed the importance of NO in the protection against damages induced by ionizing radiations or by radiation-induced bystander signals, and could have important impacts on development of advanced cancer treatment strategies. PMID:27529238

  7. Exogenous Nitric Oxide Suppresses in Vivo X-ray-Induced Targeted and Non-Targeted Effects in Zebrafish Embryos.

    PubMed

    Kong, E Y; Yeung, W K; Chan, T K Y; Cheng, S H; Yu, K N

    2016-01-01

    The present paper studied the X-ray-induced targeted effect in irradiated zebrafish embryos (Danio rerio), as well as a non-targeted effect in bystander naïve embryos partnered with irradiated embryos, and examined the influence of exogenous nitric oxide (NO) on these targeted and non-targeted effects. The exogenous NO was generated using an NO donor, S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP). The targeted and non-targeted effects, as well as the toxicity of the SNAP, were assessed using the number of apoptotic events in the zebrafish embryos at 24 h post fertilization (hpf) revealed through acridine orange (AO) staining. SNAP with concentrations of 20 and 100 µM were first confirmed to have no significant toxicity on zebrafish embryos. The targeted effect was mitigated in zebrafish embryos if they were pretreated with 100 µM SNAP prior to irradiation with an X-ray dose of 75 mGy but was not alleviated in zebrafish embryos if they were pretreated with 20 µM SNAP. On the other hand, the non-targeted effect was eliminated in the bystander naïve zebrafish embryos if they were pretreated with 20 or 100 µM SNAP prior to partnering with zebrafish embryos having been subjected to irradiation with an X-ray dose of 75 mGy. These findings revealed the importance of NO in the protection against damages induced by ionizing radiations or by radiation-induced bystander signals, and could have important impacts on development of advanced cancer treatment strategies. PMID:27529238

  8. Effect of free electron laser (FEL) irradiation on tooth dentine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogino, Seiji; Awazu, Kunio; Tomimasu, Takio

    1996-12-01

    Free electron laser (FEL) gives high efficiency for the photo-induced effects when the laser is tuned to the absorption maximum of target materials. The effect on dentine was investigated using the FEL tuned to 9.4 micrometers , which is an absorption maximum of phosphoric acid in infrared region. As a result, irradiated dentine surface which was amorphous had changed to the recrystalized structure by the spectroscopic analysis of IR absorption and x-ray diffraction. Furthermore, the atomic ratio of P/Ca had reduced from 0.65 to 0.60. These results indicated that 9.4micrometers -FEL irradiation caused the selective ablation of phosphoric acid ion and the reconstruction of disordered atoms.

  9. Diffusion under irradiation of rare earth elements in apatite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, P.; Chevarier, A.; Panczer, G.

    2000-02-01

    Nuclear waste ceramic forms among which the apatite, are under development as an alternative to waste glass in case of selective confinement. In that context, we studied the diffusion of lanthanide ions (La 3+, Eu 3+) in hydroxyapatite over a temperature range of storage interest, taking into account a possible enhanced diffusion due to irradiation effects. The lanthanide ions are introduced in apatite targets using ion implantation. The diffusion coefficients are deduced from Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS) at each step of annealing and irradiation procedure. Evidence of enhanced diffusion is shown and can be explained as a diffusion process governed by defect migration towards the surface. Time resolved laser-induced fluorescence measurements show that, during enhanced diffusion performed under vacuum, the europium ions substitute the calcium ions preferentially in Ca(I) hydroxyapatite sites.

  10. Gold Nanoparticles and Microwave Irradiation Inhibit Beta-Amyloid Amyloidogenesis

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Peptide-Gold nanoparticles selectively attached to β-amyloid protein (Aβ) amyloidogenic aggregates were irradiated with microwave. This treatment produces dramatic effects on the Aβ aggregates, inhibiting both the amyloidogenesis and the restoration of the amyloidogenic potential. This novel approach offers a new strategy to inhibit, locally and remotely, the amyloidogenic process, which could have application in Alzheimer’s disease therapy. We have studied the irradiation effect on the amyloidogenic process in the presence of conjugates peptide-nanoparticle by transmission electronic microscopy observations and by Thioflavine T assays to quantify the amount of fibrils in suspension. The amyloidogenic aggregates rather than the amyloid fibrils seem to be better targets for the treatment of the disease. Our results could contribute to the development of a new therapeutic strategy to inhibit the amyloidogenic process in Alzheimer’s disease.

  11. Gold Nanoparticles and Microwave Irradiation Inhibit Beta-Amyloid Amyloidogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araya, Eyleen; Olmedo, Ivonne; Bastus, Neus G.; Guerrero, Simón; Puntes, Víctor F.; Giralt, Ernest; Kogan, Marcelo J.

    2008-11-01

    Peptide-Gold nanoparticles selectively attached to β-amyloid protein (Aβ) amyloidogenic aggregates were irradiated with microwave. This treatment produces dramatic effects on the Aβ aggregates, inhibiting both the amyloidogenesis and the restoration of the amyloidogenic potential. This novel approach offers a new strategy to inhibit, locally and remotely, the amyloidogenic process, which could have application in Alzheimer’s disease therapy. We have studied the irradiation effect on the amyloidogenic process in the presence of conjugates peptide-nanoparticle by transmission electronic microscopy observations and by Thioflavine T assays to quantify the amount of fibrils in suspension. The amyloidogenic aggregates rather than the amyloid fibrils seem to be better targets for the treatment of the disease. Our results could contribute to the development of a new therapeutic strategy to inhibit the amyloidogenic process in Alzheimer’s disease.

  12. Production of No-Carrier Added Lutetium-177 by Irradiation of Enriched Ytterbium-176.

    PubMed

    Tarasov, Valery A; Andreev, Oleg I; Romanov, Evgeny G; Kuznetsov, Rostislav A; Kupriyanov, Vladimir V; Tselishchev, Ivan V

    2015-01-01

    Two methods of Lu-177 production are reviewed: irradiation of isotopically enriched Lu- 176 (direct way) and irradiation of ytterbium enriched with Yb-176 (indirect way). Based on neutronphysical calculations Lu-177 yield and specific activity were estimated for both methods. Lu-177 specific activity strongly depends on neutron flux density in the direct way, that is 75,000 Ci/g for 10- days irradiation in a neutron flux of 2.10(15) cm(-2) s(-1), and only 13,000 Ci/g after 30 days irradiation at neutron flux 1.10(14) cm(-2) s(-1). Irradiation of Yb-176 provides Lu-177 specific activity close to theoretical value (110,000 Ci/g). Neutron flux density effect Lu-177 yield, that is 530 Ci/g for 2.1015 cm(-2) s(-1) neutron flux density after 30 days irradiation. A procedure of isolation and purification of Lu-177 from irradiated targets is described based on combination of galvanostatic extraction of ytterbium followed by cation-exchange chromatography from alfa-hydroxyisobutirate solutions on BioRad AG(®)50W-X8 resin.

  13. Effect of microwave irradiation on TATB explosive.

    PubMed

    Yu, Weifei; Zhang, Tonglai; Huang, Yigang; Yang, Li; Li, Gang; Li, Haibo; Li, Jinshan; Huang, Hui

    2009-09-15

    Finished TATB (1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene) explosive safety under 800W microwave irradiation was experimented. No burning, deflagration and detonation were observed during 30-min continuous irradiation and no remarkable change were observed after irradiation according to HPLC, particles size analysis, and differential thermal analysis. Wet TATB sampled from synthesis line was irradiated with microwave vacuum method and irradiated TATB was measured to accord with military standard specifications including appearance, moisture and volatile, chloride content, HPLC, mean particle size, DTA exothermic peak, ash, acetone soluble content, PH value, etc. Microwave vacuum desiccation was deemed laborsaving, energy-efficient, and practicable compared to conventional processing method. PMID:19324496

  14. Effect of microwave irradiation on TATB explosive.

    PubMed

    Yu, Weifei; Zhang, Tonglai; Huang, Yigang; Yang, Li; Li, Gang; Li, Haibo; Li, Jinshan; Huang, Hui

    2009-09-15

    Finished TATB (1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene) explosive safety under 800W microwave irradiation was experimented. No burning, deflagration and detonation were observed during 30-min continuous irradiation and no remarkable change were observed after irradiation according to HPLC, particles size analysis, and differential thermal analysis. Wet TATB sampled from synthesis line was irradiated with microwave vacuum method and irradiated TATB was measured to accord with military standard specifications including appearance, moisture and volatile, chloride content, HPLC, mean particle size, DTA exothermic peak, ash, acetone soluble content, PH value, etc. Microwave vacuum desiccation was deemed laborsaving, energy-efficient, and practicable compared to conventional processing method.

  15. Modification of uterotropic effect of estrogens by whole-body gamma-irradiation.

    PubMed

    Bershtein, L M; Tsyrlina, E V; Poroshina, T E; Gamayunova, V B; Solntseva, O S; Kalinina, N M; Ivanov, S D; Kovalenko, I G; Vasil'ev, D A

    2001-08-01

    The effect of gamma-irradiation on the realization of the effects of estrogens was studied on rats treated with N-acetylcysteine, vitamins C and E, melatonin, and carnosine or subjected to forced swimming in a training mode. Irradiation (0.2 Gy) in combination with estrogens and without correction therapy induced genotoxic changes in the uterus, while irradiation in a higher dose (2 Gy) predominantly potentiated the hormonal effect of estrogens. Correction of the revealed abnormalities was achieved mainly with carnosine. The peculiarities of "estrogen toggle (re-targeting) effect" under the effect of gamma-irradiation and its elimination differed from those induced by ethanol intake or tobacco smoking, which is important for understanding the mechanisms of hormone-induced carcinogenesis.

  16. A local proton irradiation model for isotopic anomalies in the solar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, T.

    1978-01-01

    An attempt is made to explain the O-16 and Al-26 anomalies observed in solar-system bodies in the framework of a local irradiation model wherein a small amount of solar system matter of normal isotopic composition was irradiated by energetic protons from the primeval sun. Several isotopic constraints are summarized with which the model should be consistent, and a proton energy distribution and fluence and a target elemental composition are chosen such that the extraordinary component produced by irradiation satisfies the constraints. Detailed attention is given to the relevant oxygen reactions, Al-26 production, and effects of proton irradiation on isotopes of Mg, Ca, and Ba. A scenario is outlined which satisfies all the constraints. Consequences of the model are discussed with respect to the isotopic anomalies observed in Allende inclusions.

  17. Performance of HTGR biso- and triso-coated fertile particles irradiated in capsule HT-34

    SciTech Connect

    Long, E.L. Jr.; Tiegs, T.N.; Robbins, J.M.; Kania, M.J.

    1981-08-01

    Experiment HT-34, irradiated in the target region of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), was designed to correlate HTGR Biso- and Triso-coated particle performance with fabrication parameters. Gamma analysis of the irradiated Triso-coated ThO/sub 2/ particles showed that the SiC deposited at the highest coating rate apparently had the best cesium-retention properties. Results of a similar analysis of the irradiated Biso-coated ThO/sub 2/ particles showed no differences in performance that could be related to coating conditions, but all the particles showed a significant loss of cesium (> 50%) at the higher temperatures. Pressure-vessel failures occurred with a significant number of particles; however, fission-gas-content measurements made at room temperature showed that the intact Biso particles from all batches except one became permeable during irradiation.

  18. AGR 3/4 Irradiation Test Final As Run Report

    SciTech Connect

    Collin, Blaise P.

    2015-06-01

    Several fuel and material irradiation experiments have been planned for the Idaho National Laboratory Advanced Reactor Technologies Technology Development Office Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification Program (referred to as the INL ART TDO/AGR fuel program hereafter), which supports the development and qualification of tristructural-isotropic (TRISO) coated particle fuel for use in HTGRs. The goals of these experiments are to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, and provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination and safety testing (INL 05/2015). AGR-3/4 combined the third and fourth in this series of planned experiments to test TRISO coated low enriched uranium (LEU) oxycarbide fuel. This combined experiment was intended to support the refinement of fission product transport models and to assess the effects of sweep gas impurities on fuel performance and fission product transport by irradiating designed-to-fail fuel particles and by measuring subsequent fission metal transport in fuel-compact matrix material and fuel-element graphite. The AGR 3/4 fuel test was successful in irradiating the fuel compacts to the burnup and fast fluence target ranges, considering the experiment was terminated short of its initial 400 EFPD target (Collin 2015). Out of the 48 AGR-3/4 compacts, 42 achieved the specified burnup of at least 6% fissions per initial heavy-metal atom (FIMA). Three capsules had a maximum fuel compact average burnup < 10% FIMA, one more than originally specified, and the maximum fuel compact average burnup was <19% FIMA for the remaining capsules, as specified. Fast neutron fluence fell in the expected range of 1.0 to 5.5×1025 n/m2 (E >0.18 MeV) for all compacts. In addition, the AGR-3/4 experiment was globally successful in keeping the

  19. Design of YCF-1 mobile γ irradiator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hehu, Zhang; Chuanzhen, Wang

    1993-07-01

    YCF-1 Mobile irradiator is designed by BINE of China. It has been put into running in YanJi city of Jilin province. It is able to be moved to border and distance places and area lumped and spreading out of agricultural products to service. It can play a important role in demonstration and extending irradiation technology in food irradiation, disinfestation, sterilization and quarantine, etc. This paper describes the features and design considerations of mobile irradiator. This irradiator adopted Cesium-137 source. The design capacity of loading source is 9.25PBq (250kCi), A half-time of Cs- 137 is 30.2 years long, exchanging source is not needed utilization rate of energy is higher, and the shielding is thinner, The Weight is lighter, The dose rate on the surface of it is 0.0025mSv/h in accordance with national standard. The internal size of irradiation room is 1800×1800×900mm (L×W×H), The sheilding of irradiation room is a steel shell filled with lead. The thickness of lead is 18cm. The irradiator is installed on a special flat truck. The size of the truck is 7000×3400×4200mm (L×W×H). The weight of irradiator is more than 80 150kw. The main components and parts of irradiator are: source, source racks and hoist, irradiation chamber, storage source chamber, the product's transport system, dose monitoring system, ventilation system and safety interlock system, etc.

  20. Hepatobiliary kinetics after whole-body irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Durakovic, A.

    1986-09-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to study hepatobiliary kinetics after whole-body gamma irradiation. Two groups of nine male beagle dogs were irradiated with a single whole body dose of 4- and 8-Gy cobalt-60 photons. Each animal was injected with 2 mCi Tc-99m DISIDA and scintigraphic studies were obtained with a gamma camera with a parallel hole multipurpose collimator. The parameters studied included: peak activity of the liver and gall bladder and gall bladder and intestinal visualization from the time of Tc-99m DISIDA administration. Total and indirect bilirubin, LDH, SGOT, and SGPT determined as baseline studies before irradiation and at different time intervals after irradiation were not changed in irradiated animals. Whole body Co-60 irradiation with 4 and 8 Gy produced no significant changes in the Tc-99m DISIDA visualization of the gall bladder or in the peak activity in the gall bladder or the liver 1 and 7 days after irradiation. Intestinal visualization occurred significantly earlier in 8 Gy Co-60 irradiated animals on both day 1 and day 7 post irradiation, compared to baseline values where it was never observed before 195.0 minutes. Gall bladder emptying is significantly accelerated after 8 Gy but not after 4-Gy Co-60 gamma irradiation. These observations suggest that gamma irradiation stimulates gall bladder contractility without modifying intrahepatic biliary kinetics.

  1. Irradiation effects on hydrases for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furuta, Masakazu; Ohashi, Isao; Oka, Masahito; Hayashi, Toshio

    2000-03-01

    To apply an irradiation technique to sterilize "Hybrid" biomedical materials including enzymes, we selected papain, a well-characterized plant endopeptidase as a model to examine durability of enzyme activity under the practical irradiation condition in which limited data were available for irradiation inactivation of enzymes. Dry powder and frozen aqueous solution of papain showed significant durability against 60Co-gamma irradiation suggesting that, the commercial irradiation sterilizing method is applicable without modification. Although irradiation of unfrozen aqueous papain solution showed an unusual change of the enzymatic activity with the increasing doses, and was totally inactivated at 15 kGy, we managed to keep the residual activity more than 50% of initial activity after 30-kGy irradiation, taking such optimum conditions as increasing enzyme concentration from 10 to 100 mg/ml and purging with N 2 gas to suppress the formation of free radicals.

  2. Experimental Verification of Heavy Ion Irradiation Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Shengyun; Iwata, T.; Xu, Yongjun; Zheng, Yongnan; Zhou, Dongmei; Zhu, Jiazheng; Wang, Zhiqqiang; Yuan, Daqing; Du, Enpeng; Zuo, Yi

    The heavy ion irradiation simulation of neutron and/or proton irradiation has been verified experimentally by the detailed study of radiation damage in α-Al2O3 irradiated at the equivalent dose by 5.28×1015 cm-285 MeV 19F ions and by 3×1020 cm-2 En≥1MeV neutrons, respectively. The radiation damage created by irradiation was examined by a positron annihilation lifetime technique. The positron annihilation parameters of lifetime and intensity obtained for both irradiations in α-Al2O3 are all in good agreement. This demonstrates that the heavy ion irradiation can well simulate the neutron and/or proton irradiation.

  3. [Vitamin A in irradiated foodstuffs (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Diehl, J F

    1979-01-29

    Vitamin A losses induced by 10 MeV electrons in cream cheese, calf liver sausage, pig liver, whole egg powder and margarine continued to increase during storage for 4--8 weeks in presence of air. Thus vitamin A loss in sausage irradiated with 5 Mrad was 22% on the day after irradiation, 61% after 4 weeks. Irradiation and storage at 0 degrees C instead of at ambient temperature reduced these losses considerably. Exclusion of air (vacuum, nitrogen) or irradiation on dry ice (approx. -80 degrees C) were even more effective in preventing destruction of vitamin A. After 4 weeks of storage, cream cheese irradiated at 5 Mrad had lost 60% when irradiated and stored in air at ambient temperature, 20% in nitrogen atmosphere, 5% in vacuum package, and 5% when irradiated on dry ice and stored at ambient temperature.

  4. Color formation in irradiated polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clough, R. L.; Gillen, K. T.; Malone, G. M.; Wallace, J. S.

    1996-11-01

    Discoloration is a problem in the radiation processing of polymers (such as radiation sterilization), and also in emerging applications in which optical-property materials are used in radiation environments (such as scintillation detectors). We have completed a survey of 17 different types of optical polymers, in which it is found that these materials form both permanent and annealable color centers, but in very different magnitudes and ratios. Optical absorption spectra of irradiated polymers both immediately after irradiation and following different time periods of annealing are provided. Also provided are tables showing rank ordering of the relative resistance of different polymer types to induced discoloration. It is found that the extent of radiation-induced discoloration of polymers has little or no dependence on whether the macromolecule is aromatic or aliphatic, and shows no correlation with the relative extent of radiation-induced mechanical property change. Examples of the influence of stabilizer additives on the extent of discoloration are discussed.

  5. Mobile gamma-irradiation robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teply, J.; Franek, C.; Vocilka, J.; Stetka, R.; Vins, J.; Krotil, J.; Garba, A.

    1993-07-01

    The source container with 98 TBq of 137Cs and shielding made from depleted uranium has the total weight of 264 kg, height of 0.370 and diameter 0.272 m. The container is joined to accessories allowing movment of the radiation beam. The dose rate at a distance of 0.4 m in the beam axis is 50 Gy/h. Various technical means are available for manipulation and transport. The irradiation process proceeds according to a precalculated program. The safety measures have been taken to secure the possible application in historical buildings and similar objects. The licence from health physics authorities has been obtained. The first irradiation process performed is described.

  6. GTL-1 Irradiation Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    D. M. Perez; G. S. Chang; N. E. Woolstenhulme; D. M. Wachs

    2012-01-01

    The primary objective of the Gas Test Loop (GTL-1) miniplate experiment is to confirm acceptable performance of high-density (i.e., 4.8 g-U/cm3) U3Si2/Al dispersion fuel plates clad in Al-6061 and irradiated under the relatively aggressive Booster Fast Flux Loop (BFFL) booster fuel conditions, namely a peak plate surface heat flux of 450 W/cm2. As secondary objectives, several design and fabrication variations were included in the test matrix that may have the potential to improve the high-heat flux, high-temperature performance of the base fuel plate design.1, 2 The following report summarizes the life of the GTL-1 experiment through end of irradiation, including as-run neutronic analysis, thermal analysis and hydraulic testing results.

  7. Proton Irradiation Creep in Pyrocarbon

    SciTech Connect

    Was, Gary S.; Campbell, Anne

    2011-10-01

    This project aims to understand irradiation creep in pyrocarbon using proton irradiation under controlled stresses and temperatures. Experiments will be conducted over a range of temperatures and stresses per the proposal submitted. The work scope will include the preparation of samples, measurement of deposition thickness, thickness uniformity, and anisotropy. The samples produced will be made in strips, which will be used for the creep experiments. Materials used will include pyrolytic carbon (PyC), Highly Oriented Pyrolytic Graphite (HOPG), or graphite strip samples in that order depending upon success. Temperatures tested under will range from 800°C to 1200°C, and stresses from 6MPa to 20.7MPa. Optional testing may occur at 900°C and 1100°C and stresses from 6MPa to 20.7MPa if funding is available.

  8. Food irradiation development in Pakistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, I.

    The large scale trials were held to extend the storage life of potatoes, onions and dry fruits by gamma radiation. It was concluded that radiation preservation of potatoes and onions was much cheaper as compared to conventional methods. A dose of 1 kGy can control the insects in dry fruits and nuts. The consumers' acceptability and market testing performed during the last four years are also conducive to the commercialization of the technology in this country. The Government of Pakistan has accorded clearance for the irradiation of some food items like potatoes, onions, garlic and spices for human consumption. The Pakistan Radiation Services (PARAS), the commercial irradiator (200 Kci) at Lahore, has already started functioning in April, 1987. It is planned to start large scale sterilization of spices by gamma radiation in PARAS shortly.

  9. Spectrophotometric analysis of irradiated spices.

    PubMed

    Josimović, L; Cudina, I

    1987-01-01

    Seven different spices (thyme, cinnamon, coriander, caraway, pimento, paprika, black pepper) were treated by gamma radiation at an absorbed dose of 10 kGy, and the effect on chemical quality was determined. The effects of this dose were assessed by spectrophotometric analysis of some water-soluble constituents of spices (carbohydrates; carbonyl compounds) and on the content of water-insoluble steam-volatile oils. The colour of paprika and the content of piperine in pepper held in different packaging materials were measured in unirradiated and irradiated samples as a function of storage time. In all cases irradiation does not bring about any distinct qualitative or quantitative chemical changes based on spectrophotometric analysis of spice extracts.

  10. Thermal effects in tissues induced by interstitial irradiation of near infrared laser with a cylindrical diffuser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Kelvin; Johsi, Chet; Figueroa, Daniel; Goddard, Jessica; Li, Xiaosong; Towner, Rheal A.; Saunders, Debra; Smith, Nataliya; Liu, Hong; Hode, Tomas; Nordquist, Robert E.; Chen, Wei R.

    2011-03-01

    Laser immunotherapy (LIT), using non-invasive laser irradiation, has resulted in promising outcomes in the treatment of late-stage cancer patients. However, the tissue absorption of laser light limits the clinical applications of LIT in patients with dark skin, or with deep tumors. The present study is designed to investigate the thermal effects of interstitial irradiation using an 805-nm laser with a cylindrical diffuser, in order to overcome the limitations of the non-invasive mode of treatment. Cow liver and rat tumors were irradiated using interstitial fiber. The temperature increase was monitored by thermocouples that were inserted into the tissue at different sites around the cylinder fiber. Three-dimensional temperature distribution in target tissues during and after interstitial laser irradiation was also determined by Proton Resonance Frequency. The preliminary results showed that the output power of laser and the optical parameters of the target tissue determined the light distribution in the tissue. The temperature distributions varied in the tissue according to the locations relative to the active tip of the cylindrical diffuser. The temperature increase is strongly related to the laser power and irradiation time. Our results using thermocouples and optical sensors indicated that the PRF method is reliable and accurate for temperature determination. Although the inhomogeneous biological tissues could result in temperature fluctuation, the temperature trend still can be reliable enough for the guidance of interstitial irradiation. While this study provides temperature profiles in tumor tissue during interstitial irradiation, the biological effects of the irradiation remain unclear. Future studies will be needed, particularly in combination with the application of immunostimulant for inducing tumor-specific immune responses in the treatment of metastatic tumors.

  11. RERTR-13 Irradiation Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    D. M. Perez; M. A. Lillo; G. S. Chang; D. M. Wachs; G. A. Roth; N. E. Woolstenhulme

    2012-09-01

    The Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) experiment RERTR-13 was designed to assess performance of different types of neutron absorbers that can be potentially used as burnable poisons in the low enriched uranium-molybdenum based dispersion and monolithic fuels.1 The following report summarizes the life of the RERTR-13 experiment through end of irradiation, including as-run neutronic analysis results, thermal analysis results and hydraulic testing results.

  12. Radical Irradiation of Extracranial Oligometastases

    PubMed Central

    Salama, Joseph K.; Milano, Michael T.

    2014-01-01

    Advances in radiotherapy planning and delivery have been used to treat patients with limited metastatic disease. With these techniques, high rates of treated metastasis control and low toxicity have been reported. Some patients have long disease-free intervals after radiotherapy similar to those seen after surgical resection. Ongoing studies will determine the benefit of these irradiation techniques to treat limited metastases, identify appropriate candidates, and assist in integrating these treatments into management strategies for specific diseases. PMID:25113765

  13. RERTR-8 Irradiation Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    D. M. Perez; M. A. Lillo; G. S. Chang; G. A. Roth; N. E. Woolstenhulme; D. M. Wachs

    2011-12-01

    The Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) experiment RERTR-8, was designed to test monolithic mini-fuel plates fabricated via hot isostatic pressing (HIP), the effect of molybdenum (Mo) content on the monolithic fuel behavior, and the efficiency of ternary additions to dispersion fuel particles on the interaction layer behavior at higher burnup. The following report summarizes the life of the RERTR-8 experiment through end of irradiation, including as-run neutronic analysis, thermal analysis and hydraulic testing results.

  14. Microstructure evolution in irradiated materials

    SciTech Connect

    Caturla, M

    1999-11-30

    Study the interaction of defects produced during irradiation or deformation of a metal with the microstructure of that particular material, such as dislocations and grain boundaries. In particular we will study the interaction of dislocation with interstitial loops and stacking fault tetrahedral, and the production of displacement cascades close to dislocations and grain boundaries. The data obtained from these simulations will be used as input to diffusion models and dislocation dynamics models.

  15. Integration of optical imaging with a small animal irradiator

    SciTech Connect

    Weersink, Robert A.; Ansell, Steve; Wang, An; Wilson, Graham; Shah, Duoaud; Lindsay, Patricia E.; Jaffray, David A.

    2014-10-15

    Purpose: The authors describe the integration of optical imaging with a targeted small animal irradiator device, focusing on design, instrumentation, 2D to 3D image registration, 2D targeting, and the accuracy of recovering and mapping the optical signal to a 3D surface generated from the cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging. The integration of optical imaging will improve targeting of the radiation treatment and offer longitudinal tracking of tumor response of small animal models treated using the system. Methods: The existing image-guided small animal irradiator consists of a variable kilovolt (peak) x-ray tube mounted opposite an aSi flat panel detector, both mounted on a c-arm gantry. The tube is used for both CBCT imaging and targeted irradiation. The optical component employs a CCD camera perpendicular to the x-ray treatment/imaging axis with a computer controlled filter for spectral decomposition. Multiple optical images can be acquired at any angle as the gantry rotates. The optical to CBCT registration, which uses a standard pinhole camera model, was modeled and tested using phantoms with markers visible in both optical and CBCT images. Optically guided 2D targeting in the anterior/posterior direction was tested on an anthropomorphic mouse phantom with embedded light sources. The accuracy of the mapping of optical signal to the CBCT surface was tested using the same mouse phantom. A surface mesh of the phantom was generated based on the CBCT image and optical intensities projected onto the surface. The measured surface intensity was compared to calculated surface for a point source at the actual source position. The point-source position was also optimized to provide the closest match between measured and calculated intensities, and the distance between the optimized and actual source positions was then calculated. This process was repeated for multiple wavelengths and sources. Results: The optical to CBCT registration error was 0.8 mm. Two

  16. Effects of weak electromagnetic irradiation on various types of behavior in the mealworm Tenebrio molitor.

    PubMed

    Sheiman, I M; Kreshchenko, N D

    2010-10-01

    The effects of weak electromagnetic irradiation on simple forms of behavior were studied using adult Tenebrio molitor mealworms. The beetles' motor behavior was studied in conditions of different motivations, i.e., positive (food) and negative (avoidance of light), in otherwise identical experimental conditions. The beetles had to navigate a defined space to reach their target - potato or cover from light. Experiments consisted of one trial per day for five days. Target attainment time was measured in groups of beetles. Behavior in both cases developed as follows: an initial orientation reaction appeared and was followed by adaptation to the apparatus. Exposure to weak electromagnetic irradiation led to increases in the response time at the initial stages of the experiments. The effects of irradiation were seasonal in nature and differed in the two types of behavior. PMID:20680476

  17. Irradiation performance of nitride fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, R.B.

    1993-01-01

    The properties and advantages of nitride fuels are well documented in the literature. Basically the high thermal conductivity and uranium density of nitride fuels permit high power density, good breeding ratios, low reactivity swings, and large diameter pins compared to oxides. Nitrides are compatible with cladding alloys and liquid metal coolants, thereby reducing fuel/cladding chemical interactions and permitting the use of sodium-bonded pins and the operation of breached pins. Recent analyses done under similar operating conditions show that - compared to metal - fuels mixed nitrides operate at lower temperatures, produce less cladding strain, have greater margins to failure, result in lower transient temperatures, and have lower sodium void reactivity. Uranium nitride fuel pellet fabrication processes were demonstrated during the SP-100 program, and irradiated nitride fuels can be reprocessed by the PUREX process. Irradiation performance data suggest that nitrides have low fission gas release and swelling rates thereby permitting favorable pin designs and long lifetime. The objective of this report is to summarize the available nitride irradiation performance data base and to recommend optimum nitride characteristics for use in advanced liquid metal reactors.

  18. Experience with IPNS targets

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, J.M.; Hins, A.G.

    1993-12-31

    Three targets have operated in the IPNS Neutron Scattering Facility. The first, a depleted Uranium target, served from 1981 until it was replaced in 1988 by the Enriched Uranium Booster Target. The Booster Target had operated for nearly three years when it suffered a cladding leak and was replaced with the retired depleted Uranium target. That target reached its end-of-life after less than one year`s further operation, and was replaced with an identical one newly assembled from spare components, which is still operating satisfactorily. This paper reviews the operating history of the IPNS targets and the findings reached during analysis of the failures. Similarities with ISIS target experience, preliminary conclusions and plans for providing spares and improved targets are discussed. We present some preliminary results from the hot cell examination of the failed depleted Uranium target.

  19. Electrically charged targets

    DOEpatents

    Goodman, Ronald K.; Hunt, Angus L.

    1984-01-01

    Electrically chargeable laser targets and method for forming such charged targets in order to improve their guidance along a predetermined desired trajectory. This is accomplished by the incorporation of a small amount of an additive to the target material which will increase the electrical conductivity thereof, and thereby enhance the charge placed upon the target material for guidance thereof by electrostatic or magnetic steering mechanisms, without adversely affecting the target when illuminated by laser energy.

  20. Polarized internal target apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Holt, Roy J.

    1986-01-01

    A polarized internal target apparatus with a polarized gas target of improved polarization and density achieved by mixing target gas atoms with a small amount of alkali metal gas atoms, and passing a high intensity polarized light source into the mixture to cause the alkali metal gas atoms to become polarized which interact in spin exchange collisions with target gas atoms yielding polarized target gas atoms.

  1. Polarized internal target apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Holt, R.J.

    1984-10-10

    A polarized internal target apparatus with a polarized gas target of improved polarization and density (achieved by mixing target gas atoms with a small amount of alkali metal gas atoms, and passing a high intensity polarized light source into the mixture to cause the alkali metal gas atoms to become polarized which interact in spin exchange collisions with target gas atoms yielding polarized target gas atoms) is described.

  2. Segmented photon beams technique for irradiation of postmastectomy patients

    PubMed Central

    Semaniak, Anna; Jodkiewicz, Zbigniew; Skowrońska-Gardas, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Aim To present the segmented photon beams technique (SPBT) for irradiation of postmastectomy patients. Background In majority of techniques for irradiation of posmastectomy patients, a few adjacent photon or electron beams were usually implemented in order to encompass different parts of the target. In the presented SPBT technique, the radiotherapy plan consists of 6 isocentric photon beams and the area CTV includes both the chest wall and the supraclavicular area. This makes it possible to provide a uniform dose to the CTV with no hot and cold points and enables the determination of doses for the entire volume of critical organs. Methods and material The treatment forward-IMRT plan comprises six isocentric 4 and 15 MV photon beams. Modulation of the dose distribution for each field was obtained by applying three segments on average. The total dose of 45 Gy was administered in 20 fractions. Dose distributions in target volume and organs at risk were evaluated for 70 randomly chosen patients. Results On average, 94.8% of the CTV volume received doses within 95–107% of the prescribed dose. The average volume of the heart receiving a dose of 30 Gy and lager was 2% for patients with left breast cancer. The average dose to the lung on the irradiation side was always lower than 15.5 Gy and the average V20 Gy was below 35.5%. Conclusions The SPBT complies with requirements for high dose homogeneity within the target volume and satisfactory level of sparing of organs at risk. PMID:24377005

  3. ECRIX-H experiment: Synthesis of post-irradiation examinations and simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Béjaoui, S.; Lamontagne, J.; Esbelin, E.; Bonnerot, J. M.; Brunon, E.; Bourdot, P.

    2011-08-01

    The purpose of the ECRIX-H experiment is to study the behaviour of a composite ceramic target made of AmO 1.62 microdispersed in an MgO matrix irradiated for 318 EFPD in the Phenix sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR), in a specific carrier sub-assembly equipped with annular blocks of CaH x acting as a neutron moderator. Results indicate that magnesia-based inert matrix targets display satisfactory behaviour and moderate swelling under irradiation, even for significant quantities of helium produced and a high burn-up. On this basis, the design of transmutation fuel pins for recycling of minor actinides (MA) in accelerator-driven systems (ADS) or in fast neutron reactors (FR) could be optimised so as to increase their performance level (initial MA content, burn-up, etc.). The measured Am fission rate (25 at.%) was found to be lower than that predicted by neutronic simulations probably due to the inaccuracies linked to the complexity of neutron modelling and the uncertainties on nuclear data related to moderated neutron spectrum. In addition, as most of the initial Am transmuted into Pu under irradiation, a PuO x-type phase was created within the initial AmO 1.62 particles, leading to the incomplete dissolution of the irradiated targets under standard reprocessing conditions. This issue will have to be considered and investigated in greater detail for all transmutation fuels and targets devoted to the multi-recycling of MA.

  4. Characterization and identification of gamma-irradiated sauces by electron spin resonance spectroscopy using different sample pretreatments.

    PubMed

    Akram, Kashif; Ahn, Jae-Jun; Kwon, Joong-Ho

    2013-06-01

    Tomato ketchup, barbeque sauce, sweet chili sauce, and spaghetti sauce were gamma irradiated at 0, 1, 5, and 10 kGy. Electron spin resonance (ESR) technique was used to characterize the irradiated sauces, targeting radiation-induced cellulose radicals and using a modified sample pretreatment method. The samples were first washed with water, and then the residues were extracted with alcohol. The non-irradiated sauces exhibited the single central signal, whose intensity showed a significant increase on irradiation. The ESR spectra from the radiation-induced cellulose radicals, with two side peaks (g=2.02012 and g=1.98516) equally spaced (± 3 mT) from the central signal, were also observed in the irradiated sauces. The improvements in the central (natural) and radiation-induced (two side peaks corresponding to the cellulose radicals) signal intensities were obvious, when compared with routine freeze-drying and alcoholic-extraction techniques. PMID:23411320

  5. Production of (211)At by a vertical beam irradiation method.

    PubMed

    Nagatsu, Kotaro; Minegishi, Katsuyuki; Fukada, Masami; Suzuki, Hisashi; Hasegawa, Sumitaka; Zhang, Ming-Rong

    2014-12-01

    We produced (211)At by irradiating the semi-sealed encapsulated Bi target with an external vertical beam. At 28.5MeV, the yield of (211)At was 22MBq/μAh (600μCi/μAh). (211)At was recovered by dry distillation, and 80% of the produced (211)At was successfully obtained in dry Na(211)At form within 2h from the end of bombardment (EOB). The radionuclidic purity of (211)At was >99% at 5h from EOB. PMID:25439168

  6. Production of (211)At by a vertical beam irradiation method.

    PubMed

    Nagatsu, Kotaro; Minegishi, Katsuyuki; Fukada, Masami; Suzuki, Hisashi; Hasegawa, Sumitaka; Zhang, Ming-Rong

    2014-12-01

    We produced (211)At by irradiating the semi-sealed encapsulated Bi target with an external vertical beam. At 28.5MeV, the yield of (211)At was 22MBq/μAh (600μCi/μAh). (211)At was recovered by dry distillation, and 80% of the produced (211)At was successfully obtained in dry Na(211)At form within 2h from the end of bombardment (EOB). The radionuclidic purity of (211)At was >99% at 5h from EOB.

  7. Consequences of electroplated targets on radiopharmaceutical preparations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finn, R. D.; Tirelli, S.; Sheh, Y.; Knott, A.; Gelbard, A. S.; Larson, S. M.; Dahl, J. R.

    1991-05-01

    The staff of the cyclotron facility at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center is involved in a comprehensive radionuclide preparation program which culminates with the formulation of numerous requested short-lived, positron-emitting radiopharmaceutical agents for clinical investigation. Both the produced radionuclide as well as the final radiolabeled compound are subjected to stringent quality control standards including assays for radiochemical and chemical purity. The subtle chemical consequences resulting from the irradiation of a nickel-plated target for 13N production serve to emphasize some of these potential technical difficulties.

  8. Target motion detecting impulse Doppler radar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jehle, Robert E.; Hudson, David F.

    1992-03-01

    Radiant energy intermittently emitted from a transmitter is reflected as echo pulses from a moving target being interrogated to produce Doppler signals by counting of photons of the echo pulses during time domain intervals between emission from the transmitter. Such counting of photons is limited to the time domain intervals by operational control of a laser pump through which a reference beam is generated at an energy level activating detectors irradiated by such beam to count the photons absorbed therein after capture of the photons by a receiving antenna.

  9. Target motion detecting impulse Doppler radar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jehle, Robert E.; Hudson, David F.

    1993-06-01

    Radiant energy intermittently emitted from a transmitter is reflected as echo pulses from a moving target being interrogated to produce Doppler signals by counting of photons of the echo pulses during time domain intervals between emission from the transmitter. Such counting of photons is limited to the time domain intervals by operational control of a laser pump through which a reference beam is generated at an energy level activating detectors irradiated by such beam to count the photons absorbed therein after capture or the photons by a receiving antenna.

  10. Characteristics of W-26% Re Target Material(LCC-0103)

    SciTech Connect

    Sunwoo, A.

    2003-10-07

    The W-26 wt-% Re alloy was selected as a Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) target material for its exceptional physics properties and for the high strength and good ductility at the anticipated target operating temperatures, above the DBTT. After several years of operation, the target failed catastrophically. A detailed microstructural and mechanical characterization of the non-irradiated disk indicates that the material has been PM processed, nonuniformly mechanically worked and stress relieved. As a result, the ductility of the material varies through the thickness of the disk, making it difficult to determine the DBTT. The results of tensile and fatigue properties are reported with the corresponding fractography of the fracture surfaces.

  11. Reflectance Spectra of CM2 Chondrite Mighei Irradiated with Pulsed Laser and Implications for Low-Albedo Asteroids and Martian Moons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moroz, L. V.; Hiroi, T.; Shingareva, T. V.; Basilevsky, A. T.; Fisenko, A. V.; Semjonova, L. F.; Pieters, C. M.

    2004-01-01

    Micrometeoritic bombardment is an important space weathering process modifying surface optical properties of airless solar system bodies. We have used irradiation with a microsecond pulsed laser as an experimental method to simulate such a process on various targets. The experiment discussed here was performed on a powdered sample of CM2 carbonaceous chondrite Mighei. Shingareva et al. report the details of experimental procedure as well as the results of mineralogical and chemical studies of the irradiated material. Here we present reflectance spectra of irradiated Mighei samples and discuss their spectral properties compared to those of non-irradiated meteorite and low-albedo small solar system bodies.

  12. Magnetically attached sputter targets

    DOEpatents

    Makowiecki, D.M.; McKernan, M.A.

    1994-02-15

    An improved method and assembly for attaching sputtering targets to cathode assemblies of sputtering systems which includes a magnetically permeable material is described. The magnetically permeable material is imbedded in a target base that is brazed, welded, or soldered to the sputter target, or is mechanically retained in the target material. Target attachment to the cathode is achieved by virtue of the permanent magnets and/or the pole pieces in the cathode assembly that create magnetic flux lines adjacent to the backing plate, which strongly attract the magnetically permeable material in the target assembly. 11 figures.

  13. Magnetically attached sputter targets

    DOEpatents

    Makowiecki, Daniel M.; McKernan, Mark A.

    1994-01-01

    An improved method and assembly for attaching sputtering targets to cathode assemblies of sputtering systems which includes a magnetically permeable material. The magnetically permeable material is imbedded in a target base that is brazed, welded, or soldered to the sputter target, or is mechanically retained in the target material. Target attachment to the cathode is achieved by virtue of the permanent magnets and/or the pole pieces in the cathode assembly that create magnetic flux lines adjacent to the backing plate, which strongly attract the magnetically permeable material in the target assembly.

  14. Magnetic Resonance Lymphography-Guided Selective High-Dose Lymph Node Irradiation in Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Meijer, Hanneke J.M.; Debats, Oscar A.; Kunze-Busch, Martina; Kollenburg, Peter van; Leer, Jan Willem; Witjes, J. Alfred; Kaanders, Johannes H.A.M.; Barentsz, Jelle O.; Lin, Emile N.J.Th. van

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate the feasibility of magnetic resonance lymphography (MRL) -guided delineation of a boost volume and an elective target volume for pelvic lymph node irradiation in patients with prostate cancer. The feasibility of irradiating these volumes with a high-dose boost to the MRL-positive lymph nodes in conjunction with irradiation of the prostate using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) was also investigated. Methods and Materials: In 4 prostate cancer patients with a high risk of lymph node involvement but no enlarged lymph nodes on CT and/or MRI, MRL detected pathological lymph nodes in the pelvis. These lymph nodes were identified and delineated on a radiotherapy planning CT to create a boost volume. Based on the location of the MRL-positive lymph nodes, the standard elective pelvic target volume was individualized. An IMRT plan with a simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) was created with dose prescriptions of 42 Gy to the pelvic target volume, a boost to 60 Gy to the MRL-positive lymph nodes, and 72 Gy to the prostate. Results: All MRL-positive lymph nodes could be identified on the planning CT. This information could be used to delineate a boost volume and to individualize the pelvic target volume for elective irradiation. IMRT planning delivered highly acceptable radiotherapy plans with regard to the prescribed dose levels and the dose to the organs at risk (OARs). Conclusion: MRL can be used to select patients with limited lymph node involvement for pelvic radiotherapy. MRL-guided delineation of a boost volume and an elective pelvic target volume for selective high-dose lymph node irradiation with IMRT is feasible. Whether this approach will result in improved outcome for these patients needs to be investigated in further clinical studies.

  15. Oxidative decomposition of aromatic hydrocarbons by electron beam irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Do-Hung; Stuchinskaya, Tatiana; Won, Yang-Soo; Park, Wan-Sik; Lim, Jae-Kyong

    2003-05-01

    Decomposition of aromatic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) under electron beam irradiation was studied in order to examine the kinetics of the process, to characterize the reaction product distribution and to develop a process of waste gas control technology. Toluene, ethylbenzene, o-, m-, p-xylenes and chlorobenzene were used as target materials. The experiments were carried out at doses ranging from 0.5 to 10 kGy, using a flow reactor utilized under electron beam irradiation. Maximum degrees of decomposition carried out at 10 kGy in air environment were 55-65% for “non-chlorinated” aromatic VOC and 85% for chlorobenzene. It was found that a combination of aromatic pollutants with chlorobenzene would considerably increase the degradation value up to nearly 50% compared to the same compounds in the absence of chlorine groups. Based on our experimental observation, the degradation mechanism of the aromatic compounds combined with chloro-compound suggests that a chlorine radical, formed from EB irradiation, induces a chain reaction, resulting in an accelerating oxidative destruction of aromatic VOCs.

  16. Delocalized Plastic Flow in Proton-Irradiated Monolithic Metallic Glasses

    PubMed Central

    Heo, Jaewon; Kim, Sunghwan; Ryu, Seunghwa; Jang, Dongchan

    2016-01-01

    Creating new materials with novel properties through structural modification is the Holy Grail of materials science. The range of targetable structures for amplification of mechanical properties in metallic glasses would include types of atomic short range orders at the smallest scale through compositions or morphologies of phases in composites. Even though the usefulness of the latter approach has been successfully demonstrated in the past decades, the feasibility of the former has been incompletely proved with only marginal property improvements reported within experimentally-accessible atomic-level structural changes. Here, we report the significant enhancement of deformability in Zr-based monolithic metallic glass only through the atomic disordering by proton irradiation without altering any other structural traits. Metallic glass nanopillars that originally failed catastrophically without any notable plasticity become capable of attaining more than 30% uniaxial plastic strain accommodated by homogeneous deformation when irradiated to ~1 displacement per atom (DPA). We discuss the atomistic origin of this improved plasticity in terms of density and spatial distributions of icosahedral short range order influenced by irradiation. PMID:26988265

  17. Irradiation preservation of seafood: Literature review

    SciTech Connect

    Molton, P.M.

    1987-10-01

    The application of gamma-irradiation for extending the shelf life of seafood has been of interest for many years. This report reviews a number of studies on seafood irradiation conducted over the past several years. Topics covered include seafood irradiation techniques and dosages, species applicability and differences, the effects of packaging on seafood preservation, and changes in organoleptic acceptability as a result of irradiation. Particular attention is given to radiation effects (likely and unlikely) of concern to the public. These include the potential for generation of toxic chemical products, botulinum toxin production, and other health concerns. No scientifically defensible evidence of any kind was found for any harmful effect of irradiation of seafoods at the doses being considered (less than 300 krad), and all indications are that irradiation is an acceptable and needed additional tool for seafood preservation. 49 refs., 14 figs., 14 tabs.

  18. EPR Investigation of Irradiated Curry Powder

    SciTech Connect

    Duliu, O. G.; Ali, S. I.; Georgescu, R.

    2007-04-23

    Gamma-ray irradiated curry powder, a well priced oriental spice was investigated in order to establish the ability of EPR to detect the presence and time stability of free irradiation free-radicals. Accordingly, curry powder aliquots were irradiated with gradually increasing absorbed doses up to 11.3 kGy. The EPR spectra of all irradiated samples show the presence of al last two different species of free radicals, whose concentration increased monotonously with the absorbed doses. A 100 deg. C isothermal annealing of irradiated samples has shown a differential reduction of amplitude of various components of the initial spectra, but even after 3.6 h of thermal treatment, the remaining amplitude represents no less then 30% of the initial ones. The same peculiarities have been noticed after more than one year storage at room temperature, all of them being very useful in establishing the existence of any previous irradiation treatment.

  19. EPR Investigation of Irradiated Curry Powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duliu, O. G.; Ali, S. I.; Georgescu, R.

    2007-04-01

    Gamma-ray irradiated curry powder, a well priced oriental spice was investigated in order to establish the ability of EPR to detect the presence and time stability of free irradiation free-radicals. Accordingly, curry powder aliquots were irradiated with gradually increasing absorbed doses up to 11.3 kGy. The EPR spectra of all irradiated samples show the presence of al last two different species of free radicals, whose concentration increased monotonously with the absorbed doses. A 100° C isothermal annealing of irradiated samples has shown a differential reduction of amplitude of various components of the initial spectra, but even after 3.6 h of thermal treatment, the remaining amplitude represents no less then 30% of the initial ones. The same peculiarities have been noticed after more than one year storage at room temperature, all of them being very useful in establishing the existence of any previous irradiation treatment.

  20. Thermal analysis applied to irradiated propolis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuda, Andrea Harumi; Machado, Luci Brocardo; del Mastro, Nélida Lucia

    2002-03-01

    Propolis is a resinous hive product, collected by bees. Raw propolis requires a decontamination procedure and irradiation appears as a promising technique for this purpose. The valuable properties of propolis for food and pharmaceutical industries have led to increasing interest in its technological behavior. Thermal analysis is a chemical analysis that gives information about changes on heating of great importance for technological applications. Ground propolis samples were 60Co gamma irradiated with 0 and 10 kGy. Thermogravimetry curves shown a similar multi-stage decomposition pattern for both irradiated and unirradiated samples up to 600°C. Similarly, through differential scanning calorimetry , a coincidence of melting point of irradiated and unirradiated samples was found. The results suggest that the irradiation process do not interfere on the thermal properties of propolis when irradiated up to 10 kGy.

  1. Calibration of an automatic TLD irradiator

    SciTech Connect

    Jang, J.C.; Pasciak, W.J. )

    1987-07-01

    The Panasonic UD-801 TLDs used in the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's environmental monitoring program are calibrated using the Williston Elin Model 2001 Irradiator. This article describes the procedure used to calibrate this irradiator for the delivery of exposures in the range of 40 to 1200 mR. A select group of TLDs, another source, and an NBS-calibrated ion chamber were used to perform a secondary calibration of the WE-2001. Extraneous exposure contributions (background radiation from the irradiator's source and exposure occurring during TLD travel into and out of the irradiation chamber) were measured and evaluated. The WE-2001 TLD Irradiator was calibrated to a total uncertainty of {plus minus}3.2%; however, TLD travel time exposures were found to be quite significant for the short irradiation times typically used in environmental applications.

  2. Irradiation Testing of Ultrasonic Transducers

    SciTech Connect

    Daw, Joshua; Tittmann, Bernhard; Reinhardt, Brian; Kohse, Gordon E.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Montgomery, Robert O.; Chien, Hual-Te; Villard, Jean-Francois; Palmer, Joe; Rempe, Joy

    2014-07-30

    Ultrasonic technologies offer the potential for high accuracy and resolution in-pile measurement of a range of parameters, including geometry changes, temperature, crack initiation and growth, gas pressure and composition, and microstructural changes. Many Department of Energy-Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) programs are exploring the use of ultrasonic technologies to provide enhanced sensors for in-pile instrumentation during irradiation testing. For example, the ability of single, small diameter ultrasonic thermometers (UTs) to provide a temperature profile in candidate metallic and oxide fuel would provide much needed data for validating new fuel performance models. Other efforts include an ultrasonic technique to detect morphology changes (such as crack initiation and growth) and acoustic techniques to evaluate fission gas composition and pressure. These efforts are limited by the lack of existing knowledge of ultrasonic transducer material survivability under irradiation conditions. For this reason, the Pennsylvania State University (PSU) was awarded an Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF) project to evaluate promising magnetostrictive and piezoelectric transducer performance in the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Research Reactor (MITR) up to a fast fluence of at least 1021 n/cm2 (E> 0.1 MeV). The goal of this research is to characterize magnetostrictive and piezoelectric transducer survivability during irradiation, enabling the development of novel radiation tolerant ultrasonic sensors for use in Material and Test Reactors (MTRs). As such, this test will be an instrumented lead test and real-time transducer performance data will be collected along with temperature and neutron and gamma flux data. The current work bridges the gap between proven out-of-pile ultrasonic techniques and in-pile deployment of ultrasonic sensors by acquiring the data necessary to demonstrate the performance of ultrasonic transducers.

  3. Safety Assurance for ATR Irradiations

    SciTech Connect

    S. Blaine Grover

    2006-10-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is the world’s premiere test reactor for performing high fluence, large volume, irradiation test programs. The ATR has many capabilities and a wide variety of tests are performed in this truly one of a kind reactor, including isotope production, simple self-contained static capsule experiments, instrumented/controlled experiments, and loop testing under pressurized water conditions. Along with the five pressurized water loops, ATR may also have gas (temperature controlled) lead experiments, fuel boosted fast flux experiments, and static sealed capsules all in the core at the same time. In addition, any or all of these tests may contain fuel or moderating materials that can affect reactivity levels in the ATR core. Therefore the safety analyses required to ensure safe operation of each experiment as well as the reactor itself are complex. Each test has to be evaluated against stringent reactor control safety criteria, as well as the effects it could have on adjacent tests and the reactor as well as the consequences of those effects. The safety analyses of each experiment are summarized in a document entitled the Experiment Safety Assurance Package (ESAP). The ESAP references and employs the results of the reactor physics, thermal, hydraulic, stress, seismic, vibration, and all other analyses necessary to ensure the experiment can be irradiated safely in the ATR. The requirements for reactivity worth, chemistry compatibilities, pressure limitations, material issues, etc. are all specified in the Technical Safety Requirements and the Upgraded Final Safety Analysis Report (UFSAR) for the ATR. This paper discusses the ESAP process, types of analyses, types of safety requirements and the approvals necessary to ensure an experiment can be safely irradiated in the ATR.

  4. Irradiation effects in ferritic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lechtenberg, Thomas

    1985-08-01

    Since 1979 the Alloy Development for Irradiation Performance (ADIP) task funded by the US Department of Energy has been studying the 2-12Cr class of ferritic steels to establish the feasibility of using them in fusion reactor first wall/breeding blanket (FW/B) applications. The advantages of ferritic steels include superior swelling resistance, low thermal stresses compared to austenitic stainless steels, attractive mechanical properties up to 600°C. and service histories exceeding 100 000 h. These steels are commonly used in a range of microstructural conditions which include ferritic, martensitic. tempered martensitic, bainitic etc. Throughout this paper where the term "ferritic" is used it should be taken to mean any of these microstructures. The ADIP task is studying several candidate alloy systems including 12Cr-1MoWV (HT-9), modified 9Cr-1MoVNb, and dual-phased steels such as EM-12 and 2 {1}/{4}Cr-Mo. These materials are ferromagnetic (FM), body centered cubic (bcc), and contain chromium additions between 2 and 12 wt% and molybdenum additions usually below 2%. The perceived issues associated with the application of this class of steel to fusion reactors are the increase in the ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) with neutron damage, the compatibility of these steels with liquid metals and solid breeding materials, and their weldability. The ferromagnetic character of these steels can also be important in reactor design. It is the purpose of this paper to review the current understanding of these bcc steels and the effects of irradiation. The major points of discussion will be irradiation-induced or -enhanced dimensional changes such as swelling and creep, mechanical properties such as tensile strength and various measurements of toughness, and activation by neutron interactions with structural materials.

  5. Food irradiation and airline catering.

    PubMed

    Preston, F S

    1988-04-01

    Food poisoning from contaminated airline food can produce serious consequences for airline crew and passengers and can hazard flight. While irradiation of certain foodstuffs has been practised in a number of countries for some years, application of the process has not been made to complete meals. This paper considers the advantages, technical considerations, costs and possible application to airline meals. In addition, the need to educate the public in the advantages of the process in the wake of incidents such as Chernobyl is discussed.

  6. [Tooth extraction in irradiated areas].

    PubMed

    Gourmet, René; Chaux-Bodard, Anne-Ga lle

    2002-04-01

    Tooth avulsion after head and neck radiotherapy has always been and is still a risk gesture when the avulsion is situated on the irradiation sites. The post-operating effects can become complicated with a delay in healing which can eventually induce an osteoradionecrosis. Dental treatment before the begining of radiotherapy aiming at the elimination of any suspicious tooth, and the generalisation of fluorotherapy aiming at limiting the decayed degeneration, did not make the avulsion indication disappear. At present tooth avulsion is still possible in case of tooth infection or broken tooth.

  7. Thymus irradiation for myasthenia gravis

    SciTech Connect

    Currier, R.D.; Routh, A.; Hickman, B.T.; Douglas, M.A.

    1983-01-01

    Twenty-eight patients with progressive myasthenia gravis without thymoma received treatment of 3000 rads (30 Gy) to the anterior mediastinum, and a followup was conducted for five to 18 years. Twenty-four patients had generalized myasthenia, and four had ocular myasthenia gravis. Twenty patients with generalized myasthenia survived the several month post-treatment period and improved, but four died during that period. The improvement lasted a median of 1.5 years, and older patients had longer remissions than younger patients. The four patients who had ocular myasthenia did not change after treatment. Mediastinal irradiation produces a temporary remission in generalized myasthenia.

  8. Food irradiation and airline catering

    SciTech Connect

    Preston, F.S.

    1988-04-01

    Food poisoning from contaminated airline food can produce serious consequences for airline crew and passengers and can hazard flight. While irradiation of certain foodstuffs has been practised in a number of countries for some years, application of the process has not been made to complete meals. This paper considers the advantages, technical considerations, costs and possible application to airline meals. In addition, the need to educate the public in the advantages of the process in the wake of incidents such as Chernobyl is discussed.

  9. Electron spin resonance identification of irradiated fruits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raffi, Jacques J.; Agnel, Jean-Pierre L.

    The electron spin resonance spectrum of achenes, pips, stalks and stones from irradiated fruits (strawberry, raspberry, red currant, bilberry, apple, pear, fig, french prune, kiwi, water-melon and cherry) always displays, just after γ-treatment, a weak triplet ( aH≈30 G) due to a cellulose radical; its left line (lower field) can be used as an identification test of irradiation, at least for strawberries, rapsberries, red currants or bilberries irradiated in order to improve their storage time.

  10. Irradiated food: Is there a need?

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, B.L.

    1992-06-01

    Economic, medical, social, and technical issues related to the irradiation of food with nuclear gamma rays from radioactive sources are discussed in this article. Reasons cited for considering food irradiation include food loss due to spoilage and food-borne illnesses. Research studies investigating the effects of irradiation on the formation of carcinogens and radiolytics, and on the nutritional value of food are summarized. The support of international organizations and political aspects in the United States are also discussed in some detail.

  11. Study of target heating induced by fast electrons in mass limited targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alessio, Morace; Alexander, Magunov; Dimitri, Batani; Renato, Redaelli; Claude, Fourment; Jorge, Santos Joao; Gerard, Malka; Alain, Boscheron; Alexis, Casner; Wigen, Nazarov; Tommaso, Vinci; Yasuaki, Okano; Yuichi, Inubushi; Hiroaki, Nishimura; Alessandro, Flacco; Chris, Spindloe; Martin, Tolley

    2010-02-01

    We studied the induced plasma heating in three different kind of targets: mass limited, foam targets and large mass targets. The experiment was performed at Alisé laser facility of CEA/CESTA. The laser system emitted a ˜1-ps pulse with ˜10 J energy at a wavelength of ˜1 μm. Mass limited targets had three layers with thickness 10 μm C8H8, 1 μm C8H7Cl, 10 μm C8H8 with size 100 μm×100 μm. Detailed spectroscopic analysis of X-rays emitted from the Cl tracer showed that it was possible to heat up the plasma mass limited targets to a temperature ˜250 eV with density ˜1021 cm-3. The plasma heating is only produced by fast electron transport in the target, being the 10 μm C8H8 overcoating thick enough to prevent any possible direct irradiation of the tracer layer even taking into account mass-ablation due to the pre-pulse. These results demonstrate that with mass limited targets is possible to generate a plasma heated up to several hundreds eV. It is also very important for research concerning high energy density phenomena and for fast ignition (in particular for the study of fast electrons transport and induced heating).

  12. Study of target heating induced by fast electrons in mass limited targets

    SciTech Connect

    Alessio, Morace; Dimitri, Batani; Renato, Redaelli; Alexander, Magunov; Claude, Fourment; Jorge, Santos Joao; Gerard, Malka; Alain, Boscheron; Wigen, Nazarov; Tommaso, Vinci; Yasuaki, Okano; Yuichi, Inubushi; Hiroaki, Nishimura; Alessandro, Flacco; Chris, Spindloe; Martin, Tolley

    2010-02-02

    We studied the induced plasma heating in three different kind of targets: mass limited, foam targets and large mass targets. The experiment was performed at Alise laser facility of CEA/CESTA. The laser system emitted a {approx}1-ps pulse with {approx}10 J energy at a wavelength of {approx}1 {mu}m. Mass limited targets had three layers with thickness 10 {mu}m C{sub 8}H{sub 8}, 1 {mu}m C{sub 8}H{sub 7}Cl, 10 {mu}m C{sub 8}H{sub 8} with size 100 {mu}mx100 {mu}m. Detailed spectroscopic analysis of X-rays emitted from the Cl tracer showed that it was possible to heat up the plasma mass limited targets to a temperature {approx}250 eV with density {approx}10{sup 21} cm{sup -3}. The plasma heating is only produced by fast electron transport in the target, being the 10 {mu}m C{sub 8}H{sub 8} overcoating thick enough to prevent any possible direct irradiation of the tracer layer even taking into account mass-ablation due to the pre-pulse. These results demonstrate that with mass limited targets is possible to generate a plasma heated up to several hundreds eV. It is also very important for research concerning high energy density phenomena and for fast ignition (in particular for the study of fast electrons transport and induced heating).

  13. FLIR target screening

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aggarwal, R.

    1982-01-01

    Methods for the segmentation and recognition of individual targets sensed with forward looking infrared detectors are discussed. Particular attention is given to an adaptive multi-scenario target screener.

  14. Study of irradiation creep of vanadium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, H.; Strain, R.V.; Smith, D.L.

    1997-08-01

    Thin-wall tubing was produced from the 832665 (500 kg) heat of V-4 wt.% Cr-4 wt.% Ti to study its irradiation creep behavior. The specimens, in the form of pressurized capsules, were irradiated in Advanced Test Reactor and High Flux Isotope Reactor experiments (ATR-A1 and HFIR RB-12J, respectively). The ATR-A1 irradiation has been completed and specimens from it will soon be available for postirradiation examination. The RB-12J irradiation is not yet complete.

  15. Free radical kinetics on irradiated fennel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaoki, Rumi; Kimura, Shojiro; Ohta, Masatoshi

    2008-09-01

    Herein, an electron spin resonance study on the behavior of organic radicals in fennel before and after irradiation is reported. The spectrum of irradiated fennel composed of the spectrum component derived from the un-irradiated sample (near g=2.005) and the spectra components derived from carbohydrates. The time decay of intensity spectral components was well explained by first-order kinetics with a variety of rate constants. Especially, the signal at near g=2.02 ascribed to stable cellulose-derivative components is expected to be a good indicator in the identification of irradiated plant samples.

  16. Thermoluminescence analysis of irradiated oyster shells.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Zaragoza, E; Marcazzó, J; Della Monaca, S; Boniglia, C; Gargiulo, R; Bortolin, E

    2012-12-01

    This paper reports the thermoluminescence (TL) analysis performed on the oyster shells powder. TL response of (60)Co gamma-rays irradiated samples were studied in the range from 80 Gy to 8 kGy doses. TL signal of irradiated shell powder was higher as compared to the unirradiated control samples, which allowed to identify the irradiated oysters. Results show that the oyster shells have good TL properties and can be useful for the identification of irradiated seafood as well as for the evaluation of the treatment dose.

  17. Healing burns using atmospheric pressure plasma irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, Takamichi; Kishimoto, Takumi; Tsutsui, Chihiro; Kanai, Takao; Mori, Akira

    2014-01-01

    An experiment testing the effects of plasma irradiation with an atmospheric-pressure plasma (APP) reactor on rats given burns showed no evidence of electric shock injuries upon pathology inspection of the irradiated skin surface. In fact, the observed evidence of healing and improvement of the burns suggested healing effects from plasma irradiation. The quantities of neovascular vessels in the living tissues at 7 days were 9.2 ± 0.77 mm-2 without treatment and 18.4 ± 2.9 mm-2 after plasma irradiation.

  18. Glucose stabilizes collagen sterilized with gamma irradiation.

    PubMed

    Ohan, Mark P; Dunn, Michael G

    2003-12-15

    Gamma irradiation sterilization (gamma-irradiation) fragments and denatures collagen, drastically decreasing critical physical properties. Our goal was to maintain strength and stability of gamma-irradiated collagen by adding glucose, which in theory can initiate crosslink formation in collagen during exposure to gamma-irradiation. Collagen films prepared with and without glucose were gamma-irradiated with a standard dose of 2.5 Mrad. Relative amounts of crosslinking and denaturation were approximated based on solubility and the mechanical properties of the films after hydration, heat denaturation, or incubation in enzymes (collagenase and trypsin). After exposure to gamma-irradiation, collagen films containing glucose had significantly higher mechanical properties, greater resistance to enzymatic degradation, and decreased solubility compared with control films. The entire experiment was repeated with a second set of films that were exposed first to ultraviolet irradiation (254 nm) to provide higher initial strength and then gamma-irradiated. Again, films containing glucose had significantly greater mechanical properties and resistance to enzymatic degradation compared with controls. Gel electrophoresis showed that glucose did not prevent peptide fragmentation; therefore, the higher strength and stability in glucose-incorporated films may be due to glucose-derived crosslinks. The results of this study suggest that glucose may be a useful additive to stabilize collagenous materials or tissues sterilized by gamma-irradiation.

  19. High Power Cryogenic Targets

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory Smith

    2011-08-01

    The development of high power cryogenic targets for use in parity violating electron scattering has been a crucial ingredient in the success of those experiments. As we chase the precision frontier, the demands and requirements for these targets have grown accordingly. We discuss the state of the art, and describe recent developments and strategies in the design of the next generation of these targets.

  20. An actionable climate target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geden, Oliver

    2016-05-01

    The Paris Agreement introduced three mitigation targets. In the future, the main focus should not be on temperature targets such as 2 or 1.5 °C, but on the target with the greatest potential to effectively guide policy: net zero emissions.

  1. Plasma sheath driven targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brownell, J. H.; Freeman, B. L.

    1980-02-01

    Plasma focus driven target implosions are simulated using hydrodynamic-burn codes. Support is given to the idea that the use of a target in a plasma focus should allow 'impedance matching' between the fuel and gun, permitting larger fusion yields from a focus-target geometry than the scaling laws for a conventional plasma focus would predict.

  2. Image-guided total marrow and total lymphatic irradiation using helical tomotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Schultheiss, Timothy E. . E-mail: Schultheiss@coh.org; Wong, Jeffrey; Liu, An; Olivera, Gustavo; Somlo, George

    2007-03-15

    Purpose: To develop a treatment technique to spare normal tissue and allow dose escalation in total body irradiation (TBI). We have developed intensity-modulated radiotherapy techniques for the total marrow irradiation (TMI), total lymphatic irradiation, or total bone marrow plus lymphatic irradiation using helical tomotherapy. Methods and Materials: For TBI, we typically use 12 Gy in 10 fractions delivered at an extended source-to-surface distance (SSD). Using helical tomotherapy, it is possible to deliver equally effective doses to the bone marrow and lymphatics while sparing normal organs to a significant degree. In the TMI patients, whole body skeletal bone, including the ribs and sternum, comprise the treatment target. In the total lymphatic irradiation, the target is expanded to include the spleen and major lymph node areas. Sanctuary sites for disease (brain and testes) are included when clinically indicated. Spared organs include the lungs, esophagus, parotid glands, eyes, oral cavity, liver, kidneys, stomach, small and large intestine, bladder, and ovaries. Results: With TBI, all normal organs received the TBI dose; with TMI, total lymphatic irradiation, and total bone marrow plus lymphatic irradiation, the visceral organs are spared. For the first 6 patients treated with TMI, the median dose to organs at risk averaged 51% lower than would be achieved with TBI. By putting greater weight on the avoidance of specific organs, greater sparing was possible. Conclusion: Sparing of normal tissues and dose escalation is possible using helical tomotherapy. Late effects such as radiation pneumonitis, veno-occlusive disease, cataracts, neurocognitive effects, and the development of second tumors should be diminished in severity and frequency according to the dose reduction realized for the organs at risk.

  3. Design of sample carrier for neutron irradiation facility at TRIGA MARK II nuclear reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah, Y.; Hamid, N. A.; Mansor, M. A.; Ahmad, M. H. A. R. M.; Yusof, M. R.; Yazid, H.; Mohamed, A. A.

    2013-06-01

    The objective of this work is to design a sample carrier for neutron irradiation experiment at beam ports of research nuclear reactor, the Reaktor TRIGA PUSPATI (RTP). The sample carrier was designed so that irradiation experiment can be performed safely by researchers. This development will resolve the transferring of sample issues faced by the researchers at the facility when performing neutron irradiation studies. The function of sample carrier is to ensure the sample for the irradiation process can be transferred into and out from the beam port of the reactor safely and effectively. The design model used was House of Quality Method (HOQ) which is usually used for developing specifications for product and develop numerical target to work towards and determining how well we can meet up to the needs. The chosen sample carrier (product) consists of cylindrical casing shape with hydraulic cylinders transportation method. The sample placing can be done manually, locomotion was by wheel while shielding used was made of boron materials. The sample carrier design can shield thermal neutron during irradiation of sample so that only low fluencies fast neutron irradiates the sample.

  4. Irradiation of Human Prostate Cancer Cells Increases Uptake of Antisense Oligodeoxynucleotide

    SciTech Connect

    Anai, Satoshi; Brown, Bob D.; Nakamura, Kogenta; Goodison, Steve; Hirao, Yoshihiko; Rosser, Charles J. . E-mail: charles.rosser@urology.ufl.edu

    2007-07-15

    Purpose: To investigate whether irradiation before antisense Bcl-2 oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) administration enhances tissue uptake, and whether periodic dosing enhances cellular uptake of fluorescently labeled ODN relative to constant dosing. Methods and Materials: PC-3-Bcl-2 cells (prostate cancer cell line engineered to overexpress Bcl-2) were subjected to increasing doses of irradiation (0-10 Gy) with or without increasing concentrations of fluorescently labeled antisense Bcl-2 ODN (G4243). The fluorescent signal intensity was quantified as the total grain area with commercial software. In addition, PC-3-Bcl-2 subcutaneous xenograft tumors were treated with or without irradiation in combination with various dosing schemas of G4243. The uptake of fluorescent G4243 in tumors was quantitated. Results: The uptake of G4243 was increased in prostate cancer cells exposed to low doses of irradiation both in vitro and in vivo. Irradiation before G4243 treatment resulted in increased fluorescent signal intensity in xenograft tumors compared with those irradiated after G4243 treatment. A single weekly dose of G4243 produced higher G4243 uptake in xenograft tumors than daily dosing, even when the total dose administered per week was held constant. Conclusions: These findings suggest that ionizing radiation increases the uptake of therapeutic ODN in target tissues and, thus, has potential to increase the efficacy of ODN in clinical applications.

  5. A small animal image guided irradiation system study using 3D dosimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Xin; Admovics, John; Wuu, Cheng-Shie

    2015-01-01

    In a high resolution image-guided small animal irradiation platform, a cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is integrated with an irradiation unit for precise targeting. Precise quality assurance is essential for both imaging and irradiation components. The conventional commissioning techniques with films face major challenges due to alignment uncertainty and labour intensive film preparation and scanning. In addition, due to the novel design of this platform the mouse stage rotation for CBCT imaging is perpendicular to the gantry rotation for irradiation. Because these two rotations are associated with different mechanical systems, discrepancy between rotation isocenters exists. In order to deliver x-ray precisely, it is essential to verify coincidence of the imaging and the irradiation isocenters. A 3D PRESAGE dosimeter can provide an excellent tool for checking dosimetry and verifying coincidence of irradiation and imaging coordinates in one system. Dosimetric measurements were performed to obtain beam profiles and percent depth dose (PDD). Isocentricity and coincidence of the mouse stage and gantry rotations were evaluated with starshots acquired using PRESAGE dosimeters. A single PRESAGE dosimeter can provide 3 -D information in both geometric and dosimetric uncertainty, which is crucial for translational studies.

  6. Pre-irradiation testing of actively cooled Be-Cu divertor modules

    SciTech Connect

    Linke, J.; Duwe, R.; Kuehnlein, W.

    1995-09-01

    A set of neutron irradiation tests is prepared on different plasma facing materials (PFM) candidates and miniaturized components for ITER. Beside beryllium the irradiation program which will be performed in the High Flux Reactor (HFR) in Petten, includes different carbon fiber composites (CFQ) and tungsten alloys. The target values for the neutron irradiation will be 0.5 dpa at temperatures of 350{degrees}C and 700{degrees}C, resp.. The post irradiation examination (PIE) will cover a wide range of mechanical tests; in addition the degradation of thermal conductivity will be investigated. To determine the high heat flux (HHF) performance of actively cooled divertor modules, electron beam tests which simulate the expected heat loads during the operation of ITER, are scheduled in the hot cell electron beam facility JUDITH. These tests on a selection of different actively cooled beryllium-copper and CFC-copper divertor modules are performed before and after neutron irradiation; the pre-irradiation testing is an essential part of the program to quantify the zero-fluence high heat flux performance and to detect defects in the modules, in particular in the brazed joints.

  7. Optimization of irradiation conditions for {sup 177}Lu production at the LVR-15 research reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Lahodova, Z.; Viererbl, L.; Klupak, V.; Srank, J.

    2012-07-01

    The use of lutetium in medicine has been increasing over the last few years. The {sup 177}Lu radionuclide is commercially available for research and test purposes as a diagnostic and radiotherapy agent in the treatment of several malignant tumours. The yield of {sup 177}Lu from the {sup 176}Lu(n,{gamma}){sup 177}Lu nuclear reaction depends significantly on the thermal neutron fluence rate. The capture cross-sections of both reaction {sup 176}Lu(n,{gamma}){sup 177}Lu and reaction {sup 177}Lu(n,{gamma}){sup 178}Lu are very high. Therefore a burn-up of target and product nuclides should be taken into account when calculating {sup 177}Lu activity. The maximum irradiation time, when the activity of the {sup 177}Lu radionuclide begins to decline, was found for different fluence rates. Two vertical irradiation channels at the LVR-15 nuclear research reactor were compared in order to choose the channel with better irradiation conditions, such as a higher thermal neutron fluence rate in the irradiation volume. In this experiment, lutetium was irradiated in a titanium capsule. The influence of the Ti capsule on the neutron spectrum was monitored using activation detectors. The choice of detectors was based on requirements for irradiation time and accurate determination of thermal neutrons. The following activation detectors were selected for measurement of the neutron spectrum: Ti, Fe, Ni, Co, Ag and W. (authors)

  8. APT target-blanket fabrication development

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, D.L.

    1997-06-13

    Concepts for producing tritium in an accelerator were translated into hardware for engineering studies of tritium generation, heat transfer, and effects of proton-neutron flux on materials. Small-scale target- blanket assemblies were fabricated and material samples prepared for these performance tests. Blanket assemblies utilize composite aluminum-lead modules, the two primary materials of the blanket. Several approaches are being investigated to produce large-scale assemblies, developing fabrication and assembly methods for their commercial manufacture. Small-scale target-blanket assemblies, designed and fabricated at the Savannah River Site, were place in Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) for irradiation. They were subjected to neutron flux for nine months during 1996-97. Coincident with this test was the development of production methods for large- scale modules. Increasing module size presented challenges that required new methods to be developed for fabrication and assembly. After development, these methods were demonstrated by fabricating and assembling two production-scale modules.

  9. Prenatal irradiation: a major concern for the developing brain.

    PubMed

    Kimler, B F

    1998-04-01

    Irradiation of the mammalian foetus produces a broad spectrum of congenital abnormalities, growth retardations, developmental delays, and functional deficits, depending upon the dose and the specific gestational phase of irradiation. The developing brain is particularly susceptible to production of deleterious effects, with decreased brain size, behavioural alterations, and mental retardation having been documented. Supplementing the limited human data, rodent models have been extensively used to investigate the specific processes by which relatively low doses, with correspondingly minor cellular damage to the developing neocortex, can produce dramatic postnatal consequences in brain structure and function. The effects of a variety of physical (dose, linear energy transfer, dose rate, fractionation) and biological (species, strain, gestational age, time course post-irradiation) parameters have been examined in an attempt to provide much needed information on such critical aspects as dose response, threshold doses for effect, and extrapolation to human risk estimates. Various acute cellular responses (e.g. appearance of pyknotic cells and macrophages) observed in the developing neocortex 0-24 h after in utero irradiation can be associated with postnatal effects. Moreover, it is possible to correlate thinning of specific layers of the cerebral cortex with specific behavioural aberrations, allowing prediction of brain structural changes from functional alterations, and vice versa. Thus, it is possible to speculate as to the mechanisms and targets for extremely sensitive, radiation-induced cellular damage in the developing foetal brain, that will interfere with the orderly and precisely programmed development of the mammalian brain, leading finally to postnatal expression as delays in growth and development, perturbations in behaviour, and alterations in brain structure. PMID:9587081

  10. Electron Irradiation Damage in Quartz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayensu, Akwasi; Ocran, John

    2002-03-01

    Transmission electron microscopy for observing highly beam sensitive materials had been used to study the microstructure of deformed quartz crystals. At 100 kV accelerating voltage and electron flux of 3 x 10^8 e/cm2/s, beam spots damage appeared within five minutes of exposure to the electron beam. The rate of damage was found to depend on the crystal type; in particular, on the OH content and initial defect density, since these factors controlled the plasticity of quartz. The electron irradiation damage was manifested as black spots, prismatic dislocation loops, defect clusters, hairpin shaped images of dislocations and long segements of dislocation loops. The observed microstructure indicate that during electron beam irradiation, the primary defects in quartz attained sufficiently high mobilities permitting large-scale recombination and clustering leading to rapid creation of secondary defects from the clustering processes. The number of electrons that are lost by the recombination process is determined by the density of the recombination centres and the probability that an electron will interact with the centre.

  11. Food irradiation: Key research needs

    SciTech Connect

    Morehouse, K.M. )

    1993-01-01

    Treatment of foods with ionizing radiation reduces microbial infection and insect infestations, inhibits sprouting, and delays maturation, thereby extending the shelf life of foods. The treatment of different types of foods with ionizing radiation for specific purposes is accepted in several countries, although it is prohibited in others. The US Food and Drug Administration has established regulations to allow the treatment of several different foods with ionizing radiation and has received petitions for the approval of radiation treatment of additional foods. When carried out according to established good manufacturing practices, food irradiation yields safe, wholesome foods. The irradiated product may be often chemically or microbiologically [open quotes]safer[close quotes] than the nonirradiated product. This paper presents several areas of scientific research in which more information would facilitate the expansion of this technology and points out major areas of concern. The question of the public acceptance of foods that have been treated with ionizing radiation is discussed only briefly in order to make the presentation complete.

  12. [Wound healing after laser and red light irradiation].

    PubMed

    Hutschenreiter, G; Haina, D; Paulini, K; Schumacher, G

    1980-04-01

    Laser irradiation and red light irradiation, daily 2 respectively 4 J/cm2, do not bring any acceleration of wound healing in rats. No significant effect was evident in the cell pattern of wounds during various phases of healing through the irradiation. The tensile strength of cicatrices increased by laser irradiation, but not by red light irradiation (monochromatic lambda = 633 nm).

  13. Magnitude of Interfractional Vaginal Cuff Movement: Implications for External Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Daniel J.; Michaletz-Lorenz, Martha; Goddu, S. Murty; Grigsby, Perry W.

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To quantify the extent of interfractional vaginal cuff movement in patients receiving postoperative irradiation for cervical or endometrial cancer in the absence of bowel/bladder instruction. Methods and Materials: Eleven consecutive patients with cervical or endometrial cancer underwent placement of three gold seed fiducial markers in the vaginal cuff apex as part of standard of care before simulation. Patients subsequently underwent external irradiation and brachytherapy treatment based on institutional guidelines. Daily megavoltage CT imaging was performed during each external radiation treatment fraction. The daily positions of the vaginal apex fiducial markers were subsequently compared with the original position of the fiducial markers on the simulation CT. Composite dose-volume histograms were also created by summing daily target positions. Results: The average ({+-} standard deviation) vaginal cuff movement throughout daily pelvic external radiotherapy when referenced to the simulation position was 16.2 {+-} 8.3 mm. The maximum vaginal cuff movement for any patient during treatment was 34.5 mm. In the axial plane the mean vaginal cuff movement was 12.9 {+-} 6.7 mm. The maximum vaginal cuff axial movement was 30.7 mm. In the craniocaudal axis the mean movement was 10.3 {+-} 7.6 mm, with a maximum movement of 27.0 mm. Probability of cuff excursion outside of the clinical target volume steadily dropped as margin size increased (53%, 26%, 4.2%, and 1.4% for 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, and 2.5 cm, respectively.) However, rectal and bladder doses steadily increased with larger margin sizes. Conclusions: The magnitude of vaginal cuff movement is highly patient specific and can impact target coverage in patients without bowel/bladder instructions at simulation. The use of vaginal cuff fiducials can help identify patients at risk for target volume excursion.

  14. Effect of re-irradiation by neutrons on mechanical properties of un-irradiated/irradiated SS316LN weldments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuchiya, K.; Shimizu, M.; Kawamura, H.; Kalinin, G.

    2008-02-01

    Stainless steel of type SS316LN-IG (ITER Grade) is used for the branch pipeline connecting of the module coolant system and for other structures of ITER. One of the most important requirements for the branch pipeline connection is to recover various defects by welding. In the present study, characteristics of irradiated weldments were evaluated. SS316LN-IG specimens irradiated to helium contents of 3 and 10 appm He were prepared by the first neutron irradiation. Thereafter, the SS316LN-IG specimens with three different combinations of un-irradiation and irradiation were welded by a tungsten inert-gas (TIG) welding method. These weldments were re-irradiated at 150 °C up to a fast neutron fluence of about 7.5 × 10 24 n/m 2 ( E > 1 MeV). Tensile tests of the weldments and the base material were carried out at 20 and 150 °C after the re-irradiation. The results of the comparison before and after the re-irradiation showed that tensile properties of all weldment specimens with the different combinations were almost the same as those of the base materials.

  15. Address substrates as promising targets for laser histochemical surgery as a nontraditional line in medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piruzyan, L. A.; Mikhailovskiy, Ye. M.; Piruzyan, A. L.

    1999-12-01

    The priority concept of the laser histochemical surgery as a potentially novel line in medicine is presented. The histochemical stains, selectively coloring some targets (address substrates), that are cells or their biochemical ingredients, sensitize them to the laser irradiation. Such sensitization to laser irradiation by staining turns the colored targets into targets for the laser beam. The action of the irradiation onto its specific targets beats out of the cell its ingredients which participate in a pathology process. In particular, the beating of a stained ferment out of the general stage of biochemical processes characteristic for the pathology interrupts their currence. The laser beam, when beating out its stained targets without any damage of the unstained tissues, acts like a scalpel that cuts off affected tissues not brushing healthy ones. A scheme for testing stains as sensitizers of the `address substrates' to the laser irradiation is presented. As the criterion of the stain sensitization the fact was chosen of absence or weakness of pathomorphologic and biochemical signs of the disease in an experimental model of the pathology irradiated with laser after a stain use, while the pathology signs are present in a control sample. The basis is done for study of the histochemical stains as potential means for the laser histochemical surgery of disseminated sclerosis, mucopolysaccharidosis, hypercholesterolemia, myocardial infarction, cardiosclerosis, caries and parodontosis.

  16. Analysis of nuclide production in the MEGAPIE target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konobeyev, A. Yu.; Fischer, U.; Zanini, L.

    2009-07-01

    MEGAPIE, the first liquid metal target irradiated by a proton beam at the MW power level, was successfully operated in 2006. A continuous beam of 575 MeV protons with a current up to 1.35 mA irradiated the liquid lead-bismuth target placed in the SINQ target location at PSI (Switzerland) for a period of 4 months. The activation of the lead-bismuth irradiated in MEGAPIE has been investigated. Experimental cross-sections and evaluated data available for neutron- and proton-induced reaction cross-sections at incident energies from 10 -5 eV to 600 MeV, and results of nuclear model calculations have been used to obtain nuclear reaction rates. Calculated nuclide and gas production rates are compared with calculations using the MCNPX and FLUKA Monte Carlo codes. The total activation of the LBE agrees well with the other codes. Discrepancies with FLUKA and MCNPX are mainly in two mass regions, where experimental data are scarce: the region 30< A<50, and the region 140< A<170. The results obtained can be used for the further study of the safe operation of liquid heavy metal targets of Accelerator-Driven Systems and spallation neutron sources and for the definition of the priorities in the development of evaluated nuclear data libraries at intermediate nucleon energies.

  17. The behaviour under irradiation of molybdenum matrix for inert matrix fuel containing americium oxide (CerMet concept)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Agata, E.; Knol, S.; Fedorov, A. V.; Fernandez, A.; Somers, J.; Klaassen, F.

    2015-10-01

    Americium is a strong contributor to the long term radiotoxicity of high activity nuclear waste. Transmutation by irradiation in nuclear reactors or Accelerator Driven System (ADS, subcritical reactors dedicated to transmutation) of long-lived nuclides like 241Am is therefore an option for the reduction of radiotoxicity of waste packages to be stored in a repository. In order to safely burn americium in a fast reactor or ADS, it must be incorporated in a matrix that could be metallic (CerMet target) or ceramic (CerCer target). One of the most promising matrix to incorporate Am is molybdenum. In order to address the issues (swelling, stability under irradiation, gas retention and release) of using Mo as matrix to transmute Am, two irradiation experiments have been conducted recently at the High Flux Reactor (HFR) in Petten (The Netherland) namely HELIOS and BODEX. The BODEX experiment is a separate effect test, where the molybdenum behaviour is studied without the presence of fission products using 10B to "produce" helium, the HELIOS experiment included a more representative fuel target with the presence of Am and fission product. This paper covers the results of Post Irradiation Examination (PIE) of the two irradiation experiments mentioned above where molybdenum behaviour has been deeply investigated as possible matrix to transmute americium (CerMet fuel target). The behaviour of molybdenum looks satisfying at operating temperature but at high temperature (above 1000 °C) more investigation should be performed.

  18. Updates to ISO 21348 (determining solar irradiances)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobiska, W. Kent

    2012-07-01

    The ISO 21348 (Determining Solar Irradiances) International Standard is going through a document update. A consensus solar spectrum, solar indices/proxies descriptions, solar model descriptions, and solar measurement descriptions are among the Annexes that are proposed to the standard. These topics will be reviewed and described. The International Standards Organization (ISO) published IS 21348 in 2007 after 7 years of development by the international scientific community. In ISO, documents are reviewed on a regular basis and reaffirmed, updated, or deleted according to the votes of national delegations represented in ISO. IS 21348 provides guidelines for specifying the process of determining solar irradiances. Solar irradiances are reported through products such as measurement sets, reference spectra, empirical models, theoretical models and solar irradiance proxies or indices. These products are used in scientific and engineering applications to characterize within the natural space environment solar irradiances that are relevant to space systems and materials. Examples of applications using input solar irradiance energy include the determination of atmospheric densities for spacecraft orbit determination, attitude control and re-entry calculations, as well as for debris mitigation and collision avoidance activity. Direct and indirect pressure from solar irradiance upon spacecraft surfaces also affects attitude control separately from atmospheric density effects. Solar irradiances are used to provide inputs for a) calculations of ionospheric parameters, b) photon-induced radiation effects, and c) radiative transfer modeling of planetary atmospheres. Input solar irradiance energy is used to characterize material properties related to spacecraft thermal control, including surface temperatures, reflectivity, absorption and degradation. Solar energy applications requiring a standard process for determining solar irradiance energy include i) solar cell power

  19. CASP9 Target Classification

    PubMed Central

    Kinch, Lisa N.; Shi, Shuoyong; Cheng, Hua; Cong, Qian; Pei, Jimin; Mariani, Valerio; Schwede, Torsten; Grishin, Nick V.

    2011-01-01

    The Critical Assessment of Protein Structure Prediction round 9 (CASP9) aimed to evaluate predictions for 129 experimentally determined protein structures. To assess tertiary structure predictions, these target structures were divided into domain-based evaluation units that were then classified into two assessment categories: template based modeling (TBM) and template free modeling (FM). CASP9 targets were split into domains of structurally compact evolutionary modules. For the targets with more than one defined domain, the decision to split structures into domains for evaluation was based on server performance. Target domains were categorized based on their evolutionary relatedness to existing templates as well as their difficulty levels indicated by server performance. Those target domains with sequence-related templates and high server prediction performance were classified as TMB, while those targets without identifiable templates and low server performance were classified as FM. However, using these generalizations for classification resulted in a blurred boundary between CASP9 assessment categories. Thus, the FM category included those domains without sequence detectable templates (25 target domains) as well as some domains with difficult to detect templates whose predictions were as poor as those without templates (5 target domains). Several interesting examples are discussed, including targets with sequence related templates that exhibit unusual structural differences, targets with homologous or analogous structure templates that are not detectable by sequence, and targets with new folds. PMID:21997778

  20. Wake Shield Target Protection

    SciTech Connect

    Valmianski, Emanuil I.; Petzoldt, Ronald W.; Alexander, Neil B.

    2003-05-15

    The heat flux from both gas convection and chamber radiation on a direct drive target must be limited to avoid target damage from excessive D-T temperature increase. One of the possibilities of protecting the target is a wake shield flying in front of the target. A shield will also reduce drag force on the target, thereby facilitating target tracking and position prediction. A Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) code was used to calculate convection heat loads as boundary conditions input into ANSYS thermal calculations. These were used for studying the quality of target protection depending on various shapes of shields, target-shield distance, and protective properties of the shield moving relative to the target. The results show that the shield can reduce the convective heat flux by a factor of 2 to 5 depending on pressure, temperature, and velocity. The protective effect of a shield moving relative to the target is greater than the protective properties of a fixed shield. However, the protective effect of a shield moving under the drag force is not sufficient for bringing the heat load on the target down to the necessary limit. Some other ways of diminishing heat flux using a protective shield are discussed.