Science.gov

Sample records for mobile helium-jet transport

  1. Mobile Transporter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Atlantis, STS-110 mission, deployed this railcar, called the Mobile Transporter, and an initial 43-foot section of track, the S0 (S-zero) truss, preparing the International Space Station (ISS) for future spacewalks. The first railroad in space, the Mobile Transporter will allow the Station's robotic arm to travel up and down the finished truss for future assembly and maintenance. The 27,000-pound S0 truss is the first of 9 segments that will make up the Station's external framework that will eventually stretch 356 feet (109 meters), or approximately the length of a football field. The completed truss structure will hold solar arrays and radiators to provide power and cooling for additional international research laboratories from Japan and Europe that will be attached to the Station. The Space Shuttle Orbiter Atlantis, STS-110 mission, was launched April 8, 2002 and returned to Earth April 19, 2002. STS-110's Extravehicular Activity (EVA) marked the first use of the Station's robotic arm to maneuver spacewalkers around the Station.

  2. Mobile transporter path planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baffes, Paul; Wang, Lui

    1990-01-01

    The use of a genetic algorithm (GA) for solving the mobile transporter path planning problem is investigated. The mobile transporter is a traveling robotic vehicle proposed for the space station which must be able to reach any point of the structure autonomously. Elements of the genetic algorithm are explored in both a theoretical and experimental sense. Specifically, double crossover, greedy crossover, and tournament selection techniques are examined. Additionally, the use of local optimization techniques working in concert with the GA are also explored. Recent developments in genetic algorithm theory are shown to be particularly effective in a path planning problem domain, though problem areas can be cited which require more research.

  3. Space station mobile transporter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Renshall, James; Marks, Geoff W.; Young, Grant L.

    1988-01-01

    The first quarter of the next century will see an operational space station that will provide a permanently manned base for satellite servicing, multiple strategic scientific and commercial payload deployment, and Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle/Orbital Transfer Vehicle (OMV/OTV) retrieval replenishment and deployment. The space station, as conceived, is constructed in orbit and will be maintained in orbit. The construction, servicing, maintenance and deployment tasks, when coupled with the size of the station, dictate that some form of transportation and manipulation device be conceived. The Transporter described will work in conjunction with the Orbiter and an Assembly Work Platform (AWP) to construct the Work Station. The Transporter will also work in conjunction with the Mobile Remote Servicer to service and install payloads, retrieve, service and deploy satellites, and service and maintain the station itself. The Transporter involved in station construction when mounted on the AWP and later supporting a maintenance or inspection task with the Mobile Remote Servicer and the Flight Telerobotic Servicer is shown.

  4. High-Speed Rainbow Schlieren Visualization of an Oscillating Helium Jet Undergoing Gravitational Change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leptuch, Peter A.; Agrawal, Ajay K.

    2005-01-01

    Rainbow schlieren deflectometry combined with high-speed digital imaging was used to study buoyancy effects on flow structure of a helium jet discharged vertically into air. The experimental data were taken using the 2.2-sec drop tower facility at the NASA John H. Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio. The test conditions pertained to jet Reynolds number of 490 and jet Richardson number of 0.11, for which buoyancy is often considered unimportant. Experimental results show global oscillations at a frequency of 27 Hz in Earth gravity. In microgravity, the jet oscillations vanished and the jet width increased. Results provide a direct physical evidence of the importance of buoyancy on the flow structure of low-density gas jets at a Richardson number considered too small to account for gravity.

  5. High-Speed Rainbow Schlieren Deflectometry Analysis of Helium Jets Flowing into Air for Microgravity Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leptuch, Peter A.

    2002-01-01

    The flow phenomena of buoyant jets have been analyzed by many researchers in recent years. Few, however have studied jets in microgravity conditions, and the exact nature of the flow under these conditions has until recently been unknown. This study seeks to extend the work done by researchers at the university of Oklahoma in examining and documenting the behavior of helium jets in micro-gravity conditions. Quantitative rainbow schlieren deflectometry data have been obtained for helium jets discharging vertically into quiescent ambient air from tubes of several diameters at various flow rates using a high-speed digital camera. These data have obtained before, during and after the onset of microgravity conditions. High-speed rainbow schlieren deflectometry has been developed for this study with the installation and use of a high-speed digital camera and modifications to the optical setup. Higher temporal resolution of the transitional phase between terrestrial and micro-gravity conditions has been obtained which has reduced the averaging effect of longer exposure times used in all previous schlieren studies. Results include color schlieren images, color time-space images (temporal evolution images), frequency analyses, contour plots of hue and contour plots of helium mole fraction. The results, which focus primarily on the periods before and during the onset of microgravity conditions, show that the pulsation of the jets normally found in terrestrial gravity ("earth"-gravity) conditions cease, and the gradients in helium diminish to produce a widening of the jet in micro-gravity conditions. In addition, the results show that the disturbance propagate upstream from a downstream source.

  6. Effect of Gravity on the Near Field Flow Structure of Helium Jet in Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agrawal, Ajay K.; Parthasarathy, Ramkumar; Griffin, DeVon

    2002-01-01

    Experiments have shown that a low-density jet injected into a high-density surrounding medium undergoes periodic oscillations in the near field. Although the flow oscillations in these jets at Richardson numbers about unity are attributed to the buoyancy, the direct physical evidence has not been acquired in the experiments. If the instability were indeed caused by buoyancy, the near-field flow structure would undergo drastic changes upon removal of gravity in the microgravity environment. The present study was conducted to investigate this effect by simulating microgravity environment in the 2.2-second drop tower at the NASA Glenn Research Center. The non-intrusive, rainbow schlieren deflectometry technique was used for quantitative measurements of helium concentrations in buoyant and non-buoyant jets. Results in a steady jet show that the radial growth of the jet shear layer in Earth gravity is hindered by the buoyant acceleration. The jet in microgravity was 30 to 70 percent wider than that in Earth gravity. The microgravity jet showed typical growth of a constant density jet shear layer. In case of a self-excited helium jet in Earth gravity, the flow oscillations continued as the jet flow adjusted to microgravity conditions in the drop tower. The flow oscillations were however not present at the end of the drop when steady microgravity conditions were reached.

  7. Full-Field Measurements of Self-Excited Oscillations in Momentum-Dominated Helium Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yildirim, B. S.; Agrawal, A. K.

    2005-01-01

    Flow structure of momentum-dominated helium jets discharged vertically into ambient air was investigated using a high-speed rainbow schlieren deflectometry (RSD) apparatus operated at up to 2000 Hz. The operating parameters, i.e., Reynolds number and Richardson number were varied independently to examine the self-excited, flow oscillatory behavior over a range of experimental conditions. Measurements revealed highly periodic oscillations in the laminar region at a unique frequency as well as high regularity in the flow transition and initial turbulent regions. The buoyancy was shown to affect the oscillation frequency and the distance from the jet exit to the flow transition plane. Instantaneous helium concentration contours across the field of view revealed changes in the jet flow structure and the evolution of the vortical structures during an oscillation cycle. A cross-correlation technique was applied to track the vortices and to find their convection velocity. Time-traces of helium concentration at different axial locations provided detailed information about the oscillating flow.

  8. Concentration Measurements in Self-Excited, Momentum-Dominated Helium Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yildirim, Bekir Sedat

    2004-01-01

    Flow structure of momentum-dominated pure helium jets discharged vertically into ambient air was investigated using high-speed rainbow schlieren deflectometry (RSD) technique. Effects of the operating parameters, i.e., Reynolds number (Re) and Richardson number (Ri), on the oscillatory behavior of the flow were examined over a range of experimental conditions. To seek the individual effect of these parameters, one of them was fixed and the other was varied with certain constraints. Measurements revealed highly periodic oscillations in the laminar region as well as high regularity in transition and turbulent regions. Maximum spectral power profiles at different axial locations indicated the oscillation amplitude increasing until the breakdown of the jet in the turbulent regime. The transition from the laminar to turbulent flow was also investigated. Fast Fourier transform analysis performed in the transition regime showed that the flow oscillates at a unique frequency, which was the same in the upstream laminar flow region. Measured deflection angle data were used in Abel inversion algorithm to construct the helium concentration fields. Instantaneous helium concentration contours revealed changes in the flow structure and evolution of vortical structures during an oscillation cycle. Temporal evolution plots of helium concentration at different axial location showed repeatable oscillations at all axial and radial locations up to the turbulent regime. A cross-correlation technique, applied to find the spatial displacements of the vortical structures, provided correlation coefficient peaks between consecutive schlieren images. Results show that the vortical structure convected and accelerated only in the axial direction.

  9. Visualizing Mobility of Public Transportation System.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Wei; Fu, Chi-Wing; Arisona, Stefan Müller; Erath, Alexander; Qu, Huamin

    2014-12-01

    Public transportation systems (PTSs) play an important role in modern cities, providing shared/massive transportation services that are essential for the general public. However, due to their increasing complexity, designing effective methods to visualize and explore PTS is highly challenging. Most existing techniques employ network visualization methods and focus on showing the network topology across stops while ignoring various mobility-related factors such as riding time, transfer time, waiting time, and round-the-clock patterns. This work aims to visualize and explore passenger mobility in a PTS with a family of analytical tasks based on inputs from transportation researchers. After exploring different design alternatives, we come up with an integrated solution with three visualization modules: isochrone map view for geographical information, isotime flow map view for effective temporal information comparison and manipulation, and OD-pair journey view for detailed visual analysis of mobility factors along routes between specific origin-destination pairs. The isotime flow map linearizes a flow map into a parallel isoline representation, maximizing the visualization of mobility information along the horizontal time axis while presenting clear and smooth pathways from origin to destinations. Moreover, we devise several interactive visual query methods for users to easily explore the dynamics of PTS mobility over space and time. Lastly, we also construct a PTS mobility model from millions of real passenger trajectories, and evaluate our visualization techniques with assorted case studies with the transportation researchers.

  10. Scalar Measurements and Analysis of Helium Jets in Earth Gravity and Microgravity using Rainbow Schlieren Deflectometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yep, Tze Wing

    2001-01-01

    Recent experiments have shown that low-density gas jets injected into a high-density gas undergo an instability mode leading to highly periodic oscillations in the flow field. The transition from laminar to turbulent flow in these jets is abrupt, without a gradual change in scales. Although this type of instability at high Richardson numbers has been attributed to buoyancy, direct physical evidence was not acquired through experiments. In this study, several experiments were conducted in Earth gravity and microgravity to acquire qualitative data on near field flow structure of helium jets injected into air. Microgravity conditions were simulated in the 2.2-second drop tower at NASA Glenn Research Center. The operating parameters of this study included the tube inside diameter, the jet Reynolds number, and the jet Richardson number. Tubes with inside diameters of 19.05 mm and 31.75 mm were used in the experiments conducted in the drop tower. The jet flow was analyzed using quantitative rainbow schlieren deflectometry, a non-intrusive line of sight measurement technique for the whole field. The flow structure was characterized by distributions of angular deflection and the resulting helium mole fraction obtained from color schlieren images taken at 60 Hz. Three sets of experimental data with respect to three schlieren fields of view were acquired for each tube. Results show that the jet in microgravity was up to 70 percent wider than that in Earth gravity. The global jet flow oscillations observed in Earth gravity were absent in microgravity, providing direct experimental evidence that the flow instability in the low-density jet was buoyancy-induced. This study provides quantitative details of temporal flow evolution as the experiments undergo change in gravity in the drop tower.

  11. Full Field Scalar Measurements in a Pulsating Helium Jet using Rainbow Schlieren Deflectometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pasumarthi, Kasyap S.

    2000-01-01

    The flow structure of a pulsating helium jet was investigated using quantitative rainbow schlieren deflectometry. The operating parameters included the tube inside diameter, the jet Reynolds number and the jet Richardson number. The jet structure was characterized by the frequency spectrum, temporal evolution of the oscillations and mean and root-mean-square profiles of the species mole fraction, which in this case, was helium. Experiments were conducted using a variable nozzle facility. Angular deflection data were obtained using rainbow schlieren deflectometry across full field of color images taken at a temporal resolution of 60Hz. The flicker cycle was analyzed by instantaneous rainbow schlieren images, contour plots of deflection angle and helium mole fraction placed sequentially in time. Two observe the flow downstream, the tube was lowered with respect to the optical setup and images were taken at different axial planes. In this way, the laminar, transition and turbulent regions of the jet flow were observed. Abel inversion algorithm was utilized to reconstruct the refractive index field from the measurements of the beam deflection angle. The concentration field was then generated from the refractive index field. The phenomenon of vortex initiation and propagation in the flicker cycle was described by correlating the ray deflection angle and concentration contour plots. Experiments in the flickering jet reveal global oscillation in the flow field. The effect of jet exit Reynolds number and jet Richardson number on the flickering frequency was analyzed. The effect of jet Richardson number was more pronounced than that of the jet exit Reynolds number. The flow field was studies quantitatively in terms of temporal evolution and statistical description of helium mole fraction.

  12. Transportation dynamics on networks of mobile agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Han-Xin; Wang, Wen-Xu; Xie, Yan-Bo; Lai, Ying-Cheng; Wang, Bing-Hong

    2011-01-01

    Most existing works on transportation dynamics focus on networks of a fixed structure, but networks whose nodes are mobile have become widespread, such as cell-phone networks. We introduce a model to explore the basic physics of transportation on mobile networks. Of particular interest is the dependence of the throughput on the speed of agent movement and the communication range. Our computations reveal a hierarchical dependence for the former, while an algebraic power law is found between the throughput and the communication range with the exponent determined by the speed. We develop a physical theory based on the Fokker-Planck equation to explain these phenomena. Our findings provide insights into complex transportation dynamics arising commonly in natural and engineering systems.

  13. Choices for Mobility Independence: Transportation Options for Older Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... In addition to the services described above, some communities have mobility managers who can guide you through the transportation resources and services that are available. Mobility managers know the community-wide transportation service network and understand how it ...

  14. Advances in the helium-jet coupled on-line mass separator RAMA. [Recoil Atom Mass Analyzer

    SciTech Connect

    Moltz, D M; Aysto, J; Cable, M D; Parry, R F; Haustein, P E; Wouters, J M; Cerny, J

    1980-01-01

    General improvements to the on-line mass separator RAMA (Recoil Atom Mass Analyzer) have yielded a greater reliability and efficiency for some elements. A new utilitarian helium-jet chamber has been installed to facilitate quick target and degrader foil changes in addition to a new ion source holder. A higher efficiency hollow-cathode, cathode-extraction ion source, for lower melting point elements (< 1200/sup 0/C) has also been designed. Tests with the beta-delayed proton emitter /sup 37/Ca showed a factor of five increase in yield over the old hollow-cathode, anode-extraction source. A differentially-pumped-tape drive system compatible with both ..gamma..-..gamma.. and ..beta..-..gamma.. experiments has been incorporated into the general detection system. All major operating parameters will soon be monitored by a complete stand-alone microprocessor system which will eventually be upgraded to a closed-loop control system.

  15. Rural transport and population mobility in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Leinbach, T R

    1983-04-01

    Some aspects of mobility behavior were examined within a group of Indonesian village areas. Specifically, the objectives were to investigate for samples of residents the characteristics and locations of extra village employment; the nature of select short, repetitive trip activities with respect to frequency, distance, and mode of travel; and the characteristics of transport ownership and usage in the mobility behavior. The characteristics of contact and movement behavior were compared between a group of villages located on the fringe of large urban areas and another more rural and remote group of villages. Movement behavior was examined in conjunction with and as a possible impact of improved and new rural feeder road construction under the Cash Incentive Rural Works Program of the Indonesia government. The data were obtained from interviews at households in the immediate hinterlands of the feeder road improvements. The selected households were all located within 3 kilometers of the road projects, for few residences were found beyond this distance in the various areas. Proximity to an urban area did not greatly influence the total number of individuals who had obtained outside employment, for the totals were quite similar. And there was no evidence to support the idea that the kotamadya with the largest population in the urban fringe groups had drawn more rural individuals in search of employment opportunities than those kotamadya with smaller proportions. The data did show that many more individuals in the urban fringe groups tended to seek employment either in the nearest kotamadya or other large cities. Nearly 50% in the urban fringe groups working outside found employment in various kotamadya whereas, on the average, only 25% in the more remote, rural groups did so. In general, the information gathered reveals that extravillage employment is quite low in these very poor areas and that, rather than size of city, the information about those opportunities in

  16. Efficient Mobility Summit: Transportation and the Future of Dynamic Mobility Systems

    SciTech Connect

    2015-12-01

    On October 27, 2015, The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) brought together local and national thought leaders to discuss the convergence of connectivity, vehicle automation, and transportation infrastructure investments at the Future Energy Efficient Mobility Workshop. The half-day workshop was held in conjunction with the Colorado Department of Transportation's (CDOT) Transportation Matters Summit and featured four panel sessions that showcased perspectives on efficient mobility from federal and state agencies, automakers and their suppliers, transportation data providers, and freight companies. This summary provides highlights from the meeting's exchanges of ideas and existing applications. Transportation's (CDOT) Transportation Matters Summit and featured four panel sessions that showcased perspectives on efficient mobility from federal and state agencies, automakers and their suppliers, transportation data providers, and freight companies. This summary provides highlights from the meeting's exchanges of ideas and existing applications.

  17. Mobile-host-centric transport protocol for wireless networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Liang; Shu, Yantai; Yang, Zhenyu

    2005-10-01

    Reliable transport protocols such as TCP are tuned to perform well in traditional networks where packet losses occur mostly because of congestion. However, networks with wireless and other lossy links also suffer from significant non-congestion-related losses due to reasons such as bit errors and handoffs. TCP responds to all losses by invoking congestion control and avoidance algorithms, resulting in degraded end-to-end performance in wireless and lossy networks. In case of wired-wireless interaction (WLANs), the wireless link is assumed to be the last hop where most of the loss and delay occurs. Since the mobile host is adjacent to the wireless hops, it is obviously better equipped to obtain first-hand knowledge of the wireless links. In the paper, we proposed a mobile-host-centric transport protocol called MCP (Mobile-host Control Protocol) that is like TCP in its general behavior, but allows for better congestion control and loss recovery in mobile wireless networks. The MCP shifts most transport layer control policies to the mobile host side under all cases (mobile host is a sender or receiver, fixed or mobile, and so on). Therefore, mobile stations can make better transport layer control in time based on the condition of wireless link.

  18. Location Management in a Transport Layer Mobility Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eddy, Wesley M.; Ishac, Joseph

    2005-01-01

    Mobility architectures that place complexity in end nodes rather than in the network interior have many advantageous properties and are becoming popular research topics. Such architectures typically push mobility support into higher layers of the protocol stack than network layer approaches like Mobile IP. The literature is ripe with proposals to provide mobility services in the transport, session, and application layers. In this paper, we focus on a mobility architecture that makes the most significant changes to the transport layer. A common problem amongst all mobility protocols at various layers is location management, which entails translating some form of static identifier into a mobile node's dynamic location. Location management is required for mobile nodes to be able to provide globally-reachable services on-demand to other hosts. In this paper, we describe the challenges of location management in a transport layer mobility architecture, and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of various solutions proposed in the literature. Our conclusion is that, in principle, secure dynamic DNS is most desirable, although it may have current operational limitations. We note that this topic has room for further exploration, and we present this paper largely as a starting point for comparing possible solutions.

  19. High-sensitivity laser spectroscopy with atoms from a cooled helium jet

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, D.A.; Evans, R.M.; Davids, C.N.; Finn, M.A.; Kaufman, S.L.; Greenlees, G.W.

    1983-01-01

    We have developed a cryogenic He-jet system which efficiently transports radioactive atoms produced on-line at the Argonne National Laboratory Tandem-Linac Accelertor away from the production region and forms them into a cool atomic beam. This atomic beam will be probed with high sensitivity laser spectroscopy using the photon burst method. The ultimate goal of this work is to determine the sizes, shapes, and magnetic moments of short-lived nuclei through their atomic hyperfine structure. Preliminary measurements with the He-jet system and the adaption of the photon burst method to this new geometry are described.

  20. Urban transportation: Perspectives on mobility and choice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sincoff, M. Z. (Editor); Dajani, J. S. (Editor); Arnold, G. R.; Bird, J. W.; Brooks, C. M. (Editor); Cobb, W. E.; Cross, J. E.; Darby, L. F.; Erb, N. H.; Ficht, J. C.

    1974-01-01

    A study of urban transportation systems are presented characterized by intensive scrutiny of many ideas, philosophies, and academic perspectives. This report is intended to communicate some dimensions of the urban transportation problem to the general public.

  1. Numerical Analysis of Flow Evolution in a Helium Jet Injected into Ambient Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Satti, Rajani P.; Agrawal, Ajay K.

    2005-01-01

    A computational model to study the stability characteristics of an evolving buoyant helium gas jet in ambient air environment is presented. Numerical formulation incorporates a segregated approach to solve for the transport equations of helium mass fraction coupled with the conservation equations of mixture mass and momentum using a staggered grid method. The operating parameters correspond to the Reynolds number varying from 30 to 300 to demarcate the flow dynamics in oscillating and non-oscillating regimes. Computed velocity and concentration fields were used to analyze the flow structure in the evolving jet. For Re=300 case, results showed that an instability mode that sets in during the evolution process in Earth gravity is absent in zero gravity, signifying the importance of buoyancy. Though buoyancy initiates the instability, below a certain jet exit velocity, diffusion dominates the entrainment process to make the jet non-oscillatory as observed for the Re=30 case. Initiation of the instability was found to be dependent on the interaction of buoyancy and momentum forces along the jet shear layer.

  2. Making Transporter Models for Drug-Drug Interaction Prediction Mobile.

    PubMed

    Ekins, Sean; Clark, Alex M; Wright, Stephen H

    2015-10-01

    The past decade has seen increased numbers of studies publishing ligand-based computational models for drug transporters. Although they generally use small experimental data sets, these models can provide insights into structure-activity relationships for the transporter. In addition, such models have helped to identify new compounds as substrates or inhibitors of transporters of interest. We recently proposed that many transporters are promiscuous and may require profiling of new chemical entities against multiple substrates for a specific transporter. Furthermore, it should be noted that virtually all of the published ligand-based transporter models are only accessible to those involved in creating them and, consequently, are rarely shared effectively. One way to surmount this is to make models shareable or more accessible. The development of mobile apps that can access such models is highlighted here. These apps can be used to predict ligand interactions with transporters using Bayesian algorithms. We used recently published transporter data sets (MATE1, MATE2K, OCT2, OCTN2, ASBT, and NTCP) to build preliminary models in a commercial tool and in open software that can deliver the model in a mobile app. In addition, several transporter data sets extracted from the ChEMBL database were used to illustrate how such public data and models can be shared. Predicting drug-drug interactions for various transporters using computational models is potentially within reach of anyone with an iPhone or iPad. Such tools could help prioritize which substrates should be used for in vivo drug-drug interaction testing and enable open sharing of models. PMID:26199424

  3. Mobile transporter path planning using a genetic algorithm approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baffes, Paul; Wang, Lui

    1988-01-01

    The use of an optimization technique known as a genetic algorithm for solving the mobile transporter path planning problem is investigated. The mobile transporter is a traveling robotic vehicle proposed for the Space Station which must be able to reach any point of the structure autonomously. Specific elements of the genetic algorithm are explored in both a theoretical and experimental sense. Recent developments in genetic algorithm theory are shown to be particularly effective in a path planning problem domain, though problem areas can be cited which require more research. However, trajectory planning problems are common in space systems and the genetic algorithm provides an attractive alternative to the classical techniques used to solve these problems.

  4. Mobile Transporter Path Planning Using A Genetic Algorithm Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baffes, Paul; Wang, Lui

    1988-10-01

    The use of an optimization technique known as a genetic algorithm for solving the mobile transporter path planning problem is investigated. The mobile transporter is a traveling robotic vehicle proposed for the space station which must be able to reach any point of the structure autonomously. Specific elements of the genetic algorithm are explored in both a theoretical and experimental sense. Recent developments in genetic algorithm theory are shown to be particularly effective in a path planning problem domain, though problem areas can be cited which require more research. However, trajectory planning problems are common in space systems and the genetic algorithm provides an attractive alternative to the classical techniques used to solve these problems.

  5. Polar Transport Related to Mobilization of Plant Constituents

    PubMed Central

    Zaerr, J. B.; Mitchell, J. W.

    1967-01-01

    Indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), 2-methoxy-3,6-dichlorobenzoic acid (dicamba), sucrose, and mannitol, were tested for polar transport through 5-mm hypocotyl segments of bean (Phaseolus vulgaris var. Pinto) seedlings. All 4 compounds were transported in a polar direction. Autoradiographs of segments through which 14C-labeled compounds were transported indicated areas of 14C concentration near the morphological base of segments. There was a direct correlation of IAA transport with the ability to initiate roots as well as with the degree of 14C accumulation in the morphological base of segments. Unlabeled IAA in lanolin applied to segments appeared to reduce transport of IAA-14C through those segments when measured by the accumulation of 14C in a receiver-block of agar, caused an increase in 14C accumulation in the region to which the unlabeled IAA was applied, and also caused a decrease in accumulation of 14C at the morphological base of upright segments. Histological studies showed that IAA accelerated cell division and the formation of root primordia particularly at the basal ends, and that these responses sometimes occurred at the expense of cell proliferation at the apical ends of segments. The data presented support the hypothesis that polar movement of IAA, and other endogenous and exogenous substances, in isolated stem segments was controlled by mobilization and utilization of plant constituents at the growth centers. Images PMID:16656584

  6. Potential chlordane mobilization and transport at a hazardous waste site

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson-Logan, L.R.; Klaine, S.J. )

    1990-01-01

    Elevated levels of the insecticide, chlordane, have been found in soils and sediments in the vicinity of the superfund site, North Hollywood Dump in Memphis, Tennessee. The site is a closed municipal/industrial landfill located on the alluvial plain and abandoned channels of the Wolf River. The general direction of the ground water flow is radically away from the dump but towards the river. In the following study, batch solubility and sorption experiments in combination with leaching studies using DOC were used to determine the potential for chlordane mobilization and transport at the site.

  7. Object Transportation by Two Mobile Robots with Hand Carts.

    PubMed

    Sakuyama, Takuya; Figueroa Heredia, Jorge David; Ogata, Taiki; Hara, Tatsunori; Ota, Jun

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes a methodology by which two small mobile robots can grasp, lift, and transport large objects using hand carts. The specific problems involve generating robot actions and determining the hand cart positions to achieve the stable loading of objects onto the carts. These problems are solved using nonlinear optimization, and we propose an algorithm for generating robot actions. The proposed method was verified through simulations and experiments using actual devices in a real environment. The proposed method could reduce the number of robots required to transport large objects with 50-60%. In addition, we demonstrated the efficacy of this task in real environments where errors occur in robot sensing and movement. PMID:27433499

  8. Object Transportation by Two Mobile Robots with Hand Carts

    PubMed Central

    Hara, Tatsunori

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes a methodology by which two small mobile robots can grasp, lift, and transport large objects using hand carts. The specific problems involve generating robot actions and determining the hand cart positions to achieve the stable loading of objects onto the carts. These problems are solved using nonlinear optimization, and we propose an algorithm for generating robot actions. The proposed method was verified through simulations and experiments using actual devices in a real environment. The proposed method could reduce the number of robots required to transport large objects with 50–60%. In addition, we demonstrated the efficacy of this task in real environments where errors occur in robot sensing and movement. PMID:27433499

  9. 41 CFR 302-10.5 - May I transport a mobile home over water?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false May I transport a mobile home over water? 302-10.5 Section 302-10.5 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System RELOCATION ALLOWANCES TRANSPORTATION AND STORAGE OF PROPERTY 10-ALLOWANCES FOR TRANSPORTATION OF MOBILE HOMES AND BOATS USED AS...

  10. 41 CFR 302-10.5 - May I transport a mobile home over water?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false May I transport a mobile home over water? 302-10.5 Section 302-10.5 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System RELOCATION ALLOWANCES TRANSPORTATION AND STORAGE OF PROPERTY 10-ALLOWANCES FOR TRANSPORTATION OF MOBILE HOMES AND BOATS USED AS...

  11. Conceptual design proposal: HUGO global range/mobility transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, Tom; Perretta, Dave; Mcbane, Doug; Morin, Greg; Thomas, Greg; Woodward, Joe; Gulakowski, Steve

    1993-01-01

    With the collapse of the former Soviet Union and the emergence of the United Nations actively pursuing a peace keeping role in world affairs, the United States has been forced into a position as the world's leading peace enforcer. It is still a very dangerous world with seemingly never ending ideological, territorial, and economic disputes requiring the U.S. to maintain a credible deterrent posture in this uncertain environment. This has created an urgent need to rapidly transport large numbers of troops and equipment from the continental United States (CONUS) to any potential world trouble spot by means of a global range/mobility transport aircraft. The most recent examples being Operation Desert Shield/Storm and Operation Restore Hope. To meet this challenge head-on, a request for proposal (RFP) was developed and incorporated into the 1992/1993 AIAA/McDonnell Douglas Corporation Graduate Team Aircraft Design Competition. The RFP calls for the conceptual design and justification of a large aircraft capable of power projecting a significant military force without surface transportation reliance.

  12. On mobile element transport in heated Abee. [chondrite thermal metamorphism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ikramuddin, M.; Lipschutz, M. E.; Gibson, E. K., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    Abee chondrite samples were heated at 700 C for one week at 0.00001 to 0.001 atm Ne or at 0.00001 atm H2. Samples heated in Ne showed greater loss of Bi and Se and greater retention of Zn than those heated in H2. An inverse relationship between Zn retention and ambient Ne pressure was found. Seven trace elements (Ag, Co, Cs, Ga, In, Te, and Tl) were retained or lost to the same extent regardless of the heating conditions. Variations in the apparent activation energy for C above and below 700 C suggest that diffusive loss from different hosts and/or different mobile transport processes over the temperature range may have been in effect.

  13. Colloid Mobilization and Transport during Capillary Fringe Fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aramrak, Surachet; Flury, Markus

    2016-04-01

    Capillary fringe fluctuations due to changing water tables lead to displacement of air-water interfaces in soils and sediments. These moving air-water interfaces can mobilize colloids. We visualized colloids interacting with moving air-water interfaces during capillary fringe fluctuations by confocal microscopy. We simulated capillary fringe fluctuations in a glass-bead filled column. Confocal images showed that the capillary fringe fluctuations affect colloid transport behavior. Hydrophilic negatively-charged colloids initially suspended in the aqueous phase were deposited at the solid-water interface after a drainage passage, but then were removed by subsequent capillary fringe fluctuations. The colloids that were initially attached to the wet or dry glass bead surface were detached by moving air-water interfaces in the capillary fringe. Hydrophilic negatively-charged colloids did not attach to static air-bubbles, but hydrophobic negatively-charged and hydrophilic positively-charged colloids did.

  14. Colloid mobilization and transport during capillary fringe fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Aramrak, Surachet; Flury, Markus; Harsh, James B; Zollars, Richard L

    2014-07-01

    Capillary fringe fluctuations due to changing water tables lead to displacement of air-water interfaces in soils and sediments. These moving air-water interfaces can mobilize colloids. We visualized colloids interacting with moving air-water interfaces during capillary fringe fluctuations by confocal microscopy. We simulated capillary fringe fluctuations in a glass-bead-filled column. We studied four specific conditions: (1) colloids suspended in the aqueous phase, (2) colloids attached to the glass beads in an initially wet porous medium, (3) colloids attached to the glass beads in an initially dry porous medium, and (4) colloids suspended in the aqueous phase with the presence of a static air bubble. Confocal images confirmed that the capillary fringe fluctuations affect colloid transport behavior. Hydrophilic negatively charged colloids initially suspended in the aqueous phase were deposited at the solid-water interface after a drainage passage, but then were removed by subsequent capillary fringe fluctuations. The colloids that were initially attached to the wet or dry glass bead surface were detached by moving air-water interfaces in the capillary fringe. Hydrophilic negatively charged colloids did not attach to static air-bubbles, but hydrophobic negatively charged and hydrophilic positively charged colloids did. Our results demonstrate that capillary fringe fluctuations are an effective means for colloid mobilization.

  15. COLLOID MOBILIZATION AND TRANSPORT IN CONTAMINANT PLUMES: FILED EXPERIMENTS, LABORATORY EXPERIMENTS, AND MODELING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The major hypothesis driving this research, that the transport of colloids in a contaminant plume is limited by the advance of the chemical agent causing colloid mobilization, was tested by (1) examining the dependence of colloid transport and mobilization on chemical perturbatio...

  16. Transportation and Aging: A Research Agenda for Advancing Safe Mobility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickerson, Anne E.; Molnar, Lisa J.; Eby, David W.; Adler, Geri; Bedard, Michel; Berg-Weger, Marla; Classen, Sherrilene; Foley, Daniel; Horowitz, Amy; Kerschner, Helen; Page, Oliver; Silverstein, Nina M.; Staplin, Loren; Trujillo, Leonard

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: We review what we currently know about older driver safety and mobility, and we highlight important research needs in a number of key areas that hold promise for achieving the safety and mobility goals for the aging baby boomers and future generations of older drivers. Design and Methods: Through the use of a framework for transportation…

  17. Assessment of a Regional Transportation Education Alliance To Improve Mobility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuhn, Beverly T.

    This report examines issues related to transportation education, with the objective of developing and packaging transportation-related materials for use in college and university transportation education programs. The study was conducted by the Southwest Region University Transportation Center (SWUTC) region, but it is expected that the results…

  18. Helium jet dispersion to atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khan, Hasna J.

    1986-01-01

    On the event of loss of vacuum guard of superinsulated helium dewar, high rate of heat transfer into the tank occurs. The rapid boiling of liquid helium causes the burst disk to rupture at four atmospheres and consequently the helium passes to the atmosphere through vent lines. The gaseous helium forms a vertical buoyant jet as it exits the vent line into a stagnant environment. Characterization of the gaseous jet is achieved by detailed analysis of the axial and radial dependence of the flow parameters.

  19. Mobile bacteria and transport of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, M.B.; Lion, L.W. )

    1993-10-01

    Sorption of hydrophobic pollutants such as polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) to soil and aquifer materials can severely retard their mobility and the time course of their removal. Because mobile colloids may enhance the mobility of hydrophobic pollutants in porous media and indigenous bacteria are generally colloidal in size, bacterial isolates from soil and subsurface environments were tested for their ability to enhance the transport of phenanthrene, a model PAH, in aquifer sand. Batch isotherm experiments were performed to measure the ability of selected bacteria, including 14 isolates from a manufactured gas plant waste site, to sorb [sup 14]C-phenanthrene and to determine whether the presence of the suspended cells would reduce the distribution coefficient (K[sub d]) for phenanthrene with the sand. Column experiments were then used to test the mobility of isolates that reduced the K[sub d] for phenanthrene and to test the most mobile isolate for its ability to enhance the transport of phenanthrene. All of the isolates tested passively sorbed phenanthrene, and most but not all of the isolates reduced the K[sub d] for phenanthrene. Some, but not all, of those isolates were mobile in column experiments. The most mobile isolate significantly enhanced the transport of phenanthrene in aquifer sand, reducing its retardation coefficient by 25% at a cell concentration of [approximately]5 x 10[sup 7] ml[sup [minus]1]. The experimental results demonstrated that mobile bacteria may enhance the transport of PAHs in the subsurface.

  20. Mobile bacteria and transport of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons in porous media.

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, M B; Lion, L W

    1993-01-01

    Sorption of hydrophobic pollutants such as polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) to soil and aquifer materials can severely retard their mobility and the time course of their removal. Because mobile colloids may enhance the mobility of hydrophobic pollutants in porous media and indigenous bacteria are generally colloidal in size, bacterial isolates from soil and subsurface environments were tested for their ability to enhance the transport of phenanthrene, a model PAH, in aquifer sand. Batch isotherm experiments were performed to measure the ability of selected bacteria, including 14 isolates from a manufactured gas plant waste site, to sorb 14C-phenanthrene and to determine whether the presence of the suspended cells would reduce the distribution coefficient (Kd) for phenanthrene with the sand. Column experiments were then used to test the mobility of isolates that reduced the Kd for phenanthrene and to test the most mobile isolate for its ability to enhance the transport of phenanthrene. All of the isolates tested passively sorbed phenanthrene, and most but not all of the isolates reduced the Kd for phenanthrene. Some, but not all, of those isolates were mobile in column experiments. The most mobile isolate significantly enhanced the transport of phenanthrene in aquifer sand, reducing its retardation coefficient by 25% at a cell concentration of approximately 5 x 10(7) ml-1. The experimental results demonstrated that mobile bacteria may enhance the transport of PAHs in the subsurface. PMID:8250555

  1. Decreased Salinity and Actinide Mobility: Colloid-Facilitated Transport or pH Change?

    PubMed

    Haliena, Brian; Zheng, Hangping; Melson, Nathan; Kaplan, Daniel I; Barnett, Mark O

    2016-01-19

    Colloids have been implicated in influencing the transport of actinides and other adsorbed contaminants in the subsurface, significantly increasing their mobility. Such colloid-facilitated transport can be induced by changes in groundwater chemistry that occur, for example, when high ionic strength contaminant plumes are displaced by infiltrating rainwater. We studied the transport and mobility of Th(IV), as an analogue for Pu(IV) and other tetravalent actinides [An(IV)], in saturated columns packed with a natural heterogeneous subsurface sandy sediment. As expected, decreases in ionic strength both promoted the mobilization of natural colloids and enhanced the transport of previously adsorbed Th(IV). However, colloid-facilitated transport played only a minor role in enhancing the transport of Th(IV). Instead, the enhanced transport of Th(IV) was primarily due to the pH-dependent desorption of Th(IV) caused by the change in ionic strength. In contrast, the adsorption of Th(IV) had a marked impact on the surface charge of the sandy sediment, significantly affecting the mobility of the colloids. In the absence of Th(IV), changes in ionic strength were ineffective at releasing colloids while in the presence of Th(IV), decreases in ionic strength liberated significant concentrations of colloids. Therefore, under the conditions of our experiments which mimicked acidic, high ionic strength groundwater contaminant plumes, Th(IV) had a much greater effect on colloid transport than colloids had on Th(IV) transport.

  2. SEMICONDUCTOR DEVICES: Low-field mobility and carrier transport mechanism transition in nanoscale MOSFETs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hongwei, Liu; Runsheng, Wang; Ru, Huang; Xing, Zhang

    2010-04-01

    This paper extends the flux scattering method to study the carrier transport property in nanoscale MOSFETs with special emphasis on the low-field mobility and the transport mechanism transition. A unified analytical expression for the low-field mobility is proposed, which covers the entire regime from drift-diffusion transport to quasi-ballistic transport in 1-D, 2-D and 3-D MOSFETs. Two key parameters, namely the long-channel low-field mobility (μ0) and the low-field mean free path (λ0), are obtained from the experimental data, and the transport mechanism transition in MOSFETs is further discussed both experimentally and theoretically. Our work shows that λ0 is available to characterize the inherent transition of the carrier transport mechanism rather than the low-field mobility. The mobility reduces in the MOSFET with the shrinking of the channel length; however, λ0 is nearly a constant, and λ0 can be used as the “entry criterion" to determine whether the device begins to operate under quasi-ballistic transport to some extent.

  3. Simulation of Molecular Transport in Systems Containing Mobile Obstacles.

    PubMed

    Polanowski, Piotr; Sikorski, Andrzej

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we investigate the movement of molecules in crowded environments with obstacles undergoing Brownian motion by means of extensive Monte Carlo simulations. Our investigations were performed using the dynamic lattice liquid model, which was based on the cooperative movement concept and allowed to mimic systems at high densities where the motion of all elements (obstacles as well as moving particles) were highly correlated. The crowded environments are modeled on a two-dimensional triangular lattice containing obstacles (particles whose mobility was significantly reduced) moving by a Brownian motion. The subdiffusive motion of both elements in the system was analyzed. It was shown that the percolation transition does not exist in such systems in spite of the cooperative character of the particles' motion. The reduction of the obstacle mobility leads to the longer caging of liquid particles by mobile obstacles. PMID:27387448

  4. 41 CFR 302-10.5 - May I transport a mobile home over water?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false May I transport a mobile home over water? 302-10.5 Section 302-10.5 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System RELOCATION ALLOWANCES TRANSPORTATION AND STORAGE OF PROPERTY 10-ALLOWANCES...

  5. Neuronal Activity and Glutamate Uptake Decrease Mitochondrial Mobility in Astrocytes and Position Mitochondria Near Glutamate Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Joshua G.; O'Donnell, John C.; Takano, Hajime; Coulter, Douglas A.

    2014-01-01

    Within neurons, mitochondria are nonuniformly distributed and are retained at sites of high activity and metabolic demand. Glutamate transport and the concomitant activation of the Na+/K+-ATPase represent a substantial energetic demand on astrocytes. We hypothesized that mitochondrial mobility within astrocytic processes might be regulated by neuronal activity and glutamate transport. We imaged organotypic hippocampal slice cultures of rat, in which astrocytes maintain their highly branched morphologies and express glutamate transporters. Using time-lapse confocal microscopy, the mobility of mitochondria within individual astrocytic processes and neuronal dendrites was tracked. Within neurons, a greater percentage of mitochondria were mobile than in astrocytes. Furthermore, they moved faster and farther than in astrocytes. Inhibiting neuronal activity with tetrodotoxin (TTX) increased the percentage of mobile mitochondria in astrocytes. Mitochondrial movement in astrocytes was inhibited by vinblastine and cytochalasin D, demonstrating that this mobility depends on both the microtubule and actin cytoskeletons. Inhibition of glutamate transport tripled the percentage of mobile mitochondria in astrocytes. Conversely, application of the transporter substrate d-aspartate reversed the TTX-induced increase in the percentage of mobile mitochondria. Inhibition of reversed Na+/Ca2+ exchange also increased the percentage of mitochondria that were mobile. Last, we demonstrated that neuronal activity increases the probability that mitochondria appose GLT-1 particles within astrocyte processes, without changing the proximity of GLT-1 particles to VGLUT1. These results imply that neuronal activity and the resulting clearance of glutamate by astrocytes regulate the movement of astrocytic mitochondria and suggest a mechanism by which glutamate transporters might retain mitochondria at sites of glutamate uptake. PMID:24478345

  6. Transportation Electrification Education Partnership for Green Jobs and Sustainable Mobility

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Huei; Mi, Chris; Gover, James

    2013-06-28

    This collaborative educational project between the University of Michigan—Ann Arbor, University of Michigan—Dearborn and the Kettering University successfully executed almost all the elements we proposed to do. In the original proposal, we proposed to develop four graduate courses, six undergraduate courses, four professional short courses, a K-12 electric vehicle education kit, a Saturday morning seminar series, and a set of consumer education material to support the advancement of transportation electrification. The first four deliverables were all successfully developed and offered. When we held the kick-off meeting in NETL in Morgantown back in early 2010 with all the ten ARRA education teams, however, it quickly became clear that among the ten ARRA education grantee teams, our proposed “consume education” activities are not better or with the potential to create bigger impact than some of activities proposed in other teams. For example, the Odyssey 2010 event held by the West Virginia University team had planned and successfully reached to more than 230,000 attendees, which is way more than what our proposed 100k event could ever reach. It was under the suggestion of Joseph Quaranta, the ARRA education Program Director at that time, that we should coordinate and eliminate redundancy. The resources should then be focused on activities that have less overlap. Therefore, the originally proposed activities: Saturday morning seminar series, and a set of consumer education material were dropped from our scope. We expanded the scope of our “education kit” activity to include some educational materials, mainly in the form of videos. The target audience also changed from general public to K-12 students. The majority of the project cost (~70%) goes toward the establishment of three undergraduate laboratories, which provides critically needed hands-on learning experience for next-generation green mobility engineers. We are very proud that the ARRA money

  7. Ion mobility and transport barriers in the tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, H.; Hazeltine, R.D. ); Zhang, Y.Z. ); Valanju, P.M. )

    1993-12-01

    The character of charged particle motion in an axisymmetric toroidal system with a constant radial electric field is investigated both analytically and numerically. Ion radial mobility caused by the combined effects of the radial electric field and charge exchange is found. A simple moment argument in the banana regime matches the simulation results well. Relation of present work and high confinement (H-mode) experiment is also discussed.

  8. Ion mobility and transport barriers in the tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, H.; Hazeltine, R.D.; Valanju, P.M.; Zhang, Y.Z.

    1993-06-01

    The character of charged particle motion in an axisymmetric toroidal system with a constant radial electric field is investigated both analytically and numerically. Ion radial mobility caused by the combined effects of the radial electric field and charge exchange is found. A simple moment argument in the banana regime matches the simulation results well. Relation of present work and high confinement (H-mode) experiment is also discussed.

  9. Theory of transport phenomena in polycrystalline lead chalcogenide films. Mobility. Nondegenerate statistics

    SciTech Connect

    Atakulov, Sh. B. Zaynolobidinova, S. M.; Nabiev, G. A.; Nabiyev, M. B.; Yuldashev, A. A.

    2013-07-15

    The mobility of nondegenerate electrons in quasi-single-crystal and polycrystalline PbTe films is experimentally investigated. The results obtained are compared with the data for bulk crystals at the same charge-carrier concentration. Under the assumption of limitation of the charge-carrier mobility by intercrystallite potential barriers, electron transport in an electric field is theoretically considered. The theoretical results are in good agreement with the experiment.

  10. Mobile Phone Use Behaviors and Postures on Public Transportation Systems

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Huey-Wen; Hwang, Yaw-Huei

    2016-01-01

    Mobile phones are common in our daily life, but the users’ preferences for postures or screen operating styles have not been studied. This was a cross-sectional and observational study. We randomly sampled passengers who used mobile phones on the Mass Rapid Transit (MRT) system in metropolitan Taipei. A checklist was used to observe their body postures and screen operating styles while sitting or standing. As a result, 1,230 subjects from 400 trips were observed. Overall, of all the passengers who were sitting, 41% of them were using mobile phones. The majority of the tasks involved browsing (84%) with their phones in a portrait orientation (93%). Different-hand holding/operating was the most commonly used operating style while sitting (46%) and same-hand holding/operating was the most common while standing (46%). The distribution of screen operating styles was significantly different for those sitting than for those standing and for different genders and age groups. The most frequently observed postures while sitting were having one’s trunk against a backrest, feet on the floor and with or without an arm supported (58%). As for the users who were standing, the both- and different-hands groups had a high proportion of arms unsupported, feet on the floor and either their trunk supported or not. In contrast, the same-hand group tended to have their trunk unsupported, were holding a pole or handstrap and had both feet on floor. Further studies are warranted to characterize the ergonomic exposure of these commonly used postures and operating styles, and our results will help guide the selection of experimental conditions for laboratory settings. PMID:26828797

  11. Mobile Phone Use Behaviors and Postures on Public Transportation Systems.

    PubMed

    Liang, Huey-Wen; Hwang, Yaw-Huei

    2016-01-01

    Mobile phones are common in our daily life, but the users' preferences for postures or screen operating styles have not been studied. This was a cross-sectional and observational study. We randomly sampled passengers who used mobile phones on the Mass Rapid Transit (MRT) system in metropolitan Taipei. A checklist was used to observe their body postures and screen operating styles while sitting or standing. As a result, 1,230 subjects from 400 trips were observed. Overall, of all the passengers who were sitting, 41% of them were using mobile phones. The majority of the tasks involved browsing (84%) with their phones in a portrait orientation (93%). Different-hand holding/operating was the most commonly used operating style while sitting (46%) and same-hand holding/operating was the most common while standing (46%). The distribution of screen operating styles was significantly different for those sitting than for those standing and for different genders and age groups. The most frequently observed postures while sitting were having one's trunk against a backrest, feet on the floor and with or without an arm supported (58%). As for the users who were standing, the both- and different-hands groups had a high proportion of arms unsupported, feet on the floor and either their trunk supported or not. In contrast, the same-hand group tended to have their trunk unsupported, were holding a pole or handstrap and had both feet on floor. Further studies are warranted to characterize the ergonomic exposure of these commonly used postures and operating styles, and our results will help guide the selection of experimental conditions for laboratory settings.

  12. Mobile Phone Use Behaviors and Postures on Public Transportation Systems.

    PubMed

    Liang, Huey-Wen; Hwang, Yaw-Huei

    2016-01-01

    Mobile phones are common in our daily life, but the users' preferences for postures or screen operating styles have not been studied. This was a cross-sectional and observational study. We randomly sampled passengers who used mobile phones on the Mass Rapid Transit (MRT) system in metropolitan Taipei. A checklist was used to observe their body postures and screen operating styles while sitting or standing. As a result, 1,230 subjects from 400 trips were observed. Overall, of all the passengers who were sitting, 41% of them were using mobile phones. The majority of the tasks involved browsing (84%) with their phones in a portrait orientation (93%). Different-hand holding/operating was the most commonly used operating style while sitting (46%) and same-hand holding/operating was the most common while standing (46%). The distribution of screen operating styles was significantly different for those sitting than for those standing and for different genders and age groups. The most frequently observed postures while sitting were having one's trunk against a backrest, feet on the floor and with or without an arm supported (58%). As for the users who were standing, the both- and different-hands groups had a high proportion of arms unsupported, feet on the floor and either their trunk supported or not. In contrast, the same-hand group tended to have their trunk unsupported, were holding a pole or handstrap and had both feet on floor. Further studies are warranted to characterize the ergonomic exposure of these commonly used postures and operating styles, and our results will help guide the selection of experimental conditions for laboratory settings. PMID:26828797

  13. Third-order transport properties of ion-swarms from mobility and diffusion coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koutselos, Andreas D.

    2005-08-01

    A method is presented for the calculation of third order transport properties of ions drifting in gases under the action of an electrostatic field with the use of mobility and ion-diffusion coefficients. The approach is based on a three-temperature treatment of the Boltzmann equation for the ion transport and follows the development of generalized Einstein relations (GER), between diffusion coefficients and mobility. The whole procedure is tested by comparison with numerical and molecular dynamics simulation results for three available alkali ion-noble gas systems. Extension to systems involving internal degrees of freedom and inelastic collisions is shown to follow the development of molecular GER.

  14. Enhancing Transportation Education Using Mobile Devices and Applications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallup, Jennifer; Lamothe, Saron N.; Gallup, Adam

    2015-01-01

    The most salient aspect of independent living and successful post-high school transition to employment is having the ability to independently use transportation. Adolescents and young adults with disabilities continue to experience significantly lower employment rates than their peers without disabilities (Wagner et al., 2003). One way to support…

  15. Origin of the relatively low transport mobility of graphene grown through chemical vapor deposition

    PubMed Central

    Song, H. S.; Li, S. L.; Miyazaki, H.; Sato, S.; Hayashi, K.; Yamada, A.; Yokoyama, N.; Tsukagoshi, K.

    2012-01-01

    The reasons for the relatively low transport mobility of graphene grown through chemical vapor deposition (CVD-G), which include point defect, surface contamination, and line defect, were analyzed in the current study. A series of control experiments demonstrated that the determinant factor for the low transport mobility of CVD-G did not arise from point defects or surface contaminations, but stemmed from line defects induced by grain boundaries. Electron microscopies characterized the presence of grain boundaries and indicated the polycrystalline nature of the CVD-G. Field-effect transistors based on CVD-G without the grain boundary obtained a transport mobility comparative to that of Kish graphene, which directly indicated the detrimental effect of grain boundaries. The effect of grain boundary on transport mobility was qualitatively explained using a potential barrier model. Furthermore, the conduction mechanism of CVD-G was also investigated using the temperature dependence measurements. This study can help understand the intrinsic transport features of CVD-G. PMID:22468224

  16. PLANT RHIZOSPHERE EFFECTS ON METAL MOBILIZATION AND TRANSPORT

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Teresa W.-M; Higashi, Richard M.; Crowley, David E.

    2000-12-31

    The myriad of human activities including strategic and energy development at various DOE installations have resulted in the contamination of soils and waterways that can seriously threaten human and ecosystem health. Development of efficacious and economical remediation technologies is needed to ameliorate these immensely costly problems. Bioremediation (both plant and microbe-based) has promising potential to meet this demand but still requires advances in fundamental knowledge. For bioremediation of heavy metals, the three-way interaction of plant root, microbial community, and soil organic matter (SOM) in the rhizosphere is critically important for long-term sustainability but often underconsidered. Particularly urgent is the need to understand processes that lead to metal ion stabilization in soils, which is crucial to all of the goals of bioremediation: removal, stabilization, and transformation. We have developed the tools for probing the chemistry of plant rhizosphere and generated information regarding the role of root exudation and metabolism for metal mobilization and sequestration.

  17. Plant Rhizosphere Effects on Metal Mobilization and Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Teresa W.-M; Crowley, David; Higashi, Richard M.

    1999-06-01

    A mechanistic understanding of mobilization or immobilization of nutrient and pollutant metal ions by plants is largely lacking. It begins with a lack of knowledge on the chemical nature of rhizosphere components that are reactive with metal ions. This fundamental knowledge is critical to the design and implementation of phytoremediation for metal-contaminated DOE sites. Therefore, the objectives of this project include (1) To obtain a comprehensive composition of major organic components in plant root exudates as a function of different metal ions and plant species; (2) To examine plant metabolic response(s) to these metal ion treatments, with emphasis on production of metal reactive compounds; (3) To investigate the effect(s) of soil microbial (e.g. mycorrhizae) association on (1) and (2).

  18. The Sustainable Mobility Learning Laboratory: Interactive Web-Based Education on Transportation and the Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schweitzer, Lisa A.; Marr, Linsey C.; Linford, John C.; Darby, Mary Ashburn

    2008-01-01

    The transportation field has for many years been dominated by engineers and other technical specialists. This article describes the Sustainable Mobility Learning Lab (SMLL), a Web-based tool designed to support classroom and university outreach activities to help initiate a more inclusive, nontechnical discussion about the role of transportation…

  19. 41 CFR 302-10.400 - What policies must we establish for authorizing transportation of a mobile home?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What policies must we... Agency Responsibilities § 302-10.400 What policies must we establish for authorizing transportation of a mobile home? You must establish policies for authorizing transportation of a mobile home that...

  20. 41 CFR 302-10.400 - What policies must we establish for authorizing transportation of a mobile home?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What policies must we... Agency Responsibilities § 302-10.400 What policies must we establish for authorizing transportation of a mobile home? You must establish policies for authorizing transportation of a mobile home that...

  1. 41 CFR 302-10.400 - What policies must we establish for authorizing transportation of a mobile home?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What policies must we... Agency Responsibilities § 302-10.400 What policies must we establish for authorizing transportation of a mobile home? You must establish policies for authorizing transportation of a mobile home that...

  2. COLLOID MOBILIZATION AND TRANSPORT IN CONTAMINANT PLUMES: FIELD EXPERIMENTS, LABORATORY EXPERIMENTS, AND MODELING (EPA/600/S-99/001)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The major hypothesis driving this research, that the transport of colloids in a contaminant plume is limited by the advance of the chemical agent causing colloid mobilization, was tested by (1) examining the dependence of colloid transport and mobilization on chemical perturbatio...

  3. AllAboard: Visual Exploration of Cellphone Mobility Data to Optimise Public Transport.

    PubMed

    Di Lorenzo, G; Sbodio, M; Calabrese, F; Berlingerio, M; Pinelli, F; Nair, R

    2016-02-01

    The deep penetration of mobile phones offers cities the ability to opportunistically monitor citizens' mobility and use data-driven insights to better plan and manage services. With large scale data on mobility patterns, operators can move away from the costly, mostly survey based, transportation planning processes, to a more data-centric view, that places the instrumented user at the center of development. In this framework, using mobile phone data to perform transit analysis and optimization represents a new frontier with significant societal impact, especially in developing countries. In this paper we present AllAboard, an intelligent tool that analyses cellphone data to help city authorities in visually exploring urban mobility and optimizing public transport. This is performed within a self contained tool, as opposed to the current solutions which rely on a combination of several distinct tools for analysis, reporting, optimisation and planning. An interactive user interface allows transit operators to visually explore the travel demand in both space and time, correlate it with the transit network, and evaluate the quality of service that a transit network provides to the citizens at very fine grain. Operators can visually test scenarios for transit network improvements, and compare the expected impact on the travellers' experience. The system has been tested using real telecommunication data for the city of Abidjan, Ivory Coast, and evaluated from a data mining, optimisation and user prospective.

  4. AllAboard: Visual Exploration of Cellphone Mobility Data to Optimise Public Transport.

    PubMed

    Di Lorenzo, G; Sbodio, M; Calabrese, F; Berlingerio, M; Pinelli, F; Nair, R

    2016-02-01

    The deep penetration of mobile phones offers cities the ability to opportunistically monitor citizens' mobility and use data-driven insights to better plan and manage services. With large scale data on mobility patterns, operators can move away from the costly, mostly survey based, transportation planning processes, to a more data-centric view, that places the instrumented user at the center of development. In this framework, using mobile phone data to perform transit analysis and optimization represents a new frontier with significant societal impact, especially in developing countries. In this paper we present AllAboard, an intelligent tool that analyses cellphone data to help city authorities in visually exploring urban mobility and optimizing public transport. This is performed within a self contained tool, as opposed to the current solutions which rely on a combination of several distinct tools for analysis, reporting, optimisation and planning. An interactive user interface allows transit operators to visually explore the travel demand in both space and time, correlate it with the transit network, and evaluate the quality of service that a transit network provides to the citizens at very fine grain. Operators can visually test scenarios for transit network improvements, and compare the expected impact on the travellers' experience. The system has been tested using real telecommunication data for the city of Abidjan, Ivory Coast, and evaluated from a data mining, optimisation and user prospective. PMID:26731450

  5. Conditions for charge transport without recombination in low mobility organic solar cells and photodiodes (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolterfoht, Martin; Armin, Ardalan; Philippa, Bronson; White, Ronald D.; Burn, Paul L.; Meredith, Paul; Juška, Gytis; Pivrikas, Almantas

    2015-10-01

    Organic semiconductors typically possess low charge carrier mobilities and Langevin-type recombination dynamics, which both negatively impact the performance of organic solar cells and photodetectors. Charge transport in organic solar cells is usually characterized by the mobility-lifetime product. Using newly developed transient and steady state photocurrent measurement techniques we show that the onset of efficiency limiting photocarrier recombination is determined by the charge that can be stored on the electrodes of the device. It is shown that significant photocarrier recombination can be avoided when the total charge inside the device, defined by the trapped, doping-induced and mobile charge carriers, is less than the electrode charge. Based upon this physics we propose the mobility-recombination coefficient product as an alternative and more convenient figure of merit to minimize the recombination losses. We validate the results in 3 different organic semiconductor-based light harvesting systems with very different charge transport properties. The findings allow the determination of the charge collection efficiency in fully operational devices. In turn, knowing the conditions under which non-geminate recombination is eliminated enables one to quantify the generation efficiency of free charge carriers. The results are relevant to a wide range of light harvesting systems, particularly those based upon disordered semiconductors, and require a rethink of the critical parameters for charge transport.

  6. Explaining the power-law distribution of human mobility through transportation modality decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Kai; Musolesi, Mirco; Hui, Pan; Rao, Weixiong; Tarkoma, Sasu

    2015-03-01

    Human mobility has been empirically observed to exhibit Lévy flight characteristics and behaviour with power-law distributed jump size. The fundamental mechanisms behind this behaviour has not yet been fully explained. In this paper, we propose to explain the Lévy walk behaviour observed in human mobility patterns by decomposing them into different classes according to the different transportation modes, such as Walk/Run, Bike, Train/Subway or Car/Taxi/Bus. Our analysis is based on two real-life GPS datasets containing approximately 10 and 20 million GPS samples with transportation mode information. We show that human mobility can be modelled as a mixture of different transportation modes, and that these single movement patterns can be approximated by a lognormal distribution rather than a power-law distribution. Then, we demonstrate that the mixture of the decomposed lognormal flight distributions associated with each modality is a power-law distribution, providing an explanation to the emergence of Lévy Walk patterns that characterize human mobility patterns.

  7. Results of EVA/mobile transporter space station truss assembly tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Judith J.; Heard, Walter L., Jr.; Bush, Harold G.; Lake, M. S.; Jensen, J. K.; Wallsom, R. E.; Phelps, J. E.

    1988-01-01

    Underwater neutral buoyance tests were conducted to evaluate the use of a Mobile Transporter concept in conjunction with EVA astronauts to construct the Space Station Freedom truss structure. A three-bay orthogonal tetrahedral truss configuration with a 15 foot square cross section was repeatedly assembled by a single pair of pressure suited test subjects working from the Mobile Transporter astronaut positioning devices (mobile foot restraints). The average unit assembly time (which included integrated installation of utility trays) was 27.6 s/strut, or 6 min/bay. The results of these tests indicate that EVA assembly of space station size structures can be significantly enhanced when using a Mobile Transporter equipped with astronaut positioning devices. Rapid assembly time can be expected and are dependent primarily on the rate of translation permissible for on-orbit operations. The concept used to demonstate integrated installation of utility trays requires minimal EVA handling and consequentially, as the results show, has little impact on overall assembly time.

  8. Tuning carrier mobility without spin transport degrading in copper-phthalocyanine

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, S. W.; Wang, P.; Chen, B. B.; Zhou, Y.; Ding, H. F. E-mail: dwu@nju.edu.cn; Wu, D. E-mail: dwu@nju.edu.cn

    2015-07-27

    We demonstrate more than one order of magnitude of carrier mobility tuning for the copper-phthalocyanine (CuPc) without spin transport degrading in organic spin valve devices. Depending on the preparation conditions, organic spin valves with the CuPc film mobility of 5.78 × 10{sup −3} and 1.11 × 10{sup −4} cm{sup 2}/V s are obtained for polycrystalline and amorphous CuPc, respectively. Strikingly, the spin diffusion lengths are almost the same regardless of their mobilities that are ∼50 times different, which is in sharp contrast with previous prediction. These findings directly support that the spin relaxation in CuPc is dominated by the spin-orbit coupling.

  9. Tuning carrier mobility without spin transport degrading in copper-phthalocyanine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, S. W.; Wang, P.; Chen, B. B.; Zhou, Y.; Ding, H. F.; Wu, D.

    2015-07-01

    We demonstrate more than one order of magnitude of carrier mobility tuning for the copper-phthalocyanine (CuPc) without spin transport degrading in organic spin valve devices. Depending on the preparation conditions, organic spin valves with the CuPc film mobility of 5.78 × 10-3 and 1.11 × 10-4 cm2/V s are obtained for polycrystalline and amorphous CuPc, respectively. Strikingly, the spin diffusion lengths are almost the same regardless of their mobilities that are ˜50 times different, which is in sharp contrast with previous prediction. These findings directly support that the spin relaxation in CuPc is dominated by the spin-orbit coupling.

  10. Mobilization and Transport of Organic Compounds from Reservoir Rock and Caprock in Geological Carbon Sequestration Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong, Lirong; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Mitroshkov, Alexandre V.; Shewell, Jesse L.

    2014-05-06

    Supercritical CO2 (scCO2) is an excellent solvent for organic compounds, including benzene, toluene, ethyl-benzene, and xylene (BTEX), phenols, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Monitoring results from geological carbon sequestration (GCS) field tests has shown that organic compounds are mobilized following CO2 injection. Such results have raised concerns regarding the potential for groundwater contamination by toxic organic compounds mobilized during GCS. Knowledge of the mobilization mechanism of organic compounds and their transport and fate in the subsurface is essential for assessing risks associated with GCS. Extraction tests using scCO2 and methylene chloride (CH2Cl2) were conducted to study the mobilization of volatile organic compounds (VOCs, including BTEX), the PAH naphthalene, and n-alkanes (n-C20 – n-C30) by scCO2 from representative reservoir rock and caprock obtained from depleted oil reservoirs and coal from an enhanced coal-bed methane recovery site. More VOCs and naphthalene were extractable by scCO2 compared to the CH2Cl2 extractions, while scCO2 extractable alkane concentrations were much lower than concentrations extractable by CH2Cl2. In addition, dry scCO2 was found to extract more VOCs than water saturated scCO2, but water saturated scCO2 mobilized more naphthalene than dry scCO2. In sand column experiments, moisture content was found to have an important influence on the transport of the organic compounds. In dry sand columns the majority of the compounds were retained in the column except benzene and toluene. In wet sand columns the mobility of the BTEX was much higher than that of naphthalene. Based upon results determined for the reservoir rock, caprock, and coal samples studied here, the risk to aquifers from contamination by organic compounds appears to be relatively low; however, further work is necessary to fully evaluate risks from depleted oil reservoirs.

  11. High Conductance 2D Transport around the Hall Mobility Peak in Electrolyte-Gated Rubrene Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Wei; Wang, Shun; Zhang, Xin; Leighton, C.; Frisbie, C. Daniel

    2014-12-01

    We report the observation of the Hall effect at hole densities up to 6 ×1013 cm-2 (0.3 holes/molecule ) on the surface of electrolyte-gated rubrene crystals. The perplexing peak in the conductance as a function of gate voltage is confirmed to result from a maximum in mobility, which reaches 4 cm2 V-1 s-1 at 2.5 ×1013 cm-2 . Measurements to liquid helium temperatures reveal that this peak is markedly asymmetric, with bandlike and hopping-type transport occurring on the low density side, while unconventional, likely electrostatic-disorder-affected transport dominates the high density side. Most significantly, near the mobility peak the temperature coefficient of the resistance remains positive to as low as 120 K, the low temperature resistance becomes weakly temperature dependent, and the conductance reaches within a factor of 2 of e2/h , revealing conduction unprecedentedly close to a two-dimensional metallic state.

  12. The design and development of a mobile transporter system for the Space Station Remote Manipulator System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carroll, Thomas W.

    1987-01-01

    The analyses, selection process, and conceptual design of potential candidate Mobile Transporter (MT) systems to move the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) about the exposed faces of the Space Station truss structure are described. The actual requirements for a manipulator system on the space station are discussed, including potential tasks to be performed. The SSRMS operating environment and control methods are analyzed with potential design solutions highlighted. Three general categories of transporter systems are identified and analyzed. Several design solution have emerged that will satisfy these requirements. Their relative merits are discussed, and unique variations in each system are rated for functionality.

  13. Charge transport and mobility engineering in two-dimensional transition metal chalcogenide semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Li, Song-Lin; Tsukagoshi, Kazuhito; Orgiu, Emanuele; Samorì, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) van der Waals semiconductors represent the thinnest, air stable semiconducting materials known. Their unique optical, electronic and mechanical properties hold great potential for harnessing them as key components in novel applications for electronics and optoelectronics. However, the charge transport behavior in 2D semiconductors is more susceptible to external surroundings (e.g. gaseous adsorbates from air and trapped charges in substrates) and their electronic performance is generally lower than corresponding bulk materials due to the fact that the surface and bulk coincide. In this article, we review recent progress on the charge transport properties and carrier mobility engineering of 2D transition metal chalcogenides, with a particular focus on the markedly high dependence of carrier mobility on thickness. We unveil the origin of this unique thickness dependence and elaborate the devised strategies to master it for carrier mobility optimization. Specifically, physical and chemical methods towards the optimization of the major factors influencing the extrinsic transport such as electrode/semiconductor contacts, interfacial Coulomb impurities and atomic defects are discussed. In particular, the use of ad hoc molecules makes it possible to engineer the interface with the dielectric and heal the vacancies in such materials. By casting fresh light on the theoretical and experimental studies, we provide a guide for improving the electronic performance of 2D semiconductors, with the ultimate goal of achieving technologically viable atomically thin (opto)electronics.

  14. Locust flight activity as a model for hormonal regulation of lipid mobilization and transport.

    PubMed

    Van der Horst, Dick J; Rodenburg, Kees W

    2010-08-01

    Flight activity of insects provides a fascinating yet relatively simple model system for studying the regulation of processes involved in energy metabolism. This is particularly highlighted during long-distance flight, for which the locust constitutes a long-standing favored model insect, which as one of the most infamous agricultural pests additionally has considerable economical importance. Remarkably many aspects and processes pivotal to our understanding of (neuro)hormonal regulation of lipid mobilization and transport during insect flight activity have been discovered in the locust; among which are the peptide adipokinetic hormones (AKHs), synthesized and stored by the neurosecretory cells of the corpus cardiacum, that regulate and integrate lipid (diacylglycerol) mobilization and transport, the functioning of the reversible conversions of lipoproteins (lipophorins) in the hemolymph during flight activity, revealing novel concepts for the transport of lipids in the circulatory system, and the structure and functioning of the exchangeable apolipopotein, apolipophorin III, which exhibits a dual capacity to exist in both lipid-bound and lipid-free states that is essential to these lipophorin conversions. Besides, the lipophorin receptor (LpR) was identified and characterized in the locust. In an integrative approach, this short review aims at highlighting the locust as an unrivalled model for studying (neuro)hormonal regulation of lipid mobilization and transport during insect flight activity, that additionally has offered a broad and profound research model for integrative physiology and biochemistry, and particularly focuses on recent developments in the concept of AKH-induced changes in the lipophorin system during locust flight, that deviates fundamentally from the lipoprotein-based transport of lipids in the circulation of mammals. Current studies in this field employing the locust as a model continue to attribute to its role as a favored model organism, but

  15. Mobilization and transport of naturally occurring enterococci in beach sands subject to transient infiltration of seawater.

    PubMed

    Russell, Todd L; Yamahara, Kevan M; Boehm, Alexandria B

    2012-06-01

    This study explores the transport of enterococci (ENT) from naturally contaminated beach sands to the groundwater table via infiltrating seawater using field, laboratory, and modeling experiments. ENT were readily mobilized and transported through the unsaturated zone during infiltration events in both the field and laboratory column experiments. Detachment mechanisms were investigated using a modified version of HYDRUS-1D. Three models for detachment kinetics were tested. Detachment kinetics that are first order with respect to the rate of change in the water content and attached surface bacterial concentrations were found to provide a best fit between predicted and observed data. From these experimental and model results we conclude that detachment mechanisms associated with the rapid increases in pore water content such as air-water interface scouring and thin film expansion are likely drivers of ENT mobilization in the investigated system. These findings suggest that through-beach transport of ENT may be an important pathway through which ENT from beach sands are transported to beach groundwater where they may be discharged to coastal waters via submarine groundwater discharge. PMID:22533299

  16. Mobilization and preferential transport of soil particles during infiltration: A core-scale modeling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majdalani, Samer; Michel, Eric; di Pietro, Liliana; Angulo-Jaramillo, Rafael; Rousseau, Marine

    2007-05-01

    Understanding particle movement in soils is a major concern for both geotechnics and soil physics with regard to environmental protection and water resources management. This paper describes a model for mobilization and preferential transport of soil particles through structured soils. The approach combines a kinematic-dispersive wave model for preferential water flow with a convective-dispersive equation subject to a source/sink term for particle transport and mobilization. Particle detachment from macropore walls is considered during both the steady and transient water flow regimes. It is assumed to follow first-order kinetics with a varying detachment efficiency, which depends on the history of the detachment process. Estimates of model parameters are obtained by comparing simulations with experimental particle breakthrough curves obtained during infiltrations through undisturbed soil columns. Both water flux and particle concentrations are satisfactorily simulated by the model. Particle mobilization parameters favoring both attachment and detachment of particles are related to the incoming solution ionic strength by a Fermi-type function.

  17. Transport of Organic Contaminants Mobilized from Coal through Sandstone Overlying a Geological Carbon Sequestration Reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong, Lirong; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Bacon, Diana H.; Shewell, Jesse L.

    2014-02-01

    Column experiments were conducted using a wetted sandstone rock installed in a tri-axial core holder to study the flow and transport of organic compounds mobilized by scCO2 under simulated geologic carbon storage (GCS) conditions. The sandstone rock was collected from a formation overlying a deep saline reservoir at a GCS demonstration site. Rock core effluent pressures were set at 0, 500, or 1000 psig and the core temperature was set at 20 or 50°C to simulate the transport to different subsurface depths. The concentrations of the organic compounds in the column effluent and their distribution within the sandstone core were monitored. Results indicate that the mobility though the core sample was much higher for BTEX compounds than for naphthalene. Retention of organic compounds from the vapor phase to the core appeared to be primarily controlled by partitioning from the vapor phase to the aqueous phase. Adsorption to the surfaces of the wetted sandstone was also significant for naphthalene. Reduced temperature and elevated pressure resulted in greater partitioning of the mobilized organic contaminants into the water phase.

  18. Release and transport of mobile organic matter and biocolloids: A combined physicochemical and microbiological study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichel, Katharina; Schaefer, Sabine; Babin, Doreen; Smalla, Konny; Totsche, Kai Uwe

    2016-04-01

    Biogeochemical interfaces within the aggregate system of soils are "hot spots" of microbial activity and turnover of organic matter. We explore turnover, release and transport of mobile organic matter (MOM), micro-organisms (bio-colloids) and organo-mineral associations using a novel experimental approach employing two-layer columns experiment with matured soil under unsaturated flow conditions. The top layer was spiked with phenanthrene as a tracer for studying the decomposer communities involved in the decomposition of aromatic compounds that derive from lignin in natural systems. Columns were irrigated with artificial rain water with several flow interrupts of different durations. Physicochemical and chemical parameters as well as the microbial community composition were analysed in effluent samples and in soil slices. Release of MOM from the columns was in general controlled by non-equilibrium. Export of total and dissolved organic matter differed significantly in response to the flow interrupts. Effluent comprised organic and organo-mineral components as well as vital competent cells. By molecular biological methods we were even able to show that bacterial consortia exported are rather divers. Depth distribution of the bacterial communities associated with the immobile solid phase indicated high similarities in bacterial communities of the different depth layers and treatments. According to phenanthrene high affinity to the immobile phases, only a small fraction was subject to downstream transport with a strong decrease of the amount residing at the solid phase Our experiments directly prove that intact and competent microorganisms and even communities can be transported under unsaturated flow conditions. Moreover, we found that the dominant carbon source will impact not only the activity of specific microbial taxa but also their mobilization and transport. While total contribution of microbial organism to the mobile organic matter pool seems to be small, the

  19. The versatility of a truss mounted mobile transporter for in-space construction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bush, Harold G.; Lake, Mark S.; Watson, Judith J.; Heard, Walter L., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The Mobile Transporter (MT) evolution from early erectable structures assembly activities is detailed. The MT operational features which are required to support astronauts performing on-orbit structure construction or spacecraft assembly functions are presented and discussed. Use of the MT to perform a variety of assembly functions is presented. Estimated EVA assembly times for a precision segmented reflector approximately 20 m in diameter are presented. The EVA/MT technique under study for construction of the reflector (and the entire spacecraft) is illustrated. Finally, the current status of development activities and test results involving the MT and Space Station structural assembly are presented.

  20. MOBILIZATION AND TRANSPORT OF SOIL PARTICLES DURING INFILTRATION EXPERIMENTS IN AN AGRICULTURAL FIELD, SHENANDOAH VALLEY, VIRGINIA. (R824772)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Evidence that fine particles mobilized and transported in
    soils and aquifers can have a profound influence on
    contaminant migration has spawned much interest recently
    in understanding colloid transport in natural materials.
    Repeated infiltration experiments on an i...

  1. Cooperating Mobile GIS and Wireless Sensor Networks for Managing Transportation Infrastructures in Urban areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shad, R.; Abazari, N.; Alizadeh, A.; Choghooni, M.

    2013-10-01

    Time management is a major subject which, in order to optimize trip conditions, emphasizes on interpreting processes and classifying individual's information. In this paper, with the aim of providing an optimal system for urban commuting in proper time in Mashhad, each user using SMS and introducing some of his/her mental priorities to the system, will be able to select the best option depending on the timing of movement of the available public transport system. The present study adopts a newly developed method of time management which is evaluated for urban transportation considering dynamic conditions of a spatial database. For this purpose, regarding time management, processed data such as bus lines, taxi networks, and the subway system are combined in a spatial framework of a designed Mobile GIS based on a wireless network. So, multiple potential paths which end to a desirable destination.

  2. Superior transport properties of InGaN channel heterostructure with high channel electron mobility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yachao; Zhou, Xiaowei; Xu, Shengrui; Zhang, Jinfeng; Zhang, Jincheng; Hao, Yue

    2016-06-01

    A high-quality AlGaN/InGaN heterostructure is grown by pulsed metal organic chemical vapor deposition on a sapphire substrate. A two-step AlN interlayer is adopted to improve the interface morphology and protect the high-quality InGaN channel. Temperature-dependent Hall measurement shows superior transport properties compared with the traditional GaN channel heterostructure at elevated temperatures. Further, a record highest channel electron mobility of 1681 cm2/(V·s) at room temperature for an InGaN channel heterostructure is obtained. We attribute the excellent transport properties to the improvement in the material quality, as well as the rationally designed epitaxial structure and well-controlled growth condition.

  3. Mobile sediment in an urbanizing karst aquifer: Implications for contaminant transport

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mahler, B.J.; Lynch, L.; Bennett, P.C.

    2000-01-01

    Here we investigate geochemical characteristics of sediment in different compartments of a karst aquifer and demonstrate that mobile sediments in a karst aquifer can exhibit a wide range of properties affecting their contaminant transport potential. Sediment samples were collected from surface streams, sinkholes, caves, wells, and springs of a karst aquifer (the Barton Springs portion of the Edwards (Balcones Fault Zone) Aquifer, Central Texas) and their mineralogy, grain-size distribution, organic carbon content, and specific surface area analyzed. Statistical analysis of the sediments separated the sampling sites into three distinct groups: (1) streambeds, sinkholes, and small springs; (2) wells; and (3) caves. Sediments from the primary discharge spring were a mix of these three groups. High organic carbon content and increased potential to transport contaminants; the volume of these sediments is likely to increase with continued urbanization of the watershed.

  4. Charge transport study of high mobility polymer thin-film transistors based on thiophene substituted diketopyrrolopyrrole copolymers.

    PubMed

    Ha, Tae-Jun; Sonar, Prashant; Dodabalapur, Ananth

    2013-06-28

    In this paper, we report on the device physics and charge transport characteristics of high-mobility dual-gated polymer thin-film transistors with active semiconductor layers consisting of thiophene flanked DPP with thienylene-vinylene-thienylene (PDPP-TVT) alternating copolymers. Room temperature mobilities in these devices are high and can exceed 2 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1). Steady-state and non-quasi-static measurements have been performed to extract key transport parameters and velocity distributions of charge carriers in this copolymer. Charge transport in this polymer semiconductor can be explained using a Multiple-Trap-and-Release or Monroe-type model. We also compare the activation energy vs. field-effect mobility in a few important polymer semiconductors to gain a better understanding of transport of DPP systems and make appropriate comparisons.

  5. High-mobility transport anisotropy and linear dichroism in few-layer black phosphorus.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Jingsi; Kong, Xianghua; Hu, Zhi-Xin; Yang, Feng; Ji, Wei

    2014-07-21

    Two-dimensional crystals are emerging materials for nanoelectronics. Development of the field requires candidate systems with both a high carrier mobility and, in contrast to graphene, a sufficiently large electronic bandgap. Here we present a detailed theoretical investigation of the atomic and electronic structure of few-layer black phosphorus (BP) to predict its electrical and optical properties. This system has a direct bandgap, tunable from 1.51 eV for a monolayer to 0.59 eV for a five-layer sample. We predict that the mobilities are hole-dominated, rather high and highly anisotropic. The monolayer is exceptional in having an extremely high hole mobility (of order 10,000 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1)) and anomalous elastic properties which reverse the anisotropy. Light absorption spectra indicate linear dichroism between perpendicular in-plane directions, which allows optical determination of the crystalline orientation and optical activation of the anisotropic transport properties. These results make few-layer BP a promising candidate for future electronics.

  6. The effect of molecular mobility on electronic transport in carbon nanotube-polymer composites and networks

    SciTech Connect

    Shenogin, Sergei; Lee, Jonghoon; Voevodin, Andrey A.; Roy, Ajit K.

    2014-12-21

    A multiscale modeling approach to the prediction of electrical conductivity in carbon nanotube (CNT)–polymer composite materials is developed, which takes into account thermally activated molecular mobility of the matrix and the CNTs. On molecular level, a tight-binding density functional theory and non-equilibrium Green's function method are used to calculate the static electron transmission function in the contact between two metallic carbon nanotubes that corresponds to electron transport at 0 K. For higher temperatures, the statistical distribution of effective contact resistances is considered that originates from thermal fluctuations of intermolecular distances caused by molecular mobility of carbon nanotube and the polymer matrix. Based on this distribution and using effective medium theory, the temperature dependence of macroscopic electrical resistivity for CNT-polymer composites and CNT mats is calculated. The predicted data indicate that the electrical conductivity of the CNT-polymer composites increases linearly with temperature above 50 K, which is in a quantitative agreement with the experiments. Our model predicts a slight nonlinearity in temperature dependence of electric conductivity at low temperatures for percolated composites with small CNT loading. The model also explains the effect of glass transition and other molecular relaxation processes in the polymer matrix on the composite electrical conductivity. The developed multiscale approach integrates the atomistic charge transport mechanisms in percolated CNT-polymer composites with the macroscopic response and thus enables direct comparison of the prediction with the measurements of macroscopic material properties.

  7. Hydrothermal Processes and Mobile Element Transport in Martian Impact Craters - Evidence from Terrestrial Analogue Craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newsom, H. E.; Nelson, M. J.; Shearer, C. K.; Dressler, B. L.

    2005-01-01

    Hydrothermal alteration and chemical transport involving impact craters probably occurred on Mars throughout its history. Our studies of alteration products and mobile element transport in ejecta blanket and drill core samples from impact craters show that these processes may have contributed to the surface composition of Mars. Recent work on the Chicxulub Yaxcopoil-1 drill core has provided important information on the relative mobility of many elements that may be relevant to Mars. The Chicxulub impact structure in the Yucatan Peninsula of Mexico and offshore in the Gulf of Mexico is one of the largest impact craters identified on the Earth, has a diameter of 180-200 km, and is associated with the mass extinctions at the K/T boundary. The Yax-1 hole was drilled in 2001 and 2002 on the Yaxcopoil hacienda near Merida on the Yucatan Peninsula. Yax-1 is located just outside of the transient cavity, which explains some of the unusual characteristics of the core stratigraphy. No typical impact melt sheet was encountered in the hole and most of the Yax-1 impactites are breccias. In particular, the impact melt and breccias are only 100 m thick which is surprising taking into account the considerably thicker breccia accumulations towards the center of the structure and farther outside the transient crater encountered by other drill holes.

  8. The effect of molecular mobility on electronic transport in carbon nanotube-polymer composites and networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shenogin, Sergei; Lee, Jonghoon; Voevodin, Andrey A.; Roy, Ajit K.

    2014-12-01

    A multiscale modeling approach to the prediction of electrical conductivity in carbon nanotube (CNT)-polymer composite materials is developed, which takes into account thermally activated molecular mobility of the matrix and the CNTs. On molecular level, a tight-binding density functional theory and non-equilibrium Green's function method are used to calculate the static electron transmission function in the contact between two metallic carbon nanotubes that corresponds to electron transport at 0 K. For higher temperatures, the statistical distribution of effective contact resistances is considered that originates from thermal fluctuations of intermolecular distances caused by molecular mobility of carbon nanotube and the polymer matrix. Based on this distribution and using effective medium theory, the temperature dependence of macroscopic electrical resistivity for CNT-polymer composites and CNT mats is calculated. The predicted data indicate that the electrical conductivity of the CNT-polymer composites increases linearly with temperature above 50 K, which is in a quantitative agreement with the experiments. Our model predicts a slight nonlinearity in temperature dependence of electric conductivity at low temperatures for percolated composites with small CNT loading. The model also explains the effect of glass transition and other molecular relaxation processes in the polymer matrix on the composite electrical conductivity. The developed multiscale approach integrates the atomistic charge transport mechanisms in percolated CNT-polymer composites with the macroscopic response and thus enables direct comparison of the prediction with the measurements of macroscopic material properties.

  9. High conductance 2D transport around the Hall mobility peak in electrolyte-gated rubrene crystals.

    PubMed

    Xie, Wei; Wang, Shun; Zhang, Xin; Leighton, C; Frisbie, C Daniel

    2014-12-12

    We report the observation of the Hall effect at hole densities up to 6×10¹³ cm⁻² (0.3  holes/molecule) on the surface of electrolyte-gated rubrene crystals. The perplexing peak in the conductance as a function of gate voltage is confirmed to result from a maximum in mobility, which reaches 4  cm² V⁻¹ s⁻¹ at 2.5×10¹³ cm⁻². Measurements to liquid helium temperatures reveal that this peak is markedly asymmetric, with bandlike and hopping-type transport occurring on the low density side, while unconventional, likely electrostatic-disorder-affected transport dominates the high density side. Most significantly, near the mobility peak the temperature coefficient of the resistance remains positive to as low as 120 K, the low temperature resistance becomes weakly temperature dependent, and the conductance reaches within a factor of 2 of e²/h, revealing conduction unprecedentedly close to a two-dimensional metallic state. PMID:25541790

  10. Transport Modeling of Membrane Extraction of Chlorinated Hydrocarbon from Water for Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Wei; Du, Yongzhai; Feng, Zhili; Xu, Jun

    2010-01-01

    Membrane-extraction Ion Mobility Spectrometry (ME-IMS) is a feasible technique for the continuous monitoring of chlorinated hydrocarbons in water. This work studies theoretically the time-dependent characteristics of sampling and detection of trichloroethylene (TCE). The sampling is configured so that aqueous contaminants permeate through a hollow polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) membrane and are carried away by a transport gas flowing through the membrane tube into IMS analyzer. The theoretical study is based on a two-dimensional transient fluid flow and mass transport model. The model describes the TCE mixing in the water, permeation through the membrane layer, and convective diffusion in the air flow inside membrane tube. The effect of various transport gas flow rates on temporal profiles of IMS signal intensity is investigated. The results show that fast time response and high transport yield can be achieved for ME-IMS by controlling the flow rate in the extraction membrane tube. These modeled time-response profiles are important for determining duty cycles of field-deployable sensors for monitoring chlorinated hydrocarbons in water.

  11. Impact of river regulation on potential sediment mobilization and transport in an Alpine catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Anna; Molnar, Peter; Lane, Stuart N.; Bakker, Maarten

    2015-04-01

    The upper Rhône basin (upstream of Lake Geneva) has been heavily affected by human activities during the last century. The most evident impacts are related to river regulation, specifically flow impoundement, flow abstraction and channelization. In the last century and mainly since 1960, several large dams have been built along the main tributaries of the Rhône River, resulting in the water storage of a volume equal to 20% of the total annual river flow. The dams are part of hydropower systems which abstract water from streams and transfer it through complex networks (intakes, tunnels and pumping stations) to the reservoirs. Hydropower production leads to regulated flow in the Rhône: mostly an increase of winter flows, a reduction of summer flows, and a decrease of flood peaks. The sediment supply into Lake Geneva has decreased following dam construction (Loizeau & Dominik, 2000) due to the storage of sediment in upstream reservoirs, in rivers with reduced sediment transport capacity due to flow abstraction, and due to the development of sediment mining. Our hypothesis is that streamflow regulation itself has dramatically impacted the sediment transport dynamics of the system. We investigate the impacts of flow regulation on the sediment transport regime, by analysing the effects on potential sediment transport capacity (bedload). By the use of different bedload transport formulae (Meyer-Peter Müller, Wilcock and Crowe), the potential sediment transport capacity is computed at different cross sections within the basin. Potential sediment mobility occurs when the applied bed shear stress exceeds a critical value, τ>τc. The applied bed shear stress is computed as τ=ρghS, with water depth (h) measured from rating curves. We obtain an estimate of the energy slope (S) from the analysis of the river cross section, assuming uniform flow. The critical value of bed shear stress τc is computed using empirical formulae as a function of the grain diameter (ds). To

  12. LONG-TERM COLLOID MOBILIZATION AND COLLOID-FACILITATED TRANSPORT OF RADIONUCLIDES IN A SEMI-ARID VADOSE ZONE

    SciTech Connect

    Markus Flury; James B. Harsh; Fred Zhang; Glendon W. Gee; Earl D. Mattson; Peter C. L

    2012-08-01

    The main purpose of this project was to improve the fundamental mechanistic understanding and quantification of long-term colloid mobilization and colloid-facilitated transport of radionuclides in the vadose zone, with special emphasis on the semi-arid Hanford site. While we focused some of the experiments on hydrogeological and geochemical conditions of the Hanford site, many of our results apply to colloid and colloid-facilitated transport in general. Specific objectives were (1) to determine the mechanisms of colloid mobilization and colloid-facilitated radionuclide transport in undisturbed Hanford sediments under unsaturated flow, (2) to quantify in situ colloid mobilization and colloid-facilitated radionuclidetransport from Hanford sediments under field conditions, and (3) to develop a field-scale conceptual and numerical model for colloid mobilization and transport at the Hanford vadose zone, and use that model to predict long-term colloid and colloid- facilitated radionuclide transport. To achieve these goals and objectives, we have used a combination of experimental, theoretical, and numerical methods at different spatial scales, ranging from microscopic investigationsof single particle attachment and detachment to larger-scale field experiments using outdoor lysimeters at the Hanford site. Microscopic and single particle investigations provided fundamental insight into mechanisms of colloid interactions with the air-water interface. We could show that a moving air water interface (such as a moving water front during infiltration and drainage) is very effective in removing and mobilizing particles from a stationary surface. We further demonstrated that it is particularly the advancing air-water interface which is mainly responsible for colloid mobilization. Forces acting on the colloids calculated from theory corroborated our experimental results, and confirm that the detachment forces (surface tension forces) during the advancing air-water interface

  13. A Car Transportation System in Cooperation by Multiple Mobile Robots for Each Wheel: iCART II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashiwazaki, Koshi; Yonezawa, Naoaki; Kosuge, Kazuhiro; Sugahara, Yusuke; Hirata, Yasuhisa; Endo, Mitsuru; Kanbayashi, Takashi; Shinozuka, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Koki; Ono, Yuki

    The authors proposed a car transportation system, iCART (intelligent Cooperative Autonomous Robot Transporters), for automation of mechanical parking systems by two mobile robots. However, it was difficult to downsize the mobile robot because the length of it requires at least the wheelbase of a car. This paper proposes a new car transportation system, iCART II (iCART - type II), based on “a-robot-for-a-wheel” concept. A prototype system, MRWheel (a Mobile Robot for a Wheel), is designed and downsized less than half the conventional robot. First, a method for lifting up a wheel by MRWheel is described. In general, it is very difficult for mobile robots such as MRWheel to move to desired positions without motion errors caused by slipping, etc. Therefore, we propose a follower's motion error estimation algorithm based on the internal force applied to each follower by extending a conventional leader-follower type decentralized control algorithm for cooperative object transportation. The proposed algorithm enables followers to estimate their motion errors and enables the robots to transport a car to a desired position. In addition, we analyze and prove the stability and convergence of the resultant system with the proposed algorithm. In order to extract only the internal force from the force applied to each robot, we also propose a model-based external force compensation method. Finally, proposed methods are applied to the car transportation system, the experimental results confirm their validity.

  14. Controls on the Mobilization and Transport of Hfse in Ore-Forming Magmatic-Hydrothermal Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez-Valle, C.; Louvel, M.

    2015-12-01

    The genesis of economical rare metals (Zr, Nb, REE) ore deposits in largegranitic complexes (e.g., Strange Lake and Thor Lake Nechalacho deposit, Canada; Galineiro complex, Spain) is related to the intrusion of alkaline halogen-rich magmatic bodies. Although the role of exolved magmatic fluids in the mobilization and transport of HFSE is widely recognized, the physico-chemical conditions and atomic-scale mechanisms that control the formation of the ore deposits remain poorly understood. We present new experimental constraints on behavior of HFSE during the exsolution of aqueous fluids from peralkaline granitic magmas at crustal conditions. In situ partitioning and speciation studies of Zr in the haplogranite-(F)-H2O systems using synchrotron X-ray spectroscopies provide evidence for large controls of fluid chemistry and temperature on the mobilization and transport of HFSE in crustal settings. At shallow crustal pressure conditions (> 800 °C and 0.3 GPa), Zr preferentially partitions into the exolved aqueous fluid in the presence of fluorine (Df/mZr = 1.40 ± 0.10) as previously reported for Nb in F- (and Cl-) bearing metaluminous granitic systems at similar conditions. The reverse partitioning of HFSE (Zr and Nb) into the aqueous phase at temperature above 800 °C contrast with the behavior observed at lower temperatures, where the Df/mZr remain lower than 1 at all pressures. The enrichment of the aqueous phase in HFSE (Zr, Nb) in the earlier stages of the magmatic evolution is likely related to the enhanced peralkalinity of low pressure (< 0.4 GPa), F-bearing aqueous fluid coexisting with granitic melts as temperature increases. This particular fluid chemistry provides the favorable conditions for the mobilization of HFSE via the formation of HFSE-O-Si/Na clusters in the fluid as shown by the in situ Zr speciation data. Our results show that the exsolution of highly alkaline early magmatic fluid at pressures below 0.4 GPa has the potential to extract HFSE from F

  15. A role for vesicular glutamate transporter 1 in synaptic vesicle clustering and mobility.

    PubMed

    Siksou, Léa; Silm, Kätlin; Biesemann, Christoph; Nehring, Ralf B; Wojcik, Sonja M; Triller, Antoine; El Mestikawy, Salah; Marty, Serge; Herzog, Etienne

    2013-05-01

    Synaptic vesicles (SVs) from excitatory synapses carry vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUTs) that fill the vesicles with neurotransmitter. Although the essential function of VGLUTs as glutamate transporters has been well established, the evidence for additional cell-biological functions is more controversial. Both VGLUT1 and VGLUT2 disruptions in mice result in a reduced number of SVs away from release sites, flattening of SVs, and the appearance of tubular structures. Therefore, we analysed the morphology, biochemical composition and trafficking of SVs at synapses of VGLUT1(-/-) mice in order to test for a function of VGLUTs in the formation or clustering of SVs. Analyses with high-pressure freezing immobilisation and electron tomography pointed to a role of VGLUT1 transport function in the tonicity of excitatory SVs, explaining the aldehyde-induced flattening of SVs observed in VGLUT1(-/-) synapses. We confirmed the steep reduction in the number of SVs previously observed in VGLUT1(-/-) presynaptic terminals, but did not observe accumulation of endocytotic intermediates. Furthermore, SV proteins of adult VGLUT1(-/-) mouse brain tissue were expressed at normal levels in all subcellular fractions, suggesting that they were not displaced to another organelle. We thus assessed the mobility of the recently documented superpool of SVs. Synaptobrevin2-enhanced green fluorescent protein time lapse experiments revealed an oversized superpool of SVs in VGLUT1(-/-) neurons. Our results support the idea that, beyond glutamate loading, VGLUT1 enhances the tonicity of excitatory SVs and stabilises SVs at presynaptic terminals. PMID:23581566

  16. Approaching disorder-free transport in high-mobility conjugated polymers.

    PubMed

    Venkateshvaran, Deepak; Nikolka, Mark; Sadhanala, Aditya; Lemaur, Vincent; Zelazny, Mateusz; Kepa, Michal; Hurhangee, Michael; Kronemeijer, Auke Jisk; Pecunia, Vincenzo; Nasrallah, Iyad; Romanov, Igor; Broch, Katharina; McCulloch, Iain; Emin, David; Olivier, Yoann; Cornil, Jerome; Beljonne, David; Sirringhaus, Henning

    2014-11-20

    Conjugated polymers enable the production of flexible semiconductor devices that can be processed from solution at low temperatures. Over the past 25 years, device performance has improved greatly as a wide variety of molecular structures have been studied. However, one major limitation has not been overcome; transport properties in polymer films are still limited by pervasive conformational and energetic disorder. This not only limits the rational design of materials with higher performance, but also prevents the study of physical phenomena associated with an extended π-electron delocalization along the polymer backbone. Here we report a comparative transport study of several high-mobility conjugated polymers by field-effect-modulated Seebeck, transistor and sub-bandgap optical absorption measurements. We show that in several of these polymers, most notably in a recently reported, indacenodithiophene-based donor-acceptor copolymer with a near-amorphous microstructure, the charge transport properties approach intrinsic disorder-free limits at which all molecular sites are thermally accessible. Molecular dynamics simulations identify the origin of this long sought-after regime as a planar, torsion-free backbone conformation that is surprisingly resilient to side-chain disorder. Our results provide molecular-design guidelines for 'disorder-free' conjugated polymers.

  17. Approaching disorder-free transport in high-mobility conjugated polymers.

    PubMed

    Venkateshvaran, Deepak; Nikolka, Mark; Sadhanala, Aditya; Lemaur, Vincent; Zelazny, Mateusz; Kepa, Michal; Hurhangee, Michael; Kronemeijer, Auke Jisk; Pecunia, Vincenzo; Nasrallah, Iyad; Romanov, Igor; Broch, Katharina; McCulloch, Iain; Emin, David; Olivier, Yoann; Cornil, Jerome; Beljonne, David; Sirringhaus, Henning

    2014-11-20

    Conjugated polymers enable the production of flexible semiconductor devices that can be processed from solution at low temperatures. Over the past 25 years, device performance has improved greatly as a wide variety of molecular structures have been studied. However, one major limitation has not been overcome; transport properties in polymer films are still limited by pervasive conformational and energetic disorder. This not only limits the rational design of materials with higher performance, but also prevents the study of physical phenomena associated with an extended π-electron delocalization along the polymer backbone. Here we report a comparative transport study of several high-mobility conjugated polymers by field-effect-modulated Seebeck, transistor and sub-bandgap optical absorption measurements. We show that in several of these polymers, most notably in a recently reported, indacenodithiophene-based donor-acceptor copolymer with a near-amorphous microstructure, the charge transport properties approach intrinsic disorder-free limits at which all molecular sites are thermally accessible. Molecular dynamics simulations identify the origin of this long sought-after regime as a planar, torsion-free backbone conformation that is surprisingly resilient to side-chain disorder. Our results provide molecular-design guidelines for 'disorder-free' conjugated polymers. PMID:25383522

  18. Approaching disorder-free transport in high-mobility conjugated polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkateshvaran, Deepak; Nikolka, Mark; Sadhanala, Aditya; Lemaur, Vincent; Zelazny, Mateusz; Kepa, Michal; Hurhangee, Michael; Kronemeijer, Auke Jisk; Pecunia, Vincenzo; Nasrallah, Iyad; Romanov, Igor; Broch, Katharina; McCulloch, Iain; Emin, David; Olivier, Yoann; Cornil, Jerome; Beljonne, David; Sirringhaus, Henning

    2014-11-01

    Conjugated polymers enable the production of flexible semiconductor devices that can be processed from solution at low temperatures. Over the past 25 years, device performance has improved greatly as a wide variety of molecular structures have been studied. However, one major limitation has not been overcome; transport properties in polymer films are still limited by pervasive conformational and energetic disorder. This not only limits the rational design of materials with higher performance, but also prevents the study of physical phenomena associated with an extended π-electron delocalization along the polymer backbone. Here we report a comparative transport study of several high-mobility conjugated polymers by field-effect-modulated Seebeck, transistor and sub-bandgap optical absorption measurements. We show that in several of these polymers, most notably in a recently reported, indacenodithiophene-based donor-acceptor copolymer with a near-amorphous microstructure, the charge transport properties approach intrinsic disorder-free limits at which all molecular sites are thermally accessible. Molecular dynamics simulations identify the origin of this long sought-after regime as a planar, torsion-free backbone conformation that is surprisingly resilient to side-chain disorder. Our results provide molecular-design guidelines for `disorder-free' conjugated polymers.

  19. A new approach to calculate charge carrier transport mobility in organic molecular crystals from imaginary time path integral simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Linze; Shi, Qiang

    2015-05-07

    We present a new non-perturbative method to calculate the charge carrier mobility using the imaginary time path integral approach, which is based on the Kubo formula for the conductivity, and a saddle point approximation to perform the analytic continuation. The new method is first tested using a benchmark calculation from the numerical exact hierarchical equations of motion method. Imaginary time path integral Monte Carlo simulations are then performed to explore the temperature dependence of charge carrier delocalization and mobility in organic molecular crystals (OMCs) within the Holstein and Holstein-Peierls models. The effects of nonlocal electron-phonon interaction on mobility in different charge transport regimes are also investigated.

  20. Charge transport perpendicular to the high mobility plane in organic crystals: Bandlike temperature dependence maintained despite hundredfold anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blülle, B.; Troisi, A.; Häusermann, R.; Batlogg, B.

    2016-01-01

    Charge carrier mobility in van der Waals bonded organic crystals is strongly dependent on the transfer integral between neighboring molecules, and therefore the anisotropy of charge transport is determined by the molecular arrangement within the crystal lattice. Here we report on temperature dependent transport measurements along all three principal crystal directions of the same rubrene single crystals of high purity. Hole mobilities are obtained from the carrier transit time measured with high-frequency admittance spectroscopy perpendicular to the molecular layers (μc) and from the transfer characteristics of two field-effect transistor (FET) structures oriented perpendicularly to each other in the layers (μa and μb). While the measurements of the field-effect channels confirm the previously reported high mobility and anisotropy within the a b plane, we find the mobility perpendicular to the molecular layers in the same crystals to be lower by about two orders of magnitude (μc˜0.2 cm2/Vs at 300 K ). Although the bandwidth is vanishingly small along the c direction and the transport cannot be coherent, we find μc to increase upon cooling. We show that the delocalization within the high mobility a b plane prevents the formation of small polarons and leads to the observed "bandlike" temperature dependence also in the direction perpendicular to the molecular layers, despite the incoherent transport mechanism.

  1. Global charcoal mobilization from soils via dissolution and riverine transport to the oceans.

    PubMed

    Jaffé, Rudolf; Ding, Yan; Niggemann, Jutta; Vähätalo, Anssi V; Stubbins, Aron; Spencer, Robert G M; Campbell, John; Dittmar, Thorsten

    2013-04-19

    Global biomass burning generates 40 million to 250 million tons of charcoal every year, part of which is preserved for millennia in soils and sediments. We have quantified dissolution products of charcoal in a wide range of rivers worldwide and show that globally, a major portion of the annual charcoal production is lost from soils via dissolution and subsequent transport to the ocean. The global flux of soluble charcoal accounts to 26.5 ± 1.8 million tons per year, which is ~10% of the global riverine flux of dissolved organic carbon (DOC). We suggest that the mobilization of charcoal and DOC out of soils is mechanistically coupled. This study closes a major gap in the global charcoal budget and provides critical information in the context of geoengineering.

  2. Colloids in groundwater: Their mobilization, subsurface transport, and sorption affinity for toxic chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    During the initial project period, we have pursued several activities with the overall goal of characterizing the roles of colloid in groundwater. First, we have collected soil cores from a site where we have previously found large quantities of kaolinite colloids in the groundwater. We have intensely investigated these cores to test our hypothesis that the colloids have been mobilized as a result of iron oxide dissolution. Next, we have constructed a soil core system in our laboratory with which we are attempting to mimic the factors that we think are governing colloid transport in the subsurface. Finally, we have pursued the issue of how well organic chemicals bind to the kinds of colloids that we are seeing at field sites. Together, with our knowledge of colloid mobility, we anticipate that this sorption data will enable us to predict the influence of groundwater colloids on contaminant fates in the subsurface. Our progress in each of these activities is described in this report. 7 refs., 12 figs.

  3. Excellent spin transport in spin valves based on the conjugated polymer with high carrier mobility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Feng; Li, Tian; Chen, Feng; Zhang, Fapei

    2015-03-01

    Organic semiconductors (OSCs) are characteristic of long spin-relaxation lifetime due to weak spin-orbit interaction and hyperfine interaction. However, short spin diffusion length and weak magnetoresistance (MR) effect at room temperature (RT) was commonly found on spin valves (SVs) using an organic spacer, which should be correlated with low carrier mobility of the OSCs. Here, N-type semiconducting polymer P(NDI2OD-T2) with high carrier mobility is employed as the spacer in the SV devices. Exceedingly high MR ratio of 90.0% at 4.2 K and of 6.8% at RT are achieved, respectively, via improving the interface structure between the polymer interlayer and top cobalt electrode as well as optimal annealing of manganite bottom electrode. Furthermore, we observe spin dependent transport through the polymeric interlayer and a large spin diffusion length with a weak temperature dependence. The results indicate that this polymer material can be used as a good medium for spintronic devices.

  4. Excellent spin transport in spin valves based on the conjugated polymer with high carrier mobility

    PubMed Central

    Li, Feng; Li, Tian; Chen, Feng; Zhang, Fapei

    2015-01-01

    Organic semiconductors (OSCs) are characteristic of long spin-relaxation lifetime due to weak spin-orbit interaction and hyperfine interaction. However, short spin diffusion length and weak magnetoresistance (MR) effect at room temperature (RT) was commonly found on spin valves (SVs) using an organic spacer, which should be correlated with low carrier mobility of the OSCs. Here, N-type semiconducting polymer P(NDI2OD-T2) with high carrier mobility is employed as the spacer in the SV devices. Exceedingly high MR ratio of 90.0% at 4.2 K and of 6.8% at RT are achieved, respectively, via improving the interface structure between the polymer interlayer and top cobalt electrode as well as optimal annealing of manganite bottom electrode. Furthermore, we observe spin dependent transport through the polymeric interlayer and a large spin diffusion length with a weak temperature dependence. The results indicate that this polymer material can be used as a good medium for spintronic devices. PMID:25797862

  5. Contaminant transport in dual-porosity media with dissolved organic matter and bacteria present as mobile colloids.

    PubMed

    Kim, Song-Bae; Corapcioglu, M Yavuz

    2002-12-01

    In riverbank filtration, contaminant transport is affected by colloidal particles such as dissolved organic matter (DOM) and bacterial particles. In addition, the subsurface heterogeneity influences the behavior of contaminant transport in riverbank filtration. A mathematical model is developed to describe the contaminant transport in dual-porosity media in the presence of DOM and bacteria as mobile colloids. In the model development, a porous medium is divided into the mobile and immobile regions to consider the presence of ineffective micropores in physically heterogeneous riverbanks. We assume that the contaminant transport in the mobile region is controlled by the advection and dispersion while the contaminant transport in the immobile region occurs due to the molecular diffusion. The contaminant transfer between the mobile and immobile regions takes place by diffusive mass transfer. The mobile region is conceptualized as a four-phase system: two mobile colloidal phases, an aqueous phase, and a solid matrix. The complete set of governing equations is solved numerically with a fully implicit finite difference method. The model results show that in riverbank filtration, the contaminant can migrate further than expected due to the presence of DOM and bacteria. In addition, the contaminant mobility increases further in the presence of the immobile region in aquifers. A sensitivity analysis shows that in dual-porosity media, earlier breakthrough of the contaminant takes place as the volumetric fraction of the mobile region decreases. It is also demonstrated that as the contaminant mass transfer rate coefficient between the mobile and immobile regions increases, the contaminant concentration gradient between the two regions reverses at earlier pore volumes. The contaminant mass transfer coefficient between the mobile and immobile regions mainly controls the tailing effect of the contaminant breakthrough. The contaminant breakthrough curves are sensitive to changes in

  6. Contaminant transport in dual-porosity media with dissolved organic matter and bacteria present as mobile colloids.

    PubMed

    Kim, Song-Bae; Corapcioglu, M Yavuz

    2002-12-01

    In riverbank filtration, contaminant transport is affected by colloidal particles such as dissolved organic matter (DOM) and bacterial particles. In addition, the subsurface heterogeneity influences the behavior of contaminant transport in riverbank filtration. A mathematical model is developed to describe the contaminant transport in dual-porosity media in the presence of DOM and bacteria as mobile colloids. In the model development, a porous medium is divided into the mobile and immobile regions to consider the presence of ineffective micropores in physically heterogeneous riverbanks. We assume that the contaminant transport in the mobile region is controlled by the advection and dispersion while the contaminant transport in the immobile region occurs due to the molecular diffusion. The contaminant transfer between the mobile and immobile regions takes place by diffusive mass transfer. The mobile region is conceptualized as a four-phase system: two mobile colloidal phases, an aqueous phase, and a solid matrix. The complete set of governing equations is solved numerically with a fully implicit finite difference method. The model results show that in riverbank filtration, the contaminant can migrate further than expected due to the presence of DOM and bacteria. In addition, the contaminant mobility increases further in the presence of the immobile region in aquifers. A sensitivity analysis shows that in dual-porosity media, earlier breakthrough of the contaminant takes place as the volumetric fraction of the mobile region decreases. It is also demonstrated that as the contaminant mass transfer rate coefficient between the mobile and immobile regions increases, the contaminant concentration gradient between the two regions reverses at earlier pore volumes. The contaminant mass transfer coefficient between the mobile and immobile regions mainly controls the tailing effect of the contaminant breakthrough. The contaminant breakthrough curves are sensitive to changes in

  7. Assessment of Historic Trend in Mobility and Energy Use in India Transportation Sector Using Bottom-up Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Nan; McNeil, Michael A.

    2009-05-01

    Transportation mobility in India has increased significantly in the past decades. From 1970 to 2000, motorized mobility (passenger-km) has risen by 888%, compared with an 88% population growth (Singh,2006). This contributed to many energy and environmental issues, and an energy strategy incorporates efficiency improvement and other measures needs to be designed. Unfortunately, existing energy data do not provide information on driving forces behind energy use and sometime show large inconsistencies. Many previous studies address only a single transportation mode such as passenger road travel; did not include comprehensive data collection or analysis has yet been done, or lack detail on energy demand by each mode and fuel mix. The current study will fill a considerable gap in current efforts, develop a data base on all transport modes including passenger air and water, and freight in order to facilitate the development of energy scenarios and assess significance of technology potential in a global climate change model. An extensive literature review and data collection has been done to establish the database with breakdown of mobility, intensity, distance, and fuel mix of all transportation modes. Energy consumption was estimated and compared with aggregated transport consumption reported in IEA India transportation energy data. Different scenarios were estimated based on different assumptions on freight road mobility. Based on the bottom-up analysis, we estimated that the energy consumption from 1990 to 2000 increased at an annual growth rate of 7% for the mid-range road freight growth case and 12% for the high road freight growth case corresponding to the scenarios in mobility, while the IEA data only shows a 1.7% growth rate in those years.

  8. Electron Transport in a High Mobility Free-Standing GaN Substrate Grown by Hydride Vapor Phase Epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farina, L.; Kurdak, C.; Yun, F.; Morkoc, H.; Rode, D. L.; Tsen, K. T.; Park, S. S.; Lee, K. Y.

    2001-03-01

    We studied electron transport properties in a high quality free-standing GaN grown by hydride vapor phase epitaxy. The GaN, with a thickness of more than 200 μm, was lifted off the sapphire substrate and mechanically polished. At room temperature the carrier density is 1.3x10^16cm-3 and the Hall mobility is 1200 cm^2/V-s, which is the highest reported electron mobility for GaN with a wurtzite structure. Transport properties are studied using a van der Pauw geometry in a temperature range of 20 to 300 K and in magnetic fields up to 8 Tesla. Electron mobility is found to increase at lower temperatures with a peak mobility of 7400 cm^2/V-s at 48 K. The carrier density decreases exponentially at temperatures below 80 K with an activation energy of 28 meV. The electron transport measurements were used to examine the contributions of different scattering mechanisms. Numerical solution of the Boltzmann transport equation was carried out, including non-parabolic conduction bands and wavefunction admixture, along with lattice scattering and ionized-impurity scattering. LO and TO phonon energies were determined by Raman spectroscopy.

  9. Coupled effects of solution chemistry and hydrodynamics on the mobility and transport of quantum dot nanomaterials in the Vadose Zone

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To investigate the coupled effects of solution chemistry and vadose zone processes on the mobility of quantum dot (QD) nanoparticles, laboratory scale transport experiments were performed. The complex coupled effects of ionic strength, size of QD aggregates, surface tension, contact angle, infiltrat...

  10. 41 CFR 302-10.200 - What costs are allowable when a commercial carrier transports my mobile home overland or over water?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... when a commercial carrier transports my mobile home overland or over water? 302-10.200 Section 302-10... carrier transports my mobile home overland or over water? Your agency will allow the following costs for..., road, and tunnel tolls; (3) Taxes, charges or fees fixed by a State or other government authority...

  11. 41 CFR 302-10.200 - What costs are allowable when a commercial carrier transports my mobile home overland or over water?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... when a commercial carrier transports my mobile home overland or over water? 302-10.200 Section 302-10... carrier transports my mobile home overland or over water? Your agency will allow the following costs for..., road, and tunnel tolls; (3) Taxes, charges or fees fixed by a State or other government authority...

  12. 41 CFR 302-10.200 - What costs are allowable when a commercial carrier transports my mobile home overland or over water?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... when a commercial carrier transports my mobile home overland or over water? 302-10.200 Section 302-10... carrier transports my mobile home overland or over water? Your agency will allow the following costs for..., road, and tunnel tolls; (3) Taxes, charges or fees fixed by a State or other government authority...

  13. 41 CFR 302-10.200 - What costs are allowable when a commercial carrier transports my mobile home overland or over water?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... when a commercial carrier transports my mobile home overland or over water? 302-10.200 Section 302-10... carrier transports my mobile home overland or over water? Your agency will allow the following costs for..., road, and tunnel tolls; (3) Taxes, charges or fees fixed by a State or other government authority...

  14. Subsurface Transport and Mobilization of Pathogenic Microbes and Microspheres: Effect of Microbe Size, Soil Physical Heterogeneity, and Intermittent Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulicek, M. C.; Metge, D. W.; Mohanty, S. K.; Harvey, R. W.; Ryan, J. N.

    2013-12-01

    Intermittent flows of rainwater frequently mobilize pathogenic microbes attached to subsurface soils, thereby causing groundwater contamination. The potential of intermittent rainfall to mobilize diverse pathogens (e.g., size, shape, taxa) remains understudied for heterogeneous soil systems. This study investigates the combined effects of microbe size and shape, intermittent flow, and soil physical heterogeneity on the transport, retention and mobilization of microbes through an intact, fractured shale saprolite core. Microbes, including MS-2 bacteriophage (~26 nm), Pseudomonas stutzeri bacteria (~1 μm), and Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts (3.6 μm), and 0.5 μm fluorescent microspheres (FMS), preceded by a bromide tracer, were applied to the core to obtain breakthrough. After breakthrough, the core was subjected to intermittent rainfalls to mobilize the attached microbes and FMS. Water samples were collected using 19 spatially-arranged outlet ports at the core base to resolve the effect of soil physical heterogeneity. Water infiltrated through only eight of 19 total sampling ports, which indicated water partially bypassed soil matrices and infiltrated through macropores. Bromide recovery was less than 100%, which indicated diffusion of bromide into the soil matrix. Macropores and the soil matrix dominated flow were characterized based on the cumulative bromide recovery within individual sampling ports. Thus, lower recovery was attributed to increased matrix diffusion and higher recovery indicated the presence of macropores. Intermittent flow mobilized previously sequestered microbes and FMS; however, mobilization varied with the size of microbes/FMS and sampling ports. Greater mobilization occurred through macropores compared to soil matrices. Mobilization of larger, spherical C. parvum oocysts was greater than that of the smaller, spherical MS-2 bacteriophage and the rod-shaped P. stutzeri bacteria during intermittent flow. This suggested shear forces mobilize

  15. Symmetric caging formation for convex polygonal object transportation by multiple mobile robots based on fuzzy sliding mode control.

    PubMed

    Dai, Yanyan; Kim, YoonGu; Wee, SungGil; Lee, DongHa; Lee, SukGyu

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, the problem of object caging and transporting is considered for multiple mobile robots. With the consideration of minimizing the number of robots and decreasing the rotation of the object, the proper points are calculated and assigned to the multiple mobile robots to allow them to form a symmetric caging formation. The caging formation guarantees that all of the Euclidean distances between any two adjacent robots are smaller than the minimal width of the polygonal object so that the object cannot escape. In order to avoid collision among robots, the parameter of the robots radius is utilized to design the caging formation, and the A⁎ algorithm is used so that mobile robots can move to the proper points. In order to avoid obstacles, the robots and the object are regarded as a rigid body to apply artificial potential field method. The fuzzy sliding mode control method is applied for tracking control of the nonholonomic mobile robots. Finally, the simulation and experimental results show that multiple mobile robots are able to cage and transport the polygonal object to the goal position, avoiding obstacles.

  16. New quantum oscillations in magneto transport of a high-mobility two-dimensional electron system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Changli

    Quantum transport in two-dimensional electron systems (2DES) has been one of the major topics in condensed matter physics for many years. Although extensive studies have been performed in the regime of the quantum Hall effect (QHE) where a high magnetic field (typical B ˜ 10 T) is required, much less attention has been paid to the lower magnetic field regime where the Landau quantization of the 2DES is important but the QHE are absent (typical B ≲ 0.5 T). The 2D transport at the lower B regime was thought to be well understood and no surprise was expected. Contrary to this belief, three new classes of quantum oscillations have been discovered recently by our group (Quantum transport group of the University of Utah, led by Prof. RuiRui Du) in high-mobility 2DES at low magnetic fields. These new quantum oscillations are (1) the magneto-acoustic-phonon resonance (MAPR) involving acoustic phonons (in contrast with the well-known magneto-phonon resonance involving optical phonons), (2) the magneto-Zener-tunneling resonance (MZTR), induced by a relatively large dc current, and (3) the microwave-induced photo-conductivity resonance (MIPCR). In ultra-high-mobility samples, the minima of the MIPCR oscillations further develop into the so-called "zero resistance state" (ZRS). All these phenomena are manifested in magnetoresistance by periodic (in 1/B) oscillations. It is now clear that an important selection rule in 2D transport, namely q = 2 kF in momentum space or DeltaY = 2 Rc in real space, is underlying the MAPR and the MZTR, where q is the electron momentum transferred to a scatterer, kF is the Fermi wavevector of the 2DES, Delta Y is the guiding center shift of a scattered electron, and Rc is the cyclotron radius. This selection rule is not directly related to a conservation law but due to the very sharp cutoff at Delta Y = 2Rc for the overlap integral between displaced Landau orbits in the vicinity of the Fermi level. On the other hand, the origin of the MIPCR

  17. Density-dependent electron transport and precise modeling of GaN high electron mobility transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajaj, Sanyam; Shoron, Omor F.; Park, Pil Sung; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Akyol, Fatih; Hung, Ting-Hsiang; Reza, Shahed; Chumbes, Eduardo M.; Khurgin, Jacob; Rajan, Siddharth

    2015-10-01

    We report on the direct measurement of two-dimensional sheet charge density dependence of electron transport in AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs). Pulsed IV measurements established increasing electron velocities with decreasing sheet charge densities, resulting in saturation velocity of 1.9 × 107 cm/s at a low sheet charge density of 7.8 × 1011 cm-2. An optical phonon emission-based electron velocity model for GaN is also presented. It accommodates stimulated longitudinal optical (LO) phonon emission which clamps the electron velocity with strong electron-phonon interaction and long LO phonon lifetime in GaN. A comparison with the measured density-dependent saturation velocity shows that it captures the dependence rather well. Finally, the experimental result is applied in TCAD-based device simulator to predict DC and small signal characteristics of a reported GaN HEMT. Good agreement between the simulated and reported experimental results validated the measurement presented in this report and established accurate modeling of GaN HEMTs.

  18. Density-dependent electron transport and precise modeling of GaN high electron mobility transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Bajaj, Sanyam Shoron, Omor F.; Park, Pil Sung; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Akyol, Fatih; Hung, Ting-Hsiang; Reza, Shahed; Chumbes, Eduardo M.; Khurgin, Jacob; Rajan, Siddharth

    2015-10-12

    We report on the direct measurement of two-dimensional sheet charge density dependence of electron transport in AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs). Pulsed IV measurements established increasing electron velocities with decreasing sheet charge densities, resulting in saturation velocity of 1.9 × 10{sup 7 }cm/s at a low sheet charge density of 7.8 × 10{sup 11 }cm{sup −2}. An optical phonon emission-based electron velocity model for GaN is also presented. It accommodates stimulated longitudinal optical (LO) phonon emission which clamps the electron velocity with strong electron-phonon interaction and long LO phonon lifetime in GaN. A comparison with the measured density-dependent saturation velocity shows that it captures the dependence rather well. Finally, the experimental result is applied in TCAD-based device simulator to predict DC and small signal characteristics of a reported GaN HEMT. Good agreement between the simulated and reported experimental results validated the measurement presented in this report and established accurate modeling of GaN HEMTs.

  19. Wheeled mobility device transportation safety in fixed route and demand-responsive public transit vehicles within the United States.

    PubMed

    Frost, Karen L; van Roosmalen, Linda; Bertocci, Gina; Cross, Douglas J

    2012-01-01

    An overview of the current status of wheelchair transportation safety in fixed route and demand-responsive, non-rail, public transportation vehicles within the US is presented. A description of each mode of transportation is provided, followed by a discussion of the primary issues affecting safety, accessibility, and usability. Technologies such as lifts, ramps, securement systems, and occupant restraint systems, along with regulations and voluntary industry standards have been implemented with the intent of improving safety and accessibility for individuals who travel while seated in their wheeled mobility device (e.g., wheelchair or scooter). However, across both fixed route and demand-responsive transit systems a myriad of factors such as nonuse and misuse of safety systems, oversized wheeled mobility devices, vehicle space constraints, and inadequate vehicle operator training may place wheeled mobility device (WhMD) users at risk of injury even under non-impact driving conditions. Since WhMD-related incidents also often occur during the boarding and alighting process, the frequency of these events, along with factors associated with these events are described for each transit mode. Recommendations for improving WhMD transportation are discussed given the current state of

  20. Complex quantum transport in a modulation doped strained Ge quantum well heterostructure with a high mobility 2D hole gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, C.; Casteleiro, C.; Leadley, D. R.; Myronov, M.

    2016-09-01

    The complex quantum transport of a strained Ge quantum well (QW) modulation doped heterostructure with two types of mobile carriers has been observed. The two dimensional hole gas (2DHG) in the Ge QW exhibits an exceptionally high mobility of 780 000 cm2/Vs at temperatures below 10 K. Through analysis of Shubnikov de-Haas oscillations in the magnetoresistance of this 2DHG below 2 K, the hole effective mass is found to be 0.065 m0. Anomalous conductance peaks are observed at higher fields which deviate from standard Shubnikov de-Haas and quantum Hall effect behaviour due to conduction via multiple carrier types. Despite this complex behaviour, analysis using a transport model with two conductive channels explains this behaviour and allows key physical parameters such as the carrier effective mass, transport, and quantum lifetimes and conductivity of the electrically active layers to be extracted. This finding is important for electronic device applications, since inclusion of highly doped interlayers which are electrically active, for enhancement of, for example, room temperature carrier mobility, does not prevent analysis of quantum transport in a QW.

  1. A new approach to calculate charge carrier transport mobility in organic molecular crystals from imaginary time path integral simulations.

    PubMed

    Song, Linze; Shi, Qiang

    2015-05-01

    We present a new non-perturbative method to calculate the charge carrier mobility using the imaginary time path integral approach, which is based on the Kubo formula for the conductivity, and a saddle point approximation to perform the analytic continuation. The new method is first tested using a benchmark calculation from the numerical exact hierarchical equations of motion method. Imaginary time path integral Monte Carlo simulations are then performed to explore the temperature dependence of charge carrier delocalization and mobility in organic molecular crystals (OMCs) within the Holstein and Holstein-Peierls models. The effects of nonlocal electron-phonon interaction on mobility in different charge transport regimes are also investigated. PMID:25956086

  2. Double path integral method for obtaining the mobility of the one-dimensional charge transport in molecular chain.

    PubMed

    Yoo-Kong, Sikarin; Liewrian, Watchara

    2015-12-01

    We report on a theoretical investigation concerning the polaronic effect on the transport properties of a charge carrier in a one-dimensional molecular chain. Our technique is based on the Feynman's path integral approach. Analytical expressions for the frequency-dependent mobility and effective mass of the carrier are obtained as functions of electron-phonon coupling. The result exhibits the crossover from a nearly free particle to a heavily trapped particle. We find that the mobility depends on temperature and decreases exponentially with increasing temperature at low temperature. It exhibits large polaronic-like behaviour in the case of weak electron-phonon coupling. These results agree with the phase transition (A.S. Mishchenko et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 146401 (2015)) of transport phenomena related to polaron motion in the molecular chain. PMID:26701710

  3. Separation of bulk and surface electron transport in metamorphic InAs layers using quantitative mobility spectrum analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Y.; Arehart, A. R.; Carlin, A. M.; Ringel, S. A.

    2008-08-11

    Electron transport in low dislocation density, strain-relaxed InAs layers grown on metamorphic InAs{sub y}P{sub 1-y}/InP substrates by molecular beam epitaxy was characterized using quantitative mobility spectrum analysis (QMSA) of Hall effect measurements. QMSA applied to systematically varied metamorphic InAs samples reveals high bulk electron mobilities of {approx}20 000 cm{sup 2}/V s at 300 K at a Si doping concentration of 1x10{sup 17} cm{sup -3}, simultaneously with a separate population of much slower electrons having an average mobility of {approx}2400 cm{sup 2}/V s due to parallel conduction within the InAs surface electron accumulation layer. Measurements made on higher doped samples reveal only a single electron population participating in transport due to lowered surface band bending that reduces surface accumulation of electrons in conjunction with the high conductivity of the high mobility metamorphic InAs bulk that overwhelms any remaining surface conductivity in the Hall effect measurements.

  4. Transnational Sea-Ice Transport in a Warmer, More Mobile Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newton, R.; Tremblay, B.; Pfirman, S. L.; DeRepentigny, P.

    2015-12-01

    As the Arctic sea ice thins, summer ice continues to shrink in its area, and multi-year ice becomes rarer, winter ice is not disappearing from the Arctic Basin. Rather, it is ever more dominated by first year ice. And each summer, as the total coverage withdraws, the first year ice is able travel faster and farther, carrying any ice-rafted material with it. Micro-organisms, sediments, pollutants and river runoff all move across the Arctic each summer and are deposited hundreds of kilometers from their origins. Analyzing Arctic sea ice drift patterns in the context of the exclusive economic zones (EEZs) of the Arctic nations raises concerns about the changing fate of "alien" ice which forms within one country's EEZ, then drifts and melts in another country's EEZ. We have developed a new data set from satellite-based ice-drift data that allows us to track groups of ice "pixels" forward from their origin to their destination, or backwards from their melting location to their point of formation. The software has been integrated with model output to extend the tracking of sea ice to include climate projections. Results indicate, for example, that Russian sea ice dominates "imports" to the EEZ of Norway, as expected, but with increasing ice mobility it is also is exported into the EEZs of other countries, including Canada and the United States. Regions of potential conflict are identified, including several national borders with extensive and/or changing transboundary sea ice transport. These data are a starting point for discussion of transborder questions raised by "alien" ice and the material it may import from one nation's EEZ to another's.

  5. A source-to-sink perspective on the mobilization, transport, and burial of organic carbon following the 2008 Sichuan earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, A.; Li, G.; Hammond, D. E.; Jin, Z.

    2012-12-01

    The mobilization and fluvial transport of organic carbon is one of the most important geochemical legacies of landslides triggered by extreme events such as major floods or earthquakes. While there is some information about the quantity of carbon carried by rivers under varying flow regimes, and even in the aftermath of single large events, there is little source-to-sink information about the transfer of this carbon through river systems into depositional centers, and about the geochemical transformations following deposition. These processes may be distinct in the aftermath of extreme events because of the association of organic carbon transport with high clastic sediment loads. In this study, we use the legacy of the 2008 Mw 7.9 Wenchuan Earthquake in Sichuan, China, to explore the mobilization, transport, and ultimate fate of organic carbon associated with co-seismic and post-seismic landslides. We focus on Zipingpu Reservoir, which serves as a trap for material carried by the Min Jiang river that drains the epicentral region most dramatically affected by landslides. We use revised landslide and biomass maps to quantify total organic carbon mobilized from hillslopes within the reservoir catchment area. We have collected sediment cores from the reservoir itself, and together with estimates of sedimentation rates constrained by short-lived radionuclide abundances, we construct a budget for the carbon transport into the reservoir based on analyses of sediment solid phase organic C concentrations and isotope ratios. Post-depositional diagenetic alteration is quantified using pore water profiles, including DIC concentration, carbon isotope compositions, and the isotopic composition of methane collected both in-situ from pore waters, and associated with actively bubbling methane seeps.

  6. The role of regioregularity, crystallinity, and chain orientation on electron transport in a high-mobility n-type copolymer.

    PubMed

    Steyrleuthner, Robert; Di Pietro, Riccardo; Collins, Brian A; Polzer, Frank; Himmelberger, Scott; Schubert, Marcel; Chen, Zhihua; Zhang, Shiming; Salleo, Alberto; Ade, Harald; Facchetti, Antonio; Neher, Dieter

    2014-03-19

    We investigated the correlation between the polymer backbone structural regularity and the charge transport properties of poly{[N,N'-bis(2-octyldodecyl)-1,4,5,8-naphthalenediimide-2,6-diyl]-alt-5,5'-(2,2'-bithiophene)} [P(NDI2OD-T2)], a widely studied semiconducting polymer exhibiting high electron mobility and an unconventional micromorphology. To understand the influence of the chemical structure and crystal packing of conventional regioregular P(NDI2OD-T2) [RR-P(NDI2OD-T2)] on the charge transport, the corresponding regioirregular polymer RI-P(NDI2OD-T2) was synthesized. By combining optical, X-ray, and transmission electron microscopy data, we quantitatively characterized the aggregation, crystallization, and backbone orientation of all of the polymer films, which were then correlated to the electron mobilities in electron-only diodes. By carefully selecting the preparation conditions, we were able to obtain RR-P(NDI2OD-T2) films with similar crystalline structure along the three crystallographic axes but with different orientations of the polymer chains with respect to the substrate surface. RI-P(NDI2OD-T2), though exhibiting a rather similar LUMO structure and energy compared with the regioregular counterpart, displayed a very different packing structure characterized by the formation of ordered stacks along the lamellar direction without detectible π-stacking. Vertical electron mobilities were extracted from the space-charge-limited currents in unipolar devices. We demonstrate the anisotropy of the charge transport along the different crystallographic directions and how the mobility depends on π-stacking but is insensitive to the degree or coherence of lamellar stacking. The comparison between the regioregular and regioirregular polymers also shows how the use of large planar functional groups leads to improved charge transport, with mobilities that are less affected by chemical and structural disorder with respect to classic semicrystalline polymers such

  7. Role of climatic single events and pedohydraulic factors in the mobilization and the transport of mobile organic matter in an arable soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmalwasser, Andreas; Totsche, Kai Uwe

    2013-04-01

    Soils are the largest terrestrial pool for organic carbon. To improve our understanding of local and global carbon cycles, factors and conditions that effect release, redistribution and transport of organic carbon should be known. Besides dissolved organic substances, organic particles with sizes up to several micrometers are mobile in soils. The aims of this work are (i) to investigate the impact of external factors (climatic, anthropogenic) and pedohydraulic conditions on the mobilization of mobile organic matter (MOM) and (ii) to characterize the MOM with focus on the particulate fraction. We monitored spatially resolved water and carbon fluxes at an agricultural site (Luvisol) with wheat and maize cultivation. Climatic and pedohydraulic boundary conditions were measured continuously with a climate station and a soilhydraulic monitoring pit. The seepage water has been collected in two depths (plough horizon and subsoil) with sixteen tension lysimeters. The results from two years observation suggest that release of MOM in soil is mainly triggered by single events like heavy rain and snowmelt. The pedohydraulic data support that preferential flow along biopores plays a major role for the MOM release during these events, whereas the hydraulic gradient was not observed as an important factor for MOM release. Owing to preferential flow, less MOM were detected in the seepage water collected below the plough pan than in the deeper subsoiĺs seepage water at single events. Further, the translocation of dissolved and particulate organic substances depends on the cultivation type. With regard to probably increasing occurrence of extreme events as a consequence of the climatic change, the influence of MOM translocation should be considered in future balances of carbon cycling.

  8. Decoupling Charge Transport and Electroluminescence in a High Mobility Polymer Semiconductor.

    PubMed

    Harkin, David J; Broch, Katharina; Schreck, Maximilian; Ceymann, Harald; Stoy, Andreas; Yong, Chaw-Keong; Nikolka, Mark; McCulloch, Iain; Stingelin, Natalie; Lambert, Christoph; Sirringhaus, Henning

    2016-08-01

    Fluorescence enhancement of a high-mobility polymer semiconductor is achieved via energy transfer to a higher fluorescence quantum yield squaraine dye molecule on 50 ps timescales. In organic light-emitting diodes, an order of magnitude enhancement of the external quantum efficiency is observed without reduction in the charge-carrier mobility resulting in radiances of up to 5 W str(-1) m(-2) at 800 nm.

  9. Understanding arsenic mobilization using reactive transport modeling of groundwater hydrochemistry in the Datong basin study plot, China.

    PubMed

    Mapoma, Harold Wilson Tumwitike; Xie, Xianjun; Pi, Kunfu; Liu, Yaqing; Zhu, Yapeng

    2016-03-01

    This paper discusses the reactive transport and evolution of arsenic along a selected flow path in a study plot within the central part of Datong basin. The simulation used the TOUGHREACT code. The spatial and temporal trends in hydrochemistry and mineral volume fraction along a flow path were observed. Furthermore, initial simulation of major ions and pH fits closely to the measured data. The study shows that equilibrium conditions may be attained at different stress periods for each parameter simulated. It is noted that the variations in ionic chemistry have a greater impact on arsenic distribution while reducing conditions drive the mobilization of arsenic. The study concluded that the reduction of Fe(iii) and As(v) and probably SO4/HS cycling are significant factors affecting localized mobilization of arsenic. Besides cation exchange and water-rock interaction, incongruent dissolution of silicates is also a significant control mechanism of general chemistry of the Datong basin aquifer.

  10. Understanding arsenic mobilization using reactive transport modeling of groundwater hydrochemistry in the Datong basin study plot, China.

    PubMed

    Mapoma, Harold Wilson Tumwitike; Xie, Xianjun; Pi, Kunfu; Liu, Yaqing; Zhu, Yapeng

    2016-03-01

    This paper discusses the reactive transport and evolution of arsenic along a selected flow path in a study plot within the central part of Datong basin. The simulation used the TOUGHREACT code. The spatial and temporal trends in hydrochemistry and mineral volume fraction along a flow path were observed. Furthermore, initial simulation of major ions and pH fits closely to the measured data. The study shows that equilibrium conditions may be attained at different stress periods for each parameter simulated. It is noted that the variations in ionic chemistry have a greater impact on arsenic distribution while reducing conditions drive the mobilization of arsenic. The study concluded that the reduction of Fe(iii) and As(v) and probably SO4/HS cycling are significant factors affecting localized mobilization of arsenic. Besides cation exchange and water-rock interaction, incongruent dissolution of silicates is also a significant control mechanism of general chemistry of the Datong basin aquifer. PMID:26857449

  11. Devices using ballistic transport of two dimensional electron gas in delta doped gallium arsenide high electron mobility transistor structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Sungmu

    In this thesis, devices using the ballistic transport of two dimensional electron gas (2DEG) in GaAs High Electron Mobility Transistor(HEMT) structure is fabricated and their dc and ac properties are characterized. This study gives insight on operation and applications of modern submicron devices with ever reduced gate length comparable to electron mean free path. The ballistic transport is achieved using both temporal and spatial limits in this thesis. In temporal limit, when frequency is higher than the scattering frequency (1/(2pitau)), ballistic transport can be achieved. At room temperature, generally the scattering frequency is around 500 GHz but at cryogenic temperature (≤4K) with high mobility GaAs HEMT structure, the frequency is much lower than 2 GHz. On this temporal ballistic transport regime, effect of contact impedance and different dc mobility on device operation is characterized with the ungated 2DEG of HEMT structure. In this ballistic regime, impedance and responsivity of plasma wave detector are investigated using the gated 2DEG of HEMT at different ac boundary conditions. Plasma wave is generated at asymmetric ac boundary conditions of HEMTs, where source is short to ground and drain is open while rf power is applied to gate. The wave velocity can be tuned by gate bias voltage and induced drain to source voltage(Vds ) shows the resonant peak at odd number of fundamental frequency. Quantitative power coupling to plasma wave detector leads to experimental characterization of resonant response of plasma wave detector as a function of frequency. Because plasma wave resonance is not limited by transit time, the physics learned in this study can be directly converted to room temperature terahertz detection by simply reducing gate length(Lgate) to submicron for the terahertz application such as non destructive test, bio medical analysis, homeland security, defense and space. In same HEMT structure, the dc and rf characterization on device is also

  12. 41 CFR 302-10.200 - What costs are allowable when a commercial carrier transports my mobile home overland or over water?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What costs are allowable when a commercial carrier transports my mobile home overland or over water? 302-10.200 Section 302-10.200 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System RELOCATION ALLOWANCES TRANSPORTATION AND STORAGE OF PROPERTY...

  13. Secure architecture for extensible mobile internet transport services (SAFEMITS) design and testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzgibbons, Patrick W.; Das, Digen K.; Hash, Larry J.

    2006-05-01

    The purpose of this research was to design and implement the functional requirements of three important distributed services in a secure mobile ad-hoc network. The three distributed services are described: lookup services, adaptation services and composition services. Further, research was required to implement security at various layers to enhance the overall security of the SAFEMITS network. This required an extensive analysis of the security features of lookup server which functions as the controller of the mobile ad hoc network. Finally a technique was designed to select a super node, and a performance test was performed using both the Windows and Linux operating systems.

  14. Optical conductivity and optical effective mass in a high-mobility organic semiconductor: Implications for the nature of charge transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuan; Yi, Yuanping; Coropceanu, Veaceslav; Brédas, Jean-Luc

    2014-12-01

    We present a multiscale modeling of the infrared optical properties of the rubrene crystal. The results are in very good agreement with the experimental data that point to nonmonotonic features in the optical conductivity spectrum and small optical effective masses. We find that, in the static-disorder approximation, the nonlocal electron-phonon interactions stemming from low-frequency lattice vibrations can decrease the optical effective masses and lead to lighter quasiparticles. On the other hand, the charge-transport and infrared optical properties of the rubrene crystal at room temperature are demonstrated to be governed by localized carriers driven by inherent thermal disorders. Our findings underline that the presence of apparently light carriers in high-mobility organic semiconductors does not necessarily imply bandlike transport.

  15. School Travel Planning: Mobilizing School and Community Resources to Encourage Active School Transportation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buliung, Ron; Faulkner, Guy; Beesley, Theresa; Kennedy, Jacky

    2011-01-01

    Background: Active school transport (AST), school travel using an active mode like walking, may be important to children's overall physical activity. A "school travel plan" (STP) documents a school's transport characteristics and provides an action plan to address school and neighborhood barriers to AST. Methods: We conducted a pilot STP…

  16. Mobility and fluxes of major, minor and trace metals during basalt weathering and groundwater transport at Mt. Etna volcano (Sicily)

    SciTech Connect

    Aiuppa, A.; Allard, P.; D'Alessandro, W.; Michel, A.; Parello, F.; Treuil, M.; Valenza, M.

    2000-06-01

    The concentrations and fluxes of major, minor and trace metals were determined in 53 samples of groundwaters from around Mt. Etna, in order to evaluate the conditions and extent of alkali basalt weathering by waters enriched in magma-derived CO{sub 2} and the contribution of aqueous transport to the overall metal discharge of the volcano. The authors show that gaseous input of magmatic volatile metals into the Etnean aquifer is small or negligible, being limited by cooling of the rising fluids. Basalt leaching by weakly acidic, CO{sub 2}-charged water is the overwhelming source of metals and appears to be more extensive in two sectors of the S-SW (Paterno) and E (Zafferana) volcano flanks, where out flowing groundwaters are the richest in metals and bicarbonate of magmatic origin. Thermodynamic modeling of the results allows evaluation of the relative mobility and chemical speciation of various elements during their partitioning between solid and liquid phases through the weathering process. At Mt. Etna, poorly mobile elements (Al, Th, Fe) are preferentially retained in the solid residue of weathering, while alkalis, alkaline earth and oxo-anion-forming elements (As, Se, Sb, Mo) are more mobile and released to the aqueous system. Transition metals display an intermediate behavior and are strongly dependent on either the redox conditions (Mn, Cr, V) or solid surface-related processes (V, Zn, Cu).

  17. Disordered RuO2 exhibits two dimensional, low-mobility transport and a metal–insulator transition

    PubMed Central

    Osofsky, M. S.; Krowne, C. M.; Charipar, K. M.; Bussmann, K.; Chervin, C. N.; Pala, I. R.; Rolison, D. R.

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of low-dimensional metallic systems such as high-mobility metal oxide field-effect transistors, the cuprate superconductors, and conducting oxide interfaces (e.g., LaAlO3/SrTiO3) has stimulated research into the nature of electronic transport in two-dimensional systems given that the seminal theory for transport in disordered metals predicts that the metallic state cannot exist in two dimensions (2D). In this report, we demonstrate the existence of a metal–insulator transition (MIT) in highly disordered RuO2 nanoskins with carrier concentrations that are one-to-six orders of magnitude higher and with mobilities that are one-to-six orders of magnitude lower than those reported previously for 2D oxides. The presence of an MIT and the accompanying atypical electronic characteristics place this form of the oxide in a highly diffusive, strong disorder regime and establishes the existence of a metallic state in 2D that is analogous to the three-dimensional case. PMID:26915411

  18. Disordered RuO2 exhibits two dimensional, low-mobility transport and a metal-insulator transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osofsky, M. S.; Krowne, C. M.; Charipar, K. M.; Bussmann, K.; Chervin, C. N.; Pala, I. R.; Rolison, D. R.

    2016-02-01

    The discovery of low-dimensional metallic systems such as high-mobility metal oxide field-effect transistors, the cuprate superconductors, and conducting oxide interfaces (e.g., LaAlO3/SrTiO3) has stimulated research into the nature of electronic transport in two-dimensional systems given that the seminal theory for transport in disordered metals predicts that the metallic state cannot exist in two dimensions (2D). In this report, we demonstrate the existence of a metal-insulator transition (MIT) in highly disordered RuO2 nanoskins with carrier concentrations that are one-to-six orders of magnitude higher and with mobilities that are one-to-six orders of magnitude lower than those reported previously for 2D oxides. The presence of an MIT and the accompanying atypical electronic characteristics place this form of the oxide in a highly diffusive, strong disorder regime and establishes the existence of a metallic state in 2D that is analogous to the three-dimensional case.

  19. Beyond Accessible Mobility: Insights into Psychosocial Inclusivity Dimensions in Personal Transport.

    PubMed

    Lim, Yonghun; Nickpour, Farnaz; Giacomin, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    The importance of psychosocial aspects has been gradually recognised in the field of inclusive design. A critical review of existing literature, however, such as design, healthcare, psychology, and sociology, on psychosocial aspects of inclusivity identifies a two-fold research gap which is a limited understanding of both definition and dimensions of psychosocial inclusivity in the field of inclusive design. Such concept of psychosocial inclusivity is an inherently context-dependent and multi-faceted concept. Accordingly, a 'personal mobility' was focused on in this paper as one key context to explore psychosocial inclusivity to facilitate thorough and in-depth study of this concept. In this study, therefore, the interviews with 37 mobility-challenged participants were performed, and then the interview data was analysed by using a coding analyses to identify key psychosocial factors of inclusive design based on participants' lived-experiences.

  20. Beyond Accessible Mobility: Insights into Psychosocial Inclusivity Dimensions in Personal Transport.

    PubMed

    Lim, Yonghun; Nickpour, Farnaz; Giacomin, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    The importance of psychosocial aspects has been gradually recognised in the field of inclusive design. A critical review of existing literature, however, such as design, healthcare, psychology, and sociology, on psychosocial aspects of inclusivity identifies a two-fold research gap which is a limited understanding of both definition and dimensions of psychosocial inclusivity in the field of inclusive design. Such concept of psychosocial inclusivity is an inherently context-dependent and multi-faceted concept. Accordingly, a 'personal mobility' was focused on in this paper as one key context to explore psychosocial inclusivity to facilitate thorough and in-depth study of this concept. In this study, therefore, the interviews with 37 mobility-challenged participants were performed, and then the interview data was analysed by using a coding analyses to identify key psychosocial factors of inclusive design based on participants' lived-experiences. PMID:27534352

  1. Colloids in groundwater: Their mobilization, subsurface transport, and sorption affinity for toxic chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Gschwend, P.M.

    1992-07-10

    Our originally stated objectives included: (1) development of a quantitative source function for colloid mobilization to groundwater, and (2) assessment of the most important colloidal phases to which nonpolar compounds sorb. We have been pursuing a series of studies to elucidate the roles of colloidal phases in subsurface environments. Most notably, we have discovered the critical role of secondary cementitious phases like goethite. We developed a new procedure for measuring surface iron oxides'' which is a great improvement over earlier methodologies. Currently, we are developing a unifying model with which we can predict the mobilization of colloids to groundwater flowing through such porous media. Also, we have been able to show that groundwater samples contain colloidal phases in sufficient quantities and of suitable properties to enhance the mobile load of toxic compounds like polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Finally, we have synthesized our varied field investigations from sites in Massachusetts, New Jersey, Delaware, Nevada, Connecticut, and New York to yield a protocol for other researchers interested in evaluating colloids in groundwater. These accomplishments are discussed in more detail below. Through these efforts, we have become increasingly convinced of the central role played by colloidal phases in numerous subsurface phenomena controlling contaminant fates.

  2. Framework for evaluating transportation control measures: Energy, air quality, and mobility tradeoffs. Research report

    SciTech Connect

    Euritt, M.A.; Qin, J.; Meesomboon, J.; Walton, C.M.

    1994-07-01

    Transportation planners, engineers, and air quality analysts are increasingly understanding the need for coordinated efforts in providing efficient and effective transportation systems while addressing serious energy and environmental concerns. At present, however, transportation planning and air quality analysis models are rather incompatible. Emissions models require detailed inputs which are not generally provided by transportation planning and analysis tools. Traditionally, transportation planning is comprised of four stages: trip generation, trip distribution, mode choice, and network assignment. In general, a forecast population, auto ownership, employment, and land use are inputs into the stages sequentially. This planning process does not adequately account for the manner in which individuals make travel decisions. The only travel-related decision that can be predicted using this traditional planning method is the mode of travel, while transportation control measures (TCMs), affect trip generation and trip distribution as well as route and mode choice. Variables required for emissions estimation have not routinely been components of transportation planning models. What is needed is a methodology for combining transportation planning and analysis models with emissions factor models for predicting the effectiveness of various TCMs. The application of the macro-framework is demonstrated through analyses of two sample networks. The results show that the effectiveness of a TCM depends on the characteristics of the urban environment in which it is implemented. Failure to analyze the implication of a TCM prior to its implementation may yield results inconsistent with environmental and energy policy objectives. In addition, the results show that the choice of an emissions model is very critical in air quality analysis.

  3. Mobilization and transport of metal-rich colloidal particles from mine tailings into soil under transient chemical and physical conditions.

    PubMed

    Lu, Cong; Wu, Yaoguo; Hu, Sihai; Raza, Muhammad Ali; Fu, Yilin

    2016-04-01

    Exposed mine tailing wastes with considerable heavy metals can release hazardous colloidal particles into soil under transient chemical and physical conditions. Two-layered packed columns with tailings above and soils below were established to investigate mobilization and transport of colloidal particles from metal-rich mine tailings into soil under transient infiltration ionic strength (IS: 100, 20, 2 mM) and flow rate (FR: 20.7, 41, and 62.3 mm h(-1)), with Cu and Pb as representatives of the heavy metals. Results show that the tailing particles within the colloidal size (below 2 μm) were released from the columns. A step-decrease in infiltration IS and FR enhanced, whereas a step-increase in the IS and FR restrained the release of tailing particles from the column. The effects of step-changing FR were unexpected due to the small size of the released tailing particles (220-342 nm, being not sensitive to hydrodynamic shear force), the diffusion-controlled particle release process and the relatively compact pore structure. The tailing particles present in the solution with tested IS were found negatively charged and more stable than soil particles, which provides favorable conditions for tailing particles to be transported over a long distance in the soil. The mobilization and transport of Cu and Pb from the tailings into soil were mediated by the tailing particles. Therefore, the inherent toxic tailing particles could be considerably introduced into soil under certain conditions (IS reduction or FR decrease), which may result in serious environmental pollution. PMID:26780043

  4. Transportation in an aging society: improving mobility and safety for older persons. Volume 1. Committee report and recommendations. Special report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    In June 1986, the Transportation Research Board began a project to investigate the needs and problems of older Americans in relation to the U.S. roadway-transportation system. A committee of experts was appointed to review the design and operational features of the roadway system and to recommend steps to improve the mobility and safety of older users--drivers, passengers, pedestrians--who are an integral part of the system. The committees found that people over the age of 75 are involved in more fatal crashes than any other group except teenagers. Nevertheless they decided that 'age alone is a poor predictor of the performance of any individual.' Rather than restricting licenses at any given maximum age, the committee recommended that highway safety be improved by making adjustments to the design of highway features and that license screening tests be adapted to better identify people of all ages who have impairments that would affect driving. The committee also recommended improved specialized transportation for the frail elderly.

  5. Charge injection and transport in low-mobility mixed ionic/electronic conducting systems: Regimes of behavior and limiting cases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, Thomas J.; Lonergan, Mark C.

    2012-01-01

    A comprehensive analysis of a model describing charge-carrier injection and transport in light-emitting electrochemical cells (LECs) and related mixed ionic electronic conductors (MIECs) is given. Ions are treated using a modified drift-diffusion transport equation that accounts for volume-exclusion effects, and electronic injection is treated using a spatially dependent tunneling mechanism that explicitly accounts for both forward and backward fluxes. Systems containing both one and two mobile ionic species are treated and compared. The unique physics of LECs stem from ionic polarization processes that can lead to field screening and narrowed injection barriers, producing increased electrode exchange currents via tunneling. The latter process promotes the establishment of electronic quasiequilibrium throughout the double-layer regions and hence promotes bulk-limited conduction. Explicit expressions are given describing the conditions necessary to assume field screening and bulk-limited conduction, which determine the applicability of either traditional semiconductor device models such as Fowler-Nordheim or electrochemical models such as the Nernst equation. Having established these conditions, several distinct regimes of bulk-limited LEC behavior are described. Explicit formulas for the biases delineating these regimes are given as well as formulas for the current in each regime. At low biases, the current generally increases exponentially with bias; the bulk remains field free, and the transport is predominantly unipolar and diffusive. At high biases, the current rises much less rapidly, and bulk transport is bipolar, occurring through a combination of drift and diffusion. The nature of the bulk region in the high-bias regime is markedly different in systems with one and two mobile ionic species. At intermediate biases, space charge effects preferentially drive injection of the minority carrier causing a transition from unipolar to bipolar injection. It is

  6. Plant rhizosphere effects on metal mobilization and transport. 1998 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, T.W.M.

    1998-06-01

    'Information on the mechanism of how plants mobilize, uptake, and metabolize metal ions is very limited. Especially deficient is the understanding of these processes involving pollutant metal ions and interactions among these ions. Based on the current knowledge regarding nutrient ions, it is clear that elucidation of rhizospheric processes such as exudation of organic ligands by plant roots and plant metabolism/adaptation involving these biogenic chelators is critically important. A mechanistic insight into these processes will advance knowledge in microbe-plant host interactions and how metal ions are mobilized, immobilized, and sequestered by these interactions. This, in turn, is essential to applications such as phytobioremediation and microbioremediation of metal ion pollution. Root exudation also serves many other important rhizosphere functions including energy supply for microbial degradation of organic pollutants, structuring of microbial community, and the formation of soil humic materials which are considered to be a major sink for both organic and inorganic pollutants. How root exudates function is critically dependent on the chemical nature of exudate components. Therefore, a comprehensive characterization of all major exudate components, regardless of their chemical class, should facilitate the development and implementation of bioremediation for both organic and inorganic pollutants. Therefore, the objectives of this project are: (1) To obtain a comprehensive composition of major organic components in plant root exudates as a function of different metal ions; (2) To examine plant metabolic response(s) to these metal ion treatments, with emphasis on biosynthetic pathways of organic ligands; and (3) To investigate the effect(s) of soil microbial (e.g. mycorrhizae) association on (1) and (2).'

  7. Simulation of Flow, Sediment Transport, and Sediment Mobility of the Lower Coeur d'Alene River, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Berenbrock, Charles; Tranmer, Andrew W.

    2008-01-01

    A one-dimensional sediment-transport model and a multi-dimensional hydraulic and bed shear stress model were developed to investigate the hydraulic, sediment transport, and sediment mobility characteristics of the lower Coeur d?Alene River in northern Idaho. This report documents the development and calibration of those models, as well as the results of model simulations. The one-dimensional sediment-transport model (HEC-6) was developed, calibrated, and used to simulate flow hydraulics and erosion, deposition, and transport of sediment in the lower Coeur d?Alene River. The HEC-6 modeled reach, comprised of 234 cross sections, extends from Enaville, Idaho, on the North Fork of the Coeur d?Alene River and near Pinehurst, Idaho, on the South Fork of the river to near Harrison, Idaho, on the main stem of the river. Bed-sediment samples collected by previous investigators and samples collected for this study in 2005 were used in the model. Sediment discharge curves from a previous study were updated using suspended-sediment samples collected at three sites since April 2000. The HEC-6 was calibrated using river discharge and water-surface elevations measured at five U.S. Geological Survey gaging stations. The calibrated HEC-6 model allowed simulation of management alternatives to assess erosion and deposition from proposed dredging of contaminated streambed sediments in the Dudley reach. Four management alternatives were simulated with HEC-6. Before the start of simulation for these alternatives, seven cross sections in the reach near Dudley, Idaho, were deepened 20 feet?removing about 296,000 cubic yards of sediments?to simulate dredging. Management alternative 1 simulated stage-discharge conditions from 2000, and alternative 2 simulated conditions from 1997. Results from alternatives 1 and 2 indicated that about 6,500 and 12,300 cubic yards, respectively, were deposited in the dredged reach. These figures represent 2 and 4 percent, respectively, of the total volume of

  8. Linking aquifer spatial properties and non-Fickian transport in mobile-immobile like alluvial settings

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhang, Yong; Green, Christopher T.; Baeumer, Boris

    2014-01-01

    Time-nonlocal transport models can describe non-Fickian diffusion observed in geological media, but the physical meaning of parameters can be ambiguous, and most applications are limited to curve-fitting. This study explores methods for predicting the parameters of a temporally tempered Lévy motion (TTLM) model for transient sub-diffusion in mobile–immobile like alluvial settings represented by high-resolution hydrofacies models. The TTLM model is a concise multi-rate mass transfer (MRMT) model that describes a linear mass transfer process where the transfer kinetics and late-time transport behavior are controlled by properties of the host medium, especially the immobile domain. The intrinsic connection between the MRMT and TTLM models helps to estimate the main time-nonlocal parameters in the TTLM model (which are the time scale index, the capacity coefficient, and the truncation parameter) either semi-analytically or empirically from the measurable aquifer properties. Further applications show that the TTLM model captures the observed solute snapshots, the breakthrough curves, and the spatial moments of plumes up to the fourth order. Most importantly, the a priori estimation of the time-nonlocal parameters outside of any breakthrough fitting procedure provides a reliable “blind” prediction of the late-time dynamics of subdiffusion observed in a spectrum of alluvial settings. Predictability of the time-nonlocal parameters may be due to the fact that the late-time subdiffusion is not affected by the exact location of each immobile zone, but rather is controlled by the time spent in immobile blocks surrounding the pathway of solute particles. Results also show that the effective dispersion coefficient has to be fitted due to the scale effect of transport, and the mean velocity can differ from local measurements or volume averages. The link between medium heterogeneity and time-nonlocal parameters will help to improve model predictability for non

  9. Mobility and fluxes of major, minor and trace metals during basalt weathering and groundwater transport at Mt. Etna volcano (Sicily)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aiuppa, Alessandro; Allard, Patrick; D'Alessandro, Walter; Michel, Agnes; Parello, Francesco; Treuil, Michel; Valenza, Mariano

    2000-06-01

    The concentrations and fluxes of major, minor and trace metals were determined in 53 samples of groundwaters from around Mt Etna, in order to evaluate the conditions and extent of alkali basalt weathering by waters enriched in magma-derived CO 2 and the contribution of aqueous transport to the overall metal discharge of the volcano. We show that gaseous input of magmatic volatile metals into the Etnean aquifer is small or negligible, being limited by cooling of the rising fluids. Basalt leaching by weakly acidic, CO 2-charged water is the overwhelming source of metals and appears to be more extensive in two sectors of the S-SW (Paternò) and E (Zafferana) volcano flanks, where out flowing groundwaters are the richest in metals and bicarbonate of magmatic origin. Thermodynamic modeling of the results allows to evaluate the relative mobility and chemical speciation of various elements during their partitioning between solid and liquid phases through the weathering process. The facts that rock-forming minerals and groundmass dissolve at different rates and secondary minerals are formed are taken into account. At Mt. Etna, poorly mobile elements (Al, Th, Fe) are preferentially retained in the solid residue of weathering, while alkalis, alkaline earth and oxo-anion-forming elements (As, Se, Sb, Mo) are more mobile and released to the aqueous system. Transition metals display an intermediate behavior and are strongly dependent on either the redox conditions (Mn, Cr, V) or solid surface-related processes (V, Zn, Cu). The fluxes of metals discharged by the volcanic aquifer of Etna range from 7.0 × 10 -3 t/a (Th) to 7.3 × 10 4 t/a (Na). They are comparable in magnitude to the summit crater plume emissions for a series of elements (Na, K, Ca, Mg, U, V, Li) with lithophile affinity, but are minor for volatile elements. Basalt weathering at Mt Etna also consumes about 2.1 × 10 5 t/a of magma-derived carbon dioxide, equivalent to ca. 7% of contemporaneous crater plume

  10. Betatron Application in Mobile and Relocatable Inspection Systems for Freight Transport Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakhlov, S. V.; Kasyanov, S. V.; Kasyanov, V. A.; Osipov, S. P.; Stein, M. M.; Stein, A. M.; Xiaoming, Sun

    2016-01-01

    Accelerators with energy level up to 4 MeV having high level of penetration ability by steel equivalent are the popular to control oversize cargo transported by road, by railway and by river. Betatron's usage as cyclic induction accelerator has some advantages in comparison with linear accelerators and other sources. Tomsk Polytechnic University has developed many types of betatrons, most of them are being produced by separate affiliated company " Foton ". Article is shown the results of application of the betatrons in inspection custom systems.

  11. Understanding the poor iontophoretic transport of lysozyme across the skin: when high charge and high electrophoretic mobility are not enough.

    PubMed

    Dubey, S; Kalia, Y N

    2014-06-10

    The original aim of the study was to investigate the transdermal iontophoretic delivery of lysozyme and to gain further insight into the factors controlling protein electrotransport. Initial experiments were done using porcine skin. Lysozyme transport was quantified by using an activity assay based on the lysis of Micrococcus lysodeikticus and was corrected for the release of endogenous enzyme from the skin during current application. Cumulative iontophoretic permeation of lysozyme during 8h at 0.5mA/cm(2) (0.7mM; pH6) was surprisingly low (5.37±3.46μg/cm(2) in 8h) as compared to electrotransport of cytochrome c (Cyt c) and ribonuclease A (RNase A) under similar conditions (923.0±496.1 and 170.71±92.13μg/cm(2), respectively) - despite its having a higher electrophoretic mobility. The focus of the study then became to understand and explain the causes of its poor iontophoretic transport. Lowering formulation pH to 5 increased histidine protonation in the protein and decreased the ionisation of fixed negative charges in the skin (pI ~4.5) and resulted in a small but statistically significant increase in permeation. Co-iontophoresis of acetaminophen revealed a significant inhibition of electroosmosis; inhibition factors of 12-16 were indicative of strong lysozyme binding to skin. Intriguingly, lidocaine electrotransport, which is due almost exclusively to electromigration, was also decreased (approximately 2.7-fold) following skin pre-treatment by lysozyme iontophoresis (cf. iontophoresis of buffer solution) - suggesting that lysozyme was also able to influence subsequent cation electromigration. In order to elucidate the site of skin binding, different porcine skin models were tested (dermatomed skin with thicknesses of 250 and 750μm, tape-stripped skin and heat-separated dermis). Although no difference was seen between permeation across 250 and 750μm dermatomed skin (13.57±12.20 and 5.37±3.46μg/cm(2), respectively), there was a statistically significant

  12. 41 CFR 302-10.401 - Are the allowances for transporting a mobile home in addition to the allowances for per diem...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., for an employee and immediate family member(s)? 302-10.401 Section 302-10.401 Public Contracts and... per diem, mileage, and transportation expenses, for an employee and immediate family member(s)? Yes... that the mobile home will be used as the employee's and/or immediate family member(s) primary...

  13. Impact of immobile porosity architecture on reactive transport in mobile/immobile models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babey, T.; De Dreuzy, J.; Rapaport, A.; Casenave, C.

    2011-12-01

    Diffusive porosity structures in aquifers can display a large diversity of topologies, from intergranular porosity to the ';dead-ends' of fracture networks. Here we study numerically the influence of this topology on solute transport parameters, such as dispersion coefficient, and on a simple equilibrium reaction. We build a model where diffusive structures of variable topology (with junctions, loops...) exchange with a fast, advective zone. We show that the internal organization of volumes of the diffusive structure has a strong and non-trivial influence on transport and reactivity. We also show, through Multi-Rate Mass Transfer framework, that the signature of this topology on residence times is often sufficient to reproduce the initial reaction rates. We thus propose new ways to determine the appropriate MRMT models for a wide range of porosity types. However, more complex chemical / physical processes (kinetic-limited reactions, gravity effects...) may diminish this relevance of MRMT models to reproduce reaction rates, and additional parameters linked to the topology of diffusive structures may be required.

  14. Impact of immobile porosity architecture on reactive transport in mobile/immobile models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babey, T.; De Dreuzy, J.; Rapaport, A.; Casenave, C.

    2013-12-01

    Diffusive porosity structures in aquifers can display a large diversity of topologies, from intergranular porosity to the ';dead-ends' of fracture networks. Here we study numerically the influence of this topology on solute transport parameters, such as dispersion coefficient, and on a simple equilibrium reaction. We build a model where diffusive structures of variable topology (with junctions, loops...) exchange with a fast, advective zone. We show that the internal organization of volumes of the diffusive structure has a strong and non-trivial influence on transport and reactivity. We also show, through Multi-Rate Mass Transfer framework, that the signature of this topology on residence times is often sufficient to reproduce the initial reaction rates. We thus propose new ways to determine the appropriate MRMT models for a wide range of porosity types. However, more complex chemical / physical processes (kinetic-limited reactions, gravity effects...) may diminish this relevance of MRMT models to reproduce reaction rates, and additional parameters linked to the topology of diffusive structures may be required.

  15. Imaging geochemical heterogeneities using inverse reactive transport modeling: An example relevant for characterizing arsenic mobilization and distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fakhreddine, Sarah; Lee, Jonghyun; Kitanidis, Peter K.; Fendorf, Scott; Rolle, Massimo

    2016-02-01

    The spatial distribution of reactive minerals in the subsurface is often a primary factor controlling the fate and transport of contaminants in groundwater systems. However, direct measurement and estimation of heterogeneously distributed minerals are often costly and difficult to obtain. While previous studies have shown the utility of using hydrologic measurements combined with inverse modeling techniques for tomography of physical properties including hydraulic conductivity, these methods have seldom been used to image reactive geochemical heterogeneities. In this study, we focus on As-bearing reactive minerals as aquifer contaminants. We use synthetic applications to demonstrate the ability of inverse modeling techniques combined with mechanistic reactive transport models to image reactive mineral lenses in the subsurface and quantify estimation error using indirect, commonly measured groundwater parameters. Specifically, we simulate the mobilization of arsenic via kinetic oxidative dissolution of As-bearing pyrite due to dissolved oxygen in the ambient groundwater, which is an important mechanism for arsenic release in groundwater both under natural conditions and engineering applications such as managed aquifer recharge and recovery operations. The modeling investigation is carried out at various scales and considers different flow-through domains including (i) a 1D lab-scale column (80 cm), (ii) a 2D lab-scale setup (60 cm × 30 cm) and (iii) a 2D field-scale domain (20 m × 4 m). In these setups, synthetic dissolved oxygen data and forward reactive transport simulations are used to image the spatial distribution of As-bearing pyrite using the Principal Component Geostatistical Approach (PCGA) for inverse modeling.

  16. Using a mobile laboratory to characterize the distribution and transport of sulfur dioxide in and around Beijing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, M.; Zhu, T.; Zhang, J. P.; Zhang, Q. H.; Lin, W. W.; Li, Y.; Wang, Z. F.

    2011-11-01

    Megacities are places with intensive human activity and energy consumption. To reduce air pollution, many megacities have relocated energy supplies and polluted industries to their outer regions. However, regional transport then becomes an important source of air pollution in megacities. To improve air quality before and during the 2008 Beijing Olympics, a wide range of control strategies were implemented, including the relocation of polluting industries. High sulfur dioxide (SO2) concentrations were occasionally observed during this period. Potential sources from southern regions of Beijing were indicated by backward trajectories model and urban/rural stationary measurements, but direct evidence was lacking. Here we used a mobile laboratory to characterize the spatial distribution and regional transport of SO2 to Beijing during the Campaign for Air Quality Research in Beijing and the Surrounding Region (CAREBEIJING)-2008. Among the five days chosen for the case studies during the Olympic air pollution control period, four had high SO2 concentrations (6, 20 August and 3, 4 September 2008) while one had low SO2 concentration (11 September 2008). The average values of SO2 during the low SO2 concentration day were 3.9 ppb, much lower than during the high concentration days (7.8 ppb). This result implied an impact by regional transport from outside Beijing. During these days, we captured transport events of SO2 from areas south of Beijing, with a clear decrease in SO2 concentrations southeast of the 6th to 4th Ring Roads around Beijing and along the 140 km highway from Tianjin to Beijing. The influx of SO2 through the 4th to 6th Ring Roads ranged from 2.1 to 4.6 kg s-1 on 4 September and 0.2 to 1.6 kg s-1 on 20 August 2008. The differences of influx in days were due to the variations of emission changes, transport directions and dilutions. Locally emitted SO2 from a source located along Jingshi Highway outside the southwest section of the 5th Ring Road of Beijing was

  17. Using a mobile laboratory to characterize the distribution and transport of sulfur dioxide in and around Beijing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, M.; Zhu, T.; Zhang, J. P.; Zhang, Q. H.; Lin, W. W.; Li, Y.; Wang, Z. F.

    2011-06-01

    Megacities are places with intensive human activity and energy consumption. To reduce air pollution, many megacities have relocated energy supplies and polluted industries to their outer regions. However, regional transport then becomes an important source of air pollution in megacities. To improve air quality before and during the 2008 Beijing Olympics, a wide range of control strategies were implemented, including the relocation of polluting industries. High sulfur dioxide (SO2) concentrations were occasionally observed during this period. Potential sources from southern regions of Beijing were indicated by backward trajectories and urban/rural stationary measurements, but direct evidence was lacking. Here we used a mobile laboratory to characterize the spatial distribution and regional transport of SO2 to Beijing during the Campaign for Air Quality Research in Beijing and the Surrounding Region (CAREBEIJING)-2008. Among the five days chosen for the case studies during the Olympic air pollution control period, four had high SO2 concentrations (6, 20 August and 3, 4 September 2008) while one had low SO2 concentration (11 September 2008). The average values of SO2 during the low SO2 concentration day were 3.9 ppb, much lower than during the high concentration days (7.8 ppb). This result implied an impact by regional transport from outside Beijing. During these days, we captured transport events of SO2 from areas south of Beijing, with a clear decrease in SO2 concentrations southeast of the 6th to 4th Ring Roads around Beijing and along the 140 km highway from Tianjin to Beijing. The influx of SO2 through the 4th to 6th Ring Roads ranged from 2.07 to 4.64 kg s-1 on 4 September and 0.21 to 1.56 kg s-1 on 20 August 2008. Locally emitted SO2 from a source located along Jingshi Highway outside the southwest section of the 5th Ring Road of Beijing was identified using wind field data generated by the Weather Research and Forecasting model and the measured particle size

  18. Efforts to Reduce International Space Station Crew Maintenance for the Management of the Extravehicular Mobility Unit Transport Loop Water Quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steele, John W.; Etter, David; Rector, Tony; Boyle, Robert; Vandezande, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    The EMU (Extravehicular Mobility Unit) contains a semi-closed-loop re-circulating water circuit (Transport Loop) to absorb heat into a LCVG (Liquid Coolant and Ventilation Garment) worn by the astronaut. A second, single-pass water circuit (Feed-water Loop) provides water to a cooling device (Sublimator) containing porous plates, and that water sublimates through the porous plates to space vacuum. The cooling effect from the sublimation of this water translates to a cooling of the LCVG water that circulates through the Sublimator. The quality of the EMU Transport Loop water is maintained through the use of a water processing kit (ALCLR Airlock Cooling Loop Remediation) that is used to periodically clean and disinfect the water circuit. Opportunities to reduce crew time associated with on-orbit ALCLR operations include a detailed review of the historical water quality data for evidence to support an extension to the implementation cycle. Furthermore, an EMU returned after 2-years of use on the ISS (International Space Station) is being used as a test bed to evaluate the results of extended and repeated ALCLR implementation cycles. Finally, design, use and on-orbit location enhancements to the ALCLR kit components are being considered to allow the implementation cycle to occur in parallel with other EMU maintenance and check-out activities, and to extend the life of the ALCLR kit components. These efforts are undertaken to reduce the crew-time and logistics burdens for the EMU, while ensuring the long-term health of the EMU water circuits for a post-Shuttle 6-year service life.

  19. Tests of an alternate mobile transporter and extravehicular activity assembly procedure for the Space Station Freedom truss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heard, Walter L., Jr.; Watson, Judith J.; Lake, Mark S.; Bush, Harold G.; Jensen, J. Kermit; Wallsom, Richard E.; Phelps, James E.

    1992-01-01

    Results are presented from a ground test program of an alternate mobile transporter (MT) concept and extravehicular activity (EVA) assembly procedure for the Space Station Freedom (SSF) truss keel. A three-bay orthogonal tetrahedral truss beam consisting of 44 2-in-diameter struts and 16 nodes was assembled repeatedly in neutral buoyancy by pairs of pressure-suited test subjects working from astronaut positioning devices (APD's) on the MT. The truss bays were cubic with edges 15 ft long. All the truss joint hardware was found to be EVA compatible. The average unit assembly time for a single pair of experienced test subjects was 27.6 sec/strut, which is about half the time derived from other SSF truss assembly tests. A concept for integration of utility trays during truss assembly is introduced and demonstrated in the assembly tests. The concept, which requires minimal EVA handling of the trays, is shown to have little impact on overall assembly time. The results of these tests indicate that by using an MT equipped with APD's, rapid EVA assembly of a space station-size truss structure can be expected.

  20. Impact of saturation on mass transfer rate between mobile and immobile waters in solute transport within aggregated soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Wulong; Huang, Ning; Zhang, Xiaoxian

    2014-11-01

    Solute transport in aggregated soils is controlled by pores both inside and between the aggregates. Because the intra-aggregate pores are much smaller than the inter-aggregate pores, in chemical transport modelling the water in the former was often assumed to be immobile in comparison with water in the latter. How to describe mass transfer between the two waters has been studied intensively for saturated soils but poorly for unsaturated soils. In this paper, we investigated this using pore-scale modelling and tomography. The binary structures of porous materials acquired using tomography in our previous work served as the aggregated soils. Since the sizes of the intra-aggregate pores were smaller than the resolution of the tomography, they cannot be explicitly resolved in the tomography. As a result, the solids in the binary structures were porous aggregates and their impact on solute movement was described by an effective diffusion coefficient. In all simulations, the aggregates were assumed to be fully saturated and water distribution between the aggregates was determined by inter-aggregate pore sizes and pore connectedness. Solute movement from water within the inter-aggregates into the aggregates under different saturations was simulated using a pore-scale model. The simulated concentration and flux at pore scale were spatially averaged, and they were then used to calculate the volumetric average mass transfer rate between the two waters. The calculated average mass transfer rates were linked to the memory function widely used in the literature to model solute transport in structured soils. The results indicate that the commonly-used linear mobile-immobile transfer model with its transfer rate coefficient proportional to water content cannot fit the memory function calculated at any saturation. We fitted the simulated results to an empirical formula. The comparisons reveal that in the earlier stage, the memory function decreases with time in a power-law, and in

  1. Mobility of Source Zone Heavy Metals and Radionuclides: The Mixed Roles of Fermentative Activity on Fate and Transport of U and Cr

    SciTech Connect

    Apel, William; Peyton, Brent; Gerlach, Robin; Lee, Brady

    2006-04-05

    Various U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) low and medium-level radioactive waste sites contain mixtures of heavy metals, radionuclides and assorted organic materials. Over time, water infiltrates the wastes, and releases metals and radionuclides causing transport into the surrounding environment. We propose that fermentative microorganisms are active in these sites and may control metal and radionuclide migration from source zones (Figure 1). The following overarching hypothesis will drive our research: 'Metals and radionuclides can be mobilized by infiltration of water into waste storage sites. Microbial communities of lignocellulose degrading and fermenting microorganisms present in the subsurface of contaminated DOE sites can significantly impact migration by directly reducing and immobilizing metals and radionuclides while degrading complex organic matter to low molecular weight organic compounds. These low molecular weight organic compounds can increase metal and radionuclide mobility by chelation (i.e., certain organic acids) or decrease mobility by stimulating respiratory metal reducing microorganisms.' The objective of our research is to determine the effect of carbon and energy flow through simulated waste environments on metal and radionuclide migration from waste pits and trenches across the DOE complex. Metals and radionuclides can be mobilized by infiltration of water into waste storage sites. Cellulolytic and non-cellulolytic fermentative microorganisms have been chosen as the focus of this research because their activity is a critical first step that we hypothesize will control subsequent fate and transport in contaminated natural systems. Microbial communities of lignocellulose degrading and fermenting microorganisms present in the subsurface of contaminated DOE sites can significantly impact migration by directly reducing and immobilizing metals and radionuclides while degrading complex organic matter to low molecular weight organic compounds. These

  2. Evaluating the mobility of polymer-stabilised zero-valent iron nanoparticles and their potential to co-transport contaminants in intact soil cores.

    PubMed

    Chekli, L; Brunetti, G; Marzouk, E R; Maoz-Shen, A; Smith, E; Naidu, R; Shon, H K; Lombi, E; Donner, E

    2016-09-01

    The use of zero-valent iron nanoparticles (nZVI) has been advocated for the remediation of both soils and groundwater. A key parameter affecting nZVI remediation efficacy is the mobility of the particles as this influences the reaction zone where remediation can occur. However, by engineering nZVI particles with increased stability and mobility we may also inadvertently facilitate nZVI-mediated contaminant transport away from the zone of treatment. Previous nZVI mobility studies have often been limited to model systems as the presence of background Fe makes detection and tracking of nZVI in real systems difficult. We overcame this problem by synthesising Fe-59 radiolabelled nZVI. This enabled us to detect and quantify the leaching of nZVI-derived Fe-59 in intact soil cores, including a soil contaminated by Chromated-Copper-Arsenate. Mobility of a commercially available nZVI was also tested. The results showed limited mobility of both nanomaterials; <1% of the injected mass was eluted from the columns and most of the radiolabelled nZVI remained in the surface soil layers (the primary treatment zone in this contaminated soil). Nevertheless, the observed breakthrough of contaminants and nZVI occurred simultaneously, indicating that although the quantity transported was low in this case, nZVI does have the potential to co-transport contaminants. These results show that direct injection of nZVI into the surface layers of contaminated soils may be a viable remediation option for soils such as this one, in which the mobility of nZVI below the injection/remediation zone was very limited. This Fe-59 experimental approach can be further extended to test nZVI transport in a wider range of contaminated soil types and textures and using different application methods and rates. The resulting database could then be used to develop and validate modelling of nZVI-facilitated contaminant transport on an individual soil basis suitable for site specific risk assessment prior to n

  3. Evaluating the mobility of polymer-stabilised zero-valent iron nanoparticles and their potential to co-transport contaminants in intact soil cores.

    PubMed

    Chekli, L; Brunetti, G; Marzouk, E R; Maoz-Shen, A; Smith, E; Naidu, R; Shon, H K; Lombi, E; Donner, E

    2016-09-01

    The use of zero-valent iron nanoparticles (nZVI) has been advocated for the remediation of both soils and groundwater. A key parameter affecting nZVI remediation efficacy is the mobility of the particles as this influences the reaction zone where remediation can occur. However, by engineering nZVI particles with increased stability and mobility we may also inadvertently facilitate nZVI-mediated contaminant transport away from the zone of treatment. Previous nZVI mobility studies have often been limited to model systems as the presence of background Fe makes detection and tracking of nZVI in real systems difficult. We overcame this problem by synthesising Fe-59 radiolabelled nZVI. This enabled us to detect and quantify the leaching of nZVI-derived Fe-59 in intact soil cores, including a soil contaminated by Chromated-Copper-Arsenate. Mobility of a commercially available nZVI was also tested. The results showed limited mobility of both nanomaterials; <1% of the injected mass was eluted from the columns and most of the radiolabelled nZVI remained in the surface soil layers (the primary treatment zone in this contaminated soil). Nevertheless, the observed breakthrough of contaminants and nZVI occurred simultaneously, indicating that although the quantity transported was low in this case, nZVI does have the potential to co-transport contaminants. These results show that direct injection of nZVI into the surface layers of contaminated soils may be a viable remediation option for soils such as this one, in which the mobility of nZVI below the injection/remediation zone was very limited. This Fe-59 experimental approach can be further extended to test nZVI transport in a wider range of contaminated soil types and textures and using different application methods and rates. The resulting database could then be used to develop and validate modelling of nZVI-facilitated contaminant transport on an individual soil basis suitable for site specific risk assessment prior to n

  4. Mobile Router Technology Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivancic, William D.; Stewart, David H.; Bell, Terry L.; Kachmar, Brian A.; Shell, Dan; Leung, Kent

    2002-01-01

    Cisco Systems and NASA have been performing joint research on mobile routing technology under a NASA Space Act Agreement. Cisco developed mobile router technology and provided that technology to NASA for applications to aeronautic and space-based missions. NASA has performed stringent performance testing of the mobile router, including the interaction of routing and transport-level protocols. This paper describes mobile routing, the mobile router, and some key configuration parameters. In addition, the paper describes the mobile routing test network and test results documenting the performance of transport protocols in dynamic routing environments.

  5. Literature review for Texas Department of Transportation Research Project 0-4695: Guidance for design in areas of extreme bed-load mobility, Edwards Plateau, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heitmuller, Franklin T.; Asquith, William H.; Fang, Xing; Thompson, David B.; Wang, Keh-Han

    2005-01-01

    A review of the literature addressing sediment transport in gravel-bed river systems and structures designed to control bed-load mobility is provided as part of Texas Department of Transportation research project 0–4695: Guidance for Design in Areas of Extreme Bed-Load Mobility. The study area comprises the western half of the Edwards Plateau in central Texas. Three primary foci of the literature review are journal articles, edited volumes, and government publications. Major themes within the body of literature include deterministic sediment transport theory and equations, development of methods to measure and analyze fluvial sediment, applications and development of theory in natural channels and flume experiments, and recommendations for river management and structural design. The literature review provides an outline and foundation for the research project to characterize extreme bed-load mobility in rivers and streams across the study area. The literature review also provides a basis upon which potential modifications to low-water stream-crossing design in the study area can be made.

  6. Flotillins regulate membrane mobility of the dopamine transporter but are not required for its protein kinase C dependent endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Sorkina, Tatiana; Caltagarone, John; Sorkin, Alexander

    2013-06-01

    Flotillins were proposed to mediate clathrin-independent endocytosis, and recently, flotillin-1 was implicated in the protein kinase C (PKC)-triggered endocytosis of the dopamine transporter (DAT). Since endocytosis of DAT was previously shown to be clathrin-mediated, we re-examined the role of clathrin coat proteins and flotillin in DAT endocytosis using DAT tagged with the hemagglutinin epitope (HA) in the extracellular loop and a quantitative HA antibody uptake assay. Depletion of flotillin-1, flotillin-2 or both flotillins together by small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) did not inhibit PKC-dependent internalization and degradation of HA-DAT. In contrast, siRNAs to clathrin heavy chain and μ2 subunit of clathrin adaptor complex AP-2 as well as a dynamin inhibitor Dyngo-4A significantly decreased PKC-dependent endocytosis of HA-DAT. Similarly, endocytosis and degradation of DAT that is not epitope-tagged were highly sensitive to the clathrin siRNAs and dynamin inhibition but were not affected by flotillin knockdown. Very little co-localization of DAT with flotillins was observed in cells ectopically expressing DAT and in cultured mouse dopaminergic neurons. Depletion of flotillins increased diffusion rates of HA-DAT in the plasma membrane, suggesting that flotillin-organized microdomains may regulate the lateral mobility of DAT. We propose that clathrin-mediated endocytosis is the major pathway of PKC-dependent internalization of DAT, and that flotillins may modulate functional association of DAT with plasma membrane rafts rather than mediate DAT endocytosis.

  7. Interplay between hopping and band transport in high-mobility disordered semiconductors at large carrier concentrations: The case of the amorphous oxide InGaZnO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fishchuk, I. I.; Kadashchuk, A.; Bhoolokam, A.; de Jamblinne de Meux, A.; Pourtois, G.; Gavrilyuk, M. M.; Köhler, A.; Bässler, H.; Heremans, P.; Genoe, J.

    2016-05-01

    We suggest an analytic theory based on the effective medium approximation (EMA) which is able to describe charge-carrier transport in a disordered semiconductor with a significant degree of degeneration realized at high carrier concentrations, especially relevant in some thin-film transistors (TFTs), when the Fermi level is very close to the conduction-band edge. The EMA model is based on special averaging of the Fermi-Dirac carrier distributions using a suitably normalized cumulative density-of-state distribution that includes both delocalized states and the localized states. The principal advantage of the present model is its ability to describe universally effective drift and Hall mobility in heterogeneous materials as a function of disorder, temperature, and carrier concentration within the same theoretical formalism. It also bridges a gap between hopping and bandlike transport in an energetically heterogeneous system. The key assumption of the model is that the charge carriers move through delocalized states and that, in addition to the tail of the localized states, the disorder can give rise to spatial energy variation of the transport-band edge being described by a Gaussian distribution. It can explain a puzzling observation of activated and carrier-concentration-dependent Hall mobility in a disordered system featuring an ideal Hall effect. The present model has been successfully applied to describe experimental results on the charge transport measured in an amorphous oxide semiconductor, In-Ga-Zn-O (a-IGZO). In particular, the model reproduces well both the conventional Meyer-Neldel (MN) compensation behavior for the charge-carrier mobility and inverse-MN effect for the conductivity observed in the same a-IGZO TFT. The model was further supported by ab initio calculations revealing that the amorphization of IGZO gives rise to variation of the conduction-band edge rather than to the creation of localized states. The obtained changes agree with the one we

  8. Transportation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crank, Ron

    This instructional unit is one of 10 developed by students on various energy-related areas that deals specifically with transportation and energy use. Its objective is for the student to be able to discuss the implication of energy usage as it applies to the area of transportation. Some topics covered are efficiencies of various transportation…

  9. Impact of pressure on transport properties of AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xinbo; Ji, Dong; Lu, Yanwu

    2015-11-01

    The properties of AlxGa1-xN/GaN high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) impacted by pressure are characterized quantitatively. The results indicate that the dislocation density increases as the critical thickness decreases with increasing pressure. The two-dimensional electron gas density was found to be linearly changeable with the pressure. A simulation has been completed to verify the influence of electron mobility. The results show that the misfit dislocation scattering induced by the pressure is a major limiting factor for the properties of HEMT.

  10. The Human ABCG1 Transporter Mobilizes Plasma Membrane and Late Endosomal Non-Sphingomyelin-Associated-Cholesterol for Efflux and Esterification

    PubMed Central

    Neufeld, Edward B.; O’Brien, Katherine; Walts, Avram D.; Stonik, John A.; Malide, Daniela; Combs, Christian A.; Remaley, Alan T.

    2014-01-01

    We have previously shown that GFP-tagged human ABCG1 on the plasma membrane (PM) and in late endosomes (LE) mobilizes sterol on both sides of the membrane lipid bilayer, thereby increasing cellular cholesterol efflux to lipid surfaces. In the present study, we examined ABCG1-induced changes in membrane cholesterol distribution, organization, and mobility. ABCG1-GFP expression increased the amount of mobile, non-sphingomyelin(SM)-associated cholesterol at the PM and LE, but not the amount of SM-associated-cholesterol or SM. ABCG1-mobilized non-SM-associated-cholesterol rapidly cycled between the PM and LE and effluxed from the PM to extracellular acceptors, or, relocated to intracellular sites of esterification. ABCG1 increased detergent-soluble pools of PM and LE cholesterol, generated detergent-resistant, non-SM-associated PM cholesterol, and increased resistance to both amphotericin B-induced (cholesterol-mediated) and lysenin-induced (SM-mediated) cytolysis, consistent with altered organization of both PM cholesterol and SM. ABCG1 itself resided in detergent-soluble membrane domains. We propose that PM and LE ABCG1 residing at the phase boundary between ordered (Lo) and disordered (Ld) membrane lipid domains alters SM and cholesterol organization thereby increasing cholesterol flux between Lo and Ld, and hence, the amount of cholesterol available for removal by acceptors on either side of the membrane bilayer for either efflux or esterification. PMID:25485894

  11. Chlordecone impairs Na(+)-stimulated L-( sup 3 H)glutamate transport and mobility of 16-doxyl stearate in rat liver plasma membrane vesicles

    SciTech Connect

    Rochelle, L.G.; Miller, T.L.; Curtis, L.R. )

    1990-09-01

    Chlordecone (CD) treatment of rat liver plasma membranes (LPM) provided in vitro evidence for mechanisms of in vivo liver dysfunction caused by CD. LPM preparations enriched 14- to 19-fold in the bile canalicular markers gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase, alkaline phosphatase, and leucine aminopeptidase were isolated from male Sprague-Dawley rats. CD inhibited the bile canalicular-specific active transport of Na(+)-stimulated L-({sup 3}H)glutamate in LPM vesicles. CD (0.08 and 0.5 mumol/mg protein) reduced both the initial velocity and the maximum level of Na(+)-stimulated L-(3H)glutamate uptake without significantly reducing Na(+)-independent uptake. In vitro treatment of LPM with CD (0.2-1.0 mumols/mg protein) also reduced the mobility of a 16-doxyl stearate spin label probe in a concentration-dependent manner. No change in mobility was apparent at CD concentrations below 0.2 mumol/mg protein. These results demonstrated that CD impaired a bile canalicular-specific transport system and induced liver plasma membrane perturbation. Na(+)-stimulated L-({sup 3}H)glutamate uptake was more sensitive to CD than was detectable immobilization of the spin label probe.

  12. Mobility of Source Zone Heavy Metals and Radionuclides: The Mixed Roles of Fermentative Activity on Fate and Transport of U and Cr. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Gerlach, Robin; Peyton, Brent M.; Apel, William A.

    2014-01-29

    Various U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) low and medium-level radioactive waste sites contain mixtures of heavy metals, radionuclides and assorted organic materials. In addition, there are numerous sites around the world that are contaminated with a mixture of organic and inorganic contaminants. In most sites, over time, water infiltrates the wastes, and releases metals, radionuclides and other contaminants causing transport into the surrounding environment. We investigated the role of fermentative microorganisms in such sites that may control metal, radionuclide and organics migration from source zones. The project was initiated based on the following overarching hypothesis: Metals, radionuclides and other contaminants can be mobilized by infiltration of water into waste storage sites. Microbial communities of lignocellulose degrading and fermenting microorganisms present in the subsurface of contaminated DOE sites can significantly impact migration by directly reducing and immobilizing metals and radionuclides while degrading complex organic matter to low molecular weight organic compounds. These low molecular weight organic acids and alcohols can increase metal and radionuclide mobility by chelation (i.e., certain organic acids) or decrease mobility by stimulating respiratory metal reducing microorganisms. We demonstrated that fermentative organisms capable of affecting the fate of Cr6+, U6+ and trinitrotoluene can be isolated from organic-rich low level waste sites as well as from less organic rich subsurface environments. The mechanisms, pathways and extent of contaminant transformation depend on a variety of factors related to the type of organisms present, the aqueous chemistry as well as the geochemistry and mineralogy. This work provides observations and quantitative data across multiple scales that identify and predict the coupled effects of fermentative carbon and electron flow on the transport of radionuclides, heavy metals and organic contaminants in

  13. Mn-euvering manganese: the role of transporter gene family members in manganese uptake and mobilization in plants

    PubMed Central

    Socha, Amanda L.; Guerinot, Mary Lou

    2014-01-01

    Manganese (Mn), an essential trace element, is important for plant health. In plants, Mn serves as a cofactor in essential processes such as photosynthesis, lipid biosynthesis and oxidative stress. Mn deficient plants exhibit decreased growth and yield and are more susceptible to pathogens and damage at freezing temperatures. Mn deficiency is most prominent on alkaline soils with approximately one third of the world's soils being too alkaline for optimal crop production. Despite the importance of Mn in plant development, relatively little is known about how it traffics between plant tissues and into and out of organelles. Several gene transporter families have been implicated in Mn transport in plants. These transporter families include NRAMP (natural resistance associated macrophage protein), YSL (yellow stripe-like), ZIP (zinc regulated transporter/iron-regulated transporter [ZRT/IRT1]-related protein), CAX (cation exchanger), CCX (calcium cation exchangers), CDF/MTP (cation diffusion facilitator/metal tolerance protein), P-type ATPases and VIT (vacuolar iron transporter). A combination of techniques including mutant analysis and Synchrotron X-ray Fluorescence Spectroscopy can assist in identifying essential transporters of Mn. Such knowledge would vastly improve our understanding of plant Mn homeostasis. PMID:24744764

  14. Effect of Clay Nanoparticle Transport, Desorption Kinetics and Redox Equilibrium on Radionuclide Mobility in Fractured Rock investigated at the Grimsel Test Site (Switzerland)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, T.; Huber, F. M.; Lagos, M.; Quinto, F.; Heck, S.; Martin, A. J.; Blechschmidt, I.; Lanyon, G. W.; Reiche, T.; Noseck, U.

    2015-12-01

    Transport of contaminants in crystalline environments might occur through dissolved species or attached to colloidal or nanoparticulate phases being mobile in water conducting features of the host rock. In this presentation we will discuss the mobility of clay nanoparticles as detected by laser-induced breakdown detection (LIBD) as a function of fracture surface roughness and groundwater chemistry. The on site observed Tc-99, U-233, Np-237, Pu-242 and Am-243 sorption/desorption kinetics with and without natural or synthetic clay minerals (smectites) are compared to laboratory studies under similar groundwater conditions. The desorption or redox kinetics were monitored over a duration of up to 426 days using natural fracture filling material as a concurrence ligand and monitoring the colloid attachment via detection of Al, Si, Ni and Zn as smectite structural elements. For trivalent actinides smectite desorption rates in the range of 1.2-3.7E-3 per hour could be determined and significantly lower desorption rates for tetravalent actinides were found. This results will be compared with field data of migration experiments performed at the Grimsel Test Site (GTS, Switzerland) using the same radionuclides and clay colloidal phases varying the fracture residence time by flow rate adjustment. Furthermore, the long-term actinide mobility will be addressed by presenting AMS/RIMS measurements of (a) samples collected several months into the tailing of the breakthrough curves not any longer detectable by HR-ICP-MS and (b) background samples of different GTS ground waters showing fallout U-236, whereas fallout Pu could not be detected indicating a much lower mobility under the given conditions.

  15. Colloids in groundwater: Their mobilization, subsurface transport, and sorption affinity for toxic chemicals. Annual technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Gschwend, P.M.

    1992-07-10

    Our originally stated objectives included: (1) development of a quantitative source function for colloid mobilization to groundwater, and (2) assessment of the most important colloidal phases to which nonpolar compounds sorb. We have been pursuing a series of studies to elucidate the roles of colloidal phases in subsurface environments. Most notably, we have discovered the critical role of secondary cementitious phases like goethite. We developed a new procedure for measuring ``surface iron oxides`` which is a great improvement over earlier methodologies. Currently, we are developing a unifying model with which we can predict the mobilization of colloids to groundwater flowing through such porous media. Also, we have been able to show that groundwater samples contain colloidal phases in sufficient quantities and of suitable properties to enhance the mobile load of toxic compounds like polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Finally, we have synthesized our varied field investigations from sites in Massachusetts, New Jersey, Delaware, Nevada, Connecticut, and New York to yield a protocol for other researchers interested in evaluating colloids in groundwater. These accomplishments are discussed in more detail below. Through these efforts, we have become increasingly convinced of the central role played by colloidal phases in numerous subsurface phenomena controlling contaminant fates.

  16. Water resources planning for rivers draining into Mobile Bay. Part 2: Non-conservative species transport models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    April, G. C.; Liu, H. A.

    1975-01-01

    Total coliform group bacteria were selected to expand the mathematical modeling capabilities of the hydrodynamic and salinity models to understand their relationship to commercial fishing ventures within bay waters and to gain a clear insight into the effect that rivers draining into the bay have on water quality conditions. Parametric observations revealed that temperature factors and river flow rate have a pronounced effect on the concentration profiles, while wind conditions showed only slight effects. An examination of coliform group loading concentrations at constant river flow rates and temperature shows these loading changes have an appreciable influence on total coliform distribution within Mobile Bay.

  17. Mobile Virtual Private Networking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pulkkis, Göran; Grahn, Kaj; Mårtens, Mathias; Mattsson, Jonny

    Mobile Virtual Private Networking (VPN) solutions based on the Internet Security Protocol (IPSec), Transport Layer Security/Secure Socket Layer (SSL/TLS), Secure Shell (SSH), 3G/GPRS cellular networks, Mobile IP, and the presently experimental Host Identity Protocol (HIP) are described, compared and evaluated. Mobile VPN solutions based on HIP are recommended for future networking because of superior processing efficiency and network capacity demand features. Mobile VPN implementation issues associated with the IP protocol versions IPv4 and IPv6 are also evaluated. Mobile VPN implementation experiences are presented and discussed.

  18. Investigating Uranium Mobility Using Stable Isotope Partitioning of 238U/235U and a Reactive Transport Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bizjack, M.; Johnson, T. M.; Druhan, J. L.; Shiel, A. E.

    2015-12-01

    We report a numerical reactive transport model which explicitly incorporates the effectively stable isotopes of uranium (U) and the factors that influence their partitioning in bioactive systems. The model reproduces trends observed in U isotope ratios and concentration measurements from a field experiment, thereby improving interpretations of U isotope ratios as a tracer for U reactive transport. A major factor contributing to U storage and transport is its redox state, which is commonly influenced by the availability of organic carbon to support metal-reducing microbial communities. Both laboratory and field experiments have demonstrated that biogenic reduction of U(VI) fractionates the stable isotope ratio 238U/235U, producing an isotopically heavy solid U(IV) product. It has also been shown that other common reactive transport processes involving U do not fractionate isotopes to a consistently measurable level, which suggests the capacity to quantify the extent of bioreduction occurring in groundwater containing U using 238U/235U ratios. A recent study of a U bioremediation experiment at the Rifle IFRC site (Colorado, USA) applied Rayleigh distillation models to quantify U stable isotope fractionation observed during acetate amendment. The application of these simplified models were fit to the observations only by invoking a "memory-effect," or a constant source of low-concentration, unfractionated U(VI). In order to more accurately interpret the measured U isotope ratios, we present a multi-component reactive transport model using the CrunchTope software. This approach is capable of quantifying the cycling and partitioning of individual U isotopes through a realistic network of transport and reaction pathways including reduction, oxidation, and microbial growth. The model incorporates physical heterogeneity of the aquifer sediments through zones of decreased permeability, which replicate the observed bromide tracer, major ion chemistry, U concentration, and U

  19. Effect of annealing on electronic carrier transport properties of gamma-irradiated AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Anupama; Schwarz, Casey; Shatkhin, Max; Wang, Luther; Flitsiyan, Elena; Chernyak, Leonid; Liu, Lu; Hwang, Ya; Ren, Fan; Pearton, Stephen; Department of Physics, University of Central Florida Collaboration; Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Florida Collaboration; Department of Materials Science; Engineering, University of Florida Collaboration

    2014-03-01

    AlGaN/GaN High Electron Mobility Transistors were irradiated with 60Co gamma-ray doses from 100Gy to 1000Gy, in order to analyze the effects of irradiation on the devices' transport properties. Temperature dependent Electron Beam Induced Current (EBIC) measurements, conducted on the devices before and after exposure to gamma-irradiation, allowed for the obtaining of activation energy related to radiation-induced defects due to nitrogen vacancies. Later, the devices were annealed at 200o C for 25 minutes. All the measurements were performed again to study the effect of annealing on the gamma-irradiated devices. Annealing of gamma-irradiated transistors shows that partial recovery of device performance is possible at this temperature. DC current-voltage measurements were also conducted on the transistors to assess the impact of gamma-irradiation and annealing on transfer, gate and drain characteristics.

  20. Biogeochemical processes controlling the mobility of major ions and trace metals in aquitard sediments beneath an oil sand tailing pond: Laboratory studies and reactive transport modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holden, A. A.; Haque, S. E.; Mayer, K. U.; Ulrich, A. C.

    2013-08-01

    Increased production and expansion of the oil sand industry in Alberta are of great benefit to the economy, but they carry major environmental challenges. The volume of fluid fine tailings requiring storage is 840 × 106 m3 and growing, making it imperative that we better understand the fate and transport of oil sand process-affected water (OSPW) seepage from these facilities. Accordingly, the current study seeks to characterize both a) the potential for major ion and trace element release, and b) the principal biogeochemical processes involved, as tailing pond OSPW infiltrates into, and interacts with, underlying glacial till sediments prior to reaching down gradient aquifers or surface waters. Objectives were addressed through a series of aqueous and solid phase experiments, including radial diffusion cells, an isotope analysis, X-ray diffraction, and sequential extractions. The diffusion cells were also simulated in a reactive transport framework to elucidate key reaction processes. The experiments indicate that the ingress and interaction of OSPW with the glacial till sediment-pore water system will result in: a mitigation of ingressing Na (retardation), displacement and then limited precipitation of exchangeable Ca and Mg (as carbonates), sulfate reduction and subsequent precipitation of the produced sulfides, as well as biodegradation of organic carbon. High concentrations of ingressing Cl (~ 375 mg L- 1) and Na (~ 575 mg L- 1) (even though the latter is delayed, or retarded) are expected to migrate through the till and into the underlying sand channel. Trace element mobility was influenced by ion exchange, oxidation-reduction, and mineral phase reactions including reductive dissolution of metal oxyhydroxides — in accordance with previous observations within sandy aquifer settings. Furthermore, although several trace elements showed the potential for release (Al, B, Ba, Cd, Mn, Pb, Si, Sr), large-scale mobilization is not supported. Thus, the present

  1. Biogeochemical processes controlling the mobility of major ions and trace metals in aquitard sediments beneath an oil sand tailing pond: laboratory studies and reactive transport modeling.

    PubMed

    Holden, A A; Haque, S E; Mayer, K U; Ulrich, A C

    2013-08-01

    Increased production and expansion of the oil sand industry in Alberta are of great benefit to the economy, but they carry major environmental challenges. The volume of fluid fine tailings requiring storage is 840×10(6) m(3) and growing, making it imperative that we better understand the fate and transport of oil sand process-affected water (OSPW) seepage from these facilities. Accordingly, the current study seeks to characterize both a) the potential for major ion and trace element release, and b) the principal biogeochemical processes involved, as tailing pond OSPW infiltrates into, and interacts with, underlying glacial till sediments prior to reaching down gradient aquifers or surface waters. Objectives were addressed through a series of aqueous and solid phase experiments, including radial diffusion cells, an isotope analysis, X-ray diffraction, and sequential extractions. The diffusion cells were also simulated in a reactive transport framework to elucidate key reaction processes. The experiments indicate that the ingress and interaction of OSPW with the glacial till sediment-pore water system will result in: a mitigation of ingressing Na (retardation), displacement and then limited precipitation of exchangeable Ca and Mg (as carbonates), sulfate reduction and subsequent precipitation of the produced sulfides, as well as biodegradation of organic carbon. High concentrations of ingressing Cl (~375 mg L(-1)) and Na (~575 mg L(-1)) (even though the latter is delayed, or retarded) are expected to migrate through the till and into the underlying sand channel. Trace element mobility was influenced by ion exchange, oxidation-reduction, and mineral phase reactions including reductive dissolution of metal oxyhydroxides - in accordance with previous observations within sandy aquifer settings. Furthermore, although several trace elements showed the potential for release (Al, B, Ba, Cd, Mn, Pb, Si, Sr), large-scale mobilization is not supported. Thus, the present

  2. A transportable high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometer and analysis system applicable to mobile, autonomous or unattended applications

    SciTech Connect

    Buckley, W.M.; Neufeld, K.W.

    1995-07-01

    The Safeguards Technology Program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is developing systems based on a compact electro-mechanically cooled high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector. This detector system broadens the practicality of performing high- resolution gamma-ray spectrometry in the field. Utilizing portable computers, multi-channel analyzers and software these systems greatly improve the ease of performing mobile high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry. Using industrial computers, we can construct systems that will run autonomously for extended periods of time without operator input or maintenance. These systems can start or make decisions based on sensor inputs rather than operator interactions. Such systems can provide greater capability for wider domain of safeguards, treaty verification application, and other unattended, autonomous or in-situ applications.

  3. Coupling Sorption to Soil Weathering During Reactive Transport: Impacts of Mineral Transformation and Sorbate Aging on Contaminant Speciation and Mobility

    SciTech Connect

    Chorover, Jon; Mueller, Karl T.; O'Day, Peggy; Serne, R. Jeff; Um, Wooyong; Steefel, Carl

    2006-06-01

    Our work is aimed at developing a predictive-mechanistic understanding of the coupling between mineral weathering from caustic waste release and contaminant (Cs, Sr, I) fate and transport in waste-impacted sediments across space, time and geochemical gradients that encompass the process-level heterogeneity observed at the Hanford DOE site. Our specific objectives are: (1) to assess the molecular-scale mechanisms responsible for time-dependent sequestration of contaminants (Cs, Sr and I) during penetration of waste-induced weathering fronts through sedimentary media; (2) to determine the rate and extent of contaminant release from the sorbed state; (3) to develop a reactive transport model based on molecular mechanisms and macroscopic flow experiments (from (1) and (2)) that accurately simulates adsorption, aging, and desorption at the bench-scale, and that can be applied to--and validated at--field sites such as Hanford.

  4. Description of bipolar charge transport in polyethylene using a fluid model with a constant mobility: model prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LeRoy, S.; Segur, P.; Teyssedre, G.; Laurent, C.

    2004-01-01

    We present a conduction model aimed at describing bipolar transport and space charge phenomena in low density polyethylene under dc stress. In the first part we recall the basic requirements for the description of charge transport and charge storage in disordered media with emphasis on the case of polyethylene. A quick review of available conduction models is presented and our approach is compared with these models. Then, the bases of the model are described and related assumptions are discussed. Finally, results on external current, trapped and free space charge distributions, field distribution and recombination rate are presented and discussed, considering a constant dc voltage, a step-increase of the voltage, and a polarization-depolarization protocol for the applied voltage. It is shown that the model is able to describe the general features reported for external current, electroluminescence and charge distribution in polyethylene.

  5. Transport, storage and mobilization of nitrogen by trees and shrubs in the wet/dry tropics of northern Australia.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Susanne; Stewart, George R.

    1998-06-01

    Xylem sap from woody species in the wet/dry tropics of northern Australia was analyzed for N compounds. At the peak of the dry season, arginine was the main N compound in sap of most species of woodlands and deciduous monsoon forest. In the wet season, a marked change occurred with amides becoming the main sap N constituents of most species. Species from an evergreen monsoon forest, with a permanent water source, transported amides in the dry season. In the dry season, nitrate accounted for 7 and 12% of total xylem sap N in species of deciduous and evergreen monsoon forests, respectively. In the wet season, the proportion of N present as nitrate increased to 22% in deciduous monsoon forest species. These results suggest that N is taken up and assimilated mainly in the wet season and that this newly assimilated N is mostly transported as amide-N (woodland species, monsoon forest species) and nitrate (monsoon forest species). Arginine is the form in which stored N is remobilized and transported by woodland and deciduous monsoon forest species in the dry season. Several proteins, which may represent bark storage proteins, were detected in inner bark tissue from a range of trees in the dry season, indicating that, although N uptake appears to be limited in the dry season, the many tree and shrub species that produce flowers, fruit or leaves in the dry season use stored N to support growth. Nitrogen characteristics of the studied species are discussed in relation to the tropical environment.

  6. Impact of carboxymethyl cellulose coating on iron sulphide nanoparticles stability, transport, and mobilization potential of trace metals present in soils and sediment.

    PubMed

    Van Koetsem, Frederik; Van Havere, Lynn; Du Laing, Gijs

    2016-03-01

    The stability and transport behaviour of carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) stabilized iron sulphide (FeS) engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) as well as their concurrent scavenging and mobilization of trace metal contaminants from field-contaminated soils and sediment was studied through a series of batch and column experiments. The synthesized CMC-FeS ENPs were shown to have a hydrodynamic diameter of 154.5 ± 5.8 nm and remained stable in suspension for a prolonged period of time (several weeks) when kept under anaerobic conditions. In the absence of CMC, much larger FeS particles were formed, which quickly aggregated and precipitated within minutes. Batch experiments indicated that the CMC-FeS ENPs have a high affinity for metal contaminants (e.g., Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, Ni, Pb, and Zn), as high amounts of these trace metals could be retrieved in the aqueous phase after treatment of the soils with the nanoparticles (i.e., up to 29 times more compared to the water-leachable metal contents). Furthermore, batch retention of the nanoparticles by the solid soil phase was low (<37%), also suggesting a high stability and potential mobility. Nanoparticle treatment of the soils also affected the CaCl2-, TCLP-, and SPLP-leachability of trace metals, although no clear trend could be observed and metal leaching appeared to depend on the specific element under consideration, the type of extraction liquid, as well as on soil properties. Column breakthrough tests demonstrated that the CMC-FeS ENPs were highly mobile in the tested soil, even without the use of an external pressure (i.e., just via gravitational percolation). Maximal breakthrough of the nanoparticles was observed after approximately 10 or 16 pore volumes (PVs) for 83.3 or 500 mg L(-1) CMC-FeS ENPs, respectively, and only about 7% of the nanoparticles were retained by the soil after 22.7 PVs. Simultaneous elution of trace elements showed that up to 19, 8.7, or 11% of the respective Cd, Pb, or Zn content originally present

  7. Coupling Sorption to Soil Weathering During Reactive Transport: Impacts of Mineral Transformation and Sorbent Aging on Contaminant Speciation and Mobility

    SciTech Connect

    Chorover, J.; Mueller, K. T.; O'Day, P. A.; Serne, R. J.; Steefel, C. I.

    2009-10-30

    This project aimed for a predictive-mechanistic understanding of the coupling between mineral weathering and contaminant (Cs, Sr, I) transport/fate in caustic waste-impacted sediments. Based on our prior studies of model clay mineral systems, we postulated that contaminant uptake to Hanford sediments would reflect concurrent adsorption and co-precipitation effects. Our specific objectives were: (1) to assess the molecular-scale mechanisms responsible for time-dependent sequestration of contaminants (Cs, Sr and I) during penetration of waste-induced weathering fronts; (2) to determine the rate and extent of contaminant release from the sorbed state; (3) to develop a reactive transport model based on molecular mechanisms and macroscopic flow experiments [(1) and (2)] that simulates adsorption, aging, and desorption dynamics. Progress toward achieving each of these objectives is discussed below. We observed unique molecular mechanisms for sequestration of Sr, Cs and I during native silicate weathering in caustic waste. Product solids, which included poorly crystalline aluminosilicates and well-crystallized zeolites and feldspathoids, accumulate contaminant species during crystal growth.

  8. Walk Score, Transportation Mode Choice, and Walking Among French Adults: A GPS, Accelerometer, and Mobility Survey Study

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, Dustin T.; Méline, Julie; Kestens, Yan; Day, Kristen; Elbel, Brian; Trasande, Leonardo; Chaix, Basile

    2016-01-01

    Background: Few studies have used GPS data to analyze the relationship between Walk Score, transportation choice and walking. Additionally, the influence of Walk Score is understudied using trips rather than individuals as statistical units. The purpose of this study is to examine associations at the trip level between Walk Score, transportation mode choice, and walking among Paris adults who were tracked with GPS receivers and accelerometers in the RECORD GPS Study. Methods: In the RECORD GPS Study, 227 participants were tracked during seven days with GPS receivers and accelerometers. Participants were also surveyed with a GPS-based web mapping application on their activities and transportation modes for all trips (6969 trips). Walk Score, which calculates neighborhood walkability, was assessed for each origin and destination of every trip. Multilevel logistic and linear regression analyses were conducted to estimate associations between Walk Score and walking in the trip or accelerometry-assessed number of steps for each trip, after adjustment for individual/neighborhood characteristics. Results: The mean overall Walk Scores for trip origins were 87.1 (SD = 14.4) and for trip destinations 87.1 (SD = 14.5). In adjusted trip-level associations between Walk Score and walking only in the trip, we found that a walkable neighborhood in the trip origin and trip destination was associated with increased odds of walking in the trip assessed in the survey. The odds of only walking in the trip were 3.48 (95% CI: 2.73 to 4.44) times higher when the Walk Score for the trip origin was “Walker’s Paradise” compared to less walkable neighborhoods (Very/Car-Dependent or Somewhat Walkable), with an identical independent effect of trip destination Walk Score on walking. The number of steps per 10 min (as assessed with accelerometry) was cumulatively higher for trips both originating and ending in walkable neighborhoods (i.e., “Very Walkable”). Conclusions: Walkable

  9. Monitoring of event based mobilization of hydrophobic pollutants in rivers: Calibration of turbidity as a proxy for particle facilitated transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rügner, Hermann; Schwientek, Marc; Grathwohl, Peter

    2014-05-01

    Transport of many pollutants in rivers is coupled to transport of suspended particles which is typically enhanced during events such as floods, snow melts etc. As the amount of total suspended solids (TSS) in rivers can be monitored by turbidity measurements this may be used as a proxy for the total concentration of particle associated pollutants in rivers such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), PCBs, etc. and several heavy metals. On-line turbidity measurements (e.g. by optical backscattering sensors) then allow for an assessment of particle and pollutant flux dynamics. In this study, pronounced flood and thus turbidity events were sampled at high temporal resolution in three contrasting catchments in Southwest Germany (Rivers Ammer, Goldersbach, Steinlach) as well as in the River Neckar. Samples were analyzed for turbidity, the total amount of PAH and total suspended solids (TSS) in water. Additionally, the grain size distributions of suspended solids were determined. Discharge and turbidity were measured on-line at gauging stations in three of the catchments. Results showed that turbidity and TSS were linearly correlated over an extended turbidity range up to 2000 NTU for the flood samples (i.e. independent on grain size). This also holds for total PAH concentrations which can be reasonably well predicted based on the turbidity measurements and TSS versus PAH relationships - even for very high turbidity or TSS values (> 2000 NTU or mg l-1, respectively). From these linear regressions concentrations of PAHs on suspended particles were obtained which varied by catchment. The values comprise a robust measure of the average sediment quality in a river network and may be correlated to the degree of urbanization represented by the number of inhabitants per total flux of suspended particles. Based on long-term on-line turbidity measurements mass flow rates of particle bound pollutants over time could be calculated. Results showed that by far the largest amount

  10. Biogeochemical processes controlling the mobility of major ions and trace metals in aquitard sediments beneath an oil sand tailing pond: laboratory studies and reactive transport modeling.

    PubMed

    Holden, A A; Haque, S E; Mayer, K U; Ulrich, A C

    2013-08-01

    Increased production and expansion of the oil sand industry in Alberta are of great benefit to the economy, but they carry major environmental challenges. The volume of fluid fine tailings requiring storage is 840×10(6) m(3) and growing, making it imperative that we better understand the fate and transport of oil sand process-affected water (OSPW) seepage from these facilities. Accordingly, the current study seeks to characterize both a) the potential for major ion and trace element release, and b) the principal biogeochemical processes involved, as tailing pond OSPW infiltrates into, and interacts with, underlying glacial till sediments prior to reaching down gradient aquifers or surface waters. Objectives were addressed through a series of aqueous and solid phase experiments, including radial diffusion cells, an isotope analysis, X-ray diffraction, and sequential extractions. The diffusion cells were also simulated in a reactive transport framework to elucidate key reaction processes. The experiments indicate that the ingress and interaction of OSPW with the glacial till sediment-pore water system will result in: a mitigation of ingressing Na (retardation), displacement and then limited precipitation of exchangeable Ca and Mg (as carbonates), sulfate reduction and subsequent precipitation of the produced sulfides, as well as biodegradation of organic carbon. High concentrations of ingressing Cl (~375 mg L(-1)) and Na (~575 mg L(-1)) (even though the latter is delayed, or retarded) are expected to migrate through the till and into the underlying sand channel. Trace element mobility was influenced by ion exchange, oxidation-reduction, and mineral phase reactions including reductive dissolution of metal oxyhydroxides - in accordance with previous observations within sandy aquifer settings. Furthermore, although several trace elements showed the potential for release (Al, B, Ba, Cd, Mn, Pb, Si, Sr), large-scale mobilization is not supported. Thus, the present

  11. Process-based reactive transport model to quantify arsenic mobility during aquifer storage and recovery of potable water.

    PubMed

    Wallis, Ilka; Prommer, Henning; Pichler, Thomas; Post, Vincent; Norton, Stuart B; Annable, Michael D; Simmons, Craig T

    2011-08-15

    Aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) is an aquifer recharge technique in which water is injected in an aquifer during periods of surplus and withdrawn from the same well during periods of deficit. It is a critical component of the long-term water supply plan in various regions, including Florida, USA. Here, the viability of ASR as a safe and cost-effective water resource is currently being tested at a number of sites due to elevated arsenic concentrations detected during groundwater recovery. In this study, we developed a process-based reactive transport model of the coupled physical and geochemical mechanisms controlling the fate of arsenic during ASR. We analyzed multicycle hydrochemical data from a well-documented affected southwest Floridan site and evaluated a conceptual/numerical model in which (i) arsenic is initially released during pyrite oxidation triggered by the injection of oxygenated water (ii) then largely complexes to neo-formed hydrous ferric oxides before (iii) being remobilized during recovery as a result of both dissolution of hydrous ferric oxides and displacement from sorption sites by competing anions.

  12. Efforts to Reduce International Space Station Crew Maintenance Time in the Management of the Extravehicular Mobility Unit Transport Loop Water Quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Etter,David; Rector, Tony; Boyle, robert; Zande, Chris Vande

    2012-01-01

    The EMU (Extravehicular Mobility Unit) contains a semi-closed-loop re-circulating water circuit (Transport Loop) to absorb heat into a LCVG (Liquid Coolant and Ventilation Garment) worn by the astronaut. A second, single-pass water circuit (Feed-water Loop) provides water to a cooling device (Sublimator) containing porous plates, and that water sublimates through the porous plates to space vacuum. The cooling effect from the sublimation of this water translates to a cooling of the LCVG water that circulates through the Sublimator. The quality of the EMU Transport Loop water is maintained through the use of a water processing kit (ALCLR - Airlock Cooling Loop Remediation) that is used to periodically clean and disinfect the water circuit. Opportunities to reduce crew time associated with ALCLR operations include a detailed review of the historical water quality data for evidence to support an extension to the implementation cycle. Furthermore, an EMU returned after 2-years of use on the ISS (International Space Station) is being used as a test bed to evaluate the results of extended and repeated ALCLR implementation cycles. Finally, design, use and on-orbit location enhancements to the ALCLR kit components are being considered to allow the implementation cycle to occur in parallel with other EMU maintenance and check-out activities, and to extend the life of the ALCLR kit components. These efforts are undertaken to reduce the crew-time and logistics burdens for the EMU, while ensuring the long-term health of the EMU water circuits for a post- Shuttle 6-year service life.

  13. Emergence of high-mobility minority holes in the electrical transport of the Ba (Fe1 -xMnxAs )2 iron pnictides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urata, T.; Tanabe, Y.; Huynh, K. K.; Heguri, S.; Oguro, H.; Watanabe, K.; Tanigaki, K.

    2015-05-01

    In Fe pnictide (Pn) superconducting materials, neither Mn nor Cr doping to the Fe site induces superconductivity, even though hole carriers are generated. This is in strong contrast with the superconductivity appearing when holes are introduced by alkali-metal substitution on the insulating blocking layers. We investigate in detail the effects of Mn doping on magnetotransport properties in Ba (Fe1 -xMnxAs )2 for elucidating the intrinsic reason. The negative Hall coefficient for x =0 estimated in the low magnetic field (B ) regime gradually increases as x increases, and its sign changes to a positive one at x =0.020 . Hall resistivities as well as simultaneous interpretation using the magnetoconductivity tensor including both longitudinal and transverse transport components clarify that minority holes with high mobility are generated by the Mn doping via spin-density wave transition at low temperatures, while original majority electrons and holes residing in the paraboliclike Fermi surfaces of the semimetallic Ba (FeAs )2 are negligibly affected. Present results indicate that the mechanism of hole doping in Ba (Fe1 -xMnxAs )2 is greatly different from that of the other superconducting FePn family.

  14. 3-Dimensional ZnO/CdS nanocomposite with high mobility as an efficient electron transport layer for inverted polymer solar cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yilin; Fu, Haiyan; Wang, Ying; Tan, Licheng; Chen, Lie; Chen, Yiwang

    2016-04-28

    The inclusions of solution-processed ZnO electron transport layers (ETLs) of inverted polymer solar cells can lead to various surface defects, which can act as interfacial recombination centers for photogenerated charges and thereby can lead to degradation of the device performance. Three-dimensional (3D) CdS with different morphologies, such as flower-like CdS (F-CdS), branched CdS (B-CdS), and spherical CdS (S-CdS), are synthesized to modify ZnO ETLs, by effectively removing the intragap states of the ZnO nanocrystal films by forming ZnO/F-CdS, ZnO/B-CdS, and ZnO/S-CdS composite ETLs, respectively. Moreover, ZnO/CdS possesses higher electron mobility and provides a larger interface between the ETL and active layer, which is beneficial for enhancing the power conversion efficiency (PCE) of the inverted organic solar cells. In particular, a device based on a ZnO/S-CdS ETL and thieno[3,4-b]-thiophene/benzodithiophene (PTB7):[6,6]-phenyl-C71-butyric acid methyl ester (PC71BM) active layer achieved a PCE of 8.0%, together with better long-term stability. PMID:27074904

  15. Mobile Learning Using Mobile Phones

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vicente, Paula

    2013-01-01

    The participation in mobile learning programs is conditioned by having/using mobile communication technology. Those who do not have or use such technology cannot participate in mobile learning programs. This study evaluates who are the most likely participants of mobile learning programs by examining the demographic profile and mobile phone usage…

  16. Monitoring of event-based mobilization of hydrophobic pollutants in rivers: calibration of turbidity as a proxy for particle facilitated transport in field and laboratory.

    PubMed

    Rügner, Hermann; Schwientek, Marc; Egner, Marius; Grathwohl, Peter

    2014-08-15

    Transport of many pollutants in rivers is coupled to mobilization of suspended particles which typically occurs during floods. Since the amount of total suspended solids (TSS) in rivers can be monitored by turbidity measurements this may be used as a proxy for the total concentration of particle associated pollutants such as PAHs, PCBs, etc. and several heavy metals. Online turbidity measurements (e.g. by optical backscattering sensors) would then also allow for an assessment of particle and pollutant flux dynamics if once calibrated against TSS and total pollutant concentrations for a given catchment. In this study, distinct flood and thus turbidity events were sampled at high temporal resolution in three contrasting sub-catchments of the River Neckar in Southwest Germany (Ammer, Goldersbach, Steinlach) as well as in the River Neckar itself and investigated for the total amount of PAHs and TSS in water; turbidity (NTU) and grain size distributions of suspended solids were determined as well. Laboratory experiments were performed with natural river bed sediments from different locations (Ammer) to investigate PAH concentrations, TSS and turbidity during sedimentation of suspended particles under controlled conditions (yielding smaller and smaller suspended particles and TSS with time). Laboratory and field results agreed very well and showed that turbidity and TSS were linearly correlated over an extended turbidity range up to 2000 NTU for the field samples and up to 8000 NTU in lab experiments. This also holds for total PAH concentrations which can be reasonably well predicted based on turbidity measurements and TSS vs. PAHs relationships - even for high turbidity values observed during flood events (>2000 NTU). Total PAH concentrations on suspended solids were independent of grain size of suspended particles. This implies that for the rivers investigated the sorption capacity of particles did not change significantly during the observed events.

  17. Skylab mobile laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Primeaux, G. R.; Larue, M. A.

    1975-01-01

    The Skylab mobile laboratory was designed to provide the capability to obtain necessary data on the Skylab crewmen 30 days before lift-off, within 1 hour after recovery, and until preflight physiological baselines were reattained. The mobile laboratory complex consisted of six laboratories that supported cardiovascular, metabolic, nutrition and endocrinology, operational medicine, blood, and microbiology experiments; a utility package; and two shipping containers. The objectives and equipment requirements of the Skylab mobile laboratory and the data acquisition systems are discussed along with processes such as permanently mounting equipment in the individual laboratories and methods of testing and transporting the units. The operational performance, in terms of amounts of data collected, and the concept of mobile laboratories for medical and scientific experiments are evaluated. The Skylab mobile laboratory succeeded in facilitating the data collection and sample preservation associated with the three Skylab manned flights.

  18. Mobile-ip Aeronautical Network Simulation Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivancic, William D.; Tran, Diepchi T.

    2001-01-01

    NASA is interested in applying mobile Internet protocol (mobile-ip) technologies to its space and aeronautics programs. In particular, mobile-ip will play a major role in the Advanced Aeronautic Transportation Technology (AATT), the Weather Information Communication (WINCOMM), and the Small Aircraft Transportation System (SATS) aeronautics programs. This report presents the results of a simulation study of mobile-ip for an aeronautical network. The study was performed to determine the performance of the transmission control protocol (TCP) in a mobile-ip environment and to gain an understanding of how long delays, handoffs, and noisy channels affect mobile-ip performance.

  19. FINAL REPORT: Coupling Sorption to Soil Weathering During Reactive Transport: Impacts of Mineral Transformation and Sorbent Aging on Contaminant Speciation and Mobility

    SciTech Connect

    O'Day, Peggy A.; Chorover, Jon; Mueller, Karl; Steefel, Carl; Serne, R. Jeff

    2009-03-21

    The goal of our project is a predictive-mechanistic understanding of the coupling between mineral weathering and contaminant (Cs, Sr, I) fate in caustic waste-impacted sediments at the Hanford Site. Through bench-scale experiments, we have identified geochemical transformations that alter the mobility of priority pollutants (Cs, Sr, I) in subsurface environments characteristic of high-level radioactive waste (HLRW)-impacted DoE sites. Our studies are designed to model the unique chemistry of this subsurface contamination, to quantify rates of contaminant uptake and release, and to identify molecular mechanisms of time-dependent, irreversible sequestration of contaminants into the solid phase. Our approach is to link quantitative macroscopic measures of contaminant mobility and partitioning to the molecular-scale mechanisms that mediate them. We have found that the molecular mechanisms themselves change with time and system composition in response to the evolving chemistry of contaminant-solution-mineral interactions. Specifically, our results show that contaminant fate is closely coupled to the major silicate incongruent weathering reactions that occur when soil solids are contacted with aqueous solutions under conditions that are far from equilibrium. Neoformed precipitates - including carbonate, feldspathoid and zeolite phases, have been observed to sequester Cs and Sr under caustic waste conditions. In contrast, iodide is less effectively sequestered into the neoformed precipitates. In any case, the long-term stability of these co-precipitates must be assessed, particularly in respect to the site closure scenario wherein sediment pore water is expected to return to a “natural” pH and ionic strength fed by rainwater recharge after removal of the caustic source. Our research centers on a series of saturated and unsaturated column studies conducted on Hanford Formation sediments that had been previously reacted in batch or column systems with synthetic tank

  20. 41 CFR 302-10.6 - Are the allowances for transporting a mobile home in addition to the allowances for per diem...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., for me and my immediate family member(s)? 302-10.6 Section 302-10.6 Public Contracts and Property... diem, mileage, and transportation expenses, for me and my immediate family member(s)? Yes, allowances... reimbursement of per diem, mileage, and transportation expenses for you and your immediate family...

  1. Segway robotic mobility platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Hoa G.; Morrell, John; Mullens, Katherine D.; Burmeister, Aaron B.; Miles, Susan; Farrington, Nathan; Thomas, Kari M.; Gage, Douglas W.

    2004-12-01

    The Segway Robotic Mobility Platform (RMP) is a new mobile robotic platform based on the self-balancing Segway Human Transporter (HT). The Segway RMP is faster, cheaper, and more agile than existing comparable platforms. It is also rugged, has a small footprint, a zero turning radius, and yet can carry a greater payload. The new geometry of the platform presents researchers with an opportunity to examine novel topics, including people-height sensing and actuation modalities. This paper describes the history and development of the platform, its characteristics, and a summary of current research projects involving the platform at various institutions across the United States.

  2. Mobility-Based Mobile Relay Selection in MANETs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Gilnam; Lee, Hyoungjoo; Lee, Kwang Bok

    The future wireless mobile communication networks are expected to provide seamless wireless access and data exchange to mobile users. In particular, it is expected that the demand for ubiquitous data exchange between mobile users will increase with the widespread use of various wireless applications of the intelligent transportation system (ITS) and intelligent vehicles. Mobile ad hoc networks (MANETs) are one of the representative research areas pursuing the technology needed to satisfy the increasing mobile communication requirements. However, most of the works on MANET systems do not take into account the continuous and dynamic changes of nodal mobility to accommodate system design and performance evaluation. The mobility of nodes limits the reliability of communication between the source and the destination node since a link between two continuously moving nodes is established only when one node enters the transmission range of the other. To alleviate this problem, mobile relay has been studied. In particular, it is shown that relay selection is an efficient way to support nodal mobility in MANET systems. In this paper, we propose a mobility-based relay selection algorithm for the MANET environment. Firstly, we define the lifetime as the maximum link duration for which the link between two nodes remains active. Therefore, the lifetime indicates the reliability of the relay link which measures its capability to successfully support relayed communication when requested by the source node. Furthermore, we consider a series of realistic scenarios according to the randomness of nodal mobility. Thus, the proposed algorithm can be easily applied in practical MANET systems by choosing the appropriate node mobility behavior. The numerical results show that the improved reliability of the proposed algorithm's relayed communication is achieved with a proper number of mobile relay nodes rather than with the conventional selection algorithm. Lastly, we show that random

  3. Application of Mobile-ip to Space and Aeronautical Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leung, Kent; Shell, Dan; Ivancic, William D.; Stewart, David H.; Bell, Terry L.; Kachmar, Brian A.

    2001-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is interested in applying mobile Internet protocol (mobile-ip) technologies to its space and aeronautics programs. In particular, mobile-ip will play a major role in the Advanced Aeronautic Transportation Technology (AAT-F), the Weather Information Communication (WINCOMM), and the Small Aircraft Transportation System (SATS) aeronautics programs. This paper describes mobile-ip and mobile routers--in particular, the features, capabilities, and initial performance of the mobile router are presented. The application of mobile-router technology to NASA's space and aeronautics programs is also discussed.

  4. 49 CFR 38.95 - Mobility aid accessibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Mobility aid accessibility. 38.95 Section 38.95... SPECIFICATIONS FOR TRANSPORTATION VEHICLES Commuter Rail Cars and Systems § 38.95 Mobility aid accessibility. (a... either paragraph (b) or (c) of this section; sufficient clearances to permit a wheelchair or mobility...

  5. 49 CFR 38.23 - Mobility aid accessibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Mobility aid accessibility. 38.23 Section 38.23... SPECIFICATIONS FOR TRANSPORTATION VEHICLES Buses, Vans and Systems § 38.23 Mobility aid accessibility. (a... permit a wheelchair or other mobility aid user to reach a securement location. At least two...

  6. 49 CFR 38.83 - Mobility aid accessibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Mobility aid accessibility. 38.83 Section 38.83... SPECIFICATIONS FOR TRANSPORTATION VEHICLES Light Rail Vehicles and Systems § 38.83 Mobility aid accessibility. (a... wheelchair or mobility aid users to reach areas, each with a minimum clear floor space of 48 inches by...

  7. 49 CFR 38.159 - Mobility aid accessibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Vehicle Safety Standards (49 CFR part 571), shall also be provided for use by wheelchair or mobility aid... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Mobility aid accessibility. 38.159 Section 38.159... SPECIFICATIONS FOR TRANSPORTATION VEHICLES Over-the-Road Buses and Systems § 38.159 Mobility aid...

  8. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching measured by confocal microscopy as a tool for the analysis of vesicular lipid transport and plasma membrane mobility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitz, Gerd; Goetz, Alexandra; Orso, Evelyn; Rothe, Gregor

    1998-04-01

    The vesicular transport of lipids from the endoplasmic reticulum via the Golgi apparatus affects the composition of the plasma membrane. The purpose of our study was to develop an in vitro test system for characterization of vesicular lipid transport kinetics by using confocal microscopy and fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP). Fibroblasts from two patients homozygous for the hypercatabolic HDL deficiency syndrome Tangier disease and 4 control subjects were pulsed with the C6-NBD-ceramide for 30 minutes. Chase incubation at room temperature resulted in the metabolic accumulation of fluorescent C6-NBD-sphingolyelin and C6-NBD-glycosylceramides in the medial- and trans-Golgi region. Cells were analyzed with an inverted Leica TCS microscope. Calibration was performed through the analysis of diffusion of 50 nm microparticles embedded in media of different viscosity. An acousto optical tunable filter (AOTF) was used for the selective bleaching of the medial- and trans- Golgi region followed by analysis of the fluorescence recovery for 4 minutes. Post-bleach fluorescence recovery through the trans-Golgi-oriented transport of NBD-sphingomyelin was calculated from 2-dimensional scans. Tangier fibroblasts displayed a retarded recovery of fluorescence in the trans- Golgi region. This suggests that the vesicular transport of sphingomyelin and cholesterol is disturbed in Tangier disease confirming data from our laboratory generated with radiometabolites on whole cells. Our data suggest that FRAP analysis allows a sensitive kinetic and spatially resolved analysis of disturbances of vesicular lipid transport.

  9. Mobile systems capability plan

    SciTech Connect

    1996-09-01

    This plan was prepared to initiate contracting for and deployment of these mobile system services. 102,000 cubic meters of retrievable, contact-handled TRU waste are stored at many sites around the country. Also, an estimated 38,000 cubic meters of TRU waste will be generated in the course of waste inventory workoff and continuing DOE operations. All the defense TRU waste is destined for disposal in WIPP near Carlsbad NM. To ship TRU waste there, sites must first certify that the waste meets WIPP waste acceptance criteria. The waste must be characterized, and if not acceptable, subjected to additional processing, including repackaging. Most sites plan to use existing fixed facilities or open new ones between FY1997-2006 to perform these functions; small-quantity sites lack this capability. An alternative to fixed facilities is the use of mobile systems mounted in trailers or skids, and transported to sites. Mobile systems will be used for all characterization and certification at small sites; large sites can also use them. The Carlsbad Area Office plans to pursue a strategy of privatization of mobile system services, since this offers a number of advantages. To indicate the possible magnitude of the costs of deploying mobile systems, preliminary estimates of equipment, maintenance, and operating costs over a 10-year period were prepared and options for purchase, lease, and privatization through fixed-price contracts considered.

  10. Proceedings of the International Conference on Mobility and Transport of Elderly and Handicapped Persons (3rd, Orlando, Florida, October 29-31, 1984). Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, William G., Ed.; Ashford, Norman J., Ed.

    These conference proceedings contain the texts of 62 papers. The first 17 papers include 4 keynote presentations as well as reviews of: major developments in several countries (Brazil, Canada, Great Britain, Jordan, Netherlands, Sweden, United States) and Hong Kong; handicapped travelers' access to air transport; and application of microcomputer…

  11. 8-Diethylamino-octyl-3,4,5-trimethoxybenzoate, a calcium store blocker, increases calcium influx, inhibits alpha-1 adrenergic receptor calcium mobilization, and alters iodide transport in FRTL-5 rat thyroid cells.

    PubMed

    Smallridge, R C; Gist, I D; Ambroz, C

    1991-07-01

    8-Diethylamino-octyl-3,4,5-trimethoxybenzoate (TMB-8) is known to inhibit mobilization of calcium from intracellular stores but, more recently, other cellular effects have been described. In the present study, the effects of TMB-8 on cytosolic free calcium [Ca2+]i levels in FRTL-5 rat thyroid cells were determined using the fluorescent dye, Indo-1. TMB-8 increased [Ca2+]i in a dose-dependent manner, with a maximum rise from 120 +/- 7 nM to 229 +/- 16 nM (90 +/- 5% increase) at 5 x 10(-4) M. This effect was considerably reduced in Ca2+ free buffer, demonstrating a dependency upon extracellular calcium influx but not upon membrane potential and which did not involve the Na+/Ca2+ exchanger. In Ca2+ free buffer TMB-8, at a dose which did not affect [Ca2+]i, completely prevented norepinephrine (10(-5) M) from mobilizing intracellular Ca2+. To determine whether TMB-8 affected differentiated functions, iodide uptake and efflux studies were performed with 125I. TMB-8 (10(-4) M) inhibited iodide uptake by approximately 40% without affecting efflux. At 10(-3) M TMB-8, efflux was also enhanced. These studies demonstrate that TMB-8 has at least two effects on [Ca2+]i, promoting calcium influx and preventing alpha-1 adrenergic mobilization from intracellular stores. TMB-8 also has multiple effects on 125I transport, both inhibiting influx and increasing efflux. The results emphasize the importance of characterizing the behavior of this compound in any cell system before using it as a biological probe.

  12. Conditions and processes affecting radionuclide transport

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simmons, Ardyth M.; Neymark, Leonid A.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding of unsaturated-zone transport is based on laboratory and field-scale experiments. Fractures provide advective transport pathways. Sorption and matrix diffusion may contribute to retardation of radionuclides. Conversely, sorption onto mobile colloids may enhance radionuclide transport.

  13. Modeling Mobility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berl, Andras

    In wireless networks, communication can take place based on an infrastructure (e.g. WLAN access point or GPRS base station) or it can take place in adhoc mode, where mobile devices are connected directly to each other and care for the routing by themselves (mobile ad-hoc networks). When such wireless networks are investigated and simulations are performed, it is often necessary to consider the movement of entities within the simulated environment.

  14. FINAL REPORT: Coupling Sorption to Soil Weathering During Reactive Transport: Impacts of Mineral Transformation and Sorbent Aging on Contaminant Speciation and Mobility

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, Karl T; Chorover, John C; ODay, Peggy A; Um, Wooyong; Steefel, Carl I

    2009-10-05

    This project aimed for a predictive-mechanistic understanding of the coupling between mineral weathering and contaminant (Cs, Sr, I) transport/fate in caustic waste-impacted sediments. Based on our prior studies of model clay mineral systems, we postulated that contaminant uptake to Hanford sediments would reflect concurrent adsorption and co-precipitation effects. Our specific objectives were: (1) to assess the molecular-scale mechanisms responsible for time-dependent sequestration of contaminants (Cs, Sr and I) during penetration of waste-induced weathering fronts; (2) to determine the rate and extent of contaminant release from the sorbed state; (3) to develop a reactive transport model based on molecular mechanisms and macroscopic flow experiments [(1) and (2)] that simulates adsorption, aging, and desorption dynamics. Progress toward achieving each of these objectives is discussed in this Final Report.

  15. The perfect ash-storm: large-scale Pyroclastic Density Current experiments reveal highly mobile, self-fluidising and air-cushioned flow transport regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lube, G.; Cronin, S. J.; Breard, E.; Valentine, G.; Bursik, M. I.; Hort, M. K.; Freundt, A.

    2013-12-01

    We report on the first systematic series of large-scale Pyroclastic Density Current (PDC) experiments using the New Zealand PDC Generator, a novel international research facility in Physical Volcanology recently commissioned at Massey University. Repeatable highly energetic and hot PDCs are synthesized by the controlled ';eruption column-collapse' of up to 3500 kg of homogenously aerated Taupo ignimbrite material from a 15 m-elevated hopper onto an instrumented inclined flume. At discharge rates between 250-1300 kg/s and low- to moderate gas injection rates (yielding initial solids concentration of 15-70 vol%) channelized gas-particle mixture flows life-scaled to dense PDCs can be generated. The flow fronts of the currents reach velocities of up to 9.5 m/s over their first 12 m of travel and rapidly develop strong vertical density stratification. The PDCs typically form a highly mobile, <60 cm-thick dense and channel-confined underflow, with an overriding dilute and turbulent ash cloud surge that also laterally escapes the flume boundaries. Depending on the PDC starting conditions underflows with 1-45 vol% solids concentration are formed, while the upper surge contains <<1 vol.% solids. A characteristic feature of the underflow is the occurrence of 'ignitive' front breakouts, producing jetted lobes that accelerate outward from the flow front, initially forming a lobe-cleft structure, followed by segregation downslope into multiple flow pulses. Depending on initial solids concentration and discharge rate, stratified, dune-bedded and inversely graded bedforms are created whose thicknesses are remarkably uniform along the medial to distal runout path characterising highly mobile flow runout. Along with high-speed video footage we present time-series data of basal arrays of load- and gas-pore pressure transducers to characterise the mobile dense underflows. Data shows that the PDCs are comprised of a turbulent coarse-grained and air-ingesting front with particle

  16. Mobility of Source Zone Heavy Metals and Radionuclides: The Mixed Roles of Fermentative Activity on Fate and Transport of U and Cr

    SciTech Connect

    Apel, William; Peyton, Brent; Gerlach, Robin; Lee, Brady

    2006-06-01

    Predicting the potential migration of metals and radionuclides from waste pits and trenches will require understanding the effects of carbon and electron flow through these environments. Important aspects of this flow include the physiological activity of cellulolytic and non-cellulolytic fermentative microbial populations, as well as the subsequent activity of metal and radionuclide reducing bacteria. The activity of subsurface fermentative microbial populations is significantly understudied even though these organisms can affect contaminant migration by at least two mechanisms. In the first mechanism, products of the fermentation process can act as chelators for metals and radionuclides increasing their transport through underlying geological media. The second mechanism is the reduction and immobilization of metals and radionuclides since some fermentative bacteria have been shown to directly reduce metals and radionuclides, while their fermentation products can provide carbon and energy for respiratory metal reducing bacteria that can also reduce oxidized metals and radionuclides.

  17. Mobile Router Developed and Tested

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivancic, William D.

    2002-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center, under a NASA Space Act Agreement with Cisco Systems, has been performing joint networking research to apply Internet-based technologies and protocols to space-based communications. As a result of this research, NASA performed stringent performance testing of the mobile router, including the interaction of routing and the transport-level protocol. In addition, Cisco Systems developed the mobile router for both commercial and Government markets. The code has become part of the Cisco Systems Internetworking Operating System (IOS) as of release 12.2 (4) T--which will make this capability available to the community at large. The mobile router is software code that resides in a network router and enables entire networks to roam while maintaining connectivity to the Internet. This router code is pertinent to a myriad of applications for both Government and commercial sectors, including the "wireless battlefield." NASA and the Department of Defense will utilize this technology for near-planetary observation and sensing spacecraft. It is also a key enabling technology for aviation-based information applications. Mobile routing will make it possible for information such as weather, air traffic control, voice, and video to be transmitted to aircraft using Internet-based protocols. This technology shows great promise in reducing congested airways and mitigating aviation disasters due to bad weather. The mobile router can also be incorporated into emergency vehicles (such as ambulances and life-flight aircraft) to provide real-time connectivity back to the hospital and health-care experts, enabling the timely application of emergency care. Commercial applications include entertainment services, Internet protocol (IP) telephone, and Internet connectivity for cruise ships, commercial shipping, tour buses, aircraft, and eventually cars. A mobile router, which is based on mobile IP, allows hosts (mobile nodes) to seamlessly "roam" among various IP

  18. The mobile satellite system of Telesat Mobile Inc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertenyi, E.; Rahman, F.

    1992-08-01

    Telesat Mobile Inc. (TMI), the Canadian mobile satellite operator, is planning to introduce full two-way mobile voice and data communications services in 1994, using its large geostationary MSAT spacecraft which is currently under construction. MSAT will provide TMI with the capability to enable its customers, even in the most remote parts of the continent, to communicate from their mobile or transportable terminals with any other point within North America, and indeed with the whole world. This paper outlines TMI's currently planned MSAT services and the main features of the overall system. A brief summary of the space and ground segments is presented, and the key performance parameters and configuration of the MSAT spacecraft are reviewed.

  19. Robotic transportation.

    PubMed

    Lob, W S

    1990-09-01

    Mobile robots perform fetch-and-carry tasks autonomously. An intelligent, sensor-equipped mobile robot does not require dedicated pathways or extensive facility modification. In the hospital, mobile robots can be used to carry specimens, pharmaceuticals, meals, etc. between supply centers, patient areas, and laboratories. The HelpMate (Transitions Research Corp.) mobile robot was developed specifically for hospital environments. To reach a desired destination, Help-Mate navigates with an on-board computer that continuously polls a suite of sensors, matches the sensor data against a pre-programmed map of the environment, and issues drive commands and path corrections. A sender operates the robot with a user-friendly menu that prompts for payload insertion and desired destination(s). Upon arrival at its selected destination, the robot prompts the recipient for a security code or physical key and awaits acknowledgement of payload removal. In the future, the integration of HelpMate with robot manipulators, test equipment, and central institutional information systems will open new applications in more localized areas and should help overcome difficulties in filling transport staff positions.

  20. Robotic transportation.

    PubMed

    Lob, W S

    1990-09-01

    Mobile robots perform fetch-and-carry tasks autonomously. An intelligent, sensor-equipped mobile robot does not require dedicated pathways or extensive facility modification. In the hospital, mobile robots can be used to carry specimens, pharmaceuticals, meals, etc. between supply centers, patient areas, and laboratories. The HelpMate (Transitions Research Corp.) mobile robot was developed specifically for hospital environments. To reach a desired destination, Help-Mate navigates with an on-board computer that continuously polls a suite of sensors, matches the sensor data against a pre-programmed map of the environment, and issues drive commands and path corrections. A sender operates the robot with a user-friendly menu that prompts for payload insertion and desired destination(s). Upon arrival at its selected destination, the robot prompts the recipient for a security code or physical key and awaits acknowledgement of payload removal. In the future, the integration of HelpMate with robot manipulators, test equipment, and central institutional information systems will open new applications in more localized areas and should help overcome difficulties in filling transport staff positions. PMID:2208684

  1. Mobility and Orientation Instruction of Blind Persons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luini, Eugene; Ryder, James

    A peripatologist taught 102 blind and partially sighted individuals of all ages mobility and orientation techniques. Volunteers assisted with transportation, followup, consultation, and direct teaching of mobility. Over a 3-year period, the number of lessons per client varied from one to 86, and the number of hours spent by the instructor in…

  2. Flow instabilities in non-uniformly heated helium jet arrays used for divertor PFCs

    SciTech Connect

    Youchison, Dennis L.

    2015-07-30

    In this study, due to a lack of prototypical experimental data, little is known about the off-normal behavior of recently proposed divertor jet cooling concepts. This article describes a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) study on two jet array designs to investigate their susceptibility to parallel flow instabilities induced by non-uniform heating and large increases in the helium outlet temperature. The study compared a single 25-jet helium-cooled modular divertor (HEMJ) thimble and a micro-jet array with 116 jets. Both have pure tungsten armor and a total mass flow rate of 10 g/s at a 600 °C inlet temperature. We investigated flow perturbations caused by a 30 MW/m2 off-normal heat flux applied over a 25 mm2 area in addition to the nominal 5 MW/m2 applied over a 75 mm2 portion of the face. The micro-jet array exhibited lower temperatures and a more uniform surface temperature distribution than the HEMJ thimble. We also investigated the response of a manifolded nine-finger HEMJ assembly using the nominal heat flux and a 274 mm2 heated area. For the 30 MW/m2 case, the micro-jet array absorbed 750 W in the helium with a maximum armor surface temperature of 1280 °C and a fluid/solid interface temperature of 801 °C. The HEMJ absorbed 750 W with a maximum armor surface temperature of 1411 °C and a fluid/solid interface temperature of 844 °C. For comparison, both the single HEMJ finger and the micro-jet array used 5-mm-thick tungsten armor. The ratio of maximum to average temperature and variations in the local heat transfer coefficient were lower for the micro-jet array compared to the HEMJ device. Although high heat flux testing is required to validate the results obtained in these simulations, the results provide important guidance in jet design and manifolding to increase heat removal while providing more even temperature distribution and minimizing non-uniformity in the gas flow and thermal stresses at the armor joint.

  3. Flow instabilities in non-uniformly heated helium jet arrays used for divertor PFCs

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Youchison, Dennis L.

    2015-07-30

    In this study, due to a lack of prototypical experimental data, little is known about the off-normal behavior of recently proposed divertor jet cooling concepts. This article describes a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) study on two jet array designs to investigate their susceptibility to parallel flow instabilities induced by non-uniform heating and large increases in the helium outlet temperature. The study compared a single 25-jet helium-cooled modular divertor (HEMJ) thimble and a micro-jet array with 116 jets. Both have pure tungsten armor and a total mass flow rate of 10 g/s at a 600 °C inlet temperature. We investigated flowmore » perturbations caused by a 30 MW/m2 off-normal heat flux applied over a 25 mm2 area in addition to the nominal 5 MW/m2 applied over a 75 mm2 portion of the face. The micro-jet array exhibited lower temperatures and a more uniform surface temperature distribution than the HEMJ thimble. We also investigated the response of a manifolded nine-finger HEMJ assembly using the nominal heat flux and a 274 mm2 heated area. For the 30 MW/m2 case, the micro-jet array absorbed 750 W in the helium with a maximum armor surface temperature of 1280 °C and a fluid/solid interface temperature of 801 °C. The HEMJ absorbed 750 W with a maximum armor surface temperature of 1411 °C and a fluid/solid interface temperature of 844 °C. For comparison, both the single HEMJ finger and the micro-jet array used 5-mm-thick tungsten armor. The ratio of maximum to average temperature and variations in the local heat transfer coefficient were lower for the micro-jet array compared to the HEMJ device. Although high heat flux testing is required to validate the results obtained in these simulations, the results provide important guidance in jet design and manifolding to increase heat removal while providing more even temperature distribution and minimizing non-uniformity in the gas flow and thermal stresses at the armor joint.« less

  4. Perfluorinated surfactants as model charged systems for understanding the effect of confinement on proton transport and water mobility in fuel cell membranes. A study by QENS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyonnard, S.; Berrod, Q.; Brüning, B.-A.; Gebel, G.; Guillermo, A.; Ftouni, H.; Ollivier, J.; Frick, B.

    2010-10-01

    We have investigated the dynamical properties of water confined in mesomorphous phases of perfluorinated sulfonic surfactants. These systems mimic the physico-chemical properties of the perfluorinated Nafion membranes which are used as electrolyte in fuel cells. As the surfactants offer the advantage to self-assemble in well defined organized phases (such as hexagonal and lamellar phases), they could be used as model charged systems to understand the structure-transport relationship in complex real materials. Indeed, the geometry as well as the typical confinement size can be easily controlled and tuned through water concentration and temperature. A QENS study of hexagonal and lamellar phases has been performed on both time-of-flight and backscattering spectrometers to cover a dynamic range from picoseconds to nanoseconds. Analysis of the data with localized translational diffusion models shows the existence of a strong confinement effect that depends on the geometry. Typical confinement sizes and diffusion coefficients can be extracted from the QENS analysis and compared to the Nafion membrane.

  5. Mobile Customer Relationship Management and Mobile Security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanayei, Ali; Mirzaei, Abas

    The purpose of this study is twofold. First, in order to guarantee a coherent discussion about mobile customer relationship management (mCRM), this paper presents a conceptualization of mCRM delineating its unique characteristics because of Among the variety of mobile services, considerable attention has been devoted to mobile marketing and in particular to mobile customer relationship management services. Second, the authors discusses the security risks in mobile computing in different level(user, mobile device, wireless network,...) and finally we focus on enterprise mobile security and it's subgroups with a series of suggestion and solution for improve mobile computing security.

  6. Going mobile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brus, Eric

    1987-12-01

    By 1990, all metropolitan areas in the U.S. and rural areas close to major cities or towns are expected to have cellular telephone service; 22 Canadian cities also feature cellular service. To supply mobile telecommunication services to sparsely-populated rural areas, a mobile satellite service (MSS) is now being developed. In this paper the projected possibilities of the MSS system are discussed, including a possibility that a piggyback-MSS payload be added to the GSTAR-4 satellite which is scheduled for a launch in 1988 or 1989; one in which some of the hardware from aborted direct-broadcast satellites would be used; and the possibility of building a new MSS satellite with large servicing capacity. Canada is planning to launch its own mobile satellite, MSAT, in the early 1990s. The MSS is expected to be 'generic', serving not only people on land but maritime and aeronautical users as well. It will also offer major benefits to truck and automobile drivers, making it possible for them to conduct business or to call for assistance from locations beyond the range of cellular systems.

  7. 9 CFR 3.79 - Mobile or traveling housing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... barriers. There must be a barrier between a mobile or traveling housing facility and the public at any time... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Mobile or traveling housing facilities... Transportation of Nonhuman Primates 2 Facilities and Operating Standards § 3.79 Mobile or traveling...

  8. 9 CFR 3.79 - Mobile or traveling housing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Mobile or traveling housing facilities... Transportation of Nonhuman Primates 2 Facilities and Operating Standards § 3.79 Mobile or traveling housing facilities. (a) Heating, cooling, and temperature. Mobile or traveling housing facilities must...

  9. 21 CFR 892.1720 - Mobile x-ray system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Mobile x-ray system. 892.1720 Section 892.1720...) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1720 Mobile x-ray system. (a) Identification. A mobile x-ray system is a transportable device system intended to be used to generate and control...

  10. 21 CFR 892.1720 - Mobile x-ray system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Mobile x-ray system. 892.1720 Section 892.1720...) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1720 Mobile x-ray system. (a) Identification. A mobile x-ray system is a transportable device system intended to be used to generate and control...

  11. 21 CFR 892.1720 - Mobile x-ray system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Mobile x-ray system. 892.1720 Section 892.1720...) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1720 Mobile x-ray system. (a) Identification. A mobile x-ray system is a transportable device system intended to be used to generate and control...

  12. 21 CFR 892.1720 - Mobile x-ray system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Mobile x-ray system. 892.1720 Section 892.1720...) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1720 Mobile x-ray system. (a) Identification. A mobile x-ray system is a transportable device system intended to be used to generate and control...

  13. 21 CFR 892.1720 - Mobile x-ray system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Mobile x-ray system. 892.1720 Section 892.1720...) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1720 Mobile x-ray system. (a) Identification. A mobile x-ray system is a transportable device system intended to be used to generate and control...

  14. 9 CFR 3.79 - Mobile or traveling housing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... barriers. There must be a barrier between a mobile or traveling housing facility and the public at any time... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Mobile or traveling housing facilities... Transportation of Nonhuman Primates 2 Facilities and Operating Standards § 3.79 Mobile or traveling...

  15. Mobile access control vestibule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DePoy, Jennifer M.

    1998-12-01

    The mobile access control vestibule (MACV) is an adaptation of techniques developed for mobile military command centers. The overall configuration of modules acts as an entry control/screening facility or transportable command center. The system would provide the following capabilities: (1) A key element for force protection, rapid deployment units sent to areas having no prepositioned equipment or where there has been a degradation of that equipment as a result of natural disasters or civil unrest. (2) A rapidly deployable security control center to upgrade the security at nonmilitary sites (e.g., diplomatic or humanitarian organizations). (3) Personnel screening, package screening, badge/identification card production for authorized personnel, centralized monitoring of deployed perimeter sensors, and centralized communications for law enforcement personnel. (4) Self-contained screening and threat detection systems, including explosives detection using the system developed by Sandia National Laboratories for the FAA. When coupled with transportable electric generators, the system is self-sufficient. The communication system for the MACV would be a combination of physically wired and wireless communication units that supports by ad hoc networking.

  16. 49 CFR 24.502 - Replacement housing payment for 180-day mobile homeowner displaced from a mobile home, and/or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... decent, safe and sanitary dwelling. (d) Owner-occupant not displaced from the mobile home. If the Agency... 49 Transportation 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Replacement housing payment for 180-day mobile homeowner displaced from a mobile home, and/or from the acquired mobile home site. 24.502 Section...

  17. Enhanced two dimensional electron gas transport characteristics in Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/AlInN/GaN metal-oxide-semiconductor high-electron-mobility transistors on Si substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Freedsman, J. J. Watanabe, A.; Urayama, Y.; Egawa, T.

    2015-09-07

    The authors report on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Al{sub 0.85}In{sub 0.15}N/GaN Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor High-Electron-Mobility Transistor (MOS-HEMT) on Si fabricated by using atomic layer deposited Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} as gate insulator and passivation layer. The MOS-HEMT with the gate length of 2 μm exhibits excellent direct-current (dc) characteristics with a drain current maximum of 1270 mA/mm at a gate bias of 3 V and an off-state breakdown voltage of 180 V for a gate-drain spacing of 4 μm. Also, the 1 μm-gate MOS-HEMT shows good radio-frequency (rf) response such as current gain and maximum oscillation cut-off frequencies of 10 and 34 GHz, respectively. The capacitance-voltage characteristics at 1 MHz revealed significant increase in two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) density for the MOS-HEMT compared to conventional Schottky barrier HEMTs. Analyses using drain-source conductivity measurements showed improvements in 2DEG transport characteristics for the MOS-HEMT. The enhancements in dc and rf performances of the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Al{sub 0.85}In{sub 0.15}N/GaN MOS-HEMT are attributed to the improvements in 2DEG characteristics.

  18. Mobile shearography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalms, Michael; Jueptner, Werner

    2005-04-01

    By reason of their sensitivity, accuracy and non-contact as well as non-destructive characteristics, modern optical methods such as digital speckle shearography have found an increasing interest for NDT applications on the factory floor. With new carbon filter technologies and other lightweight constructions in aircraft and automotive manufacturing, adapted examination designs and especially developed testing methods are necessary. Shearography as a coherent optical method has been widely accepted as an useful NDT tool. It is a robust interferometric method to determine locations with maximum stress on various material structures. However, limitations of this technique can be found in the bulky equipment components, the interpretation of the complex sherographic result images and at the work with non-cooperative surfaces (dark absorber, bright shining reflectors). We report a mobile shearography system that was especially designed for investigations at aircraft and automotive constructions.

  19. Cooperating mobile robots

    DOEpatents

    Harrington, John J.; Eskridge, Steven E.; Hurtado, John E.; Byrne, Raymond H.

    2004-02-03

    A miniature mobile robot provides a relatively inexpensive mobile robot. A mobile robot for searching an area provides a way for multiple mobile robots in cooperating teams. A robotic system with a team of mobile robots communicating information among each other provides a way to locate a source in cooperation. A mobile robot with a sensor, a communication system, and a processor, provides a way to execute a strategy for searching an area.

  20. Energy optimization in mobile sensor networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Shengwei

    Mobile sensor networks are considered to consist of a network of mobile robots, each of which has computation, communication and sensing capabilities. Energy efficiency is a critical issue in mobile sensor networks, especially when mobility (i.e., locomotion control), routing (i.e., communications) and sensing are unique characteristics of mobile robots for energy optimization. This thesis focuses on the problem of energy optimization of mobile robotic sensor networks, and the research results can be extended to energy optimization of a network of mobile robots that monitors the environment, or a team of mobile robots that transports materials from stations to stations in a manufacturing environment. On the energy optimization of mobile robotic sensor networks, our research focuses on the investigation and development of distributed optimization algorithms to exploit the mobility of robotic sensor nodes for network lifetime maximization. In particular, the thesis studies these five problems: 1. Network-lifetime maximization by controlling positions of networked mobile sensor robots based on local information with distributed optimization algorithms; 2. Lifetime maximization of mobile sensor networks with energy harvesting modules; 3. Lifetime maximization using joint design of mobility and routing; 4. Optimal control for network energy minimization; 5. Network lifetime maximization in mobile visual sensor networks. In addressing the first problem, we consider only the mobility strategies of the robotic relay nodes in a mobile sensor network in order to maximize its network lifetime. By using variable substitutions, the original problem is converted into a convex problem, and a variant of the sub-gradient method for saddle-point computation is developed for solving this problem. An optimal solution is obtained by the method. Computer simulations show that mobility of robotic sensors can significantly prolong the lifetime of the whole robotic sensor network while

  1. Mobile Schools for a Mobile World

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Booth, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Overwhelmingly, independent schools are embracing mobile devices--laptops, iPads or other tablets, and smartphones--to enhance teaching and learning. This article describes the results of the "NAIS 2012 Mobile Learning Survey." Among its findings were that 75 percent of NAIS-member schools currently use mobile learning devices in at…

  2. Human Mobility in a Continuum Approach

    PubMed Central

    Simini, Filippo; Maritan, Amos; Néda, Zoltán

    2013-01-01

    Human mobility is investigated using a continuum approach that allows to calculate the probability to observe a trip to any arbitrary region, and the fluxes between any two regions. The considered description offers a general and unified framework, in which previously proposed mobility models like the gravity model, the intervening opportunities model, and the recently introduced radiation model are naturally resulting as special cases. A new form of radiation model is derived and its validity is investigated using observational data offered by commuting trips obtained from the United States census data set, and the mobility fluxes extracted from mobile phone data collected in a western European country. The new modeling paradigm offered by this description suggests that the complex topological features observed in large mobility and transportation networks may be the result of a simple stochastic process taking place on an inhomogeneous landscape. PMID:23555885

  3. Mobility of charge carriers in disordered dielectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiotnev, A. P.; Boev, S. G.; Sadovnichii, D. N.

    1994-07-01

    We compare experimental data on the mobility of holes (the majority charge carriers) in polyepoxy-propylcarbazole, measured using the time-of-flight technique (drift mobility) and the nonsteady-state radiation-induced electrical conductivity method (effective mobility). We show that these two quantities are quite different in the dispersive transport regime; and while the second quantity is a characteristic of the material, the first quantity depends in a complicated fashion on the ratio of the electric field strength to the sample thickness. The “untreated” data on drift mobility measurements using the time-of-flight technique do not have direct physical meaning and cannot be compared with the conclusions of modern microscopic theories of the mobility of charge carriers in disordered matrices.

  4. 77 FR 30046 - Ninth Meeting: RTCA Special Committee 222, Inmarsat Aeronautical Mobile Satellite (Route) Services

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-21

    ... Satellite (Route) Services AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT). ACTION: Meeting Notice of RTCA Special Committee 222, Inmarsat Aeronautical Mobile Satellite... RTCA Special Committee 222, Inmarsat Aeronautical Mobile Satellite (Route) Services. DATES: The...

  5. 76 FR 66350 - Eighth Meeting: RTCA Special Committee 222 Inmarsat Aeronautical Mobile Satellite (Route) Services

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-26

    ... Satellite (Route) Services AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT). ACTION: Notice of RTCA Special Committee 222, Inmarsat Aeronautical Mobile Satellite (Route... Committee 222, Inmarsat Aeronautical Mobile Satellite (Route) Services for the Eighth Meeting. DATES:...

  6. 77 FR 48584 - Tenth Meeting: RTCA Special Committee 222, Inmarsat Aeronautical Mobile Satellite (Route) Services

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-14

    ... Satellite (Route) Services AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT). ACTION: Meeting Notice of RTCA Special Committee 222, Inmarsat Aeronautical Mobile Satellite... RTCA Special Committee 222, Inmarsat Aeronautical Mobile Satellite (Route) Services. DATES: The...

  7. Transportation Network Topologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, Bruce J.; Scott, John M.

    2004-01-01

    A discomforting reality has materialized on the transportation scene: our existing air and ground infrastructures will not scale to meet our nation's 21st century demands and expectations for mobility, commerce, safety, and security. The consequence of inaction is diminished quality of life and economic opportunity in the 21st century. Clearly, new thinking is required for transportation that can scale to meet to the realities of a networked, knowledge-based economy in which the value of time is a new coin of the realm. This paper proposes a framework, or topology, for thinking about the problem of scalability of the system of networks that comprise the aviation system. This framework highlights the role of integrated communication-navigation-surveillance systems in enabling scalability of future air transportation networks. Scalability, in this vein, is a goal of the recently formed Joint Planning and Development Office for the Next Generation Air Transportation System. New foundations for 21PstP thinking about air transportation are underpinned by several technological developments in the traditional aircraft disciplines as well as in communication, navigation, surveillance and information systems. Complexity science and modern network theory give rise to one of the technological developments of importance. Scale-free (i.e., scalable) networks represent a promising concept space for modeling airspace system architectures, and for assessing network performance in terms of scalability, efficiency, robustness, resilience, and other metrics. The paper offers an air transportation system topology as framework for transportation system innovation. Successful outcomes of innovation in air transportation could lay the foundations for new paradigms for aircraft and their operating capabilities, air transportation system architectures, and airspace architectures and procedural concepts. The topology proposed considers air transportation as a system of networks, within

  8. Transportation Network Topologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, Bruce J.; Scott, John

    2004-01-01

    A discomforting reality has materialized on the transportation scene: our existing air and ground infrastructures will not scale to meet our nation's 21st century demands and expectations for mobility, commerce, safety, and security. The consequence of inaction is diminished quality of life and economic opportunity in the 21st century. Clearly, new thinking is required for transportation that can scale to meet to the realities of a networked, knowledge-based economy in which the value of time is a new coin of the realm. This paper proposes a framework, or topology, for thinking about the problem of scalability of the system of networks that comprise the aviation system. This framework highlights the role of integrated communication-navigation-surveillance systems in enabling scalability of future air transportation networks. Scalability, in this vein, is a goal of the recently formed Joint Planning and Development Office for the Next Generation Air Transportation System. New foundations for 21st thinking about air transportation are underpinned by several technological developments in the traditional aircraft disciplines as well as in communication, navigation, surveillance and information systems. Complexity science and modern network theory give rise to one of the technological developments of importance. Scale-free (i.e., scalable) networks represent a promising concept space for modeling airspace system architectures, and for assessing network performance in terms of scalability, efficiency, robustness, resilience, and other metrics. The paper offers an air transportation system topology as framework for transportation system innovation. Successful outcomes of innovation in air transportation could lay the foundations for new paradigms for aircraft and their operating capabilities, air transportation system architectures, and airspace architectures and procedural concepts. The topology proposed considers air transportation as a system of networks, within which

  9. A land mobile satellite data system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kent, John D. B.

    The Telesat Mobile Incorporated (TMI) Mobile Data System (MDS) was developed to apply satellite technology to the transportation industry's requirement for a fleet management system. It will provide two-way messaging and automatic position reporting capabilities between dispatch centers and customers' fleets of trucks. The design was based on the Inmarsat L-Band space segment with system link parameters and margins adjusted to meet the land mobile satellite channel characteristics. The system interfaces with the Teleglobe Des Laurentides earth station at Weir, Quebec. The signaling protocols were derived from the Inmarsat Standard C packet signalling system with unique trucking requirements incorporated where necessary.

  10. Human engineering in mobile radwaste systems

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, D.; McMahon, J.; Motl, G.

    1988-01-01

    To a large degree, mobile radwaste systems are replacing installed plant systems at US nuclear plants due to regulatory obsolescence, high capital and maintenance costs, and increased radiation exposure. Well over half the power plants in the United States now use some sort of mobile system similar to those offered by LN Technologies Corporation. Human engineering is reflected in mobile radwaste system design due to concerns about safety, efficiency, and cost. The radwaste services business is so competitive that vendors must reflect human engineering in several areas of equipment design in order to compete. The paper discusses radiation exposure control, contamination control, compact components, maintainability, operation, and transportability.

  11. A land mobile satellite data system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kent, John D. B.

    1990-01-01

    The Telesat Mobile Incorporated (TMI) Mobile Data System (MDS) was developed to apply satellite technology to the transportation industry's requirement for a fleet management system. It will provide two-way messaging and automatic position reporting capabilities between dispatch centers and customers' fleets of trucks. The design was based on the Inmarsat L-Band space segment with system link parameters and margins adjusted to meet the land mobile satellite channel characteristics. The system interfaces with the Teleglobe Des Laurentides earth station at Weir, Quebec. The signaling protocols were derived from the Inmarsat Standard C packet signalling system with unique trucking requirements incorporated where necessary.

  12. Dynamic Transportation Navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Xiaofeng; Chen, Jidong

    Miniaturization of computing devices, and advances in wireless communication and sensor technology are some of the forces that are propagating computing from the stationary desktop to the mobile outdoors. Some important classes of new applications that will be enabled by this revolutionary development include intelligent traffic management, location-based services, tourist services, mobile electronic commerce, and digital battlefield. Some existing application classes that will benefit from the development include transportation and air traffic control, weather forecasting, emergency response, mobile resource management, and mobile workforce. Location management, i.e., the management of transient location information, is an enabling technology for all these applications. In this chapter, we present the applications of moving objects management and their functionalities, in particular, the application of dynamic traffic navigation, which is a challenge due to the highly variable traffic state and the requirement of fast, on-line computations.

  13. Mobility of University Staff.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council for Cultural Cooperation, Strasbourg (France).

    This study deals with interuniversity mobility. Part I examines the harmonization of action taken to encourage mobility, the removal of legislative and statutory obstacles to mobility, the simplification of university staff regulations and careers, and incentives to mobility. Part II describes the ideas and activities of UNESCO, the Council of…

  14. CBRN mobile laboratories in Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mari, Giorgio; Giraudi, Giampaolo; Bellino, Mariarosa; Pazienza, Michele; Garibaldi, Claudio; Lancia, Corrado

    2009-05-01

    The paper describes the experiences in Italy with the CBRN (Chemical Biological Radiological Nuclear) defense mobile laboratories. These laboratories were constructed by the Italian Army and the Italian Fire Brigades. The purpose of these mobile laboratories is to allow quick transport of the labs to the area of crisis in order to support emergency response in case of CBRN events. The differences between two alternative solutions will be developed in the paper. The first solution is when the lab is to be located in the "dangerous area" (this solution was chosen by the Italian Army) and the alternative approach is to place the mobile lab just outside the dangerous area (this approach was selected by the Italian Fire Brigades). One of the most important devices inside the lab is the isolator (also called "glove box") which allows safe ingress and handling of the "suspicious" samples from the external environment. The isolator has a special chamber for transfer of the sample from the outside. The pressure of the isolator is permanently kept below the air pressure inside the lab by means of one (or more) fan. The operators perform the sample preparations or part of the analysis by handling the sample with the gloves. The material flow inside the lab will be described depending on the kind of identification analysis to be done on the samples. Other devices installed on the mobile CBRN laboratories are: biohazard hood (UE regulation, containment level 2); autoclave; freezer; cleaning skid (tanks, pumps, etc.).

  15. Temperature dependence of ballistic mobility in a metamorphic InGaAs/InAlAs high electron mobility transistor

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jongkyong; Gang, Suhyun; Jo, Yongcheol; Kim, Jongmin; Woo, Hyeonseok; Han, Jaeseok; Kim, Hyungsang Im, Hyunsik

    2014-07-28

    We have investigated the temperature dependence of ballistic mobility in a 100 nm-long InGaAs/InAlAs metamorphic high-electron-mobility transistor designed for millimeter-wavelength RF applications. To extract the temperature dependence of quasi-ballistic mobility, our experiment involves measurements of the effective mobility in the low-bias linear region of the transistor and of the collision-dominated Hall mobility using a gated Hall bar of the same epitaxial structure. The data measured from the experiment are consistent with that of modeled ballistic mobility based on ballistic transport theory. These results advance the understanding of ballistic transport in various transistors with a nano-scale channel length that is comparable to the carrier's mean free path in the channel.

  16. 9 CFR 3.5 - Mobile or traveling housing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Transportation of Dogs and Cats 1 Facilities and Operating Standards § 3.5 Mobile or traveling housing facilities. (a) Heating, cooling, and temperature. Mobile or traveling housing facilities for dogs and cats must be sufficiently heated and cooled when necessary to protect the dogs and cats from temperature...

  17. 9 CFR 3.5 - Mobile or traveling housing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Transportation of Dogs and Cats 1 Facilities and Operating Standards § 3.5 Mobile or traveling housing facilities. (a) Heating, cooling, and temperature. Mobile or traveling housing facilities for dogs and cats must be sufficiently heated and cooled when necessary to protect the dogs and cats from temperature...

  18. 9 CFR 3.5 - Mobile or traveling housing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Transportation of Dogs and Cats 1 Facilities and Operating Standards § 3.5 Mobile or traveling housing facilities. (a) Heating, cooling, and temperature. Mobile or traveling housing facilities for dogs and cats must be sufficiently heated and cooled when necessary to protect the dogs and cats from temperature...

  19. 9 CFR 3.5 - Mobile or traveling housing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Transportation of Dogs and Cats 1 Facilities and Operating Standards § 3.5 Mobile or traveling housing facilities. (a) Heating, cooling, and temperature. Mobile or traveling housing facilities for dogs and cats must be sufficiently heated and cooled when necessary to protect the dogs and cats from temperature...

  20. 9 CFR 3.5 - Mobile or traveling housing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Transportation of Dogs and Cats 1 Facilities and Operating Standards § 3.5 Mobile or traveling housing facilities. (a) Heating, cooling, and temperature. Mobile or traveling housing facilities for dogs and cats must be sufficiently heated and cooled when necessary to protect the dogs and cats from temperature...

  1. The Mobility Decision. 1990 Wheelchair Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henke, Cliff

    1990-01-01

    This article presents tips for parents shopping for wheelchairs for children with special mobility needs. Manual versus power chairs, dimensions, maneuverability, weight, transportability, durability, adaptability, maximum/minimum speeds, battery life (for power chairs), climbing angle, and other features are discussed. Factors to consider in…

  2. Ion mobility sensor system

    DOEpatents

    Xu, Jun; Watson, David B.; Whitten, William B.

    2013-01-22

    An ion mobility sensor system including an ion mobility spectrometer and a differential mobility spectrometer coupled to the ion mobility spectrometer. The ion mobility spectrometer has a first chamber having first end and a second end extending along a first direction, and a first electrode system that generates a constant electric field parallel to the first direction. The differential mobility spectrometer includes a second chamber having a third end and a fourth end configured such that a fluid may flow in a second direction from the third end to the fourth end, and a second electrode system that generates an asymmetric electric field within an interior of the second chamber. Additionally, the ion mobility spectrometer and the differential mobility spectrometer form an interface region. Also, the first end and the third end are positioned facing one another so that the constant electric field enters the third end and overlaps the fluid flowing in the second direction.

  3. Tandem mobile robot system

    DOEpatents

    Buttz, James H.; Shirey, David L.; Hayward, David R.

    2003-01-01

    A robotic vehicle system for terrain navigation mobility provides a way to climb stairs, cross crevices, and navigate across difficult terrain by coupling two or more mobile robots with a coupling device and controlling the robots cooperatively in tandem.

  4. Superintendent Vulnerability and Mobility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Phyllis

    1996-01-01

    Examined Callahan's vulnerability thesis to determine its ability to explain the mobility of superintendents in Texas between 1985 and 1990. Questionnaire and interview data indicated that, at least in Texas where superintendent mobility reached 50% in that time period, vulnerability did not appear to account for much of superintendent mobility.…

  5. Mobility and Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernard van Leer Foundation Newsletter, 1994

    1994-01-01

    This newsletter theme issue deals with the phenomenon of mobility or transience in India, Kenya, Greece, Ireland, Malaysia, Thailand and Israel. The primary focus is on mobility's effect on young children, specifically their health and education; some of the broader concerns also addressed by the newsletter are the causes of mobility and its…

  6. Mobile Student Information System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asif, Muhammad; Krogstie, John

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: A mobile student information system (MSIS) based on mobile computing and context-aware application concepts can provide more user-centric information services to students. The purpose of this paper is to describe a system for providing relevant information to students on a mobile platform. Design/methodology/approach: The research…

  7. Ion mobility sensor

    DOEpatents

    Koo, Jackson C.; Yu, Conrad M.

    2005-08-23

    An ion mobility sensor which can detect both ion and molecules simultaneously. Thus, one can measure the relative arrival times between various ions and molecules. Different ions have different mobility in air, and the ion sensor enables measurement of ion mobility, from which one can identify the various ions and molecules. The ion mobility sensor which utilizes a pair of glow discharge devices may be designed for coupling with an existing gas chromatograph, where various gas molecules are already separated, but numbers of each kind of molecules are relatively small, and in such cases a conventional ion mobility sensor cannot be utilized.

  8. Epidemic spreading induced by diversity of agents' mobility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jie; Chung, Ning Ning; Chew, Lock Yue; Lai, Choy Heng

    2012-08-01

    In this paper, we study the impact of the preference of an individual for public transport on the spread of infectious disease, through a quantity known as the public mobility. Our theoretical and numerical results based on a constructed model reveal that if the average public mobility of the agents is fixed, an increase in the diversity of the agents’ public mobility reduces the epidemic threshold, beyond which an enhancement in the rate of infection is observed. Our findings provide an approach to improve the resistance of a society against infectious disease, while preserving the utilization rate of the public transportation system.

  9. Transportation Network Topologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexandrov, Natalia (Editor)

    2004-01-01

    The existing U.S. hub-and-spoke air transportation system is reaching saturation. Major aspects of the current system, such as capacity, safety, mobility, customer satisfaction, security, communications, and ecological effects, require improvements. The changing dynamics - increased presence of general aviation, unmanned autonomous vehicles, military aircraft in civil airspace as part of homeland defense - contributes to growing complexity of airspace. The system has proven remarkably resistant to change. NASA Langley Research Center and the National Institute of Aerospace conducted a workshop on Transportation Network Topologies on 9-10 December 2003 in Williamsburg, Virginia. The workshop aimed to examine the feasibility of traditional methods for complex system analysis and design as well as potential novel alternatives in application to transportation systems, identify state-of-the-art models and methods, conduct gap analysis, and thus to lay a foundation for establishing a focused research program in complex systems applied to air transportation.

  10. Mobile applications and Virtual Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaaff, A.; Jagade, S.

    2015-06-01

    Within a few years, smartphones and Internet tablets have become the devices to access Web or standalone applications from everywhere, with a rapid development of the bandwidth of the mobile networks (e.g. 4G). Internet tablets are used to take notes during meetings or conferences, to read scientific papers in public transportation, etc. A smartphone is for example a way to have your data in the pocket or to control, from everywhere, the progress of a heavy workflow process. These mobile devices have enough powerful hardware to run more and more complex applications for many use cases. In the field of astronomy it is possible to use these tools to access data via a simple browser, but also to develop native applications reusing libraries (written in Java for Android or Objective-C/Swift for iOS) developed for desktops/laptops. We describe the experiments conducted in this domain, at CDS and IUCAA, considering a mobile application as a native application as well as a Web application.

  11. Bulk Superconductors in Mobile Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werfel, F. N.; Delor, U. Floegel-; Rothfeld, R.; Riedel, T.; Wippich, D.; Goebel, B.; Schirrmeister, P.

    We investigate and review concepts of multi - seeded REBCO bulk superconductors in mobile application. ATZ's compact HTS bulk magnets can trap routinely 1 T@77 K. Except of magnetization, flux creep and hysteresis, industrial - like properties as compactness, power density, and robustness are of major device interest if mobility and light-weight construction is in focus. For mobile application in levitated trains or demonstrator magnets we examine the performance of on-board cryogenics either by LN2 or cryo-cooler application. The mechanical, electric and thermodynamical requirements of compact vacuum cryostats for Maglev train operation were studied systematically. More than 30 units are manufactured and tested. The attractive load to weight ratio is more than 10 and favours group module device constructions up to 5 t load on permanent magnet (PM) track. A transportable and compact YBCO bulk magnet cooled with in-situ 4 Watt Stirling cryo-cooler for 50 - 80 K operation is investigated. Low cooling power and effective HTS cold mass drives the system construction to a minimum - thermal loss and light-weight design.

  12. Mobile Remote Base System (MBS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Backdropped against the blackness of space and the Earth's horizon, the Mobile Remote Base System (MBS) is moved by the Canadarm2 for installation on the International Space Station (ISS). Delivered by the STS-111 mission aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour in June 2002, the MBS is an important part of the Station's Mobile Servicing System allowing the robotic arm to travel the length of the Station, which is neccessary for future construction tasks. In addition, STS-111 delivered a new crew, Expedition Five, replacing Expedition Four after remaining a record-setting 196 days in space. Three spacewalks enabled the STS-111 crew to accomplish the delivery and installation of the MBS to the Mobile Transporter on the S0 (S-zero) truss, the replacement of a wrist roll joint on the Station's robotic arm, and the task of unloading supplies and science experiments from the Leonardo Multi-Purpose Logistics Module, which made its third trip to the orbital outpost. The STS-111 mission, the 14th Shuttle mission to visit the ISS, was launched on June 5, 2002 and landed June 19, 2002.

  13. INFLUENCE OF MACROMOLECULES ON CHEMICAL TRANSPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Macromolecules in the pore fluid influence the mobility of hydrophobic compounds through soils. his study evaluated the significance of macromolecules in facilitating chemical transport under laboratory conditions. Partition coefficients between 14C-labeled hexachlorobenzene and ...

  14. Transportation Statistics Annual Report 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Fenn, M.

    1997-01-01

    This document is the fourth Transportation Statistics Annual Report (TSAR) prepared by the Bureau of Transportation Statistics (BTS) for the President and Congress. As in previous years, it reports on the state of U.S. transportation system at two levels. First, in Part I, it provides a statistical and interpretive survey of the system—its physical characteristics, its economic attributes, aspects of its use and performance, and the scale and severity of unintended consequences of transportation, such as fatalities and injuries, oil import dependency, and environment impacts. Part I also explores the state of transportation statistics, and new needs of the rapidly changing world of transportation. Second, Part II of the report, as in prior years, explores in detail the performance of the U.S. transportation system from the perspective of desired social outcomes or strategic goals. This year, the performance aspect of transportation chosen for thematic treatment is “Mobility and Access,” which complements past TSAR theme sections on “The Economic Performance of Transportation” (1995) and “Transportation and the Environment” (1996). Mobility and access are at the heart of the transportation system’s performance from the user’s perspective. In what ways and to what extent does the geographic freedom provided by transportation enhance personal fulfillment of the nation’s residents and contribute to economic advancement of people and businesses? This broad question underlies many of the topics examined in Part II: What is the current level of personal mobility in the United States, and how does it vary by sex, age, income level, urban or rural location, and over time? What factors explain variations? Has transportation helped improve people’s access to work, shopping, recreational facilities, and medical services, and in what ways and in what locations? How have barriers, such as age, disabilities, or lack of an automobile, affected these

  15. TRANSPORT AND EMPLACEMENT EQUIPMENT DESCRIPTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    NA

    1997-09-29

    The objective and the scope of this document are to list and briefly describe the major mobile equipment necessary for waste package (WP) Transport and Emplacement in the proposed subsurface nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain. Primary performance characteristics and some specialized design features of the equipment are explained and summarized in the individual subsections of this document. The Transport and Emplacement equipment described in this document consists of the following: (1) WP Transporter; (2) Reusable Rail Car; (3) Emplacement Gantry; (4) Gantry Carrier; and (5) Transport Locomotive.

  16. 33 CFR 165.835 - Security Zone; Port of Mobile, Mobile Ship Channel, Mobile, AL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Security Zone; Port of Mobile, Mobile Ship Channel, Mobile, AL. 165.835 Section 165.835 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... § 165.835 Security Zone; Port of Mobile, Mobile Ship Channel, Mobile, AL. (a) Definition. As used...

  17. 33 CFR 165.835 - Security Zone; Port of Mobile, Mobile Ship Channel, Mobile, AL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Security Zone; Port of Mobile, Mobile Ship Channel, Mobile, AL. 165.835 Section 165.835 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... § 165.835 Security Zone; Port of Mobile, Mobile Ship Channel, Mobile, AL. (a) Definition. As used...

  18. 49 CFR 173.5b - Portable and mobile refrigeration systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Portable and mobile refrigeration systems. 173.5b...-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS General § 173.5b Portable and mobile refrigeration... refrigeration systems, which may or may not be permanently mounted to a transport vehicle, used for...

  19. Exciton transport by surface acoustic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudolph, J.; Hey, R.; Santos, P. V.

    2007-05-01

    Long-range acoustic transport of excitons in GaAs quantum wells (QWs) is demonstrated. The mobile strain field of a surface acoustic wave creates a dynamic lateral type I modulation of the conduction and valence bands in a double-quantum-well (DQW) structure. This mobile potential modulation transports long-living indirect excitons in the DQW over several hundreds of μm.

  20. Mobility of Ar+ in CF4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikitovic, Zeljka; Stojanovic, Vladimir; Raspopovic, Zoran; Jovanovic, Jasmina; Petrovic, Zoran Lj.

    2015-09-01

    In this work we present a complete cross section set for Ar+ in CF4 where existing experimentally obtained data are selected and extrapolated. Monte Carlo simulation method is applied to accurately calculate transport parameters in hydrodynamic regime. We discuss new data for Ar+ ions in CF4 where flux and bulk values of reduced mobility are given as a function of E/N (E-electric field, N-gas density). We find that internally resonant exothermic dissociative charge transfer cross section for CF3+production significantly increases zero field ion mobility with respect to the polarization limit.

  1. Emerging needs for mobile nuclear powerplants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, J. L.

    1972-01-01

    Incentives for broadening the present role of civilian nuclear power to include mobile nuclear power plants that are compact, lightweight, and safe are examined. Specifically discussed is the growing importance of: (1) a new international cargo transportation capability, and (2) the capability for development of resources in previously remote regions of the earth including the oceans and the Arctic. This report surveys present and potential systems (vehicles, remote stations, and machines) that would both provide these capabilities and require enough power to justify using mobile nuclear reactor power plants.

  2. ACTS mobile SATCOM experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbe, Brian S.; Frye, Robert E.; Jedrey, Thomas C.

    1993-01-01

    Over the last decade, the demand for reliable mobile satellite communications (satcom) for voice, data, and video applications has increased dramatically. As consumer demand grows, the current spectrum allocation at L-band could become saturated. For this reason, NASA and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory are developing the Advanced Communications Technology Satellites (ACTS) mobile terminal (AMT) and are evaluating the feasibility of K/Ka-band (20/30 GHz) mobile satcom to meet these growing needs. U.S. industry and government, acting as co-partners, will evaluate K/Ka-band mobile satcom and develop new technologies by conducting a series of applications-oriented experiments. The ACTS and the AMT testbed will be used to conduct these mobile satcom experiments. The goals of the ACTS Mobile Experiments Program and the individual experiment configurations and objectives are further presented.

  3. Mobile learning in medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serkan Güllüoüǧlu, Sabri

    2013-03-01

    This paper outlines the main infrastructure for implicating mobile learning in medicine and present a sample mobile learning application for medical learning within the framework of mobile learning systems. Mobile technology is developing nowadays. In this case it will be useful to develop different learning environments using these innovations in internet based distance education. M-learning makes the most of being on location, providing immediate access, being connected, and acknowledges learning that occurs beyond formal learning settings, in places such as the workplace, home, and outdoors. Central to m-learning is the principle that it is the learner who is mobile rather than the device used to deliver m learning. The integration of mobile technologies into training has made learning more accessible and portable. Mobile technologies make it possible for a learner to have access to a computer and subsequently learning material and activities; at any time and in any place. Mobile devices can include: mobile phone, personal digital assistants (PDAs), personal digital media players (eg iPods, MP3 players), portable digital media players, portable digital multimedia players. Mobile learning (m-learning) is particularly important in medical education, and the major users of mobile devices are in the field of medicine. The contexts and environment in which learning occurs necessitates m-learning. Medical students are placed in hospital/clinical settings very early in training and require access to course information and to record and reflect on their experiences while on the move. As a result of this paper, this paper strives to compare and contrast mobile learning with normal learning in medicine from various perspectives and give insights and advises into the essential characteristics of both for sustaining medical education.

  4. Exploring the mobility of mobile phone users

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Csáji, Balázs Cs.; Browet, Arnaud; Traag, V. A.; Delvenne, Jean-Charles; Huens, Etienne; Van Dooren, Paul; Smoreda, Zbigniew; Blondel, Vincent D.

    2013-03-01

    Mobile phone datasets allow for the analysis of human behavior on an unprecedented scale. The social network, temporal dynamics and mobile behavior of mobile phone users have often been analyzed independently from each other using mobile phone datasets. In this article, we explore the connections between various features of human behavior extracted from a large mobile phone dataset. Our observations are based on the analysis of communication data of 100,000 anonymized and randomly chosen individuals in a dataset of communications in Portugal. We show that clustering and principal component analysis allow for a significant dimension reduction with limited loss of information. The most important features are related to geographical location. In particular, we observe that most people spend most of their time at only a few locations. With the help of clustering methods, we then robustly identify home and office locations and compare the results with official census data. Finally, we analyze the geographic spread of users’ frequent locations and show that commuting distances can be reasonably well explained by a gravity model.

  5. Transport numbers in transdermal iontophoresis.

    PubMed

    Mudry, Blaise; Guy, Richard H; Delgado-Charro, M Begoña

    2006-04-15

    Parameters determining ionic transport numbers in transdermal iontophoresis have been characterized. The transport number of an ion (its ability to carry charge) is key to its iontophoretic delivery or extraction across the skin. Using small inorganic ions, the roles of molar fraction and mobility of the co- and counterions present have been demonstrated. A direct, constant current was applied across mammalian skin in vitro. Cations were anodally delivered from either simple M(+)Cl(-) solutions (single-ion case, M(+) = sodium, lithium, ammonium, potassium), or binary and quaternary mixtures thereof. Transport numbers were deduced from ion fluxes. In the single-ion case, maximum cationic fluxes directly related to the corresponding ionic aqueous mobilities were found. Addition of co-ions decreased the transport numbers of all cations relative to the single-ion case, the degree of effect depending upon the molar fraction and mobility of the species involved. With chloride as the principal counterion competing to carry current across the skin (the in vivo situation), a maximum limit on the single or collective cation transport number was 0.6-0.8. Overall, these results demonstrate how current flowing across the skin during transdermal iontophoresis is distributed between competing ions, and establish simple rules with which to optimize transdermal iontophoretic transport.

  6. Colloid mobilization by fluid displacement fronts in channels.

    PubMed

    Lazouskaya, Volha; Wang, Lian-Ping; Or, Dani; Wang, Gang; Caplan, Jeffrey L; Jin, Yan

    2013-09-15

    Understanding colloid mobilization during transient flow in soil is important for addressing colloid and contaminant transport issues. While theoretical descriptions of colloid detachment exist for saturated systems, corresponding mechanisms of colloid mobilization during drainage and imbibition have not been considered in detail. In this work, theoretical force and torque analyses were performed to examine the interactive effects of adhesion, drag, friction, and surface tension forces on colloid mobilization and to outline conditions corresponding to the mobilization mechanisms such as lifting, sliding, and rolling. Colloid and substrate contact angles were used as variables to determine theoretical criteria for colloid mobilization mechanisms during drainage and imbibition. Experimental mobilization of hydrophilic and hydrophobic microspheres with drainage and imbibition fronts was investigated in hydrophilic and hydrophobic channels using a confocal microscope. Colloid mobilization differed between drainage and imbibition due to different dynamic contact angles and interfacial geometries on the contact line. Experimental results did not fully follow the theoretical criteria in all cases, which was explained with additional factors not included in the theory such as presence of aggregates and trailing films. Theoretical force and torque analyses resulted in similar mobilization predictions and suggested that all mobilization mechanisms contributed to the observed colloid mobilization.

  7. Reconfigurable mobile manipulation for accident response

    SciTech Connect

    ANDERSON,ROBERT J.; MORSE,WILLIAM D.; SHIREY,DAVID L.; CDEBACA,DANIEL M.; HOFFMAN JR.,JOHN P.; LUCY,WILLIAM E.

    2000-06-06

    The need for a telerobotic vehicle with hazard sensing and integral manipulation capabilities has been identified for use in transportation accidents where nuclear weapons are involved. The Accident Response Mobile Manipulation System (ARMMS) platform has been developed to provide remote dexterous manipulation and hazard sensing for the Accident Response Group (ARG) at Sandia National Laboratories. The ARMMS' mobility platform is a military HMMWV [High Mobility Multipurpose Wheeled Vehicle] that is teleoperated over RF or Fiber Optic communication channels. ARMMS is equipped with two high strength Schilling Titan II manipulators and a suite of hazardous gas and radiation sensors. Recently, a modular telerobotic control architecture call SMART (Sandia Modular Architecture for Robotic and Teleoperation) has been applied to ARMMS. SMART enables input devices and many system behaviors to be rapidly configured in the field for specific mission needs. This paper summarizes current SMART developments applied to ARMMS.

  8. Mobile Spectroscopic Instrumentation in Archaeometry Research.

    PubMed

    Vandenabeele, Peter; Donais, Mary Kate

    2016-01-01

    Mobile instrumentation is of growing importance to archaeometry research. Equipment is utilized in the field or at museums, thus avoiding transportation or risk of damage to valuable artifacts. Many spectroscopic techniques are nondestructive and micro-destructive in nature, which preserves the cultural heritage objects themselves. This review includes over 160 references pertaining to the use of mobile spectroscopy for archaeometry. Following a discussion of terminology related to mobile instrumental methods, results of a literature survey on their applications for cultural heritage objects is presented. Sections devoted to specific techniques are then provided: Raman spectroscopy, X-ray fluorescence spectrometry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy, and less frequently used techniques. The review closes with a discussion of combined instrumental approaches.

  9. NATO-Warsaw Pact. Force mobilization

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, J.

    1988-01-01

    Recent demographic and economic trends present mobilization problems for both the North Atlantic Treaty Organization and the Warsaw Pact. When the United States and the Soviet Union agreed to rid Europe of intermediate-range nuclear weapons, their agreement increased the emphasis on conventional force balances-thus creating anew strains within and between the alliances. These developments make the time ripe for a comprehensive study of NATO and Warsaw Pact capabilities to mobilize their conventional forces. This book draws upon essays prepared for the NATO-Warsaw Pact conference. In these essays, Us and European specialists discuss developments and vulnerabilities in the blocs. They address four issues: (1) mobilization and reinforcement, (2) developments in front-line states, (3) communications and transportation problems, and (4) difficulties on the flanks. These individual studies and the book as a whole represent the most current and thorough examination of NATO-Warsaw Pact capabilities available today.

  10. Mobility control agent

    SciTech Connect

    Argabright, P.A.; Phillips, B.L.; Rhudy, J.S.

    1983-05-17

    Polymer mobility control agents useful in supplemental oil recovery processes, which give improved reciprocal relative mobilities, are prepared by initiating the polymerization of a monomer containing a vinyl group with a catalyst comprising a persulfate and ferrous ammonium sulfate. The vinyl monomer is an acrylyl, a vinyl cyanide, a styryl and water soluble salts thereof.

  11. Mobile Apps for Librarians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Power, June L.

    2013-01-01

    In an increasing mobile environment, library and reading-related activities often take place on a phone or tablet device. Not only does this mean that library Web sites must keep mobile navigability in mind, but also develop and utilize apps that allow patrons to interact with information and with libraries. While apps do not serve every purpose,…

  12. Mobile Learning Anytime, Anywhere

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hlodan, Oksana

    2010-01-01

    Some educational institutions are taking the leap to mobile learning (m-learning) by giving out free iPods. For example, Abilene Christian University gave iPods or iPhones to freshman students and developed 15 Web applications specifically for the mobile devices. The iPod is not the only ubiquitous m-learning device. Any technology that connects…

  13. Mastering Mobile Security

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Panettieri, Joseph C.

    2007-01-01

    Without proper security, mobile devices are easy targets for worms, viruses, and so-called robot ("bot") networks. Hackers increasingly use bot networks to launch massive attacks against eCommerce websites--potentially targeting one's online tuition payment or fundraising/financial development systems. How can one defend his mobile systems against…

  14. Mobility and Reading Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waters, Theresa Z.

    A study examined the effect of geographic mobility on elementary school students' achievement. Although such mobility, which requires students to make multiple moves among schools, can have a negative impact on academic achievement, the hypothesis for the study was that it was not a determining factor in reading achievement test scores. Subjects…

  15. Mobile Goes Mainstream

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eisele-Dyrli, Kurt

    2011-01-01

    Mobile learning--the use of mobile devices for educational purposes by students--is rapidly moving from an experimental initiative by a few innovative districts over the last five years to a broadly accepted concept in K12. The latest research and surveys, results of pilot programs, and analysis of trends in both public education and the broader…

  16. Conformation sensitive charge transport in conjugated polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Mattias Andersson, L.; Hedström, Svante; Persson, Petter

    2013-11-18

    Temperature dependent charge carrier mobility measurements using field effect transistors and density functional theory calculations are combined to show how the conformation dependent frontier orbital delocalization influences the hole- and electron mobilities in a donor-acceptor based polymer. A conformationally sensitive lowest unoccupied molecular orbital results in an electron mobility that decreases with increasing temperature above room temperature, while a conformationally stable highest occupied molecular orbital is consistent with a conventional hole mobility behavior and also proposed to be one of the reasons for why the material works well as a hole transporter in amorphous bulk heterojunction solar cells.

  17. Radiation Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Urbatsch, Todd James

    2015-06-15

    We present an overview of radiation transport, covering terminology, blackbody raditation, opacities, Boltzmann transport theory, approximations to the transport equation. Next we introduce several transport methods. We present a section on Caseology, observing transport boundary layers. We briefly broach topics of software development, including verification and validation, and we close with a section on high energy-density experiments that highlight and support radiation transport.

  18. [Cognition and mobility].

    PubMed

    Bridenbaugh, Stephanie A

    2015-04-01

    Felix Platter Hospital, University Center for Medicine of Aging, Basel, Switzerland; There is a strong association between cognition and mobility. Older adults with gait deficits have an increased risk of developing cognitive deficits, even dementia. Cognitive deficits, on the other hand, are associated with worsening gait. Cognitive as well as mobility deficits are associated with an increased fall risk. Assessments of cognition, particularly the executive functions, and functional mobility should therefore be an integral part of every comprehensive geriatric assessment. Some quick screening tests for mobility disorders can be performed in a clinical praxis. If those assessments provide pathological results, then consider patient referral for an in-depth gait analysis. Gait analyses that utilize dual task paradigms (walking and simultaneously performing a second task) are particularly meaningful for early detection of mobility and cognitive deficits. Early detection permits timely implementation of targeted interventions to improve gait and brain function. PMID:25791044

  19. BACTERIAL TRANSPORT THROUGH HOMOGENEOUS SOIL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The transport of microorganisms in soils is of major importance for bioremediation of subsurface polluted zones and for pollution of groundwater with pathogens. A procedure for evaluating the relative mobility and recovery of bacteria in the soil matrix was developed. In the meth...

  20. Road Transport Industry Training Board

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Industrial Training International, 1975

    1975-01-01

    The Road Transport Industry Training Board has recognized that manpower planning was the key to estimating the industry's training needs. The effective training methods discussed are: management training, Group Training Associations, apprentice training, direct training, and mobile-training service. (Author/BP)

  1. Gone Mobile? (Mobile Libraries Survey 2010)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Lisa Carlucci

    2010-01-01

    Librarians, like patrons and researchers, are caught between traditional library service models and the promise of evolving information technologies. In recent years, professional conferences have strategically featured programs and presentations geared toward building a mobile agenda and adapting or adopting services to meet new demands of mobile…

  2. Natural organic matter enhanced mobility of nano zerovalent iron.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Richard L; Johnson, Graham O'Brien; Nurmi, James T; Tratnyek, Paul G

    2009-07-15

    Column studies showed that the mobility of nanometer-sized zerovalent iron (nZVI) through granular media is greatly increased in the presence of natural organic matter (NOM). At NOM concentrations of 20 mg/L or greater, the nZVI was highly mobile during transport experiments in 0.15-m long columns packed with medium sand. Below 20 mg/L NOM, mobility of the nZVI was less; however, even at 2 mg/L the nZVI showed significantly increased mobility compared to the no-NOM case. Spectrophotometric and aggregation studies of nZVI suspensions in the presence of NOM suggest that sorption of the NOM onto the nZVI, resulting in a reduced sticking coefficient, may be the primary mechanism of enhanced mobility. Modeling the mobility of nZVI in porous media with filtration theory is challenging, but calibration of a simple model with experimental results from the column experiments reported here allows simulation of transport distances during injection. The simulation results show that the increased mobility due to NOM combined with the decrease in mobility due to decreased velocity with distance from an injection well could produce an injection zone that is wide enough to be useful for remediation but small enough to avoid reaching unwanted receptors. PMID:19708381

  3. FACILITATED TRANSPORT OF INORGANIC CONTAMINANTS IN GROUNDWATER: PART II. COLLOIDAL TRANSPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This project consisted of both field and laboratory components. Field studies evaluated routine sampling procedures for determination of aqueous inorganicgeochemistry and assessment of contaminant transport by colloidal mobility. Research at three different metal-contaminated sit...

  4. Ambipolar acoustic transport in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barros, A. D.; Batista, P. D.; Tahraoui, A.; Diniz, J. A.; Santos, P. V.

    2012-07-01

    We have investigated the ambipolar transport of electrons and holes by electrically generated surface acoustic waves (SAWs) on silicon wafers coated with a piezoelectric ZnO film. The transport experiments were carried out by using a focused laser beam to optically excite carriers. The carriers are then captured by the moving SAW piezoelectric field and then transported towards a lateral p-i-n junction, where they are electrically detected. The piezoelectric modulation modifies the current vs. voltage characteristics of the lateral p-i-n junction. This behavior is accounted for by a simple model for the change of the junction potential by the SAW fields. We demonstrate that electrons and holes can be acoustically transported over distances approaching 100 μm, the transport efficiency being limited by the low mobility of holes in the material. These results open the way for silicon-based acousto-electric devices using ambipolar transport such as photo-detectors and solar cells.

  5. Adapting End Host Congestion Control for Mobility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eddy, Wesley M.; Swami, Yogesh P.

    2005-01-01

    Network layer mobility allows transport protocols to maintain connection state, despite changes in a node's physical location and point of network connectivity. However, some congestion-controlled transport protocols are not designed to deal with these rapid and potentially significant path changes. In this paper we demonstrate several distinct problems that mobility-induced path changes can create for TCP performance. Our premise is that mobility events indicate path changes that require re-initialization of congestion control state at both connection end points. We present the application of this idea to TCP in the form of a simple solution (the Lightweight Mobility Detection and Response algorithm, that has been proposed in the IETF), and examine its effectiveness. In general, we find that the deficiencies presented are both relatively easily and painlessly fixed using this solution. We also find that this solution has the counter-intuitive property of being both more friendly to competing traffic, and simultaneously more aggressive in utilizing newly available capacity than unmodified TCP.

  6. Charge carrier mobility in hybrid halide perovskites

    PubMed Central

    Motta, Carlo; El-Mellouhi, Fedwa; Sanvito, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    The charge transport properties of hybrid halide perovskites are investigated with a combination of density functional theory including van der Waals interaction and the Boltzmann theory for diffusive transport in the relaxation time approximation. We find the mobility of electrons to be in the range 5–10 cm2V−1s−1 and that for holes within 1–5 cm2V−1s−1, where the variations depend on the crystal structure investigated and the level of doping. Such results, in good agreement with recent experiments, set the relaxation time to about 1 ps, which is the time-scale for the molecular rotation at room temperature. For the room temperature tetragonal phase we explore two possible orientations of the organic cations and find that the mobility has a significant asymmetry depending on the direction of the current with respect to the molecular axis. This is due mostly to the way the PbI3 octahedral symmetry is broken. Interestingly we find that substituting I with Cl has minor effects on the mobilities. Our analysis suggests that the carrier mobility is probably not a key factor in determining the high solar-harvesting efficiency of this class of materials. PMID:26235910

  7. Chamber transport

    SciTech Connect

    OLSON,CRAIG L.

    2000-05-17

    Heavy ion beam transport through the containment chamber plays a crucial role in all heavy ion fusion (HIF) scenarios. Here, several parameters are used to characterize the operating space for HIF beams; transport modes are assessed in relation to evolving target/accelerator requirements; results of recent relevant experiments and simulations of HIF transport are summarized; and relevant instabilities are reviewed. All transport options still exist, including (1) vacuum ballistic transport, (2) neutralized ballistic transport, and (3) channel-like transport. Presently, the European HIF program favors vacuum ballistic transport, while the US HIF program favors neutralized ballistic transport with channel-like transport as an alternate approach. Further transport research is needed to clearly guide selection of the most attractive, integrated HIF system.

  8. Limits of social mobilization.

    PubMed

    Rutherford, Alex; Cebrian, Manuel; Dsouza, Sohan; Moro, Esteban; Pentland, Alex; Rahwan, Iyad

    2013-04-16

    The Internet and social media have enabled the mobilization of large crowds to achieve time-critical feats, ranging from mapping crises in real time, to organizing mass rallies, to conducting search-and-rescue operations over large geographies. Despite significant success, selection bias may lead to inflated expectations of the efficacy of social mobilization for these tasks. What are the limits of social mobilization, and how reliable is it in operating at these limits? We build on recent results on the spatiotemporal structure of social and information networks to elucidate the constraints they pose on social mobilization. We use the DARPA Network Challenge as our working scenario, in which social media were used to locate 10 balloons across the United States. We conduct high-resolution simulations for referral-based crowdsourcing and obtain a statistical characterization of the population recruited, geography covered, and time to completion. Our results demonstrate that the outcome is plausible without the presence of mass media but lies at the limit of what time-critical social mobilization can achieve. Success relies critically on highly connected individuals willing to mobilize people in distant locations, overcoming the local trapping of diffusion in highly dense areas. However, even under these highly favorable conditions, the risk of unsuccessful search remains significant. These findings have implications for the design of better incentive schemes for social mobilization. They also call for caution in estimating the reliability of this capability. PMID:23576719

  9. Limits of social mobilization.

    PubMed

    Rutherford, Alex; Cebrian, Manuel; Dsouza, Sohan; Moro, Esteban; Pentland, Alex; Rahwan, Iyad

    2013-04-16

    The Internet and social media have enabled the mobilization of large crowds to achieve time-critical feats, ranging from mapping crises in real time, to organizing mass rallies, to conducting search-and-rescue operations over large geographies. Despite significant success, selection bias may lead to inflated expectations of the efficacy of social mobilization for these tasks. What are the limits of social mobilization, and how reliable is it in operating at these limits? We build on recent results on the spatiotemporal structure of social and information networks to elucidate the constraints they pose on social mobilization. We use the DARPA Network Challenge as our working scenario, in which social media were used to locate 10 balloons across the United States. We conduct high-resolution simulations for referral-based crowdsourcing and obtain a statistical characterization of the population recruited, geography covered, and time to completion. Our results demonstrate that the outcome is plausible without the presence of mass media but lies at the limit of what time-critical social mobilization can achieve. Success relies critically on highly connected individuals willing to mobilize people in distant locations, overcoming the local trapping of diffusion in highly dense areas. However, even under these highly favorable conditions, the risk of unsuccessful search remains significant. These findings have implications for the design of better incentive schemes for social mobilization. They also call for caution in estimating the reliability of this capability.

  10. Mobile sensing systems.

    PubMed

    Macias, Elsa; Suarez, Alvaro; Lloret, Jaime

    2013-12-16

    Rich-sensor smart phones have made possible the recent birth of the mobile sensing research area as part of ubiquitous sensing which integrates other areas such as wireless sensor networks and web sensing. There are several types of mobile sensing: individual, participatory, opportunistic, crowd, social, etc. The object of sensing can be people-centered or environment-centered. The sensing domain can be home, urban, vehicular… Currently there are barriers that limit the social acceptance of mobile sensing systems. Examples of social barriers are privacy concerns, restrictive laws in some countries and the absence of economic incentives that might encourage people to participate in a sensing campaign. Several technical barriers are phone energy savings and the variety of sensors and software for their management. Some existing surveys partially tackle the topic of mobile sensing systems. Published papers theoretically or partially solve the above barriers. We complete the above surveys with new works, review the barriers of mobile sensing systems and propose some ideas for efficiently implementing sensing, fusion, learning, security, privacy and energy saving for any type of mobile sensing system, and propose several realistic research challenges. The main objective is to reduce the learning curve in mobile sensing systems where the complexity is very high.

  11. Mobile Sensing Systems

    PubMed Central

    Macias, Elsa; Suarez, Alvaro; Lloret, Jaime

    2013-01-01

    Rich-sensor smart phones have made possible the recent birth of the mobile sensing research area as part of ubiquitous sensing which integrates other areas such as wireless sensor networks and web sensing. There are several types of mobile sensing: individual, participatory, opportunistic, crowd, social, etc. The object of sensing can be people-centered or environment-centered. The sensing domain can be home, urban, vehicular… Currently there are barriers that limit the social acceptance of mobile sensing systems. Examples of social barriers are privacy concerns, restrictive laws in some countries and the absence of economic incentives that might encourage people to participate in a sensing campaign. Several technical barriers are phone energy savings and the variety of sensors and software for their management. Some existing surveys partially tackle the topic of mobile sensing systems. Published papers theoretically or partially solve the above barriers. We complete the above surveys with new works, review the barriers of mobile sensing systems and propose some ideas for efficiently implementing sensing, fusion, learning, security, privacy and energy saving for any type of mobile sensing system, and propose several realistic research challenges. The main objective is to reduce the learning curve in mobile sensing systems where the complexity is very high. PMID:24351637

  12. Limits of social mobilization

    PubMed Central

    Rutherford, Alex; Cebrian, Manuel; Dsouza, Sohan; Moro, Esteban; Pentland, Alex; Rahwan, Iyad

    2013-01-01

    The Internet and social media have enabled the mobilization of large crowds to achieve time-critical feats, ranging from mapping crises in real time, to organizing mass rallies, to conducting search-and-rescue operations over large geographies. Despite significant success, selection bias may lead to inflated expectations of the efficacy of social mobilization for these tasks. What are the limits of social mobilization, and how reliable is it in operating at these limits? We build on recent results on the spatiotemporal structure of social and information networks to elucidate the constraints they pose on social mobilization. We use the DARPA Network Challenge as our working scenario, in which social media were used to locate 10 balloons across the United States. We conduct high-resolution simulations for referral-based crowdsourcing and obtain a statistical characterization of the population recruited, geography covered, and time to completion. Our results demonstrate that the outcome is plausible without the presence of mass media but lies at the limit of what time-critical social mobilization can achieve. Success relies critically on highly connected individuals willing to mobilize people in distant locations, overcoming the local trapping of diffusion in highly dense areas. However, even under these highly favorable conditions, the risk of unsuccessful search remains significant. These findings have implications for the design of better incentive schemes for social mobilization. They also call for caution in estimating the reliability of this capability. PMID:23576719

  13. Mobile sensing systems.

    PubMed

    Macias, Elsa; Suarez, Alvaro; Lloret, Jaime

    2013-01-01

    Rich-sensor smart phones have made possible the recent birth of the mobile sensing research area as part of ubiquitous sensing which integrates other areas such as wireless sensor networks and web sensing. There are several types of mobile sensing: individual, participatory, opportunistic, crowd, social, etc. The object of sensing can be people-centered or environment-centered. The sensing domain can be home, urban, vehicular… Currently there are barriers that limit the social acceptance of mobile sensing systems. Examples of social barriers are privacy concerns, restrictive laws in some countries and the absence of economic incentives that might encourage people to participate in a sensing campaign. Several technical barriers are phone energy savings and the variety of sensors and software for their management. Some existing surveys partially tackle the topic of mobile sensing systems. Published papers theoretically or partially solve the above barriers. We complete the above surveys with new works, review the barriers of mobile sensing systems and propose some ideas for efficiently implementing sensing, fusion, learning, security, privacy and energy saving for any type of mobile sensing system, and propose several realistic research challenges. The main objective is to reduce the learning curve in mobile sensing systems where the complexity is very high. PMID:24351637

  14. Displays enabling mobile multimedia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimmel, Jyrki

    2007-02-01

    With the rapid advances in telecommunications networks, mobile multimedia delivery to handsets is now a reality. While a truly immersive multimedia experience is still far ahead in the mobile world, significant advances have been made in the constituent audio-visual technologies to make this become possible. One of the critical components in multimedia delivery is the mobile handset display. While such alternatives as headset-style near-to-eye displays, autostereoscopic displays, mini-projectors, and roll-out flexible displays can deliver either a larger virtual screen size than the pocketable dimensions of the mobile device can offer, or an added degree of immersion by adding the illusion of the third dimension in the viewing experience, there are still challenges in the full deployment of such displays in real-life mobile communication terminals. Meanwhile, direct-view display technologies have developed steadily, and can provide a development platform for an even better viewing experience for multimedia in the near future. The paper presents an overview of the mobile display technology space with an emphasis on the advances and potential in developing direct-view displays further to meet the goal of enabling multimedia in the mobile domain.

  15. Land mobile services of Inmarsat.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, J.-C.

    1991-04-01

    Inmarsat is the sole satellite organization with global L-band capacity uniquely placed to serve all areas of the world and quickly develop potential markets for land mobile services. The Standard-A system is currently in use, with terminals mounted either in vehicles or moved from one site to another in transportable configurations. Attention is given to the way these terminals provide fax, telex, voice and voice-band data connections with the international public switched networks. An enhanced Standard-C system for messaging and data communications, having a small omnidirectional antenna that can be mounted in any ground vehicle to provide general two-way messaging or automatic position reporting, is presented.

  16. Mobile Energy Laboratory Use Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-04-01

    This document provides a framework for the use of four Mobile Energy Laboratories (MELs) by federal agencies. These laboratories are made available by the US Department of Energy Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) to measure and analyze the efficiency of on-site energy conversion, distribution, and end-use application. The MELs are customized passenger buses converted to provide transportation and storage of sophisticated energy monitoring, auditing, and analysis equipment. The MELs also provide mobile work space for specially trained engineers and technicians. One MEL is currently assigned to each of the following agencies: Department of the Army, Department of the Air Force, Department of the Navy, and Department of Energy. Experience over the past five years has indicated the need for centralized MEL administration, application scheduling, test procedure development, user training, and technical oversight. This need is evidenced by increasing requests for MEL use and the economies available by having trained full-time MEL operators and near continuous MEL operation. Other evidence suggests that a regional, rather than Departmental, administration can reduce the costs of MEL relocation.

  17. Mobile remote manipulator vehicle system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bush, Harold G. (Inventor); Mikulas, Martin M., Jr. (Inventor); Wallsom, Richard E. (Inventor); Jensen, J. Kermit (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A mobile remote manipulator system is disclosed for assembly, repair and logistics transport on, around and about a space station square bay truss structure. The vehicle is supported by a square track arrangement supported by guide pins integral with the space station truss structure and located at each truss node. Propulsion is provided by a central push-pull drive mechanism that extends out from the vehicle one full structural bay over the truss and locks drive rods into the guide pins. The draw bar is now retracted and the mobile remote manipulator system is pulled onto the next adjacent structural bay. Thus, translation of the vehicle is inchworm style. The drive bar can be locked onto two guide pins while the extendable draw bar is within the vehicle and then push the vehicle away one bay providing bidirectional push-pull drive. The track switches allow the vehicle to travel in two orthogonal directions over the truss structure which coupled with the bidirectional drive, allow movement in four directions on one plane. The top layer of this trilayered vehicle is a logistics platform. This platform is capable of 369 degees of rotation and will have two astronaut foot restraint platforms and a space crane integral.

  18. Mobile sociology. 2000.

    PubMed

    Urry, John

    2010-01-01

    This article seeks to develop a manifesto for a sociology concerned with the diverse mobilities of peoples, objects, images, information, and wastes; and of the complex interdependencies between, and social consequences of, such diverse mobilities. A number of key concepts relevant for such a sociology are elaborated: 'gamekeeping', networks, fluids, scapes, flows, complexity and iteration. The article concludes by suggesting that a 'global civil society' might constitute the social base of a sociology of mobilities as we move into the twenty-first century.

  19. Transport proteins.

    PubMed

    Thatcher, Jack D

    2013-04-16

    This Teaching Resource provides and describes two animated lessons that illustrate general properties of transport proteins. The lesson called "transport protein classes" depicts major classes and subclasses of transport proteins. The "transporters, mechanism of action" lesson explains how transporters and P class ATPase (adenosine triphosphatase) pumps function. These animations serve as valuable resources for any collegiate-level course that describes these important factors. Courses that might use them include introductory biology, biochemistry, cell biology, physiology, and biophysics.

  20. AUSSAT mobile satellite services

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nowland, Wayne L.; Wagg, Michael; Simpson, Daniel

    1988-01-01

    An overview of AUSSAT's planned mobile satellite system is given. The development program which is being undertaken to achieve the 1992 service date is described. Both business and technical aspects of the development program are addressed.

  1. Understanding Mobile Apps

    MedlinePlus

    ... a device, you’re committed to using the operating system and the type of apps that go with it. The Android, Apple, Microsoft and BlackBerry mobile operating systems have app stores online where you can look ...

  2. Persuasive Mobile Health Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia Wylie, Carlos; Coulton, Paul

    With many industrialized societies bearing the cost of an increasingly sedentary lifestyle on the health of their populations there is a need to find new ways of encouraging physical activity to promote better health and well being. With the increasing power of mobile phones and the recent emergence of personal heart rate monitors, aimed at dedicated amateur runners, there is now a possibility to develop “Persuasive Mobile Health Applications” to promote well being through the use of real-time physiological data and persuade users to adopt a healthier lifestyle. In this paper we present a novel general health monitoring software for mobile phones called Heart Angel. This software is aimed at helping users monitor, record, as well as improve their fitness level through built-in cardio-respiratory tests, a location tracking application for analyzing heart rate exertion over time and location, and a fun mobile-exergame called Health Defender.

  3. Monitoring and evaluation of rowing performance using mobile mapping data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mpimis, A.; Gikas, V.

    2011-12-01

    Traditionally, the term mobile mapping refers to a means of collecting geospatial data using mapping sensors that are mounted on a mobile platform. Historically, this process was mainly driven by the need for highway infrastructure mapping and transportation corridor inventories. However, the recent advances in mapping sensor and telecommunication technologies create the opportunity that, completely new, emergent application areas of mobile mapping to evolve rapidly. This article examines the potential of mobile mapping technology (MMT) in sports science and in particular in competitive rowing. Notably, in this study the concept definition of mobile mapping somehow differs from the traditional one in a way that, the end result is not relevant to the geospatial information acquired as the moving platform travels in space. In contrast, the interest is placed on the moving platform (rowing boat) itself and on the various subsystems which are also in continuous motion.

  4. Mobile multiple access study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Multiple access techniques (FDMA, CDMA, TDMA) for the mobile user and attempts to identify the current best technique are discussed. Traffic loading is considered as well as voice and data modulation and spacecraft and system design. Emphasis is placed on developing mobile terminal cost estimates for the selected design. In addition, design examples are presented for the alternative techniques of multiple access in order to compare with the selected technique.

  5. 41 CFR 302-10.204 - What costs are allowed for preparing a mobile home for shipment?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., and sealing each section for movement; (d) Reassembling the two halves of a double-wide mobile home... for preparing a mobile home for shipment? 302-10.204 Section 302-10.204 Public Contracts and Property...-ALLOWANCES FOR TRANSPORTATION OF MOBILE HOMES AND BOATS USED AS A PRIMARY RESIDENCE Computation of...

  6. 41 CFR 302-10.204 - What costs are allowed for preparing a mobile home for shipment?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., and sealing each section for movement; (d) Reassembling the two halves of a double-wide mobile home... for preparing a mobile home for shipment? 302-10.204 Section 302-10.204 Public Contracts and Property...-ALLOWANCES FOR TRANSPORTATION OF MOBILE HOMES AND BOATS USED AS A PRIMARY RESIDENCE Computation of...

  7. Establishing reference condition for streambed mobility: Quantifying the effect of form roughness from stream habitat survey data

    EPA Science Inventory

    The size and mobility of streambed particles are sensitive to changes in the balance between sediment supply and transport. Therefore, changes in mobility can be an indicator of natural or anthropogenic alterations in this balance. Predictions of the critical diameter for mobil...

  8. Libraries and the Mobile Web

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanson, Cody

    2011-01-01

    In 2011, cell phones and mobile devices are ubiquitous. The vast majority of Americans now own cell phones, and over half of them have mobile access to the Internet through a phone or other mobile device. For libraries to stay relevant, they must be able to offer content and services through the mobile web. In this issue of "Library Technology…

  9. Mobility. Snapshot Report, Fall 2011

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Student Clearinghouse, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents information on student mobility for 2011. It offers data on the following: (1) Mobility Rates by Student Enrollment Status; (2) Mobile Student Enrollment at 2-/4-Year Institutions; and (3) Mobile Student Enrollment at Public/Private Institutions.

  10. First-Principles Prediction of the Charge Mobility in Black Phosphorus Semiconductor Nanoribbons.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Jin; Long, Mengqiu; Zhang, Xiaojiao; Zhang, Dan; Xu, Hui; Chan, Kwok Sum

    2015-10-15

    We have investigated the electronic structure and carrier mobility of monolayer black phosphorus nanoribbons (BPNRs) using density functional theory combined with Boltzmann transport method with relaxation time approximation. It is shown that the calculated ultrahigh electron mobility can even reach the order of 10(3) to 10(7) cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) at room temperature. Owing to the electron mobility being higher than the hole mobility, armchair and diagonal BPNRs behave like n-type semiconductors. Comparing with the bare BPNRs, the difference between the hole and electronic mobilities can be enhanced in ribbons with the edges terminated by H atoms. Moreover, because the hole mobility is about two orders of magnitude larger than the electron mobility, zigzag BPNRs with H termination behave like p-type semiconductors. Our results indicate that BPNRs can be considered as a new kind of nanomaterial for applications in optoelectronics, nanoelectronic devices owing to the intrinsic band gap and ultrahigh charge mobility.

  11. Estimating mobile source pollutant emission: Methodological comparison and planning implications.

    PubMed

    Kim, T J; Hoskote, N G

    1983-03-01

    In the United States, the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1977 require that all non-attainment metropolitan areas evaluate the potential of transportation controls in meeting 1982 National Ambient Air Quality Standards. Many of these controls are designed to impact on mobile source emissions by altering vehicular speed.The paper discusses differences in results obtained by two alternative methods for estimating the same area's mobile source emissions. The findings suggest that alternative zonal speed aggregation procedures can lead to widely diverging emission estimates. The paper further discusses the inherent assumptions in the aggregation procedures and the potential consequences of their uses in transportation planning for air quality controls.

  12. Theoretical interpretation of the electron mobility behavior in InAs nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Marin, E. G. Ruiz, F. G. Godoy, A.; Tienda-Luna, I. M.; Martínez-Blanque, C.; Gámiz, F.

    2014-11-07

    This work studies the electron mobility in InAs nanowires (NWs), by solving the Boltzmann Transport Equation under the Momentum Relaxation Time approximation. The numerical solver takes into account the contribution of the main scattering mechanisms present in III-V compound semiconductors. It is validated against experimental field effect-mobility results, showing a very good agreement. The mobility dependence on the nanowire diameter and carrier density is analyzed. It is found that surface roughness and polar optical phonons are the scattering mechanisms that mainly limit the mobility behavior. Finally, we explain the origin of the oscillations observed in the mobility of small NWs at high electric fields.

  13. The MSAT spacecraft of Telesat Mobile Inc.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertenyi, E.

    The MSAT spacecraft of the Canadian mobile satellite operator, Telesat Mobile Inc. (TMI) is described. When launched in 1994, the large geostationary MSAT spacecraft which is currently under construction by Hughes Aircraft Co. and Spar Aerospace Ltd. will enable TMI to provide mobile and transportable communications services to its customers even in the most remote parts of the North American continent. The main elements of TMI's mobile satellite system (described in a companion paper) are the space segment and the ground segment. TMI's space segment will employ one of two nearly identical satellites, one of which will be owned and operated by TMI, the other by the U.S. mobile satellite operator, American Mobile Satellite Corporation (AMSC). The two companies are participating in a joint spacecraft procurement in order to reduce the nonrecurring costs and to ensure system compatibility between the two systems; and they have also agreed to provide in-orbit backup to each other in the event of a catastrophic satellite failure. The program status, performance requirements, main parameters, and configuration of the MSAT spacecraft are reviewed. The major features of the communications subsystem are discussed in some detail, and a brief summary is presented of the spacecraft service module. Key technology items include the L-band RF power amplifier, which must operate with a high DC to RF power efficiency and generate low intermodulation when loaded with multi-carrier signals; and the large diameter deployable L-band antenna. The development status and expected performance of these spacecraft components is examined.

  14. The mobile Water vapor Aerosol Raman LIdar and its implication in the framework of the HyMeX and ChArMEx programs: application to a dust transport process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chazette, P.; Marnas, F.; Totems, J.

    2014-06-01

    The increasing importance of the coupling of water and aerosol cycles in environmental applications requires observation tools that allow simultaneous measurements of these two fundamental processes for climatological and meteorological studies. For this purpose, a new mobile Raman lidar, WALI (Water vapor and Aerosol LIdar), has been developed and implemented within the framework of the international HyMeX and ChArMEx programs. This paper presents the key properties of this new device and its first applications to scientific studies. The lidar uses an eye-safe emission in the ultraviolet range at 354.7 nm and a set of compact refractive receiving telescopes. Cross-comparisons between rawinsoundings performed from balloon or aircraft and lidar measurements have shown a good agreement in the derived water vapor mixing ratio (WVMR). The discrepancies are generally less than 0.5 g kg-1 and therefore within the error bars of the respective instruments. A detailed study of the uncertainty of the WVMR retrieval was conducted and shows values between 7 and 11%, which is largely constrained by the quality of the lidar calibration. It also proves that the lidar is able to measure the WVMR during daytime over a range of about 1 km. In addition the WALI system provides measurements of aerosol optical properties such as the lidar ratio (LR) or the particulate depolarization ratio (PDR). An important example of scientific application addressing the main objectives of the HyMeX and ChArMEx programs is then presented, following an event of desert dust aerosols over the Balearic Islands in October 2012. This dust intrusion may have had a significant impact on the intense precipitations that occurred over southwestern France and the Spanish Mediterranean coasts. During this event, the LR and PDR values obtained are in the ranges of ~45-63 ± 6 and 0.10-0.19 ± 0.01 sr, respectively, which is representative of dust aerosols. The dust layers are also shown to be associated with

  15. The mobile Water vapor Aerosol Raman LIdar and its implication in the frame of the HyMeX and ChArMEx programs: application to a dust transport process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chazette, P.; Marnas, F.; Totems, J.

    2013-12-01

    The increasing importance of the coupling of water and aerosol cycles in environmental applications requires observation tools which allow simultaneous measurements of these two fundamental processes for climatological and meteorological studies. In this purpose, a new mobile Raman lidar, WALI (Water vapor and Aerosol LIDAR), has been developed and implemented within the framework of the international HyMeX/IODA-MED and ChArMEx programs. This paper presents the key properties of this new device and its first applications to scientific studies. The lidar uses an eye-safe emission in the ultra-violet range at 354.7 nm and a set of compact refractive receptors. Cross-comparisons between rawindsoundings performed from balloon or aircraft and lidar measurements have shown a good agreement in the derived water vapor mixing ratio (WVMR). The discrepancies are generally less than 0.5 g kg-1 and therefore within the error bars of the instruments. A detailed study of the uncertainties was conducted and shows a 7 to 11% accuracy of the WVMR retrieval, which is largely constrained by the quality of the calibration. It also proves that the lidar is able to measure the WVMR during the day over a range of about 1 km. The WALI system otherwise provides measurements of aerosol optical properties such as the lidar ratio (LR) or the particulate depolarization ratio (PDR). An important example of scientific application addressing the main objectives of the HyMeX and ChArMEx programs is then presented, following an event of desert dust aerosols over the Balearic Islands. This dust intrusion may have had a significant impact on the intense precipitations that occurred over southwestern France and the Spanish Mediterranean coasts. During this event, the LR and PDR values obtained are in the ranges of ~ 45-63 ± 6 sr and 0.1-0.19 ± 0.01, respectively, which is representative of dust aerosols. The dust layers are also shown to be associated with significant WVMR, i.e. between 4 and 6.7 g

  16. Carrier mobility in rubrene-doped 4-cyano-4'-pentylbiphenyl studied by the time-of-flight method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honma, Michinori; Nose, Toshiaki

    2013-09-01

    We have investigated the transient photocurrent of rubrene-doped nematic liquid crystal using a time-of-flight examination. Drift mobilities on the order of 10-6 cm2/V s were obtained for both positive and negative carriers. The minimal dependence of the rubrene concentration on the drift mobility is indicative of the ionic conduction as carrier transport process. The product of the drift mobility and the viscosity obeys the Walden rule, further supporting the ionic carrier transport process.

  17. Efficient Mobility Management Signalling in Network Mobility Supported PMIPV6

    PubMed Central

    Jebaseeli Samuelraj, Ananthi; Jayapal, Sundararajan

    2015-01-01

    Proxy Mobile IPV6 (PMIPV6) is a network based mobility management protocol which supports node's mobility without the contribution from the respective mobile node. PMIPV6 is initially designed to support individual node mobility and it should be enhanced to support mobile network movement. NEMO-BSP is an existing protocol to support network mobility (NEMO) in PMIPV6 network. Due to the underlying differences in basic protocols, NEMO-BSP cannot be directly applied to PMIPV6 network. Mobility management signaling and data structures used for individual node's mobility should be modified to support group nodes' mobility management efficiently. Though a lot of research work is in progress to implement mobile network movement in PMIPV6, it is not yet standardized and each suffers with different shortcomings. This research work proposes modifications in NEMO-BSP and PMIPV6 to achieve NEMO support in PMIPV6. It mainly concentrates on optimizing the number and size of mobility signaling exchanged while mobile network or mobile network node changes its access point. PMID:26366431

  18. Efficient Mobility Management Signalling in Network Mobility Supported PMIPV6.

    PubMed

    Samuelraj, Ananthi Jebaseeli; Jayapal, Sundararajan

    2015-01-01

    Proxy Mobile IPV6 (PMIPV6) is a network based mobility management protocol which supports node's mobility without the contribution from the respective mobile node. PMIPV6 is initially designed to support individual node mobility and it should be enhanced to support mobile network movement. NEMO-BSP is an existing protocol to support network mobility (NEMO) in PMIPV6 network. Due to the underlying differences in basic protocols, NEMO-BSP cannot be directly applied to PMIPV6 network. Mobility management signaling and data structures used for individual node's mobility should be modified to support group nodes' mobility management efficiently. Though a lot of research work is in progress to implement mobile network movement in PMIPV6, it is not yet standardized and each suffers with different shortcomings. This research work proposes modifications in NEMO-BSP and PMIPV6 to achieve NEMO support in PMIPV6. It mainly concentrates on optimizing the number and size of mobility signaling exchanged while mobile network or mobile network node changes its access point.

  19. Efficient Mobility Management Signalling in Network Mobility Supported PMIPV6.

    PubMed

    Samuelraj, Ananthi Jebaseeli; Jayapal, Sundararajan

    2015-01-01

    Proxy Mobile IPV6 (PMIPV6) is a network based mobility management protocol which supports node's mobility without the contribution from the respective mobile node. PMIPV6 is initially designed to support individual node mobility and it should be enhanced to support mobile network movement. NEMO-BSP is an existing protocol to support network mobility (NEMO) in PMIPV6 network. Due to the underlying differences in basic protocols, NEMO-BSP cannot be directly applied to PMIPV6 network. Mobility management signaling and data structures used for individual node's mobility should be modified to support group nodes' mobility management efficiently. Though a lot of research work is in progress to implement mobile network movement in PMIPV6, it is not yet standardized and each suffers with different shortcomings. This research work proposes modifications in NEMO-BSP and PMIPV6 to achieve NEMO support in PMIPV6. It mainly concentrates on optimizing the number and size of mobility signaling exchanged while mobile network or mobile network node changes its access point. PMID:26366431

  20. Mobile propeller dynamometer validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Mason Wade

    With growing interest in UAVs and OSU's interest in propeller performance and manufacturing, evaluating UAV propeller and propulsion system performance has become essential. In attempts to evaluate these propellers a mobile propeller dynamometer has been designed, built, and tested. The mobile dyno has been designed to be cost effective through the ability to load it into the back of a test vehicle to create simulated forward flight characteristics. This allows much larger propellers to be dynamically tested without the use of large and expensive wind tunnels. While evaluating the accuracy of the dyno, several improvements had to be made to get accurate results. The decisions made to design and improve the mobile propeller dyno will be discussed along with attempts to validate the dyno by comparing its results against known sources. Another large part of assuring the accuracy of the mobile dyno is determining if the test vehicle will influence the flow going into the propellers being tested. The flow into the propeller needs to be as smooth and uniform as possible. This is determined by characterizing the boundary layer and accelerated flow over the vehicle. This evaluation was accomplished with extensive vehicle aerodynamic measurements with the use of full-scale tests using a pitot-rake and the actual test vehicle. Additional tests were conducted in Oklahoma State University's low speed wind tunnel with a 1/8-scale model using qualitative flow visualization with smoke. Continuing research on the mobile dyno will be discussed, along with other potential uses for the dyno.

  1. Autonomous mobile communication relays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Hoa G.; Everett, Hobart R.; Manouk, Narek; Verma, Ambrish

    2002-07-01

    Maintaining a solid radio communication link between a mobile robot entering a building and an external base station is a well-recognized problem. Modern digital radios, while affording high bandwidth and Internet-protocol-based automatic routing capabilities, tend to operate on line-of-sight links. The communication link degrades quickly as a robot penetrates deeper into the interior of a building. This project investigates the use of mobile autonomous communication relay nodes to extend the effective range of a mobile robot exploring a complex interior environment. Each relay node is a small mobile slave robot equipped with sonar, ladar, and 802.11b radio repeater. For demonstration purposes, four Pioneer 2-DX robots are used as autonomous mobile relays, with SSC-San Diego's ROBART III acting as the lead robot. The relay robots follow the lead robot into a building and are automatically deployed at various locations to maintain a networked communication link back to the remote operator. With their on-board external sensors, they also act as rearguards to secure areas already explored by the lead robot. As the lead robot advances and RF shortcuts are detected, relay nodes that become unnecessary will be reclaimed and reused, all transparent to the operator. This project takes advantage of recent research results from several DARPA-funded tasks at various institutions in the areas of robotic simulation, ad hoc wireless networking, route planning, and navigation. This paper describes the progress of the first six months of the project.

  2. School Transportation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Executive Educator, 1990

    1990-01-01

    This special section on student transportation offers a case study of a school system that recycles buses for safety drills; articles on fuel-saving strategies, the pros and cons of contracting for transportation services or operating a publicly owned bus fleet, and advice on full cost accounting for transportation costs; and a transportation…

  3. Transport Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Timothy M.; Wuebbles, Donald J.; Boering, Kristie A.; Eckman, Richard S.; Lerner, Jean; Plumb, R. Alan; Rind, David H.; Rinsland, Curtis P.; Waugh, Darryn W.; Wei, Chu-Feng

    1999-01-01

    MM II defined a series of experiments to better understand and characterize model transport and to assess the realism of this transport by comparison to observations. Measurements from aircraft, balloon, and satellite, not yet available at the time of MM I [Prather and Remsberg, 1993], provide new and stringent constraints on model transport, and address the limits of our transport modeling abilities. Simulations of the idealized tracers the age spectrum, and propagating boundary conditions, and conserved HSCT-like emissions probe the relative roles of different model transport mechanisms, while simulations of SF6 and C02 make the connection to observations. Some of the tracers are related, and transport diagnostics such as the mean age can be derived from more than one of the experiments for comparison to observations. The goals of the transport experiments are: (1) To isolate the effects of transport in models from other processes; (2) To assess model transport for realistic tracers (such as SF6 and C02) for comparison to observations; (3) To use certain idealized tracers to isolate model mechanisms and relationships to atmospheric chemical perturbations; (4) To identify strengths and weaknesses of the treatment of transport processes in the models; (5) To relate evaluated shortcomings to aspects of model formulation. The following section are included:Executive Summary, Introduction, Age Spectrum, Observation, Tropical Transport in Models, Global Mean Age in Models, Source-Transport Covariance, HSCT "ANOY" Tracer Distributions, and Summary and Conclusions.

  4. Regularity and predictability of human mobility in personal space.

    PubMed

    Austin, Daniel; Cross, Robin M; Hayes, Tamara; Kaye, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    Fundamental laws governing human mobility have many important applications such as forecasting and controlling epidemics or optimizing transportation systems. These mobility patterns, studied in the context of out of home activity during travel or social interactions with observations recorded from cell phone use or diffusion of money, suggest that in extra-personal space humans follow a high degree of temporal and spatial regularity - most often in the form of time-independent universal scaling laws. Here we show that mobility patterns of older individuals in their home also show a high degree of predictability and regularity, although in a different way than has been reported for out-of-home mobility. Studying a data set of almost 15 million observations from 19 adults spanning up to 5 years of unobtrusive longitudinal home activity monitoring, we find that in-home mobility is not well represented by a universal scaling law, but that significant structure (predictability and regularity) is uncovered when explicitly accounting for contextual data in a model of in-home mobility. These results suggest that human mobility in personal space is highly stereotyped, and that monitoring discontinuities in routine room-level mobility patterns may provide an opportunity to predict individual human health and functional status or detect adverse events and trends.

  5. Mobile Phone Terminal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    In the photo, an employee of a real estate firm is contacting his office by means of HICOM, an advanced central terminal for mobile telephones. Developed by the Orlando Division of Martin Marietta Aerospace, Orlando, Florida, and manufactured by Harris Corporation's RF Division, Rochester, N.Y., HICOM upgrades service to users, provides better system management to telephone companies, and makes more efficient use of available mobile telephone channels through a computerized central control terminal. The real estate man, for example, was able to dial his office and he could also have direct-dialed a long distance number. Mobile phones in most areas not yet served by HICOM require an operator's assistance for both local and long distance calls. HICOM improves system management by automatically recording information on all calls for accurate billing, running continual performance checks on its own operation, and reporting any malfunctions to a central office.

  6. Mobility of organic carbon from incineration residues

    SciTech Connect

    Ecke, Holger Svensson, Malin

    2008-07-01

    Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) may affect the transport of pollutants from incineration residues when landfilled or used in geotechnical construction. The leaching of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) from municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) bottom ash and air pollution control residue (APC) from the incineration of waste wood was investigated. Factors affecting the mobility of DOC were studied in a reduced 2{sup 6-1} experimental design. Controlled factors were treatment with ultrasonic radiation, full carbonation (addition of CO{sub 2} until the pH was stable for 2.5 h), liquid-to-solid (L/S) ratio, pH, leaching temperature and time. Full carbonation, pH and the L/S ratio were the main factors controlling the mobility of DOC in the bottom ash. Approximately 60 weight-% of the total organic carbon (TOC) in the bottom ash was available for leaching in aqueous solutions. The L/S ratio and pH mainly controlled the mobilization of DOC from the APC residue. About 93 weight-% of TOC in the APC residue was, however, not mobilized at all, which might be due to a high content of elemental carbon. Using the European standard EN 13 137 for determination of total organic carbon (TOC) in MSWI residues is inappropriate. The results might be biased due to elemental carbon. It is recommended to develop a TOC method distinguishing between organic and elemental carbon.

  7. Mobility of Plasmids†

    PubMed Central

    Smillie, Chris; Garcillán-Barcia, M. Pilar; Francia, M. Victoria; Rocha, Eduardo P. C.; de la Cruz, Fernando

    2010-01-01

    Summary: Plasmids are key vectors of horizontal gene transfer and essential genetic engineering tools. They code for genes involved in many aspects of microbial biology, including detoxication, virulence, ecological interactions, and antibiotic resistance. While many studies have decorticated the mechanisms of mobility in model plasmids, the identification and characterization of plasmid mobility from genome data are unexplored. By reviewing the available data and literature, we established a computational protocol to identify and classify conjugation and mobilization genetic modules in 1,730 plasmids. This allowed the accurate classification of proteobacterial conjugative or mobilizable systems in a combination of four mating pair formation and six relaxase families. The available evidence suggests that half of the plasmids are nonmobilizable and that half of the remaining plasmids are conjugative. Some conjugative systems are much more abundant than others and preferably associated with some clades or plasmid sizes. Most very large plasmids are nonmobilizable, with evidence of ongoing domestication into secondary chromosomes. The evolution of conjugation elements shows ancient divergence between mobility systems, with relaxases and type IV coupling proteins (T4CPs) often following separate paths from type IV secretion systems. Phylogenetic patterns of mobility proteins are consistent with the phylogeny of the host prokaryotes, suggesting that plasmid mobility is in general circumscribed within large clades. Our survey suggests the existence of unsuspected new relaxases in archaea and new conjugation systems in cyanobacteria and actinobacteria. Few genes, e.g., T4CPs, relaxases, and VirB4, are at the core of plasmid conjugation, and together with accessory genes, they have evolved into specific systems adapted to specific physiological and ecological contexts. PMID:20805406

  8. Autonomous mobile robot teams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agah, Arvin; Bekey, George A.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes autonomous mobile robot teams performing tasks in unstructured environments. The behavior and the intelligence of the group is distributed, and the system does not include a central command base or leader. The novel concept of the Tropism-Based Cognitive Architecture is introduced, which is used by the robots in order to produce behavior transforming their sensory information to proper action. The results of a number of simulation experiments are presented. These experiments include worlds where the robot teams must locate, decompose, and gather objects, and defend themselves against hostile predators, while navigating around stationary and mobile obstacles.

  9. Correlation ion mobility spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Pfeifer, Kent B.; Rohde, Steven B.

    2008-08-26

    Correlation ion mobility spectrometry (CIMS) uses gating modulation and correlation signal processing to improve IMS instrument performance. Closely spaced ion peaks can be resolved by adding discriminating codes to the gate and matched filtering for the received ion current signal, thereby improving sensitivity and resolution of an ion mobility spectrometer. CIMS can be used to improve the signal-to-noise ratio even for transient chemical samples. CIMS is especially advantageous for small geometry IMS drift tubes that can otherwise have poor resolution due to their small size.

  10. A Rapid Screen Technique for Estimating Nanoparticle Transport in Porous Media

    EPA Science Inventory

    Quantifying the mobility of engineered nanoparticles in hydrologic pathways from point of release to human or ecological receptors is essential for assessing environmental exposures. Column transport experiments are a widely used technique to estimate the transport parameters of ...

  11. 78 FR 53137 - Flint Hills Resources Alaska, LLC, BP Pipelines (Alaska) Inc., ConocoPhillips Transportation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-28

    ...Phillips Transportation Alaska, Inc., ExxonMobil Pipeline Company; Notice of Complaint Take notice that on... formal complaint against BP Pipelines (Alaska) Inc., ConocoPhillips Transportation Alaska, Inc.,...

  12. Photonic sensor applications in transportation security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krohn, David A.

    2007-09-01

    There is a broad range of security sensing applications in transportation that can be facilitated by using fiber optic sensors and photonic sensor integrated wireless systems. Many of these vital assets are under constant threat of being attacked. It is important to realize that the threats are not just from terrorism but an aging and often neglected infrastructure. To specifically address transportation security, photonic sensors fall into two categories: fixed point monitoring and mobile tracking. In fixed point monitoring, the sensors monitor bridge and tunnel structural health and environment problems such as toxic gases in a tunnel. Mobile tracking sensors are being designed to track cargo such as shipboard cargo containers and trucks. Mobile tracking sensor systems have multifunctional sensor requirements including intrusion (tampering), biochemical, radiation and explosives detection. This paper will review the state of the art of photonic sensor technologies and their ability to meet the challenges of transportation security.

  13. Mobile colloid generation induced by a cementitious plume: mineral surface-charge controls on mobilization.

    PubMed

    Li, Dien; Kaplan, Daniel I; Roberts, Kimberly A; Seaman, John C

    2012-03-01

    Cementitious materials are increasingly used as engineered barriers and waste forms for radiological waste disposal. Yet their potential effect on mobile colloid generation is not well-known, especially as it may influence colloid-facilitated contaminant transport. Whereas previous papers have studied the introduction of cement colloids into sediments, this study examined the influence of cement leachate chemistry on the mobilization of colloids from a subsurface sediment collected from the Savannah River Site, USA. A sharp mobile colloid plume formed with the introduction of a cement leachate simulant. Colloid concentrations decreased to background concentrations even though the aqueous chemical conditions (pH and ionic strength) remained unchanged. Mobile colloids were mainly goethite and to a lesser extent kaolinite. The released colloids had negative surface charges and the mean particle sizes ranged primarily from 200 to 470 nm. Inherent mineralogical electrostatic forces appeared to be the controlling colloid removal mechanism in this system. In the background pH of ~6.0, goethite had a positive surface charge, whereas quartz (the dominant mineral in the immobile sediment) and kaolinite had negative surface charges. Goethite acted as a cementing agent, holding kaolinite and itself onto the quartz surfaces due to the electrostatic attraction. Once the pH of the system was elevated, as in the cementitious high pH plume front, the goethite reversed to a negative charge, along with quartz and kaolinite, then goethite and kaolinite colloids were mobilized and a sharp spike in turbidity was observed. Simulating conditions away from the cementitious source, essentially no colloids were mobilized at 1:1000 dilution of the cement leachate or when the leachate pH was ≤ 8. Extreme alkaline pH environments of cementitious leachate may change mineral surface charges, temporarily promoting the formation of mobile colloids.

  14. An aeronautical mobile satellite experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jedrey, T. C.; Dessouky, K. I.; Lay, N. E.

    1990-01-01

    The various activities and findings of a NASA/FAA/COMSAT/INMARSAT collaborative aeronautical mobile satellite experiment are detailed. The primary objective of the experiment was to demonstrate and evaluate an advanced digital mobile satellite terminal developed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory under the NASA Mobile Satellite Program. The experiment was a significant milestone for NASA/JPL, since it was the first test of the mobile terminal in a true mobile satellite environment. The results were also of interest to the general mobile satellite community because of the advanced nature of the technologies employed in the terminal.

  15. Strong mobility in weakly disordered systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-naim, Eli; Krapivsky, Pavel

    2009-01-01

    We study transport of interacting particles in weakly disordered media. Our one-dimensional system includes (i) disorder, the hopping rate governing the movement of a particle between two neighboring lattice sites is inhomogeneous, and (ii) hard core interaction, the maximum occupancy at each site is one particle. We find that over a substantial regime, the root-mean-square displacement of a particle s grows superdiffusively with time t, {sigma}{approx}({epsilon}t){sup 2/3}, where {epsilon} is the disorder strength. Without disorder the particle displacement is subdiffusive, {sigma} {approx}t{sup 1/4}, and therefore disorder strongly enhances particle mobility. We explain this effect using scaling arguments, and verify the theoretical predictions through numerical simulations. Also, the simulations show that regardless of disorder strength, disorder leads to stronger mobility over an intermediate time regime.

  16. ATHLETE: A Mobility and Manipulation System for Mobile Lunar Habitats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilcox, B. H.

    2008-03-01

    ATHLETE is a mobility and manipulation system considered by recent Lunar Architecture Teams. This presentation will discuss the possible use of ATHLETE-based mobile habitats for global-scale scientific exploration of the moon.

  17. Ridesharing and transportation for the disadvantaged. Transportation research record

    SciTech Connect

    Lauritzen, T.; McKelvey, F.X.; Lyles, R.W.; Lighthizer, D.R.; Hardy, D.K.

    1988-01-01

    The 11 papers in the report deal with the following areas: a 1-year review of performance measures for the Chicago transit authority's special services contracted service for the elderly and handicapped; evaluation of a demonstration small bus program for the elderly and handicapped; travel mode choice behavior and physical barrier constraints among the elderly and handicapped: an examination of travel-mode preferences; the role of private enterprise in elderly and handicapped transportation in Canada; special transportation-service in Sweden--involvement of private operators; role of the private sector in the delivery of transportation services to the elderly and handicapped in the United States; suburban activity center transportation demand management market research study; commuting behavior of Hawaii state workers in Honolulu: implications for transportation system management strategies; mobility and specialized transportation for elderly and for disabled persons: a view from four selected countries; an inventory of twelve paratransit service delivery experiences; integrating social-service client transportation and special needs transportation systems: the Portland experience.

  18. Developing Mobile Based Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Florence; Pastore, Raymond; Snider, Jean

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes an instructional design class's experience developing instruction for the mobile web. The class was taught at a southeastern university in the United States in a master's level computer based instruction course. Two example projects are showcased and student reflections on design issues are highlighted. Additionally,…

  19. Mobile Applications for Extension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drill, Sabrina L.

    2012-01-01

    Mobile computing devices (smart phones, tablets, etc.) are rapidly becoming the dominant means of communication worldwide and are increasingly being used for scientific investigation. This technology can further our Extension mission by increasing our power for data collection, information dissemination, and informed decision-making. Mobile…

  20. Mobile lighting apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Roe, George Michael; Klebanoff, Leonard Elliott; Rea, Gerald W; Drake, Robert A; Johnson, Terry A; Wingert, Steven John; Damberger, Thomas A; Skradski, Thomas J; Radley, Christopher James; Oros, James M; Schuttinger, Paul G; Grupp, David J; Prey, Stephen Carl

    2013-05-14

    A mobile lighting apparatus includes a portable frame such as a moveable trailer or skid having a light tower thereon. The light tower is moveable from a stowed position to a deployed position. A hydrogen-powered fuel cell is located on the portable frame to provide electrical power to an array of the energy efficient lights located on the light tower.

  1. Visions of Mobile Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    T.H.E. Journal, 2011

    2011-01-01

    It is almost a foregone conclusion that the mobile device will become an indispensable tool for learning in the future. That's why "T.H.E. Journal" asked a number of educators to let their imaginations go wild and conjure up visions of the future of the device in the classroom. This paper presents the views of educators who conjure up the mobile…

  2. Mobile Learning for All

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bestwick, Angel; Campbell, John R.

    2010-01-01

    Parents and educational professionals are asking the question, "Are schools preparing students for their future lives?" Mobile technologies such as smart phones, iPods, GPS systems, iPads, and a constant stream of information drive much of people's world and work. The use of such technologies increases with each passing day. But how often do…

  3. ORION mobile unit design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brunn, D. L.; Wu, S. C.; Thom, E. H.; Mclaughlin, F. D.; Sweetser, B. M.

    1980-01-01

    An overview of the design of the ORION mobile system is presented. System capability and performance characteristics are outlined. Functional requirements and key performance parameters are stated for each of the nine subsystems. A master design and implementation schedule is given.

  4. Mobile Equipment Expands Inventory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGough, Robert L.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Describes the Mobile Equipment Modules (MEM) system in Duluth, Minnesota. MEM is a way to hold down costs and increase learning opportunities by consolidating purchases of expensive shop equipment within the school district, grouping the equipment in modules, and scheduling and moving it from school to school as needed. (MF)

  5. Mobile Agents Applications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martins, Rosane Maria; Chaves, Magali Ribeiro; Pirmez, Luci; Rust da Costa Carmo, Luiz Fernando

    2001-01-01

    Discussion of the need to filter and retrieval relevant information from the Internet focuses on the use of mobile agents, specific software components which are based on distributed artificial intelligence and integrated systems. Surveys agent technology and discusses the agent building package used to develop two applications using IBM's Aglet…

  6. Mathematics and Mobile Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Tobin; Martin, Lee

    2014-01-01

    This paper argues for an approach to mobile learning that leverages students' informal digital practices as resources for designing mathematics classrooms activities. We briefly describe two exploratory designs along these lines, one featuring the use of photos taken by students outside class and the other centered on their recording and…

  7. Mobil lube dewaxing technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, C.L.; McGuiness, M.P.

    1995-09-01

    Currently, the lube refining industry is in a period of transition, with both hydroprocessing and catalytic dewaxing gathering momentum as replacements for solvent extraction and solvent dewaxing. In addition, lube product quality requirements have been increasing, both in the US and abroad. Mobil has developed a broad array of dewaxing catalytic technologies which can serve refiners throughout the stages of this transition. In the future, lube feedstocks which vary in source and wax content will become increasingly important, requiring an optimized system for highest performance. The Mobil Lube Dewaxing (MLDW) process is the work-horse of the catalytic dewaxing technologies, being a robust, low cost technology suitable for both solvent extracted and hydrocracked feeds. The Mobil Selective Dewaxing (MSDW) process has been recently introduced in response to the growth of hydroprocessing. MSDW requires either severely hydrotreated or hydrocracked feeds and provides improved lube yields and VI. For refiners with hydrocrackers and solvent dewaxing units, Mobil Wax Isomerization (MWI) technology can make higher VI base stocks to meet the growing demand for very high quality lube products. A review of these three technologies is presented in this paper.

  8. Essays on Teacher Mobility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Jeremy A.

    2012-01-01

    The allocation of quality teachers across schools is of interest because of both the importance and costliness of teachers as inputs in the education production process. Furthermore, because teachers have preferences over their workplace characteristics, this allocation across schools is nonrandom. This research examines teacher mobility within…

  9. Mathematics and Mobile Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sayed, Fayez

    2015-01-01

    The wide range of Mathematical Apps targeting different mathematical concepts and the various types of mobile devices available present a demanding and challenging problem to the teaching and learning in the field of mathematics. In an attempt to address this issue, a few Apps were selected, implemented and tested in this work. [For complete…

  10. Private Schools. Goin' Mobile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Laura

    1995-01-01

    To give children of migrant farm workers an academic boost, teachers at one Roman Catholic elementary school became mobile, following them to their destinations and offering a sense of stability to the Mexican and Mexican American students. The program integrates Mexican culture and Spanish language and provides outreach to families. (SM)

  11. EFFECTS OF HUMIC SUBSTANCES ON ATTENUATION OF METALS: BIOAVAILABILITY AND MOBILITY IN SOIL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Humic substances play vastly important roles in metal behavior in a wide variety of environments. They can affect the mobility and bioavailability of metals by binding and sequestration thereby decreasing the mobility of a metal. They can also transport metals into solution or ...

  12. 23 CFR 630.1006 - Work zone safety and mobility policy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Work zone safety and mobility policy. 630.1006 Section 630.1006 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION ENGINEERING AND TRAFFIC OPERATIONS PRECONSTRUCTION PROCEDURES Work Zone Safety and Mobility § 630.1006 Work zone safety and...

  13. Developing a Framework and Priorities to Promote Mobility among Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Lynda A.; Slonim, Amy; Yen, Irene H.; Jones, Dina L.; Allen, Peg; Hunter, Rebecca H.; Goins, R. Turner; Leith, Katherine H.; Rosenberg, Dori; Satariano, William A.; McPhillips-Tangum, Carol

    2014-01-01

    Mobility, broadly defined as movement in all of its forms from ambulation to transportation, is critical to supporting optimal aging. This article describes two projects to develop a framework and a set of priority actions designed to promote mobility among community-dwelling older adults. Project 1 involved a concept-mapping process to solicit…

  14. Mobility platform coupling device and method for coupling mobility platforms

    DOEpatents

    Shirey, David L.; Hayward, David R.; Buttz, James H.

    2002-01-01

    A coupling device for connecting a first mobility platform to a second mobility platform in tandem. An example mobility platform is a robot. The coupling device has a loose link mode for normal steering conditions and a locking position, tight link mode for navigation across difficult terrain and across obstacles, for traversing chasms, and for navigating with a reduced footprint in tight steering conditions.

  15. Research and development of electric vehicles for clean transportation.

    PubMed

    Wada, Masayoshi

    2009-01-01

    This article presents the research and development of an electric vehicle (EV) in Department of Human-Robotics Saitama Institute of Technology, Japan. Electric mobile systems developed in our laboratory include a converted electric automobile, electric wheelchair and personal mobile robot. These mobile systems contribute to realize clean transportation since energy sources and devices from all vehicles, i.e., batteries and electric motors, does not deteriorate the environment. To drive motors for vehicle traveling, robotic technologies were applied.

  16. Biodegradation of PuEDTA and Impacts on Pu Mobility

    SciTech Connect

    Xun, Luying; Bolton, Harvey, Jr.

    2003-06-01

    This project is part of a major project (PI, Dr. Harvey Bolton, Jr. at PNNL) regarding plutonium mobility in the subsurface. Ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA) is a common chelating agent that can increase the mobility of radionuclides and heavy metals in groundwater. Biodegradation of EDTA decreases the enhanced mobility. The overall objective is to understand how microbial degradation affects Plutonium-EDTA transport in the environment, and the specific objective of this component is to understand how microorganisms degrade EDTA. Over the past two years, significant progress has been made to the understanding on how EDTA is degraded by an EDTA-degrading bacterium BNC1. The characterization of EDTA and nitrilotriacetate (NTA) transport into BNC1 cells is summarized here. The uptake is the limiting step in EDTA and NTA degradation. The objectives of near-term research are described. We are making progress as projected in the proposal.

  17. 9 CFR 3.79 - Mobile or traveling housing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Transportation of Nonhuman Primates 2 Facilities and Operating Standards § 3.79 Mobile or traveling housing... sufficiently heated and cooled when necessary to protect nonhuman primates from temperature extremes and to... not fall below 45 °F (7.2 °C) for more than 4 consecutive hours when nonhuman primates are...

  18. 49 CFR 38.125 - Mobility aid accessibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... mechanical, electrical or other system operates to ensure that cars do not move when the lift is in use. (3... SPECIFICATIONS FOR TRANSPORTATION VEHICLES Intercity Rail Cars and Systems § 38.125 Mobility aid accessibility. (a)(1) General. All intercity rail cars, other than level entry cars, required to be accessible...

  19. 49 CFR 38.95 - Mobility aid accessibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... SPECIFICATIONS FOR TRANSPORTATION VEHICLES Commuter Rail Cars and Systems § 38.95 Mobility aid accessibility. (a)(1) General. All new commuter rail cars, other than level entry cars, covered by this subpart shall...(d) are provided, the car is not required to be equipped with a car-borne device. The access...

  20. 49 CFR 38.125 - Mobility aid accessibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... SPECIFICATIONS FOR TRANSPORTATION VEHICLES Intercity Rail Cars and Systems § 38.125 Mobility aid accessibility... cars, other than level entry cars, required to be accessible by §§ 38.111 (a) and (e) of this subpart... complying with § 38.113(d) are provided, the car is not required to be equipped with a car-borne device....

  1. 49 CFR 38.95 - Mobility aid accessibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... SPECIFICATIONS FOR TRANSPORTATION VEHICLES Commuter Rail Cars and Systems § 38.95 Mobility aid accessibility... rail cars, other than level entry cars, covered by this subpart shall provide a level-change mechanism... accessible, or mini-high platforms complying with § 38.93(d) are provided, the car is not required to...

  2. 36 CFR 1192.159 - Mobility aid accessibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Mobility aid accessibility. 1192.159 Section 1192.159 Parks, Forests, and Public Property ARCHITECTURAL AND TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS.... Platforms stowed in a vertical position, and deployed platforms when occupied, shall have provisions...

  3. 36 CFR 1192.83 - Mobility aid accessibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Mobility aid accessibility. 1192.83 Section 1192.83 Parks, Forests, and Public Property ARCHITECTURAL AND TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS... accessible by 49 CFR part 37, the vehicle is not required to be equipped with a car-borne device. Where...

  4. 36 CFR 1192.23 - Mobility aid accessibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Mobility aid accessibility. 1192.23 Section 1192.23 Parks, Forests, and Public Property ARCHITECTURAL AND TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS... while occupied. (4) Power or equipment failure. Platforms stowed in a vertical position, and...

  5. 36 CFR 1192.159 - Mobility aid accessibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Mobility aid accessibility. 1192.159 Section 1192.159 Parks, Forests, and Public Property ARCHITECTURAL AND TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS.... Platforms stowed in a vertical position, and deployed platforms when occupied, shall have provisions...

  6. 36 CFR 1192.23 - Mobility aid accessibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Mobility aid accessibility. 1192.23 Section 1192.23 Parks, Forests, and Public Property ARCHITECTURAL AND TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS... while occupied. (4) Power or equipment failure. Platforms stowed in a vertical position, and...

  7. 36 CFR 1192.23 - Mobility aid accessibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Mobility aid accessibility. 1192.23 Section 1192.23 Parks, Forests, and Public Property ARCHITECTURAL AND TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS... while occupied. (4) Power or equipment failure. Platforms stowed in a vertical position, and...

  8. 36 CFR 1192.159 - Mobility aid accessibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Mobility aid accessibility. 1192.159 Section 1192.159 Parks, Forests, and Public Property ARCHITECTURAL AND TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS.... Platforms stowed in a vertical position, and deployed platforms when occupied, shall have provisions...

  9. 36 CFR 1192.159 - Mobility aid accessibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Mobility aid accessibility. 1192.159 Section 1192.159 Parks, Forests, and Public Property ARCHITECTURAL AND TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS.... Platforms stowed in a vertical position, and deployed platforms when occupied, shall have provisions...

  10. 36 CFR 1192.125 - Mobility aid accessibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Mobility aid accessibility. 1192.125 Section 1192.125 Parks, Forests, and Public Property ARCHITECTURAL AND TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS...(d) are provided, at stations or stops required to be accessible by 49 CFR part 37, the car is...

  11. 36 CFR 1192.159 - Mobility aid accessibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Mobility aid accessibility. 1192.159 Section 1192.159 Parks, Forests, and Public Property ARCHITECTURAL AND TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS.... Platforms stowed in a vertical position, and deployed platforms when occupied, shall have provisions...

  12. 36 CFR 1192.95 - Mobility aid accessibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Mobility aid accessibility. 1192.95 Section 1192.95 Parks, Forests, and Public Property ARCHITECTURAL AND TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS... with § 1192.93(d) are provided, at stations or stops required to be accessible by 49 CFR part 37,...

  13. 36 CFR 1192.83 - Mobility aid accessibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Mobility aid accessibility. 1192.83 Section 1192.83 Parks, Forests, and Public Property ARCHITECTURAL AND TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS... accessible by 49 CFR part 37, the vehicle is not required to be equipped with a car-borne device. Where...

  14. 36 CFR 1192.83 - Mobility aid accessibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Mobility aid accessibility. 1192.83 Section 1192.83 Parks, Forests, and Public Property ARCHITECTURAL AND TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS... accessible by 49 CFR part 37, the vehicle is not required to be equipped with a car-borne device. Where...

  15. 36 CFR 1192.23 - Mobility aid accessibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Mobility aid accessibility. 1192.23 Section 1192.23 Parks, Forests, and Public Property ARCHITECTURAL AND TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS... while occupied. (4) Power or equipment failure. Platforms stowed in a vertical position, and...

  16. 36 CFR 1192.83 - Mobility aid accessibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Mobility aid accessibility. 1192.83 Section 1192.83 Parks, Forests, and Public Property ARCHITECTURAL AND TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS... accessible by 49 CFR part 37, the vehicle is not required to be equipped with a car-borne device. Where...

  17. 36 CFR 1192.95 - Mobility aid accessibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Mobility aid accessibility. 1192.95 Section 1192.95 Parks, Forests, and Public Property ARCHITECTURAL AND TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS... with § 1192.93(d) are provided, at stations or stops required to be accessible by 49 CFR part 37,...

  18. 36 CFR 1192.125 - Mobility aid accessibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Mobility aid accessibility. 1192.125 Section 1192.125 Parks, Forests, and Public Property ARCHITECTURAL AND TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS...(d) are provided, at stations or stops required to be accessible by 49 CFR part 37, the car is...

  19. 36 CFR 1192.125 - Mobility aid accessibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Mobility aid accessibility. 1192.125 Section 1192.125 Parks, Forests, and Public Property ARCHITECTURAL AND TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS...(d) are provided, at stations or stops required to be accessible by 49 CFR part 37, the car is...

  20. 36 CFR 1192.95 - Mobility aid accessibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Mobility aid accessibility. 1192.95 Section 1192.95 Parks, Forests, and Public Property ARCHITECTURAL AND TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS... with § 1192.93(d) are provided, at stations or stops required to be accessible by 49 CFR part 37,...

  1. 36 CFR 1192.23 - Mobility aid accessibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Mobility aid accessibility. 1192.23 Section 1192.23 Parks, Forests, and Public Property ARCHITECTURAL AND TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS... while occupied. (4) Power or equipment failure. Platforms stowed in a vertical position, and...

  2. 36 CFR 1192.125 - Mobility aid accessibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Mobility aid accessibility. 1192.125 Section 1192.125 Parks, Forests, and Public Property ARCHITECTURAL AND TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS...(d) are provided, at stations or stops required to be accessible by 49 CFR part 37, the car is...

  3. 36 CFR 1192.125 - Mobility aid accessibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Mobility aid accessibility. 1192.125 Section 1192.125 Parks, Forests, and Public Property ARCHITECTURAL AND TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS...(d) are provided, at stations or stops required to be accessible by 49 CFR part 37, the car is...

  4. 36 CFR 1192.95 - Mobility aid accessibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Mobility aid accessibility. 1192.95 Section 1192.95 Parks, Forests, and Public Property ARCHITECTURAL AND TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS... with § 1192.93(d) are provided, at stations or stops required to be accessible by 49 CFR part 37,...

  5. 36 CFR 1192.83 - Mobility aid accessibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Mobility aid accessibility. 1192.83 Section 1192.83 Parks, Forests, and Public Property ARCHITECTURAL AND TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS... accessible by 49 CFR part 37, the vehicle is not required to be equipped with a car-borne device. Where...

  6. 36 CFR 1192.95 - Mobility aid accessibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Mobility aid accessibility. 1192.95 Section 1192.95 Parks, Forests, and Public Property ARCHITECTURAL AND TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS... with § 1192.93(d) are provided, at stations or stops required to be accessible by 49 CFR part 37,...

  7. MOBILE LADLES, ATTACHED TO OVERHEAD RAILS, ARE FILLED AT EITHER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MOBILE LADLES, ATTACHED TO OVERHEAD RAILS, ARE FILLED AT EITHER THE MALLEABLE FOUNDRY BULL LADLE OR ELECTRIC FURNACE BEFORE THEY TRANSPORT MOLTEN IRON TO MOLDS PREPARED BY DISAMATIC MOLDMAKING MACHINE OR ON ONE OF THE CONVEYORS. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, Malleable Foundry, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  8. Mobile Quarantine Facility unloaded at Ellington Air Force Base, Texas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    A Mobile Quarantine Facility, with the three Apollo 11 crewmen inside, is unloaded from a U.S. Air Force C141 transport at Ellington Air Force Base early Sunday after a flight from Hawaii. A large crowd was present to welcome Astronauts Neil Armstrong, Michael Collins and Edwin Aldrin Jr. back to Houston following their historic lunar landing mission.

  9. Dielectric-constant-enhanced hall mobility in complex oxides.

    PubMed

    Siemons, Wolter; McGuire, Michael A; Cooper, Valentino R; Biegalski, Michael D; Ivanov, Ilia N; Jellison, Gerald E; Boatner, Lynn A; Sales, Brian C; Christen, Hans M

    2012-08-01

    The high dielectric constant of doped ferroelectric KTa(1-x)Nb(x)O(3) is shown to increase dielectric screening of electron scatterers, and thus to enhance the electronic mobility, overcoming one of the key limitations in the application of functional oxides. These observations are based on transport and optical measurements as well as band structure calculations.

  10. DETAIL VIEW OF CONNECTOR FOR MATING TO THE CRAWLER TRANSPORTER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL VIEW OF CONNECTOR FOR MATING TO THE CRAWLER TRANSPORTER - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Mobile Launcher Platforms, Launcher Road, East of Kennedy Parkway North, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  11. The motion commotion: Human factors in transportation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Millar, A. E., Jr. (Editor); Rosen, R. L. (Editor); Gibson, J. D. (Editor); Crum, R. G. (Editor)

    1972-01-01

    The program for a systems approach to the problem of incorporating human factors in designing transportation systems is summarized. The importance of the human side of transportation is discussed along with the three major factors related to maintaining a mobile and quality life. These factors are (1) people, as individuals and groups, (2) society as a whole, and (3) the natural environment and man-made environs. The problems and bottlenecks are presented along with approaches to their solutions through systems analysis. Specific recommendations essential to achieving improved mobility within environmental constraints are presented.

  12. Social Mobility and Social Participation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sewell, William H.

    1978-01-01

    Examines data related to social mobility and social participation of Americans. Topics include educational and occupational mobility; voting; volunteer work; charitable giving; community participation; views on religion; and anomie. For journal availability, see SO 506 144. (Author/DB)

  13. Advanced extravehicular mobility unit study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elkins, W.

    1982-01-01

    Components of the advanced extravehicular mobility unit (suit) are described. Design considerations for radiation protection, extravehicular operational pressure, mobility effects, tool/glove/effector, anthropometric definition, lighting, and equipment turnaround are addressed.

  14. Mobility, Fertility, and Residential Crowding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Earl W.

    1977-01-01

    Regression analyses predicting fertility and mobility in a sample of a metropolitan county in New York State indicate that residential mobility serves to release the negative pressure that residential crowding might exert on fertility behavior. (Author)

  15. NASA NDE Applications for Mobile MEMS Devices and Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, William C.; Atkinson, Gary M.; Barclay, R. O.

    2008-01-01

    NASA would like new devices and sensors for performing nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of aerospace vehicles. These devices must be small in size/volume, mass, and power consumption. The devices must be autonomous and mobile so they can access the internal structures of aircraft and spacecraft and adequately monitor the structural health of these craft. The platforms must be mobile in order to transport NDE sensors for evaluating structural integrity and determining whether further investigations will be required. Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technology is crucial to the development of the mobile platforms and sensor systems. This paper presents NASA s needs for micro mobile platforms and MEMS sensors that will enable NDE to be performed on aerospace vehicles.

  16. A mobile apparatus for solar collector testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hotchkiss, G. B.; Simon, F. F.; Burmeister, L. C.

    1979-01-01

    The design, construction, and operation of a mobile apparatus for solar collector testing (MASCOT) is described. The MASCOT is a self-contained test unit costing about $10,000 whose only external requirement for operation is electrical power and which is capable of testing two water-cooled flat-plate solar collectors simultaneously. The MASCOT is small enough and light enough to be transported to any geographical site for outdoor tests at the location of collector usage. It has been used in both indoor solar simulator tests and outdoor tests.

  17. Colloid-Facilitated Transport of Radionuclides through the Vadose Zone

    SciTech Connect

    Flury, Markus; Harsh, James B.; Zachara, John M.; McCarthy, John F.; Lichtner, Peter C.

    2006-05-31

    This project seeks to improve the basic understanding of the role of colloids in facilitating the transport of contaminants in the vadose zone. We focus on three major thrusts: (1) thermodynamic stability and mobility of colloids formed by reactions of sediments with highly alkaline tank waste solutions, (2) colloid-contaminant interactions, and (3) in-situ colloid mobilization and colloid facilitated contaminant transport occurring in both contaminated and uncontaminated Hanford sediments.

  18. Fade-Free Mobile Communication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevenson, C. R.

    1986-01-01

    Scheme for mobile communication reduces multipath fading and interference between adjacent channels. Proposed communication system lends itself to almost completely digital implementation, eliminating costly and bulky crystal filters. Scheme suitable for satellite-aided or terrestrial mobile communication, including cellular mobile telephony, at frequencies in 150-to-900-MHz range.

  19. Mobile satellite service for Canada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sward, David

    1988-01-01

    The Mobile Satellite (MSAT) system and a special program designed to provide interim mobile satellite services (IMSS) during the construction phase of MSAT are described. A mobile satellite system is a key element in extending voice and and data telecommunications to all Canadians.

  20. Libraries and the Mobile Revolution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krishnan, Yvonne

    2011-01-01

    With the advent of mobile phones--and smartphones in particular--people are slowly moving away from the notion that mobile phones are just for making calls and texting. This coupled with the fact that the uptake of mobile phones hit the 5 billion mark in 2010 has spurred many libraries to offer services that can be used by their patrons on these…

  1. Mobile Technology in Educational Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Jueming; Kinshuk

    2005-01-01

    The use of computers and the Internet has successfully enabled educational institutions to provide their students and staff members with various online educational services. With the recent developments in mobile technology, further possibilities are emerging to provide such services through mobile devices such as mobile phones and PDAs. By…

  2. Long range hopping mobility platform.

    SciTech Connect

    Spletzer, Barry Louis; Fischer, Gary John

    2003-03-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has developed a mesoscale hopping mobility platform (Hopper) to overcome the longstanding problems of mobility and power in small scale unmanned vehicles. The system provides mobility in situations such as negotiating tall obstacles and rough terrain that are prohibitive for other small ground base vehicles. The Defense Advanced Research Projects Administration (DARPA) provided the funding for the hopper project.

  3. Mobile Learning in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraga, Lucretia M.

    2012-01-01

    This mixed method research study investigated the beliefs of university faculty regarding mobile learning. As well as to determine if providing technology professional development to university faculty supports the increase of mobile learning opportunities in higher education. This study used the Beliefs About Mobile Learning Inventory (BAMLI) to…

  4. Book Reporting with Book Mobiles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bates, Ellie

    1984-01-01

    Students can be motivated to share their reading interests and their writing talents by creating book report mobiles. After students have read a book, they begin their mobile by attaching string to an empty box which has been covered with plain paper. Next, they decorate one side of the mobile with a drawing which illustrates the story or they…

  5. Barriers and facilitators to community mobility for assistive technology users.

    PubMed

    Layton, Natasha

    2012-01-01

    Mobility is frequently described in terms of individual body function and structures however contemporary views of disability also recognise the role of environment in creating disability. Aim. To identify consumer perspectives regarding barriers and facilitators to optimal mobility for a heterogeneous population of impaired Victorians who use assistive technology in their daily lives. Method. An accessible survey investigated the impact of supports or facilitators upon actual and desired life outcomes and health-related quality of life, from 100 AT users in Victoria, Australia. This paper reports upon data pertaining to community mobility. Results. A range of barriers and enablers to community mobility were identified including access to AT devices, environmental interventions, public transport, and inclusive community environs. Substantial levels of unmet need result in limited personal mobility and community participation. Outcomes fall short of many principles enshrined in current policy and human rights frameworks. Conclusion. AT devices as well as accessible and inclusive home and community environs are essential to maximizing mobility for many. Given the impact of the environment upon the capacity of individuals to realise community mobility, this raises the question as to whether rehabilitation practitioners, as well as prescribing AT devices, should work to build accessible communities via systemic advocacy. PMID:23029617

  6. Incorporating Mobile Phone Technologies to Expand Evidence-Based Care

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Deborah J.; Anton, Margaret; Gonzalez, Michelle; Honeycutt, Amanda; Khavjou, Olga; Forehand, Rex; Parent, Justin

    2014-01-01

    Ownership of mobile phones is on the rise, a trend in uptake that transcends age, region, race, and ethnicity, as well as income. It is precisely the emerging ubiquity of mobile phones that has sparked enthusiasm regarding their capacity to increase the reach and impact of health care, including mental health care. Community-based clinicians charged with transporting evidence-based interventions beyond research and training clinics are in turn, ideally and uniquely situated to capitalize on mobile phone uptake and functionality to bridge the efficacy to effectiveness gap. As such, this article delineates key considerations to guide these frontline clinicians in mobile phone-enhanced clinical practice, including an overview of industry data on the uptake of and evolution in the functionality of mobile phone platforms, conceptual considerations relevant to the integration of mobile phones into practice, representative empirical illustrations of mobile-phone enhanced assessment and treatment, and practical considerations relevant to ensuring the feasibility and sustainability of such an approach. PMID:26213458

  7. Barriers and Facilitators to Community Mobility for Assistive Technology Users

    PubMed Central

    Layton, Natasha

    2012-01-01

    Mobility is frequently described in terms of individual body function and structures however contemporary views of disability also recognise the role of environment in creating disability. Aim. To identify consumer perspectives regarding barriers and facilitators to optimal mobility for a heterogeneous population of impaired Victorians who use assistive technology in their daily lives. Method. An accessible survey investigated the impact of supports or facilitators upon actual and desired life outcomes and health-related quality of life, from 100 AT users in Victoria, Australia. This paper reports upon data pertaining to community mobility. Results. A range of barriers and enablers to community mobility were identified including access to AT devices, environmental interventions, public transport, and inclusive community environs. Substantial levels of unmet need result in limited personal mobility and community participation. Outcomes fall short of many principles enshrined in current policy and human rights frameworks. Conclusion. AT devices as well as accessible and inclusive home and community environs are essential to maximizing mobility for many. Given the impact of the environment upon the capacity of individuals to realise community mobility, this raises the question as to whether rehabilitation practitioners, as well as prescribing AT devices, should work to build accessible communities via systemic advocacy. PMID:23029617

  8. Changes in community mobility in older men and women. A 13-year prospective study.

    PubMed

    Fristedt, Sofi; Dahl, Anna K; Wretstrand, Anders; Björklund, Anita; Falkmer, Torbjörn

    2014-01-01

    Community mobility, defined as "moving [ones] self in the community and using public or private transportation", has a unique ability to promote older peoples' wellbeing by enabling independence and access to activity arenas for interaction with others. Early predictors of decreased community mobility among older men and women are useful in developing health promoting strategies. However, long-term prediction is rare, especially when it comes to including both public and private transportation. The present study describes factors associated with community mobility and decreased community mobility over time among older men and women. In total, 119 men and 147 women responded to a questionnaire in 1994 and 2007. Respondents were between 82 and 96 years old at follow-up. After 13 years, 40% of men and 43% of women had decreased community mobility, but 47% of men and 45% of women still experienced some independent community mobility. Cross-sectional independent community mobility among men was associated with higher ratings of subjective health, reporting no depression and more involvement in sport activities. Among women, cross-sectional independent community mobility was associated with better subjective health and doing more instrumental activities of daily living outside the home. Lower subjective health predicted decreased community mobility for both men and women, whereas self-reported health conditions did not. Consequently, general policies and individual interventions aiming to improve community mobility should consider older persons' subjective health.

  9. Mobile Multicast in Hierarchical Proxy Mobile IPV6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafizah Mohd Aman, Azana; Hashim, Aisha Hassan A.; Mustafa, Amin; Abdullah, Khaizuran

    2013-12-01

    Mobile Internet Protocol Version 6 (MIPv6) environments have been developing very rapidly. Many challenges arise with the fast progress of MIPv6 technologies and its environment. Therefore the importance of improving the existing architecture and operations increases. One of the many challenges which need to be addressed is the need for performance improvement to support mobile multicast. Numerous approaches have been proposed to improve mobile multicast performance. This includes Context Transfer Protocol (CXTP), Hierarchical Mobile IPv6 (HMIPv6), Fast Mobile IPv6 (FMIPv6) and Proxy Mobile IPv6 (PMIPv6). This document describes multicast context transfer in hierarchical proxy mobile IPv6 (H-PMIPv6) to provide better multicasting performance in PMIPv6 domain.

  10. Electronic transport in smectic liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiyanovskaya, I.; Singer, K. D.; Twieg, R. J.; Sukhomlinova, L.; Gettwert, V.

    2002-04-01

    Time-of-flight measurements of transient photoconductivity have revealed bipolar electronic transport in phenylnaphthalene and biphenyl liquid crystals (LC), which exhibit several smectic mesophases. In the phenylnaphthalene LC, the hole mobility is significantly higher than the electron mobility and exhibits different temperature and phase behavior. Electron mobility in the range ~10-5 cm2/V s is temperature activated and remains continuous at the phase transitions. However, hole mobility is nearly temperature independent within the smectic phases, but is very sensitive to smectic order, 10-3 cm2/V s in the smectic-B (Sm-B) and 10-4 cm2/V s in the smectic-A (Sm-A) mesophases. The different behavior for holes and electron transport is due to differing transport mechanisms. The electron mobility is apparently controlled by rate-limiting multiple shallow trapping by impurities, but hole mobility is not. To explain the lack of temperature dependence for hole mobility within the smectic phases we consider two possible polaron transport mechanisms. The first mechanism is based on the hopping of Holstein small polarons in the nonadiabatic limit. The polaron binding energy and transfer integral values, obtained from the model fit, turned out to be sensitive to the molecular order in smectic mesophases. A second possible scenario for temperature-independent hole mobility involves the competion between two different polaron mechanisms involving so-called nearly small molecular polarons and small lattice polarons. Although the extracted transfer integrals and binding energies are reasonable and consistent with the model assumptions, the limited temperature range of the various phases makes it difficult to distinguish between any of the models. In the biphenyl LCs both electron and hole mobilities exhibit temperature activated behavior in the range of 10-5 cm2/V s without sensitivity to the molecular order. The dominating transport mechanism is considered as multiple trapping

  11. Transport Phenomena.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCready, Mark J.; Leighton, David T.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the problems created in graduate chemical engineering programs when students enter with a wide diversity of understandings of transport phenomena. Describes a two-semester graduate transport course sequence at the University of Notre Dame which focuses on fluid mechanics and heat and mass transfer. (TW)

  12. Self mobile space manipulator project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, H. Ben; Friedman, Mark; Xu, Yangsheng; Kanade, Takeo

    1992-01-01

    A relatively simple, modular, low mass, low cost robot is being developed for space EVA that is large enough to be independently mobile on a space station or platform exterior, yet versatile enough to accomplish many vital tasks. The robot comprises two long flexible links connected by a rotary joint, with 2-DOF 'wrist' joints and grippers at each end. It walks by gripping pre-positioned attachment points, such as trusswork nodes, and alternately shifting its base of support from one foot (gripper) to the other. The robot can perform useful tasks such as visual inspection, material transport, and light assembly by manipulating objects with one gripper, while stabilizing itself with the other. At SOAR '90, we reported development of 1/3 scale robot hardware, modular trusswork to serve as a locomotion substrate, and a gravity compensation system to allow laboratory tests of locomotion strategies on the horizontal face of the trusswork. In this paper, we report on project progress including the development of: (1) adaptive control for automatic adjustment to loads; (2) enhanced manipulation capabilities; (3) machine vision, including the use of neural nets, to guide autonomous locomotion; (4) locomotion between orthogonal trusswork faces; and (5) improved facilities for gravity compensation and telerobotic control.

  13. Mobile extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Rajagopal, V; Bailey, M J

    1991-01-01

    During the last 18 months, extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) has been provided at Epsom District Hospital using a mobile unit containing a Dornier HM4 lithotriptor. Patients with upper ureteric and renal stones were selected for treatment, which was performed without anaesthesia or sedation as a day-case procedure; 83 patients were treated, 5 of them with bilateral stones. Seventy patients required 1 treatment session, 17 required 2 and 1 patient required 3. There were no serious complications but 3 patients needed ureteroscopy to remove obstructing stones. The overall success rate was 86%. The cost to treat each NHS patient was 253 pounds. Mobile lithotripsy as a day-case procedure is a safe and cost-effective means of treating urolithiasis and can be performed in a District General Hospital.

  14. Mobile Biomass Pelletizing System

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas Mason

    2009-04-16

    This grant project examines multiple aspects of the pelletizing process to determine the feasibility of pelletizing biomass using a mobile form factor system. These aspects are: the automatic adjustment of the die height in a rotary-style pellet mill, the construction of the die head to allow the use of ceramic materials for extreme wear, integrating a heat exchanger network into the entire process from drying to cooling, the use of superheated steam for adjusting the moisture content to optimum, the economics of using diesel power to operate the system; a break-even analysis of estimated fixed operating costs vs. tons per hour capacity. Initial development work has created a viable mechanical model. The overall analysis of this model suggests that pelletizing can be economically done using a mobile platform.

  15. Mobile Autonomous Humanoid Assistant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diftler, M. A.; Ambrose, R. O.; Tyree, K. S.; Goza, S. M.; Huber, E. L.

    2004-01-01

    A mobile autonomous humanoid robot is assisting human co-workers at the Johnson Space Center with tool handling tasks. This robot combines the upper body of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Robonaut system with a Segway(TradeMark) Robotic Mobility Platform yielding a dexterous, maneuverable humanoid perfect for aiding human co-workers in a range of environments. This system uses stereo vision to locate human team mates and tools and a navigation system that uses laser range and vision data to follow humans while avoiding obstacles. Tactile sensors provide information to grasping algorithms for efficient tool exchanges. The autonomous architecture utilizes these pre-programmed skills to form human assistant behaviors. The initial behavior demonstrates a robust capability to assist a human by acquiring a tool from a remotely located individual and then following the human in a cluttered environment with the tool for future use.

  16. Miniaturized Ion Mobility Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaye, William J. (Inventor); Stimac, Robert M. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    By utilizing the combination of a unique electronic ion injection control circuit in conjunction with a particularly designed drift cell construction, the instantly disclosed ion mobility spectrometer achieves increased levels of sensitivity, while achieving significant reductions in size and weight. The instant IMS is of a much simpler and easy to manufacture design, rugged and hermetically sealed, capable of operation at high temperatures to at least 250.degree. C., and is uniquely sensitive, particularly to explosive chemicals.

  17. Telemedicine by mobile communication.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, K

    1999-01-01

    A concept of mobile telemedicine has been proposed to provide emergency care in a moving vehicle. The practicality of this technique was investigated through technical considerations required to realize mobile telemedicine. Some problems with this technique were identified, and measures to resolve the problems were devised. Then, theoretical analysis verified the feasibility of the proposed technique. Different multiplexing techniques for the multiple medical data transmission by mobile communication were investigated. An experimental system that can simultaneously transmit color images, an audio signal, three-channel ECGs, and blood pressure from a moving vehicle to a fixed station was developed. Experiments on the transmission of multichannel medical data from a moving ambulance, a navigating ship, and a flying aircraft were conducted. The results of these experiments verified the practical feasibility of the proposed technique. In the practical application of this technique, there may be some legal problems: for example, whether medical treatment through a communication medium would be legally acceptable or not, and whether the transmission of medical data violates the protection of personal privacy. However, considering the emergency nature of this technique and the significance of the results, both problems seem to be either legally or technically solvable. This application of mobile communication to telemedicine is not confined to merely a proposal to use new techniques. It can also bring about a methodological change in the concept of conventional telemedicine by changing it from static to dynamic, and by enlarging its scope from a local area to a global or cosmic area. It may also have an impact on conventional emergency medicine in that it will open up a new field of application that applies to moving vehicles.

  18. Mobility implants: a review.

    PubMed

    Danz, W

    1990-01-01

    We present a brief review of mobility implants, their contribution, and the experiences derived after almost 40 years since the new concepts of full mobility implants were introduced. In early 1940, experiments with a new material for the making of plastic artificial eyes was also being considered for the making of orbital implants. Methyl-methacrylate (MMA) had proven inert and satisfactory for dental products. The Surgeon Generals office of the Armed Services encouraged further research and experimental work in the development of plastic eyes. The success of the new material sponsored the beginning of great expansion with new concepts for orbital implants. Through a period of more than a decade, the design and types of implants went through three stages. First, the buried implant was introduced, then the exposed integrated followed, and the buried integrated subsequently followed. The path of progress was not smooth. Theoretically correct designs and surgical procedures met unexpected practical difficulties for the ophthalmic surgeon, the patient, and the eye maker. Surgical and technical efforts were carefully reviewed to eliminate the problems encountered, only to have further unforeseen complications arise. Infections, extrusions, and migration of the implant were not uncommon. The exposed integrated implant was eventually abandoned. However, there were some extraordinary successes of mobility. A new era introduced fully buried mobility implants that were more successful. However, this procedure also produced some problems, causing infection (or allergy), extrusion, and migration. Tantalum mesh and gauze gave great promise with the inception of their use. Orbital tissue grew into the material in an astonishing way, making it possible to secure the extraocular muscles and tenons.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Integrated mobile robot control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amidi, Omead; Thorpe, Charles

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes the structure, implementation, and operation of a real-time mobile robot controller which integrates capabilities such as: position estimation, path specification and tracking, human interfaces, fast communication, and multiple client support. The benefits of such high-level capabilities in a low-level controller was shown by its implementation for the Navlab autonomous vehicle. In addition, performance results from positioning and tracking systems are reported and analyzed.

  20. High-mobility diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landstrass, Maurice I.

    1994-04-01

    Recent improvements in the CVD diamond deposition process have made possible the fabrication of diamond photoconductive diodes with carrier mobility and lifetime exceeding the values typical of natural gemstones. One of the more surprising recent results is that the best room-temperature carrier properties have been measured on polycrystalline diamond films. The combined electron- hole mobility, as measured by transient photoconductivity at low carrier densities, is 4000 square centimeters per volt per second at electric field of 200 volts per centimeter and is comparable to that of the best single-crystal IIa natural diamonds. Carrier lifetimes measured under the same conditions are 150 picoseconds for the CVD diamond films. The collection distance within the diamond films, at the highest applied fields, is comparable to the average film grain size, indicative of little or no carrier scattering at grain boundaries. A comparison of SIMS measurements with electrical results suggest that impurity incorporation in the near grain boundary regions are responsible for controlling the carrier mobility.

  1. Mobile lunar base project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlov, I. A.; Shevchenko, V. V.

    1995-01-01

    An explorer must possess maximal mobility on the Moon if he is to discover natural anomalies most interesting for investigation. The same problem arises in the case of utilization of lunar natural resources. Moreover, according to lunar ecology requirements we should not destroy lunar surface layers over a wide area. For mining processes, many small plots should be chosen far away from each other. The concept of a mobile lunar manned base is proposed. The base structure consists of three vertical cylindrical modules placed into triangular (top view) girder construction. Each module is 5 meters in diameter with a height of 7 meters. The space around the cylinders is filled by a one meter protective layer of lunar soil. The ends of three vertical tube-type supports are put on the separate chassis. Total volume of living and working space is about 350 cubic meters. These modules are sized for a crew of nine. The velocity of the mobile lunar base is about 8 km per hour on a horizontal surface.

  2. Integron associated mobile genes

    PubMed Central

    Labbate, Maurizio; Boucher, Yan; Luu, Ivan; Chowdhury, Piklu Roy; Stokes, H.W.

    2012-01-01

    Lateral gene transfer (LGT) impacts on the evolution of prokaryotes in both the short and long-term. The short-term impacts of mobilized genes are a concern to humans since LGT explains the global rise of multi drug resistant pathogens seen in the past 70 years. However, LGT has been a feature of prokaryotes from the earliest days of their existence and the concept of a bifurcating tree of life is not entirely applicable to prokaryotes since most genes in extant prokaryotic genomes have probably been acquired from other lineages. Successful transfer and maintenance of a gene in a new host is understandable if it acts independently of cell networks and confers an advantage. Antibiotic resistance provides an example of this whereby a gene can be advantageous in virtually any cell across broad species backgrounds. In a longer evolutionary context however laterally transferred genes can be assimilated into even essential cell networks. How this happens is not well understood and we discuss recent work that identifies a mobile gene, unique to a cell lineage, which is detrimental to the cell when lost. We also present some additional data and believe our emerging model will be helpful in understanding how mobile genes integrate into cell networks. PMID:22754748

  3. Studies on deaf mobile application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nathan, Shelena Soosay; Hussain, Azham; Hashim, Nor Laily

    2016-08-01

    The deaf normally considered to be disabled that do not need any mobile technology due to the inabilities of hearing and talking. However, many deaf are using mobile phone in their daily life for various purposes such as communication and learning. Many studies have attempted to identify the need of deaf people in mobile application and level of usage of the applications. This study aims in studying the recent research conducted on deaf mobile application to understand the level of importance of mobile technology for this disabled community. This paper enable identification of studies conducted are limited and the need of more research done of this disabled people to ensure their privilege of using mobile technology and its application, which leads to the identification of deaf user requirement for mobile application as future study.

  4. Securing mobile code.

    SciTech Connect

    Link, Hamilton E.; Schroeppel, Richard Crabtree; Neumann, William Douglas; Campbell, Philip LaRoche; Beaver, Cheryl Lynn; Pierson, Lyndon George; Anderson, William Erik

    2004-10-01

    If software is designed so that the software can issue functions that will move that software from one computing platform to another, then the software is said to be 'mobile'. There are two general areas of security problems associated with mobile code. The 'secure host' problem involves protecting the host from malicious mobile code. The 'secure mobile code' problem, on the other hand, involves protecting the code from malicious hosts. This report focuses on the latter problem. We have found three distinct camps of opinions regarding how to secure mobile code. There are those who believe special distributed hardware is necessary, those who believe special distributed software is necessary, and those who believe neither is necessary. We examine all three camps, with a focus on the third. In the distributed software camp we examine some commonly proposed techniques including Java, D'Agents and Flask. For the specialized hardware camp, we propose a cryptographic technique for 'tamper-proofing' code over a large portion of the software/hardware life cycle by careful modification of current architectures. This method culminates by decrypting/authenticating each instruction within a physically protected CPU, thereby protecting against subversion by malicious code. Our main focus is on the camp that believes that neither specialized software nor hardware is necessary. We concentrate on methods of code obfuscation to render an entire program or a data segment on which a program depends incomprehensible. The hope is to prevent or at least slow down reverse engineering efforts and to prevent goal-oriented attacks on the software and execution. The field of obfuscation is still in a state of development with the central problem being the lack of a basis for evaluating the protection schemes. We give a brief introduction to some of the main ideas in the field, followed by an in depth analysis of a technique called 'white-boxing'. We put forth some new attacks and improvements

  5. SIMON: Integration of mobility and parking solutions for people with disabilities.

    PubMed

    Ferreras, Alberto; Barberà, Ricard; Durá-Gil, Juan Vicente; Solaz, José; Muñoz, Eva María; Serrano, Manuel; Marqués, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Mobility and parking in urban areas are often difficult for people with disabilities. Obstacles include lack of accessible information on routes, transport alternatives and parking availability, as well as fraud in the use of the specific services intended for these citizens. The SIMON project aims to improve this situation through the integration of different ICT solutions. SIMON is enhancing the European Parking Card for disable people with contactless technologies and integrates mobile solutions to support user unique identification in existing parking areas whilst preserving privacy. SIMON will also promote better mobility solutions for mobility including information, navigation and access to restricted areas. PMID:26294493

  6. Enhancing the Electron Mobility via Delta-Doping in SrTiO3

    SciTech Connect

    Kozuka, Y.

    2011-08-11

    We fabricated high-mobility {delta}-doped structures in SrTiO{sub 3} thin films in order to investigate the low temperature electronic transport properties of confined carriers in this system. An enhancement of the electron mobility above the bulk value was observed as the doped layer thickness decreased. High-field Hall measurements revealed that this mobility enhancement originates from higher-mobility electrons in the undoped clean regions, which have quantum-mechanically broadened from the doped layer. Because of the absence of apparent lattice misfit between the layers, this structure is highly suitable for investigating two-dimensional electron gases in SrTiO{sub 3}

  7. SIMON: Integration of mobility and parking solutions for people with disabilities.

    PubMed

    Ferreras, Alberto; Barberà, Ricard; Durá-Gil, Juan Vicente; Solaz, José; Muñoz, Eva María; Serrano, Manuel; Marqués, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Mobility and parking in urban areas are often difficult for people with disabilities. Obstacles include lack of accessible information on routes, transport alternatives and parking availability, as well as fraud in the use of the specific services intended for these citizens. The SIMON project aims to improve this situation through the integration of different ICT solutions. SIMON is enhancing the European Parking Card for disable people with contactless technologies and integrates mobile solutions to support user unique identification in existing parking areas whilst preserving privacy. SIMON will also promote better mobility solutions for mobility including information, navigation and access to restricted areas.

  8. Dust mobilization on airless planetary bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horanyi, M.

    2013-12-01

    There are a number of observations indicating that small dust grains can be mobilized and transported on the surfaces of airless bodies. While not a single measurement to date can unambiguously identify the responsible process, the entire body of existing observations as a whole suggests that electrodynamics remains the most likely candidate. If this is the case, our models have to be able to account for the electrostatic charging and subsequent dynamics of the grains sculpted by surface electric fields. The Colorado Center for Dust and Atmospheric Studies (CCLDAS) of the former NASA Lunar Science Institute conducted a series of small-scale laboratory experiments to address dust charging and mobilization issues, including the effects of flowing plasmas and UV radiation. This talk will draw conclusions based on these series of experiments and use them to guide the analysis and interpretation of the data from the Lunar Dust Experiment (LDEX) onboard the Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Mission (LADEE). By the time of this talk, LADEE is expected to collect its initial science measurements. The combination of laboratory and in situ space measurements provides a unique opportunity to advance our theoretical models on the transport of charged dust particles on the lunar surface, and apply these arguments to all other airless planetary bodies.

  9. Advantage of suppressed non-Langevin recombination in low mobility organic solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Stolterfoht, Martin; Armin, Ardalan; Pandey, Ajay K.; Burn, Paul L.; Meredith, Paul; Pivrikas, Almantas; Philippa, Bronson; White, Ronald D.

    2014-07-07

    Photovoltaic performance in relation to charge transport is studied in efficient (7.6%) organic solar cells (PTB7:PC{sub 71}BM). Both electron and hole mobilities are experimentally measured in efficient solar cells using the resistance dependent photovoltage technique, while the inapplicability of classical techniques, such as space charge limited current and photogenerated charge extraction by linearly increasing voltage is discussed. Limits in the short-circuit current originate from optical losses, while charge transport is shown not to be a limiting process. Efficient charge extraction without recombination can be achieved with a mobility of charge carriers much lower than previously expected. The presence of dispersive transport with strongly distributed mobilities in high efficiency solar cells is demonstrated. Reduced non-Langevin recombination is shown to be beneficial for solar cells with imbalanced, low, and dispersive electron and hole mobilities.

  10. A test of a climatic index of dune mobility using measurements from the southwestern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lancaster, N.; Helm, P.

    2000-01-01

    The climatic index of dune mobility developed by Lancaster (1988) has been applied to a variety of different environments. The index is, however, untested and unverified. We tested the index by comparison of values of the dune mobility index calculated from climate data with rates of sand transport measured at three stations in Arizona and New Mexico over the period 1985 to 1997. Our results show that changes in measured rates of sand transport closely parallel temporal changes in the dune mobility index. The mobility index is, however, a relatively poor predictor of the magnitude of actual sand transport on a year-to-year basis. This discrepancy is probably due to the fact that sand transport rates at these sites are strongly influenced by vegetation cover, the state of which may lag changes in annual precipitation. There is, however, a good relation between the mean annual mobility index and mean annual rates of sand transport. This indicates that the dune mobility index is a valid predictor of the long-term state of the aeolian system and can be used confidently for the purposes for which it was originally intended. Copyright (C) 2000 John Wiley and Sons, Ltd.

  11. Intercellular transport.

    PubMed

    Thatcher, Jack D

    2013-04-16

    These animations depict generalities of intercellular transport. The animation called "permeability and transport" demonstrates the permeability of four classes of molecules. The "gap junctions" animation shows how these intercellular complexes exclude large factors while they allow small factors to diffuse between cells. These animations serve as useful resources for any collegiate-level course that describes these processes. Courses that might use them include biochemistry, biophysics, cell biology, introductory biology, and physiology.

  12. [Air transport biomechanical risk: reduced mobility passengers' handling].

    PubMed

    Draicchio, F; Campoli, G; Silvetti, A; Badellino, E; Forzano, F; Ranavolo, A; Iavicoli, S; Campagna, G; Raffaele, G; Gismondi, M

    2012-01-01

    As the airport traffic increases there is a continuous increase of passengers with different motor disabilities. Disabled passenger's assistance causes a biomechanical overload in airport workers. Some disabled passengers are classified by IATA as WCHC (wheel chair in cabin or Charlie). Our study, was performed in one of the most important Italian airport on Charlie passengers (about 10% of all assistances). We identified four critical points: 1) wheelchair and baggage moving (unstable load), 2) inclined ramps with worker's backwards steps and braked wheelchair to prevent passenger tipping or falling, 3) transfer from standard wheelchair to bicycle wheelchair, specifically designed for the aisle; 4.) transfer from bicycle wheelchair to aircraft seat. The last two points required sometimes to lift passengers over the armrest and positioning them on a window side seat, causing a serious increase of biomechanical load. For each critical point we have proposed technical and organizational measures to reduce airport worker's biomechanical risk.

  13. Senior Transportation and Mobility Improvement Act of 2011

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Sen. Kohl, Herb [D-WI

    2011-12-05

    12/05/2011 Read twice and referred to the Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs. (text of measure as introduced: CR S8184-8185) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  14. [Air transport biomechanical risk: reduced mobility passengers' handling].

    PubMed

    Draicchio, F; Campoli, G; Silvetti, A; Badellino, E; Forzano, F; Ranavolo, A; Iavicoli, S; Campagna, G; Raffaele, G; Gismondi, M

    2012-01-01

    As the airport traffic increases there is a continuous increase of passengers with different motor disabilities. Disabled passenger's assistance causes a biomechanical overload in airport workers. Some disabled passengers are classified by IATA as WCHC (wheel chair in cabin or Charlie). Our study, was performed in one of the most important Italian airport on Charlie passengers (about 10% of all assistances). We identified four critical points: 1) wheelchair and baggage moving (unstable load), 2) inclined ramps with worker's backwards steps and braked wheelchair to prevent passenger tipping or falling, 3) transfer from standard wheelchair to bicycle wheelchair, specifically designed for the aisle; 4.) transfer from bicycle wheelchair to aircraft seat. The last two points required sometimes to lift passengers over the armrest and positioning them on a window side seat, causing a serious increase of biomechanical load. For each critical point we have proposed technical and organizational measures to reduce airport worker's biomechanical risk. PMID:23405594

  15. BIOMETHYLATION AND ENVIRONMENTAL TRANSPORT OF METALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Toxic heavy metals are ubiquitous in the environment. They are found as metal or oxide dust in air, metal ions attached to humic substances in surface and ground water, and as metal ions bound to soils and sediments. The transformations, mobilization, transport, and bioaccumulati...

  16. Spacesuit mobility knee joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vykukal, H. C. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    Pressure suit mobility joints are for use in interconnecting adjacent segments of an hermetically sealed spacesuit in which low torques, low leakage and a high degree of reliability are required. Each of the joints is a special purpose joint characterized by substantially constant volume and low torque characteristics and includes linkages which restrain the joint from longitudinal distension and includes a flexible, substantially impermeable diaphragm of tubular configuration spanning the distance between pivotally supported annuli. The diaphragms of selected joints include rolling convolutions for balancing the joints, while various joints include wedge-shaped sections which enhance the range of motion for the joints.

  17. Mobile Bay turbidity study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crozier, G. F.; Schroeder, W. W.

    1978-01-01

    The termination of studies carried on for almost three years in the Mobile Bay area and adjacent continental shelf are reported. The initial results concentrating on the shelf and lower bay were presented in the interim report. The continued scope of work was designed to attempt a refinement of the mathematical model, assess the effectiveness of optical measurement of suspended particulate material and disseminate the acquired information. The optical characteristics of particulate solutions are affected by density gradients within the medium, density of the suspended particles, particle size, particle shape, particle quality, albedo, and the angle of refracted light. Several of these are discussed in detail.

  18. Trauma and Mobile Radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Drafke, M.W.

    1989-01-01

    Trauma and Mobile Radiography focuses on the radiography of trauma patients and of patients confined to bed. This book offers students a foundation in the skills they need to produce quality radiograms without causing additional injury or pain to the patient. Features of this new book include: coverage of the basics of radiography and patient care, including monitoring of heavily sedated, immobile, and accident patients. Information on the injuries associated with certain types of accidents, and methods for dealing with these problems. Detailed explanation of the positioning of each anatomical area. A Quick Reference Card with information on evaluating, monitoring and radiographing trauma patients.

  19. Mobile health monitoring systems.

    PubMed

    Walker, William; Aroul, A L Praveen; Bhatia, Dinesh

    2009-01-01

    Advancements are being made towards a cheap and effective means for health monitoring. A mobile monitoring system is proposed for monitoring a bicycle rider using light weight, low power wireless sensors. Biometric and environmental information pertaining to the bicycle rider is captured, transmitted to, and stored in a remote database with little user interaction required. Remote users have real time access to the captured information through a web application. Possible applications for this system include the monitoring of a soldier in the battlefield and the monitoring of a patient during an ambulance ride. PMID:19965041

  20. Dynamism of Transportation and Land Use Interaction in Urban Context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandya, Rajesh J.; Katti, B. K.

    2012-10-01

    Transportation in urban areas is highly complex and the urban transport system is intricately linked with urban form and spatial structure. Urban transit is an important dimension of mobility, notably in high density areas. The spatial separation of human activities which creates the need for travel and goods transport is the underlying principle of transport analysis and forecasting. To understand the complex relationships between transportation and land use and to help the urban planning process, several models have been developed. Many theories, models are developed by different authors on land use and transportation interaction, which clearly indicate that change in land use transformation have a greater impact on transportation. Similarly, introducing new transportation facility or strengthening of existing transport facility makes an impact on the abutting land. In cities like Delhi, Navi Mumbai, Ahmedabad, introducing of new mass transport system or strengthening of existing transportation system had given greater impact on surrounding development. In this Paper the major theoretical approaches to explain the two-way interaction of land use and transport in metropolitan areas are summarized. The paper also reviews research on the two-way interaction between urban land use and transport, i.e. the location and mobility responses of private actors (households and firms, travelers) to changes in the urban land use and transport system at the urban regional level.

  1. The interfacility transport of critically ill newborns

    PubMed Central

    Whyte, Hilary EA; Jefferies, Ann L

    2015-01-01

    The practice of paediatric/neonatal interfacility transport continues to expand. Transport teams have evolved into mobile intensive care units capable of delivering state-of-the-art critical care during paediatric and neonatal transport. While outcomes are best for high-risk infants born in a tertiary care setting, high-risk mothers often cannot be safely transferred. Their newborns may then have to be transported to a higher level of care following birth. The present statement reviews issues relating to transport of the critically ill newborn population, including personnel, team competencies, skills, equipment, systems and processes. Six recommendations for improving interfacility transport of critically ill newborns are highlighted, emphasizing the importance of regionalized care for newborns. PMID:26175564

  2. The interfacility transport of critically ill newborns.

    PubMed

    Whyte, Hilary Ea; Jefferies, Ann L

    2015-01-01

    The practice of paediatric/neonatal interfacility transport continues to expand. Transport teams have evolved into mobile intensive care units capable of delivering state-of-the-art critical care during paediatric and neonatal transport. While outcomes are best for high-risk infants born in a tertiary care setting, high-risk mothers often cannot be safely transferred. Their newborns may then have to be transported to a higher level of care following birth. The present statement reviews issues relating to transport of the critically ill newborn population, including personnel, team competencies, skills, equipment, systems and processes. Six recommendations for improving interfacility transport of critically ill newborns are highlighted, emphasizing the importance of regionalized care for newborns.

  3. Back-gate effects and mobility characterization in junctionless transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parihar, Mukta Singh; Liu, Fanyu; Navarro, Carlos; Barraud, Sylvain; Bawedin, Maryline; Ionica, Irina; Kranti, Abhinav; Cristoloveanu, Sorin

    2016-11-01

    This work addresses the effect of inter-gate coupling on back-channel characteristics of planar accumulation-mode junctionless (JL) MOSFETs, fabricated with advanced Fully Depleted Silicon-on-Insulator (FDSOI) technology. A systematic methodology to extract and distinguish the contributions of bulk and accumulation-mode mobility has been developed. Front-gate voltage strongly controls the transport properties of back channel in ultra-thin heavily doped JL devices. It is demonstrated that both volume and accumulation-layer mobility values increase when the front interface is in accumulation.

  4. ATHLETE Mobility Performance in Long-Range Traverse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, Julie

    2011-01-01

    The All-Terrain Hex-Limbed Extra-Terrestrial Explorer (ATHLETE) is a modular mobility and manipulation platform being developed to support NASA operations in a variety of missions, including exploration of planetary surfaces. The agile system consists of a symmetrical arrangement of six limbs, each with seven articulated degrees of freedom and a powered wheel. This design enables transport of bulky payloads over a wide range of terrains and is envisioned as a tool to mobilize habitats, power-generation equipment, and other supplies for long-range exploration and outpost construction.

  5. Public Transport for Everyone: A Summary of the Results of Research and Development Projects Concerning Disabled People and Transport Facilities Supported by the Swedish Transport Research Board. TFB-Report 1989:1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borjesson, Mats

    This report summarizes the results of research and development concerning disabled individuals in Sweden and their use of transport facilities. The first section, "People with Impaired Mobility and Their Travel Needs," outlines Sweden's transport policy goal to adapt transport to the needs of disabled people, addresses the difficulty in…

  6. Creating a Mobile Library Website

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cutshall, Tom C.; Blake, Lindsay; Bandy, Sandra L.

    2011-01-01

    The overwhelming results were iPhones and Android devices. Since the library wasn't equipped technologically to develop an in-house application platform and because we wanted the content to work across all mobile platforms, we decided to focus on creating a mobile web-based platform. From the NLM page of mobile sites we chose the basic PubMed/…

  7. The Mobile Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scharfstein, Gregory; Cox, Russell

    2012-01-01

    A document discusses a simulation chamber that represents a shift from the thermal-vacuum chamber stereotype. This innovation, currently in development, combines the capabilities of space simulation chambers, the user-friendliness of modern-day electronics, and the modularity of plug-and-play computing. The Mobile Chamber is a customized test chamber that can be deployed with great ease, and is capable of bringing payloads at temperatures down to 20 K, in high vacuum, and with the desired metrology instruments integrated to the systems control. Flexure plans to lease Mobile Chambers, making them affordable for smaller budgets and available to a larger customer base. A key feature of this design will be an Apple iPad-like user interface that allows someone with minimal training to control the environment inside the chamber, and to simulate the required extreme environments. The feedback of thermal, pressure, and other measurements is delivered in a 3D CAD model of the chamber's payload and support hardware. This GUI will provide the user with a better understanding of the payload than any existing thermal-vacuum system.

  8. Ghana social mobilization analysis.

    PubMed

    Tweneboa-Kodua, A; Obeng-Quaidoo, I; Abu, K

    1991-01-01

    In order to increase communication channels for child survival and development, the government and UNICEF Ghana undertook a "social mobilization analysis." This analysis included three studies that aimed to identify individuals and existing organizations with the potential to serve as health communicators and to determine the type of assistance that they needed to maximize their effectiveness in this role. The first study surveyed governmental institutions, trade unions, revolutionary organizations, traditional leaders, and others and found a largely untapped reservoir of capacities to promote child health, with varying levels of current involvement. The primary need identified was for information and training materials. The second study focused on the mass media and revealed a low coverage of maternal and child health topics and the need for better cooperation between journalists and health professionals. The third study assessed sources of health information for parents and found several sources, such as religious organizations, women's groups, and school teachers that could be mobilized to promote child health. Recommendations are made for the use of the findings. PMID:2037495

  9. Wideband, mobile networking technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyer, Kevin L.; Bowen, Douglas G.; Pulsipher, Dennis C.

    2005-05-01

    Ubiquitous communications will be the next era in the evolving communications revolution. From the human perspective, access to information will be instantaneous and provide a revolution in services available to both the consumer and the warfighter. Services will be from the mundane - anytime, anywhere access to any movie ever made - to the vital - reliable and immediate access to the analyzed real-time video from the multi-spectral sensors scanning for snipers in the next block. In the former example, the services rely on a fixed infrastructure of networking devices housed in controlled environments and coupled to fixed terrestrial fiber backbones - in the latter, the services are derived from an agile and highly mobile ad-hoc backbone established in a matter of minutes by size, weight, and power-constrained platforms. This network must mitigate significant changes in the transmission media caused by millisecond-scale atmospheric temperature variations, the deployment of smoke, or the drifting of a cloud. It must mitigate against structural obscurations, jet wash, or incapacitation of a node. To maintain vital connectivity, the mobile backbone must be predictive and self-healing on both near-real-time and real-time time scales. The nodes of this network must be reconfigurable to mitigate intentional and environmental jammers, block attackers, and alleviate interoperability concerns caused by changing standards. The nodes must support multi-access of disparate waveform and protocols.

  10. Trace metal mobilization in soil by bacterial polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jyh-Herng; Czajka, D.R.; Lion, L.W.

    1995-02-01

    Enhanced transport of trace metal in porous media can occur in the presence of a ligand or {open_quotes}carrier{close_quotes} that has a high affinity for binding the pollutant, is dispersed and mobile in the soil environment, is recalcitrant with respect to microbial degradation, and is acceptable to the public. These aspects of the facilitated transport to trace metals are discussed with respect to a naturally occurring carrier; extracellular polymers of bacterial origin. The literature is reviewed regarding the production and composition of bacterial extracellular polymers, the processes relevant to the facilitated transport of trace metals in soil by bacterial polymers, and potential for transformation of polymers in soils by microbial degradation. Model calculations of contaminant retardation are presented for the case of polymer-mediated transport of cadmium in a sandy aquifer material. The available information suggests that extracellular polymers can bind metal ions and are mobile in the soil environment. Extracellular polymers also appear to be relatively slowly degraded by soil microorganisms. These properties and the supporting model calculations indicate that extracellular polymers of bacterial origin merit consideration as agents that may be applied to contaminated soils to enhance trace metal mobility. 58 refs., 3 figs.

  11. Transport properties of rippled graphene.

    PubMed

    Zwierzycki, Maciej

    2014-04-01

    The exceptionally high mobility of carriers in graphene is one of its defining characteristics, especially in view of potential applications. Therefore it is of both practical and fundamental importance to understand the mechanisms responsible for limiting the values of the mobility. The aim of the paper is to study theoretically one such mechanism, i.e. scattering on ripples. The transport properties of rippled graphene are studied using the single-band tight-binding model. Both the bond-length variation, corresponding to the vector potential in the effective mass picture, and the fluctuating scalar potential are included in the formalism. The samples are modeled as self-similar surfaces characterized by the roughness exponent, with values ranging from those typical for graphene on SiO2 to those seen for suspended samples. The range of calculated resistivities and mobilities overlaps with those from experiments. The results presented in this paper support the notion of rippling as one of the important factors limiting the mobility of carriers in graphene.

  12. Re-thinking residential mobility

    PubMed Central

    van Ham, Maarten; Findlay, Allan M.

    2015-01-01

    While researchers are increasingly re-conceptualizing international migration, far less attention has been devoted to re-thinking short-distance residential mobility and immobility. In this paper we harness the life course approach to propose a new conceptual framework for residential mobility research. We contend that residential mobility and immobility should be re-conceptualized as relational practices that link lives through time and space while connecting people to structural conditions. Re-thinking and re-assessing residential mobility by exploiting new developments in longitudinal analysis will allow geographers to understand, critique and address pressing societal challenges. PMID:27330243

  13. Webizing mobile augmented reality content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Sangchul; Ko, Heedong; Yoo, Byounghyun

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a content structure for building mobile augmented reality (AR) applications in HTML5 to achieve a clean separation of the mobile AR content and the application logic for scaling as on the Web. We propose that the content structure contains the physical world as well as virtual assets for mobile AR applications as document object model (DOM) elements and that their behaviour and user interactions are controlled through DOM events by representing objects and places with a uniform resource identifier. Our content structure enables mobile AR applications to be seamlessly developed as normal HTML documents under the current Web eco-system.

  14. Nuclear powerplants for mobile applications.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, J. L.

    1972-01-01

    Mobile nuclear powerplants for applications other than large ships and submarines will require compact, lightweight reactors with especially stringent impact-safety design. This paper examines the technical and economic feasibility that the broadening role of civilian nuclear power, in general, (land-based nuclear electric generating plants and nuclear ships) can extend to lightweight, safe mobile nuclear powerplants. The paper discusses technical experience, identifies potential sources of technology for advanced concepts, cites the results of economic studies of mobile nuclear powerplants, and surveys future technical capabilities needed by examining the current use and projected needs for vehicles, machines, and habitats that could effectively use mobile nuclear reactor powerplants.

  15. Assessing Landslide Mobility Using GIS: Application to Kosrae, Micronesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, M. E.; Brien, D. L.; Godt, J.; Schmitt, R. G.; Harp, E. L.

    2015-12-01

    Deadly landslides are often mobile landslides, as exemplified by the disastrous landslide that occurred near Oso, Washington in 2014 killing 43. Despite this association, many landslide susceptibility maps do not identify runout areas. We developed a simple, GIS-based method for identifying areas potentially overrun by mobile slides and debris flows. Our method links three processes within a DEM landscape: landslide initiation, transport, and debris-flow inundation (from very mobile slides). Given spatially distributed shear strengths, we first identify initiation areas using an infinite-slope stability analysis. We then delineate transport zones, or regions of potential entrainment and/or deposition, using a height/length runout envelope. Finally, where these transport zones intersect the channel network, we start debris-flow inundation zones. The extent of inundation is computed using the USGS model Laharz, modified to include many debris-flow locations throughout a DEM. Potential debris-flow volumes are computed from upslope initiation areas and typical slide thicknesses. We applied this approach to the main island of Kosrae State, Federated States of Micronesia (FSM). In 2002, typhoon Chata'an triggered numerous landslides on the neighboring islands of Chuuk State, FSM, resulting in 43 fatalities. Using an infinite-slope stability model calibrated to the Chuuk event, we identified potential landslide initiation areas on Kosrae. We then delineated potential transport zones using a 20º runout envelope, based on runout observations from Chuuk. Potential debris-flow inundation zones were then determined using Laharz. Field inspections on Kosrae revealed that our resulting susceptibility map correctly classified areas covered by previous debris-flow deposits and did not include areas covered by fluvial deposits. Our map has the advantage of providing a visual tool to portray initiation, transport, and runout zones from mobile landslides.

  16. Mobile vehicle road and weather observation quality check methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koller, Daniel Raymond

    Today State Departments of Transportation rely more and more on road weather data to make maintenance decisions. Inaccurate data can result in wrong treatment applications or inadequate staffing levels to maintain the roadway at the desired level of service. Previous methods of road condition data reporting have been limited to static in situ sensor stations. These road weather information systems (RWIS) provide varied data about precipitation, winds, temperature, and more, but their siting does not always provide an accurate representation of weather and road conditions along the roadway. The use of mobile data collection from vehicles travelling the highway corridors may assist in the locations where RWIS sitings are sparse or non-existent. The United States Department of Transporation's "Connected Vehicle" (formally IntelliDrive) research project is designed to create a fully connected transportation system providing road and weather data collection from an extensive array of vehicles. While the implementation of Connected Vehicle is in the future, some of the theories and technologies are already in place today. Several states, as a part of the Pooled Fund Study Maintenance Decision Support System (MDSS), have equipped their winter maintenance vehicles with Mobile Data Collection Automated / Vehicle Location (MDC/AVL) systems. In addition, since 1996, automobiles sold in the United States are required to be equipped with an Onboard Diagnostic Version 2 (OBDII) port that streams live data from sensors located in and around the vehicle. While these sensors were designed for vehicle diagnostics, some of the data can be used to determine weather characteristics around the vehicle. The OBDII data can be collected by a smartphone and sent to a server in real time to be processed. These mobile systems may fill the information gap along the roads that stationary environmental sensor stations are not able to collect. Particular concern and care needs to be focused on

  17. An analytical model of anisotropic low-field electron mobility in wurtzite indium nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shulong; Liu, Hongxia; Song, Xin; Guo, Yulong; Yang, Zhaonian

    2014-03-01

    This paper presents a theoretical analysis of anisotropic transport properties and develops an anisotropic low-field electron analytical mobility model for wurtzite indium nitride (InN). For the different effective masses in the Γ-A and Γ-M directions of the lowest valley, both the transient and steady state transport behaviors of wurtzite InN show different transport characteristics in the two directions. From the relationship between velocity and electric field, the difference is more obvious when the electric field is low in the two directions. To make an accurate description of the anisotropic transport properties under low field, for the first time, we present an analytical model of anisotropic low-field electron mobility in wurtzite InN. The effects of different ionized impurity scattering models on the low-field mobility calculated by Monte Carlo method (Conwell-Weisskopf and Brooks-Herring method) are also considered.

  18. Recent Advances in Synthetic Membrane Transporters

    PubMed Central

    McNALLY, BETH A.; LEEVY, W. MATTHEW; SMITH, BRADLEY D.

    2010-01-01

    It is 25 years since the first report of a synthetic ion channel transporter. Today, dozens of molecular and supramolecular designs have been developed to facilitate ion and small molecule transport across a bilayer membrane. Presented here is a concise summary of the advances made over the past four years. The transporters are grouped into three mechanistic classes: mobile carrier, monomeric channel, and self-assembled pore. Common building blocks are crown ethers, steroids, cyclodextrins, peptides, curcubiturils, and calixarenes. The eventual goal is to produce functional supramolecular devices such as sensors, enzyme assays, and lead candidates for pharmaceutical development. PMID:20376284

  19. Mobile Phones, in Combination with a Computer Locator System, Improve the Response Times of Emergency Medical Services in Central London

    PubMed Central

    Gossage, JA; Frith, DP; Carrell, TWG; Damiani, M; Terris, J; Burnand, KG

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The aim of this study was to determine whether mobile phones and mobile phone locating devices are associated with improved ambulance response times in central London. PATIENTS AND METHODS All calls from the London Ambulance Service database since 1999 were analysed. In addition, 100 consecutive patients completed a questionnaire on mobile phone use whilst attending the St Thomas's Hospital Emergency Department in central London. RESULTS Mobile phone use for emergencies in central London has increased from 4007 (5% of total) calls in January 1999 to 21,585 (29%) in August 2004. Ambulance response times for mobile phone calls were reduced after the introduction of the mobile phone locating system (mean 469 s versus 444 s; P = 0.0195). The proportion of mobile phone calls made from mobile phones for life-threatening emergencies was higher after injury than for medical emergencies (41% versus 16%, P = 0.0063). Of patients transported to the accident and emergency department by ambulance, 44% contacted the ambulance service by mobile phone. Three-quarters of calls made from outside the home or work-place were by mobile phone and 72% of patients indicated that it would have taken longer to contact the emergency services if they had not used a mobile. CONCLUSIONS Since the introduction of the mobile phone locating system, there has been an improvement in ambulance response times. Mobile locating systems in urban areas across the UK may lead to faster response times and, potentially, improved patient outcomes. PMID:18325208

  20. Mobile Learning and Integration of Mobile Technologies in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keengwe, Jared; Bhargava, Malini

    2014-01-01

    Mobile technologies have a huge potential to transform education provided these technologies are designed and implemented in such a way that they are relevant to the social and cultural context of learning. Clearly, the application, implementation, and design of mobile technology in the global educational context pose technological and…

  1. Mobile Learning with a Mobile Game: Design and Motivational Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwabe, Gerhard; Goth, Christoph

    2005-01-01

    Mobile technologies offer the opportunity to embed learning in a natural environment. This paper describes the design of the MobileGame prototype, exploring the opportunities to support learning through an orientation game in a university setting. The paper first introduces the scenario and then describes the general architecture of the prototype.…

  2. Mobile Perspectives: On Websites. Mobile Matters--Communication Trumps Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Susan T.

    2011-01-01

    Mobile technology is a favorite discussion topic among senior IT leaders and higher education administrators. Mobile is the future for content delivery. Colleges and universities need to establish a strategy now and make the decisions necessary to take advantage of this communication opportunity. In this article, the author recommends making…

  3. Mobilis in mobile: a probabilistic and chronotopic model of mobility in urban spaces.

    PubMed

    Bazzani, A; Giorgini, B; Servizi, G; Turchetti, G

    2001-01-01

    In this communication we propose an urban mobility model based on individual random walk driven by a chronotopic action with a deterministic public transportation network. In the absence of chronotopoi the mean field analytic results are found in good agreement with simulations on a computer. When the chronotopoi are switched on, they attract people according to a given law and we obtain a sort of diffusive motion. The model can describe many different kinds of dynamical systems, including biological ones. The work is in progress and the next step will be an empirical test in a concrete case. PMID:11913103

  4. A Mobile IPv6 based Distributed Mobility Management Mechanism of Mobile Internet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Shi; Jiayin, Cheng; Shanzhi, Chen

    A flatter architecture is one of the trends of mobile Internet. Traditional centralized mobility management mechanism faces the challenges such as scalability and UE reachability. A MIPv6 based distributed mobility management mechanism is proposed in this paper. Some important network entities and signaling procedures are defined. UE reachability is also considered in this paper through extension to DNS servers. Simulation results show that the proposed approach can overcome the scalability problem of the centralized scheme.

  5. Linear transport models for adsorbing solutes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, K.; Jury, W. A.

    1993-04-01

    A unified linear theory for the transport of adsorbing solutes through soils is presented and applied to analyze movement of napropamide through undisturbed soil columns. The transport characteristics of the soil are expressed in terms of the travel time distribution of the mobile phase which is then used to incorporate local interaction processes. This approach permits the analysis of all linear transport processes, not only the small subset for which a differential description is known. From a practical point of view, it allows the direct use of measured concentrations or fluxes of conservative solutes to characterize the mobile phase without first subjecting them to any model. For complicated flow regimes, this may vastly improve the identification of models and estimation of their parameters for the local adsorption processes.

  6. Modeling charge transport in organic photovoltaic materials.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Jenny; Kwiatkowski, Joe J; Kirkpatrick, James; Frost, Jarvist M

    2009-11-17

    The performance of an organic photovoltaic cell depends critically on the mobility of charge carriers within the constituent molecular semiconductor materials. However, a complex combination of phenomena that span a range of length and time scales control charge transport in disordered organic semiconductors. As a result, it is difficult to rationalize charge transport properties in terms of material parameters. Until now, efforts to improve charge mobilities in molecular semiconductors have proceeded largely by trial and error rather than through systematic design. However, recent developments have enabled the first predictive simulation studies of charge transport in disordered organic semiconductors. This Account describes a set of computational methods, specifically molecular modeling methods, to simulate molecular packing, quantum chemical calculations of charge transfer rates, and Monte Carlo simulations of charge transport. Using case studies, we show how this combination of methods can reproduce experimental mobilities with few or no fitting parameters. Although currently applied to material systems of high symmetry or well-defined structure, further developments of this approach could address more complex systems such anisotropic or multicomponent solids and conjugated polymers. Even with an approximate treatment of packing disorder, these computational methods simulate experimental mobilities within an order of magnitude at high electric fields. We can both reproduce the relative values of electron and hole mobility in a conjugated small molecule and rationalize those values based on the symmetry of frontier orbitals. Using fully atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of molecular packing, we can quantitatively replicate vertical charge transport along stacks of discotic liquid crystals which vary only in the structure of their side chains. We can reproduce the trends in mobility with molecular weight for self-organizing polymers using a cheap, coarse

  7. Mobile electric power

    SciTech Connect

    Bloomfield, V.J.; Bloomfield, D.P.; Johnson, B.Q.

    1992-01-30

    Analytic Power has proven the feasibility of a mobile electric power unit in the form of a hydride fueled ion-exchange membrane (IEM) fuel cell stack. We have over 5 years experience building and testing IEM fuel cells. The power section of a 350 watt fuel cell stack weighs 4.65 pounds based on our five cell sub-stack component weights. The composite stack structure is fabricated from two components; a unitized flow field and catalyzed membrane. The lightweight unitized flow field concept was proven in the first three months of the contract. A single unit flow field weighs 0.155 pounds and can seal to 60 psi. The single cell catalyzed Nafion membrane exceeded our performance goal of 0.6 volts at 100 ASF. Stack performance points were 0.42 volts at 113 ASF and .75 volts at 96 asf.

  8. Phobos Mobility Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bielski, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Phobos, the larger of Mars' moons, provides a potential staging location for human exploration of the Martian surface. Its low gravity (about 1/200th of Earth) and lack of atmosphere makes it an attractive destination before a more complex human landing on Mars is attempted. While easier to approach and depart than Mars itself, Phobos provides unique challenges to visiting crews. It is irregularly shaped, so its local gravitational field does not always point straight down with respect to the visible horizon. It is very close to Mars and tidally locked, so the Martian gravity gradient and applied acceleration greatly affect the perceived surface gravity direction and magnitude. This simulation allows the assessment of unique mobility approaches on the surface of Phobos, including hopping in particular.

  9. Atmospheric process evaluation of mobile source emissions

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-01

    During the past two decades there has been a considerable effort in the US to develop and introduce an alternative to the use of gasoline and conventional diesel fuel for transportation. The primary motives for this effort have been twofold: energy security and improvement in air quality, most notably ozone, or smog. The anticipated improvement in air quality is associated with a decrease in the atmospheric reactivity, and sometimes a decrease in the mass emission rate, of the organic gas and NO{sub x} emissions from alternative fuels when compared to conventional transportation fuels. Quantification of these air quality impacts is a prerequisite to decisions on adopting alternative fuels. The purpose of this report is to present a critical review of the procedures and data base used to assess the impact on ambient air quality of mobile source emissions from alternative and conventional transportation fuels and to make recommendations as to how this process can be improved. Alternative transportation fuels are defined as methanol, ethanol, CNG, LPG, and reformulated gasoline. Most of the discussion centers on light-duty AFVs operating on these fuels. Other advanced transportation technologies and fuels such as hydrogen, electric vehicles, and fuel cells, will not be discussed. However, the issues raised herein can also be applied to these technologies and other classes of vehicles, such as heavy-duty diesels (HDDs). An evaluation of the overall impact of AFVs on society requires consideration of a number of complex issues. It involves the development of new vehicle technology associated with engines, fuel systems, and emission control technology; the implementation of the necessary fuel infrastructure; and an appropriate understanding of the economic, health, safety, and environmental impacts associated with the use of these fuels. This report addresses the steps necessary to properly evaluate the impact of AFVs on ozone air quality.

  10. Modelling an Institutional Mobile Learning Readiness Analyser

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ireri, Bonface Ngari; Omwenga, Elijah I.

    2015-01-01

    Due to the affordability, ease of use and availability of mobile devices, many people in Africa and developing countries have acquired at least a mobile device. The penetration of mobile devices places many learning institution in a position to adopt mobile learning, however there are few tools for measuring mobile learning readiness for an…

  11. Modeling hydrogen transport by dislocations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dadfarnia, Mohsen; Martin, May L.; Nagao, Akihide; Sofronis, Petros; Robertson, Ian M.

    2015-05-01

    Recent experimental studies of the microstructure beneath fracture surfaces of specimens fractured in the presence of high concentrations of hydrogen suggest that the dislocation structure and hydrogen transported by mobile dislocations play important roles in establishing the local conditions that promote failure. The experiments demonstrate that hydrogen is responsible for the copious plasticity in large volumes of material before the onset of fracture and further afield from a crack tip. A revised model for hydrogen transport that accounts for hydrogen carried by dislocations along with stress driven diffusion and trapping at other microstructural defects is proposed. With the use of this new model, numerical simulation results for transient hydrogen profiles in the neighborhood of a crack tip are presented. Based on hydrogen-enhanced dislocation mobility and density, the results indicate that dislocation transport can contribute to the elevation of the local hydrogen concentrations ahead of the crack to levels above those predicted by the classical diffusion model and to distributions that extend farther afield.

  12. Structure, function, and plasticity of GABA transporters

    PubMed Central

    Scimemi, Annalisa

    2014-01-01

    GABA transporters belong to a large family of neurotransmitter:sodium symporters. They are widely expressed throughout the brain, with different levels of expression in different brain regions. GABA transporters are present in neurons and in astrocytes and their activity is crucial to regulate the extracellular concentration of GABA under basal conditions and during ongoing synaptic events. Numerous efforts have been devoted to determine the structural and functional properties of GABA transporters. There is also evidence that the expression of GABA transporters on the cell membrane and their lateral mobility can be modulated by different intracellular signaling cascades. The strength of individual synaptic contacts and the activity of entire neuronal networks may be finely tuned by altering the density, distribution and diffusion rate of GABA transporters within the cell membrane. These findings are intriguing because they suggest the existence of complex regulatory systems that control the plasticity of GABAergic transmission in the brain. Here we review the current knowledge on the structural and functional properties of GABA transporters and highlight the molecular mechanisms that alter the expression and mobility of GABA transporters at central synapses. PMID:24987330

  13. The unexpected beneficial effect of the L-valley population on the electron mobility of GaAs nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Marin, E. G. E-mail: franruiz@ugr.es Ruiz, F. G. E-mail: franruiz@ugr.es Godoy, A. E-mail: franruiz@ugr.es Tienda-Luna, I. M.; Gámiz, F.

    2015-01-12

    The impact of the L-valley population on the transport properties of GaAs cylindrical nanowires (NWs) is analyzed by numerically calculating the electron mobility under the momentum relaxation time approximation. In spite of its low contribution to the electron mobility (even for high electron populations in small NWs), it is demonstrated to have a beneficial effect, since it significantly favours the Γ-valley mobility by screening the higher Γ-valley energy subbands.

  14. Modelling human mobility patterns using photographic data shared online.

    PubMed

    Barchiesi, Daniele; Preis, Tobias; Bishop, Steven; Moat, Helen Susannah

    2015-08-01

    Humans are inherently mobile creatures. The way we move around our environment has consequences for a wide range of problems, including the design of efficient transportation systems and the planning of urban areas. Here, we gather data about the position in space and time of about 16 000 individuals who uploaded geo-tagged images from locations within the UK to the Flickr photo-sharing website. Inspired by the theory of Lévy flights, which has previously been used to describe the statistical properties of human mobility, we design a machine learning algorithm to infer the probability of finding people in geographical locations and the probability of movement between pairs of locations. Our findings are in general agreement with official figures in the UK and on travel flows between pairs of major cities, suggesting that online data sources may be used to quantify and model large-scale human mobility patterns.

  15. Intelligent mobility for robotic vehicles in the army after next

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerhart, Grant R.; Goetz, Richard C.; Gorsich, David J.

    1999-07-01

    The TARDEC Intelligent Mobility program addresses several essential technologies necessary to support the army after next (AAN) concept. Ground forces in the AAN time frame will deploy robotic unmanned ground vehicles (UGVs) in high-risk missions to avoid exposing soldiers to both friendly and unfriendly fire. Prospective robotic systems will include RSTA/scout vehicles, combat engineering/mine clearing vehicles, indirect fire artillery and missile launch platforms. The AAN concept requires high on-road and off-road mobility, survivability, transportability/deployability and low logistics burden. TARDEC is developing a robotic vehicle systems integration laboratory (SIL) to evaluate technologies and their integration into future UGV systems. Example technologies include the following: in-hub electric drive, omni-directional wheel and steering configurations, off-road tires, adaptive tire inflation, articulated vehicles, active suspension, mine blast protection, detection avoidance and evasive maneuver. This paper will describe current developments in these areas relative to the TARDEC intelligent mobility program.

  16. Mobility of electrons in supercritical krypton: Role of density fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishikawa, Masaru; Holroyd, Richard A.; Preses, Jack M.

    2007-07-01

    Excess electrons were generated in supercritical krypton by means of pulsed x-ray irradiation, and the electron transport phenomena were studied. Electron signals immediately after a 30ps pulse showed a distinctive feature characteristic of the presence of the Ramsauer-Townsend minimum in the momentum transfer cross section. The dependence of the drift velocity vD on field strength was found to be concave upward in the low field region and then to go through a maximum with increasing field strength, which is also typical of the presence of a minimum in the scattering cross section at an intermediate field strength. A minimum in the electron mobility was observed at about one-half the critical density. The acoustical phonon scattering model, which successfully explained the mobility change in this density region in supercritical xenon, was again found to account for the mobility in supercritical krypton.

  17. Modelling human mobility patterns using photographic data shared online

    PubMed Central

    Barchiesi, Daniele; Preis, Tobias; Bishop, Steven; Moat, Helen Susannah

    2015-01-01

    Humans are inherently mobile creatures. The way we move around our environment has consequences for a wide range of problems, including the design of efficient transportation systems and the planning of urban areas. Here, we gather data about the position in space and time of about 16 000 individuals who uploaded geo-tagged images from locations within the UK to the Flickr photo-sharing website. Inspired by the theory of Lévy flights, which has previously been used to describe the statistical properties of human mobility, we design a machine learning algorithm to infer the probability of finding people in geographical locations and the probability of movement between pairs of locations. Our findings are in general agreement with official figures in the UK and on travel flows between pairs of major cities, suggesting that online data sources may be used to quantify and model large-scale human mobility patterns. PMID:26361545

  18. Navigation using local position determination from a mobile satellite terminal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kee, Steven M.; Marquart, Robert C.

    The authors describe the implementation and performance evaluation of a location-determination system which uses a mobile satellite transmitter for one-way communications of position data for vehicle tracking. Field results have demonstrated that a mobile satellite terminal can provide reliable messaging and position reporting for many over-the-road applications. With installation techniques suitable for nontechnical personnel using a minimum of test equipment, the mobile terminal can provide proximity reporting adequate for most fleet dispatch requirements. Position data with one-way or two-way communications can improve the logistics and management of service fleets by eliminating deadhead mileage, maximizing route efficiencies, and heading off problems with up-to-date status information of transported loads.

  19. A techno-economic analysis of using mobile distributed pyrolysis facilities to deliver a forest residue resource.

    PubMed

    Brown, Duncan; Rowe, Andrew; Wild, Peter

    2013-12-01

    Distributed mobile conversion facilities using either fast pyrolysis or torrefaction processes can be used to convert forest residues to more energy dense substances (bio-oil, bio-slurry or torrefied wood) that can be transported as feedstock for bio-fuel facilities. Results show that the levelised delivered cost of a forest residue resource using mobile facility networks can be lower than using conventional woodchip delivery methods under appropriate conditions. Torrefied wood is the lowest cost pathway of delivering a forest residue resource when using mobile facilities. Cost savings occur against woodchip delivery for annual forest residue harvests above 2.5 million m(3) or when transport distances greater than 300 km are required. Important parameters that influence levelised delivered costs are transport distances (forest residue spatial density), haul cost factors, and initial moisture content of forest residues. Relocating mobile facilities can be optimised for lowest cost delivery as transport distances of raw biomass are reduced.

  20. Pupil Transportation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bete, Tim, Ed.

    1998-01-01

    Presents the opinions of four transportation experts on issues related to school buses. The experts respond to the following questions: will advertisements placed on buses be used to generate district revenue; will compressed natural gas or liquefied natural gas become standard fuel for school buses; and will school bus seat belts be mandatory and…