Science.gov

Sample records for mock galaxy catalogues

  1. An algorithm to build mock galaxy catalogues using MICE simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carretero, J.; Castander, F. J.; Gaztañaga, E.; Crocce, M.; Fosalba, P.

    2015-02-01

    We present a method to build mock galaxy catalogues starting from a halo catalogue that uses halo occupation distribution (HOD) recipes as well as the subhalo abundance matching (SHAM) technique. Combining both prescriptions we are able to push the absolute magnitude of the resulting catalogue to fainter luminosities than using just the SHAM technique and can interpret our results in terms of the HOD modelling. We optimize the method by populating with galaxies friends-of-friends dark matter haloes extracted from the Marenostrum Institut de Ciències de l'Espai dark matter simulations and comparing them to observational constraints. Our resulting mock galaxy catalogues manage to reproduce the observed local galaxy luminosity function and the colour-magnitude distribution as observed by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. They also reproduce the observed galaxy clustering properties as a function of luminosity and colour. In order to achieve that, the algorithm also includes scatter in the halo mass-galaxy luminosity relation derived from direct SHAM and a modified Navarro-Frenk-White mass density profile to place satellite galaxies in their host dark matter haloes. Improving on general usage of the HOD that fits the clustering for given magnitude limited samples, our catalogues are constructed to fit observations at all luminosities considered and therefore for any luminosity subsample. Overall, our algorithm is an economic procedure of obtaining galaxy mock catalogues down to faint magnitudes that are necessary to understand and interpret galaxy surveys.

  2. Fast and accurate mock catalogue generation for low-mass galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koda, Jun; Blake, Chris; Beutler, Florian; Kazin, Eyal; Marin, Felipe

    2016-06-01

    We present an accurate and fast framework for generating mock catalogues including low-mass haloes, based on an implementation of the COmoving Lagrangian Acceleration (COLA) technique. Multiple realisations of mock catalogues are crucial for analyses of large-scale structure, but conventional N-body simulations are too computationally expensive for the production of thousands of realizations. We show that COLA simulations can produce accurate mock catalogues with a moderate computation resource for low- to intermediate-mass galaxies in 1012 M⊙ haloes, both in real and redshift space. COLA simulations have accurate peculiar velocities, without systematic errors in the velocity power spectra for k ≤ 0.15 h Mpc-1, and with only 3-per cent error for k ≤ 0.2 h Mpc-1. We use COLA with 10 time steps and a Halo Occupation Distribution to produce 600 mock galaxy catalogues of the WiggleZ Dark Energy Survey. Our parallelized code for efficient generation of accurate halo catalogues is publicly available at github.com/junkoda/cola_halo.

  3. Galaxy Cluster Mass Reconstruction Project - II. Quantifying scatter and bias using contrasting mock catalogues

    DOE PAGES

    Old, L.; Wojtak, R.; Mamon, G. A.; ...

    2015-03-26

    Our paper is the second in a series in which we perform an extensive comparison of various galaxy-based cluster mass estimation techniques that utilize the positions, velocities and colours of galaxies. Our aim is to quantify the scatter, systematic bias and completeness of cluster masses derived from a diverse set of 25 galaxy-based methods using two contrasting mock galaxy catalogues based on a sophisticated halo occupation model and a semi-analytic model. Analysing 968 clusters, we find a wide range in the rms errors in log M200c delivered by the different methods (0.18–1.08 dex, i.e. a factor of ~1.5–12), with abundance-matchingmore » and richness methods providing the best results, irrespective of the input model assumptions. In addition, certain methods produce a significant number of catastrophic cases where the mass is under- or overestimated by a factor greater than 10. Given the steeply falling high-mass end of the cluster mass function, we recommend that richness- or abundance-matching-based methods are used in conjunction with these methods as a sanity check for studies selecting high-mass clusters. We also see a stronger correlation of the recovered to input number of galaxies for both catalogues in comparison with the group/cluster mass, however, this does not guarantee that the correct member galaxies are being selected. Finally, we did not observe significantly higher scatter for either mock galaxy catalogues. These results have implications for cosmological analyses that utilize the masses, richnesses, or abundances of clusters, which have different uncertainties when different methods are used.« less

  4. Galaxy Cluster Mass Reconstruction Project - II. Quantifying scatter and bias using contrasting mock catalogues

    SciTech Connect

    Old, L.; Wojtak, R.; Mamon, G. A.; Skibba, R. A.; Pearce, F. R.; Croton, D.; Bamford, S.; Behroozi, P.; de Carvalho, R.; Munoz-Cuartas, J. C.; Gifford, D.; Gray, M. E.; der Linden, A. v.; Merrifield, M. R.; Muldrew, S. I.; Muller, V.; Pearson, R. J.; Ponman, T. J.; Rozo, E.; Rykoff, E.; Saro, A.; Sepp, T.; Sifon, C.; Tempel, E.

    2015-03-26

    Our paper is the second in a series in which we perform an extensive comparison of various galaxy-based cluster mass estimation techniques that utilize the positions, velocities and colours of galaxies. Our aim is to quantify the scatter, systematic bias and completeness of cluster masses derived from a diverse set of 25 galaxy-based methods using two contrasting mock galaxy catalogues based on a sophisticated halo occupation model and a semi-analytic model. Analysing 968 clusters, we find a wide range in the rms errors in log M200c delivered by the different methods (0.18–1.08 dex, i.e. a factor of ~1.5–12), with abundance-matching and richness methods providing the best results, irrespective of the input model assumptions. In addition, certain methods produce a significant number of catastrophic cases where the mass is under- or overestimated by a factor greater than 10. Given the steeply falling high-mass end of the cluster mass function, we recommend that richness- or abundance-matching-based methods are used in conjunction with these methods as a sanity check for studies selecting high-mass clusters. We also see a stronger correlation of the recovered to input number of galaxies for both catalogues in comparison with the group/cluster mass, however, this does not guarantee that the correct member galaxies are being selected. Finally, we did not observe significantly higher scatter for either mock galaxy catalogues. These results have implications for cosmological analyses that utilize the masses, richnesses, or abundances of clusters, which have different uncertainties when different methods are used.

  5. Galaxy Cluster Mass Reconstruction Project - II. Quantifying scatter and bias using contrasting mock catalogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Old, L.; Wojtak, R.; Mamon, G. A.; Skibba, R. A.; Pearce, F. R.; Croton, D.; Bamford, S.; Behroozi, P.; de Carvalho, R.; Muñoz-Cuartas, J. C.; Gifford, D.; Gray, M. E.; der Linden, A. von; Merrifield, M. R.; Muldrew, S. I.; Müller, V.; Pearson, R. J.; Ponman, T. J.; Rozo, E.; Rykoff, E.; Saro, A.; Sepp, T.; Sifón, C.; Tempel, E.

    2015-05-01

    This paper is the second in a series in which we perform an extensive comparison of various galaxy-based cluster mass estimation techniques that utilize the positions, velocities and colours of galaxies. Our aim is to quantify the scatter, systematic bias and completeness of cluster masses derived from a diverse set of 25 galaxy-based methods using two contrasting mock galaxy catalogues based on a sophisticated halo occupation model and a semi-analytic model. Analysing 968 clusters, we find a wide range in the rms errors in log M200c delivered by the different methods (0.18-1.08 dex, i.e. a factor of ˜1.5-12), with abundance-matching and richness methods providing the best results, irrespective of the input model assumptions. In addition, certain methods produce a significant number of catastrophic cases where the mass is under- or overestimated by a factor greater than 10. Given the steeply falling high-mass end of the cluster mass function, we recommend that richness- or abundance-matching-based methods are used in conjunction with these methods as a sanity check for studies selecting high-mass clusters. We see a stronger correlation of the recovered to input number of galaxies for both catalogues in comparison with the group/cluster mass, however, this does not guarantee that the correct member galaxies are being selected. We do not observe significantly higher scatter for either mock galaxy catalogues. Our results have implications for cosmological analyses that utilize the masses, richnesses, or abundances of clusters, which have different uncertainties when different methods are used.

  6. nIFTy cosmology: Galaxy/halo mock catalogue comparison project on clustering statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Zhao, Cheng; Prada, Francisco; Munari, Emiliano; Avila, Santiago; Izard, Albert; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Manera, Marc; Monaco, Pierluigi; Murray, Steven; Knebe, Alexander; Scóccola, Claudia G.; Yepes, Gustavo; Garcia-Bellido, Juan; Marín, Felipe A.; Müller, Volker; Skibba, Ramin; Crocce, Martin; Fosalba, Pablo; Gottlöber, Stefan; Klypin, Anatoly A.; Power, Chris; Tao, Charling; Turchaninov, Victor

    2015-09-01

    We present a comparison of major methodologies of fast generating mock halo or galaxy catalogues. The comparison is done for two-point (power spectrum and two-point correlation function in real and redshift space), and the three-point clustering statistics (bispectrum and three-point correlation function). The reference catalogues are drawn from the BigMultiDark N-body simulation. Both friend-of-friends (including distinct haloes only) and spherical overdensity (including distinct haloes and subhalos) catalogues have been used with the typical number density of a large volume galaxy surveys. We demonstrate that a proper biasing model is essential for reproducing the power spectrum at quasi-linear and even smaller scales. With respect to various clustering statistics, a methodology based on perturbation theory and a realistic biasing model leads to very good agreement with N-body simulations. However, for the quadrupole of the correlation function or the power spectrum, only the method based on semi-N-body simulation could reach high accuracy (1 per cent level) at small scales, i.e. r < 25 h-1 Mpc or k > 0.15 h Mpc-1. Full N-body solutions will remain indispensable to produce reference catalogues. Nevertheless, we have demonstrated that the more efficient approximate solvers can reach a few per cent accuracy in terms of clustering statistics at the scales interesting for the large-scale structure analysis. This makes them useful for massive production aimed at covariance studies, to scan large parameter spaces, and to estimate uncertainties in data analysis techniques, such as baryon acoustic oscillation reconstruction, redshift distortion measurements, etc.

  7. Redshift weights for baryon acoustic oscillations: application to mock galaxy catalogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Fangzhou; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; White, Martin; Ross, Ashley J.; Zhao, Gongbo

    2016-09-01

    Large redshift surveys capable of measuring the baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) signal have proven to be an effective way of measuring the distance-redshift relation in cosmology. Building off the work in Zhu et al., we develop a technique to directly constrain the distance-redshift relation from BAO measurements without splitting the sample into redshift bins. We apply the redshift weighting technique in Zhu et al. to the clustering of galaxies from 1000 Quick particle mesh (QPM) mock simulations after reconstruction and achieve a 0.75 per cent measurement of the angular diameter distance DA at z = 0.64 and the same precision for Hubble parameter H at z = 0.29. These QPM mock catalogues mimic the clustering and noise level of the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey Data Release 12 (DR12). We compress the correlation functions in the redshift direction on to a set of weighted correlation functions. These estimators give unbiased DA and H measurements across the entire redshift range of the combined sample. We demonstrate the effectiveness of redshift weighting in improving the distance and Hubble parameter estimates. Instead of measuring at a single `effective' redshift as in traditional analyses, we report our DA and H measurements at all redshifts. The measured fractional error of DA ranges from 1.53 per cent at z = 0.2 to 0.75 per cent at z = 0.64. The fractional error of H ranges from 0.75 per cent at z = 0.29 to 2.45 per cent at z = 0.7. Our measurements are consistent with a Fisher forecast to within 10-20 per cent depending on the pivot redshift. We further show the results are robust against the choice of fiducial cosmologies, galaxy bias models, and redshift-space distortions streaming parameters.

  8. The clustering of galaxies in the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: mock galaxy catalogues for the BOSS Final Data Release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Zhao, Cheng; Prada, Francisco; Gil-Marín, Héctor; Guo, Hong; Yepes, Gustavo; Klypin, Anatoly; Scóccola, Claudia G.; Tinker, Jeremy; McBride, Cameron; Reid, Beth; Sánchez, Ariel G.; Salazar-Albornoz, Salvador; Grieb, Jan Niklas; Vargas-Magana, Mariana; Cuesta, Antonio J.; Neyrinck, Mark; Beutler, Florian; Comparat, Johan; Percival, Will J.; Ross, Ashley

    2016-03-01

    We reproduce the galaxy clustering catalogue from the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey Final Data Release (BOSS DR11&DR12) with high fidelity on all relevant scales in order to allow a robust analysis of baryon acoustic oscillations and redshift space distortions. We have generated (6000) 12 288 MultiDark PATCHY BOSS (DR11) DR12 light cones corresponding to an effective volume of ˜192 000 [h-1 Gpc]3 (the largest ever simulated volume), including cosmic evolution in the redshift range from 0.15 to 0.75. The mocks have been calibrated using a reference galaxy catalogue based on the halo abundance matching modelling of the BOSS DR11&DR12 galaxy clustering data and on the data themselves. The production follows three steps. First, we apply the PATCHY code to generate a dark matter field and an object distribution including non-linear stochastic galaxy bias. Secondly, we run the halo/stellar distribution reconstruction HADRON code to assign masses to the various objects. This step uses the mass distribution as a function of local density and non-local indicators (i.e. tidal field tensor eigenvalues and relative halo exclusion separation for massive objects) from the reference simulation applied to the corresponding patchy dark matter and galaxy distribution. Finally, we apply the SUGAR code to build the light cones. The resulting MultiDarkPATCHY mock light cones reproduce the number density, selection function, survey geometry, and in general within 1σ, for arbitrary stellar mass bins, the power spectrum up to k = 0.3 h Mpc-1, the two-point correlation functions down to a few Mpc scales, and the three-point statistics of the BOSS DR11&DR12 galaxy samples.

  9. Creating mock catalogues of stellar haloes from cosmological simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowing, Ben; Wang, Wenting; Cooper, Andrew; Kennedy, Rachel; Helly, John; Cole, Shaun; Frenk, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    We present a new technique for creating mock catalogues of the individual stars that make up the accreted component of stellar haloes in cosmological simulations and show how the catalogues can be used to test and interpret observational data. The catalogues are constructed from a combination of methods. A semi-analytic galaxy formation model is used to calculate the star formation history in haloes in an N-body simulation and dark matter particles are tagged with this stellar mass. The tags are converted into individual stars using a stellar population synthesis model to obtain the number density and evolutionary stage of the stars, together with a phase-space sampling method that distributes the stars while ensuring that the phase-space structure of the original N-body simulation is maintained. A set of catalogues based on the Λ cold dark matter Aquarius simulations of Milky Way mass haloes have been created and made publicly available on a website. Two example applications are discussed that demonstrate the power and flexibility of the mock catalogues. We show how the rich stellar substructure that survives in the stellar halo precludes a simple measurement of its density profile and demonstrate explicitly how pencil-beam surveys can return almost any value for the slope of the profile. We also show that localized variations in the abundance of particular types of stars, a signature of differences in the composition of stellar populations, allow streams to be easily identified.

  10. The clustering of the SDSS main galaxy sample - II. Mock galaxy catalogues and a measurement of the growth of structure from redshift space distortions at z = 0.15

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howlett, Cullan; Ross, Ashley J.; Samushia, Lado; Percival, Will J.; Manera, Marc

    2015-05-01

    We measure redshift space distortions in the two-point correlation function of a sample of 63 163 spectroscopically identified galaxies with z < 0.2, an epoch where there are currently only limited measurements, from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 main galaxy sample (MGS). Our sample, which we denote MGS, covers 6813 deg2 with an effective redshift zeff = 0.15 and is described in our companion paper (Paper I), which concentrates on baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) measurements. In order to validate the fitting methods used in both papers, and derive errors, we create and analyse 1000 mock catalogues using a new algorithm called PICOLA to generate accurate dark matter fields. Haloes are then selected using a friends-of-friends algorithm, and populated with galaxies using a halo-occupation distribution fitted to the data. Using errors derived from these mocks, we fit a model to the monopole and quadrupole moments of the MGS correlation function. If we assume no Alcock-Paczynski (AP) effect (valid at z = 0.15 for any smooth model of the expansion history), we measure the amplitude of the velocity field, fσ8, at z = 0.15 to be 0.49_{-0.14}^{+0.15}. We also measure fσ8 including the AP effect. This latter measurement can be freely combined with recent cosmic microwave background results to constrain the growth index of fluctuations, γ. Assuming a background Λ cold dark matter cosmology and combining with current BAO data, we find γ = 0.64 ± 0.09, which is consistent with the prediction of general relativity (γ ≈ 0.55), though with a slight preference for higher γ and hence models with weaker gravitational interactions.

  11. The revised Flat Galaxy Catalogue.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karachentsev, I. D.; Karachentseva, V. E.; Kudrya, Yu. N.; Sharina, M. E.; Parnovskij, S. L.

    The authors present a new improved and completed version of the Flat Galaxy Catalogue (FGC) named the Revised Flat Galaxy Catalogue (RFGC) containing 4236 thin edge-on spiral galaxies and covering the whole sky. The Catalogue is intended to study large-scale cosmic streamings as well as other problems of observational cosmology. The dipole moment of distribution of the RFGC galaxies (l = 273°, b = +19°) lies within statistical errors (±10°) in the direction of the Local Group motion towards the Microwave Background Radiation.

  12. Minimization of biases in galaxy peculiar velocity catalogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorce, Jenny G.

    2015-07-01

    Galaxy distances and derived radial peculiar velocity catalogues constitute valuable data sets to study the dynamics of the Local Universe. However, such catalogues suffer from biases whose effects increase with the distance. Malmquist biases and lognormal error distribution affect the catalogues. Velocity fields of the Local Universe reconstructed with these catalogues present a spurious overall infall on to the Local Volume if they are not corrected for biases. Such an infall is observed in the reconstructed velocity field obtained when applying the Bayesian Wiener-Filter technique to the raw second radial peculiar velocity catalogue of the Cosmicflows project. In this paper, an iterative method to reduce spurious non-Gaussianities in the radial peculiar velocity distribution, to retroactively derive overall better distance estimates resulting in a minimization of the effects of biases, is presented. This method is tested with mock catalogues. To control the cosmic variance, mocks are built out of different cosmological constrained simulations which resemble the Local Universe. To realistically reproduce the effects of biases, the mocks are constructed to be lookalikes of the second data release of the Cosmicflows project, with respect to the size, distribution of data and distribution of errors. Using a suite of mock catalogues, the outcome of the correction is verified to be affected neither by the added error realization, nor by the data point selection, nor by the constrained simulation. Results are similar for the different tested mocks. After correction, the general infall is satisfactorily suppressed. The method allows us to obtain catalogues which together with the Wiener-Filter technique give reconstructions approximating non-biased velocity fields at 100-150 km s-1 (2-3 h-1 Mpc in terms of linear displacement), the linear theory threshold.

  13. HALOGEN: a tool for fast generation of mock halo catalogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avila, Santiago; Murray, Steven G.; Knebe, Alexander; Power, Chris; Robotham, Aaron S. G.; Garcia-Bellido, Juan

    2015-06-01

    We present a simple method of generating approximate synthetic halo catalogues: HALOGEN. This method uses a combination of second-order Lagrangian Perturbation Theory (2LPT) in order to generate the large-scale matter distribution, analytical mass functions to generate halo masses, and a single-parameter stochastic model for halo bias to position haloes. HALOGEN represents a simplification of similar recently published methods. Our method is constrained to recover the two-point function at intermediate (10 h-1 Mpc < r < 50 h-1 Mpc) scales, which we show is successful to within 2 per cent. Larger scales (˜100 h-1 Mpc) are reproduced to within 15 per cent. We compare several other statistics (e.g. power spectrum, point distribution function, redshift space distortions) with results from N-body simulations to determine the validity of our method for different purposes. One of the benefits of HALOGEN is its flexibility, and we demonstrate this by showing how it can be adapted to varying cosmologies and simulation specifications. A driving motivation for the development of such approximate schemes is the need to compute covariance matrices and study the systematic errors for large galaxy surveys, which requires thousands of simulated realizations. We discuss the applicability of our method in this context, and conclude that it is well suited to mass production of appropriate halo catalogues. The code is publicly available at https://github.com/savila/halogen.

  14. Galaxy simulations: Kinematics and mock observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moody, Christopher E.

    2013-08-01

    There are six topics to my thesis, which are: (1) slow rotator production in varied simulation schemes and kinematically decoupled cores and twists in those simulations, (2) the change in number of clumps in radiation pressure and no-radiation pressure simulations, (3) Sunrise experiments and failures including UVJ color-color dust experiments and UVbeta slopes, (4) the Sunrise image pipeline and algorithms. Cosmological simulations of have typically produced too many stars at early times. We find that the additional radiation pressure (RP) feedback suppresses star formation globally by a factor of ~ 3. Despite this reduction, the simulation still overproduces stars by a factor of ~ 2 with respect to the predictions provided by abundance matching methods. In simulations with RP the number of clumps falls dramatically. However, only clumps with masses Mclump/Mdisk ≤ 8% are impacted by the inclusion of RP, and clump counts above this range are comparable. Above this mass, the difference between and RP and no-RP contrast ratios diminishes. If we restrict our selection to galaxies hosting at least a single clump above this mass range then clump numbers, contrast ratios, survival fractions and total clump masses show little discrepancy between RP and no-RP simulations. By creating mock Hubble Space Telescope observations we find that the number of clumps is slightly reduced in simulations with RP. We demonstrate that clumps found in any single gas, stellar, or mock observation image are not necessarily clumps found in another map, and that there are few clumps common to multiple maps. New kinematic observations from ATLAS3D have highlighted the need to understand the evolutionary mechanism leading to a spectrum of fast-rotator and slow-rotators in early-type galaxies. We address the formation of slow and fast rotators through a series of controlled, comprehensive hydrodynamic simulations sampling idealized galaxy merger formation scenarios constructed from model

  15. Assessing colour-dependent occupation statistics inferred from galaxy group catalogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Duncan; van den Bosch, Frank C.; Hearin, Andrew; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Berlind, Andreas; Mo, H. J.; Tinker, Jeremy; Yang, Xiaohu

    2015-09-01

    We investigate the ability of current implementations of galaxy group finders to recover colour-dependent halo occupation statistics. To test the fidelity of group catalogue inferred statistics, we run three different group finders used in the literature over a mock that includes galaxy colours in a realistic manner. Overall, the resulting mock group catalogues are remarkably similar, and most colour-dependent statistics are recovered with reasonable accuracy. However, it is also clear that certain systematic errors arise as a consequence of correlated errors in group membership determination, central/satellite designation, and halo mass assignment. We introduce a new statistic, the halo transition probability (HTP), which captures the combined impact of all these errors. As a rule of thumb, errors tend to equalize the properties of distinct galaxy populations (i.e. red versus blue galaxies or centrals versus satellites), and to result in inferred occupation statistics that are more accurate for red galaxies than for blue galaxies. A statistic that is particularly poorly recovered from the group catalogues is the red fraction of central galaxies as a function of halo mass. Group finders do a good job in recovering galactic conformity, but also have a tendency to introduce weak conformity when none is present. We conclude that proper inference of colour-dependent statistics from group catalogues is best achieved using forward modelling (i.e. running group finders over mock data) or by implementing a correction scheme based on the HTP, as long as the latter is not too strongly model dependent.

  16. The APM Galaxy Survey - V. Catalogues of galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalton, G. B.; Maddox, S. J.; Sutherland, W. J.; Efstathiou, G.

    1997-08-01

    We describe the construction of catalogues of galaxy clusters from the APM Galaxy survey using an automated algorithm based on Abell-like selection criteria. We investigate the effects of varying several parameters in our selection algorithm, including the magnitude range and radius from the cluster centre used to estimate the cluster richnesses. We quantify the accuracy of the photometric distance estimates by comparing them with measured redshifts, and we investigate the stability and completeness of the resulting catalogues. We find that the angular correlation functions for different cluster catalogues are in good agreement with one another, and are also consistent with the observed amplitude of the spatial correlation function of rich clusters.

  17. LasDamas Mock Galaxy Catalogs for SDSS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBride, Cameron; Berlind, A.; Scoccimarro, R.; Wechsler, R.; Busha, M.; Gardner, J.; van den Bosch, F.

    2009-01-01

    The statistical strength of galaxy redshift surveys, such as the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), have ushered us into the era of precision measurements of galaxy clustering. We are now fitting physical models to measured clustering statistics. Galaxy clustering is thus in a position to directly constrain cosmological and galaxy formation theories. This paradigm shift from qualitative to quantitative demands that we understand the statistical and systematic errors in our measurements. Moreover, we must quantify the theoretical uncertainties in our models, which are no longer clearly sub-dominant to observational errors. We address this emerging need with the LasDamas project (LArge Suite of DArk MAtter Simulations) by producing an unprecedented number of independent and realistic mock galaxy catalogs. To date, we have run over 100 independent N-body realizations using a fixed cosmology and initialized using 2nd order Lagrangian perturbation theory. We populate overdensities of dark matter using the halo occupation distribution framework, designed to match both small and large scale clustering of the observed SDSS data. A series of mock galaxy catalogs matching the geometry of the final SDSS release (DR7) are created over a wide luminosity range to correspond to Main and LRG volume-limited samples. We include important observational effects, such as redshift distortions and fiber collisions. These galaxy mocks are publicly available.

  18. The Theoretical Astrophysical Observatory: Cloud-based Mock Galaxy Catalogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernyk, Maksym; Croton, Darren J.; Tonini, Chiara; Hodkinson, Luke; Hassan, Amr H.; Garel, Thibault; Duffy, Alan R.; Mutch, Simon J.; Poole, Gregory B.; Hegarty, Sarah

    2016-03-01

    We introduce the Theoretical Astrophysical Observatory (TAO), an online virtual laboratory that houses mock observations of galaxy survey data. Such mocks have become an integral part of the modern analysis pipeline. However, building them requires expert knowledge of galaxy modeling and simulation techniques, significant investment in software development, and access to high performance computing. These requirements make it difficult for a small research team or individual to quickly build a mock catalog suited to their needs. To address this TAO offers access to multiple cosmological simulations and semi-analytic galaxy formation models from an intuitive and clean web interface. Results can be funnelled through science modules and sent to a dedicated supercomputer for further processing and manipulation. These modules include the ability to (1) construct custom observer light cones from the simulation data cubes; (2) generate the stellar emission from star formation histories, apply dust extinction, and compute absolute and/or apparent magnitudes; and (3) produce mock images of the sky. All of TAO’s features can be accessed without any programming requirements. The modular nature of TAO opens it up for further expansion in the future.

  19. THE THEORETICAL ASTROPHYSICAL OBSERVATORY: CLOUD-BASED MOCK GALAXY CATALOGS

    SciTech Connect

    Bernyk, Maksym; Croton, Darren J.; Tonini, Chiara; Hodkinson, Luke; Hassan, Amr H.; Garel, Thibault; Duffy, Alan R.; Mutch, Simon J.; Poole, Gregory B.; Hegarty, Sarah

    2016-03-15

    We introduce the Theoretical Astrophysical Observatory (TAO), an online virtual laboratory that houses mock observations of galaxy survey data. Such mocks have become an integral part of the modern analysis pipeline. However, building them requires expert knowledge of galaxy modeling and simulation techniques, significant investment in software development, and access to high performance computing. These requirements make it difficult for a small research team or individual to quickly build a mock catalog suited to their needs. To address this TAO offers access to multiple cosmological simulations and semi-analytic galaxy formation models from an intuitive and clean web interface. Results can be funnelled through science modules and sent to a dedicated supercomputer for further processing and manipulation. These modules include the ability to (1) construct custom observer light cones from the simulation data cubes; (2) generate the stellar emission from star formation histories, apply dust extinction, and compute absolute and/or apparent magnitudes; and (3) produce mock images of the sky. All of TAO’s features can be accessed without any programming requirements. The modular nature of TAO opens it up for further expansion in the future.

  20. Correlation analysis of objectively defined galaxy and cluster catalogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevenson, P. R. F.; Fong, R.; Shanks, T.

    1988-10-01

    The authors present further galaxy clustering results from the objective COSMOS/UKST galaxy catalogue of Stevenson et al. They first re-examine the results of SSFM for the galaxy correlation function, wgg(θ), testing the stability of the result against possible systematic effects and extending the analysis to larger angular scales. They then use the method of Turner & Gott to automatically detect groups and clusters in these catalogues. The authors next present the cluster-galaxy cross-correlation function wcg. Finally, the above correlation analyses are carried out on simulated galaxy and cluster catalogues.

  1. Catalogue of UV sources in the Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beitia-Antero, L.; Gómez de Castro, A. I.

    2017-03-01

    The Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) ultraviolet (UV) database contains the largest photometric catalogue in the ultraviolet range; as a result GALEX photometric bands, Near UV band (NUV) and the Far UV band (FUV), have become standards. Nevertheless, the GALEX catalogue does not include bright UV sources due to the high sensitivity of its detectors, neither sources in the Galactic plane. In order to extend the GALEX database for future UV missions, we have obtained synthetic FUV and NUV photometry using the database of UV spectra generated by the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE). This database contains 63,755 spectra in the low dispersion mode (λ / δ λ ˜ 300) obtained during its 18-year lifetime. For stellar sources in the IUE database, we have selected spectra with high Signal-To-NoiseRatio (SNR) and computed FUV and NUV magnitudes using the GALEX transmission curves along with the conversion equations between flux and magnitudes provided by the mission. Besides, we have performed variability tests to determine whether the sources were variable (during the IUE observations). As a result, we have generated two different catalogues: one for non-variable stars and another one for variable sources. The former contains FUV and NUV magnitudes, while the latter gives the basic information and the FUV magnitude for each observation. The consistency of the magnitudes has been tested using White Dwarfs contained in both GALEX and IUE samples. The catalogues are available through the Centre des Donées Stellaires. The sources are distributed throughout the whole sky, with a special coverage of the Galactic plane.

  2. The EAGLE simulations of galaxy formation: Public release of halo and galaxy catalogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAlpine, S.; Helly, J. C.; Schaller, M.; Trayford, J. W.; Qu, Y.; Furlong, M.; Bower, R. G.; Crain, R. A.; Schaye, J.; Theuns, T.; Dalla Vecchia, C.; Frenk, C. S.; McCarthy, I. G.; Jenkins, A.; Rosas-Guevara, Y.; White, S. D. M.; Baes, M.; Camps, P.; Lemson, G.

    2016-04-01

    We present the public data release of halo and galaxy catalogues extracted from the EAGLE suite of cosmological hydrodynamical simulations of galaxy formation. These simulations were performed with an enhanced version of the GADGET code that includes a modified hydrodynamics solver, time-step limiter and subgrid treatments of baryonic physics, such as stellar mass loss, element-by-element radiative cooling, star formation and feedback from star formation and black hole accretion. The simulation suite includes runs performed in volumes ranging from 25 to 100 comoving megaparsecs per side, with numerical resolution chosen to marginally resolve the Jeans mass of the gas at the star formation threshold. The free parameters of the subgrid models for feedback are calibrated to the redshift z = 0 galaxy stellar mass function, galaxy sizes and black hole mass-stellar mass relation. The simulations have been shown to match a wide range of observations for present-day and higher-redshift galaxies. The raw particle data have been used to link galaxies across redshifts by creating merger trees. The indexing of the tree produces a simple way to connect a galaxy at one redshift to its progenitors at higher redshift and to identify its descendants at lower redshift. In this paper we present a relational database which we are making available for general use. A large number of properties of haloes and galaxies and their merger trees are stored in the database, including stellar masses, star formation rates, metallicities, photometric measurements and mock gri images. Complex queries can be created to explore the evolution of more than 105 galaxies, examples of which are provided in the Appendix. The relatively good and broad agreement of the simulations with a wide range of observational datasets makes the database an ideal resource for the analysis of model galaxies through time, and for connecting and interpreting observational datasets.

  3. A new catalogue of ISM content of normal galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bettoni, D.; Galletta, G.; García-Burillo, S.

    2003-07-01

    We have compiled a catalogue of the gas content for a sample of 1916 galaxies, considered to be a fair representation of ``normality''. The definition of a ``normal'' galaxy adopted in this work implies that we have purposely excluded from the catalogue galaxies having distorted morphology (such as interaction bridges, tails or lopsidedness) and/or any signature of peculiar kinematics (such as polar rings, counterrotating disks or other decoupled components). In contrast, we have included systems hosting active galactic nuclei (AGN) in the catalogue. This catalogue revises previous compendia on the ISM content of galaxies published by \\citet{bregman} and \\citet{casoli}, and compiles data available in the literature from several small samples of galaxies. Masses for warm dust, atomic and molecular gas, as well as X-ray luminosities have been converted to a uniform distance scale taken from the Catalogue of Principal Galaxies (PGC). We have used two different normalization factors to explore the variation of the gas content along the Hubble sequence: the blue luminosity (LB) and the square of linear diameter (D225). Our catalogue significantly improves the statistics of previous reference catalogues and can be used in future studies to define a template ISM content for ``normal'' galaxies along the Hubble sequence. The catalogue can be accessed on-line and is also available at the Centre des Données Stellaires (CDS). The catalogue is available in electronic form at http://dipastro.pd.astro.it/galletta/ismcat and at the CDS via anonymous ftp to\\ cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via\\ http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/405/5

  4. Maximum likelihood random galaxy catalogues and luminosity function estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, Shaun

    2011-09-01

    We present a new algorithm to generate a random (unclustered) version of an magnitude limited observational galaxy redshift catalogue. It takes into account both galaxy evolution and the perturbing effects of large-scale structure. The key to the algorithm is a maximum likelihood (ML) method for jointly estimating both the luminosity function (LF) and the overdensity as a function of redshift. The random catalogue algorithm then works by cloning each galaxy in the original catalogue, with the number of clones determined by the ML solution. Each of these cloned galaxies is then assigned a random redshift uniformly distributed over the accessible survey volume, taking account of the survey magnitude limit(s) and, optionally, both luminosity and number density evolution. The resulting random catalogues, which can be employed in traditional estimates of galaxy clustering, make fuller use of the information available in the original catalogue and hence are superior to simply fitting a functional form to the observed redshift distribution. They are particularly well suited to studies of the dependence of galaxy clustering on galaxy properties as each galaxy in the random catalogue has the same list of attributes as measured for the galaxies in the genuine catalogue. The derivation of the joint overdensity and LF estimator reveals the limit in which the ML estimate reduces to the standard 1/Vmax LF estimate, namely when one makes the prior assumption that the are no fluctuations in the radial overdensity. The new ML estimator can be viewed as a generalization of the 1/Vmax estimate in which Vmax is replaced by a density corrected Vdc, max.

  5. Galaxy triplets in Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 - I. Catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Mill, Ana Laura; Duplancic, Fernanda; García Lambas, Diego; Valotto, Carlos; Sodré, Laerte

    2012-04-01

    We present a new catalogue of galaxy triplets derived from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 7. The identification of systems was performed considering galaxies brighter than Mr=-20.5 and imposing constraints over the projected distances, radial velocity differences of neighbouring galaxies and isolation. To improve the identification of triplets, we employed a data pixelization scheme, which allows us to handle large amounts of data as in the SDSS photometric survey. Using spectroscopic and photometric data in the redshift range 0.01 ≤z≤ 0.40, we obtain 5901 triplet candidates. We have used a mock catalogue to analyse the completeness and contamination of our methods. The results show a high level of completeness (˜80 per cent) and low contamination (˜5 per cent). By using photometric and spectroscopic data, we have also addressed the effects of fibre collisions in the spectroscopic sample. We have defined an isolation criterion considering the distance of the triplet brightest galaxy to the closest neighbour cluster, to describe a global environment, as well as the galaxies within a fixed aperture, around the triplet brightest galaxy, to measure the local environment. The final catalogue comprises 1092 isolated triplets of galaxies in the redshift range 0.01 ≤z≤ 0.40. Our results show that photometric redshifts provide very useful information, allowing us to complete the sample of nearby systems whose detection is affected by fibre collisions, as well as extending the detection of triplets to large distances, where spectroscopic redshifts are not available.

  6. IMPROVED MOCK GALAXY CATALOGS FOR THE DEEP2 GALAXY REDSHIFT SURVEY FROM SUBHALO ABUNDANCE AND ENVIRONMENT MATCHING

    SciTech Connect

    Gerke, Brian F.; Wechsler, Risa H.; Behroozi, Peter S.; Yan, Renbin; Coil, Alison L.

    2013-09-15

    We develop empirical methods for modeling the galaxy population and populating cosmological N-body simulations with mock galaxies according to the observed properties of galaxies in survey data. We use these techniques to produce a new set of mock catalogs for the DEEP2 Galaxy Redshift Survey based on the output of the high-resolution Bolshoi simulation, as well as two other simulations with different cosmological parameters, all of which we release for public use. The mock-catalog creation technique uses subhalo abundance matching to assign galaxy luminosities to simulated dark-matter halos. It then adds color information to the resulting mock galaxies in a manner that depends on the local galaxy density, in order to reproduce the measured color-environment relation in the data. In the course of constructing the catalogs, we test various models for including scatter in the relation between halo mass and galaxy luminosity, within the abundance-matching framework. We find that there is no constant-scatter model that can simultaneously reproduce both the luminosity function and the autocorrelation function of DEEP2. This result has implications for galaxy-formation theory, and it restricts the range of contexts in which the mock catalogs can be usefully applied. Nevertheless, careful comparisons show that our new mock catalogs accurately reproduce a wide range of the other properties of the DEEP2 catalog, suggesting that they can be used to gain a detailed understanding of various selection effects in DEEP2.

  7. Optimal weights for measuring redshift space distortions in multitracer galaxy catalogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, David W.; Samushia, Lado; Gagrani, Praful

    2016-12-01

    Since the volume accessible to galaxy surveys is fundamentally limited, it is extremely important to analyse available data in the most optimal fashion. One way of enhancing the cosmological information extracted from the clustering of galaxies is by weighting the galaxy field. The most widely used weighting schemes assign weights to galaxies based on the average local density in the region (FKP weights) and their bias with respect to the dark matter field (PVP weights). They are designed to minimize the fractional variance of the galaxy power-spectrum. We demonstrate that the currently used bias dependent weighting scheme can be further optimized for specific cosmological parameters. We develop a procedure for computing the optimal weights and test them against mock catalogues for which the values of all fitting parameters, as well as the input power-spectrum are known. We show that by applying these weights to the joint power-spectrum of emission line galaxies and luminous red galaxies from the Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument survey, the variance in the measured growth rate parameter can be reduced by as much as 36 per cent.

  8. The SuperCOSMOS all-sky galaxy catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peacock, J. A.; Hambly, N. C.; Bilicki, M.; MacGillivray, H. T.; Miller, L.; Read, M. A.; Tritton, S. B.

    2016-10-01

    We describe the construction of an all-sky galaxy catalogue, using SuperCOSMOS scans of Schmidt photographic plates from the UK Schmidt Telescope and Second Palomar Observatory Sky Survey. The photographic photometry is calibrated using Sloan Digital Sky Survey data, with results that are linear to 2 per cent or better. All-sky photometric uniformity is achieved by matching plate overlaps and also by requiring homogeneity in optical-to-2MASS colours, yielding zero-points that are uniform to 0.03 mag or better. The typical AB depths achieved are BJ < 21, RF < 19.5 and IN < 18.5, with little difference between hemispheres. In practice, the IN plates are shallower than the BJ and RF plates, so for most purposes we advocate the use of a catalogue selected in these two latter bands. At high Galactic latitudes, this catalogue is approximately 90 per cent complete with 5 per cent stellar contamination; we quantify how the quality degrades towards the Galactic plane. At low latitudes, there are many spurious galaxy candidates resulting from stellar blends: these approximately match the surface density of true galaxies at |b| = 30°. Above this latitude, the catalogue limited in BJ and RF contains in total about 20 million galaxy candidates, of which 75 per cent are real. This contamination can be removed, and the sky coverage extended, by matching with additional data sets. This SuperCOSMOS catalogue has been matched with 2MASS and with WISE, yielding quasi-all-sky samples of respectively 1.5 million and 18.5 million galaxies, to median redshifts of 0.08 and 0.20. This legacy data set thus continues to offer a valuable resource for large-angle cosmological investigations.

  9. The MICE Grand Challenge light-cone simulation - III. Galaxy lensing mocks from all-sky lensing maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fosalba, P.; Gaztañaga, E.; Castander, F. J.; Crocce, M.

    2015-02-01

    In Paper I of this series, we presented a new N-body light-cone simulation from the MICE Collaboration, the MICE Grand Challenge (MICE-GC), containing about 70 billion dark-matter particles in a (3 h-1 Gpc)3 comoving volume, from which we built halo and galaxy catalogues using a Halo Occupation Distribution and Halo Abundance Matching technique, as presented in the companion Paper II. Given its large volume and fine mass resolution, the MICE-GC simulation also allows an accurate modelling of the lensing observables from upcoming wide and deep galaxy surveys. In the last paper of this series (Paper III), we describe the construction of all-sky lensing maps, following the `Onion Universe' approach, and discuss their properties in the light-cone up to z = 1.4 with sub-arcminute spatial resolution. By comparing the convergence power spectrum in the MICE-GC to lower mass-resolution (i.e. particle mass ˜1011 h-1 M⊙) simulations, we find that resolution effects are at the 5 per cent level for multipoles ℓ ˜ 103 and 20 per cent for ℓ ˜ 104. Resolution effects have a much lower impact on our simulation, as shown by comparing the MICE-GC to recent numerical fits by Takahashi. We use the all-sky lensing maps to model galaxy lensing properties, such as the convergence, shear, and lensed magnitudes and positions, and validate them thoroughly using galaxy shear auto and cross-correlations in harmonic and configuration space. Our results show that the galaxy lensing mocks here presented can be used to accurately model lensing observables down to arcminute scales. Accompanying this series of papers, we make a first public data release of the MICE-GC galaxy mock, the MICECAT v1.0, through a dedicated web-portal for the MICE simulations, http://cosmohub.pic.es, to help developing and exploiting the new generation of astronomical surveys.

  10. The analysis of realistic stellar Gaia mock catalogues - I. Red clump stars as tracers of the central bar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero-Gómez, M.; Figueras, F.; Antoja, T.; Abedi, H.; Aguilar, L.

    2015-02-01

    In this first paper, we simulate the population of disc red clump stars to be observed by Gaia. We generate a set of test particles and we evolve it in a 3D barred Milky Way like galactic potential. We assign physical properties of the red clump trace population and a realistic 3D interstellar extinction model. We add Gaia observational constraints and an error model according to the pre-commissioning scientific performance assessments. We present and analyse two mock catalogues, offered to the community, that are an excellent test bed for testing tools being developed for the future scientific exploitation of Gaia data. The first catalogue contains stars up to Gaia G˜20, while the second is the subset containing Gaia radial velocity data with a maximum error of σ _{V_r}=10 km s-1. Here, we present first attempts to characterize the density structure of the Galactic bar in the Gaia space of observables. The Gaia large errors in parallax and the high interstellar extinction in the inner parts of the Galactic disc prevent us to model the bar overdensity. This result suggests the need to combine Gaia and IR data to undertake such studies. We find that IR photometric distances for this Gaia sample allow us to recover the Galactic bar orientation angle with an accuracy of ˜5°.

  11. Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) blended spectra catalogue: strong galaxy-galaxy lens and occulting galaxy pair candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holwerda, B. W.; Baldry, I. K.; Alpaslan, M.; Bauer, A.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Brough, S.; Brown, M. J. I.; Cluver, M. E.; Conselice, C.; Driver, S. P.; Hopkins, A. M.; Jones, D. H.; López-Sánchez, Á. R.; Loveday, J.; Meyer, M. J.; Moffett, A.

    2015-06-01

    We present the catalogue of blended galaxy spectra from the Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey. These are cases where light from two galaxies are significantly detected in a single GAMA fibre. Galaxy pairs identified from their blended spectrum fall into two principal classes: they are either strong lenses, a passive galaxy lensing an emission-line galaxy; or occulting galaxies, serendipitous overlaps of two galaxies, of any type. Blended spectra can thus be used to reliably identify strong lenses for follow-up observations (high-resolution imaging) and occulting pairs, especially those that are a late-type partly obscuring an early-type galaxy which are of interest for the study of dust content of spiral and irregular galaxies. The GAMA survey setup and its AUTOZ automated redshift determination were used to identify candidate blended galaxy spectra from the cross-correlation peaks. We identify 280 blended spectra with a minimum velocity separation of 600 km s-1, of which 104 are lens pair candidates, 71 emission-line-passive pairs, 78 are pairs of emission-line galaxies and 27 are pairs of galaxies with passive spectra. We have visually inspected the candidates in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and Kilo Degree Survey (KiDS) images. Many blended objects are ellipticals with blue fuzz (Ef in our classification). These latter `Ef' classifications are candidates for possible strong lenses, massive ellipticals with an emission-line galaxy in one or more lensed images. The GAMA lens and occulting galaxy candidate samples are similar in size to those identified in the entire SDSS. This blended spectrum sample stands as a testament of the power of this highly complete, second-largest spectroscopic survey in existence and offers the possibility to expand e.g. strong gravitational lens surveys.

  12. An extensive catalogue of early-type galaxies in the nearby Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabringhausen, J.; Fellhauer, M.

    2016-08-01

    We present a catalogue of 1715 early-type galaxies from the literature, spanning the luminosity range from faint dwarf spheroidal galaxies to giant elliptical galaxies. The aim of this catalogue is to be one of the most comprehensive and publicly available collections of data on early-type galaxies. The emphasis in this catalogue lies on dwarf elliptical galaxies, for which some samples with detailed data have been published recently. For almost all of the early-type galaxies included in it, this catalogue contains data on their locations, distances, redshifts, half-light radii, the masses of their stellar populations and apparent magnitudes in various passbands. Data on metallicity and various colours are available for a majority of the galaxies presented here. The data on magnitudes, colours, metallicities and masses of the stellar populations are supplemented with entries that are based on fits to data from simple stellar population models and existing data from observations. Also, some simple transformations have been applied to the data on magnitudes, colours and metallicities in this catalogue, in order to increase the homogeneity of these data. Estimates on the Sérsic profiles, internal velocity dispersions, maximum rotational velocities, dynamical masses and ages are listed for several hundreds of the galaxies in this catalogue. Finally, each quantity listed in this catalogue is accompanied with information on its source, so that users of this catalogue can easily exclude data that they do not consider as reliable enough for their purposes.

  13. Apples to apples A2 - I. Realistic galaxy simulated catalogues and photometric redshift predictions for next-generation surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ascaso, B.; Mei, S.; Benítez, N.

    2015-11-01

    We present new mock catalogues for two of the largest Stage IV next-generation surveys in the optical and infrared: Large Synoptic Sky Telescope (LSST) and Euclid, based on an N-body simulation+semi-analytical cone with a posterior modification with PHOTREAL. This technique modifies the original photometry by using an empirical library of spectral templates to make it more realistic. The reliability of the catalogues is confirmed by comparing the obtained colour-magnitude relation, the luminosity and mass function and the angular correlation function with those of real data. Consistent comparisons between the expected photometric redshifts for different surveys are also provided. Very deep near-infrared surveys such as Euclid will provide very good performance (Δz/(1 + z) ˜ 0.025-0.053) down to H ˜ 24 AB mag and up to z ˜ 3 depending on the optical observations available from the ground, whereas extremely deep optical surveys such as LSST will obtain an overall lower photometric redshift resolution (Δz/(1 + z) ˜ 0.045) down to i ˜ 27.5 AB mag, being considerably improved (Δz/(1 + z) ˜ 0.035) if we restrict the sample down to i ˜ 24 AB mag. Those numbers can be substantially upgraded by selecting a subsample of galaxies with the best quality photometric redshifts. We finally discuss the impact that these surveys will have for the community in terms of photometric redshift legacy. This is the first of a series of papers where we set a framework for comparability between mock catalogues and observations with a particular focus on cluster surveys. The Euclid and LSST mocks are made publicly available.

  14. The AMIGA sample of isolated galaxies. IV. A catalogue of neighbours around isolated galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verley, S.; Odewahn, S. C.; Verdes-Montenegro, L.; Leon, S.; Combes, F.; Sulentic, J.; Bergond, G.; Espada, D.; García, E.; Lisenfeld, U.; Sabater, J.

    2007-08-01

    Context: Studies of the effects of environment on galaxy properties and evolution require well defined control samples. Such isolated galaxy samples have up to now been small or poorly defined. The AMIGA project (Analysis of the interstellar Medium of Isolated GAlaxies) represents an attempt to define a statistically useful sample of the most isolated galaxies in the local (z ≤ 0.05) Universe. Aims: A suitable large sample for the AMIGA project already exists, the Catalogue of Isolated Galaxies (CIG, Karachentseva, 1973, Astrofizicheskie Issledovaniia Izvestiya Spetsial'noj Astrofizicheskoj Observatorii, 8, 3; 1050 galaxies), and we use this sample as a starting point to refine and perform a better quantification of its isolation properties. Methods: Digitised POSS-I E images were analysed out to a minimum projected radius R ≥ 0.5 Mpc around 950 CIG galaxies (those within Vr = 1500 km s-1 were excluded). We identified all galaxy candidates in each field brighter than B = 17.5 with a high degree of confidence using the LMORPHO software. We generated a catalogue of approximately 54 000 potential neighbours (redshifts exist for ≈30% of this sample). Results: Six hundred sixty-six galaxies pass and two hundred eighty-four fail the original CIG isolation criterion. The available redshift data confirm that our catalogue involves a largely background population rather than physically associated neighbours. We find that the exclusion of neighbours within a factor of four in size around each CIG galaxy, employed in the original isolation criterion, corresponds to Δ Vr ≈ 18 000 km s-1 indicating that it was a conservative limit. Conclusions: Galaxies in the CIG have been found to show different degrees of isolation. We conclude that a quantitative measure of this is mandatory. It will be the subject of future work based on the catalogue of neighbours obtained here. Full Table [see full text] is only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc

  15. The Many Faces of Galaxy Clusters: Mock Observations of Cluster Populations in Multiple Wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nord, Brian; Evrard, A. E.; Rasia, E.; Stanek, R.

    2008-05-01

    Clusters of Galaxies trace the cosmic mass density field and thus have have potential as sensitive probes of the universe's energy content, including Dark Energy. To form a complete and unbiased perspective of these buoys, observations must occur at several wavelengths, including the X-ray, optical, and radio bands. Within the next decade, projects like the Dark Energy Survey will detect 50,000 clusters through optical observations of their galaxies. In an overlapping region of the sky, the South Pole Telescope will provide measurements of arcminute CMB anomalies, revealing the hot gas of clusters (via the Sunyaev Zeldovich effect). Independent observations of clusters--from the light of galaxies and from the scattering effect of hot gas--will allow us to address selection effects and completeness in cluster samples, as well as the definition and categorization of clusters. These efforts promise a holistic view of galaxy cluster populations; however, to properly "weigh the universe," we must precisely match observable features with masses, which are provided by the underlying dark matter halo. N-body cosmological simulations of dark matter and realistic baryonic components (e.g., hydrodynamics, AGN, star formation, etc.) offer rich, state-of-the-art venues for mock observations of cluster populations. We use re-simulations of the Millennium Run that include gas physics and pre-heating to create lightcones and then mock surveys, incorporating selection effects and survey limitations. With these mock skies, we may help to calibrate upcoming surveys (like DES and SPT), as well as to draw robust links between observable cluster properties and the underlying mass. Here, we present the recent work in construction and analysis of these mock, multi-wavelength cluster surveys.

  16. Star-galaxy separation strategies for WISE-2MASS all-sky infrared galaxy catalogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovács, András; Szapudi, István

    2015-04-01

    We combine photometric information of the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) and Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) all-sky infrared data bases, and demonstrate how to produce clean and complete galaxy catalogues for future analyses. Adding 2MASS colours to WISE photometry improves star-galaxy separation efficiency substantially at the expense of losing a small fraction of the galaxies. We find that 93 per cent of the WISE objects within W1 < 15.2 mag have a 2MASS match, and that a class of supervised machine learning algorithms, support vector machines (SVM), are efficient classifiers of objects in our multicolour data set. We constructed a training set from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey PhotoObj table with known star-galaxy separation, and determined redshift distribution of our sample from the Galaxy and Mass Assembly spectroscopic survey. Varying the combination of photometric parameters input into our algorithm we show that W1WISE - J2MASS is a simple and effective star-galaxy separator, capable of producing results comparable to the multidimensional SVM classification. We present a detailed description of our star-galaxy separation methods, and characterize the robustness of our tools in terms of contamination, completeness, and accuracy. We explore systematics of the full sky WISE-2MASS galaxy map, such as contamination from moon glow. We show that the homogeneity of the full sky galaxy map is improved by an additional J2MASS < 16.5 mag flux limit. The all-sky galaxy catalogue we present in this paper covers 21 200 deg2 with dusty regions masked out, and has an estimated stellar contamination of 1.2 per cent and completeness of 70.1 per cent among 2.4 million galaxies with zmed ≈ 0.14. WISE-2MASS galaxy maps with well controlled stellar contamination will be useful for spatial statistical analyses, including cross-correlations with other cosmological random fields, such as the cosmic microwave background. The same techniques also yield a

  17. Pressure Profiles of Distant Galaxy Clusters in the Planck Catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourdin, H.; Mazzotta, P.; Kozmanyan, A.; Jones, C.; Vikhlinin, A.

    2017-07-01

    Successive releases of Planck data have demonstrated the strength of the Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) effect in detecting hot baryons out to the galaxy cluster peripheries. To infer the hot gas pressure structure from nearby galaxy clusters to more distant objects, we developed a parametric method that models the spectral energy distribution and spatial anisotropies of both the Galactic thermal dust (GTD) and the cosmic microwave background (CMB), which are combined with the cluster SZ and dust signals. Taking advantage of the best angular resolution of the High Frequency Instrument channels (5 arcmin) and using X-ray priors in the innermost cluster regions that are not resolved with Planck, this modeling allowed us to analyze a sample of 61 nearby members of the Planck Catalogue of SZ sources (0< z< 0.5, \\tilde{z}=0.15) using the full mission data, as well as to examine a distant sample of 23 clusters (0.5< z< 1, \\tilde{z}=0.56) that have been recently followed-up with XMM-Newton and Chandra observations. We find that (i) the average shape of the mass-scaled pressure profiles agrees with results obtained by the Planck Collaboration in the nearby cluster sample, and that (ii) no sign of evolution is discernible between averaged pressure profiles of the low- and high-redshift cluster samples. In line with theoretical predictions for these halo masses and redshift ranges, the dispersion of individual profiles relative to a self-similar shape stays well below 10% inside r 500 but increases in the cluster outskirts.

  18. A new catalogue of polar-ring galaxies selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moiseev, Alexei V.; Smirnova, Ksenia I.; Smirnova, Aleksandrina A.; Reshetnikov, Vladimir P.

    2011-11-01

    Galaxies with polar rings (PRGs) are a unique class of extragalactic objects. Using these, we can investigate a wide range of problems, linked to the formation and evolution of galaxies, and we can study the properties of their dark haloes. The progress that has been made in the study of PRGs has been constrained by the small number of known objects of this type. The Polar Ring Catalogue (PRC) by Whitmore et al. and their photographic atlas of PRGs and related objects includes 157 galaxies. At present, there are only about two dozen kinematically confirmed galaxies in this PRG class, mostly from the PRC. We present a new catalogue of PRGs, supplementing the PRC and significantly increasing the number of known candidate PRGs. The catalogue is based on the results of the original Galaxy Zoo project. Within this project, volunteers performed visual classifications of nearly a million galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Based on the preliminary classifications of the Galaxy Zoo, we viewed more than 40 000 images of the SDSS and selected 275 galaxies to include in our catalogue. Our SDSS-based Polar Ring Catalogue (SPRC) contains 70 galaxies that we have classified as 'the best candidates'. Among these, we expect to have a very high proportion of true PRGs, and 115 good PRG candidates. There are 53 galaxies classified as PRG-related objects (mostly galaxies with strongly warped discs, and mergers). In addition, we have identified 37 galaxies that have their presumed polar rings strongly inclined to the line of sight (seen almost face-on). The SPRC objects are, on average, fainter and are located further away than the galaxies from the PRC, although our catalogue does include dozens of new nearby candidate PRGs. The SPRC significantly increases the number of genuine PRG candidates. It might serve as a good basis for both a further detailed study of individual galaxies and a statistical analysis of PRGs as a separate class of objects. We have performed

  19. Generating log-normal mock catalog of galaxies in redshift space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, Aniket; Makiya, Ryu; Chiang, Chi-Ting; Jeong, Donghui; Saito, Shun; Komatsu, Eiichiro

    2017-10-01

    We present a public code to generate a mock galaxy catalog in redshift space assuming a log-normal probability density function (PDF) of galaxy and matter density fields. We draw galaxies by Poisson-sampling the log-normal field, and calculate the velocity field from the linearised continuity equation of matter fields, assuming zero vorticity. This procedure yields a PDF of the pairwise velocity fields that is qualitatively similar to that of N-body simulations. We check fidelity of the catalog, showing that the measured two-point correlation function and power spectrum in real space agree with the input precisely. We find that a linear bias relation in the power spectrum does not guarantee a linear bias relation in the density contrasts, leading to a cross-correlation coefficient of matter and galaxies deviating from unity on small scales. We also find that linearising the Jacobian of the real-to-redshift space mapping provides a poor model for the two-point statistics in redshift space. That is, non-linear redshift-space distortion is dominated by non-linearity in the Jacobian. The power spectrum in redshift space shows a damping on small scales that is qualitatively similar to that of the well-known Fingers-of-God (FoG) effect due to random velocities, except that the log-normal mock does not include random velocities. This damping is a consequence of non-linearity in the Jacobian, and thus attributing the damping of the power spectrum solely to FoG, as commonly done in the literature, is misleading.

  20. Galaxy clusters in visible light (I): catalogues, large-scale distribution, and general properties.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Yulin

    1995-12-01

    While the nature, behaviour, and evolution of galaxy clusters is a such wide research field, only some of their optical properties are underlined in the present review. The whole article is divided into two parts, of which this is the first one, contributed to cluster catalogues, large-scale distribution, and some general characteristics of galaxy clusters.

  1. A lightcone catalogue from the Millennium-XXL simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Alex; Cole, Shaun; Baugh, Carlton; Zheng, Zheng; Angulo, Raúl; Norberg, Peder; Zehavi, Idit

    2017-10-01

    Future galaxy surveys require realistic mock catalogues to understand and quantify systematics in order to make precise cosmological measurements. We present a halo lightcone catalogue and halo occupation distribution (HOD) galaxy catalogue built using the Millennium-XXL simulation. The halo catalogue covers the full sky, extending to z = 2.2 with a mass resolution of ˜1011 h-1 M⊙. We use this to build a galaxy catalogue, which has an r-band magnitude limit of r < 20.0, with a median redshift of z ˜ 0.2. A Monte Carlo HOD method is used to assign galaxies to the halo lightcone catalogue, and we evolve the HODs to reproduce a target luminosity function; by construction, the luminosity function of galaxies in the mock is in agreement with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) at low redshifts and the Galaxy and Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey at high redshifts. A Monte Carlo method is used to assign a 0.1(g - r) colour to each galaxy, and the colour distribution of galaxies at different redshifts agrees with measurements from GAMA. The clustering of galaxies in the mock for galaxies in different magnitude and redshift bins is in good agreement with measurements from SDSS and GAMA, and the colour-dependent clustering is in reasonable agreement. We show that the baryon acoustic oscillation can be measured in the mock catalogue, and the redshift-space distortions are in agreement with measurements from SDSS illustrating that this catalogue will be useful for upcoming surveys.

  2. Recovering the mass profile and orbit anisotropy of mock dwarf galaxies with Schwarzschild modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalczyk, Klaudia; Łokas, Ewa L.; Valluri, Monica

    2017-10-01

    We present a new study concerning the application of the Schwarzschild orbit superposition method to model spherical galaxies. The method aims to recover the mass and the orbit anisotropy parameter profiles of the objects using measurements of positions and line-of-sight velocities usually available for resolved stellar populations of dwarf galaxies in the Local Group. To test the reliability of the method, we used different sets of mock data extracted from four numerical realizations of dark matter haloes. The models shared the same density profile but differed in anisotropy profiles, covering a wide range of possibilities, from constant to increasing and decreasing with radius. The tests were done in two steps, first assuming that the mass profile of the dwarf is known and employing the method to retrieve the anisotropy only, and then varying also the mass distribution. We used two kinds of data samples: unrealistically large ones based on over 270 000 particles from the numerical realizations and small ones matching the amount of data available for the Fornax dwarf. For the large data samples, we recover both the mass and the anisotropy profiles with very high accuracy. For the realistically small ones, we also find a reasonably good agreement between the fitted and the input anisotropies, however the total density profiles can be significantly biased as a result of their oversensitivity to the available data. Our results therefore provide convincing evidence in favour of the applicability of the Schwarzschild method to break the mass-anisotropy degeneracy in dwarf galaxies.

  3. Populating dark matter haloes with galaxies: comparing the 2dFGRS with mock galaxy redshift surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaohu; Mo, H. J.; Jing, Y. P.; van den Bosch, Frank C.; Chu, YaoQuan

    2004-06-01

    In two recent papers, we developed a powerful technique to link the distribution of galaxies to that of dark matter haloes by considering halo occupation numbers as a function of galaxy luminosity and type. In this paper we use these distribution functions to populate dark matter haloes in high-resolution N-body simulations of the standard ΛCDM cosmology with Ωm= 0.3, ΩΛ= 0.7 and σ8= 0.9. Stacking simulation boxes of 100 h-1 Mpc and 300 h-1 Mpc with 5123 particles each we construct mock galaxy redshift surveys out to a redshift of z= 0.2 with a numerical resolution that guarantees completeness down to 0.01L*. We use these mock surveys to investigate various clustering statistics. The predicted two-dimensional correlation function ξ(rp, π) reveals clear signatures of redshift space distortions. The projected correlation functions for galaxies with different luminosities and types, derived from ξ(rp, π), match the observations well on scales larger than ~3 h-1 Mpc. On smaller scales, however, the model overpredicts the clustering power by about a factor two. Modelling the `finger-of-God' effect on small scales reveals that the standard ΛCDM model predicts pairwise velocity dispersions (PVD) that are ~400 km s-1 too high at projected pair separations of ~1 h-1 Mpc. A strong velocity bias in massive haloes, with bvel≡σgal/σdm~ 0.6 (where σgal and σdm are the velocity dispersions of galaxies and dark matter particles, respectively) can reduce the predicted PVD to the observed level, but does not help to resolve the overprediction of clustering power on small scales. Consistent results can be obtained within the standard ΛCDM model only when the average mass-to-light ratio of clusters is of the order of 1000 (M/L)solar in the B-band. Alternatively, as we show by a simple approximation, a ΛCDM model with σ8~= 0.75 may also reproduce the observational results. We discuss our results in light of the recent WMAP results and the constraints on σ8 obtained

  4. The MICE Grand Challenge lightcone simulation - II. Halo and galaxy catalogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crocce, M.; Castander, F. J.; Gaztañaga, E.; Fosalba, P.; Carretero, J.

    2015-10-01

    This is the second in a series of three papers in which we present an end-to-end simulation from the MICE collaboration, the MICE Grand Challenge (MICE-GC) run. The N-body contains about 70 billion dark-matter particles in a (3 h-1 Gpc)3 comoving volume spanning five orders of magnitude in dynamical range. Here, we introduce the halo and galaxy catalogues built upon it, both in a wide (5000 deg2) and deep (z < 1.4) lightcone and in several comoving snapshots. Haloes were resolved down to few 1011 h-1 M⊙. This allowed us to model galaxies down to absolute magnitude Mr < -18.9. We used a new hybrid halo occupation distribution and abundance matching technique for galaxy assignment. The catalogue includes the spectral energy distributions of all galaxies. We describe a variety of halo and galaxy clustering applications. We discuss how mass resolution effects can bias the large-scale two-pt clustering amplitude of poorly resolved haloes at the ≲5 per cent level, and their three-pt correlation function. We find a characteristic scale-dependent bias of ≲6 per cent across the BAO feature for haloes well above M⋆ ˜ 1012 h-1 M⊙ and for luminous red galaxy like galaxies. For haloes well below M⋆ the scale dependence at 100 h-1 Mpc is ≲2 per cent. Lastly, we discuss the validity of the large-scale Kaiser limit across redshift and departures from it towards non-linear scales. We make the current version of the lightcone halo and galaxy catalogue (MICECATv1.0) publicly available through a dedicated web portal to help develop and exploit the new generation of astronomical surveys.

  5. CoMaLit - III. Literature catalogues of weak lensing clusters of galaxies (LC2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sereno, Mauro

    2015-07-01

    The measurement of the mass of clusters of galaxies is crucial for their use in cosmology and astrophysics. Masses can be efficiently determined with weak lensing (WL) analyses. I compiled literature catalogues of WL clusters (LC2). Cluster identifiers, coordinates, and redshifts have been standardized. WL masses were reported to over-densities of 2500, 500, 200, and to the virial one in the reference ΛCDM model. Duplicate entries were carefully handled. I produced three catalogues: LC2-single, with 485 unique groups and clusters analysed with the single-halo model; LC2-substructure, listing substructures in complex systems; LC2-all, listing all the 822 WL masses found in the literature. The catalogues and future updates are publicly available at http://pico.bo.astro.it/˜sereno/CoMaLit/LC2/.

  6. X-ray morphological study of galaxy cluster catalogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Democles, Jessica; Pierre, Marguerite; Arnaud, Monique

    2016-07-01

    Context : The intra-cluster medium distribution as probed by X-ray morphology based analysis gives good indication of the system dynamical state. In the race for the determination of precise scaling relations and understanding their scatter, the dynamical state offers valuable information. Method : We develop the analysis of the centroid-shift so that it can be applied to characterize galaxy cluster surveys such as the XXL survey or high redshift cluster samples. We use it together with the surface brightness concentration parameter and the offset between X-ray peak and brightest cluster galaxy in the context of the XXL bright cluster sample (Pacaud et al 2015) and a set of high redshift massive clusters detected by Planck and SPT and observed by both XMM-Newton and Chandra observatories. Results : Using the wide redshift coverage of the XXL sample, we see no trend between the dynamical state of the systems with the redshift.

  7. On the filamentary structures in the Lick galaxy catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrzycki, Adam

    1989-01-01

    The positions of the filaments observed by Moody et al. (1983) are discussed with respect to the arrangement of the plates in the Lick galaxy survey. An apparent difficiency of filaments near the plate centers is noted. Although the most prominent filaments appear to pass through the areas in the sky where the Lick survey plates overlap, on the whole there is no statistical tendency for the filaments to lie only on the overlapping areas.

  8. Compact groups of galaxies selected by stellar mass: the 2MASS compact group catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz-Giménez, Eugenia; Mamon, Gary A.; Pacheco, Marcela; Mendes de Oliveira, Claudia; Alonso, M. Victoria

    2012-10-01

    We present a photometric catalogue of compact groups of galaxies (p2MCGs) automatically extracted from the Two-Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) extended source catalogue. A total of 262 p2MCGs are identified, following the criteria defined by Hickson, of which 230 survive visual inspection (given occasional galaxy fragmentation and blends in the 2MASS parent catalogue). Only one quarter of these 230 groups were previously known compact groups (CGs). Among the 144 p2MCGs that have all their galaxies with known redshifts, 85 (59 per cent) have four or more accordant galaxies. This v2MCG sample of velocity-filtered p2MCGs constitutes the largest sample of CGs (with N ≥ 4) catalogued to date, with both well-defined selection criteria and velocity filtering, and is the first CG sample selected by stellar mass. It is fairly complete up to Kgroup ˜ 9 and radial velocity of ˜6000 km s-1. We compared the properties of the 78 v2MCGs with median velocities greater than 3000 km s-1 with the properties of other CG samples, as well as those (mvCGs) extracted from the semi-analytical model (SAM) of Guo et al. run on the high-resolution Millennium-II simulation. This mvCG sample is similar (i.e. with 2/3 of physically dense CGs) to those we had previously extracted on three other SAMs run on the Millennium simulation with 125 times worse spatial and mass resolutions. The space density of v2MCGs within 6000 km s-1 is 8.0 × 10-5 h3 Mpc-3, i.e. four times that of the Hickson sample [Hickson Compact Group (HCG)] up to the same distance and with the same criteria used in this work, but still 40 per cent less than that of mvCGs. The v2MCG constitutes the first group catalogue to show a statistically large first-second ranked galaxy magnitude gap according to Tremaine-Richstone statistics, as expected if the first ranked group members tend to be the products of galaxy mergers, and as confirmed in the mvCGs. The v2MCG is also the first observed sample to show that first-ranked galaxies

  9. The EFIGI catalogue of 4458 nearby galaxies with morphology. II. Statistical properties along the Hubble sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Lapparent, V.; Baillard, A.; Bertin, E.

    2011-08-01

    Aims: The EFIGI catalogue of 4458 galaxies extracted from the PGC and SDSS DR4 was designed to provide a multiwavelength reference database of the morphological properties of nearby galaxies. The sample is limited in apparent diameter and densely samples all RC3 Hubble types. Methods: We examine the statistics of the 16 EFIGI shape attributes, describing the various dynamical components, the texture, and the contamination by the environment of each galaxy. Using the redshifts from SDSS, HyperLeda, or NED for 99.53% of EFIGI galaxies, we derive estimates of absolute major isophotal diameters and the corresponding mean surface brightness in the SDSS g-band. Results: We study the variations of the EFIGI morphological attributes with Hubble type and confirm that the visual Hubble sequence is a decreasing sequence of bulge-to-total ratio and an increasing sequence of disk contribution to the total galaxy flux. There is, nevertheless, a total spread of approximately five types for a given bulge-to-total ratio, because the Hubble sequence is primarily based on the strength and pitch angle of the spiral arms, independently from the bulge-to-total ratio. A steep decrease in the presence of dust from Sb to Sbc-Sc types appears to produce the grand spiral design of the Sc galaxies. In contrast, the scattered and giant HII regions show different strength variation patterns, with peaks for types Scd and Sm; hence, they do not appear to directly participate in the establishment of the visual Hubble sequence. The distortions from a symmetric profile also incidentally increase along the sequence. Bars and inner rings are frequent and occur in 41% and 25% of the disk galaxies respectively. Outer rings are half as frequent than inner rings, and outer pseudo-rings occur in 11% of barred galaxies. Finally, we find a smooth decrease in mean surface brightness and intrinsic size along the Hubble sequence. The largest galaxies are cD, ellipticals and Sab-Sbc intermediate spirals (20

  10. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Catalogue of Markarian Galaxies (Markarian+ 1967-81)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markarian, B. E.

    1994-11-01

    Markarian galaxies have a moderate to strong ultraviolet continuum as detected by an objective-prism survey at Byurakan Observatory from 1965 to 1978. The survey was done with a 40-inch Schmidt telescope with a dispersion of 2500 angstroms/millimeter at H-alpha. The catalog contains no galaxies brighter than mag 13.0 or fainter than mag 17.5. The catalog fields are Markarian Identification number; S(eyfert) or Q(uasar) flag; cross identifications to other catalogs; B1950 positions; major and minor axis (arcsec); magnitude and spectral types, including a code for the strength of the UV continuum. This catalogue is superseded by the First Byurakan Survey (see the "See Also" section below) The original documentation was by Robert S. Hill and Lee E. Brotzman in the "adc.doc" file (From the CD-ROM "Selected Astronomical Catalogs" Vol. 1 (1992), directory "nonstell/galaxies/mkn") (1 data file).

  11. Effects of the environment on galaxies in the Catalogue of Isolated Galaxies: physical satellites and large scale structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argudo-Fernández, M.; Verley, S.; Bergond, G.; Sulentic, J.; Sabater, J.; Fernández Lorenzo, M.; Espada, D.; Leon, S.; Sánchez-Expósito, S.; Santander-Vela, J. D.; Verdes-Montenegro, L.

    2014-04-01

    Context. We present a study of the 3D environment for a sample of 386 galaxies in the Catalogue of Isolated Galaxies (CIG, Karachentseva 1973) using the Ninth Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-DR9). Aims: We aim to identify and quantify the effects of the satellite distribution around a sample of galaxies in the CIG, as well as the effects of the large-scale structure (LSS). Methods: To recover the physically bound galaxies we first focused on the satellites that are within the escape speed of each CIG galaxy. We also propose a more conservative method using the stacked Gaussian distribution of the velocity difference of the neighbours. The tidal strengths affecting the primary galaxy were estimated to quantify the effects of the local and LSS environments. We also defined the projected number density parameter at the fifth nearest neighbour to characterise the LSS around the CIG galaxies. Results: Out of the 386 CIG galaxies considered in this study, at least 340 (88% of the sample) have no physically linked satellite. Following the more conservative Gaussian distribution of physical satellites around the CIG galaxies leads to upper limits. Out of the 386 CIG galaxies, 327 (85% of the sample) have no physical companion within a projected distance of 0.3 Mpc. The CIG galaxies are distributed following the LSS of the local Universe, although presenting a large heterogeneity in their degree of connection with it. When present around a CIG galaxy, the effect of physically bound galaxies largely dominates (typically by more than 90%) the tidal strengths generated by the LSS. Conclusions: The CIG samples a variety of environments, from galaxies with physical satellites to galaxies without neighbours within 3 Mpc. A clear segregation appears between early-type CIG galaxies with companions and isolated late-type CIG galaxies. Isolated galaxies are in general bluer, with probably younger stellar populations and very high star formation compared with older

  12. Redshift Distributions of Galaxies in the DES Science Verification Shear Catalogue and Implications for Weak Lensing

    SciTech Connect

    Bonnett, C.

    2015-07-21

    We present photometric redshift estimates for galaxies used in the weak lensing analysis of the Dark Energy Survey Science Verification (DES SV) data. Four model- or machine learning-based photometric redshift methods { annz2, bpz calibrated against BCC-U fig simulations, skynet, and tpz { are analysed. For training, calibration, and testing of these methods, we also construct a catalogue of spectroscopically confirmed galaxies matched against DES SV data. The performance of the methods is evalu-ated against the matched spectroscopic catalogue, focusing on metrics relevant for weak lensing analyses, with additional validation against COSMOS photo-zs. From the galaxies in the DES SV shear catalogue, which have mean redshift 0.72 ±0.01 over the range 0:3 < z < 1:3, we construct three tomographic bins with means of z = {0.45; 0.67,1.00g}. These bins each have systematic uncertainties δz ≲ 0.05 in the mean of the fiducial skynet photo-z n(z). We propagate the errors in the redshift distributions through to their impact on cosmological parameters estimated with cosmic shear, and find that they cause shifts in the value of σ8 of approx. 3%. This shift is within the one sigma statistical errors on σ8 for the DES SV shear catalog. We also found that further study of the potential impact of systematic differences on the critical surface density, Σcrit, contained levels of bias safely less than the statistical power of DES SV data. We recommend a final Gaussian prior for the photo-z bias in the mean of n(z) of width 0:05 for each of the three tomographic bins, and show that this is a sufficient bias model for the corresponding cosmology analysis.

  13. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Catalogue of Seyfert Galaxies (Lipovetsky+, 1988)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipovetsky, V. A.; Neizvestny, S. I.; Neizvestnaya, O. M.

    1995-01-01

    A list of 959 Seyfert galaxies whose data were obtained up to the beginning of 1987 is compiled. Coordinates, redshifts, UBVR-photoelectric magnitudes, absolute magnitudes, morphological types, fluxes in H and [OIII] 5007, JHKLN-fluxes, far-infrared (IRAS) fluxes, radio-fluxes at 6 and 11 centimeters, monochromatic X-ray fluxes in 0.3-3.5 and 2-10 keV and some other data are presented in six Tables. This Catalogue data may be used as basic ones for some statistical investigations. References contain 957 entries. (6 data files).

  14. Very thin disc galaxies in the SDSS catalogue of edge-on galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bizyaev, D. V.; Kautsch, S. J.; Sotnikova, N. Ya.; Reshetnikov, V. P.; Mosenkov, A. V.

    2017-03-01

    We study the properties of galaxies with very thin discs (VTDs) using a sample of 85 objects whose stellar disc radial-to-vertical scale ratio determined from photometric decomposition, exceeds 9. We present evidences of similarities between the VTD galaxies and low surface brightness (LSB) disc galaxies, and conclude that both small and giant LSB galaxies may reveal themselves as VTD, edge-on galaxies. Our VTD galaxies are mostly bulgeless, and those with large radial scalelength tend to have redder colours. We performed spectral observations of 22 VTD galaxies with the Dual Imaging Spectrograph on the 3.5 m telescope at the Apache Point Observatory. The spectra with good resolution (R ∼ 5000) allow us to determine the distance and the ionized gas rotation curve maximum for the galaxies. Our VTD galaxies have low dust content, in contrast to regular disc galaxies. Apparently, VTD galaxies reside in specific cosmological low-density environments and tend to have less connection with filaments. Comparing a toy model that assumes marginally low star formation in galactic discs with obtained gas kinematics data, we conclude that there is a threshold central surface density of about 88 M⊙ pc-2, which we observe in the case of very thin, rotationally supported galactic discs.

  15. A sample of X-ray emitting normal galaxies from the BMW-HRI Catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tajer, M.; Trinchieri, G.; Wolter, A.; Campana, S.; Moretti, A.; Tagliaferri, G.

    2005-06-01

    We obtained a sample of 143 normal galaxies with X-ray luminosity in the range 1038{-}1043 erg s-1 from the cross-correlation of the ROSAT HRI Brera Multi-scale Wavelet (BMW-HRI) Catalogue with the Lyon-Meudon Extragalactic Database (LEDA). We find that the average X-ray properties of this sample are in good agreement with those of other samples of galaxies in the literature. We selected a complete flux limited serendipitous sample of 32 galaxies from which we derived the log N-log S distribution of normal galaxies in the flux range 1.1{-} 110 × 10-14 erg cm-2 s-1. The resulting distribution is consistent with the Euclidean -1.5 slope. Comparisons with other samples, such as the Extended Medium Sensitivity Survey, the ROSAT All Sky Survey, the XMM-Newton/2dF survey, and the Chandra Deep Field Survey indicate that the log N -log S distribution of normal galaxies is consistent with a Euclidean slope over a flux range of about 6 decades.

  16. The ALHAMBRA survey: reliable morphological catalogue of 22 051 early- and late-type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pović, M.; Huertas-Company, M.; Aguerri, J. A. L.; Márquez, I.; Masegosa, J.; Husillos, C.; Molino, A.; Cristóbal-Hornillos, D.; Perea, J.; Benítez, N.; Olmo, A. del; Fernández-Soto, A.; Jiménez-Teja, Y.; Moles, M.; Alfaro, E.; Aparicio-Villegas, T.; Ascaso, B.; Broadhurst, T.; Cabrera-Caño, J.; Castander, F. J.; Cepa, J.; Fernandez Lorenzo, M.; Cerviño, M.; Delgado, R. M. González; Infante, L.; López-Sanjuan, C.; Martínez, V. J.; Matute, I.; Oteo, I.; Pérez-García, A. M.; Prada, F.; Quintana, J. M.

    2013-11-01

    Advanced Large Homogeneous Area Medium Band Redshift Astronomical (ALHAMBRA) is photometric survey designed to trace the cosmic evolution and cosmic variance. It covers a large area of ˜4 deg2 in eight fields, where seven fields overlap with other surveys, allowing us to have complementary data in other wavelengths. All observations were carried out in 20 continuous, medium band (30 nm width) optical and 3 near-infrared (JHK) bands, providing the precise measurements of photometric redshifts. In addition, morphological classification of galaxies is crucial for any kind of galaxy formation and cosmic evolution studies, providing the information about star formation histories, their environment and interactions, internal perturbations, etc. We present a morphological classification of >40 000 galaxies in the ALHAMBRA survey. We associate to every galaxy a probability to be early type using the automated Bayesian code GALSVM. Despite of the spatial resolution of the ALHAMBRA images (˜1 arcsec), for 22 051 galaxies, we obtained the contamination by other type of less than 10 per cent. Of those, 1640 and 10 322 galaxies are classified as early- (down to redshifts ˜0.5) and late-type (down to redshifts ˜1.0), respectively, with magnitudes F613W ≤ 22.0. In addition, for magnitude range 22.0 < F613W ≤ 23.0, we classified other 10 089 late-type galaxies with redshifts ≤1.3. We show that the classified objects populate the expected regions in the colour-mass and colour-magnitude planes. The presented data set is especially attractive given the homogeneous multiwavelength coverage available in the ALHAMBRA fields, and is intended to be used in a variety of scientific applications. The low-contamination catalogue (<10 per cent) is made publicly available with this paper.

  17. The Millennium Galaxy Catalogue: the Mbh-Lspheroid derived supermassive black hole mass function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vika, Marina; Driver, Simon P.; Graham, Alister W.; Liske, Jochen

    2009-12-01

    Supermassive black hole (SMBH) mass estimates are derived for 1743 galaxies from the Millennium Galaxy Catalogue (MGC) using the recently revised empirical relation between SMBH mass and the luminosity of the host spheroid. The MGC spheroid luminosities are based on R1/n bulge plus exponential-disc decompositions. The majority of black hole masses reside between 106Msolar and an upper limit of 2 × 109Msolar. Using previously determined space-density weights, we derive the SMBH mass function which we fit with a Schechter-like function. Integrating the black hole mass function over 106 < Mbh/Msolar < 1010 gives an SMBH mass density of (3.8 +/- 0.6) × 105h370Msolar Mpc-3 for early-type galaxies and (0.96 +/- 0.2) × 105h370Msolar Mpc-3 for late-type galaxies. The errors are estimated from Monte Carlo simulations which include the uncertainties in the Mbh-L relation, the luminosity of the host spheroid and the intrinsic scatter of the Mbh-L relation. Assuming SMBHs form via baryonic accretion, we find that (0.008 +/- 0.002)h370 per cent of the Universe's baryons are currently locked up in SMBHs. This result is consistent with our previous estimate based on the Mbh-n (Sérsic index) relation.

  18. Merging groups and clusters of galaxies from the SDSS data. The catalogue of groups and potentially merging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tempel, E.; Tuvikene, T.; Kipper, R.; Libeskind, N. I.

    2017-06-01

    Context. Galaxy groups and clusters are the main tools used to test cosmological models and to study the environmental effect of galaxy formation. Aims: This work provides a catalogue of galaxy groups and clusters, as well as potentially merging systems based on the SDSS main galaxy survey. Methods: We identified galaxy groups and clusters using the modified friends-of-friends (FoF) group finder designed specifically for flux-limited galaxy surveys. The FoF group membership is refined by multimodality analysis to find subgroups and by using the group virial radius and escape velocity to expose unbound galaxies. We look for merging systems by comparing distances between group centres with group radii. Results: The analysis results in a catalogue of 88 662 galaxy groups with at least two members. Among them are 6873 systems with at least six members which we consider to be more reliable groups. We find 498 group mergers with up to six groups. We performed a brief comparison with some known clusters in the nearby Universe, including the Coma cluster and Abell 1750. The Coma cluster in our catalogue is a merging system with six distinguishable subcomponents. In the case of Abell 1750 we find a clear sign of filamentary infall toward this cluster. Our analysis of mass-to-light ratio (M/L) of galaxy groups reveals that M/L slightly increases with group richness. The catalogue is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/602/A100

  19. A comprehensive HST BVI catalogue of star clusters in five Hickson compact groups of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedotov, K.; Gallagher, S. C.; Durrell, P. R.; Bastian, N.; Konstantopoulos, I. S.; Charlton, J.; Johnson, K. E.; Chandar, R.

    2015-05-01

    We present a photometric catalogue of star cluster candidates in Hickson compact groups (HCGs) 7, 31, 42, 59, and 92, based on observations with the Advanced Camera for Surveys and the Wide Field Camera 3 on the Hubble Space Telescope. The catalogue contains precise cluster positions (right ascension and declination), magnitudes, and colours in the BVI filters. The number of detected sources ranges from 2200 to 5600 per group, from which we construct the high-confidence sample by applying a number of criteria designed to reduce foreground and background contaminants. Furthermore, the high-confidence cluster candidates for each of the 16 galaxies in our sample are split into two subpopulations: one that may contain young star clusters and one that is dominated by globular older clusters. The ratio of young star cluster to globular cluster candidates varies from group to group, from equal numbers to the extreme of HCG 31 which has a ratio of 8 to 1, due to a recent starburst induced by interactions in the group. We find that the number of blue clusters with MV < -9 correlates well with the current star formation rate in an individual galaxy, while the number of globular cluster candidates with MV < -7.8 correlates well (though with large scatter) with the stellar mass. Analyses of the high-confidence sample presented in this paper show that star clusters can be successfully used to infer the gross star formation history of the host groups and therefore determine their placement in a proposed evolutionary sequence for compact galaxy groups.

  20. NIR Tully-Fisher in the Zone of Avoidance - III. Deep NIR catalogue of the HIZOA galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Said, Khaled; Kraan-Korteweg, Renée C.; Jarrett, T. H.; Staveley-Smith, Lister; Williams, Wendy L.

    2016-11-01

    We present a deep near-infrared (NIR; J, H, and Ks bands) photometric catalogue of sources from the Parkes H I Zone of Avoidance (HIZOA) survey, which forms the basis for an investigation of the matter distribution in the Zone of Avoidance. Observations were conducted between 2006 and 2013 using the Infrared Survey Facility (IRSF), a 1.4-m telescope situated at the South African Astronomical Observatory site in Sutherland. The images cover all 1108 HIZOA detections and yield 915 galaxies. An additional 105 bright 2MASS galaxies in the southern ZOA were imaged with the IRSF, resulting in 129 galaxies. The average Ks-band seeing and sky background for the survey are 1.38 arcsec and 20.1 mag, respectively. The detection rate as a function of stellar density and dust extinction is found to depend mainly on the H I mass of the H I detected galaxies, which in principal correlates with the NIR brightness of the spiral galaxies. The measured isophotal magnitudes are of sufficient accuracy (errors ˜0.02 mag) to be used in a Tully-Fisher analysis. In the final NIR catalogue, 285 galaxies have both IRSF and 2MASS photometry (180 HIZOA plus 105 bright 2MASX galaxies). The Ks-band isophotal magnitudes presented in this paper agree, within the uncertainties, with those reported in the 2MASX catalogue. Another 30 galaxies, from the HIZOA northern extension, are also covered by UKIDSS Galactic Plane Survey (GPS) images, which are one magnitude deeper than our IRSF images. A modified version of our photometry pipeline was used to derive the photometric parameters of these UKIDSS galaxies. Good agreement was found between the respective Ks-band isophotal magnitudes. These comparisons confirm the robustness of the isophotal parameters and demonstrate that the IRSF images do not suffer from foreground contamination, after star removal, nor underestimate the isophotal fluxes of ZoA galaxies.

  1. A catalogue of photometric redshifts for the SDSS-DR9 galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brescia, M.; Cavuoti, S.; Longo, G.; De Stefano, V.

    2014-08-01

    Context. Accurate photometric redshifts for large samples of galaxies are among the main products of modern multiband digital surveys. Over the last decade, the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) has become a sort of benchmark against which to test the various methods. Aims: We present an application of a new method to the estimation of photometric redshifts for the galaxies in the SDSS Data Release 9 (SDSS-DR9). Photometric redshifts for more than 143 million galaxies were produced. Methods: The Multi Layer Perceptron with Quasi Newton Algorithm (MLPQNA) model, provided within the framework of the DAta Mining and Exploration Web Application REsource (DAMEWARE), is an interpolative method derived from machine learning models. Results: The obtained redshifts have an overall uncertainty of σ = 0.023 with a very small average bias of ~3 × 10-5, and a fraction of catastrophic outliers (|Δz| > 2σ) of ~5%. This result is slightly better than what was already available in the literature in terms of the smaller fraction of catastrophic outliers as well. The produced catalogue, composed by 58 tables is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/568/A126

  2. SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey data release 12: Galaxy target selection and large-scale structure catalogues

    DOE PAGES

    Reid, Beth; Ho, Shirley; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; ...

    2015-11-17

    The Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS), part of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) III project, has provided the largest survey of galaxy redshifts available to date, in terms of both the number of galaxy redshifts measured by a single survey, and the effective cosmological volume covered. Key to analysing the clustering of these data to provide cosmological measurements is understanding the detailed properties of this sample. Potential issues include variations in the target catalogue caused by changes either in the targeting algorithm or properties of the data used, the pattern of spectroscopic observations, the spatial distribution of targets formore » which redshifts were not obtained, and variations in the target sky density due to observational systematics. We document here the target selection algorithms used to create the galaxy samples that comprise BOSS. We also present the algorithms used to create large-scale structure catalogues for the final Data Release (DR12) samples and the associated random catalogues that quantify the survey mask. The algorithms are an evolution of those used by the BOSS team to construct catalogues from earlier data, and have been designed to accurately quantify the galaxy sample. Furthermore, the code used, designated mksample, is released with this paper.« less

  3. SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey data release 12: Galaxy target selection and large-scale structure catalogues

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, Beth; Ho, Shirley; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Percival, Will J.; Tinker, Jeremy; Tojeiro, Rito; White, Marin; Daniel J. Einstein; Maraston, Claudia; Ross, Ashley J.; Sanchez, Ariel G.; Schlegel, David; Sheldon, Erin; Strauss, Michael A.; Thomas, Daniel; Wake, David; Beutler, Florian; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Bolton, Adam S.; Brownstein, Joel R.; Chuang, Chia -Hsun; Dawson, Kyle; Harding, Paul; Kitaura, Francisco -Shu; Leauthaud, Alexie; Masters, Karen; McBride, Cameron K.; More, Surhud; Olmstead, Matthew D.; Oravetz, Daniel; Nuza, Sebastian E.; Pan, Kaike; Parejko, John; Pforr, Janine; Prada, Francisco; Rodriguez-Torres, Sergio; Salazar-Albornoz, Salvador; Samushia, Lado; Schneider, Donald P.; Scoccola, Claudia G.; Simmons, Audrey; Vargas-Magana, Mariana

    2015-11-17

    The Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS), part of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) III project, has provided the largest survey of galaxy redshifts available to date, in terms of both the number of galaxy redshifts measured by a single survey, and the effective cosmological volume covered. Key to analysing the clustering of these data to provide cosmological measurements is understanding the detailed properties of this sample. Potential issues include variations in the target catalogue caused by changes either in the targeting algorithm or properties of the data used, the pattern of spectroscopic observations, the spatial distribution of targets for which redshifts were not obtained, and variations in the target sky density due to observational systematics. We document here the target selection algorithms used to create the galaxy samples that comprise BOSS. We also present the algorithms used to create large-scale structure catalogues for the final Data Release (DR12) samples and the associated random catalogues that quantify the survey mask. The algorithms are an evolution of those used by the BOSS team to construct catalogues from earlier data, and have been designed to accurately quantify the galaxy sample. Furthermore, the code used, designated mksample, is released with this paper.

  4. Clusters and groups of galaxies in the 2dF galaxy redshift survey: A new catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tago, E.; Einasto, J.; Saar, E.; Einasto, M.; Suhhonenko, I.; Jõeveer, M.; Vennik, J.; Heinämäki, P.; Tucker, D. L.

    2006-05-01

    We create a new catalogue of groups and clusters, applying the friends-of-friends method to the 2dF GRS final release. We investigate various selection effects due to the use of a magnitude limited sample. For this purpose we follow the changes in group sizes and mean galaxy number densities within groups when shifting nearby observed groups to larger distances. We study the distribution of sizes of dark matter haloes in N-body simulations and compare properties of these haloes and the 2dF groups. We show that at large distances from the observer luminous and intrinsically greater groups dominate, but in these groups only very bright members are seen, which form compact cores of the groups. These two effects almost cancel each other, so that the mean sizes and densities of groups do not change considerably with distance. Our final sample contains 10750 groups in the Northern part, and 14465 groups in the Southern part of the 2dF survey with membership N_gal ≥ 2. We estimate the total luminosities of our groups, correcting for group members fainter than the observational limit of the survey. The cluster catalogue is available at our web-site (\\texttt{http://www.aai.ee/˜maret/2dfgr.html}).

  5. Redshift distributions of galaxies in the Dark Energy Survey Science Verification shear catalogue and implications for weak lensing

    DOE PAGES

    Bonnett, C.; Troxel, M. A.; Hartley, W.; ...

    2016-08-30

    Here we present photometric redshift estimates for galaxies used in the weak lensing analysis of the Dark Energy Survey Science Verification (DES SV) data. Four model- or machine learning-based photometric redshift methods—annz2, bpz calibrated against BCC-Ufig simulations, skynet, and tpz—are analyzed. For training, calibration, and testing of these methods, we construct a catalogue of spectroscopically confirmed galaxies matched against DES SV data. The performance of the methods is evaluated against the matched spectroscopic catalogue, focusing on metrics relevant for weak lensing analyses, with additional validation against COSMOS photo-z’s. From the galaxies in the DES SV shear catalogue, which have meanmore » redshift 0.72±0.01 over the range 0.38 of approximately 3%. This shift is within the one sigma statistical errors on σ8 for the DES SV shear catalogue. We further study the potential impact of systematic differences on the critical surface density, Σcrit, finding levels of bias safely less than the statistical power of DES SV data. In conclusion, we recommend a final Gaussian prior for the photo-z bias in the mean of n(z) of width 0.05 for each of the three tomographic bins, and show that this is a sufficient bias model for the corresponding cosmology analysis.« less

  6. The MUSE-Wide survey: A first catalogue of 831 emission line galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herenz, Edmund Christian; Urrutia, Tanya; Wisotzki, Lutz; Kerutt, Josephine; Saust, Rikke; Werhahn, Maria; Schmidt, Kasper Borello; Caruana, Joseph; Diener, Catrina; Bacon, Roland; Brinchmann, Jarle; Schaye, Joop; Maseda, Michael; Weilbacher, Peter M.

    2017-09-01

    We present a first instalment of the MUSE-Wide survey, covering an area of 22.2 arcmin2 (corresponding to 20% of the final survey) in the CANDELS/Deep area of the Chandra Deep Field South. We use the MUSE integral field spectrograph at the ESO VLT to conduct a full-area spectroscopic mapping at a depth of 1 h exposure time per 1 arcmin2 pointing. We searched for compact emission line objects using our newly developed LSDCat software based on a 3D matched filtering approach, followed by interactive classification and redshift measurement of the sources. Our catalogue contains 831 distinct emission line galaxies with redshifts ranging from 0.04 to 6. Roughly one third (237) of the emission line sources are Lyman α emitting galaxies with 3 < z < 6, only four of which had previously measured spectroscopic redshifts. At lower redshifts 351 galaxies are detected primarily by their [O ii] emission line (0.3 ≲ z ≲ 1.5), 189 by their [O iii] line (0.21 ≲ z ≲ 0.85), and 46 by their Hα line (0.04 ≲ z ≲ 0.42). Comparing our spectroscopic redshifts to photometric redshift estimates from the literature, we find excellent agreement for z < 1.5 with a median Δz of only 4 × 10-4 and an outlier rate of 6%, however a significant systematic offset of Δz = 0.26 and an outlier rate of 23% for Lyα emitters at z > 3. Together with the catalogue we also release 1D PSF-weighted extracted spectra and small 3D datacubes centred on each of the 831 sources. Based on observations collected at the European Organisation for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere under ESO programme 094.A-0205.Data products are available via http://muse-vlt.eu/science/ and at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/606/A12 .

  7. Machine-learning identification of galaxies in the WISE × SuperCOSMOS all-sky catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krakowski, T.; Małek, K.; Bilicki, M.; Pollo, A.; Kurcz, A.; Krupa, M.

    2016-11-01

    Context. The two currently largest all-sky photometric datasets, WISE and SuperCOSMOS, have been recently cross-matched to construct a novel photometric redshift catalogue on 70% of the sky. Galaxies were separated from stars and quasars through colour cuts, which may leave imperfections because different source types may overlap in colour space. Aims: The aim of the present work is to identify galaxies in the WISE × SuperCOSMOS catalogue through an alternative approach of machine learning. This allows us to define more complex separations in the multi-colour space than is possible with simple colour cuts, and should provide a more reliable source classification. Methods: For the automatised classification we used the support vector machines (SVM) learning algorithm and employed SDSS spectroscopic sources that we cross-matched with WISE × SuperCOSMOS to construct the training and verification set. We performed a number of tests to examine the behaviour of the classifier (completeness, purity, and accuracy) as a function of source apparent magnitude and Galactic latitude. We then applied the classifier to the full-sky data and analysed the resulting catalogue of candidate galaxies. We also compared the resulting dataset with the one obtained through colour cuts. Results: The tests indicate very high accuracy, completeness, and purity (>95%) of the classifier at the bright end; this deteriorates for the faintest sources, but still retains acceptable levels of 85%. No significant variation in the classification quality with Galactic latitude is observed. When we applied the classifier to all-sky WISE × SuperCOSMOS data, we found 15 million galaxies after masking problematic areas. The resulting sample is purer than the one produced by applying colour cuts, at the price of a lower completeness across the sky. Conclusions: The automatic classification is a successful alternative approach to colour cuts for defining a reliable galaxy sample. The identifications we

  8. Documentation for the machine-readable version of the Morphological Catalogue of Galaxies (MCG) of Vorontsov-Velyaminov et al, 1962-1968

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warren, W. H., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Modifications, corrections, and the record format are provided for the machine-readable version of the "Morphological Catalogue of Galaxies.' In addition to hundreds of individual corrections, a detailed comparison of the machine-readable with the published catalogue resulted in the addition of 116 missing objects, the deletion of 10 duplicate records, and a format modification to increase storage efficiency.

  9. Cosmology with XMM galaxy clusters: the X-CLASS/GROND catalogue and photometric redshifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridl, J.; Clerc, N.; Sadibekova, T.; Faccioli, L.; Pacaud, F.; Greiner, J.; Krühler, T.; Rau, A.; Salvato, M.; Menzel, M.-L.; Steinle, H.; Wiseman, P.; Nandra, K.; Sanders, J.

    2017-06-01

    The XMM Cluster Archive Super Survey (X-CLASS) is a serendipitously detected X-ray-selected sample of 845 galaxy clusters based on 2774 XMM archival observations and covering an approximately 90 deg2 spread across the high-Galactic latitude (|b| > 20°) sky. The primary goal of this survey is to produce a well-selected sample of galaxy clusters on which cosmological analyses can be performed. This paper presents the photometric redshift follow-up of a high signal-to-noise ratio subset of 265 of these clusters with declination δ < +20° with Gamma-Ray Burst Optical and Near-Infrared Detector (GROND), a 7-channel (grizJHK) simultaneous imager on the MPG 2.2-m telescope at the ESO La Silla Observatory. We use a newly developed technique based on the red sequence colour-redshift relation, enhanced with information coming from the X-ray detection to provide photometric redshifts for this sample. We determine photometric redshifts for 232 clusters, finding a median redshift of z = 0.39 with an accuracy of Δz = 0.02(1 + z) when compared to a sample of 76 spectroscopically confirmed clusters. We also compute X-ray luminosities for the entire sample and find a median bolometric luminosity of 7.2 × 1043 erg s-1 and a median temperature of 2.9 keV. We compare our results to those of the XMM-XCS and XMM-XXL surveys, finding good agreement in both samples. The X-CLASS catalogue is available online at http://xmm-lss.in2p3.fr:8080/l4sdb/.

  10. The 3XMM/SDSS Stripe 82 Galaxy Cluster Survey. I. Cluster catalogue and discovery of two merging cluster candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takey, A.; Durret, F.; Mahmoud, E.; Ali, G. B.

    2016-10-01

    We present a galaxy cluster survey based on XMM-Newton observations that are located in Stripe 82 of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). The survey covers an area of 11.25 deg2. The X-ray cluster candidates were selected as serendipitously extended detected sources from the third XMM-Newton serendipitous source catalogue (3XMM-DR5). A cross-correlation of the candidate list that comprises 94 objects with recently published X-ray and optically selected cluster catalogues provided optical confirmations and redshift estimates for about half of the candidate sample. We present a catalogue of X-ray cluster candidates previously known in X-ray and/or optical bands from the matched catalogues or NED. The catalogue consists of 54 systems with redshift measurements in the range of 0.05-1.19 with a median of 0.36. Of these, 45 clusters have spectroscopic confirmations as stated in the matched catalogues. We spectroscopically confirmed another 6 clusters from the available spectroscopic redshifts in the SDSS-DR12. The cluster catalogue includes 17 newly X-ray discovered clusters, while the remainder were detected in previous XMM-Newton and/or ROSAT cluster surveys. Based on the available redshifts and fluxes given in the 3XMM-DR5 catalogue, we estimated the X-ray luminosities and masses for the cluster sample. We also present the list of the remaining X-ray cluster candidates (40 objects) that have no redshift information yet in the literature. Of these candidates, 25 sources are considered as distant cluster candidates beyond a redshift of 0.6. We also searched for galaxy cluster mergers in our cluster sample and found two strong candidates for newly discovered cluster mergers at redshifts of 0.11 and 0.26. The X-ray and optical properties of these systems are presented. Tables A.1, C.1, and C.2 are also available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/594/A32

  11. The Large Area Radio Galaxy Evolution Spectroscopic Survey (LARGESS): survey design, data catalogue and GAMA/WiggleZ spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ching, John H. Y.; Sadler, Elaine M.; Croom, Scott M.; Johnston, Helen M.; Pracy, Michael B.; Couch, Warrick J.; Hopkins, A. M.; Jurek, Russell J.; Pimbblet, K. A.

    2017-01-01

    We present the Large Area Radio Galaxy Evolution Spectroscopic Survey (LARGESS), a spectroscopic catalogue of radio sources designed to include the full range of radio AGN populations out to redshift z ˜ 0.8. The catalogue covers ˜800 deg2 of sky, and provides optical identifications for 19 179 radio sources from the 1.4 GHz Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty-cm (FIRST) survey down to an optical magnitude limit of imod < 20.5 in Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) images. Both galaxies and point-like objects are included, and no colour cuts are applied. In collaboration with the WiggleZ and Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) spectroscopic survey teams, we have obtained new spectra for over 5000 objects in the LARGESS sample. Combining these new spectra with data from earlier surveys provides spectroscopic data for 12 329 radio sources in the survey area, of which 10 856 have reliable redshifts. 85 per cent of the LARGESS spectroscopic sample are radio AGN (median redshift z = 0.44), and 15 per cent are nearby star-forming galaxies (median z = 0.08). Low-excitation radio galaxies (LERGs) comprise the majority (83 per cent) of LARGESS radio AGN at z < 0.8, with 12 per cent being high-excitation radio galaxies (HERGs) and 5 per cent radio-loud QSOs. Unlike the more homogeneous LERG and QSO sub-populations, HERGs are a heterogeneous class of objects with relatively blue optical colours and a wide dispersion in mid-infrared colours. This is consistent with a picture in which most HERGs are hosted by galaxies with recent or ongoing star formation as well as a classical accretion disc.

  12. Redshift distributions of galaxies in the Dark Energy Survey Science Verification shear catalogue and implications for weak lensing

    SciTech Connect

    Bonnett, C.; Troxel, M. A.; Hartley, W.; Amara, A.; Leistedt, B.; Becker, M. R.; Bernstein, G. M.; Bridle, S. L.; Bruderer, C.; Busha, M. T.; Carrasco Kind, M.; Childress, M. J.; Castander, F. J.; Chang, C.; Crocce, M.; Davis, T. M.; Eifler, T. F.; Frieman, J.; Gangkofner, C.; Gaztanaga, E.; Glazebrook, K.; Gruen, D.; Kacprzak, T.; King, A.; Kwan, J.; Lahav, O.; Lewis, G.; Lidman, C.; Lin, H.; MacCrann, N.; Miquel, R.; O’Neill, C. R.; Palmese, A.; Peiris, H. V.; Refregier, A.; Rozo, E.; Rykoff, E. S.; Sadeh, I.; Sánchez, C.; Sheldon, E.; Uddin, S.; Wechsler, R. H.; Zuntz, J.; Abbott, T.; Abdalla, F. B.; Allam, S.; Armstrong, R.; Banerji, M.; Bauer, A. H.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bertin, E.; Brooks, D.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Burke, D. L.; Capozzi, D.; Carnero Rosell, A.; Carretero, J.; Cunha, C. E.; D’Andrea, C. B.; da Costa, L. N.; DePoy, D. L.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Dietrich, J. P.; Doel, P.; Fausti Neto, A.; Fernandez, E.; Flaugher, B.; Fosalba, P.; Gerdes, D. W.; Gruendl, R. A.; Honscheid, K.; Jain, B.; James, D. J.; Jarvis, M.; Kim, A. G.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Li, T. S.; Lima, M.; Maia, M. A. G.; March, M.; Marshall, J. L.; Martini, P.; Melchior, P.; Miller, C. J.; Neilsen, E.; Nichol, R. C.; Nord, B.; Ogando, R.; Plazas, A. A.; Reil, K.; Romer, A. K.; Roodman, A.; Sako, M.; Sanchez, E.; Santiago, B.; Smith, R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Suchyta, E.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Thaler, J.; Thomas, D.; Vikram, V.; Walker, A. R.

    2016-08-30

    Here we present photometric redshift estimates for galaxies used in the weak lensing analysis of the Dark Energy Survey Science Verification (DES SV) data. Four model- or machine learning-based photometric redshift methods—annz2, bpz calibrated against BCC-Ufig simulations, skynet, and tpz—are analyzed. For training, calibration, and testing of these methods, we construct a catalogue of spectroscopically confirmed galaxies matched against DES SV data. The performance of the methods is evaluated against the matched spectroscopic catalogue, focusing on metrics relevant for weak lensing analyses, with additional validation against COSMOS photo-z’s. From the galaxies in the DES SV shear catalogue, which have mean redshift 0.72±0.01 over the range 0.38 of approximately 3%. This shift is within the one sigma statistical errors on σ8 for the DES SV shear catalogue. We further study the potential impact of systematic differences on the critical surface density, Σcrit, finding levels of bias safely less than the statistical power of DES SV data. In conclusion, we recommend a final Gaussian prior for the photo-z bias in the mean of n(z) of width 0.05 for each of the three tomographic bins, and show that this is a sufficient bias model for the corresponding cosmology analysis.

  13. Redshift distributions of galaxies in the Dark Energy Survey Science Verification shear catalogue and implications for weak lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnett, C.; Troxel, M. A.; Hartley, W.; Amara, A.; Leistedt, B.; Becker, M. R.; Bernstein, G. M.; Bridle, S. L.; Bruderer, C.; Busha, M. T.; Carrasco Kind, M.; Childress, M. J.; Castander, F. J.; Chang, C.; Crocce, M.; Davis, T. M.; Eifler, T. F.; Frieman, J.; Gangkofner, C.; Gaztanaga, E.; Glazebrook, K.; Gruen, D.; Kacprzak, T.; King, A.; Kwan, J.; Lahav, O.; Lewis, G.; Lidman, C.; Lin, H.; MacCrann, N.; Miquel, R.; O'Neill, C. R.; Palmese, A.; Peiris, H. V.; Refregier, A.; Rozo, E.; Rykoff, E. S.; Sadeh, I.; Sánchez, C.; Sheldon, E.; Uddin, S.; Wechsler, R. H.; Zuntz, J.; Abbott, T.; Abdalla, F. B.; Allam, S.; Armstrong, R.; Banerji, M.; Bauer, A. H.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bertin, E.; Brooks, D.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Burke, D. L.; Capozzi, D.; Carnero Rosell, A.; Carretero, J.; Cunha, C. E.; D'Andrea, C. B.; da Costa, L. N.; DePoy, D. L.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Dietrich, J. P.; Doel, P.; Fausti Neto, A.; Fernandez, E.; Flaugher, B.; Fosalba, P.; Gerdes, D. W.; Gruendl, R. A.; Honscheid, K.; Jain, B.; James, D. J.; Jarvis, M.; Kim, A. G.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Li, T. S.; Lima, M.; Maia, M. A. G.; March, M.; Marshall, J. L.; Martini, P.; Melchior, P.; Miller, C. J.; Neilsen, E.; Nichol, R. C.; Nord, B.; Ogando, R.; Plazas, A. A.; Reil, K.; Romer, A. K.; Roodman, A.; Sako, M.; Sanchez, E.; Santiago, B.; Smith, R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Suchyta, E.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Thaler, J.; Thomas, D.; Vikram, V.; Walker, A. R.; Dark Energy Survey Collaboration

    2016-08-01

    We present photometric redshift estimates for galaxies used in the weak lensing analysis of the Dark Energy Survey Science Verification (DES SV) data. Four model- or machine learning-based photometric redshift methods—annz2, bpz calibrated against BCC-Ufig simulations, skynet, and tpz—are analyzed. For training, calibration, and testing of these methods, we construct a catalogue of spectroscopically confirmed galaxies matched against DES SV data. The performance of the methods is evaluated against the matched spectroscopic catalogue, focusing on metrics relevant for weak lensing analyses, with additional validation against COSMOS photo-z 's. From the galaxies in the DES SV shear catalogue, which have mean redshift 0.72 ±0.01 over the range 0.3 catalogue. We further study the potential impact of systematic differences on the critical surface density, Σcrit , finding levels of bias safely less than the statistical power of DES SV data. We recommend a final Gaussian prior for the photo-z bias in the mean of n (z ) of width 0.05 for each of the three tomographic bins, and show that this is a sufficient bias model for the corresponding cosmology analysis.

  14. Redshift distributions of galaxies in the Dark Energy Survey Science Verification shear catalogue and implications for weak lensing

    SciTech Connect

    Bonnett, C.; Troxel, M. A.; Hartley, W.; Amara, A.; Leistedt, B.; Becker, M. R.; Bernstein, G. M.; Bridle, S. L.; Bruderer, C.; Busha, M. T.; Carrasco Kind, M.; Childress, M. J.; Castander, F. J.; Chang, C.; Crocce, M.; Davis, T. M.; Eifler, T. F.; Frieman, J.; Gangkofner, C.; Gaztanaga, E.; Glazebrook, K.; Gruen, D.; Kacprzak, T.; King, A.; Kwan, J.; Lahav, O.; Lewis, G.; Lidman, C.; Lin, H.; MacCrann, N.; Miquel, R.; O’Neill, C. R.; Palmese, A.; Peiris, H. V.; Refregier, A.; Rozo, E.; Rykoff, E. S.; Sadeh, I.; Sánchez, C.; Sheldon, E.; Uddin, S.; Wechsler, R. H.; Zuntz, J.; Abbott, T.; Abdalla, F. B.; Allam, S.; Armstrong, R.; Banerji, M.; Bauer, A. H.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bertin, E.; Brooks, D.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Burke, D. L.; Capozzi, D.; Carnero Rosell, A.; Carretero, J.; Cunha, C. E.; D’Andrea, C. B.; da Costa, L. N.; DePoy, D. L.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Dietrich, J. P.; Doel, P.; Fausti Neto, A.; Fernandez, E.; Flaugher, B.; Fosalba, P.; Gerdes, D. W.; Gruendl, R. A.; Honscheid, K.; Jain, B.; James, D. J.; Jarvis, M.; Kim, A. G.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Li, T. S.; Lima, M.; Maia, M. A. G.; March, M.; Marshall, J. L.; Martini, P.; Melchior, P.; Miller, C. J.; Neilsen, E.; Nichol, R. C.; Nord, B.; Ogando, R.; Plazas, A. A.; Reil, K.; Romer, A. K.; Roodman, A.; Sako, M.; Sanchez, E.; Santiago, B.; Smith, R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Suchyta, E.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Thaler, J.; Thomas, D.; Vikram, V.; Walker, A. R.

    2016-08-30

    Here we present photometric redshift estimates for galaxies used in the weak lensing analysis of the Dark Energy Survey Science Verification (DES SV) data. Four model- or machine learning-based photometric redshift methods—annz2, bpz calibrated against BCC-Ufig simulations, skynet, and tpz—are analyzed. For training, calibration, and testing of these methods, we construct a catalogue of spectroscopically confirmed galaxies matched against DES SV data. The performance of the methods is evaluated against the matched spectroscopic catalogue, focusing on metrics relevant for weak lensing analyses, with additional validation against COSMOS photo-z’s. From the galaxies in the DES SV shear catalogue, which have mean redshift 0.72±0.01 over the range 0.38 of approximately 3%. This shift is within the one sigma statistical errors on σ8 for the DES SV shear catalogue. We further study the potential impact of systematic differences on the critical surface density, Σcrit, finding levels of bias safely less than the statistical power of DES SV data. In conclusion, we recommend a final Gaussian prior for the photo-z bias in the mean of n(z) of width 0.05 for each of the three tomographic bins, and show that this is a sufficient bias model for the corresponding cosmology analysis.

  15. DGSAT: Dwarf Galaxy Survey with Amateur Telescopes. II. A catalogue of isolated nearby edge-on disk galaxies and the discovery of new low surface brightness systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henkel, C.; Javanmardi, B.; Martínez-Delgado, D.; Kroupa, P.; Teuwen, K.

    2017-07-01

    The connection between the bulge mass or bulge luminosity in disk galaxies and the number, spatial and phase space distribution of associated dwarf galaxies is a discriminator between cosmological simulations related to galaxy formation in cold dark matter and generalised gravity models. Here, a nearby sample of isolated Milky Way-class edge-on galaxies is introduced, to facilitate observational campaigns to detect the associated families of dwarf galaxies at low surface brightness. Three galaxy pairs with at least one of the targets being edge-on are also introduced. Approximately 60% of the catalogued isolated galaxies contain bulges of different size, while the remaining objects appear to be bulgeless. Deep images of NGC 3669 (small bulge, with NGC 3625 at the edge of the image) and NGC 7814 (prominent bulge), obtained with a 0.4 m aperture, are also presented, resulting in the discovery of two new dwarf galaxy candidates, NGC 3669-DGSAT-3 and NGC 7814-DGSAT-7. Eleven additional low surface brightness galaxies are identified, previously notified with low quality measurement flags in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Integrated magnitudes, surface brightnesses, effective radii, Sersic indices, axis ratios, and projected distances to their putative major hosts are displayed. At least one of the galaxies, NGC 3625-DGSAT-4, belongs with a surface brightness of μr ≈ 26 mag arcsec-2 and effective radius >1.5 kpc to the class of ultra-diffuse galaxies (UDGs). NGC 3669-DGSAT-3, the galaxy with the lowest surface brightness in our sample, may also be an UDG.

  16. Weak lensing calibration of mass bias in the REFLEX+BCS X-ray galaxy cluster catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simet, Melanie; Battaglia, Nicholas; Mandelbaum, Rachel; Seljak, Uroš

    2017-04-01

    The use of large, X-ray-selected Galaxy cluster catalogues for cosmological analyses requires a thorough understanding of the X-ray mass estimates. Weak gravitational lensing is an ideal method to shed light on such issues, due to its insensitivity to the cluster dynamical state. We perform a weak lensing calibration of 166 galaxy clusters from the REFLEX and BCS cluster catalogue and compare our results to the X-ray masses based on scaled luminosities from that catalogue. To interpret the weak lensing signal in terms of cluster masses, we compare the lensing signal to simple theoretical Navarro-Frenk-White models and to simulated cluster lensing profiles, including complications such as cluster substructure, projected large-scale structure and Eddington bias. We find evidence of underestimation in the X-ray masses, as expected, with = 0.75 ± 0.07 stat. ±0.05 sys. for our best-fitting model. The biases in cosmological parameters in a typical cluster abundance measurement that ignores this mass bias will typically exceed the statistical errors.

  17. Strong bimodality in the host halo mass of central galaxies from galaxy-galaxy lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandelbaum, Rachel; Wang, Wenting; Zu, Ying; White, Simon; Henriques, Bruno; More, Surhud

    2016-04-01

    We use galaxy-galaxy lensing to study the dark matter haloes surrounding a sample of locally brightest galaxies (LBGs) selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We measure mean halo mass as a function of the stellar mass and colour of the central galaxy. Mock catalogues constructed from semi-analytic galaxy formation simulations demonstrate that most LBGs are the central objects of their haloes, greatly reducing interpretation uncertainties due to satellite contributions to the lensing signal. Over the full stellar mass range, 10.3 < log [M*/M⊙] < 11.6, we find that passive central galaxies have haloes that are at least twice as massive as those of star-forming objects of the same stellar mass. The significance of this effect exceeds 3σ for log [M*/M⊙] > 10.7. Tests using the mock catalogues and on the data themselves clarify the effects of LBG selection and show that it cannot artificially induce a systematic dependence of halo mass on LBG colour. The bimodality in halo mass at fixed stellar mass is reproduced by the astrophysical model underlying our mock catalogue, but the sign of the effect is inconsistent with recent, nearly parameter-free age-matching models. The sign and magnitude of the effect can, however, be reproduced by halo occupation distribution models with a simple (few-parameter) prescription for type dependence.

  18. Catalogue of the morphological features in the Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies (S4G)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrera-Endoqui, M.; Díaz-García, S.; Laurikainen, E.; Salo, H.

    2015-10-01

    Context. A catalogue of the features for the complete Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies (S4G), including 2352 nearby galaxies, is presented. The measurements are made using 3.6 μm images, largely tracing the old stellar population; at this wavelength the effects of dust are also minimal. The measured features are the sizes, ellipticities, and orientations of bars, rings, ringlenses, and lenses. Measured in a similar manner are also barlenses (lens-like structures embedded in the bars), which are not lenses in the usual sense, being rather the more face-on counterparts of the boxy/peanut structures in the edge-on view. In addition, pitch angles of spiral arm segments are measured for those galaxies where they can be reliably traced. More than one pitch angle may appear for a single galaxy. All measurements are made in a human-supervised manner so that attention is paid to each galaxy. Aims: We create a catalogue of morphological features in the complete S4G. Methods: We used isophotal analysis, unsharp masking, and fitting ellipses to measured structures. Results: We find that the sizes of the inner rings and lenses normalized to barlength correlate with the galaxy mass: the normalized sizes increase toward the less massive galaxies; it has been suggested that this is related to the larger dark matter content in the bar region in these systems. Bars in the low mass galaxies are also less concentrated, likely to be connected to the mass cut-off in the appearance of the nuclear rings and lenses. We also show observational evidence that barlenses indeed form part of the bar, and that a large fraction of the inner lenses in the non-barred galaxies could be former barlenses in which the thin outer bar component has dissolved. Full Tables 2 and 3 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/582/A86

  19. Spherical harmonic analysis of the PSCz galaxy catalogue: redshift distortions and the real-space power spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tadros, H.; Ballinger, W. E.; Taylor, A. N.; Heavens, A. F.; Efstathiou, G.; Saunders, W.; Frenk, C. S.; Keeble, O.; McMahon, R.; Maddox, S. J.; Oliver, S.; Rowan-Robinson, M.; Sutherland, W. J.; White, S. D. M.

    1999-05-01

    We apply the formalism of spherical harmonic decomposition to the galaxy density field of the IRAS PSCz redshift survey. The PSCz redshift survey has almost all-sky coverage and includes IRAS galaxies to a flux limit of 0.6 Jy. Using maximum likelihood methods to examine (to first order) the distortion of the galaxy pattern resulting from redshift coordinates, we have measured the parameter beta=Omega^{0.6}/b. We also simultaneously measure either (a) the undistorted amplitude of perturbations in the galaxy distribution when a parametrized power spectrum is assumed, or (b) the shape and amplitude of the real-space power spectrum if the band-power in a set of passbands is measured in a step-wise fashion. These methods are extensively tested on a series of CDM, Lambda CDM and MDM simulations and are found to be unbiased. We obtain consistent results for the subset of the PSCz catalogue with flux above 0.75 Jy, but inclusion of galaxies to the formal flux limit of the catalogue gives variations which are larger than our internal errors. For the 0.75-Jy catalogue we find, in the case of a parametrized power spectrum, beta=0.58+/-0.26 and the amplitude of the real-space power measured at wavenumber k=0.1h Mpc^-1 is Delta_0.1=0.42+/-0.03. Freeing the shape of the power spectrum we find that beta=0.47+/-0.16 (conditional error) and Delta_0.1=0.47+/-0.03. The shape of the real-space power spectrum is consistent with a Gamma=0.2 CDM-like model, but does not strongly rule out a number of other models. Finally by combining our estimate of the amplitude of galaxy clustering and the distortion parameter we find the amplitude of mass fluctuations on a scale k=0.1h Mpc^-1 is Delta_rho=0.24Omega_0^-0.6, with an uncertainty of 50 per cent.

  20. The Planck Catalogue of High-z source candidates : A laboratory for high-z star forming galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montier, Ludovic

    2015-08-01

    The Planck satellite has provided the first FIR/submm all-sky survey with a sensitivity allowing us to identify the rarest, most luminous high-z dusty star-forming sources on the sky. It opens a new window on these extreme star-forming systems at redshift above 1.5, providing a powerful laboratory to study the mechanisms of galaxy evolution and enrichment in the frame of the large scale structure growth.I will describe how the Planck catalogue of high-z source candidates (PHz, Planck 2015 in prep.) has been built and charcaterized over 25% of the sky by selecting the brightest red submm sources at a 5' resolution. Follow-up observations with Herschel/SPIRE over 228 Planck candidates have shown that 93% of these candidates are actually overdensities of red sources with SEDs peaking at 350um (Planck Int. results. XXVII 2014). Complementarily to this population of objects, 12 Planck high-z candidates have been identified as strongly lensed star forming galaxies at redshift lying between 2.2 and 3.6 (Canameras et al 2015 subm.), with flux densities larger than 400 mJy up to 1 Jy at 350um, and strong magnification factors. These Planck lensed star-forming galaxies are the rarest brightest lensed in the submm range, providing a unique opportunity to extend the exploration of the star-forming system in this range of mass and redshift.I will detail further a specific analysis performed on a proto-cluster candidate, PHz G95.5-61.6, identified as a double structure at z=1.7 and z=2.03, using an extensive follow-up program (Flores-Cacho et al 2015 subm.). This is the first Planck proto-cluster candidate with spectroscopic confirmation, which opens a new field of statistical analysis about the evolution of dusty star-forming galaxies in such accreting structures.I will finally discuss how the PHz catalogue may help to answer some of the fundamental questions like: At what cosmic epoch did massive galaxy clusters form most of their stars? Is star formation more or less vigorous

  1. Robust covariance estimation of galaxy-galaxy weak lensing: validation and limitation of jackknife covariance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirasaki, Masato; Takada, Masahiro; Miyatake, Hironao; Takahashi, Ryuichi; Hamana, Takashi; Nishimichi, Takahiro; Murata, Ryoma

    2017-09-01

    We develop a method to simulate galaxy-galaxy weak lensing by utilizing all-sky, light-cone simulations and their inherent halo catalogues. Using the mock catalogue to study the error covariance matrix of galaxy-galaxy weak lensing, we compare the full covariance with the 'jackknife' (JK) covariance, the method often used in the literature that estimates the covariance from the resamples of the data itself. We show that there exists the variation of JK covariance over realizations of mock lensing measurements, while the average JK covariance over mocks can give a reasonably accurate estimation of the true covariance up to separations comparable with the size of JK subregion. The scatter in JK covariances is found to be ∼10 per cent after we subtract the lensing measurement around random points. However, the JK method tends to underestimate the covariance at the larger separations, more increasingly for a survey with a higher number density of source galaxies. We apply our method to the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) data, and show that the 48 mock SDSS catalogues nicely reproduce the signals and the JK covariance measured from the real data. We then argue that the use of the accurate covariance, compared to the JK covariance, allows us to use the lensing signals at large scales beyond a size of the JK subregion, which contains cleaner cosmological information in the linear regime.

  2. VizieR Online Data Catalog: REFLEX Galaxy Cluster Survey catalogue (Boehringer+, 2004)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehringer, H.; Schuecker, P.; Guzzo, L.; Collins, C. A.; Voges, W.; Cruddace, R. G.; Ortiz-Gil, A.; Chincarini, G.; de Grandi, S.; Edge, A. C.; MacGillivray, H. T.; Neumann, D. M.; Schindler, S.; Shaver, P.

    2004-05-01

    The following tables provide the catalogue as well as several data files necessary to reproduce the sample preparation. These files are also required for the cosmological modeling of these observations in e.g. the study of the statistics of the large-scale structure of the matter distribution in the Universe and related cosmological tests. (13 data files).

  3. Luminosity dependence of the spatial and velocity distributions of galaxies: semi-analytic models versus the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Cheng; Jing, Y. P.; Kauffmann, Guinevere; Börner, Gerhard; Kang, Xi; Wang, Lan

    2007-04-01

    By comparing semi-analytic galaxy catalogues with data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), we show that current galaxy formation models reproduce qualitatively the dependence of galaxy clustering and pairwise peculiar velocities on luminosity, but some subtle discrepancies with the data still remain. The comparisons are carried out by constructing a large set of mock galaxy redshift surveys that have the same selection function as the SDSS Data Release Four (DR4). The mock surveys are based on two sets of semi-analytic catalogues presented by Croton et al. and Kang et al. From the mock catalogues, we measure the redshift-space projected two-point correlation function wp(rp), the power spectrum P(k) and the pairwise velocity dispersion (PVD) in Fourier space σ12(k) and in configuration space σ12(rp), for galaxies in different luminosity intervals. We then compare these theoretical predictions with the measurements derived from the SDSS DR4. On large scales and for galaxies brighter than L*, both sets of mock catalogues agree well with the data. For fainter galaxies, however, both models predict stronger clustering and higher pairwise velocities than observed. We demonstrate that this problem can be resolved if the fraction of faint satellite galaxies in massive haloes is reduced by ~30 per cent compared to the model predictions. A direct look into the model galaxy catalogues reveals that a significant fraction (15 per cent) of faint galaxies (-18 < M0.1r - 5 log10h < -17) reside in haloes with Mvir > 1013 Msolar, and this population is predominantly red in colour. These faint red galaxies are responsible for the high PVD values of low-luminosity galaxies on small scales.

  4. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Catalogue of far-infrared loops in the Galaxy (Konyves+, 2007)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konyves, V.; Kiss, Cs.; Moor, A.; Kiss, Z. T.; Toth, L. V.

    2006-11-01

    An all-sky survey of loop- and arc-like intensity enhancements has been performed in order to investigate the large-scale structure of the diffuse far-infrared emission. We used maps made of 60 and 100um processed IRAS data (Sky Survey Atlas and dust infrared emission maps) to identify large-scale structures: loops, arcs or cavities, in the far-infrared emission in the Galaxy. Distances were attributed to a subsample of loops using associated objects. We identified 462 far-infrared loops, analyzed their individual FIR properties and their distribution. This data forms the Catalogue of Far-Infrared Loops in the Galaxy. We obtained observational estimates of fin~30% and fout~5% for the hot gas volume filling factor of the inward and outward Galactic neighbourhood of the Solar System. We obtained a slope of the power law size luminosity function {beta}=1.37 for low Galactic latitudes in the outer Milky Way. Deviations in the celestial distribution of far-infrared loops clearly indicate, that violent events frequently overwrite the structure of the interstellar matter in the inner Galaxy. Our objects trace out the spiral arm structure of the Galaxy in the neighbourhood of the Sun and their distribution clearly suggests that there is an efficient process that can generate loop-like features at high Galactic latitudes. Power law indices of size luminosity distributions suggest, that the structure of the ISM is ruled by supernovae and stellar winds at low Galactic latitudes while it is governed by supersonic turbulence above the Galactic plane. (4 data files).

  5. A Catalogue of Galaxies Having Radial Velocities: Volume 15: Part 7

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fredrick, L. W.; Gutsch, W. A.

    1974-01-01

    A tabulation of galaxies which have radial velocities is presented. The parameters of each galaxy are: (1) an abbreviation for the catalog designation, (2) RA(1950), (3) Dec. (1950), (4) new galactic longitude, (5) new galactic latitude, (6) morphological type, (7) magnitude, (8) observed radial velocity in kilometers per second (9) radial velocity corrected for solar motion, and (10) estimated error in radial velocity in kilometers per second.

  6. ICE-COLA: towards fast and accurate synthetic galaxy catalogues optimizing a quasi-N-body method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izard, Albert; Crocce, Martin; Fosalba, Pablo

    2016-07-01

    Next generation galaxy surveys demand the development of massive ensembles of galaxy mocks to model the observables and their covariances, what is computationally prohibitive using N-body simulations. COmoving Lagrangian Acceleration (COLA) is a novel method designed to make this feasible by following an approximate dynamics but with up to three orders of magnitude speed-ups when compared to an exact N-body. In this paper, we investigate the optimization of the code parameters in the compromise between computational cost and recovered accuracy in observables such as two-point clustering and halo abundance. We benchmark those observables with a state-of-the-art N-body run, the MICE Grand Challenge simulation. We find that using 40 time-steps linearly spaced since zi ˜ 20, and a force mesh resolution three times finer than that of the number of particles, yields a matter power spectrum within 1 per cent for k ≲ 1 h Mpc-1 and a halo mass function within 5 per cent of those in the N-body. In turn, the halo bias is accurate within 2 per cent for k ≲ 0.7 h Mpc-1 whereas, in redshift space, the halo monopole and quadrupole are within 4 per cent for k ≲ 0.4 h Mpc-1. These results hold for a broad range in redshift (0 < z < 1) and for all halo mass bins investigated (M > 1012.5 h-1 M⊙). To bring accuracy in clustering to one per cent level we study various methods that re-calibrate halo masses and/or velocities. We thus propose an optimized choice of COLA code parameters as a powerful tool to optimally exploit future galaxy surveys.

  7. The ROSAT-ESO Flux Limited X-ray (REFLEX) Galaxy cluster survey. V. The cluster catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böhringer, H.; Schuecker, P.; Guzzo, L.; Collins, C. A.; Voges, W.; Cruddace, R. G.; Ortiz-Gil, A.; Chincarini, G.; De Grandi, S.; Edge, A. C.; MacGillivray, H. T.; Neumann, D. M.; Schindler, S.; Shaver, P.

    2004-10-01

    We present the catalogue of the REFLEX Cluster Survey providing information on the X-ray properties, redshifts, and some identification details of the clusters in the REFLEX sample. The catalogue describes a statistically complete X-ray flux-limited sample of 447 galaxy clusters above an X-ray flux of 3 × 10-12 erg s-1 cm-2 (0.1 to 2.4 keV) in an area of 4.24 ster in the southern sky. The cluster candidates were first selected by their X-ray emission in the ROSAT-All Sky Survey and subsequently spectroscopically identified in the frame of an ESO key programme. Previously described tests have shown that the sample is more than 90% complete and there is a conservative upper limit of 9% on the fraction of clusters with a dominant X-ray contamination from AGN. In addition to the cluster catalogue we also describe the complete selection criteria as a function of the sky position and the conversion functions used to analyse the X-ray data. These are essential for the precise statistical analysis of the large-scale cluster distribution. This data set is at present the largest, statistically complete X-ray galaxy cluster sample. Together with these data set we also provide for the first time the full three-dimensional selection function. The sample forms the basis of several cosmological studies, one of the most important applications being the assessment of the statistics of the large-scale structure of the universe and the test of cosmological models. Part of these cosmological results have already been published. Based on observations at the European Southern Observatory La Silla, Chile. The full Tables \\ref{tab1}-\\ref{tab9} are only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/425/367 as well as on our home page http://www.xray.mpe.mpg.de/theorie/REFLEX/DATA Appendix is only available in electronic form at http://www.edpsciences.org

  8. HerMES: a search for high-redshift dusty galaxies in the HerMES Large Mode Survey - catalogue, number counts and early results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asboth, V.; Conley, A.; Sayers, J.; Béthermin, M.; Chapman, S. C.; Clements, D. L.; Cooray, A.; Dannerbauer, H.; Farrah, D.; Glenn, J.; Golwala, S. R.; Halpern, M.; Ibar, E.; Ivison, R. J.; Maloney, P. R.; Marques-Chaves, R.; Martinez-Navajas, P. I.; Oliver, S. J.; Pérez-Fournon, I.; Riechers, D. A.; Rowan-Robinson, M.; Scott, Douglas; Siegel, S. R.; Vieira, J. D.; Viero, M.; Wang, L.; Wardlow, J.; Wheeler, J.

    2016-10-01

    Selecting sources with rising flux densities towards longer wavelengths from Herschel/Spectral and Photometric Imaging Receiver (SPIRE) maps is an efficient way to produce a catalogue rich in high-redshift (z > 4) dusty star-forming galaxies. The effectiveness of this approach has already been confirmed by spectroscopic follow-up observations, but the previously available catalogues made this way are limited by small survey areas. Here we apply a map-based search method to 274 deg2 of the Herschel Multi-tiered Extragalactic Survey (HerMES) Large Mode Survey and create a catalogue of 477 objects with SPIRE flux densities S500 > S350 > S250 and a 5σ cut-off S500 > 52 mJy. From this catalogue we determine that the total number of these `red' sources is at least an order of magnitude higher than predicted by galaxy evolution models. These results are in agreement with previous findings in smaller HerMES fields; however, due to our significantly larger sample size we are also able to investigate the shape of the red source counts for the first time. We have obtained spectroscopic redshift measurements for two of our sources using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array. The redshifts z = 5.1 and 3.8 confirm that with our selection method we can indeed find high-redshift dusty star-forming galaxies.

  9. The orientation of galaxies and of clusters from an objectively defined catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fong, R.; Stevenson, P. R. F.; Shanks, T.

    1990-01-01

    The galaxy and cluster catalogs of Stevenson et al. (1988) are used to study the orientations of clusters and galaxies within clusters. Results are presented from statistical tests on the orientation distribution of galaxies and clusters. Consideration is given to the possibility that a cluster's major axis extends beyond the central region from which the axis is determined. The results do not confirm Bignelli's (1982) hypothesis that clusters point towards the nearest neighbor cluster. Also, the suggestion of Argyres et al. (1986) that major axes of clusters extend to scale of about 15/h Mpc is not confirmed. It is shown that for clusters within separations less than 34 arcmin, neighboring clusters may tend to align with each other.

  10. Kinematics of the galaxy from OB stars with proper motions from the Gaia DR1 catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobylev, V. V.; Bajkova, A. T.

    2017-03-01

    We consider two samples of OB stars with different distance scales that we have studied previously. The first and second samples consist of massive spectroscopic binaries with photometric distances and distances determined from interstellar calcium lines, respectively. The OB stars are located at heliocentric distances up to 7 kpc. We have identified them with the Gaia DR1 catalogue. Using the proper motions taken from the Gaia DR1 catalogue is shown to reduce the random errors in the Galactic rotation parameters compared to the previously known results. By analyzing the proper motions and parallaxes of 208 OB stars from the Gaia DR1 catalogue with a relative parallax error of less than 200%, we have found the following kinematic parameters: ( U, V)⊙ = (8.67, 6.63)± (0.88, 0.98) km s-1, Ω0 = 27.35 ± 0.77 km s-1 kpc-1, Ω'0 = -4.13 ± 0.13 km s-1 kpc-2, and Ω″0 = 0.672 ± 0.070 km s-1 kpc-3, the Oort constants are A = -16.53 ± 0.52 km s-1 kpc-1 and B = 10.82 ± 0.93 km s-1 kpc-1, and the linear circular rotation velocity of the local standard of rest around the Galactic rotation axis is V 0 = 219 ± 8 km s-1 for the adopted R 0 = 8.0 ± 0.2 kpc. Based on the same stars, we have derived the rotation parameters only from their line-of-sight velocities. By comparing the estimated values of Ω'0, we have found the distance scale factor for the Gaia DR1 catalogue to be close to unity: 0.96. Based on 238 OB stars of the combined sample with photometric distances for the stars of the first sample and distances in the calcium distance scale for the stars of the second sample, line-of-sight velocities, and proper motions from the Gaia DR1 catalogue, we have found the following kinematic parameters: ( U, V, W)⊙ = (8.19, 9.28, 8.79)± (0.74, 0.92, 0.74) km s-1, Ω0 = 31.53 ± 0.54 km s-1 kpc-1, Ω'0 = -4.44 ± 0.12 km s-1 kpc-2, and Ω″0 = 0.706 ± 0.100 km s-1 kpc-3; here, A = -17.77 ± 0.46 km s-1 kpc-1, B = 13.76 ± 0.71 km s-1 kpc-1, and V 0 = 252 ± 8 km s-1.

  11. Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA): estimating galaxy group masses via caustic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alpaslan, Mehmet; Robotham, Aaron S. G.; Driver, Simon; Norberg, Peder; Peacock, John A.; Baldry, Ivan; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Brough, Sarah; Hopkins, Andrew M.; Kelvin, Lee S.; Liske, Jochen; Loveday, Jon; Merson, Alexander; Nichol, Robert C.; Pimbblet, Kevin

    2012-11-01

    We have generated complementary halo mass estimates for all the groups in the Galaxy And Mass Assembly Galaxy Group Catalogue (GAMA G3Cv1) using a modified caustic mass estimation algorithm, originally developed by Diaferio & Geller. We calibrate the algorithm by applying it on a series of nine GAMA mock galaxy light cones and investigate the effects of using different definitions for group centre and size. We select the set of parameters that provide median-unbiased mass estimates when tested on mocks, and generate mass estimates for the real group catalogue. We find that on average, the caustic mass estimates agree with dynamical mass estimates within a factor of 2 in 90.8 ± 6.1 per cent groups and compare equally well to velocity dispersion based mass estimates for both high- and low-multiplicity groups over the full range of masses probed by the G3Cv1.

  12. The SDSS-IV eBOSS: emission line galaxy catalogues at z ≈ 0.8 and study of systematic errors in the angular clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delubac, T.; Raichoor, A.; Comparat, J.; Jouvel, S.; Kneib, J.-P.; Yèche, C.; Zou, H.; Brownstein, J. R.; Abdalla, F. B.; Dawson, K.; Jullo, E.; Myers, A. D.; Newman, J. A.; Percival, W. J.; Prada, F.; Ross, A. J.; Schneider, D. P.; Zhou, X.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, G.

    2017-02-01

    We present two wide-field catalogues of photometrically selected emission line galaxies (ELGs) at z ≈ 0.8 covering about 2800 deg2over the south galactic cap. The catalogues were obtained using a Fisher discriminant technique described in a companion paper. The two catalogues differ by the imaging used to define the Fisher discriminant: the first catalogue includes imaging from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer, the second also includes information from the South Galactic Cap U-band Sky Survey. Containing respectively 560 045 and 615 601 objects, they represent the largest ELG catalogues available today and were designed for the ELG programme of the extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (eBOSS). We study potential sources of systematic variation in the angular distribution of the selected ELGs due to fluctuations of the observational parameters. We model the influence of the observational parameters using a multivariate regression and implement a weighting scheme which allows effective removal of all of the systematic errors induced by the observational parameters. We show that fluctuations in the imaging zero-points of the photometric bands have minor impact on the angular distribution of objects in our catalogues. We compute the angular clustering of both catalogues and show that our weighting procedure effectively removes spurious clustering on large scales. We fit a model to the small-scale angular clustering, showing that the selections have similar biases of 1.35/Da(z) and 1.28/Da(z). Both catalogues are publicly available.

  13. Kinematics of the galaxy from Cepheids with proper motions from the Gaia DR1 catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobylev, V. V.

    2017-03-01

    A sample of classical Cepheids with known distances and line-of-sight velocities has been supplemented with proper motions from the Gaia DR1 catalogue. Based on the velocities of 260 stars, we have found the components of the peculiar solar velocity vector ( U, V, W)⊙ = (7.90, 11.73, 7.39) ± (0.65, 0.77, 0.62) km s-1 and the following parameters of the Galactic rotation curve: Ω0 = 28.84 ± 0.33 km s-1 kpc-1, Ω'0 = -4.05 ± 0.10 km s-1 kpc-2, and Ω″0 = 0.805 ± 0.067 km s-1 kpc-3 for the adopted solar Galactocentric distance R 0 = 8 kpc; the linear rotation velocity of the local standard of rest is V 0 = 231 ± 6 km s-1.

  14. Spectroscopic observations of the distant cluster of galaxies Abell 370 - A catalogue of 84 spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soucail, G.; Mellier, Y.; Fort, B.; Cailloux, M.

    1988-06-01

    Spectroscopic and photometric data are presented on 84 objects in the field of the distant cluster of galaxies Abell 370 (z = 0.374) obtained with the multiaperture spectroscopic systems PUMA developed at the Toulouse Observatory for the CFHT and ESO. The redshift and the spectral types as well as CCD photometry in the B and R bands are given with a discussion on the accuracy of the different data and measurements.

  15. Characterizing and Cataloguing Star-Forming Galaxies in Preparation for the LADUMA Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, Manuel Joe; Baker, Andrew J.; Wu, John F.

    2017-01-01

    This poster presents the results of an effort to process, characterize, and catalog the optical spectra of ~ 1,500 star-forming galaxies, located in the Extended Chandra Deep Field South (ECDFS), which will be used in stacking experiments by the Looking At the Distant Universe with the MeerKAT Array (LADUMA) deep HI survey. The LADUMA HI data will be used to study the evolution of the Tully-Fisher relation, cosmic neutral gas density, and other intrinsic properties of galaxies as a function of redshift. The stacking component of this research will rely on large catalogs of star-forming galaxies in the ECDFS, categorized according to star-formation rate (SFR), metallicity, stellar color excess, and redshift. We used optical spectra obtained with the Anglo-Australian Telescope, for which we have developed an automated pipeline to calculate extinction-corrected line fluxes, SFRs, and various metallicity diagnostics. The pipeline ultimately provides a visualization of the objects and their intrinsic properties as related to redshift for future analysis by the LADUMA team. This work has been supported by NSF grant PHY-1560077.

  16. NIHAO X: reconciling the local galaxy velocity function with cold dark matter via mock H I observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macciò, Andrea V.; Udrescu, Silviu M.; Dutton, Aaron A.; Obreja, Aura; Wang, Liang; Stinson, Greg R.; Kang, Xi

    2016-11-01

    We used 87 high-resolution hydrodynamical cosmological simulations from the NIHAO suite to investigate the relation between the maximum circular velocity (V_max^DM) of a dark matter halo in a collisionless simulation and the velocity width of the H I gas in the same halo in the hydrodynamical simulation. These two quantities are normally used to compare theoretical and observational velocity functions and have led to a possible discrepancy between observations and predictions based on the cold dark matter (CDM) model. We show that below 100 km s-1, there is clear bias between H I -based velocities and V_max^DM, that leads to an underestimation of the actual circular velocity of the halo. When this bias is taken into account, the CDM model has no trouble in reproducing the observed velocity function and no lack of low-velocity galaxies is actually present. Our simulations also reproduce the linewidth-stellar mass (Tully-Fisher) relation and H I sizes, indicating that the H I gas in our simulations is as extended as observed. The physical reason for the lower than expected linewidths is that, in contrast to high-mass galaxies, low-mass galaxies no longer have extended thin H I rotating discs, as is commonly assumed.

  17. The VIMOS-VLT deep survey: the group catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cucciati, O.; Marinoni, C.; Iovino, A.; Bardelli, S.; Adami, C.; Mazure, A.; Scodeggio, M.; Maccagni, D.; Temporin, S.; Zucca, E.; De Lucia, G.; Blaizot, J.; Garilli, B.; Meneux, B.; Zamorani, G.; Le Fèvre, O.; Cappi, A.; Guzzo, L.; Bottini, D.; Le Brun, V.; Tresse, L.; Vettolani, G.; Zanichelli, A.; Arnouts, S.; Bolzonella, M.; Charlot, S.; Ciliegi, P.; Contini, T.; Foucaud, S.; Franzetti, P.; Gavignaud, I.; Ilbert, O.; Lamareille, F.; McCracken, H. J.; Marano, B.; Merighi, R.; Paltani, S.; Pellò, R.; Pollo, A.; Pozzetti, L.; Vergani, D.; Pérez-Montero, E.

    2010-09-01

    Aims: We present a homogeneous and complete catalogue of optical galaxy groups identified in the purely flux-limited (17.5 ≤ IAB ≤ 24.0) VIMOS-VLT deep redshift Survey (VVDS). Methods: We use mock catalogues extracted from the Millennium Simulation, to correct for potential systematics that might affect the overall distribution as well as the individual properties of the identified systems. Simulated samples allow us to forecast the number and properties of groups that can be potentially found in a survey with VVDS-like selection functions. We use them to correct for the expected incompleteness and, to asses in addition, how well galaxy redshifts trace the line-of-sight velocity dispersion of the underlying mass overdensity. In particular, on these mock catalogues we train the adopted group-finding technique i.e., the Voronoi-Delaunay Method (VDM). The goal is to fine-tune its free parameters, recover in a robust and unbiased way the redshift and velocity dispersion distributions of groups (n(z) and n(σ), respectively), and maximize, at the same time, the level of completeness and purity of the group catalogue. Results: We identify 318 VVDS groups with at least 2 members in the range 0.2 ≤ z ≤ 1.0, among which 144 (/30) with at least 3 (/5) members. The sample has an overall completeness of ~60% and a purity of ~50%. Nearly 45% of the groups with at least 3 members are still recovered if we run the algorithm with a particular parameter set that maximizes the purity (~75%) of the resulting catalogue. We use the group sample to explore the redshift evolution of the fraction fb of blue galaxies (U-B ≤ 1) in the redshift range 0.2 ≤ z ≤ 1. We find that the fraction of blue galaxies is significantly lower in groups than in the global population (i.e. in the whole ensemble of galaxies irrespective of their environment). Both of these quantities increase with redshift, the fraction of blue galaxies in groups exhibiting a marginally significant steeper

  18. Galaxy-galaxy lensing estimators and their covariance properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Sukhdeep; Mandelbaum, Rachel; Seljak, Uroš; Slosar, Anže; Vazquez Gonzalez, Jose

    2017-11-01

    We study the covariance properties of real space correlation function estimators - primarily galaxy-shear correlations, or galaxy-galaxy lensing - using SDSS data for both shear catalogues and lenses (specifically the BOSS LOWZ sample). Using mock catalogues of lenses and sources, we disentangle the various contributions to the covariance matrix and compare them with a simple analytical model. We show that not subtracting the lensing measurement around random points from the measurement around the lens sample is equivalent to performing the measurement using the lens density field instead of the lens overdensity field. While the measurement using the lens density field is unbiased (in the absence of systematics), its error is significantly larger due to an additional term in the covariance. Therefore, this subtraction should be performed regardless of its beneficial effects on systematics. Comparing the error estimates from data and mocks for estimators that involve the overdensity, we find that the errors are dominated by the shape noise and lens clustering, which empirically estimated covariances (jackknife and standard deviation across mocks) that are consistent with theoretical estimates, and that both the connected parts of the four-point function and the supersample covariance can be neglected for the current levels of noise. While the trade-off between different terms in the covariance depends on the survey configuration (area, source number density), the diagnostics that we use in this work should be useful for future works to test their empirically determined covariances.

  19. Galaxy groups in the low-redshift Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, S. H.; Mo, H. J.; Lu, Yi; Wang, Huiyuan; Yang, Xiaohu

    2017-09-01

    We apply a halo-based group finder to four large redshift surveys, the 2MRS (Two Micron All-Sky Redshift Survey), 6dFGS (Six-degree Field Galaxy Survey), SDSS (Sloan Digital Sky Survey) and 2dFGRS (Two-degree Field Galaxy Redshift Survey), to construct group catalogues in the low-redshift Universe. The group finder is based on that of Yang et al. but with an improved halo mass assignment so that it can be applied uniformly to various redshift surveys of galaxies. Halo masses are assigned to groups according to proxies based on the stellar mass/luminosity of member galaxies. The performances of the group finder in grouping galaxies according to common haloes and in halo mass assignments are tested using realistic mock samples constructed from hydrodynamical simulations and empirical models of galaxy occupation in dark matter haloes. Our group finder finds ∼94 per cent of the correct true member galaxies for 90-95 per cent of the groups in the mock samples; the halo masses assigned by the group finder are un-biased with respect to the true halo masses, and have a typical uncertainty of ∼0.2 dex. The properties of group catalogues constructed from the observational samples are described and compared with other similar catalogues in the literature.

  20. Total magnitudes of Virgo galaxies - III. Scale errors in the Reference Catalogue of Bright Galaxies T system and light-profile distortion by resolution-degrading and differential-distance effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Christopher Ke-shih

    2004-11-01

    We investigate the BT magnitude scales of the Second and Third Reference Catalogues of Bright Galaxies, finding both scales to be reasonably reliable for 11.5 <~Bt<~ 14.0. However, large-scale errors of 0.26 and 0.24mag per unit mag interval respectively are uncovered for early-type galaxies at the bright ends, whilst even larger ones of 0.74 and 0.36mag per unit mag interval are found for galaxies of all morphological types at the faint ends. We attribute this situation to several effects already discussed by Young et al. and Young (Paper I), including the application of relatively inflexible growth-curve models that are only in a few specific cases appropriate to the galaxies concerned. Of particular interest to this study though, we find that the apparent profile shapes of giant galaxies in the Virgo direction of cz < 15000 km s-1 tend to be less centrally concentrated the greater their distance. This demonstrates that even for relatively nearby galaxies, the distortion of the overall shapes of light profiles by resolution-degrading effects such as seeing and data smoothing, as originally predicted and modelled by Young & Currie and Young et al., is a significant effect. It is, therefore, not good practice simply to extrapolate the profiles of galaxies of identical intrinsic size and intrinsic profile shape (i.e. identical morphology) by means of the same growth-curve model, unless the galaxies are known a priori to be at the same distance and unless their photometry is of the same angular resolution. We also investigate the total-magnitude scale of the catalogue of photometric types of Prugniel & Héraudeau, finding it to be much more reliable than the BT one. However, we argue that photometric type is really a measure of apparent profile shape (i.e. intrinsic profile shape after scale reduction on account of distance followed by convolution with a seeing disc and often a smoothing function as well). Strictly, it should therefore only be applicable to

  1. Reconstructing the galaxy density field with photometric redshifts. I. Methodology and validation on stellar mass functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malavasi, N.; Pozzetti, L.; Cucciati, O.; Bardelli, S.; Cimatti, A.

    2016-01-01

    Context. Measuring environment for large numbers of galaxies in the distant Universe is an open problem in astrophysics, as environment is important in determining many properties of galaxies during their formation and evolution. In order to measure galaxy environments, we need galaxy positions and redshifts. Photometric redshifts are more easily available for large numbers of galaxies, but at the price of larger uncertainties than spectroscopic redshifts. Aims: We study how photometric redshifts affect the measurement of galaxy environment and how the reconstruction of the density field may limit an analysis of the galaxy stellar mass function (GSMF) in different environments. Methods: Through the use of mock galaxy catalogues, we measured galaxy environment with a fixed aperture method, using each galaxy's true and photometric redshifts. We varied the parameters defining the fixed aperture volume and explored different configurations. We also used photometric redshifts with different uncertainties to simulate the case of various surveys. We then computed GSMF of the mock galaxy catalogues as a function of redshift and environment to see how the environmental estimate based on photometric redshifts affects their analysis. Results: We found that the most extreme environments can be reconstructed in a fairly accurate way only when using high-precision photometric redshifts with σΔz/ (1 + z) ≲ 0.01, with a fraction ≥ 60 ÷ 80% of galaxies placed in the correct density quartile and a contamination of ≤10% by opposite quartile interlopers. A length of the volume in the radial direction comparable to the ±1.5σ error of photometric redshifts and a fixed aperture radius of a size similar to the physical scale of the studied environment grant a better reconstruction than other volume configurations. When using this kind of an estimate of the density field, we found that any difference between the starting GSMF (divided accordingly to the true galaxy environment

  2. On the evolution of the star formation rate function of massive galaxies: constraints at 0.4 < z < 1.8 from the GOODS-MUSIC catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontanot, Fabio; Cristiani, Stefano; Santini, Paola; Fontana, Adriano; Grazian, Andrea; Somerville, Rachel S.

    2012-03-01

    We study the evolution of the star formation rate function (SFRF) of massive (M★ > 1010 M⊙) galaxies over the 0.4 < z < 1.8 redshift range and its implications for our understanding of the physical processes responsible for galaxy evolution. We use multiwavelength observations included in the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey-Multiwavelength Southern Infrared Catalog (GOODS-MUSIC) catalogue, which provides a suitable coverage of the spectral region from 0.3 to 24 ?m and either spectroscopic or photometric redshifts for each object. Individual SFRs have been obtained by combining ultraviolet and 24-?m observations, when the latter were available. For all other sources a 'spectral energy distribution (SED) fitting' SFR estimate has been considered. We then define a stellar mass limited sample, complete in the M★ > 1010 M⊙ range and determine the SFRF using the 1/Vmax algorithm. We thus define simulated galaxy catalogues based on the predictions of three different state-of-the-art semi-analytical models (SAMs) of galaxy formation and evolution, and compare them with the observed SFRF. We show that the theoretical SFRFs are well described by a double power law functional form and its redshift evolution is approximated with high accuracy by a pure evolution of the typical SFR (SFR★). We find good agreement between model predictions and the high-SFR end of the SFRF, when the observational errors on the SFR are taken into account. However, the observational SFRF is characterized by a double-peaked structure, which is absent in its theoretical counterparts. At z > 1.0 the observed SFRF shows a relevant density evolution, which is not reproduced by SAMs, due to the well-known overprediction of intermediate-mass galaxies at z˜ 2. SAMs are thus able to reproduce the most intense SFR events observed in the GOODS-MUSIC sample and their redshift distribution. At the same time, the agreement at the low-SFR end is poor: all models overpredict the space density of

  3. Catalogue of HI PArameters (CHIPA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saponara, J.; Benaglia, P.; Koribalski, B.; Andruchow, I.

    2015-08-01

    The catalogue of HI parameters of galaxies HI (CHIPA) is the natural continuation of the compilation by M.C. Martin in 1998. CHIPA provides the most important parameters of nearby galaxies derived from observations of the neutral Hydrogen line. The catalogue contains information of 1400 galaxies across the sky and different morphological types. Parameters like the optical diameter of the galaxy, the blue magnitude, the distance, morphological type, HI extension are listed among others. Maps of the HI distribution, velocity and velocity dispersion can also be display for some cases. The main objective of this catalogue is to facilitate the bibliographic queries, through searching in a database accessible from the internet that will be available in 2015 (the website is under construction). The database was built using the open source `` mysql (SQL, Structured Query Language, management system relational database) '', while the website was built with ''HTML (Hypertext Markup Language)'' and ''PHP (Hypertext Preprocessor)''.

  4. The matter distribution in the local Universe as derived from galaxy groups in SDSS DR12 and 2MRS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saulder, Christoph; van Kampen, Eelco; Chilingarian, Igor V.; Mieske, Steffen; Zeilinger, Werner W.

    2016-11-01

    Context. Friends-of-friends algorithms are a common tool to detect galaxy groups and clusters in large survey data. In order to be as precise as possible, they have to be carefully calibrated using mock catalogues. Aims: We create an accurate and robust description of the matter distribution in the local Universe using the most up-to-date available data. This will provide the input for a specific cosmological test planned as follow-up to this work, and will be useful for general extragalactic and cosmological research. Methods: We created a set of galaxy group catalogues based on the 2MRS and SDSS DR12 galaxy samples using a friends-of-friends based group finder algorithm. The algorithm was carefully calibrated and optimised on a new set of wide-angle mock catalogues from the Millennium simulation, in order to provide accurate total mass estimates of the galaxy groups taking into account the relevant observational biases in 2MRS and SDSS. Results: We provide four different catalogues: (i) a 2MRS based group catalogue; (ii) an SDSS DR12 based group catalogue reaching out to a redshift z = 0.11 with stellar mass estimates for 70% of the galaxies; (iii) a catalogue providing additional fundamental plane distances for all groups of the SDSS catalogue that host elliptical galaxies; (iv) a catalogue of the mass distribution in the local Universe based on a combination of our 2MRS and SDSS catalogues. Conclusions: While motivated by a specific cosmological test, three of the four catalogues that we produced are well suited to act as reference databases for a variety of extragalactic and cosmological science cases. Our catalogue of fundamental plane distances for SDSS groups provides further added value to this paper. The full catalogues (Tables A.1 to A.8) are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/596/A14

  5. Can anisotropy in the galaxy distribution tell the bias?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Biswajit

    2017-08-01

    We use information entropy to analyse the anisotropy in the mock galaxy catalogues from dark matter distribution and simulated biased galaxy distributions from Λ cold dark matter N-body simulation. We show that one can recover the linear bias parameter of the simulated galaxy distributions by comparing the radial, polar and azimuthal anisotropies in the simulated galaxy distributions with that from the dark matter distribution. This method for determination of the linear bias requires only O(N) operations as compared to O(N2) or at least O(Nlog N) operations required for the methods based on the two-point correlation function and the power spectrum. We apply this method to determine the linear bias parameter for the galaxies in the 2MASS Redshift Survey (2MRS) and find that the 2MRS galaxies in the Ks band have a linear bias of ∼1.3.

  6. The MeSsI (merging systems identification) algorithm and catalogue.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Los Rios, Martín; Domínguez R., Mariano J.; Paz, Dante; Merchán, Manuel

    2016-05-01

    Merging galaxy systems provide observational evidence of the existence of dark matter and constraints on its properties. Therefore, statistically uniform samples of merging systems would be a powerful tool for several studies. In this paper, we present a new methodology for the identification of merging systems and the results of its application to galaxy redshift surveys. We use as a starting point a mock catalogue of galaxy systems, identified using friends-of-friends algorithms, that have experienced a major merger, as indicated by its merger tree. By applying machine learning techniques in this training sample, and using several features computed from the observable properties of galaxy members, it is possible to select galaxy groups that have a high probability of having experienced a major merger. Next, we apply a mixture of Gaussian techniques on galaxy members in order to reconstruct the properties of the haloes involved in such mergers. This methodology provides a highly reliable sample of merging systems with low contamination and precisely recovered properties. We apply our techniques to samples of galaxy systems obtained from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7, the Wide-Field Nearby Galaxy-Cluster Survey (WINGS) and the Hectospec Cluster Survey (HeCS). Our results recover previously known merging systems and provide several new candidates. We present their measured properties and discuss future analysis on current and forthcoming samples.

  7. Philadelphus L.: mock orange

    Treesearch

    Nancy L. Shaw; Emerenciana G. Hurd; Peter F. Stickney

    2008-01-01

    The mock oranges - Philadelphus spp. - have been placed in several families: Saxifragaceae (Harrington 1954), Hydrangeaceae (Hitchcock and others 1961), and more recently, the Philadelphaceae (Hickman 1993). Hydrangeaceae, however, is the most widely accepted placement (Cronquist and others 1997; USDA NRCS 2001). There are about 50 to 65 species of mock orange,...

  8. Building a better understanding of the massive high-redshift BOSS CMASS galaxies as tools for cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favole, Ginevra; McBride, Cameron K.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Prada, Francisco; Swanson, Molly E.; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Schneider, Donald P.

    2016-10-01

    We explore the massive bluer star-forming population of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) III/BOSS CMASS DR11 galaxies at z > 0.55 to quantify their differences, in terms of redshift-space distortions and large-scale bias, with respect to the luminous red galaxy sample. We perform a qualitative analysis to understand the significance of these differences and whether we can model and reproduce them in mock catalogues. Specifically, we measure galaxy clustering in CMASS on small and intermediate scales (0.1 ≲ r ≲ 50 h-1 Mpc) by computing the two-point correlation function - both projected and redshift-space - of these galaxies, and a new statistic, Σ(π), able to separate the coherent and dispersed redshift-space distortion contributions and the large-scale bias. We interpret our clustering measurements by adopting a Halo Occupation Distribution (HOD) scheme that maps them on to high-resolution N-body cosmological simulations to produce suitable mock galaxy catalogues. The traditional HOD prescription can be applied to the red and the blue samples, independently, but this approach is unphysical since it allows the same mock galaxies to be either red or blue. To overcome this ambiguity, we modify the standard formulation and infer the red and the blue models by splitting the full mock catalogue into two complementary and non-overlapping submocks. This separation is performed by constraining the HOD with the observed CMASS red and blue galaxy fractions and produces reliable and accurate models.

  9. James Dunlop's historical catalogue of southern nebulae and clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cozens, Glen; Walsh, Andrew; Orchiston, Wayne

    2010-03-01

    In 1826 James Dunlop compiled the second ever catalogue of southern star clusters, nebulae and galaxies from Parramatta (NSW, Australia) using a 23-cm reflecting telescope. Initially acclaimed, the catalogue and author were later criticised and condemned by others - including Sir John Herschel and both the catalogue and author are now largely unknown. The criticism of the catalogue centred on the large number of fictitious or ‘missing’ objects, yet detailed analysis reveals the remarkable completeness of the catalogue, despite its inherent errors. We believe that James Dunlop was an important early Australian astronomer, and his catalogue should be esteemed as the southern equivalent of Messier's famous northern catalogue.

  10. The Mock Research Paper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Carlton

    2008-01-01

    The mock research paper combines creative writing with academic writing and, in the process, breaks down that binary. This article describes a writing assignment that offers an introduction to the college research paper genre. This assignment helps students focus on crafting an argument and learning genre conventions while postponing until the…

  11. An exploration of galaxy-galaxy lensing and galaxy clustering in the Millennium-XXL simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marian, Laura; Smith, Robert E.; Angulo, Raul E.

    2015-08-01

    The combination of galaxy-galaxy lensing and galaxy clustering data has the potential to simultaneously constrain both the cosmological and galaxy formation models. In this paper, we perform a comprehensive exploration of these signals and their covariances through a combination of analytic and numerical approaches. First, we derive analytic expressions for the projected galaxy correlation function and stacked tangential shear profile and their respective covariances, which include Gaussian and discreteness noise terms. Secondly, we measure these quantities from mock galaxy catalogues obtained from the Millennium-XXL simulation and semi-analytic models of galaxy formation. We find that on large scales (R > 10 h-1 Mpc), the galaxy bias is roughly linear and deterministic. On smaller scales (R ≲ 5 h-1 Mpc), the bias is a complicated function of scale and luminosity, determined by the different spatial distribution and abundance of satellite galaxies present when different magnitude cuts are applied, as well as by the mass dependence of the host haloes on magnitude. Our theoretical model for the covariances provides a reasonably good description of the measured ones on small and large scales. However, on intermediate scales (1 < R < 10 h-1 Mpc), the predicted errors are ˜2-3 times smaller, suggesting that the inclusion of higher order, non-Gaussian terms in the covariance will be required for further improvements. Importantly, both our theoretical and numerical methods show that the galaxy-galaxy lensing and clustering signals have a non-zero cross-covariance matrix with significant bin-to-bin correlations. Future surveys aiming to combine these probes must take this into account in order to obtain unbiased and realistic constraints.

  12. Bibliography of Mock Trial Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. for Citizen Education in the Law, Washington, DC.

    This catalog lists general articles on mock trials, information for arranging mock trial competitions, mock trial problem sets, and video tapes. The problem sets contain introductory material, applicable law, statements of facts, witness statements, and documents. The cases include issues in family, consumer, criminal, and immigration law. Several…

  13. Street Law Mock Trial Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGuire, Patricia, Ed.; O'Brien, Edward L.; Arbetman, Lee; Mills, Vivian H.; Pannell, Andrew

    Designed to facilitate the expanded use of mock trials, this manual is divided into two principle sections--a teacher's guide and a student's guide. The teacher's guide contains specific advice to teachers on all aspects of preparing for a mock trial and seven specific lesson plans for a 2- to 3-week mock trial unit. Each lesson contains…

  14. Understanding the nature of luminous red galaxies (LRGs): connecting LRGs to central and satellite subhaloes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masaki, Shogo; Hikage, Chiaki; Takada, Masahiro; Spergel, David N.; Sugiyama, Naoshi

    2013-08-01

    We develop a novel abundance matching method to construct a mock catalogue of luminous red galaxies (LRGs) in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), using catalogues of haloes and subhaloes in N-body simulations for a Λ-dominated cold dark matter model. Motivated by observations suggesting that LRGs are passively evolving, massive early-type galaxies with a typical age ≳5 Gyr, we assume that simulated haloes at z = 2 (z2-halo) are progenitors for LRG-host subhaloes observed today, and we label the most tightly bound particles in each progenitor z2-halo as LRG `stars'. We then identify the subhaloes containing these stars to z = 0.3 (SDSS redshift) in descending order of the masses of z2-haloes until the comoving number density of the matched subhaloes becomes comparable to the measured number density of SDSS LRGs, bar{n}_LRG=10^{-4} h^3 Mpc^{-3}. Once the above prescription is determined, our only free parameter is the number density of haloes identified at z = 2 and this parameter is fixed to match the observed number density at z = 0.3. By tracing subsequent merging and assembly histories of each progenitor z2-halo, we can directly compute, from the mock catalogue, the distributions of central and satellite LRGs and their internal motions in each host halo at z = 0.3. While the SDSS LRGs are galaxies selected by the magnitude and colour cuts from the SDSS images and are not necessarily a stellar-mass-selected sample, our mock catalogue reproduces a host of SDSS measurements: the halo occupation distribution for central and satellite LRGs, the projected autocorrelation function of LRGs, the cross-correlation of LRGs with shapes of background galaxies (LRG-galaxy weak lensing) and the non-linear redshift-space distortion effect, the Finger-of-God effect, in the angle-averaged redshift-space power spectrum. The mock catalogue generated based on our method can be used for removing or calibrating systematic errors in the cosmological interpretation of LRG clustering

  15. A galaxy-halo model for multiple cosmological tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bull, Philip

    2017-10-01

    The information extracted from large galaxy surveys with the likes of DES, DESI, Euclid, LSST, SKA, and WFIRST will be greatly enhanced if the resultant galaxy catalogues can be cross-correlated with one another. Predicting the nature of the information gain, and developing the tools to realize it, depends on establishing a consistent model of how the galaxies detected by each survey trace the same underlying matter distribution. Existing analytic methods, such as halo occupation distribution modelling, are not well suited for this task, and can suffer from ambiguities and tuning issues when applied to multiple tracers. In this paper, we take the first step towards constructing an alternative that provides a common model for the connection between galaxies and dark matter haloes across a wide range of wavelengths (and thus tracer populations). This is based on a chain of parametrized statistical distributions that model the connection between (i) halo mass and bulk physical properties of galaxies, such as star formation rate; and (ii) those same physical properties and a variety of emission processes. The result is a flexible parametric model that allows analytic halo model calculations of one-point functions to be carried out for multiple tracers, as well as providing semi realistic galaxy properties for fast mock catalogue generation.

  16. An 80 Mpc Filament of Galaxies at Redshift z=2.38

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodgate, B.; Palunas, P.; Francis, P.; Williger, G.; Teplitz, H.

    2004-01-01

    We present the detection of 34 Lyman-alpha emission-line galaxy candidates in a 80 x 80 x 60 co-moving Mpc region surrounding the known z=2.38 galaxy cluster J2143-4423. We have confirmed 15 of these candidates in followup spectroscopy with 2dF at the AAT. The peak space density is a factor of 4 greater than that found by field samples at similar redshifts. The distribution of these galaxy candidates contains several 5-10 Mpc scale voids. We compare our observations with mock catalogs derived from the VIRGO consortium Lambda-CDM N-body simulations. Fewer than 1\\% of the mock catalogues contains voids as large as we observe. Our observations thus tentatively suggest that the galaxy distribution at redshift 2.38 contains larger voids than predicted by current models. The distribution of galaxies suggests a filament or cross-section of a great wall at least 80 x 10 Mpc in transverse extent. Three of the candidate galaxies and one previously discovered galaxy have the large luminosities and extended morphologies of "Lyman-alpha blobs". X-ray properties and physical characteristics of those blobs will be discussed in an accompanying poster by Williger et al.

  17. Galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    Normal galaxies, radio galaxies, and Seyfert galaxies are considered. The large magellanic cloud and the great galaxy in Andromedia are highlighted. Quasars and BL lacertae objects are also discussed and a review of the spectral observations of all of these galaxies and celestial objects is presented.

  18. GLACE survey: OSIRIS/GTC tuneable filter Hα imaging of the rich galaxy cluster ZwCl 0024.0+1652 at z = 0.395. I. Survey presentation, TF data reduction techniques, and catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Portal, M.; Pintos-Castro, I.; Pérez-Martínez, R.; Cepa, , J.; Pérez García, A. M.; Domínguez-Sánchez, H.; Bongiovanni, A.; Serra, A. L.; Alfaro, E.; Altieri, B.; Aragón-Salamanca, A.; Balkowski, C.; Biviano, A.; Bremer, M.; Castander, F.; Castañeda, H.; Castro-Rodríguez, N.; Chies-Santos, A. L.; Coia, D.; Diaferio, A.; Duc, P. A.; Ederoclite, A.; Geach, J.; González-Serrano, I.; Haines, C. P.; McBreen, B.; Metcalfe, L.; Oteo, I.; Pérez-Fournón, I.; Poggianti, B.; Polednikova, J.; Ramón-Pérez, M.; Rodríguez-Espinosa, J. M.; Santos, J. S.; Smail, I.; Smith, G. P.; Temporin, S.; Valtchanov, I.

    2015-06-01

    The cores of clusters at 0 ≲ z ≲ 1 are dominated by quiescent early-type galaxies, whereas the field is dominated by star-forming late-type galaxies. Clusters grow through the accretion of galaxies and groups from the surrounding field, which implies that galaxy properties, notably the star formation ability, are altered as they fall into overdense regions. The critical issues for understanding this evolution are how the truncation of star formation is connected to the morphological transformation and what physical mechanism is responsible for these changes. The GaLAxy Cluster Evolution Survey (GLACE) is conducting a thorough study of the variations in galaxy properties (star formation, AGN activity, and morphology) as a function of environment in a representative and well-studied sample of clusters. To address these questions, the GLACE survey is making a deep panoramic survey of emission line galaxies (ELG), mapping a set of optical lines ([O ii], [O iii], Hβ andHα/[N ii] when possible) in several galaxy clusters at z ~ 0.40, 0.63, and 0.86. Using the tunable filters (TF) of the OSIRIS instrument at the 10.4 m GTC telescope, the GLACE survey applies the technique of TF tomography: for each line, a set of images are taken through the OSIRIS TF, each image tuned at a different wavelength (equally spaced), to cover a rest frame velocity range of several thousand km s-1 centred on the mean cluster redshift, and scanned for the full TF field of view of an 8 arcmin diameter. Here we present the first results of the GLACE project, targeting the Hα/[N ii] lines in the intermediate-redshift cluster ZwCl 0024.0+1652 at z = 0.395. Two pointings have been performed that cover ~2 × rvir. We discuss the specific techniques devised to process the TF tomography observations in order to generate the catalogue of cluster Hα emitters, which contains more than 200 sources down to a star formation rate (SFR) ≲1 M⊙/yr. An ancillary broadband catalogue is constructed

  19. Galaxy clusters and groups in the ALHAMBRA survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ascaso, B.; Benítez, N.; Fernández-Soto, A.; Arnalte-Mur, P.; López-Sanjuan, C.; Molino, A.; Schoenell, W.; Jiménez-Teja, Y.; Merson, A. I.; Huertas-Company, M.; Díaz-García, L. A.; Martínez, V. J.; Cenarro, A. J.; Dupke, R.; Márquez, I.; Masegosa, J.; Nieves-Seoane, L.; Pović, M.; Varela, J.; Viironen, K.; Aguerri, J. A. L.; Olmo, A. Del; Moles, M.; Perea, J.; Alfaro, E.; Aparicio-Villegas, T.; Broadhurst, T.; Cabrera-Caño, J.; Castander, F. J.; Cepa, J.; Cerviño, M.; Delgado, R. M. González; Cristóbal-Hornillos, D.; Hurtado-Gil, L.; Husillos, C.; Infante, L.; Prada, F.; Quintana, J. M.

    2015-09-01

    We present a catalogue of 348 galaxy clusters and groups with 0.2 < z < 1.2 selected in the 2.78 deg2 Advanced Large, Homogeneous Area Medium Band Redshift Astronomical (ALHAMBRA) survey. The high precision of our photometric redshifts, close to 1 per cent, and the wide spread of the seven ALHAMBRA pointings ensure that this catalogue has better mass sensitivity and is less affected by cosmic variance than comparable samples. The detection has been carried out with the Bayesian Cluster Finder, whose performance has been checked in ALHAMBRA-like light-cone mock catalogues. Great care has been taken to ensure that the observable properties of the mocks photometry accurately correspond to those of real catalogues. From our simulations, we expect to detect galaxy clusters and groups with both 70 per cent completeness and purity down to dark matter halo masses of Mh ˜ 3 × 1013 M⊙ for z < 0.85. Cluster redshifts are expected to be recovered with ˜0.6 per cent precision for z < 1. We also expect to measure cluster masses with σ _{M_h|M^*_{CL}}˜ 0.25-0.35 dex precision down to ˜ 3 × 1013 M⊙, masses which are 50 per cent smaller than those reached by similar work. We have compared these detections with previous optical, spectroscopic and X-rays work, finding an excellent agreement with the rates reported from the simulations. We have also explored the overall properties of these detections such as the presence of a colour-magnitude relation, the evolution of the photometric blue fraction and the clustering of these sources in the different ALHAMBRA fields. Despite the small numbers, we observe tentative evidence that, for a fixed stellar mass, the environment is playing a crucial role at lower redshifts (z < 0.5).

  20. Formation, evolution and properties of isolated field elliptical galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemi, Sami-Matias; Heinämäki, Pekka; Nurmi, Pasi; Saar, Enn

    2010-06-01

    We study the properties, evolution and formation mechanisms of isolated field elliptical (IfE) galaxies. We create a `mock' catalogue of IfE galaxies from the Millennium Simulation Galaxy Catalogue, and trace their merging histories. The formation, identity and assembly redshifts of simulated isolated and non-isolated elliptical galaxies are studied and compared. Observational and numerical data are used to compare age, mass and the colour-magnitude relation. Our results, based on simulation data, show that almost 7 per cent of all elliptical galaxies brighter than -19mag in B band can be classified as IfE galaxies. Results also show that isolated elliptical galaxies have a rather flat luminosity function; a number density of ~3 × 10-6h3Mpc-3mag-1, throughout their B-band magnitudes. IfE galaxies show bluer colours than non-isolated elliptical galaxies and they appear younger, in a statistical sense, according to their mass-weighted age. IfE galaxies also form and assemble at lower redshifts compared to non-isolated elliptical galaxies. About 46 per cent of IfE galaxies have undergone at least one major merging event in their formation history, while the same fraction is only ~33 per cent for non-isolated ellipticals. Almost all (~98 per cent) isolated elliptical galaxies show merging activity during their evolution, pointing towards the importance of mergers in the formation of IfE galaxies. The mean time of the last major merging is at z ~ 0.6 or 6Gyr ago for isolated ellipticals, while non-isolated ellipticals experience their last major merging significantly earlier at z ~ 1.1 or 8Gyr ago. After inspecting merger trees of simulated IfE galaxies, we conclude that three different, yet typical, formation mechanisms can be identified: solitude, coupling and cannibalism. Our results also predict a previously unobserved population of blue, dim and light galaxies that fulfil observational criteria to be classified as IfE galaxies. This separate population comprises

  1. Synthetic data products for future H I galaxy surveys: a tool for characterizing source confusion in spectral line stacking experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elson, E. C.; Blyth, S. L.; Baker, A. J.

    2016-08-01

    Much of our current understanding of neutral, atomic gas in galaxies comes from radio observations of the nearby Universe. Until the next generation of instruments allow us to push to much higher redshifts, we must rely mostly upon theoretical models of galaxy formation to provide us with key insights into the likely cosmic evolution of H I in the Universe, and its links to molecular clouds and star formation. In this work, we present a new set of methods to convert mock galaxy catalogues into synthetic data cubes containing model galaxies with realistic spatial and spectral H I distributions over large cosmological volumes. Such synthetic data products can be used to guide observing and data handling/analysis strategies for forthcoming H I galaxy surveys. As a demonstration of the potential use of our simulated products we use them to conduct several mock H I stacking experiments for both low and high-redshift galaxy samples. The stacked spectra can be accurately decomposed into contributions from target and non-target galaxies, revealing in all co-added spectra large fractions of contaminant mass due to source confusion. Our results are consistent with similar estimates extrapolated from z = 0 observational data. The amount of confused mass in a stacked spectrum grows almost linearly with the size of the observational beam, suggesting potential overestimates of Ω _{H I} by some recent H I stacking experiments. Our simulations will allow the study of subtle redshift-dependent effects in future stacking analyses.

  2. Galaxy-galaxy lensing in the Dark Energy Survey Science Verification data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clampitt, J.; Sánchez, C.; Kwan, J.; Krause, E.; MacCrann, N.; Park, Y.; Troxel, M. A.; Jain, B.; Rozo, E.; Rykoff, E. S.; Wechsler, R. H.; Blazek, J.; Bonnett, C.; Crocce, M.; Fang, Y.; Gaztanaga, E.; Gruen, D.; Jarvis, M.; Miquel, R.; Prat, J.; Ross, A. J.; Sheldon, E.; Zuntz, J.; Abbott, T. M. C.; Abdalla, F. B.; Armstrong, R.; Becker, M. R.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernstein, G. M.; Bertin, E.; Brooks, D.; Burke, D. L.; Carnero Rosell, A.; Carrasco Kind, M.; Cunha, C. E.; D'Andrea, C. B.; da Costa, L. N.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Dietrich, J. P.; Doel, P.; Estrada, J.; Evrard, A. E.; Fausti Neto, A.; Flaugher, B.; Fosalba, P.; Frieman, J.; Gruendl, R. A.; Honscheid, K.; James, D. J.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lahav, O.; Lima, M.; March, M.; Marshall, J. L.; Martini, P.; Melchior, P.; Mohr, J. J.; Nichol, R. C.; Nord, B.; Plazas, A. A.; Romer, A. K.; Sanchez, E.; Scarpine, V.; Schubnell, M.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Smith, R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Suchyta, E.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Thomas, D.; Vikram, V.; Walker, A. R.

    2017-03-01

    We present galaxy-galaxy lensing results from 139 deg2 of Dark Energy Survey (DES) Science Verification (SV) data. Our lens sample consists of red galaxies, known as redMaGiC, which are specifically selected to have a low photometric redshift error and outlier rate. The lensing measurement has a total signal-to-noise ratio of 29 over scales 0.09 < R < 15 Mpc h-1, including all lenses over a wide redshift range 0.2 < z < 0.8. Dividing the lenses into three redshift bins for this constant moving number density sample, we find no evidence for evolution in the halo mass with redshift. We obtain consistent results for the lensing measurement with two independent shear pipelines, NGMIX and IM3SHAPE. We perform a number of null tests on the shear and photometric redshift catalogues and quantify resulting systematic uncertainties. Covariances from jackknife subsamples of the data are validated with a suite of 50 mock surveys. The result and systematic checks in this work provide a critical input for future cosmological and galaxy evolution studies with the DES data and redMaGiC galaxy samples. We fit a halo occupation distribution (HOD) model, and demonstrate that our data constrain the mean halo mass of the lens galaxies, despite strong degeneracies between individual HOD parameters.

  3. The dark matter of galaxy voids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutter, P. M.; Lavaux, Guilhem; Wandelt, Benjamin D.; Weinberg, David H.; Warren, Michael S.

    2014-03-01

    How do observed voids relate to the underlying dark matter distribution? To examine the spatial distribution of dark matter contained within voids identified in galaxy surveys, we apply Halo Occupation Distribution models representing sparsely and densely sampled galaxy surveys to a high-resolution N-body simulation. We compare these galaxy voids to voids found in the halo distribution, low-resolution dark matter and high-resolution dark matter. We find that voids at all scales in densely sampled surveys - and medium- to large-scale voids in sparse surveys - trace the same underdensities as dark matter, but they are larger in radius by ˜20 per cent, they have somewhat shallower density profiles and they have centres offset by ˜ 0.4Rv rms. However, in void-to-void comparison we find that shape estimators are less robust to sampling, and the largest voids in sparsely sampled surveys suffer fragmentation at their edges. We find that voids in galaxy surveys always correspond to underdensities in the dark matter, though the centres may be offset. When this offset is taken into account, we recover almost identical radial density profiles between galaxies and dark matter. All mock catalogues used in this work are available at http://www.cosmicvoids.net.

  4. The evolution of the galaxy content of dark matter haloes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contreras, S.; Zehavi, I.; Baugh, C. M.; Padilla, N.; Norberg, P.

    2017-03-01

    We use the halo occupation distribution (HOD) framework to characterize the predictions from two independent galaxy formation models for the galactic content of dark matter haloes and its evolution with redshift. Our galaxy samples correspond to a range of fixed number densities defined by stellar mass and span 0 ≤ z ≤ 3. We find remarkable similarities between the model predictions. Differences arise at low galaxy number densities which are sensitive to the treatment of heating of the hot halo by active galactic nuclei. The evolution of the form of the HOD can be described in a relatively simple way, and we model each HOD parameter using its value at z = 0 and an additional evolutionary parameter. In particular, we find that the ratio between the characteristic halo masses for hosting central and satellite galaxies can serve as a sensitive diagnostic for galaxy evolution models. Our results can be used to test and develop empirical studies of galaxy evolution, and can facilitate the construction of mock galaxy catalogues for future surveys.

  5. The Hi-GAL compact source catalogue - I. The physical properties of the clumps in the inner Galaxy (-71.0° < ℓ < 67.0°)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elia, Davide; Molinari, S.; Schisano, E.; Pestalozzi, M.; Pezzuto, S.; Merello, M.; Noriega-Crespo, A.; Moore, T. J. T.; Russeil, D.; Mottram, J. C.; Paladini, R.; Strafella, F.; Benedettini, M.; Bernard, J. P.; Di Giorgio, A.; Eden, D. J.; Fukui, Y.; Plume, R.; Bally, J.; Martin, P. G.; Ragan, S. E.; Jaffa, S. E.; Motte, F.; Olmi, L.; Schneider, N.; Testi, L.; Wyrowski, F.; Zavagno, A.; Calzoletti, L.; Faustini, F.; Natoli, P.; Palmeirim, P.; Piacentini, F.; Piazzo, L.; Pilbratt, G. L.; Polychroni, D.; Baldeschi, A.; Beltrán, M. T.; Billot, N.; Cambrésy, L.; Cesaroni, R.; García-Lario, P.; Hoare, M. G.; Huang, M.; Joncas, G.; Liu, S. J.; Maiolo, B. M. T.; Marsh, K. A.; Maruccia, Y.; Mège, P.; Peretto, N.; Rygl, K. L. J.; Schilke, P.; Thompson, M. A.; Traficante, A.; Umana, G.; Veneziani, M.; Ward-Thompson, D.; Whitworth, A. P.; Arab, H.; Bandieramonte, M.; Becciani, U.; Brescia, M.; Buemi, C.; Bufano, F.; Butora, R.; Cavuoti, S.; Costa, A.; Fiorellino, E.; Hajnal, A.; Hayakawa, T.; Kacsuk, P.; Leto, P.; Li Causi, G.; Marchili, N.; Martinavarro-Armengol, S.; Mercurio, A.; Molinaro, M.; Riccio, G.; Sano, H.; Sciacca, E.; Tachihara, K.; Torii, K.; Trigilio, C.; Vitello, F.; Yamamoto, H.

    2017-10-01

    Hi-GAL (Herschel InfraRed Galactic Plane Survey) is a large-scale survey of the Galactic plane, performed with Herschel in five infrared continuum bands between 70 and 500 μm. We present a band-merged catalogue of spatially matched sources and their properties derived from fits to the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) and heliocentric distances, based on the photometric catalogues presented in Molinari et al., covering the portion of Galactic plane -71.0° < ℓ < 67.0°. The band-merged catalogue contains 100 922 sources with a regular SED, 24 584 of which show a 70-μm counterpart and are thus considered protostellar, while the remainder are considered starless. Thanks to this huge number of sources, we are able to carry out a preliminary analysis of early stages of star formation, identifying the conditions that characterize different evolutionary phases on a statistically significant basis. We calculate surface densities to investigate the gravitational stability of clumps and their potential to form massive stars. We also explore evolutionary status metrics such as the dust temperature, luminosity and bolometric temperature, finding that these are higher in protostellar sources compared to pre-stellar ones. The surface density of sources follows an increasing trend as they evolve from pre-stellar to protostellar, but then it is found to decrease again in the majority of the most evolved clumps. Finally, we study the physical parameters of sources with respect to Galactic longitude and the association with spiral arms, finding only minor or no differences between the average evolutionary status of sources in the fourth and first Galactic quadrants, or between 'on-arm' and 'interarm' positions.

  6. ZFOURGE catalogue of AGN candidates: an enhancement of 160-μm-derived star formation rates in active galaxies to z = 3.2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowley, Michael J.; Spitler, Lee R.; Tran, Kim-Vy H.; Rees, Glen A.; Labbé, Ivo; Allen, Rebecca J.; Brammer, Gabriel B.; Glazebrook, Karl; Hopkins, Andrew M.; Juneau, Stéphanie; Kacprzak, Glenn G.; Mullaney, James R.; Nanayakkara, Themiya; Papovich, Casey; Quadri, Ryan F.; Straatman, Caroline M. S.; Tomczak, Adam R.; van Dokkum, Pieter G.

    2016-03-01

    We investigate active galactic nuclei (AGN) candidates within the FourStar Galaxy Evolution Survey (ZFOURGE) to determine the impact they have on star formation in their host galaxies. We first identify a population of radio, X-ray, and infrared-selected AGN by cross-matching the deep Ks-band imaging of ZFOURGE with overlapping multiwavelength data. From this, we construct a mass-complete (log(M_{{*}}/M_{{⊙}}) ≥9.75), AGN luminosity limited sample of 235 AGN hosts over z = 0.2-3.2. We compare the rest-frame U - V versus V - J (UVJ) colours and specific star formation rates (sSFRs) of the AGN hosts to a mass-matched control sample of inactive (non-AGN) galaxies. UVJ diagnostics reveal AGN tend to be hosted in a lower fraction of quiescent galaxies and a higher fraction of dusty galaxies than the control sample. Using 160 μm Herschel PACS data, we find the mean specific star formation rate of AGN hosts to be elevated by 0.34 ± 0.07 dex with respect to the control sample across all redshifts. This offset is primarily driven by infrared-selected AGN, where the mean sSFR is found to be elevated by as much as a factor of ˜5. The remaining population, comprised predominantly of X-ray AGN hosts, is found mostly consistent with inactive galaxies, exhibiting only a marginal elevation. We discuss scenarios that may explain these findings and postulate that AGN are less likely to be a dominant mechanism for moderating galaxy growth via quenching than has previously been suggested.

  7. Cosmic web reconstruction through density ridges: catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yen-Chi; Ho, Shirley; Brinkmann, Jon; Freeman, Peter E.; Genovese, Christopher R.; Schneider, Donald P.; Wasserman, Larry

    2016-10-01

    We construct a catalogue for filaments using a novel approach called SCMS (subspace constrained mean shift). SCMS is a gradient-based method that detects filaments through density ridges (smooth curves tracing high-density regions). A great advantage of SCMS is its uncertainty measure, which allows an evaluation of the errors for the detected filaments. To detect filaments, we use data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, which consist of three galaxy samples: the NYU main galaxy sample (MGS), the LOWZ sample and the CMASS sample. Each of the three data set covers different redshift regions so that the combined sample allows detection of filaments up to z = 0.7. Our filament catalogue consists of a sequence of two-dimensional filament maps at different redshifts that provide several useful statistics on the evolution cosmic web. To construct the maps, we select spectroscopically confirmed galaxies within 0.050 < z < 0.700 and partition them into 130 bins. For each bin, we ignore the redshift, treating the galaxy observations as a 2-D data and detect filaments using SCMS. The filament catalogue consists of 130 individual 2-D filament maps, and each map comprises points on the detected filaments that describe the filamentary structures at a particular redshift. We also apply our filament catalogue to investigate galaxy luminosity and its relation with distance to filament. Using a volume-limited sample, we find strong evidence (6.1σ-12.3σ) that galaxies close to filaments are generally brighter than those at significant distance from filaments.

  8. Galaxy bias from the Dark Energy Survey Science Verification data: Combining galaxy density maps and weak lensing maps

    DOE PAGES

    Chang, C.; Pujol, A.; Gaztañaga, E.; ...

    2016-04-15

    We measure the redshift evolution of galaxy bias for a magnitude-limited galaxy sample by combining the galaxy density maps and weak lensing shear maps for a ~116 deg2 area of the Dark Energy Survey (DES) Science Verification (SV) data. This method was first developed in Amara et al. and later re-examined in a companion paper with rigorous simulation tests and analytical treatment of tomographic measurements. In this work we apply this method to the DES SV data and measure the galaxy bias for a i < 22.5 galaxy sample. We find the galaxy bias and 1σ error bars in fourmore » photometric redshift bins to be 1.12 ± 0.19 (z = 0.2–0.4), 0.97 ± 0.15 (z = 0.4–0.6), 1.38 ± 0.39 (z = 0.6–0.8), and 1.45 ± 0.56 (z = 0.8–1.0). These measurements are consistent at the 2σ level with measurements on the same data set using galaxy clustering and cross-correlation of galaxies with cosmic microwave background lensing, with most of the redshift bins consistent within the 1σ error bars. In addition, our method provides the only σ8 independent constraint among the three. We forward model the main observational effects using mock galaxy catalogues by including shape noise, photo-z errors, and masking effects. We show that our bias measurement from the data is consistent with that expected from simulations. With the forthcoming full DES data set, we expect this method to provide additional constraints on the galaxy bias measurement from more traditional methods. Moreover, in the process of our measurement, we build up a 3D mass map that allows further exploration of the dark matter distribution and its relation to galaxy evolution.« less

  9. Galaxy bias from the Dark Energy Survey Science Verification data: combining galaxy density maps and weak lensing maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, C.; Pujol, A.; Gaztañaga, E.; Amara, A.; Réfrégier, A.; Bacon, D.; Becker, M. R.; Bonnett, C.; Carretero, J.; Castander, F. J.; Crocce, M.; Fosalba, P.; Giannantonio, T.; Hartley, W.; Jarvis, M.; Kacprzak, T.; Ross, A. J.; Sheldon, E.; Troxel, M. A.; Vikram, V.; Zuntz, J.; Abbott, T. M. C.; Abdalla, F. B.; Allam, S.; Annis, J.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bertin, E.; Brooks, D.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Burke, D. L.; Capozzi, D.; Rosell, A. Carnero; Kind, M. Carrasco; Cunha, C. E.; D'Andrea, C. B.; da Costa, L. N.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Dietrich, J. P.; Doel, P.; Eifler, T. F.; Estrada, J.; Evrard, A. E.; Flaugher, B.; Frieman, J.; Goldstein, D. A.; Gruen, D.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gutierrez, G.; Honscheid, K.; Jain, B.; James, D. J.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lahav, O.; Li, T. S.; Lima, M.; Marshall, J. L.; Martini, P.; Melchior, P.; Miller, C. J.; Miquel, R.; Mohr, J. J.; Nichol, R. C.; Nord, B.; Ogando, R.; Plazas, A. A.; Reil, K.; Romer, A. K.; Roodman, A.; Rykoff, E. S.; Sanchez, E.; Scarpine, V.; Schubnell, M.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Smith, R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Suchyta, E.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Thomas, D.; Walker, A. R.

    2016-07-01

    We measure the redshift evolution of galaxy bias for a magnitude-limited galaxy sample by combining the galaxy density maps and weak lensing shear maps for a ˜116 deg2 area of the Dark Energy Survey (DES) Science Verification (SV) data. This method was first developed in Amara et al. and later re-examined in a companion paper with rigorous simulation tests and analytical treatment of tomographic measurements. In this work we apply this method to the DES SV data and measure the galaxy bias for a i < 22.5 galaxy sample. We find the galaxy bias and 1σ error bars in four photometric redshift bins to be 1.12 ± 0.19 (z = 0.2-0.4), 0.97 ± 0.15 (z = 0.4-0.6), 1.38 ± 0.39 (z = 0.6-0.8), and 1.45 ± 0.56 (z = 0.8-1.0). These measurements are consistent at the 2σ level with measurements on the same data set using galaxy clustering and cross-correlation of galaxies with cosmic microwave background lensing, with most of the redshift bins consistent within the 1σ error bars. In addition, our method provides the only σ8 independent constraint among the three. We forward model the main observational effects using mock galaxy catalogues by including shape noise, photo-z errors, and masking effects. We show that our bias measurement from the data is consistent with that expected from simulations. With the forthcoming full DES data set, we expect this method to provide additional constraints on the galaxy bias measurement from more traditional methods. Furthermore, in the process of our measurement, we build up a 3D mass map that allows further exploration of the dark matter distribution and its relation to galaxy evolution.

  10. Galaxy bias from the Dark Energy Survey Science Verification data: Combining galaxy density maps and weak lensing maps

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, C.; Pujol, A.; Gaztañaga, E.; Amara, A.; Réfrégier, A.; Bacon, D.; Becker, M. R.; Bonnett, C.; Carretero, J.; Castander, F. J.; Crocce, M.; Fosalba, P.; Giannantonio, T.; Hartley, W.; Jarvis, M.; Kacprzak, T.; Ross, A. J.; Sheldon, E.; Troxel, M. A.; Vikram, V.; Zuntz, J.; Abbott, T. M. C.; Abdalla, F. B.; Allam, S.; Annis, J.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bertin, E.; Brooks, D.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Burke, D. L.; Capozzi, D.; Rosell, A. Carnero; Kind, M. Carrasco; Cunha, C. E.; D'Andrea, C. B.; da Costa, L. N.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Dietrich, J. P.; Doel, P.; Eifler, T. F.; Estrada, J.; Evrard, A. E.; Flaugher, B.; Frieman, J.; Goldstein, D. A.; Gruen, D.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gutierrez, G.; Honscheid, K.; Jain, B.; James, D. J.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lahav, O.; Li, T. S.; Lima, M.; Marshall, J. L.; Martini, P.; Melchior, P.; Miller, C. J.; Miquel, R.; Mohr, J. J.; Nichol, R. C.; Nord, B.; Ogando, R.; Plazas, A. A.; Reil, K.; Romer, A. K.; Roodman, A.; Rykoff, E. S.; Sanchez, E.; Scarpine, V.; Schubnell, M.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Smith, R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Suchyta, E.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Thomas, D.; Walker, A. R.

    2016-04-15

    We measure the redshift evolution of galaxy bias for a magnitude-limited galaxy sample by combining the galaxy density maps and weak lensing shear maps for a ~116 deg2 area of the Dark Energy Survey (DES) Science Verification (SV) data. This method was first developed in Amara et al. and later re-examined in a companion paper with rigorous simulation tests and analytical treatment of tomographic measurements. In this work we apply this method to the DES SV data and measure the galaxy bias for a i < 22.5 galaxy sample. We find the galaxy bias and 1σ error bars in four photometric redshift bins to be 1.12 ± 0.19 (z = 0.2–0.4), 0.97 ± 0.15 (z = 0.4–0.6), 1.38 ± 0.39 (z = 0.6–0.8), and 1.45 ± 0.56 (z = 0.8–1.0). These measurements are consistent at the 2σ level with measurements on the same data set using galaxy clustering and cross-correlation of galaxies with cosmic microwave background lensing, with most of the redshift bins consistent within the 1σ error bars. In addition, our method provides the only σ8 independent constraint among the three. We forward model the main observational effects using mock galaxy catalogues by including shape noise, photo-z errors, and masking effects. We show that our bias measurement from the data is consistent with that expected from simulations. With the forthcoming full DES data set, we expect this method to provide additional constraints on the galaxy bias measurement from more traditional methods. Moreover, in the process of our measurement, we build up a 3D mass map that allows further exploration of the dark matter distribution and its relation to galaxy evolution.

  11. Galaxy bias from the Dark Energy Survey Science Verification data: Combining galaxy density maps and weak lensing maps

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, C.; Pujol, A.; Gaztañaga, E.; Amara, A.; Réfrégier, A.; Bacon, D.; Becker, M. R.; Bonnett, C.; Carretero, J.; Castander, F. J.; Crocce, M.; Fosalba, P.; Giannantonio, T.; Hartley, W.; Jarvis, M.; Kacprzak, T.; Ross, A. J.; Sheldon, E.; Troxel, M. A.; Vikram, V.; Zuntz, J.; Abbott, T. M. C.; Abdalla, F. B.; Allam, S.; Annis, J.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bertin, E.; Brooks, D.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Burke, D. L.; Capozzi, D.; Rosell, A. Carnero; Kind, M. Carrasco; Cunha, C. E.; D'Andrea, C. B.; da Costa, L. N.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Dietrich, J. P.; Doel, P.; Eifler, T. F.; Estrada, J.; Evrard, A. E.; Flaugher, B.; Frieman, J.; Goldstein, D. A.; Gruen, D.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gutierrez, G.; Honscheid, K.; Jain, B.; James, D. J.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lahav, O.; Li, T. S.; Lima, M.; Marshall, J. L.; Martini, P.; Melchior, P.; Miller, C. J.; Miquel, R.; Mohr, J. J.; Nichol, R. C.; Nord, B.; Ogando, R.; Plazas, A. A.; Reil, K.; Romer, A. K.; Roodman, A.; Rykoff, E. S.; Sanchez, E.; Scarpine, V.; Schubnell, M.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Smith, R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Suchyta, E.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Thomas, D.; Walker, A. R.

    2016-04-15

    We measure the redshift evolution of galaxy bias for a magnitude-limited galaxy sample by combining the galaxy density maps and weak lensing shear maps for a ~116 deg2 area of the Dark Energy Survey (DES) Science Verification (SV) data. This method was first developed in Amara et al. and later re-examined in a companion paper with rigorous simulation tests and analytical treatment of tomographic measurements. In this work we apply this method to the DES SV data and measure the galaxy bias for a i < 22.5 galaxy sample. We find the galaxy bias and 1σ error bars in four photometric redshift bins to be 1.12 ± 0.19 (z = 0.2–0.4), 0.97 ± 0.15 (z = 0.4–0.6), 1.38 ± 0.39 (z = 0.6–0.8), and 1.45 ± 0.56 (z = 0.8–1.0). These measurements are consistent at the 2σ level with measurements on the same data set using galaxy clustering and cross-correlation of galaxies with cosmic microwave background lensing, with most of the redshift bins consistent within the 1σ error bars. In addition, our method provides the only σ8 independent constraint among the three. We forward model the main observational effects using mock galaxy catalogues by including shape noise, photo-z errors, and masking effects. We show that our bias measurement from the data is consistent with that expected from simulations. With the forthcoming full DES data set, we expect this method to provide additional constraints on the galaxy bias measurement from more traditional methods. Moreover, in the process of our measurement, we build up a 3D mass map that allows further exploration of the dark matter distribution and its relation to galaxy evolution.

  12. The REFLEX II galaxy cluster survey: power spectrum analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balaguera-Antolínez, A.; Sánchez, Ariel G.; Böhringer, H.; Collins, C.; Guzzo, L.; Phleps, S.

    2011-05-01

    We present the power spectrum of galaxy clusters measured from the new ROSAT-ESO Flux-Limited X-Ray (REFLEX II) galaxy cluster catalogue. This new sample extends the flux limit of the original REFLEX catalogue to 1.8 × 10-12 erg s-1 cm-2, yielding a total of 911 clusters with ≥94 per cent completeness in redshift follow-up. The analysis of the data is improved by creating a set of 100 REFLEX II-catalogue-like mock galaxy cluster catalogues built from a suite of large-volume Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) N-body simulations (L-BASICC II). The measured power spectrum is in agreement with the predictions from a ΛCDM cosmological model. The measurements show the expected increase in the amplitude of the power spectrum with increasing X-ray luminosity. On large scales, we show that the shape of the measured power spectrum is compatible with a scale-independent bias and provide a model for the amplitude that allows us to connect our measurements with a cosmological model. By implementing a luminosity-dependent power-spectrum estimator, we observe that the power spectrum measured from the REFLEX II sample is weakly affected by flux-selection effects. The shape of the measured power spectrum is compatible with a featureless power spectrum on scales k > 0.01 h Mpc-1 and hence no statistically significant signal of baryonic acoustic oscillations can be detected. We show that the measured REFLEX II power spectrum displays signatures of non-linear evolution.

  13. The clustering of galaxies in the completed SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: cosmic flows and cosmic web from luminous red galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ata, Metin; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio; Angulo, Raul E.; Ferraro, Simone; Gil-Marín, Hector; McDonald, Patrick; Hernández Monteagudo, Carlos; Müller, Volker; Yepes, Gustavo; Autefage, Mathieu; Baumgarten, Falk; Beutler, Florian; Brownstein, Joel R.; Burden, Angela; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Guo, Hong; Ho, Shirley; McBride, Cameron; Neyrinck, Mark; Olmstead, Matthew D.; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Percival, Will J.; Prada, Francisco; Rossi, Graziano; Sánchez, Ariel G.; Schlegel, David; Schneider, Donald P.; Seo, Hee-Jong; Streblyanska, Alina; Tinker, Jeremy; Tojeiro, Rita; Vargas-Magana, Mariana

    2017-06-01

    We present a Bayesian phase-space reconstruction of the cosmic large-scale matter density and velocity fields from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-III Baryon Oscillations Spectroscopic Survey Data Release 12 CMASS galaxy clustering catalogue. We rely on a given Λ cold dark matter cosmology, a mesh resolution in the range of 6-10 h-1 Mpc, and a lognormal-Poisson model with a redshift-dependent non-linear bias. The bias parameters are derived from the data and a general renormalized perturbation theory approach. We use combined Gibbs and Hamiltonian sampling, implemented in the argo code, to iteratively reconstruct the dark matter density field and the coherent peculiar velocities of individual galaxies, correcting hereby for coherent redshift space distortions. Our tests relying on accurate N-body-based mock galaxy catalogues show unbiased real space power spectra of the non-linear density field up to k ˜ 0.2 h Mpc-1, and vanishing quadrupoles down to r ˜ 20 h-1 Mpc. We also demonstrate that the non-linear cosmic web can be obtained from the tidal field tensor based on the Gaussian component of the reconstructed density field. We find that the reconstructed velocities have a statistical correlation coefficient compared to the true velocities of each individual light-cone mock galaxy of r ˜ 0.68 including about 10 per cent of satellite galaxies with virial motions (about r = 0.75 without satellites). The power spectra of the velocity divergence agree well with theoretical predictions up to k ˜ 0.2 h Mpc-1. This work will be especially useful to improve, for example, baryon acoustic oscillation reconstructions, kinematic Sunyaev-Zeldovich, integrated Sachs-Wolfe measurements or environmental studies.

  14. The Clustering of Galaxies in the Completed SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: Cosmic Flows and Cosmic Web from Luminous Red Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ata, Metin; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio; Angulo, Raul E.; Ferraro, Simone; Gil-Marín, Hector; McDonald, Patrick; Monteagudo, Carlos Hernández; Müller, Volker; Yepes, Gustavo; Autefage, Mathieu; Baumgarten, Falk; Beutler, Florian; Brownstein, Joel R.; Burden, Angela; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Guo, Hong; Ho, Shirley; McBride, Cameron; Neyrinck, Mark; Olmstead, Matthew D.; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Percival, Will J.; Prada, Francisco; Rossi, Graziano; Sánchez, Ariel G.; Schlegel, David; Schneider, Donald P.; Seo, Hee-Jong; Streblyanska, Alina; Tinker, Jeremy; Tojeiro, Rita; Vargas-Magana, Mariana

    2017-01-01

    We present a Bayesian phase-space reconstruction of the cosmic large-scale matter density and velocity fields from the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillations Spectroscopic Survey Data Release 12 (BOSS DR12) CMASS galaxy clustering catalogue. We rely on a given ΛCDM cosmology, a mesh resolution in the range of 6-10 h-1 Mpc, and a lognormal-Poisson model with a redshift dependent nonlinear bias. The bias parameters are derived from the data and a general renormalised perturbation theory approach. We use combined Gibbs and Hamiltonian sampling, implemented in the ARGO code, to iteratively reconstruct the dark matter density field and the coherent peculiar velocities of individual galaxies, correcting hereby for coherent redshift space distortions (RSD). Our tests relying on accurate N-body based mock galaxy catalogues, show unbiased real space power spectra of the nonlinear density field up to k ˜ 0.2 h Mpc-1, and vanishing quadrupoles down to r ˜ 20 h-1 Mpc. We also demonstrate that the nonlinear cosmic web can be obtained from the tidal field tensor based on the Gaussian component of the reconstructed density field. We find that the reconstructed velocities have a statistical correlation coefficient compared to the true velocities of each individual lightcone mock galaxy of r ˜ 0.68 including about 10% of satellite galaxies with virial motions (about r = 0.75 without satellites). The power spectra of the velocity divergence agree well with theoretical predictions up to k ˜ 0.2 h Mpc-1. This work will be especially useful to improve, e.g. BAO reconstructions, kinematic Sunyaev-Zeldovich (kSZ), integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) measurements, or environmental studies.

  15. Dust and star formation properties of a complete sample of local galaxies drawn from the Planck Early Release Compact Source Catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clemens, M. S.; Negrello, M.; De Zotti, G.; Gonzalez-Nuevo, J.; Bonavera, L.; Cosco, G.; Guarese, G.; Boaretto, L.; Salucci, P.; Baccigalupi, C.; Clements, D. L.; Danese, L.; Lapi, A.; Mandolesi, N.; Partridge, R. B.; Perrotta, F.; Serjeant, S.; Scott, D.; Toffolatti, L.

    2013-07-01

    We combine Planck High Frequency Instrument data at 857, 545, 353 and 217 GHz with data from Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE), Spitzer, IRAS and Herschel to investigate the properties of a well-defined, flux-limited sample of local star-forming galaxies. A 545 GHz flux density limit was chosen so that the sample is 80 per cent complete at this frequency, and the resulting sample contains a total of 234 local, star-forming galaxies. We investigate the dust emission and star formation properties of the sample via various models and calculate the local dust mass function. Although single-component-modified blackbodies fit the dust emission longward of 80 μm very well, with a median β = 1.83, the known degeneracy between dust temperature and β also means that the spectral energy distributions are very well described by a dust component with dust emissivity index fixed at β = 2 and temperature in the range 10-25 K. Although a second, warmer dust component is required to fit shorter wavelength data, and contributes approximately a third of the total infrared emission, its mass is negligible. No evidence is found for a very cold (6-10 K) dust component. The temperature of the cold dust component is strongly influenced by the ratio of the star formation rate to the total dust mass. This implies, contrary to what is often assumed, that a significant fraction of even the emission from ˜20 K dust is powered by ongoing star formation, whether or not the dust itself is associated with star-forming clouds or `cirrus'. There is statistical evidence of a free-free contribution to the 217 GHz flux densities of ≲20 per cent. We find a median dust-to-stellar mass ratio of 0.0046; and that this ratio is anticorrelated with galaxy mass. There is good correlation between dust mass and atomic gas mass (median Md/MHI = 0.022), suggesting that galaxies that have more dust (higher values of Md/M*) have more interstellar medium in general. Our derived dust mass function

  16. Fresno County Mock Trial Competition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fresno City Unified School District, CA.

    THE FOLLOWING IS THE FULL TEXT OF THIS DOCUMENT: The Fresno County Office of Education and the Fresno Unified School District hosted the Mock Trial Competition. The state competition is sponsored by the Constitutional Rights Foundation, with cosponsorship from the California State Bar Association and the California Young Lawyer's Association. This…

  17. Mock Trials and Critical Thinking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karraker, Meg Wilkes

    1993-01-01

    One college teacher's use of mock trials in sociology instruction is described. Students are assigned roles as petitioner, respondent, attorneys, judge, courtroom staff, witnesses, reporters, and jurors. Pretrial investigations provide experience in information-gathering and critical thinking. Posttrial debriefing reveals others' thinking…

  18. Mock Interviews for Student Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Jill M.

    2007-01-01

    Each semester during student-teacher seminars, the author invites local administrators to come to campus and participate in mock job interviews. These practice interviews provide students an opportunity to prepare for a successful interview and give administrators the chance to meet graduating students who will help alleviate Arizona's teacher…

  19. Algorithm for the direct reconstruction of the dark matter correlation function from weak lensing and galaxy clustering

    SciTech Connect

    Baldauf, Tobias; Smith, Robert E.; Seljak, Uros; Mandelbaum, Rachel

    2010-03-15

    The clustering of matter on cosmological scales is an essential probe for studying the physical origin and composition of our Universe. To date, most of the direct studies have focused on shear-shear weak lensing correlations, but it is also possible to extract the dark matter clustering by combining galaxy-clustering and galaxy-galaxy-lensing measurements. In order to extract the required information, one must relate the observable galaxy distribution to the underlying dark matter distribution. In this study we develop in detail a method that can constrain the dark matter correlation function from galaxy clustering and galaxy-galaxy-lensing measurements, by focusing on the correlation coefficient between the galaxy and matter overdensity fields. Our goal is to develop an estimator that maximally correlates the two. To generate a mock galaxy catalogue for testing purposes, we use the halo occupation distribution approach applied to a large ensemble of N-body simulations to model preexisting SDSS luminous red galaxy sample observations. Using this mock catalogue, we show that a direct comparison between the excess surface mass density measured by lensing and its corresponding galaxy clustering quantity is not optimal. We develop a new statistic that suppresses the small-scale contributions to these observations and show that this new statistic leads to a cross-correlation coefficient that is within a few percent of unity down to 5h{sup -1} Mpc. Furthermore, the residual incoherence between the galaxy and matter fields can be explained using a theoretical model for scale-dependent galaxy bias, giving us a final estimator that is unbiased to within 1%, so that we can reconstruct the dark matter clustering power spectrum at this accuracy up to k{approx}1h Mpc{sup -1}. We also perform a comprehensive study of other physical effects that can affect the analysis, such as redshift space distortions and differences in radial windows between galaxy clustering and weak

  20. The Herschel Point Source Catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marton, Gabor; Schulz, Bernhard; Altieri, Bruno; Calzoletti, Luca; Kiss, Csaba; Lim, Tanya; Lu, Nanyao; Paladini, Roberta; Papageorgiou, Andreas; Pearson, Chris; Rector, John; Shupe, David; Valtchanov, Ivan; Verebélyi, Erika; Xu, Kevin

    2015-08-01

    The Herschel Space Observatory was the fourth cornerstone mission in the European Space Agency (ESA) science programme with excellent broad band imaging capabilities in the submillimetre and far-infrared part of the spectrum. Although the spacecraft finished its observations in 2013, it left a large legacy dataset that is far from having been fully scrutinized and still has potential for new scientific discoveries. This is specifically true for the photometric observations of the PACS and SPIRE instruments that scanned >10% of the sky at 70, 100, 160, 250, 350 and 500 microns. Some source catalogs have already been produced by individual observing programs, but there are many observations that would never be analyzed for their full source content. To maximize the science return of the SPIRE and PACS data sets, our international team of instrument experts is in the process of building the Herschel Point Source Catalog (HPSC) from all scan map observations. Our homogeneous source extraction enables a systematic and unbiased comparison of sensitivity across the different Herschel fields that single programs will generally not be able to provide. The extracted point sources will contain individual YSOs of our Galaxy, unresolved YSO clusters in resolved nearby galaxies and unresolved galaxies of the local and distant Universe that are related to star formation. Such a huge dataset will help scientists better understand the evolution from interstellar clouds to individual stars. Furthermore the analysis of stellar clusters and the star formation on galactic scales will add more details to the understanding of star formation laws through time.We present our findings on comparison of different source detection and photometric tools. First results of the extractions are shown along with the description of our pipelines and catalogue entries. We also provide an additional science product, the structure noise map, that is used for the quality assessment of the catalogue in

  1. Galaxy cluster mass reconstruction project - I. Methods and first results on galaxy-based techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Old, L.; Skibba, R. A.; Pearce, F. R.; Croton, D.; Muldrew, S. I.; Muñoz-Cuartas, J. C.; Gifford, D.; Gray, M. E.; der Linden, A. von; Mamon, G. A.; Merrifield, M. R.; Müller, V.; Pearson, R. J.; Ponman, T. J.; Saro, A.; Sepp, T.; Sifón, C.; Tempel, E.; Tundo, E.; Wang, Y. O.; Wojtak, R.

    2014-06-01

    This paper is the first in a series in which we perform an extensive comparison of various galaxy-based cluster mass estimation techniques that utilize the positions, velocities and colours of galaxies. Our primary aim is to test the performance of these cluster mass estimation techniques on a diverse set of models that will increase in complexity. We begin by providing participating methods with data from a simple model that delivers idealized clusters, enabling us to quantify the underlying scatter intrinsic to these mass estimation techniques. The mock catalogue is based on a Halo Occupation Distribution (HOD) model that assumes spherical Navarro, Frenk and White (NFW) haloes truncated at R200, with no substructure nor colour segregation, and with isotropic, isothermal Maxwellian velocities. We find that, above 1014M⊙, recovered cluster masses are correlated with the true underlying cluster mass with an intrinsic scatter of typically a factor of 2. Below 1014M⊙, the scatter rises as the number of member galaxies drops and rapidly approaches an order of magnitude. We find that richness-based methods deliver the lowest scatter, but it is not clear whether such accuracy may simply be the result of using an over-simplistic model to populate the galaxies in their haloes. Even when given the true cluster membership, large scatter is observed for the majority non-richness-based approaches, suggesting that mass reconstruction with a low number of dynamical tracers is inherently problematic.

  2. Sensor Catalogue Service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usländer, Thomas; Kunz, Siegbert; Stumpp, Jörg; Watson, Kym

    2010-05-01

    The Fraunhofer has realized a sensor aware catalogue service capable of bridging the OGC Sensor Web and INSPIRE. The available network resources (observed features, sensors, data sources) are registered in a semantic catalogue server along with meta-data to support resource discovery by client applications. Clients can find, for example, information sources for a given region and observable phenomenon of interest. The Catalogue Harvester harvests meta-information from the capabilities of OGC SWE services and maps them to INSPIRE metadata. The semantic functions support the principles of query expansion and query refinements via the use of ontologies. The catalogue client provides means for the management of harvested SWE services and supports the formulation of enhanced search queries using the semantic functionality of the catalogue.

  3. Deep Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope photometric survey of the entire M33 galaxy - I. Catalogue of 36000 variable point sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartman, J. D.; Bersier, D.; Stanek, K. Z.; Beaulieu, J.-P.; Kaluzny, J.; Marquette, J.-B.; Stetson, P. B.; Schwarzenberg-Czerny, A.

    2006-09-01

    We have conducted a variability survey of the Local Group galaxy M33, using g',r', and i' observations from 27 nights spanning 17 months, made with the MegaPrime/MegaCam instrument on the 3.6-m Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT). We identify more than 36000 variable sources with g', r', i' <~ 24, out of approximately two million point sources in a 1-deg2 field of view. This increases the number of known variables in this galaxy by more than a factor of 20. In this paper, we provide a brief description of the data and a general overview of the variable star population which includes more than 1300 candidate variable blue and red supergiant stars, more than 2000 Cepheids, and more than 19000 long-period variable asymptotic giant branch and red giant branch stars. Based on observations obtained with the MegaPrime/MegaCam, a joint project of Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) and CEA/DAPNIA, at the CFHT which is operated by the National Research Council (NRC) of Canada, the Institut National des Science de l'Univers of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) of France, and the University of Hawaii. E-mail: jhartman@cfa.harvard.edu (JDH); dfb@astro.livjm.ac.uk (DB); kstanek@astronomy.ohio-state.edu (KZS); beaulieu@iap.fr (J-PB); jka@camk.edu.pl (JK); marquette@iap.fr (J-BM); Peter.Stetson@nrc.ca (PBS); alex@camk.edu.pl (AS-C)

  4. Color and magnitude dependence of galaxy clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Volker

    2016-10-01

    A quantitative study of the clustering properties of galaxies in the cosmic web as a function of absolute magnitude and colour is presented using the SDSS Data Release 7 galaxy redshift survey. We compare our results with mock galaxy samples obtained with four different semi-analytical models of galaxy formation imposed on the merger trees of the Millenium simulation.

  5. The Effect of Fiber Collisions on the Galaxy Power Spectrum Multipoles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, ChangHoon; Scoccimarro, Roman; Blanton, Michael R.; Tinker, Jeremy L.; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio A.

    2017-05-01

    Fibre-fed multi-object spectroscopic surveys, with their ability to collect an unprecedented number of redshifts, currently dominate large-scale structure studies. However, physical constraints limit these surveys from successfully collecting redshifts from galaxies too close to each other on the focal plane. This ultimately leads to significant systematic effects on galaxy clustering measurements. Using simulated mock catalogues, we demonstrate that fibre collisions have a significant impact on the power spectrum, P(k), monopole and quadrupole that exceeds sample variance at scales smaller than k ˜ 0.1 h Mpc-1. We present two methods to account for fibre collisions in the power spectrum. The first, statistically reconstructs the clustering of fibre-collided galaxy pairs by modelling the distribution of the line-of-sight displacements between them. It also properly accounts for fibre collisions in the shot-noise correction term of the P(k) estimator. Using this method, we recover the true P(k) monopole of the mock catalogues with residuals of <0.5 per cent at k = 0.3 h Mpc-1 and <4 per cent at k = 0.83 h Mpc-1 - a significant improvement over existing correction methods. The quadrupole, however, does not improve significantly. The second method models the effect of fibre collisions on the power spectrum as a convolution with a configuration space top-hat function that depends on the physical scale of fibre collisions. It directly computes theoretical predictions of the fibre-collided P(k) multipoles and reduces the influence of smaller scales to a set of nuisance parameters. Using this method, we reliably model the effect of fibre collisions on the monopole and quadrupole down to the scale limits of theoretical predictions. The methods we present in this paper will allow us to robustly analyse galaxy power spectrum multipole measurements to much smaller scales than previously possible.

  6. Measuring galaxy environment with the synergy of future photometric and spectroscopic surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cucciati, O.; Marulli, F.; Cimatti, A.; Merson, A. I.; Norberg, P.; Pozzetti, L.; Baugh, C. M.; Branchini, E.

    2016-10-01

    We exploit the synergy between low-resolution spectroscopy and photometric redshifts to study environmental effects on galaxy evolution in slitless spectroscopic surveys from space. As a test case, we consider the future Euclid Deep survey (˜40 deg2), which combines a slitless spectroscopic survey limited at Hα flux ≥5 × 10-17 erg cm-2 s-1 and a photometric survey limited in H band (H ≤ 26). We use Euclid-like galaxy mock catalogues, in which we anchor the photometric redshifts to the 3D galaxy distribution of the available spectroscopic redshifts. We then estimate the local density contrast by counting objects in cylindrical cells with radius from 1 to 10 h-1Mpc, over the redshift range 0.9 < z < 1.8. We compare this density field with the one computed in a mock catalogue with the same depth as the Euclid Deep survey (H = 26) but without redshift measurement errors. We find that our method successfully separates high- from low-density environments (the last from the first quintile of the density distribution), with higher efficiency at low redshift and large cells: the fraction of low-density regions mistaken by high-density peaks is <1 per cent for all scales and redshifts explored, but for scales of 1 h-1Mpc for which is a few per cent. These results show that we can efficiently study environment in photometric samples if spectroscopic information is available for a smaller sample of objects that sparsely samples the same volume. We demonstrate that these studies are possible in the Euclid Deep survey, i.e. in a redshift range in which environmental effects are different from those observed in the local Universe, hence providing new constraints for galaxy evolution models.

  7. A catalogue of AKARI FIS BSC extragalactic objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marton, Gabor; Toth, L. Viktor; Gyorgy Balazs, Lajos

    2015-08-01

    We combined photometric data of about 70 thousand point sources from the AKARI Far-Infrared Surveyor Bright Source Catalogue with AllWISE catalogue data to identify galaxies. We used Quadratic Discriminant Analysis (QDA) to classify our sources. The classification was based on a 6D parameter space that contained AKARI [F65/F90], [F90/F140], [F140/F160] and WISE W1-W2 colours along with WISE W1 magnitudes and AKARI [F140] flux values. Sources were classified into 3 main objects types: YSO candidates, evolved stars and galaxies. The training samples were SIMBAD entries of the input point sources wherever an associated SIMBAD object was found within a 30 arcsecond search radius. The QDA resulted more than 5000 AKARI galaxy candidate sources. The selection was tested cross-correlating our AKARI extragalactic catalogue with the Revised IRAS-FSC Redshift Catalogue (RIFSCz). A very good match was found. A further classification attempt was also made to differentiate between extragalactic subtypes using Support Vector Machines (SVMs). The results of the various methods showed that we can confidently separate cirrus dominated objects (type 1 of RIFSCz). Some of our “galaxy candidate” sources are associated with 2MASS extended objects, and listed in the NASA Extragalactic Database so far without clear proofs of their extragalactic nature. Examples will be presented in our poster. Finally other AKARI extragalactic catalogues will be also compared to our statistical selection.

  8. Galaxy-galaxy(-galaxy) lensing as a sensitive probe of galaxy evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saghiha, H.; Hilbert, S.; Schneider, P.; Simon, P.

    2012-11-01

    Context. The gravitational lensing effect provides various ways to study the mass environment of galaxies. Aims: We investigate how galaxy-galaxy(-galaxy) lensing can be used to test models of galaxy formation and evolution. Methods: We consider two semi-analytic galaxy formation models based on the Millennium Run N-body simulation: the Durham model by Bower et al. (2006, MNRAS, 370, 645) and the Garching model by Guo et al. (2011, MNRAS, 413, 101). We generate mock lensing observations for the two models, and then employ Fast Fourier Transform methods to compute second- and third-order aperture statistics in the simulated fields for various galaxy samples. Results: We find that both models predict qualitatively similar aperture signals, but there are large quantitative differences. The Durham model predicts larger amplitudes in general. In both models, red galaxies exhibit stronger aperture signals than blue galaxies. Using these aperture measurements and assuming a linear deterministic bias model, we measure relative bias ratios of red and blue galaxy samples. We find that a linear deterministic bias is insufficient to describe the relative clustering of model galaxies below ten arcmin angular scales. Dividing galaxies into luminosity bins, the aperture signals decrease with decreasing luminosity for brighter galaxies, but increase again for fainter galaxies. This increase is likely an artifact due to too many faint satellite galaxies in massive group and cluster halos predicted by the models. Conclusions: Our study shows that galaxy-galaxy(-galaxy) lensing is a sensitive probe of galaxy evolution.

  9. Intensity mapping cross-correlations: connecting the largest scales to galaxy evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolz, L.; Tonini, C.; Blake, C.; Wyithe, J. S. B.

    2016-05-01

    Intensity mapping of the neutral hydrogen (H I) is a new observational tool to efficiently map the large-scale structure over wide redshift ranges. The cross-correlation of intensity maps with galaxy surveys is a robust measure of the cosmological power spectrum and the H I content of galaxies which diminishes systematics caused by instrumental effects and foreground removal. We examine the cross-correlation signature at redshift 0.9 using a semi-analytical galaxy formation model in order to model the H I gas of galaxies as well as their optical magnitudes. We determine the scale-dependent clustering of the cross-correlation power for different types of galaxies determined by their colours, which act as a proxy for their star formation activity. We find that the cross-correlation coefficient with H I density for red quiescent galaxies falls off more quickly on smaller scales k > 0.2 h Mpc-1 than for blue star-forming galaxies. Additionally, we create a mock catalogue of highly star-forming galaxies to mimic the WiggleZ Dark Energy Survey, and use this to predict existing and future measurements using data from the Green Bank telescope and Parkes telescope. We find that the cross-power of highly star-forming galaxies shows a higher clustering on small scales than any other galaxy type and that this significantly alters the power spectrum shape on scales k > 0.2 h Mpc-1. We show that the cross-correlation coefficient is not negligible when interpreting the cosmological cross-power spectrum and additionally contains information about the H I content of the optically selected galaxies.

  10. The XMM Cluster Survey: the halo occupation number of BOSS galaxies in X-ray clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehrtens, Nicola; Romer, A. Kathy; Nichol, Robert C.; Collins, Chris A.; Sahlén, Martin; Rooney, Philip J.; Mayers, Julian A.; Bermeo-Hernandez, A.; Bristow, Martyn; Capozzi, Diego; Christodoulou, L.; Comparat, Johan; Hilton, Matt; Hoyle, Ben; Kay, Scott T.; Liddle, Andrew R.; Mann, Robert G.; Masters, Karen; Miller, Christopher J.; Parejko, John K.; Prada, Francisco; Ross, Ashley J.; Schneider, Donald P.; Stott, John P.; Streblyanska, Alina; Viana, Pedro T. P.; White, Martin; Wilcox, Harry; Zehavi, Idit

    2016-12-01

    We present a direct measurement of the mean halo occupation distribution (HOD) of galaxies taken from the eleventh data release (DR11) of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). The HOD of BOSS low-redshift (LOWZ: 0.2 < z < 0.4) and Constant-Mass (CMASS: 0.43 < z < 0.7) galaxies is inferred via their association with the dark matter haloes of 174 X-ray-selected galaxy clusters drawn from the XMM Cluster Survey (XCS). Halo masses are determined for each galaxy cluster based on X-ray temperature measurements, and range between log10(M180/M⊙) = 13 and 15. Our directly measured HODs are consistent with the HOD-model fits inferred via the galaxy-clustering analyses of Parejko et al. for the BOSS LOWZ sample and White et al. for the BOSS CMASS sample. Under the simplifying assumption that the other parameters that describe the HOD hold the values measured by these authors, we have determined a best-fitting alpha-index of 0.91 ± 0.08 and 1.27^{+0.03}_{-0.04} for the CMASS and LOWZ HOD, respectively. These alpha-index values are consistent with those measured by White et al. and Parejko et al. In summary, our study provides independent support for the HOD models assumed during the development of the BOSS mock-galaxy catalogues that have subsequently been used to derive BOSS cosmological constraints.

  11. The 3XMM Catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Mike

    2012-09-01

    Preparation of the 3XMM source catalogue is in progress by the XMM-Newton Survey Science Centre (SSC) and it is expected to be released by the end of 2012. 3XMM will be based on a uniform reprocessing of all publicly available XMM EPIC data, with ~30% more observations than its immediate predecessor (2XMM-DR3) and nearly a factor two more than the 2XMM catalogue published in 2009 (the last bulk reprocessing of the database; Watson et al 2009). We expect ~460k detections associated with ~340k unique sources, from a (non-overlapping) sky area of ~650 square degrees. The 3XMM catalogue will thus ensure that the XMM serendipitous source survey continues to provide the largest available catalogue of celestial X-ray sources; this will remain true until the completion of the first part of the e-ROSITA survey in several years' time. The 3XMM data processing incorporates several additions and enhancements relative to the previous versions, including: S:N-optimised extraction of source spectra and time series, optimised removal of time periods of high background and several other enhancements, eg. the use of a higher-accuracy PSF to reduce the number of spurious sources and improved astrometric rectification. This talk will outline these improvements, summarise the catalogue statistics, and give a few preliminary highlights of individual sources and of other associated analyses.

  12. The DEEP2 galaxy redshift survey: the evolution of the blue fraction in groups and the field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerke, Brian F.; Newman, Jeffrey A.; Faber, S. M.; Cooper, Michael C.; Croton, Darren J.; Davis, Marc; Willmer, Christopher N. A.; Yan, Renbin; Coil, Alison L.; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Koo, David C.; Weiner, Benjamin J.

    2007-04-01

    We explore the behaviour of the blue galaxy fraction over the redshift range 0.75 <= z <= 1.3 in the DEEP2 Survey, both for field galaxies and for galaxies in groups. The primary aim is to determine the role that groups play in driving the evolution of galaxy colour at high z. In pursuing this aim, it is essential to define a galaxy sample that does not suffer from redshift-dependent selection effects in colour-magnitude space. We develop four such samples for this study: at all redshifts considered, each one is complete in colour-magnitude space, and the selection also accounts for evolution in the galaxy luminosity function. These samples will also be useful for future evolutionary studies in DEEP2. The colour segregation observed between local group and field samples is already in place at z ~ 1: DEEP2 groups have a significantly lower blue fraction than the field. At fixed z, there is also a correlation between blue fraction and galaxy magnitude, such that brighter galaxies are more likely to be red, both in groups and in the field. In addition, there is a negative correlation between blue fraction and group richness. In terms of evolution, the blue fraction in groups and the field remains roughly constant from z = 0.75 to 1, but beyond this redshift the blue fraction in groups rises rapidly with z, and the group and field blue fractions become indistinguishable at z ~ 1.3. Careful tests indicate that this effect does not arise from known systematic or selection effects. To further ensure the robustness of this result, we build on previous mock DEEP2 catalogues to develop mock catalogues that reproduce the colour-overdensity relation observed in DEEP2 and use these to test our methods. The convergence between the group and field blue fractions at z ~ 1.3 implies that DEEP2 galaxy groups only became efficient at quenching star formation at z ~ 2; this result is broadly consistent with other recent observations and with current models of galaxy evolution and

  13. Catalogue of Icelandic Volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilyinskaya, Evgenia; Larsen, Gudrun; Gudmundsson, Magnus T.; Vogfjord, Kristin; Pagneux, Emmanuel; Oddsson, Bjorn; Barsotti, Sara; Karlsdottir, Sigrun

    2016-04-01

    The Catalogue of Icelandic Volcanoes is a newly developed open-access web resource in English intended to serve as an official source of information about active volcanoes in Iceland and their characteristics. The Catalogue forms a part of an integrated volcanic risk assessment project in Iceland GOSVÁ (commenced in 2012), as well as being part of the effort of FUTUREVOLC (2012-2016) on establishing an Icelandic volcano supersite. Volcanic activity in Iceland occurs on volcanic systems that usually comprise a central volcano and fissure swarm. Over 30 systems have been active during the Holocene (the time since the end of the last glaciation - approximately the last 11,500 years). In the last 50 years, over 20 eruptions have occurred in Iceland displaying very varied activity in terms of eruption styles, eruptive environments, eruptive products and the distribution lava and tephra. Although basaltic eruptions are most common, the majority of eruptions are explosive, not the least due to magma-water interaction in ice-covered volcanoes. Extensive research has taken place on Icelandic volcanism, and the results reported in numerous scientific papers and other publications. In 2010, the International Civil Aviation Organisation (ICAO) funded a 3 year project to collate the current state of knowledge and create a comprehensive catalogue readily available to decision makers, stakeholders and the general public. The work on the Catalogue began in 2011, and was then further supported by the Icelandic government and the EU through the FP7 project FUTUREVOLC. The Catalogue of Icelandic Volcanoes is a collaboration of the Icelandic Meteorological Office (the state volcano observatory), the Institute of Earth Sciences at the University of Iceland, and the Civil Protection Department of the National Commissioner of the Iceland Police, with contributions from a large number of specialists in Iceland and elsewhere. The Catalogue is built up of chapters with texts and various

  14. EGG: hatching a mock Universe from empirical prescriptions⋆

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreiber, C.; Elbaz, D.; Pannella, M.; Merlin, E.; Castellano, M.; Fontana, A.; Bourne, N.; Boutsia, K.; Cullen, F.; Dunlop, J.; Ferguson, H. C.; Michałowski, M. J.; Okumura, K.; Santini, P.; Shu, X. W.; Wang, T.; White, C.

    2017-06-01

    This paper introduces EGG, the Empirical Galaxy Generator, a tool designed within the ASTRODEEP collaboration to generate mock galaxy catalogs for deep fields with realistic fluxes and simple morphologies. The simulation procedure is based exclusively on empirical prescriptions - rather than first principles - to provide the most accurate match with current observations at 0 galaxies can be either quiescent or star-forming, and used their stellar mass (M∗) and redshift (z) as the fundamental properties from which all the other observables can be statistically derived. Drawing z and M∗ from the observed galaxy stellar mass functions, a star-formation rate (SFR) is attributed to each galaxy from the tight SFR-M∗ main sequence, while dust attenuation, optical colors and simple disk plus bulge morphologies are obtained from empirical relations that we established from the high quality Hubble and Herschel observations from the CANDELS fields. Random scatter was introduced in each step to reproduce the observed distributions of each parameter. Based on these observables, an adequate panchromatic spectral energy distribution (SED) is selected for each galaxy and synthetic photometry is produced by integrating the redshifted SED in common broad-band filters. Finally, the mock galaxies are placed on the sky at random positions with a fixed angular two-point correlation function to implement basic clustering. The resulting flux catalogs reproduce accurately the observed number counts in all broad bands from the ultraviolet up to the sub-millimeter, and can be directly fed to image simulators such as SkyMaker. The images can then be used to test source extraction softwares and image-based techniques such as stacking. EGG is open-source, and is made available to the community on behalf of the ASTRODEEP collaboration, together with a set of pre-generated catalogs and images. http://cschreib.github.io/egg/ Full Table C.1 is only available at the

  15. VizieR Online Data Catalog: The ENACS Catalogue. V. (Katgert+ 1998)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katgert, P.; Mazure, A.; den Hartog, R.; Adami, C.; Biviano, A.; Perea, J.

    1998-04-01

    Table enacs presents the full ENACS catalogue: i.e. redshifts and photometry of 5634 galaxies in the directions of 107 rich Southern cluster candidates from the ACO catalogue. Table 2 of this paper lists additional redshifts from the literature for 33 galaxies contained within the Optopus areas of 4 clusters observed in the ENACS. Table 5 of this paper lists the centre of the Optopus plates and the dates of the Optopus observations (3 data files).

  16. Outdoor Education: Resource Catalogue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manitoba Dept. of Education, Winnipeg.

    Compiled to serve as a reference to help teachers locate outdoor education materials available from Canadian government and private agencies, this catalogue lists services and publications which can be utilized by educators in planning and implementing outdoor education programs. Among the services listed is a sampling of organizations,…

  17. Catalogue of Palaearctic Coleoptera

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The palaearctic weevils of the subfamily Baridinae are catalogued. Two subgenera are raised to full generic rank, 12 genera are transferred from incertae sedis to tribes and subtribes, 25 species names are transferred to other genera and nine are synonymized. A total of 215 primary references were c...

  18. Catalogue of Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tufts Univ., Medford, MA. Lincoln Filene Center for Citizenship and Public Affairs.

    This catalogue lists resource materials available to secondary social studies teachers using an inductive approach and multi-media techniques to create a variety of learning experiences. Seven supplemental classroom instructional programs were developed by the Center: 1) Dimensions of Citizenship; 2) Politics and Policy Making; 3) Urban Problems…

  19. Marine Science Film Catalogue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, Frank L.

    Forty-eight motion picture films and filmstrips in the field of marine science are catalogued in this booklet. Following the alphabetical index, one page is devoted to each film indicating its type, producer, recommended grade level, running time, and presence of color and/or sound. A summary of film content, possible uses, and outstanding…

  20. SCOPE in Cataloguing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tom, Ellen; Reed, Sue

    This report describes the Systematic Computerized Processing in Cataloguing system (SCOPE), an automated system for the catalog department of a university library. The system produces spine labels, pocket labels, book cards for the circulation system, catalog cards including shelf list, main entry, subject and added entry cards, statistics, an…

  1. An early TYCHO astrometric catalogue.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Høg, E.; Bässgen, G.; Bastian, U.; Egret, D.; Halbwachs, J. L.

    The TICR catalogue is a revision of the TYCHO Input Catalogue, TIC, containing positions derived from the first 12 months of TYCHO observations. Its properties, its role in TYCHO data analysis, and other possible uses are discussed.

  2. Standard Asteroid Photometric Catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piironen, J.; Lagerkvist, C.-I.; Torppa, J.; Kaasalainen, M.; Warner, B.

    2001-12-01

    The Asteroid Photometric Catalogue (APC) is now in its fifth update with over 8600 lightcurves of more than 1000 asteroids in the database. The APC also has references of over one thousand lightcurves not in digital format. The catalogue has been published by Uppsala University Observatory and is distributed by request (contact: classe@astro.uu.se). The new update also includes a list of known asteroid rotational periods and a CD-ROM containing all the existing digital data in the APC. The total number of observed lightcurves is growing rapidly, not the least because of the new state-of-the-art equipment and growing interest among amateur astronomers. The photometric database is now so large that the present format must be altered to facilitate a user-friendly on-line service for the down- and uploading of data. We are proposing (and have started to construct) a new Internet-based Standard Asteroid Photometric Catalogue (SAPC). The website is planned to open during the first half of the year 2002. In addition to the data files, the site would contain the index and guide to the catalogue, a web-form for reporting observations, and some general observing guidelines (e.g., on filters, timing, etc.). There would also be a list of asteroids for which more observations are needed, together with recommended observing periods. This would be accompanied by an up-to-date collection of physical asteroid models based on photometric data, as well as links to observer network pages and other sites that work in collaboration with the catalogue project. Our aim is to develop this site into a global standard service used by everyone involved in asteroid photometry.

  3. Reconstructing the lensing mass in the Universe from photometric catalogue data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collett, Thomas E.; Marshall, Philip J.; Auger, Matthew W.; Hilbert, Stefan; Suyu, Sherry H.; Greene, Zachary; Treu, Tommaso; Fassnacht, Christopher D.; Koopmans, Léon V. E.; Bradač, Maruša; Blandford, Roger D.

    2013-06-01

    High precision cosmological distance measurements towards individual objects such as time delay gravitational lenses or Type Ia supernovae are affected by weak lensing perturbations by galaxies and groups along the line of sight. In time delay gravitational lenses, `external convergence', κext, can dominate the uncertainty in the inferred distances and hence cosmological parameters. In this paper we attempt to reconstruct κext, due to line of sight structure, using a simple halo model. We use mock catalogues from the Millennium Simulation, and calibrate and compare our reconstructed P(κext) to ray-traced κext `truth' values; taking into account realistic uncertainties on redshift and stellar masses. We find that the reconstruction of κext provides an improvement in precision of ˜50 per cent over galaxy number counts. We find that the lowest κext lines of sight have the best constrained P(κext). In anticipation of future samples with thousands of lenses, we find that selecting the third of the systems with the highest precision κext estimates gives a subsample of unbiased time delay distance measurements with (on average) just 1 per cent uncertainty due to line of sight external convergence effects. Photometric data alone are sufficient to pre-select the best-constrained lines of sight, and can be done before investment in light-curve monitoring. Conversely, we show that selecting lines of sight with high external shear could, with the reconstruction model presented here, induce biases of up to 1 per cent in time delay distance. We find that a major potential source of systematic error is uncertainty in the high-mass end of the stellar mass-halo mass relation; this could introduce ˜2 per cent biases on the time delay distance if completely ignored. We suggest areas for the improvement of this general analysis framework (including more sophisticated treatment of high-mass structures) that should allow yet more accurate cosmological inferences to be made.

  4. The BOSS-WiggleZ overlap region - II. Dependence of cosmic growth on galaxy type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marín, Felipe A.; Beutler, Florian; Blake, Chris; Koda, Jun; Kazin, Eyal; Schneider, Donald P.

    2016-02-01

    The anisotropic galaxy two-point correlation function (2PCF) allows measurement of the growth of large-scale structures from the effect of peculiar velocities on the clustering pattern. We present new measurements of the auto- and cross-correlation function multipoles of 69 180 WiggleZ and 46 380 Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey CMASS galaxies sharing an overlapping volume of ˜0.2 (h-1 Gpc)3. Analysing the redshift-space distortions (RSD) of galaxy two-point statistics for these two galaxy tracers, we test for systematic errors in the modelling depending on galaxy type and investigate potential improvements in cosmological constraints. We build a large number of mock galaxy catalogues to examine the limits of different RSD models in terms of fitting scales and galaxy type, and to study the covariance of the measurements when performing joint fits. For the galaxy data, fitting the monopole and quadrupole of the WiggleZ 2PCF on scales 24 < s < 80 h-1Mpc produces a measurement of the normalized growth rate fσ8(z = 0.54) = 0.409 ± 0.055, whereas for the CMASS galaxies we found a consistent constraint of fσ8(z = 0.54) = 0.466 ± 0.069, When combining the measurements, accounting for the correlation between the two surveys, we obtain fσ8(z = 0.54) = 0.413 ± 0.048, in agreement with the Λ Cold Dark Matter of structure growth and with other survey measurements.

  5. Catalogue of Icelandic volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilyinskaya, Evgenia; Larsen, Gudrun; Vogfjörd, Kristin; Tumi Gudmundsson, Magnus; Jonsson, Trausti; Oddsson, Björn; Reynisson, Vidir; Barsotti, Sara; Karlsdottir, Sigrun

    2015-04-01

    Volcanic activity in Iceland occurs on volcanic systems that usually comprise a central volcano and fissure swarm. Over 30 systems have been active during the Holocene. In the last 100 years, over 30 eruptions have occurred displaying very varied activity in terms of eruption styles, eruptive environments, eruptive products and their distribution. Although basaltic eruptions are most common, the majority of eruptions are explosive, not the least due to magma-water interaction in ice-covered volcanoes. Extensive research has taken place on Icelandic volcanism, and the results reported in scientific papers and other publications. In 2010, the International Civil Aviation Organisation funded a 3 year project to collate the current state of knowledge and create a comprehensive catalogue readily available to decision makers, stakeholders and the general public. The work on the Catalogue began in 2011, and was then further supported by the Icelandic government and the EU. The Catalogue forms a part of an integrated volcanic risk assessment project in Iceland (commenced in 2012), and the EU FP7 project FUTUREVOLC (2012-2016), establishing an Icelandic volcano Supersite. The Catalogue is a collaborative effort between the Icelandic Meteorological Office (the state volcano observatory), the Institute of Earth Sciences at the University of Iceland, and the Icelandic Civil Protection, with contributions from a large number of specialists in Iceland and elsewhere. The catalogue is scheduled for opening in the first half of 2015 and once completed, it will be an official publication intended to serve as an accurate and up to date source of information about active volcanoes in Iceland and their characteristics. The Catalogue is an open web resource in English and is composed of individual chapters on each of the volcanic systems. The chapters include information on the geology and structure of the volcano; the eruption history, pattern and products; the known precursory signals

  6. Merged infrared catalogue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitz, M.; Brown, L. W.; Mead, J. M.; Nagy, T. A.

    1978-01-01

    A compilation of equatorial coordinates, spectral types, magnitudes, and fluxes from five catalogues of infrared observations is presented. This first edition of the Merged Infrared Catalogue contains 11,201 oservations from the Two-Micron Sky Survey, Observations of Infrared Radiation from Cool Stars, the Air Force Geophysics Laboratory four Color Infrared Sky Survey and its Supplemental Catalog, and from Catalog of 10 micron Celestial Objects (HALL). This compilation is a by-product of a computerized infrared data base under development at Goddard Space Flight Center; the objective is to maintain a complete and current record of all infrared observations from 1 micron m to 1000 micron m of nonsolar system objects. These observations are being placed into a standardized system.

  7. Fingers-of-God effect of infalling satellite galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hikage, Chiaki; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Non-linear redshift-space distortion known as the Fingers-of-God (FoG) effect is a major systematic uncertainty in redshift-space distortion studies conducted to test gravity models. The FoG effect has been usually attributed to the random motion of galaxies inside their clusters. When the internal galaxy motion is not well virialized, however, the coherent infalling motion towards the cluster centre generates the FoG effect. Here, we derive an analytical model of the satellite velocity distribution due to the infall motion combined with the random motion. We show that the velocity distribution becomes far from Maxwellian when the infalling motion is dominant. We use simulated subhalo catalogues to find that the contribution of infall motion is important to massive subhaloes and that the velocity distribution has a top-hat like shape as expected from our analytic model. We also study the FoG effect due to infall motion on the redshift-space power spectrum. Using simulated mock samples of luminous red galaxies constructed from haloes and massive subhaloes in N-body simulations, we show that the redshift-space power spectra can differ from expectations when the infall motion is ignored.

  8. Some observational tests of a minimal galaxy formation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohn, J. D.

    2017-04-01

    Dark matter simulations can serve as a basis for creating galaxy histories via the galaxy-dark matter connection. Here, one such model by Becker is implemented with several variations on three different dark matter simulations. Stellar mass and star formation rates are assigned to all simulation subhaloes at all times, using subhalo mass gain to determine stellar mass gain. The observational properties of the resulting galaxy distributions are compared to each other and observations for a range of redshifts from 0 to 2. Although many of the galaxy distributions seem reasonable, there are noticeable differences as simulations, subhalo mass gain definitions or subhalo mass definitions are altered, suggesting that the model should change as these properties are varied. Agreement with observations may improve by including redshift dependence in the added-by-hand random contribution to star formation rate. There appears to be an excess of faint quiescent galaxies as well (perhaps due in part to differing definitions of quiescence). The ensemble of galaxy formation histories for these models tend to have more scatter around their average histories (for a fixed final stellar mass) than the two more predictive and elaborate semi-analytic models of Guo et al. and Henriques et al., and require more basis fluctuations (using principal component analysis) to capture 90 per cent of the scatter around their average histories. The codes to plot model predictions (in some cases alongside observational data) are publicly available to test other mock catalogues at https://github.com/jdcphysics/validation/. Information on how to use these codes is in Appendix A.

  9. Technology Catalogue. First edition

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    The Department of Energy`s Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) is responsible for remediating its contaminated sites and managing its waste inventory in a safe and efficient manner. EM`s Office of Technology Development (OTD) supports applied research and demonstration efforts to develop and transfer innovative, cost-effective technologies to its site clean-up and waste management programs within EM`s Office of Environmental Restoration and Office of Waste Management. The purpose of the Technology Catalogue is to provide performance data on OTD-developed technologies to scientists and engineers assessing and recommending technical solutions within the Department`s clean-up and waste management programs, as well as to industry, other federal and state agencies, and the academic community. OTD`s applied research and demonstration activities are conducted in programs referred to as Integrated Demonstrations (IDs) and Integrated Programs (IPs). The IDs test and evaluate.systems, consisting of coupled technologies, at specific sites to address generic problems, such as the sensing, treatment, and disposal of buried waste containers. The IPs support applied research activities in specific applications areas, such as in situ remediation, efficient separations processes, and site characterization. The Technology Catalogue is a means for communicating the status. of the development of these innovative technologies. The FY93 Technology Catalogue features technologies successfully demonstrated in the field through IDs and sufficiently mature to be used in the near-term. Technologies from the following IDs are featured in the FY93 Technology Catalogue: Buried Waste ID (Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho); Mixed Waste Landfill ID (Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico); Underground Storage Tank ID (Hanford, Washington); Volatile organic compound (VOC) Arid ID (Richland, Washington); and VOC Non-Arid ID (Savannah River Site, South Carolina).

  10. The 3XMM catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, N.; XMM-Newton Survey Science Centre

    2014-07-01

    The 3XMM X-ray catalogue produced by the XMM-Newton Survey Science Centre (SSC) contains 531261 X-ray detections across 794 square degrees of sky and 372728 unique X-ray sources. This catalogue realeased on 23rd July 2013 contains almost 50% more sources than the previous version (2XMMi-DR3) and uses significant improvements to the XMM-Newton Science Analysis Software as well as incorporating developments with the calibration. Improvements include better source characterisation, a reduced number of spurious source detections, better astrometric precision, greater net sensitivity and spectra and timeseries for fainter sources, with improved signal-to-noise. The median flux is ~2.4e-14 erg/cm²/s and the data taken span 12 years. It is therefore the ideal resource to search for faint/distant sources as well as variable objects. We summarise the 3XMM catalogue and present some of the rare and interesting objects discovered within it, including accreting stellar mass compact objects, tidal disruption events and extreme AGN.

  11. Reconstruction of halo power spectrum from redshift-space galaxy distribution: cylinder-grouping method and halo exclusion effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okumura, Teppei; Takada, Masahiro; More, Surhud; Masaki, Shogo

    2017-07-01

    The peculiar velocity field measured by redshift-space distortions (RSD) in galaxy surveys provides a unique probe of the growth of large-scale structure. However, systematic effects arise when including satellite galaxies in the clustering analysis. Since satellite galaxies tend to reside in massive haloes with a greater halo bias, the inclusion boosts the clustering power. In addition, virial motions of the satellite galaxies cause a significant suppression of the clustering power due to non-linear RSD effects. We develop a novel method to recover the redshift-space power spectrum of haloes from the observed galaxy distribution by minimizing the contamination of satellite galaxies. The cylinder-grouping method (CGM) we study effectively excludes satellite galaxies from a galaxy sample. However, we find that this technique produces apparent anisotropies in the reconstructed halo distribution over all the scales which mimic RSD. On small scales, the apparent anisotropic clustering is caused by exclusion of haloes within the anisotropic cylinder used by the CGM. On large scales, the misidentification of different haloes in the large-scale structures, aligned along the line of sight, into the same CGM group causes the apparent anisotropic clustering via their cross-correlation with the CGM haloes. We construct an empirical model for the CGM halo power spectrum, which includes correction terms derived using the CGM window function at small scales as well as the linear matter power spectrum multiplied by a simple anisotropic function at large scales. We apply this model to a mock galaxy catalogue at z = 0.5, designed to resemble Sloan Digital Sky Survey-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) CMASS galaxies, and find that our model can predict both the monopole and quadrupole power spectra of the host haloes up to k < 0.5 {{h Mpc^{-1}}} to within 5 per cent.

  12. The Planck Catalogue of Galactic Cold Clumps : PGCC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montier, L.

    The Planck satellite has provided an unprecedented view of the submm sky, allowing us to search for the dust emission of Galactic cold sources. Combining Planck-HFI all-sky maps in the high frequency channels with the IRAS map at 100um, we built the Planck catalogue of Galactic Cold Clumps (PGCC, Planck 2015 results. XXVIII), counting 13188 sources distributed over the whole sky, and following mainly the Galactic structures at low and intermediate latitudes. This is the first all-sky catalogue of Galactic cold sources obtained with a single instrument at this resolution and sensitivity, which opens a new window on star-formation processes in our Galaxy.

  13. Extragalactic distance scale derived from ''sosie'' galaxies. I. Distances of 167 galaxies which are sosies of 14 nearby galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Bottinelli; Gouguenheim, L.; Paturel, G.; de Vaucouleurs, G.

    1985-11-01

    The method of ''sosie'' galaxies is applied to a large sample of galaxies extracted from the BGP catalog of H I line data and the Second Reference Catalogue of Bright Galaxies. The ''sosies'' of 14 calibrating galaxies (primary calibrators and galaxies in the nearest groups) are defined as those having the same parameters, either (1) morphological type T, axis ratio R, and maximum rotation velocity V/sub M/ or (2) T, R, and luminosity index ..lambda../sub c/.

  14. Lensing is low: cosmology, galaxy formation or new physics?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leauthaud, Alexie; Saito, Shun; Hilbert, Stefan; Barreira, Alexandre; More, Surhud; White, Martin; Alam, Shadab; Behroozi, Peter; Bundy, Kevin; Coupon, Jean; Erben, Thomas; Heymans, Catherine; Hildebrandt, Hendrik; Mandelbaum, Rachel; Miller, Lance; Moraes, Bruno; Pereira, Maria E. S.; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio A.; Schmidt, Fabian; Shan, Huan-Yuan; Viel, Matteo; Villaescusa-Navarro, Francisco

    2017-05-01

    We present high signal-to-noise galaxy-galaxy lensing measurements of the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey constant mass (CMASS) sample using 250 deg2 of weak-lensing data from Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Lensing Survey and Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Stripe 82 Survey. We compare this signal with predictions from mock catalogues trained to match observables including the stellar mass function and the projected and two-dimensional clustering of CMASS. We show that the clustering of CMASS, together with standard models of the galaxy-halo connection, robustly predicts a lensing signal that is 20-40 per cent larger than observed. Detailed tests show that our results are robust to a variety of systematic effects. Lowering the value of S_8=σ _8 \\sqrt{Ω _m/0.3} compared to Planck Collaboration XIII reconciles the lensing with clustering. However, given the scale of our measurement (r < 10 h-1 Mpc), other effects may also be at play and need to be taken into consideration. We explore the impact of baryon physics, assembly bias, massive neutrinos and modifications to general relativity on ΔΣ and show that several of these effects may be non-negligible given the precision of our measurement. Disentangling cosmological effects from the details of the galaxy-halo connection, the effect of baryons, and massive neutrinos, is the next challenge facing joint lensing and clustering analyses. This is especially true in the context of large galaxy samples from Baryon Acoustic Oscillation surveys with precise measurements but complex selection functions.

  15. Modelling and interpreting spectral energy distributions of galaxies with BEAGLE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chevallard, Jacopo; Charlot, Stéphane

    2016-10-01

    We present a new-generation tool to model and interpret spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of galaxies, which incorporates in a consistent way the production of radiation and its transfer through the interstellar and intergalactic media. This flexible tool, named BEAGLE (for BayEsian Analysis of GaLaxy sEds), allows one to build mock galaxy catalogues as well as to interpret any combination of photometric and spectroscopic galaxy observations in terms of physical parameters. The current version of the tool includes versatile modelling of the emission from stars and photoionized gas, attenuation by dust and accounting for different instrumental effects, such as spectroscopic flux calibration and line spread function. We show a first application of the BEAGLE tool to the interpretation of broad-band SEDs of a published sample of ˜ 10^4 galaxies at redshifts 0.1 ≲ z ≲ 8. We find that the constraints derived on photometric redshifts using this multipurpose tool are comparable to those obtained using public, dedicated photometric-redshift codes and quantify this result in a rigorous statistical way. We also show how the post-processing of BEAGLE output data with the PYTHON extension PYP-BEAGLE allows the characterization of systematic deviations between models and observations, in particular through posterior predictive checks. The modular design of the BEAGLE tool allows easy extensions to incorporate, for example, the absorption by neutral galactic and circumgalactic gas, and the emission from an active galactic nucleus, dust and shock-ionized gas. Information about public releases of the BEAGLE tool will be maintained on http://www.jacopochevallard.org/beagle.

  16. The DES Science Verification weak lensing shear catalogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarvis, M.; Sheldon, E.; Zuntz, J.; Kacprzak, T.; Bridle, S. L.; Amara, A.; Armstrong, R.; Becker, M. R.; Bernstein, G. M.; Bonnett, C.; Chang, C.; Das, R.; Dietrich, J. P.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Eifler, T. F.; Gangkofner, C.; Gruen, D.; Hirsch, M.; Huff, E. M.; Jain, B.; Kent, S.; Kirk, D.; MacCrann, N.; Melchior, P.; Plazas, A. A.; Refregier, A.; Rowe, B.; Rykoff, E. S.; Samuroff, S.; Sánchez, C.; Suchyta, E.; Troxel, M. A.; Vikram, V.; Abbott, T.; Abdalla, F. B.; Allam, S.; Annis, J.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bertin, E.; Brooks, D.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Burke, D. L.; Capozzi, D.; Carnero Rosell, A.; Carrasco Kind, M.; Carretero, J.; Castander, F. J.; Clampitt, J.; Crocce, M.; Cunha, C. E.; D'Andrea, C. B.; da Costa, L. N.; DePoy, D. L.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Doel, P.; Fausti Neto, A.; Flaugher, B.; Fosalba, P.; Frieman, J.; Gaztanaga, E.; Gerdes, D. W.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gutierrez, G.; Honscheid, K.; James, D. J.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lahav, O.; Li, T. S.; Lima, M.; March, M.; Martini, P.; Miquel, R.; Mohr, J. J.; Neilsen, E.; Nord, B.; Ogando, R.; Reil, K.; Romer, A. K.; Roodman, A.; Sako, M.; Sanchez, E.; Scarpine, V.; Schubnell, M.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Smith, R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Thaler, J.; Thomas, D.; Walker, A. R.; Wechsler, R. H.

    2016-08-01

    We present weak lensing shear catalogues for 139 square degrees of data taken during the Science Verification (SV) time for the new Dark Energy Camera (DECam) being used for the Dark Energy Survey (DES). We describe our object selection, point spread function estimation and shear measurement procedures using two independent shear pipelines, IM3SHAPE and NGMIX, which produce catalogues of 2.12 million and 3.44 million galaxies, respectively. We detail a set of null tests for the shear measurements and find that they pass the requirements for systematic errors at the level necessary for weak lensing science applications using the SV data. We also discuss some of the planned algorithmic improvements that will be necessary to produce sufficiently accurate shear catalogues for the full 5-yr DES, which is expected to cover 5000 square degrees.

  17. The ASAS-SN bright supernova catalogue - II. 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holoien, T. W.-S.; Brown, J. S.; Stanek, K. Z.; Kochanek, C. S.; Shappee, B. J.; Prieto, J. L.; Dong, Subo; Brimacombe, J.; Bishop, D. W.; Basu, U.; Beacom, J. F.; Bersier, D.; Chen, Ping; Danilet, A. B.; Falco, E.; Godoy-Rivera, D.; Goss, N.; Pojmanski, G.; Simonian, G. V.; Skowron, D. M.; Thompson, Todd A.; Woźniak, P. R.; Ávila, C. G.; Bock, G.; Carballo, J.-L. G.; Conseil, E.; Contreras, C.; Cruz, I.; Andújar, J. M. F.; Guo, Zhen; Hsiao, E. Y.; Kiyota, S.; Koff, R. A.; Krannich, G.; Madore, B. F.; Marples, P.; Masi, G.; Morrell, N.; Monard, L. A. G.; Munoz-Mateos, J. C.; Nicholls, B.; Nicolas, J.; Wagner, R. M.; Wiethoff, W. S.

    2017-05-01

    This manuscript presents information for all supernovae discovered by the All-Sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae (ASAS-SN) during 2015, its second full year of operations. The same information is presented for bright (mV ≤ 17), spectroscopically confirmed supernovae discovered by other sources in 2015. As with the first ASAS-SN bright supernova catalogue, we also present redshifts and near-ultraviolet through infrared magnitudes for all supernova host galaxies in both samples. Combined with our previous catalogue, this work comprises a complete catalogue of 455 supernovae from multiple professional and amateur sources, allowing for population studies that were previously impossible. This is the second of a series of yearly papers on bright supernovae and their hosts from the ASAS-SN team.

  18. The clustering of galaxies in the completed SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: tomographic BAO analysis of DR12 combined sample in configuration space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuting; Zhao, Gong-Bo; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Ross, Ashley J.; Percival, Will J.; Gil-Marín, Héctor; Cuesta, Antonio J.; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Rodriguez-Torres, Sergio; Brownstein, Joel R.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Ho, Shirley; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Olmstead, Matthew D.; Prada, Francisco; Rossi, Graziano; Sánchez, Ariel G.; Salazar-Albornoz, Salvador; Thomas, Daniel; Tinker, Jeremy; Tojeiro, Rita; Vargas-Magaña, Mariana; Zhu, Fangzhou

    2017-08-01

    We perform a tomographic baryon acoustic oscillations (BAOs) analysis using the two-point galaxy correlation function measured from the combined sample of Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey Data Release 12 (BOSS DR12), which covers the redshift range of 0.2 < z < 0.75. Upon splitting the sample into multiple overlapping redshift slices to extract the redshift information of galaxy clustering, we obtain a measurement of DA(z)/rd and H(z)rd at nine effective redshifts with the full covariance matrix calibrated using MultiDark-Patchy mock catalogues. Using the reconstructed galaxy catalogues, we obtain the precision of 1.3-2.2 per cent for DA(z)/rd and 2.1-6.0 per cent for H(z)rd. To quantify the gain from the tomographic information, we compare the constraints on the cosmological parameters using our nine-bin BAO measurements, the consensus three-bin BAO and redshift space distortion measurements at three effective redshifts in Alam et al., and the non-tomographic (one-bin) BAO measurement at a single effective redshift. Comparing the nine-bin with one-bin constraint result, it can improve the dark energy Figure of Merit by a factor of 1.24 for the Chevallier-Polarski-Linder parametrization for equation-of-state parameter wDE. The errors of w0 and wa from nine-bin constraints are slightly improved when compared to the three-bin constraint result.

  19. Towards Dynamic Catalogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheers, B.; Groffen, F.; TKP Team

    2012-09-01

    The International LOFAR Telescope is designed to carry out unique science in the spatial, spectral, polarisation and temporal domains. The Transients Key Science Project aims to study all transient and variable sources detected by LOFAR. One of its products will be an up-to-date catalogue of all sources detected by LOFAR, i.e. a spectral light-curve database, with real-time capabilities, and expected to grow gradually with 50-100 TB/yr. The response time to transient and variable events depends strongly on the query execution plans of the algorithms that search the LOFAR light-curve database for previous (non-)detections in the spatial, spectral, polarisation and temporal domains. Here we show how the Transients Key Science Project of LOFAR approaches these challenges by using column-stores, sharded databases and implementing the new array query language SciQL (pronounced as ‘cycle’).

  20. Binary catalogue of exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, Richard; Bazso, Akos; Zechner, Renate; Funk, Barbara

    2016-02-01

    Since 1995 there is a database which list most of the known exoplanets (The Extrasolar Planets Encyclopaedia at http://exoplanet.eu/). With the growing number of detected exoplanets in binary and multiple star systems it became more important to mark and to separate them into a new database, which is not available in the Extrasolar Planets Encyclopaedia. Therefore we established an online database (which can be found at: http://www.univie.ac.at/adg/schwarz/multiple.html) for all known exoplanets in binary star systems and in addition for multiple star systems, which will be updated regularly and linked to the Extrasolar Planets Encyclopaedia. The binary catalogue of exoplanets is available online as data file and can be used for statistical purposes. Our database is divided into two parts: the data of the stars and the planets, given in a separate list. We describe also the different parameters of the exoplanetary systems and present some applications.

  1. Technology catalogue. Second edition

    SciTech Connect

    1995-04-01

    The Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Office of Environmental Management (EM) is responsible for remediating DOE contaminated sites and managing the DOE waste inventory in a safe and efficient manner. EM`s Office of Technology Development (OTD) supports applied research and demonstration efforts to develop and transfer innovative, cost-effective technologies to its site clean-up and waste-management programs within EM. The purpose of the Technology Catalogue is to: (a) provide performance data on OTD-developed technologies to scientists and engineers responsible for preparing Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Studies (RI/FSs) and other compliance documents for the DOE`s clean-up and waste-management programs; and (b) identify partnering and commercialization opportunities with industry, other federal and state agencies, and the academic community.

  2. Galaxy formation by dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Boqi; Field, Goerge B.

    1989-01-01

    It has been known since the early 1940's that radiation can cause an instability in the interstellar medium. Absorbing dust particles in an isotropic radiation field shadow each other by a solid angle which is inversely proportional to the square of the distance between the two particles, leading to an inverse-square attractive force - mock gravity. The effect is largest in an optically thin medium. Recently Hogan and White (HW, hereafter) proposed that if the pre-galactic universe contained suitable sources of radiation and dust, instability in the dust distribution caused by mock gravity may have led to the formation of galaxies and galaxy clusters. In their picture of a well-coupled dust-gas medium, HW show that mock gravity begins to dominate gravitational instability when the perturbation becomes optically thin, provided that the radiation field at the time is strong enough. The recent rocket observation of the microwave background at submillimeter wavelengths by Matsumoto et al. might be from pre-galactic stars, the consequence of the absorption of ultraviolet radiation by dust, and infrared reemission which is subsequently redshifted. HW's analysis omits radiative drag, incomplete collisional coupling of gas and dust, finite dust albedo, and finite matter pressure. These effects could be important. In a preliminary calculation including them, the authors have confirmed that mock gravitational instability is effective if there is a strong ultraviolet radiation at the time, but any galaxies that form would be substantially enriched in heavy elements because the contraction of the dust is more rapid than that of the gas. Moreover, since the dust moves with supersonic velocity through the gas soon after the perturbation becomes optically thin, the sputtering of dust particles by gas is significant, so the dust could disappear before the instability develops significantly. They conclude that the mock gravity by dust is not important in galaxy formations.

  3. A FIRST LOOK AT CREATING MOCK CATALOGS WITH MACHINE LEARNING TECHNIQUES

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Xiaoying; Ho, Shirley; Trac, Hy; Schneider, Jeff; Ntampaka, Michelle; Poczos, Barnabas

    2013-08-01

    We investigate machine learning (ML) techniques for predicting the number of galaxies (N{sub gal}) that occupy a halo, given the halo's properties. These types of mappings are crucial for constructing the mock galaxy catalogs necessary for analyses of large-scale structure. The ML techniques proposed here distinguish themselves from traditional halo occupation distribution (HOD) modeling as they do not assume a prescribed relationship between halo properties and N{sub gal}. In addition, our ML approaches are only dependent on parent halo properties (like HOD methods), which are advantageous over subhalo-based approaches as identifying subhalos correctly is difficult. We test two algorithms: support vector machines (SVM) and k-nearest-neighbor (kNN) regression. We take galaxies and halos from the Millennium simulation and predict N{sub gal} by training our algorithms on the following six halo properties: number of particles, M{sub 200}, {sigma}{sub v}, v{sub max}, half-mass radius, and spin. For Millennium, our predicted N{sub gal} values have a mean-squared error (MSE) of {approx}0.16 for both SVM and kNN. Our predictions match the overall distribution of halos reasonably well and the galaxy correlation function at large scales to {approx}5%-10%. In addition, we demonstrate a feature selection algorithm to isolate the halo parameters that are most predictive, a useful technique for understanding the mapping between halo properties and N{sub gal}. Lastly, we investigate these ML-based approaches in making mock catalogs for different galaxy subpopulations (e.g., blue, red, high M{sub star}, low M{sub star}). Given its non-parametric nature as well as its powerful predictive and feature selection capabilities, ML offers an interesting alternative for creating mock catalogs.

  4. Observing Handbook and Catalogue of Deep-Sky Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luginbuhl, Christian B.; Skiff, Brian A.

    1998-09-01

    List of charts, tables and figures; Prolegomenon; Part I. Amateur Observing: Telescopes; Eyepieces; Finderscopes and finding; Star atlases; Gadgets; Looking through the telescope; Lighting and the recording of notes; Observing locations; Instruments used in the survey of deep-sky objects; Observing sites for the survey; Part II. Deep-Sky Data Sources: Galaxies; Open clusters; Globular clusters; Planetary nebulae; Galactic nebulae; Double stars; Part III. Observations: Notes on references for deep-sky observers; Catalogue; Appendix of double stars.

  5. Holomorphic projections and Ramanujan's mock theta functions.

    PubMed

    Imamoğlu, Özlem; Raum, Martin; Richter, Olav K

    2014-03-18

    We use spectral methods of automorphic forms to establish a holomorphic projection operator for tensor products of vector-valued harmonic weak Maass forms and vector-valued modular forms. We apply this operator to discover simple recursions for Fourier series coefficients of Ramanujan's mock theta functions.

  6. X-ray selected stars in HRC and BHRC catalogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mickaelian, A. M.; Paronyan, G. M.

    2014-12-01

    A joint HRC/BHRC Catalogue has been created based on merging of Hamburg ROSAT Catalogue (HRC) and Byurakan Hamburg ROSAT Catalogue (BHRC). Both have been made by optical identifications of X-ray sources based on low-dispersion spectra of the Hamburg Quasar Survey (HQS) using ROSAT Catalogues. As a result, the largest sample of 8132 (5341+2791) optically identified X-ray sources was created having count rate (CR) of photons ≤ 0.04 ct/s in the area with galactic latitudes |b|≤ 20° and declinations d≤ 0°.There are 4253 AGN, 492 galaxies, 1800 stars and 1587 unknown objects in the sample. All stars have been found in GSC 2.3.2, as well as most of them are in GALEX, USNO-B1.0, 2MASS and WISE catalogues. In addition, 1429 are in SDSS DR9 and 204 have SDSS spectra. For these stars we have carried out spectral classification and along with the bright stars, many new cataclysmic variables (CV), white dwarfs (WD) and late-type stars (K-M and C) have been revealed. For all stars, statistical studies of their multiwavelength properties have been made. An attempt to find a connection between the radiation fluxes in different bands for different types of sources, and identify their characteristics was made as well.

  7. Building an automated 100 million+ variable star catalogue for Gaia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holl, Berry; Eyer, Laurent; Mowlavi, Nami; Evans, Dafydd W.; Clementini, Gisella; Cuypers, Jan; Lanzafame, Alessandro; De Ridder, Joris; Sarro, Luis; Ordoñez-Blanco, Diego; Nienartowicz, Krzysztof; Charnas, Jonathan; Guy, Leanne; Jévardat de Fombelle, Grégory; Lecoeur-Taïbi, Isabelle; Rimoldini, Lorenzo; Süveges, Maria; Bouchy, François

    2015-08-01

    Gaia is currently monitoring over a billion sources in and around our Galaxy, of which of the order of hundred million are expected to be variable stars. This unmatched sample will revolutionise research on stars and stellar physics not only because of its sheer size, but also because of the availability of simultaneous photometric, astrometric, and, for the brighter stars, radial velocity measurements. The public release of the Gaia data will be accompanied by many catalogues produced by the Gaia Data Processing and Analysis Consortium, amongst which the variable star catalogue provided by the Coordination Unit 7 (CU7). This catalogue will be the starting point for many stellar studies following the data release and therefore has to be of very high quality.In this presentation we present an initial overview of the information that can be expected to be part of this variable star catalogue. Additionally, we discuss the important aspects of the CU7 automated pipeline that will lead to the production of this catalogue: i) the motivation of its design, ii) the modelling of periodic sources, iii) the synergy of various classifiers, and iv) variable type-specific modelling. Additionally the advantages of combining photometric, spectroscopic and astrometric measurements will be highlighted.

  8. A catalogue of quasars and active nuclei (8th edition).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Véron-Cetty, M.-P.; Véron, P.

    1998-03-01

    Because of the fast increase in the number of known quasars, the authors have prepared an updated version of their catalogue of quasars and active nuclei (Véron-Cetty & Véron, 1984, 1985, 1987, 1989, 1991, 1993, 1996) which now contains 11358 quasars, 357 BL Lac objects and 3334 active galaxies (of which 1111 are Seyfert 1), compared with 8609 quasars, 220 BL Lac objects and 2833 Seyfert and related galaxies in the seventh edition. Like the seventh edition, it includes positions and redshift as well as photometry (U,B,V) and 6 and 11 cm flux densities when available.

  9. Connecting massive galaxies to dark matter haloes in BOSS - I. Is galaxy colour a stochastic process in high-mass haloes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Shun; Leauthaud, Alexie; Hearin, Andrew P.; Bundy, Kevin; Zentner, Andrew R.; Behroozi, Peter S.; Reid, Beth A.; Sinha, Manodeep; Coupon, Jean; Tinker, Jeremy L.; White, Martin; Schneider, Donald P.

    2016-08-01

    We use subhalo abundance matching (SHAM) to model the stellar mass function (SMF) and clustering of the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) `CMASS' sample at z ˜ 0.5. We introduce a novel method which accounts for the stellar mass incompleteness of CMASS as a function of redshift, and produce CMASS mock catalogues which include selection effects, reproduce the overall SMF, the projected two-point correlation function wp, the CMASS dn/dz, and are made publicly available. We study the effects of assembly bias above collapse mass in the context of `age matching' and show that these effects are markedly different compared to the ones explored by Hearin et al. at lower stellar masses. We construct two models, one in which galaxy colour is stochastic (`AbM' model) as well as a model which contains assembly bias effects (`AgM' model). By confronting the redshift dependent clustering of CMASS with the predictions from our model, we argue that that galaxy colours are not a stochastic process in high-mass haloes. Our results suggest that the colours of galaxies in high-mass haloes are determined by other halo properties besides halo peak velocity and that assembly bias effects play an important role in determining the clustering properties of this sample.

  10. GALEX catalogue of UV point sources in M33

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mudd, Dale; Stanek, K. Z.

    2015-07-01

    The hottest stars (>10 000 K), and by extension typically the most massive ones, are those that will be prevalent in the ultraviolet (UV) portion of the electromagnetic spectrum, and we expect to numerous B, O and WR (WR) stars to be bright in UV data. In this paper, we update the previous point source UV catalogue of M33, created using the Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (UIT), using data from the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX). We utilize point spread function photometry to optimally photometer sources in the crowded regions of the galaxy, and benefit from GALEX's increased sensitivity compared to UIT. We match our detections with data from the Local Group Galaxies Survey to create a catalogue with photometry spanning from the far-UV through the optical for a final list of 24 738 sources. All of these sources have far-UV (FUV; 1516 Å), near-UV (NUV; 2267 Å) and V data, and a significant fraction also have U, B, R and I data as well. We also present an additional 3000 sources that have no matching optical counterpart. We compare all of our sources to a catalogue of known WR stars in M33 and find that we recover 114 of 206 stars with spatially-coincident UV point sources. Additionally, we highlight and investigate those sources with unique colours as well as a selection of other well-studied sources in M33.

  11. The Unification of Astrometric Catalogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stock, J.; Abad, C.

    1988-06-01

    RESUMEN Se desarrolla un metodo de interpolaci6n para detectar diferencias sistematicas entre catalogos de posiciones y movimientos propios y se aplica a los catalogos AGK3 y Santiago 67, usando los cata'logos No. 1 y No. 2 del Cfrculo Meridiano Carlsberg como sistema de referencia. ABSTRACT An interpolation mechanism is developed for the detection of systematic differences between position and proper motion catalogues and is applied to the AGK3 and Santiago 67 catalogues, using the Carlsberg Meridian Circle catalogues No. 1 and No. 2 as reference sources. Key words: ASTROMETRY

  12. The clustering of the SDSS DR7 main Galaxy sample - I. A 4 per cent distance measure at z = 0.15

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, Ashley J.; Samushia, Lado; Howlett, Cullan; Percival, Will J.; Burden, Angela; Manera, Marc

    2015-05-01

    We create a sample of spectroscopically identified galaxies with z < 0.2 from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 7 (DR7), covering 6813 deg2. Galaxies are chosen to sample the highest mass haloes, with an effective bias of 1.5, allowing us to construct 1000 mock galaxy catalogues (described in Paper II), which we use to estimate statistical errors and test our methods. We use an estimate of the gravitational potential to `reconstruct' the linear density fluctuations, enhancing the baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) signal in the measured correlation function and power spectrum. Fitting to these measurements, we determine DV(zeff = 0.15) = (664 ± 25)(rd/rd, fid) Mpc; this is a better than 4 per cent distance measurement. This `fills the gap' in BAO distance ladder between previously measured local and higher redshift measurements, and affords significant improvement in constraining the properties of dark energy. Combining our measurement with other BAO measurements from Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey and 6-degree Field Galaxy Redshift Survey galaxy samples provides a 15 per cent improvement in the determination of the equation of state of dark energy and the value of the Hubble parameter at z = 0 (H0). Our measurement is fully consistent with the Planck results and the Λ cold dark matter concordance cosmology, but increases the tension between Planck+BAO H0 determinations and direct H0 measurements.

  13. Catalogue of Icelandic Volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilyinskaya, Evgenia; Larsen, Gudrún; Gudmundsson, Magnús T.; Vogfjörd, Kristin; Jonsson, Trausti; Oddsson, Björn; Reynisson, Vidir; Pagneux, Emmanuel; Barsotti, Sara; Karlsdóttir, Sigrún; Bergsveinsson, Sölvi; Oddsdóttir, Thorarna

    2017-04-01

    The Catalogue of Icelandic Volcanoes (CIV) is a newly developed open-access web resource (http://icelandicvolcanoes.is) intended to serve as an official source of information about volcanoes in Iceland for the public and decision makers. CIV contains text and graphic information on all 32 active volcanic systems in Iceland, as well as real-time data from monitoring systems in a format that enables non-specialists to understand the volcanic activity status. The CIV data portal contains scientific data on all eruptions since Eyjafjallajökull 2010 and is an unprecedented endeavour in making volcanological data open and easy to access. CIV forms a part of an integrated volcanic risk assessment project in Iceland GOSVÁ (commenced in 2012), as well as being part of the European Union funded effort FUTUREVOLC (2012-2016) on establishing an Icelandic volcano supersite. The supersite concept implies integration of space and ground based observations for improved monitoring and evaluation of volcanic hazards, and open data policy. This work is a collaboration of the Icelandic Meteorological Office, the Institute of Earth Sciences at the University of Iceland, and the Civil Protection Department of the National Commissioner of the Iceland Police, with contributions from a large number of specialists in Iceland and elsewhere.

  14. Efficient construction of mock catalogs for baryon acoustic oscillation surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunayama, Tomomi; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Heitmann, Katrin; Habib, Salman; Rangel, Esteban

    2016-05-01

    Precision measurements of the large scale structure of the Universe require large numbers of high fidelity mock catalogs to accurately assess, and account for, the presence of systematic effects. We introduce and test a scheme for generating mock catalogs rapidly using suitably derated N-body simulations. Our aim is to reproduce the large scale structure and the gross properties of dark matter halos with high accuracy, while sacrificing the details of the halo's internal structure. By adjusting global and local time-steps in an N-body code, we demonstrate that we recover halo masses to better than 0.5% and the power spectrum to better than 1% both in real and redshift space for k=1hMpc-1, while requiring a factor of 4 less CPU time. We also calibrate the redshift spacing of outputs required to generate simulated light cones. We find that outputs separated by Δ z=0.05 allow us to interpolate particle positions and velocities to reproduce the real and redshift space power spectra to better than 1% (out to k=1hMpc-1). We apply these ideas to generate a suite of simulations spanning a range of cosmologies, motivated by the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) but broadly applicable to future large scale structure surveys including eBOSS and DESI. As an initial demonstration of the utility of such simulations, we calibrate the shift in the baryonic acoustic oscillation peak position as a function of galaxy bias with higher precision than has been possible so far. This paper also serves to document the simulations, which we make publicly available.

  15. Remnant radio galaxies in the LOFAR Lockman Hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brienza, Marisa; Godfrey, Leith; Morganti, Raffaella

    2016-08-01

    I will present recent 150-MHz deep observations performed with the Low-frequency Array (LOFAR) of the well-known extragalactic region of the Lockman Hole. Thanks to its high sensitivity and resolution this data allows us to perform new studies of the radio loud AGN population at low radio frequencies. In particular, we conducted a systematic search of remnant radio galaxies, which represent the final "dying" phase of the radio galaxy evolution, when the jets have switched off. This class of sources is best to investigate the life-cycle of radio loud AGN as well as to quantify the role of radio AGN feedback. Indeed, the modelling of their radio spectrum provides constraints on the time-scales of activity and quiescence of the radio source and on its energy output. For a long time there have been claims that deep low-frequency surveys would have enhanced the detection of this class of sources, which are usually rare in flux limited samples.With our search, we thus intend to provide good statistics on the detection and properties of remnant radio galaxies. To avoid selection biases towards any specific class of objects we used both morphological and spectral selection criteria. To do this we combined the LOFAR data with publicly available surveys at other frequencies as well as dedicated deep observations. We find that the fraction of candidate remnant sources is < 6-8% of the entire radio source population and is dominated by steep spectrum sources. To better understand the observed fraction we developed mock catalogues of the radio sky population based on radio galaxy evolution models. These models are used to constrain the main mechanisms contributing to the source luminosity evolution i.e. adiabatic expansion, radiative losses, as well as to make predictions on their fraction in flux limited samples.

  16. The PASTEL catalogue: 2016 version

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soubiran, Caroline; Le Campion, Jean-François; Brouillet, Nathalie; Chemin, Laurent

    2016-06-01

    The bibliographical compilation of stellar atmospheric parameters (Teff, log g, [Fe/H]) relying on high-resolution, high signal-to-noise spectroscopy started in the eighties with the so-called [Fe/H] catalogue, and was continued in 2010 with the PASTEL catalogue, which also includes determinations of Teff alone, based on various methods. Here we present an update of the PASTEL catalogue. The main journals and the CDS database have been surveyed to find relevant publications presenting new determinations of atmospheric parameters. As of February 2016, PASTEL includes 64 082 determinations of either Teff or (Teff, log g, [Fe/H]) for 31 401 stars, corresponding to 1142 bibliographical references. Some 11 197 stars have a determination of the three parameters (Teff, log g, [Fe/H]) with a high-quality spectroscopic metallicity. The PASTEL catalogue is available in electronic form at the CDS (http://vizier.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/VizieR?-source=B/pastel).

  17. Catalogue of Tephritidae of Colombia

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The present Catalogue includes 93 species and 23 genera of Tephritidae that have been recorded in Colombia. Four subfamilies (Blepharoneurinae, Dacinae, Trypetinae and Tephritinae), and eight tribes (Acrotaeniini, Carpomyini, Dacini, Eutretini, Myopitini, Noeetini, Tephritini, and Toxotrypanini) are...

  18. CMB-galaxy correlation in Unified Dark Matter scalar field cosmologies

    SciTech Connect

    Bertacca, Daniele; Bartolo, Nicola; Matarrese, Sabino; Raccanelli, Alvise; Piattella, Oliver F.; Pietrobon, Davide; Giannantonio, Tommaso E-mail: alvise.raccanelli@port.ac.uk E-mail: davide.pietrobon@jpl.nasa.gov E-mail: sabino.matarrese@pd.infn.it

    2011-03-01

    We present an analysis of the cross-correlation between the CMB and the large-scale structure (LSS) of the Universe in Unified Dark Matter (UDM) scalar field cosmologies. We work out the predicted cross-correlation function in UDM models, which depends on the speed of sound of the unified component, and compare it with observations from six galaxy catalogues (NVSS, HEAO, 2MASS, and SDSS main galaxies, luminous red galaxies, and quasars). We sample the value of the speed of sound and perform a likelihood analysis, finding that the UDM model is as likely as the ΛCDM, and is compatible with observations for a range of values of c{sub ∞} (the value of the sound speed at late times) on which structure formation depends. In particular, we obtain an upper bound of c{sub ∞}{sup 2} ≤ 0.009 at 95% confidence level, meaning that the ΛCDM model, for which c{sub ∞}{sup 2} = 0, is a good fit to the data, while the posterior probability distribution peaks at the value c{sub ∞}{sup 2} = 10{sup −4} . Finally, we study the time dependence of the deviation from ΛCDM via a tomographic analysis using a mock redshift distribution and we find that the largest deviation is for low-redshift sources, suggesting that future low-z surveys will be best suited to constrain UDM models.

  19. Characterizing the optical properties of galaxy clusters with GMPhoRCC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hood, R. J.; Mann, R. G.

    2017-08-01

    We introduce the Gaussian Mixture full Photometric Red sequence Cluster Characteriser (GMPhoRCC), an algorithm for determining the redshift and richness of a galaxy cluster candidate. By using data from a multiband sky survey with photometric redshifts, a red sequence colour-magnitude relation (CMR) is isolated and modelled and used to characterize the optical properties of the candidate. GMPhoRCC provides significant advantages over existing methods, including treatment of multimodal distributions, variable width full CMR red sequence, richness extrapolation and quality control in order to algorithmically identify catastrophic failures. We present redshift comparisons for clusters from the GMBCG, NORAS, REFLEX and XMM Cluster Survey catalogues, where the GMPhoRCC estimates are in excellent agreement with spectra, showing accurate, unbiased results with low scatter (σδz/(1+z) ˜ 0.017). We conclude with the evaluation of GMPhoRCC performance using empirical Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) like mock galaxy clusters. GMPhoRCC is shown to produce highly pure characterizations with very low probabilities (<1 per cent) of spurious, clean characterizations. In addition, GMPhoRCC is shown to demonstrate high rates of completeness with respect to recovering redshift, richness and correctly identifying the brightest cluster galaxy (BCG).

  20. Mock-ups as "interactive laboratories": mixed methods research using inpatient unit room mock-ups.

    PubMed

    Watkins, Nicholas; Myers, Donald; Villasante, Ronald

    2008-01-01

    To establish evidence-based design (EBD) guidelines for inpatient rooms at Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) facilities. Simulation allows clients, designers, and researchers to visualize how users might interact with a proposed design before actual construction of the design. This study used mock-ups as a simulation technique during a study of the VA inpatient room standards. The participants used the inpatient room mock-ups as "interactive laboratory" environments to maximize opportunities for participatory design, qualitative research, and quantitative research of project-specific EBD solutions. The research used questionnaires, scenarios, on-demand modifications, and observations to evaluate and confirm EBD solutions for inpatient room mock-ups. A total of 71 participants responded to a questionnaire administered across five mock-up work sessions. These 71 participants consisted of administrators, nurses, physicians, support staff, environment and maintenance staff, and patient and staff safety representatives from throughout the VA healthcare system. EBD solutions were tested, evaluated, and modified for each inpatient room type and were applicable to two or more of the inpatient room types. The latter included the location of patient beds and standard headwall position, technology and spaces for nurse charting activities, clearances (e.g., equipment, wheelchair, and bariatric patient), universal rooms, and patient and family amenities. Also, EBD solutions were tested, validated, and modified to the needs of each inpatient room. The mock-ups allowed researchers and designers to evaluate and confirm EBD solutions and strategies for the development of VA inpatient room standards. When used as a means for mixed-methods research, mock-ups can successfully integrate research and design during project-related work. EBD research using mock-ups not only addresses project- or organization-specific concerns, but it may contribute to the knowledge base of the

  1. Catalogue of Texas spiders

    PubMed Central

    Dean, David Allen

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This catalogue lists 1,084 species of spiders (three identified to genus only) in 311 genera from 53 families currently recorded from Texas and is based on the “Bibliography of Texas Spiders” published by Bea Vogel in 1970. The online list of species can be found at http://pecanspiders.tamu.edu/spidersoftexas.htm. Many taxonomic revisions have since been published, particularly in the families Araneidae, Gnaphosidae and Leptonetidae. Many genera in other families have been revised. The Anyphaenidae, Ctenidae, Hahniidae, Nesticidae, Sicariidae and Tetragnathidae were also revised. Several families have been added and others split up. Several genera of Corinnidae were transferred to Phrurolithidae and Trachelidae. Two genera from Miturgidae were transferred to Eutichuridae. Zoridae was synonymized under Miturgidae. A single species formerly in Amaurobiidae is now in the Family Amphinectidae. Some trapdoor spiders in the family Ctenizidae have been transferred to Euctenizidae. Gertsch and Mulaik started a list of Texas spiders in 1940. In a letter from Willis J. Gertsch dated October 20, 1982, he stated “Years ago a first listing of the Texas fauna was published by me based largely on Stanley Mulaik material, but it had to be abandoned because of other tasks.” This paper is a compendium of the spiders of Texas with distribution, habitat, collecting method and other data available from revisions and collections. This includes many records and unpublished data (including data from three unpublished studies). One of these studies included 16,000 adult spiders belonging to 177 species in 29 families. All specimens in that study were measured and results are in the appendix. Hidalgo County has 340 species recorded with Brazos County at 323 and Travis County at 314 species. These reflect the amount of collecting in the area. PMID:27103878

  2. Machine learning etudes in astrophysics: selection functions for mock cluster catalogs

    SciTech Connect

    Hajian, Amir; Alvarez, Marcelo A.; Bond, J. Richard E-mail: malvarez@cita.utoronto.ca

    2015-01-01

    Making mock simulated catalogs is an important component of astrophysical data analysis. Selection criteria for observed astronomical objects are often too complicated to be derived from first principles. However the existence of an observed group of objects is a well-suited problem for machine learning classification. In this paper we use one-class classifiers to learn the properties of an observed catalog of clusters of galaxies from ROSAT and to pick clusters from mock simulations that resemble the observed ROSAT catalog. We show how this method can be used to study the cross-correlations of thermal Sunya'ev-Zeldovich signals with number density maps of X-ray selected cluster catalogs. The method reduces the bias due to hand-tuning the selection function and is readily scalable to large catalogs with a high-dimensional space of astrophysical features.

  3. Construction of luminosity function for galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godłowski, Włodzimierz; Popiela, Joanna; Bajan, Katarzyna; Biernacka, Monika; Flin, Piotr; Panko, Elena

    2015-02-01

    The luminosity function is an important quantity for analysis of large scale structure statistics, interpretation of galaxy counts (Lin & Kirshner 1996). We investigate the luminosity function of galaxy clusters. This is performed by counting the brightness of galaxies belonging to clusters in PF Catalogue. The obtained luminosity function is significantly different than that obtained both for optical and radiogalaxies (Machalski & Godowski 2000). The implications of this result for theories of galaxy formation are discussed as well.

  4. Extended distribution functions for our Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, Jason L.; Binney, James

    2015-06-01

    We extend models of our Galaxy based on distribution functions that are analytic functions of the action integrals to extended distribution functions (EDFs), which have an analytic dependence on metallicity as well. We use a simple, but physically motivated, functional forms for the metallicity of the interstellar medium as a function of radius and time and for the star formation rate, and a model for the diffusion of stars through phase space to suggest the required functional form of an EDF. We introduce a simple prescription for radial migration that preserves the overall profile of the disc while allowing individual stars to migrate throughout the disc. Our models explicitly consider the thin and thick discs as two distinct components separated in age. We show how an EDF can be used to incorporate realistic selection functions in models, and to construct mock catalogues of observed samples. We show that the selection function of the Geneva-Copenhagen Survey (GCS) biases in favour of young stars, which have atypically small random velocities. With the selection function taken into account our models produce good fits of the GCS data in chemo-dynamical space and the Gilmore & Reid (1983) density data. From our EDF, we predict the structure of the Sloan Extension for Galactic Understanding and Exploration G-dwarf sample. The kinematics are successfully predicted. The predicted metallicity distribution has too few stars with [Fe/H] ≃ -0.5 dex and too many metal-rich stars. A significant problem may be the lack of any chemical-kinematic correlations in our thick disc. We argue that EDFs will prove essential tools for the analysis of both observational data and sophisticated models of Galaxy formation and evolution.

  5. An accurate tool for the fast generation of dark matter halo catalogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monaco, P.; Sefusatti, E.; Borgani, S.; Crocce, M.; Fosalba, P.; Sheth, R. K.; Theuns, T.

    2013-08-01

    We present a new parallel implementation of the PINpointing Orbit Crossing-Collapsed HIerarchical Objects (PINOCCHIO) algorithm, a quick tool, based on Lagrangian Perturbation Theory, for the hierarchical build-up of dark matter (DM) haloes in cosmological volumes. To assess its ability to predict halo correlations on large scales, we compare its results with those of an N-body simulation of a 3 h-1 Gpc box sampled with 20483 particles taken from the MICE suite, matching the same seeds for the initial conditions. Thanks to the Fastest Fourier Transforms in the West (FFTW) libraries and to the relatively simple design, the code shows very good scaling properties. The CPU time required by PINOCCHIO is a tiny fraction (˜1/2000) of that required by the MICE simulation. Varying some of PINOCCHIO numerical parameters allows one to produce a universal mass function that lies in the range allowed by published fits, although it underestimates the MICE mass function of Friends-of-Friends (FoF) haloes in the high-mass tail. We compare the matter-halo and the halo-halo power spectra with those of the MICE simulation and find that these two-point statistics are well recovered on large scales. In particular, when catalogues are matched in number density, agreement within 10 per cent is achieved for the halo power spectrum. At scales k > 0.1 h Mpc-1, the inaccuracy of the Zel'dovich approximation in locating halo positions causes an underestimate of the power spectrum that can be modelled as a Gaussian factor with a damping scale of d = 3 h-1 Mpc at z = 0, decreasing at higher redshift. Finally, a remarkable match is obtained for the reduced halo bispectrum, showing a good description of non-linear halo bias. Our results demonstrate the potential of PINOCCHIO as an accurate and flexible tool for generating large ensembles of mock galaxy surveys, with interesting applications for the analysis of large galaxy redshift surveys.

  6. Comparison of the VIMOS-VLT Deep Survey with the Munich semi-analytical model. I. Magnitude counts, redshift distribution, colour bimodality, and galaxy clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Torre, S.; Meneux, B.; De Lucia, G.; Blaizot, J.; Le Fèvre, O.; Garilli, B.; Cucciati, O.; Mellier, Y.; Pollo, A.; Abbas, U.; Bottini, D.; Le Brun, V.; Maccagni, D.; Scodeggio, M.; Tresse, L.; Vettolani, G.; Zanichelli, A.; Adami, C.; Arnouts, S.; Bardelli, S.; Bolzonella, M.; Cappi, A.; Charlot, S.; Ciliegi, P.; Contini, T.; Foucaud, S.; Franzetti, P.; Gavignaud, I.; Guzzo, L.; Ilbert, O.; Iovino, A.; McCracken, H. J.; Marinoni, C.; Mazure, A.; Merighi, R.; Paltani, S.; Pelló, R.; Pozzetti, L.; Vergani, D.; Zamorani, G.; Zucca, E.

    2011-01-01

    Aims: This paper presents a detailed comparison between high-redshift observations from the VIMOS-VLT Deep Survey (VVDS) and predictions from the Munich semi-analytical model of galaxy formation. In particular, we focus this analysis on the magnitude, redshift, and colour distributions of galaxies, as well as their clustering properties. Methods: We constructed 100 quasi-independent mock catalogues, using the output of the semi-analytical model presented in De Lucia & Blaizot (2007, MNRAS, 375, 2). We then applied the same observational selection function of the VVDS-Deep survey, so as to carry out a fair comparison between models and observations. Results: We find that the semi-analytical model reproduces well the magnitude counts in the optical bands. It tends, however, to overpredict the abundance of faint red galaxies, in particular in the i' and z' bands. Model galaxies exhibit a colour bimodality that is only in qualitative agreement with the data. In particular, we find that the model tends to overpredict the number of red galaxies at low redshift and of blue galaxies at all redshifts probed by VVDS-Deep observations, although a large fraction of the bluest observed galaxies is absent from the model. In addition, the model overpredicts by about 14 per cent the number of galaxies observed at 0.2 < z < 1 with IAB < 24. When comparing the galaxy clustering properties, we find that model galaxies are more strongly clustered than observed ones at all redshift from z = 0.2 to z = 2, with the difference being less significant above z ≃ 1. When splitting the samples into red and blue galaxies, we find that the observed clustering of blue galaxies is well reproduced by the model, while red model galaxies are much more clustered than observed ones, being principally responsible for the strong global clustering found in the model. Conclusions: Our results show that the discrepancies between Munich semi-analytical model predictions and VVDS-Deep observations

  7. VizieR Online Data Catalog: PMA Catalogue (Akhmetov+, 2017)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhmetov, V. S.; Fedorov, P. N.; Velichko, A. B.; Shulga, V. M.

    2017-06-01

    The idea for creating the catalogue is very simple. The PMA catalogue has been derived from a combination of two catalogues, namely 2MASS and Gaia DR1. The difference of epochs of observations for these catalogues is approximately 15 yr. The positions of objects in the Gaia DR1 catalogue are referred to the reference frame, which is consistent with ICRF to better than 0.1 mas for the J2015.0 epoch. The positions of objects in 2MASS are referred to HCRF, which, as was shown in Kovalevsky et al. (1997A&A...323..620K), is aligned with the ICRF to within ±0.6 mas at the epoch 1991.25 and is non-rotating with respect to distant extragalactic objects to within ±0.25mas/yr. By comparing the positions of the common objects contained in the catalogues, it is possible to determine their proper motions within their common range of stellar magnitudes by dividing differences of positions over the time interval between their observations. Formally, proper motions derived in such a way are given in the ICRF system, because the positions of both Gaia DR1 stars and those of 2MASS objects (through Hipparcos/Tycho-2 stars) are given in the ICRF and cover the whole sphere without gaps. We designate them further in this paper as relative, with the aim of discriminating them from absolute ones, which refer to the reference frame defined by the positions of about 1.6 million galaxies from Gaia DR1. After elimination of the systematic errors, the root-mean-squared deviation of the coordinate differences of extended sources is about 200mas, and the mean number of galaxies inside each pixel is about 1300, so we expect the error of the absolute calibration to be 0.35mas/yr. We compared the proper motions of common objects from PMA and from the TGAS and UCAC4 catalogues. Knowing the mean-square errors of (PMA-TGAS) and (PMA-UCAC4) proper motion differences in each pixel, the appropriate errors in PMA vary from 2 to 10mas/yr, depending on magnitude, which are consistent with the errors

  8. ATLASGAL - compact source catalogue: 330° < ℓ < 21°

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contreras, Y.; Schuller, F.; Urquhart, J. S.; Csengeri, T.; Wyrowski, F.; Beuther, H.; Bontemps, S.; Bronfman, L.; Henning, T.; Menten, K. M.; Schilke, P.; Walmsley, C. M.; Wienen, M.; Tackenberg, J.; Linz, H.

    2013-01-01

    Context. The APEX Telescope Large Area Survey of the GALaxy (ATLASGAL) is the first systematic survey of the inner Galactic plane in the sub-millimetre. The observations were carried out with the Large APEX Bolometer Camera (LABOCA), an array of 295 bolometers observing at 870 μm (345 GHz). Aims: Here we present a first version of the compact source catalogue extracted from this survey. This catalogue provides an unbiased database of dusty clumps in the inner Galaxy. Methods: The construction of this catalogue was made using the source extraction routine SExtractor. We have cross-associated the obtained sources with the IRAS and MSX catalogues, in order to constrain their nature. Results: We have detected 6639 compact sources in the range from 330 ≤ ℓ ≤ 21 degrees and |b| ≤ 1.5 degrees. The catalogue has a 99% completeness for sources with a peak flux above 6σ, which corresponds to a flux density of ~0.4 Jy beam-1. The parameters extracted for sources with peak fluxes below the 6σ completeness threshold should be used with caution. Tests on simulated data find the uncertainty in the flux measurement to be ~12%, however, in more complex regions the flux values can be overestimated by a factor of 2 due to the additional background emission. Using a search radius of 30'' we found that 40% of ATLASGAL compact sources are associated with an IRAS or MSX point source, but, ~50% are found to be associated with MSX 21 μm fluxes above the local background level, which is probably a lower limit to the actual number of sources associated with star formation. Conclusions: Although infrared emission is found towards the majority of the clumps detected, this catalogue is still likely to include a significant number of clumps that are devoid of star formation activity and therefore excellent candidates for objects in the coldest, earliest stages of (high-mass) star formation. The full catalogue and the calibrated emission maps are only available at the CDS via

  9. Analysis of the star formation histories of galaxies in different environments: from low to high density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega-Minakata, René A.

    2015-11-01

    In this thesis, a value-added cataloge of 403,372 SDSS-DR7 galaxies is presented. This catalogue incorporates information on their stellar populations, including their star formation histories, their dominant emission-line activity type, inferred morphology and a measurement of their environmental density. The sample that formed this catalogue was selected from the SDSS-DR7 (Legacy) spectroscopic catalogue of galaxies in the Northern Galactic Cap, selecting only galaxies with high-quality spectra and redshift determination, and photometric measurements with small errors. Also, galaxies near the edge of the photometric survey footprint were excluded to avoid errors in the determination of their environment. Only galaxies in the 0.03-0.30 redshift range were considered. Starlight fits of the spectra of these galaxies were used to obtain information on their star formation history and stellar mass, velocity dispersion and mean age. From the fit residuals, emission-line fluxes were measured and used to obtain the dominant activity type of these galaxies using the BPT diagnostic diagram. A neighbour search code was written and applied to the catalogue to measure the local environmental density of these galaxies. This code counts the number of neighbours within a fixed search radius and a radial velocity range centered at each galaxy's radial velocity. A projected radius of 1.5 Mpc and a range of ± 2,500 km/s, both centered at the redshift of the target galaxy, were used to search and count all the neighbours of each galaxy in the catalogue. The neighbours were counted from the photometric catalogue of the SDSS-DR7 using photometric redshifts, to avoid incompleteness of the spectroscopic catalogue. The morphology of the galaxies in the catalogue was inferred by inverting previously found relations between subsamples of galaxies with visual morphology classification and their optical colours and concentration of light. The galaxies in the catalogue were matched to six

  10. The 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey: the clustering of galaxy groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padilla, Nelson D.; Baugh, Carlton M.; Eke, Vincent R.; Norberg, Peder; Cole, Shaun; Frenk, Carlos S.; Croton, Darren J.; Baldry, Ivan K.; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Bridges, Terry; Cannon, Russell; Colless, Matthew; Collins, Chris; Couch, Warrick; Dalton, Gavin; De Propris, Roberto; Driver, Simon P.; Efstathiou, George; Ellis, Richard S.; Glazebrook, Karl; Jackson, Carole; Lahav, Ofer; Lewis, Ian; Lumsden, Stuart; Maddox, Steve; Madgwick, Darren; Peacock, John A.; Peterson, Bruce A.; Sutherland, Will; Taylor, Keith

    2004-07-01

    We measure the clustering of galaxy groups in the 2dFGRS Percolation-Inferred Galaxy Group (2PIGG) catalogue. The 2PIGG sample has 28 877 groups with at least two members. The clustering amplitude of the full 2PIGG catalogue is weaker than that of 2dFGRS galaxies, in agreement with theoretical predictions. We have subdivided the 2PIGG catalogue into samples that span a factor of ~ 25 in median total luminosity. Our correlation function measurements span an unprecedented range of clustering strengths, connecting the regimes probed by groups fainter than L* galaxies and rich clusters. There is a steady increase in clustering strength with group luminosity; the most luminous groups are 10 times more strongly clustered than the full 2PIGG catalogue. We demonstrate that the 2PIGG results are in very good agreement with the clustering of groups expected in the ΛCDM model.

  11. Planck 2013 results. The Planck Catalogue of Compact Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Caniego, M.

    2015-05-01

    The Planck Catalogue of Compact Sources (PCCS) is the catalogue of sources detected in the Planck Nominal mission corresponding to 15 months of data. It consists of nine single-frequency catalogues of Galactic and extragalactic compact sources detected over the entire sky. The PCCS covers the frequency range 30--857 GHz with higher sensitivity and better angular resolution than previous all-sky surveys in the microwave band. The flux density at the 90% completeness level at 143 and 217 GHz, the most sensitive channels, are 190 and 180 mJy. The Planck beams are very different and has a big impact in the detection of compact sources. The resolution of the Planck beams range from 32.38 to 4.33 arcmin at 30 and 857 GHz, respectively. The number of detections change very much with frequency, ranging from ˜1,250 detections at 30 GHz up to ˜24,000 857 GHz, respectively. By construction its reliability is >80 %, and more than 65 % of the sources have been detected at least in two contiguous Planck channels. Many of the Planck PCCS sources can be associated with stars with dust shells, stellar cores, radio galaxies, blazars, infrared luminous galaxies and Galactic interstellar medium features. Here we summarize the construction and validation of the PCCS, its contents and its statistical characterization.

  12. Search for New Open Clusters in Huge Catalogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolotukhin, I.; Koposov, S.; Glushkova, E.

    2006-07-01

    Current catalogues (lists indeed) of open clusters are simply heterogeneous and incomplete compilations. No attempts to search for open clusters through huge photometric catalogues using an homogeneous approach have been done so far. We have developed a method based on the analysis of star densities. Our algorithm finds star density peaks and then builds the color-magnitude diagram. We exploit the fact that only stars lying on the isochrone show a density peak whereas field stars show a flat distribution. An automatic procedure eliminates occasional density peaks and obtains the isochrone and the geometrical parameters of the survived candidates (coordinates, size, distance, age and color excess). A preliminary study of 150 sq. degrees in the Galaxy Anticentre region yielded 10 new clusters. The system will allow us to build, for the first time, an homogeneous catalogue of open clusters on an all-sky basis. Although we have started with 2MASS data, it will be possible to apply the automated pipeline on any multicolor catalogue provided that a VO-compliant way of access (e.g. ADQL + SkyNode) is implemented (SDSS, etc.).

  13. A catalogue of quasars and active nuclei: 11th edition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Véron-Cetty, M.-P.; Véron, P.

    2003-12-01

    The recent release of the final installement of the 2dF quasar catalogue and of the first part of the Sloan catalogue, almost doubling the number of known QSOs, led us to prepare an updated version of our Catalogue of quasars and active nuclei which now contains 48 921 quasars, 876 BL Lac objects and 15 069 active galaxies (including 11 777 Seyfert 1s). Like the tenth edition, it includes position and redshift as well as photometry (U, B, V) and 6 and 11 cm flux densities when available. We also give a list of all known lensed and double quasars. The catalogue (Table_QSO, Table_BL, Table_AGN and Table_reject) and the list of references are only available in electronic form at the CDS via anomymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/412/399 or at the Observatoire de Haute Provence (http://www.obs-hp.fr/).

  14. The real-space clustering of luminous red galaxies around z < 0.6 quasars in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padmanabhan, Nikhil; White, Martin; Norberg, Peder; Porciani, Cristiano

    2009-08-01

    We measure the clustering of a sample of photometrically selected luminous red galaxies (LRGs) around a low-redshift (0.2 < z < 0.6) sample of quasars selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 5. We make use of a new statistical estimator to obtain precise measurements of the LRG autocorrelations and constrain halo occupation distributions for them. These are used to generate mock catalogues which aid in interpreting our quasar-LRG cross-correlation measurements. The cross-correlation is well described by a power law with slope 1.8 +/- 0.1 and r0 = 6 +/- 0.5h-1Mpc, consistent with observed galaxy correlation functions. We find no evidence for `excess' clustering on 0.1Mpc scales and demonstrate that this is consistent with the results of Serber et al. and Strand, Brunner and Myers, when one accounts for several subtleties in the interpretation of their measurements. Combining the quasar-LRG cross-correlation with the LRG autocorrelations, we determine a large-scale quasar bias bQSO = 1.09 +/- 0.15 at a median redshift of 0.43, with no observed redshift or luminosity evolution. This corresponds to a mean halo mass ~ 1012h-1Msolar, Eddington ratios from 0.01 to 1 and lifetimes less than 107yr. Using simple models of halo occupation, these correspond to a number density of quasar hosts greater than 10-3 h3Mpc-3 and stellar masses less than 1011 h-1Msolar. The small-scale clustering signal can be interpreted with the aid of our mock LRG catalogues, and depends on the manner in which quasars inhabit haloes. We find that our small-scale measurements are inconsistent with quasar positions being randomly subsampled from halo centres above a mass threshold, requiring a satellite fraction >25 per cent.

  15. Using Galaxy Winds to Constrain Galaxy Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Churchill, Christopher W.; Klypin, A.; Ceverino, D.; Kacprzak, G.; Klimek, E.

    2010-01-01

    Analysis of mock quasar spectra of metal absorption lines in the proximity of formed galaxies in cosmological simulation is a highly promising for understanding the role of galaxies in IGM physics, or IGM physics in the role of galaxy formation in context of the cosmic web. Such analysis using neutral hydrogen in the cosmic web has literally revolutionized our understanding of the Lyman alpha forest. We are undertaking a wholesale approach to use powerful Lambda-CDM simulations to interpret absorption line data from redshift 1-3 starbursting galaxies e.g. Lyman break galaxies, etc) The data with which direct quantitative comparison is made are from the DEEP survey (Weiner et al.) and the collective work of Steidel et al. and collaborators. The simulations are performed using the Eulerian Gasdynamics plus N-body Adaptive Refinement Tree (ART) code, which has gas cell resolutions of 20-50 pc. Physical processes implemented in the code include realistic radiative cooling, star formation, metal enrichment and thermal feedback due to type II and type Ia supernovae. We quantitatively compare the spatial and kinematic distribution of HI, MgII, CIV, and OVI of absorption lines over a range of impact parameters for various simulated galaxies as a function of redshift, and discuss key insights for interpreting the underlying temperature, density, and ionization structure of the halo/cosmic-web interface, and the influence of galaxies on its chemical enrichment.

  16. The many lives of active galactic nuclei-II: The formation and evolution of radio jets and their impact on galaxy evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raouf, Mojtaba; Shabala, Stanislav S.; Croton, Darren J.; Khosroshahi, Habib G.; Bernyk, Maksym

    2017-10-01

    We describe new efforts to model radio active galactic nuclei (AGN) in a cosmological context using the Semi-Analytic Galaxy Evolution (SAGE) semi-analytic galaxy model. Our new method tracks the physical properties of radio jets in massive galaxies including the evolution of radio lobes and their impact on the surrounding gas. This model also self consistently follows the gas cooling-heating cycle that significantly shapes star formation and the life and death of many galaxy types. Adding jet physics to SAGE adds new physical properties to the model output, which in turn allows us to make more detailed predictions for the radio AGN population. After calibrating the model to a set of core observations we analyse predictions for jet power, radio cocoon size, radio luminosity and stellar mass. We find that the model is able to match the stellar mass-radio luminosity relation at z ∼ 0 and the radio luminosity function out to z ∼ 1. This updated model will make possible the construction of customised AGN-focused mock survey catalogues to be used for large-scale observing programs.

  17. Ramanujan’s mock theta functions

    PubMed Central

    Griffin, Michael; Ono, Ken; Rolen, Larry

    2013-01-01

    In his famous deathbed letter, Ramanujan introduced the notion of a mock theta function, and he offered some alleged examples. Recent work by Zwegers [Zwegers S (2001) Contemp Math 291:268–277 and Zwegers S (2002) PhD thesis (Univ of Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands)] has elucidated the theory encompassing these examples. They are holomorphic parts of special harmonic weak Maass forms. Despite this understanding, little attention has been given to Ramanujan’s original definition. Here, we prove that Ramanujan’s examples do indeed satisfy his original definition. PMID:23536292

  18. Sunset science. I. The mock mirage.

    PubMed

    Young, A T; Kattawar, G W; Parviainen, P

    1997-04-20

    A previously unrecognized phenomenon, which we call the mock mirage, produces inverted images of the Sun and Moon near the horizon when the observer looks downward through a thermal inversion. No ducting is involved; the rays can be concave toward the Earth throughout their length, with a radius of curvature larger than the radius of the Earth. Quite mild inversions produce surprisingly large effects, which increase with the height of the observer. Although the phenomenon has frequently been photographed, published pictures have been misinterpreted. Finally, we distinguish between features that are due to waves on inversion layers and the larger features that are due to the inversions themselves.

  19. New Catalogue of Moroccan meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibhi, Abderrahmane

    2016-01-01

    Prof. Abderrahmane Ibhi has documented the meteorite collection of Ibn Zohr exhibited at the “Musée Universitaire de météorites” in his new “Catalogue de Météorites” (Catalogue of meteorites). This museum is the first with exposure over entire Africa and the Arab world. Each piece of the collection is precisely identified with its name, location, GPS coordinates, its classification, its weight and the number of fragments, including a detailed photograph prepared at the University Ibn Zohr.

  20. The clustering of galaxies in the completed SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: combining correlated Gaussian posterior distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez, Ariel G.; Grieb, Jan Niklas; Salazar-Albornoz, Salvador; Alam, Shadab; Beutler, Florian; Ross, Ashley J.; Brownstein, Joel R.; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Cuesta, Antonio J.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Percival, Will J.; Prada, Francisco; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio; Seo, Hee-Jong; Tinker, Jeremy; Tojeiro, Rita; Vargas-Magaña, Mariana; Vazquez, Jose A.; Zhao, Gong-Bo

    2017-01-01

    The cosmological information contained in anisotropic galaxy clustering measurements can often be compressed into a small number of parameters whose posterior distribution is well described by a Gaussian. We present a general methodology to combine these estimates into a single set of consensus constraints that encode the total information of the individual measurements, taking into account the full covariance between the different methods. We illustrate this technique by applying it to combine the results obtained from different clustering analyses, including measurements of the signature of baryon acoustic oscillations and redshift-space distortions, based on a set of mock catalogues of the final SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). Our results show that the region of the parameter space allowed by the consensus constraints is smaller than that of the individual methods, highlighting the importance of performing multiple analyses on galaxy surveys even when the measurements are highly correlated. This paper is part of a set that analyses the final galaxy clustering data set from BOSS. The methodology presented here is used in Alam et al. to produce the final cosmological constraints from BOSS.

  1. The clustering of galaxies in the completed SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: combining correlated Gaussian posterior distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Sánchez, Ariel G.; Grieb, Jan Niklas; Salazar-Albornoz, Salvador; Alam, Shadab; Beutler, Florian; Ross, Ashley J.; Brownstein, Joel R.; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Cuesta, Antonio J.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Percival, Will J.; Prada, Francisco; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio; Seo, Hee-Jong; Tinker, Jeremy; Tojeiro, Rita; Vargas-Magaña, Mariana; Vazquez, Jose A.; Zhao, Gong-Bo

    2016-09-30

    The cosmological information contained in anisotropic galaxy clustering measurements can often be compressed into a small number of parameters whose posterior distribution is well described by a Gaussian. Here, we present a general methodology to combine these estimates into a single set of consensus constraints that encode the total information of the individual measurements, taking into account the full covariance between the different methods. We also illustrate this technique by applying it to combine the results obtained from different clustering analyses, including measurements of the signature of baryon acoustic oscillations and redshift-space distortions, based on a set of mock catalogues of the final SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). Our results show that the region of the parameter space allowed by the consensus constraints is smaller than that of the individual methods, highlighting the importance of performing multiple analyses on galaxy surveys even when the measurements are highly correlated. Our paper is part of a set that analyses the final galaxy clustering data set from BOSS. The methodology presented here is used in Alam et al. to produce the final cosmological constraints from BOSS.

  2. The clustering of galaxies in the completed SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: combining correlated Gaussian posterior distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Sánchez, Ariel G.; Grieb, Jan Niklas; Salazar-Albornoz, Salvador; Alam, Shadab; Beutler, Florian; Ross, Ashley J.; Brownstein, Joel R.; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Cuesta, Antonio J.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Percival, Will J.; Prada, Francisco; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio; Seo, Hee-Jong; Tinker, Jeremy; Tojeiro, Rita; Vargas-Magaña, Mariana; Vazquez, Jose A.; Zhao, Gong-Bo

    2016-09-30

    The cosmological information contained in anisotropic galaxy clustering measurements can often be compressed into a small number of parameters whose posterior distribution is well described by a Gaussian. Here, we present a general methodology to combine these estimates into a single set of consensus constraints that encode the total information of the individual measurements, taking into account the full covariance between the different methods. We also illustrate this technique by applying it to combine the results obtained from different clustering analyses, including measurements of the signature of baryon acoustic oscillations and redshift-space distortions, based on a set of mock catalogues of the final SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). Our results show that the region of the parameter space allowed by the consensus constraints is smaller than that of the individual methods, highlighting the importance of performing multiple analyses on galaxy surveys even when the measurements are highly correlated. Our paper is part of a set that analyses the final galaxy clustering data set from BOSS. The methodology presented here is used in Alam et al. to produce the final cosmological constraints from BOSS.

  3. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Enhanced 3XMM catalogue (3XMMe) (Rosen+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosen, S.

    2016-04-01

    The construction of the enhanced 3XMM catalogue involves 3 main elements: 1. The cleaning (ejection) of detections that are considered to be of lower scientific reliability or quality. 2. Application of criteria to identify detections that are considered potential candidates for the 3 main science themes (i.e. active galactic nuclei (AGN), clusters of galaxies and the galactic plane) of the Arches project. The constituent detections of unique sources on the sky are examined to decide which unique sources, overall, meet the criteria to be assigned to each science theme. 3. Addition of other information that augments the scientific value of the catalogue. The primary publicly released version of the catalogue is based on unique sources rather than separate detections. However, a detection-based catalogue is available. (2 data files).

  4. Catalogue of Australian Cynipoidea (Hymenoptera)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A catalogue of all families, subfamilies, genera, and species of Cynipoidea present in Australia is presented here. The Australian cynipoid fauna is very poorly known, with 37 genera cited: one each for Austrocynipidae, Ibaliidae, Liopteridae, two for Cynipidae, and 32 for Figitidae. The first Austr...

  5. Catalogue of representative meteor spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vojáček, V.; Borovička, J.; Koten, P.; Spurný, P.; Štork, R.

    2016-01-01

    We present a library of low-resolution meteor spectra that includes sporadic meteors, members of minor meteor showers, and major meteor showers. These meteors are in the magnitude range from +2 to -3, corresponding to meteoroid sizes from 1 mm to10 mm. This catalogue is available online at the CDS for those interested in video meteor spectra.

  6. The 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey: Preliminary Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maddox, Steve; 2DF Galaxy Redshift Survey Team; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Cannon, Russell; Cole, Shaun; Colless, Matthew; Collins, Chris; Couch, Warrick; Dalton, Gavin; Driver, Simon; Ellis, Richard; Efstathiou, George; Folkes, Simon; Frenk, Carlos; Glazebrook, Karl; Kaiser, Nick; Lahav, Ofer; Lumsden, Stuart; Peterson, Bruce; Peacock, John; Sutherland, Will; Taylor, Keith

    Spectroscopic observations for a new survey of 250 000 galaxy redshifts are underway, using the 2dF instrument at the AAT. The input galaxy catalogue and commissioning data are described. The first result from the preliminary data is a new estimate of the galaxy luminosity function at = 0.1.

  7. Induced Nuclear Activity in Galaxy Pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-Ibarra, F. J.; Dultzin, D.; Krongold, Y.; Del Olmo, A.; Perea, J.

    2011-10-01

    We analized the nuclear spectra of 893 galaxies in isolated pairs from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (DR7). These pairs can be divided into three groups: S+S, E+E, E+S according to the catalogue of isolated galaxy pairs (KPG) by Karachentsev. We also analyzed two samples of isolated galaxies: the catalogue of Isolated Galaxies by Karachentseva (CIG) and Varela's sample of northern isolated galaxies. We studied the incidence of Nuclear Activity in every group. Our results show that the incidence of AGN activity is significantly higher in most galaxies in pairs as compared to isolated. Most importantly, we show that this is stronger for earlier morphological types. The presence of a bulb appears to be crucial in explaining the feeding of super massive black holes in AGN. We also confirm that Seyfert type 1 nuclei are almost absent. This result cannot be explained with the unified model for Seyferts only.

  8. Observing and Cataloguing Nebulae and Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinicke, Wolfgang

    2017-03-01

    Preface; 1. Introduction; 2. William Herschel's observations and parallel activities; 3. John Herschel's Slough observations; 4. Discoveries made in parallel with John Herschel's Slough; 5. John Herschel at the Cape of Good Hope; 6. The time after Herschel's observations till Auwers' list of new nebulae; 7. Compiling the General Catalogue; 8. Dreyer's first catalogue: the supplement to Herschel's General Catalogue; 9. Compilation of the New General Catalogue 356; 10. The New General Catalogue: publication, analysis and effects; 11. Special topics; 12. Summary; Appendices; Index.

  9. Tickling, Punching, and Poking: Mock Aggressive Behavior in College Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ballard, Mary E.; Green, Shavonda

    Several hypotheses have been generated about the functions of mock aggression, including its association with dominance. This paper describes a study that expanded this line of research by interviewing college students about a broad array of mock aggressive behaviors and their contexts, targets, benefits, and functions. The hypotheses were that:…

  10. The SPM Kinematic Catalogue of Planetary Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López, J. A.; Richer, M.; Riesgo, H.; Steffen, W.; Meaburn, J.; García-Segura, G.; Escalante, K.

    2006-06-01

    We present a progress report on the San Pedro Mártir Kinematic Catalogue of Planetary Nebulae. Both, galactic PNe from the disk, bulge and halo populations, and PNe from galaxies in the local group from a diverse range of metallicities have been observed. Most of the observations have been made with the 2.1-m SPM telescope and the Manchester Echelle Spectrometer (Meaburn et al. 2003, RevMexAA, 39, 185). The data consists of spatially resoved long slit spectra at resolutions of ˜ 10 km s^{-1}. For most galactic targets more than one slit positions has been observed. The interpretation of the 3D structures and outflows derived from the kinematic data is being performed with the aid of SHAPE (see the contributions by Steffen, López, & Escalante, Steffen & López in this symposium). This unique database of high dispersion spectra will allow a firm characterisation of nebular shell properties in relation to progenitors from diverse stellar populations.

  11. A catalogue of quasars and active nuclei: 10th edition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Véron-Cetty, M.-P.; Véron, P.

    2001-07-01

    The recent publication of the first release of the 2dF quasar catalogue (Croom et al. \\cite{croom}) containing nearly 10 000 new QSOs, almost doubling the number of known such objects, led us to prepare an updated version of our catalogue of quasars and active nuclei which now contains 23 760 quasars, 608 BL Lac objects and 5751 active galaxies (of which 2765 are Seyfert 1s). Like the ninth edition, it includes position and redshift as well as photometry (U, B, V) and 6 and 11 cm flux densities when available. We also give a list of all known lensed and double quasars. The catalogue (Tables I to V) is only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/374/92 or at the Observatoire de Haute Provence http://www.obs-hp.fr).

  12. The Planck Compact Source Catalogues: present and future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Caniego, Marcos; Aff002

    The Planck Collaboration has produced catalogues of radio and sub-millimeter compact sources at the nine Planck frequencies in total intensity and polarization. In particular, the 2015 Second Planck Catalogue of Compact Sources (PCCS2) contains over 45.000 sources detected in the Planck full mission maps. Since the Planck instruments have polarization capabilities in seven of its nine detectors, we were able to measure the polarized flux density of over 600 sources between 30 and 353 GHz. But we are searching not only for compact sources in single frequency maps, and we take advantage of the large frequency coverage of Planck to search for objects with specific emission laws. This is the case of the SZ catalogue of cluster of galaxies (PSZ2), that lists 1653 clusters, 1203 of which are confirmed clusters with clear associations in external data-sets, and the Galactic cold clump catalogue (PGCC) with 13188 objects. The Planck Collaboration has also published a list of high-redshift source candidates (see the report by Ludovic Montier here). These objects are rare bright sub-millimeter sources with an spectral energy distribution peaking between 353 and 857 GHz, and have been detected combining Planck and IRAS data. The colours of most of these objects are consistent with redshifts z>2, a fraction of which could be lensed objects with redshifts between 2 and 4. But new catalogues are foreseen. A multi-frequency compact source catalogue is being produced selecting sources at radio frequencies and studying them across all Planck bands. Multi-frequency catalogues can be difficult to produce in experiments like Planck that have a large frequency coverage and very different resolutions across bands. In some cases, a source can be very bright across the whole Planck frequency range and it is easy to do the associations across channels. However, it frequent to find unrelated sub-millimeter sources within the half-degree beam of the 30 GHz low frequency detector, and the

  13. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Imperial IRAS-FSC redshift catalogue (IIFSCz) (Wang+, 2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L.; Rowan-Robinson, M.

    2010-04-01

    We present a new catalogue, the Imperial IRAS-FSC Redshift Catalogue (IIFSCz), of 60303 galaxies selected at 60um from the IRAS Faint Source Catalogue (FSC). The IIFSCz consists of accurate position, optical, near-infrared and/or radio identifications, spectroscopic redshift (if available) or photometric redshift (if possible), predicted far-infrared (FIR) and submillimetre (submm) fluxes ranging from 12 to 1380um based upon the best-fitting infrared template. About 55% of the galaxies in the IIFSCz have spectroscopic redshifts, and a further 20% have photometric redshifts obtained through either the training set or the template-fitting method. For S(60)>0.36Jy, the 90% completeness limit of the FSC, 90% of the sources have either spectroscopic or photometric redshifts. Scientific applications of the IIFSCz include validation of current and forthcoming infrared and submm/mm surveys such as AKARI, Planck and Herschel, follow-up studies of rare source populations, large-scale structure and galaxy bias, local multiwavelength luminosity functions and source counts. The catalogue is publicly available at http://astro.imperial.ac.uk/~mrr/fss/. (2 data files).

  14. The Planck Catalogue of High-z source candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montier, Ludovic

    2015-08-01

    The Planck satellite has provided the first FIR/submm all-sky survey with a sensitivity allowing us to identify the rarest, most luminous high-z dusty star-forming sources on the sky. It opens a new window on these extreme star-forming systems at redshift above 1.5, providing a powerful laboratory to study the mechanisms of galaxy evolution and enrichment in the frame of the large scale structure growth.I will describe how the Planck catalogue of high-z source candidates (PHz, Planck 2015 in prep.) has been built and charcaterized over 25% of the sky by selecting the brightest red submm sources at a 5' resolution. Follow-up observations with Herschel/SPIRE over 228 Planck candidates have shown that 93% of these candidates are actually overdensities of red sources with SEDs peaking at 350um (Planck Int. results. XXVII 2014). Complementarily to this population of objects, 12 Planck high-z candidates have been identified as strongly lensed star forming galaxies at redshift lying between 2.2 and 3.6 (Canameras et al 2015 subm.), with flux densities larger than 400 mJy up to 1 Jy at 350um, and strong magnification factors. These Planck lensed star-forming galaxies are the rarest brightest lensed in the submm range, providing a unique opportunity to extend the exploration of the star-forming system in this range of mass and redshift.I will detail further a specific analysis performed on a proto-cluster candidate, PHz G95.5-61.6, identified as a double structure at z=1.7 and z=2.03, using an extensive follow-up program (Flores-Cacho et al 2015 subm.). This is the first Planck proto-cluster candidate with spectroscopic confirmation, which opens a new field of statistical analysis about the evolution of dusty star-forming galaxies in such accreting structures.I will finally discuss how the PHz catalogue may help to answer some of the fundamental questions like: At what cosmic epoch did massive galaxy clusters form most of their stars? Is star formation more or less vigorous

  15. Galaxies with "rows": A new catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butenko, M. A.; Khoperskov, A. V.

    2017-07-01

    Galaxies with "rows" in Vorontsov-Velyaminov's terminology stand out among the variety of spiral galactic patterns. A characteristic feature of such objects is the sequence of straight-line segments that forms the spiral arm. In 2001 A. Chernin and co-authors published a catalog of such galaxies which includes 204 objects from the Palomar Atlas. In this paper, we supplement the catalog with 276 objects based on an analysis of all the galaxies from the New General Catalogue and Index Catalogue. The total number of NGC and IC galaxies with rows is 406, including the objects of Chernin et al. (2001). The use of more recent galaxy images allowed us to detect more "rows" on average, compared with the catalog of Chernin et al. When comparing the principal galaxy properties we found no significant differences between galaxies with rows and all S-typeNGC/IC galaxies.We discuss twomechanisms for the formation of polygonal structures based on numerical gas-dynamic and collisionless N-body calculations, which demonstrate that a spiral pattern with rows is a transient stage in the evolution of galaxies and a system with a powerful spiral structure can pass through this stage. The hypothesis of A. Chernin et al. (2001) that the occurrence frequency of interacting galaxies is twice higher among galaxies with rows is not confirmed for the combined set of 480 galaxies. The presence of a central stellar bar appears to be a favorable factor for the formation of a system of "rows".

  16. UKRVO - Features and Comparison of the New Catalogue of Photographic Survey of the Northern Sky

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Protsyuk, Yu.; Relke, E.

    UkrVO plate archives contain information obtained at different observatories for a long time. With using data of photographic survey of the northern sky (FON project, from -4° to 90°) in Main Astronomical Observatory of National Academy of Science (MAO) new catalogue of positions and magnitudes was obtained. The catalogue contains coordinates and magnitudes of more than 19 million stars and galaxies from 3m to 17.5m for the mean epoch of 1988.3. Comparison with the catalogues UCAC4, PPMX, XPM was carried out. The differences of common stars positions between catalogues are from 0.05"-0.06" for the 9- 11m stars to 0.30"-0.40" for the 5-7m and 15-16m stars. The differences of common stars B-magnitudes between catalogues are from 0.05m-0.10m for the 10-11m stars to 0.4m-0.5m for the 6-7m and 15-16m stars. The obtained results suggest the advisability of using the new catalogue for improving proper motions of stars within the range of 8m-14m magnitudes.

  17. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Nearby early-type galaxies catalog (Dabringhausen+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabringhausen, J.; Fellhauer, M.

    2016-06-01

    We present a catalogue of 1715 early-type galaxies from the literature, spanning the luminosity range from faint dwarf spheroidal galaxies to giant elliptical galaxies. The aim of this catalogue is to be one of the most comprehensive and publicly available collections of data on early-type galaxies. The emphasis in this catalogue lies on dwarf elliptical galaxies, for which some samples with detailed data have been published recently. For almost all of the early-type galaxies included in it, this catalogue contains data on their locations, distances, redshifts, half-light radii, the masses of their stellar populations and apparent magnitudes in various passbands. Data on metallicity and various colours are available for a majority of the galaxies presented here. The data on magnitudes, colours, metallicities and masses of the stellar populations is supplemented with entries that are based on fits to data from simple stellar population models and existing data from observations. Also, some simple transformations have been applied to the data on magnitudes, colours and metallicities in this catalog, in order to increase the homogeneity of this data. Estimates on the Sersic profiles, internal velocity dispersions, maximum rotational velocities, dynamical masses and ages are listed for several hundreds of the galaxies in this catalogue. Finally, each quantity listed in this catalogue is accompanied with information on its source, so that users of this catalogue can easily exclude data that they do not consider as reliable enough for their purposes. (10 data files).

  18. The Solar Stormwatch CME catalogue.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnard, Luke

    2015-04-01

    Since the launch of the twin STEREO satellites in late 2006, the Heliospheric Imagers have been used, with good results, in tracking transients of solar origin, such as Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs), out through the inner heliosphere. A frequently used approach is to build a "J-Map", in which multiple elongation profiles along a constant position angle are stacked in time, building an image in which radially propagating transients form curved tracks in the J-Map. From this the time-elongation profile of a solar transient can be manually identified. This is a time consuming and laborious process, and the results are subjective, depending on the skill and expertise of the investigator. With the Heliospheric Imager data it is possible to follow CMEs from the outer limits of the solar corona all the way to 1AU. Solar Stormwatch is a citizen science project that employs the power of thousands of volunteers to both identify and track CMEs in the Heliospheric Imager data. The CMEs identified by Solar Stormwatch are tracked many times by multiple users and this allows the calculation of consensus time-elongation profiles for each event and also provides an estimate of the error in the consensus profile. Therefore this system does not suffer from the potential subjectivity of individual researchers identifying and tracking CMEs. In this sense, the Solar Stormwatch system can be thought of as providing a middle ground between manually identified CME catalogues, such as the CDAW list, and CME catalogues generated through fully automated algorithms, such as CACtus and ARTEMIS etc. We provide a summary of the reduction of the Solar Stormwatch data into a catalogue of CMEs observed by STEREO-A and STEREO-B through the deep minimum of solar cycle 23 and review some key statistical properties of these CMEs. Through some case studies of the propagation of CMEs out into the inner heliosphere we argue that the Solar Stormwatch CME catalogue, which publishes the time

  19. Galaxy Zoo: multimergers and the Millennium Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darg, D. W.; Kaviraj, S.; Lintott, C. J.; Schawinski, K.; Silk, J.; Lynn, S.; Bamford, S.; Nichol, R. C.

    2011-09-01

    We present a catalogue of 39 multiple mergers, found using the mergers catalogue of the Galaxy Zoo project for z < 0.1, and compare them to corresponding semi-analytical galaxies from the Millennium Simulation. We estimate the (volume-limited) multimerger fraction of the local Universe using our sample and find it to be at least 2 orders of magnitude less than binary mergers - in good agreement with the simulations (especially the Munich group). We then investigate the properties of galaxies in binary mergers and multimergers (morphologies, colours, stellar masses and environment) and compare these results with those predicted by the semi-analytical galaxies. We find that multimergers favour galaxies with properties typical of elliptical morphologies and that this is in qualitative agreement with the models. Studies of multimergers thus provide an independent (and largely corroborating) test of the Millennium semi-analytical models.

  20. Optically bright active galactic nuclei in the ROSAT-Faint source catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Véron-Cetty, M.-P.; Balayan, S. K.; Mickaelian, A. M.; Mujica, R.; Chavushyan, V.; Hakopian, S. A.; Engels, D.; Véron, P.; Zickgraf, F.-J.; Voges, W.; Xu, D.-W.

    2004-02-01

    To build a large, optically bright, X-ray selected AGN sample we have correlated the ROSAT-FSC catalogue of X-ray sources with the USNO catalogue limited to objects brighter than O=16.5 and then with the APS database. Each of the 3212 coincidences was classified using the slitless Hamburg spectra. 493 objects were found to be extended and 2719 starlike. Using both the extended objects and the galaxies known from published catalogues we built up a sample of 185 galaxies with O_APS<17.0 mag, which are high-probability counterparts of RASS-FSC X-ray sources. 130 galaxies have a redshift from the literature and for another 34 we obtained new spectra. The fraction of Seyfert galaxies in this sample is 20%. To select a corresponding sample of 144 high-probability counterparts among the starlike sources we searched for very blue objects in an APS-based color-magnitude diagram. Forty-one were already known AGN and for another 91 objects we obtained new spectra, yielding 42 new AGN, increasing their number in the sample to 83. This confirms that surveys of bright QSOs are still significantly incomplete. On the other hand we find that, at a flux limit of 0.02 count s-1 and at this magnitude, only 40% of all QSOs are detected by ROSAT. Tables 2, 3 and 4 are only available in electronic form at http://www.edpsciences.org

  1. The Mock Experiment: Introducing Students to the Scientific Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sticker, Leeann

    2002-01-01

    Describes the Mock Experiment which introduces both science and non-science majors to the scientific method, literature, and journal articles. Explains guidelines, experiment application, and manuscript evaluation. (YDS)

  2. Boeing CST-100 Mock-Up Undergoes Airbag Stabilization Test

    NASA Image and Video Library

    The Boeing Company's mock-up CST-100 spacecraft was put through water landing development tests Oct. 1-5, 2012, at Bigelow Aerospace's headquarters outside of Las Vegas. Engineers with Bigelow have...

  3. Constraining the properties of AGN host galaxies with spectral energy distribution modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciesla, L.; Charmandaris, V.; Georgakakis, A.; Bernhard, E.; Mitchell, P. D.; Buat, V.; Elbaz, D.; LeFloc'h, E.; Lacey, C. G.; Magdis, G. E.; Xilouris, M.

    2015-04-01

    Detailed studies of the spectral energy distribution (SED) of normal galaxies have increasingly been used to understand the physical mechanism dominating their integrated emission, mainly owing to the availability of high quality multi-wavelength data from the UV to the far-infrared (FIR). However, systems hosting dust-enshrouded nuclear starbursts and/or an accreting supermassive black hole (an active galactic nucleus or AGN) are especially challenging to study. This is due to the complex interplay between the heating by massive stars and the AGN, the absorption and emission of radiation from dust, as well as the presence of the underlying old stellar population. We used the latest release of CIGALE, a fast state-of-the-art galaxy SED-fitting model relying on energy balance, to study the influence of an AGN in a self consistent manner in estimating both the star formation rate (SFR) and stellar mass in galaxies, as well as to calculate the contribution of the AGN to the power output of the host. Using the semi-analytical galaxy formation model galform, we created a suite of mock galaxy SEDs using realistic star formation histories (SFH). We also added an AGN of Type-1, Type-2, or intermediate-type whose contribution to the bolometric luminosity can be variable. We performed an SED-fitting of these catalogues with CIGALE, assuming three different SFHs: a single-exponentially-decreasing (1τ-dec), a double-exponentially-decreasing (2τ-dec), and a delayed SFH. Constraining the overall contribution of an AGN to the total infrared luminosity (fracAGN) is very challenging for fracAGN< 20%, with uncertainties of ~5-30% for higher fractions depending on the AGN type, while FIR and sub-mm are essential. The AGN power has an impact on the estimation of M∗ in Type-1 and intermediate-type AGNs but has no effect on galaxies hosting Type-2 AGNs. We find that in the absence of AGN emission, the best estimates of M∗ are obtained using the 2τ-dec model but at the expense of

  4. A Catalogue of quasars and active nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veron-Cetty, M.-P.; Veron, P.

    General note: A machine readable version of the catalogue is available either via anonymous ftp at ftp.obs-hp.fr (or 192.134.160.100) under directory catalogues or via the OHP WWW server: http://www.obs-hp.fr/ Electronic access: http://www.obs-hp.fr/

  5. ESO Catalogue Facility Design and Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moins, C.; Retzlaff, J.; Arnaboldi, M.; Zampieri, S.; Delmotte, N.; Forchí, V.; Klein Gebbinck, M.; Lockhart, J.; Micol, A.; Vera Sequeiros, I.; Bierwirth, T.; Peron, M.; Romaniello, M.; Suchar, D.

    2013-10-01

    The ESO Phase 3 Catalogue Facility provides investigators with the possibility to ingest catalogues resulting from ESO public surveys and large programs and to query and download their content according to positional and non-positional criteria. It relies on a chain of tools that covers the complete workflow from submission to validation and ingestion into the ESO archive and catalogue repository and a web application to browse and query catalogues. This repository consists of two components. One is a Sybase ASE relational database where catalogue meta-data are stored. The second one is a Sybase IQ data warehouse where the content of each catalogue is ingested in a specific table that returns all records matching a user's query. Spatial indexing has been implemented in Sybase IQ to speed up positional queries and relies on the Spherical Geometry Toolkit from the Johns Hopkins University which implements the Hierarchical Triangular Mesh (HTM) algorithm. It is based on a recursive decomposition of the celestial sphere in spherical triangles and the assignment of an index to each of them. It has been complemented with the use of optimized indexes on the non-positional columns that are likely to be frequently used as query constraints. First tests performed on catalogues such as 2MASS have confirmed that this approach provides a very good level of performance and a smooth user experience that are likely to facilitate the scientific exploitation of catalogues.

  6. Relic galaxies: where are they?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peralta de Arriba, L.; Quilis, V.; Trujillo, I.; Cebrián, M.; Balcells, M.

    2017-03-01

    The finding that massive galaxies grow with cosmic time fired the starting gun for the search of objects which could have survived up to the present day without suffering substantial changes (neither in their structures, neither in their stellar populations). Nevertheless, and despite the community efforts, up to now only one firm candidate to be considered one of these relics is known: NGC 1277. Curiously, this galaxy is located at the centre of one of the most rich near galaxy clusters: Perseus. Is its location a matter of chance? Should relic hunters focus their search on galaxy clusters? In order to reply this question, we have performed a simultaneous and analogous analysis using simulations (Millennium I-WMAP7) and observations (New York University Value-Added Galaxy Catalogue). Our results in both frameworks agree: it is more probable to find relics in high density environments.

  7. Submillimeter, millimeter, and microwave spectral line catalogue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poynter, R. L.; Pickett, H. M.

    1984-01-01

    This report describes a computer accessible catalogue of submillimeter, millimeter, and microwave spectral lines in the frequency range between 0 and 10000 GHz (i.e., wavelengths longer than 30 micrometers). The catalogue can be used as a planning guide or as an aid in the identification and analysis of observed spectral lines. The information listed for each spectral line includes the frequency and its estimated error, the intensity, lower state energy, and quantum number assignment. The catalogue has been constructed using theoretical least squares fits of published spectral lines to accepted molecular models. The associated predictions and their estimated errors are based upon the resultant fitted parameters and their covariances. Future versions of this catalogue will add more atoms and molecules and update the present listings (151 species) as new data appear. The catalogue is available from the authors as a magnetic tape recorded in card images and as a set of microfiche records.

  8. The 3XMM-DR4 Catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosen, S.; Watson, M.; Pye, J.; Webb, N.; Schwope, A.; Freyberg, M.; Motch, C.; Ballet, J.; Carrera, F.; Page, M.; Page, C.

    2015-09-01

    The 3XMM-DR4 catalogue is the third generation catalogue of serendipitous X-ray sources from the European Space Agency's (ESA) XMM-Newton observatory, and has been created by the XMM-Newton Survey Science Centre (SSC) on behalf of ESA. Released in July 2013, 3XMM-DR4 contains 531261 detections from 372728 unique sources observed in 7427 XMM-Newton observations, about 50% more than in the preceding 2XMMi-DR3 catalogue, made public in April 2010. We review some of the key science-driven algorithmic and calibration changes to the processing pipeline adopted to enhance the scientific quality of the catalogue, such as the optimised filtering of background flares, improvements to the astrometric analysis and upgrades to the catalogue construction process. Examples of the gains obtained are illustrated.

  9. Mouse genetics: catalogue and scissors.

    PubMed

    Sung, Young Hoon; Baek, In-Jeoung; Seong, Je Kyung; Kim, Jin Soo; Lee, Han-Woong

    2012-12-01

    Phenotypic analysis of gene-specific knockout (KO) mice has revolutionized our understanding of in vivo gene functions. As the use of mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells is inevitable for conventional gene targeting, the generation of knockout mice remains a very time-consuming and expensive process. To accelerate the large-scale production and phenotype analyses of KO mice, international efforts have organized global consortia such as the International Knockout Mouse Consortium (IKMC) and International Mouse Phenotype Consortium (IMPC), and they are persistently expanding the KO mouse catalogue that is publicly available for the researches studying specific genes of interests in vivo. However, new technologies, adopting zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) or Transcription Activator-Like Effector (TALE) Nucleases (TALENs) to edit the mouse genome, are now emerging as valuable and effective shortcuts alternative for the conventional gene targeting using ES cells. Here, we introduce the recent achievement of IKMC, and evaluate the significance of ZFN/TALEN technology in mouse genetics.

  10. A Cosmic Void Catalog of SDSS DR12 BOSS Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Qingqing; Berlind, Andreas A.; Scherrer, Robert J.; Neyrinck, Mark C.; Scoccimarro, Román; Tinker, Jeremy L.; McBride, Cameron K.; Schneider, Donald P.; Pan, Kaike; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Malanushenko, Elena; Malanushenko, Viktor

    2017-02-01

    We present a cosmic void catalog using the large-scale structure galaxy catalog from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). This galaxy catalog is part of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 12 and is the final catalog of SDSS-III. We take into account the survey boundaries, masks, and angular and radial selection functions, and apply the ZOBOV void finding algorithm to the Galaxy catalog. We identify a total of 10,643 voids. After making quality cuts to ensure that the voids represent real underdense regions, we obtain 1,228 voids with effective radii spanning the range 20–100 {h}-1 {Mpc} and with central densities that are, on average, 30% of the mean sample density. We release versions of the catalogs both with and without quality cuts. We discuss the basic statistics of voids, such as their size and redshift distributions, and measure the radial density profile of the voids via a stacking technique. In addition, we construct mock void catalogs from 1000 mock galaxy catalogs, and find that the properties of BOSS voids are in good agreement with those in the mock catalogs. We compare the stellar mass distribution of galaxies living inside and outside of the voids, and find no large difference. These BOSS and mock void catalogs are useful for a number of cosmological and galaxy environment studies.

  11. Surface Brightness-dependent Clustering of APM Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Z.

    Based on a simple estimation of surface brightness (SB) of galaxies in the Automated Plate Measuring Machine (APM) catalogue, a homogeneous sample of apparent central SB data for more than 2 million galaxies brighter than BJ=20.5, covering 4300 deg2 in the region of the south galactic cap, was taken account to investigate the dependence of the strength of galaxy clustering on SB. The two point correlation function was used to compare the clustering pattern of galaxies in a series of SB volume-limited samples. Galaxies with high SB were found to have a significantly strong clustering strength in comparison to normal and low SB galaxies.

  12. A Ks-band-selected catalogue of objects in the ALHAMBRA survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieves-Seoane, L.; Fernandez-Soto, A.; Arnalte-Mur, P.; Molino, A.; Stefanon, M.; Ferreras, I.; Ascaso, B.; Ballesteros, F. J.; Cristóbal-Hornillos, D.; López-Sanjuán, C.; Hurtado-Gil, Ll.; Márquez, I.; Masegosa, J.; Aguerri, J. A. L.; Alfaro, E.; Aparicio-Villegas, T.; Benítez, N.; Broadhurst, T.; Cabrera-Caño, J.; Castander, F. J.; Cepa, J.; Cerviño, M.; González Delgado, R. M.; Husillos, C.; Infante, L.; Martínez, V. J.; Moles, M.; Olmo, A. del; Perea, J.; Pović, M.; Prada, F.; Quintana, J. M.; Troncoso-Iribarren, P.; Viironen, K.

    2017-02-01

    The original ALHAMBRA catalogue contained over 400 000 galaxies selected using a synthetic F814W image, to the magnitude limit AB(F814W) ≈ 24.5. Given the photometric redshift depth of the ALHAMBRA multiband data ( = 0.86) and the approximately I-band selection, there is a noticeable bias against red objects at moderate redshift. We avoid this bias by creating a new catalogue selected in the Ks band. This newly obtained catalogue is certainly shallower in terms of apparent magnitude, but deeper in terms of redshift, with a significant population of red objects at z > 1. We select objects using the Ks band images, which reach an approximate AB magnitude limit Ks ≈ 22. We generate masks and derive completeness functions to characterize the sample. We have tested the quality of the photometry and photometric redshifts using both internal and external checks. Our final catalogue includes ≈95 000 sources down to Ks ≈ 22, with a significant tail towards high redshift. We have checked that there is a large sample of objects with spectral energy distributions that correspond to that of massive, passively evolving galaxies at z > 1, reaching as far as z ≈ 2.5. We have tested the possibility of combining our data with deep infrared observations at longer wavelengths, particularly Spitzer IRAC data.

  13. Preliminary results on the study of the environment of a complete sample of Seyfert galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvato, M.; Rafanelli, P.

    1997-07-01

    The results of the study of the environment of a complete sample of Seyfert galaxies taken from the CfA Redshift Survey (Davis et al. 1983; Huchra et al. 1983) are shown. In particular we compare the distribution of the positions of all galaxies located within five diameters from each Seyfert galaxy of our sample with the analogous distribution observed in a control sample of normal galaxies taken from the Merged Catalogue of Galaxies (hereafter MERCG) (Kogoshvili 1986). This research is based on the analysis of the digitized images of the "Digitized Sky Survey" and on the on--line catalogues APM (Automatic Plate Measuring System) and APS (Automated Plate Scanner).

  14. Modelling galaxy clustering on small scales to tighten constraints on dark energy and modified gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yun

    2017-01-01

    We present a new approach to measuring cosmic expansion history and growth rate of large-scale structure using the anisotropic two-dimensional galaxy correlation function (2DCF) measured from data; it makes use of the empirical modelling of small-scale galaxy clustering derived from numerical simulations by Zheng et al. We validate this method using mock catalogues, before applying it to the analysis of the CMASS sample from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 10 of the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey. We find that this method enables accurate and precise measurements of cosmic expansion history and growth rate of large-scale structure. Modelling the 2DCF fully including non-linear effects and redshift space distortions in the scale range of 16-144 h-1 Mpc, we find H(0.57)rs(zd)/c = 0.0459 ± 0.0006, DA(0.57)/rs(zd) = 9.011 ± 0.073, and fg(0.57)σ8(0.57) = 0.476 ± 0.050, which correspond to precisions of 1.3 per cent, 0.8 per cent, and 10.5 per cent, respectively. We have defined rs(zd) to be the sound horizon at the drag epoch computed using a simple integral, fg(z) as the growth rate at redshift z, and σ8(z) as the matter power spectrum normalization on 8 h-1 Mpc scale at z. We find that neglecting the small-scale information significantly weakens the constraints on H(z) and DA(z), and leads to a biased estimate of fg(z). Our results indicate that we can significantly tighten constraints on dark energy and modified gravity by reliably modelling small-scale galaxy clustering.

  15. Galaxy group dynamics using the GAMA survey and predictions from semi-analytics and cosmological simulation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kafle, Prajwal R.; Robotham, Aaron; Lagos, Claudia; Driver, Simon P.

    2017-01-01

    We aim to discuss the dynamics of galaxies in group environment. We present our current findings on the contentious issue of the stellar mass segregation in galaxy groups using the Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey, the GALFORM semi-analytic and the EAGLE cosmological hydrodynamical simulation catalogues of galaxy groups. We will discuss our main results that show negligible mass segregation in galaxy groups, which also show a lack of redshift evolution.

  16. An analysis of the first three catalogues of southern star clusters and nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cozens, Glendyn John

    2008-06-01

    of the Lacaille and Herschel catalogues. In order to identify and compare the catalogues, positions given for an object by each astronomer were precessed to J2000.0 coordinates. These modern positions for an object could then be plotted onto modern photographic star atlases and digital images of the sky, to determine the accuracy of the original positions. Analysis of the three non-stellar catalogues included the determination of the radial distance of each object from its "correct" position and diagrams of both difference in Right Ascension and difference in Declination against Right Ascension and Declination, in order to identify any trends. Each catalogue contained some copy or printing errors, but these were omitted from the statistical calculations performed. The results for the three catalogues, from the astrometric perspective, showed that the Herschel catalogue contained the most accurate positions, followed closely by the Lacaille catalogue with no obvious or systematic trends in their inaccuracies. In contrast, the Dunlop catalogue showed some clear trends in the positional inaccuracies which, regardless of mitigating circumstances, to some extent warranted John Herschel's criticism. Finally an examination of the completeness of each catalogue was undertaken to determine the thoroughness of each astronomer. Firstly the effective aperture and theoretical magnitude limit for each telescope was calculated. Next the non-stellar objects were grouped into five types, open clusters, globular clusters, diffuse nebulae, planetary nebulae and galaxies, and a single working magnitude limit was found for each catalogue. A number of indicators were used to determine the working magnitude limit. The number of faint objects of each type which were seen, and the number of bright objects which were missed by the three astronomers, was assessed. In both the Dunlop and Herschel catalogues galaxies gave the best indicator of the working magnitude limit. Globular clusters

  17. Galaxy 'Hunting' Made Easy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-09-01

    Galaxies found under the Glare of Cosmic Flashlights Astronomers using ESO's Very Large Telescope have discovered in a single pass about a dozen otherwise invisible galaxies halfway across the Universe. The discovery, based on a technique that exploits a first-class instrument, represents a major breakthrough in the field of galaxy 'hunting'. ESO PR Photo 40a/07 ESO PR Photo 40a/07 Newly Found Galaxies (SINFONI/VLT) The team of astronomers led by Nicolas Bouché have used quasars to find these galaxies. Quasars are very distant objects of extreme brilliance, which are used as cosmic beacons that reveal galaxies lying between the quasar and us. The galaxy's presence is revealed by a 'dip' in the spectrum of the quasar - caused by the absorption of light at a specific wavelength. The team used huge catalogues of quasars, the so-called SDSS and 2QZ catalogues, to select quasars with dips. The next step was then to observe the patches of the sky around these quasars in search for the foreground galaxies from the time the Universe was about 6 billion years old, almost half of its current age. "The difficulty in actually spotting and seeing these galaxies stems from the fact that the glare of the quasar is too strong compared to the dim light of the galaxy," says Bouché. This is where observations taken with SINFONI on ESO's VLT made the difference. SINFONI is an infrared 'integral field spectrometer' that simultaneously delivers very sharp images and highly resolved colour information (spectra) of an object on the sky. ESO PR Photo 32e/07 ESO PR Photo 40b/07 Chasing 'Hidden' Galaxies (Artist's Impression) With this special technique, which untangles the light of the galaxy from the quasar light, the team detected 14 galaxies out of the 20 pre-selected quasar patches of sky, a hefty 70% success rate. "This high detection rate alone is a very exciting result," says Bouché. "But, these are not just ordinary galaxies: they are most notable ones, actively forming a lot of

  18. THE DEEP2 GALAXY REDSHIFT SURVEY: THE VORONOI-DELAUNAY METHOD CATALOG OF GALAXY GROUPS

    SciTech Connect

    Gerke, Brian F.; Newman, Jeffrey A.; Davis, Marc; Coil, Alison L.; Cooper, Michael C.; Dutton, Aaron A.; Faber, S. M.; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Koo, David C.; Phillips, Andrew C.; Noeske, Kai; Rosario, David J.; Weiner, Benjamin J.; Willmer, Christopher N. A.; Yan, Renbin

    2012-05-20

    We present a public catalog of galaxy groups constructed from the spectroscopic sample of galaxies in the fourth data release from the Deep Extragalactic Evolutionary Probe 2 (DEEP2) Galaxy Redshift Survey, including the Extended Groth Strip (EGS). The catalog contains 1165 groups with two or more members in the EGS over the redshift range 0 < z < 1.5 and 1295 groups at z > 0.6 in the rest of DEEP2. Twenty-five percent of EGS galaxies and fourteen percent of high-z DEEP2 galaxies are assigned to galaxy groups. The groups were detected using the Voronoi-Delaunay method (VDM) after it has been optimized on mock DEEP2 catalogs following similar methods to those employed in Gerke et al. In the optimization effort, we have taken particular care to ensure that the mock catalogs resemble the data as closely as possible, and we have fine-tuned our methods separately on mocks constructed for the EGS and the rest of DEEP2. We have also probed the effect of the assumed cosmology on our inferred group-finding efficiency by performing our optimization on three different mock catalogs with different background cosmologies, finding large differences in the group-finding success we can achieve for these different mocks. Using the mock catalog whose background cosmology is most consistent with current data, we estimate that the DEEP2 group catalog is 72% complete and 61% pure (74% and 67% for the EGS) and that the group finder correctly classifies 70% of galaxies that truly belong to groups, with an additional 46% of interloper galaxies contaminating the catalog (66% and 43% for the EGS). We also confirm that the VDM catalog reconstructs the abundance of galaxy groups with velocity dispersions above {approx}300 km s{sup -1} to an accuracy better than the sample variance, and this successful reconstruction is not strongly dependent on cosmology. This makes the DEEP2 group catalog a promising probe of the growth of cosmic structure that can potentially be used for cosmological tests.

  19. Cosmology with void-galaxy correlations.

    PubMed

    Hamaus, Nico; Wandelt, Benjamin D; Sutter, P M; Lavaux, Guilhem; Warren, Michael S

    2014-01-31

    Galaxy bias, the unknown relationship between the clustering of galaxies and the underlying dark matter density field is a major hurdle for cosmological inference from large-scale structure. While traditional analyses focus on the absolute clustering amplitude of high-density regions mapped out by galaxy surveys, we propose a relative measurement that compares those to the underdense regions, cosmic voids. On the basis of realistic mock catalogs we demonstrate that cross correlating galaxies and voids opens up the possibility to calibrate galaxy bias and to define a static ruler thanks to the observable geometric nature of voids. We illustrate how the clustering of voids is related to mass compensation and show that volume-exclusion significantly reduces the degree of stochasticity in their spatial distribution. Extracting the spherically averaged distribution of galaxies inside voids from their cross correlations reveals a remarkable concordance with the mass-density profile of voids.

  20. Log-Normal Distribution of Cosmic Voids in Simulations and Mocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, E.; Pycke, J.-R.

    2017-01-01

    Following up on previous studies, we complete here a full analysis of the void size distributions of the Cosmic Void Catalog based on three different simulation and mock catalogs: dark matter (DM), haloes, and galaxies. Based on this analysis, we attempt to answer two questions: Is a three-parameter log-normal distribution a good candidate to satisfy the void size distributions obtained from different types of environments? Is there a direct relation between the shape parameters of the void size distribution and the environmental effects? In an attempt to answer these questions, we find here that all void size distributions of these data samples satisfy the three-parameter log-normal distribution whether the environment is dominated by DM, haloes, or galaxies. In addition, the shape parameters of the three-parameter log-normal void size distribution seem highly affected by environment, particularly existing substructures. Therefore, we show two quantitative relations given by linear equations between the skewness and the maximum tree depth, and between the variance of the void size distribution and the maximum tree depth, directly from the simulated data. In addition to this, we find that the percentage of voids with nonzero central density in the data sets has a critical importance. If the number of voids with nonzero central density reaches ≥3.84% in a simulation/mock sample, then a second population is observed in the void size distributions. This second population emerges as a second peak in the log-normal void size distribution at larger radius.

  1. Statistical study of warps in a sample of spiral and lenticular galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendy, Y. H. M.; Samir, R. M.; Shaker, A. A.; Ibrahim, Alhassan I.

    2016-12-01

    A sample of edge-on (or nearly edge-on) spiral and lenticular galaxies is selected to study the warp phenomenon in their disks. This sample contains 36 disk galaxies selected from Watanabe's catalogue (Watanabe, 1983). We investigate the existence of physical relations between photometric and spectroscopic parameters and the warp degree of galaxies.

  2. The durability of silicone versus latex mock arteries.

    PubMed

    Conti, J C; Strope, E R; Goldenberg, L M; Price, K S

    2001-01-01

    Latex mock arteries used in medical device testing allow researchers to evaluate mechanical characteristics of intravascular medical products without using animal or human clinical studies for this data. Such intravascular situations include determining properties such as drag and steerability of catheters, recoil of vascular stents, and clinician training. In fatigue testing, the latex mock arteries are used to receive deployed products and are then repeatedly pressurized at biologically relevant pressures to determine the long term durability of the product. By matching dimensions and pressure-volume relationships (compliance) of these latex tubes, researchers have a reliable means to evaluate and predict product lifetimes. The problem with latex mock arteries is two-fold: First, they are opaque so the product inside the artery cannot be seen during evaluation of the integrity of the product or during clinical training sessions. Second, latex tubes fatigue; therefore, the loading that they place on the internalized products varies with time. During long term durability studies, latex tubes may have to be replaced as often as every 100 million cycles. This can be problematic with products that are difficult to redeploy. We have developed a clear silicone mock artery system that allows us to fabricate three-dimensional objects, including tubes with precise geometric and mechanical properties. Our evaluations show that the mock arteries can be stressed up to 400 million cycles with little or no change in mechanical properties. We are in the process of continuing evaluations to determine long term durability.

  3. Disk Galaxies in the Outer Local Supercluster: Optical CCD Surface Photometry and Distribution of Galaxy Disk Parameter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, N. Y.

    1998-01-01

    We report new B-band CCD surface photometry on a sample of 76 disk galaxies brighter than BT = 14.5 mag in the Uppsala General Catalogue of Galaxies, which are confined within a volume located in the outer part of the Local Supercluster.

  4. Earthquake Catalogue of the Caucasus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godoladze, T.; Gok, R.; Tvaradze, N.; Tumanova, N.; Gunia, I.; Onur, T.

    2016-12-01

    The Caucasus has a documented historical catalog stretching back to the beginning of the Christian era. Most of the largest historical earthquakes prior to the 19th century are assumed to have occurred on active faults of the Greater Caucasus. Important earthquakes include the Samtskhe earthquake of 1283 (Ms˜7.0, Io=9); Lechkhumi-Svaneti earthquake of 1350 (Ms˜7.0, Io=9); and the Alaverdi earthquake of 1742 (Ms˜6.8, Io=9). Two significant historical earthquakes that may have occurred within the Javakheti plateau in the Lesser Caucasus are the Tmogvi earthquake of 1088 (Ms˜6.5, Io=9) and the Akhalkalaki earthquake of 1899 (Ms˜6.3, Io =8-9). Large earthquakes that occurred in the Caucasus within the period of instrumental observation are: Gori 1920; Tabatskuri 1940; Chkhalta 1963; Racha earthquake of 1991 (Ms=7.0), is the largest event ever recorded in the region; Barisakho earthquake of 1992 (M=6.5); Spitak earthquake of 1988 (Ms=6.9, 100 km south of Tbilisi), which killed over 50,000 people in Armenia. Recently, permanent broadband stations have been deployed across the region as part of the various national networks (Georgia (˜25 stations), Azerbaijan (˜35 stations), Armenia (˜14 stations)). The data from the last 10 years of observation provides an opportunity to perform modern, fundamental scientific investigations. In order to improve seismic data quality a catalog of all instrumentally recorded earthquakes has been compiled by the IES (Institute of Earth Sciences/NSMC, Ilia State University) in the framework of regional joint project (Armenia, Azerbaijan, Georgia, Turkey, USA) "Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Assessment (PSHA) in the Caucasus. The catalogue consists of more then 80,000 events. First arrivals of each earthquake of Mw>=4.0 have been carefully examined. To reduce calculation errors, we corrected arrivals from the seismic records. We improved locations of the events and recalculate Moment magnitudes in order to obtain unified magnitude

  5. Submillimeter, millimeter, and microwave spectral line catalogue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poynter, R. L.; Pickett, H. M.

    1980-01-01

    A computer accessible catalogue of submillimeter, millimeter, and microwave spectral lines in the frequency range between O and 3000 GHz (such as; wavelengths longer than 100 m) is discussed. The catalogue was used as a planning guide and as an aid in the identification and analysis of observed spectral lines. The information listed for each spectral line includes the frequency and its estimated error, the intensity, lower state energy, and quantum number assignment. The catalogue was constructed by using theoretical least squares fits of published spectral lines to accepted molecular models. The associated predictions and their estimated errors are based upon the resultant fitted parameters and their covariances.

  6. General catalogue of variable stars: Version GCVS 5.1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samus', N. N.; Kazarovets, E. V.; Durlevich, O. V.; Kireeva, N. N.; Pastukhova, E. N.

    2017-01-01

    Work aimed at compiling detailed catalogs of variable stars in the Galaxy, which has been carried out continuously by Moscow variable-star researchers since 1946 on behalf of the International Astronomical Union, has entered the stage of the publication of the 5th, completely electronic edition of the General Catalogue of Variable Stars (GCVS). This paper describes the requirements for the contents of the 5th edition and the current state of the catalog in its new version, GCVS 5.1. The complete revision of information for variable stars in the constellation Carina and the compilation of the 81st Name-list of Variable Stars are considered as examples of work on the 5th edition. The GCVS 5.1 is freely accessible on the Internet. We recommend the present paper as a unified reference to the 5th edition of the GCVS.

  7. Inclination-Independent Galaxy Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailin, Jeremy; Harris, William E.

    2008-07-01

    We present a new method to classify galaxies from large surveys such as the Sloan Digital Sky Survey using inclination-corrected concentration, inclination-corrected location on the color-magnitude diagram, and apparent axis ratio. Explicitly accounting for inclination tightens the distribution of each of these parameters and enables simple boundaries to be drawn that delineate three different galaxy populations: early-type galaxies, which are red, highly concentrated, and round; late-type galaxies, which are blue, have low concentrations, and are disk dominated; and intermediate-type galaxies, which are red, have intermediate concentrations, and have disks. We have validated our method by comparing to visual classifications of high-quality imaging data from the Millennium Galaxy Catalogue. The inclination correction is crucial to unveiling the previously unrecognized intermediate class. Intermediate-type galaxies, roughly corresponding to lenticulars and early spirals, lie on the red sequence. The red sequence is therefore composed of two distinct morphological types, suggesting that there are two distinct mechanisms for transiting to the red sequence. We propose that intermediate-type galaxies are those that have lost their cold gas via strangulation, while early-type galaxies are those that have experienced a major merger either that consumed their cold gas, or whose merger progenitors were already devoid of cold gas (the "dry merger" scenario).

  8. GALAXY COLLISIONS IN DISTANT CLUSTER

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The group of galaxies -- or 'galaxy cluster' -- catalogued as MS1054-03 is 8 billion light-years away, one of the most distant known so far. Although hundreds of galaxies appear in the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image, a European-led team of astronomers has studied in detail 81 galaxies that certainly belong to the cluster, 13 of which are remnants of recent collisions or pairs of colliding galaxies. This is by far the largest number of colliding galaxies ever found in a cluster. The picture is actually a 'mosaic' of images, so that astronomers can have a much wider view of the distant cluster. This is why the colliding galaxies, mostly located in clumps in the outskirts of the cluster, had not been discovered so far. In the image, streams of stars can be seen being pulled out of the galaxies, a consequence of the huge tidal forces in action. The red color of most of the merger remnants means that the stars are old and not much star formation has 'recently' taken place. The observations with the Hubble were made in May 1998. The 10-meter Keck telescope in Hawaii was used to confirm that the colliding galaxies were part of the cluster. Photo Credits: Pieter van Dokkum, Marijn Franx (University of Groningen/Leiden), ESA and NASA

  9. Building 9 ISS mock-ups and trainers

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-08-02

    Photographic documentation showing the bldg. 9 ISS module mock-ups and trainers. Views include: various overall views of the configuration of the ISS module trainers on the floor of bldg. 9 (08445-46, 08449-51, 08458-61, 08464-65, 08469, 08471, 08476); various portions of the mock-ups (08447-48, 08470); views of the Node 2, Experiment Module and Logistics Module (08452); Node 2 (08453, 08466); Destiny and Node 2 (08454); Destiny, Unity and Airlock (08455); Zarya, Service Module and shuttle mock-ups (08456); Logistics Module and Experiment Module (08457, 08468); various views of Columbia, Node 2 and Destiny (08462-63); Columbus, Node 2, Experiment Module and Logistics Module (08467); U.S. Laboratory module (08472); Logistics Module (08473); module layout (08474); Logistics Module and Experiment Module (08475).

  10. Development of inert density mock materials for HMX

    DOE PAGES

    Yeager, John D.; Higginbotham Duque, Amanda L.; Shorty, Marvin; ...

    2017-09-22

    Inert surrogates or mocks for high explosives are commonly used in place of the real material for complex experiments or in situations where safety is a concern. We tested several materials as potential mocks for HMX in terms of density, thermal stability, and processability. Selection criteria were developed and a literature search was conducted primarily using the Cambridge Structural Database. Moreover, out of over 200 potentially acceptable materials, six were chosen for crystallization experiments and a suite of analytical characterization. Of these six, 5-iodo-2'-deoxyuridine, N,N'-bis(2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorophenyl)oxamide, and 2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorobenzamide all were found to be thermally stable at 150°C, matched HMX density asmore » a pressed pellet, and could be crystallized to appropriate particle sizes. These three materials are considered suitable inert density mocks for HMX and will be the subject of future testing.« less

  11. Mock aridity and the paleoecology of volcanically influenced ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Judith; van Couvering, John

    1995-07-01

    The effects of volcanicity often mimic those of aridity and can lead to paleoenvironmental misinterpretations. The occurrence of volcanically induced barrenness, xeric conditions, and extreme geochemical alkalinity or salinity in the context of a regionally more humid climate is dubbed here “mock aridity.” Biotic recovery at Mount St. Helens (Washington) and Oldoinyo Lengai (Kenya) points to potential long-term effects of volcanicity on the overall ecosystem. Contraindicating sedimentary rocks and fossils from Kenya Miocene rocks and contraindicating sites in U.S. Pacific Northwest Miocene rocks both suggest interpretive problems due to mock aridity. This calls for a reevaluation of volcanogenic sites derived from supposed climax ecosystems in the light of mock aridity.

  12. Mouse genetics: Catalogue and scissors

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Young Hoon; Baek, In-Jeoung; Seong, Je Kyung; Kim, Jin-Soo; Lee, Han-Woong

    2012-01-01

    Phenotypic analysis of gene-specific knockout (KO) mice has revolutionized our understanding of in vivo gene functions. As the use of mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells is inevitable for conventional gene targeting, the generation of knockout mice remains a very time-consuming and expensive process. To accelerate the large-scale production and phenotype analyses of KO mice, international efforts have organized global consortia such as the International Knockout Mouse Consortium (IKMC) and International Mouse Phenotype Consortium (IMPC), and they are persistently expanding the KO mouse catalogue that is publicly available for the researches studying specific genes of interests in vivo. However, new technologies, adopting zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) or Transcription Activator-Like Effector (TALE) Nucleases (TALENs) to edit the mouse genome, are now emerging as valuable and effective shortcuts alternative for the conventional gene targeting using ES cells. Here, we introduce the recent achievement of IKMC, and evaluate the significance of ZFN/TALEN technology in mouse genetics. [BMB Reports 2012; 45(12): 686-692] PMID:23261053

  13. The influence of sex on mock jurors' verdicts across type of child abuse cases.

    PubMed

    Pettalia, Jennifer; Pozzulo, Joanna D; Reed, Jennifer

    2017-07-01

    This study examined the influence of victim sex, mock juror sex, and type of child abuse (physical, sexual, emotional, and neglect) on mock jurors' assessments of eyewitness and defendant integrity, continuous guilt ratings, dichotomous verdicts, and sentencing recommendations. Participants read one of eight versions of a trial transcript and then answered a self-report questionnaire. Female mock jurors were significantly more likely to find the defendant guilty overall. Moreover, female mock jurors recommended significantly longer sentences for defendants in sexual abuse cases; whereas, male mock jurors recommended significantly longer sentences for defendants in sexual and physical abuse cases. Male mock jurors perceived the defendant more favorably than female mock jurors; whereas, female mock jurors perceived the alleged victim more favorable than male mock jurors. These results suggest that juror sex may be an influential factor in child abuse cases overall. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Transmyometrial embryo transfer after difficult immediate mock transcervical transfer.

    PubMed

    Sharif, K; Afnan, M; Lenton, W; Bilalis, D; Hunjan, M; Khalaf, Y

    1996-05-01

    To evaluate the place of ultrasound-directed transvaginal transmyometrial ET in a protocol using both the transcervical and transmyometrial routes in a step-wise fashion. A prospective descriptive clinical study. A university-based assisted conception unit. Thirteen patients who had difficult or impossible mock transcervical ET immediately before the real transfer. Ultrasound-directed transvaginal transmyometrial ET. Pregnancy and clinical pregnancy. Four patients became pregnant, including three with clinical pregnancies. In cases in which transcervical ET isd difficult or impossible, transvaginal transmyometrial ET is a viable option. The use of mock transcervical ET immediately before the real transfer would identify patients needing transmyometrial ET.

  15. Unimodal sequences and quantum and mock modular forms

    PubMed Central

    Bryson, Jennifer; Ono, Ken; Pitman, Sarah; Rhoades, Robert C.

    2012-01-01

    We show that the rank generating function U(t; q) for strongly unimodal sequences lies at the interface of quantum modular forms and mock modular forms. We use U(-1; q) to obtain a quantum modular form which is “dual” to the quantum form Zagier constructed from Kontsevich’s “strange” function F(q). As a result, we obtain a new representation for a certain generating function for L-values. The series U(i; q) = U(-i; q) is a mock modular form, and we use this fact to obtain new congruences for certain enumerative functions.

  16. Environments of Starburst Galaxies Diagnosed with the NVO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieto-Santisteban, M. A.; Sosey, M.; de Mello, D.

    2004-12-01

    We present an analysis of the environment of starburst galaxies using the National Virtual Observatory. We have matched the sample of starburst galaxies by Wu et al. (2002) with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and searched for companions in their neighborhood. We also have compared the starburst sample with the sample of isolated galaxies by Karachentseva (1986) and with the SDSS merging galaxies by Allam et al. (2004). Using color selection criteria from the known sample of starburst galaxies, we have built a database of starburst candidates from the SDSS catalogue. This allowed us to do a more statistical comparison of starburst galaxies, their neighborhoods and possible environmental effects on their evolution. We see the NVO environment as an extrememly useful tool for astronomical research. As such, this poster also details the effective ways in which we were able to access both the SDSS catalogue as well as other internet resources, encorporating the entire project into a very useful internet website.

  17. Submillimeter, millimeter, and microwave spectral line catalogue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poynter, R. L.; Pickett, H. M.

    1981-01-01

    A computer accessible catalogue of submillimeter, millimeter and microwave spectral lines in the frequency range between 0 and 3000 GHZ (i.e., wavelengths longer than 100 mu m) is presented which can be used a planning guide or as an aid in the identification and analysis of observed spectral lines. The information listed for each spectral line includes the frequency and its estimated error, the intensity, lower state energy, and quantum number assignment. The catalogue was constructed by using theoretical least squares fits of published spectral lines to accepted molecular models. The associated predictions and their estimated errors are based upon the resultant fitted parameters and their covariances. Future versions of this catalogue will add more atoms and molecules and update the present listings (133 species) as new data appear. The catalogue is available as a magnetic tape recorded in card images and as a set of microfiche records.

  18. Magnitude systems in old star catalogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiwara, Tomoko; Yamaoka, Hitoshi

    2005-06-01

    The current system of stellar magnitudes originally introduced by Hipparchus was strictly defined by Norman Pogson in 1856. He based his system on Ptolemy's star catalogue, the Almagest, recorded in about AD137, and defined the magnitude-intensity relationship on a logarithmic scale. Stellar magnitudes observed with the naked eye recorded in seven old star catalogues were analyzed in order to examine the visual magnitude systems. Although psychophysicists have proposed that human visual sensitivity follows a power-law scale, it is shown here that the degree of agreement is far better for a logarithmic scale than for a power-law scale. It is also found that light ratios in each star catalogue are nearly equal to 2.512, if the brightest (1st magnitude) and the faintest (6th magnitude and dimmer) stars are excluded from the study. This means that the visual magnitudes in the old star catalogues agree fully with Pogson's logarithmic scale.

  19. FRBCAT: The Fast Radio Burst Catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petroff, E.; Barr, E. D.; Jameson, A.; Keane, E. F.; Bailes, M.; Kramer, M.; Morello, V.; Tabbara, D.; van Straten, W.

    2016-09-01

    Here, we present a catalogue of known Fast Radio Burst sources in the form of an online catalogue, FRBCAT. The catalogue includes information about the instrumentation used for the observations for each detected burst, the measured quantities from each observation, and model-dependent quantities derived from observed quantities. To aid in consistent comparisons of burst properties such as width and signal-to-noise ratios, we have re-processed all the bursts for which we have access to the raw data, with software which we make available. The originally derived properties are also listed for comparison. The catalogue is hosted online as a Mysql database which can also be downloaded in tabular or plain text format for off-line use. This database will be maintained for use by the community for studies of the Fast Radio Burst population as it grows.

  20. The History of Ptolemy's Star Catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graßhoff, Gerd

    Table of contents

    Contents: Introduction.- The Stars of the Almagest.- Accusations.- The Rehabilitation of Ptolemy.- The Analysis of the Star Catalogue.- Structures in Ptolemy's Star Catalogue.- Theory and Observation.- Appendix A.- Stars and Constellations.- Identifications.- Appendix B.- Transformation Formulae.- Column Headings.- Appendix C.- Column Headings.- Literature.- Index.

  1. The TYCHO Input Catalogue and the Guide Star Catalogue of the Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egret, D.

    1985-08-01

    The identification of the stars observed by TYCHO is based on an a priori catalogue of stars, the TYCHO Input Catalogue (TIC) complete to B = 12.5 and containing some two million stars. The main source for TIC is the Guide Star Catalogue (GSC) presently being produced for the needs of the Space Telescope. The production and the contents of the TIC is presented and the possible use of the GSC for checking the coordinates of the final HIPPARCOS Input Catalogue is discussed.

  2. Andromeda Galaxy

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-12-10

    This image is from NASA Galaxy Evolution Explorer is an observation of the large galaxy in Andromeda, Messier 31. The Andromeda galaxy is the most massive in the local group of galaxies that includes our Milky Way.

  3. The Adopted Morphological Types of 247 Rich PF Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panko, Elena; Bajan, Katarzyna; Flin, Piotr; Gotsulyak, Alla

    2016-10-01

    Morphological types were determined for 247 rich galaxy clusters from the PF Catalogue of Galaxy Clusters and Groups. The adopted types are based on classical morphological schemes and consider concentration to the cluster center, the signs of preferential direction or plane in the cluster, and the positions of the brightest galaxies. It is shown that both concentration and preferential plane are significant and independent morphological criteria.

  4. A pseudo-spectrum analysis of galaxy-galaxy lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hikage, Chiaki; Oguri, Masamune

    2016-10-01

    We present the application of the pseudo-spectrum method to galaxy-galaxy lensing. We derive explicit expressions for the pseudo-spectrum analysis of the galaxy-shear cross-spectrum, which is the Fourier space counterpart of the stacked galaxy-galaxy lensing profile. The pseudo-spectrum method corrects observational issues such as the survey geometry, masks of bright stars and their spikes, and inhomogeneous noise, which distort the spectrum and also mix the E-mode and the B-mode signals. Using ray-tracing simulations in N-body simulations including realistic masks, we confirm that the pseudo-spectrum method successfully recovers the input galaxy-shear cross-spectrum. We also show that the galaxy-shear cross-spectrum has an excess covariance relative to the Gaussian covariance at small scales (k ≳ 1h Mpc-1) where the shot noise is dominated in the Gaussian approximation. We find that the excess is consistent with the expectation from the halo sample variance (HSV), which originates from the matter fluctuations at scales larger than the survey area. We apply the pseudo-spectrum method to the observational data of Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Lensing survey shear catalogue and three different spectroscopic samples of Sloan Digital Sky Survey Luminous Red Galaxy, and Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey CMASS and LOWZ galaxies. The galaxy-shear cross-spectra are significantly detected at the level of 7-10σ using the analytic covariance with the HSV contribution included. We also confirm that the observed spectra are consistent with the halo model predictions with the halo occupation distribution parameters estimated from previous work. This work demonstrates the viability of galaxy-galaxy lensing analysis in the Fourier space.

  5. Brighter galaxy bias: underestimating the velocity dispersions of galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Old, L.; Gray, M. E.; Pearce, F. R.

    2013-09-01

    We study the systematic bias introduced when selecting the spectroscopic redshifts of brighter cluster galaxies to estimate the velocity dispersion of galaxy clusters from both simulated and observational galaxy catalogues. We select clusters with Ngal ≥ 50 at five low-redshift snapshots from the publicly available De Lucia & Blaziot semi-analytic model galaxy catalogue. Clusters are also selected from the Tempel Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 8 groups and clusters catalogue across the redshift range 0.021 ≤ z ≤ 0.098. We employ various selection techniques to explore whether the velocity dispersion bias is simply due to a lack of dynamical information or is the result of an underlying physical process occurring in the cluster, for example, dynamical friction experienced by the brighter cluster members. The velocity dispersions of the parent dark matter (DM) haloes are compared to the galaxy cluster dispersions and the stacked distribution of DM particle velocities is examined alongside the corresponding galaxy velocity distribution. We find a clear bias between the halo and the semi-analytic galaxy cluster velocity dispersion on the order of σgal/σDM ˜ 0.87-0.95 and a distinct difference in the stacked galaxy and DM particle velocities distribution. We identify a systematic underestimation of the velocity dispersions when imposing increasing absolute I-band magnitude limits. This underestimation is enhanced when using only the brighter cluster members for dynamical analysis on the order of 5-35 per cent, indicating that dynamical friction is a serious source of bias when using galaxy velocities as tracers of the underlying gravitational potential. In contrast to the literature we find that the resulting bias is not only halo mass dependent but also that the nature of the dependence changes according to the galaxy selection strategy. We make a recommendation that, in the realistic case of limited availability of spectral observations, a strictly

  6. Galaxy and mass assembly (GAMA): projected galaxy clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrow, D. J.; Cole, Shaun; Norberg, Peder; Metcalfe, N.; Baldry, I.; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Brown, Michael J. I.; Hopkins, A. M.; Lacey, Cedric G.; Liske, J.; Loveday, Jon; Palamara, David P.; Robotham, A. S. G.; Sridhar, Srivatsan

    2015-12-01

    We measure the projected two-point correlation function of galaxies in the 180 deg2 equatorial regions of the GAMA II survey, for four different redshift slices between z = 0.0 and 0.5. To do this, we further develop the Cole method of producing suitable random catalogues for the calculation of correlation functions. We find that more r-band luminous, more massive and redder galaxies are more clustered. We also find that red galaxies have stronger clustering on scales less than ˜3 h-1 Mpc. We compare to two different versions of the GALFORM galaxy formation model, Lacey et al. (in preparation) and Gonzalez-Perez et al., and find that the models reproduce the trend of stronger clustering for more massive galaxies. However, the models underpredict the clustering of blue galaxies, can incorrectly predict the correlation function on small scales and underpredict the clustering in our sample of galaxies with {˜ } 3 Lr^*. We suggest possible avenues to explore to improve these clustering predictions. The measurements presented in this paper can be used to test other galaxy formation models, and we make the measurements available online to facilitate this.

  7. Canadian Seismicity Catalogue - Western Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulder, T.

    2003-04-01

    The first seismograph station in western Canada was installed in Victoria, BC, in 1898, under the Meteorological Service of Canada. By 1940, seismograph installations in Canada were amalgamated under the Dominion Observatory. The first short-period instruments were installed in western Canada in the early 1950's. The first digital instruments were installed in the mid-1970's. To date there are now 54 digital stations in western Canada that are routinely used in analysis as well as 2 paper-record stations. Detection ability has increased significantly over the past 20 years. Magnitude thresholds for locations vary over space and time reflecting seismicity levels, station distribution, and staffing levels. Currently the magnitude thresholds are (these do not necessarily equate to completeness levels): M=2.5-3.0 for western Canada; M=2.0 in the St Elias Mountains, YT, the northern Coast Mountains, BC, most of southern BC, and southwestern Alberta; M=1.0-1.5 in the Queen Charlotte Islands, southern Coast Mountains, and northern Vancouver Island; M=0.7-0.8 in southern Vancouver Island and the adjacent mainland. Events have been located with a variety of location programs over the years. A number of velocity models have been in use over time, currently resulting in a generic model for all of western Canada, and a model each for offshore, the Queen Charlotte Islands, and Vancouver Island. Recently purchased Antelope software will allow improved ability to maintain and possibly extend current magnitude thresholds as much of the daily analyst housekeeping tasks are decreased. Recent additions to the catalogue are regular computation of P-nodal and moment tensor solutions.

  8. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Isolated galaxies, pairs and triplets (Argudo-Fernandez+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argudo-Fernandez, M.; Verley, S.; Bergond, G.; Duarte Puertas, S.; Ramos Carmona, E.; Sabater, J.; Fernandez, Lorenzo M.; Espada, D.; Sulentic, J.; Ruiz, J. E.; Leon, S.

    2015-04-01

    Catalogues of isolated galaxies, isolated pairs, and isolated triplets in the local Universe with positions, redshifts, and degrees of relation with their physical and large-scale environments. (5 data files).

  9. Radio Galaxies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downes, Ann

    1986-01-01

    Provides background information on radio galaxies. Topic areas addressed include: what produces the radio emission; radio telescopes; locating radio galaxies; how distances to radio galaxies are found; physics of radio galaxies; computer simulations of radio galaxies; and the evolution of radio galaxies with cosmic time. (JN)

  10. Radio Galaxies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downes, Ann

    1986-01-01

    Provides background information on radio galaxies. Topic areas addressed include: what produces the radio emission; radio telescopes; locating radio galaxies; how distances to radio galaxies are found; physics of radio galaxies; computer simulations of radio galaxies; and the evolution of radio galaxies with cosmic time. (JN)

  11. Morphological type correlation between nearest neighbor pairs of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamagata, Tomohiko

    1990-01-01

    Although the morphological type of galaxies is one of the most fundamental properties of galaxies, its origin and evolutionary processes, if any, are not yet fully understood. It has been established that the galaxy morphology strongly depends on the environment in which the galaxy resides (e.g., Dressler 1980). Galaxy pairs correspond to the smallest scales of galaxy clustering and may provide important clues to how the environment influences the formation and evolution of galaxies. Several investigators pointed out that there is a tendency for pair galaxies to have similar morphological types (Karachentsev and Karachentseva 1974, Page 1975, Noerdlinger 1979). Here, researchers analyze morphological type correlation for 18,364 nearest neighbor pairs of galaxies identified in the magnetic tape version of the Center for Astrophysics Redshift Catalogue.

  12. Morphological type correlation between nearest neighbor pairs of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamagata, Tomohiko

    1990-11-01

    Although the morphological type of galaxies is one of the most fundamental properties of galaxies, its origin and evolutionary processes, if any, are not yet fully understood. It has been established that the galaxy morphology strongly depends on the environment in which the galaxy resides (e.g., Dressler 1980). Galaxy pairs correspond to the smallest scales of galaxy clustering and may provide important clues to how the environment influences the formation and evolution of galaxies. Several investigators pointed out that there is a tendency for pair galaxies to have similar morphological types (Karachentsev and Karachentseva 1974, Page 1975, Noerdlinger 1979). Here, researchers analyze morphological type correlation for 18,364 nearest neighbor pairs of galaxies identified in the magnetic tape version of the Center for Astrophysics Redshift Catalogue.

  13. Understanding Pretrial Publicity: Predecisional Distortion of Evidence by Mock Jurors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hope, Lorraine; Memon, Amina; McGeorge, Peter

    2004-01-01

    Prejudicial pretrial publicity (PTP) constitutes a serious source of juror bias. The current study examined differences in predecisional distortion for mock jurors exposed to negative PTP (N-PTP) versus nonexposed control participants. According to work by K. A. Carlson and J. E. Russo (2001), predecisional distortion occurs when jurors bias new…

  14. Boning up for the Research Paper: A Mock Trial.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyle, Kevin

    Research papers produced by students in college composition classes are often boring, poorly written, and disappointing. One way to help students overcome their inability to write decent research reports is to assign them the task of handing in a three page trial-run mock research paper about three weeks before the final essay is due. They must…

  15. Thermal Pollution: Background Material for a Mock Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armstrong, David G.

    1977-01-01

    Secondary teachers can involve students in a mock trial based on a 1975 New Jersey Superior Court case involving "thermal pollution." Article provides teachers' instructions; background data for plaintiff, defense, and witnesses; debriefing questions; and capstone activity. Available from: Law in American Society Foundation, 33 North LaSalle…

  16. The Implementation of Mock Negotiations in Teaching International Business Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raffield, Barney T., III

    Mock negotiations are used as part of an undergraduate course in international business management at Lebanon Valley College (Pennsylvania) in order to introduce students to the process of negotiating for advantage in foreign countries and to emphasize the importance of an individual nation's customs, culture, and ways of transacting business in…

  17. Mock Trial: A Window to Free Speech Rights and Abilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Sherry

    2010-01-01

    This article provides some strategies to alleviate the current tensions between personal responsibility and freedom of speech rights in the public school classroom. The article advocates the necessity of making sure students understand the points and implications of the first amendment by providing a mock trial unit concerning free speech rights.…

  18. Complainant Sexual History Evidence: Its Impact on Mock Jurors' Decisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schuller, Regina A.; Hastings, Patricia A.

    2002-01-01

    The current study examined the impact of complainant sexual history evidence on mock jurors' judgements in a sexual assault trial. One hundred and sixty-nine undergraduates listened to an audiotape of a sexual assault trial in which the sexual history between the complainant and defendant was systematically varied to include either sexual…

  19. Holomorphic projections and Ramanujan’s mock theta functions

    PubMed Central

    Imamoğlu, Özlem; Raum, Martin; Richter, Olav K.

    2014-01-01

    We use spectral methods of automorphic forms to establish a holomorphic projection operator for tensor products of vector-valued harmonic weak Maass forms and vector-valued modular forms. We apply this operator to discover simple recursions for Fourier series coefficients of Ramanujan’s mock theta functions. PMID:24591582

  20. Best Practices in Preparing Students for Mock Interviews

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Katharine; Oliphant, Gary C.; Oliphant, Becky J.; Hansen, Randall S.

    2009-01-01

    Studies have shown the importance of employment interview preparation in boosting the confidence and performance of students and jobseekers when they interview. This article reviews several techniques for preparing students for mock job interviews and, hence, actual job interviews. For instructors who would like to enhance the learning value of…

  1. Thermal Pollution: Background Material for a Mock Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armstrong, David G.

    1977-01-01

    Secondary teachers can involve students in a mock trial based on a 1975 New Jersey Superior Court case involving "thermal pollution." Article provides teachers' instructions; background data for plaintiff, defense, and witnesses; debriefing questions; and capstone activity. Available from: Law in American Society Foundation, 33 North LaSalle…

  2. A Learner-Centred Mock Conference Model for Undergraduate Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kumar, Kari

    2011-01-01

    This essay describes a mock conference model of instruction suitable for use in undergraduate teaching, and which adheres to principles of learner-centred instruction and universal design for learning. A staged process of learner preparation for the conference is outlined, and student and instructor roles during preconference, conference, and…

  3. Mock Trials: Scripts for Wisconsin Lawyers and Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisconsin State Dept. of Public Instruction, Madison. Div. of Instructional Services.

    The document presents scripts prepared by experienced lawyers for seven mock trials. Designed for high school or adult audiences as introductions to the American legal system, the scripts use community lawyers, judges, and law officers as well as actors. Script topics include cases concerning automobile accidents, drunken driving, homicide,…

  4. Complainant Sexual History Evidence: Its Impact on Mock Jurors' Decisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schuller, Regina A.; Hastings, Patricia A.

    2002-01-01

    The current study examined the impact of complainant sexual history evidence on mock jurors' judgements in a sexual assault trial. One hundred and sixty-nine undergraduates listened to an audiotape of a sexual assault trial in which the sexual history between the complainant and defendant was systematically varied to include either sexual…

  5. Understanding Pretrial Publicity: Predecisional Distortion of Evidence by Mock Jurors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hope, Lorraine; Memon, Amina; McGeorge, Peter

    2004-01-01

    Prejudicial pretrial publicity (PTP) constitutes a serious source of juror bias. The current study examined differences in predecisional distortion for mock jurors exposed to negative PTP (N-PTP) versus nonexposed control participants. According to work by K. A. Carlson and J. E. Russo (2001), predecisional distortion occurs when jurors bias new…

  6. Mock Trial: A Window to Free Speech Rights and Abilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Sherry

    2010-01-01

    This article provides some strategies to alleviate the current tensions between personal responsibility and freedom of speech rights in the public school classroom. The article advocates the necessity of making sure students understand the points and implications of the first amendment by providing a mock trial unit concerning free speech rights.…

  7. The extragalactic distance scale derived from 'sosie' galaxies. I - Distances of 167 galaxies which are sosies of 14 nearby galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottinelli, L.; Gouguenheim, L.; Paturel, G.; de Vaucouleurs, G.

    1985-11-01

    The method of "sosie" galaxies is applied to a large sample of galaxies extracted from the BGP catalog of H I line data and the Second Reference Catalogue of Bright Galaxies. The "sosies" of 14 calibrating galaxies (primary calibrators and galaxies in the nearest groups) are defined as those having the same parameters, either (1) morphological type T, axis ratio R, and maximum rotation velocity VM or (2) T, R, and luminosity index Λc. These two sets provide respectively for 127 and 72 galaxies (28 are in common) distance moduli directly derived from apparent magnitudes and/or diameters. The distances obtained here are compared with various other determinations; the agreement is generally good.

  8. Radio emission in peculiar galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demellorabaca, Dulia F.; Abraham, Zulema

    1990-01-01

    During the last decades a number of surveys of peculiar galaxies have been carried out and accurate positions become available. Since peculiarities are a possible evidence of radio emission (Wright, 1974; Sulentic, 1976; Stocke et al., 1978), the authors selected a sample of 24 peculiar galaxies with optical jet-like features or extensions in different optical catalogues, mainly the Catalogue of Southern Peculiar Galaxies and Associations (Arp and Madore, 1987) and the ESO/Uppsala Survey of the ESO(B) Atlas (Lauberts, 1982) for observation at the radio continuum frequency of 22 GHz. The sample is listed in a table. Sol (1987) studied this sample and concluded that the majority of the jet-like features seem to admit an explanation in terms of interactive galaxies with bridges and/or tails due to tidal effects. Only in a few cases do the jets seem to be possibly linked to some nuclear activity of the host galaxy. The observations were made with the 13.7m-radome enclosed Itapetinga Radiotelescope (HPBW of 4.3 arcmin), in Brazil. The receiver was a 1 GHz d.s.b. super-heterodine mixer operated in total-power mode, with a system temperature of approximately 800 K. The observational technique consisted in scans in right ascention, centralized in the optical position of the galaxy. The amplitude of one scan was 43 arcmin, and its duration time was 20 seconds. The integration time was at least 2 hours (12 ten-minute observations) and the sensibility limit adopted was an antenna temperature greater than 3 times the r.m.s. error of the baseline determination. Virgo A was used as the calibrator source. Three galaxies were detected for the first time as radio sources and four other known galaxies at low frequencies had their flux densities measured at 22 GHz. The results for these sources are presented.

  9. N galaxies - A new class of X-ray sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, F. E.; Mushotzky, R. F.; Boldt, E. A.; Holt, S. S.; Rothschild, R. E.; Serlemitsos, P. J.

    1978-01-01

    It is shown that in addition to many Seyfert galaxies and quasars, N galaxies are also powerful X-ray sources. X-ray emission has been discovered from all six N galaxies in the 3C radio catalogue with redshifts less than 0.06 and from the N galaxy Pic A. Since many of the N galaxies possess compact radio components, it is suggested that the principle cause of X-ray emission may be the synchrotron self-Compton process. An alternate theory suggests that X-rays may be generated by gas clouds colliding with velocities of the order of the Doppler width of the broad lines.

  10. Northern dwarf and low surface brightness galaxies. I - The Arecibo neutral hydrogen survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Stephen E.; Thuan, Trinh X.; Magri, Christopher; Wadiak, James E.

    1990-01-01

    Neutral hydrogen observations of a large sample of dwarf and other low surface brightness galaxies are presented. Nearly all galaxies classified in the Uppsala General Catalogue as dwarf, irregular, Sd-m, or later and in the declination range of the Arecibo telescope have now been observed; here observations for 762 galaxies are reported. About 40 percent of these galaxies have no previously published detections. In total, counting previous detections, over 90 percent of these late-type systems are detected at Arecibo. The galaxies are examined for potential confusion with nearby galaxies, and substantially better SNR are derived for many previously detected galaxies.

  11. Extended Source/Galaxy All Sky 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    This panoramic view encompasses the entire sky and reveals the distribution of galaxies beyond the Milky Way galaxy, which astronomers call extended sources, as observed by Two Micron All-Sky Survey. The image is assembled from a database of over 1.6 million galaxies listed in the survey's All-Sky Survey Extended Source Catalog,; more than half of the galaxies have never before been catalogued. The colors represent how the many galaxies appear at three distinct wavelengths of infrared light (blue at 1.2 microns, green at 1.6 microns, and red at 2.2 microns). Quite evident are the many galactic clusters and superclusters, as well as some streamers composing the large-scale structure of the nearby universe. The blue overlay represents the very close and bright stars from our own Milky Way galaxy. In this projection, the bluish Milky Way lies predominantly toward the upper middle and edges of the image.

  12. Hamilton Jeffers and the Double Star Catalogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenn, Joseph S.

    2013-01-01

    Astronomers have long tracked double stars in efforts to find those that are gravitationally-bound binaries and then to determine their orbits. Court reporter and amateur astronomer Shelburne Wesley Burnham (1838-1921) published a massive double star catalogue containing more than 13,000 systems in 1906. The next keeper of the double stars was Lick Observatory astronomer Robert Grant Aitken (1864-1951), who produced a much larger catalogue in 1932. Aitken maintained and expanded Burnham’s records of observations on handwritten file cards, eventually turning them over to Lick Observatory astrometrist Hamilton Moore Jeffers (1893-1976). Jeffers further expanded the collection and put all the observations on punched cards. With the aid of Frances M. "Rete" Greeby (1921-2002), he made two catalogues: an Index Catalogue with basic data about each star, and a complete catalogue of observations, with one observation per punched card. He enlisted Willem van den Bos of Johannesburg to add southern stars, and they published the Index Catalogue of Visual Double Stars, 1961.0. As Jeffers approached retirement he became greatly concerned about the disposition of the catalogues. He wanted to be replaced by another "double star man," but Lick Director Albert E. Whitford (1905-2002) had the new 120-inch reflector, the world’s second largest telescope, and he wanted to pursue modern astrophysics instead. Jeffers was vociferously opposed to turning over the card files to another institution, and especially against their coming under the control of Kaj Strand of the U.S. Naval Observatory. In the end the USNO got the files and has maintained the records ever since, first under Charles Worley (1935-1997), and, since 1997, under Brian Mason. Now called the Washington Double Star Catalog (WDS), it is completely online and currently contains more than 1,000,000 measures of more than 100,000 pairs.

  13. Alcohol promotions in Australian supermarket catalogues.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Robyn; Stafford, Julia; Pierce, Hannah; Daube, Mike

    2017-07-01

    In Australia, most alcohol is sold as packaged liquor from off-premises retailers, a market increasingly dominated by supermarket chains. Competition between retailers may encourage marketing approaches, for example, discounting, that evidence indicates contribute to alcohol-related harms. This research documented the nature and variety of promotional methods used by two major supermarket retailers to promote alcohol products in their supermarket catalogues. Weekly catalogues from the two largest Australian supermarket chains were reviewed for alcohol-related content over 12 months. Alcohol promotions were assessed for promotion type, product type, number of standard drinks, purchase price and price/standard drink. Each store catalogue included, on average, 13 alcohol promotions/week, with price-based promotions most common. Forty-five percent of promotions required the purchase of multiple alcohol items. Wine was the most frequently promoted product (44%), followed by beer (24%) and spirits (18%). Most (99%) wine cask (2-5 L container) promotions required multiple (two to three) casks to be purchased. The average number of standard drinks required to be purchased to participate in catalogue promotions was 31.7 (SD = 24.9; median = 23.1). The median price per standard drink was $1.49 (range $0.19-$9.81). Cask wines had the lowest cost per standard drink across all product types. Supermarket catalogues' emphasis on low prices/high volumes of alcohol reflects that retailers are taking advantage of limited restrictions on off-premise sales and promotion, which allow them to approach market competition in ways that may increase alcohol-related harms in consumers. Regulation of alcohol marketing should address retailer catalogue promotions. [Johnston R, Stafford J, Pierce H, Daube M. Alcohol promotions in Australian supermarket catalogues. Drug Alcohol Rev 2017;36:456-463]. © 2016 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs.

  14. New Generation of Catalogues for the New Generation of Users: A Comparison of Six Library Catalogues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mercun, Tanja; Zumer, Maja

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to describe some of the problems and issues faced by online library catalogues. It aims to establish how libraries have undertaken the mission of developing the next generation catalogues and how they compare to new tools such as Amazon. Design/methodology/approach: An expert study was carried out in January…

  15. Galaxy populations in rich environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Kim-Vy Huu

    2002-11-01

    Combining two color HST/WFPC2 mosaics with extensive Keck/LRIS spectroscopy, we derive physical properties for over 400 confirmed cluster members at z = 0.33, 0.58, and 0.83 to provide key tests of current CDM models of hierarchical galaxy formation. Morphological characteristics such as bulge to total luminosity, half-light radius, bulge/disk scale length, and galaxy asymmetry are measured by determining the best-fit 2D bulge + disk model for each galaxy. We rigorously test these measurements using extensive mock galaxy catalogs to quantify systematic and random errors. Utilizing quantitative structural parameters, spectral indices ([OII] λ3727, HS, and H-γ), Hubble types, internal velocity dispersions (for a subset), and galaxy colors, we find that: (1)Galaxies spanning the range of Hubble type (-5 ≤ T ≤ 8) are well-fit by a de Vaucouleurs bulge with exponential disk profile; (2)The average [OII] equivalent width of the most disk-dominated members (B/T < 0.25) is significantly higher than the average of the bulge-dominated members (B/T ≥ 0.4); (3)The physical properties, e.g. half-light radii, bulge-to-total luminosities, and bulge ellipticities, of cluster elliptical and S0 galaxies (-17.3 ≥ MBz - 5log h 70 ≥ -19.3) are consistent with the two types sharing a common parent galaxy population; (4)In these three clusters, the distributions of cluster disk sizes are indistinguishable, a result contrary to predictions from current hierarchical formation models; (5)Post- starburst (“E + A”) galaxies are a non- negligible fraction (˜5 20%) of the cluster population at these redshifts; (6)We find compelling evidence that the E + A mass distribution evolves with redshift (“downsizing”) such that E + A galaxies span the range in mass at high redshift but only low mass E + A's exist in nearby clusters.

  16. The Most Bound Halo Particle-Galaxy Correspondence Model: Comparison between Models with Different Merger Timescales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Sungwook E.; Park, Changbom; Kim, Juhan

    2016-06-01

    We develop a galaxy assignment scheme that populates dark matter halos with galaxies by tracing the most bound member particles (MBPs) of simulated halos. Several merger timescale models based on analytic calculations and numerical simulations are adopted as the survival times of mock satellite galaxies. We build mock galaxy samples from halo merger data of the Horizon Run 4 N-body simulation from z = 12-0. We compare group properties and two-point correlation functions (2pCFs) of mock galaxies with those of volume-limited SDSS galaxies, with r-band absolute magnitudes of {{ M }}r-5{log}h\\lt -21 and -20 at z = 0. It is found that the MBP-galaxy correspondence scheme reproduces the observed population of SDSS galaxies in massive galaxy groups (M\\gt {10}14 {h}-1 {M}⊙ ) and the small-scale 2pCF ({r}{{p}}\\lt 10 {h}-1 {Mpc}) quite well for the majority of the merger timescale models adopted. The new scheme outperforms the previous subhalo-galaxy correspondence scheme by more than 2σ.

  17. Tsunami Catalogues for the Eastern Mediterranean - Revisited.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambraseys, N.; Synolakis, C. E.

    2008-12-01

    We critically examine examine tsunami catalogues of tsunamis in the Eastern Mediterranean published in the last decade, by reference to the original sources, see Ambraseys (2008). Such catalogues have been widely used in the aftermath of the 2004 Boxing Day tsunami for probabilistic hazard analysis, even to make projections for a ten year time frame. On occasion, such predictions have caused panic and have reduced the credibility of the scientific community in making hazard assessments. We correct classification and other spurious errors in earlier catalogues and posit a new list. We conclude that for some historic events, any assignment of magnitude, even on a six point intensity scale is inappropriate due to lack of information. Further we assert that any tsunami catalogue, including ours, can only be used in conjunction with sedimentologic evidence to quantitatively infer the return period of larger events. Statistical analyses correlating numbers of tsunami events derived solely from catalogues with their inferred or imagined intensities are meaningless, at least when focusing on specific locales where only a handful of tsunamis are known to have been historically reported. Quantitative hazard assessments based on scenario events of historic tsunamis for which -at best- only the size and approximate location of the parent earthquake is known should be undertaken with extreme caution and only with benefit of geologic studies to enhance the understanding of the local tectonics. Ambraseys N. (2008) Earthquakes in the Eastern Mediterranean and the Middle East: multidisciplinary study of 2000 years of seimicity, Cambridge Univ. Press, Cambridge (ISBN 9780521872928).

  18. A Revised Earthquake Catalogue for South Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panzera, Francesco; Zechar, J. Douglas; Vogfjörd, Kristín S.; Eberhard, David A. J.

    2016-01-01

    In 1991, a new seismic monitoring network named SIL was started in Iceland with a digital seismic system and automatic operation. The system is equipped with software that reports the automatic location and magnitude of earthquakes, usually within 1-2 min of their occurrence. Normally, automatic locations are manually checked and re-estimated with corrected phase picks, but locations are subject to random errors and systematic biases. In this article, we consider the quality of the catalogue and produce a revised catalogue for South Iceland, the area with the highest seismic risk in Iceland. We explore the effects of filtering events using some common recommendations based on network geometry and station spacing and, as an alternative, filtering based on a multivariate analysis that identifies outliers in the hypocentre error distribution. We identify and remove quarry blasts, and we re-estimate the magnitude of many events. This revised catalogue which we consider to be filtered, cleaned, and corrected should be valuable for building future seismicity models and for assessing seismic hazard and risk. We present a comparative seismicity analysis using the original and revised catalogues: we report characteristics of South Iceland seismicity in terms of b value and magnitude of completeness. Our work demonstrates the importance of carefully checking an earthquake catalogue before proceeding with seismicity analysis.

  19. A 2 epoch proper motion catalogue from the UKIDSS Large Area Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Leigh; Lucas, Phil; Burningham, Ben; Jones, Hugh; Pinfield, David; Smart, Ricky; Andrei, Alexandre

    2013-04-01

    The UKIDSS Large Area Survey (LAS) began in 2005, with the start of the UKIDSS program as a 7 year effort to survey roughly 4000 square degrees at high galactic latitudes in Y, J, H and K bands. The survey also included a significant quantity of 2-epoch J band observations, with epoch baselines ranging from 2 to 7 years. We present a proper motion catalogue for the 1500 square degrees of the 2 epoch LAS data, which includes some 800,000 sources with motions detected above the 5σ level. We developed a bespoke proper motion pipeline which applies a source-unique second order polynomial transformation to UKIDSS array coordinates of each source to counter potential local non-uniformity in the focal plane. Our catalogue agrees well with the proper motion data supplied in the current WFCAM Science Archive (WSA) DR9 catalogue where there is overlap, and in various optical catalogues, but it benefits from some improvements. One improvement is that we provide absolute proper motions, using LAS galaxies for the relative to absolute correction. Also, by using unique, local, 2nd order polynomial tranformations, as opposed to the linear transformations in the WSA, we correct better for any local distortions in the focal plane, not including the radial distortion that is removed by their pipeline.

  20. Galaxy-Galaxy Lensing in the DES Science Verification Data

    SciTech Connect

    Clampitt, J.; et al.

    2016-03-18

    We present galaxy-galaxy lensing results from 139 square degrees of Dark Energy Survey (DES) Science Verification (SV) data. Our lens sample consists of red galaxies, known as redMaGiC, which are specifically selected to have a low photometric redshift error and outlier rate. The lensing measurement has a total signal-to-noise of 29, including all lenses over a wide redshift range $0.2 < z < 0.8$. Dividing the lenses into three redshift bins, we find no evidence for evolution in the halo mass with redshift. We obtain consistent results for the lensing measurement with two independent shear pipelines, ngmix and im3shape. We perform a number of null tests on the shear and photometric redshift catalogs and quantify resulting systematic errors. Covariances from jackknife subsamples of the data are validated with a suite of 50 mock surveys. The results and systematics checks in this work provide a critical input for future cosmological and galaxy evolution studies with the DES data and redMaGiC galaxy samples. We fit a Halo Occupation Distribution (HOD) model, and demonstrate that our data constrains the mean halo mass of the lens galaxies, despite strong degeneracies between individual HOD parameters.

  1. Apparent brightness distribution of GRB host galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagoly, Zsolt; Rácz, István I.; Balázs, Lajos G.; Horváth, István; Tóth, L. Viktor

    We studied the unbiased optical brightness distribution which was calculated from the survival analysis of host galaxies (HGs) data and its relationship with the Swift GRB data of the host galaxies observed by the Keck telescope. Based on the sample obtained from merging the Swift GRB table and the Keck optical data we also studied the dependence of this distribution on the GRB's data. Finally, we compared the HGs distribution with standard galaxies distribution of the DEEP2 redshift survey and checked the result with the VIPERS catalogue too.

  2. A Day in Court: How Mock Trials Bring Learning to Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherrin, David

    2016-01-01

    This article is drawn from the authors' book, "Judging for Themselves: Using Mock Trials to Bring Social Studies and English to Life," which discusses the effectiveness of mock trials as tools for learning and assessments. Mock trials are effective because they are challenging, authentic projects in which students create and then do…

  3. Using Controversial Mock Trials in "Psychology and Law" Courses: Suggestions from Participants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Werth, James L., Jr.; Harvey, James; McNamara, Rebecca; Svoboda, Andrea; Gulbrandson, Raina; Hendren, Jennifer; Greedy, Tiffany; Leybold, Christie

    2002-01-01

    Describes a mock trial focused on Jack Kevorkian and an euthanasia case that was included in a psychology and law course. Discusses the course format, provides the reactions to the mock trial by students and consultants, and includes suggestions for improving the mock trial. (CMK)

  4. Using Controversial Mock Trials in "Psychology and Law" Courses: Suggestions from Participants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Werth, James L., Jr.; Harvey, James; McNamara, Rebecca; Svoboda, Andrea; Gulbrandson, Raina; Hendren, Jennifer; Greedy, Tiffany; Leybold, Christie

    2002-01-01

    Describes a mock trial focused on Jack Kevorkian and an euthanasia case that was included in a psychology and law course. Discusses the course format, provides the reactions to the mock trial by students and consultants, and includes suggestions for improving the mock trial. (CMK)

  5. The topology of the IRAS Point Source Catalogue Redshift Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canavezes, A.; Springel, V.; Oliver, S. J.; Rowan-Robinson, M.; Keeble, O.; White, S. D. M.; Saunders, W.; Efstathiou, G.; Frenk, C. S.; McMahon, R. G.; Maddox, S.; Sutherland, W.; Tadros, H.

    1998-07-01

    We investigate the topology of the new Point Source Catalogue Redshift Survey (PSCz) of IRAS galaxies by means of the genus statistic. The survey maps the local Universe with approximately 15 000 galaxies over 84.1 per cent of the sky, and provides an unprecedented number of resolution elements for the topological analysis. For comparison with the PSCz data we also examine the genus of large N-body simulations of four variants of the cold dark matter (CDM) cosmogony. The simulations are part of the Virgo project to simulate the formation of structure in the Universe. We assume that the statistical properties of the galaxy distribution can be identified with those of the dark matter particles in the simulations. We extend the standard genus analysis by examining the influence of sampling noise on the genus curve and introducing a statistic able to quantify the amount of phase correlation present in the density field, the amplitude drop of the genus compared to a Gaussian field with identical power spectrum. The results for PSCz are consistent with the hypothesis of random-phase initial conditions. In particular, no strong phase correlation is detected on scales ranging from 10 to 32 h^-1 Mpc, whereas there is a positive detection of phase correlation at smaller scales. Among the simulations, phase correlations are detected in all models at small scales, albeit with different strengths. When scaled to a common normalization, the amplitude drop depends primarily on the shape of the power spectrum. We find that the constant-bias standard CDM model can be ruled out at high significance, because the shape of its power spectrum is not consistent with PSCz. The other CDM models with more large-scale power all fit the PSCz data almost equally well, with a slight preference for a high-density tauCDM model.

  6. Hipparcos to deliver its final results catalogue soon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1995-10-01

    them, almost 30 years ago, to propose carrying out these observations from the relatively benign environment of space. Hipparcos is, by present standards, a medium-sized satellite, with a 30 cm telescope sensing simply ordinary light. But it has been described as the most imaginative in the short history of space astronomy. This foresight has been amply repaid. In the long history of stargazing it ranks with the surveys by Hipparchus the Greek in the 2nd Century BC and by Tichy Brahe the Dane in the 16th Century AD, both of which transformed human perceptions of the Universe. Positions derived from the Hipparcos satellite are better than a millionth of a degree, and newly a thousand times more accurate than star positions routinely determined from he ground. This accuracy makes it possible to measure directly the distances to the stars. While it took 250 years between astronomers first setting out on the exacting task of measuring the distance to a star, and a stellar distance being measured for the first time, ESA's Hipparcos mission has revolutionised this long, painstaking, and fundamental task by measuring accurate distances and movements of more than one hundred thousand. The measurement concept involved he satellite triangulating its way between he stars all wound the sky, building up a celestial map in much the same way as land surveyors use triangulation between hill-tops to measure distances accurately. Only the angles involved are much smaller : the accuracy that has been achieved with the Hipparcos Catalogue is such that he two edges of a coin, viewed from he other side of the Atlantic Ocean, could be distinguished. The results from Hipparcos will deliver scientists with long-awaited details of our place in he Milky Way Galaxy. Most of he stars visible to the naked eye are, to a large extent, companions of the Sun, in a great orbital march around the centre of the Galaxy, a journey so long that it takes individual stars 250 million years to complete, in

  7. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Galaxy clusters from the APM galaxy survey (Dalton+ 1997)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalton, G. B.; Maddox, S. J.; Sutherland, W. J.; Efstahiou, G.

    1997-10-01

    We describe the construction of catalogues of galaxy clusters from the APM Galaxy survey using an automated algorithm based on Abell-like selection criteria. We investigate the effects of varying several parameters in our selection algorithm, including the magnitude range and radius from the cluster centre used to estimate the cluster richnesses. We quantify the accuracy of the photometric distance estimates by comparing them with measured redshifts, and we investigate the stability and completeness of the resulting catalogues. We find that the angular correlation functions for different cluster catalogues are in good agreement with one another, and are also consistent with the observed amplitude of the spatial correlation function of rich clusters. (1 data file).

  8. Ultraviolet to infrared emission of z > 1 galaxies: Can we derive reliable star formation rates and stellar masses?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buat, V.; Heinis, S.; Boquien, M.; Burgarella, D.; Charmandaris, V.; Boissier, S.; Boselli, A.; Le Borgne, D.; Morrison, G.

    2014-01-01

    Aims: Our knowledge of the cosmic mass assembly relies on measurements of star formation rates (SFRs) and stellar masses (Mstar), of galaxies as a function of redshift. These parameters must be estimated in a consistent way with a good knowledge of systematics before studying their correlation and the variation of the specific SFR. Constraining these fundamental properties of galaxies across the Universe is of utmost importance if we want to understand galaxy formation and evolution. Methods: We seek to derive SFRs and stellar masses in distant galaxies and to quantify the main uncertainties affecting their measurement. We explore the impact of the assumptions made in their derivation with standard calibrations or through a fitting process, as well as the impact of the available data, focusing on the role of infrared emission originating from dust. Results: We build a sample of galaxies with z > 1, all observed from the ultraviolet to the infrared in their rest frame. The data are fitted with the code CIGALE, which is also used to build and analyse a catalogue of mock galaxies. Models with different star formation histories are introduced: an exponentially decreasing or increasing SFR and a more complex one coupling a decreasing SFR with a younger burst of constant star formation. We define different sets of data, with or without a good sampling of the ultraviolet range, near-infrared, and thermal infrared data. Variations of the metallicity are also investigated. The impact of these different cases on the determination of stellar mass and SFR are analysed. Conclusions: Exponentially decreasing models with a redshift formation of the stellar population zf ≃ 8 cannot fit the data correctly. All the other models fit the data correctly at the price of unrealistically young ages when the age of the single stellar population is taken to be a free parameter, especially for the exponentially decreasing models. The best fits are obtained with two stellar populations. As

  9. Large Catalogue Query Performance in Relational Databases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Power, Robert A.

    2007-05-01

    The performance of the mysql and oracle database systems have been compared for a selection of astronomy queries using large catalogues of up to a billion objects. The queries tested are those expected from the astronomy community: general database queries, cone searches, neighbour finding and cross matching. The catalogue preparation, sql query formulation and database performance is presented. Most of the general queries perform adequately when appropriate indexes are present in the database. Each system performs well for cone search queries when the Hierarchical Triangular Mesh spatial index is used. Neighbour finding and cross matching are not well supported in a database environment when compared to software specifically developed to solve these problems.

  10. Catalogue data system for new metallic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makiura, Hirofumi

    In the event of realizing wide practical use of new metallic material, it is necessary that both manufacture and utilization sides on the material have common understanding and recognition for the performance. As one of the information source for that, a catalogue data system of new metallic material has been developed. In this system, 3000 cases of catalogue information from around 150 domestic companies were recorded into CD-ROM, and the information can easily be searched and processed using a personal computer. Introducing details on 36 kinds of the new metallic material recorded and 26 data items, this report summerizes the search method.

  11. Understanding pretrial publicity: predecisional distortion of evidence by mock jurors.

    PubMed

    Hope, Lorraine; Memon, Amina; McGeorge, Peter

    2004-06-01

    Prejudicial pretrial publicity (PTP) constitutes a serious source of juror bias. The current study examined differences in predecisional distortion for mock jurors exposed to negative PTP (N-PTP) versus nonexposed control participants. According to work by K. A. Carlson and J. E. Russo (2001), predecisional distortion occurs when jurors bias new evidence in favor of their current leading party (prosecution or defense) rather than evaluating this information for its actual probative properties. Jury-eligible university students (N=116) acted as jurors in a mock trial. Elevated rates of guilty verdicts were observed in the N-PTP condition. Predecisional distortion scores were significantly higher in the N-PTP condition and reflected a proprosecution bias. The effect of prejudicial PTP on verdict outcomes was mediated by predecisional distortion in the evaluation of testimony. Results are discussed in relation to motivated decision making and confirmation biases. Copyright 2004 American Psychological Association

  12. An interdisciplinary mock trial involving pharmacy, law, and ethics.

    PubMed

    Broeseker, A E; Jones, M M

    1999-01-01

    To describe an innovative, interdisciplinary approach to illustrate the relationship between healthcare ethics and law. A mock trial was created for students enrolled in the Samford University McWhorter School of Pharmacy and Department of Paralegal Education. The trial served as the starting point to discuss confidentiality in health care in general and pharmacy in particular. Students from both programs served on the jury and rendered a verdict after the case had been presented. The Alabama statute concerning exceptions to confidentiality is reviewed. The students' assignment and lessons learned are also described. Students thoroughly enjoyed this method of teaching and learning. The mock trial provided an interesting way to exemplify the often complex relationship between healthcare ethics and law.

  13. The Mock Trial: Revisiting a Valuable Training Strategy.

    PubMed

    Glancy, Graham D

    2016-03-01

    The number of forensic psychiatrists has increased dramatically over the past 40 years. With this welcome development has also come some challenges for educating future generations of practitioners, specifically the greater demands on training programs and the need to divide practice hours among a larger pool of individuals. Junior trainees and experienced practitioners alike can benefit by supplementing work experience with well-designed, theoretically informed simulations. In this article, the theoretical perspectives of simulation, deliberate practice, and experiential education are discussed and linked to the design of mock trials, a form of simulation used to teach the essential skill of expert testimony. My argument is that, by explicitly linking the mock trial to learning theory, its efficacy and range of application can be increased. I provide recommendations for effective design and application.

  14. Evaluating the effectiveness of a mock oral educational program.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Laura E; Snyder, Mara; Sullivan, Sarah A; Foley, Eugene F; Greenberg, Jacob A

    2016-10-01

    To obtain board certification, the American Board of Surgery requires graduates of general surgery training programs to pass both the written qualifying examination (QE) and the oral certifying examination (CE). In 2015, the pass rates for the QE and CE were 80% and 77%, respectively. In the 2011-2012 academic year, the University of Wisconsin instituted a mandatory, faculty-led, monthly CE preparation educational program (CE prep) as a supplement to their existing annual mock oral examination. We hypothesized that the implementation of these sessions would improve the first-time pass rate for residents taking the ABS CE at our institution. Secondary outcomes studied were QE pass rate, correlation with American Board of Surgery In-Training Examination (ABSITE) and mock oral examination scores, cost, and type of study materials used, perception of examination difficulty, and applicant preparedness. A sixteen question survey was sent to 57 of 59 residents who attended the University of Wisconsin between the years of 2007 and 2015. Email addresses for two former residents could not be located. De-identified data for the ABSITE and first-time pass rates for the QE and CE examination were retrospectively collected and analyzed along with survey results. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS version 22 (IBM Corp., Armonk, NY). P values < 0.05 were considered significant. Survey response rate was 77.2%. Of the residents who have attempted the CE, first-time pass rate was 76.0% (19 of 25) before the implementation of the formal CE Prep and 100% (22 of 22) after (P = 0.025). Absolute ABSITE score, and mock oral annual examination grades were significantly improved after the CE Prep was initiated (P values < 0.001 and 0.003, respectively), however, ABSITE percentile was not significantly different (P = 0.415). ABSITE raw score and percentile, as well as mock oral annual examination scores were significantly associated with passing the QE (0.032, 0.027, and 0

  15. Mock Nuclear Processing Facility-Safeguards Training Requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbs, Philip; Hasty, Tim; Johns, Rissell; Baum, Gregory

    2014-08-31

    This document outlines specific training requirements in the topical areas of Material Control and Accounting (MC&A) and Physical Protection(PP) which are to be used as technical input for designing a mock Integrated Security Facility (ISF) at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The overall project objective for these requirements is to enhance the ability to deliver training on Material Protection Control and Accounting (MC&A) concepts regarding hazardous material such as irradiated materials with respect to bulk processing facilities.

  16. An Overview of the Mock LISA Data Challenges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnaud, Keith A.; Babak, Stanislav; Baker, John G.; Benacquista, Matthew J.; Cornish, Neil J.; Cutler, Curt; Larson, Shane L.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Vallisneri, Michele; Vecchio, Alberto; hide

    2006-01-01

    The LISA International Science Team Working Group on Data Analysis (LIST-WG1B) is sponsoring several rounds of mock data challenges, with the purpose of fostering the development of LISA data-analysis capabilities, and of demonstrating technical readiness for the maximum science exploitation of the LISA data. The first round of challenge data sets were released at this Symposium. We describe the objectives, structure, and timeline of this program.

  17. An Overview of the Mock LISA Data Challenges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnaud, Keith A.; Babak, Stanislav; Baker, John G.; Benacquista, Matthew J.; Cornish, Neil J.; Cutler, Curt; Larson, Shane L.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Vallisneri, Michele; Vecchio, Alberto; Vinet, Jean-Yves

    2006-01-01

    The LISA International Science Team Working Group on Data Analysis (LIST-WG1B) is sponsoring several rounds of mock data challenges, with the purpose of fostering the development of LISA data-analysis capabilities, and of demonstrating technical readiness for the maximum science exploitation of the LISA data. The first round of challenge data sets were released at this Symposium. We describe the objectives, structure, and timeline of this program.

  18. Experimental modal survey of the probe mass mock-up

    SciTech Connect

    Manning, P.A.; Woehrle, T.G.

    1992-07-01

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is engaged in a technology development project which includes designing a lightweight, autonomous, highly maneuverable space vehicle, commonly referred to as a probe. The current probe design includes a guidance and control system that requires complete information on the dynamic response of the probe during operation. A finite element model of the probe was constructed to provide analytical information on the dynamic response to specific operational inputs. In order to verify the assumptions made in the model, a mass mock-up of the probe was constructed at LLNL and an experimental modal survey was performed to determine the frequencies, damping values and deflection shapes for each natural mode of the mock-up. The experimental modal parameters were compared with the parameters obtained through modal analysis of the finite element model to provide a measure of the correlation between the model and the actual structure. This report describes the experimental modal testing and analysis of the mass mock-up and compares the experimental results with the finite element results.

  19. A Coupled THMC model of FEBEX mock-up test

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Liange; Samper, Javier

    2008-09-15

    FEBEX (Full-scale Engineered Barrier EXperiment) is a demonstration and research project for the engineered barrier system (EBS) of a radioactive waste repository in granite. It includes two full-scale heating and hydration tests: the in situ test performed at Grimsel (Switzerland) and a mock-up test operating at CIEMAT facilities in Madrid (Spain). The mock-up test provides valuable insight on thermal, hydrodynamic, mechanical and chemical (THMC) behavior of EBS because its hydration is controlled better than that of in situ test in which the buffer is saturated with water from the surrounding granitic rock. Here we present a coupled THMC model of the mock-up test which accounts for thermal and chemical osmosis and bentonite swelling with a state-surface approach. The THMC model reproduces measured temperature and cumulative water inflow data. It fits also relative humidity data at the outer part of the buffer, but underestimates relative humidities near the heater. Dilution due to hydration and evaporation near the heater are the main processes controlling the concentration of conservative species while surface complexation, mineral dissolution/precipitation and cation exchanges affect significantly reactive species as well. Results of sensitivity analyses to chemical processes show that pH is mostly controlled by surface complexation while dissolved cations concentrations are controlled by cation exchange reactions.

  20. Thermal hydraulic modeling of the mock fuel facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, Jacob

    The major focus of this thesis was to make improved three dimensional models of the Mock Fuel Facility. Three distinct experiment types run with the Mock Fuel Facility (MFF) were the main focus of this thesis. Two of the experiments were modeled and an in-depth analysis of the model results was performed to gain a better understanding of the Mock Fuel Facility. For the third experiment the process of creating a model was begun. There were multiple purposes for the work completed in this thesis. The work was done partially to gain a greater understanding of the UMass Lowell Research Reactor (UMLRR). There is minimal instrumentation within the UMLRR to measure localized temperatures within the UMLRR. It is hoped that the work done in this thesis will provide a basis for future modeling work which will give insight into the temperature profiles within the UMLRR. This work is also being done to gain insight into the capabilities of the COMSOL multiphysics modelling software and evaluate its potential for future modelling work. Finally this work is also being done for its potential as an educational tool. The MFF and COMSOL have potential to be used for experimental lab work by students to learn about computer modeling and validation.

  1. Explanatory supplement of the ISOGAL-DENIS Point Source Catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuller, F.; Ganesh, S.; Messineo, M.; Moneti, A.; Blommaert, J. A. D. L.; Alard, C.; Aracil, B.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Omont, A.; Schultheis, M.; Simon, G.; Soive, A.; Testi, L.

    2003-06-01

    We present version 1.0 of the ISOGAL-DENIS Point Source Catalogue (PSC), containing more than 100 000 point sources detected at 7 and/or 15 mu m in the ISOGAL survey of the inner Galaxy with the ISOCAM instrument on board the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO). These sources are cross-identified, wherever possible, with near-infrared (0.8-2.2 mu m) data from the DENIS survey. The overall surface covered by the ISOGAL survey is about 16 square degrees, mostly (95%) distributed near the Galactic plane ( | b | <~ 1deg), where the source extraction can become confusion limited and perturbed by the high background emission. Therefore, special care has been taken aimed at limiting the photometric error to ~ 0.2 mag down to a sensitivity limit of typically 10 mJy. The present paper gives a complete description of the entries and the information which can be found in this catalogue, as well as a detailed discussion of the data processing and the quality checks which have been completed. The catalogue is available at the Centre de Données Astronomiques de Strasbourg (via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/403/955) and also via the server at the Institut d'Astrophysique de Paris (http://www-isogal.iap.fr/). A more complete version of this paper, including a detailed description of the data processing, is available in electronic form through the ADS service and at http://www.edpsciences.org. This is paper No. 18 in a refereed journal based on data from the ISOGAL project. Based on observations with ISO, an ESA project with instruments funded by ESA Member States (especially the PI countries: France, Germany, the Netherlands and the UK) and with the participation of ISAS and NASA; and on DENIS observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Chile.

  2. Detecting effects of filaments on galaxy properties in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yen-Chi; Ho, Shirley; Mandelbaum, Rachel; Bahcall, Neta A.; Brownstein, Joel R.; Freeman, Peter E.; Genovese, Christopher R.; Schneider, Donald P.; Wasserman, Larry

    2017-04-01

    We study the effects of filaments on galaxy properties in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 12 using filaments from the 'Cosmic Web Reconstruction' catalogue, a publicly available filament catalogue for SDSS. Since filaments are tracers of medium- to high-density regions, we expect that galaxy properties associated with the environment are dependent on the distance to the nearest filament. Our analysis demonstrates that a red galaxy or a high-mass galaxy tends to reside closer to filaments than a blue or low-mass galaxy. After adjusting the effect from stellar mass, on average, early-forming galaxies or large galaxies have a shorter distance to filaments than late-forming galaxies or small galaxies. For the main galaxy sample, all signals are very significant (>6σ). For the LOWZ and CMASS sample, the stellar mass and size are significant (>2σ). The filament effects we observe persist until z = 0.7 (the edge of the CMASS sample). Comparing our results to those using the galaxy distances from redMaPPer galaxy clusters as a reference, we find a similar result between filaments and clusters. Moreover, we find that the effect of clusters on the stellar mass of nearby galaxies depends on the galaxy's filamentary environment. Our findings illustrate the strong correlation of galaxy properties with proximity to density ridges, strongly supporting the claim that density ridges are good tracers of filaments.

  3. Learning German: A CAI Program Catalogue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coombs, Virginia M.

    1984-01-01

    Presents a catalogue of microcomputer courseware specifically designed for use in learning German. Covers four types of software: (1) authoring systems for drill and practice, (2) drill and practice programs that are self-contained, (3) authoring systems that create game-like materials, and (4) game programs. Includes a listing of publishers and…

  4. AWP Catalogue of Writing Programs. Third Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walton, Kathy, Ed.

    New and revised information on workshop and degree programs in creative writing offered at 251 United States and five Canadian colleges is contained in this catalogue. Entries on each institution provide the following: (1) information about the degree offered and about the required course of study, including thesis requirements, number of hours…

  5. Crustal Dynamics Project: Catalogue of site information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    This document represents a catalogue of site information for the Crustal Dynamics Project. It contains information and descriptions of those sites used by the Project as observing stations for making the precise geodetic measurements useful for studies of the Earth's crustal movements and deformation.

  6. The British Film Catalogue: 1895-1970.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gifford, Denis

    This reference book catalogues nearly every commercial film produced in Britain for public entertainment from 1895 to 1970. The entries are listed chronologically by year and month. Each entry is limited to a single film and contains a cross index code number, exhibition date, main title, length, color system, production company, distribution…

  7. The Belgian Union Catalogue of Periodicals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goedeme, G.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    Describes the edition, on computer output microfiche, of the supplement to the 1965 Union catalogue of foreign periodicals in Belgian and Luxemburgian libraries and documentation centers. The microfiches contain location information of 28,000 periodicals in 300 libraries and are edited in a rich typography. (Author)

  8. A Catalogue of Wallcharts. Seventh Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Committee for Audio-Visual Aids in Education, London (England).

    The aim of this catalogue of wallcharts is to provide a list of charts and flannelgraphs suitable for use in schools so that teachers, education authorities, and others may have on hand a concise reference to all charts available on any particular topic. All charts of specific teaching value designed especially for wall display and at least 10…

  9. The Belgian Union Catalogue of Periodicals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goedeme, G.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    Describes the edition, on computer output microfiche, of the supplement to the 1965 Union catalogue of foreign periodicals in Belgian and Luxemburgian libraries and documentation centers. The microfiches contain location information of 28,000 periodicals in 300 libraries and are edited in a rich typography. (Author)

  10. Gaia Data Release 1. Catalogue validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arenou, F.; Luri, X.; Babusiaux, C.; Fabricius, C.; Helmi, A.; Robin, A. C.; Vallenari, A.; Blanco-Cuaresma, S.; Cantat-Gaudin, T.; Findeisen, K.; Reylé, C.; Ruiz-Dern, L.; Sordo, R.; Turon, C.; Walton, N. A.; Shih, I.-C.; Antiche, E.; Barache, C.; Barros, M.; Breddels, M.; Carrasco, J. M.; Costigan, G.; Diakité, S.; Eyer, L.; Figueras, F.; Galluccio, L.; Heu, J.; Jordi, C.; Krone-Martins, A.; Lallement, R.; Lambert, S.; Leclerc, N.; Marrese, P. M.; Moitinho, A.; Mor, R.; Romero-Gómez, M.; Sartoretti, P.; Soria, S.; Soubiran, C.; Souchay, J.; Veljanoski, J.; Ziaeepour, H.; Giuffrida, G.; Pancino, E.; Bragaglia, A.

    2017-02-01

    Context. Before the publication of the Gaia Catalogue, the contents of the first data release have undergone multiple dedicated validation tests. Aims: These tests aim to provide in-depth analysis of the Catalogue content in order to detect anomalies and individual problems in specific objects or in overall statistical properties, and either to filter them before the public release or to describe the different caveats on the release for an optimal exploitation of the data. Methods: Dedicated methods using either Gaia internal data, external catalogues, or models have been developed for the validation processes. They test normal stars as well as various populations such as open or globular clusters, double stars, variable stars, and quasars. Properties of coverage, accuracy, and precision of the data are provided by the numerous tests presented here and are jointly analysed to assess the data release content. Results: This independent validation confirms the quality of the published data, Gaia DR1 being the most precise all-sky astrometric and photometric catalogue to date. However, several limitations in terms of completeness, and astrometric or photometric quality are identified and described. Figures describing the relevant properties of the release are shown, and the testing activities carried out validating the user interfaces are also described. A particular emphasis is made on the statistical use of the data in scientific exploitation.

  11. Unusual flux-distance relationship for pulsars suggested by analysis of the Australia national telescopy facility pulsar catalogue

    SciTech Connect

    Singleton, John; Perez, M R; Singleton, J; Ardavan, H; Ardavan, A

    2009-01-01

    We analyze pulsar fluxes at 1400 MHz (S(1400)) and distances d taken from the Australia National Telescope Facility (ATNF) Pulsar Catalogue. Under the assumption that pulsar populations in different parts of the Galaxy are similar, we find that either (a) pulsar fluxes diminish with distance according to a non-standard power law (we suggest S(1400){proportional_to} 1/d rather than {proportional_to} 1/d{sup 2}) or (b) that there are very significant (i.e. order of magnitude) errors in the distance estimates quoted in the ATNF Catalogue. The former conclusion (a) supports a recent model for pulsar emission that has also successfully explained the frequency spectrum of the Crab pulsar over 16 orders of magnitude of frequency, whilst alternative (b) would necessitate a radical re-evaluation of both the dispersion method for estimating pulsar distances and current ideas about the distribution of pulsars within our Galaxy.

  12. VizieR Online Data Catalog: SDSS nearby galaxies morphologies (Yoshino+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshino, A.; Yamauchi, C.

    2015-01-01

    These catalogues are intended to study statistically Box/Peanut or Bar structures in edge-on or face-on nearby galaxies, containing values of surface brightness parameters of model galaxy, coordinate, redshift, morphology and matched PGC number for edge-on or face-on nearby galaxies in g, r and i-band selected from SDSS DR7. table1[gri].dat are the catalogues for edge-on galaxies in g, r and i-band, respectively. table2[gri].dat are those for face-on galaxies. table3[gri].dat contain only Box/Peanut galaxies extracted from table1[gri].dat. table4[gri].dat contain only Barred galaxies extracted from table2[gri].dat. (12 data files).

  13. A 1500 deg2 near infrared proper motion catalogue from the UKIDSS Large Area Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Leigh; Lucas, P. W.; Burningham, B.; Jones, H. R. A.; Smart, R. L.; Andrei, A. H.; Catalán, S.; Pinfield, D. J.

    2014-02-01

    The United Kingdom Infrared Deep Sky Survey (UKIDSS) Large Area Survey (LAS) began in 2005, with the start of the UKIDSS programme as a 7 year effort to survey roughly 4000 deg2 at high Galactic latitudes in Y, J, H and K bands. The survey also included a significant quantity of two epoch J band observations, with an epoch baseline greater than 2 years to calculate proper motions. We present a near-infrared proper motion catalogue for the 1500 deg2 of the two epoch LAS data, which includes 135 625 stellar sources and a further 88 324 with ambiguous morphological classifications, all with motions detected above the 5σ level. We developed a custom proper motion pipeline which we describe here. Our catalogue agrees well with the proper motion data supplied for a 300 deg2 subset in the current Wide Field Camera Science Archive (WSA) 10th data release (DR10) catalogue, and in various optical catalogues, but it benefits from a larger matching radius and hence a larger upper proper motion detection limit. We provide absolute proper motions, using LAS galaxies for the relative to absolute correction. By using local second-order polynomial transformations, as opposed to linear transformations in the WSA, we correct better for any local distortions in the focal plane, not including the radial distortion that is removed by the UKIDSS pipeline. We present the results of proper motion searches for new brown dwarfs and white dwarfs. We discuss 41 sources in the WSA DR10 overlap with our catalogue with proper motions >300 mas yr-1, several of which are new detections. We present 15 new candidate ultracool dwarf binary systems.

  14. The JCMT Plane Survey: first complete data release - emission maps and compact source catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eden, D. J.; Moore, T. J. T.; Plume, R.; Urquhart, J. S.; Thompson, M. A.; Parsons, H.; Dempsey, J. T.; Rigby, A. J.; Morgan, L. K.; Thomas, H. S.; Berry, D.; Buckle, J.; Brunt, C. M.; Butner, H. M.; Carretero, D.; Chrysostomou, A.; Currie, M. J.; deVilliers, H. M.; Fich, M.; Gibb, A. G.; Hoare, M. G.; Jenness, T.; Manser, G.; Mottram, J. C.; Natario, C.; Olguin, F.; Peretto, N.; Pestalozzi, M.; Polychroni, D.; Redman, R. O.; Salji, C.; Summers, L. J.; Tahani, K.; Traficante, A.; diFrancesco, J.; Evans, A.; Fuller, G. A.; Johnstone, D.; Joncas, G.; Longmore, S. N.; Martin, P. G.; Richer, J. S.; Weferling, B.; White, G. J.; Zhu, M.

    2017-08-01

    We present the first data release of the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope Plane Survey (JPS), the JPS Public Release 1. JPS is an 850-μm continuum survey of six fields in the northern inner Galactic plane in a longitude range of ℓ = 7°-63°, made with the Submillimetre Common-User Bolometer Array 2. This first data release consists of emission maps of the six JPS regions with an average pixel-to-pixel noise of 7.19 mJy beam-1, when smoothed over the beam, and a compact source catalogue containing 7813 sources. The 95 per cent completeness limits of the catalogue are estimated at 0.04 Jy beam-1 and 0.3 Jy for the peak and integrated flux densities, respectively. The emission contained in the compact source catalogue is 42 ± 5 per cent of the total and, apart from the large-scale (greater than 8 arcmin) emission, there is excellent correspondence with features in the 500-μm Herschel maps. We find that, with two-dimensional matching, 98 ± 2 per cent of sources within the fields centred at ℓ = 20°, 30°, 40° and 50° are associated with molecular clouds, with 91 ± 3 per cent of the ℓ = 30° and 40° sources associated with dense molecular clumps. Matching the JPS catalogue to Herschel 70-μm sources, we find that 38 ± 1 per cent of sources show evidence of ongoing star formation. The JPS Public Release 1 images and catalogue will be a valuable resource for studies of star formation in the Galaxy and the role of environment and spiral arms in the star formation process.

  15. X-rays beware: the deepest Chandra catalogue of point sources in M31

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vulic, N.; Gallagher, S. C.; Barmby, P.

    2016-10-01

    This study represents the most sensitive Chandra X-ray point source catalogue of M31. Using 133 publicly available Chandra ACIS-I/S observations totalling ˜1 Ms, we detected 795 X-ray sources in the bulge, north-east, and south-west fields of M31, covering an area of ≈0.6 deg2, to a limiting unabsorbed 0.5-8.0 keV luminosity of ˜1034 erg s-1. In the inner bulge, where exposure is approximately constant, X-ray fluxes represent average values because they were determined from many observations over a long period of time. Similarly, our catalogue is more complete in the bulge fields since monitoring allowed more transient sources to be detected. The catalogue was cross-correlated with a previous XMM-Newton catalogue of M31's D25 isophote consisting of 1948 X-ray sources, with only 979 within the field of view of our survey. We found 387 (49 per cent) of our Chandra sources (352 or 44 per cent unique sources) matched to within 5 arcsec of 352 XMM-Newton sources. Combining this result with matching done to previous Chandra X-ray sources we detected 259. new sources in our catalogue. We created X-ray luminosity functions (XLFs) in the soft (0.5-2.0 keV) and hard (2.0-8.0 keV) bands that are the most sensitive for any large galaxy based on our detection limits. Completeness-corrected XLFs show a break around ≈1.3 × 1037 erg s-1, consistent with previous work. As in past surveys, we find that the bulge XLFs are flatter than the disc, indicating a lack of bright high-mass X-ray binaries in the disc and an aging population of low-mass X-ray binaries in the bulge.

  16. Optical SED models of galaxy mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, Gregory F.; Cox, T. J.; Hayward, Christopher C.; Hernquist, Lars; Jonsson, Patrik

    2012-08-01

    I discuss recent work in which we construct models of poststarburst galaxies by combining fully three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of galaxy mergers with radiative transfer calculations of dust attenuation. The poststarburst signatures can occur shortly after a bright starburst phase in gas-rich mergers, and thus offer a unique opportunity to study the formation of bulges and the effects of feedback. Several additional applications of spatially-resolved spectroscopic models of interacting galaxies include multi-wavelength studies of AGN/starburst diagnostics, mock integral field unit data to interpret the evolution of ULIRGs, and the `Green Valley'. Optical spectra of simulated major gas-rich galaxy mergers can be found at http://www.cfa.harvard.edu/~gsnyder

  17. The Environmental Dependence of the Galaxy Stellar Mass Function in the ECO Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richstein, Hannah; Berlind, Andreas A.; Calderon, Victor; Eckert, Kathleen D.; Kannappan, Sheila; Moffett, Amanda J.; Stark, David

    2017-01-01

    We study the environmental dependence of the galaxy stellar mass function in the ECO survey and compare it with models that associate galaxies with dark matter halos. Specifically, we quantify the environment of each galaxy in the ECO survey using an Nth nearest neighbor distance metric, and we measure how the galaxy stellar mass distribution varies from low density to high density environments. As expected, we find that massive galaxies preferentially populate high density regions, while low mass galaxies preferentially populate lower density environments. We investigate whether this trend can be explained simply by the stellar-to-halo mass relation combined with the environmental dependence of the halo mass function. In other words, we test the hypothesis that the stellar mass of a galaxy depends solely on the mass of its dark matter halo and does not exhibit a residual dependence on the halo’s larger environment. To test this hypothesis, we first construct mock ECO catalogs by populating dark matter halos in an N-body simulation with galaxies using a model that preserves the overall clustering strength of the galaxy population. We then assign stellar masses to the mock galaxies using physically motivated models that connect stellar mass to halo mass and are constrained to match the global ECO stellar mass function. Finally, we impose the radial and angular selection functions of the ECO survey and repeat our environmental analysis on the mock catalogs. We find that the environmental dependence of stellar mass in the mock catalogs is in agreement with that observed in the ECO survey. Our results are thus consistent with the simple hypothesis that galaxy stellar mass only depends on halo mass. The RESOLVE/ECO surveys were supported by NSF award AST-0955368.

  18. The SAMI Galaxy Survey: Early Data Release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, J. T.; Croom, S. M.; Konstantopoulos, I. S.; Bryant, J. J.; Sharp, R.; Cecil, G. N.; Fogarty, L. M. R.; Foster, C.; Green, A. W.; Ho, I.-T.; Owers, M. S.; Schaefer, A. L.; Scott, N.; Bauer, A. E.; Baldry, I.; Barnes, L. A.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Bloom, J. V.; Brough, S.; Colless, M.; Cortese, L.; Couch, W. J.; Drinkwater, M. J.; Driver, S. P.; Goodwin, M.; Gunawardhana, M. L. P.; Hampton, E. J.; Hopkins, A. M.; Kewley, L. J.; Lawrence, J. S.; Leon-Saval, S. G.; Liske, J.; López-Sánchez, Á. R.; Lorente, N. P. F.; McElroy, R.; Medling, A. M.; Mould, J.; Norberg, P.; Parker, Q. A.; Power, C.; Pracy, M. B.; Richards, S. N.; Robotham, A. S. G.; Sweet, S. M.; Taylor, E. N.; Thomas, A. D.; Tonini, C.; Walcher, C. J.

    2015-01-01

    We present the Early Data Release of the Sydney-AAO Multi-object Integral field spectrograph (SAMI) Galaxy Survey. The SAMI Galaxy Survey is an ongoing integral field spectroscopic survey of ˜3400 low-redshift (z < 0.12) galaxies, covering galaxies in the field and in groups within the Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey regions, and a sample of galaxies in clusters. In the Early Data Release, we publicly release the fully calibrated data cubes for a representative selection of 107 galaxies drawn from the GAMA regions, along with information about these galaxies from the GAMA catalogues. All data cubes for the Early Data Release galaxies can be downloaded individually or as a set from the SAMI Galaxy Survey website. In this paper we also assess the quality of the pipeline used to reduce the SAMI data, giving metrics that quantify its performance at all stages in processing the raw data into calibrated data cubes. The pipeline gives excellent results throughout, with typical sky subtraction residuals in the continuum of 0.9-1.2 per cent, a relative flux calibration uncertainty of 4.1 per cent (systematic) plus 4.3 per cent (statistical), and atmospheric dispersion removed with an accuracy of 0.09 arcsec, less than a fifth of a spaxel.

  19. 32 CFR 575.6 - Catalogue, United States Military Academy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Catalogue, United States Military Academy. 575.6... ADMISSION TO THE UNITED STATES MILITARY ACADEMY § 575.6 Catalogue, United States Military Academy. The latest edition of the catalogue, United States Military Academy, contains additional...

  20. 32 CFR 575.6 - Catalogue, United States Military Academy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2012-07-01 2009-07-01 true Catalogue, United States Military Academy. 575.6... ADMISSION TO THE UNITED STATES MILITARY ACADEMY § 575.6 Catalogue, United States Military Academy. The latest edition of the catalogue, United States Military Academy, contains additional...

  1. 32 CFR 575.6 - Catalogue, United States Military Academy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Catalogue, United States Military Academy. 575.6... ADMISSION TO THE UNITED STATES MILITARY ACADEMY § 575.6 Catalogue, United States Military Academy. The latest edition of the catalogue, United States Military Academy, contains additional...

  2. 32 CFR 575.6 - Catalogue, United States Military Academy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Catalogue, United States Military Academy. 575.6... ADMISSION TO THE UNITED STATES MILITARY ACADEMY § 575.6 Catalogue, United States Military Academy. The latest edition of the catalogue, United States Military Academy, contains additional information...

  3. 32 CFR 575.6 - Catalogue, United States Military Academy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Catalogue, United States Military Academy. 575.6... ADMISSION TO THE UNITED STATES MILITARY ACADEMY § 575.6 Catalogue, United States Military Academy. The latest edition of the catalogue, United States Military Academy, contains additional information...

  4. Low mass galaxy clusters and galaxy morphology evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilo Castellón, J. L.; Órdenes, Y.; Ramos, F.; Alonso, M. V.; Cuevas, H.; García Lambas, D.; Ramírez, A.

    We present preliminary results about the galaxy morphology evolution in three low mass galaxy clusters: RX J0533.9-5809 ([VMF98]046, z 0.198), RX J1204.3-0350 ([VMF98]113, z 0.261) and RX J0533.8-5746 ([VMF98]045, z 0.295). Full photometric catalogues were created using SExtractor v2.8.0. Also, photometric redshifts (z phot ) were obtained for all the object classified as galaxies, using the ANNz code. Color-Magnitude Diagrams (CMD) were generated for those galaxies clas- sified as cluster members. Clear Red Cluster Sequences (RCS) with a me- dian slopes of -0.03 are observed for all the tree clusters. Based on the RCS best fit, a blue and a red population of galaxies were defined, observ- ing that the color distribution of the cluster [VMF98]045 is well fitted by a double Gaussian function (2 0.2), while the clusters [VMF98]046 and [VMF98]113 presents a third population between the blue and red peak dis- tributions. These preliminary results would show the existence of a possible transi- tion population between the blue and the red population in these low mass galaxy clusters at low redshifts.

  5. A Comparative Study of the Guo Shoujing Star Catalogue and the Ulugh Beg Star Catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiaochun; Yang, Fan; Zhao, Yongheng

    2015-08-01

    The Chinese Star Catalogue by Guo Shoujing (1231-1316) contained equatorial coordinates of 678 stars, more than doubled the number of stars in previous Chinese star catalogues. In the period 1420-1437, using astronomical instruments at Samarkand Observatory, Ulugh Beg (1394-1449) made independent observations and determined star positions of 1018 stars. An analysis of two star catalogues will show the observational techniques behind them and their accuracies. Both astronomers tried to increase accuracy of measurement by enlarging the astronomical instruments. The Chinese catalogue gives equatorial coordinates of stars. The coordinates were directly read off the armillary sphere, which was mounted equatorially mounted. Sun Xiaochun (1996) suggested that the data of the existent Guo Shoujing catalogue was actually observed around 1380, at the beginning of the Ming dynasty. The Ulugh Beg catalogue gives ecliptic coordinates of stars. Does this mean they were directly measured using an ecliptic instrument? Using Fourier analysis we discover a 3 arc minute systematic error in the declinations, which are derived from the ecliptic coordinates, suggesting the data might be first measured equatorially and then converted to ecliptic coordinates, following Ptolemaic tradition. The 3 arc minute systematic error was caused by the misalignment of the instrument's pole and celestial north pole. And the Our comparative study might throw some light on transmission of astronomical knowledge and techniques between China and Central Asia in medieval times.

  6. An infrared imaging study of galaxies in the local universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grauer, Albert D.; Rieke, Marcia J.; Mcleod, Kim K.

    1995-01-01

    This poster was a preliminary report on a survey of galaxies in the local universe at J and K using a NICMOS3 256 x 256 infrared photometric camera attached to the 61 inch telescope on Mt. Bigelow. Deep images are being obtained for a representative sample of galaxies in the Uppsala General Catalogue. Structural and color parameters are determined for a wide variety of galactic types. These data should prove to be valuable in characterizing stellar populations within disks and bulges, determining if IR-active galaxies have unusual global as well as- nuclear properties, and understanding the effects of evolution and redshift dimming in distant galaxies.

  7. AMIGA Project: Quantification of the Isolation of 950 CIG galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verley, S.; Leon, S.; Verdes-Montenegro, L.; Combes, F.; Sabater, J.; Sulentic, J.; Bergond, G.; Espada, D.; Lisenfeld, U.; Odewahn, S. C.

    2010-10-01

    The role of the environment on galaxy evolution is still not fully understood. In order to quantify and set limits on the role of nurture one must identify and study a sample of isolated galaxies. The AMIGA project "Analysis of the Interstellar Medium of Isolated GAlaxies" is doing a multi-wavelength study of a large sample of isolated galaxies in order to examine their interstellar medium and star formation activity. We processed data for 950 galaxies from the Catalogue of Isolated Galaxies (CIG, Karachentseva 1973) and evaluated their isolation using an automated star-galaxy classification procedure (down to MB ˜ 17.5) on large digitised POSS-I fields surrounding each isolated galaxy (within a projected radius of at least 0.5 Mpc). We defined, compared and discussed various criteria to quantify the degree of isolation for these galaxies: e.g. Karachentseva’s revised criterion, local surface density computations, estimation of the external tidal force affecting each is olated galaxy. We found galaxies violating Karachentseva’s original criterion, and we defined various subsamples of galaxies according to their degree of isolation. Additionally, we sought for the redshifts of the primary and companion galaxies to access the radial dimension. We also applied our pipeline to triplets, compact groups and clusters and interpret the isolated galaxy population in light of these control samples.

  8. Automated physical classification in the SDSS DR10. A catalogue of candidate quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brescia, M.; Cavuoti, S.; Longo, G.

    2015-07-01

    We discuss whether modern machine learning methods can be used to characterize the physical nature of the large number of objects sampled by the modern multiband digital surveys. In particular, we applied the MLPQNA (Multi Layer Perceptron with Quasi Newton Algorithm) method to the optical data of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 10, investigating whether photometric data alone suffice to disentangle different classes of objects as they are defined in the SDSS spectroscopic classification. We discuss three groups of classification problems: (i) the simultaneous classification of galaxies, quasars and stars; (ii) the separation of stars from quasars; (iii) the separation of galaxies with normal spectral energy distribution from those with peculiar spectra, such as starburst or star-forming galaxies and AGN. While confirming the difficulty of disentangling AGN from normal galaxies on a photometric basis only, MLPQNA proved to be quite effective in the three-class separation. In disentangling quasars from stars and galaxies, our method achieved an overall efficiency of 91.31 per cent and a QSO class purity of ˜95 per cent. The resulting catalogue of candidate quasars/AGNs consists of ˜3.6 million objects, of which about half a million are also flagged as robust candidates, and will be made available on CDS VizieR facility.

  9. Platelet Function During Hypothermia in Experimental Mock Circulation.

    PubMed

    Van Poucke, Sven; Stevens, Kris; Kicken, Cécile; Simons, Antoine; Marcus, Abraham; Lancé, Marcus

    2016-03-01

    Alterations in platelet function are a common finding in surgical procedures involving cardiopulmonary bypass and hypothermia. Although the combined impact of hypothermia and artificial circulation on platelets has been studied before, the ultimate strategy to safely minimize the risk for bleeding and thrombosis is yet unknown. The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of a mock circulation loop to study the impact of hypothermia for platelet-related hemostatic changes. Venous blood was collected from healthy adult humans (n = 3). Closed mock circulation loops were assembled, each consisting of a centrifugal pump, an oxygenator with integrated heat exchanger, and a hardshell venous reservoir. The experiment started with the mock circulation temperature set at 37°C (T0 [0 h]). Cooling was then initiated at T1 (+2 h), where temperature was adjusted from 37°C to 32°C. Hypothermia was maintained from T2 (+4 h) to T3 (+28 h). From that point in time, rewarming from 32°C to 37°C was initiated with similar speed as cooling. From time point T4 (+30 h), normothermia (37°C) was maintained until the experiment ended at T5 (+32 h). Blood samples were analyzed in standard hematological tests: light transmission aggregometry (LTA) (arachidonic acid [AA], adenosine diphosphate [ADP], collagen [COL], thrombin-receptor-activating-peptide-14 [TRAP]), multiple electrode aggregometry (MEA) (AA, ADP, COL, TRAP), and rotational thromboelastometry (ROTEM) (EXTEM, FIBTEM, PLTEM). Hemoglobin, hematocrit, and platelet count decrease more substantially during temperature drop (37-32°C) than during hypothermia maintenance. Hb and Hct continue to follow this trend during active rewarming (32-37°C). PC increase from the moment active rewarming was initiated. None of the values return to the initial values. LTA values demonstrate a similar decrease in aggregation after stimulation with the platelet agonists between the start of the mock circulation and the start of cooling. Except

  10. Seismic Catalogue and Seismic Network in Haiti

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belizaire, D.; Benito, B.; Carreño, E.; Meneses, C.; Huerfano, V.; Polanco, E.; McCormack, D.

    2013-05-01

    The destructive earthquake occurred on January 10, 2010 in Haiti, highlighted the lack of preparedness of the country to address seismic phenomena. At the moment of the earthquake, there was no seismic network operating in the country, and only a partial control of the past seismicity was possible, due to the absence of a national catalogue. After the 2010 earthquake, some advances began towards the installation of a national network and the elaboration of a seismic catalogue providing the necessary input for seismic Hazard Studies. This paper presents the state of the works carried out covering both aspects. First, a seismic catalogue has been built, compiling data of historical and instrumental events occurred in the Hispaniola Island and surroundings, in the frame of the SISMO-HAITI project, supported by the Technical University of Madrid (UPM) and Developed in cooperation with the Observatoire National de l'Environnement et de la Vulnérabilité of Haiti (ONEV). Data from different agencies all over the world were gathered, being relevant the role of the Dominican Republic and Puerto Rico seismological services which provides local data of their national networks. Almost 30000 events recorded in the area from 1551 till 2011 were compiled in a first catalogue, among them 7700 events with Mw ranges between 4.0 and 8.3. Since different magnitude scale were given by the different agencies (Ms, mb, MD, ML), this first catalogue was affected by important heterogeneity in the size parameter. Then it was homogenized to moment magnitude Mw using the empirical equations developed by Bonzoni et al (2011) for the eastern Caribbean. At present, this is the most exhaustive catalogue of the country, although it is difficult to assess its degree of completeness. Regarding the seismic network, 3 stations were installed just after the 2010 earthquake by the Canadian Government. The data were sent by telemetry thought the Canadian System CARINA. In 2012, the Spanish IGN together

  11. Centroid moment tensor catalogue for Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, M.; Yamashina, T.; Kumagai, H.; Inoue, H.; Sunarjo

    2010-12-01

    We developed a centroid moment tensor (CMT) catalogue of earthquakes in and around Indonesia (InaCMT) using data from the nationwide broadband seismograph network in Indonesia. We obtained CMT solutions for about 500 earthquakes that occurred in and around Indonesia between 2006 and 2009. The moment magnitudes ranged from 4.5 to 8.3. We examined the accuracy of the CMT solutions of the InaCMT catalogue by comparing them with those obtained by the Global CMT (GCMT) Project. The seismic moments and focal mechanisms of these catalogues were highly consistent with each other, but we found systematic differences between the catalogues in the source centroid locations of earthquakes off Sumatra. The InaCMT source centroid locations were closer to the hypocenter locations in the Preliminary Determination of Earthquakes (PDE) of the U.S. Geological Survey compared to those of GCMT. The systematic deviations in the GCMT source centroid locations may mainly reflect insufficient azimuthal coverage of the stations used for the inversions as well as uncertainties in the Earth model. Using the InaCMT catalogue, we investigated seismic activity related to the off Bengkulu seismic sequence on 12 September 2007 ( Mw = 8.3, 7.9, and 6.8), southwest of Sumatra, and the earthquakes northwest of the island of New Guinea on 3 January 2009 ( Mw = 7.7 and 7.4). In the aftershock activity of the 2007 off Bengkulu seismic sequence, we found that shallow earthquakes were aligned along the eastern coast of Siberut Island, located between the Sunda trench and Sumatra. These earthquakes may have occurred along the Mentawai fault or another unknown fault. The focal mechanisms of the earthquakes were dominantly reverse slip, although the Mentawai fault has been considered to be a strike-slip fault. Shallow large earthquakes along this fault may cause damage above the source region and generate large tsunamis. We found that the 2009 earthquakes northwest of New Guinea occurred along the Manokwari

  12. Galaxy Zoo: morphologies derived from visual inspection of galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lintott, Chris J.; Schawinski, Kevin; Slosar, Anže; Land, Kate; Bamford, Steven; Thomas, Daniel; Raddick, M. Jordan; Nichol, Robert C.; Szalay, Alex; Andreescu, Dan; Murray, Phil; Vandenberg, Jan

    2008-09-01

    In order to understand the formation and subsequent evolution of galaxies one must first distinguish between the two main morphological classes of massive systems: spirals and early-type systems. This paper introduces a project, Galaxy Zoo, which provides visual morphological classifications for nearly one million galaxies, extracted from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). This achievement was made possible by inviting the general public to visually inspect and classify these galaxies via the internet. The project has obtained more than 4 × 107 individual classifications made by ~105 participants. We discuss the motivation and strategy for this project, and detail how the classifications were performed and processed. We find that Galaxy Zoo results are consistent with those for subsets of SDSS galaxies classified by professional astronomers, thus demonstrating that our data provide a robust morphological catalogue. Obtaining morphologies by direct visual inspection avoids introducing biases associated with proxies for morphology such as colour, concentration or structural parameters. In addition, this catalogue can be used to directly compare SDSS morphologies with older data sets. The colour-magnitude diagrams for each morphological class are shown, and we illustrate how these distributions differ from those inferred using colour alone as a proxy for morphology. This publication has been made possible by the participation of more than 100000 volunteers in the Galaxy Zoo project. Their contributions are individually acknowledged at http://www.galaxyzoo.org/Volunteers.aspx E-mail: cjl@astro.ox.ac.uk (CJL); kevins@astro.ox.ac.uk (KS)

  13. Neutron spectrum from the little boy mock-up

    SciTech Connect

    Robba, A.A.

    1986-01-01

    Most of the human exposure data used for setting radiation protection guidelines have been obtained by following the survivors of the nuclear explosions at Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Proper evaluation of these data requires estimates of the radiation exposure received by those survivors. Until now neutron dose estimates have relied primarily on calculations as no measurements of the leakage neutron flux or neutron spectrum were available. We have measured the high-energy leakage neutron spectrum from a mock-up of the Little Boy device operating at delayed critical. The measurements are compared with Monte Carlo calculations of the leakage neutron spectrum.

  14. Quantum modular forms, mock modular forms, and partial theta functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimport, Susanna

    Defined by Zagier in 2010, quantum modular forms have been the subject of an explosion of recent research. Many of these results are aimed at discovering examples of these functions, which are defined on the rational numbers and have "nice" modularity properties. Though the subject is in its early stages, numerous results (including Zagier's original examples) show these objects naturally arising from many areas of mathematics as limits of other modular-like functions. One such family of examples is due to Folsom, Ono, and Rhoades, who connected these new objects to partial theta functions (introduced by Rogers in 1917) and mock modular forms (about which there is a rich theory, whose origins date back to Ramanujan in 1920). In this thesis, we build off of the work of Folsom, Ono, and Rhoades by providing an infinite family of quantum modular forms of arbitrary positive half-integral weight. Further, this family of quantum modular forms "glues" mock modular forms to partial theta functions and is constructed from a so-called "universal" mock theta function by extending a method of Eichler and Zagier (originally defined for holomorphic Jacobi forms) into a non-holomorphic setting. In addition to the infinite family, we explore the weight 1/2 and 3/2 functions in more depth. For both of these weights, we are able to explicitly write down the quantum modular form, as well as the corresponding "errors to modularity," which can be shown to be Mordell integrals of specific theta functions and, as a consequence, are real-analytic functions. Finally, we turn our attention to the partial theta functions associated with these low weight examples. Berndt and Kim provide asymptotic expansions for a certain class of partial theta functions as q approaches 1 radially within the unit disk. Here, we extend this work to not only obtain asymptotic expansions for this class of functions as q approaches any root of unity, but also for a certain class of derivatives of these functions

  15. Star Formation and Environment in Compact Groups of Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iglesias-Páramo, J.; Vílchez, J. M.

    H &alpha luminosities are presented in order to study the Star Formation Rates (SFRs) of a sample of galaxies in compact groups from Hickson's (1982) catalogue. Although the comparison of the SFRs of the disk galaxies in our sample with those of a sample of field galaxies yielded no difference between the average SFRs for disk galaxies in compact groups and in the field, environmental effects seem to influence the H &alpha luminosities of late and early-type galaxies in compact groups. No relationship was found between the total normalized H &alpha luminosities of the groups and some dynamical parameters, indicating that the dynamical state of the group does not influence the SFR of the group. The lack of dominant interaction induced starbursts in our sample is compatible with a scenario for compact groups of galaxies in which the dark matter of the group is arranged in a common halo, thereby preventing a fast collapse of the galaxies.

  16. The Far-Infrared Properties of the Most Isolated Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisenfeld, U.; Verdes-Montenegro, L.; Sulentic, J.; Leon, S.; Espada, D.; Bergond, G.; García, E.; Sabater, J.; Santander-Vela, J. D.; Verley, S.

    2007-05-01

    A long-standing question in galaxy evolution involves the role of nature (self-regulation) vs. nurture (environment) on the observed properties (and evolution) of galaxies. A collaboration centreed at the Instituto de Astrofisica de Andalucia (Granada, Spain) is trying to address this question by producing a observational database for a sample of 1050 isolated galaxies from the catalogue of Karachentseva (1973) with the overarching goal being the generation of a "zero-point" sample against which effects of environment on galaxies can be assessed. The AMIGA (Analysis of the Interstellar Medium of Isolated Galaxies) database (see www.iaa.es/AMIGA.html) will include optical, IR and radio line and continuum measures. The galaxies in the sample represent the most isolated galaxies in the local universe. In the present contribution, we will present the project, as well as the results of an analysis of the far-infrared (FIR) and molecular gas properties of this sample.

  17. Void galaxy properties depending on void filament straightness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shim, Junsup; Lee, Jounghun; Hoyle, Fiona

    2015-08-01

    We investigate the properties of galaxies belonging to the filaments in cosmic void regions, using the void catalogue constructed by Pan et al. (2012) from the SDSS DR7. To identify galaxy filaments within a void, voids with 30 or more galaxies are selected as a sample. We identify 3172 filaments in 1055 voids by applying the filament finding algorithm utilizing minimal spanning tree (MST) which is an unique linear pattern into which connects all the galaxies in a void. We study the correlations between galaxy properties and the specific size of filament which quantifies the degree of the filament straightness. For example, the average magnitude and the magnitude of the faintest galaxy in filament decrease as the straightness of the filament increases. We also find that the correlations become stronger in rich filaments with many member galaxies than in poor ones. We discuss a physical explanation to our findings and their cosmological implications.

  18. Lyman-α emitters in the context of hierarchical galaxy formation: predictions for VLT/MUSE surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garel, T.; Guiderdoni, B.; Blaizot, J.

    2016-02-01

    The VLT/Multi Unit Spectrograph Explorer (MUSE) integral-field spectrograph can detect Lyα emitters (LAE) in the redshift range 2.8 ≲ z ≲ 6.7 in a homogeneous way. Ongoing MUSE surveys will notably probe faint Lyα sources that are usually missed by current narrow-band surveys. We provide quantitative predictions for a typical wedding-cake observing strategy with MUSE based on mock catalogues generated with a semi-analytic model of galaxy formation coupled to numerical Lyα radiation transfer models in gas outflows. We expect ≈1500 bright LAEs (FLyα ≳ 10-17 erg s-1 cm-2) in a typical shallow field (SF) survey carried over ≈100 arcmin2 , and ≈2000 sources as faint as 10-18 erg s-1 cm-2 in a medium-deep field (MDF) survey over 10 arcmin2 . In a typical deep field (DF) survey of 1 arcmin2 , we predict that ≈500 extremely faint LAEs (FLyα ≳ 4 × 10-19 erg s-1 cm-2) will be found. Our results suggest that faint Lyα sources contribute significantly to the cosmic Lyα luminosity and SFR budget. While the host haloes of bright LAEs at z ≈ 3 and 6 have descendants with median masses of 2 × 1012 and 5 × 1013 M⊙, respectively, the faintest sources detectable by MUSE at these redshifts are predicted to reside in haloes which evolve into typical sub-L* and L* galaxy haloes at z = 0. We expect typical DF and MDF surveys to uncover the building blocks of Milky Way-like objects, even probing the bulk of the stellar mass content of LAEs located in their progenitor haloes at z ≈ 3.

  19. The power spectrum of the Point Source Catalogue redshift survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutherland, W.; Tadros, H.; Efstathiou, G.; Frenk, C. S.; Keeble, O.; Maddox, S.; McMahon, R. G.; Oliver, S.; Rowan-Robinson, M.; Saunders, W.; White, S. D. M.

    1999-09-01

    We measure the redshift-space power spectrum P(k) for the recently completed IRAS Point Source Catalogue (PSC) redshift survey, which contains 14 500 galaxies over 84 per cent of the sky with 60-μm flux >=0.6 Jy. Comparison with simulations shows that our estimated errors on P(k) are realistic, and that systematic errors resulting from the finite survey volume are small for wavenumbers k >~ 0.03 h Mpc^-1. At large scales our power spectrum is intermediate between those of the earlier QDOT and 1.2-Jy surveys, but with considerably smaller error bars; it falls slightly more steeply to smaller scales. We have fitted families of CDM-like models using the Peacock-Dodds formula for non-linear evolution; the results are somewhat sensitive to the assumed small-scale velocity dispersion σ_V. Assuming a realistic σ_V ~ 300 km s^-1 yields a shape parameter Γ ~ 0.25 and normalization bσ_8 ~ 0.75; if σ_V is as high as 600 km s^-1 then Γ = 0.5 is only marginally excluded. There is little evidence for any `preferred scale' in the power spectrum or non-Gaussian behaviour in the distribution of large-scale power.

  20. Grid Enabled Geospatial Catalogue Web Service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Ai-Jun; Di, Li-Ping; Wei, Ya-Xing; Liu, Yang; Bui, Yu-Qi; Hu, Chau-Min; Mehrotra, Piyush

    2004-01-01

    Geospatial Catalogue Web Service is a vital service for sharing and interoperating volumes of distributed heterogeneous geospatial resources, such as data, services, applications, and their replicas over the web. Based on the Grid technology and the Open Geospatial Consortium (0GC) s Catalogue Service - Web Information Model, this paper proposes a new information model for Geospatial Catalogue Web Service, named as GCWS which can securely provides Grid-based publishing, managing and querying geospatial data and services, and the transparent access to the replica data and related services under the Grid environment. This information model integrates the information model of the Grid Replica Location Service (RLS)/Monitoring & Discovery Service (MDS) with the information model of OGC Catalogue Service (CSW), and refers to the geospatial data metadata standards from IS0 19115, FGDC and NASA EOS Core System and service metadata standards from IS0 191 19 to extend itself for expressing geospatial resources. Using GCWS, any valid geospatial user, who belongs to an authorized Virtual Organization (VO), can securely publish and manage geospatial resources, especially query on-demand data in the virtual community and get back it through the data-related services which provide functions such as subsetting, reformatting, reprojection etc. This work facilitates the geospatial resources sharing and interoperating under the Grid environment, and implements geospatial resources Grid enabled and Grid technologies geospatial enabled. It 2!so makes researcher to focus on science, 2nd not cn issues with computing ability, data locztic, processir,g and management. GCWS also is a key component for workflow-based virtual geospatial data producing.

  1. Comparative analysis of Debrecen sunspot catalogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Győri, L.; Ludmány, A.; Baranyi, T.

    2017-02-01

    Sunspot area data are important for studying solar activity and its long-term variations. At the Debrecen Heliophysical Observatory, we compiled three sunspot catalogues: the Debrecen Photoheliographic Data (DPD), the SDO/HMI Debrecen Data (HMIDD) and the SOHO/MDI Debrecen Data. For comparison, we also compiled an additional sunspot catalogue, the Greenwich Photoheliographic Data, from the digitized Royal Greenwich Observatory images for 1974-76. By comparing these catalogues when they overlap in time, we can investigate how various factors influence the measured area of sunspots, and, in addition, we can derive area cross-calibration factors for these catalogues. The main findings are as follows. Poorer seeing increases the individual corrected spot areas and decreases the number of small spots. Interestingly, the net result of these two effects for the total corrected spot area is zero. DPD daily total corrected sunspot areas are 5 per cent smaller than the HMIDD ones. Revised DPD daily total corrected umbra areas are 9 per cent smaller than those of HMIDD. The Greenwich photoheliographic areas are only a few per cent smaller than DPD areas. A 0.2° difference between the north directions of the DPD and MDI images is found. This value is nearly the same as was found (0.22°) by us in a previous paper comparing HMI and MDI images. The area measurement practice (spots smaller than 10 mh were not directly measured but an area of 2 mh was assigned to each) of the Solar Observing Optical Network cannot explain the large area deficit of the Solar Observing Optical Network.

  2. Internet resources cataloguing inherited disorders in dogs.

    PubMed

    Nicholas, Frank W; Crook, Alice; Sargan, David R

    2011-08-01

    Up-to-date annotated catalogues of known inherited disorders in dogs are freely available on the Internet, providing vital information to existing and prospective dog owners, dog breeders, veterinarians, geneticists and others interested in the occurrence and control of inherited disorders. These resources are the Canine Inherited Disorders Database (CIDD), Inherited Diseases in Dogs (IDID) and Online Mendelian Inheritance in Animals (OMIA) the latter associated with Listing of Inherited Disorders in Animals (LIDA). The history and features of these resources are summarised.

  3. WFCatalog: A catalogue for seismological waveform data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trani, Luca; Koymans, Mathijs; Atkinson, Malcolm; Sleeman, Reinoud; Filgueira, Rosa

    2017-09-01

    This paper reports advances in seismic waveform description and discovery leading to a new seismological service and presents the key steps in its design, implementation and adoption. This service, named WFCatalog, which stands for waveform catalogue, accommodates features of seismological waveform data. Therefore, it meets the need for seismologists to be able to select waveform data based on seismic waveform features as well as sensor geolocations and temporal specifications. We describe the collaborative design methods and the technical solution showing the central role of seismic feature catalogues in framing the technical and operational delivery of the new service. Also, we provide an overview of the complex environment wherein this endeavour is scoped and the related challenges discussed. As multi-disciplinary, multi-organisational and global collaboration is necessary to address today's challenges, canonical representations can provide a focus for collaboration and conceptual tools for agreeing directions. Such collaborations can be fostered and formalised by rallying intellectual effort into the design of novel scientific catalogues and the services that support them. This work offers an example of the benefits generated by involving cross-disciplinary skills (e.g. data and domain expertise) from the early stages of design, and by sustaining the engagement with the target community throughout the delivery and deployment process.

  4. Morphology of galaxies in the WINGS clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fasano, G.; Vanzella, E.; Dressler, A.; Poggianti, B. M.; Moles, M.; Bettoni, D.; Valentinuzzi, T.; Moretti, A.; D'Onofrio, M.; Varela, J.; Couch, W. J.; Kjærgaard, P.; Fritz, J.; Omizzolo, A.; Cava, A.

    2012-02-01

    We present the morphological catalogue of galaxies in nearby clusters of the WIde-field Nearby Galaxy-clusters Survey (WINGS). The catalogue contains a total number of 39 923 galaxies, for which we provide the automated estimates of the morphological type, applying the purposely devised tool MORPHOT to the V-band WINGS imaging. For ˜3000 galaxies we also provide visual estimates of the morphological type. A substantial part of the paper is devoted to the description of the MORPHOT tool, whose application is limited, at least for the moment, to the WINGS imaging only. The approach of the tool to the automation of morphological classification is a non-parametric and fully empirical one. In particular, MORPHOT exploits 21 morphological diagnostics, directly and easily computable from the galaxy image, to provide two independent classifications: one based on a maximum likelihood (ML), semi-analytical technique and the other one on a neural network (NN) machine. A suitably selected sample of ˜1000 visually classified WINGS galaxies is used to calibrate the diagnostics for the ML estimator and as a training set in the NN machine. The final morphological estimator combines the two techniques and proves to be effective both when applied to an additional test sample of ˜1000 visually classified WINGS galaxies and when compared with small samples of Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) galaxies visually classified by Fukugita et al. and Nair et al. Finally, besides the galaxy morphology distribution (corrected for field contamination) in the WINGS clusters, we present the ellipticity (ɛ), colour (B-V) and Sersic index (n) distributions for different morphological types, as well as the morphological fractions as a function of the clustercentric distance (in units of R200).

  5. The star catalogue of Hevelius. Machine-readable version and comparison with the modern Hipparcos Catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verbunt, F.; van Gent, R. H.

    2010-06-01

    The catalogue by Johannes Hevelius with the positions and magnitudes of 1564 entries was published by his wife Elisabeth Koopman in 1690. We provide a machine-readable version of the catalogue, and briefly discuss its accuracy on the basis of comparison with data from the modern Hipparcos Catalogue. We compare our results with an earlier analysis by Rybka (1984), finding good overall agreement. The magnitudes given by Hevelius correlate well with modern values. The accuracy of his position measurements is similar to that of Brahe, with σ = 2´ for longitudes and latitudes, but with more errors >5´ than expected for a Gaussian distribution. The position accuracy decreases slowly with magnitude. The fraction of stars with position errors larger than a degree is 1.5%, rather smaller than the fraction of 5% in the star catalogue of Brahe. Star catalogue of Hevelius is only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/516/A29

  6. Mock-ups of USSR Soyuz spacecraft on display at Star City

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Two mock-ups of the USSR Soyuz spacecraft which are on display at the Cosmonaut Training Center (Star City) near Moscow. The spherical-shaped section of the Soyuz is called the orbital module. The middle section with the lettering 'CCCP' (USSR) on it is called the descent vehicle. Two solar panels extend out from the instrument-assembly module. A docking module mock-up is atop the Soyuz training mock-up on the left.

  7. Mock-ups of USSR Soyuz spacecraft on display at Star City

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Two mock-ups of the USSR Soyuz spacecraft which are on display at the Cosmonaut Training Center (Star City) near Moscow. The spherical-shaped section of the Soyuz is called the orbital module. The middle section with the lettering 'CCCP' (USSR) on it is called the descent vehicle. Two solar panels extend out from the instrument-assembly module. A docking module mock-up is atop the Soyuz training mock-up on the left.

  8. Hubble Space Telescope mock-up in use in the MDF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    View of helium filled mock-up of the Hubble Space Telescope in use in the Manipulator Development Facility (MDF) in bldg 9A. The mock-up is being maneuvered into a mock-up of the Shuttle payload bay on the end of the remote manipulator system (RMS) arm. The Space Shuttle full fuselage trainer is seen in the background, to the left. To the right is another simulation of the Hubble Telescope.

  9. Hubble Space Telescope mock-up in use in the MDF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    View of helium filled mock-up of the Hubble Space Telescope in use in the Manipulator Development Facility (MDF) in bldg 9A. The mock-up is being maneuvered into a mock-up of the Shuttle payload bay on the end of the remote manipulator system (RMS) arm. The Space Shuttle full fuselage trainer is seen in the background, to the left. To the right is another simulation of the Hubble Telescope.

  10. Near-Resonant Thermomechanics of Energetic and Mock Energetic Composite Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-11-01

    AFRL-RW-EG-TR-2016-088 Near-Resonant Thermomechanics of Energetic and Mock Energetic Composite Materials Jeffrey F. Rhoads, Steven F...Near-Resonant Thermomechanics of Energetic and Mock Energetic Composite Materials 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA8651-16-D-0287 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c...the near-resonant thermomechanics of energetic and mock energetic particulate composite materials. The effort specifically focuses on: (i

  11. The BMW (Brera-Multiscale-Wavelet) Catalogue of Serendipitous X-Ray Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazzati, Davide; Campana, Sergio; Covino, Stefano; Israel, Gian L.; Guzzo, Luigi; Mignani, Roberto; Moretti, Alberto; Panzera, Maria R.; Tagliaferri, Gianpiero

    In collaboration with the Observatories of Palermo and Rome and the SAX-SDC we are constructing a multi-site interactive archive system featuring specific analysis tools. In this context we developed a detection algorithm based on the Wavelet Transform (WT) and performed a systematic analysis of all ROSATHRI public data (˜3100 observations +1000 to come). The WT is specifically suitable to detect and characterize extended sources while properly detecting point sources in very crowded fields. Moreover, the good angular resolution of HRI images allows the source extension and position to be accurately determined. This effort has produced the BMW (Brera Multiscale Wavelet) catalogue, with more than 19,000 sources detected at the ˜4.2σ level. For each source detection we have information on the X-ray flux and extension, allowing for instance to select complete samples of extended X-ray sources such as candidate clusters of galaxies or SNR's. Details about the detection algorithm and the catalogue can be found in Lazzati et al. 1999 and Campana et al. 1999. Here we shall present an overview of first results from several undergoing projects which make use of the BMW catalogue.

  12. Compiling an earthquake catalogue for the Arabian Plate, Western Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deif, Ahmed; Al-Shijbi, Yousuf; El-Hussain, Issa; Ezzelarab, Mohamed; Mohamed, Adel M. E.

    2017-10-01

    The Arabian Plate is surrounded by regions of relatively high seismicity. Accounting for this seismicity is of great importance for seismic hazard and risk assessments, seismic zoning, and land use. In this study, a homogenous earthquake catalogue of moment-magnitude (Mw) for the Arabian Plate is provided. The comprehensive and homogenous earthquake catalogue provided in the current study spatially involves the entire Arabian Peninsula and neighboring areas, covering all earthquake sources that can generate substantial hazard for the Arabian Plate mainland. The catalogue extends in time from 19 to 2015 with a total number of 13,156 events, of which 497 are historical events. Four polygons covering the entire Arabian Plate were delineated and different data sources including special studies, local, regional and international catalogues were used to prepare the earthquake catalogue. Moment magnitudes (Mw) that provided by original sources were given the highest magnitude type priority and introduced to the catalogues with their references. Earthquakes with magnitude differ from Mw were converted into this scale applying empirical relationships derived in the current or in previous studies. The four polygons catalogues were included in two comprehensive earthquake catalogues constituting the historical and instrumental periods. Duplicate events were identified and discarded from the current catalogue. The present earthquake catalogue was declustered in order to contain only independent events and investigated for the completeness with time of different magnitude spans.

  13. Clusters of Galaxies at High Redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fort, Bernard

    For a long time, the small number of clusters at z > 0.3 in the Abell survey catalogue and simulations of the standard CDM formation of large scale structures provided a paradigm where clusters were considered as young merging structures. At earlier times, loose concentrations of galaxy clumps were mostly anticipated. Recent observations broke the taboo. Progressively we became convinced that compact and massive clusters at z = 1 or possibly beyond exist and should be searched for.

  14. Planck 2015 results. XXVII. The second Planck catalogue of Sunyaev-Zeldovich sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Barrena, R.; Bartlett, J. G.; Bartolo, N.; Battaner, E.; Battye, R.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bikmaev, I.; Böhringer, H.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Bucher, M.; Burenin, R.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Carvalho, P.; Catalano, A.; Challinor, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chary, R.-R.; Chiang, H. C.; Chon, G.; Christensen, P. R.; Clements, D. L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Comis, B.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Dahle, H.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Désert, F.-X.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dolag, K.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Eisenhardt, P. R. M.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Falgarone, E.; Fergusson, J.; Feroz, F.; Ferragamo, A.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Frejsel, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Giard, M.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; Gjerløw, E.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Grainge, K. J. B.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Hansen, F. K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D. L.; Hempel, A.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jin, T.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Khamitov, I.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leonardi, R.; Lesgourgues, J.; Levrier, F.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mak, D. S. Y.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; Mazzotta, P.; McGehee, P.; Mei, S.; Melchiorri, A.; Melin, J.-B.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Moss, A.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nastasi, A.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Olamaie, M.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paoletti, D.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Pearson, T. J.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrott, Y. C.; Perrotta, F.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Pratt, G. W.; Prézeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J. P.; Reach, W. T.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Renzi, A.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rozo, E.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rumsey, C.; Rusholme, B.; Rykoff, E. S.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Saunders, R. D. E.; Savelainen, M.; Savini, G.; Schammel, M. P.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M. D.; Shellard, E. P. S.; Shimwell, T. W.; Spencer, L. D.; Stanford, S. A.; Stern, D.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Streblyanska, A.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tramonte, D.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Wehus, I. K.; White, S. D. M.; Wright, E. L.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2016-09-01

    We present the all-sky Planck catalogue of Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) sources detected from the 29 month full-mission data. The catalogue (PSZ2) is the largest SZ-selected sample of galaxy clusters yet produced and the deepest systematic all-sky surveyof galaxy clusters. It contains 1653 detections, of which 1203 are confirmed clusters with identified counterparts in external data sets, and is the first SZ-selected cluster survey containing >103 confirmed clusters. We present a detailed analysis of the survey selection function in terms of its completeness and statistical reliability, placing a lower limit of 83% on the purity. Using simulations, we find that the estimates of the SZ strength parameter Y5R500are robust to pressure-profile variation and beam systematics, but accurate conversion to Y500 requires the use of prior information on the cluster extent. We describe the multi-wavelength search for counterparts in ancillary data, which makes use of radio, microwave, infra-red, optical, and X-ray data sets, and which places emphasis on the robustness of the counterpart match. We discuss the physical properties of the new sample and identify a population of low-redshift X-ray under-luminous clusters revealed by SZ selection. These objects appear in optical and SZ surveys with consistent properties for their mass, but are almost absent from ROSAT X-ray selected samples.

  15. The infrared database of extragalactic observables from Spitzer - I. The redshift catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernán-Caballero, Antonio; Spoon, Henrik W. W.; Lebouteiller, Vianney; Rupke, David S. N.; Barry, Donald P.

    2016-01-01

    This is the first of a series of papers on the Infrared Database of Extragalactic Observables from Spitzer (IDEOS). In this work, we describe the identification of optical counterparts of the infrared sources detected in Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) observations, and the acquisition and validation of redshifts. The IDEOS sample includes all the spectra from the Cornell Atlas of Spitzer/IRS Sources (CASSIS) of galaxies beyond the Local Group. Optical counterparts were identified from correlation of the extraction coordinates with the NASA Extragalactic Database (NED). To confirm the optical association and validate NED redshifts, we measure redshifts with unprecedented accuracy on the IRS spectra (σ(Δz/(1+z)) ˜ 0.0011) by using an improved version of the maximum combined pseudo-likelihood method (MCPL). We perform a multistage verification of redshifts that considers alternate NED redshifts, the MCPL redshift, and visual inspection of the IRS spectrum. The statistics is as follows: the IDEOS sample contains 3361 galaxies at redshift 0 < z < 6.42 (mean: 0.48, median: 0.14). We confirm the default NED redshift for 2429 sources and identify 124 with incorrect NED redshifts. We obtain IRS-based redshifts for 568 IDEOS sources without optical spectroscopic redshifts, including 228 with no previous redshift measurements. We provide the entire IDEOS redshift catalogue in machine-readable formats. The catalogue condenses our compilation and verification effort, and includes our final evaluation on the most likely redshift for each source, its origin, and reliability estimates.

  16. Velocity-density correlations from the cosmicflows-3 distance catalogue and the 2MASS Redshift Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nusser, Adi

    2017-09-01

    The peculiar velocity of a mass tracer is on average aligned with the dipole modulation of the surrounding mass density field. We present a first measurement of the correlation between radial peculiar velocities of objects in the cosmicflows-3 catalogue and the dipole moment of the 2MRS galaxy distribution in concentric spherical shells centred on these objects. Limiting the analysis to cosmicflows-3 objects with distances of 100h-1 Mpc, the correlation function is detected at a confidence level of ≳ 4σ. The measurement is found consistent with the standard ΛCDM model at the ≲ 1.7σ level. We formally derive the constraints 0.32 < Ω0.55σ8 < 0.48 (68 per cent confidence level) or equivalently 0.34 < Ω0.55/b < 0.52, where b is the galaxy bias factor. Deeper and improved peculiar velocity catalogues will substantially reduce the uncertainties, allowing tighter constraints from this type of correlations.

  17. Planck 2015 results: XXVII. The second Planck catalogue of Sunyaev-Zeldovich sources

    DOE PAGES

    Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Arnaud, M.; ...

    2016-09-20

    Here, we present the all-sky Planck catalogue of Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) sources detected from the 29 month full-mission data. The catalogue (PSZ2) is the largest SZ-selected sample of galaxy clusters yet produced and the deepest systematic all-sky surveyof galaxy clusters. It contains 1653 detections, of which 1203 are confirmed clusters with identified counterparts in external data sets, and is the first SZ-selected cluster survey containing >103 confirmed clusters. We present a detailed analysis of the survey selection function in terms of its completeness and statistical reliability, placing a lower limit of 83% on the purity. Using simulations, we find that themore » estimates of the SZ strength parameter Y5R500are robust to pressure-profile variation and beam systematics, but accurate conversion to Y500 requires the use of prior information on the cluster extent. We describe the multi-wavelength search for counterparts in ancillary data, which makes use of radio, microwave, infra-red, optical, and X-ray data sets, and which places emphasis on the robustness of the counterpart match. We discuss the physical properties of the new sample and identify a population of low-redshift X-ray under-luminous clusters revealed by SZ selection. These objects appear in optical and SZ surveys with consistent properties for their mass, but are almost absent from ROSAT X-ray selected samples.« less

  18. The invisible AGN catalogue: a mid-infrared-radio selection method for optically faint active galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truebenbach, Alexandra E.; Darling, Jeremy

    2017-06-01

    A large fraction of active galactic nuclei (AGN) are 'invisible' in extant optical surveys due to either distance or dust-obscuration. The existence of this large population of dust-obscured, infrared (IR)-bright AGN is predicted by models of galaxy-supermassive black hole coevolution and is required to explain the observed X-ray and IR backgrounds. Recently, IR colour cuts with Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer have identified a portion of this missing population. However, as the host galaxy brightness relative to that of the AGN increases, it becomes increasingly difficult to differentiate between IR emission originating from the AGN and from its host galaxy. As a solution, we have developed a new method to select obscured AGN using their 20-cm continuum emission to identify the objects as AGN. We created the resulting invisible AGN catalogue by selecting objects that are detected in AllWISE (mid-IR) and FIRST (20 cm), but are not detected in SDSS (optical) or 2MASS (near-IR), producing a final catalogue of 46 258 objects. 30 per cent of the objects are selected by existing selection methods, while the remaining 70 per cent represent a potential previously unidentified population of candidate AGN that are missed by mid-IR colour cuts. Additionally, by relying on a radio continuum detection, this technique is efficient at detecting radio-loud AGN at z ≥ 0.29, regardless of their level of dust obscuration or their host galaxy's relative brightness.

  19. Deep 3-GHz observations of the Lockman Hole North with the Very Large Array - II. Catalogue and μJy source properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vernstrom, T.; Scott, Douglas; Wall, J. V.; Condon, J. J.; Cotton, W. D.; Kellermann, K. I.; Perley, R. A.

    2016-11-01

    This is the second of two papers describing the observations and source catalogues derived from sensitive 3-GHz images of the Lockman Hole North using the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA). We describe the reduction and cataloguing process, which yielded an image with 8 arcsec resolution and instrumental noise of σn = 1.01 μJy beam-1 rms (before primary-beam corrections) and a catalogue of 558 sources detected above 5σn. We include details of how we estimate source spectral indices across the 2-GHz VLA bandwidth, finding a median index of -0.76 ± 0.04. Stacking of source spectra reveals a flattening of spectral index with decreasing flux density. We present a source count derived from the catalogue. We show a traditional count estimate compared with a completely independent estimate made via a P(D) confusion analysis, and find very good agreement. Cross-matches of the catalogue with X-ray, optical, infrared, radio, and redshift catalogues are also presented. The X-ray, optical and infrared data, as well as active galactic nuclei (AGN) selection criteria allow us to classify 10 per cent as radio-loud AGN, 28 per cent as radio-quiet AGN, and 58 per cent as star-forming galaxies, with only 4 per cent unclassified.

  20. Hard X-Ray Radio Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panessa, Francesca; Bassani, L.; Venturi, T.; Molina, M.; Dallacasa, D.; Ubertini, P.; Bazzano, A.; Malizia, A.; La Franca, F.; Landi, R.

    2016-10-01

    In order to investigate the role of absorption in AGN with jets, we have studied the column density distribution of a hard X-ray selected sample of radio galaxies, derived from the INTEGRAL/IBIS and Swift/BAT AGN catalogues. They represent 7-10% of the total AGN population and are characterized by high 20-100 keV luminosities and high Eddington ratios. The radio morphology is typical of FRII galaxies and all of them have an optical classification and a measure of the column density. The observed fraction of absorbed AGN is around 40% among the total sample, and 75% among type 2 AGN. The observed fraction of Compton thick AGN is 2-3%. In this talk we will discuss the obscuration characteristics of radio galaxies compared to non-radio galaxies selected at hard X-rays.

  1. Radio luminosity function of brightest cluster galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Z. S.; Han, J. L.; Wen, Z. L.

    2016-08-01

    By cross-matching the currently largest optical catalogue of galaxy clusters and the NVSS radio survey data base, we obtain a large complete sample of brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) in the redshift range of 0.05 < z ≤ 0.45, which have radio emission and redshift information. We confirm that more powerful radio BCGs tend to be these optically very bright galaxies located in more relaxed clusters. We derived the radio luminosity functions of the largest sample of radio BCGs, and find that the functions depend on the optical luminosity of BCGs and the dynamic state of galaxy clusters. However, the radio luminosity function does not show significant evolution with redshift.

  2. The outer halo globular cluster system of M31 - I. The final PAndAS catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huxor, A. P.; Mackey, A. D.; Ferguson, A. M. N.; Irwin, M. J.; Martin, N. F.; Tanvir, N. R.; Veljanoski, J.; McConnachie, A.; Fishlock, C. K.; Ibata, R.; Lewis, G. F.

    2014-08-01

    We report the discovery of 59 globular clusters (GCs) and two candidate GCs in a search of the halo of M31, primarily via visual inspection of Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope/MegaCam imagery from the Pan-Andromeda Archaeological Survey (PAndAS). The superior quality of these data also allows us to check the classification of remote objects in the Revised Bologna Catalogue (RBC), plus a subset of GC candidates drawn from Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) imaging. We identify three additional new GCs from the RBC, and confirm the GC nature of 11 SDSS objects (8 of which appear independently in our remote halo catalogue); the remaining 188 candidates across both lists are either foreground stars or background galaxies. Our new catalogue represents the first uniform census of GCs across the M31 halo - we find clusters to the limit of the PAndAS survey area at projected radii of up to Rproj ˜ 150 kpc. Tests using artificial clusters reveal that detection incompleteness cuts in at luminosities below MV = -6.0; our 50 per cent completeness limit is MV ≈ -4.1. We construct a uniform set of PAndAS photometric measurements for all known GCs outside Rproj = 25 kpc, and any new GCs within this radius. With these data, we update results from Huxor et al., investigating the luminosity function (LF), colours and effective radii of M31 GCs with a particular focus on the remote halo. We find that the GCLF is clearly bimodal in the outer halo (Rproj > 30 kpc), with the secondary peak at MV ˜ -5.5. We argue that the GCs in this peak have most likely been accreted along with their host dwarf galaxies. Notwithstanding, we also find, as in previous surveys, a substantial number of GCs with above-average luminosity in the outer M31 halo - a population with no clear counterpart in the Milky Way.

  3. The Planck Catalogue of Galactic Cold Clumps : Looking at the early stages of star-formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montier, Ludovic

    2015-08-01

    The Planck satellite has provided an unprecedented view of the submm sky, allowing us to search for the dust emission of Galactic cold sources. Combining Planck-HFI all-sky maps in the high frequency channels with the IRAS map at 100um, we built the Planck catalogue of Galactic Cold Clumps (PGCC, Planck 2015 results XXVIII 2015), counting 13188 sources distributed over the whole sky, and following mainly the Galactic structures at low and intermediate latitudes. This is the first all-sky catalogue of Galactic cold sources obtained with a single instrument at this resolution and sensitivity, which opens a new window on star-formation processes in our Galaxy.I will briefly describe the colour detection method used to extract the Galactic cold sources, i.e., the Cold Core Colour Detection Tool (CoCoCoDeT, Montier et al. 2010), and its application to the Planck data. I will discuss the statistical distribution of the properties of the PGCC sources (in terms of dust temperature, distance, mass, density and luminosity), which illustrates that the PGCC catalogue spans a large variety of environments and objects, from molecular clouds to cold cores, and covers various stages of evolution. The Planck catalogue is a very powerful tool to study the formation and the evolution of prestellar objects and star-forming regions.I will finally present an overview of the Herschel Key Program Galactic Cold Cores (PI. M.Juvela), which allowed us to follow-up about 350 Planck Galactic Cold Clumps, in various stages of evolution and environments. With this program, the nature and the composition of the 5' Planck sources have been revealed at a sub-arcmin resolution, showing very different configurations, such as starless cold cores or multiple Young Stellar objects still embedded in their cold envelope.

  4. The BMW-Chandra Serendipitous Source Catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romano, P.; Campana, S.; Mignani, R. P.; Moretti, A.; Panzera, M. R.; Tagliaferri, G.

    We present the BMW-Chandra Source Catalogue drawn from all Chandra ACIS-I pointed observations with an exposure time in excess of 10 ks public as of March 2003 (136 observations). Using the wavelet detection algorithm developed by \\citep{Lazzatiea99} and \\citep{Campanaea99}, which can characterize point-like as well as extended sources, we identified 21325 sources which were visually inspected and verified. Among them, 16758 are not associated with the targets of the pointings and are considered certain; they have a 0.5-10 keV absorption corrected flux distribution median of ˜ 7 × 10-15 erg cm-2 s-1. The catalogue consists of source positions, count rates, extensions and relative errors in three energy bands (total, 0.5-7 keV; soft, 0.5-2 keV; and hard band, 2-7 keV), as well as the additional information drawn from the headers of the original files. We also extracted source counts in four additional energy bands, (0.5-1.0 keV, 1.0-2.0 keV, 2.0-4.0 keV and 4.0-7.0 keV). We compute the sky coverage in the soft and hard bands. The complete catalogue provides a sky coverage in the soft band (0.5-2 keV, S/N =3) of ˜ 8 deg2 at a limiting flux of ˜ 10-13 erg cm-2 s-1, and ˜ 2 deg2 at a limiting flux of ˜ 10-15 erg cm-2 s-1. http://www.merate.mi.astro.it/~xanadu/BMC/bmc_home.html

  5. Mock modular index of M2-M5 brane systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okazaki, Tadashi; Smith, Douglas J.

    2017-07-01

    We present Bogomolny-Prasad-Sommerfield (BPS) indices of the supergroup Wess-Zumino-Witten (WZW) models that live on intersecting M2-M5-brane systems. They can encode data of the stretched M2-branes between M5-branes and count the BPS states. They are generally expressed in terms of mock theta functions via the Kac-Wakimoto character formula of the affine Lie superalgebra. We give an explicit expression of the index for the P S L (2 |2 )k =1 WZW model in terms of the second-order multivariable Appell-Lerch sum. It indicates that wall crossing occurs in the BPS state counting due to the C field on the M5-branes.

  6. Advanced smile diagnostics using CAD/CAM mock-ups.

    PubMed

    Sancho-Puchades, Manuel; Fehmer, Vincent; Hämmerle, Christoph; Sailer, Irena

    2015-01-01

    Diagnostics are essential for predictable restorative dentistry. Both patient and clinician must agree on a treatment goal before the final restorations are delivered to avoid future disappointments. However, fully understanding the patient's desires is difficult. A useful tool to overcome this problem is the diagnostic wax-up and mock-up. A potential treatment outcome is modeled in wax prior to treatment and transferred into the patient's mouth using silicon indexes and autopolymerizing resin to obtain the patient's approval. Yet, this time-consuming procedure only produces a single version of the possible treatment outcome, which can be unsatisfactory for both the patient and the restorative team. Contemporary digital technologies may provide advantageous features to aid in this diagnostic treatment step. This article reviews opportunities digital technologies offer in the diagnostic phase, and presents clinical cases to illustrate the procedures.

  7. IXV Mock-Up Water Impact Test and Results Correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullio, R.; Becchio, V.; D'Amico, J.; Di Vita, G.

    2012-07-01

    In the frame of the ESA FLPP/IXV project one of the main goal is to validate the simulation methodology defined by TAS-I for the estimation of the maximum expected loads generated during splashdown event. Numerical results, obtained in different vehicle attitudes and landing conditions, were compared with experimental results from a reduced-scale drop test campaign, carried out making use of a rigid IXV vehicle scaled mock-up (1/4 of the IXV vehicle size). The test campaign was performed in the CNR-INSEAN (Istituto Nazionale per Studied Esperienze di Architettura Navale) facilities in Rome. In this paper firstly the engineering evaluation of the test results are discussed especially with respect to the selection of the best attitude candidate for landing. Then, the comparison of the test/analysis correlation activity is presented, and the related outcomes are evaluated in order to reduce the model factor uncertainty and enhance the derivation of the splashdown loads.

  8. Solving a Mock Arsenic-Poisoning Case Using Atomic Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarr, Matthew A.

    2001-01-01

    A new upper-level undergraduate atomic spectroscopy laboratory procedure has been developed that presents a realistic problem to students and asks them to assist in solving it. Students are given arsenic-laced soda samples from a mock crime scene. From these samples, they are to gather evidence to help prosecute a murder suspect. The samples are analyzed by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy or by atomic absorbance spectroscopy to determine the content of specific metal impurities. By statistical comparison of the samples' composition, the students determine if the soda samples can be linked to arsenic found in the suspect's home. As much as possible, the procedures and interpretations are developed by the students. Particular emphasis is placed on evaluating the limitations and capabilities of the analytical method with respect to the demands of the problem.

  9. The Mock LISA Data Challenges: History, Status, Prospects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vallisneri, Michele; Babak, Stas; Baker, John; Benacquista, Matt; Cornish, Neil; Crowder, Jeff; Cutler, Curt; Larson, Shane; Littenberg, Tyson; Porter, Edward; hide

    2007-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the importance for the Mock LISA Data Challenges (MLDC). Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) is a gravitational wave (GW) observatory that will return data such that data analysis is integral to the measurement concept. Further rationale of the MLDC are to kickstart the development of a LISA data-analysis computational infrastructure, and to encourage, track, and compare progress in LISA data-analysis development in the open community. The MLDCs is a coordinated, voluntary effort in GW community, that will periodically issue datasets with synthetic noise and GW signals from sources of undisclosed parameters; increasing difficulty. The challenge participants return parameter estimates and descriptions of search methods. Some of the challenges and the resultant entries are reviewed. The aim is to show that LISA data analysis is possible, and to develop new techniques, using multiple international teams for the development of LISA core analysis tools

  10. The Mock LISA Data Challenges: History, Status, Prospects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vallisneri, Michele; Babak, Stas; Baker, John; Benacquista, Matt; Cornish, Neil; Crowder, Jeff; Cutler, Curt; Larson, Shane; Littenberg, Tyson; Porter, Edward; Vecchio, Alberto

    2007-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the importance for the Mock LISA Data Challenges (MLDC). Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) is a gravitational wave (GW) observatory that will return data such that data analysis is integral to the measurement concept. Further rationale of the MLDC are to kickstart the development of a LISA data-analysis computational infrastructure, and to encourage, track, and compare progress in LISA data-analysis development in the open community. The MLDCs is a coordinated, voluntary effort in GW community, that will periodically issue datasets with synthetic noise and GW signals from sources of undisclosed parameters; increasing difficulty. The challenge participants return parameter estimates and descriptions of search methods. Some of the challenges and the resultant entries are reviewed. The aim is to show that LISA data analysis is possible, and to develop new techniques, using multiple international teams for the development of LISA core analysis tools

  11. The Status of the Mock LISA Data Challenges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, John

    2009-01-01

    For the last four years, many gravitational-wave researchers around the world have participated in the Mock LISA Data Challenges (MLDCs), a program to demonstrate and encourage the development of LISA data-analysis capabilities, tools and techniques. In this poster, we present a summary of the results of MLDC 3, which was completed in 2009. During MLDC 3, 27 participants from 15 institutions successfully analyzed data sets that included Galactic binaries, coalescing spinning massive black holes, extreme-mass-ratio inspirals, cosmic-string cusp bursts and a stochastic gravitational-wave background. We also describe the technical and scientific challenges that will be addressed by future MLI)Cs, starting with MLDC 4, which is currently in progress.

  12. Automatic Detection of Galaxy Groups by Probabilistic Hough Transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibrahem, R. T.; Tino, P.; Pearson, R. J.; Ponman, T. J.; Babul, A.

    2015-12-01

    Galaxy groups play a significant role in explaining the evolution of the universe. Given the amounts of available survey data, automated discovery of galaxy groups is of utmost interest. We introduce a novel methodology, based on probabilistic Hough transform, for finding galaxy groups embedded in a rich background. The model takes advantage of a typical signature pattern of galaxy groups known as "fingers-of-God". It also allows us to include prior astrophysical knowledge as an inherent part of the method. The proposed method is first tested in large scale controlled experiments with 2-D patterns and then verified on 3-D realistic mock data (comparing with the well-known friends-of-friends method used in astrophysics). The experiments suggest that our methodology is a promising new candidate for galaxy group finders developed within a machine learning framework.

  13. The Palermo Swift-BAT hard X-ray catalogue. III. Results after 54 months of sky survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cusumano, G.; La Parola, V.; Segreto, A.; Ferrigno, C.; Maselli, A.; Sbarufatti, B.; Romano, P.; Chincarini, G.; Giommi, P.; Masetti, N.; Moretti, A.; Parisi, P.; Tagliaferri, G.

    2010-12-01

    Aims: We present the Second Palermo Swift-BAT hard X-ray catalogue obtained by analysing data acquired in the first 54 months of the Swift mission. Methods: Using our software dedicated to the analysis of data from coded mask telescopes, we analysed the BAT survey data in three energy bands (15-30 keV, 15-70 keV, 15-150 keV), obtaining a list of 1256 detections above a significance threshold of 4.8 standard deviations. The identification of the source counterparts is pursued using two strategies: the analysis of field observations of soft X-ray instruments and cross-correlation of our catalogue with source databases. Results: The survey covers 50% of the sky to a 15-150 keV flux limit of 1.0×10-11 erg cm-2 s-1 and 9.2×10-12 erg cm-2 s-1 for |b| < 10° and |b| > 10°, respectively. The Second Palermo Swift-BAT hard X-ray catalogue includes 1079 (~86%) hard X-ray sources with an associated counterpart (26 with a double association and 2 with a triple association) and 177 BAT excesses (~14%) that still lack a counterpart. The distribution of the BAT sources among the different object classes consists of ~19% Galactic sources, ~57% extragalactic sources, and ~10% sources with a counterpart at softer energies whose nature has not yet been determined. About half of the BAT associated sources lack a counterpart in the ROSAT catalogues. This suggests that either moderate or strong absorption may be preventing their detection in the ROSAT energy band. The comparison of our BAT catalogue with the Fermi Large Area Telescope First Source Catalogue identifies 59 BAT/Fermi correspondences: 48 blazars, 3 Seyfert galaxies, 1 interacting galaxy, 3 high mass X-ray binaries, and 4 pulsars/supernova remnants. This small number of correspondences indicates that different populations make the sky shine in these two different energy bands. Catalogue is also available in electronic firm at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc

  14. The Frequency of Anomalously Red Galaxies in SDSS Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shearman, O.; Pimbblet, K. A.

    2014-09-01

    We present a systematic photometric search for spectroscopically confirmed anomalously red galaxies members of 748 low redshift clusters between 0.03 z 0.17 from the SDSS-C4 cluster catalogue (Miller et al. 2005). For each cluster we spectroscopically determine cluster membership, construct a colour-magnitude diagram and fit the red sequence using a robust bi-weight fit. We define an "anomalously red galaxy" as having a (g - r) colour of greater than 3σ redward of the fitted cluster colour-magnitude relation. We find that of 7485 galaxies at r ≤ 17.77 in (g - r), 7 galaxies are anomalously red - 0.0935 per cent of all galaxies in our sample. We show that two of the red outliers are caused by red contamination from nearby sources and are therefore not intrinsically anomalous red. However, 5 have no underlying cause to be so red and we speculate that they may have a high internal dust content. These intrinsically red galaxies are rare - comprising no more than 0.0668 per cent of all cluster galaxies. Most are morphologically early type galaxies, with a few probable late type galaxies that are viewed edge-on and one low surface brightness late type. One of our anomalously red galaxies appears to be a dust-shrouded starburst and we speculate that this may be a unique galaxy amoungst this galaxy set.

  15. Stellar-to-halo mass relation of cluster galaxies

    DOE PAGES

    Niemiec, Anna; Jullo, Eric; Limousin, Marceau; ...

    2017-07-04

    In the formation of galaxy groups and clusters, the dark matter haloes containing satellite galaxies are expected to be tidally stripped in gravitational interactions with the host. We use galaxy-galaxy weak lensing to measure the average mass of dark matter haloes of satellite galaxies as a function of projected distance to the centre of the host, since stripping is expected to be greater for satellites closer to the centre of the cluster. We further classify the satellites according to their stellar mass: assuming that the stellar component of the galaxy is less disrupted by tidal stripping, stellar mass can bemore » used as a proxy of the infall mass. We study the stellar to halo mass relation of satellites as a function of the cluster-centric distance to measure tidal stripping. We use the shear catalogues of the DES science veri cation archive, the CFHTLenS and the CFHT Stripe 82 surveys, and we select satellites from the redMaPPer catalogue of clusters. For galaxies located in the outskirts of clusters, we nd a stellar to halo mass relation in good agreement with the theoretical expectations from Moster, Naab & White (2013) for central galaxies. In the centre of the cluster, we nd that this relation is shifted to smaller halo mass for a given stellar mass. We interpret this nding as further evidence for tidal stripping of dark matter haloes in high density environments.« less

  16. Stellar-to-halo mass relation of cluster galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemiec, Anna; Jullo, Eric; Limousin, Marceau; Giocoli, Carlo; Erben, Thomas; Hildebrant, Hendrik; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Leauthaud, Alexie; Makler, Martin; Moraes, Bruno; Pereira, Maria E. S.; Shan, Huanyuan; Rozo, Eduardo; Rykoff, Eli; Van Waerbeke, Ludovic

    2017-10-01

    In the formation of galaxy groups and clusters, the dark matter haloes containing satellite galaxies are expected to be tidally stripped in gravitational interactions with the host. We use galaxy-galaxy weak lensing to measure the average mass of dark matter haloes of satellite galaxies as a function of projected distance to the centre of the host, since stripping is expected to be greater for satellites closer to the centre of the cluster. We further classify the satellites according to their stellar mass: Assuming that the stellar component of the galaxy is less disrupted by tidal stripping, stellar mass can be used as a proxy of the infall mass. We study the stellar-to-halo mass relation of satellites as a function of the cluster-centric distance to measure tidal stripping. We use the shear catalogues of the Dark Energy Survey (DES) science verification archive, the Canada-France-Hawaii Lensing Survey (CFHTLenS) and the CFHT Stripe 82 surveys, and we select satellites from the redMaPPer catalogue of clusters. For galaxies located in the outskirts of clusters, we find a stellar-to- halo mass relation in good agreement with the theoretical expectations from Moster et al. for central galaxies. In the centre of the cluster, we find that this relation is shifted to smaller halo mass for a given stellar mass. We interpret this finding as further evidence for tidal stripping of dark matter haloes in high-density environments.

  17. Catalogue of diffuse interstellar band measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snow, T. P., Jr.; York, D. G.; Welty, D. E.

    1976-01-01

    Diffuse-band data have been collected from the literature and reduced statistically to a common measurement system, enabling correlation analyses to be made with a larger quantity of data than previously possible. A full listing of the catalogued data is presented, along with some discussion of the correlations. One important application of such studies is the identification of cases of peculiar diffuse-band behavior, and a table is given showing all cases of band strengths deviating by more than twice the mean dispersion from the best-fit correlations. This table may be useful in planning further observations.

  18. Associations Between the Ancient Star Catalogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duke, Dennis W.

    2002-07-01

    There are just two substantial sources of star coordinates preserved for us from antiquity: the star catalogue of Ptolemy's Almagest, and the rising, setting, and culmination phenomena, along with some star declinations and right ascensions, from Hipparchus' Commentary to Aratus. Given the controversy associated with the idea that Ptolemy's catalogue is, in whole or in substantial part, a copy of an earlier but now lost catalogue of Hipparchus, it is of interest to try to establish clear and significant associations, or the lack thereof, between the two sets of ancient star data. There have been two complementary efforts to clarify the possible associations. Vogt used the phenomena and declinations to reconstruct the ecliptical coordinates of some 122 stars in Hipparchus' Commentary that also appear in the Almagest catalogue. Vogt's conclusion was that since his reconstructed coordinates and the Almagest coordinates were, in general, different, Ptolemy did not obtain his data from Hipparchus. Vogt did notice five stars with very similar errors and concluded that Ptolemy probably did copy those from Hipparchus. More recently, however, Grasshoff has pointed out that there are several reasons to doubt Vogt's conclusion. Further, Grasshoff worked in the opposite direction, using the Almagest coordinates to compute the Hipparchan phenomena, and concluded, for two reasons, that the Almagest data and the Commentary data share a common origin. First, there are a number of stars that share large common errors, and it is highly unlikely that these agreements could be coincidental. Second, the correlation coefficients between the various error sets are typically large and statistically significant, and this also suggests a common origin of the two data sets. However, Grasshoff provided no analysis of the correlations to support this second conclusion. In this paper I will (1) analyze the correlations between the errors of the phenomena and the predictions of these phenomena

  19. Galaxy cluster's rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manolopoulou, M.; Plionis, M.

    2017-03-01

    We study the possible rotation of cluster galaxies, developing, testing, and applying a novel algorithm which identifies rotation, if such does exist, as well as its rotational centre, its axis orientation, rotational velocity amplitude, and, finally, the clockwise or counterclockwise direction of rotation on the plane of the sky. To validate our algorithms we construct realistic Monte Carlo mock rotating clusters and confirm that our method provides robust indications of rotation. We then apply our methodology on a sample of Abell clusters with z ≲ 0.1 with member galaxies selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey DR10 spectroscopic data base. After excluding a number of substructured clusters, which could provide erroneous indications of rotation, and taking into account the expected fraction of misidentified coherent substructure velocities for rotation, provided by our Monte Carlo simulation analysis, we find that ∼23 per cent of our clusters are rotating under a set of strict criteria. Loosening the strictness of the criteria, on the expense of introducing spurious rotation indications, we find this fraction increasing to ∼28 per cent. We correlate our rotation indicators with the cluster dynamical state, provided either by their Bautz-Morgan type or by their X-ray isophotal shape and find for those clusters showing rotation within 1.5 h^{-1}_{70} Mpc that the significance of their rotation is related to the dynamically younger phases of cluster formation but after the initial anisotropic accretion and merging has been completed. Finally, finding rotational modes in galaxy clusters could lead to the necessity of correcting the dynamical cluster mass calculations.

  20. Broad Absorption Line Quasar catalogues with Supervised Neural Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Scaringi, Simone; Knigge, Christian; Cottis, Christopher E.; Goad, Michael R.

    2008-12-05

    We have applied a Learning Vector Quantization (LVQ) algorithm to SDSS DR5 quasar spectra in order to create a large catalogue of broad absorption line quasars (BALQSOs). We first discuss the problems with BALQSO catalogues constructed using the conventional balnicity and/or absorption indices (BI and AI), and then describe the supervised LVQ network we have trained to recognise BALQSOs. The resulting BALQSO catalogue should be substantially more robust and complete than BI-or AI-based ones.

  1. Characterisation of an isolated galaxy sample: Astrophysical implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argudo Fernandez, Maria del Carmen

    2013-11-01

    In order to understand the evolution of galaxies, it is necessary to have a reference sample where the effects of the environment are minimised and quantified. Recent advances in large redshift galaxy surveys, such as the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-DR9), allow to reach a 3-dimensional picture of the environment. In the first two parts of the thesis, we present, in the framework of the AMIGA project (Analysis of the interstellar Medium of Isolated GAlaxies), a revision of the isolation degree and a study of the 3-dimensional environment for galaxies in the Catalogue of Isolated Galaxies (CIG, Karachentseva 1973). Using the 3-dimensional information, new catalogues of isolated galaxies, isolated pairs, and isolated triplets are assembled in the third part of the thesis. The main aims of this thesis are: * to refine the photographic-based CIG and to provide an improvement of the quantification of the isolation degree with respect to previous works, using both photometry and spectroscopy; * to identify and quantify the effects of the physical satellite distribution around galaxies in the CIG, as well as the effects of the Large Scale Structure (LSS); * to construct a catalogue of galaxies isolated in 3-dimension, and build catalogues of physically associated isolated pairs and isolated triplets. We develop an automatic method to search for neighbours around each CIG galaxy in the SDSS, within a projected area up to 3 Mpc. To recover the physically bound neighbour galaxies we focus on the satellites which are within the escape speed of each CIG galaxy. The local number density, at the 5 th nearest neighbour, and the tidal strength affecting the CIG galaxy are estimated to quantify the local and LSS isolation degrees. For the first time, the environment and the isolation degree of CIG galaxies are quantified using digital data. Besides, the availability of the spectroscopic data allows us to check the validity of the CIG isolation criterion, and shows that it is not

  2. Environments of Starburst Galaxies Diagnosed with the NVO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Mello, D.; Sosey, M.

    2004-12-01

    We will present the analysis of the environment of starburst galaxies using the National Virtual Observatory. We have matched the sample of starburst galaxies by Wu et al. (2002) with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and searched for companions in their neighborhood. We found: (i) three starbursts with no companion, (ii) four starbursts with clear interaction and in the process of merging, (iii) nine starbursts with at least one companion. We have compared the starburst sample with the sample of isolated galaxies by Karachentseva (1986) and with the SDSS merging galaxies by Allam et al. (2004). Using color selection criteria from the known sample of starburst galaxies, we have built a database of starburst candidates from the SDSS catalogue. This allowed us to do a more statistical comparison of starburst galaxies, their neighborhoods and possible environmental effects on their evolution. Direct links to the SDSS images and related photometry are provided for easy reference.

  3. Mock Trials versus Management or Litigation-Driven Models of Business Law Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gershuny, Pamela; McAllister, Charles; Rainey, Carolyn

    2012-01-01

    This study was designed to gain a greater understanding of the learning outcomes associated with the mock trial as an active teaching method. Participating in a product liability mock trial presents students with the complex interplay of administrative regulations and common law. As in real life, the harsh constraints of time pressures, less than…

  4. The Rhetoric of Mock Trial Debate: Using Logos, Pathos and Ethos in Undergraduate Competition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Felicia R.

    2005-01-01

    While engaging in learning about roles of evidence, rules of procedure and case law, undergraduate mock trial students must also learn how to effectively communicate their evidence to the fact-finder. In mock trial, as in real courtroom trials in the United States legal system, communication skills and the ability to persuade are essential. This…

  5. Introducing Preservice Teachers to Issues Surrounding Evolution and Creationism via a Mock Trial.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helgeson, Lars J.; Hoover, John; Sheehan, James

    2002-01-01

    Describes cooperation between social studies and science education professors to introduce preservice teachers to the evolution versus creationism debate via a mock trial. Uses a hypothetical situation in which a 6th grade teacher was fired for not balancing evolution and creationism in his teaching. Reports that the mock trial slightly increased…

  6. Statement of Facts for 1994 City-Wide Mock Trial Competitions. Scott Walker v. Tanya Brewster.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. for Citizen Education in the Law, Washington, DC.

    Prepared by the District of Columbia Street Law Project for its 23rd annual city-wide mock trial competition, this instructional handout provides the material for a mock civil trial over an accidental shooting. Thirteen-year-old T. J. Walker, Scott Walker's son from a previous marriage, visited the home of 5-year-old Jesse Walker with a pistol…

  7. Employing a Mock Trial in a Criminology Course: An Applied Learning Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shepelak, Norma J.

    1996-01-01

    Recounts a criminology class exercise that consisted of staging a mock trial using the murders from Truman Capote's "In Cold Blood" as source material. Students research the case and role play various lawyers, jury members, and witnesses. Identifies and discusses four educational objectives attainable through the staging of mock trials. (MJP)

  8. The Rhetoric of Mock Trial Debate: Using Logos, Pathos and Ethos in Undergraduate Competition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Felicia R.

    2005-01-01

    While engaging in learning about roles of evidence, rules of procedure and case law, undergraduate mock trial students must also learn how to effectively communicate their evidence to the fact-finder. In mock trial, as in real courtroom trials in the United States legal system, communication skills and the ability to persuade are essential. This…

  9. Hubble Space Telescope mock-up in use in the MDF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    View of helium filled mock-up of the Hubble Space Telescope in use in the Manipulator Development Facility (MDF) in bldg 9A. The mock-up is being maneuvered on the end of the remote manipulator system (RMS) arm. The Space Shuttle full fuselage trainer is seen in the background, to the left.

  10. Staging a mock trial: educating nurses on the importance of documenting critical values.

    PubMed

    Troxel, Dyan

    2012-01-01

    For nurse educators teaching about policies, choosing an interactive approach is vital. One such method is a mock trial. This article describes the process to present a mock trial to emphasize the importance of documenting critical values. This strategy emphasizes learner participation and offers a real-life scenario in a safe, simulated environment. © 2012 AWHONN.

  11. Introducing Preservice Teachers to Issues Surrounding Evolution and Creationism via a Mock Trial.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helgeson, Lars J.; Hoover, John; Sheehan, James

    2002-01-01

    Describes cooperation between social studies and science education professors to introduce preservice teachers to the evolution versus creationism debate via a mock trial. Uses a hypothetical situation in which a 6th grade teacher was fired for not balancing evolution and creationism in his teaching. Reports that the mock trial slightly increased…

  12. Mock Trials versus Management or Litigation-Driven Models of Business Law Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gershuny, Pamela; McAllister, Charles; Rainey, Carolyn

    2012-01-01

    This study was designed to gain a greater understanding of the learning outcomes associated with the mock trial as an active teaching method. Participating in a product liability mock trial presents students with the complex interplay of administrative regulations and common law. As in real life, the harsh constraints of time pressures, less than…

  13. Hubble Space Telescope mock-up in use in the MDF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    View of helium filled mock-up of the Hubble Space Telescope in use in the Manipulator Development Facility (MDF) in bldg 9A. The mock-up is being maneuvered on the end of the remote manipulator system (RMS) arm. The Space Shuttle full fuselage trainer is seen in the background, to the left.

  14. Employing a Mock Trial in a Criminology Course: An Applied Learning Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shepelak, Norma J.

    1996-01-01

    Recounts a criminology class exercise that consisted of staging a mock trial using the murders from Truman Capote's "In Cold Blood" as source material. Students research the case and role play various lawyers, jury members, and witnesses. Identifies and discusses four educational objectives attainable through the staging of mock trials. (MJP)

  15. Citizenship Education in Michigan Schools: A Mock Election and Political Awareness Resource Guide. Secondary Level.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michigan State Board of Education, Lansing.

    An eight-chapter resource guide helps high school students become actively involved in the presidential election process. Chapter 1 contains directions for student participation in the 1984 Michigan statewide mock election; these directions are easily adaptable to other state and local mock election projects. Included are sample voter application…

  16. The First Three Catalogues of Southern Star Clusters and Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cozens, Glen; Orchiston, W.; Walsh, A.

    2011-01-01

    Nicolas de la Caille, James Dunlop and John Herschel compiled the first three catalogues of southern star clusters and nebulae. Lacaille catalogued 42 objects from Cape Town, South Africa, in 1751 and 1752. Dunlop catalogued 629 objects from Parramatta, Australia, in 1826 and Herschel catalogued 1708 objects between 1834 and 1838 from Cape Town. Many of these objects had not been seen before; In this paper we discuss the new discoveries and the accuracy of the positions supplied by Lacaille, Dunlop and Herschel. Half of Dunlop's 629 objects turned out to be asterisms and faint double stars.

  17. Catalogues of variable stars from Parenago to the present day

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samus, N. N.

    2006-04-01

    After World War II, the International Astronomical Union made Soviet astronomers responsible for variable-star catalogues. This work has been continued ever since the first edition of the General Catalogue of Variable Stars compiled by the team headed by P.P. Parenago and B.V. Kukarkin and published in 1948. Currently, the catalogue work is a joint project of the Institute of Astronomy (Russian Academy of Sciences) and the Sternberg Astronomical Institute (Moscow University). This paper is a brief review of recent trends in the field of variable-star catalogues. Problems as well as new prospects related to modern large-scale automatic photometric sky surveys are discussed.

  18. On the nature and correction of the spurious S-wise spiral galaxy winding bias in Galaxy Zoo 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, Wayne B.; Davis, Darren; Silva, Pedro

    2017-04-01

    The Galaxy Zoo 1 catalogue displays a bias towards the S-wise winding direction in spiral galaxies, which has yet to be explained. The lack of an explanation confounds our attempts to verify the Cosmological Principle, and has spurred some debate as to whether a bias exists in the real Universe. The bias manifests not only in the obvious case of trying to decide if the universe as a whole has a winding bias, but also in the more insidious case of selecting which Galaxies to include in a winding direction survey. While the former bias has been accounted for in a previous image-mirroring study, the latter has not. Furthermore, the bias has never been corrected in the GZ1 catalogue, as only a small sample of the GZ1 catalogue was reexamined during the mirror study. We show that the existing bias is a human selection effect rather than a human chirality bias. In effect, the excess S-wise votes are spuriously 'stolen' from the elliptical and edge-on-disc categories, not the Z-wise category. Thus, when selecting a set of spiral galaxies by imposing a threshold T so that max (PS, PZ) > T or PS + PZ > T, we spuriously select more S-wise than Z-wise galaxies. We show that when a provably unbiased machine selects which galaxies are spirals independent of their chirality, the S-wise surplus vanishes, even if humans still determine the chirality. Thus, when viewed across the entire GZ1 sample (and by implication, the Sloan catalogue), the winding direction of arms in spiral galaxies as viewed from Earth is consistent with the flip of a fair coin.

  19. The Arecibo Environment Galaxy Survey: The NGC 2577/UGC 4375-galaxy pair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iguina, Ashley Ann; Minchin, Robert F.

    2017-01-01

    We searched for and catalogued galaxy candidates in an area of 5 square degrees around the NGC 2577/UGC 4375-galaxy pair via the 21-cm emission of the neutral hydrogen gas emitted by the candidates' interstellar media. The data were taken as a part of the Arecibo Galaxy Environment Survey (AGES) and consist of a data cube with the dimensions right ascension, declination, and the recessional velocity of the 21-cm line. We used the FITS viewer FRELLED to assist in visually extracting sources. We have cross identified the galaxy candidates with optical counterparts via the NASA Extragalactic Database and data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We made a total of 49 HI detections in the vicinity of the galaxy pair. We did not detect the S0 galaxy, NGC 2577, but we did detect the SB galaxy, UGC 4375, and four galaxies in the region around the galaxy pair at ~2000 km/s. We detected another overdensity at 4000 km/s. Additionally, an HI detection appears in our local neighborhood at 426 km/s. The Arecibo Observatory is operated by SRI International under a cooperative agreement with the National Science Foundation and in alliance with Ana G. Méndez-Universidad Metropolitana, and the Universities Space Research Association. The Arecibo Observatory REU program is funded under grant AST-1559849 to Universidad Metropolitana.

  20. Characterization of flaws in a tube bundle mock-up for reliability studies

    SciTech Connect

    Kupperman, D.S.; Bakhtiari, S.

    1996-10-01

    As part of an assessment of in-service inspection of steam generator tubes, the authors will assemble a steam generator mock-up for round robin studies and use as a test bed in evaluating emerging technologies. Progress is reported on the characterization of flaws that will be part of the mock-up. Eddy current and ultrasonic techniques are being evaluated as a means to characterize the flaws in the mock-up tubes before final assembly. Twenty Inconel 600 tubes with laboratory-grown cracks, typical of those to be used in the mock-up, were provided by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for laboratory testing. After the tubes were inspected with eddy current and ultrasonic techniques, they were destructively analyzed to establish the actual depths, lengths, and profiles of the cracks. The analysis of the results will allow the best techniques to be used for characterizing the flaws in the mock-up tubes.

  1. Multidisciplinary mock codes: dream it, plan it, do it, rate it.

    PubMed

    Funkhouser, M J; Hayward, M F

    1989-01-01

    A mock code program using the nursing process was developed to teach nurses to cope with code situations. In addition, the program was designed to increase staff feelings of competency and effectiveness in response to a code, and provide a review of procedures, equipment, and roles during a code. The mock code program began with a multidisciplinary 2-hour minishop followed by a 6-month pilot project of prescheduled, and "briefed" mock codes. The specific behavioral objectives for mock code outcomes were translated into an evaluation questionnaire sent to each participant. Final evaluation, including cost analysis, proved the efficiency of the mock code exercises. This article describes how to get started in developing a similar program. Planning is the key. Creative teaching/learning approaches, active participation, realistic simulations, and immediate feedback all contribute to program success.

  2. Characterization of flaws in a tube bundle mock-up for reliability studies

    SciTech Connect

    Kupperman, D.S.; Bakhtiari, S.

    1997-02-01

    As part of an assessment of in-service inspection of steam generator tubes, the authors will assemble a steam generator mock-up for round robin studies and use as a test bed in evaluating emerging technologies. Progress is reported on the characterization of flaws that will be part of the mock-up. Eddy current and ultrasonic techniques are being evaluated as a means to characterize the flaws in the mock-up tubes before final assembly. Twenty Inconel 600 tubes with laboratory-grown cracks, typical of those to be used in the mock-up, were provided by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for laboratory testing. After the tubes were inspected with eddy current and ultrasonic techniques, they were destructively analyzed to establish the actual depths, lengths, and profiles of the cracks. The analysis of the results will allow the best techniques to be used for characterizing the flaws in the mock-up tubes.

  3. Comparing gravitational redshifts of SDSS galaxy clusters with the magnified redshift enhancement of background BOSS galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimeno, Pablo; Broadhurst, Tom; Coupon, Jean; Umetsu, Keiichi; Lazkoz, Ruth

    2015-04-01

    A clean measurement of the evolution of the galaxy cluster mass function can significantly improve our understanding of cosmology from the rapid growth of cluster masses below z < 0.5. Here, we examine the consistency of cluster catalogues selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey by applying two independent gravity-based methods using all available spectroscopic redshifts from the DR10 release. First, we detect a gravitational redshift related signal for 20,119 and 13,128 clusters with spectroscopic redshifts contained in the Gaussian Mixture Brightest Cluster Galaxy (GMBCG) and red-sequence Matched-filter Probabilistic Percolation (redMaPPer) catalogues, respectively, at a level of ˜-10 km s-1. This we show is consistent with the magnitude expected using the richness-mass relations provided by the literature and after applying recently clarified relativistic and flux bias corrections. This signal is also consistent with the richest clusters in the larger catalogue of Wen et al., corresponding to M200m ≳ 2 × 1014 M⊙ h-1; however, we find no significant detection of a gravitational redshift signal for lower richness clusters, which may be related to bulk motions from substructure and spurious cluster detections. Secondly, we find all three catalogues generate mass-dependent levels of lensing magnification bias, which enhances the mean redshift of flux-selected background galaxies from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey survey. The magnitude of this lensing effect is generally consistent with the corresponding richness-mass relations advocated for the surveys. We conclude that all catalogues comprise a high proportion of reliable clusters, and that the GMBCG and redMaPPer cluster finder algorithms favour more relaxed clusters with a meaningful gravitational redshift signal, as anticipated by the red-sequence colour selection of the GMBCG and redMaPPer samples.

  4. Photometric stellar catalogue for TV meteor astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonov, V. A.; Bagrov, A. V.

    2016-01-01

    Photometry for ordinary astrophysics was carefully developed for its own purposes. As stars radiation is very similar to the blackbody radiation, astronomers measure star illumination in wide or narrow calibrated spectral bands. This is enough for star photometry with precise accuracy and for measuring their light flux in these bands in energetic units. Meteors are moving objects and do not allow collection of more photons then they emit. So meteor observers use the whole spectral band that can be covered by sensitivity of their light sensors. This is why measurements of stellar magnitudes of background stars by these sensors are not the same as catalogued star brightness in standard photometric spectral bands. Here we present a special photometric catalogue of 93 bright non-variable stars of the northern hemisphere, that can be used by meteor observers of standard background whose brightness are calculated in energetic units as well as in non-systematic stellar magnitudes in spectral wavelength of the WATEC 902 sensitivity.

  5. HELCATS - Heliospheric Cataloguing, Analysis and Techniques Service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, D.; Harrison, R. A.; Davies, J. A.; Byrne, J.; Perry, C. H.; Moestl, C.; Rouillard, A. P.; Bothmer, V.; Rodriguez, L.; Eastwood, J. P.; Kilpua, E.; Odstrcil, D.; Gallagher, P.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the evolution of the solar wind is fundamental to advancing our knowledge of energy and mass transport in the Solar System, making it crucial to space weather and its prediction. The advent of truly wide-angle heliospheric imaging has revolutionised the study of both transient (CMEs) and background (IRs) solar wind plasma structures, by enabling their direct and continuous observation out to 1 AU and beyond. The EU-funded FP7 HELCATS project combines European expertise in heliospheric imaging, built up in particular through lead involvement in NASA's STEREO mission, with expertise in solar and coronal imaging as well as in-situ and radio measurements of solar wind phenomena, in a programme of work that will enable a much wider exploitation and understanding of heliospheric imaging observations. The HELCATS project endeavors to catalogue transient and background solar wind structures imaged by STEREO/HI throughout the duration of the mission. This catalogue will include estimates of their kinematic properties using a variety of established and more speculative approaches, which are to be evaluated through comparisons with solar source and in-situ measurements. The potential for driving numerical models from these kinematic properties is to be assessed, as is their complementarity to radio observations, specifically Type II bursts and interplanetary scintillation. This presentation provides an overview of the HELCATS project and its progress in first 18 months of operations.

  6. Towards dynamic light-curve catalogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheers, Bart; Groffen, Fabian

    2012-09-01

    Time-domain astronomy is becoming a fundamental aspect of the next generation of astronomical instruments. The timing properties will revolutionise the studies of all kinds of astronomical objects. Consequetially, the huge complex data volumes and high cadences of these facilities will force us to overhaul and extend current software solutions. LOFAR, laying the groundwork for this, will produce a continuously updated spectral light-curve catalogue of all detected sources, with real-time capabilities to cope with the growth of 50 - 100TB/yr, making it the largest dynamic astronomical catalogue. Automated pipelines use the column-store MonetDB as their key component. We exploit SciLens, a 300+ node, 4-tier locally distributed cluster focussed on massive I/O. Introduction of the new array-based query language, SciQL, simplifies data exploration and mining. I will demonstrate how MonetDB/SQL & SciQL on its SciLens platform manages the millions of lightcurves for LOFAR. Initial benchmark results confirm the linear scale-up performance over tens of TBs using tens of nodes.

  7. Pan-European catalogue of flood events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parajka, Juraj; Mangini, Walter; Viglione, Alberto; Hundecha, Yeshewatesfa; Ceola, Serena

    2016-04-01

    There have been numerous extreme flood events observed in Europe in the past years. One of the way to improve our understanding about causing flood generation mechanisms is to analyse spatial and temporal variability of a large number of flood events. The aim of this study is to present a pan-European catalogue of flood events developed within the SWITCH-ON EU Project. The flood events are identified from daily discharge observations at 1315 stations listed in Global Runoff Data Centre database. The average length of discharge time-series for selected stations is 54 years. For each event, basin boundary and additional hydrological and weather characteristics are extracted. Hydrological characteristics are extracted from the pan-European HYPE model simulations. Precipitation, together with the corresponding proportions of rainfall and snowfall, snowmelt, and evapotranspiration are computed as total amounts between the event start date and event peak date. Soil moisture, soil moisture deficit, and basin accumulated snow water equivalent are computed for the event start date. Weather characteristics are derived from the weather circulation pattern catalogue developed within COST 733 Project. The results are generated in an open data access and tools framework which allows reproduction and extension of results to other regions. More information about the analysis and project are available at: http://www.water-switch-on.eu/lab.html.

  8. Properties of an H I-selected galaxy sample

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szomoru, Arpad; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Van Gorkom, Jacqueline H.; Knapen, Johan H.; Weinberg, David H.; Fruchter, Andrew S.

    1994-01-01

    We analyze the properties of a sample of galaxies identified in a 21cm, H I-line survey of selected areas in the Perseus-Pisces supercluster and its foreground void. Twelve fields were observed in the supercluster, five of them (target fields) centered on optically bright galaxies, and the other seven (blank fields) selected to contain no bright galaxies within 45 min. of their centers. We detected nine previously uncatalogued, gas-rich galaxies, six of them in the target fields. We also detected H I from seven previously catalogued galaxies in these fields. Observations in the void covered the same volume as the 12 supercluster fields at the same H I-mass sensitivity, but no objects were detected. Combining out H I data with optical broadband and H alpha imaging, we conclude that the properties of H I-selected galaxies do not differ substantially from those of late-type galaxies found in optical surveys. In particular, the galaxies in our sample do not appear to be unusually faint for their H I mass, or for their circular velocity. We find tentative evidence for a connection between optical surface brightness and degree of isolation, in the sense that low surface brightness galaxies tend to be more isolated. The previously catalogued, optically bright galaxies in our survey volume dominate the total H I mass density and cross section; the uncatalogued galaxies contribute only approximately 19 percent of the mass and approximately 12 percent of the cross section. Thus, existing estimates of the density and cross section of neutral hydrogen, most of which are based on optically selected galaxy samples, are probably accurate. Such estimates can be used to compare the nearby universe to the high-redshift universe probed by quasar absorption lines.

  9. Improving fast generation of halo catalogues with higher order Lagrangian perturbation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munari, Emiliano; Monaco, Pierluigi; Sefusatti, Emiliano; Castorina, Emanuele; Mohammad, Faizan G.; Anselmi, Stefano; Borgani, Stefano

    2017-03-01

    We present the latest version of PINOCCHIO, a code that generates catalogues of dark matter haloes in an approximate but fast way with respect to an N-body simulation. This code version implements a new on-the-fly production of halo catalogue on the past light cone with continuous time sampling, and the computation of particle and halo displacements are extended up to third-order Lagrangian perturbation theory (LPT), in contrast with previous versions that used Zel'dovich approximation. We run PINOCCHIO on the same initial configuration of a reference N-body simulation, so that the comparison extends to the object-by-object level. We consider haloes at redshifts 0 and 1, using different LPT orders either for halo construction or to compute halo final positions. We compare the clustering properties of PINOCCHIO haloes with those from the simulation by computing the power spectrum and two-point correlation function in real and redshift space (monopole and quadrupole), the bispectrum and the phase difference of halo distributions. We find that 2LPT and 3LPT give noticeable improvement. 3LPT provides the best agreement with N-body when it is used to displace haloes, while 2LPT gives better results for constructing haloes. At the highest orders, linear bias is typically recovered at a few per cent level. In Fourier space and using 3LPT for halo displacements, the halo power spectrum is recovered to within 10 per cent up to kmax ∼ 0.5 h Mpc-1. The results presented in this paper have interesting implications for the generation of large ensemble of mock surveys for the scientific exploitation of data from big surveys.

  10. The Relationship Between Mock Boards and Clinical Board Examinations in Dental Hygiene Education.

    PubMed

    Martin, Victoria M; Rogo, Ellen J; Hodges, Kathleen O; Piland, Neill F; Osborn Popp, Sharon E

    2017-01-01

    Research on the effectiveness of clinical mock boards for future oral health professionals is conflicting and limited. Despite this, U.S. dental hygiene programs rely on clinical mock board experiences as essential components for preparing students for their clinical board examinations. Differences in programs' mock board characteristics may relate to board exam outcomes. The validity and reliability of mock boards can be questioned when deviations from exam criteria and procedures are made and grading mechanisms are not consistent. The aim of this study was to determine which mock board characteristics were critical in preparing students by exploring the relationships between programs' dental hygiene, local anesthesia, and restorative mock boards and their 2013-14 candidates' performance on the corresponding three Western Regional Examining Board (WREB) licensure exams. Of the 23 U.S. dental hygiene education programs in four states invited to participate, 15 agreed to do so, and 13 consented to have WREB provide their programs' test result data. The mock board coordinators provided data on characteristics of their programs' mock boards with an online questionnaire distributed in 2014. Scores calculated from the responses were compared to performance of the programs' candidates on the corresponding WREB exam. Of the 45 questionnaires (on three exams each x 15 programs), 33 were completed (73.3%). Significant relationships were found between candidates' WREB exam results and the mock boards' intensity scores, remediation, multiple experiences, and examiner calibration scores. The results of this study provide fundamental information about mock board characteristics that may assist educators in facilitating experiences to more effectively prepare students for these high-stakes exams.

  11. The ASTRODEEP Frontier Fields catalogues. I. Multiwavelength photometry of Abell-2744 and MACS-J0416

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merlin, E.; Amorín, R.; Castellano, M.; Fontana, A.; Buitrago, F.; Dunlop, J. S.; Elbaz, D.; Boucaud, A.; Bourne, N.; Boutsia, K.; Brammer, G.; Bruce, V. A.; Capak, P.; Cappelluti, N.; Ciesla, L.; Comastri, A.; Cullen, F.; Derriere, S.; Faber, S. M.; Ferguson, H. C.; Giallongo, E.; Grazian, A.; Lotz, J.; Michałowski, M. J.; Paris, D.; Pentericci, L.; Pilo, S.; Santini, P.; Schreiber, C.; Shu, X.; Wang, T.

    2016-05-01

    Context. The Frontier Fields survey is a pioneering observational program aimed at collecting photometric data, both from space (Hubble Space Telescope and Spitzer Space Telescope) and from ground-based facilities (VLT Hawk-I), for six deep fields pointing at clusters of galaxies and six nearby deep parallel fields, in a wide range of passbands. The analysis of these data is a natural outcome of the Astrodeep project, an EU collaboration aimed at developing methods and tools for extragalactic photometry and creating valuable public photometric catalogues. Aims: We produce multiwavelength photometric catalogues (from B to 4.5 μm) for the first two of the Frontier Fields, Abell-2744 and MACS-J0416 (plus their parallel fields). Methods: To detect faint sources even in the central regions of the clusters, we develop a robust and repeatable procedure that uses the public codes Galapagos and Galfit to model and remove most of the light contribution from both the brightest cluster members, and the intra-cluster light. We perform the detection on the processed HST H160 image to obtain a pure H-selected sample, which is the primary catalogue that we publish. We also add a sample of sources which are undetected in the H160 image but appear on a stacked infrared image. Photometry on the other HST bands is obtained using SExtractor, again on processed images after the procedure for foreground light removal. Photometry on the Hawk-I and IRAC bands is obtained using our PSF-matching deconfusion code t-phot. A similar procedure, but without the need for the foreground light removal, is adopted for the Parallel fields. Results: The procedure of foreground light subtraction allows for the detection and the photometric measurements of ~2500 sources per field. We deliver and release complete photometric H-detected catalogues, with the addition of the complementary sample of infrared-detected sources. All objects have multiwavelength coverage including B to H HST bands, plus K

  12. The clustering of galaxies in the completed SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: baryon acoustic oscillations in the Fourier space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beutler, Florian; Seo, Hee-Jong; Ross, Ashley J.; McDonald, Patrick; Saito, Shun; Bolton, Adam S.; Brownstein, Joel R.; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Cuesta, Antonio J.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Font-Ribera, Andreu; Grieb, Jan Niklas; Hand, Nick; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Modi, Chirag; Nichol, Robert C.; Percival, Will J.; Prada, Francisco; Rodriguez-Torres, Sergio; Roe, Natalie A.; Ross, Nicholas P.; Salazar-Albornoz, Salvador; Sánchez, Ariel G.; Schneider, Donald P.; Slosar, Anže; Tinker, Jeremy; Tojeiro, Rita; Vargas-Magaña, Mariana; Vazquez, Jose A.

    2017-01-01

    We analyse the baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) signal of the final Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) data release (DR12). Our analysis is performed in the Fourier space, using the power spectrum monopole and quadrupole. The data set includes 1198 006 galaxies over the redshift range 0.2 < z < 0.75. We divide this data set into three (overlapping) redshift bins with the effective redshifts zeff = 0.38, 0.51 and 0.61. We demonstrate the reliability of our analysis pipeline using N-body simulations as well as ˜1000 MultiDark-Patchy mock catalogues that mimic the BOSS-DR12 target selection. We apply density field reconstruction to enhance the BAO signal-to-noise ratio. By including the power spectrum quadrupole we can separate the line of sight and angular modes, which allows us to constrain the angular diameter distance DA(z) and the Hubble parameter H(z) separately. We obtain two independent 1.6 and 1.5 per cent constraints on DA(z) and 2.9 and 2.3 per cent constraints on H(z) for the low (zeff = 0.38) and high (zeff = 0.61) redshift bin, respectively. We obtain two independent 1 and 0.9 per cent constraints on the angular averaged distance DV(z), when ignoring the Alcock-Paczynski effect. The detection significance of the BAO signal is of the order of 8σ (post-reconstruction) for each of the three redshift bins. Our results are in good agreement with the Planck prediction within Λ cold dark matter. This paper is part of a set that analyses the final galaxy clustering data set from BOSS. The measurements and likelihoods presented here are combined with others in Alam et al. to produce the final cosmological constraints from BOSS.

  13. Redshift-space distortions of galaxies, clusters, and AGN. Testing how the accuracy of growth rate measurements depends on scales and sample selections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marulli, Federico; Veropalumbo, Alfonso; Moscardini, Lauro; Cimatti, Andrea; Dolag, Klaus

    2017-03-01

    Aims: Redshift-space clustering anisotropies caused by cosmic peculiar velocities provide a powerful probe to test the gravity theory on large scales. However, to extract unbiased physical constraints, the clustering pattern has to be modelled accurately, taking into account the effects of non-linear dynamics at small scales, and properly describing the link between the selected cosmic tracers and the underlying dark matter field. Methods: We used a large hydrodynamic simulation to investigate how the systematic error on the linear growth rate, f, caused by model uncertainties, depends on sample selections and co-moving scales. Specifically, we measured the redshift-space two-point correlation function of mock samples of galaxies, galaxy clusters and active galactic nuclei, extracted from the Magneticum simulation, in the redshift range 0.2 ≤ z ≤ 2, and adopting different sample selections. We estimated fσ8 by modelling both the monopole and the full two-dimensional anisotropic clustering, using the dispersion model. Results: We find that the systematic error on fσ8 depends significantly on the range of scales considered for the fit. If the latter is kept fixed, the error depends on both redshift and sample selection due to the scale-dependent impact of non-linearities if not properly modelled. Concurrently, we show that it is possible to achieve almost unbiased constraints on fσ8 provided that the analysis is restricted to a proper range of scales that depends non-trivially on the properties of the sample. This can have a strong impact on multiple tracer analyses, and when combining catalogues selected at different redshifts.

  14. The clustering of galaxies in the completed SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: Baryon Acoustic Oscillations in Fourier-space

    SciTech Connect

    Beutler, Florian; Seo, Hee -Jong; Ross, Ashley J.; McDonald, Patrick; Saito, Shun; Bolton, Adam S.; Joel R. Brownstein; Chuang, Chia -Hsun; Cuesta, Antonio J.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Font-Ribera, Andreu; Grieb, Jan Niklas; Hand, Nick; Kitaura, Francisco -Shu; Modi, Chirag; Nichol, Robert C.; Percival, Will J.; Prada, Francisco; Rodriguez-Torres, Sergio; Roe, Natalie A.; Ross, Nicholas P.; Salazar-Albornoz, Salvador; Sanchez, Ariel G.; Schneider, Donald P.; Slosar, Anze; Tinker, Jeremy; Tojeiro, Rita; Vargas-Magana, Mariana; Vazquez, Jose A.

    2016-07-13

    Here, we analyse the Baryon Acoustic Oscillation (BAO) signal of the final Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) data release (DR12). Our analysis is performed in Fourier-space, using the power spectrum monopole and quadrupole. The dataset includes 1 198 006 galaxies over the redshift range 0.2 < z < 0.75. We divide this dataset into three (overlapping) redshift bins with the effective redshifts zeff = 0.38, 0.51 and 0.61. We demonstrate the reliability of our analysis pipeline using N-body simulations as well as 1000 MultiDark-Patchy mock catalogues, which mimic the BOSS-DR12 target selection. We apply density eld reconstruction to enhance the BAO signal-to-noise ratio. By including the power spectrum quadrupole we can sep-arate the line-of-sight and angular modes, which allows us to constrain the angular diameter distance DA(z) and the Hubble parameter H ( z ) separately. We obtain two independent 1 : 6% and 1 : 5% constraints on DA(z) and 2.9% and 2.3% constraints on H(z) for the low (zeff = 0.38) and high (zeff = 0.61) redshift bin, respectively. We obtain two independent 1% and 0.9% constraints on the angular averaged distance DV(z), when ignoring the Alcock-Paczynski e ect. The detection significance of the BAO signal is of the order of 8σ (post-reconstruction) for each of the three redshift bins. Our results are in good agreement with the Planck prediction within CDM. This paper is part of a set that analyses the final galaxy clustering dataset from BOSS. The measurements and likelihoods presented here are combined with others in Alam et al. (2016) to produce the final cosmological constraints from BOSS.

  15. The clustering of galaxies in the completed SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: Baryon Acoustic Oscillations in Fourier-space

    SciTech Connect

    Beutler, Florian; Seo, Hee -Jong; Ross, Ashley J.; McDonald, Patrick; Saito, Shun; Bolton, Adam S.; Joel R. Brownstein; Chuang, Chia -Hsun; Cuesta, Antonio J.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Font-Ribera, Andreu; Grieb, Jan Niklas; Hand, Nick; Kitaura, Francisco -Shu; Modi, Chirag; Nichol, Robert C.; Percival, Will J.; Prada, Francisco; Rodriguez-Torres, Sergio; Roe, Natalie A.; Ross, Nicholas P.; Salazar-Albornoz, Salvador; Sanchez, Ariel G.; Schneider, Donald P.; Slosar, Anze; Tinker, Jeremy; Tojeiro, Rita; Vargas-Magana, Mariana; Vazquez, Jose A.

    2016-07-13

    Here, we analyse the Baryon Acoustic Oscillation (BAO) signal of the final Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) data release (DR12). Our analysis is performed in Fourier-space, using the power spectrum monopole and quadrupole. The dataset includes 1 198 006 galaxies over the redshift range 0.2 < z < 0.75. We divide this dataset into three (overlapping) redshift bins with the effective redshifts zeff = 0.38, 0.51 and 0.61. We demonstrate the reliability of our analysis pipeline using N-body simulations as well as 1000 MultiDark-Patchy mock catalogues, which mimic the BOSS-DR12 target selection. We apply density eld reconstruction to enhance the BAO signal-to-noise ratio. By including the power spectrum quadrupole we can sep-arate the line-of-sight and angular modes, which allows us to constrain the angular diameter distance DA(z) and the Hubble parameter H ( z ) separately. We obtain two independent 1 : 6% and 1 : 5% constraints on DA(z) and 2.9% and 2.3% constraints on H(z) for the low (zeff = 0.38) and high (zeff = 0.61) redshift bin, respectively. We obtain two independent 1% and 0.9% constraints on the angular averaged distance DV(z), when ignoring the Alcock-Paczynski e ect. The detection significance of the BAO signal is of the order of 8σ (post-reconstruction) for each of the three redshift bins. Our results are in good agreement with the Planck prediction within CDM. This paper is part of a set that analyses the final galaxy clustering dataset from BOSS. The measurements and likelihoods presented here are combined with others in Alam et al. (2016) to produce the final cosmological constraints from BOSS.

  16. The clustering of galaxies in the completed SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: Baryon Acoustic Oscillations in Fourier-space

    DOE PAGES

    Beutler, Florian; Seo, Hee -Jong; Ross, Ashley J.; ...

    2016-07-13

    Here, we analyse the Baryon Acoustic Oscillation (BAO) signal of the final Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) data release (DR12). Our analysis is performed in Fourier-space, using the power spectrum monopole and quadrupole. The dataset includes 1 198 006 galaxies over the redshift range 0.2 < z < 0.75. We divide this dataset into three (overlapping) redshift bins with the effective redshifts zeff = 0.38, 0.51 and 0.61. We demonstrate the reliability of our analysis pipeline using N-body simulations as well as 1000 MultiDark-Patchy mock catalogues, which mimic the BOSS-DR12 target selection. We apply density eld reconstruction to enhance themore » BAO signal-to-noise ratio. By including the power spectrum quadrupole we can sep-arate the line-of-sight and angular modes, which allows us to constrain the angular diameter distance DA(z) and the Hubble parameter H ( z ) separately. We obtain two independent 1 : 6% and 1 : 5% constraints on DA(z) and 2.9% and 2.3% constraints on H(z) for the low (zeff = 0.38) and high (zeff = 0.61) redshift bin, respectively. We obtain two independent 1% and 0.9% constraints on the angular averaged distance DV(z), when ignoring the Alcock-Paczynski e ect. The detection significance of the BAO signal is of the order of 8σ (post-reconstruction) for each of the three redshift bins. Our results are in good agreement with the Planck prediction within CDM. This paper is part of a set that analyses the final galaxy clustering dataset from BOSS. The measurements and likelihoods presented here are combined with others in Alam et al. (2016) to produce the final cosmological constraints from BOSS.« less

  17. Gaussian covariance matrices for anisotropic galaxy clustering measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grieb, Jan Niklas; Sánchez, Ariel G.; Salazar-Albornoz, Salvador; Dalla Vecchia, Claudio

    2016-04-01

    Measurements of the redshift-space galaxy clustering have been a prolific source of cosmological information in recent years. Accurate covariance estimates are an essential step for the validation of galaxy clustering models of the redshift-space two-point statistics. Usually, only a limited set of accurate N-body simulations is available. Thus, assessing the data covariance is not possible or only leads to a noisy estimate. Further, relying on simulated realizations of the survey data means that tests of the cosmology dependence of the covariance are expensive. With these points in mind, this work presents a simple theoretical model for the linear covariance of anisotropic galaxy clustering observations with synthetic catalogues. Considering the Legendre moments (`multipoles') of the two-point statistics and projections into wide bins of the line-of-sight parameter (`clustering wedges'), we describe the modelling of the covariance for these anisotropic clustering measurements for galaxy samples with a trivial geometry in the case of a Gaussian approximation of the clustering likelihood. As main result of this paper, we give the explicit formulae for Fourier and configuration space covariance matrices. To validate our model, we create synthetic halo occupation distribution galaxy catalogues by populating the haloes of an ensemble of large-volume N-body simulations. Using linear and non-linear input power spectra, we find very good agreement between the model predictions and the measurements on the synthetic catalogues in the quasi-linear regime.

  18. Searching for luminous absorbed sources in the WISE AGN catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mountrichas, G.; Georgantopoulos, I.; Secrest, N. J.; Ordovás-Pascual, I.; Corral, A.; Akylas, A.; Mateos, S.; Carrera, F. J.; Batziou, E.

    2017-07-01

    Mid-infrared (IR) colour selection techniques have proved to be very efficient in finding active galactic nuclei (AGN). This is because the AGN heats the surrounding dust producing warm mid-IR colours. Using the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer 3.6, 4.5 and 12 μm colours, the largest sample of IR selected AGN has already been produced containing 1.4 million AGN over the whole sky. Here, we explore the X-ray properties of this AGN sample by cross-correlating it with the subsample of the 3XMM X-ray catalogue that has available X-ray spectra and at the same time optical spectroscopy from Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Our goal is to find rare luminous obscured AGN. Our final sample contains 65 QSOs with log νLν ≥ 46.2 erg s-1. This IR luminosity cut corresponds to log LX ≈ 45 erg s-1, at the median redshift of our sample (z = 2.3), that lies at the bright end of the X-ray luminosity function at z > 2. The X-ray spectroscopic analysis reveals seven obscured AGN having a column density NH > 1022 cm-2. Six of them show evidence for broad [C iv] absorption lines and five are classified as broad absorption line QSOs. We fit the optical spectra of our X-ray absorbed sources to estimate the optical reddening. We find that none of these show any obscuration according to the optical continuum. These sources add to the growing evidence for populations of luminous QSOs with evidence for substantial absorption by outflowing ionized material, similar to those expected to be emerging from their absorbing cocoons in the framework of AGN/galaxy co-evolution.

  19. The VIPERS Multi-Lambda Survey. I. UV and near-IR observations, multi-colour catalogues, and photometric redshifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moutard, T.; Arnouts, S.; Ilbert, O.; Coupon, J.; Hudelot, P.; Vibert, D.; Comte, V.; Conseil, S.; Davidzon, I.; Guzzo, L.; Llebaria, A.; Martin, C.; McCracken, H. J.; Milliard, B.; Morrison, G.; Schiminovich, D.; Treyer, M.; Van Werbaeke, L.

    2016-05-01

    We present observations collected in the CFHTLS-VIPERS region in the ultraviolet with the GALEX satellite (far- and near-ultraviolet channels) and in the near-infrared with the CFHT/WIRCam camera (Ks band) over an area of 22 and 27 deg2, respectively. The depth of the photometry was optimised to measure the physical properties (e.g., star formation rate, stellar masses) of all the galaxies in the VIPERS spectroscopic survey. The large volume explored by VIPERS will enable a unique investigation of the relationship between the galaxy properties and their environment (density field and cosmic web) at high redshift (0.5 ≤ z ≤ 1.2). In this paper, we present the observations, the data reductions, and the build-up of the multi-colour catalogues. The CFHTLS-T0007 (gri-χ2) images are used as reference to detect and measure the Ks-band photometry, while the T0007 u∗-selected sources are used as priors to perform the GALEX photometry based on a dedicated software (EMphot). Our final sample reaches NUVAB ~ 25 (at 5σ) and KAB ~ 22 (at 3σ). The large spectroscopic sample (~51 000 spectroscopic redshifts) allows us to highlight the robustness of our star/galaxy separation and the reliability of our photometric redshifts with a typical accuracy of σz ≤ 0.04 and a fraction of catastrophic failures η ≤ 2% down to i ~ 23. We present various tests on the Ks-band completeness and photometric redshift accuracy by comparing our results with existing overlapping deep photometric catalogues. Finally, we discuss the BzK sample of passive and active galaxies at high redshift and the evolution of galaxy morphology in the (NUV-r) vs. (r-Ks) diagram at low redshift (z ≤ 0.25) based on the high image quality of the CFHTLS. The catalogue is available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/590/A102The images, catalogues, and photometric redshifts for 1.5 million sources (down to NUV

  20. VizieR Online Data Catalog: MUSE-Wide survey: 831 emission line galaxies (Herenz+, 2017)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herenz, E. C.; Urrutia, T.; Wisotzki, L.; Kerutt, J.; Saust, R.; Werhahn, M.; Schmidt, K. B.; Caruana, J.; Diener, C.; Bacon, R.; Brinchman, J.; Schaye, J.; Maseda, M.; Weilbacher, P. M.

    2017-05-01

    This data release consists of an emission line galaxy catalogue containing 831 emission line galaxies detected in the first period of observations of the MUSE-Wide survey. We also release 1D PSF-weighted extracted spectra and 3D datacubes for each of those 831 sources. The emission line galaxy catalogue consists of two tables: A catalogue of all 831 detected emission line objects and a table of all 1652 detected emission lines in those objects. These tables are described in detail in Sect. 4.1 and 4.2 of the paper. Both tables are in the FITS binary table format, adhering to the FITS standard described in Pence et al. (2010A&A...524A..42P). (8 data files).

  1. VizieR Online Data Catalog: MHO Catalogue (Davis+, 2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, C. J.; Gell, R.; Khanzadyan, T.; Smith, M. D.; Jenness, T.

    2010-02-01

    The catalogue contains almost 1000 objects and covers regions on the sky loosely based on the constellations and associated Giant Molecular Clouds (Perseus, Orion A, Orion B, Taurus, etc.); full details are given in the paper. Note also that this catalogue is being maintained (and updated) at a dedicated, search-able website: http://www.jach.hawaii.edu/UKIRT/MHCat/ (2 data files).

  2. Modern Special Collections Cataloguing: A University of London Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Attar, K. E.

    2013-01-01

    Recent years have seen a growing emphasis on modern special collections (in themselves no new phenomenon), with a dichotomy between guidance for detailed cataloguing in "Descriptive Cataloging of Rare Materials (Books)" (DCRM(B), 2007) and the value of clearing cataloguing backlogs expeditiously. This article describes the De la Mare…

  3. Modern Special Collections Cataloguing: A University of London Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Attar, K. E.

    2013-01-01

    Recent years have seen a growing emphasis on modern special collections (in themselves no new phenomenon), with a dichotomy between guidance for detailed cataloguing in "Descriptive Cataloging of Rare Materials (Books)" (DCRM(B), 2007) and the value of clearing cataloguing backlogs expeditiously. This article describes the De la Mare…

  4. Surface brightness measurements for APM galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Z.; Maddox, S. J.; Jones, J. B.; Coles, P.

    2003-01-01

    This paper considers some simple surface brightness (SB) estimates for galaxies in the Automated Plate Measuring machine (APM) catalogue in order to derive homogeneous SB data for a very large sample of faint galaxies. The isophotal magnitude and area are used to estimate the central surface brightness and total magnitude based on the assumption of an exponential SB profile. The SB measurements are corrected for field effects on each UK Schmidt plate and the zero-point of each plate is adjusted to give a uniform sample of SB and total magnitude estimates over the whole survey. Results are obtained for 2.4 million galaxies with blue photographic magnitudes brighter than bJ= 20.5 covering 4300 deg2 in the region of the South Galactic Cap. Almost all galaxies in our sample have central surface brightness in the range 20 to 24 bJ mag arcsec-2. The SB measurements we obtain are compared to previous SB measurements and we find an acceptable level of error of +/-0.2 bJ mag arcsec-2. The distribution of SB profiles is considered for different galaxy morphologies for the bright APM galaxies. We find that early-type galaxies have more centrally concentrated profiles.

  5. Extended Source/Galaxy All Sky 1

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-03-27

    This panoramic view of the entire sky reveals the distribution of galaxies beyond our Milky Way galaxy, which astronomers call extended sources, as observed by Two Micron All-Sky Survey. The image is constructed from a database of over 1.6 million galaxies listed in the survey's Extended Source Catalog; more than half of the galaxies have never before been catalogued. The image is a representation of the relative brightnesses of these million-plus galaxies, all observed at a wavelength of 2.2 microns. The brightest and nearest galaxies are represented in blue, and the faintest, most distant ones are in red. This color scheme gives insights into the three dimensional large-scale structure of the nearby universe with the brightest, closest clusters and superclusters showing up as the blue and bluish-white features. The dark band in this image shows the area of the sky where our Milky Way galaxy blocks our view of distant objects, which, in this projection, lies predominantly along the edges of the image. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA04252

  6. Extended Source/Galaxy All Sky 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    This panoramic view of the entire sky reveals the distribution of galaxies beyond our Milky Way galaxy, which astronomers call extended sources, as observed by Two Micron All-Sky Survey. The image is constructed from a database of over 1.6 million galaxies listed in the survey's Extended Source Catalog; more than half of the galaxies have never before been catalogued. The image is a representation of the relative brightnesses of these million-plus galaxies, all observed at a wavelength of 2.2 microns.

    The brightest and nearest galaxies are represented in blue, and the faintest, most distant ones are in red. This color scheme gives insights into the three dimensional large-scale structure of the nearby universe with the brightest, closest clusters and superclusters showing up as the blue and bluish-white features. The dark band in this image shows the area of the sky where our Milky Way galaxy blocks our view of distant objects, which, in this projection, lies predominantly along the edges of the image.

  7. Value of Hipparcos Catalogue shown by planet assessments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1996-08-01

    now have privileged use of the data for nearly a year, before the release of the catalogues to the world-wide astronomical community in April 1997. The new precision in star-fixing promises an extraordinary harvest of new results, on subjects ranging from asteroids to cosmology. A vivid picture of the stars in motion in our corner of the Milky Way Galaxy is one expected outcome. Hipparcos has more than doubled the number of known variable stars, and has discovered many thousands of new double or multiple star systems. Striding the light-years by parallax The study of stars with candidate planets is a dramatic example of Hipparcos's new determinations of the distances of stars by the parallax principle. Many other discoveries will flow from it. Parallax is an unfamiliar name for a familiar concept, akin to stereoscopic vision. People judge distances in nearby scenes from the difference in direction of the two eyes when focused on an object. Military rangefinders use the same principle, with more widely separated optics. Astronomers adapt the Earth's orbit to make a huge rangefinder. At opposite seasons, the Earth is on opposite sides of the Sun, at vantage points 300 million kilometres apart. As a result, the bearings of stars change a little. Nearby stars shift more than very distant stars, and astronomers can measure their distances by trigonometry. Until now, unavoidable inaccuracies in observing the directions of stars from the ground have meant that the distances of only the closest stars can be measured directly by parallax, out to about 100 light-years. Even at short ranges the margin of uncertainty is often wide. Long chains of inference and observation extend the distance scale to much farther objects, including galaxies millions or billions of light-years away. From the resulting estimates, astronomers try to calculate the age of the Universe and arrive at conclusions about its origin and evolution. The foundation for these reckonings has been decidedly shaky

  8. The Laniakea supercluster of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tully, R. Brent; Courtois, Hélène; Hoffman, Yehuda; Pomarède, Daniel

    2014-09-01

    Galaxies congregate in clusters and along filaments, and are missing from large regions referred to as voids. These structures are seen in maps derived from spectroscopic surveys that reveal networks of structure that are interconnected with no clear boundaries. Extended regions with a high concentration of galaxies are called `superclusters', although this term is not precise. There is, however, another way to analyse the structure. If the distance to each galaxy from Earth is directly measured, then the peculiar velocity can be derived from the subtraction of the mean cosmic expansion, the product of distance times the Hubble constant, from observed velocity. The peculiar velocity is the line-of-sight departure from the cosmic expansion and arises from gravitational perturbations; a map of peculiar velocities can be translated into a map of the distribution of matter. Here we report a map of structure made using a catalogue of peculiar velocities. We find locations where peculiar velocity flows diverge, as water does at watershed divides, and we trace the surface of divergent points that surrounds us. Within the volume enclosed by this surface, the motions of galaxies are inward after removal of the mean cosmic expansion and long range flows. We define a supercluster to be the volume within such a surface, and so we are defining the extent of our home supercluster, which we call Laniakea.

  9. The Laniakea supercluster of galaxies.

    PubMed

    Tully, R Brent; Courtois, Hélène; Hoffman, Yehuda; Pomarède, Daniel

    2014-09-04

    Galaxies congregate in clusters and along filaments, and are missing from large regions referred to as voids. These structures are seen in maps derived from spectroscopic surveys that reveal networks of structure that are interconnected with no clear boundaries. Extended regions with a high concentration of galaxies are called 'superclusters', although this term is not precise. There is, however, another way to analyse the structure. If the distance to each galaxy from Earth is directly measured, then the peculiar velocity can be derived from the subtraction of the mean cosmic expansion, the product of distance times the Hubble constant, from observed velocity. The peculiar velocity is the line-of-sight departure from the cosmic expansion and arises from gravitational perturbations; a map of peculiar velocities can be translated into a map of the distribution of matter. Here we report a map of structure made using a catalogue of peculiar velocities. We find locations where peculiar velocity flows diverge, as water does at watershed divides, and we trace the surface of divergent points that surrounds us. Within the volume enclosed by this surface, the motions of galaxies are inward after removal of the mean cosmic expansion and long range flows. We define a supercluster to be the volume within such a surface, and so we are defining the extent of our home supercluster, which we call Laniakea.

  10. Methods for accurate analysis of galaxy clustering on non-linear scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vakili, Mohammadjavad

    2017-01-01

    Measurements of galaxy clustering with the low-redshift galaxy surveys provide sensitive probe of cosmology and growth of structure. Parameter inference with galaxy clustering relies on computation of likelihood functions which requires estimation of the covariance matrix of the observables used in our analyses. Therefore, accurate estimation of the covariance matrices serves as one of the key ingredients in precise cosmological parameter inference. This requires generation of a large number of independent galaxy mock catalogs that accurately describe the statistical distribution of galaxies in a wide range of physical scales. We present a fast method based on low-resolution N-body simulations and approximate galaxy biasing technique for generating mock catalogs. Using a reference catalog that was created using the high resolution Big-MultiDark N-body simulation, we show that our method is able to produce catalogs that describe galaxy clustering at a percentage-level accuracy down to highly non-linear scales in both real-space and redshift-space.In most large-scale structure analyses, modeling of galaxy bias on non-linear scales is performed assuming a halo model. Clustering of dark matter halos has been shown to depend on halo properties beyond mass such as halo concentration, a phenomenon referred to as assembly bias. Standard large-scale structure studies assume that halo mass alone is sufficient in characterizing the connection between galaxies and halos. However, modeling of galaxy bias can face systematic effects if the number of galaxies are correlated with other halo properties. Using the Small MultiDark-Planck high resolution N-body simulation and the clustering measurements of Sloan Digital Sky Survey DR7 main galaxy sample, we investigate the extent to which the dependence of galaxy bias on halo concentration can improve our modeling of galaxy clustering.

  11. Steam generator mock-up for assessment of inservice inspection technology.

    SciTech Connect

    Bakhtiari, S.; Kupperman, D. S.; Muscara, J.

    1999-09-11

    A steam generator mock-up has been assembled for round-robin studies of the effectiveness of currently practiced inservice inspection (ISI) technology for detection of current-day flaws. The mock-up will also be used to evaluate emerging inspection technologies. The 3.66-m (12-ft.)-tall mock-up contains 400 tube openings, each consisting of 9 test sections that can be used to simulate current-day field-induced flaws and artifacts. Included in the mock-up are simulations of tube support plate (TSP) intersections and the tube sheet (TS). Cracks are present at the TSP, TS, and in the free span sections of the mock-up. For initial evaluation of the round-robin results, various eddy current methods, as well as multivariate models for data analysis techniques, are being used to estimate the depth and length of defects in the mock-up. To ensure that the round-robin is carried out with procedures as close as possible to those implemented in the field, input was obtained from industry experts on the protocol and procedures to be used for the exercise. One initial assembly of the mock-up with a limited number of flaws and artifact has been completed and tested. A second completed configuration with additional flaw and artifacts simulations will be used for the round-robin.

  12. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Red galaxies with pseudo-bulges in the SDSS (Ribeiro+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, B.; Lobo, C.; Anton, S.; Gomes, J. M.; Papaderos, P.

    2016-10-01

    This study is largely motivated by and builds upon our previous work in Coelho et al. (2013MNRAS.436.2426C) that focused on a sample of massive red galaxies selected from the same NYU-VAGC catalogue of Blanton et al. (2005AJ....129.2562B) to ascertain the frequency of active galactic nuclei (AGN) hosted by quiescent galaxies with a negligible or absent bulge. Since the Coelho et al. (2013MNRAS.436.2426C) sample was restricted to low Sersic indices ({eta}<1.5), we have extended it to include as well galaxies where the bulge has a significant contribution to the total light of the galaxy. We thus select SDSS DR7 galaxies from the same NYU-VAGC catalogue of Blanton et al. (2005AJ....129.2562B) that gathers photometric and structural parameters for all SDSS galaxies having spectroscopic data. (4 data files).

  13. The VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey (VIPERS). Ωm0 from the galaxy clustering ratio measured at z ~ 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bel, J.; Marinoni, C.; Granett, B. R.; Guzzo, L.; Peacock, J. A.; Branchini, E.; Cucciati, O.; de la Torre, S.; Iovino, A.; Percival, W. J.; Steigerwald, H.; Abbas, U.; Adami, C.; Arnouts, S.; Bolzonella, M.; Bottini, D.; Cappi, A.; Coupon, J.; Davidzon, I.; De Lucia, G.; Fritz, A.; Franzetti, P.; Fumana, M.; Garilli, B.; Ilbert, O.; Krywult, J.; Le Brun, V.; Le Fèvre, O.; Maccagni, D.; Małek, K.; Marulli, F.; McCracken, H. J.; Paioro, L.; Polletta, M.; Pollo, A.; Schlagenhaufer, H.; Scodeggio, M.; Tasca, L. A. M.; Tojeiro, R.; Vergani, D.; Zanichelli, A.; Burden, A.; Di Porto, C.; Marchetti, A.; Mellier, Y.; Moscardini, L.; Nichol, R. C.; Phleps, S.; Wolk, M.; Zamorani, G.

    2014-03-01

    We use a sample of about 22 000 galaxies at 0.65 < z < 1.2 from the VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey (VIPERS) Public Data Release 1 (PDR-1) catalogue, to constrain the cosmological model through a measurement of the galaxy clustering ratio ηg,R. This statistic has favourable properties, which is defined as the ratio of two quantities characterizing the smoothed density field in spheres of a given radius R: the value of its correlation function on a multiple of this scale, ξ(nR), and its variance σ2(R). For sufficiently large values of R, this is a universal number, which captures 2-point clustering information independently of the linear bias and linear redshift-space distortions of the specific galaxy tracers. In this paper, we discuss how to extend the application of ηg,R to quasi-linear scales and how to control and remove observational selection effects, which are typical of redshift surveys as VIPERS, in detail. We verify the accuracy and efficiency of these procedures using mock catalogues that match the survey selection process. These results show the robustness of ηg,R to non-linearities and observational effects, which is related to its very definition as a ratio of quantities that are similarly affected. At an effective redshift z = 0.93, we measured the value ηg,R(15) = 0.141 ± 0.013 at R = 5h-1 Mpc. Within a flat ΛCDM cosmology and by including the best available priors on H0, ns and baryon density, we obtain a matter density parameter at the current epoch Ωm,0 = 0.270-0.025+0.029. In addition to the great precision achieved on our estimation of Ωm using VIPERS PDR-1, this result is remarkable because it appears to be in good agreement with a recent estimate at z ≃ 0.3, which was obtained by applying the same technique to the SDSS-LRG catalogue. It, therefore, supports the robustness of the present analysis. Moreover, the combination of these two measurements at z ~ 0.3 and z ~ 0.9 provides us with a very precise estimate of Ωm,0

  14. First Carlsberg Meridian Telescope (CMT) CCD Catalogue.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bélizon, F.; Muiños, J. L.; Vallejo, M.; Evans, D. W.; Irwin, M.; Helmer, L.

    2003-11-01

    The Carlsberg Meridian Telescope (CMT) is a telescope owned by Copenhagen University Observatory (CUO). It was installed in the Spanish observatory of El Roque de los Muchachos on the island of La Palma (Canary Islands) in 1984. It is operated jointly by the CUO, the Institute of Astronomy, Cambridge (IoA) and the Real Instituto y Observatorio de la Armada of Spain (ROA) in the framework of an international agreement. From 1984 to 1998 the instrument was provided with a moving slit micrometer and with its observations a series of 11 catalogues were published, `Carlsberg Meridian Catalogue La Palma (CMC No 1-11)'. Since 1997, the telescope has been controlled remotely via Internet. The three institutions share this remote control in periods of approximately three months. In 1998, the CMT was upgraded by installing as sensor, a commercial Spectrasource CCD camera as a test of the possibility of performing meridian transits observed in drift-scan mode. Once this was shown possible, in 1999, a second model of CCD camera, built in the CUO workshop with a better performance, was installed. The Spectrasource camera was loaned to ROA by CUO and is now installed in the San Fernando Automatic Meridian Circle in San Juan (CMASF). In 1999, the observations were started of a sky survey from -3deg to +30deg in declination. In July 2002, a first release of the survey was published, with the positions of the observed stars in the band between -3deg and +3deg in declination. This oral communication will present this first release of the survey.

  15. The Role of Host Galaxy for the Environmental Dependence of Active Nuclei in Local Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Richard I.; Hicks, E. K. S.; Erwin, P.; Burtscher, L.; Contursi, A.; Genzel, R.; Janssen, A.; Koss, M.; Lin, M.-Y.; Lutz, D.; Maciejewski, W.; Müller-Sánchez, F.; Orban de Xivry, G.; Ricci, C.; Riffel, R.; Riffel, R. A.; Rosario, D.; Schartmann, M.; Schnorr-Müller, A.; Shimizu, T.; Sternberg, A.; Sturm, E.; Storchi-Bergmann, T.; Tacconi, L.; Veilleux, S.

    2017-01-01

    We discuss the environment of local hard X-ray selected active galaxies, with reference to two independent group catalogues. We find that the fraction of these AGN in S0 host galaxies decreases strongly as a function of galaxy group size (halo mass) - which contrasts with the increasing fraction of galaxies of S0 type in denser environments. However, there is no evidence for an environmental dependence of AGN in spiral galaxies. Because most AGN are found in spiral galaxies, this dilutes the signature of environmental dependence for the population as a whole. We argue that the differing results for AGN in disk-dominated and bulge-dominated galaxies is related to the source of the gas fuelling the AGN, and so may also impact the luminosity function, duty cycle, and obscuration. We find that there is a significant difference in the luminosity function for AGN in spiral and S0 galaxies, and tentative evidence for some difference in the fraction of obscured AGN.

  16. The role of host galaxy for the environmental dependence of active nuclei in local galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Richard I.; Hicks, E. K. S.; Erwin, P.; Burtscher, L.; Contursi, A.; Genzel, R.; Janssen, A.; Koss, M.; Lin, M.-Y.; Lutz, D.; Maciejewski, W.; Müller-Sánchez, F.; Orban de Xivry, G.; Ricci, C.; Riffel, R.; Riffel, R. A.; Rosario, D.; Schartmann, M.; Schnorr-Müller, A.; Shimizu, T.; Sternberg, A.; Sturm, E.; Storchi-Bergmann, T.; Tacconi, L.; Veilleux, S.

    2017-04-01

    We discuss the environment of local hard X-ray selected active galaxies, with reference to two independent group catalogues. We find that the fraction of these AGN in S0 host galaxies decreases strongly as a function of galaxy group size (halo mass) - which contrasts with the increasing fraction of galaxies of S0 type in denser environments. However, there is no evidence for an environmental dependence of AGN in spiral galaxies. Because most AGN are found in spiral galaxies, this dilutes the signature of environmental dependence for the population as a whole. We argue that the differing results for AGN in disc-dominated and bulge-dominated galaxies are related to the source of the gas fuelling the AGN, and so may also impact the luminosity function, duty cycle and obscuration. We find that there is a significant difference in the luminosity function for AGN in spiral and S0 galaxies, and tentative evidence for some difference in the fraction of obscured AGN.

  17. Galaxy Zoo: morphological classifications for 120 000 galaxies in HST legacy imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willett, Kyle W.; Galloway, Melanie A.; Bamford, Steven P.; Lintott, Chris J.; Masters, Karen L.; Scarlata, Claudia; Simmons, B. D.; Beck, Melanie; Cardamone, Carolin N.; Cheung, Edmond; Edmondson, Edward M.; Fortson, Lucy F.; Griffith, Roger L.; Häußler, Boris; Han, Anna; Hart, Ross; Melvin, Thomas; Parrish, Michael; Schawinski, Kevin; Smethurst, R. J.; Smith, Arfon M.

    2017-02-01

    We present the data release paper for the Galaxy Zoo: Hubble (GZH) project. This is the third phase in a large effort to measure reliable, detailed morphologies of galaxies by using crowdsourced visual classifications of colour-composite images. Images in GZH were selected from various publicly released Hubble Space Telescope legacy programmes conducted with the Advanced Camera for Surveys, with filters that probe the rest-frame optical emission from galaxies out to z ˜ 1. The bulk of the sample is selected to have mI814W < 23.5, but goes as faint as mI814W < 26.8 for deep images combined over five epochs. The median redshift of the combined samples is = 0.9 ± 0.6, with a tail extending out to z ≃ 4. The GZH morphological data include measurements of both bulge- and disc-dominated galaxies, details on spiral disc structure that relate to the Hubble type, bar identification, and numerous measurements of clump identification and geometry. This paper also describes a new method for calibrating morphologies for galaxies of different luminosities and at different redshifts by using artificially redshifted galaxy images as a baseline. The GZH catalogue contains both raw and calibrated morphological vote fractions for 119 849 galaxies, providing the largest data set to date suitable for large-scale studies of galaxy evolution out to z ˜ 1.

  18. Multiple D3-Instantons and Mock Modular Forms I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrov, Sergei; Banerjee, Sibasish; Manschot, Jan; Pioline, Boris

    2017-07-01

    We study D3-instanton corrections to the hypermultiplet moduli space in type IIB string theory compactified on a Calabi-Yau threefold. In a previous work, consistency of D3-instantons with S-duality was established at first order in the instanton expansion, using the modular properties of the M5-brane elliptic genus. We extend this analysis to the two-instanton level, where wall-crossing phenomena start playing a role. We focus on the contact potential, an analogue of the Kähler potential which must transform as a modular form under S-duality. We show that it can be expressed in terms of a suitable modification of the partition function of D4-D2-D0 BPS black holes, constructed out of the generating function of MSW invariants (the latter coincide with Donaldson-Thomas invariants in a particular chamber). Modular invariance of the contact potential then requires that, in the case where the D3-brane wraps a reducible divisor, the generating function of MSW invariants must transform as a vector-valued mock modular form, with a specific modular completion built from the MSW invariants of the constituents. Physically, this gives a powerful constraint on the degeneracies of BPS black holes. Mathematically, our result gives a universal prediction for the modular properties of Donaldson-Thomas invariants of pure two-dimensional sheaves.

  19. Multiple D3-Instantons and Mock Modular Forms I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrov, Sergei; Banerjee, Sibasish; Manschot, Jan; Pioline, Boris

    2016-11-01

    We study D3-instanton corrections to the hypermultiplet moduli space in type IIB string theory compactified on a Calabi-Yau threefold. In a previous work, consistency of D3-instantons with S-duality was established at first order in the instanton expansion, using the modular properties of the M5-brane elliptic genus. We extend this analysis to the two-instanton level, where wall-crossing phenomena start playing a role. We focus on the contact potential, an analogue of the Kähler potential which must transform as a modular form under S-duality. We show that it can be expressed in terms of a suitable modification of the partition function of D4-D2-D0 BPS black holes, constructed out of the generating function of MSW invariants (the latter coincide with Donaldson-Thomas invariants in a particular chamber). Modular invariance of the contact potential then requires that, in the case where the D3-brane wraps a reducible divisor, the generating function of MSW invariants must transform as a vector-valued mock modular form, with a specific modular completion built from the MSW invariants of the constituents. Physically, this gives a powerful constraint on the degeneracies of BPS black holes. Mathematically, our result gives a universal prediction for the modular properties of Donaldson-Thomas invariants of pure two-dimensional sheaves.

  20. A hybrid mock circulation loop for a total artificial heart.

    PubMed

    Nestler, Frank; Bradley, Andrew P; Wilson, Stephen J; Timms, Daniel L; Frazier, O Howard; Cohn, William E

    2014-09-01

    Rotary blood pumps are emerging as a viable technology for total artificial hearts, and the development of physiological control algorithms is accelerated with new evaluation environments. In this article, we present a novel hybrid mock circulation loop (HMCL) designed specifically for evaluation of rotary total artificial hearts (rTAH). The rTAH is operated in the physical domain while all vasculature elements are embedded in the numerical domain, thus combining the strengths of both approaches: fast and easy exchange of the vasculature model together with improved controllability of the pump. Parameters, such as vascular resistance, compliance, and blood volume, can be varied dynamically in silico during operation. A hydraulic-numeric interface creates a real-time feedback loop between the physical and numerical domains. The HMCL uses computer-controlled resistance valves as actuators, thereby reducing the size and number of hydraulic elements. Experimental results demonstrate a stable interaction over a wide operational range and a high degree of flexibility. Therefore, we demonstrate that the newly created design environment can play an integral part in the hydraulic design, control development, and durability testing of rTAHs.

  1. D3-instantons, mock theta series and twistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrov, Sergei; Manschot, Jan; Pioline, Boris

    2013-04-01

    The D-instanton corrected hypermultiplet moduli space of type II string theory compactified on a Calabi-Yau threefold is known in the type IIA picture to be determined in terms of the generalized Donaldson-Thomas invariants, through a twistorial construction. At the same time, in the mirror type IIB picture, and in the limit where only D3-D1-D(-1)-instanton corrections are retained, it should carry an isometric action of the S-duality group SL(2, {Z} ). We prove that this is the case in the one-instanton approximation, by constructing a holomorphic action of SL(2, {Z} ) on the linearized twistor space. Using the modular invariance of the D4-D2-D0 black hole partition function, we show that the standard Darboux coordinates in twistor space have modular anomalies controlled by period integrals of a Siegel-Narain theta series, which can be canceled by a contact transformation generated by a holomorphic mock theta series.

  2. BioCatalogue: a universal