Science.gov

Sample records for mode iii effects

  1. Effects of friction and high torque on fatigue crack propagation in Mode III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayeb-Hashemi, H.; McClintock, F. A.; Ritchie, R. O.

    1982-12-01

    Turbo-generator and automotive shafts are often subjected to complex histories of high torques. To provide a basis for fatigue life estimation in such components, a study of fatigue crack propagation in Mode III (anti-plane shear) for a mill-annealed AISI 4140 steel (RB88, 590 MN/m2 tensile strength) has been undertaken, using torsionally-loaded, circumferentially-notched cylindrical specimens. As demonstrated previously for higher strength AISI 4340 steel, Mode III cyclic crack growth rates (dc/dN) IIIcan be related to the alternating stress intensity factor ΔKIII for conditions of small-scale yielding. However, to describe crack propagation behavior over an extended range of crack growth rates (˜10-6 to 10-2 mm per cycle), where crack growth proceeds under elastic-plastic and full plastic conditions, no correlation between (dc/dN) III and ΔKIII is possible. Accordingly, a new parameter for torsional crack growth, termed the plastic strain intensity Γ III, is introduced and is shown to provide a unique description of Mode III crack growth behavior for a wide range of testing conditions, provided a mean load reduces friction, abrasion, and interlocking between mating fracture surfaces. The latter effect is found to be dependent upon the mode of applied loading (i.e., the presence of superimposed axial loads) and the crack length and torque level. Mechanistically, high-torque surfaces were transverse, macroscopically flat, and smeared. Lower torques showed additional axial cracks (longitudinal shear cracking) perpendicular to the main transverse surface. A micro-mechanical model for the main radi l Mode III growth, based on the premise that crack advance results from Mode II coalescence of microcracks initiated at inclusions ahead of the main crack front, is extended to high nominal stress levels, and predicts that Mode III fatigue crack propagation rates should be proportional to the range of plastic strain intensity (ΔΓIII if local Mode II growth rates are

  2. Effective representation of amide III, II, I, and A modes on local vibrational modes: Analysis of ab initio quantum calculation results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, Seungsoo

    2016-10-01

    The Hamiltonian matrix for the first excited vibrational states of a protein can be effectively represented by local vibrational modes constituting amide III, II, I, and A modes to simulate various vibrational spectra. Methods for obtaining the Hamiltonian matrix from ab initio quantum calculation results are discussed, where the methods consist of three steps: selection of local vibrational mode coordinates, calculation of a reduced Hessian matrix, and extraction of the Hamiltonian matrix from the Hessian matrix. We introduce several methods for each step. The methods were assessed based on the density functional theory calculation results of 24 oligopeptides with four different peptide lengths and six different secondary structures. The completeness of a Hamiltonian matrix represented in the reduced local mode space is improved by adopting a specific atom group for each amide mode and reducing the effect of ignored local modes. The calculation results are also compared to previous models using C=O stretching vibration and transition dipole couplings. We found that local electric transition dipole moments of the amide modes are mainly bound on the local peptide planes. Their direction and magnitude are well conserved except amide A modes, which show large variation. Contrary to amide I modes, the vibrational coupling constants of amide III, II, and A modes obtained by analysis of a dipeptide are not transferable to oligopeptides with the same secondary conformation because coupling constants are affected by the surrounding atomic environment.

  3. Effective representation of amide III, II, I, and A modes on local vibrational modes: Analysis of ab initio quantum calculation results.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Seungsoo

    2016-10-28

    The Hamiltonian matrix for the first excited vibrational states of a protein can be effectively represented by local vibrational modes constituting amide III, II, I, and A modes to simulate various vibrational spectra. Methods for obtaining the Hamiltonian matrix from ab initio quantum calculation results are discussed, where the methods consist of three steps: selection of local vibrational mode coordinates, calculation of a reduced Hessian matrix, and extraction of the Hamiltonian matrix from the Hessian matrix. We introduce several methods for each step. The methods were assessed based on the density functional theory calculation results of 24 oligopeptides with four different peptide lengths and six different secondary structures. The completeness of a Hamiltonian matrix represented in the reduced local mode space is improved by adopting a specific atom group for each amide mode and reducing the effect of ignored local modes. The calculation results are also compared to previous models using C=O stretching vibration and transition dipole couplings. We found that local electric transition dipole moments of the amide modes are mainly bound on the local peptide planes. Their direction and magnitude are well conserved except amide A modes, which show large variation. Contrary to amide I modes, the vibrational coupling constants of amide III, II, and A modes obtained by analysis of a dipeptide are not transferable to oligopeptides with the same secondary conformation because coupling constants are affected by the surrounding atomic environment.

  4. Effects of friction and high torque on fatigue crack propagation in mode III. [AISI 4140 and 4340

    SciTech Connect

    Nayeb-Hashemi, H.; McClintock, F.A.; Ritchie, R.O.

    1982-12-01

    Turbo-generator and automotive shafts are often subjected to complex histories of high torques. To provide a basis for fatigue life estimation in such components, a study of fatigue crack propagation in Mode III (anti-plane shear) for a mill-annealed AISI 4140 steel (R /SUB B/ 88, 590 MN/m/sup 2/ tensile strength) has been undertaken, using torsionally-loaded, circumferentially-notched cylindrical specimens. As demonstrated previously for higher strength AISI 4340 steel, Mode III cyclic crack growth rates (dc/dN) /SUB III/ can be related to the alternating stress intensity factor ..delta..K /SUB III/ for conditions of small-scale yielding. However, to describe crack propagation behavior over an extended range of crack growth rates (about 10/sup -6/ to 10/sup -2/ mm per cycle), where crack growth proceeds under elastic-plastic and full plastic conditions, no correlation between (dc/dN) /SUB III/ and ..delta..K /SUB III/ is possible. Accordingly, a new parameter for torsional crack growth, termed the plastic strain intensity GAMMA /SUB III/, is introduced and is shown to provide a unique description of Mode III crack growth behavior for a wide range of testing conditions, provided a mean load reduces friction, abrasion, and interlocking between mating fracture surfaces A micro-mechanical model for the main radial Mode III growth is extended to high nominal stress levels, and predicts that Mode III fatigue crack propagation rates should be proportional to the range of plastic strain intensity (..delta..GAMMA /SUB III/) if local Mode II growth rates are proportional to the displacements. Such predictions are shown to be in agreement with measured growth rates in AISI 4140 steel from 10/sup -6/ to 10/sup -2/ mm per cycle.

  5. Mode III cleavage of a coin-shaped titanium implant in bone: effect of friction and crack propagation.

    PubMed

    Mathieu, Vincent; Vayron, Romain; Barthel, Etienne; Dalmas, Davy; Soffer, Emmanuel; Anagnostou, Fani; Haiat, Guillaume

    2012-04-01

    Endosseous cementless implants are widely used in orthopaedic, maxillofacial and oral surgery. However, failures are still observed and remain difficult to anticipate as remodelling phenomena at the bone-implant interface are poorly understood. The assessment of the biomechanical strength of the bone-implant interface may improve the understanding of the osseointegration process. An experimental approach based on a mode III cleavage mechanical device aims at understanding the behaviour of a planar bone-implant interface submitted to torsional loading. To do so, coin-shaped titanium implants were inserted on the tibiae of a New Zealand white rabbit for seven weeks. After the sacrifice, mode III cleavage experiments were performed on bone samples. An analytical model was developed to understand the debonding process of the bone-implant interface. The model allowed to assess the values of different parameters related to bone tissue at the vicinity of the implant with the additional assumption that bone adhesion occurs over around 70% of the implant surface, which is confirmed by microscopy images. The approach allows to estimate different quantities related to the bone-implant interface such as: torsional stiffness (around 20.5 N m rad(-1)), shear modulus (around 240 MPa), maximal torsional loading (around 0.056 N.m), mode III fracture energy (around 77.5 N m(-1)) and stress intensity factor (0.27 MPa m(1/2)). This study paves the way for the use of mode III cleavage testing for the investigation of torsional loading strength of the bone-implant interface, which might help for the development and optimization of implant biomaterial, surface treatment and medical treatment investigations.

  6. Combined mode I-mode III fracture toughness of a particulate reinforced metal-matrix composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manoharan, M.; Lewandowski, J. J.

    1991-01-01

    The aim of this investigation was to determine the fracture behavior of a particulate reinfored aluminum alloy composite under combined mode I-mode III loading conditions. A modified three-point bend specimen was used to carry out these tests. It was found that the mode I loading condition was energetically most favorable. Addition of mode III components to the system seems to increase the amount of redundant work during fracture without affecting the critical fracture criterion.

  7. Fractographic study of epoxy fractured under mode I loading and mixed mode I/III loading

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Fei; Wang, Jy-An John; Bertelsen, Williams D.

    2011-01-01

    Fiber reinforced polymeric composite materials are widely used in structural components such as wind turbine blades, which are typically subject to complicated loading conditions. Thus, material response under mixed mode loading is of great significance to the reliability of these structures. Epoxy is a thermosetting polymer that is currently used in manufacturing wind turbine blades. The fracture behavior of epoxy is relevant to the mechanical integrity of the wind turbine composite materials. In this study, a novel fracture testing methodology, the spiral notch torsion test (SNTT), was applied to study the fracture behavior of an epoxy material. SNTT samples were tested using either monotonic loading or cyclic loading, while both mode I and mixed mode I/III loading conditions were used. Fractographic examination indicated the epoxy samples included in this study were prone to mode I failure even when the samples were subject to mixed mode loading. Different fatigue precracks were observed on mode I and mixed mode samples, i.e. precracks appeared as a uniform band under mode I loading, and a semi-ellipse under mixed mode loading. Fracture toughness was also estimated using quantitative fractography.

  8. Complexation of Curium(III) with DTPA at 10–70 °C: Comparison with Eu(III)–DTPA in Thermodynamics, Luminescence, and Coordination Modes

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Guoxin; Zhang, Zhiyong; Martin, Leigh R.; Rao, Linfeng

    2015-02-16

    Separation of trivalent actinides (An(III)) from trivalent lanthanides (Ln(III)) is a challenging task because of their nearly identical chemical properties. Diethylenetriaminepentaacetate (DTPA), a key reagent used in the TALSPEAK process that effectively separates An(III) from Ln(III), is believed to play a critical role in the An(III)/Ln(III) separation. However, the underlying principles for the separation based on the difference in the complexation of DTPA with An(III) and Ln(III) remain unclear. In this work, the complexation of DTPA with Cm(III) at 10-70 ºC was investigated by spectrophotometry, luminescence spectroscopy, and microcalorimetry, in conjunction with computational methods. The binding strength, the enthalpy of complexation, the coordination modes, and the luminescence properties are compared between the Cm(III)-DTPA and Eu(III)-DTPA systems. The experimental and computational data have demonstrated that the difference between Cm(III) and Eu(III) in the binding strength with DTPA can be attributed to the stronger covalence bonding between Cm(III) and the nitrogen donors of DTPA.

  9. Mixed-mode I/III fracture toughness of a ferritic/martensitic stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Huaxin; Jones, R.H.; Gelles, D.S.; Hirth, J.P.

    1993-10-01

    The critical J-integrals of mode I (J{sub IC}), mixed-mode I/III (J{sub MC}), and mode III (J{sub IIIC}) were examined for a ferritic stainless steel (F-82H) at ambient temperature. A determination of J{sub MC} was made using modified compact-tension specimens. Different ratios of tension/shear stress were achieved by varying the principal axis of the crack plane between 0 and 55 degrees from the load line. Results showed that J{sub MC} and tearing modulus (T{sub M}) values varied with the crack angles and were lower than their mode I and mode III counterparts. Both the minimum J{sub MC} and T{sub M} values occurred at a crack angle between 40 and 50 degrees, where the load ratio of {sigma}{sub i}/{sigma}{sub iii} was 1.2 to 0.84. The J{sub min} was 240 Kj/M{sup 2}, and ratios of J{sub IC}/J{sub min} and J{sub IIIC}/J{sub min} were 2.1 and 1.9, respectively. The morphology of fracture surfaces was consistent with the change of J{sub MC} and T{sub M} values. While the upper shelf-fracture toughness of F-82H depends on loading mode, the J{sub min} remains very high. Other important considerations include the effect of mixed-mode loading on the DBT temperature, and effects of hydrogen and irradiation on J{sub min}.

  10. Is the Pharmacological Mode of Action of Chromium(III) as a Second Messenger?

    PubMed

    Vincent, John B

    2015-07-01

    Although recent studies have shown that chromium (as the trivalent ion) is not an essential trace element, it has been demonstrated to generate beneficial effects at pharmacologically relevant doses on insulin sensitivity and cholesterol levels of rodent models of insulin insensitivity, including models of type 2 diabetes. The mode of action of Cr(III) at a molecular level is still an area of active debate; however, the movement of Cr(III) in the body, particularly in response to changes in insulin concentration, suggests that Cr(III) could act as a second messenger, amplifying insulin signaling. The evidence for the pharmacological mechanism of Cr(III)'s ability to increase insulin sensitivity by acting as a second messenger is reviewed, and proposals for testing this hypothesis are described.

  11. III-nitride tunable cup-cavities supporting quasi whispering gallery modes from ultraviolet to infrared

    PubMed Central

    Shubina, T. V.; Pozina, G.; Jmerik, V. N.; Davydov, V. Yu.; Hemmingsson, C.; Andrianov, A. V.; Kazanov, D. R.; Ivanov, S. V.

    2015-01-01

    Rapidly developing nanophotonics needs microresonators for different spectral ranges, formed by chip-compatible technologies. In addition, the tunable ones are much in demand. Here, we present site-controlled III-nitride monocrystal cup-cavities grown by molecular beam epitaxy. The cup-cavities can operate from ultraviolet to near-infrared, supporting quasi whispering gallery modes up to room temperature. Besides, their energies are identical in large ’ripened’ crystals. In these cavities, the refractive index variation near an absorption edge causes the remarkable effect of mode switching, which is accompanied by the spatial redistribution of electric field intensity with concentration of light into a subwavelength volume. Our results shed light on the mode behavior in semiconductor cavities and open the way for single-growth-run manufacturing the devices comprising an active region and a cavity with tunable mode frequencies. PMID:26656267

  12. Versatile bonding and coordination modes of ditriazolylidene ligands in rhodium(iii) and iridium(iii) complexes.

    PubMed

    Farrell, Kevin; Müller-Bunz, Helge; Albrecht, Martin

    2016-10-12

    Metalation of novel ditriazolium salts containing a trimethylene (-CH2CH2CH2-) or dimethylether linker (-CH2OCH2-) was probed with different rhodium(iii) and iridium(iii) precursors. When using [MCp*Cl2]2, a transmetalation protocol via a triazolylidene silver intermediate was effective, while base-assisted metalation with MCl3via sequential deprotonation of the triazolium salt with KOtBu and addition of the metal precursor afforded homoleptic complexes. The N-substituent on the triazole heterocycle directed the metalation process and led to Ctrz,Ctrz,CPh-tridentate chelating ditriazolylidene complexes for N-phenyl substituents. With ethyl substituents, only Ctrz,Ctrz-bidentate complexes were formed, while metalation with mesityl substituents was unsuccessful, presumably due to steric constraints. Through modification of the reaction conditions for the metalation step, an intermediate species was isolated that contains a Ctrz,CPh-bidentate chelate en route to the formation of the tridentate ligand system. Accordingly, Cphenyl-H bond activation occurs prior to formation of the second metal-triazolylidene bond. Stability studies with a Ctrz,Ctrz,CPh-tridentate chelating ditriazolylidene iridium complex towards DCl showed deuterium incorporation at both N-phenyl groups and indicate that Cphenyl-H bond activation is reversible while the Ctrz-Ir bond is robust. The flexible linker between the two triazolylidene donor sites provides access to both facial and meridional coordination modes.

  13. Mode I and Mode III fractures in intermediate zone of full-thickness porcine temporomandibular joint discs.

    PubMed

    Beatty, Mark W; Hohl, Rebecca H; Nickel, Jeffrey C; Iwasaki, Laura R; Pidaparti, Ramana M

    2008-05-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the critical energy required to induce flaw propagation in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disc when tensile and shear stresses were applied. J-integrals were measured for Mode I and III fractures because excessive tensile and shear stresses promote disc failure. Single edge notch (Mode I) and trouser tear (Mode III) specimens were constructed with flaws oriented parallel to the predominant anteroposteriorly oriented collagen fibers of the TMJ disc. Disks with and without an impulsive pre-load of 3 N s were studied to compare impact-damaged and healthy tissues. Results demonstrated that impulsive loading stiffened the tissues and significantly increased the Mode I fracture energy (J (IC)) but not Mode III (J (IIIC)) (p < or = 0.05). J (IC) and J (IIIC) values were similar for undamaged tissues, but J (IC) values were 2.3 times higher for impulsively loaded tissues (p < or = 0.05). This suggests that when flaws are introduced through impact, the TMJ disc responds by requiring more energy for tensile flaw extension. This research is a first step towards characterizing the mechanical microenvironment that initiates joint disease. This characterization is essential for successful integration of engineered replacement tissues for damaged TMJs.

  14. Subcritical crack growth under mode I, II, and III loading for Coconino sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Tae Young

    In systems subjected to long-term loading, subcritical crack growth is the principal mechanism causing the time-dependent deformation and failure of rocks. Subcritical crack growth is environmentally-assisted crack growth, which can allow cracks to grow over a long period of time at stresses far smaller than their failure strength and at tectonic strain rates. The characteristics of subcritical crack growth can be described by a relationship between the stress intensity factor and the crack velocity. This study presents the results of studies conducted to validate the constant stress-rate test for determining subcritical crack growth parameters in Coconino sandstone, compared with the conventional testing method, the double torsion test. The results of the constant stress-rate test are in good agreement with the results of double torsion test. More importantly, the stress-rate tests can determine the parameter A with a much smaller standard deviation than the double torsion test. Thus the constant stress-rate test seems to be both a valid and preferred test method for determining the subcritical crack growth parameters in rocks. We investigated statistical aspects of the constant stress-rate test. The effects of the number of tests conducted on the subcritical crack growth parameters were examined and minimum specimen numbers were determined. The mean and standard deviation of the subcritical crack growth parameters were obtained by randomly selecting subsets from the original strength data. In addition, the distribution form of the subcritical crack growth parameters and the relation between the parameter n and A were determined. We extended the constant stress-rate test technique to modes II and III subcritical crack growth in rocks. The experimental results of the modes I, II and III tests show that the values of the subcritical crack growth parameters are similar to each other. The subcritical crack growth parameter n value for Coconino sandstone has the range

  15. Helicon modes in uniform plasmas. III. Angular momentum

    SciTech Connect

    Stenzel, R. L.; Urrutia, J. M.

    2015-09-15

    Helicons are electromagnetic waves with helical phase fronts propagating in the whistler mode in magnetized plasmas and solids. They have similar properties to electromagnetic waves with angular momentum in free space. Helicons are circularly polarized waves carrying spin angular momentum and orbital angular momentum due to their propagation around the ambient magnetic field B{sub 0}. These properties have not been considered in the community of researchers working on helicon plasma sources, but are the topic of the present work. The present work focuses on the field topology of helicons in unbounded plasmas, not on helicon source physics. Helicons are excited in a large uniform laboratory plasma with a magnetic loop antenna whose dipole axis is aligned along or across B{sub 0}. The wave fields are measured in orthogonal planes and extended to three dimensions (3D) by interpolation. Since density and B{sub 0} are uniform, small amplitude waves from loops at different locations can be superimposed to generate complex antenna patterns. With a circular array of phase shifted loops, whistler modes with angular and axial wave propagation, i.e., helicons, are generated. Without boundaries radial propagation also arises. The azimuthal mode number m can be positive or negative while the field polarization remains right-hand circular. The conservation of energy and momentum implies that these field quantities are transferred to matter which causes damping or reflection. Wave-particle interactions with fast electrons are possible by Doppler shifted resonances. The transverse Doppler shift is demonstrated. Wave-wave interactions are also shown by showing collisions between different helicons. Whistler turbulence does not always have to be created by nonlinear wave-interactions but can also be a linear superposition of waves from random sources. In helicon collisions, the linear and/or orbital angular momenta can be canceled, which results in a great variety of field

  16. Helicon modes in uniform plasmas. III. Angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenzel, R. L.; Urrutia, J. M.

    2015-09-01

    Helicons are electromagnetic waves with helical phase fronts propagating in the whistler mode in magnetized plasmas and solids. They have similar properties to electromagnetic waves with angular momentum in free space. Helicons are circularly polarized waves carrying spin angular momentum and orbital angular momentum due to their propagation around the ambient magnetic field B0. These properties have not been considered in the community of researchers working on helicon plasma sources, but are the topic of the present work. The present work focuses on the field topology of helicons in unbounded plasmas, not on helicon source physics. Helicons are excited in a large uniform laboratory plasma with a magnetic loop antenna whose dipole axis is aligned along or across B0. The wave fields are measured in orthogonal planes and extended to three dimensions (3D) by interpolation. Since density and B0 are uniform, small amplitude waves from loops at different locations can be superimposed to generate complex antenna patterns. With a circular array of phase shifted loops, whistler modes with angular and axial wave propagation, i.e., helicons, are generated. Without boundaries radial propagation also arises. The azimuthal mode number m can be positive or negative while the field polarization remains right-hand circular. The conservation of energy and momentum implies that these field quantities are transferred to matter which causes damping or reflection. Wave-particle interactions with fast electrons are possible by Doppler shifted resonances. The transverse Doppler shift is demonstrated. Wave-wave interactions are also shown by showing collisions between different helicons. Whistler turbulence does not always have to be created by nonlinear wave-interactions but can also be a linear superposition of waves from random sources. In helicon collisions, the linear and/or orbital angular momenta can be canceled, which results in a great variety of field topologies. The work will

  17. Comparison of Mode II and III Monotonic and Fatigue Delamination Onset Behavior for Carbon/Toughened Epoxy Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jian; OBrien, T. Kevin; Lee, Shaw Ming

    1997-01-01

    Monotonic and fatigue tests were performed to compare the Mode II and III interlaminar fracture toughness and fatigue delamination onset for Tenax-HTA/R6376 carbon/toughened epoxy composites. The Mode II interlaminar fracture toughness and fatigue delamination onset were characterized using the end-notched flexure (ENF) test while the Mode III interlaminar fracture toughness and fatigue delamination onset were characterized by using the edge crack torsion (ECT) test. Monotonic tests show that the Mode III fracture toughness is higher than the Mode II fracture toughness. Both Mode II and III cyclic loading greatly increases the tendency for a delamination to grow relative to a single monotonically increasing load. Under fatigue loading, the Mode III specimen also has a longer life than the Mode II specimen.

  18. Out-of-plane deviation of a mode I+III crack encountering a tougher obstacle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leblond, Jean-Baptiste; Ponson, Laurent

    2016-07-01

    One possible explanation of out-of-plane deviations of cracks loaded in mode I+III was suggested by Gao and Rice in 1986. These authors noted that small in-plane undulations of the crack front, arising from fluctuations of the fracture toughness, should generate a small local mode-II component, causing the crack to depart from planarity. Their analysis is completed here by explicitly calculating the evolution in time of the out-of-plane deviation of a mode-I+III crack encountering a tougher obstacle. The calculation is based on (i) first-order formulae for the stress intensity factors of a crack slightly perturbed within and out of its plane; and (ii) a "double" propagation criterion combining a Griffith condition on the local energy-release rate and a Goldstein-Salganik condition on the local stress intensity factor of mode II. It is predicted that the crack must evolve toward a stationary state, wherein the orthogonal distance from the average fracture plane to the perturbed crack front is constant outside the obstacle and varies linearly across it. We hope that this theoretical prediction will encourage comparison with experiments, and propose a fracture test involving propagation of a mode-I+III crack through a 3D-printed specimen containing some designed obstacle. xml:lang="fr"

  19. Heterogeneously integrated III-V/silicon dual-mode distributed feedback laser array for terahertz generation.

    PubMed

    Shao, Haifeng; Keyvaninia, Shahram; Vanwolleghem, Mathias; Ducournau, Guillaume; Jiang, Xiaoqing; Morthier, Geert; Lampin, Jean-Francois; Roelkens, Gunther

    2014-11-15

    We demonstrate an integrated distributed feedback (DFB) laser array as a dual-wavelength source for narrowband terahertz (THz) generation. The laser array is composed of four heterogeneously integrated III-V-on-silicon DFB lasers with different lengths enabling dual-mode lasing tolerant to process variations, bias fluctuations, and ambient temperature variations. By optical heterodyning the two modes emitted by the dual-wavelength DFB laser in the laser array using a THz photomixer composed of an uni-traveling carrier photodiode (UTC-PD), a narrow and stable carrier signal with a frequency of 0.357 THz is generated. The central operating frequency and the emitted terahertz wave linewidth are analyzed, along with their dependency on the bias current applied to the laser diode and ambient temperature.

  20. Multiple nucleic acid cleavage modes in divergent type III CRISPR systems

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jing; Graham, Shirley; Tello, Agnes; Liu, Huanting; White, Malcolm F.

    2016-01-01

    CRISPR-Cas is an RNA-guided adaptive immune system that protects bacteria and archaea from invading nucleic acids. Type III systems (Cmr, Csm) have been shown to cleave RNA targets in vitro and some are capable of transcription-dependent DNA targeting. The crenarchaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus has two divergent subtypes of the type III system (Sso-IIID and a Cmr7-containing variant of Sso-IIIB). Here, we report that both the Sso-IIID and Sso-IIIB complexes cleave cognate RNA targets with a ruler mechanism and 6 or 12 nt spacing that relates to the organization of the Cas7 backbone. This backbone-mediated cleavage activity thus appears universal for the type III systems. The Sso-IIIB complex is also known to possess a distinct ‘UA’ cleavage mode. The predominant activity observed in vitro depends on the relative molar concentration of protein and target RNA. The Sso-IIID complex can cleave plasmid DNA targets in vitro, generating linear DNA products with an activity that is dependent on both the cyclase and HD nuclease domains of the Cas10 subunit, suggesting a role for both nuclease active sites in the degradation of double-stranded DNA targets. PMID:26801642

  1. Mixed mode stress field effect in adhesive fracture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, G. P.; Devries, K. L.; Williams, M. L.

    1974-01-01

    Numerical or analytical analyses were performed on seven different test specimens including blister test, 90-degree peel test, torsion test, and various cone tests. These specimens are in general subjected to complex stress fields having various amounts of Mode I, Mode II, and Mode III loads. The specimens were then constructed using polymethyl methacrylate for the adherends and a transparent polyurethane elastomer (Solithane 113) for the adhesive. This combination permitted direct observation of the bondline as load was applied. Although initial debonds as well as bond end termination singularities were present in all specimens, in some cases the debond did not initiate at the singularity points as would normally have been expected. An explanation for this behavior is presented, as well as a comparison of loading mode effect on those specimens for which the debond did propagate from a bond terminus singular point.

  2. Characterization of the Edge Crack Torsion (ECT) Test for Mode III Fracture Toughness Measurement of Laminated Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratcliffe, James G.

    2004-01-01

    The edge crack torsion (ECT) test is designed to initiate mode III delamination growth in composite laminates. An ECT specimen is a rectangular laminate, containing an edge delamination at the laminate mid-plane. Torsion load is applied to the specimens, resulting in relative transverse shear sliding of the delaminated faces. The test data reduction schemes are intended to yield initiation values of critical mode III strain energy release rate, G(sub IIIc), that are constant with delamination length. The test has undergone several design changes during its development. The objective of this paper was to determine the suitability of the current ECT test design as a mode III fracture test. To this end, ECT tests were conducted on specimens manufactured from IM7/8552 and specimens made from S2/8552 tape laminates. Several specimens, each with different delamination lengths are tested. Detailed, three-dimensional finite element analyses of the specimens were performed. The analysis results were used to calculate the distribution of mode I, mode II, and mode III strain energy release rate along the delamination front. The results indicated that mode III-dominated delamination growth would be initiated from the specimen center. However, in specimens of both material types, the measured values of G(sub IIIc) exhibited significant dependence on delamination length. Furthermore, there was a large amount of scatter in the data. Load-displacement response of the specimens exhibited significant deviation from linearity before specimen failure. X-radiographs of a sample of specimens revealed that damage was initiated in the specimens prior to failure. Further inspection of the failure surfaces is required to identify the damage and determine that mode III delamination is initiated in the specimens.

  3. Characterization of the Edge Crack Torsion (ECT) Test for Mode III Fracture Toughness Measurement of Laminated Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratcliffe, James G.

    2004-01-01

    The edge crack torsion (ECT) test is designed to initiate mode III delamination growth in composite laminates. The test has undergone several design changes during its development. The objective of this paper was to determine the suitability of the current ECT test design a mode III fracture test. To this end, ECT tests were conducted on specimens manufactured from IM7/8552 and S2/8552 tape laminates. Three-dimensional finite element analyses were performed. The analysis results were used to calculate the distribution of mode I, mode II, and mode III strain energy release rate along the delamination front. The results indicated that mode IIIdominated delamination growth would be initiated from the specimen center. However, in specimens of both material types, the measured values of GIIIc exhibited significant dependence on delamination length. Load-displacement response of the specimens exhibited significant deviation from linearity before specimen failure. X-radiographs of a sample of specimens revealed that damage was initiated in the specimens prior to failure. Further inspection of the failure surfaces is required to identify the damage and determine that mode III delamination is initiated in the specimens.

  4. Dependence of mode I and mixed mode I/III fracture toughness on temperature for a ferritic/martensitic stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Li, H.; Jones, R.H.; Gelles, D.S.

    1995-04-01

    The objective is to investigate the dependence of mode I and mixed mode I/III fracture toughness on temperature in the range of {minus}95{degrees}C to 25{degrees}C for a low activation ferritic/martensitic stainless steel (F82-H). Mode I and mixed Mode I/III fracture toughnesses were investigated in the range of {minus}95 to 25{degree}C for a F82-H steel heat-treated in the following way; 1000{degree}C/20 h/air-cooled (AC), 1100{degree}C/7 min/AC, and 700{degree}C/2 h/AC. The results indicate that crack tip plasticity was increased by mixed mode loading, and suggest that at low temperature, mode I fracture toughness is the critical design parameter, but at temperatures above room temperature, expecially concerning fatigure and creep-fatigue crack growth rate, a mixed mode loading may be more harmful than a mode I loading for this steel because a mixed mode loading results in lower fracture toughness and higher crack tip plasticity (or dislocation activity).

  5. Effets de l'humidite sur la propagation du delaminage dans un composite carbone/epoxy sollicite en mode mixte I/II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LeBlanc, Luc R.

    In industries such as aerospace, motorsports, and even sporting equipment, composite materials are used more than ever, primarily due to their high stiffness and strength to weight ratios. Studies have shown that moisture exposure on carbon/epoxy composite materials can affect their delamination toughness, initiation and growth rate. Of these studies, only a few demonstrated the effects of moisture on delamination toughness and initiation with mixed mode I/II loadings, while none have investigated the effects of moisture exposure of composites on delamination growth rate with mixed mode I/II loadings. The first part of this thesis studies the effects of moisture exposure on delamination growth in a carbon/epoxy composite using mixed mode I/II loadings. Coupons were cut from plates of unidirectional carbon/epoxy (040-800/5276-1) and were submerged in a 70°C distilled water bath until they reached saturation. Quasi -static experimental tests were performed using a range of mode mixities (0%, 25%, 50%, 75% and 1 00%) on dry and conditioned coupons to determine the effects of humidity on delamination toughness. Fatigue tests with the same mode mixities were performed to determine the effects of moisture on delamination initiation and growth rate. Results from tests with quasi-static loadings demonstrated that delamination toughness decreased for all loading modes studied except for mode I after composites are exposed to moisture. When a conditioned composite is subject to mode I loadings, its delamination toughness increases compared to non-conditioned composites. Composites exposed to moisture showed accelerated delamination initiation and growth rates for all mixed mode I/II fatigue loadings. Experimental data was used to determine which fracture criterion and growth rate model for mixed mode I/II delamination better represented the studied composite. A regression curve and regression surface was used to fit the experimental data to the delamination fracture

  6. A comparison of pure mode I and mixed mode I-III cracking of an adhesive containing an open knit cloth carrier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ripling, E. J.; Crosley, P. B.; Johnson, W. S.

    1988-01-01

    Static and fatigue tests were carried out on two commercial modified epoxy film adhesives with a wide open knit polyester carrier in order to compare crack resistance in mode I and mixed mode I-III loading. The carrier cloth is found to have a significant influence on the cracking behavior of the adhesives. The open air net carrier used in this study separates from the adhesive in mode I cracking but shreds during mixed-mode crack extension. This decreases the opening mode toughness but increases the mixed-mode toughness as compared with results obtained earlier using a heavier knit carrier. The results suggest that the type of carrier may have a far larger influence on crack resistance than is generally recognized.

  7. Collisionless microinstabilities in stellarators. III. The ion-temperature-gradient mode

    SciTech Connect

    Plunk, G. G. Helander, P.; Xanthopoulos, P.

    2014-03-15

    We investigate the linear theory of the ion-temperature-gradient (ITG) mode, with the goal of developing a general understanding that may be applied to stellarators. We highlight the Wendelstein 7X (W7-X) device. Simple fluid and kinetic models that follow closely from existing literature are reviewed and two new first-principle models are presented and compared with results from direct numerical simulation. One model investigates the effect of regions of strong localized shear, which are generic to stellarator equilibria. These “shear spikes” are found to have a potentially significant stabilizing affect on the mode; however, the effect is strongest at short wavelengths perpendicular to the magnetic field, and it is found to be significant only for the fastest growing modes in W7-X. A second model investigates the long-wavelength limit for the case of negligible global magnetic shear. The analytic calculation reveals that the effect of the curvature drive enters at second order in the drift frequency, confirming conventional wisdom that the ITG mode is slab-like at long wavelengths. Using flux tube simulations of a zero-shear W7-X configuration, we observe a close relationship to an axisymmetric configuration at a similar parameter point. It is concluded that scale lengths of the equilibrium gradients constitute a good parameter space to characterize the ITG mode. Thus, to optimize the magnetic geometry for ITG mode stability, it may be fruitful to focus on local parameters, such as the magnitude of bad curvature, connection length, and local shear at locations of bad curvature (where the ITG mode amplitude peaks)

  8. Mixed-mode I+II fracture characterization of human cortical bone using the Single Leg Bending test.

    PubMed

    Silva, F G A; de Moura, M F S F; Dourado, N; Xavier, J; Pereira, F A M; Morais, J J L; Dias, M I R

    2016-02-01

    Mixed-mode I+II fracture characterization of human cortical bone was analyzed in this work. A miniaturized version of the Single Leg Bending test (SLB) was used owing to its simplicity. A power law criterion was verified to accurately describe the material fracture envelop under mixed-mode I+II loading. The crack tip opening displacements measured by digital image correlation were used in a direct method to determine the cohesive law mimicking fracture behavior of cortical bone. Cohesive zone modeling was used for the sake of validation. Several fracture quantities were compared with the experimental results and the good agreement observed proves the appropriateness of the proposed procedure for fracture characterization of human bone under mixed-mode I+II loading.

  9. Studies on mode of action of hexaammine Co(III) chloride against diethylnitrosamine-induced hepatocarcinogenesis in mice.

    PubMed

    Naura, Amarjit S; Sharma, Rajeshwar

    2009-01-01

    We recently reported the anticarcinogenic potential of hexaammine cobalt(III) chloride, a synthetic complex of cobalt, on diethylnitrosamine (DENA)-induced carcinogenesis. The present study was conducted to ascertain the possible mode of action of this compound on DENA-induced hepatocarcinogenesis in male BALB/c mice. Time course evaluation of liver injury markers showed that the low dose of the compound is more effective in ameliorating DENA-induced changes when administered for longer duration of time. Long-term exposure of the compound significantly reversed the levels of diacylgylcerol (DAG) and nitric oxide synthase (NOS) induced by DENA, thus suggesting that the compound may hinder the process of chemical carcinogenesis potentially by downregulating the signal transduction mechanism involving DAG and NOS. Furthermore, short-term intraperitoneal injection of the compound to mice 26 weeks after DENA initiation reduced the cell viability count in preneoplstic liver lesions in a dose-dependent manner. In conclusion, our results showed that anticarcinogenic effects of hexaammine cobalt(III) chloride result from its influence on signal transduction events mediated through DAG together with its direct cytotoxic action against preneoplastic hepatic lesions induced by DENA in mice.

  10. Comparative serum albumin interactions and antitumor effects of Au(III) and Ga(III) ions.

    PubMed

    Sarioglu, Omer Faruk; Ozdemir, Ayse; Karaboduk, Kuddusi; Tekinay, Turgay

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, interactions of Au(III) and Ga(III) ions on human serum albumin (HSA) were studied comparatively via spectroscopic and thermal analysis methods: UV-vis absorbance spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). The potential antitumor effects of these ions were studied on MCF-7 cells via Alamar blue assay. It was found that both Au(III) and Ga(III) ions can interact with HSA, however; Au(III) ions interact with HSA more favorably and with a higher affinity. FT-IR second derivative analysis results demonstrated that, high concentrations of both metal ions led to a considerable decrease in the α-helix content of HSA; while Au(III) led to around 5% of decrease in the α-helix content at 200μM, it was around 1% for Ga(III) at the same concentration. Calorimetric analysis gave the binding kinetics of metal-HSA interactions; while the binding affinity (Ka) of Au(III)-HSA binding was around 3.87×10(5)M(-1), it was around 9.68×10(3)M(-1) for Ga(III)-HSA binding. Spectroscopy studies overall suggest that both metal ions have significant effects on the chemical structure of HSA, including the secondary structure alterations. Antitumor activity studies on MCF7 tumor cell line with both metal ions revealed that, Au(III) ions have a higher antiproliferative activity compared to Ga(III) ions.

  11. Lanthanide(III) and Yttrium(III) Complexes of Benzimidazole-2-Acetic Acid: Synthesis, Characterisation and Effect of La(III) Complex on Germination of Wheat

    PubMed Central

    Gudasi, Kalagouda B.; Shenoy, Rashmi V.; Vadavi, Ramesh S.; Patil, Manjula S.; Patil, Siddappa A.; Hanchinal, Rayappa R.; Desai, Srinivas A.; Lohithaswa, H.

    2006-01-01

    The synthesis and characterisation of lanthanide(III) and yttrium(III) nitrate complexes of benzimidazole-2-acetic acid (HBIA) are reported. The complexes have been characterised by elemental analysis, molar conductance, magnetic studies, IR, 1H NMR, UV-visible, EPR, and TG/DTA studies. They have the stoichiometry [Ln3(BIA)2(NO3)7(H2O)4] · 3H2O where Ln=La(III), Pr(III), Nd(II), Sm(III), Eu(III), Gd(III), Tb(III), Dy(III), and Y(III). The effect of La(III) complex on germination, coleoptile, and root length of two local varieties of wheat DWR-195 and GW-349 for different treatment periods has been investigated. The complex was found to exhibit enhanced activity, compared to HBIA or metal salt alone at lower treatment periods. PMID:17497017

  12. The Language Element in the Somerset Mode III Integrated European Studies Syllabus and Its Relevance to the Less Able Pupil

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Barrie

    1974-01-01

    The Somerset CSE Mode III integrated European Studies syllabus, which contains a French language course, is aimed at the lower and below CSE candidate. The second language element of the course is described and reasons for constructing such a course for less able students are discussed. (RM)

  13. Mode Transitions in Hall Effect Thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sekerak, Michael J.; Longmier, Benjamin W.; Gallimore, Alec D.; Brown, Daniel L.; Hofer, Richard R.; Polk, James E.

    2013-01-01

    Mode transitions have been commonly observed in Hall Effect Thruster (HET) operation where a small change in a thruster operating parameter such as discharge voltage, magnetic field or mass flow rate causes the thruster discharge current mean value and oscillation amplitude to increase significantly. Mode transitions in a 6-kW-class HET called the H6 are induced by varying the magnetic field intensity while holding all other operating parameters constant and measurements are acquired with ion saturation probes and ultra-fast imaging. Global and local oscillation modes are identified. In the global mode, the entire discharge channel oscillates in unison and azimuthal perturbations (spokes) are either absent or negligible. Downstream azimuthally spaced probes show no signal delay between each other and are very well correlated to the discharge current signal. In the local mode, signals from the azimuthally spaced probes exhibit a clear delay indicating the passage of "spokes" and are not well correlated to the discharge current. These spokes are localized oscillations propagating in the ExB direction that are typically 10-20% of the mean value. In contrast, the oscillations in the global mode can be 100% of the mean value. The transition between global and local modes occurs at higher relative magnetic field strengths for higher mass flow rates or higher discharge voltages. The thrust is constant through mode transition but the thrust-to-power decreased by 25% due to increasing discharge current. The plume shows significant differences between modes with the global mode significantly brighter in the channel and the near-field plasma plume as well as exhibiting a luminous spike on thruster centerline. Mode transitions provide valuable insight to thruster operation and suggest improved methods for thruster performance characterization.

  14. A Mixed-Mode (I-II) Fracture Criterion for AS4/8552 Carbon/Epoxy Composite Laminate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karnati, Sidharth Reddy

    A majority of aerospace structures are subjected to bending and stretching loads that introduce peel and shear stresses between the plies of a composite laminate. These two stress components cause a combination of mode I and II fracture modes in the matrix layer of the composite laminate. The most common failure mode in laminated composites is delamination that affects the structural integrity of composite structures. Damage tolerant designs of structures require two types of materials data: mixed-mode (I-II) delamination fracture toughness that predicts failure and delamination growth rate that predicts the life of the structural component. This research focuses determining mixed-mode (I-II) fracture toughness under a combination of mode I and mode II stress states and then a fracture criterion for AS4/8552 composite laminate, which is widely used in general aviation. The AS4/8552 prepreg was supplied by Hexcel Corporation and autoclave fabricated into a 20-ply unidirectional laminate with an artificial delamination by a Fluorinated Ethylene Propylene (FEP) film at the mid-plane. Standard split beam specimens were prepared and tested in double cantilever beam (DCB) and end notched flexure modes to determine mode I (GIC) and II (GIIC) fracture toughnesses, respectively. The DCB specimens were also tested in a modified mixed-mode bending apparatus at GIIm /GT ratios of 0.18, 0.37, 0.57 and 0.78, where GT is total and GIIm is the mode II component of energy release rates. The measured fracture toughness, GC, was found to follow the locus a power law equation. The equation was validated for the present and literature experimental data.

  15. The equilibrium concentration of hydrogen atoms ahead of a mixed mode I-mode III crack tip in single crystal iron

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, T.Y.; Hack, J.E.

    1999-01-01

    Calculations of the equilibrium hydrogen concentration profiles about a mixed ode I-mode III crack in single crystal iron were performed. Both material anisotropy and the tetragonal nature of the distortion induced in the iron crystal structure by interstitial hydrogen were incorporated. Results show that, unlike the case of a spherical distortion, a strong coupling exists between the strain field of the interstitial hydrogen and the stress field of the crack for orientations of the crack plane that are not coincident with the cube axes of the lattice. As a result, the predicated enhancement of hydrogen in the crack tip region increases with increasing levels of mode III loading for those orientations. The results may help reconcile conflicting observations concerning the potential role of shear stresses in hydrogen embrittlement and preferential cracking of grains ahead of loaded crack tips in sustained load cracking experiments.

  16. Energetic particle effects on global magnetohydrodynamic modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, C. Z.

    1990-06-01

    The effects of energetic particles on magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) type modes are studied using analytical theories and the nonvariational kinetic-MHD stability code (nova-k) [Workshop on Theory of Fusion Plasmas, (Societa Italiana di Fisica, Bologna, 1987), p. 185]. In particular, the problems of (1) the stabilization of ideal MHD internal kink modes and the excitation of resonant ``fishbone'' internal modes and (2) the alpha particle destabilization of toroidicity-induced Alfvén eigenmodes (TAE) via transit resonances are addressed. Analytical theories are presented to help explain the nova-k results. For energetic trapped particles generated by neutral beam injection or ion cyclotron resonant heating, a stability window for the n=1 internal kink mode in the hot particle beta space exists even in the absence of core ion finite Larmor radius effect. On the other hand, the trapped alpha particles are found to resonantly excite instability of the n=1 internal mode and can lower the critical beta threshold. The circulating alpha particles can strongly destabilize TAE modes via inverse Landau damping associated with the spatial gradient of the alpha-particle pressure.

  17. Energetic particle effects on global magnetohydrodynamic modes

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, C.Z. )

    1990-06-01

    The effects of energetic particles on magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) type modes are studied using analytical theories and the nonvariational kinetic-MHD stability code (NOVA-K) ({ital Workshop} {ital on} {ital Theory} {ital of} {ital Fusion} {ital Plasmas}, (Societa Italiana di Fisica, Bologna, 1987), p. 185). In particular, the problems of (1) the stabilization of ideal MHD internal kink modes and the excitation of resonant fishbone'' internal modes and (2) the alpha particle destabilization of toroidicity-induced Alfven eigenmodes (TAE) via transit resonances are addressed. Analytical theories are presented to help explain the NOVAresults. For energetic trapped particles generated by neutral beam injection or ion cyclotron resonant heating, a stability window for the {ital n}=1 internal kink mode in the hot particle beta space exists even in the absence of core ion finite Larmor radius effect. On the other hand, the trapped alpha particles are found to resonantly excite instability of the {ital n}=1 internal mode and can lower the critical beta threshold. The circulating alpha particles can strongly destabilize TAE modes via inverse Landau damping associated with the spatial gradient of the alpha-particle pressure.

  18. An assessment of BWR (boiling water reactor) Mark III containment challenges, failure modes, and potential improvements in performance

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, J.A.; Pafford, D.J.; Kelly, D.L.; Jones, K.R.; Dallman, F.J. )

    1991-01-01

    This report describes risk-significant challenges posed to Mark III containment systems by severe accidents as identified for Grand Gulf. Design similarities and differences between the Mark III plants that are important to containment performance are summarized. The accident sequences responsible for the challenges and the postulated containment failure modes associated with each challenge are identified and described. Improvements are discussed that have the potential either to prevent or delay containment failure, or to mitigate the offsite consequences of a fission product release. For each of these potential improvements, a qualitative analysis is provided. A limited quantitative risk analysis is provided for selected potential improvements. 21 refs., 5 figs., 46 tabs.

  19. Effect of temperature on the mixed-mode impact behavior of a normalized 1050 steel

    SciTech Connect

    Manoharan, M.; Seow, H.P.

    1997-10-01

    A considerable amount of work on mixed mode I/III fracture toughness of materials is available using proportional loading methods and all the work using such a loading method has recently been summarized. The superposition of mode III loading results in drastic reduction in fracture toughness in some materials whereas in other materials it has little effect or even results in an increase in the fracture toughness. Fracture mechanism maps delineating regions of susceptibility to tensile and shear loads have been proposed to explain such differences. In the mixed mode fracture toughness tests outlined above, the use of a modified compact tension specimen has enabled the testing of materials under a variety of combinations of mode I and mode III loadings. By using appropriately defined mixed-mode versions of the stress intensity factor K and the J integral, the susceptibility of these materials to mixed-mode fracture can be quantified. In addition to compact tension specimens, three point bend specimens with an inclined crack can also be used to determine the mixed-mode fracture behavior of materials. The aim of the present study was to study the feasibility of extending the mixed mode fracture concept to impact testing using a charpy type test specimen.

  20. Mode I and mixed I/III crack initiation and propagation behavior of V-4Cr-4Ti alloy at 25{degrees}C

    SciTech Connect

    Li, H.X.; Kurtz, R.J.; Jones, R.H.

    1997-04-01

    The mode I and mixed-mode I/III fracture behavior of the production-scale heat (No. 832665) of V-4Cr-4Ti has been investigated at 25{degrees}C using compact tension (CT) specimens for a mode I crack and modified CT specimens for a mixed-mode I/III crack. The mode III to mode I load ratio was 0.47. Test specimens were vacuum annealed at 1000{degrees}C for 1 h after final machining. Both mode I and mixed-mode I/III specimens were fatigue cracked prior to J-integral testing. It was noticed that the mixed-mode I/III crack angle decreased from an initial 25 degrees to approximately 23 degrees due to crack plane rotation during fatigue cracking. No crack plane rotation occurred in the mode I specimen. The crack initiation and propagation behavior was evaluated by generating J-R curves. Due to the high ductility of this alloy and the limited specimen thickness (6.35 mm), plane strain requirements were not met so valid critical J-integral values were not obtained. However, it was found that the crack initiation and propagation behavior was significantly different between the mode I and the mixed-mode I/III specimens. In the mode I specimen crack initiation did not occur, only extensive crack tip blunting due to plastic deformation. During J-integral testing the mixed-mode crack rotated to an increased crack angle (in contrast to fatigue precracking) by crack blunting. When the crack initiated, the crack angle was about 30 degrees. After crack initiation the crack plane remained at 30 degrees until the test was completed. Mixed-mode crack initiation was difficult, but propagation was easy. The fracture surface of the mixed-mode specimen was characterized by microvoid coalescence.

  1. A binuclear Fe(III)Dy(III) single molecule magnet. Quantum effects and models.

    PubMed

    Ferbinteanu, Marilena; Kajiwara, Takashi; Choi, Kwang-Yong; Nojiri, Hiroyuki; Nakamoto, Akio; Kojima, Norimichi; Cimpoesu, Fanica; Fujimura, Yuichi; Takaishi, Shinya; Yamashita, Masahiro

    2006-07-19

    The binuclear [FeIII(bpca)(mu-bpca)Dy(NO3)4], having Single Molecule Magnet (SMM) properties, belonging to a series of isostructural FeIIILnIII complexes (Ln = Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho) and closely related FeIILnIII chain structures, was characterized in concise experimental and theoretical respects. The low temperature magnetization data showed hysteresis and tunneling. The anomalous temperature dependence of Mössbauer spectra is related to the onset of magnetic order, consistent with the magnetization relaxation time scale resulting from AC susceptibility measurements. The advanced ab initio calculations (CASSCF and spin-orbit) revealed the interplay of ligand field, spin-orbit, and exchange effects and probed the effective Ising nature of the lowest states, involved in the SMM and tunneling effects.

  2. Fracture toughness of the F-82H steel-effect of loading modes, hydrogen, and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, H.-X.; Jones, R. H.; Hirth, J. P.; Gelles, D. S.

    1996-10-01

    The effects of loading mode, hydrogen, and temperature on fracture toughness and tearing modulus were examined for a ferritic/martensitic steel (F-82H). The introduction of a shear load component, mode III, significantly decreased the initiation and propagation resistance of cracks compared to the opening load, mode I, behavior. Mode I crack initiation and propagation exhibited the highest resistance. A minimum resistance occurred when the mode I and mode III loads were nearly equal. The presence of 4 wppm hydrogen decreased the cracking resistance compared to behavior without H regardless of the loading mode. The minimum mixed-mode fracture toughness with the presence of hydrogen was about 30% of the hydrogen-free mode I fracture toughness. The mixed-mode toughness exhibited a lesser sensitivity to temperature than the mode I toughness. The JIC value was 284 kJ/m 2 at room temperature, but only 60 kJ/m 2 at -55°C and 30 kJ/m 2 at -90°C. The ductile to brittle transition temperature (DBTT) was apparently higher than -55°C.

  3. A streamlined failure mode and effects analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, Eric C. Smith, Koren; Terezakis, Stephanie; Croog, Victoria; Gollamudi, Smitha; Gage, Irene; Keck, Jordie; DeWeese, Theodore; Sibley, Greg

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Explore the feasibility and impact of a streamlined failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) using a structured process that is designed to minimize staff effort. Methods: FMEA for the external beam process was conducted at an affiliate radiation oncology center that treats approximately 60 patients per day. A structured FMEA process was developed which included clearly defined roles and goals for each phase. A core group of seven people was identified and a facilitator was chosen to lead the effort. Failure modes were identified and scored according to the FMEA formalism. A risk priority number,RPN, was calculated and used to rank failure modes. Failure modes with RPN > 150 received safety improvement interventions. Staff effort was carefully tracked throughout the project. Results: Fifty-two failure modes were identified, 22 collected during meetings, and 30 from take-home worksheets. The four top-ranked failure modes were: delay in film check, missing pacemaker protocol/consent, critical structures not contoured, and pregnant patient simulated without the team's knowledge of the pregnancy. These four failure modes hadRPN > 150 and received safety interventions. The FMEA was completed in one month in four 1-h meetings. A total of 55 staff hours were required and, additionally, 20 h by the facilitator. Conclusions: Streamlined FMEA provides a means of accomplishing a relatively large-scale analysis with modest effort. One potential value of FMEA is that it potentially provides a means of measuring the impact of quality improvement efforts through a reduction in risk scores. Future study of this possibility is needed.

  4. Period-Luminosity relations derived from the OGLE-III first-overtone mode Cepheids in the Magellanic Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhardwaj, Anupam; Ngeow, Chow-Choong; Kanbur, Shashi M.; Singh, Harinder P.

    2016-06-01

    We present multiband Period-Luminosity (PL) relations for first-overtone mode Cepheids in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). We derive optical band PL relations and the Wesenheit function using VI mean magnitudes from the Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment (OGLE-III) survey. We cross-match OGLE-III first-overtone mode Cepheids to the 2MASS and SAGE-SMC catalogues to derive PL relations at near-infrared (JHKs) and mid-infrared (3.6 and 4.5 μm) wavelengths. We test for possible non-linearities in these PL relations using robust statistical tests and find a significant break only in the optical band PL relations at 2.5 d for first-overtone mode Cepheids. We do not find statistical evidence for a non-linearity in these PL relations at 1 d. The multiband PL relations for fundamental-mode Cepheids in the SMC also exhibit a break at 2.5 d. We suggest that the period break around 2.5 d is related to sharp changes in the light-curve parameters for SMC Cepheids. We also derive new optical and mid-infrared band PL relations for first-overtone mode Cepheids in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). We compare multiband PL relations for first-overtone mode Cepheids in the Magellanic Clouds and find a significant difference in the slope of the V-band PL relations but not for I-band PL relations. The slope of PL relations are found to be consistent in most of the infrared bands. A relative distance modulus of Δμ = 0.49 ± 0.02 mag between the two clouds is estimated using multiband PL relations for the first-overtone mode Cepheids in the SMC and LMC.

  5. The variation, with the Poisson ratio, of Lamb modes in a free plate, III: Behaviour of individual modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freedman, A.

    1990-03-01

    The way individual, real-valued Lamb mode branches of a free, elastic plate vary with the Poisson ratio, σ, is studied, the coverage extending over the whole range, both positive and negative, of the latter parameter. After examining the zero order antisymmetric and symmetric branches, an investigation is made of the non-zero order branches of arbitrary order. The overall behaviour is shown to be largely influenced by two cylicities; the first of these applies over the full range of σ and occurs when the normal displacements within the plate are entirely dilatational, while the second cyclicity applies only over the negative range of σ and occurs when the normal displacements within the plate are entirely shear. Illustrations covering the full range of σ are presented for the first few non-zero order modes. Additionally, guidance supplementing Mindlin's rules of bounds is proffered for the easy sketching (without need for any computations) of sets of Lamb mode spectra, at any positive or negative value of σ, onto grids of Mindlin's bounds.

  6. Mode Transitions in Hall Effect Thrusters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-01

    Astronautics Mode Transitions in Hall Effect Thrusters Michael J. Sekerak 1 , Benjamin W. Longmier 2 and Alec D. Gallimore 3 University of Michigan...nude Faraday probe, retarding potential analyzer and cylindrical Langmuir prove, Brown showed the transition from “low-current” to “high-current...thank two former PEPL students: Dr. Robert Lobbia for development of the HDLP; and Dr. Michael McDonald for development of the FastCam Analysis

  7. Gravitational wave quasinormal mode from Population III massive black hole binaries in various models of population synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinugawa, Tomoya; Nakano, Hiroyuki; Nakamura, Takashi

    2016-10-01

    Focusing on the remnant black holes after merging binary black holes, we show that ringdown gravitational waves of Population III binary black hole mergers can be detected at the rate of 5.9-500 events yr(SFR/(10M yr Mpc))ṡ([f/(1+f)]/0.33) for various parameters and functions. This rate is estimated for events with SNR>8 for second-generation gravitational wave detectors such as KAGRA. Here, SFR and f are the peak value of the Population III star formation rate and the fraction of binaries, respectively. When we consider only events with SNR>35, the event rate becomes 0.046-4.21 events yr(SFR/(10M yr Mpc))ṡ([f/(1+f)]/0.33). This suggest that for a remnant black hole spin of q>0.95 we have an event rate of quasinormal modes with SNR>35 of less than 0.037 events yr(SFR/(10M yr Mpc))ṡ([f/(1+f)]/0.33), while it is 3-30 events yr(SFR/(10M yr Mpc))ṡ([f/(1+f)]/0.33) for third-generation detectors such as the Einstein Telescope. If we detect many Population III binary black hole mergers, it may be possible to constrain the Population III binary evolution paths not only by the mass distribution but also by the spin distribution.

  8. Experiments on fracture toughness of thick-wall cylinder for modes I, II, III

    SciTech Connect

    Saegusa, T.; Urabe, N.; Ito, C.; Shirai, K.; Kosaki, A.

    1999-07-01

    There have been few data on fracture toughness for Mode 2 and 3 as compared with those for Mode 1. Experimental data on fracture toughness of plates made of ductile cast iron (ASTM A874-89) and forged steel (ASME SA350 LF5 C1.1) were obtained at a temperature range from 77K to 293K for Mode 1, 2 and 3. The results showed: J{sub IC} < J{sub IIC} < J{sub IIIC}, and K{sub IC} < K{sub IIC} K{sub IIIC}. Integrity of a thick-wall cylinder with artificial flaw was demonstrated against brittle fracture at 233K for Mode 1, 2 and 3, which is one of the design requirements of containers shipping radioactive materials.

  9. The poloidal distribution of type-III edge localized modes in the Mega-Ampere spherical tokamak (MAST)

    SciTech Connect

    Antar, G.Y.

    2006-05-15

    This article describes the poloidal plasma particle distribution of type-III edge localized modes (ELMs) in the Mega-Ampere spherical tokamak [R.-J. Akers et al., Phys. Plasmas 9, 3919 (2002)]. A fast imaging camera with 10 {mu}s exposure time is used to record the D{sub {alpha}} light coming from the entire poloidal cross section. Furthermore, three sets of probes, triggered at the same time, acquired at 1 MHz, and located at different poloidal, radial, and toroidal locations in the tokamak are used. ELMs are observed to affect the D{sub {alpha}} emission throughout the low-field scrape-off layer; on the high-field side, however, this effect is found to be small. The results obtained by imaging agree with the pointwise measurements using Langmuir probes. The radial propagation is shown to occur at a speed of 250 m/s, whereas the toroidal convection from the top to the bottom of the plasma is shown to be consistent with a transport at the local sound speed. Strong correlation amplitudes are reported among the probes that are poloidally and toroidally separated by several meters. The study of the cross-correlation coefficients as a function of the frequency indicates that this correlation is caused by the low-frequency component of the signal and that the high-frequency part is not correlated. Consequently, the filamentary structures are interpreted as caused by the onset of turbulence during an ELM and do not constitute the ELM itself.

  10. Optical modes within III-nitride multiple quantum well microdisk cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mair, R. A.; Zeng, K. C.; Lin, J. Y.; Jiang, H. X.; Zhang, B.; Dai, L.; Botchkarev, A.; Kim, W.; Morkoç, H.; Khan, M. A.

    1998-03-01

    Optical resonance modes have been observed in optically pumped microdisk cavities fabricated from 50 Å/50 Å GaN/AlxGa1-xN(x˜0.07) and 45 Å/45 Å InxGa1-xN/GaN(x˜0.15) multiple quantum well structures. Microdisks, approximately 9 μm in diameter and regularly spaced every 50 μm, were formed by an ion beam etch process. Individual disks were pumped at 300 and 10 K with 290 nm laser pulses focused to a spot size much smaller than the disk diameter. Optical modes corresponding to (i) the radial mode type with a spacing of 49-51 meV (both TE and TM) and (ii) the Whispering Gallery mode with a spacing of 15-16 meV were observed in the GaN microdisk cavities. The spacings of these modes are consistent with those expected for modes within a resonant cavity of cylindrical symmetry, refractive index, and dimensions of the microdisks under investigation. The GaN-based microdisk cavity is compared with its GaAs counterpart and implications regarding future GaN-based microdisk lasers are discussed.

  11. Period spacings in red giants. III. Coupling factors of mixed modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosser, B.; Pinçon, C.; Belkacem, K.; Takata, M.; Vrard, M.

    2017-03-01

    Context. The power of asteroseismology relies on the capability of global oscillations to infer the stellar structure. For evolved stars, we benefit from unique information directly carried out by mixed modes that probe their radiative cores. This third article of the series devoted to mixed modes in red giants focuses on their coupling factors, which have remained largely unexploited up to now. Aims: With the measurement of coupling factors, we intend to give physical constraints on the regions surrounding the radiative core and the hydrogen-burning shell of subgiants and red giants. Methods: A new method for measuring the coupling factor of mixed modes was implemented, which was derived from the method recently implemented for measuring period spacings. This new method was automated so that it could be applied to a large sample of stars. Results: Coupling factors of mixed modes were measured for thousands of red giants. They show specific variation with mass and evolutionary stage. Weak coupling is observed for the most evolved stars on the red giant branch only; large coupling factors are measured at the transition between subgiants and red giants as well as in the red clump. Conclusions: The measurement of coupling factors in dipole mixed modes provides a new insight into the inner interior structure of evolved stars. While the large frequency separation and the asymptotic period spacings probe the envelope and core, respectively, the coupling factor is directly sensitive to the intermediate region in between and helps determine its extent. Observationally, the determination of the coupling factor is a prior to precise fits of the mixed-mode pattern and can now be used to address further properties of the mixed-mode pattern, such as the signature of buoyancy glitches and core rotation.

  12. Failure modes and effects analysis automation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamhieh, Cynthia H.; Cutts, Dannie E.; Purves, R. Byron

    1988-01-01

    A failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA) assistant was implemented as a knowledge based system and will be used during design of the Space Station to aid engineers in performing the complex task of tracking failures throughout the entire design effort. The three major directions in which automation was pursued were the clerical components of the FMEA process, the knowledge acquisition aspects of FMEA, and the failure propagation/analysis portions of the FMEA task. The system is accessible to design, safety, and reliability engineers at single user workstations and, although not designed to replace conventional FMEA, it is expected to decrease by many man years the time required to perform the analysis.

  13. Magnetic antenna excitation of whistler modes. III. Group and phase velocities of wave packets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urrutia, J. M.; Stenzel, R. L.

    2015-07-01

    The properties of whistler modes excited by single and multiple magnetic loop antennas have been investigated in a large laboratory plasma. A single loop excites a wavepacket, but an array of loops across the ambient magnetic field B0 excites approximate plane whistler modes. The single loop data are measured. The array patterns are obtained by linear superposition of experimental data shifted in space and time, which is valid in a uniform plasma and magnetic field for small amplitude waves. Phasing the array changes the angle of wave propagation. The antennas are excited by an rf tone burst whose propagating envelope and oscillations yield group and phase velocities. A single loop antenna with dipole moment across B0 excites wave packets whose topology resembles m = 1 helicon modes, but without radial boundaries. The phase surfaces are conical with propagation characteristics of Gendrin modes. The cones form near the antenna with comparable parallel and perpendicular phase velocities. A physical model for the wave excitation is given. When a wave burst is applied to a phased antenna array, the wave front propagates both along the array and into the plasma forming a "whistler wing" at the front. These laboratory observations may be relevant for excitation and detection of whistler modes in space plasmas.

  14. A Modified Edge Crack Torsion Test for Measurement of Mode III Fracture Toughness of Laminated Tape Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Czabaj, Michael W.; Davidson, Barry D.; Ratcliffe, James G.

    2016-01-01

    Modifications to the edge crack torsion (ECT) test are studied to improve the reliability of this test for measuring the mode-III fracture toughness, G (sub IIIc), of laminated tape fiber-reinforced polymeric (FRP) composites. First, the data reduction methods currently used in the ECT test are evaluated and deficiencies in their accuracy are discussed. An alternative data reduction technique, which uses a polynomial form to represent ECT specimen compliance solution, is evaluated and compared to FEA (finite element analysis) results. Second, seven batches of ECT specimens are tested, each batch containing specimens with a preimplanted midplane edge delamination and midplane plies with orientations of plus theta divided by minus theta, with theta ranging from 0 degrees to 90 degrees in 15-degree increments. Tests on these specimens show that intralaminar cracking occurs in specimens from all batches except for which theta = 15 degrees and 30 degrees. Tests on specimens of these two batches are shown to result in mode-III delamination growth at the intended ply interface. The findings from this study are encouraging steps towards the use of the ECT test as a standardized method for measuring G (sub IIIc), although further modification to the data reduction method is required to make it suitable for use as part of a standardized test method.

  15. Cooling effect on the electron states of Si(III)Pd and Si(III)Pt interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbati, I.; Braicovich, L.; Michelis, B. De; Pennino, U. Del; Valeri, S.

    1980-09-01

    Photoemission and Auger results are given for Si(III)Pd and Si(III)Pt interfaces prepared by depositing 10 ml metal onto cleaved Si(III). Thermal cycling between room temperature and liquid nitrogen temperature originates a reversible effect in the spectra due to metal concentration increase in {Si}/{Pt} and decrease in {Si}/{Pd}. The results are discussed in connection with open problems on Si d-metal interfaces.

  16. Electron cyclotron maser emission mode coupling to the z-mode on a longitudinal density gradient in the context of solar type III bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Pechhacker, R.; Tsiklauri, D.

    2012-11-15

    A beam of super-thermal, hot electrons was injected into maxwellian plasma with a density gradient along a magnetic field line. 1.5D particle-in-cell simulations were carried out which established that the EM emission is produced by the perpendicular component of the beam injection momentum. The beam has a positive slope in the distribution function in perpendicular momentum phase space, which is the characteristic feature of a cyclotron maser. The cyclotron maser in the overdense plasma generates emission at the electron cyclotron frequency. The frequencies of generated waves were too low to propagate away from the injection region, hence the wavelet transform shows a pulsating wave generation and decay process. The intensity pulsation frequency is twice the relativistic cyclotron frequency. Eventually, a stable wave packet formed and could mode couple on the density gradient to reach frequencies of the order of the plasma frequency that allowed for propagation. The emitted wave is likely to be a z-mode wave. The total electromagnetic energy generated is of the order of 0.1% of the initial beam kinetic energy. The proposed mechanism is of relevance to solar type III radio bursts, as well as other situations, when the injected electron beam has a non-zero perpendicular momentum, e.g., magnetron.

  17. Effects of Jigsaw III Technique on Achievement in Written Expression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sahin, Abdullah

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to compare the Jigsaw III technique (of cooperative learning) with the instructional teacher-centered teaching method in six graders in terms of the effect of written expression on their academic success. The universe of the study consists of 71 sixth-grade students studying during 2009-2010 academic term in a…

  18. 25 CFR 291.15 - How long do Class III gaming procedures remain in effect?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true How long do Class III gaming procedures remain in effect... ENTERPRISES CLASS III GAMING PROCEDURES § 291.15 How long do Class III gaming procedures remain in effect? Class III gaming procedures remain in effect for the duration specified in the procedures or...

  19. 25 CFR 291.15 - How long do Class III gaming procedures remain in effect?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false How long do Class III gaming procedures remain in effect... ENTERPRISES CLASS III GAMING PROCEDURES § 291.15 How long do Class III gaming procedures remain in effect? Class III gaming procedures remain in effect for the duration specified in the procedures or...

  20. 25 CFR 291.15 - How long do Class III gaming procedures remain in effect?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false How long do Class III gaming procedures remain in effect... ENTERPRISES CLASS III GAMING PROCEDURES § 291.15 How long do Class III gaming procedures remain in effect? Class III gaming procedures remain in effect for the duration specified in the procedures or...

  1. 25 CFR 291.15 - How long do Class III gaming procedures remain in effect?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false How long do Class III gaming procedures remain in effect... ENTERPRISES CLASS III GAMING PROCEDURES § 291.15 How long do Class III gaming procedures remain in effect? Class III gaming procedures remain in effect for the duration specified in the procedures or...

  2. 25 CFR 291.15 - How long do Class III gaming procedures remain in effect?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How long do Class III gaming procedures remain in effect... ENTERPRISES CLASS III GAMING PROCEDURES § 291.15 How long do Class III gaming procedures remain in effect? Class III gaming procedures remain in effect for the duration specified in the procedures or...

  3. (-)-Carvone: antispasmodic effect and mode of action.

    PubMed

    Souza, Fábia Valéria M; da Rocha, Marcelly Barbosa; de Souza, Damião P; Marçal, Rosilene Moretti

    2013-03-01

    (-)-Carvone is a monoterpene ketone found in spearmint (Mentha spicata var. crispa) essential oil that is widely used as an odor and flavor additive. An intestinal antispasmodic effect was recently reported for (-)-carvone, and it has been shown to be more potent than its (+)-antipode. The mechanism of (-)-carvone action in the intestines has not been investigated. To gain a better understanding of the (-)-carvone antispasmodic effect, we investigated its pharmacological effects in the guinea pig ileum. Terminal portions of the ileum were mounted for isotonic contraction recordings. The effect of (-)-carvone was compared with that of the classical calcium channel blocker (CCB) verapamil. In isolated ileal smooth muscle, (-)-carvone did not produce direct contractile or relaxation responses and did not modify electrically elicited contractions or low K(+)-evoked contractions. The submaximal contractions induced by histamine (p<0.001), BaCl2 (p<0.05), and carbachol (p<0.01) were significantly reduced by (-)-carvone. The contractile response elicited by high concentrations of carbachol was reduced but not abolished by (-)-carvone. No additive action was detected with co-incubation of (-)-carvone and verapamil on carbachol-induced contraction. (-)-Carvone reduced the contraction induced by high K(+) and was almost 100 times more potent than verapamil. Thus, (-)-carvone showed a typical and potent CCB-like action. Many effects described for both (-)-carvone and spearmint oil can be explained as a CCB-like mode of action.

  4. Drift effects on electromagnetic geodesic acoustic modes

    SciTech Connect

    Sgalla, R. J. F.

    2015-02-15

    A two fluid model with parallel viscosity is employed to derive the dispersion relation for electromagnetic geodesic acoustic modes (GAMs) in the presence of drift (diamagnetic) effects. Concerning the influence of the electron dynamics on the high frequency GAM, it is shown that the frequency of the electromagnetic GAM is independent of the equilibrium parallel current but, in contrast with purely electrostatic GAMs, significantly depends on the electron temperature gradient. The electromagnetic GAM may explain the discrepancy between the f ∼ 40 kHz oscillation observed in tokamak TCABR [Yu. K. Kuznetsov et al., Nucl. Fusion 52, 063044 (2012)] and the former prediction for the electrostatic GAM frequency. The radial wave length associated with this oscillation, estimated presently from this analytical model, is λ{sub r} ∼ 25 cm, i.e., an order of magnitude higher than the usual value for zonal flows (ZFs)

  5. The Distribution of Scaled Scores and Possible Floor Effects on the WISC-III and WAIS-III

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitaker, Simon; Wood, Christopher

    2008-01-01

    Objective: It has been suggested that, as the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Third Edition (WAIS-III) and the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Third Edition (WISC-III) give a scaled score of one even if a client scores a raw score of zero, these assessments may have a hidden floor effect at low IQ levels. The study looked for…

  6. III-Vs at Scale: A PV Manufacturing Cost Analysis of the Thin Film Vapor-Liquid-Solid Growth Mode

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Maxwell; Horowitz, Kelsey; Woodhouse, Michael; Battaglia, Corsin; Kapadia, Rehan; Javey, Ali

    2016-06-01

    The authors present a manufacturing cost analysis for producing thin-film indium phosphide modules by combining a novel thin-film vapor-liquid-solid (TF-VLS) growth process with a standard monolithic module platform. The example cell structure is ITO/n-TiO2/p-InP/Mo. For a benchmark scenario of 12% efficient modules, the module cost is estimated to be $0.66/W(DC) and the module cost is calculated to be around $0.36/W(DC) at a long-term potential efficiency of 24%. The manufacturing cost for the TF-VLS growth portion is estimated to be ~$23/m2, a significant reduction compared with traditional metalorganic chemical vapor deposition. The analysis here suggests the TF-VLS growth mode could enable lower-cost, high-efficiency III-V photovoltaics compared with manufacturing methods used today and open up possibilities for other optoelectronic applications as well.

  7. Effect of thrombin and endotoxin on the in vivo metabolism of antithrombin III (AT III) in dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, H.; Kobayashi, N.; Maekawa, T.

    1985-11-01

    Effect of thrombin and endotoxin on the metabolism of I-125-labelled canine AT III was studied in mongrel dogs. Under control condition, mean total amount of intravascular AT III with standard deviation was 23.4 +/- 2.4 mg/kg, plasma half life of i.v. injected I-125-AT III was 1.7 +/- 0.2 days, and the fractional catabolic flux (j3x) was 16.3 +/- 1.6 mg/kg/day. The total amount of intra- and extra-vascular AT III was 36.0 +/- 0.34 mg/kg. Neither a 3 hour infusion of a small dose (30 units/kg/hr) of thrombin nor i.v. injection of a large amount of thrombin (5,000-15,000 units/day) with heparin significantly affected AT III metabolism except for a transient decrease in AT III concentration in the latter case, although decrease in plasma fibrinogen concentration and platelet count was observed in both cases. Two injections with 200 micrograms/kg of endotoxin resulted in an evident acceleration of AT III metabolism with significant decrease in the plasma AT III, fibrinogen concentrations and platelet count. More marked changes in AT III metabolism were induced by a single infusion with 1 mg/kg of endotoxin. Changes in hemostatic system coincided with those observed in DIC.

  8. The mode III crack problem in bonded materials with a nonhomogeneous interfacial zone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erdogan, F.; Joseph, P. F.; Kaya, A. C.

    1991-01-01

    The mode 3 crack problem for two bonded homogeneous half planes was considered. The interfacial zone was modelled by a nonhomogeneous strip in such a way that the shear modulus is a continuous function throughout the composite medium and has discontinuous derivatives along the boundaries of the interfacial zone. The problem was formulated for cracks perpendicular to the nominal interface and was solved for various crack locations in and around the interfacial region. The asymptotic stress field near the tip of a crack terminating at an interface was examined and it was shown that, unlike the corresponding stress field in piecewise homogeneous materials, in this case the stresses have the standard square root singularity and their angular variation was identical to that of a crack in a homogeneous medium. With application to the subcritical crack growth process in mind, the results given include mostly the stress intensity factors for some typical crack geometries and various material combinations.

  9. Mode Contributions to the Casimir Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Intravaia, F.; Henkel, C.

    2010-04-01

    Applying a sum-over-modes approach to the Casimir interaction between two plates with finite conductivity, we isolate and study the contributions of surface plasmons and Foucault (eddy current) modes. We show in particular that for the TE-polarization eddy currents provide a repulsive force that cancels, at high temperatures, the Casimir free energy calculated with the plasma model.

  10. Alpha particle effects on the internal kink modes

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Yanlin; Cheng, C.Z.

    1994-08-01

    The {alpha}-particle effects on the internal kink mode stability are studied. Finite Grad-Shafranov Shift, plasma {beta}, and plasma shape can significantly enhance the trapped particle drift reversal domain in pitch angle space and reduce average magnetic drift frequency. The drift reversal effect on the ideal kink mode is small, but the {beta}{sub {alpha}} threshold for the fishbone mode can be much lower than previously predicted. In addition, the ion diamagnetic drift has a stronger destabilizing effect.

  11. Geometrical effects in X-mode scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Bretz, N.

    1986-10-01

    One technique to extend microwave scattering as a probe of long wavelength density fluctuations in magnetically confined plasmas is to consider the launching and scattering of extraordinary (X-mode) waves nearly perpendicular to the field. When the incident frequency is less than the electron cyclotron frequency, this mode can penetrate beyond the ordinary mode cutoff at the plasma frequency and avoid significant distortions from density gradients typical of tokamak plasmas. In the more familiar case, where the incident and scattered waves are ordinary, the scattering is isotropic perpendicular to the field. However, because the X-mode polarization depends on the frequency ratios and the ray angle to the magnetic field, the coupling between the incident and scattered waves is complicated. This geometrical form factor must be unfolded from the observed scattering in order to interpret the scattering due to density fluctuations alone. The geometrical factor is calculated here for the special case of scattering perpendicular to the magnetic field. For frequencies above the ordinary mode cutoff the scattering is relatively isotropic, while below cutoff there are minima in the forward and backward directions which go to zero at approximately half the ordinary mode cutoff density.

  12. Composed planar Hall effect sensors with dual-mode operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mor, Vladislav; Roy, Debangsu; Schultz, Moty; Klein, Lior

    2016-02-01

    We present a composed planar Hall effect sensor with two modes of operation: (a) an ON mode where the composed sensor responds to magnetic field excitations similarly to the response of a regular planar Hall effect sensor, and (b) an OFF mode where the response is negligible. The composed planar Hall effect sensor switches from the OFF mode to the ON mode when it is exposed to a magnetic field which exceeds a certain threshold determined by the sensor design. The features of this sensor make it useful as a switch triggered by magnetic field and as a sensing device with memory, as its mode of operation indicates exposure to a magnetic field larger than a certain threshold without the need to be activated during the exposure itself.

  13. Analysis of the Effects of Three Modes of Head Start Delivery. Head Start Delivery Modes Project: Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, Donald L.; And Others

    This study analyzed the critical features of three delivery modes for Head Start services in order to: (1) compare the effects of different delivery modes on the immediate outcomes for children and parents; and (2) explore the pattern of effects both within and across modes to ascertain how the process works. The first mode represented the most…

  14. H-mode plasma transport simulation in ITER with effect of neoclassical tearing mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Y.; Yamazaki, K.; Arimoto, H.; Shoji, T.

    2008-07-01

    For the prediction of the ITER plasmas, the effect of the neoclassical tearing mode (NTM) on the plasma confinement has been calculated using the 1.5-dimensional equilibrium and transport simulation code TOTAL. The time evolution of the NTM magnetic island has been analyzed using the modified Rutherford equation for ITER normal shear plasmas. The anomalous transport model used here is GLF23. The saturated magnetic island widths are w/a ~ 0.048 at 3/2 mode and w/a~0.21 at 2/1 mode, and the reduction in fusion power output by NTM is 27% at the 3/2 mode, and 82% at the 2/1 mode. The stabilization effect of the electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) with EC is also clarified. The threshold of ECCD power for the full stabilization at high beta NTM island formation is ~10 MW against the 3/2 mode, and ~23 MW against the 2/1 mode.

  15. Plasmon modes of metallic nanowires including quantum nonlocal effects

    SciTech Connect

    Moradi, Afshin

    2015-03-15

    The properties of electrostatic surface and bulk plasmon modes of cylindrical metallic nanowires are investigated, using the quantum hydrodynamic theory of plasmon excitation which allows an analytical study of quantum tunneling effects through the Bohm potential term. New dispersion relations are obtained for each type of mode and their differences with previous treatments based on the standard hydrodynamic model are analyzed in detail. Numerical results show by considering the quantum effects, as the value of wave number increases, the surface modes are slightly red-shifted first and then blue-shifted while the bulk modes are blue-shifted.

  16. Alpha particle effects on the internal kink and fishbone modes

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Y.; Cheng, C.Z.; White, R.B.

    1994-06-01

    The effects of alpha particles on the internal kink and fishbone modes are studied analytically. The nonadiabatic contribution from untrapped alpha particles is negligible. Finite inverse aspect ratio, plasma {beta} and plasma shaping effects can significantly enhance the trapped particle drift reversal domain in the pitch angle space and reduce the bounce-averaged magnetic drift frequency. The drift reversal effect on the ideal kink mode is small, but the {beta}{sub {alpha}} threshold for the fishbone mode can be much lower than previously predicted. Moreover, the fishbone mode could be excited by alpha particles even when the plasma is stable in the ideal MHD limit. In addition, the ion diamagnetic drift frequency (finite ion Larmor radius effect) has a strong destabilizing effect on the fishbone mode when it is comparable with the trapped alpha averaged precessional drift frequency, even though it stabilizes the plasma in the ideal MHD limit.

  17. Effective As(III) Removal by A Multi-Charged Hydroacid Complex Draw Solute Facilitated Forward Osmosis-Membrane Distillation (FO-MD) Processes.

    PubMed

    Ge, Qingchun; Han, Gang; Chung, Tai-Shung

    2016-03-01

    Effective removal of As(III) from water by an oxalic acid complex with the formula of Na3[Cr(C2O4)3] (Na-Cr-OA) is demonstrated via an forward osmosis-membrane distillation (FO-MD) hybrid system in this study. Na-Cr-OA first proved its superiority as a draw solute with high water fluxes and negligible reverse fluxes in FO, then a systematic investigation of the Na-Cr-OA promoted FO process was conducted to ascertain the factors in As(III) removal. Relatively high water fluxes of 28 LMH under the FO mode and 74 LMH under the pressure retarded osmosis (PRO) mode were achieved when using a 1000 ppm As(III) solution as the feed and 1.0 M Na-Cr-OA as the draw solution at 60 °C. As(III) removal with a water recovery up to 21.6% (FO mode) and 48.3% (PRO mode) were also achieved in 2 h. An outstanding As(III) rejection with 30-3000 μg/L As(III) in the permeate was accomplished when As(III) feed solutions varied from 5 × 10(4) to 1 × 10(6) μg/L, superior to the best FO performance reported for As(III) removal. Incorporating MD into FO not only makes As(III) removal sustainable by reconcentrating the Na-Cr-OA solution simultaneously, but also reduces the As(III) concentration below 10 μg/L in the product water, meeting the WHO standard.

  18. Mode locking based on the temporal Talbot effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udem, Thomas; Ozawa, Akira

    2017-04-01

    We propose a new laser mode locking state in which the pulse disperses quickly and then revives after a certain time. This mechanism is based on the temporal Talbot effect and requires a large amount of intra-cavity group velocity dispersion. Similar to the usual mode locking it should be possible to employ the Kerr effect to force the laser into this mode, even when the cold cavity dispersion is not exactly matched. We show that the mode spectrum of such a laser is not equidistant but increases linearly with very high precision. This Talbot frequency comb can be self referenced. The beating with the adjacent modes uniquely defines the optical mode frequency, which means that the optical spectrum is directly mapped into the radio frequency domain. This is similar to the dual frequency comb technique, albeit without the limiting relative jitter between two combs.

  19. Mod 1 wind turbine generator failure modes and effects analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    A failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA) was directed primarily at identifying those critical failure modes that would be hazardous to life or would result in major damage to the system. Each subsystem was approached from the top down, and broken down to successive lower levels where it appeared that the criticality of the failure mode warranted more detail analysis. The results were reviewed by specialists from outside the Mod 1 program, and corrective action taken wherever recommended.

  20. Effects of Multiple Resistive Walls and Mode Coupling on Mode Locking in RFPs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, S. C.; Chu, M. S.

    2001-10-01

    Locked dynamo modes give rise to a serious deterioration of confinement at the plasma edge during the high current phase of reversed field pinches (RFP) operations. This is caused by the large braking torque exerted by the eddy currents on the resistive vacuum vessel on the dynamo modes1. The torque is strong enough to reduce the rotation frequency to an extremely small value. These tearing modes are then readily stopped (wall-locked) by a small external fixed error field. Several RFP devices are equipped with one or two thin (or thick) shells outside the vessel. This can, in principle, alleviate the locked mode problem. The present work presents a systematic calculation of the braking torques of multiple resistive walls (including both thin and thick shells) on a rotating tearing mode. The evolution of the frequency and the amplitude of a single representative tearing mode under the effect of multiple resistive walls is investigated. Numerical examples are provided for the modified RFX and other relevant devices. Generalization to the case of multiple(three) coupled modes and in the presence of externally applied helical rotating magnetic field2 will also be presented. 1. R. Fitzpatrick, S.C. Guo, D. J. Den Hartog and C. C. Hegna; Phys. of Plasmas, 6(10) 3878 (1999). 2. S. C. Guo and M. S. Chu; Phys. of Plasmas, 8(7) 3342 (2001).

  1. Spin-Seebeck Effect in III-V Based Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaworski, Christopher M.; Myers, Roberto C.; Heremans, Joseph P.

    2012-02-01

    The spin-Seebeck effect has now been observed in metals^1 (NiFe), semiconductors^2 (GaMnAs), and insulators^3 (YIG). It consists of a thermally generated spin distribution that is phonon driven. Here we extend our measurements of the spin-Seebeck effect to other group III-V based magnetic semiconductors and present measurements of conventional thermomagnetic and galvanomagnetic properties as well as the spin-Seebeck effect. Work supported by the National Science Foundation, NSF-CBET-1133589 1. K. Uchida, et al., Nature 455 778 (2008) 2. C.M. Jaworski et al., Nature Materials 8 898 (2010), Phys. Rev. Lett. 106 186601 (2011) 3. K. Uchida, et al., Nature Materials 8 893 (2010)

  2. Complexation of Nd(III) with tetraborate ion and its effect on actinide (III) solubility in WIPP brine

    SciTech Connect

    Borkowski, Marian; Richmann, Michael K; Reed, Donald T; Yongliang, Xiong

    2010-01-01

    The potential importance of tetraborate complexation on lanthanide(III) and actinide(III) solubility is recognized in the literature but a systematic study of f-element complexation has not been performed. In neodymium solubility studies in WIPP brines, the carbonate complexation effect is not observed since tetraborate ions form a moderately strong complex with neodymium(III). The existence of these tetraborate complexes was established for low and high ionic strength solutions. Changes in neodymium(III) concentrations in undersaturation experiments were used to determine the neodymium with tetraborate stability constants as a function of NaCl ionic strength. As very low Nd(III) concentrations have to be measured, it was necessary to use an extraction pre-concentration step combined with ICP-MS analysis to extend the detection limit by a factor of 50. The determined Nd(III) with borate stability constants at infinite dilution and 25 C are equal to log {beta}{sub 1} = 4.55 {+-} 0.06 using the SIT approach, equal to log {beta}{sub 1} = 4.99 {+-} 0.30 using the Pitzer approach, with an apparent log {beta}{sub 1} = 4.06 {+-} 0.15 (in molal units) at I = 5.6 m NaCl. Pitzer ion-interaction parameters for neodymium with tetraborate and SIT interaction coefficients were also determined and reported.

  3. Co-norming the WAIS-III and WMS-III: Is there a test-order effect on IQ and memory scores?

    PubMed

    Zhu, J; Tulsky, D S

    2000-11-01

    Test-order effect on the WAIS-III and WMS-III scores was evaluated using the WMS-III standardization sample. Participants completed the standardization editions of the WAIS-III and WMS-III in one session, with the tests administered in roughly counterbalanced order. Repeated measure MANOVA analyses were conducted to determine if there was an overall test-order effect for subtest, index, or IQ scores. No significant test-order effects were found for either the WAIS-III index or IQ scores or for the WMS-III index scores. At the subtest level, the majority of the WAIS-III and WMS-III subtests did not show a significant test-order effect. The exceptions were Digit Span and Digit Symbol-Coding on the WAIS-III and Faces II and Logical Memory II on the WMS-III. Although statistically significant test-order effects were found on these subtests, the effect sizes were small. This study indicates that the test-order effect is not a potential threat to the internal validity of the WAIS-III and WMS-III normative data. The practical implications of the current study are discussed.

  4. Effect of high-frequency modes on singlet fission dynamics.

    PubMed

    Fujihashi, Yuta; Chen, Lipeng; Ishizaki, Akihito; Wang, Junling; Zhao, Yang

    2017-01-28

    Singlet fission is a spin-allowed energy conversion process whereby a singlet excitation splits into two spin-correlated triplet excitations residing on adjacent molecules and has a potential to dramatically increase the efficiency of organic photovoltaics. Recent time-resolved nonlinear spectra of pentacene derivatives have shown the importance of high frequency vibrational modes in efficient fission. In this work, we explore impacts of vibration-induced fluctuations on fission dynamics through quantum dynamics calculations with parameters from fitting measured linear and nonlinear spectra. We demonstrate that fission dynamics strongly depends on the frequency of the intramolecular vibrational mode. Furthermore, we examine the effect of two vibrational modes on fission dynamics. Inclusion of a second vibrational mode creates an additional fission channel even when its Huang-Rhys factor is relatively small. Addition of more vibrational modes may not enhance the fission per se, but can dramatically affect the interplay between fission dynamics and the dominant vibrational mode.

  5. Effect of high-frequency modes on singlet fission dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujihashi, Yuta; Chen, Lipeng; Ishizaki, Akihito; Wang, Junling; Zhao, Yang

    2017-01-01

    Singlet fission is a spin-allowed energy conversion process whereby a singlet excitation splits into two spin-correlated triplet excitations residing on adjacent molecules and has a potential to dramatically increase the efficiency of organic photovoltaics. Recent time-resolved nonlinear spectra of pentacene derivatives have shown the importance of high frequency vibrational modes in efficient fission. In this work, we explore impacts of vibration-induced fluctuations on fission dynamics through quantum dynamics calculations with parameters from fitting measured linear and nonlinear spectra. We demonstrate that fission dynamics strongly depends on the frequency of the intramolecular vibrational mode. Furthermore, we examine the effect of two vibrational modes on fission dynamics. Inclusion of a second vibrational mode creates an additional fission channel even when its Huang-Rhys factor is relatively small. Addition of more vibrational modes may not enhance the fission per se, but can dramatically affect the interplay between fission dynamics and the dominant vibrational mode.

  6. Letter report seismic shutdown system failure mode and effect analysis

    SciTech Connect

    KECK, R.D.

    1999-09-01

    The Supply Ventilation System Seismic Shutdown ensures that the 234-52 building supply fans, the dry air process fans and vertical development calciner are shutdown following a seismic event. This evaluates the failure modes and determines the effects of the failure modes.

  7. Alpha particle effects on the internal kink and fishbone modes

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Y.; Cheng, C.Z.; White, R.B. )

    1994-10-01

    The effects of alpha particles on the internal kink and fishbone modes are studied analytically. The nonadiabatic contribution from untrapped alpha particles is negligible. Finite inverse aspect ratio, plasma [beta], and plasma shaping effects can significantly enhance the trapped particle drift reversal domain in the pitch angle space and reduce the bounce-averaged magnetic drift frequency. The decrease of the drift magnitude and drift reversal effects on the ideal kink mode is small, but the [beta][sub [alpha

  8. Central and peripheral cardiovascular effects of angiotensin III in trout.

    PubMed

    Mimassi, N; Lancien, F; Le Mével, J C

    2009-04-01

    The present study was undertaken to determine the central and peripheral actions of trout angiotensin III (ANG III) on heart rate (HR) and mean dorsal aortic blood pressure (P(DA)) in the unanaesthetized rainbow trout. Intracerebroventricular injection of ANG III (5-100 pmol) produced a significant and dose-dependent increase in HR without significant change in P(DA). In contrast, when injected peripherally ANG III (5-50 pmol) evoked a significant and dose-dependent increase in P(DA). The hypertensive responses were accompanied by a bradycardia that reached significance only for the highest dose of ANG III tested. In conclusion, our results have shown that ANG III has potent and contrasting cardiovascular actions depending on whether its site of action is the brain or the peripheral circulation. Endogenous ANG III may have important physiological functions in teleost fishes.

  9. Robust single-mode all-solid multi-trench fiber with large effective mode area.

    PubMed

    Jain, Deepak; Jung, Yongmin; Kim, Jaesun; Sahu, Jayanta K

    2014-09-01

    We experimentally demonstrate all-solid 30 and 90 μm core diameter multi-trench fibers. Measurements ensure an effective single-mode operation over a wide range of bend radius in the case of 30 μm core fiber, making it suitable for applications like beam delivery and compact fiber lasers. On the other hand, a 90 μm core fiber ensures an effective single-mode operation and shows good potential for rod-type fiber laser applications. Both fibers were fabricated by the conventional modified chemical vapor deposition process in conjunction with the rod-in-tube technique, hence making them suitable for mass production.

  10. Development of fracture facets from a crack loaded in mode I+III: Solution and application of a model 2D problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leblond, Jean-Baptiste; Frelat, Joël

    2014-03-01

    It is experimentally well-known that a crack loaded in mode I+III propagates through formation of discrete fracture facets inclined at a certain tilt angle on the original crack plane, depending on the ratio of the mode III to mode I initial stress intensity factors. Pollard et al. (1982) have proposed to calculate this angle by considering the tractions on all possible future infinitesimal facets and assuming shear tractions to be zero on that which will actually develop. In this paper we consider the opposite case of well-developed facets; the stress field near the lateral fronts of such facets becomes independent of the initial crack and essentially 2D in a plane perpendicular to the main direction of crack propagation. To determine this stress field, we solve the model 2D problem of an infinite plate containing an infinite periodic array of cracks inclined at some angle on a straight line, and loaded through uniform stresses at infinity. This is done first analytically, for small values of this angle, by combining Muskhelishvili's (1953) formalism and a first-order perturbation procedure. The formulae found for the 2D stress intensity factors are then extended in an approximate way to larger angles by using another reference solution, and finally assessed through comparison with some finite element results. To finally illustrate the possible future application of these formulae to the prediction of the stationary tilt angle, we introduce the tentative assumption that the 2D mode II stress intensity factor is zero on the lateral fronts of the facets. An approximate formula providing the tilt angle as a function of the ratio of the mode III to mode I stress intensity factors of the initial crack is deduced from there. This formula, which slightly depends on the type of loading imposed, predicts somewhat smaller angles than that of Pollard et al. (1982).

  11. Effect of loading mode on the fracture toughness of a reduced activation ferritic/martensitic stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Li, H.; Hirth, J.P.; Jones, R.H.; Gelles, D.S.

    1993-09-01

    The critical J integrals of mode I (J{sub IC}), mixed-mode I/III (J{sub MC}), and mode III (J{sub IIIC}) were examined for a ferritic stainless steel (F-82H) at ambient temperature. A determination of J{sub MC} was made using modified compact-tension specimens. Different ratios of tension/shear stress were achieved by varying the principal axis of the crack plane between 0 and 55 degrees from the load line. The results showed that J{sub MC}s and tearing moduli (T{sub M}) varied with the crack angles and were lower than their mode I and mode III counterparts. Both the minimum J{sub MC} and T{sub M} occurred at a crack angle between 40 and 50 degrees, where {sigma}{sub i}/{sigma}{sub iii} was 1.2 to 0.84. The J{sub min} was 240 kJ/m{sup 2}, and ratios of J{sub IC}/J{sub min} and J{sub IIIC}/J{sub min} were about 2.1 and 1.9, respectively. Morphology of fracture surfaces was consistent with the change of J{sub MC} and T{sub M} values. While the upper shelf-fracture toughness of F-82H depends on loading mode, the J{sub min} remains very high. Other important considerations include the effect of mixed-mode loading on the DBT temperature, and effects of hydrogen and irradiation on J{sub min}.

  12. Geometric Effects on the Amplification of First Mode Instability Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirk, Lindsay C.; Candler, Graham V.

    2013-01-01

    The effects of geometric changes on the amplification of first mode instability waves in an external supersonic boundary layer were investigated using numerical techniques. Boundary layer stability was analyzed at Mach 6 conditions similar to freestream conditions obtained in quiet ground test facilities so that results obtained in this study may be applied to future test article design to measure first mode instability waves. The DAKOTA optimization software package was used to optimize an axisymmetric geometry to maximize the amplification of the waves at first mode frequencies as computed by the 2D STABL hypersonic boundary layer stability analysis tool. First, geometric parameters such as nose radius, cone half angle, vehicle length, and surface curvature were examined separately to determine the individual effects on the first mode amplification. Finally, all geometric parameters were allowed to vary to produce a shape optimized to maximize the amplification of first mode instability waves while minimizing the amplification of second mode instability waves. Since first mode waves are known to be most unstable in the form of oblique wave, the geometries were optimized using a broad range of wave frequencies as well as a wide range of oblique wave angles to determine the geometry that most amplifies the first mode waves. Since first mode waves are seen most often in flows with low Mach numbers at the edge of the boundary layer, the edge Mach number for each geometry was recorded to determine any relationship between edge Mach number and the stability of first mode waves. Results indicate that an axisymmetric cone with a sharp nose and a slight flare at the aft end under the Mach 6 freestream conditions used here will lower the Mach number at the edge of the boundary layer to less than 4, and the corresponding stability analysis showed maximum first mode N factors of 3.

  13. Energetic Ion Effects on Tearing Mode Stability in Tokamak Equilibria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halfmoon, Michael; Brennan, Dylan

    2014-10-01

    The 2/1 tearing mode is found to be damped or stabilized by energetic ions in a slowing down distribution, where the interaction between the ions and the mode is similar to their interaction in ideal MHD, which has been extensively studied. This damping effect is mainly due to trapped particle precession resonance and causes the tearing mode to have a finite real frequency. This study focuses on the pressure-driven, slow growing tearing modes; which are the first modes to be driven unstable as pressure increases. The layer physics modifies the mode interaction, and affects the frequency of the mode. In these simulations, a series of equilibria with fixed safety factor and varying pressure are analyzed using a δf hybrid-kinetic MHD code in NIMROD. Our equilibrium consists of a D-shaped poloidal cross section, a peaked pressure profile, and safety factor with finite shear to the magnetic axis. Also, a high aspect ratio toroidal model based on Hu & Betti's work is investigated analytically to gain insight to the physics of mode-particle interactions. We combine our computational and analytic tools in an effort to explain this damping and stabilizing effect.

  14. Effects of Ca2+ on refolding of the recombinant hemolytic lectin CEL-III.

    PubMed

    Hisamatsu, Keigo; Unno, Hideaki; Goda, Shuichiro; Hatakeyama, Tomomitsu

    2009-05-01

    CEL-III is a hemolytic lectin isolated from Cucumaria echinata. Although recombinant CEL-III (rCEL-III) expressed in Escherichia coli showed very weak hemolytic activity compared with native protein, it was considerably enhanced by refolding in the presence of Ca(2+). This suggests that Ca(2+) supported correct folding of the carbohydrate-binding domains of rCEL-III, leading to effective binding to the cell surface and subsequent self-oligomerization.

  15. Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) Assistant Tool Feasibility Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flores, Melissa; Malin, Jane T.

    2013-01-01

    An effort to determine the feasibility of a software tool to assist in Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) has been completed. This new and unique approach to FMEA uses model based systems engineering concepts to recommend failure modes, causes, and effects to the user after they have made several selections from pick lists about a component s functions and inputs/outputs. Recommendations are made based on a library using common failure modes identified over the course of several major human spaceflight programs. However, the tool could be adapted for use in a wide range of applications from NASA to the energy industry.

  16. Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) Assistant Tool Feasibility Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, Melissa D.; Malin, Jane T.; Fleming, Land D.

    2013-09-01

    An effort to determine the feasibility of a software tool to assist in Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) has been completed. This new and unique approach to FMEA uses model based systems engineering concepts to recommend failure modes, causes, and effects to the user after they have made several selections from pick lists about a component's functions and inputs/outputs. Recommendations are made based on a library using common failure modes identified over the course of several major human spaceflight programs. However, the tool could be adapted for use in a wide range of applications from NASA to the energy industry.

  17. Improving the accuracy of derivation of the Williams’ series parameters under mixed (I+II) mode loading by compensation of measurement bias in the stress field components data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lychak, Oleh V.; Holyns'kiy, Ivan S.

    2016-12-01

    A new method for compensation of bias in the stress field components measurement data used for Williams’ series parameters derivation was presented. Essential increase of accuracy of derivation of SIF-related leading terms in series under mixed (I+II) mode loading was demonstrated. It was shown that a relatively low value of bias in the stress field components data error could result in the essential deviation of the values of derived Williams’ coefficients and the crack tip coordinates.

  18. Arc fusion splicing effects in large-mode-area single-mode ytterbium-doped fibers.

    PubMed

    Feng, Ting; Jenkins, Micah H; Yan, Fengping; Gaylord, Thomas K

    2013-11-10

    For the first time the effects of arc fusion splicing on the residual stress and refractive index of large-mode-area single-mode ytterbium-doped fibers (YDFs) are investigated using a state-of-the-art three-dimensional concurrent stress-index measurement method. The results, based on a commercially available fiber, describe a host of perturbations that decrease the core/cladding refractive index difference by as much as 1.74 × 10(-3) over an axial length of many hundreds of wavelengths. Simulations indicate that these perturbations result in an expansion of the mode-field-diameter by 39.6% and, based on the measured sample, result in an extra splice loss of 20.8%. The results of this investigation will be useful in the design and optimization of high-power all-fiber YDF lasers and amplifiers.

  19. Cumulative effects in inflation with ultra-light entropy modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achúcarro, Ana; Atal, Vicente; Germani, Cristiano; Palma, Gonzalo A.

    2017-02-01

    In multi-field inflation one or more non-adiabatic modes may become light, potentially inducing large levels of isocurvature perturbations in the cosmic microwave background. If in addition these light modes are coupled to the adiabatic mode, they influence its evolution on super horizon scales. Here we consider the case in which a non-adiabatic mode becomes approximately massless (``ultralight") while still coupled to the adiabatic mode, a typical situation that arises with pseudo-Nambu-Goldstone bosons or moduli. This ultralight mode freezes on super-horizon scales and acts as a constant source for the curvature perturbation, making it grow linearly in time and effectively suppressing the isocurvature component. We identify a Stückelberg-like emergent shift symmetry that underlies this behavior. As inflation lasts for many e-folds, the integrated effect of this source enhances the power spectrum of the adiabatic mode, while keeping the non-adiabatic spectrum approximately untouched. In this case, towards the end of inflation all the fluctuations, adiabatic and non-adiabatic, are dominated by a single degree of freedom.

  20. Survey mode effects on valuation of environmental goods.

    PubMed

    Bell, Jason; Huber, Joel; Viscusi, W Kip

    2011-04-01

    This article evaluates the effect of the choice of survey recruitment mode on the value of water quality in lakes, rivers, and streams. Four different modes are compared: bringing respondents to one central location after phone recruitment, mall intercepts in two states, national phone-mail survey, and an Internet survey with a national, probability-based panel. The modes differ in terms of the representativeness of the samples, non-response rates, sample selection effects, and consistency of responses. The article also shows that the estimated value of water quality can differ substantially depending on the survey mode. The national Internet panel has the most desirable properties with respect to performance on the four important survey dimensions of interest.

  1. Polarization Effects in Group III-Nitride Materials and Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Qiyuan

    Group III-nitride semiconductors have wide application in optoelectronic devices. Spontaneous and piezoelectric polarization effects have been found to be critical for electric and optical properties of group III-nitrides. In this dissertation, firstly, the crystal orientation dependence of the polarization is calculated and in-plane polarization is revealed. The in-plane polarization is sensitive to the lateral characteristic dimension determined by the microstructure. Specific semi-polar plane growth is suggested for reducing quantum-confined Stark effect. The macroscopic electrostatic field from the polarization discontinuity in the heterostructures is discussed, b ased on that, the band diagram of InGaN/GaN quantum well/barrier and AlGaN/GaN heterojunction is obtained from the self-consistent solution of Schrodinger and Poisson equations. New device design such as triangular quantum well with the quenched polarization field is proposed. Electron holography in the transmission electron microscopy is used to examine the electrostatic potential under polarization effects. The measured potential energy profiles of heterostructure are compared with the band simulation, and evidences of two-dimensional hole gas (2DHG) in a wurtzite AlGaN/ AlN/ GaN superlattice, as well as quasi two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) in a zinc-blende AlGaN/GaN are found. The large polarization discontinuity of AlN/GaN is the main source of the 2DHG of wurtzite nitrides, while the impurity introduced during the growth of AlGaN layer provides the donor states that to a great extent balance the free electrons in zinc-blende nitrides. It is also found that the quasi-2DEG concentration in zinc-blende AlGaN/GaN is about one order of magnitude lower than the wurtzite AlGaN/GaN, due to the absence of polarization. Finally, the InAlN/GaN lattice-matched epitaxy, which ideally has a zero piezoelectric polarization and strong spontaneous polarization, is experimentally studied. The breakdown in

  2. Bending effect on fiber acousto-optic mode coupling.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jianhui; Liu, Xiaoming; Wang, Yan; Luo, Ye

    2005-08-20

    The acousto-optic effect in a bent fiber is studied experimentally and numerically by using the scalar finite-element method. The resulting transmission spectra show that new mode-coupling peaks appear due to the breaking of the mode spatial symmetry. The strength of new peaks increases as the fiber-bending curvature increases with a redshift or blueshift in wavelength, strongly depending on the orientation of fiber bending with respect to the acoustic-wave vibration direction.

  3. Langmuir mixing effects on global climate: WAVEWATCH III in CESM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qing; Webb, Adrean; Fox-Kemper, Baylor; Craig, Anthony; Danabasoglu, Gokhan; Large, William G.; Vertenstein, Mariana

    2016-07-01

    Large-Eddy Simulations (LES) have shown the effects of ocean surface gravity waves in enhancing the ocean boundary layer mixing through Langmuir turbulence. Neglecting this Langmuir mixing process may contribute to the common shallow bias in mixed layer depth in regions of the Southern Ocean and the Northern Atlantic in most state-of-the-art climate models. In this study, a third generation wave model, WAVEWATCH III, has been incorporated as a component of the Community Earth System Model, version 1.2 (CESM1.2). In particular, the wave model is now coupled with the ocean model through a modified version of the K-Profile Parameterization (KPP) to approximate the influence of Langmuir mixing. Unlike past studies, the wind-wave misalignment and the effects of Stokes drift penetration depth are considered through empirical scalings based on the rate of mixing in LES. Wave-Ocean only experiments show substantial improvements in the shallow biases of mixed layer depth in the Southern Ocean. Ventilation is enhanced and low concentration biases of pCFC-11 are reduced in the Southern Hemisphere. A majority of the improvements persist in the presence of other climate feedbacks in the fully coupled experiments. In addition, warming of the subsurface water over the majority of global ocean is observed in the fully coupled experiments with waves, and the cold subsurface ocean temperature biases are reduced.

  4. Verification of gyrokinetic particle simulation of current-driven instability in fusion plasmas. III. Collisionless tearing mode

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Dongjian; Bao, Jian; Han, Tao; Wang, Jiaqi; Lin, Zhihong

    2016-02-15

    A finite-mass electron fluid model for low frequency electromagnetic fluctuations, particularly the collisionless tearing mode, has been implemented in the gyrokinetic toroidal code. Using this fluid model, linear properties of the collisionless tearing mode have been verified. Simulations verify that the linear growth rate of the single collisionless tearing mode is proportional to D{sub e}{sup 2}, where D{sub e} is the electron skin depth. On the other hand, the growth rate of a double tearing mode is proportional to D{sub e} in the parameter regime of fusion plasmas.

  5. The low density type III ELMy H-mode regime on JET-ILW: a low density H-mode compatible with a tungsten divertor?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delabie, E.; Hillesheim, J. C.; Mailloux, J.; Maggi, C. F.; Rimini, F.; Solano, E. R.; JET contributors Team

    2016-10-01

    The threshold power to access H-mode on JET-ILW has a minimum as function of density. Power ramps in the low and high density branch show qualitatively very different behavior above threshold. In the high density branch, edge density and temperature abruptly increase after the L-H transition, and the plasma evolves into a type I ELMy H-mode. Transitions in the low density branch are gradual and lead to the formation of a temperature pedestal, without increase in edge density. These characteristics are reminiscent of the I-mode regime, but with high frequency ELM activity. The small ELMs allow stable H-mode operation with tolerable tungsten contamination, as long as both density and power stay below the type I ELM boundary. The density range in which the low density branch can be accessed scales favourably with toroidal field but unfavourably with isotope mass. At BT=3.4T, a stable H-mode has been obtained at = 2.9 1019 m-3 with up to 15 MW of heating power at H98y 0.9. Better knowledge of the operational boundaries of this high frequency ELM regime could provide insight in how to sustain it at higher heating power for high temperature scenarios. Work supported, in part, by the US DOE under Contract No. DE-AC05-00OR22725.

  6. Effect of Population III Multiplicity on Dark Star Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stacy, Athena; Pawlik, Andreas H.; Bromm, Volker; Loeb, Abraham

    2012-01-01

    We numerically study the mutual interaction between dark matter (DM) and Population III (Pop III) stellar systems in order to explore the possibility of Pop III dark stars within this physical scenario. We perform a cosmological simulation, initialized at z approx. 100, which follows the evolution of gas and DM. We analyze the formation of the first mini halo at z approx. 20 and the subsequent collapse of the gas to densities of 10(exp 12)/cu cm. We then use this simulation to initialize a set of smaller-scale 'cut-out' simulations in which we further refine the DM to have spatial resolution similar to that of the gas. We test multiple DM density profiles, and we employ the sink particle method to represent the accreting star-forming region. We find that, for a range of DM configurations, the motion of the Pop III star-disk system serves to separate the positions of the protostars with respect to the DM density peak, such that there is insufficient DM to influence the formation and evolution of the protostars for more than approx. 5000 years. In addition, the star-disk system causes gravitational scattering of the central DM to lower densities, further decreasing the influence of DM over time. Any DM-powered phase of Pop III stars will thus be very short-lived for the typical multiple system, and DM will not serve to significantly prolong the life of Pop III stars.

  7. An Effective Distance Mode of Teaching Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatia, V. B.

    2006-08-01

    In January this year, Indira Gandhi National Open University, threw open a course in astronomy for the students pursuing B. Sc. Physics Programme. The course was designed by eminent academicians and chapters to it were contributed by several astronomers across India. I was asked to edit and give the course the final shape. The course contains material thought necessary for a graduate level introductory course and includes a few simple activities. To reach the students all over the country, the university decided to hold some twenty teleconferences with the students. Each conference was to feature a few concepts handled by an expert. The occasion was to used to exhort students to carry out some simple activities. The students are supposed to carry out these activities and report them as a folder to be examined by experts. A few conferences have been held so far. It is felt that this method may in fact be superior to the traditional classroom method, because here one can use all kinds of aids such as animations, movies and footages from other sources. For example, to teach some aspects of positional astronomy, the recordings from inside a planetarium were used. It is hoped that this method will turn out to be highly cost-effective and other institutions could follow it with profit.

  8. Microturbulence in DIII-D tokamak pedestal. III. Effects of collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, X.; Lin, Z.; Holod, I.; Xiao, Y.; Li, B.; Snyder, P. B.

    2016-12-01

    Gyrokinetic simulations of the H-mode pedestal in DIII-D discharge 145701 find that the kinetic ballooning mode (KBM) is the most unstable mode for low toroidal numbers (n ≤ 25) and that the trapped electron mode (TEM) dominates over the KBM at higher toroidal mode numbers for realistic pressure gradients in the pedestal. Collisions reduce the TEM growth rate but have little effects on the KBM. KBM has the conventional ballooning mode structure peaking at the outer mid-plane, while TEM has an unconventional mode structure peaking at the top and bottom of the poloidal plane.

  9. Effect of operating parameters on indium (III) ion removal by iron electrocoagulation and evaluation of specific energy consumption.

    PubMed

    Chou, Wei-Lung; Wang, Chih-Ta; Huang, Kai-Yu

    2009-08-15

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of operating parameters on the specific energy consumption and removal efficiency of synthetic wastewater containing indium (III) ions by electrocoagulation in batch mode using an iron electrode. Several parameters, including different electrode pairs, supporting electrolytes, initial concentration, pH variation, and applied voltage, were investigated. In addition, the effects of applied voltage, supporting electrolyte, and initial concentration on indium (III) ion removal efficiency and specific energy consumption were investigated under the optimum balance of reasonable removal efficiency and relative low energy consumption. Experiment results indicate that a Fe/Al electrode pair is the most efficient choice of the four electrode pairs in terms of energy consumption. The optimum supporting electrolyte concentration, initial concentration, and applied voltage were found to be 100 mg/l NaCl, 20 mg/l, and 20V, respectively. A higher pH at higher applied voltage (20 or 30V) enhanced the precipitation of indium (III) ion as insoluble indium hydroxide, which improved the removal efficiency. Results from the indium (III) ion removal kinetics show that the kinetics data fit the pseudo second-order kinetic model well. Finally, the composition of the sludge produced was characterized with energy dispersion spectra (EDS).

  10. Effects of induced vibration modes on droplet sliding phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mejia, Jose Eduardo; Alvarado, Jorge; Yao, Chun-Wei; Dropwise Condensation Collaboration; Engineered Surfaces Collaboration

    2016-11-01

    An analytical and experimental investigation has been undertaken to understand the effects of induced vibration modes on droplet sliding phenomena. A mathematical model has been postulated which is capable of estimating accurately droplet sliding angles when using hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces. The model, which takes into account equilibrium contact angle, contact angle hysteresis, and droplet volume, has been validated using experimental data. The model has been modified to be able to estimate droplet sliding angle when different modes of vibrations are imposed on the surfaces. Experimental results to date reveal that when resonance modes of vibrations are imposed, the droplet sliding angles decrease considerably. The results also indicate that the modified model can be used effectively to relate imposed resonance frequencies to the critical sliding angle of droplets. LSAMP sponsored NSF Fellowship.

  11. Effect of praseodymium(III) on zinc(II) species in human interstitial fluid.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haiyuan; Wang, Jinping; Lu, Xin; Yang, Kuiyue; Niu, Chunji

    2005-11-01

    A multiphase model of metal ion species in human interstitial fluid was constructed under physiological conditions. The effect of Pr(III) on Zn(II) species was studied. At the normal conditions, Zn(II) species mainly distribute in [Zn(HSA)], [Zn(IgG)], and [Zn(Cys)(2)H](+). With the Pr(III) level increased, the apparent competition of Pr(III) for ligands lead to the redistribution of Zn(II) species.

  12. The effect of search mode on dimension weighting.

    PubMed

    Kumada, Takatsune

    2014-01-01

    In a visual feature search task, reaction times to a singleton target are known to be shorter when participants have advance knowledge of the defining-features of targets. The present study examined whether the prior-knowledge effect is influenced by search modes (feature vs. singleton). In addition, using a variant of the flanker task, the present study assessed whether prior-knowledge affected efficiency of attentional focusing to a target. When participants performed a target discrimination task (i.e., compound search task), using a singleton detection mode, no prior-knowledge effect was found (Experiments 1 and 3). However, when the same task was performed using a feature search mode, prior-knowledge facilitated performance (Experiment 2). This suggests that the dimension weighting of a target-defining feature is modulated by the search mode. Also flanker response congruency was affected by prior-knowledge suggesting that the dimension weighting correlated with attentional focusing to targets. On the other hand, inter-trial dimensional priming was not affected by the search mode. Implications for mechanisms of feature-based top-down control of attention in visual feature search are discussed.

  13. Nonlinear simulations of particle source effects on edge localized mode

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, J.; Tang, C. J.; Chen, S. Y.; Wang, Z. H.

    2015-12-15

    The effects of particle source (PS) with different intensities and located positions on Edge Localized Mode (ELM) are systematically studied with BOUT++ code. The results show the ELM size strongly decreases with increasing the PS intensity once the PS is located in the middle or bottom of the pedestal. The effects of PS on ELM depend on the located position of PS. When it is located at the top of the pedestal, peeling-ballooning (P-B) modes can extract more free energy from the pressure gradient and grow up to be a large filament at the initial crash phase and the broadening of mode spectrum can be suppressed by PS, which leads to more energy loss. When it is located in the middle or bottom of the pedestal, the extraction of free energy by P-B modes can be suppressed, and a small filament is generated. During the turbulence transport phase, the broader mode spectrum suppresses the turbulence transport when PS is located in the middle, while the zonal flow plays an important role in damping the turbulence transport when PS is located at the bottom.

  14. Enhancing Effective Chemistry Learning through Hypermedia Instructional Mode of Delivery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abanikannda, Mutahir Oluwafemi

    2016-01-01

    This study provides a framework for the production of Hypermedia Instructional package. It also assessed the effectiveness of hypermedia instructional mode of delivery on students? performance in Chemistry. This is with a view of improving the learning of Chemistry which may eventually help to improve students? performance. The developmental study…

  15. Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA): A Bibliography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA) is a bottom-up analytical process that identifies process hazards, which helps managers understand vulnerabilities of systems, as well as assess and mitigate risk. It is one of several engineering tools and techniques available to program and project managers aimed at increasing the likelihood of safe and successful NASA programs and missions. This bibliography references 465 documents in the NASA STI Database that contain the major concepts, failure modes or failure analysis, in either the basic index of the major subject terms.

  16. Enhancement of optical Faraday effect of nonanuclear Tb(III) complexes.

    PubMed

    Nakanishi, Takayuki; Suzuki, Yuki; Doi, Yoshihiro; Seki, Tomohiro; Koizumi, Hitoshi; Fushimi, Koji; Fujita, Koji; Hinatsu, Yukio; Ito, Hajime; Tanaka, Katsuhisa; Hasegawa, Yasuchika

    2014-07-21

    The effective magneto-optical properties of novel nonanuclear Tb(III) complexes with Tb-O lattice (specifically, [Tb9(sal-R)16(μ-OH)10](+)NO3(-), where sal-R = alkyl salicylate (R = -CH3 (Me), -C2H5 (Et), -C3H7 (Pr), or -C4H9 (Bu)) are reported. The geometrical structures of these nonanuclear Tb(III) complexes were characterized using X-ray single-crystal analysis and shape-measure calculation. Optical Faraday rotation was observed in nonanuclear Tb(III) complexes in the visible region. The Verdet constant per Tb(III) ion of the Tb9(sal-Me) complex is 150 times larger than that of general Tb(III) oxide glass. To understand their large Faraday rotation, electron paramagnetic resonance measurements of Gd(III) complexes were carried out. In this Report, the magneto-optical relation to the coordination geometry of Tb ions is discussed.

  17. Reorganization of intramolecular high frequency vibrational modes and dynamic solvent effect in electron transfer reactions.

    PubMed

    Yudanov, Vladislav V; Mikhailova, Valentina A; Ivanov, Anatoly I

    2012-04-26

    The possibility of the multichannel stochastic model to adequately describe all principal regularities observed in thermal electron transfer kinetics has been demonstrated. The most important are as follows: (i) the model predicts the solvent controlled regime in the Marcus normal region and its almost full suppression in the Marcus inverted region as well as a continuous transition between them in the vicinity of the activationless region; (ii) the suppression of dynamic solvent effect (DSE) is principally caused by the reorganization of high frequency vibrational modes; (iii) an additional factor of the DSE suppression stems from fast solvent relaxation component; (iv) in the inverted region, the multichannel stochastic model predicts the apparent activation energy to be much less than that calculated with Marcus equation. The exploration of the multichannel stochastic model has allowed one to conclude that the reorganization of high frequency vibrational modes can (i) raise the maximum rate constant above the solvent controlled limit by 2 and more orders of magnitude, (ii) shift the rate constant maximum to larger values of the free energy gap, and (iii) approach the electron transfer kinetics to the nonadiabatic regime.

  18. Effects upon metabolic pathways and energy production by Sb(III) and As(III)/Sb(III)-oxidase gene aioA in Agrobacterium tumefaciens GW4.

    PubMed

    Li, Jingxin; Yang, Birong; Shi, Manman; Yuan, Kai; Guo, Wei; Li, Mingshun; Wang, Gejiao

    2017-01-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens GW4 is a heterotrophic arsenite [As(III)]/antimonite [Sb(III)]-oxidizing strain. The As(III) oxidase AioAB is responsible for As(III) oxidation in the periplasm and it is also involved in Sb(III) oxidation in Agrobacterium tumefaciens 5A. In addition, Sb(III) oxidase AnoA and cellular H2O2 are also responsible for Sb(III) oxidation in strain GW4. However, the deletion of aioA increased the Sb(III) oxidation efficiency in strain GW4. In the present study, we found that the cell mobility to Sb(III), ATP and NADH contents and heat release were also increased by Sb(III) and more significantly in the aioA mutant. Proteomics and transcriptional analyses showed that proteins/genes involved in Sb(III) oxidation and resistance, stress responses, carbon metabolism, cell mobility, phosphonate and phosphinate metabolism, and amino acid and nucleotide metabolism were induced by Sb(III) and were more significantly induced in the aioA mutant. The results suggested that Sb(III) oxidation may produce energy. In addition, without periplasmic AioAB, more Sb(III) would enter bacterial cells, however, the cytoplasmic AnoA and the oxidative stress response proteins were significantly up-regulated, which may contribute to the increased Sb(III) oxidation efficiency. Moreover, the carbon metabolism was also activated to generate more energy against Sb(III) stress. The generated energy may be used in Sb transportation, DNA repair, amino acid synthesis, and cell mobility, and may be released in the form of heat.

  19. Effects upon metabolic pathways and energy production by Sb(III) and As(III)/Sb(III)-oxidase gene aioA in Agrobacterium tumefaciens GW4

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jingxin; Yang, Birong; Shi, Manman; Yuan, Kai; Guo, Wei; Li, Mingshun

    2017-01-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens GW4 is a heterotrophic arsenite [As(III)]/antimonite [Sb(III)]-oxidizing strain. The As(III) oxidase AioAB is responsible for As(III) oxidation in the periplasm and it is also involved in Sb(III) oxidation in Agrobacterium tumefaciens 5A. In addition, Sb(III) oxidase AnoA and cellular H2O2 are also responsible for Sb(III) oxidation in strain GW4. However, the deletion of aioA increased the Sb(III) oxidation efficiency in strain GW4. In the present study, we found that the cell mobility to Sb(III), ATP and NADH contents and heat release were also increased by Sb(III) and more significantly in the aioA mutant. Proteomics and transcriptional analyses showed that proteins/genes involved in Sb(III) oxidation and resistance, stress responses, carbon metabolism, cell mobility, phosphonate and phosphinate metabolism, and amino acid and nucleotide metabolism were induced by Sb(III) and were more significantly induced in the aioA mutant. The results suggested that Sb(III) oxidation may produce energy. In addition, without periplasmic AioAB, more Sb(III) would enter bacterial cells, however, the cytoplasmic AnoA and the oxidative stress response proteins were significantly up-regulated, which may contribute to the increased Sb(III) oxidation efficiency. Moreover, the carbon metabolism was also activated to generate more energy against Sb(III) stress. The generated energy may be used in Sb transportation, DNA repair, amino acid synthesis, and cell mobility, and may be released in the form of heat. PMID:28241045

  20. Stabilization effect of Weibel modes in relativistic laser fusion plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belghit, Slimen; Sid, Abdelaziz

    2016-06-01

    In this work, the Weibel instability (WI) due to inverse bremsstrahlung (IB) absorption in a laser fusion plasma has been investigated. The stabilization effect due to the coupling of the self-generated magnetic field by WI with the laser wave field is explicitly shown. In this study, the relativistic effects are taken into account. Here, the basic equation is the relativistic Fokker-Planck (F-P) equation. The main obtained result is that the coupling of self-generated magnetic field with the laser wave causes a stabilizing effect of excited Weibel modes. We found a decrease in the spectral range of Weibel unstable modes. This decreasing is accompanied by a reduction of two orders in the growth rate of instable Weibel modes or even stabilization of these modes. It has been shown that the previous analysis of the Weibel instability due to IB has overestimated the values of the generated magnetic fields. Therefore, the generation of magnetic fields by the WI due to IB should not affect the experiences of an inertial confinement fusion.

  1. Failure mode and effect analysis-based quality assurance for dynamic MLC tracking systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sawant, Amit; Dieterich, Sonja; Svatos, Michelle; Keall, Paul

    2010-12-15

    Purpose: To develop and implement a failure mode and effect analysis (FMEA)-based commissioning and quality assurance framework for dynamic multileaf collimator (DMLC) tumor tracking systems. Methods: A systematic failure mode and effect analysis was performed for a prototype real-time tumor tracking system that uses implanted electromagnetic transponders for tumor position monitoring and a DMLC for real-time beam adaptation. A detailed process tree of DMLC tracking delivery was created and potential tracking-specific failure modes were identified. For each failure mode, a risk probability number (RPN) was calculated from the product of the probability of occurrence, the severity of effect, and the detectibility of the failure. Based on the insights obtained from the FMEA, commissioning and QA procedures were developed to check (i) the accuracy of coordinate system transformation, (ii) system latency, (iii) spatial and dosimetric delivery accuracy, (iv) delivery efficiency, and (v) accuracy and consistency of system response to error conditions. The frequency of testing for each failure mode was determined from the RPN value. Results: Failures modes with RPN{>=}125 were recommended to be tested monthly. Failure modes with RPN<125 were assigned to be tested during comprehensive evaluations, e.g., during commissioning, annual quality assurance, and after major software/hardware upgrades. System latency was determined to be {approx}193 ms. The system showed consistent and accurate response to erroneous conditions. Tracking accuracy was within 3%-3 mm gamma (100% pass rate) for sinusoidal as well as a wide variety of patient-derived respiratory motions. The total time taken for monthly QA was {approx}35 min, while that taken for comprehensive testing was {approx}3.5 h. Conclusions: FMEA proved to be a powerful and flexible tool to develop and implement a quality management (QM) framework for DMLC tracking. The authors conclude that the use of FMEA-based QM ensures

  2. Failure mode and effect analysis-based quality assurance for dynamic MLC tracking systems

    PubMed Central

    Sawant, Amit; Dieterich, Sonja; Svatos, Michelle; Keall, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To develop and implement a failure mode and effect analysis (FMEA)-based commissioning and quality assurance framework for dynamic multileaf collimator (DMLC) tumor tracking systems. Methods: A systematic failure mode and effect analysis was performed for a prototype real-time tumor tracking system that uses implanted electromagnetic transponders for tumor position monitoring and a DMLC for real-time beam adaptation. A detailed process tree of DMLC tracking delivery was created and potential tracking-specific failure modes were identified. For each failure mode, a risk probability number (RPN) was calculated from the product of the probability of occurrence, the severity of effect, and the detectibility of the failure. Based on the insights obtained from the FMEA, commissioning and QA procedures were developed to check (i) the accuracy of coordinate system transformation, (ii) system latency, (iii) spatial and dosimetric delivery accuracy, (iv) delivery efficiency, and (v) accuracy and consistency of system response to error conditions. The frequency of testing for each failure mode was determined from the RPN value. Results: Failures modes with RPN≥125 were recommended to be tested monthly. Failure modes with RPN<125 were assigned to be tested during comprehensive evaluations, e.g., during commissioning, annual quality assurance, and after major software∕hardware upgrades. System latency was determined to be ∼193 ms. The system showed consistent and accurate response to erroneous conditions. Tracking accuracy was within 3%–3 mm gamma (100% pass rate) for sinusoidal as well as a wide variety of patient-derived respiratory motions. The total time taken for monthly QA was ∼35 min, while that taken for comprehensive testing was ∼3.5 h. Conclusions: FMEA proved to be a powerful and flexible tool to develop and implement a quality management (QM) framework for DMLC tracking. The authors conclude that the use of FMEA-based QM ensures efficient

  3. The Effects of Non-Normality on Type III Error for Comparing Independent Means

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendes, Mehmet

    2007-01-01

    The major objective of this study was to investigate the effects of non-normality on Type III error rates for ANOVA F its three commonly recommended parametric counterparts namely Welch, Brown-Forsythe, and Alexander-Govern test. Therefore these tests were compared in terms of Type III error rates across the variety of population distributions,…

  4. 25 CFR 291.13 - When do Class III gaming procedures for an Indian tribe become effective?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true When do Class III gaming procedures for an Indian tribe... ECONOMIC ENTERPRISES CLASS III GAMING PROCEDURES § 291.13 When do Class III gaming procedures for an Indian tribe become effective? Upon approval of Class III gaming procedures for the Indian tribe under...

  5. 25 CFR 291.13 - When do Class III gaming procedures for an Indian tribe become effective?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false When do Class III gaming procedures for an Indian tribe... ECONOMIC ENTERPRISES CLASS III GAMING PROCEDURES § 291.13 When do Class III gaming procedures for an Indian tribe become effective? Upon approval of Class III gaming procedures for the Indian tribe under...

  6. 25 CFR 291.13 - When do Class III gaming procedures for an Indian tribe become effective?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false When do Class III gaming procedures for an Indian tribe... ECONOMIC ENTERPRISES CLASS III GAMING PROCEDURES § 291.13 When do Class III gaming procedures for an Indian tribe become effective? Upon approval of Class III gaming procedures for the Indian tribe under...

  7. 25 CFR 291.13 - When do Class III gaming procedures for an Indian tribe become effective?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false When do Class III gaming procedures for an Indian tribe... ECONOMIC ENTERPRISES CLASS III GAMING PROCEDURES § 291.13 When do Class III gaming procedures for an Indian tribe become effective? Upon approval of Class III gaming procedures for the Indian tribe under...

  8. 25 CFR 291.13 - When do Class III gaming procedures for an Indian tribe become effective?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false When do Class III gaming procedures for an Indian tribe... ECONOMIC ENTERPRISES CLASS III GAMING PROCEDURES § 291.13 When do Class III gaming procedures for an Indian tribe become effective? Upon approval of Class III gaming procedures for the Indian tribe under...

  9. Could test length or order affect scores on letter number sequencing of the WAIS-III and WMS-III? Ruling out effects of fatigue.

    PubMed

    Tulsky, D S; Zhu, J

    2000-11-01

    The Letter Number Sequencing subtest of the WAIS-III and WMS-III was administered at the end of the standardization edition of the WMS-III. It was not administered as part of the WAIS-III standardization battery. Nevertheless, the subtest was included in the published version of the WAIS-III. This study examines differences between examinees administered the Letter Number Sequencing subtest at three different times during a psychological battery: (1) as part of the published battery, (2) as part of the WMS-III when the WMS-III was administered as the first test in a sequence, and (3) as part of the WMS-III standardization when the WAIS-III was administered immediately preceding the WMS-III. The participants were 372 examinees ( n = 124 in each condition) who were matched on key demographic variables. A repeated measures MANOVA yielded no difference in subtest scores when administered in any of these conditions. The results show no evidence of fatigue or ordering effects on the Letter Number Sequencing subtest.

  10. Linear canonical transformations of coherent and squeezed states in the Wigner phase space. III - Two-mode states

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, D.; Kim, Y. S.; Noz, Marilyn E.

    1990-01-01

    It is shown that the basic symmetry of two-mode squeezed states is governed by the group SP(4) in the Wigner phase space which is locally isomorphic to the (3 + 2)-dimensional Lorentz group. This symmetry, in the Schroedinger picture, appears as Dirac's two-oscillator representation of O(3,2). It is shown that the SU(2) and SU(1,1) interferometers exhibit the symmetry of this higher-dimensional Lorentz group. The mathematics of two-mode squeezed states is shown to be applicable to other branches of physics including thermally excited states in statistical mechanics and relativistic extended hadrons in the quark model.

  11. 'Junction-Level' Heterogeneous Integration of III-V Materials with Si CMOS for Novel Asymmetric Field-Effect Transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Yoon Jung

    Driven by Moore's law, semiconductor chips have become faster, denser and cheaper through aggressive dimension scaling. The continued scaling not only led to dramatic performance improvements in digital logic applications but also in mixed-mode and/or communication applications. Moreover, size/weight/power (SWAP) restrictions on all high-performance system components have resulted in multi-functional integration of multiple integrated circuits (ICs)/dies in 3D packages/ICs by various system-level approaches. However, these approaches still possess shortcomings and in order to truly benefit from the most advanced digital technologies, the future high-speed/high power devices for communication applications need to be fully integrated into a single CMOS chip. Due to limitations in Si device performance in high-frequency/power applications as well as expensive III-V compound semiconductor devices with low integration density, heterogeneous integration of compound semiconductor materials/devices with Si CMOS platform has emerged as a viable solution to low-cost high-performance ICs. In this study, we first discuss on channel and drain engineering approaches in the state-of-the-art multiple-gate field-effect transistor to integrate III-V compound semiconductor materials with Si CMOS for improved device performance in mixed-mode and/or communication applications. Then, growth, characterization and electrical analysis on small-area (diameter < 100nm) complete selective-area epitaxy of GaAs/GaN will be demonstrated for achieving 'dislocation-free' III-V compound semiconductor film on a Si(001) substrate. Based on a success in dislocation-free heterogeneous III-V film growth, we propose a novel ultra-scaled 'junction-level' heterogeneous integration onto mainstream Si CMOS platform. Device architecture and its key features to overcome aforementioned challenges will be given to demonstrate the potential to improve the overall system performance with diverse functionality.

  12. A simulation study on the mode conversion process from slow Z-mode to LO mode by the tunneling effect and variations of beaming angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalaee, Mohammad Javad; Katoh, Yuto

    2014-12-01

    For a particular angle of incidence wave, it is possible for a slow Z-mode wave incident on an inhomogeneous plasma slab to be converted into an LO mode wave. But for another wave normal angle of the incident wave, it has been considered impossible, since an evanescence region exists between two mode branches. In this case we expect that the mode conversion takes place through the tunneling effect. We investigate the effect of the spatial scale of the density gradient on the mode conversion efficiency in an inhomogeneous plasma where the mode conversion can occur only by the tunneling effect. We use the computer simulation solving Maxwell's equations and the motion of a cold electron fluid. By considering the steepness of the density gradient, the simulation results show the efficient mode conversion could be expected even in the case that the mismatch of the refractive indexes prevents the close coupling of plasma waves. Also, we show for these cases the beaming angle does not correspond to Jones' formula. This effect leads to the angles larger and smaller than the angle estimated by the formula. This type of mode conversion process becomes important in a case where the different plasmas form a discontinuity at their contact boundary.

  13. Development and Application of Benchmark Examples for Mixed-Mode I/II Quasi-Static Delamination Propagation Predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, Ronald

    2012-01-01

    The development of benchmark examples for quasi-static delamination propagation prediction is presented and demonstrated for a commercial code. The examples are based on finite element models of the Mixed-Mode Bending (MMB) specimen. The examples are independent of the analysis software used and allow the assessment of the automated delamination propagation prediction capability in commercial finite element codes based on the virtual crack closure technique (VCCT). First, quasi-static benchmark examples were created for the specimen. Second, starting from an initially straight front, the delamination was allowed to propagate under quasi-static loading. Third, the load-displacement relationship from a propagation analysis and the benchmark results were compared, and good agreement could be achieved by selecting the appropriate input parameters. Good agreement between the results obtained from the automated propagation analysis and the benchmark results could be achieved by selecting input parameters that had previously been determined during analyses of mode I Double Cantilever Beam and mode II End Notched Flexure specimens. The benchmarking procedure proved valuable by highlighting the issues associated with choosing the input parameters of the particular implementation. Overall the results are encouraging, but further assessment for mixed-mode delamination fatigue onset and growth is required.

  14. Effects of Similarity in Action-Effect Configuration on Mode Awareness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horiguchi, Yukio; Fukuju, Ryuichi; Sawaragi, Tetsuo

    Automated systems are often structured into modes for providing enhanced capabilities to perform complex tasks, but they also increase the need for and difficulty of maintaining mode awareness, which may induce mode errors and eventually lead to automation surprises. Salient feedback on the mode status is necessary for the user to maintain mode awareness, and it should be carefully designed not to interfere in the user's primary task to be achieved in collaboration with the systems. For the purpose of developing a practical theory for effective and robust supports for maintaining mode awareness, this study focuses on action-effect relations as an intuitive human-machine communication channel. An action-effect relation is defined as an association of a user action with some observable effects on the system behavior, and it is expected to provide additional valuable information on the internal state of the system with no focal visual attention required. From this perspective, one hypothesis is made that different modes with a same or similar configuration of action-effect relations should be easily mixed up with one another. This paper tests this hypothesis through a driving simulator experiment where subject drivers were examined on their awareness of the operating mode status of ACC (Adaptive Cruise Control) during driving with the mode-rich automated system. Another experiment examines the contribution of differentiated configuration of action-effect relations to enhancing mode awareness.

  15. Proton irradiation effects on advanced digital and microwave III-V components

    SciTech Connect

    Hash, G.L.; Schwank, J.R.; Shaneyfelt, M.R.; Sandoval, C.E.; Connors, M.P.; Sheridan, T.J.; Sexton, F.W.; Slayton, E.M.; Heise, J.A.; Foster, C.

    1994-09-01

    A wide range of advanced III-V components suitable for use in high-speed satellite communication systems were evaluated for displacement damage and single-event effects in high-energy, high-fluence proton environments. Transistors and integrated circuits (both digital and MMIC) were irradiated with protons at energies from 41 to 197 MeV and at fluences from 10{sup 10} to 2 {times} 10{sup 14} protons/cm{sup 2}. Large soft-error rates were measured for digital GaAs MESFET (3 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} errors/bit-day) and heterojunction bipolar circuits (10{sup {minus}5} errors/bit-day). No transient signals were detected from MMIC circuits. The largest degradation in transistor response caused by displacement damage was observed for 1.0-{mu}m depletion- and enhancement-mode MESFET transistors. Shorter gate length MESFET transistors and HEMT transistors exhibited less displacement-induced damage. These results show that memory-intensive GaAs digital circuits may result in significant system degradation due to single-event upset in natural and man-made space environments. However, displacement damage effects should not be a limiting factor for fluence levels up to 10{sup 14} protons/cm{sup 2} [equivalent to total doses in excess of 10 Mrad(GaAs)].

  16. Failure mode and effects analysis based risk profile assessment for stereotactic radiosurgery programs at three cancer centers in Brazil

    SciTech Connect

    Teixeira, Flavia C.

    2016-01-15

    Purpose: The goal of this study was to evaluate the safety and quality management program for stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) treatment processes at three radiotherapy centers in Brazil by using three industrial engineering tools (1) process mapping, (2) failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA), and (3) fault tree analysis. Methods: The recommendations of Task Group 100 of American Association of Physicists in Medicine were followed to apply the three tools described above to create a process tree for SRS procedure for each radiotherapy center and then FMEA was performed. Failure modes were identified for all process steps and values of risk priority number (RPN) were calculated from O, S, and D (RPN = O × S × D) values assigned by a professional team responsible for patient care. Results: The subprocess treatment planning was presented with the highest number of failure modes for all centers. The total number of failure modes were 135, 104, and 131 for centers I, II, and III, respectively. The highest RPN value for each center is as follows: center I (204), center II (372), and center III (370). Failure modes with RPN ≥ 100: center I (22), center II (115), and center III (110). Failure modes characterized by S ≥ 7, represented 68% of the failure modes for center III, 62% for center II, and 45% for center I. Failure modes with RPNs values ≥100 and S ≥ 7, D ≥ 5, and O ≥ 5 were considered as high priority in this study. Conclusions: The results of the present study show that the safety risk profiles for the same stereotactic radiotherapy process are different at three radiotherapy centers in Brazil. Although this is the same treatment process, this present study showed that the risk priority is different and it will lead to implementation of different safety interventions among the centers. Therefore, the current practice of applying universal device-centric QA is not adequate to address all possible failures in clinical processes at different

  17. EFFECTS OF ASYMMETRIC FLOWS IN SOLAR CONVECTION ON OSCILLATION MODES

    SciTech Connect

    Baldner, Charles S.; Schou, Jesper

    2012-11-20

    Many helioseismic measurements suffer from substantial systematic errors. A particularly frustrating one is that time-distance measurements suffer from a large center to limb effect which looks very similar to the finite light travel time, except that the magnitude depends on the observable used and can have the opposite sign. This has frustrated attempts to determine the deep meridional flow in the solar convection zone, with Zhao et al. applying an ad hoc correction with little physical basis to correct the data. In this Letter, we propose that part of this effect can be explained by the highly asymmetrical nature of the solar granulation which results in what appears to the oscillation modes as a net radial flow, thereby imparting a phase shift on the modes as a function of observing height and thus heliocentric angle.

  18. Failure Mode Effects Analysis for an Accelerator Control System

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, Steven M

    2009-01-01

    Failure mode effects analysis (FMEA) has been used in industry for design, manufacturing and assembly process quality control. It describes a formal approach for categorizing how a process may fail and for prioritizing failures based on their severity, frequency and likelihood of detection. Experience conducting a partial FMEA of an accelerator subsystem and its related control system will be reviewed. The applicability of the FMEA process to an operational accelerator control system will be discussed.

  19. Microstructural effects on fracture toughness of polycrystalline ceramics in combined mode I and mode II loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, D.; Shetty, D. K.

    1988-01-01

    Fracture toughness of polycrystalline alumina and ceria partially-stabilized tetragonal zirconia (CeO2-TZP) ceramics were assessed in combined mode I and mode II loading using precracked disk specimens in diametral compression. Stress states ranging from pure mode I, combined mode I and mode II, and pure mode II were obtained by aligning the center crack at specific angles relative to the loading diameter. The resulting mixed-mode fracture toughness envelope showed significant deviation to higher fracture toughness in mode II relative to the predictions of the linear elastic fracture mechanics theory. Critical comparison with corresponding results on soda-lime glass and fracture surface observations showed that crack surface resistance arising from grain interlocking and abrasion was the main source of the increased fracture toughness in mode II loading of the polycrystalline ceramics. The normalized fracture toughness for pure mode II loading, (KII/KIc), increased with increasing grain size for the CeO2-TZP ceramics. Quantitative fractography confirmed an increased percentage of transgranular fracture of the grains in mode II loading.

  20. Development and Application of Benchmark Examples for Mixed-Mode I/II Quasi-Static Delamination Propagation Predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, Ronald

    2012-01-01

    The development of benchmark examples for quasi-static delamination propagation prediction is presented. The example is based on a finite element model of the Mixed-Mode Bending (MMB) specimen for 50% mode II. The benchmarking is demonstrated for Abaqus/Standard, however, the example is independent of the analysis software used and allows the assessment of the automated delamination propagation prediction capability in commercial finite element codes based on the virtual crack closure technique (VCCT). First, a quasi-static benchmark example was created for the specimen. Second, starting from an initially straight front, the delamination was allowed to propagate under quasi-static loading. Third, the load-displacement as well as delamination length versus applied load/displacement relationships from a propagation analysis and the benchmark results were compared, and good agreement could be achieved by selecting the appropriate input parameters. The benchmarking procedure proved valuable by highlighting the issues associated with choosing the input parameters of the particular implementation. Overall, the results are encouraging, but further assessment for mixed-mode delamination fatigue onset and growth is required.

  1. Effects of Humidity on Non-Hermetically Packaged III-V Structures and Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leon, R.; Martin, S.; Lee, T.; Okuno, J.; Ruiz, R.; Gauldin, R.; Gaidis, M.; Smith, R.

    1999-01-01

    High humidity and temperature test (known as 85/85 tests) were performed on various III-V devices and structures to determine environmental effects in non-hermetically packaged GaAs membrane mixer diodes.

  2. Effects of ionic strength and fulvic acid on adsorption of Tb(III) and Eu(III) onto clay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poetsch, Maria; Lippold, Holger

    2016-09-01

    High salinity and natural organic matter are both known to facilitate migration of toxic or radioactive metals in geochemical systems, but little is known on their combined effect. We investigated complexation of Tb(III) and Eu(III) (as analogues for trivalent actinides) with fulvic acid and their adsorption onto a natural clay in the presence of NaCl, MgCl2 and CaCl2 up to very high ionic strengths. 160Tb, 152Eu and 14C-labelled fulvic acid were employed as radiotracers, allowing investigations at very low concentrations according to probable conditions in far-field scenarios of nuclear waste repositories. A combined Kd approach (Linear Additive Model) was tested for suitability in predicting solid-liquid distribution of metals in the presence of organic matter based on the interactions in the constituent subsystems. In this analysis, it could be shown that high ionic strength does not further enhance the mobilizing potential of humic matter. A quantitative reproduction of the influence of fulvic acid failed for most systems under study. Assumptions and limitations of the model are discussed.

  3. Effect of heat treatment on the mixed-mode impact behavior of a 6061 aluminum alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Manoharan, M.

    1996-10-15

    In the mixed mode fracture toughness tests, the use of a modified compact tension specimen has enabled the testing of materials under a variety of combinations of mode I and mode III loadings. By using appropriately defined mixed-mode versions of the stress intensity factor K and the J integral, the susceptibility of these materials to mixed-mode fracture can be quantified. In addition to compact tension specimens, three point bend specimens with a inclined crack can also be used to determine the mixed-mode fracture behavior of materials. The aim of the present study was to study the feasibility of extending the mixed mode fracture concept to impact testing using a charpy type test specimen.

  4. Hydrodynamic effects of the tip movement on surface nanobubbles: a combined tapping mode, lift mode and force volume mode AFM study.

    PubMed

    Walczyk, Wiktoria; Hain, Nicole; Schönherr, Holger

    2014-08-28

    We report on an Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) study of AFM tip-nanobubble interactions in experiments conducted on argon surface nanobubbles on HOPG (highly oriented pyrolytic graphite) in water in tapping mode, lift mode and Force Volume (FV) mode AFM. By subsequent data acquisition on the same nanobubbles in these three different AFM modes, we could directly compare the effect of different tip-sample interactions. The tip-bubble interaction strength was found to depend on the vertical and horizontal position of the tip on the bubble with respect to the bubble center. The interaction forces measured experimentally were in good agreement with the forces calculated using the dynamic interaction model. The strength of the hydrodynamic effect was also found to depend on the direction of the tip movement. It was more pronounced in the FV mode, in which the tip approaches the bubble from the top, than in the lift mode, in which the tip approaches the bubble from the side. This result suggests that the direction of tip movement influences the bubble deformation. The effect should be taken into account when nanobubbles are analysed by AFM in various scanning modes.

  5. Experimental and Theoretical Studies on Biologically Active Lanthanide (III) Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostova, I.; Trendafilova, N.; Georgieva, I.; Rastogi, V. K.; Kiefer, W.

    2008-11-01

    The complexation ability and the binding mode of the ligand coumarin-3-carboxylic acid (HCCA) to La(III), Ce(III), Nd(III), Sm(III), Gd(III) and Dy(III) lanthanide ions (Ln(III)) are elucidated at experimental and theoretical level. The complexes were characterized using elemental analysis, DTA and TGA data as well as 1H NMR and 13C NMR spectra. FTIR and Raman spectroscopic techniques as well as DFT quantum chemical calculations were used for characterization of the binding mode and the structures of lanthanide(III) complexes of HCCA. The metal—ligand binding mode is predicted through molecular modeling and energy estimation of different Ln—CCA structures using B3LYP/6-31G(d) method combined with a large quasi-relativistic effective core potential for lanthanide ion. The energies obtained predict bidentate coordination of CCA- to Ln(III) ions through the carbonylic oxygen and the carboxylic oxygen. Detailed vibrational analysis of HCCA, CCA- and Ln(III) complexes based on both calculated and experimental frequencies confirms the suggested metal—ligand binding mode. The natural bonding analysis predicts strongly ionic character of the Ln(III)-CCA bonding in the- complexes studied. With the relatively resistant tumor cell line K-562 we obtained very interesting in-vitro results which are in accordance with our previously published data concerning the activity of lanthanide(III) complexes with other coumarin derivatives.

  6. Magnetospheric filter effect for Pc 3 Alfven mode waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, X.; Comfort, R. H.; Gallagher, D. L.; Green, J. L.; Musielak, Z. E.; Moore, T. E.

    1995-01-01

    We present a ray-tracing study of the propagation of Pc 3 Alfven mode waves originating at the dayside magnetopause. This study reveals interesting features of magnetospheric filter effect for these waves. Pc 3 Alfven mode waves cannot penetrate to low Earth altitudes unless the wave frequency is below approximately 30 mHz. Configurations of the dispersion curves and the refractive index show that the gyroresonance and pseudo-cutoff introduced by the heavy ion O(+) block the waves. When the O(+) concentration is removed from the plasma composition, the barriers caused by the O(+) no longer exist, and waves with much higher frequencies than 30 mHz can penetrate to low altitudes. The result that the 30 mHz or lower frequency Alfven waves can be guided to low altitudes agrees with ground-based power spectrum observation at high altitudes.

  7. Magnetospheric filter effect for Pc 3 Alfven mode waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, X.; Comfort, R. H.; Gallagher, D. L.; Green, J. L.; Musielak, Z. E.; Moore, T. E.

    1994-01-01

    We present a ray-tracing study of the propagation of Pc 3 Alfven mode waves originating at the dayside magnetopause. This study reveals interesting features of a magnetospheric filter effect for these waves. Pc 3 Alfven mode waves cannot penetrate to low Earth altitudes unless the wave frequency is below approximately 30 mHz. Configurations of the dispersion curves and the refractive index show that the gyroresonance and pseudo-cutoff introduced by the heavy ion O(+) block the waves. When the O(+) concentration is removed from the plasma composition, the barriers caused by the O(+) no longer exist, and waves with much higher frequencies than 30 mHz can penetrate to low altitudes. The result that the 30 mHz or lower frequency Alfven waves can be guided to low altitudes agrees with ground-based power spectrum observations at high latitudes.

  8. Incremental validity of the WJ III COG: Limited predictive effects beyond the GIA-E.

    PubMed

    McGill, Ryan J; Busse, R T

    2015-09-01

    This study is an examination of the incremental validity of Cattell-Horn-Carroll (CHC) broad clusters from the Woodcock-Johnson III Tests of Cognitive Abilities (WJ III COG) for predicting scores on the Woodcock-Johnson III Tests of Achievement (WJ III ACH). The participants were children and adolescents, ages 6-18 (n = 4,722), drawn from the WJ III standardization sample. The sample was nationally stratified and proportional to U.S. census estimates for race/ethnicity, parent education level, and geographic region. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses were used to assess for cluster-level effects after controlling for the variance accounted for by the General Intellectual Ability-Extended (GIA-E) composite score. The results were interpreted using the R²/ΔR² statistic as the effect size indicator. Consistent with previous studies, the GIA-E accounted for statistically and clinically significant portions of WJ III ACH cluster score variance, with R2 values ranging from .29 to .56. WJ III COG CHC cluster scores collectively provided statistically significant incremental variance beyond the GIA-E in all of the regression models, although the effect sizes were consistently negligible to small (Average ΔR2(CHC) = .06), with significant effects observed only in the Oral Expression model (ΔR²(CHC) = .23). Individually, the WJ III COG cluster scores accounted for mostly small portions of achievement variance across the prediction models, with a large effect found for the Comprehension-Knowledge cluster in the Oral Expression model (ΔR²(Gc) = .23). The potential clinical and theoretical implications of these results are discussed.

  9. The Escherichia coli modE gene: effect of modE mutations on molybdate dependent modA expression.

    PubMed

    McNicholas, P M; Chiang, R C; Gunsalus, R P

    1996-11-15

    The Escherichia coli modABCD operon, which encodes a high-affinity molybdate uptake system, is transcriptionally regulated in response to molybdate availability by ModE. Here we describe a highly effective enrichment protocol, applicable to any gene with a repressor role, and establish its application in the isolation of transposon mutations in modE. In addition we show that disruption of the ModE C-terminus abolishes derepression in the absence of molybdate, implying this region of ModE controls the repressor activity. Finally, a mutational analysis of a proposed molybdate binding motif indicates that this motif does not function in regulating the repressor activity of ModE.

  10. Membrane permeability transition and dysfunction of rice mitochondria effected by Er(III).

    PubMed

    Gao, Jia-ling; Wu, Man; Wang, Xuan; Zhang, Ye-zhong; Jiang, Feng-lei; Liu, Yi; Dai, Jie

    2015-02-01

    Herein, the biological effects of heavy rare earth ion Er(III) on rice mitochondria were comprehensively investigated mainly by spectroscopic methods. The experimental results demonstrated that Er(III) could lead to the swelling of rice mitochondria, collapse of mitochondrial transmembrane potential, decrease of membrane fluidity, promotion of H(+) permeability and suppression of K(+) permeability. These further indicated that Er(III) could induce the mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) and the dysfunction of rice mitochondria. The ultra-structure change of mitochondria observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) also proved that Er(III) induced MPT. Moreover, the testing results of the protective effect of four different agents on mitochondrial swelling implied that the thiol chelation on the mitochondrial inner membrane was the main reason that caused the MPT.

  11. What Factors Underlie the Aging Effects on WAIS-R and WAIS-III Subtests?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gregoire, Jacques

    2001-01-01

    Studied the factors underlying the aging effects seen on the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Adults-Revised (WAIS-R) and the scale's third edition (WAIS-III) using the French standardization samples of 1,104 for the WAIS-III and 1,000 for the WAIS-R. Results show that the observed decline in scores for both tests cannot be fully explained with a…

  12. Effects of damping on mode shapes, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gates, R. M.

    1977-01-01

    Displacement, velocity, and acceleration admittances were calculated for a realistic NASTRAN structural model of space shuttle for three conditions: liftoff, maximum dynamic pressure and end of solid rocket booster burn. The realistic model of the orbiter, external tank, and solid rocket motors included the representation of structural joint transmissibilities by finite stiffness and damping elements. Methods developed to incorporate structural joints and their damping characteristics into a finite element model of the space shuttle, to determine the point damping parameters required to produce realistic damping in the primary modes, and to calculate the effect of distributed damping on structural resonances through the calculation of admittances.

  13. Effects of dispersion on mode locking in optical parametric oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longhi, S.

    1995-08-01

    We discuss the role that group-velocity dispersion and cavity detuning play in the onset of mode locking in synchronously pumped optical parametric oscillators. Because of the phase-sensitive character of the parametric gain, it is shown for the degenerate case that dispersion effects associated with off-resonance operation can lead to subpulse structures and spectral splitting of the parametric pulses. This behavior is interpreted on the basis of a dispersion-induced interference phenomenon between the two nearly degenerate parametric photons produced by the conversion of one pump photon in the nonlinear medium.

  14. Iron (III) Matrix Effects on Mineralization and Immobilization of Actinides

    SciTech Connect

    Cynthia-May S. Gong; Tyler A. Sullens; Kenneth R. Czerwinski

    2006-01-01

    Abstract - A number of models for the Yucca Mountain Project nuclear waste repository use studies of actinide sorption onto well-defined iron hydroxide materials. In the case of a waste containment leak, however, a complex interaction between dissolved waste forms and failed containment vessel components can lead to immediate precipitation of migratory iron and uranyl in the silicate rich near-field environment. Use of the Fe(III) and UO22+ complexing agent acetohydroxamic acid (AHA) as a colorimetric agent for visible spectrophotometry is well-known. Using the second derivative of these spectra a distinct shift in iron complexation in the presence of silicate is seen that is not seen with uranyl or alone. Silica also decreases the ability of uranyl and ferric solutions to absorb hydroxide, hastening precipitation. These ferric silicate precipitates are highly amorphous and soluble. Precipitates formed in the presence of uranyl below ~1 mol% exhibit lower solubility than precipitates from up to 50 mol % and of uranyl silicates alone.

  15. Reflective liquid crystal light valve with hybrid field effect mode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boswell, Donald D. (Inventor); Grinberg, Jan (Inventor); Jacobson, Alexander D. (Inventor); Myer, Gary D. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    There is disclosed a high performance reflective mode liquid crystal light valve suitable for general image processing and projection and particularly suited for application to real-time coherent optical data processing. A preferred example of the device uses a CdS photoconductor, a CdTe light absorbing layer, a dielectric mirror, and a liquid crystal layer sandwiched between indium-tin-oxide transparent electrodes deposited on optical quality glass flats. The non-coherent light image is directed onto the photoconductor; this reduces the impedance of the photoconductor, thereby switching the AC voltage that is impressed across the electrodes onto the liquid crystal to activate the device. The liquid crystal is operated in a hybrid field effect mode. It utilizes the twisted nematic effect to create a dark off-state (voltage off the liquid crystal) and the optical birefringence effect to create the bright on-state. The liquid crystal thus modulates the polarization of the coherent read-out or projection light responsively to the non-coherent image. An analyzer is used to create an intensity modulated output beam.

  16. An effective diffusivity model based on Koopman mode decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbabi, Hassan; Mezic, Igor

    2016-11-01

    In the previous work, we had shown that the Koopman mode decomposition (KMD) can be used to analyze mixing of passive tracers in time-dependent flows. In this talk, we discuss the extension of this type of analysis to the case of advection-diffusion transport for passive scalar fields. Application of KMD to flows with complex time-dependence yields a decomposition of the flow into mean, periodic and chaotic components. We briefly discuss the computation of these components using a combination of harmonic averaging and Discrete Fourier Transform. We propose a new effective diffusivity model in which the advection is dominated by mean and periodic components whereas the effect of chaotic motion is absorbed into an effective diffusivity tensor. The performance of this model is investigated in the case of lid-driven cavity flow.

  17. Stereoselectivity and affinity in molecular pharmacology. III. Structural aspects in the mode of action of natural and synthetic auxins.

    PubMed

    Lehmann F, P A

    1978-02-01

    Analysis of available potency estimates for 35 pairs of enantiomeric arylcarboxylic acids with auxin activity (flax-root-growth inhibition test) revealed extensive correlations between the activity of the more potent and less potent isomers, as well as between the log of the ratio of potencies and the log potency of the more active isomer when structurally similar analogs are compared. 5 structural subgroups were discernible (n, eudismic-affinity quotient (EAQ), r2); (1) arylpropionic acids (6, -0.36, 0.66); (2) 2-naphthoxy-carboxylic acids (6, +1.07, 0.99); (3) 1-naphthoxycarboxylic acids (3, +1.56, 0.96); (4) ortho-substituted phenoxycarboxylic acids (10, +0.97, 0.96) and (5) ortho-unsubstituted phenoxycarboxylic acids (10, +0.56, 0.70). For achiral lower homologs such as auxin itself 3-indolyl-acetic acid (IAA), phenoxyacetic acid and 1-naphthoxyacetic acid, extrapolated potencies were found to agree well with experimental values. On the basis of these observations an auxin receptor is postulated and binding arrangements are described which explain most of the experimental data available. A 3-point attachment when allowed is the only binding mode compatible with the reported data.

  18. Effective Photo- and Triboluminescent Europium(III) Coordination Polymers with Rigid Triangular Spacer Ligands.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Yasuchika; Tateno, Shiori; Yamamoto, Masanori; Nakanishi, Takayuki; Kitagawa, Yuichi; Seki, Tomohiro; Ito, Hajime; Fushimi, Koji

    2017-02-21

    Luminescent Eu(III) coordination polymers with rigid triangular spacer ligands are reported. The Eu(III) coordination polymer, [Eu3 (hfa)9 (tppb)2 ]n (hfa: hexafluoroacetylacetonate, tppb: tris(4-diphenylphosphorylphenyl)benzene), shows high thermo-stability (decomposition temperature=354 °C) and photoluminescence quantum yield (Φ4f-4f =82 %, photosensitized energy transfer efficiency=78 %). The triboluminescence efficiency of Eu(III) coordination polymer with triangular spacers under laser pulse irradiation (Nd:YAG, λ=1064 nm, pulse width=5 ns, pulse energy=0.1 mJ) is calculated to be 49 %. Characteristic triangular structure, high emission quantum yield, effective photosensitized energy transfer, and remarkable triboluminescence properties of Eu(III) coordination polymers are demonstrated for the first time.

  19. The Games Children Play III: More Comments on Effective Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Humphries, Charlotte A.; Ashy, Madge

    2013-01-01

    In the years since the authors published two articles with tips for effective teaching, they have acquired and developed more advice and impressions on teaching. This article presents ideas that can help physical educators become increasingly effective in their teaching.

  20. Doppler effect in opposite propagating modes of cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enaki, Nicolae; Bazgan, Sergiu

    2016-12-01

    It is proposed a new approach in the estimation of quantum fluctuations of the electromagnetic field and Doppler effect using a model formed from two quantum modes of the cavity which propagate in opposite direction. The Doppler effect plays a significant role in the model in which an atom flies through the nodes and anti-nodes of the standing wave. It is shown that if the vacuum Rabi frequency achieves the value of Doppler shift kv, where k is the wave vector and v represents the atomic velocity, then the collective interactive and non-interactive modes of the resonator become connected. The interaction process looks like in the case of two coupled cavities in one of which is placed an atom. The comparison between the proposed approach and existing time dependent coupling model is given. In our model, it is obtained the non-zero value of quantum fluctuations in the nodes of the standing wave during the time in which atom flies through the cavity.

  1. Effect of multiperforated plates on the acoustic modes in combustors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gullaud, Elsa; Mendez, Simon; Sensiau, Claude; Nicoud, Franck; Poinsot, Thierry

    2009-06-01

    The analytical model derived by Howe assessing the acoustic effect of perforated plates has been implemented in a 3D Helmholtz solver. This solver allows one to compute the acoustic modes of industrial chambers taking into account the multiperforated plates present for the cooling of the walls. An academic test case consisting of two coaxial cylinders, with the inner one being perforated is used to validate the implementation in the general purpose AVSP code. This case is also used to show the effects of the presence of the plates. In particular, the sensitivity of the acoustic damping to the bias flow speed will be studied. A maximum absorption speed is shown, and the behaviour towards an infinite speed will be illustrated by the academic case. Computations are also conducted in the case of an industrial helicopter chamber. The value of the maximum absorption speed is discussed to explain why the modes are in fact not much absorbed by the perforated plates, and that the frequencies are the same as for walls. To cite this article: E. Gullaud et al., C. R. Mecanique 337 (2009).

  2. Gravitational Effects on Collective Modes of Superfluid Shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padavić, Karmela; Sun, Kuei; Lannert, Courtney; Vishveshwara, Smitha

    We study the effects of gravity on collective excitations of shell-shaped Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs). Superfluid shells are of general interest as examples of hollow geometries that can be produced in ultracold atoms in bubble-trap potentials or optical lattices. Our approach to analyzing superfluid shells is based on a Gross-Pitaevskii mean field theory and hydrodynamic equations derived from it. Considering a spherically symmetric BEC in general, there are distinct collective excitation spectra for the cases of a fully filled sphere and a very thin shell. Furthermore, an adiabatic change in the potential producing a slow transition from one geometry to the other shows a characteristic evolution. Given that in most realistic experimental conditions gravity cannot be neglected we investigate its effects on the equilibrium profile and the collective modes in the very thin shell limit. We analytically obtain the full excitation spectrum for the thin shell geometry and account for gravity perturbatively at length and energy scales that describe a stable matter-wave bubble. We find that gravity breaks spherical symmetry of the equilibrium density profile and affects the collective excitations by coupling adjacent modes in the angular direction.

  3. Mode Transitions in Magnetically Shielded Hall Effect Thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sekerak, Michael J.; Longmier, Benjamin W.; Gallimore, Alec D.; Huang, Wensheng; Kamhawi, Hani; Hofer, Richard R.; Jorns, Benjamin A.; Polk, James E.

    2014-01-01

    A mode transition study is conducted in magnetically shielded thrusters where the magnetic field magnitude is varied to induce mode transitions. Three different oscillatory modes are identified with the 20-kW NASA-300MS-2 and the 6-kW H6MS: Mode 1) global mode similar to unshielded thrusters at low magnetic fields, Mode 2) cathode oscillations at nominal magnetic fields, and Mode 3) combined spoke, cathode and breathing mode oscillations at high magnetic fields. Mode 1 exhibits large amplitude, low frequency (1-10 kHz), breathing mode type oscillations where discharge current mean value and oscillation amplitude peak. The mean discharge current is minimized while thrust-to-power and anode efficiency are maximized in Mode 2, where higher frequency (50-90 kHz), low amplitude, cathode oscillations dominate. Thrust is maximized in Mode 3 and decreases by 5-6% with decreasing magnetic field strength. The presence or absence of spokes and strong cathode oscillations do not affect each other or discharge current. Similar to unshielded thrusters, mode transitions and plasma oscillations affect magnetically shielded thruster performance and should be characterized during system development.

  4. Application of failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) to pretreatment phases in tomotherapy.

    PubMed

    Broggi, Sara; Cantone, Marie Claire; Chiara, Anna; Di Muzio, Nadia; Longobardi, Barbara; Mangili, Paola; Veronese, Ivan

    2013-09-06

    The aim of this paper was the application of the failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) approach to assess the risks for patients undergoing radiotherapy treatments performed by means of a helical tomotherapy unit. FMEA was applied to the preplanning imaging, volume determination, and treatment planning stages of the tomotherapy process and consisted of three steps: 1) identification of the involved subprocesses; 2) identification and ranking of the potential failure modes, together with their causes and effects, using the risk probability number (RPN) scoring system; and 3) identification of additional safety measures to be proposed for process quality and safety improvement. RPN upper threshold for little concern of risk was set at 125. A total of 74 failure modes were identified: 38 in the stage of preplanning imaging and volume determination, and 36 in the stage of planning. The threshold of 125 for RPN was exceeded in four cases: one case only in the phase of preplanning imaging and volume determination, and three cases in the stage of planning. The most critical failures appeared related to (i) the wrong or missing definition and contouring of the overlapping regions, (ii) the wrong assignment of the overlap priority to each anatomical structure, (iii) the wrong choice of the computed tomography calibration curve for dose calculation, and (iv) the wrong (or not performed) choice of the number of fractions in the planning station. On the basis of these findings, in addition to the safety strategies already adopted in the clinical practice, novel solutions have been proposed for mitigating the risk of these failures and to increase patient safety.

  5. Effective method for calculating modes of multilayer waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, I. K.; Dimitrov, P. D.

    2017-01-01

    A fast and efficient numerical method for finding the modes of a multilayered waveguide is proposed. Using the complex vector of the Riemann-Silberstein has resulted in a reduction of the order of the differential equations describing the passage of light through the different layers, as well as a double reduction of the searched variables. The approximation of the differential equations is made by the method of Galyorkin by a suitable choice of the base functions. The calculation of the effective indices and their corresponding wave configurations is realized by the inverse-shifting power method with Rayleigh’s quantity. The method was successfully applied waveguide systems, generating values close in the effective indices.

  6. Failure modes and effects analysis (RADL Item 2-23)

    SciTech Connect

    1980-04-01

    The Pilot Plant is a central receiver design concept. It is comprised of five major subsystems as shown schematically, plus a set of equipment (Plant Support Subsystem) used to support total plant operation. The failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA) is a bottom-up analysis used to identify the failure characteristics of the system (total equipment used to produce electrical power), that is, the failure of a single component is assumed and the effect of that failure upon the system is determined. The FMEA is concerned with the plant from an operational standpoint (i.e., the production of electrical power). This analysis was performed to the component level. This was interpreted as a valve, computer, measurement sensor and its associated signal conditioning, an electronic black box, etc.

  7. [Failure mode and effect analysis: application in chemotherapy].

    PubMed

    Chuang, Ching-Hui; Chuang, Sheu-Wen

    2009-08-01

    Medical institutions are increasingly concerned about ensuring the safety of patients under their care. Failure mode and effect analysis (FMEA) is a qualitative approach based on a proactive process. Strongly promoted by the Joint Commission Accredited of Health Organization (JCAHO) since 2002, FMEA has since been adopted and widely practiced in healthcare organizations to assess and analyze clinical error events. FMEA has proven to be an effective method of minimizing errors in both manufacturing and healthcare industries. It predicts failure points in systems and allows an organization to address proactively the causes of problems and prioritize improvement strategies. The application of FMEA in chemotherapy at our department identified three main failure points: (1) inappropriate chemotherapy standard operating procedures (SOPs), (2) communication barriers, and (3) insufficient training of nurses. The application of FMEA in chemotherapy is expected to enhance the sensitivity and proactive abilities of healthcare practitioners during potentially risky situations as well as to improve levels of patient care safety.

  8. Retrieval Mode Distinguishes the Testing Effect from the Generation Effect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karpicke, Jeffrey D.; Zaromb, Franklin M.

    2010-01-01

    A series of four experiments examined the effects of generation vs. retrieval practice on subsequent retention. Subjects were first exposed to a list of target words. Then the subjects were shown the targets again intact for Read trials or they were shown fragments of the targets. Subjects in Generate conditions were told to complete the fragments…

  9. Effects of Al(III) and nano-Al13 species on malate dehydrogenase activity.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaodi; Cai, Ling; Peng, Yu; Li, Huihui; Chen, Rong Fu; Shen, Ren Fang

    2011-01-01

    The effects of different aluminum species on malate dehydrogenase (MDH) activity were investigated by monitoring amperometric i-t curves for the oxidation of NADH at low overpotential using a functionalized multi-wall nanotube (MWNT) modified glass carbon electrode (GCE). The results showed that Al(III) and Al(13) can activate the enzymatic activity of MDH, and the activation reaches maximum levels as the Al(III) and Al(13) concentration increase. Our study also found that the effects of Al(III) and Al(13) on the activity of MDH depended on the pH value and aluminum speciation. Electrochemical and circular dichroism spectra methods were applied to study the effects of nano-sized aluminum compounds on biomolecules.

  10. Effects of Al(III) and Nano-Al13 Species on Malate Dehydrogenase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiaodi; Cai, Ling; Peng, Yu; Li, Huihui; Chen, Rong Fu; Shen, Ren Fang

    2011-01-01

    The effects of different aluminum species on malate dehydrogenase (MDH) activity were investigated by monitoring amperometric i-t curves for the oxidation of NADH at low overpotential using a functionalized multi-wall nanotube (MWNT) modified glass carbon electrode (GCE). The results showed that Al(III) and Al13 can activate the enzymatic activity of MDH, and the activation reaches maximum levels as the Al(III) and Al13 concentration increase. Our study also found that the effects of Al(III) and Al13 on the activity of MDH depended on the pH value and aluminum speciation. Electrochemical and circular dichroism spectra methods were applied to study the effects of nano-sized aluminum compounds on biomolecules. PMID:22163924

  11. Dislocation effects in FinFETs for different III-V compound semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hur, Ji-Hyun; Jeon, Sanghun

    2016-04-01

    While Si-based devices are facing the limits of scaling, III-V materials, having high mobility, have attracted more and more attention. However, their advantages are obtained by ignoring the drawbacks of inevitably present dislocations. In this paper, we present a theoretical model that describes the degradation in carrier mobility caused by these inevitable charged dislocations in nanometer-sized, quantum-confined III-V compound semiconductor fin-shaped field effect transistors. We conclude that the Fermi-level pinning effect needs to be resolved to give carriers high enough energy (Fermi energy in the channel) to effectively ignore Coulomb scattering of charges at dislocations in a channel made by III-V compound semiconductors.

  12. Effectiveness of Urban Shelter-in-Place. III: Commercial Districts

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, Wanyu R.; Chan, Wanyu R.; Nazaroff, William W.; Price, Phillip N.; Gadgil, Ashok J.

    2007-12-28

    In the event of a toxic chemical release to the atmosphere, shelter-in-place (SIP) is an emergency response option available to protect public health. This paper is the last in a three-part series that examines the effectiveness of SIP at reducing adverse health effects in communities. We model a hypothetical chemical release in an urban area, and consider SIP effectiveness in protecting occupants of commercial buildings. Building air infiltration rates are predicted from empirical data using an existing model. We consider the distribution of building air infiltration rates both with mechanical ventilation systems turned off and with the systems operating. We also consider the effects of chemical sorption to indoor surfaces and nonlinear chemical dose-response relationships. We find that commercial buildings provide effective shelter when ventilation systems are off, but that any delay in turning off ventilation systems can greatly reduce SIP effectiveness. Using a two-zone model, we find that there can be substantial benefit by taking shelter in the inner parts of a building that do not experience direct air exchange with the outdoors. Air infiltration rates vary substantially among buildings and this variation is important in quantifying effectiveness for emergency response. Community-wide health metrics, introduced in the previous papers in this series, can be applied in pre-event planning and to guide real-time emergency response.

  13. Genetic heterogeneity in the apolipoprotein C-III promoter and effects of insulin.

    PubMed

    Dallinga-Thie, G M; Groenendijk, M; Blom, R N; De Bruin, T W; De Kant, E

    2001-09-01

    In the present study, we have investigated the in vivo and in vitro role of two newly identified variants (G(-)944A and A(-)1180C) located in the upstream promoter region of the apolipoprotein C-III (apoC-III) gene. These variants were studied in 30 probands diagnosed with FCHL, their relatives, and spouses. The allele frequencies of both variants were not different between the groups. No significant associations between plasma lipid traits and DNA variants were observed. We further analyzed the effect of the presence of these variants in the upstream enhancing region of the apoC-III gene, as five different in vivo occurring haplotypes, on the transcriptional activity of apoC-III in both HepG2 and Caco-2 cells. All five promoter constructs, including the wild type, showed similar enhancing activity of the apoC-III gene. The average transcription efficiency was enhanced 19-fold in HepG2 cells and 11-fold in Caco-2 cells. Previous studies have shown in vitro insulin-dependent down-regulation of the apoC-III gene transcription in HepG2 cells by DNA variation in an insulin response element (IRE) in the apoC-III promoter. We observed a 30% insulin-dependent down-regulation of apoC-III expression that was, however, independent of the presence of the two IRE variants. In contrast, in Caco-2 cells, a more variable insulin-dependent up-regulation was found that was also independent of the presence of the IRE variants.In conclusion, our data suggested that the apoC-III gene transcription in vitro is regulated by insulin but independent of the presence of the two IRE variants at -455 and -482. We were unable to detect associations between these apoC-III variants and plasma lipids and insulin in our FCHL population. This means that in vivo apoC-III transcription not only depends upon insulin but appears to be mediated by other mechanisms.

  14. TU-AB-BRD-02: Failure Modes and Effects Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Huq, M.

    2015-06-15

    Current quality assurance and quality management guidelines provided by various professional organizations are prescriptive in nature, focusing principally on performance characteristics of planning and delivery devices. However, published analyses of events in radiation therapy show that most events are often caused by flaws in clinical processes rather than by device failures. This suggests the need for the development of a quality management program that is based on integrated approaches to process and equipment quality assurance. Industrial engineers have developed various risk assessment tools that are used to identify and eliminate potential failures from a system or a process before a failure impacts a customer. These tools include, but are not limited to, process mapping, failure modes and effects analysis, fault tree analysis. Task Group 100 of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine has developed these tools and used them to formulate an example risk-based quality management program for intensity-modulated radiotherapy. This is a prospective risk assessment approach that analyzes potential error pathways inherent in a clinical process and then ranks them according to relative risk, typically before implementation, followed by the design of a new process or modification of the existing process. Appropriate controls are then put in place to ensure that failures are less likely to occur and, if they do, they will more likely be detected before they propagate through the process, compromising treatment outcome and causing harm to the patient. Such a prospective approach forms the basis of the work of Task Group 100 that has recently been approved by the AAPM. This session will be devoted to a discussion of these tools and practical examples of how these tools can be used in a given radiotherapy clinic to develop a risk based quality management program. Learning Objectives: Learn how to design a process map for a radiotherapy process Learn how to

  15. Effect of Trapped Energetic Particles on the Resistive Wall Mode

    SciTech Connect

    Hao, G. Z.; Wang, A. K.; Qiu, X. M.; Liu, Y. Q.

    2011-07-01

    A stability analysis for the resistive wall mode is studied in the presence of trapped energetic particles (EPs). When the EPs' beta exceeds a critical value, a fishbonelike bursting mode (FLM) with an external kink eigenstructure can exist. This offers the first analytic interpretation of the experimental observations [Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 045001 (2009)]. The mode-particle resonances for the FLM and the q=1 fishbone occur in different regimes of the precession frequency of EPs. In certain ranges of the plasma rotation speed and the EPs' beta, a mode conversion can occur between the resistive wall mode and FLM.

  16. Flare loop radiative hydrodynamics. III - Nonlocal radiative transfer effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canfield, R. C.; Fisher, G. H.; Mcclymont, A. N.

    1983-01-01

    The study has three goals. The first is to demonstrate that processes exist whose intrinsic nonlocal nature cannot be represented by local approximations. The second is to elucidate the physical nature and origins of these nonlocal processes. The third is to suggest that the methods and results described here may prove useful in constructing semiempirical models of the chromosphere by means more efficient than trial and error. Matrices are computed that describe the effect of a temperature perturbation at an arbitrary point in the loop on density, hydrogen ionized fraction, total radiative loss rate, and radiative loss rate of selected hydrogen lines and continua at all other points. It is found that the dominant nonlocal radiative transfer effects can be separated into flux divergence coefficient effects and upper level population effects. The former are most important when the perturbation takes place in a region of significant opacity. Upper level population effects arise in both optically thick and thin regions in response to nonlocal density, ionization, and interlocking effects.

  17. The effect of line-tying on tearing modes

    SciTech Connect

    Delzanno, Gian Luca; Finn, John M.

    2008-03-15

    Cylindrical magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) constant-{psi} or nonconstant-{psi} tearing modes that are linearly unstable with periodic axial boundary conditions are studied in a line-tied cylinder. Examples of these two respective classes of modes, with m=1 and m=2 (m being the azimuthal mode number), are studied. With a suitable MHD equilibrium, the former modes are marginally stable in ideal MHD for periodic axial boundary conditions, and occur as fast tearing modes (resistive kinks) in the presence of resistivity {eta}. The latter modes are stable in ideal MHD for periodic axial boundary conditions, and with resistivity occur as constant-{psi} tearing modes, unstable in a range of parameters. In both cases, the results for the line-tied modes show the expected tearing scaling with {eta} for very long plasmas, but the scaling becomes {gamma}{proportional_to}{eta} for smaller cylinder lengths L. These results are consistent with the following interpretation: For L{yields}{infinity}, the modes have a tearing width characteristic of tearing, leading to characteristic tearing mode growth. As L decreases, the modes develop a geometric width, which increases as L decreases; the {gamma}{proportional_to}{eta} scaling occurs when L is small enough that the geometric width exceeds the tearing width.

  18. Diamagnetic drift effects on the low-n magnetohydrodynamic modes at the high mode pedestal with plasma rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, L. J.; Kotschenreuther, M. T.; Valanju, P.

    2014-06-01

    The diamagnetic drift effects on the low-n magnetohydrodynamic instabilities at the high-mode (H-mode) pedestal are investigated in this paper with the inclusion of bootstrap current for equilibrium and rotation effects for stability, where n is the toroidal mode number. The AEGIS (Adaptive EiGenfunction Independent Solutions) code [L. J. Zheng and M. T. Kotschenreuther, J. Comp. Phys. 211 (2006)] is extended to include the diamagnetic drift effects. This can be viewed as the lowest order approximation of the finite Larmor radius effects in consideration of the pressure gradient steepness at the pedestal. The H-mode discharges at Jointed European Torus is reconstructed numerically using the VMEC code [P. Hirshman and J. C. Whitson, Phys. Fluids 26, 3553 (1983)], with bootstrap current taken into account. Generally speaking, the diamagnetic drift effects are stabilizing. Our results show that the effectiveness of diamagnetic stabilization depends sensitively on the safe factor value (qs) at the safety-factor reversal or plateau region. The diamagnetic stabilization are weaker, when qs is larger than an integer; while stronger, when qs is smaller or less larger than an integer. We also find that the diamagnetic drift effects also depend sensitively on the rotation direction. The diamagnetic stabilization in the co-rotation case is stronger than in the counter rotation case with respect to the ion diamagnetic drift direction.

  19. Diamagnetic drift effects on the low-n magnetohydrodynamic modes at the high mode pedestal with plasma rotation

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, L. J.; Kotschenreuther, M. T.; Valanju, P.

    2014-06-15

    The diamagnetic drift effects on the low-n magnetohydrodynamic instabilities at the high-mode (H-mode) pedestal are investigated in this paper with the inclusion of bootstrap current for equilibrium and rotation effects for stability, where n is the toroidal mode number. The AEGIS (Adaptive EiGenfunction Independent Solutions) code [L. J. Zheng and M. T. Kotschenreuther, J. Comp. Phys. 211 (2006)] is extended to include the diamagnetic drift effects. This can be viewed as the lowest order approximation of the finite Larmor radius effects in consideration of the pressure gradient steepness at the pedestal. The H-mode discharges at Jointed European Torus is reconstructed numerically using the VMEC code [P. Hirshman and J. C. Whitson, Phys. Fluids 26, 3553 (1983)], with bootstrap current taken into account. Generally speaking, the diamagnetic drift effects are stabilizing. Our results show that the effectiveness of diamagnetic stabilization depends sensitively on the safe factor value (q{sub s}) at the safety-factor reversal or plateau region. The diamagnetic stabilization are weaker, when q{sub s} is larger than an integer; while stronger, when q{sub s} is smaller or less larger than an integer. We also find that the diamagnetic drift effects also depend sensitively on the rotation direction. The diamagnetic stabilization in the co-rotation case is stronger than in the counter rotation case with respect to the ion diamagnetic drift direction.

  20. Investigation of ELM [edge localized mode] Dynamics with the Resonant Magnetic Perturbation Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Pankin, Alexei Y.; Kritz, Arnold H.

    2011-07-19

    Topics covered are: anomalous transport and E x B flow shear effects in the H-mode pedestal; RMP (resonant magnetic perturbation) effects in NSTX discharges; development of a scaling of H-mode pedestal in tokamak plasmas with type I ELMs (edge localized modes); and divertor heat load studies.

  1. An effective model for microscopic intrinsic localized modes.

    SciTech Connect

    Kalosakas, G.; Bishop, A. R.

    2001-01-01

    We present a system of coupled degrees of freedom that can effectively describe the localization of intra-molecular excitations in the charge transfer solid PtCl. These excitations correspond to the Raman active motion of chlorines (symmetric Pt - Cl stretching). By fitting two parameters of the model we obtain an accurate description of the strong red-shifts that appear in the overtone Raman spectra of the isotopically pure material. The resulting intrinsic localized modes extend on length scales of the order of nanometers. With the same set of parameters the model can reproduce the specific structure of the Raman spectra of naturally abundant PtCl, which contains a random distribution of chloride isotopes.

  2. Lasing mode regulation and single-mode realization in ZnO whispering gallery microcavities by the Vernier effect.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y Y; Xu, C X; Jiang, M M; Li, J T; Dai, J; Lu, J F; Li, P L

    2016-10-07

    The wide direct bandgap and strong exciton binding energy of ZnO have inspired examinations of ultraviolet lasing over the previous decades. However, regulation of the lasing mode, especially the realization of single mode lasing, is still a challenge. In this study, a ZnO comb-like structure with an array of microrods was selected to design coupled whispering-gallery-mode cavities, wherein the naturally varied air-gap between the adjacent microrods created a flexible condition for optical field coupling without any complicated micromanipulation. Spectral behaviour of lasing and coupling interaction between coupled ZnO microrods were systematically investigated. By regulating the nano-scale inter-space of dual coupled microrods, stable single-mode lasing with a higher Q factor and lower threshold was obtained successfully based on the Vernier effect. The formation conditions and the mechanism of single-mode lasing derived from the coupled ZnO microrods were discussed in detail. It also demonstrated an approach to construct high quality single-mode lasing by tuning the diameters of the coupled ZnO microrods.

  3. Can dispersal mode predict corridor effects on plant parasites?

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, Lauren, L.; Johnson, Brenda, L.; Brudvig, Lars, A.; Haddad, Nick, M.

    2011-08-01

    Habitat corridors, a common management strategy for increasing connectivity in fragmented landscapes, have experimentally validated positive influences on species movement and diversity. However, long-standing concerns that corridors could negatively impact native species by spreading antagonists, such as disease, remain largely untested. Using a large-scale, replicated experiment, we evaluated whether corridors increase the incidence of plant parasites. We found that corridor impacts varied with parasite dispersal mode. Connectivity provided by corridors increased incidence of biotically dispersed parasites (galls on Solidago odora) but not of abiotically dispersed parasites (foliar fungi on S. odora and three Lespedeza spp.). Both biotically and abiotically dispersed parasites responded to edge effects, but the direction of responses varied across species. Although our results require additional tests for generality to other species and landscapes, they suggest that, when establishing conservation corridors, managers should focus on mitigating two potential negative effects: the indirect effects of narrow corridors in creating edges and direct effects of corridors in enhancing connectivity of biotically dispersed parasites.

  4. Morphometric analysis of treatment effects of bone-anchored maxillary protraction in growing Class III patients

    PubMed Central

    De Clerck, H. J.; Cevidanes, L. H.; Franchi, L.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present morphometric investigation was to evaluate the effects of bone-anchored maxillary protraction (BAMP) in the treatment of growing patients with Class III malocclusion. The shape and size changes in the craniofacial configuration of a sample of 26 children with Class III malocclusions consecutively treated with the BAMP protocol were compared with a matched sample of 15 children with untreated Class III malocclusions. All subjects in the two groups were at a prepubertal stage of skeletal development at time of first observation. Average duration of treatment was 14 months. Significant treatment-induced modifications involved both the maxilla and the mandible. The most evident deformation consisted of marked forward displacement of the maxillary complex with more moderate favourable effects in the mandible. Deformations in the vertical dimension were not detected. The significant deformations were associated with significant differences in size in the group treated with the BAMP protocol. PMID:21187527

  5. Effects of terbium (III) on signaling molecules in horseradish.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lihong; Zhang, Xuanbo; Zhou, Qing; Huang, Xiaohua

    2015-03-01

    Rare earth elements, especially terbium (Tb), are high-valence heavy metal elements that accumulate in the environment, and they show toxic effects on plants. Signaling molecules regulate many physiological and biochemical processes in plants. How rare earth elements affect signaling molecules remains largely unknown. In the present study, the effects of Tb(3+) on some extracellular and intracellular signaling molecules (gibberellic acid, abscisic acid, auxin, H2O2, and Ca(2+)) in horseradish leaves were investigated by using high-performance liquid chromatography, X-ray energy spectrometry, and transmission electron microscopy, and Tb(3+) was sprayed on the surface of leaves. Tb(3+) treatment decreased the auxin and gibberellic acid contents and increased the abscisic acid content. These changes in the contents of phytohormones (gibberellic acid, abscisic acid, and auxin) triggered excessive production of intracellular H2O2. Consequently, the increase in H2O2 content stimulated the influx of extracellular Ca(2+) and the release of Ca(2+) from Ca(2+) stores, leading to Ca(2+) overload and the resulting inhibition of physiological and biochemical processes. The effects outlined above were more evident with increasing the concentration of Tb(3+) sprayed on horseradish leaves. Our data provide a possible underlying mechanism of Tb(3+) action on plants.

  6. Resonant magnetic perturbation effect on tearing mode dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frassinetti, L.; Olofsson, K. E. J.; Brunsell, P. R.; Drake, J. R.

    2010-03-01

    The effect of a resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) on the tearing mode (TM) dynamics is experimentally studied in the EXTRAP T2R device. EXTRAP T2R is equipped with a set of sensor coils and active coils connected by a digital controller allowing a feedback control of the magnetic instabilities. The recently upgraded feedback algorithm allows the suppression of all the error field harmonics but keeping a selected harmonic to the desired amplitude, therefore opening the possibility of a clear study of the RMP effect on the corresponding TM. The paper shows that the RMP produces two typical effects: (1) a weak oscillation in the TM amplitude and a modulation in the TM velocity or (2) a strong modulation in the TM amplitude and phase jumps. Moreover, the locking mechanism of a TM to a RMP is studied in detail. It is shown that before the locking, the TM dynamics is characterized by velocity modulation followed by phase jumps. Experimental results are reasonably explained by simulations obtained with a model.

  7. The biological effects and possible modes of action of nanosilver.

    PubMed

    Völker, Carolin; Oetken, Matthias; Oehlmann, Jörg

    2013-01-01

    Novel physicochemical and biological properties have led to a versatile spectrum of applications for nanosized silver particles. Silver nanoparticles are applied primarily for their antimicrobial effects, and may variety of commercially available products have emerged. To better predict and prevent possible environmental impacts from silver nanoparticles that are derived from increasing production volumes and environmental release, more data on the biological effects are needed on appropriate model organisms. We examined the literature that addressed the adverse effects of silver nanoparticles on different levels of biological integration, including in vitro and in vivo test systems. Results of in vitro studies indicate a dose-dependent programmed cell death included by oxidative stress as main possible pathway of toxicity. Furthermore, silver nanoparticles may affect cellular enzymes by interference with free thiol groups and mimicry of endogenous ions. Similar mechanisms may apply for antibacterial effects produced by nonasilver. These effects are primary from the interference nanosilver has with bacterial cell membranes. Few in vivo studies have been performed to evaluated the toxic mode of action of nanosilver or to provide evidence for oxidative stress as an important mechanism of nanosilver toxicity. Organisms that are most acutely sensitive to nanosilver toxicity are the freshwater filter-freeding organisms. Both in vitro and in vivo studies have demonstrated tha silver ions released from nanoparticle surface contribute to the toxicity, and, indeed, some findings indicated a unique nanoparticles effect. For an adequate evaluation of the environmental impact of nanosilver, greater emphasis should be placed on combining mechanistic investigations that are performed in vitro, with results obtained in in vivo test systems. Future in vivo test system studies should emphasize long-term exposure scenarios. Moreover, the dietary uptake of silver nanoparticles and

  8. Effect of the transverse parasitic mode on beam performance for the ADS driver linac in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Peng; Pei, Shi-Lun; Wang, Jiu-Qing; Li, Zhi-Hui

    2015-05-01

    The ADS (Accelerator Driven subcritical System) driver linac in China is designed to run in CW (Continuous Wave) mode with 10 mA designed beam current. In this scenario, the beam-induced parasitic modes in the ADS driver linac may make the beam unstable or deteriorate the beam performance. To evaluate the parasitic mode effect on the beam dynamics systematically, simulation studies using the ROOT-based numerical code SMD have been conducted. The longitudinal beam instability induced by the HOMs (High Order Modes) and SOMs (Same Order Modes) has little effect on the longitudinal beam performance for the current ADS driver linac design based on the 10 MeV/325 MHz injector I from previous studies. Here the transverse parasitic mode (i.e., dipole HOM) effect on the transverse beam performance at the ADS driver linac exit is investigated. To more reasonably quantify the dipole mode effect, the multi-bunch effective emittance is introduced in this paper.

  9. Finite Larmor radius effects on the coupled trapped electron and ion temperature gradient modes

    SciTech Connect

    Sandberg, I.; Isliker, H.; Pavlenko, V. P.

    2007-09-15

    The properties of the coupled trapped electron and toroidal ion temperature gradient modes are investigated using the standard reactive fluid model and taking rigorously into account the effects attributed to the ion polarization drift and to the drifts associated with the lowest-order finite ion Larmor radius effects. In the flat density regime, where the coupling between the modes is relatively weak, the properties of the unstable modes are slightly modified through these effects. For the peak density regions, where the coupling of the modes is rather strong, these second-order drifts determine the spectra of the unstable modes near the marginal conditions.

  10. The Effect of Microbial FE(III) Reduction on Smectite Flocculation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    smectite suspensions. The effects of pH on the clay flocculation were minimal in this study because the value of pH remained nearly constant at pH = 7.0-7.3...rather than the Fe(III) in the observations of suspended particles were made. smectite structure. The pH of the initial aqueous phase was In this...study, the microbiological factor, especially 7.3. No attempt was made to buffer the pH value during the microbial Fe(III) reduction in controlling

  11. Pulsatile Support Mode of BJUT-II Ventricular Assist Device (VAD) has Better Hemodynamic Effects on the Aorta than Constant Speed Mode: A Primary Numerical Study

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Kaiyun; Gao, Bin; Chang, Yu; Zeng, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Background BJUT-II VAD is a novel left ventricular assist device (LVADs), directly implanted into the ascending aorta. The pulsatile support mode is proposed to achieve better unloading performance than constant speed mode. However, the hemodynamic effects of this support mode on the aorta are still unclear. The aim of this study was to clarify the hemodynamic effects BJUT-II VAD under pulsatile support mode on the aorta. Material/Methods Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) studies, based on a patient-specific aortic geometric model, were conducted. Wall shear stress (WSS), averaged WSS (avWSS), oscillatory shear index (OSI), and averaged helicity density (Ha) were calculated to compare the differences in hemodynamic effects between pulsatile support mode and constant speed mode. Results The results show that avWSS under pulsatile support mode is significantly higher than that under constant speed mode (0.955Pa vs. 0.675Pa). Similarly, the OSI value under pulsatile mode is higher than that under constant speed mode (0.104 vs. 0.057). In addition, Ha under pulsatile mode for all selected cross-sections is larger than that under constant mode. Conclusions BJUT-II VAD, under pulsatile control mode, may prevent atherosclerosis lesions and aortic remodeling. The precise effects of pulsatile support mode on atherosclerosis and aortic remodeling need to be further studied in animal experiments. PMID:27363758

  12. Pulsatile Support Mode of BJUT-II Ventricular Assist Device (VAD) has Better Hemodynamic Effects on the Aorta than Constant Speed Mode: A Primary Numerical Study.

    PubMed

    Gu, Kaiyun; Gao, Bin; Chang, Yu; Zeng, Yi

    2016-07-01

    BACKGROUND BJUT-II VAD is a novel left ventricular assist device (LVADs), directly implanted into the ascending aorta. The pulsatile support mode is proposed to achieve better unloading performance than constant speed mode. However, the hemodynamic effects of this support mode on the aorta are still unclear. The aim of this study was to clarify the hemodynamic effects BJUT-II VAD under pulsatile support mode on the aorta. MATERIAL AND METHODS Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) studies, based on a patient-specific aortic geometric model, were conducted. Wall shear stress (WSS), averaged WSS (avWSS), oscillatory shear index (OSI), and averaged helicity density (Ha) were calculated to compare the differences in hemodynamic effects between pulsatile support mode and constant speed mode. RESULTS The results show that avWSS under pulsatile support mode is significantly higher than that under constant speed mode (0.955Pa vs. 0.675Pa). Similarly, the OSI value under pulsatile mode is higher than that under constant speed mode (0.104 vs. 0.057). In addition, Ha under pulsatile mode for all selected cross-sections is larger than that under constant mode. CONCLUSIONS BJUT-II VAD, under pulsatile control mode, may prevent atherosclerosis lesions and aortic remodeling. The precise effects of pulsatile support mode on atherosclerosis and aortic remodeling need to be further studied in animal experiments.

  13. Effectiveness of phosphate removal during anaerobic digestion of waste activated sludge by dosing iron(III).

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xiang; Wang, Jue; Chen, Bing; Wang, Yu; Liu, Jiaqi; Liu, Lubo

    2017-05-15

    Phosphate-Fe(II) precipitation induced by Fe(III) reduction during the anaerobic digestion of excess activated sludge was investigated for the removal of phosphorus and its possible recovery. The experiments were conducted with three Fe(III) sources at 35 °C and 55 °C. The results show that ferrihydrite-Fe(III) was effectively reduced during the anaerobic sludge digestion by 63% and 96% under mesophilic and thermophilic conditions, respectively. Whereas FeCl3-Fe(III) was only mesophilically reducible and the reduction of hematite-Fe(III) was unnoticeable at either temperature. Efficient precipitation of vivianite was not observed although high saturation index values, e.g., >14 (activity reduction not considered), had been reached. This reveals the complexity of vivianite precipitation in anaerobic digestion systems; for example, Fe(II) complexation and organic interference could not be ignored. With ferrihydrite amendments at a Fe/TP of 1.5, methane production from sludge digestion was reduced by 35.1% at 35 °C, and was unaffected when the digestion temperature went up to 55 °C. But, acidic FeCl3 severely inhibited the methane production and consequently the sludge biomass degradation.

  14. Failure mode and effects analysis: too little for too much?

    PubMed

    Dean Franklin, Bryony; Shebl, Nada Atef; Barber, Nick

    2012-07-01

    Failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) is a structured prospective risk assessment method that is widely used within healthcare. FMEA involves a multidisciplinary team mapping out a high-risk process of care, identifying the failures that can occur, and then characterising each of these in terms of probability of occurrence, severity of effects and detectability, to give a risk priority number used to identify failures most in need of attention. One might assume that such a widely used tool would have an established evidence base. This paper considers whether or not this is the case, examining the evidence for the reliability and validity of its outputs, the mathematical principles behind the calculation of a risk prioirty number, and variation in how it is used in practice. We also consider the likely advantages of this approach, together with the disadvantages in terms of the healthcare professionals' time involved. We conclude that although FMEA is popular and many published studies have reported its use within healthcare, there is little evidence to support its use for the quantitative prioritisation of process failures. It lacks both reliability and validity, and is very time consuming. We would not recommend its use as a quantitative technique to prioritise, promote or study patient safety interventions. However, the stage of FMEA involving multidisciplinary mapping process seems valuable and work is now needed to identify the best way of converting this into plans for action.

  15. Coordination Modes in the Formation of Ternary Complexes of Am(III), Cm(III) and Eu(III) with EDTA and NTA: TRLFS, 13C NMR, EXAFS, and Thermodynamics of the complexation.

    SciTech Connect

    Mathur,J.; Thakur, P.; Dodge, C.; Francis, A.; Choppin, G.

    2006-01-01

    The formation and the structure of the ternary complexes of trivalent Am, Cm, and Eu with mixtures of EDTA+NTA (ethylenediamine tetraacetate and nitrilotriacetate) have been studied by time-resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy, {sup 13}C NMR, extended X-ray absorption fine structure, and two-phase metal ion equilibrium distribution at 6.60 m (NaClO{sub 4}) and a hydrogen ion concentration value (pcH) between 3.60 and 11.50. In the ternary complexes, EDTA binds via four carboxylates and two nitrogens, while the binding of the NTA varies with the hydrogen ion concentration, pcH, and the concentration ratios of the metal ion and the ligand. When the concentration ratios of the metal to ligand is low (1:1:1-1:1:2), two ternary complexes, M(EDTA)(NTAH){sup 3-} and M(EDTA)(NTA){sup 4-}, are formed at pcH ca. 9.00 in which NTA binds via three carboxylates, via two carboxylates and one nitrogen, or via two carboxylates and a H{sub 2}O. At higher ratios (1:1:20 and 1:10:10) and pcH's of ca. 9.00 and 11.50, one ternary complex, M(EDTA)(NTA){sup 4-}, is formed in which NTA binds via three carboxylates and not via nitrogen. The two-phase equilibrium distribution studies at tracer concentrations of Am, Cm, and Eu have also confirmed the formation of the ternary complex M(EDTA)(NTA){sup 4-} at temperatures between 0 and 60 {sup o}C. The stability constants (log{beta}{sub 111}) for these metal ions increase with increasing temperature. The endothermic enthalpy and positive entropy indicated a significant effect of cation dehydration in the formation of the ternary complexes at high ionic strength.

  16. No Middle Ground, but Many Mansions: Design Features of Effective Mixed Mode Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pratt, D. D.

    2007-01-01

    In this account a model of communicative functions is used in an attempt to clarify the nature of mixed mode learning delivery. Formulated in research on communication in written mode, the model can be seen to offer insights into the nature of hypermedia communication, as well as helping to identify some key features of effective mixed mode course…

  17. Cr(III) removal by a microalgal isolate, Chlorella miniata: effects of nitrate, chloride and sulfate.

    PubMed

    Han, Xu; Gong, Yu-Feng; Wong, Yuk-Shan; Tam, Nora Fung Yee

    2014-05-01

    In the present study, nitrate, chloride and sulfate anion systems were used to investigate the presence of anions on the removal of Cr(III) by Chlorella miniata. Kinetic studies suggested that the equilibrium time of Cr(III) biosorption was not affected by the presence of different sodium salts, even at the concentration of 1.0 M, and all reached equilibrium after 24 h. Equilibrium experiments showed that the effects of different anions on Cr(III) biosorption varied, and the inhibitory order was SO4 (2-) > Cl(-) > NO3 (-). Langmuir isotherm indicated that the maximum sorption capacity of C. miniata increased with the increase of pH under different anion systems. The strongest inhibition effect of the sulfate system was attributed to the formation of Cr(OH)SO4 aq. and the decrease of Cr(OH)(2+) and Cr(3+) in solution, while the difference of inhibitory effect in the other two anion systems could be accounted by the formation of the inner-sphere surface complex in the nitrate system and the outer-sphere surface complex in the chloride system. The present study suggested that the presence of anions greatly affected the removal of Cr(III) on C. miniata and thereby their transport in the environment.

  18. Quantum dynamics through conical intersections in macrosystems: Combining effective modes and time-dependent Hartree

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basler, Mathias; Gindensperger, Etienne; Meyer, Hans-Dieter; Cederbaum, Lorenz S.

    2008-05-01

    We address the nonadiabatic quantum dynamics of (macro)systems involving a vast number of nuclear degrees of freedom (modes) in the presence of conical intersections. The macrosystem is first decomposed into a system part carrying a few, strongly coupled modes, and an environment, comprising the remaining modes. By successively transforming the modes of the environment, a hierarchy of effective Hamiltonians for the environment can be constructed. Each effective Hamiltonian depends on a reduced number of effective modes, which carry cumulative effects. The environment is described by a few effective modes augmented by a residual environment. In practice, the effective modes can be added to the system's modes and the quantum dynamics of the entire macrosystem can be accurately calculated on a limited time-interval. For longer times, however, the residual environment plays a role. We investigate the possibility to treat fully quantum mechanically the system plus a few effective environmental modes, augmented by the dynamics of the residual environment treated by the time-dependent Hartree (TDH) approximation. While the TDH approximation is known to fail to correctly reproduce the dynamics in the presence of conical intersections, it is shown that its use on top of the effective-mode formalism leads to much better results. Two numerical examples are presented and discussed; one of them is known to be a critical case for the TDH approximation.

  19. The Worker Exposure Failure Modes and Effects Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Cadwallader, L.C.

    2005-05-15

    The Worker Exposure Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (WE-FMEA) is a new approach to quantitatively evaluate worker risks from possible failures of co-located equipment in the complex environment of a magnetic or inertial fusion experiment. For next-step experiments such as the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) or the National Ignition Facility (NIF), the systems and equipment will be larger, handle more throughput or power, and will, in general, be more robust than past experiments. These systems and equipment are necessary to operate the machine, but the rooms are congested with equipment, piping, and cables, which poses a new level of hazard for workers who will perform hands-on maintenance. The WE-FMEA systematically analyzes the nearby equipment and the work environment for equipment failure or inherent hazards, and then develops exposure scenarios. Once identified, the exposure scenarios are evaluated for the worker hazards and quantitative worker risk is calculated. Then risk scenarios are quantitatively compared to existing statistical data on worker injuries; high-risk scenarios can be identified and addressed in more detail to determine the proper means to reduce, mitigate, or protect against the hazard. The WE-FMEA approach is described and a cooling system maintenance example is given.

  20. FMEA, the alternative process hazard method. [Failure Mode Effects Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Goyal, R.K. )

    1993-05-01

    Failure mode effects analysis (FMEA) is an old reliability/assurance tool finding its way into the HPI. Not popular yet, this hazard technique has some viable applications that can improve hazard assessment data. Notably, FMEA studies can identify possible areas for improvement that may have not been discovered using other methods. Also, FMEA is not as labor intensive and costly as other process hazard analysis (PHA) methods. PSHA 1910.119 set in place an informational structure whose main purpose is the reduction of potential accidents and minimizing risks in the event of an accident. Consequently, HPI operators must evaluate their process systems and identify potential major hazards, such as fires, explosions and accidental release of toxic/hazardous chemicals, and protect their facilities, employees, the public and the environment. But, which PHA method(s) apply to a particular plant or process still remains a difficult question. This paper describes what FMEA is; types of FMEA; how to conduct a FMEA study; comparison with HAZOP (hazard and operability study); computer software; applicability of FMEA; and examples of its use.

  1. Size effects of nanocrystalline TiO2 on As(V) and As(III) adsorption and As(III) photooxidation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhonghou; Meng, Xiaoguang

    2009-09-15

    The physicochemical properties of TiO(2) particles in the diameter range between 6.6 and 30.1 nm and the effect of the crystalline size on arsenic adsorption and photocatalytical oxidation were investigated. TiO(2) nanoparticles of different sizes were single-phase anatase. The adsorption capacity of the TiO(2) for As(III) and As(V) increased linearly with the N(2) Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area (S(BET)) of the particles. There was not much difference in the rate of As(III) photooxidation when the diameter of the TiO(2) nanoparticles was between 6.6 and 14.8 nm. However, the As(III) photooxidation rate clearly decreased when the particle size increased to 30.1 nm. Arsenite photooxidation data could be fitted with a first-order kinetics equation.

  2. Parker Instability in Nonuniform Gravitational Fields. III. The Effect of a Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamaya, Hideyuki; Horiuchi, Toshiro; Matsumoto, Ryoji; Hanawa, Tomoyuki; Shibata, Kazunari; Mineshige, Shin

    1997-09-01

    Magnetized gas layers in gravitational fields (e.g., accretion disks and galactic disks) can be subject to the Parker instability, an undular mode of the magnetic buoyancy instabilities. By means of a linear stability analysis, we examined the effects of hot, tenuous regions (``coronae'') on the growth of the Parker instability in the underlying magnetized gas layers. As an unperturbed state, we consider the magnetized gas layers in static equilibrium. The stratified gas layers are threaded by horizontal magnetic fields in the x-direction. The temperature varies almost discontinuously at the coronal base in the z-direction. The ratio of magnetic pressure to gas pressure, α, is assumed to be constant. Our analysis has confirmed that the presence of a corona reduces the growth rate of the Parker instability and increases the critical wavelength. It is found that the growth of the Parker instability is more sensitive to the height of the coronal base than the temperature ratio between the disk and the corona is. In particular, the Parker instability is stabilized substantially when the coronal base lies below the height of maximum gravitational acceleration. When the wavenumber vector of the perturbation is parallel to the magnetic field (ky = 0), the growth rates of all modes in the disk are reduced considerably in the limit of the vanishing coronal base height. The first harmonic mode (1h-mode with odd symmetric velocity eigenfunctions with respect to the equatorial plane) is more easily stabilized by coronae than the fundamental mode is (f-mode with even symmetric velocity eigenfunctions). This is because global convective motion across the equatorial plane is allowed for the f-mode even when ky = 0, whereas it is not allowed for the 1h-mode. For the f-mode, furthermore, we find that the smallest possible γ (critical gamma) against the instability is γcrit = 1 + α, regardless of the value of ky. The reason for this is discussed briefly.

  3. Mixed-mode fracture of ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Petrovic, J.J.

    1985-01-01

    The mixed-mode fracture behavior of ceramic materials is of importance for monolithic ceramics in order to predict the onset of fracture under generalized loading conditions and for ceramic composites to describe crack deflection toughening mechanisms. Experimental data on surface flaw mixed-mode fracture in various ceramics indicate that the flaw-plane normal stress at fracture decreases with increasing in-flaw-plane shear stress, although present data exhibit a fairly wide range in details of this sigma - tau relationship. Fracture from large cracks suggests that Mode II has a greater effect on Mode I fracture than Mode III. A comparison of surface flaw and large crack mixed-mode I-II fracture responses indicated that surface flaw behavior is influenced by shear resistance effects.

  4. Collisionless microtearing modes in hot tokamaks: Effect of trapped electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Swamy, Aditya K.; Ganesh, R.; Brunner, S.; Vaclavik, J.; Villard, L.

    2015-07-15

    Collisionless microtearing modes have recently been found linearly unstable in sharp temperature gradient regions of large aspect ratio tokamaks. The magnetic drift resonance of passing electrons has been found to be sufficient to destabilise these modes above a threshold plasma β. A global gyrokinetic study, including both passing electrons as well as trapped electrons, shows that the non-adiabatic contribution of the trapped electrons provides a resonant destabilization, especially at large toroidal mode numbers, for a given aspect ratio. The global 2D mode structures show important changes to the destabilising electrostatic potential. The β threshold for the onset of the instability is found to be generally downshifted by the inclusion of trapped electrons. A scan in the aspect ratio of the tokamak configuration, from medium to large but finite values, clearly indicates a significant destabilizing contribution from trapped electrons at small aspect ratio, with a diminishing role at larger aspect ratios.

  5. Conformational Changes in the Endosomal Sorting Complex Required for the Transport III Subunit Ist1 Lead to Distinct Modes of ATPase Vps4 Regulation.

    PubMed

    Tan, Jason; Davies, Brian A; Payne, Johanna A; Benson, Linda M; Katzmann, David J

    2015-12-11

    Intralumenal vesicle formation of the multivesicular body is a critical step in the delivery of endocytic cargoes to the lysosome for degradation. Endosomal sorting complex required for transport III (ESCRT-III) subunits polymerize on endosomal membranes to facilitate membrane budding away from the cytoplasm to generate these intralumenal vesicles. The ATPase Vps4 remodels and disassembles ESCRT-III, but the manner in which Vps4 activity is coordinated with ESCRT-III function remains unclear. Ist1 is structurally homologous to ESCRT-III subunits and has been reported to inhibit Vps4 function despite the presence of a microtubule-interacting and trafficking domain-interacting motif (MIM) capable of stimulating Vps4 in the context of other ESCRT-III subunits. Here we report that Ist1 inhibition of Vps4 ATPase activity involves two elements in Ist1: the MIM itself and a surface containing a conserved ELYC sequence. In contrast, the MIM interaction, in concert with a more open conformation of the Ist1 core, resulted in stimulation of Vps4. Addition of the ESCRT-III subunit binding partner of Ist1, Did2, also converted Ist1 from an inhibitor to a stimulator of Vps4 ATPase activity. Finally, distinct regulation of Vps4 by Ist1 corresponded with altered ESCRT-III disassembly in vitro. Together, these data support a model in which Ist1-Did2 interactions during ESCRT-III polymerization coordinate Vps4 activity with the timing of ESCRT-III disassembly.

  6. Influence of retrieval mode on effects of production: Evidence for costs in free recall.

    PubMed

    Mama, Yaniv; Icht, Michal

    2016-06-01

    Study modality (visual, auditory) of words as well as production mode (reading aloud, writing down) have been shown to influence the production effect (PE). When study words are presented visually, reading them aloud yields superior memory. However, when the same study words are presented aurally, writing them down leads to superior memory. Missing in PE studies is the variable of retrieval mode (written, aloud), which was addressed in the present study. In a pair of experiments, we manipulated the 3 variables-study modality, production mode, and retrieval mode-in a factorial fashion. With visual study, aloud production mode (vocalizing) was found to be superior to written production, in both retrieval modes (written and aloud). However, the difference between the productions was significantly smaller in the aloud retrieval mode relative to the written retrieval mode. With auditory study, written production mode was superior to aloud production mode, in the written as well as in the aloud retrieval modes. Here, the difference between the productions was significantly smaller in the written relative to the aloud retrieval mode. In other words, the difference between productions was smaller for the retrieval mode that matched the superior production. We interpret these findings using a retrieval-cost account. (PsycINFO Database Record

  7. Strain-effect transistors: Theoretical study on the effects of external strain on III-nitride high-electron-mobility transistors on flexible substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Shervin, Shahab; Asadirad, Mojtaba; Kim, Seung-Hwan; Ravipati, Srikanth; Lee, Keon-Hwa; Bulashevich, Kirill; Ryou, Jae-Hyun

    2015-11-09

    This paper presents strain-effect transistors (SETs) based on flexible III-nitride high-electron-mobility transistors (HEMTs) through theoretical calculations. We show that the electronic band structures of InAlGaN/GaN thin-film heterostructures on flexible substrates can be modified by external bending with a high degree of freedom using polarization properties of the polar semiconductor materials. Transfer characteristics of the HEMT devices, including threshold voltage and transconductance, are controlled by varied external strain. Equilibrium 2-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) is enhanced with applied tensile strain by bending the flexible structure with the concave-side down (bend-down condition). 2DEG density is reduced and eventually depleted with increasing compressive strain in bend-up conditions. The operation mode of different HEMT structures changes from depletion- to enchantment-mode or vice versa depending on the type and magnitude of external strain. The results suggest that the operation modes and transfer characteristics of HEMTs can be engineered with an optimum external bending strain applied in the device structure, which is expected to be beneficial for both radio frequency and switching applications. In addition, we show that drain currents of transistors based on flexible InAlGaN/GaN can be modulated only by external strain without applying electric field in the gate. The channel conductivity modulation that is obtained by only external strain proposes an extended functional device, gate-free SETs, which can be used in electro-mechanical applications.

  8. The effect of magnetopause motion on fast mode resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartinger, M. D.; Welling, D.; Viall, N. M.; Moldwin, M. B.; Ridley, A.

    2014-10-01

    The Earth's magnetosphere supports several types of ultralow frequency (ULF) waves. These include fast mode resonance (FMR): cavity modes, waveguide modes, and tunneling modes/virtual resonance. The magnetopause, often treated as the outer boundary for cavity/waveguide modes in the dayside magnetosphere, is not stationary. A rapidly changing outer boundary condition—e.g., due to rapid magnetopause motion—is not favorable for FMR generation and may explain the sparseness of FMR observations in the outer magnetosphere. We examine how magnetopause motion affects the dayside magnetosphere's ability to sustain FMR with idealized Space Weather Modeling Framework (SWMF) simulations using the BATS-R-US global magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) code coupled with the Ridley Ionosphere Model (RIM). We present observations of FMR in BATS-R-US, reproducing results from other global MHD codes. We further show that FMR is present for a wide range of solar wind conditions, even during periods with large and rapid magnetopause displacements. We compare our simulation results to FMR observations in the dayside magnetosphere, finding that FMR occurrence does not depend on solar wind dynamic pressure, which can be used as a proxy for dynamic pressure fluctuations and magnetopause perturbations. Our results demonstrate that other explanations besides a nonstationary magnetopause—such as the inability to detect FMR in the presence of other ULF wave modes with large amplitudes—are required to explain the rarity of FMR observations in the outer magnetosphere.

  9. A Meta-Analysis of Testing Mode Effects in Grade K-12 Mathematics Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Shudong; Jiao, Hong; Young, Michael J.; Brooks, Thomas; Olson, John

    2007-01-01

    This study conducted a meta-analysis of computer-based and paper-and-pencil administration mode effects on K-12 student mathematics tests. Both initial and final results based on fixed- and random-effects models are presented. The results based on the final selected studies with homogeneous effect sizes show that the administration mode had no…

  10. The Effect of Chin-cup Therapy in Class III Malocclusion: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Mousoulea, Sophia; Tsolakis, Ioannis; Ferdianakis, Efstratios; Tsolakis, Apostolos I.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The treatment of Class III malocclusion has been challenging for orthodontists. Among a plethora of treatment modalities, the chin-cup is considered a traditional appliance for early orthopedic intervention. Objective: The present study aims to investigate the current scientific evidence regarding the effectiveness of chin-cup therapy in Class III malocclusion of prognathic growing patients. Method: A systematic review of the literature was conducted using PubMed/Medline and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials from January 1954 to October 2015. Articles were selected based on established inclusion/ exclusion criteria. Results: The search strategy resulted in 3285 articles.14 studies were selected for the final analysis. They were all CCTs, 13 of retrospective and 1 of prospective design. Methodological quality was evaluated by a risk of bias assessment, as suggested by the Cochrane Risk of Bias Assessment Tool for Non-Randomized Studies on Interventions. The reported evidence presented favorable short-term outcomes both in hard and soft tissues improving the Class III profile, as well as desirable dento-alveolar changes, positively affecting the Class III malocclusion. Conclusion: There is considerable agreement between studies that chin-cup therapy can be considered for the short-term treatment of growing patients with Class III malocclusion, as indicated by favorable changes both in the hard and soft tissues. The existence of considerable risk of bias in all selected studies and the unclear long-term effectiveness of chin-cup therapy highlight the need for further investigation to draw reliable conclusions. PMID:28077971

  11. Effects of travel mode on exposures to particulate air pollution.

    PubMed

    Briggs, David J; de Hoogh, Kees; Morris, Chloe; Gulliver, John

    2008-01-01

    Monitoring was carried out of particulate concentrations whilst simultaneously walking and driving 48 routes in London, UK. Monitoring was undertaken during May and June 2005. Route lengths ranged from 601 to 1351 m, and most routes were travelled in both directions. Individual journey times ranged from 1.5 to 15 min by car (average 3.7 min) and 7.3 to 30 min (average 12.8 min) whilst walking; car trips were therefore repeated up to 5 times for each single walking trip and the results averaged for the route. Car trips were made with windows closed and the ventilation system on a moderate setting. Results show that mean exposures while walking are greatly in excess of those while driving, by a factor 4.7 for the coarse particle mass (PM10-PM2.5), 2.2 for the fine particle mass (PM2.5-PM1), 1.9 for the very fine particle mass (mode from car to walking in response to policies aimed at encouraging a modal shift in travel behavior are thus likely to experience considerably increased journey-time personal exposures to traffic-related air pollution. More effort is consequently needed to increase separation between road vehicles and pedestrians if negative effects of these policies are to be avoided.

  12. Effect of tris(3-hydroxy-4-pyridinonate) iron(III) complexes on iron uptake and storage in soybean (Glycine max L.).

    PubMed

    Santos, Carla S; Carvalho, Susana M P; Leite, Andreia; Moniz, Tânia; Roriz, Mariana; Rangel, António O S S; Rangel, Maria; Vasconcelos, Marta W

    2016-09-01

    Iron deficiency chlorosis (IDC) is a serious environmental problem affecting the growth of several crops in the world. The application of synthetic Fe(III) chelates is still one of the most common measures to correct IDC and the search for more effective Fe chelates remains an important issue. Herein, we propose a tris(3-hydroxy-4-pyridinonate) iron(III) complex, Fe(mpp)3, as an IDC corrector. Different morphological, biochemical and molecular parameters were assessed as a first step towards understanding its mode of action, compared with that of the commercial fertilizer FeEDDHA. Plants treated with the pyridinone iron(III) complexes were significantly greener and had increased biomass. The total Fe content was measured using ICP-OES and plants treated with pyridinone complexes accumulated about 50% more Fe than those treated with the commercial chelate. In particular, plants supplied with compound Fe(mpp)3 were able to translocate iron from the roots to the shoots and did not elicit the expression of the Fe-stress related genes FRO2 and IRT1. These results suggest that 3,4-HPO iron(III) chelates could be a potential new class of plant fertilizing agents.

  13. Children’s Social Desirability: Effects of Test Assessment Mode

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Patricia H.; Baxter, Suzanne D.; Royer, Julie A.; Hitchcock, David B.; Smith, Albert F.; Collins, Kathleen L.; Guinn, Caroline H.; Smith, Alyssa L.; Puryear, Megan P.; Vaadi, Kate K.; Finney, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    This study examined a recently developed short version of the Children’s Social Desirability (CSD-S) scale with 157 fourth-grade children. Of interest was a) whether one-month test-retest reliability would vary as a function of test assessment mode (interview or classroom), gender, race, SES, and BMI percentile, and b) whether the degree of social desirability would vary as a function of these same variables. The CSD-S scale showed good test-retest reliability for both interview and classroom assessment modes (.85 and .83, respectively). Internal consistency also was good (first interview administration = .84; first classroom administration = .81). Reliability was good and did not vary significantly over assessment mode or any child subgroup variables, suggesting that the CSD-S scale is appropriate for general use. The interview mode elicited significantly more socially desirable answers than did the classroom mode. Social desirability did not differ across child subgroups. Some of these findings were examined, and replicated, on another sample. Thus, the CSD-S scale may be used with diverse groups of children to a) reliably assess a social desirability bias that may systematically bias other self-reports of interest to researchers and b) examine individual differences in degree of social desirability. PMID:25870465

  14. Children's Social Desirability: Effects of Test Assessment Mode.

    PubMed

    Miller, Patricia H; Baxter, Suzanne D; Royer, Julie A; Hitchcock, David B; Smith, Albert F; Collins, Kathleen L; Guinn, Caroline H; Smith, Alyssa L; Puryear, Megan P; Vaadi, Kate K; Finney, Christopher J

    2015-09-01

    This study examined a recently developed short version of the Children's Social Desirability (CSD-S) scale with 157 fourth-grade children. Of interest was a) whether one-month test-retest reliability would vary as a function of test assessment mode (interview or classroom), gender, race, SES, and BMI percentile, and b) whether the degree of social desirability would vary as a function of these same variables. The CSD-S scale showed good test-retest reliability for both interview and classroom assessment modes (.85 and .83, respectively). Internal consistency also was good (first interview administration = .84; first classroom administration = .81). Reliability was good and did not vary significantly over assessment mode or any child subgroup variables, suggesting that the CSD-S scale is appropriate for general use. The interview mode elicited significantly more socially desirable answers than did the classroom mode. Social desirability did not differ across child subgroups. Some of these findings were examined, and replicated, on another sample. Thus, the CSD-S scale may be used with diverse groups of children to a) reliably assess a social desirability bias that may systematically bias other self-reports of interest to researchers and b) examine individual differences in degree of social desirability.

  15. Quantum cascade emission in the III-nitride material system designed with effective interface grading

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Alex Y. Huang, Tzu-Yung; Zah, Chung-En; Gmachl, Claire F.; Bhat, Rajaram; Wang, Jie; Allerman, Andrew A.

    2015-09-28

    We report the realization of quantum cascade (QC) light emission in the III-nitride material system, designed with effective interface grading (EIG). EIG induces a continuous transition between wells and barriers in the quantum confinement, which alters the eigenstate system and even delocalizes the states with higher energy. Fully transverse-magnetic spontaneous emission is observed from the fabricated III-nitride QC structure, with a center wavelength of ∼4.9 μm and a full width at half maximum of ∼110 meV, both in excellent agreement with theoretical predictions. A multi-peak photo-response spectrum is also measured from the QC structure, which again agrees well with theoretical calculations and verifies the effects of EIG.

  16. Assessment of the transition strip effect in the transonic flow over the sounding rocket Sonda III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falcão Filho, J. B. P.; Reis, M. L. C. C.; Francisco, C. P. F.; Silva, L. M.

    2016-11-01

    Measurements of normalized pressure distribution are carried out over a 1:8 scale half-model of the Sonda III sounding rocket. The objective is to analyze the effect of the implementation of transition devices on the flow over the vehicle. Measurements show that the presence of the transition devices affect pressure distributions in different Mach numbers around the inter-stage region of Sonda III depending on its location and independently of the turbulent transition method employed. The study of these effects plays a significant role for future developments, since transition phenomena and the modification of the boundary layer behaviour due to the expansion can alter the load distributions and the turbulent structures of the flow. Furthermore, the experimental verification of such phenomena is crucial for the correct implementation of computational fluid dynamics calculations, as they might be able to capture the correct flow behaviour in these regions.

  17. Alpha-particle effects on ballooning flute modes in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Andrushchenko, Z.N.; Bijko, A.Y.; Cheremnykh, O.K. )

    1990-11-01

    In this paper a more accurate dispersion equation for ideal ballooning flute modes in a plasma with alpha particles is obtained. It is shown that circulating and trapped alpha particles generate the eigenbranches of the mode oscillations with frequencies {omega} {approx lt} {omega}{sub *i}, where {omega}{sub *i}, is the ion drift frequency. The relevant growth rates and frequencies are found. It is ascertained that in the frequency range {omega}{sub *i} {lt} {omega} {lt} {bar {omega}{sub Db}}, where {bar {omega}{sub Db}} is the magnetic drift frequency average over a bounce period, trapped alpha particles may generate forced oscillations that influence the ideal ballooning flute mode stability boundary. It is shown that the stability may be improved for certain plasma parameters and trapped alpha-particle pressures.

  18. Gd(III) complexes for electron-electron dipolar spectroscopy: Effects of deuteration, pH and zero field splitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garbuio, Luca; Zimmermann, Kaspar; Häussinger, Daniel; Yulikov, Maxim

    2015-10-01

    Spectral parameters of Gd(III) complexes are intimately linked to the performance of the Gd(III)-nitroxide or Gd(III)-Gd(III) double electron-electron resonance (DEER or PELDOR) techniques, as well as to that of relaxation induced dipolar modulation enhancement (RIDME) spectroscopy with Gd(III) ions. These techniques are of interest for applications in structural biology, since they can selectively detect site-to-site distances in biomolecules or biomolecular complexes in the nanometer range. Here we report relaxation properties, echo detected EPR spectra, as well as the magnitude of the echo reduction effect in Gd(III)-nitroxide DEER for a series of Gadolinium(III) complexes with chelating agents derived from tetraazacyclododecane. We observed that solvent deuteration does not only lengthen the relaxation times of Gd(III) centers but also weakens the DEER echo reduction effect. Both of these phenomena lead to an improved signal-to-noise ratios or, alternatively, longer accessible distance range in pulse EPR measurements. The presented data enrich the knowledge on paramagnetic Gd(III) chelate complexes in frozen solutions, and can help optimize the experimental conditions for most types of the pulse measurements of the electron-electron dipolar interactions.

  19. Investigating higher order modes effects on thermionic RF gun transverse emittance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajabi, A.; Shokri, B.; Feghhi, S. A. H.

    2017-02-01

    As the excitation of higher order modes in high gradient accelerating cavities of the RF gun negatively influences electron beam quality, in the present work a theory is obtained based on generalizing Panofsky-Wenzel theorem to study the effect of transverse magnetic modes on transverse emittance growth of the RF gun. Based on this theory, the impact of higher order modes on transverse momentum is investigated. Based on analysis and simulation results, it is shown that different RF modes result in divergence or convergence effects on beam transverse dynamics. The presence of dipole and quadrupole modes can enhance the transverse emittance by 320 % and 450 % , respectively. The compound effect of the presence of two higher order modes results in 470 % transverse emittance growth.

  20. The effect of lanthanum(III) and cerium(III) ions between layers of manganese oxide on water oxidation.

    PubMed

    Najafpour, Mohammad Mahdi; Isaloo, Mohsen Abbasi; Hołyńska, Małgorzata; Shen, Jian-Ren; Allakhverdiev, Suleyman I; Allakhverdiev, Suleyman

    2015-12-01

    Manganese oxide structure with lanthanum(III) or cerium(III) ions between the layers was synthesized by a simple method. The ratio of Mn to Ce or La in samples was 0.00, 0.04, 0.08, 0.16, 0.32, 0.5, 0.82, or 1.62. The compounds were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction studies, and atomic absorption spectroscopy. The compounds show efficient catalytic activity of water oxidation in the presence of cerium(IV) ammonium nitrate with a turnover frequency of 1.6 mmol O2/mol Mn.s. In contrast to the water-oxidizing complex in Photosystem II, calcium(II) has no specific role to enhance the water-oxidizing activity of the layered manganese oxides and other cations can be replaced without any significant decrease in water-oxidizing activities of these layered Mn oxides. Based on this and previously reported results from oxygen evolution in the presence of H 2 (18) O, we discuss the mechanism and the important factors influencing the water-oxidizing activities of the manganese oxides.

  1. 75 FR 11530 - Crystal Lake Wind III, LLC, et al.; Notice of Effectiveness of Exempt Wholesale Generator Status

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-11

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Crystal Lake Wind III, LLC, et al.; Notice of Effectiveness of Exempt Wholesale Generator Status March 4, 2010. Docket Nos. Crystal Lake Wind III, LLC EG10-6-000 GardenGarden Wind, LLC EG10-7-000 Star Point Wind Project LLC EG10-8-000 Nacogdoches Power, LLC EG10-9-000...

  2. Failure mode and effects analysis outputs: are they valid?

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Failure Mode and Effects Analysis (FMEA) is a prospective risk assessment tool that has been widely used within the aerospace and automotive industries and has been utilised within healthcare since the early 1990s. The aim of this study was to explore the validity of FMEA outputs within a hospital setting in the United Kingdom. Methods Two multidisciplinary teams each conducted an FMEA for the use of vancomycin and gentamicin. Four different validity tests were conducted: · Face validity: by comparing the FMEA participants’ mapped processes with observational work. · Content validity: by presenting the FMEA findings to other healthcare professionals. · Criterion validity: by comparing the FMEA findings with data reported on the trust’s incident report database. · Construct validity: by exploring the relevant mathematical theories involved in calculating the FMEA risk priority number. Results Face validity was positive as the researcher documented the same processes of care as mapped by the FMEA participants. However, other healthcare professionals identified potential failures missed by the FMEA teams. Furthermore, the FMEA groups failed to include failures related to omitted doses; yet these were the failures most commonly reported in the trust’s incident database. Calculating the RPN by multiplying severity, probability and detectability scores was deemed invalid because it is based on calculations that breach the mathematical properties of the scales used. Conclusion There are significant methodological challenges in validating FMEA. It is a useful tool to aid multidisciplinary groups in mapping and understanding a process of care; however, the results of our study cast doubt on its validity. FMEA teams are likely to need different sources of information, besides their personal experience and knowledge, to identify potential failures. As for FMEA’s methodology for scoring failures, there were discrepancies between the teams’ estimates

  3. Analytical relation between effective mode field area and waveguide dispersion in microstructure fibers.

    PubMed

    Moenster, Mathias; Steinmeyer, Günter; Iliew, Rumen; Lederer, Falk; Petermann, Klaus

    2006-11-15

    For optical fibers exhibiting a radially symmetric refractive index profile, there exists an analytical relation that connects waveguide dispersion and the Petermann-II mode field radius. We extend the usefulness of this relation to the nonradially symmetric case of microstructure fibers in the anomalous dispersion regime, yielding a simple relation between dispersion and effective mode field area. Assuming a Gaussian mode distribution, we derive a fundamental upper limit for the effective mode field area that is required to obtain a certain amount of anomalous waveguide dispersion. This relation is demonstrated to show excellent agreement for fiber designs suited for supercontinuum generation and soliton lasers in the near infrared.

  4. Analytical relation between effective mode field area and waveguide dispersion in microstructure fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moenster, Mathias; Steinmeyer, Günter; Iliew, Rumen; Lederer, Falk; Petermann, Klaus

    2006-11-01

    For optical fibers exhibiting a radially symmetric refractive index profile, there exists an analytical relation that connects waveguide dispersion and the Petermann-II mode field radius. We extend the usefulness of this relation to the nonradially symmetric case of microstructure fibers in the anomalous dispersion regime, yielding a simple relation between dispersion and effective mode field area. Assuming a Gaussian mode distribution, we derive a fundamental upper limit for the effective mode field area that is required to obtain a certain amount of anomalous waveguide dispersion. This relation is demonstrated to show excellent agreement for fiber designs suited for supercontinuum generation and soliton lasers in the near infrared.

  5. Effect of Deformation Mode on the Wear Behavior of NiTi Shape Memory Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Lina; Liu, Yong

    2016-06-01

    Owing to good biocompatibility, good fatigue resistance, and excellent superelasticity, various types of bio-medical devices based on NiTi shape memory alloy (SMA) have been developed. Due to the complexity in deformation mode in service, for example NiTi implants, accurate assessment/prediction of the surface wear process is difficult. This study aims at providing a further insight into the effect of deformation mode on the wear behavior of NiTi SMA. In the present study, two types of wear testing modes were used, namely sliding wear mode and reciprocating wear mode, to investigate the effect of deformation mode on the wear behavior of NiTi SMA in both martensitic and austenitic states. It was found that, when in martensitic state and under high applied loads, sliding wear mode resulted in more surface damage as compared to that under reciprocating wear mode. When in austenitic state, although similar trends in the coefficient of friction were observed, the coefficient of friction and surface damage in general is less under reciprocating mode than under sliding mode. These observations were further discussed in terms of different deformation mechanisms involved in the wear tests, in particular, the reversibility of martensite variant reorientation and stress-induced phase transformation, respectively.

  6. Vibrational Modes and the Dynamic Solvent Effect in Electron and Proton Transfer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-05-18

    Vibrational Modes and the Dynamic Solvent Effect in Electron and Proton Transfer Paul F. Barbara, Gilbert C. Walker and Terrance P. Smith Science, 256, 975...Copies of the form are available from cognizant grant of contract administrator 92-13720i|i|Hfl|fl MARTICLES Vibrational Modes and the Dynamic Solvent...photosynthetic systems. (X + AGO)’ The kinetic impact of high-frequency In order to set the stage for a discussion A = (1) vibrational modes in electron

  7. Effect of confinement on the mode dynamics of dipole clusters.

    PubMed

    Schella, André; Melzer, André; July, Christoph; Bechinger, Clemens

    2015-02-14

    Dynamical properties of colloidal clusters composed of paramagnetic beads are presented. The clusters were trapped either in a parabolic trough or in a hard-wall confinement. In order to access the dynamics of the ensembles, the instantaneous normal mode (INM) approach is utilized, which uses cluster configurations as an input. The peaks in the mode spectra weaken when the system size is increased and when the coupling strength is lowered. The short-time diffusive properties of the clusters are deduced using the INM technique. It is found that angular diffusion is always larger than radial diffusion regardless of the shape of the external trap. Further, short-time diffusion seems to be almost independent of the coupling strength in the solid regime, but decreases with increasing packing fraction and size of the ensembles. In general, it is found that diffusion is larger for parabolically confined than for hard-wall trapped clusters.

  8. Anharmonicity effects in the frictionlike mode of graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menéndez, C.; Lobato, A.; Abbasi-Pérez, D.; Fernández-Núñez, J.; Baonza, V. G.; Recio, J. M.

    2016-04-01

    Graphite is a prototypical solid lubricant demanding a thorough understanding of its low-friction behavior. The E2 g(1) Raman active vibrational mode of graphite is associated with the rigid-layer relative movement of its graphene sheets. Thus, this mode can provide a good means of exploring the low resistance of graphene layers to slip with respect to each other. To take advantage of this fact, the anharmonicity of the E2 g(1) mode has to be carefully characterized and evaluated since the atomic arrangement of carbon atoms in the ambient condition ABA stacking of graphite evidences potential asymmetry. The calculated one-dimensional energetic profile of the E2 g(1) mode reveals this local anisotropy around the energy minima and can be microscopically interpreted in terms of electron density interactions. Morse-type potentials accurately fit the energetic profiles at different interlayer separations, and provide simple analytical expressions for evaluating harmonic and anharmonic contributions to the Γ -point E2 g(1) frequency ωE2g(1 ) under a perturbative algebraic treatment. We quantify how the anharmonic contribution increases with the available energy (E ) at zero pressure, and how this contribution decreases as hydrostatic pressure (p ) or uniaxial stress is applied for a given available energy. The calculated ωE2g(1 )-p and ωE2g(1 )-E trends indicate an increasing (decreasing) of frictional forces in graphite with pressure (temperature). Our conclusions are supported by the good agreement of the calculated frequencies with existing Raman experiments under hydrostatic pressure conditions.

  9. Effects of light curing modes and ethanol-wet bonding on dentin bonding properties*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mu-zi; Wang, Jin-rui; Liu, Hong; Wang, Xia; Gan, Kang; Liu, Xiu-ju; Niu, De-li; Song, Xiao-qing

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This study explored the effects of different light curing modes and ethanol-wet bonding on dentin bonding strength and durability. Methods: A total of 54 molars were randomly divided into three groups: Single Bond 2, Gluma Comfort Bond, and N-Bond. Based on the three light-curing modes and presence or absence of ethanol pretreatment, the samples were assigned to six subgroups: high-light mode, ethanol pretreatment+high-light mode, soft-start mode, ethanol pretreatment+soft-start mode, standard mode, and ethanol pretreatment+standard mode. All samples were bonded with resin based on the experimental groups. After 24 h and 6 months of water storage, a universal testing machine was used to measure microtensile bond strength. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was applied to observe mixed layer morphology. Results: The 24-h and 6-month microtensile bond strengths of the ethanol pretreatment groups were significantly higher than those of the non-ethanol pretreatment groups at the same light modes (P<0.05). With or without ethanol pretreatment, the microtensile bond strengths of the high-light modes were significantly lower than those of the soft-start modes and standard modes (P<0.05). The microtensile bond strengths of samples from the 6-month water storage group significantly decreased compared with those of samples from the 24-h water storage group (P<0.05). The soft-start groups and standard groups formed better mixed layers than the high-light mode groups, whereas the ethanol pretreatment groups formed more uniform mixed layers than those without ethanol pretreatment. Conclusions: Ethanol-wet bonding technique, soft-start, and standard modes could improve dentin bonding properties. PMID:27604862

  10. The effect of organic compounds in the oxidation kinetics of Cr(III) by H 2O 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pettine, Maurizio; Gennari, Francesca; Campanella, Luigi; Millero, Frank J.

    2008-12-01

    The oxidation of Cr(III) has been studied in NaCl solutions in the presence of two siderophore models, acetohydroxamic acid (Aha) and benzohydroxamic acid (Bha), the natural siderophore Desferal (DFOB) and the synthetic aminocarboxilate (ethylenedinitrilo)-tetra-acetic acid (EDTA) as a function of pH (8-9), ionic strength (0.01-2 M) and temperature (10-50 °C), at different Cr(III)-organic compound ratios. The addition of Aha and Bha caused the rates to increase at low ligand/Cr(III) ratios and decrease at high ratios. The variation of the pseudo first order rate constant ( k1) as a function of the ligand concentration has been attributed to the formation of three Cr(III)-organo species (1:1, 1:2, 1:3), which can form in the presence of monohydroxamic acids. A kinetic model has been developed that gives a value of 600 (min -1) for the pseudo first order rate constant k and values approaching zero for k and k. These kinetic results demonstrate that these monohydroxamic acids are able to bind with Cr(III) under experimental conditions that may occur in natural waters and can increase the oxidation rates of Cr(III) with H 2O 2 by a factor of 3.5 at an Aha/Cr(III) ratio of about 50-100. The monohydroxamic acids also affect the rates on aged products of Cr(III), suggesting that these ligands are able to affect the oxidation rates by releasing reactive Cr(III). DFOB and EDTA do not have a great effect on the oxidation of Cr(III) with H 2O 2. This is thought to be due to the much longer times they need to form complexes with Cr(III) compared to Aha and Bha. The rates for the formation of DFOB and EDTA complexes with Cr(III) are not competitive with the rates of the formation of aged Cr(III). After allowing Cr(III) and DFOB to react for 5 days to form the complex, reaction rates of Cr(III) with H 2O 2 appear to be lowered probably because of steric hindrance of the chelated Cr(III).

  11. A Model of Energetic Ion Effects on Pressure Driven Tearing Modes in Tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halfmoon, M. R.; Brennan, D. P.

    2016-10-01

    Previous analysis of toroidal confinement experiments has shown that energetic ions interact with and affect MHD mode stability, which has been modeled and simulated for ideal MHD instabilities and resistive wall modes. In addition, the 2/1 tearing mode was found to be damped or stabilized by energetic ions, with significant effects on the slow growing resistive mode. This study focuses on the mode-particle interactions between energetic ions and pressure-driven, slow growing tearing modes which have been shown to be driven unstable in experiments as pressure increases. Using a reduced analytic description of a high aspect ratio tokamak equilibrium with a fixed total current and variable magnetic shear; we add in the effects of high energy particles as a modification to the perturbed pressure. We find the importance of global magnetic shear (s =1/q dq/dr) on the particle precession drift frequency, which determines whether or not the energetic particle population resonates with the mode. We find that for s>scrit at the radial position of the pressure jump, particles have a stabilizing effect on the 2/1 tearing mode. However, we find that for smode development.

  12. Differential effects of Heparitinase I and Heparitinase III on endothelial tube formation in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Raman, Karthik; Kuberan, Balagurunathan

    2010-01-01

    Heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) play vital roles in many steps of angiogenesis under physiological and pathological conditions. HSPGs on endothelial cell surfaces act as coreceptors for a variety of pro-angiogenic growth factors such as FGF and VEGF and anti-angiogenic factors such as endostatin. However, the fine structural requirements of these binding interactions are dependent on the sulfation patterns of HSPGs. Previous studies have shown that Heparitinases, heparin lyases isolated from flavobacterium heparinum, can cleave heparan sulfate chains. These enzymes have been shown to reduce tumor—derived neovascularization in vivo in mice. However, the results from these experiments could not conclusively pinpoint the origin of the HS fragments. Thus, in this study we utilized an in vitro assay to assess the differential effects of Heparitinase I (Hep I) and Heparitinase III (Hep III) on endothelial tube formation. Hep III was found to be a more potent inhibitor of tube formation than Hep I. In conclusion, differential cleavage of endothelial cell surface bound HS can affect the extent of inhibition of tube formation. PMID:20599743

  13. Tricarboxylate-based Gd(III) coordination polymers exhibiting large magnetocaloric effects.

    PubMed

    Liu, Sui-Jun; Cao, Chen; Xie, Chen-Chao; Zheng, Teng-Fei; Tong, Xiao-Lan; Liao, Jin-Sheng; Chen, Jing-Lin; Wen, He-Rui; Chang, Ze; Bu, Xian-He

    2016-05-31

    Two Gd(III) coordination polymers with the formula [Gd(cit)(H2O)]∞ () and [Gd(nta)(H2O)2]∞ () (H4cit = citric acid, H3nta = nitrilotriacetic acid) have been successfully prepared under hydrothermal conditions. Complex exhibits a three-dimensional (3D) structure based on carboxylate-bridged layers, while complex is a double-layer structure containing eight-coordinated Gd(III). Magnetic investigations reveal that weak antiferromagnetic couplings between adjacent Gd(III) ions in both and with different Weiss values result in large cryogenic magnetocaloric effects. It is notable that the maximum entropy changes (-ΔS) of and reach 31.3 J kg(-1) K(-1) and 32.2 J kg(-1) K(-1) at 2 K for a moderate field change (ΔH = 3 T), and a remarkable -ΔS (41.5 J kg(-1) K(-1) for and 42.0 J kg(-1) K(-1) for ) could be obtained for ΔH = 7 T.

  14. The effects of two methods of Class III malocclusion treatment on temporomandibular disorders.

    PubMed

    Kurt, Hanefi; Alioğlu, Ceylan; Karayazgan, Banu; Tuncer, Necat; Kılıçoğlu, Hülya

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this research was to evaluate, within a controlled clinical study, the effects of a Delaire-type facemask or a modified Jasper Jumper (JJ) used in the treatment of children with Class III malocclusions due to maxillary retrognathia on temporomandibular disorders (TMDs). Forty-six patients with Class III malocclusions referred for orthodontic treatment were divided into two groups, a test and a control. The test group comprised 33 randomly chosen patients (15 females, 18 males) aged 8-11 years. The control group included 13 patients (eight females, five males) with similar features. TMD assessment was performed before and after treatment using a two-axis questionnaire, the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMDs). Qualitative data were evaluated using chi-square and McNemar tests. No statistically significant differences related to the presence of TMD were observed pre- or post-treatment (P > 0.05). The most commonly encountered diagnosis was arthralgia in the JJ group both before and after treatment. Evaluation of joint and muscle regions showed decreased symptoms, apart from the diagnosed discomforts, in the JJ group (P < 0.05). Reduced symptoms were observed in the Delaire group; however, this reduction was not statistically significant. An increase, not considered to be statistically significant, was observed in the control group. The Delaire-type facemask and modified JJ used in the early phase of Class III malocclusion treatment did not result in TMD.

  15. The genome of an Encephalitozoon cuniculi type III strain reveals insights into the genetic diversity and mode of reproduction of a ubiquitous vertebrate pathogen.

    PubMed

    Pelin, A; Moteshareie, H; Sak, B; Selman, M; Naor, A; Eyahpaise, M-È; Farinelli, L; Golshani, A; Kvac, M; Corradi, N

    2016-05-01

    Encephalitozoon cuniculi is a model microsporidian species with a mononucleate nucleus and a genome that has been extensively studied. To date, analyses of genome diversity have revealed the existence of four genotypes in E. cuniculi (EcI, II, III and IV). Genome sequences are available for EcI, II and III, and are all very divergent, possibly diploid and genetically homogeneous. The mechanisms that cause low genetic diversity in E. cuniculi (for example, selfing, inbreeding or a combination of both), as well as the degree of genetic variation in their natural populations, have been hard to assess because genome data have been so far gathered from laboratory-propagated strains. In this study, we aim to tackle this issue by analyzing the complete genome sequence of a natural strain of E. cuniculi isolated in 2013 from a steppe lemming. The strain belongs to the EcIII genotype and has been designated EcIII-L. The EcIII-L genome sequence harbors genomic features intermediate to known genomes of II and III lab strains, and we provide primers that differentiate the three E. cuniculi genotypes using a single PCR. Surprisingly, the EcIII-L genome is also highly homogeneous, harbors signatures of heterozygosity and also one strain-specific single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) that introduces a stop codon in a key meiosis gene, Spo11. Functional analyses using a heterologous system demonstrate that this SNP leads to a deficient meiosis in a model fungus. This indicates that EcIII-L meiotic machinery may be presently broken. Overall, our findings reveal previously unsuspected genome diversity in E. cuniculi, some of which appears to affect genes of primary importance for the biology of this pathogen.

  16. Global particle-in-cell simulations of plasma pressure effects on Alfvenic modes

    SciTech Connect

    Mishchenko, Alexey; Koenies, Axel; Hatzky, Roman

    2011-01-15

    Global linear gyrokinetic particle-in-cell simulations of electromagnetic modes in realistic tokamak geometry are reported. The effect of plasma pressure on Alfvenic modes is studied. It is shown that the fast-particle pressure can considerably affect the shear Alfven wave continuum structure and hence the toroidicity-induced gap in the continuum. It is also found that the energetic ions can substantially reduce the growth rate of the ballooning modes (and perhaps completely stabilize them in a certain parameter range). Ballooning modes are found to be the dominant instabilities if the bulk-plasma pressure gradient is large enough.

  17. Effects of energetic ions on double tearing modes in reversed shear plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xian-Qu; Wang, Xiao-Gang

    2017-01-01

    The modified dispersion relation of q s  =  m/n double tearing modes (DTMs) with trapped energetic ions is derived by the matching procedure of mode structures in the ideal region and resistive layer. It is found that a mode transition between the DTM and the fishbone-like mode can be triggered, depending on fast ion driving, which provides a possible explanation for the observation of experiments (Günter et al 1999 Nucl. Fusion 39 1793; Maget et al 2006 Nucl. Fusion 46 797). The resistivity scaling of DTMs is changed significantly by on/off-axis heating beams. The effects of beam energy, electron inertia, magnetic shear and plasma resistivity on the stability of the mode and mode transition are discussed in detail.

  18. A study of the relative effectiveness and cost of computerized information retrieval in the interactive mode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smetana, F. O.; Furniss, M. A.; Potter, T. R.

    1974-01-01

    Results of a number of experiments to illuminate the relative effectiveness and costs of computerized information retrieval in the interactive mode are reported. It was found that for equal time spent in preparing the search strategy, the batch and interactive modes gave approximately equal recall and relevance. The interactive mode however encourages the searcher to devote more time to the task and therefore usually yields improved output. Engineering costs as a result are higher in this mode. Estimates of associated hardware costs also indicate that operation in this mode is more expensive. Skilled RECON users like the rapid feedback and additional features offered by this mode if they are not constrained by considerations of cost.

  19. Effects of Video Caption Modes on English Listening Comprehension and Vocabulary Acquisition Using Handheld Devices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsu, Ching-Kun; Hwang, Gwo-Jen; Chang, Yu-Tzu; Chang, Chih-Kai

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of different display modes of video captions on mobile devices, including non-caption, full-caption, and target-word modes, on the English comprehension and vocabulary acquisition of fifth graders. During the one-month experiment, the status of the students' English listening comprehension and vocabulary…

  20. Effective Communication Modes in Multilingual Encounters: Comparing Alternatives in Computer Mediated Communication (CMC)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Mulken, Margot; Hendriks, Berna

    2017-01-01

    This paper reports on an experimental study investigating alternative communication modes to English as a Lingua Franca. The purpose was to examine the effectiveness of different modes of communication and to gain insight in communication strategies used by interlocutors to solve referential conflicts. Findings show that ELF may not necessarily be…

  1. Overview of the effect of Title III of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments on the natural gas industry

    SciTech Connect

    Child, C.J.

    1995-12-31

    The regulation of hazardous air pollutants by Title III of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 has a potential wide-ranging impact for the natural gas industry. Title III includes a list of 189 hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) which are targeted for reduction. Under Title III, HAP emissions from major sources will be reduced by the implementation of maximum achievable control technology (MACT) standards. If the source is defined as a major source, it must also comply with Title V (operating permit) and Title VII (enhanced monitoring) requirements. This presentation will review Title III`s effect on the natural gas industry by discussing the regulatory requirements and schedules associated with MACT as well as the control technology options available for affected sources.

  2. Combined effects of Lanthanum(III) and elevated Ultraviolet-B radiation on root nitrogen nutrient in soybean seedlings.

    PubMed

    Huang, Guangrong; Wang, Lihong; Sun, Zhaoguo; Li, Xiaodong; Zhou, Qing; Huang, Xiaohua

    2015-02-01

    Rare earth element pollution and elevated ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation occur simultaneously in some regions, but the combined effects of these two factors on plants have not attracted enough attention. Nitrogen nutrient is vital to plant growth. In this study, the combined effects of lanthanum(III) and elevated UV-B radiation on nitrate reduction and ammonia assimilation in soybean (Glycine max L.) roots were investigated. Treatment with 0.08 mmol L(-1) La(III) did not change the effects of elevated UV-B radiation on nitrate reductase (NR), nitrite reductase (NiR), glutamine synthetase (GS), glutamate synthase (GOGAT), glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH), nitrate, ammonium, amino acids, or soluble protein in the roots. Treatment with 0.24 mmol L(-1) La(III) and elevated UV-B radiation synergistically decreased the NR, NiR, GS, and GOGAT activities as well as the nitrate, amino acid, and soluble protein levels, except for the GDH activity and ammonium content. Combined treatment with 1.20 mmol L(-1) La(III) and elevated UV-B radiation produced severely deleterious effects on all test indices, and these effects were stronger than those induced by La(III) or elevated UV-B radiation treatment alone. Following the withdrawal of La(III) and elevated UV-B radiation, all test indices for the combined treatments with 0.08/0.24 mmol L(-1) La(III) and elevated UV-B radiation recovered to a certain extent, but they could not recover for treatments with 1.20 mmol L(-1) La(III) and elevated UV-B radiation. In summary, combined treatment with La(III) and elevated UV-B radiation seriously affected nitrogen nutrition in soybean roots through the inhibition of nitrate reduction and ammonia assimilation.

  3. Design of photonic band gap fibers with suppressed higher-order modes: Towards the development of effectively single mode large hollow-core fiber platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saitoh, Kunimasa; Florous, Nikolaos J.; Murao, Tadashi; Koshiba, Masanori

    2006-08-01

    The objective of the present investigation is to propose and theoretically demonstrate the effective suppression of higher-order modes in large-hollow-core photonic band gap fibers (PBGFs), mainly for low-loss data transmission platforms and/or high power delivery systems. The proposed design strategy is based on the index-matching mechanism of central air-core modes with defected outer core modes. By incorporating several air-cores in the cladding of the PBGF with 6-fold symmetry it is possible to resonantly couple the light corresponding to higher-order modes into the outer core, thus significantly increasing the leakage losses of the higher-order modes in comparison to the fundamental mode, thus making our proposed design to operate in an effectively single mode fashion with polarization independent propagation characteristics. The validation of the procedure is ensured with a detailed PBGF analysis based on an accurate finite element modal solver. Extensive numerical results show that the leakage losses of the higher-order modes can be enhanced in a level of at least 2 orders of magnitude in comparison to those of the fundamental mode. Our investigation is expected to remove an essential obstacle in the development of large-core single-mode hollow-core fibers, thus enabling them to surpass the attenuation of conventional fibers.

  4. Design of photonic band gap fibers with suppressed higher-order modes: towards the development of effectively single mode large hollow-core fiber platforms.

    PubMed

    Saitoh, Kunimasa; Florous, Nikolaos J; Murao, Tadashi; Koshiba, Masanori

    2006-08-07

    The objective of the present investigation is to propose and theoretically demonstrate the effective suppression of higher-order modes in large-hollow-core photonic band gap fibers (PBGFs), mainly for low-loss data transmission platforms and/or high power delivery systems. The proposed design strategy is based on the index-matching mechanism of central air-core modes with defected outer core modes. By incorporating several air-cores in the cladding of the PBGF with 6-fold symmetry it is possible to resonantly couple the light corresponding to higher-order modes into the outer core, thus significantly increasing the leakage losses of the higher-order modes in comparison to the fundamental mode, thus making our proposed design to operate in an effectively single mode fashion with polarization independent propagation characteristics. The validation of the procedure is ensured with a detailed PBGF analysis based on an accurate finite element modal solver. Extensive numerical results show that the leakage losses of the higher-order modes can be enhanced in a level of at least 2 orders of magnitude in comparison to those of the fundamental mode. Our investigation is expected to remove an essential obstacle in the development of large-core single-mode hollow-core fibers, thus enabling them to surpass the attenuation of conventional fibers.

  5. Mass effect of redox reactions: A novel mode for surface plasmon resonance-based bioanalysis.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Pei-Xin; Deng, Sheng-Yuan; Xin, Peng; Ji, Xu-Bo; Shan, Dan; Cosnier, Serge

    2015-12-15

    The pursuit of more specific and sensitive response is a perpetual goal for modern bioassays. This work proposed a novel label-free strategy about redox-related mass effect based on the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) technique for ultrasensitive determination of DNA. The protocol starts with the modification of SPR gilded disk with the capture DNA (cDNA). After the conjugation of immobilized cDNA with the target DNA (tDNA), the hybridization chain reaction was triggered by the introduction of mutual partial complementary primers to elongate the terminal into a nanoscale duplex. As it is reported that porphyrin could intercalate into the grooves of the double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) scaffold, multiple positive-charged Fe(III)meso-tetra(N-methyl-4-pyridyl) porphine (FeTMPyP) with symmetric structure were uptaken for in situ formation of porphyrin-dsDNA complex. Given FeTMPyP a highly efficient catalysis for the peroxide reduction, its presence as a biomimetic cofactor was validated via circular dichroism and UV-vis spectroscopy, demonstrating a tight binding as well as high catalytic activity and stability. Using 4-chloro-1-naphthol as a proton donor, the catalytic reduction of H2O2 would oxidize it into insoluble benzo-4-chloro-hexadienone, which simultaneously deposited on the heterogeneous interface, leading to a significant amplification in both SPR response and topological height profile. The signal increment was proportional to the concentration of tDNA, thus an ultrasensitive SPR-based DNA assay was developed with a linear range over four orders of magnitudes and a sub-femtomolar detection limit of 0.73 fM. The developed methodology exemplifies a different way of thinking about mass-sensing modes, extending conventional SPR-based DNA analysis to relevant biomedical applications.

  6. Zero-mode clad waveguides for performing spectroscopy with confined effective observation volumes

    DOEpatents

    Levene, Michael J.; Korlach, Jonas; Turner, Stephen W.; Craighead, Harold G.; Webb, Watt W.

    2005-07-12

    The present invention is directed to a method and an apparatus for analysis of an analyte. The method involves providing a zero-mode waveguide which includes a cladding surrounding a core where the cladding is configured to preclude propagation of electromagnetic energy of a frequency less than a cutoff frequency longitudinally through the core of the zero-mode waveguide. The analyte is positioned in the core of the zero-mode waveguide and is then subjected, in the core of the zero-mode waveguide, to activating electromagnetic radiation of a frequency less than the cut-off frequency under conditions effective to permit analysis of the analyte in an effective observation volume which is more compact than if the analysis were carried out in the absence of the zero-mode waveguide.

  7. Effect of Buckling Modes on the Fatigue Life and Damage Tolerance of Stiffened Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davila, Carlos G.; Bisagni, Chiara; Rose, Cheryl A.

    2015-01-01

    The postbuckling response and the collapse of composite specimens with a co-cured hat stringer are investigated experimentally and numerically. These specimens are designed to evaluate the postbuckling response and the effect of an embedded defect on the collapse load and the mode of failure. Tests performed using controlled conditions and detailed instrumentation demonstrate that the damage tolerance, fatigue life, and collapse loads are closely tied with the mode of the postbuckling deformation, which can be different between two nominally identical specimens. Modes that tend to open skin/stringer defects are the most damaging to the structure. However, skin/stringer bond defects can also propagate under shearing modes. In the proposed paper, the effects of initial shape imperfections on the postbuckling modes and the interaction between different postbuckling deformations and the propagation of skin/stringer bond defects under quasi-static or fatigue loads will be examined.

  8. Linear and nonlinear effect of sheared plasma flow on resistive tearing modes

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Qiming Hu, Xiwei; Yu, Q.

    2014-12-15

    The effect of sheared plasma flow on the m/n = 2/1 tearing mode is studied numerically (m and n are the poloidal and toroidal mode numbers). It is found that in the linear phase the plasma flow with a weak or moderate shear plays a stabilizing effect on tearing mode. However, the mode is driven to be more unstable by sufficiently strong sheared flow when approaching the shear Alfvén resonance (AR). In the nonlinear phase, a moderate (strong) sheared flow leads to a smaller (larger) saturated island width. The stabilization of tearing modes by moderate shear plasma flow is enhanced for a larger plasma viscosity and a lower Alfvén velocity. It is also found that in the nonlinear phase AR accelerates the plasma rotation around the 2/1 rational surface but decelerates it at the AR location, and the radial location satisfying AR spreads inwards towards the magnetic axis.

  9. Effects of collective excitations on the G-band and RBM modes in the Raman spectra of metallic unfilled and filled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gayen, Saurabh; Behera, Surjyo; Bose, Shyamalendu

    2006-03-01

    The Raman spectra of a single-wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) consist of three types of modes; (i) the high frequency G-mode arising out of tangential oscillations of carbon atoms, (ii) D-mode due to the defects in the nanotube and (iii) the low frequency radial breathing mode (RBM) resulting out of radial oscillations of the carbon atoms. In this paper we theoretically investigate the effects of collective oscillations of electrons (plasmons) on the G and RBM modes in the Raman spectra of a filled and unfilled metallic SWNT. Inclusion of plasmon and the filling (rattler) atom produces four peaks in the Raman spectra in general. The positions and relative strengths of the Raman peaks [1] depend upon phonon frequencies of the nanotube and that of the filling atoms, the plasmon frequency, the strength of the electron-phonon interaction, strength of the interactions between the nanotube phonons and rattler phonon and radius of the nanotube [2]. Usually the intensity of the G-mode is higher than that of RBM. For heavier filling atoms the frequency of the rattler phonon is lower in value, which may broaden the peak to such an extent that it may disappear in the background spectrum altogether. 1.S.M. Bose et al., Physica B 351, 129 (2004) 2. S.M. Bose, S.Gayen and S. Behera, Phys. Rev. B 72, 153402 (2005).

  10. Effect of operating modes on simultaneous anaerobic sulfide and nitrate removal in microbial fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Cai, Jing; Zheng, Ping; Qaisar, Mahmood; Xing, Yajuan

    2014-05-01

    The effect of operating modes on the simultaneous sulfide and nitrate removal were studied in two-chamber microbial fuel cells (MFCs). The batch and continuous operating modes were compared and evaluated in terms of substrate removal and electricity generation. Upon gradual increase in the influent sulfide concentration from 60 to 1,020 S mg L(-1), and the hydraulic retention time decrease from 17.2 to 6 h, the MFC accomplished a good substrate removal efficiency whereby nitrogen and sulfate were the main end products. The removal efficiency of the MFC in the continuous mode was much higher than that in the batch mode, and its current densities in the continuous mode were more stable and higher than in the batch mode, which could be explained by the linear relationship between electrons released by the substrates and accepted on the electrodes. The electricity output in the continuous mode of the MFC was higher than that in the batch mode. MFC's operation in the continuous mode was a better strategy for the simultaneous treatment of sulfide and nitrate.

  11. Resistive effects on line-tied magnetohydrodynamic modes in cylindrical geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Delzanno, Gian Luca; Evstatiev, E. G.; Finn, John M.

    2007-09-15

    An investigation of the effect of resistivity on the linear stability of line-tied magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modes is presented in cylindrical geometry, based on the method recently developed in the paper by Evstatiev et al. [Phys. Plasmas 13, 072902 (2006)]. The method uses an expansion of the full solution of the problem in one-dimensional radial eigenfunctions. This method is applied to study sausage modes (m=0, m being the poloidal wavenumber), kink modes (m=1), and m=2 modes. All these modes can be resistively unstable. It is found that m{ne}0 modes can be unstable below the ideal MHD threshold due to resistive diffusion of the field lines, with growth rates proportional to resistivity. For these resistive modes, there is no indication of tearing, i.e., current sheets or boundary layers due to ideal MHD singularities. That is, resistivity acts globally on the whole plasma column and not in layers. Modes with m=0, on the other hand, can exist as tearing modes if the equilibrium axial magnetic field reverses sign within the plasma.

  12. The Application of Failure Modes and Effects Analysis Methodology to Intrathecal Drug Delivery for Pain Management

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Teresa; Fisher, Stanley P.

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to utilize failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA) to transform clinical insights into a risk mitigation plan for intrathecal (IT) drug delivery in pain management. Methods The FMEA methodology, which has been used for quality improvement, was adapted to assess risks (i.e., failure modes) associated with IT therapy. Ten experienced pain physicians scored 37 failure modes in the following categories: patient selection for therapy initiation (efficacy and safety concerns), patient safety during IT therapy, and product selection for IT therapy. Participants assigned severity, probability, and detection scores for each failure mode, from which a risk priority number (RPN) was calculated. Failure modes with the highest RPNs (i.e., most problematic) were discussed, and strategies were proposed to mitigate risks. Results Strategic discussions focused on 17 failure modes with the most severe outcomes, the highest probabilities of occurrence, and the most challenging detection. The topic of the highest‐ranked failure mode (RPN = 144) was manufactured monotherapy versus compounded combination products. Addressing failure modes associated with appropriate patient and product selection was predicted to be clinically important for the success of IT therapy. Conclusions The methodology of FMEA offers a systematic approach to prioritizing risks in a complex environment such as IT therapy. Unmet needs and information gaps are highlighted through the process. Risk mitigation and strategic planning to prevent and manage critical failure modes can contribute to therapeutic success. PMID:27477689

  13. Matrix resin effects in composite delamination - Mode I fracture aspects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunston, Donald L.; Moulton, Richard J.; Johnston, Norman J.; Bascom, Willard D.

    1987-01-01

    A number of thermoset, toughened thermoset, and thermoplastic resin matrix systems were characterized for Mode I critical strain energy release rates, and their composites were tested for interlaminar critical strain energy release rates using the double cantilever beam method. A clear correlation is found between the two sets of data. With brittle resins, the interlaminar critical strain energy release rates are somewhat larger than the neat resin values due to a full transfer of the neat resin toughness to the composite and toughening mechanisms associated with crack growth. With tougher matrices, the higher critical strain energy release rates are only partially transferred to the composites, presumably because the fibers restrict the crack-tip deformation zones.

  14. Effect of Aspect Ratio on H-mode and ELM Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thome, K. E.; Bodner, G. M.; Bongard, M. W.; Burke, M. G.; Fonck, R. J.; Kriete, D. M.

    2015-11-01

    The H-mode confinement regime is achieved at near-unity aspect ratio (A < 1 . 2) in the Pegasus Toroidal Experiment via high-field-side fueling and low edge recycling. Ohmic H-mode is attained in both limited and diverted magnetic topologies. This regime is characterized by: reduced Dα emissions; increased core rotation; increased central heating; formation of edge current and pressure pedestals; and measured energy confinement consistent with the ITER98pb(y,2) scaling. The H-mode power threshold, PLH , behaves quite differently at low- A when compared with high- A operations. PLH /PLH_ITPA 08 increases sharply as A is lowered and no difference in PLH for limited and diverted plasmas is observed at A ~ 1 . 2 . No minimum in PLH with density is observed. Some of these results are consistent with the FM3 model for the L-H transition. Two classes of ELMs have been observed. Small, Type III-like ELMs are present at low input power and have n <= 4 . At POH >>PLH , they transition to large, Type-I-like ELMs with intermediate 5 < n < 15 . The Type III ELM magnetic structures behave opposite that of high- A plasmas, with n much higher, presumably due to the naturally higher J / B peeling mode drive at low- A . Long-sought measurements of the Jedge (R , t) pedestal collapse during an ELM event show a complex, multimodal pedestal collapse and the subsequent ejection of a current-carrying filament. Work supported by US DOE grant DE-FG02-96ER54375.

  15. Failure modes and effects analysis of fusion magnet systems

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmermann, M; Kazimi, M S; Siu, N O; Thome, R J

    1988-12-01

    A failure modes and consequence analysis of fusion magnet system is an important contributor towards enhancing the design by improving the reliability and reducing the risk associated with the operation of magnet systems. In the first part of this study, a failure mode analysis of a superconducting magnet system is performed. Building on the functional breakdown and the fault tree analysis of the Toroidal Field (TF) coils of the Next European Torus (NET), several subsystem levels are added and an overview of potential sources of failures in a magnet system is provided. The failure analysis is extended to the Poloidal Field (PF) magnet system. Furthermore, an extensive analysis of interactions within the fusion device caused by the operation of the PF magnets is presented in the form of an Interaction Matrix. A number of these interactions may have significant consequences for the TF magnet system particularly interactions triggered by electrical failures in the PF magnet system. In the second part of this study, two basic categories of electrical failures in the PF magnet system are examined: short circuits between the terminals of external PF coils, and faults with a constant voltage applied at external PF coil terminals. An electromagnetic model of the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT) is used to examine the mechanical load conditions for the PF and the TF coils resulting from these fault scenarios. It is found that shorts do not pose large threats to the PF coils. Also, the type of plasma disruption has little impact on the net forces on the PF and the TF coils. 39 refs., 30 figs., 12 tabs.

  16. Mode coupling and aspect ratio effects on low and high-n plasma instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiyama, L. E.

    2015-07-01

    In magnetically confined toroidal plasmas such as tokamaks, magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities experience strong toroidal and nonlinear mode coupling effects. Resistive MHD simulations with the M3D code show the importance of mode coupling and compressible MHD effects, which contribute to stronger mode coupling. For the m/n = 1/1 internal kink mode and sawtooth crash and for the edge localized mode (ELM) at higher n, MHD reproduces many features of the experimental observations, including the fast sawtooth crash and the moderate n ∼ 10 toroidal harmonics of the ELM. A general property of the perpendicular momentum equation in toroidal fusion plasmas is that the unbalanced radial forces remain relatively small, so that the terms that are lowest order in small inverse aspect ratio mostly cancel. The higher order terms then have significant effects, even at small r/Ro and small amplitude. Effects are strongest for the lowest toroidal harmonics n ≃ 1 and the most strongly driven ones with highest amplitude. Unlike the n = 1 internal kink mode, the small amplitude ELM ballooning/peeling-type mode, and thus ELM MHD marginal stability, may be reasonably described by the lowest order in aspect ratio, for moderate and large n ≳ 10. The ELM crash, however, depends on higher order.

  17. Effect of axial load on mode shapes and frequencies of beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaker, F. J.

    1975-01-01

    An investigation of the effect of axial load on the natural frequencies and mode shapes of uniform beams and of a cantilevered beam with a concentrated mass at the tip is presented. Characteristic equations which yield the frequencies and mode shape functions for the various cases are given. The solutions to these equations are presented by a series of graphs so that frequency as a function of axial load can readily be determined. The effect of axial load on the mode shapes are also depicted by another series of graphs.

  18. Effects of Berry Curvature on the Collective Modes of Ultracold Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Hannah M.; Cooper, Nigel R.

    2013-11-01

    Topological energy bands have important geometrical properties described by the Berry curvature. We show that the Berry curvature changes the hydrodynamic equations of motion for a trapped Bose-Einstein condensate, and causes significant modifications to the collective mode frequencies. We illustrate our results for the case of two-dimensional Rashba spin-orbit coupling in a Zeeman field. Using an operator approach, we derive the effects of Berry curvature on the dipole mode in very general settings. We show that the sizes of these effects can be large and readily detected in experiment. Collective modes therefore provide a sensitive way to measure geometrical properties of energy bands.

  19. Strain effect in group-III nitride semiconductors and their alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Qimin; Rinke, Patrick; Scheffler, Matthias; van de Walle, Chris

    2009-11-01

    Strain plays a crucial role in group-III nitride semiconductor based devices since it affects the band structure near the valence- and conduction-band edges and thus the optical properties and the device characteristics. However, the deformation potentials that describe the change in band structure under strain have not yet been reliably determined. We present a systematic study of the strain effects in AlN, GaN and InN in the wurtzite phase. We apply density functional theory and hybrid functionals to address the band-gap problem. We observe nonlinearities of transition energies under realistic strain condition that may, in part, explain the appreciable scatter in previous theoretical work on deformation potentials of group-III-nitrides. For the linear regime around the experimental lattice parameters, we present a complete set of deformation potentials. Applying our deformation potentials, we study strain effects in InGaN alloys (including c-, m-, and semi-polar planes) grown on GaN substrates. We make predictions for the transition energies in these systems and their dependence on In composition.

  20. Effects of amino acid mutations in the pore-forming domain of the hemolytic lectin CEL-III.

    PubMed

    Nagao, Tomonao; Masaki, Risa; Unno, Hideaki; Goda, Shuichiro; Hatakeyama, Tomomitsu

    2016-10-01

    The hemolytic lectin CEL-III forms transmembrane pores in the membranes of target cells. A study on the effect of site-directed mutation at Lys405 in domain 3 of CEL-III indicated that replacements of this residue by relatively smaller residues lead to a marked increase in hemolytic activity, suggesting that moderately destabilizing domain 3 facilitates formation of transmembrane pores through conformational changes.

  1. Fast Particle Effects on the Internal Kink, Fishbone and Alfven Modes

    SciTech Connect

    N.N. Gorelenkov; S. Bernabei; C.Z. Cheng; G.Y. Fu; K. Hill; S. Kaye; G.J. Kramer; Y. Kusama; K. Shinohara; R. Nazikian; T. Ozeki; W. Park

    2000-11-15

    The issues of linear stability of low frequency perturbative and nonperturbative modes in advanced tokamak regimes are addressed based on recent developments in theory, computational methods, and progress in experiments. Perturbative codes NOVA and ORBIT are used to calculate the effects of TAEs on fast particle population in spherical tokamak NSTX. Nonperturbative analysis of chirping frequency modes in experiments on TFTR and JT-60U is presented using the kinetic code HINST, which identified such modes as a separate branch of Alfven modes - resonance TAE (R-TAE). Internal kink mode stability in the presence of fast particles is studied using the NOVA code and hybrid kinetic-MHD nonlinear code M3D.

  2. Cooperative entangled effects between the cavity mode components of Raman process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enaki, Nicolae A.

    2016-12-01

    The cooperative excitation and absorption of light into three cavity modes (pump, Stokes and anti-Stokes), stimulated by excited radiators, is studied as bound entangled states of the photon subsystem. The three modes collective Roman emission and its connection with entangled state is defined introducing the cooperative description between photons of cavity modes. In the case, when the scattering rates in the Stokes and anti-Stokes modes coincide, the SU(2) and SU(1,1) symmetries are applied for a simple description of these cooperative processes. The possibilities to realize this effect in the free space is proposed, replacing the cavity modes with dipole active excited atoms in tow-quantum interaction with dipole-forbidden transitions of D atom. The statistical properties and detection method are proposed using the information entropy and atomic correlation functions.

  3. Effects of salt-related mode conversions on subsalt prospecting

    SciTech Connect

    Ogilvie, J.S.; Purnell, G.W.

    1996-03-01

    Mode conversion of waves during seismic reflection surveys has generally been considered a small phenomenon that could be neglected in data processing and interpretation. However, in subsalt prospecting, the contrast in material properties at the salt/sediment interface is often great enough that significant P-to-S and/or S-to-P conversion occurs. The resulting converted waves can be both a help and a hindrance for subsalt prospecting. A case history from the Mississippi Canyon area of the Gulf of Mexico demonstrates strong converted-wave reflections from the base-of-salt that complicate the evaluation of a subsalt prospect using 3-D seismic data. Before and after stack, the converted-wave reflections are evident in 2-D and 3-D surveys across the prospect. Ray-tracing synthetic common midpoint (CMP) gathers provides some useful insights about the occurrence of these waves, but elastic-wave-equation modeling is even more useful. While the latter is more time-consuming, even in 2-D, it also provides a more realistic simulated seismic survey across the prospect, which helps to reveal how some converted waves survive the processes of CMP stack and migration, and thereby present possible pitfalls to an unwary interpreter. The insights gained from the synthetic-data suggest some simple techniques that can assist an interpreter in the 3-D interpretation of subsalt events.

  4. Inversed Vernier effect based single-mode laser emission in coupled microdisks.

    PubMed

    Li, Meng; Zhang, Nan; Wang, Kaiyang; Li, Jiankai; Xiao, Shumin; Song, Qinghai

    2015-09-02

    Recently, on-chip single-mode laser emissions in coupled microdisks have attracted considerable research attention due to their wide applications. While most of single-mode lasers in coupled microdisks or microrings have been qualitatively explained by either Vernier effect or inversed Vernier effect, none of them have been experimentally confirmed. Here, we studied the mechanism of single-mode laser operation in coupled microdisks. We found that the mode numbers had been significantly reduced to nearly single-mode within a large pumping power range from threshold to gain saturation. The detail laser spectra showed that the largest gain and the first lasing peak were mainly generated by one disk and the laser intensity was proportional to the wavelength detuning of two set of modes. The corresponding theoretical analysis showed that the experimental observations were dominated by internal coupling within one cavity, which was similar to the recently explored inversed Vernier effect in two coupled microrings. We believe our finding will be important for understanding the previous experimental findings and the development of on-chip single-mode laser.

  5. Inversed Vernier effect based single-mode laser emission in coupled microdisks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Meng; Zhang, Nan; Wang, Kaiyang; Li, Jiankai; Xiao, Shumin; Song, Qinghai

    2015-09-01

    Recently, on-chip single-mode laser emissions in coupled microdisks have attracted considerable research attention due to their wide applications. While most of single-mode lasers in coupled microdisks or microrings have been qualitatively explained by either Vernier effect or inversed Vernier effect, none of them have been experimentally confirmed. Here, we studied the mechanism of single-mode laser operation in coupled microdisks. We found that the mode numbers had been significantly reduced to nearly single-mode within a large pumping power range from threshold to gain saturation. The detail laser spectra showed that the largest gain and the first lasing peak were mainly generated by one disk and the laser intensity was proportional to the wavelength detuning of two set of modes. The corresponding theoretical analysis showed that the experimental observations were dominated by internal coupling within one cavity, which was similar to the recently explored inversed Vernier effect in two coupled microrings. We believe our finding will be important for understanding the previous experimental findings and the development of on-chip single-mode laser.

  6. Inversed Vernier effect based single-mode laser emission in coupled microdisks

    PubMed Central

    Li, Meng; Zhang, Nan; Wang, Kaiyang; Li, Jiankai; Xiao, Shumin; Song, Qinghai

    2015-01-01

    Recently, on-chip single-mode laser emissions in coupled microdisks have attracted considerable research attention due to their wide applications. While most of single-mode lasers in coupled microdisks or microrings have been qualitatively explained by either Vernier effect or inversed Vernier effect, none of them have been experimentally confirmed. Here, we studied the mechanism of single-mode laser operation in coupled microdisks. We found that the mode numbers had been significantly reduced to nearly single-mode within a large pumping power range from threshold to gain saturation. The detail laser spectra showed that the largest gain and the first lasing peak were mainly generated by one disk and the laser intensity was proportional to the wavelength detuning of two set of modes. The corresponding theoretical analysis showed that the experimental observations were dominated by internal coupling within one cavity, which was similar to the recently explored inversed Vernier effect in two coupled microrings. We believe our finding will be important for understanding the previous experimental findings and the development of on-chip single-mode laser. PMID:26330218

  7. Effect of direct dissipative coupling of two competing modes on intensity fluctuations in a quantum-dot-microcavity laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fanaei, M.; Foerster, A.; Leymann, H. A. M.; Wiersig, J.

    2016-10-01

    We investigate two-mode photon correlations in a quantum-dot-microcavity laser with special emphasis on the effects induced by a direct coupling of two competing modes due to the dissipative character of the laser resonator. Numerical results based on a microscopic semiconductor theory reveal an enhanced autocorrelation of both modes and an enhanced anticorrelation between the modes. A detailed analysis is given in terms of dark and bright modes. It is shown that above the lasing threshold the original modes build up a bright mode coupled to the quantum dots and a dark mode, which interacts only indirectly with the quantum dots. We demonstrate that a populated dark mode can enable an efficient transfer of photons between the two original cavity modes, mediating an effective coupling between them.

  8. Effective mode area and its optimization in silicon-nanocrystal waveguides.

    PubMed

    Rukhlenko, Ivan D; Premaratne, Malin; Agrawal, Govind P

    2012-06-15

    We revisit the problem of the optimization of a silicon-nanocrystal (Si-NC) waveguide, aiming to attain the maximum field confinement inside its nonlinear core and to ensure optimal waveguide performance for a given mode power. Using a Si-NC/SiO2 slot waveguide as an example, we show that the common definition of the effective mode area may lead to significant errors in estimation of optical intensity governing the nonlinear optical response and, as a result, to poor strength evaluation of the associated nonlinear effects. A simple and physically meaningful definition of the effective mode area is given to relate the total mode power to the average field intensity inside the nonlinear region and is employed to study the optimal parameters of Si-NC slot waveguides.

  9. Controlling the dynamical modes of the chiral magnetic structures by spin Hall effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ronghua; Lim, Weng-Lee; Urazhdin, Sergei

    2014-03-01

    Recently, pure spin currents generated due to spin Hall effect have been proved as an efficient approach to reverse the magnetization, modify the dynamical relaxation rates, and excite magnetization oscillations in the heavy metal/ferromagnetic heterostructures. In addition, the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI) can also induce chiral magnetization configurations and rich dynamics in these asymmetrical heterostructures . We controllably excited several distinct dynamical modes in spin Hall oscillator based on Pt/ [CoNi] magnetic multilayer with perpendicular anisotropy. At low current, a quasi-linear Slonczewski-like propagating spin wave mode was excited. This mode transforms to a localized soliton mode above a certain threshold current. At large fields, this mode can be identified as the spin wave `bullet' mode. At small fields, the localized mode is transformed to the topological structure of the `droplet' mode, which comes from the oscillations of the chiral domain walls forming the boundary of the bubble domain due to DMI. Our measurements demonstrate a straightforward route for emission of spin waves by nano-oscillators controlled either by current or by the applied magnetic field. This work was supported by the NSF grant ECCS-1218419.

  10. Crystallinity effects on scaling properties of photoinduced modes in silver nanoprisms

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, Ming-Yaw; Ho, I-Lin; Chang, Yia-Chung

    2015-02-21

    The crystallinity effects on scaling properties of photoinduced modes in crystalline silver nanoprisms with C{sub 3v} symmetry are studied using a realistic atomistic model and group theory. Among all vibrational modes, photoinduced modes can be identified as those vibrational modes which possess larger in-phase radial atomic displacement and can be projected out by the projected density of states method. We found that the properties of vibrations in silver nanoprisms strongly depend on the particle’s aspect ratio (bisector length over thickness). By considering crystallinity of silver nanoprisms, the dominant modes with the in-plane oscillation become several closely spaced modes, and become obvious for nanoprisms with a smaller aspect ratio. The oscillation spectra show that the dominant planar modes are insensitive to thickness change. On the contrary, the atomic displacements show significantly different patterns for nanoprisms of different thicknesses. We also found that, for nanoprisms with same aspect ratio that is larger than 4, the vibrational properties of dominant modes exhibit scaling similarity. By using a simple linear transformation, the vibration frequencies for large-sized nanoprisms of aspect ratio 6 can be obtained by a corresponding scaling factor. The calculated results are in good agreement with experimental data.

  11. Rotational shear effects on edge harmonic oscillations in DIII-D quiescent H-mode discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xi; Burrell, K. H.; Ferraro, N. M.; Osborne, T. H.; Austin, M. E.; Garofalo, A. M.; Groebner, R. J.; Kramer, G. J.; Luhmann, N. C., Jr.; McKee, G. R.; Muscatello, C. M.; Nazikian, R.; Ren, X.; Snyder, P. B.; Solomon, W. M.; Tobias, B. J.; Yan, Z.

    2016-07-01

    In the quiescent H-mode (QH-mode) regime, edge harmonic oscillations (EHOs) play an important role in avoiding transient edge localized mode (ELM) power fluxes by providing benign and continuous edge particle transport. A detailed theoretical, experimental and modeling comparison has been made of low-n (n  ⩽  5) EHO in DIII-D QH-mode plasmas. The calculated linear eigenmode structure from the extended magentoohydrodynamics (MHD) code M3D-C1 matches closely the coherent EHO properties from external magnetics data and internal measurements using the ECE, BES, ECE-Imaging and microwave imaging reflectometer (MIR) diagnostics, as well as the kink/peeling mode properties found by the ideal MHD code ELITE. Numerical investigations indicate that the low-n EHO-like solutions from M3D-C1 are destabilized by rotation and/or rotational shear while high-n modes are stabilized. This effect is independent of the rotation direction, suggesting that EHOs can be destabilized in principle with rotation in either direction. The modeling results are consistent with observations of EHO, support the proposed theory of the EHO as a low-n kink/peeling mode destabilized by edge E  ×  B rotational shear, and improve our understanding and confidence in creating and sustaining QH-mode in present and future devices.

  12. Toxic effects of Cr(VI) and Cr(III) on energy metabolism of heterotrophic Euglena gracilis.

    PubMed

    Jasso-Chávez, Ricardo; Pacheco-Rosales, Angélica; Lira-Silva, Elizabeth; Gallardo-Pérez, Juan Carlos; García, Noemí; Moreno-Sánchez, Rafael

    2010-11-15

    To assess the toxic effect of Cr on energy metabolism, heterotrophic Euglena gracilis was grown in a medium that prompts high yield biomass and in the presence of different Cr(VI) or Cr(III) concentrations. The cell growth IC₅₀ value was 12 and >250μM for Cr(VI) and Cr(III), respectively; in these cells chromium was accumulated and a fraction compartmentalized into mitochondria, and synthesis of cysteine and glutathione was induced. Respiration of control isolated mitochondria was strongly inhibited by added Cr(VI) or Cr(III) with L-lactate or succinate as substrates. In turn, cellular and mitochondrial respiration, respiratory Complexes I, III and IV, glycolysis and cytosolic NAD(+)-alcohol and -lactate dehydrogenases from cells cultured with Cr(VI) were significantly lower than control, whereas AOX and external NADH dehydrogenase activities were unaltered or increased, respectively. Addition of Cr(VI) or Cr(III) to isolated mitochondria or cytosol from control- or Cr(VI)-grown cells induced inhibition of respiration, respiratory Complexes III, IV and AOX, and glycolytic pyruvate kinase; whereas Complex I, external NADH dehydrogenase, and other glycolytic enzymes were unaffected. Protein contents of mitochondrial Complexes I, III, IV and V, and ANT were diminished in Cr(VI)-grown cells. Decreased respiration and glycolysis induced by Cr(VI) resulted in lower cellular ATP content. Results suggested that Cr(VI) cytotoxicity altered gene expression (as widely documented) and hence enzyme content, and induced oxidative stress, but it was also related with direct enzyme inhibition; Cr(III) was also cytotoxic although at higher concentrations. These findings establish new paradigms for chromium toxicity: Cr(VI) direct enzyme inhibition and non-innocuous external Cr(III) toxicity.

  13. EGIS-7229, the new combined class III antiarrhythmic agent: lack of EAD inducing effect.

    PubMed

    Bányász, T; Magyar, J; Varró, A; Kovács, A; Gyönös, I; Szénási, G; Nánási, P P

    1999-03-01

    EGIS-7229 is a novel antiarrhythmic candidate having multiple mechanisms of action with class III predominance. In this study, the effects of EGIS-7229 and sotalol on action potential duration (APD) and incidence of early afterdepolarizations (EADs) were studied and compared in rabbit papillary muscle by using conventional microelectrode techniques. In control bathing solution, both drugs increased APD in a concentration-dependent manner; however, the prolongation of APD was greater with sotalol than with EGIS-7229 when the same drug concentrations were compared. EAD developed in 3 of the 11 preparations (27%) bathed with a solution containing 3.6 mmol/l CsCl + 2 mmol/l KCl within the first 120 min of superfusion. The addition of 100 micromol/l sotalol to this superfusate increased the incidence of EAD to 83% (10 from 12), whereas the addition of the same concentration of EGIS-7229 prevented the development of EAD in all of the 9 preparations studied. These differences in incidence of EAD are likely attributable to differences in drug-induced increases of APD-50 in the presence of CsCl. Prolongation of APD-90 showed less correlation with incidence of EAD than changes in APD-50. On the basis of these in vitro results, high concentrations of EGIS-7229 cannot be expected to be torsadogenic in vivo--in contrast with sotalol--presumably owing to the combined class III + IV activity of the compound.

  14. Media Presentation Mode, English Listening Comprehension and Cognitive Load in Ubiquitous Learning Environments: Modality Effect or Redundancy Effect?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Chi-Cheng; Lei, Hao; Tseng, Ju-Shih

    2011-01-01

    Although ubiquitous learning enhances students' access to learning materials, it is crucial to find out which media presentation modes produce the best results for English listening comprehension. The present study examined the effect of media presentation mode (sound and text versus sound) on English listening comprehension and cognitive load.…

  15. Examination of effects of Cu(II) and Cr(III) on Al(III) binding by dissolved organic matter using absorbance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Yan, Mingquan; Ma, Jing; Ji, Guodong

    2016-04-15

    Effects of Cu(II) and Cr(III) ions on the binding of Al(III) onto Dissolved Organic Matter (DOM) exemplified by Suwannee River Humic Acid (SRHA) at pH 6.0 were quantified in this study using linear and log-transformed SRHA absorbance spectra acquired at varying Al(3+) concentrations and Cu(2+) or Cr(3+) levels. The competition between Al(3+) and Cu(2+)/Cr(3+) for the binding sites in DOM was ascertained by examining the intensity and shapes of the metal-specific differential spectra of DOM. The results indicated that the binding of Al(3+) onto SRHA is little influenced in the cases of in presence of 1.0 and 10.0 μM background Cr(3+) and in presence of 1.0 μM background Cu(2+), but it is significantly depressed in presence of 10.0 μM Cu(2+). Changes of the spectral slope of the log-transformed absorbance spectra in the 350-400 nm wavelength range (S350-400) were unambiguously correlated with the total amount of DOM-bound metals. The concentrations of Me-DOM complexes were determined using the NICA-Donnan Model. The results demonstrate that differential absorbance measurements provide quantitatively interpretable information concerning the nature and mechanisms of metal-DOM interactions and effects of metal cations competition on these processes.

  16. Correction: Effective Am(III)/Eu(III) separations using 2,6-bis(1,2,4-triazin-3-yl)pyridine (BTP) functionalised titania particles and hierarchically porous beads.

    PubMed

    Veliscek-Carolan, J; Jolliffe, K A; Hanley, T L

    2015-07-25

    Correction for 'Effective Am(III)/Eu(III) separations using 2,6-bis(1,2,4-triazin-3-yl)pyridine (BTP) functionalised titania particles and hierarchically porous beads' by J. Veliscek-Carolan et al., Chem. Commun., 2015, DOI: 10.1039/c5cc03957f.

  17. Surfactant-laden drop jellyfish-breakup mode induced by the Marangoni effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hui; Zhang, Wen-Bin; Xu, Jian-Liang; Li, Wei-Feng; Liu, Hai-Feng

    2017-03-01

    Drop breakup is a familiar event in both nature and technology. In this study, we find that the bag breakup mode can be replaced by a new breakup mode: jellyfish breakup, when the surfactant concentration of a surfactant-laden drop is high. This new breakup mode has a morphology resembling a jellyfish with many long tentacles. This is due to the inhomogeneous distribution of surfactant in the process of drop deformation and breakup. The thin film of liquid can remain stable as a result of the Marangoni effect. Finally, we propose that the dimensionless surfactant concentration can serve as a criterion for breakup mechanisms.

  18. Effect of Oxidation Rate and Fe(II) State on Microbial Nitrate-Dependent Fe(III) Mineral Formation

    PubMed Central

    Senko, John M.; Dewers, Thomas A.; Krumholz, Lee R.

    2005-01-01

    A nitrate-dependent Fe(II)-oxidizing bacterium was isolated and used to evaluate whether Fe(II) chemical form or oxidation rate had an effect on the mineralogy of biogenic Fe(III) (hydr)oxides resulting from nitrate-dependent Fe(II) oxidation. The isolate (designated FW33AN) had 99% 16S rRNA sequence similarity to Klebsiella oxytoca. FW33AN produced Fe(III) (hydr)oxides by oxidation of soluble Fe(II) [Fe(II)sol] or FeS under nitrate-reducing conditions. Based on X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis, Fe(III) (hydr)oxide produced by oxidation of FeS was shown to be amorphous, while oxidation of Fe(II)sol yielded goethite. The rate of Fe(II) oxidation was then manipulated by incubating various cell concentrations of FW33AN with Fe(II)sol and nitrate. Characterization of products revealed that as Fe(II) oxidation rates slowed, a stronger goethite signal was observed by XRD and a larger proportion of Fe(III) was in the crystalline fraction. Since the mineralogy of Fe(III) (hydr)oxides may control the extent of subsequent Fe(III) reduction, the variables we identify here may have an effect on the biogeochemical cycling of Fe in anoxic ecosystems. PMID:16269756

  19. Effect of the oxidation rate and Fe(II) state on microbial nitrate-dependent Fe(III) mineral formation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Senko, John M.; Dewers , Thomas A.; Krumholz, Lee R.

    2005-01-01

    A nitrate-dependent Fe(II)-oxidizing bacterium was isolated and used to evaluate whether Fe(II) chemical form or oxidation rate had an effect on the mineralogy of biogenic Fe(III) (hydr)oxides resulting from nitrate-dependent Fe(II) oxidation. The isolate (designated FW33AN) had 99% 16S rRNA sequence similarity to Klebsiella oxytoca. FW33AN produced Fe(III) (hydr)oxides by oxidation of soluble Fe(II) [Fe(II)sol] or FeS under nitrate-reducing conditions. Based on X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis, Fe(III) (hydr)oxide produced by oxidation of FeS was shown to be amorphous, while oxidation of Fe(II)sol yielded goethite. The rate of Fe(II) oxidation was then manipulated by incubating various cell concentrations of FW33AN with Fe(II)sol and nitrate. Characterization of products revealed that as Fe(II) oxidation rates slowed, a stronger goethite signal was observed by XRD and a larger proportion of Fe(III) was in the crystalline fraction. Since the mineralogy of Fe(III) (hydr)oxides may control the extent of subsequent Fe(III) reduction, the variables we identify here may have an effect on the biogeochemical cycling of Fe in anoxic ecosystems.

  20. Mode Summation Approach to Casimir Effect Between Two Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teo, L. P.

    2012-10-01

    In the last few years, several approaches have been developed to compute the exact Casimir interaction energy between two nonplanar objects, all lead to the same functional form, which is called the TGTG formula. In this paper, we explore the TGTG formula from the perspective of mode summation approach. Both scalar fields and electromagnetic fields are considered. In this approach, one has to first solve the equation of motion to find a wave basis for each object. The two T's in the TGTG formula are T-matrices representing the Lippmann-Schwinger T-operators, one for each of the objects. Each T-matrix can be found by matching the boundary conditions imposed on the object, and it is independent of the other object. However, it depends on whether the object is interacting with an object outside it, or an object inside it. The two G's in the TGTG formula are the translation matrices, relating the wave basis of an object to the wave basis of the other object. These translation matrices only depend on the wave basis chosen for each object, and they are independent of the boundary conditions on the objects. After discussing the general theory, we apply the prescription to derive the explicit formulas for the Casimir energies for the sphere-sphere, sphere-plane, cylinder-cylinder and cylinder-plane interactions. First the T-matrices for a plane, a sphere and a cylinder are derived for the following cases: the object is imposed with Dirichlet, Neumann or general Robin boundary conditions; the object is semitransparent; and the object is a magnetodielectric object immersed in a magnetodielectric media. Then the operator approach developed by R. C. Wittman [IEEE Trans. Antennas Propag.36, 1078 (1988)] is used to derive the translation matrices. From these, the explicit TGTG formula for each of the scenarios can be written down. On the one hand, we have summarized all the TGTG formulas that have been derived so far for the sphere-sphere, cylinder-cylinder, sphere-plane and

  1. Silver nanoparticles-enhanced rare earth co-luminescence effect of Tb(III)-Y(III)-dopamine system.

    PubMed

    Li, Huihui; Wu, Xia

    2015-06-01

    It was found that silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) could enhance co-luminescence effect of rare earths ions Tb(3+) and Y(3+). Based on this, a sensitive fluorescence detection method for the determination of dopamine (DA) was proposed. Moreover, the detection limit for DA was very low (down to nM). This is because DA can remarkably enhance the luminescence intensity of the Tb(3+) ion by Y(3+) in the colloidal solution of AgNPs, forming a new co-luminescence system. Furthermore, based on the metal enhanced fluorescence (MEF), AgNPs can sensitize the co-luminescence effect of the complex of Tb(3+)-Y(3+)-DA. In a neutral buffer solution (pH 7.50), the luminescence intensity of the system was linearly related to the concentration of DA in the range of 2.0-100 nM, with a limit of detection as low as 0.57 nM. The proposed method was applied for the determination of DA in dopamine hydrochloride injections and human serum samples with good accuracy and satisfactory recovery.

  2. Failure Mode and Effects Analysis (FMEA) Introductory Overview

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-14

    effects based on how severe they are, how often they might occur, and how easily we can find them. 3. Effects: the consequences of failure. The...Actions ! 0 l!1 .. requirE-ments ~ l=ailure 1-’rP.vP.ntion .., llP.tP.c::tion Completion Dato Action• Taken P. il "’ ; · .. "’ = 0 i;r= ~ ~ " S pnrg

  3. Bi-fluid and neoclassical effect on a Double-Tearing mode in Tore Supra

    SciTech Connect

    Maget, Patrick Garbet, Xavier; Février, Olivier; Ségui, Jean-Luc; Lütjens, Hinrich; Luciani, Jean-François

    2014-06-15

    Tearing modes associated to hollow current profiles are prone to grow in moderate performance plasmas and often constrain the realization of non-inductive discharges in the Tore Supra tokamak, where long pulse duration is performed using Lower Hybrid waves for providing most of the plasma current. The prediction of MHD boundaries in such scenarios is complicated by the importance of diamagnetic effects, combined with curvature stabilization, which determine the stability of these modes. We show that diamagnetic effects, as well as neoclassical forces, are playing a key role in the linear and nonlinear regimes of Double-Tearing Modes on q = 5/3 and q = 2 in these experimental conditions. Detailed comparison with experimental measurements, combined with a scaling in plasma resistivity, give constraints about the experimental equilibrium. Resistive-Interchange Modes destabilized by diamagnetic rotation could also play a role in degrading the energy confinement in the negative magnetic shear region.

  4. Effects of Interchain Exchange Interactions on ESR Modes in Axial Triangular Antiferromagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kambe, Takashi; Tanaka, Hidekazu; Nagata, Kazukiyo

    1993-10-01

    We investigate the effects of a diagonal interchain interaction J2 on the ESR modes in the ABX3-type antiferromagnets with easy-axis anisotropy.The static properties are described by replacing the conventional interchain interaction J1 by J1-2J2. However, because of the phase difference between the sublattice magnetizations, J2 coupling produces marked effects on some ESR modes in cooperation with J1 coupling. Large separation between the ω1-mode and EPR line for H{\\perp}c and ω2- and ω3-modes for H{//}c (H>HSF) can be derived by maintaining consistency with the canting angle of spins from the c-axis and the spin wave dispersion at zero field. ESR measurements in CsMnI3 are reported. The frequency-field diagram obtained is described well by the model involving J2 coupling.

  5. Age-related decline in olympic triathlon performance: effect of locomotion mode.

    PubMed

    Bernard, Thierry; Sultana, Frédéric; Lepers, Romuald; Hausswirth, Christophe; Brisswalter, Jeanick

    2010-01-01

    This study describes the decline in performance with age during Olympic triathlon Age Groups World Championships among the different locomotion modes. Mean performance of top 10 performers were analyzed for each group of age using the exponential model proposed by Baker, Tang, and Turner (2003, Experimental Aging Research, 29, 47-65). Comparison in performance decline was done between locomotion modes. Decline in performance in triathlon as a function of age follows an exponential model. A significant interaction effect between age and locomotion mode was observed on performance values. In swimming, a significant decrease was observed close to 5% per year after 45 years. Decline in performance was less pronounced in cycling until 60 years. Analysis of the effect of age in the different locomotion modes of a triathlon could provide information for maintaining quality of life with aging.

  6. Modeling framework for materials capable of solid-solid phase transformation: application to the analytical solution of the semi-infinite mode III crack problem in an idealized shape memory alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaki, Wael; Moumni, Ziad

    2015-04-01

    We propose two frameworks for the derivation of constitutive models for solids undergoing phase transformations. The first is based on the assumption that solid phases within the material are finely mixed whereas the second considers the material as a heterogeneous solution of phase fragments and uses the homogenization theory to derive equilibrium conditions for displacement fields and phase distributions. It is shown that in the case of reversible phase transformation, the energy of the material can be obtained by taking the convex envelope of the energy functions of the constituent phases. As an application, a schematic model is derived for an idealized shape memory alloy and used to obtain a novel analytical solution for the problem of semi-infinite mode III crack in this material. The derivation of the analytical solution uses the hodograph method to map Cartesian coordinates into the hodograph plane. The resulting boundary-value problem for the mode III crack considered becomes analytically tractable for the idealized shape memory alloy considered and leads to closed-form expressions for the displacement and phase volume fraction fields near the crack tip as well as for the boundaries between different phase regions.

  7. The effect of electron beam pitch angle and density gradient on solar type III radio bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Pechhacker, R.; Tsiklauri, D.

    2012-11-15

    1.5D particle-in-cell simulations of a hot, low density electron beam injected into magnetized, maxwellian plasma were used to further explore the alternative non-gyrotropic beam driven electromagnetic (EM) emission mechanism, first studied in Tsiklauri, Phys. Plasmas 18, 052903 (2011). Variation of beam injection angle and background density gradient showed that the emission process is caused by the perpendicular component of the beam injection current, whereas the parallel component only produces Langmuir waves, which play no role in the generation of EM waves in our mechanism. Particular emphasis was put on the case, where the beam is injected perpendicularly to the background magnetic field, as this turned off any electrostatic wave generation along the field and left a purely electromagnetic signal in the perpendicular components. The simulations establish the following key findings: (i) Initially, waves at a few {omega}{sub ce}/{gamma} are excited, mode converted and emitted at Almost-Equal-To {omega}{sub pe} (ii) The emission intensity along the beam axis is proportional to the respective component of the kinetic energy of the beam; (iii) The frequency of the escaping EM emission is independent of the injection angle; (iv) A stronger background density gradient causes earlier emission; (v) The beam electron distribution function in phase space shows harmonic oscillation in the perpendicular components at the relativistic gyrofrequency; (vi) The requirement for cyclotron maser emission, ({partial_derivative}f/{partial_derivative}v{sub Up-Tack })>0, is fulfilled; (vii) The degree of linear polarization of the emission is strongly dependent on the beam injection angle; (viii) The generated electromagnetic emission is left-hand elliptically polarized as the pitch angle tends to 90 Degree-Sign ; and (ix) The generated electromagnetic energy is of the order of 0.1% of the initial beam kinetic energy.

  8. A Tool To Support Failure Mode And Effects Analysis Based On Causal Modelling And Reasoning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Underwood, W. E.; Laib, S. L.

    1987-05-01

    A prototype knowledge-based system has been developed that supports Failure Mode & Effects Analysis (FMEA). The knowledge base consists of causal models of components and a representation for coupling these components into assemblies and systems. The causal models are qualitative models. They allow reasoning as to whether variables are increasing, decreasing or steady. The analysis strategies used by the prototype allow it to determine the effects of failure modes on the function of the part, the failure effect on the assembly the part is contained in, and the effect on the subsystem containing the assembly.

  9. Effect of desferrioxamine B and Suwannee River fulvic acid on Fe(III) release and Cr(III) desorption from goethite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Angela G.; Hudson-Edwards, Karen A.; Dubbin, William E.

    2016-04-01

    Siderophores are biogenic chelating ligands that facilitate the solubilisation of Fe(III) and form stable complexes with a range of contaminant metals and therefore may significantly affect their biogeochemical cycling. Desferrioxamine B (DFOB) is a trihydroxamate siderophore that acts synergistically with fulvic acid and low molecular weight organic ligands to release Fe from Fe(III) oxides. We report the results of batch dissolution experiments in which we determine the rates of Cr(III) desorption and Fe(III) release from Cr(III)-treated synthetic goethite as influenced by DFOB, by fulvic acid, and by the two compounds in combination. We observed that adsorbed Cr(III) at 3% surface coverage significantly reduced Fe(III) release from goethite for all combinations of DFOB and fulvic acid. When DFOB (270 μM) was the only ligand present, dissolved Fe(III) and Cr(III) increased approximately 1000-fold and 16-fold, respectively, as compared to the ligand-free system, a difference we attribute to the slow rate of water exchange of Cr(III). Suwannee River fulvic acid (SRFA) acts synergistically with DFOB by (i) reducing the goethite surface charge leading to increased HDFOB+ surface excess and by (ii) forming aqueous Fe(III)-SRFA species whose Fe(III) is subsequently removed by DFOB to yield aqueous Fe(III)-DFOB complexes. These observations shed new light on the synergistic relationship between DFOB and fulvic acid and reveal the mechanisms of Fe(III) acquisition available to plants and micro-organisms in Cr(III) contaminated environments.

  10. Effect of Pressure Anisotropy on the m = 1 Small Wavelength Modes in Z-Pinches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faghihi, M.

    1987-05-01

    A generalization of Freidberg's perpendicular MHD model is used to investigate the effect of pressure anisotropy on the small wavelength internal kink (m = 1) mode instability in a Z-Pinch. A normal mode analysis of perturbed motion of an incompressible, collisionless and cylindrical plasma is performed. The stability criterion is (rΣB2)' <= 0, where Σ = 1 - (P|| - P⊥)/B2. It cannot be fulfilled without violation of the fire hose stability condition Σ >= 0.

  11. Observation of coherent effects using a mode-locked rubidium laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Aihua; Sautenkov, Vladimir A.; Rostovtsev, Yuri V.; Welch, George R.

    2017-02-01

    We study a diode-pumped alkaline rubidium laser operating at the D 1-line transition. The mode-locked regime of laser operation using an active technique inside the laser cavity has been demonstrated. We have also experimentally shown that the mode-locked laser radiation can be used to observe coherent effects: the electromagnetically induced transparency and the nonlinear Faraday rotation in Rb vapor.

  12. Effect of Bypass Capacitor in Common-mode Noise Reduction Technique for Automobile PCB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uno, Takanori; Ichikawa, Kouji; Mabuchi, Yuichi; Nakamura, Atushi

    In this letter, we studied the use of common mode noise reduction technique for in-vehicle electronic equipment, each comprising large-scale integrated circuit (LSI), printed circuit board (PCB), wiring harnesses, and ground plane. We have improved the model circuit of the common mode noise that flows to the wire harness to add the effect of by-pass capacitors located near an LSI.

  13. Exchange effect and magneto-plasmon mode dispersion in an anisotropic two-dimensional electronic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiaoguang

    2016-11-01

    The exchange effect and the magneto-plasmon mode dispersion are studied theoretically for an anisotropic two-dimensional electronic system in the presence of a uniform perpendicular magnetic field. Employing an effective low-energy model with anisotropic effective masses, which is relevant for a monolayer of phosphorus, the exchange effect due to the electron-electron interaction is treated within the self-consistent Hartree-Fock approximation. The magneto-plasmon mode dispersion is obtained by solving a Bethe-Salpeter equation for the electron density-density correlation function within the ladder diagram approximation. It is found that the exchange effect is reduced in the anisotropic system in comparison with the isotropic one. The magneto-plasmon mode dispersion shows a clear dependence on the direction of the wave vector. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61076092 and 61290303).

  14. Effect of phosphate and sulfate on Ni repartitioning during Fe(II)-catalyzed Fe(III) oxide mineral recrystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinkle, Margaret A. G.; Catalano, Jeffrey G.

    2015-09-01

    Dissolved Fe(II) activates coupled oxidative growth and reductive dissolution of Fe(III) oxide minerals, causing recrystallization and the repartitioning of structurally-compatible trace metals. Phosphate and sulfate, two ligands common to natural aquatic systems, alter Fe(II) adsorption onto Fe(III) oxides and affect Fe(III) oxide dissolution and precipitation. However, the effect of these oxoanions on trace metal repartitioning during Fe(II)-catalyzed Fe(III) oxide recrystallization is unclear. The effects of phosphate and sulfate on Ni adsorption and Ni repartitioning during Fe(II)-catalyzed Fe(III) oxide recrystallization were investigated as such repartitioning may be affected by both Fe(II)-oxoanion and metal-oxoanion interactions. In most systems examined, phosphate alters Ni repartitioning during Fe(II)-catalyzed recrystallization to a larger extent than sulfate. Phosphate substantially enhances Ni adsorption onto hematite but decreases (nearly inhibiting) Fe(II)-catalyzed Ni incorporation into and release from this mineral. In the goethite system, however, phosphate suppresses Ni release but enhances Ni incorporation in the presence of aqueous Fe(II). In contrast, sulfate has little effect on macroscopic Ni adsorption and release of Ni from Fe(III) oxides, but substantially enhances Ni incorporation into goethite. This demonstrates that phosphate and sulfate have unique, mineral-specific interactions with Ni during Fe(II)-catalyzed Fe(III) oxide recrystallization. This research suggests that micronutrient bioavailability at redox interfaces in hematite-dominated systems may be especially suppressed by phosphate, while both oxoanions likely have limited effects in goethite-rich soils or sediments. Phosphate may also exert a large control on contaminant fate at redox interfaces, increasing Ni retention on iron oxide surfaces. These results further indicate that trace metal retention by iron oxides during lithification and later repartitioning during

  15. Luminescent Eu(III) and Gd(III) trisbipyridine cryptates: experimental and theoretical study of the substituent effects.

    PubMed

    Guillaumont, Dominique; Bazin, Hervé; Benech, Jean-Marc; Boyer, Marion; Mathis, Gérard

    2007-02-19

    Synthesis, absorption spectra and luminescebce properties of a series of lanthanide trisbipyridine cryptates Ln within R-Bpy x R-Bpy x R-Bpy, where Ln = Eu, Gd and R = H, COOH, COOCH3, CONH(CH2)2NH2 are described. Comparison of the unsubstituted parent compound with the substituted compounds shows that bipyridine substitution doesn't alter significantly the photophysical properties of the lanthanide cryptate. The absorption maximum is slightly red-shifted when three bipyridines are substituted, whereas substituting one bipyridines has a negligible effect on the absorption spectra. The experimental triplet state energy is between 21600 and 22 100 cm(-1) for the series of compounds and the luminescence lifetimes at 77 K are between 0.5 and 0.8 ms in HO2 and equal to 1.7 ms in D2O. The experimental characterizations are completed by DFT and TD-DFT calculations to assess the ability of these approaches to predict absorption maxima, triplet state energies and structural parameters of lanthanide cryptates and to characterize the electronic structure of the excited states. The calculations on the unsubstituted parent and substituted compounds show that absorption maxima and lowest 3pipi* triplet state energies can be accurately determined from density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent (TD) DFT calculations.

  16. Comments on the somatic effects section of the BEIR III report

    SciTech Connect

    Rossi, H.H.

    1980-12-01

    The recent report of the BEIR Committee of the National Academy of Sciences presents a wide range of risk estimates for radiogenic cancer. The values that can be considered to be most plausible on the basis of radiobiological and epidemiological evidence are given little emphasis and they are presented as lower bounds of the probable risk. The upper bound is said to be provided by estimates based on the so-called linear hypothesis. The preferred analysis in BEIR III requires an arbitrary choice of a critical parameter. This results in estimates that differ little from those given in BEIR I and that may be too high by an order of magnitude. It also refuses to speculate on any health effects of background radiation. It thus does not support the validity of those concepts of radiation protection that are based on linearity.

  17. Genotoxic effects of Bismuth (III) oxide nanoparticles by Allium and Comet assay.

    PubMed

    Liman, Recep

    2013-09-01

    Genotoxic effects of Bismuth (III) oxide nanoparticles (BONPs) were investigated on the root cells of Allium cepa by Allium and Comet assay. A. cepa roots were treated with the aqueous dispersions of BONPs at five different concentrations (12.5, 25, 50, 75, and 100ppm) for 4h. Exposure of BONPs significantly increased mitotic index (MI) except 12.5ppm, total chromosomal aberrations (CAs) in Allium test. While stickiness chromosome laggards, disturbed anaphase-telophase and anaphase bridges were observed in anaphase-telophase cells, pro-metaphase and c-metaphase in other cells. A significant increase in DNA damage was also observed at all concentrations of BONPs except 12.5ppm by Comet assay. The results were also analyzed statistically by using SPSS for Windows; Duncan's multiple range test was performed. These results indicate that BONPs exhibit genotoxic activity in A. cepa root meristematic cells.

  18. Effective electron mass in quantum wires of III-V, ternary and quaternary materials.

    PubMed

    Paitya, N; Ghatak, K P

    2012-12-01

    In this paper, an attempt is made to study the effective electron mass (EEM) in Quantum wires (QWs) of III-V, ternary and quaternary materials on the basis of three and two band models of Kane within the framework of k x p formalism. It has been found, taking QWs of InAs, InSb, GaAs, Hg(1-x)Cd(x)Te and In(1-x)Ga(x)As(1-y)P(t) that the 1D EEM increases with electron concentration per unit length and decreases with increasing film thickness respectively. For ternary and quaternary materials the EEM increases with increase in alloy composition. Under certain special conditions all the results for all the 1-D materials get simplified into the well known parabolic energy bands and thus confirming the compatibility test. The results of this paper find two applications in the fields of nanoscience and technology.

  19. Effects of Internal Fields on the Optical Emission in Nanostructured III-N LEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yalavarthi, Krishna; Sundaresan, Sasi; Merrill, Ky; Ahmed, Shaikh

    2012-02-01

    Nanostructured optical emitters can accommodate a broader range of lattice mismatch, be used in full-solar-spectrum light emitting diodes, and provide higher temperature stability of the threshold current and the luminescence. However, strong quantum confinement and certain symmetry-lowering mechanisms (caused by various internal fields) lead to pronounced optical polarization anisotropy and strong suppression of interband transitions in these structures. The objective of this work is to study the competing effects of various internal fields on the electronic structure and optical properties of nanostructured III-N LEDs. A multiscale approach has been employed where: 1) the NEMO 3-D tool is used to calculate the atomistic strain distribution and one-particle electronic states within a sp3s*d5 tight-binding framework, and 2) the outputs from NEMO 3-D are then coupled to the Synopsys TCAD tool to determine the terminal electrical and optical properties of the device.

  20. Hydrogen effects in dilute III-N-V alloys: From defect engineering to nanostructuring

    SciTech Connect

    Pettinari, G.; Felici, M.; Capizzi, M.; Polimeni, A.; Trotta, R.

    2014-01-07

    The variation of the band gap energy of III-N-V semiconductors induced by hydrogen incorporation is the most striking effect that H produces in these materials. A special emphasis is given here to the combination of N-activity passivation by hydrogen with H diffusion kinetics in dilute nitrides. Secondary ion mass spectrometry shows an extremely steep (smaller than 5 nm/decade) forefront of the H diffusion profile in Ga(AsN) under appropriate hydrogenation conditions. This discovery prompts the opportunity for an in-plane nanostructuring of hydrogen incorporation and, hence, for a modulation of the material band gap energy at the nanoscale. The properties of quantum dots fabricated by a lithographically defined hydrogenation are presented, showing the zero-dimensional character of these novel nanostructures. Applicative prospects of this nanofabrication method are finally outlined.

  1. Gravitational-wave observations of binary black holes: Effect of nonquadrupole modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varma, Vijay; Ajith, Parameswaran; Husa, Sascha; Bustillo, Juan Calderon; Hannam, Mark; Pürrer, Michael

    2014-12-01

    We study the effect of nonquadrupolar modes in the detection and parameter estimation of gravitational waves (GWs) from nonspinning black-hole binaries. We evaluate the loss of signal-to-noise ratio and the systematic errors in the estimated parameters when one uses a quadrupole-mode template family to detect GW signals with all the relevant modes, for target signals with total masses 20 M⊙≤M ≤250 M⊙ and mass ratios 1 ≤q ≤18 . Target signals are constructed by matching numerical-relativity simulations describing the late inspiral, merger, and ringdown of the binary with post-Newtonian/effective-one-body waveforms describing the early inspiral. We find that waveform templates modeling only the quadrupolar modes of the GW signal are sufficient (loss of detection rate <10 %) for the detection of GWs with mass ratios q ≤4 using advanced GW observatories. Neglecting the effect of nonquadrupole modes will introduce systematic errors in the estimated parameters. The systematic errors are larger than the expected 1 σ statistical errors for binaries with large, unequal masses (q ≳4 ,M ≳150 M⊙ ), for sky-averaged signal-to-noise ratios larger than 8. We provide a summary of the regions in the parameter space where neglecting nonquadrupole modes will cause unacceptable loss of detection rates and unacceptably large systematic biases in the estimated parameters.

  2. Modeling the effect of toroidal plasma rotation on drift-magnetohydrodynamic modes in tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, I. T.; Sharapov, S. E.; Huysmans, G. T. A.; Mikhailovskii, A. B.

    2006-06-01

    A new code, MISHKA-F (Flow), has been developed as an extension of the ideal magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) code MISHKA-1 [Mikhailovskii et al., Plasma Phys. Rep. 23, 844 (1997)] in order to investigate the linear MHD stability of ideal and resistive eigenmodes with respect to the effects of toroidal rotation in tokamaks in general toroidal geometry with the ion diamagnetic drift effect taken into account. Benchmark test results of the MISHKA-F code show good agreement with analytic theory [A. B. Mikhailovskii and S. E. Sharapov, Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 42, 57 (2000)] for the stability limits of the ideal n /m=1/1 internal kink mode. The combined stabilizing effects of the ion diamagnetic drift frequency, ω*i, and the toroidal flow shear are also studied. The ω*i stabilization of the internal kink mode is found to be more effective at finite flow shear. Finite-n ballooning modes are studied in plasmas with the toroidal flow shear effect included. The stabilization of the ballooning modes by toroidal rotation is found to agree well with earlier predictions [Webster et al., Phys. Plasmas 11, 2135 (2004)]. The effect of high flow shear is analyzed for a sawtoothing discharge typical in the Mega Ampère Spherical Tokamak (MAST) [Sykes et al., Nucl. Fusion 41, 1423 (2001)]. It is found that the ideal n =1 internal kink mode can be stabilized by toroidal rotation at values observed experimentally.

  3. Modeling the effect of toroidal plasma rotation on drift-magnetohydrodynamic modes in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, I.T.; Sharapov, S.E.; Huysmans, G.T.A.; Mikhailovskii, A. B.

    2006-06-15

    A new code, MISHKA-F (Flow), has been developed as an extension of the ideal magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) code MISHKA-1 [Mikhailovskii et al., Plasma Phys. Rep. 23, 844 (1997)] in order to investigate the linear MHD stability of ideal and resistive eigenmodes with respect to the effects of toroidal rotation in tokamaks in general toroidal geometry with the ion diamagnetic drift effect taken into account. Benchmark test results of the MISHKA-F code show good agreement with analytic theory [A. B. Mikhailovskii and S. E. Sharapov, Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 42, 57 (2000)] for the stability limits of the ideal n/m=1/1 internal kink mode. The combined stabilizing effects of the ion diamagnetic drift frequency, {omega}{sub *i}, and the toroidal flow shear are also studied. The {omega}{sub *i} stabilization of the internal kink mode is found to be more effective at finite flow shear. Finite-n ballooning modes are studied in plasmas with the toroidal flow shear effect included. The stabilization of the ballooning modes by toroidal rotation is found to agree well with earlier predictions [Webster et al., Phys. Plasmas 11, 2135 (2004)]. The effect of high flow shear is analyzed for a sawtoothing discharge typical in the Mega Ampere Spherical Tokamak (MAST) [Sykes et al., Nucl. Fusion 41, 1423 (2001)]. It is found that the ideal n=1 internal kink mode can be stabilized by toroidal rotation at values observed experimentally.

  4. Effects of heavy modes on vacuum stability in supersymmetric theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brizi, Leonardo; Scrucca, Claudio A.

    2010-11-01

    We study the effects induced by heavy fields on the masses of light fields in supersymmetric theories, under the assumption that the heavy mass scale is much higher than the supersymmetry breaking scale. We show that the square-masses of light scalar fields can get two different types of significant corrections when a heavy multiplet is integrated out. The first is an indirect level-repulsion effect, which may arise from heavy chiral multiplets and is always negative. The second is a direct coupling contribution, which may arise from heavy vector multiplets and can have any sign. We then apply these results to the sGoldstino mass and study the implications for the vacuum metastability condition. We find that the correction from heavy chiral multiplets is always negative and tends to compromise vacuum metastability, whereas the contribution from heavy vector multiplets is always positive and tends on the contrary to reinforce it. These two effects are controlled respectively by Yukawa couplings and gauge charges, which mix one heavy and two light fields respectively in the superpotential and the Kähler potential. Finally we also comment on similar effects induced in soft scalar masses when the heavy multiplets couple both to the visible and the hidden sector.

  5. Mode-Specific Effects among Three Treatments for Depression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Imber, Stanley D.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Randomly assigned 250 depressed outpatients to interpersonal psychotherapy, cognitive-behavioral therapy, imipramine plus clinical management, or pill placebo plus clinical management treatments. All treatments demonstrated significant symptom reduction with few differences in general outcomes. None of the therapies produced consistent effects on…

  6. Kinetic method for the determination of traces of thyroxine by its catalytic effect on the Mn(III) metaphosphate-As(III) reaction.

    PubMed

    Pastor, Ferenc T; Milovanović, Gordana A; Todorović, Marija

    2008-02-15

    A new, highly sensitive and simple kinetic method for the determination of thyroxine was proposed. The method was based on the catalytic effect of thyroxine on the oxidation of As(III) by Mn(III) metaphosphate. The kinetics of the reaction was studied in the presence of orthophosphoric acid. The reaction rate was followed spectrophotometrically at 516 nm. It was established that orthophosphoric acid increased the reaction rate and that the extent of the non-catalytic reaction was extremely small. A kinetic equation was postulated and the apparent rate constant was calculated. The dependence of the reaction rate on temperature was investigated and the energy of activation and other kinetic parameters were determined. Thyroxine was determined under the optimal experimental conditions in the range 7.0 x 10(-9) to 3.0 x 10(-8) mol L(-1) with a relative standard deviation up to 6.7% and a detection limit of 2.7 x 10(-9) molL(-1). In the presence of 0.08 mol L(-1) chloride, the detection limit decreased to 6.6 x 10(-10) mol L(-1). The proposed method was applied for the determination of thyroxine in tablets. The accuracy of the method was evaluated by comparison with the HPLC method.

  7. The growth of the tearing mode - Boundary and scaling effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinolfson, R. S.; Van Hoven, G.

    1983-01-01

    A numerical model of resistive magnetic tearing is developed in order to verify and relate the results of the principal approximations used in analytic analyses and to investigate the solutions and their growth-rate scalings over a large range of primary parameters which include parametric values applicable to the solar atmosphere. The computations cover the linear behavior for a variety of boundary conditions, emphasizing effects which differentiate magnetic tearing in astrophysical situations from that in laboratory devices. Eigenfunction profiles for long and short wavelengths are computed and the applicability of the 'constant psi' approximation is investigated. The growth rate is computed for values of the magnetic Reynolds number up to a trillion and of the dimensionless wavelength parameter down to 0.001. The analysis predicts significant effects due to differing values of the magnetic Reynolds number.

  8. Effect Of Clock Mode On Radiation Hardness Of An ADC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Choon I.; Rax, Bernie G.; Johnston, Allan H.

    1995-01-01

    Report discusses techniques for testing and evaluating effects of total dosages of ionizing radiation on performances of high-resolution successive-approximation analog-to-digital converters (ADCs), without having to test each individual bit or transition. Reduces cost of testing by reducing tests to few critical parametric measurements, from which one determines approximate radiation failure levels providing good approximations of responses of converters for purpose of total-dose-radiation evaluations.

  9. High relaxivity Gd(III)-DNA gold nanostars: investigation of shape effects on proton relaxation.

    PubMed

    Rotz, Matthew W; Culver, Kayla S B; Parigi, Giacomo; MacRenaris, Keith W; Luchinat, Claudio; Odom, Teri W; Meade, Thomas J

    2015-03-24

    Gadolinium(III) nanoconjugate contrast agents (CAs) have distinct advantages over their small-molecule counterparts in magnetic resonance imaging. In addition to increased Gd(III) payload, a significant improvement in proton relaxation efficiency, or relaxivity (r1), is often observed. In this work, we describe the synthesis and characterization of a nanoconjugate CA created by covalent attachment of Gd(III) to thiolated DNA (Gd(III)-DNA), followed by surface conjugation onto gold nanostars (DNA-Gd@stars). These conjugates exhibit remarkable r1 with values up to 98 mM(-1) s(-1). Additionally, DNA-Gd@stars show efficient Gd(III) delivery and biocompatibility in vitro and generate significant contrast enhancement when imaged at 7 T. Using nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion analysis, we attribute the high performance of the DNA-Gd@stars to an increased contribution of second-sphere relaxivity compared to that of spherical CA equivalents (DNA-Gd@spheres). Importantly, the surface of the gold nanostar contains Gd(III)-DNA in regions of positive, negative, and neutral curvature. We hypothesize that the proton relaxation enhancement observed results from the presence of a unique hydrophilic environment produced by Gd(III)-DNA in these regions, which allows second-sphere water molecules to remain adjacent to Gd(III) ions for up to 10 times longer than diffusion. These results establish that particle shape and second-sphere relaxivity are important considerations in the design of Gd(III) nanoconjugate CAs.

  10. Mode of Action of Shigella Toxin. Effects on Ribosome Structure and Function

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-08-15

    accepted that clinical symptoms associated with these toxin -producing bacteria are, in part, a result of their effect on protein synthesis. To go one...NUMBER I Mode of Action of Shigella Toxin : Effects on Ribosome Structure and Function Annual Report STom G. Obrig, Ph.D. 0 August 15, 1983 Supported...REPORT A PERIOD COVERED MODE OF ACTION OF SII(;EI.LA TOXIN : EFFECTS Annual 11/15/82-8/l/83 ON RIBOSOME STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION 6 PERFORMING ORG. REPORT

  11. WE-G-BRA-08: Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) for Gamma Knife Radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Y; Bhatnagar, J; Bednarz, G; Flickinger, J; Arai, Y; Huq, M Saiful; Vacsulka, J; Monaco, E; Niranjan, A; Lunsford, L Dade; Feng, W

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To perform a failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA) study for Gamma Knife (GK) radiosurgery processes at our institution based on our experience with the treatment of more than 13,000 patients. Methods: A team consisting of medical physicists, nurses, radiation oncologists, neurosurgeons at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center and an external physicist expert was formed for the FMEA study. A process tree and a failure mode table were created for the GK procedures using the Leksell GK Perfexion and 4C units. Three scores for the probability of occurrence (O), the severity (S), and the probability of no detection (D) for failure modes were assigned to each failure mode by each professional on a scale from 1 to 10. The risk priority number (RPN) for each failure mode was then calculated (RPN = OxSxD) as the average scores from all data sets collected. Results: The established process tree for GK radiosurgery consists of 10 sub-processes and 53 steps, including a sub-process for frame placement and 11 steps that are directly related to the frame-based nature of the GK radiosurgery. Out of the 86 failure modes identified, 40 failure modes are GK specific, caused by the potential for inappropriate use of the radiosurgery head frame, the imaging fiducial boxes, the GK helmets and plugs, and the GammaPlan treatment planning system. The other 46 failure modes are associated with the registration, imaging, image transfer, contouring processes that are common for all radiation therapy techniques. The failure modes with the highest hazard scores are related to imperfect frame adaptor attachment, bad fiducial box assembly, overlooked target areas, inaccurate previous treatment information and excessive patient movement during MRI scan. Conclusion: The implementation of the FMEA approach for Gamma Knife radiosurgery enabled deeper understanding of the overall process among all professionals involved in the care of the patient and helped identify potential

  12. Normal Mode Splitting and Mechanical Effects of an Optical Lattice in a Ring Cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klinner, Julian; Lindholdt, Malik; Nagorny, Boris; Hemmerich, Andreas

    2006-01-01

    A novel regime of atom-cavity physics is explored, arising when large atom samples dispersively interact with high-finesse optical cavities. A stable far-detuned optical lattice of several million rubidium atoms is formed inside an optical ring resonator by coupling equal amounts of laser light to each propagation direction of a longitudinal cavity mode. An adjacent longitudinal mode, detuned by about 3 GHz, is used to perform probe transmission spectroscopy of the system. The atom-cavity coupling for the lattice beams and the probe is dispersive and dissipation results only from the finite photon-storage time. The observation of two well-resolved normal modes demonstrates the regime of strong cooperative coupling. The details of the normal mode spectrum reveal mechanical effects associated with the retroaction of the probe upon the optical lattice.

  13. Normal mode splitting and mechanical effects of an optical lattice in a ring cavity.

    PubMed

    Klinner, Julian; Lindholdt, Malik; Nagorny, Boris; Hemmerich, Andreas

    2006-01-20

    A novel regime of atom-cavity physics is explored, arising when large atom samples dispersively interact with high-finesse optical cavities. A stable far-detuned optical lattice of several million rubidium atoms is formed inside an optical ring resonator by coupling equal amounts of laser light to each propagation direction of a longitudinal cavity mode. An adjacent longitudinal mode, detuned by about 3 GHz, is used to perform probe transmission spectroscopy of the system. The atom-cavity coupling for the lattice beams and the probe is dispersive and dissipation results only from the finite photon-storage time. The observation of two well-resolved normal modes demonstrates the regime of strong cooperative coupling. The details of the normal mode spectrum reveal mechanical effects associated with the retroaction of the probe upon the optical lattice.

  14. Normal Mode Splitting and Mechanical Effects of an Optical Lattice in a Ring Cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Klinner, Julian; Lindholdt, Malik; Nagorny, Boris; Hemmerich, Andreas

    2006-01-20

    A novel regime of atom-cavity physics is explored, arising when large atom samples dispersively interact with high-finesse optical cavities. A stable far-detuned optical lattice of several million rubidium atoms is formed inside an optical ring resonator by coupling equal amounts of laser light to each propagation direction of a longitudinal cavity mode. An adjacent longitudinal mode, detuned by about 3 GHz, is used to perform probe transmission spectroscopy of the system. The atom-cavity coupling for the lattice beams and the probe is dispersive and dissipation results only from the finite photon-storage time. The observation of two well-resolved normal modes demonstrates the regime of strong cooperative coupling. The details of the normal mode spectrum reveal mechanical effects associated with the retroaction of the probe upon the optical lattice.

  15. Effect of laser parameters and mode on pulp surgery outcome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilder-Smith, Petra B. B.; Arrastia-Jitosho, Anna-Marie A.; Peavy, George M.; Kurosaki, Tom

    1997-05-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effectiveness of localized laser pulp surgery in the canine model. Effects of laser parameters on treatment outcome were also investigated. Pulpal exposure 3 mm in diameter were prepared in healthy teeth and left open to infection from the oral cavity for 72 hours. Pulpal tissue was then removed using high speed handpiece with sterile irrigation, or a CO2 laser. Teeth were monitored clinically, radiographically for 3 months. Results for each criterion were evaluated on a scale of 0-(-2). After sacrifice, histological assessment was made soft and hard tissue response. Results for each category were evaluated on a standard scale of 0-(-2). All evaluations were performed by 1 blinded, pre-standardized clinician. Statistical assessment using the chi-square test and Fisher's Exact Test associated laser treatment with a significantly better clinical, radiographic and histological treatment outcome. NIH RRO1192, seed grant funding form Loma Linda University, the Edna P. Jacobsen Charitable Trust for Animals, Inc.

  16. EVALUATION OF SAFETY IN A RADIATION ONCOLOGY SETTING USING FAILURE MODE AND EFFECTS ANALYSIS

    PubMed Central

    Ford, Eric C.; Gaudette, Ray; Myers, Lee; Vanderver, Bruce; Engineer, Lilly; Zellars, Richard; Song, Danny Y.; Wong, John; DeWeese, Theodore L.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) is a widely used tool for prospectively evaluating safety and reliability. We report our experiences in applying FMEA in the setting of radiation oncology. Methods and Materials We performed an FMEA analysis for our external beam radiation therapy service, which consisted of the following tasks: (1) create a visual map of the process, (2) identify possible failure modes; assign risk probability numbers (RPN) to each failure mode based on tabulated scores for the severity, frequency of occurrence, and detectability, each on a scale of 1 to 10; and (3) identify improvements that are both feasible and effective. The RPN scores can span a range of 1 to 1000, with higher scores indicating the relative importance of a given failure mode. Results Our process map consisted of 269 different nodes. We identified 127 possible failure modes with RPN scores ranging from 2 to 160. Fifteen of the top-ranked failure modes were considered for process improvements, representing RPN scores of 75 and more. These specific improvement suggestions were incorporated into our practice with a review and implementation by each department team responsible for the process. Conclusions The FMEA technique provides a systematic method for finding vulnerabilities in a process before they result in an error. The FMEA framework can naturally incorporate further quantification and monitoring. A general-use system for incident and near miss reporting would be useful in this regard. PMID:19409731

  17. Evaluation of Safety in a Radiation Oncology Setting Using Failure Mode and Effects Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, Eric C. Gaudette, Ray; Myers, Lee; Vanderver, Bruce; Engineer, Lilly; Zellars, Richard; Song, Danny Y.; Wong, John; DeWeese, Theodore L.

    2009-07-01

    Purpose: Failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) is a widely used tool for prospectively evaluating safety and reliability. We report our experiences in applying FMEA in the setting of radiation oncology. Methods and Materials: We performed an FMEA analysis for our external beam radiation therapy service, which consisted of the following tasks: (1) create a visual map of the process, (2) identify possible failure modes; assign risk probability numbers (RPN) to each failure mode based on tabulated scores for the severity, frequency of occurrence, and detectability, each on a scale of 1 to 10; and (3) identify improvements that are both feasible and effective. The RPN scores can span a range of 1 to 1000, with higher scores indicating the relative importance of a given failure mode. Results: Our process map consisted of 269 different nodes. We identified 127 possible failure modes with RPN scores ranging from 2 to 160. Fifteen of the top-ranked failure modes were considered for process improvements, representing RPN scores of 75 and more. These specific improvement suggestions were incorporated into our practice with a review and implementation by each department team responsible for the process. Conclusions: The FMEA technique provides a systematic method for finding vulnerabilities in a process before they result in an error. The FMEA framework can naturally incorporate further quantification and monitoring. A general-use system for incident and near miss reporting would be useful in this regard.

  18. EFFECT OF HOST IMMUNITY TO A FILTERABLE VIRUS (VIRUS III) ON THE GROWTH AND MALIGNANCY OF A TRANSPLANTABLE RABBIT NEOPLASM

    PubMed Central

    Pearce, Louise; Rivers, Thomas M.

    1927-01-01

    Experiments are reported in which were studied the course and character of a transplantable malignant neoplasm in normal rabbits and in rabbits immunized with a filterable virus, Virus III. The disease which developed in immunized rabbits was extremely mild and much less severe than in normal animals. The effect upon the tumor process displayed by Virus III immune rabbits in the direction of diminished malignancy is considered to be entirely non-specific in character, and the suggestion is made that it is accomplished through a more effective resistance of the host. PMID:19869330

  19. Implications of the Differential Toxicological Effects of III-V Ionic and Particulate Materials for Hazard Assessment of Semiconductor Slurries.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wen; Lin, Sijie; Chang, Chong Hyun; Ji, Zhaoxia; Sun, Bingbing; Wang, Xiang; Li, Ruibin; Pon, Nanetta; Xia, Tian; Nel, André E

    2015-12-22

    Because of tunable band gaps, high carrier mobility, and low-energy consumption rates, III-V materials are attractive for use in semiconductor wafers. However, these wafers require chemical mechanical planarization (CMP) for polishing, which leads to the generation of large quantities of hazardous waste including particulate and ionic III-V debris. Although the toxic effects of micron-sized III-V materials have been studied in vivo, no comprehensive assessment has been undertaken to elucidate the hazardous effects of submicron particulates and released III-V ionic components. Since III-V materials may contribute disproportionately to the hazard of CMP slurries, we obtained GaP, InP, GaAs, and InAs as micron- (0.2-3 μm) and nanoscale (<100 nm) particles for comparative studies of their cytotoxic potential in macrophage (THP-1) and lung epithelial (BEAS-2B) cell lines. We found that nanosized III-V arsenides, including GaAs and InAs, could induce significantly more cytotoxicity over a 24-72 h observation period. In contrast, GaP and InP particulates of all sizes as well as ionic GaCl3 and InCl3 were substantially less hazardous. The principal mechanism of III-V arsenide nanoparticle toxicity is dissolution and shedding of toxic As(III) and, to a lesser extent, As(V) ions. GaAs dissolves in the cell culture medium as well as in acidifying intracellular compartments, while InAs dissolves (more slowly) inside cells. Chelation of released As by 2,3-dimercapto-1-propanesulfonic acid interfered in GaAs toxicity. Collectively, these results demonstrate that III-V arsenides, GaAs and InAs nanoparticles, contribute in a major way to the toxicity of III-V materials that could appear in slurries. This finding is of importance for considering how to deal with the hazard potential of CMP slurries.

  20. The effect of an anisotropic pressure of thermal particles on resistive wall mode stability

    SciTech Connect

    Berkery, J. W. Sabbagh, S. A.; Betti, R.; Guazzotto, L.; Manickam, J.

    2014-11-15

    The effect of an anisotropic pressure of thermal particles on resistive wall mode stability in tokamak fusion plasmas is derived through kinetic theory and assessed through calculation with the MISK code [B. Hu et al., Phys. Plasmas 12, 0 57301 (2005)]. The fluid anisotropy is treated as a small perturbation on the plasma equilibrium and modeled with a bi-Maxwellian distribution function. A complete stability treatment without an assumption of high frequency mode rotation leads to anisotropic kinetic terms in the dispersion relation in addition to anisotropy corrections to the fluid terms. With the density and the average pressure kept constant, when thermal particles have a higher temperature perpendicular to the magnetic field than parallel, the fluid pressure-driven ballooning destabilization term is reduced. Additionally, the stabilizing kinetic effects of the trapped thermal ions can be enhanced. Together these two effects can lead to a modest increase in resistive wall mode stability.

  1. Nonlinear dynamics of the tearing mode with two-fluid and curvature effects in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Meshcheriakov, Dmytro; Maget, Patrick; Garbet, Xavier; Lütjens, Hinrich; Beyer, Peter

    2014-01-15

    Curvature and diamagnetic effects are both known to have an influence on tearing mode dynamics. In this paper, we investigate the impact of these effects on the nonlinear stability and saturation of a (2, 1) island using non-linear two-fluid MHD simulations and we apply our results to Tore Supra experiments, where its behavior is not well understood from the single fluid MHD model. Simulations show that a metastable state induced by diamagnetic effect exists for this mode and that it also produces a reduction of the saturated island size, in presence of toroidal curvature. The mode is found to be nonlinearly destabilized by a seed island and it saturates at a macroscopic level causing a significant confinement degradation. The interpretation of dual states, with either no island on q = 2 or a large one, observed on discharges with high non inductive current source on Tore Supra, is revisited.

  2. [Effects of nitrogen source and aeration mode on algae growth in freshwater].

    PubMed

    Liu, Chun-Guang; Jin, Xiang-Can; Sun, Ling; Sun, Hong-Wen; Zhu, Lin; Yu, Yang; Dai, Shu-Gui; Zhuang, Yuan-Yi

    2006-01-01

    Aquarium microcosms were used to study the effects of nitrogen source and aeration mode on the growth and species changes of algae in freshwater. Nitrate nitrogen(NO3(-) -N) and ammonia nitrogen(NH4(+) -N) were used as nitrogen sources. For each nitrogen source, four modes of aeration were selected, including control, continuous aeration, aeration during the day, and aeration at night. In the early stage of the experiment, algae in the NH4(+) -N treatment experiment grew well. In the later stage, algae in the NO3(-) -N treatment experiment grew better. For different aeration modes, continuous aeration show varied effects on algae growth in the two nitrogen source treatments. Day-only aeration had little effect on algae growth. Night-only aeration inhibited algae growth considerably. In NH(+) -N treatments, cyanophyta became dominant species easily. In contrast, chlorophyta dominated in NO3(-) -N treatments.

  3. Observing mesoscale eddy effects on mode-water subduction and transport in the North Pacific

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Lixiao; Li, Peiliang; Xie, Shang-Ping; Liu, Qinyu; Liu, Cong; Gao, Wendian

    2016-01-01

    While modelling studies suggest that mesoscale eddies strengthen the subduction of mode waters, this eddy effect has never been observed in the field. Here we report results from a field campaign from March 2014 that captured the eddy effects on mode-water subduction south of the Kuroshio Extension east of Japan. The experiment deployed 17 Argo floats in an anticyclonic eddy (AC) with enhanced daily sampling. Analysis of over 3,000 hydrographic profiles following the AC reveals that potential vorticity and apparent oxygen utilization distributions are asymmetric outside the AC core, with enhanced subduction near the southeastern rim of the AC. There, the southward eddy flow advects newly ventilated mode water from the north into the main thermocline. Our results show that subduction by eddy lateral advection is comparable in magnitude to that by the mean flow—an effect that needs to be better represented in climate models. PMID:26829888

  4. BEIR-III report and the health effects of low-level radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Fabrikant, J.I.

    1980-01-01

    The present BEIR-III Committee has not highlighted any controversy over the health effects of low-level radiation. In its evaluation of the experimental data and epidemiological surveys, the Committee has carefully reviewed and assessed the value of all the available scientific evidence for estimating numerical risk coefficients for the health hazards to human populations exposed to low levels of ionizing radiation. Responsible public awareness of the possible health effects of ionizing radiations from medical and industrial radiation exposure, centers on three important matters of societal concern: (1) to place into perspective the extent of harm to the health of man and his descendants to be expected in the present and in the future from those societal activities involving ionizing radiation; (2) to develop quantitative indices of harm based on dose-effect relationships; such indices could then be used with prudent caution to introduce concepts of the regulation of population doses on the basis of somatic and genetic risks; and (3) to identify the magnitude and extent of radiation activities which could cause harm, to assess their relative significance, and to provide a framework for recommendations on how to reduce unnecessary radiation exposure to human populations. The main difference of the BEIR Committee Report is not so much from new data or new interpretations of existing data, but rather from a philosophical approach and appraisal of existing and future radiation protection resulting from an atmosphere of constantly changing societal conditions and public attitudes. (PCS)

  5. Explanation of non-additive effects in mixtures of similar mode of action chemicals.

    PubMed

    Kamo, Masashi; Yokomizo, Hiroyuki

    2015-09-01

    Many models have been developed to predict the combined effect of drugs and chemicals. Most models are classified into two additive models: independent action (IA) and concentration addition (CA). It is generally considered if the modes of action of chemicals are similar then the combined effect obeys CA; however, many empirical studies report nonlinear effects deviating from the predictions by CA. Such deviations are termed synergism and antagonism. Synergism, which leads to a stronger toxicity, requires more careful management, and hence it is important to understand how and which combinations of chemicals lead to synergism. In this paper, three types of chemical reactions are mathematically modeled and the cause of the nonlinear effects among chemicals with similar modes of action was investigated. Our results show that combined effects obey CA only when the modes of action are exactly the same. Contrary to existing knowledge, combined effects are generally nonlinear even if the modes of action of the chemicals are similar. Our results further show that the nonlinear effects vanish out when the chemical concentrations are low, suggesting that the current management procedure of assuming CA is rarely inappropriate because environmental concentrations of chemicals are generally low.

  6. Dentofacial effects of bone-anchored maxillary protraction: A controlled study of consecutively treated Class III patients

    PubMed Central

    De Clerck, Hugo; Cevidanes, Lucia; Baccetti, Tiziano

    2011-01-01

    Introduction In this cephalometric investigation, we analyzed the treatment effects of bone-anchored maxillary protraction (BAMP) with miniplates in the maxilla and mandible connected by Class III elastics in patients with Class III malocclusion. Methods The treated sample consisted of 21 Class III patients consecutively treated with the BAMP protocol before the pubertal growth spurt (mean age, 11.10 ± 1.8 years) and reevaluated after BAMP therapy, about 1 year later. The treated group was compared with a matched control group of 18 untreated Class III subjects. Significant differences between the treated and control groups were assessed with independent-sample t tests (P<0.05). Results Sagittal measurements of the maxilla showed highly significant improvements during active treatment (about 4 mm more than the untreated controls), with significant protraction effects at orbitale and pterygomaxillare. Significant improvements of overjet and molar relationship were recorded, as well as in the mandibular skeletal measures at Point B and pogonion. Vertical skeletal changes and modifications in incisor inclination were negligible, except for a significant proclination of the mandibular incisors in the treated group. Significant soft-tissue changes reflected the underlying skeletal modifications. Conclusions Compared with growth of the untreated Class III subjects, the BAMP protocol induced an average increment on skeletal and soft-tissue advancement of maxillary structures of about 4 mm, and favorable mandibular changes exceeded 2 mm. PMID:21055597

  7. Fast Sausage Modes in Magnetic Tubes with Continuous Transverse Profiles: Effects of a Finite Plasma Beta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shao-Xia; Li, Bo; Xiong, Ming; Yu, Hui; Guo, Ming-Zhe

    2016-12-01

    While standing fast sausage modes in flare loops are often invoked to interpret quasi-periodic pulsations (QPPs) in solar flares, it is unclear as to how they are influenced by the combined effects of a continuous transverse structuring and a finite internal plasma beta ({β }{{i}}). We derive a generic dispersion relation governing linear sausage waves in straight magnetic tubes for which plasma pressure is not negligible, and the density and temperature inhomogeneities of essentially arbitrary form take place in a layer of arbitrary width. Focusing on fast modes, we find that {β }{{i}} only weakly influences {k}{{c}}, the critical longitudinal wavenumber separating the leaky from trapped modes. Likewise, for both trapped and leaky modes, the periods P in units of the transverse fast time depend only weakly on {β }{{i}}, which is compatible with the fact that the effective wave vectors of fast sausage modes are largely perpendicular to the background magnetic field. However, a weak {β }{{i}} dependence of the damping times τ is seen only when the length-to-radius ratio L/R is ∼50% larger than some critical value π /({k}{{c}}R), which itself rather sensitively depends on the density contrast, profile steepness, as well as on how the transverse structuring is described. In the context of QPPs, we conclude that the much simpler zero-beta theory can be employed for trapped modes, as long as one sees the deduced internal Alfvén speed as actually being the fast speed. In contrast, effects due to a finite beta in flare loops should be considered when leaky modes are exploited.

  8. The effects of differential flow between rational surfaces on toroidal resistive MHD modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brennan, Dylan; Halfmoon, Michael; Rhodes, Dov; Cole, Andrew; Okabayashi, Michio; Paz-Soldan, Carlos; Finn, John

    2016-10-01

    Differential flow between resonant surfaces can strongly affect the coupling and penetration of resonant components of resistive modes, and yet this mechanism is not yet fully understood. This study focuses on the evolution of tearing instabilities and the penetration of imposed resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) in tokamak configurations relevant to DIII-D and ITER, including equilibrium flow shear. It has been observed on DIII-D that the onset of tearing instabilities leading to disruption is often coincident with a loss of differential rotation between a higher m/n tearing surface (normally the 4/3 or 3/2) and a lower m/n tearing surface (normally the 2/1). Imposing RMPs can strongly affect this coupling and the torques between the modes. We apply the nonlinear 3-D resistive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) code NIMROD to study the mechanisms by which these couplings occur. Reduced MHD analyses are applied to study the effects of differential flow between resonant surfaces in the simulations. Interaction between resonant modes can cause significant energy transfer between them, effectively stabilizing one mode while the other grows. The flow mitigates this transfer, but also affects the individual modes. The combination of these effects determines the nonlinear outcome. Supported by US DOE Grants DE-SC0014005 and DE-SC0014119.

  9. Application of failure mode and effect analysis in an assisted reproduction technology laboratory.

    PubMed

    Intra, Giulia; Alteri, Alessandra; Corti, Laura; Rabellotti, Elisa; Papaleo, Enrico; Restelli, Liliana; Biondo, Stefania; Garancini, Maria Paola; Candiani, Massimo; Viganò, Paola

    2016-08-01

    Assisted reproduction technology laboratories have a very high degree of complexity. Mismatches of gametes or embryos can occur, with catastrophic consequences for patients. To minimize the risk of error, a multi-institutional working group applied failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) to each critical activity/step as a method of risk assessment. This analysis led to the identification of the potential failure modes, together with their causes and effects, using the risk priority number (RPN) scoring system. In total, 11 individual steps and 68 different potential failure modes were identified. The highest ranked failure modes, with an RPN score of 25, encompassed 17 failures and pertained to "patient mismatch" and "biological sample mismatch". The maximum reduction in risk, with RPN reduced from 25 to 5, was mostly related to the introduction of witnessing. The critical failure modes in sample processing were improved by 50% in the RPN by focusing on staff training. Three indicators of FMEA success, based on technical skill, competence and traceability, have been evaluated after FMEA implementation. Witnessing by a second human operator should be introduced in the laboratory to avoid sample mix-ups. These findings confirm that FMEA can effectively reduce errors in assisted reproduction technology laboratories.

  10. Correlation effects and phonon modes softening with doping in Ba₁-xKxBiO₃.

    PubMed

    Korotin, Dm M; Novoselov, D; Anisimov, V I

    2014-05-14

    The monoclinic crystal structure of the undoped BaBiO₃ can be described as a cubic perovskite which is distorted by the frozen breathing and tilting phonon modes of the BiO₆ octahedra. The phonon mode softening is experimentally observed (Braden et al 1996 Europhys. Lett. 34 531) in Ba₁-xKxBiO₃ through potassium doping followed by a transition into an ideal cubic perovskite structure at x = 0.37, close to the emergence of superconductivity. In our previous paper (Korotin et al 2012 J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 24 415603) we demonstrated that it is necessary to take into account correlation effects using the DFT+U method in Wannier functions as a basis to obtain a good agreement between the calculated and experimental values of crystal structure distortion and the energy gap in BaBiO₃. In the present work, using the same method, we calculated the breathing mode phonon frequencies as a function of the potassium doping level in Ba₁-xKxBiO₃. The obtained frequencies are in good agreement with experimental values and the breathing mode softening with doping is reproduced, contrary to calculations made without consideration of correlation effects. We show that the cubic crystal structure becomes stable at x = 0.30 in agreement with the experimental transition to cubic perovskite at x = 0.37. The possible connections between the correlation effects, phonon mode softening and superconductivity in Ba₁-xKxBiO₃ are discussed.

  11. Detailed study of bending effects in large mode area segmented cladding fibers.

    PubMed

    Ma, Shaoshuo; Ning, Tigang; Li, Jing; Pei, Li; Zhang, Chuanbiao; Wen, Xiaodong

    2016-12-10

    This paper studies the bending effects on segmented cladding fibers (SCFs) in detail. Rod-type SCFs have offered large effective mode areas (EMAs) very successfully. The low-index segments in the design also enable the optical fibers to be bend-resistant. In this paper, the bending performance of the SCFs has been investigated by using the finite element method. The results indicate that SCFs can provide low-loss effective single-mode operation in a wide bandwidth under a bent configuration, due to the leakage losses of the higher-order modes (HOMs). A large ratio between the HOMs and the fundamental mode losses can be ensured, over a wide range of duty cycle, refractive index difference, and bending radius. Therefore, the required fabrication accuracy decreases. The mode loss ratio and EMA are independent of the bending orientation. Operating at 1550 nm and 10 cm bend radius, large EMA (754  μm2) is achievable with a large loss ratio (>30). The trade-offs between loss, EMA, and bending are studied. The structure has potential for compact high power fiber lasers, amplifiers, and beam delivery applications.

  12. Realizing mode conversion and optical diode effect by coupling photonic crystal waveguides with cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Han; Zhang, Jin-Qian-Nan; Yu, Zhong-Yuan; Wang, Dong-Lin; Chen, Zhi-Hui

    2015-09-01

    We propose a novel two-dimensional photonic crystal structure consisting of two line defect waveguides and a cavity to realize mode conversion based on the coupling effect. The W1/cavity/W2 structure breaks the spatial symmetry and successfully converts the even (odd) mode to the odd (even) mode in the W2 waveguide during the forward (backward) transmission. When considering the incidence of only the even mode, the optical diode effect emerges and achieves approximate 35 dB unidirectionality at the resonant frequency. Moreover, owing to the narrow bandpass feature and the flexibility of the tuning cavity, utilization of the proposed structure as a wavelength filter is demonstrated in a device with a Y-branch splitter. Here, we provide a heuristic design for a mode converter, optical diode, and wavelength filter derived from the coupling effect between a cavity and adjacent waveguides, and expect that the proposed structure can be applied as a building block in future all-optical integrated circuits. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61372037 and 61307069), Beijing Excellent Ph. D. Thesis Guidance Foundation, China (Grant No. 20131001301), and the Natural Science Foundation of Shanxi Province, China (Grant No. 2013021017-3).

  13. On the interplay effects with proton scanning beams in stage III lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yupeng; Kardar, Laleh; Liao, Li; Lim, Gino; Li, Xiaoqiang; Li, Heng; Zhu, Ronald X.; Sahoo, Narayan; Gillin, Michael; Zhang, Xiaodong; Cao, Wenhua; Chang, Joe Y.; Liao, Zhongxing; Komaki, Ritsuko; Cox, James D.

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: To assess the dosimetric impact of interplay between spot-scanning proton beam and respiratory motion in intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) for stage III lung cancer. Methods: Eleven patients were sampled from 112 patients with stage III nonsmall cell lung cancer to well represent the distribution of 112 patients in terms of target size and motion. Clinical target volumes (CTVs) and planning target volumes (PTVs) were defined according to the authors' clinical protocol. Uniform and realistic breathing patterns were considered along with regular- and hypofractionation scenarios. The dose contributed by a spot was fully calculated on the computed tomography (CT) images corresponding to the respiratory phase that the spot is delivered, and then accumulated to the reference phase of the 4DCT to generate the dynamic dose that provides an estimation of what might be delivered under the influence of interplay effect. The dynamic dose distributions at different numbers of fractions were compared with the corresponding 4D composite dose which is the equally weighted average of the doses, respectively, computed on respiratory phases of a 4DCT image set. Results: Under regular fractionation, the average and maximum differences in CTV coverage between the 4D composite and dynamic doses after delivery of all 35 fractions were no more than 0.2% and 0.9%, respectively. The maximum differences between the two dose distributions for the maximum dose to the spinal cord, heart V40, esophagus V55, and lung V20 were 1.2 Gy, 0.1%, 0.8%, and 0.4%, respectively. Although relatively large differences in single fraction, correlated with small CTVs relative to motions, were observed, the authors' biological response calculations suggested that this interfractional dose variation may have limited biological impact. Assuming a hypofractionation scenario, the differences between the 4D composite and dynamic doses were well confined even for single fraction. Conclusions: Despite

  14. Effects of load voltage on voltage breakdown modes of electrical exploding aluminum wires in air

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Jian; Li, Xingwen Yang, Zefeng; Wang, Kun; Chao, Youchuang; Shi, Zongqian; Jia, Shenli; Qiu, Aici

    2015-06-15

    The effects of the load voltage on the breakdown modes are investigated in exploding aluminum wires driven by a 1 kA, 0.1 kA/ns pulsed current in air. From laser probing images taken by laser shadowgraphy, schlieren imaging, and interferometry, the position of the shockwave front, the plasma channel, and the wire core edge of the exploding product can be determined. The breakdown mode makes a transition from the internal mode, which involves breakdown inside the wire core, to the shunting mode, which involves breakdown in the compressed air, with decreasing charging voltage. The breakdown electrical field for a gaseous aluminum wire core of nearly solid density is estimated to be more than 20 kV/cm, while the value for gaseous aluminum of approximately 0.2% solid density decreases to 15–20 kV/cm. The breakdown field in shunting mode is less than 20 kV/cm and is strongly affected by the vaporized aluminum, the desorbed gas, and the electrons emitted from the wire core during the current pause. Ohmic heating during voltage collapses will induce further energy deposition in the current channel and thus will result in different expansion speeds for both the wire core and the shockwave front in the different modes.

  15. Spraying mode effect on droplet formation and ion chemistry in electrosprays.

    PubMed

    Nemes, Peter; Marginean, Ioan; Vertes, Akos

    2007-04-15

    Depending on the spraying conditions and fluid properties, a variety of electrospray regimes exists. Here we explore the changes in ion production that accompany the transitions among the three axial spraying modes, the burst mode, the pulsating Taylor cone mode, and the cone-jet mode. Spray current oscillation and phase Doppler anemometry measurements, fast imaging of the electrified meniscus, and mass spectrometry are utilized to study the formation, size, velocity, and chemical composition of droplets produced in the three modes. High-speed images indicate that the primary droplets are produced by varicose waves and lateral kink instabilities on the liquid jet emerging from the Taylor cone, whereas secondary droplets are formed by fission. Dramatic changes in the droplet size distributions result from the various production and breakup mechanisms observed at different emitter voltages and liquid flow rates. We demonstrate that droplet fission can be facilitated by space charge effects along the liquid jet and in the plume. Compared to the other two regimes, a significantly enhanced signal-to-noise ratio, a lower degree of analyte oxidation, and milder fragmentation are observed for the cone-jet mode.

  16. Effects of Different Light Curing Units/Modes on the Microleakage of Flowable Composite Resins

    PubMed Central

    Yazici, A. Ruya; Celik, Cigdem; Dayangac, Berrin; Ozgunaltay, Gul

    2008-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the influence of different light curing units and modes on microleakage of flowable composite resins. Methods Eighty Class V cavities were prepared in buccal and lingual surfaces of 40 extracted human premolars with cervical wall located in dentin and the occlusal wall in enamel. These teeth were randomly assigned into two groups (n=20) and restored with different flowable composites; Group I: Esthet-X Flow, Group II: Grandio Flow. Each group was randomly divided into four subgroups; while the samples of the first subgroup were polymerized with conventional Halogen light, the rest of them were polymerized with different curing modes of Light Emitting Diode (LED). The second subgroup was polymerized with fast-curing; the third subgroup with pulse-curing and those of the fourth subgroup with step-curing modes of LED. After the samples were thermocycled and immersed in dye, they were longitudinally sectioned. Dye penetration was assessed under a stereomicroscope. Data were analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests. Results None of the restorations showed leakage on enamel margins. On dentin margins no significant differences were observed between flowable composite resins polymerized with halogen light (P>.05). While step curing mode of LED presented significant differences between the resins, the difference was insignificant when fast-curing and pulse-curing mode of LED were used. No statistically significant differences were observed between curing units for Esthet-X Flow samples. For Grandio Flow samples, only step-curing mode of LED caused statistically higher leakage scores than halogen and other curing modes of LED (P<.05). Conclusions The effect of curing units’ type and curing mode on flowable composite resin leakage might be material-dependent. PMID:19212529

  17. Direct observation of lanthanide(III)-phthalocyanine molecules on Au(111) by using scanning tunneling microscopy and scanning tunneling spectroscopy and thin-film field-effect transistor properties of Tb(III)- and Dy(III)-phthalocyanine molecules.

    PubMed

    Katoh, Keiichi; Yoshida, Yusuke; Yamashita, Masahiro; Miyasaka, Hitoshi; Breedlove, Brian K; Kajiwara, Takashi; Takaishi, Shinya; Ishikawa, Naoto; Isshiki, Hironari; Zhang, Yan Feng; Komeda, Tadahiro; Yamagishi, Masakazu; Takeya, Jun

    2009-07-29

    The crystal structures of double-decker single molecule magnets (SMM) LnPc(2) (Ln = Tb(III) and Dy(III); Pc = phthalocyanine) and non-SMM YPc(2) were determined by using X-ray diffraction analysis. The compounds are isomorphous to each other. The compounds have metal centers (M = Tb(3+), Dy(3+), and Y(3+)) sandwiched by two Pc ligands via eight isoindole-nitrogen atoms in a square-antiprism fashion. The twist angle between the two Pc ligands is 41.4 degrees. Scanning tunneling microscopy was used to investigate the compounds adsorbed on a Au(111) surface, deposited by using the thermal evaporation in ultrahigh vacuum. Both MPc(2) with eight lobes and MPc with four lobes, which has lost one Pc ligand, were observed. In the scanning tunneling spectroscopy images of TbPc molecules at 4.8 K, a Kondo peak with a Kondo temperature (T(K)) of approximately 250 K was observed near the Fermi level (V = 0 V). On the other hand, DyPc, YPc, and MPc(2) exhibited no Kondo peak. To understand the observed Kondo effect, the energy splitting of sublevels in a crystal field should be taken into consideration. As the next step in our studies on the SMM/Kondo effect in Tb-Pc derivatives, we investigated the electronic transport properties of Ln-Pc molecules as the active layer in top- and bottom-contact thin-film organic field effect transistor devices. Tb-Pc molecule devices exhibit p-type semiconducting properties with a hole mobility (mu(H)) of approximately 10(-4) cm(2) V(-1) s(-1). Interestingly, the Dy-Pc based devices exhibited ambipolar semiconducting properties with an electron mobility (mu(e)) of approximately 10(-5) and a mu(H) of approximately 10(-4) cm(2) V(-1) s(-1). This behavior has important implications for the electronic structure of the molecules.

  18. Bismuth(III) deferiprone effectively inhibits growth of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ATCC 27774.

    PubMed

    Barton, Larry L; Lyle, Daniel A; Ritz, Nathaniel L; Granat, Alex S; Khurshid, Ali N; Kherbik, Nada; Hider, Robert; Lin, Henry C

    2016-04-01

    Sulfate-reducing bacteria have been implicated in inflammatory bowel diseases and ulcerative colitis in humans and there is an interest in inhibiting the growth of these sulfide-producing bacteria. This research explores the use of several chelators of bismuth to determine the most effective chelator to inhibit the growth of sulfate-reducing bacteria. For our studies, Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ATCC 27774 was grown with nitrate as the electron acceptor and chelated bismuth compounds were added to test for inhibition of growth. Varying levels of inhibition were attributed to bismuth chelated with subsalicylate or citrate but the most effective inhibition of growth by D. desulfuricans was with bismuth chelated by deferiprone, 3-hydroxy-1,2-dimethyl-4(1H)-pyridone. Growth of D. desulfuricans was inhibited by 10 μM bismuth as deferiprone:bismuth with either nitrate or sulfate respiration. Our studies indicate deferiprone:bismuth has bacteriostatic activity on D. desulfuricans because the inhibition can be reversed following exposure to 1 mM bismuth for 1 h at 32 °C. We suggest that deferiprone is an appropriate chelator for bismuth to control growth of sulfate-reducing bacteria because deferiprone is relatively nontoxic to animals, including humans, and has been used for many years to bind Fe(III) in the treatment of β-thalassemia.

  19. Antimicrobial effects of helix D-derived peptides of human antithrombin III.

    PubMed

    Papareddy, Praveen; Kalle, Martina; Bhongir, Ravi K V; Mörgelin, Matthias; Malmsten, Martin; Schmidtchen, Artur

    2014-10-24

    Antithrombin III (ATIII) is a key antiproteinase involved in blood coagulation. Previous investigations have shown that ATIII is degraded by Staphylococcus aureus V8 protease, leading to release of heparin binding fragments derived from its D helix. As heparin binding and antimicrobial activity of peptides frequently overlap, we here set out to explore possible antibacterial effects of intact and degraded ATIII. In contrast to intact ATIII, the results showed that extensive degradation of the molecule yielded fragments with antimicrobial activity. Correspondingly, the heparin-binding, helix D-derived, peptide FFFAKLNCRLYRKANKSSKLV (FFF21) of human ATIII, was found to be antimicrobial against particularly the Gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Fluorescence microscopy and electron microscopy studies demonstrated that FFF21 binds to and permeabilizes bacterial membranes. Analogously, FFF21 was found to induce membrane leakage of model anionic liposomes. In vivo, FFF21 significantly reduced P. aeruginosa infection in mice. Additionally, FFF21 displayed anti-endotoxic effects in vitro. Taken together, our results suggest novel roles for ATIII-derived peptide fragments in host defense.

  20. Lemur responses to edge effects in the Vohibola III classified forest, Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Lehman, Shawn M; Rajaonson, Andry; Day, Sabine

    2006-03-01

    Forest edges are dynamic zones characterized by the penetration (to varying depths and intensities) of conditions from the surrounding environment (matrix) into the forest interior. Although edge effects influence many tropical organisms, they have not been studied directly in primates. Edge effects are particularly relevant to lemurs because of the highly fragmented forest landscapes found in Madagascar. In this study, data are presented regarding how the densities of six lemur species (Avahi laniger, Cheirogaleus major, Eulemur rubriventer, Hapalemur griseus griseus, Microcebus rufus, and Propithecus diadema edwardsi) varied between six 500-m interior transects and six 500-m edge transects in the Vohibola III Classified Forest in SE Madagascar. Diurnal (n = 433) and nocturnal (n = 128) lemur surveys were conducted during June-October 2003 and May-November 2004. A. laniger, E. rubriventer, and H. g. griseus exhibited a neutral edge response (no differences in densities between habitats). M. rufus and P. d. edwardsi had a positive edge response (higher densities in edge habitats), which may be related to edge-related variations in food abundance and quality. Positive edge responses by M. rufus and P. d. edwardsi may ultimately be detrimental due to edge-related anthropogenic factors (e.g., hunting by local people). The negative edge response exhibited by C. major (lower densities in edge habitats) may result from heightened ambient temperatures that inhibit torpor in edge habitats.

  1. Birefringence effects in multi-core fiber: coupled local-mode theory.

    PubMed

    Macho, Andrés; García-Meca, Carlos; Fraile-Peláez, F Javier; Morant, Maria; Llorente, Roberto

    2016-09-19

    In this paper, we evaluate experimentally and model theoretically the intra- and inter-core crosstalk between the polarized core modes in single-mode multi-core fiber media including temporal and longitudinal birefringent effects. Specifically, extensive experimental results on a four-core fiber indicate that the temporal fluctuation of fiber birefringence modifies the intra- and inter-core crosstalk behavior in both linear and nonlinear optical power regimes. To gain theoretical insight into the experimental results, we introduce an accurate multi-core fiber model based on local modes and perturbation theory, which is derived from the Maxwell equations including both longitudinal and temporal birefringent effects. Numerical calculations based on the developed theory are found to be in good agreement with the experimental data.

  2. Effects of filtration modes on membrane fouling behavior and treatment in submerged membrane bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Maqbool, Tahir; Khan, Sher Jamal; Lee, Chung-Hak

    2014-11-01

    Relaxation or backwashing is obligatory for effective operation of membrane module and intermittent aeration is helpful for nutrients removal. This study was performed to investigate effects of different filtration modes on membrane fouling behavior and treatment in membrane bioreactor (MBR) operated at three modes i.e., 12, 10 and 8min filtration and 3, 2, and 2min relaxation corresponding to 6, 5 and 4cycles/hour, respectively. Various parameters including trans-membrane pressure, specific cake resistance, specific oxygen uptake rate, nutrients removal and sludge dewaterability were examined to optimize the filtration mode. TMP profiles showed that MBR(8+2) with 8min filtration and 2min relaxation reduced the fouling rate and depicted long filtration time in MBR treating synthetic wastewater. MBR(12+3) was more efficient in organic and nutrients removal while denitrification rate was high in MBR(8+2).

  3. High Relaxivity Gd(III)–DNA Gold Nanostars: Investigation of Shape Effects on Proton Relaxation

    PubMed Central

    Rotz, Matthew W.; Culver, Kayla S. B.; Parigi, Giacomo; MacRenaris, Keith W.; Luchinat, Claudio; Odom, Teri W.; Meade, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    Gadolinium(III) nanoconjugate contrast agents (CAs) have distinct advantages over their small-molecule counterparts in magnetic resonance imaging. In addition to increased Gd(III) payload, a significant improvement in proton relaxation efficiency, or relaxivity (r1), is often observed. In this work, we describe the synthesis and characterization of a nanoconjugate CA created by covalent attachment of Gd(III) to thiolated DNA (Gd(III)–DNA), followed by surface conjugation onto gold nanostars (DNA–Gd@stars). These conjugates exhibit remarkable r1 with values up to 98 mM−1 s−1. Additionally, DNA–Gd@stars show efficient Gd(III) delivery and biocompatibility in vitro and generate significant contrast enhancement when imaged at 7 T. Using nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion analysis, we attribute the high performance of the DNA–Gd@stars to an increased contribution of second-sphere relaxivity compared to that of spherical CA equivalents (DNA–Gd@spheres). Importantly, the surface of the gold nanostar contains Gd(III)–DNA in regions of positive, negative, and neutral curvature. We hypothesize that the proton relaxation enhancement observed results from the presence of a unique hydrophilic environment produced by Gd(III)–DNA in these regions, which allows second-sphere water molecules to remain adjacent to Gd(III) ions for up to 10 times longer than diffusion. These results establish that particle shape and second-sphere relaxivity are important considerations in the design of Gd(III) nanoconjugate CAs. PMID:25723190

  4. Hybrid simulation of energetic particle effects on tearing modes in tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Cai Huishan; Fu Guoyong

    2012-07-15

    The effects of energetic ions on stability of tearing mode are investigated by global kinetic/MHD hybrid simulations in a low beta tokamak plasma. The kinetic effects of counter circulating energetic ions from the non-adiabatic response are found to be strongly destabilizing while the effects from the adiabatic response are stabilizing. The net effect with both adiabatic and non-adiabatic contributions is destabilizing. On the other hand, the kinetic effects of co-circulating energetic ions from the non-adiabatic response are calculated to be weakly stabilizing while the corresponding adiabatic contribution is destabilizing for small energetic ion beta. The net effect is weakly stabilizing. The dependence of kinetic effects on energetic ion beta, gyroradius, and speed is studied systematically and the results agree in large part with the previous analytic results for the kinetic effects of circulating particles. For trapped energetic ions, their effects on tearing mode stability are dominated by the adiabatic response due to large banana orbit width and strong poloidal variation of particle pressure. The net effect of trapped energetic particles on tearing modes is much more destabilizing as compared to that of counter circulating particles at the same beta value.

  5. Effectiveness and cost of failure mode and effects analysis methodology to reduce neurosurgical site infections.

    PubMed

    Hover, Alexander R; Sistrunk, William W; Cavagnol, Robert M; Scarrow, Alan; Finley, Phillip J; Kroencke, Audrey D; Walker, Judith L

    2014-01-01

    Mercy Hospital Springfield is a tertiary care facility with 32 000 discharges and 15 000 inpatient surgeries in 2011. From June 2009 through January 2011, a stable inpatient elective neurosurgery infection rate of 2.15% was observed. The failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) methodology to reduce inpatient neurosurgery infections was utilized. Following FMEA implementation, overall elective neurosurgery infection rates were reduced to 1.51% and sustained through May 2012. Compared with baseline, the post-FMEA deep-space and organ infection rate was reduced by 41% (P = .052). Overall hospital inpatient clean surgery infection rates for the same time frame did not decrease to the same extent, suggesting a specific effect of the FMEA. The study team believes that the FMEA interventions resulted in 14 fewer expected infections, $270 270 in savings, a 168-day reduction in expected length of stay, and 22 fewer readmissions. Given the serious morbidity and cost of health care-associated infections, the study team concludes that FMEA implementation was clinically cost-effective.

  6. Shaping Effects on Resistive-Plasma Resistive-Wall Mode Stability in a Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhodes, Dov; Cole, A. J.; Navratil, G. A.; Levesque, J. P.; Mauel, M. E.; Brennan, D. P.; Finn, J. M.; Fitzpatrick, R.

    2016-10-01

    A sharp-boundary MHD model is used to explore the effects of toroidal curvature and cross-sectional shaping on resistive-plasma resistive-wall modes in a tokamak. Building on the work of Fitzpatrick, we investigate mode stability with fixed toroidal number n =1 and a broad spectrum of poloidal m-numbers, given varying aspect-ratio, elongation, triangularity and up-down asymmetry. The speed and versatility of the sharp-boundary model facilitate exploration of a large parameter space, revealing qualitative trends to be further investigated by larger codes. In addition, the study addresses the effect of geometric mode-coupling on higher beta stability limits associated with an ideal-plasma or ideal-wall. These beta limits were used by Brennan and Finn to identify plasma response domains for feedback control. Present results show how geometric mode-coupling affects the stability limits and plasma response domains. The results are explained by an analytic reduced-MHD model with two coupled modes having different m-numbers. The next phase of this work will explore feedback control in different tokamak geometries. Supported by U.S. DOE Grant DE-FG02-86ER53222.

  7. Plasma Density Effects on Toroidal Flow Stabilization of Edge Localized Modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Shikui; Zhu, Ping; Banerjee, Debabrata

    2016-10-01

    Recent EAST experiments have demonstrated mitigation and suppression of edge localized modes (ELMs) with toroidal rotation flow in higher collisionality regime, suggesting potential roles of plasma density. In this work, the effects of plasma density on the toroidal flow stabilization of the high- n edge localized modes have been extensively studied in linear calculations for a circular-shaped limiter H-mode tokamak, using the initial-value extended MHD code NIMROD. In the single MHD model, toroidal flow has a weak stabilizing effects on the high- n modes. Such a stabilization, however, can be significantly enhanced with the increase in plasma density. Furthermore, our calculations show that the enhanced stabilization of high- n modes from toroidal flow with higher edge plasma density persists in the 2-fluid MHD model. These findings may explain the ELM mitigation and suppression by toroidal rotation in higher collisionality regime due to the enhancement of plasma density obtained in EAST experiment. Supported by the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Program of China under Grant Nos. 2014GB124002 and 2015GB101004, the 100 Talent Program and the President International Fellowship Initiative of Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  8. An Examination of the Effect of Coach Leadership Behaviors on the Psychosocial Development of Division III College Football Players

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Gary P.

    2010-01-01

    This study explores the relationship between student athlete development and coach leadership behaviors in NCAA Division III football players. Three key elements support this study. The first, Thelma Horn's model of coaching effectiveness, provided the framework for the impact of coaching behaviors on student athlete development. The second,…

  9. Ionic Strength Effect on the Rate of Reduction of Hexacyanoferrate (III) by Ascorbic Acid: A Physical Chemistry Laboratory Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watkins, Kenneth W.; Olson, June A.

    1980-01-01

    Describes a physical chemistry experiment that allows students to test the effect of ionic strength on the rates of a reaction between ions. The reduction of hexacyanoferrate III by ascorbic acid is detailed. Comparisons with the iodine clock reaction are made. (CS)

  10. Talents and Type Iiis: The Effects of the Talents Unlimited Model on Creative Productivity in Gifted Youngsters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, Jane L.

    2005-01-01

    This study examined a set of lessons that integrate the Talents Unlimited Model (TU; C. L. Schlichter, 1986) with the 10 steps of completing a Type III activity (J. S. Renzulli & S. M. Reis, 1985) to determine the effects of these lessons on the quality of students' creative products and on the number of students who completed their products.…

  11. Effects of impedance matching network on the discharge mode transitions in a radio-frequency inductively coupled plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Z. F.; Yuan, G. Y.; Gao, W.; Sun, J. C.

    2008-06-15

    In inductively coupled plasma sources, discharge transitions from electrostatic mode (E mode) to electromagnetic mode (H mode) and from H mode to E mode occur. In previous studies, only a few works paid attention to the effects of the impedance matching network. Cunge et al. [Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 8, 576 (1999)] investigated the E-H and H-E mode transitions under two different impedance matching situations, but no physical mechanism or interpretation was presented. This issue is remained to be systematically and quantitatively investigated, and the underlying mechanism to be unveiled. In this paper, the effects of the impedance matching network were experimentally studied in electropositive argon gas by varying the series capacitance in an inversely L-shaped matching network. The positive and negative feedback regions are established according to the effect of varying the series capacitance on the output power of the rf power supply. It was found that under the same experimental parameters, the discharge mode transitions are apt to be discontinuous and continuous in the positive and negative feedback regions, respectively. In addition, the critical coil rf current (or applied power) at the mode transition, the hysteretic loop width, and the difference in applied power during the discharge mode transition vary with the series capacitance. The critical coil rf current at the E-H mode transition is not always higher than that at the H-E mode transition.

  12. The hemodynamic effect of the support mode for the intra-aorta pump on the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Gao, Bin; Chang, Yu; Xuan, Yanjiao; Zeng, Yi; Liu, Youjun

    2013-02-01

    Intra-aorta pump is a novel rotary ventricular assist device. Because of the special structure and connection with the native heart, the hemodynamic effect of support mode of this pump on the cardiovascular system is not clear. In this work, three support modes, including "constant speed" mode, "co-pulse" mode, and "counter-pulse" mode, have been designed for the intra-aorta pump to evaluate the hemodynamic effect of different support modes on the cardiovascular system. Simulation results demonstrate that that both "co-pulse" mode and "counter-pulse" mode can achieve better unloading performance than "constant speed" mode. The intra-aorta pump controlled by "co-pulse" mode is beneficial for improving coronary flow. Moreover, the external work, which is defined as the product of left ventricular pressure and cardiac output, under "co-pulse" mode is the minimum of the three support modes (0.783 w vs. 0.615 w vs. 0.702 w). The pulsatility ratio, defined as the ratio of the peak-to-peak value of arterial pressure (AP) to the mean arterial pressure value, under "co-pulse" mode is the maximum of the three modes (24% vs. 32.8% vs. 23.7%). The equivalent afterload value, which is the ratio of pulsatile pressure at the pump inflow and pulsatile pump flow, is larger than other support modes (0.596 mm Hg.s/mL vs. 0.9704 mm Hg.s/mL vs. 0.55 mm Hg.s/mL). In brief, the intra-aorta pump under "co-pulse" mode support is beneficial for improving myocardial perfusion and restoring pulsatility of AP, while "counter-pulse" mode is beneficial to the perfusion of vital organs.

  13. Failure modes and effects criticality analysis and accelerated life testing of LEDs for medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawant, M.; Christou, A.

    2012-12-01

    While use of LEDs in Fiber Optics and lighting applications is common, their use in medical diagnostic applications is not very extensive. Since the precise value of light intensity will be used to interpret patient results, understanding failure modes [1-4] is very important. We used the Failure Modes and Effects Criticality Analysis (FMECA) tool to identify the critical failure modes of the LEDs. FMECA involves identification of various failure modes, their effects on the system (LED optical output in this context), their frequency of occurrence, severity and the criticality of the failure modes. The competing failure modes/mechanisms were degradation of: active layer (where electron-hole recombination occurs to emit light), electrodes (provides electrical contact to the semiconductor chip), Indium Tin Oxide (ITO) surface layer (used to improve current spreading and light extraction), plastic encapsulation (protective polymer layer) and packaging failures (bond wires, heat sink separation). A FMECA table is constructed and the criticality is calculated by estimating the failure effect probability (β), failure mode ratio (α), failure rate (λ) and the operating time. Once the critical failure modes were identified, the next steps were generation of prior time to failure distribution and comparing with our accelerated life test data. To generate the prior distributions, data and results from previous investigations were utilized [5-33] where reliability test results of similar LEDs were reported. From the graphs or tabular data, we extracted the time required for the optical power output to reach 80% of its initial value. This is our failure criterion for the medical diagnostic application. Analysis of published data for different LED materials (AlGaInP, GaN, AlGaAs), the Semiconductor Structures (DH, MQW) and the mode of testing (DC, Pulsed) was carried out. The data was categorized according to the materials system and LED structure such as AlGaInP-DH-DC, Al

  14. Line-of-sight geometrical and instrumental resolution effects on intensity perturbations by sausage modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antolin, P.; Van Doorsselaere, T.

    2013-07-01

    Context. Diagnostics of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves in the solar atmosphere is a topic that often encounters interpretation problems, partly because of the high complexity of the solar atmospheric medium. Forward modelling can significantly guide interpretation, bridging the gap between numerical simulations and observations, and increasing the reliability of mode identification for applying MHD seismology. Aims: We determine the characteristics of the fast MHD sausage mode in the corona on the modulation of observable quantities, such as line intensity and spectral line broadening. Effects of the line-of-sight angle and of spatial, temporal, and spectral resolutions are considered. Methods: We take a cylindrical tube that simulates a loop in a low-β coronal environment with an optically thin background and let it oscillate with the fast sausage mode. A parametric study is performed. Results: Longitudinal structuring of the intensity modulation is obtained and set by the nodal structure of the radial velocity. The modulation is strongly dependent on the contribution function of the spectral line. Under the assumption of equilibrium ionisation, the intensity variation can be very low (≲4% for Fe ix 171) or significant (35% for Fe xii 193). Most of this variation disappears when considering the radiative relaxation times of the ions, due to the fast timescales of the sausage mode in the corona. Regardless of the ionisation state of the plasma, the variation in spectral line broadening can be significant, even for low intensity modulation. The nature of this broadening is not thermal but is mostly turbulent. This places spectrometers in clear advantage over imaging instruments for the detection of the sausage mode. The modulation of all quantities can considerably decrease with the line-of-sight angle with respect to the perpendicular to the tube axis. The spatial and temporal resolution are the main factors affecting modulation, erasing longitudinal

  15. Effect of Mode of Interest Assessment on Clients' Career Decision-Making Self-Efficacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uffelman, Rachel A.; Subich, Linda Mezydlo; Diegelman, Nathan M.; Wagner, Kimberly S.; Bardash, Rebekah J.

    2004-01-01

    To compare the effects of three different modes of interest assessment on career decision-making self-efficacy, 81 career-undecided college students participated in one of the following four conditions: an assessment intervention using the Strong Interest Inventory, an intervention using one of two methods of applying the Self-Directed Search, or…

  16. The Effects of Different Modes of Representation on Mathematical Problem Solving

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gagatsis, Athanasios; Elia, Iliada

    2004-01-01

    The main objective of this study is to investigate the role of four different modes of representation in mathematical problem solving (MPS), and more specifically to develop a model, which provides information about the effects of these representations in the solution procedures of one-step problems of additive structures. Data were collected from…

  17. The Effects of Mode and Rate of Presentation on Evaluative Encoding in Children's Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Douglas, Joan Delahanty; Corsale, Kathleen

    1977-01-01

    The release-from-proactive-inhibition technique was used to assess the effects of mode of presentation and presentation rate on the development of elementary school children's ability to use the evaluative dimension of the Semantic Differential as an encoding device in short-term memory. (Author/JMB)

  18. Analysis of Resistive Wall Modes in RFP Plasmas with Rotation and Dissipative Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, S. C.; Freidberg, J. P.; Nachtrieb, R.

    1998-11-01

    The stability of the non-resonant external kink modes under the resistive wall boundary condition in an RFP is analyzed. This topic is especially relevant to the future long pulse discharges. With respect to previous work(R.Nachtrieb, J.P.Freidberg and R.Betti, Reversed Field Pinch Workshop, Madison, WI October 14-16, 1996), the parallel viscosity (Braginskii's stress tensor) effects have been added into the eigenmode equation. Therefore, both the ion sound wave damping and the viscosity effects together with the plasma rotation are taken into account in the analysis. The influence of the equilibrium parameters on the mode instability is carefully studied by employing the conventional α-Θo equilibrium models. It is found that the behaviours of the RWM is rather sensitive to the reversal parameter F of RFPs. In the low β (or zero β) plasma region, there is a stability window in the wall-plasma distance b/a due to the plasma rotation and viscous dissipative effects. For the typical RFP operating parameters, the required rotation velocity to stabilize the modes is in the range of the ion sound speed or even higher. The effects of the viscosity on the instability of the modes are investigated.

  19. The Relative Effects of Explicit Correction and Recasts on Two Target Structures via Two Communication Modes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yilmaz, Yucel

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of negative feedback type (i.e., explicit correction vs. recasts), communication mode (i.e., face-to-face communication vs. synchronous computer-mediated communication), and target structure salience (i.e., salient vs. nonsalient) on the acquisition of two Turkish morphemes. Forty-eight native speakers of…

  20. The Effect of Mode of Response on a Semidirect Test of Oral Proficiency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiddle, Thom; Kormos, Judit

    2011-01-01

    This article reports on a study conducted with 42 participants from a Chilean university, which aimed to determine the effect of mode of response on test performance and test-taker perception of test features by comparing a semidirect online version and a direct face-to-face version of a speaking test. Candidate performances on both test versions…

  1. Effects Of Three-Dimensional Conducting Structures On Resistive Wall Modes

    SciTech Connect

    Villone, Fabio

    2008-11-01

    This paper illustrates the effect of three-dimensional conducting structures on the evolution of Resistive Wall Modes (RWM) occurring in toroidal fusion devices. The CarMa code is used to derive the model, which then is used to design a feedback controller of RWMs. Some examples of application to the ITER geometry are reported.

  2. Comparative Effects of Two Modes of Computer-Assisted Instructional Package on Solid Geometry Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gambari, Isiaka Amosa; Ezenwa, Victoria Ifeoma; Anyanwu, Romanus Chogozie

    2014-01-01

    The study examined the effects of two modes of computer-assisted instructional package on solid geometry achievement amongst senior secondary school students in Minna, Niger State, Nigeria. Also, the influence of gender on the performance of students exposed to CAI(AT) and CAI(AN) packages were examined. This study adopted a pretest-posttest…

  3. Effects of Presentation Mode and Computer Familiarity on Summarization of Extended Texts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yu, Guoxing

    2010-01-01

    Comparability studies on computer- and paper-based reading tests have focused on short texts and selected-response items via almost exclusively statistical modeling of test performance. The psychological effects of presentation mode and computer familiarity on individual students are under-researched. In this study, 157 students read extended…

  4. Cognitive Processing Capacity and Learning-Mode Effects in Prose Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Furukawa, James M.

    1977-01-01

    High cognitive processing capacity (CPC) students were superior to low-CPC students in prose learning. Of the four learning modes--programmed instruction (PI), control, chunking study outline, and adjunct questions--PI was the most effective. Substantial CPC and performance correlations and poor long-term retention suggested that PI was not best…

  5. The Effects of Communication Mode on Negotiation of Meaning and Its Noticing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yuksel, Dogan; Inan, Banu

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the effects of communication mode ("i.e.", face to face versus computer mediated communication) on the instances of negotiation of meaning (NofM) and its level of noticing by learners. Sixty-four participants (32 dyads) completed two jigsaw tasks in two different mediums (one in each) and four days after the tasks…

  6. Effect of dynamical instability on timing jitter in passively mode-locked quantum-dot lasers.

    PubMed

    Pimenov, A; Habruseva, T; Rachinskii, D; Hegarty, S P; Huyet, G; Vladimirov, A G

    2014-12-15

    We study the effect of noise on the dynamics of passively mode-locked semiconductor lasers both experimentally and theoretically. A method combining analytical and numerical approaches for estimation of pulse timing jitter is proposed. We investigate how the presence of dynamical features such as wavelength bistability in a quantum-dot laser affects timing jitter.

  7. The Effect of Corner Modes in the Initial Conditions of Cosmological Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falck, B.; McCullagh, N.; Neyrinck, M. C.; Wang, J.; Szalay, A. S.

    2017-03-01

    In view of future high-precision large-scale structure surveys, it is important to quantify the percent and subpercent level effects in cosmological N-body simulations from which theoretical predictions are drawn. One such effect involves deciding whether to zero all modes above the one-dimensional Nyquist frequency, the so-called “corner” modes, in the initial conditions. We investigate this effect by comparing power spectra, density distribution functions, halo mass functions, and halo profiles in simulations with and without these modes. For a simulation with a mass resolution of {m}p∼ {10}11 {h}-1 {M}ȯ , we find that at z> 6, the difference in the matter power spectrum is large at wavenumbers above ∼80% of {k}{Ny}, reducing to below 2% at all scales by z∼ 3. Including corner modes results in a better match between low- and high-resolution simulations at wavenumbers around the Nyquist frequency of the low-resolution simulation, but the effect of the corner modes is smaller than the effect of particle discreteness. The differences in mass functions are 3% for the smallest halos at z = 6 for the {m}p∼ {10}11 {h}-1 {M}ȯ simulation, but we find no significant difference in the stacked profiles of well-resolved halos at z≤slant 6. Thus removing power at | {\\boldsymbol{k}}| > {k}{Ny} in the initial conditions of cosmological simulations has a small effect on small scales and high redshifts, typically below a few percent.

  8. Mapping the effective mass of electrons in III-V semiconductor quantum confined structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gass, M. H.; Papworth, A. J.; Beanland, R.; Bullough, T. J.; Chalker, P. R.

    2006-01-01

    The electron effective mass me* can be calculated from the Kramers-Kronig transformation of electron energy loss spectra (EELS) for III-V semiconductor materials. The mapping capabilities of a scanning transmission electron microscope, equipped with a GatanEnfina™ EELS system are exploited to produce maps showing the variation of me* with nanometer scale resolution for a range of semiconductors. The analysis was carried out on three material systems: a GaInNAs quantum well in a GaAs matrix; InAs quantum dots in a GaAs matrix, and bulk wurzitic GaN. Values of me* were measured as ˜0.07m0 for GaAs and 0.183m0 for GaN, both in excellent agreement with the literature. It has also been shown that the high frequency dielectric constant can be calculated using the Kramers-Kronig methodology. When the high frequency dielectric constant is incorporated into the calculations a much more accurate visual representation of me* is displayed in the maps.

  9. Anticarcinogenic effects of hexaamminecobalt(III) chloride in mice initiated with diethylnitrosamine.

    PubMed

    Naura, Amarjit S; Kalla, Natwar R; Sharma, Raj P; Sharma, Rajeshwar

    2007-11-01

    Hexaamminecobalt(III) chloride ([Co(NH3)6]Cl3) was investigated for its antineoplastic role in relation to tumor marker enzymes, drug metabolizing enzymes, oxidative stress-related parameters, and histopathological analysis of liver and lung tissues of mice. Initiation was performed using a single intraperitoneal injection of diethylnitrosamine (DENA) at a carcinogenic dose of 90 mg/kg body weight. The cobalt complex supplementation at a dose of 100 ppm in drinking water was given ad libitum throughout the experimental period of 14 weeks. In comparison to lung, the cobalt complex supplementation was found to reverse DENA-induced biochemical changes more effectively in liver. Histological examination of liver and lung from DENA-initiated and cobalt-complex-supplemented mice showed considerable protection in the case of liver compared to that of lung. The involvement of the [Co(NH3)6]Cl3 in modulating several factors associated with carcinogenesis induced by DENA thus showed its anticarcinogenic potential against chemically induced hepatocarcinogenesis.

  10. Effective Collision Strengths for Electron Impact Excitation of Inelastic Transitions in S III

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tayal, S. S.

    1997-01-01

    We have calculated electron collisional excitation strengths for all electric dipole forbidden, semi-forbidden, and allowed transitions among the lowest 17 LS states 3s(exp 2)3p(exp 2) P-3, D-1, S-1, 3s3p(exp 3)S-5(exp 0), D-3(exp 0), P-3(exp 0), P-1(exp 0), S-3(exp 0), D-1(exp 0), 3S(exp 2)3p3d D-1(exp 0), F-3(exp 0), P-3(exp 0), D-3(exp 0), F-3(exp 0), P-1(exp 0), and 3S(exp 2)3p4S P-3(exp 0), P-l(exp 0) of S III using the R-matrix method. These S m states are represented by fairly extensive configuration-interaction wave functions that yield excited state energies in close agreement with recent laboratory measurements. Rydberg series of resonances converging to the excited state thresholds are explicitly included in the scattering calculation. The effective collision strengths are determined assuming Maxwellian distribution of electron energies. These are listed over a wide temperature range ([0.5-10] x 10(exp 4) K) and compared, where possible, with other available calculations. Subject headings: atomic data - atomic processes

  11. Effect of Temperature Anisotropy on Various Modes and Instabilities for a Magnetized Non-relativistic Bi-Maxwellian Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bashir, Muhammad Fraz; Murtaza, G.

    2012-12-01

    Using kinetic theory for homogeneous collisionless magnetized plasmas, we present an extended review of the plasma waves and instabilities and discuss the anisotropic response of generalized relativistic dielectric tensor and Onsager symmetry properties for arbitrary distribution functions. In general, we observe that for such plasmas only those modes whose magnetic-field perturbations are perpendicular to the ambient magnetic field, i.e., B 1 bot B 0, are effected by the anisotropy. However, in oblique propagation all modes do show such anisotropic effects. Considering the non-relativistic bi-Maxwellian distribution and studying the relevant components of the general dielectric tensor under appropriate conditions, we derive the dispersion relations for various modes and instabilities. We show that only the electromagnetic R- and L- waves, those derived from them (i.e., the whistler mode, pure Alfvén mode, firehose instability, and whistler instability), and the O-mode are affected by thermal anisotropies, since they satisfy the required condition {B}1bot {B}0. By contrast, the perpendicularly propagating X-mode and the modes derived from it (the pure transverse X-mode and Bernstein mode) show no such effect. In general, we note that the thermal anisotropy modifies the parallel propagating modes via the parallel acoustic effect, while it modifies the perpendicular propagating modes via the Larmor-radius effect. In oblique propagation for kinetic Alfvén waves, the thermal anisotropy affects the kinetic regime more than it affects the inertial regime. The generalized fast mode exhibits two distinct acoustic effects, one in the direction parallel to the ambient magnetic field and the other in the direction perpendicular to it. In the fast-mode instability, the magneto-sonic wave causes suppression of the firehose instability. We discuss all these propagation characteristics and present graphic illustrations. The threshold conditions for different instabilities are

  12. Effects of sediment characteristics on the toxicity of chromium(III) and chromium(VI) to the amphipod, Hyalella azteca

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Besser, J.M.; Brumbaugh, W.G.; Kemble, N.E.; May, T.W.; Ingersoll, C.G.

    2004-01-01

    We evaluated the influence of sediment characteristics, acid-volatile sulfide (AVS) and organic matter (OM), on the toxicity of chromium (Cr) in freshwater sediments. We conducted chronic (28-42-d) toxicity tests with the amphipod Hyalella azteca exposed to Cr(VI) and Cr(III) in water and in spiked sediments. Waterborne Cr(VI) caused reduced survival of amphipods with a median lethal concentration (LC50) of 40 ??g/L. Cr(VI) spiked into test sediments with differing levels of AVS resulted in graded decreases in AVS and sediment OM. Only Cr(VI)-spiked sediments with low AVS concentrations (<1 ??mol/g) caused significant amphipod mortality. Waterborne Cr(III) concentrations near solubility limits caused decreased survival of amphipods at pH 7 and pH 8 but not at pH 6. Sediments spiked with high levels of Cr(III) did not affect amphipod survival but had minor effects on growth and inconsistent effects on reproduction. Pore waters of some Cr(III)-spiked sediments contained measurable concentrations of Cr(VI), but observed toxic effects did not correspond closely to Cr concentrations in sediment or pore waters. Our results indicate that risks of Cr toxicity are low in freshwater sediments containing substantial concentrations of AVS.

  13. Split resonance modes of a AuBRC plasmonic nanosystem caused by the coupling effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Yuan; Kan, Caixia; Xu, Haiying; Wang, Changshun

    2016-12-01

    A plasmonic nanosystem can give rise to particular optical responses due to a coupling effect. In this work, we investigate the optical properties and field distributions of a novel ‘matrioska’ nanocavity structure composed of a Au nanorod (AuNR) within a nanobox (AuNB) via finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulation. This nanocavity can be fabricated by a two-step wet-chemical method. The multiple SPR modes of optical spectrum for nanocavity are caused by the strong interaction between the AuNR-core and AuNB-shell when the incident light is perpendicular or parallel to the long axis of the Au box/rod nanocavity (AuBRC). The SPR modes are known as the dipole-dipole bonding resonance mode in the lower-energy region and the antibonding resonance mode in the higher-energy region. It is proposed that AuBRC can escape the orientation confinement of AuNR because the multiple modes occur and provide a potential application for the enhancement of the photoluminescence signal. Additionally, the SPR modes red-shift with increasing the offset of the AuNR-core, whereas the SPR mode dramatically blue-shifts when the conductive coupling is formed. The intense ‘hot-spot’ could be induced within a small interaction region in the conductive coupled system. The SPR line-shape of high quality would also be promoted. The SPR is highly sensitive to the medium, which is promising in the sensing and detecting devices.

  14. Vortex Laser based on III-V semiconductor metasurface: direct generation of coherent Laguerre-Gauss modes carrying controlled orbital angular momentum

    PubMed Central

    Seghilani, Mohamed S.; Myara, Mikhael; Sellahi, Mohamed; Legratiet, Luc; Sagnes, Isabelle; Beaudoin, Grégoire; Lalanne, Philippe; Garnache, Arnaud

    2016-01-01

    The generation of a coherent state, supporting a large photon number, with controlled orbital-angular-momentum L = ħl (of charge l per photon) presents both fundamental and technological challenges: we demonstrate a surface-emitting laser, based on III-V semiconductor technology with an integrated metasurface, generating vortex-like coherent state in the Laguerre-Gauss basis. We use a first order phase perturbation to lift orbital degeneracy of wavefunctions, by introducing a weak anisotropy called here “orbital birefringence”, based on a dielectric metasurface. The azimuthal symmetry breakdown and non-linear laser dynamics create “orbital gain dichroism” allowing selecting vortex handedness. This coherent photonic device was characterized and studied, experimentally and theoretically. It exhibits a low divergence (<1°) diffraction limited beam, emitting 49 mW output power in the near-IR at λ ≃ 1 μm, a charge l = ±1, … ±4 (>50 dB vortex purity), and single frequency operation in a stable low noise regime (0.1% rms). Such high performance laser opens the path to widespread new photonic applications. PMID:27917885

  15. Vortex Laser based on III-V semiconductor metasurface: direct generation of coherent Laguerre-Gauss modes carrying controlled orbital angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seghilani, Mohamed S.; Myara, Mikhael; Sellahi, Mohamed; Legratiet, Luc; Sagnes, Isabelle; Beaudoin, Grégoire; Lalanne, Philippe; Garnache, Arnaud

    2016-12-01

    The generation of a coherent state, supporting a large photon number, with controlled orbital-angular-momentum L = ħl (of charge l per photon) presents both fundamental and technological challenges: we demonstrate a surface-emitting laser, based on III-V semiconductor technology with an integrated metasurface, generating vortex-like coherent state in the Laguerre-Gauss basis. We use a first order phase perturbation to lift orbital degeneracy of wavefunctions, by introducing a weak anisotropy called here “orbital birefringence”, based on a dielectric metasurface. The azimuthal symmetry breakdown and non-linear laser dynamics create “orbital gain dichroism” allowing selecting vortex handedness. This coherent photonic device was characterized and studied, experimentally and theoretically. It exhibits a low divergence (<1°) diffraction limited beam, emitting 49 mW output power in the near-IR at λ ≃ 1 μm, a charge l = ±1, … ±4 (>50 dB vortex purity), and single frequency operation in a stable low noise regime (0.1% rms). Such high performance laser opens the path to widespread new photonic applications.

  16. Vortex Laser based on III-V semiconductor metasurface: direct generation of coherent Laguerre-Gauss modes carrying controlled orbital angular momentum.

    PubMed

    Seghilani, Mohamed S; Myara, Mikhael; Sellahi, Mohamed; Legratiet, Luc; Sagnes, Isabelle; Beaudoin, Grégoire; Lalanne, Philippe; Garnache, Arnaud

    2016-12-05

    The generation of a coherent state, supporting a large photon number, with controlled orbital-angular-momentum L = ħl (of charge l per photon) presents both fundamental and technological challenges: we demonstrate a surface-emitting laser, based on III-V semiconductor technology with an integrated metasurface, generating vortex-like coherent state in the Laguerre-Gauss basis. We use a first order phase perturbation to lift orbital degeneracy of wavefunctions, by introducing a weak anisotropy called here "orbital birefringence", based on a dielectric metasurface. The azimuthal symmetry breakdown and non-linear laser dynamics create "orbital gain dichroism" allowing selecting vortex handedness. This coherent photonic device was characterized and studied, experimentally and theoretically. It exhibits a low divergence (<1°) diffraction limited beam, emitting 49 mW output power in the near-IR at λ ≃ 1 μm, a charge l = ±1, … ±4 (>50 dB vortex purity), and single frequency operation in a stable low noise regime (0.1% rms). Such high performance laser opens the path to widespread new photonic applications.

  17. TESTING MASS LOSS IN LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD CEPHEIDS USING INFRARED AND OPTICAL OBSERVATIONS. II. PREDICTIONS AND TESTS OF THE OGLE-III FUNDAMENTAL-MODE CEPHEIDS

    SciTech Connect

    Neilson, Hilding R.; Ngeow, Chow-Choong; Kanbur, Shashi M.; Lester, John B.

    2010-06-20

    In this paper, we test the hypothesis that Cepheids have infrared excesses due to mass loss. We fit a model using the mass-loss rate and the stellar radius as free parameters to optical observations from the OGLE-III survey and infrared observations from the Two Micron All Sky Survey and SAGE data sets. The sample of Cepheids has predicted minimum mass-loss rates ranging from 0 to 10{sup -8} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}, where the rates depend on the chosen dust properties. We use the predicted radii to compute the period-radius relation for LMC Cepheids and to estimate the uncertainty caused by the presence of infrared excess for determining angular diameters with the infrared surface brightness technique. Finally, we calculate the linear and nonlinear period-luminosity (P-L) relations for the LMC Cepheids at VIJHK + IRAC wavelengths and find that the P-L relations are consistent with being nonlinear at infrared wavelengths contrary to previous results.

  18. Effects of underwater turbulence on laser beam propagation and coupling into single-mode optical fiber.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Frank; Lasher, Mark

    2010-06-01

    We characterize and compare the effects of turbulence on underwater laser propagation with theory. Measurements of the coupling efficiency of the focused beam into a single-mode fiber are reported. A simple tip-tilt control system, based on the position of the image centroid in the focal plane, was shown to maintain good coupling efficiency for a beam radius equal to the transverse coherence length, r(0). These results are relevant to high bandwidth communication technology that requires good spatial mode quality.

  19. Effect of surface modes on coupling to fast waves in the LHRF

    SciTech Connect

    Pinsker, R.I.; Colestock, P.L.

    1990-09-16

    The effect of surface modes of propagation on coupling to fast waves in the LHRF is studied theoretically and experimentally. The previously reported up-down' poloidal phasing asymmetry for coupling to a uniform plasma is shown to be due to the properties of a mode which carries energy along the plasma-conducting wall interface. Comparison of the theory with coupling experiments performed on the PLT tokamak with a phased array of twelve dielectric-loaded waveguides at 800 MHz shows that the observed dependence of the net reflection coefficient on toroidal phase angle can be explained only if the surface wave is taken into account. 43 refs., 10 figs.

  20. Model-OA wind turbine generator - Failure modes and effects analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, William E.; Lali, Vincent R.

    1990-01-01

    The results failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA) conducted for wind-turbine generators are presented. The FMEA was performed for the functional modes of each system, subsystem, or component. The single-point failures were eliminated for most of the systems. The blade system was the only exception. The qualitative probability of a blade separating was estimated at level D-remote. Many changes were made to the hardware as a result of this analysis. The most significant change was the addition of the safety system. Operational experience and need to improve machine availability have resulted in subsequent changes to the various systems, which are also reflected in this FMEA.

  1. Mode-Coupling-Induced Dissipative and Thermal Effects at Long Times after a Quantum Quench

    SciTech Connect

    Mitra, Aditi; Giamarchi, Thierry

    2011-10-07

    An interaction quench in a Luttinger liquid can drive it into an athermal steady state. We analyze the effects on such an out of equilibrium state of a mode coupling term due to a periodic potential. Employing a perturbative renormalization group approach we show that even when the periodic potential is an irrelevant perturbation in equilibrium, it has important consequences on the athermal steady state as it generates a temperature as well as a dissipation and hence a finite lifetime for the bosonic modes.

  2. Mode-coupling-induced dissipative and thermal effects at long times after a quantum quench.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Aditi; Giamarchi, Thierry

    2011-10-07

    An interaction quench in a Luttinger liquid can drive it into an athermal steady state. We analyze the effects on such an out of equilibrium state of a mode coupling term due to a periodic potential. Employing a perturbative renormalization group approach we show that even when the periodic potential is an irrelevant perturbation in equilibrium, it has important consequences on the athermal steady state as it generates a temperature as well as a dissipation and hence a finite lifetime for the bosonic modes.

  3. Effect of leachate injection modes on municipal solid waste degradation in anaerobic bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Benbelkacem, H; Bayard, R; Abdelhay, A; Zhang, Y; Gourdon, R

    2010-07-01

    Three pilots simulated landfill bioreactors were used to investigate the effect of leachate injection modes on anaerobic digestion and biogas production from municipal solid waste. The technical modes used to increase waste moisture consisted of an initial saturation of the waste by flushing with leachate followed by a quick drainage, or weekly leachate injections with two different rates. The results confirmed that increasing moisture content is a key parameter to boost the biological reactions. Weekly leachate injection with high flow rate led to better results than the initial saturation of the waste in terms of biogas production kinetics. Water percolation was found to be an important factor to accelerate the degradation of solid waste. However, a modelling of the collected data by Gompertz model clearly showed that the intrinsic biogas potential determined on the initial solid waste was not reached with any of the progressive leachate injection modes.

  4. An effective method for designing insensitive resonator of continuous-wave passively mode-locked laser.

    PubMed

    Wen, Qiao; Sun, Liqun; Wang, Yonggang; Zhang, Enyao; Tian, Qian

    2009-05-25

    An effective method for designing the insensitive resonator of a continuous-wave passively mode-locked laser is firstly presented in this paper. This method, using resonator transform circle graphic theory, is both intuitive and reliable. Theoretical results show that the resonator is suitable to obtain highly stable mode locking operation when the following two conditions are fulfilled. First, the transform circle of the terminal mirror opposite the semiconductor saturable absorber mirror (SESAM) propagates through a series of lens (including the thermal lens of the gain medium) and a small transform circle in the image space is obtained, which ensures the small spot size at the SESAM. Second, the resonator transform circles orthogonally (or nearly orthogonally) intersect at the SESAM, which ensures the spot size at the SESAM is insensitive to the external perturbation. The experimental results of the mode locking lasers show good agreement with the theoretical studies very well.

  5. [Effects of different planting modes on the soil permeability of sloping farmlands in purple soil area].

    PubMed

    Li, Jian-Xing; He, Bing-Hui; Mei, Xue-Mei; Liang, Yan-Ling; Xiong, Jian

    2013-03-01

    Taking bare land as the control, this paper studied the effects of different planting modes on the soil permeability of sloping farmlands in purple soil area. For the test six planting modes, the soil permeability was in the order of Eriobotrya japonica > Citrus limon > Vetiveria zizanioides hedgerows +corn >Leucaena leucocephala hedgerows + corn> Hemerocallis fulva > corn> bare land, and decreased with increasing depth. The eigenvalues of soil infiltration were in the order of initial infiltration rate> average infiltration rate> stable infiltration rate. The soil permeability had significant positive linear correlations with soil total porosity, non-capillary porosity, initial moisture content, water holding capacity, and organic matter content, and significant negative linear correlation with soil bulk density. The common empirical infiltration model could well fit the soil moisture infiltration processes under the six planting modes, while the Kostiakov equation could not.

  6. The use of failure mode effect and criticality analysis in a medication error subcommittee.

    PubMed

    Williams, E; Talley, R

    1994-04-01

    Failure Mode Effect and Criticality Analysis (FMECA) is the systematic assessment of a process or product that enables one to determine the location and mechanism of potential failures. It has been used by engineers, particularly in the aerospace industry, to identify and prioritize potential failures during product development when there is a lack of data but an abundance of expertise. The Institute for Safe Medication Practices has recommended its use in analyzing the medication administration process in hospitals and in drug product development in the pharamceutical industry. A medication error subcommittee adopted and modified FMECA to identify and prioritize significant failure modes in its specific medication administration process. Based on this analysis, the subcommittee implemented solutions to four of the five highest ranked failure modes. FMECA provided a method for a multidisciplinary group to address the most important medication error concerns based upon the expertise of the group members. It also facilitated consensus building in a group with varied perceptions.

  7. Design of controlled rocking steel frames to limit higher mode effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andree Wiebe, Lydell Deighton

    Because conventional seismic force resisting systems rely on yielding of key structural members to limit seismic forces, structural damage is expected after a design-level earthquake. Repairing this damage can be very expensive, if it is possible at all. Researchers have been developing a new family of self-centring systems that avoid structural damage. One such system is a controlled rocking steel frame, which is the subject of this thesis. In a controlled rocking steel frame, the columns of a frame are permitted to uplift from the foundation, and the response is controlled by using a combination of post-tensioning and energy dissipation. Although previous studies have confirmed the viability of this system, they have also shown that rocking does not fully limit the peak seismic forces because of higher mode effects. If a structure is designed to account for these effects, it may be uneconomical, but if it is not designed to account for them, it may be unsafe. The purpose of this thesis is to develop recommendations for the design of controlled rocking steel frames, particularly with regard to higher mode effects. A theoretical framework for understanding higher mode effects is developed, and large-scale shake table testing is used to study the behaviour of a controlled rocking steel frame. Two mechanisms are proposed to mitigate the increase in structural forces due to higher mode effects, and these mechanisms are validated by shake table testing. Numerical modelling of controlled rocking steel frames is shown to become more reliable when higher mode mitigation mechanisms are used to limit the seismic response. In the final chapters, the thesis proposes and validates a new methodology for the limit states design of controlled rocking steel frames.

  8. Critical angle effects and their treatment using ray theory and mode theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westwood, Evan K.; Penrod, Clark S.

    2005-09-01

    The interaction of the acoustic field from a point source with a fluid half-space is examined in terms of ray theory and mode theory. For ray theory, a complex ray approach [E. K. Westwood, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 85, 1872-1884 (1989)] is used to find the reflected and transmitted fields as the sum of one or two eigenrays. The approach uses the method of steepest descent to solve the plane-wave integral for the fields, where the reflection and transmission coefficients are allowed to influence the locations of the saddle points and their steepest descent paths. As a consequence, saddle points are complex, and complicated processes such as the reflected lateral wave, beam displacement, and the transmitted evanescent field are included. For mode theory, the ORCA normal mode model [Westwood et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 100, 3631-3645 (1996)] is used to illustrate the effects of the critical angle on the mode structure in a Pekeris waveguide. The Pekeris branch cut is shown to correspond to the lateral wave, and a method for replacing its branch line integral with a series of modes is described.

  9. Shape, Pressure, and Kinetic Effects on the Resistive Wall Mode in Rotating Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betti, R.; Freidberg, J. P.

    1996-11-01

    A comprehensive theory of the resistive wall mode is carried out, including the effects of finite ellipticity, finite beta, and plasma rotation. In the circular-cylindrical limit, the resistive wall mode (RWM) is an external kink mode without singular surfaces inside the plasma column. In a tokamak, the noncircularity, the toroidicity, and the finite pressure of the plasma column induce the coupling of the poloidal harmonics, and the mode sidebands have singular surfaces inside the plasma. At such surfaces, the radial electric field is large and so is the power dissipated by the mode. It is well known that such a dissipation, combined with the plasma rotation, creates a window of stability in beta(R. Betti and J. P. Freidberg, Phys. Rev. Lett. 74, 2949 (1995).) and in b/a (wall radius/plasma radius).(A. Bondeson and D. J. Ward, Phys. Rev. Lett. 72, 2709 (1994).) The size of the stability window is modified by the stabilizing contribution of the trapped-particle compressibility and the plasma resistivity. The size of the stability window is determined for highly elongated plasmas where the ellipticity is comparable or larger than the toroidicity. The minimum rotation velocity for stabilization is derived, and the implications for tokamak design are discussed. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-FG02-93ER54215.

  10. Effect of drive mode of left ventricular assist device on the left ventricular mechanics.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, T; Hayashi, K; Seki, J; Nakatani, T; Noda, H; Takano, H; Akutsu, T

    1988-02-01

    Pneumatically driven left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) were acutely implanted between the left atria and the descending aortas of dogs, and were driven in five pumping modes: electrocardiogram synchronous modes with the duty factors of 1:1, 2:1, and 4:1, and asynchronous modes with the pulse rates of 60 and 80 beats/min (bpm). The ventricular diameter and myocardial segment length were measured by an ultrasonic displacement meter and implantable miniature sensors. Bulk mechanical work of the left ventricle and regional mechanical work of the myocardium were calculated from these dimensions and the left ventricular pressure. LVAD reduced the bulk mechanical work of the left ventricle by 30-50% and the regional work by 30-60%. The mean aortic pressure and the total flow (= aortic flow + pump bypass flow) were highest in the 1:1 synchronous pumping mode, which indicates that this mode is most effective to maintain the systemic circulation and coronary blood flow. Asynchronous pumping and synchronous pumping with 2:1 duty factor were most useful to reduce the mechanical work of the left ventricle.

  11. An improved method for risk evaluation in failure modes and effects analysis of CNC lathe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rachieru, N.; Belu, N.; Anghel, D. C.

    2015-11-01

    Failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) is one of the most popular reliability analysis tools for identifying, assessing and eliminating potential failure modes in a wide range of industries. In general, failure modes in FMEA are evaluated and ranked through the risk priority number (RPN), which is obtained by the multiplication of crisp values of the risk factors, such as the occurrence (O), severity (S), and detection (D) of each failure mode. However, the crisp RPN method has been criticized to have several deficiencies. In this paper, linguistic variables, expressed in Gaussian, trapezoidal or triangular fuzzy numbers, are used to assess the ratings and weights for the risk factors S, O and D. A new risk assessment system based on the fuzzy set theory and fuzzy rule base theory is to be applied to assess and rank risks associated to failure modes that could appear in the functioning of Turn 55 Lathe CNC. Two case studies have been shown to demonstrate the methodology thus developed. It is illustrated a parallel between the results obtained by the traditional method and fuzzy logic for determining the RPNs. The results show that the proposed approach can reduce duplicated RPN numbers and get a more accurate, reasonable risk assessment. As a result, the stability of product and process can be assured.

  12. Rotational Shear Effects on Edge Harmonic Oscillations in DIII-D Quiescent H-mode Discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xi; Burrell, K. H.; Ferraro, N. M.; Osborne, T. H.; Austin, M. E.; Garofalo, A. M.; Groebner, R. J.; Kramer, G. J.; Luhmann, N. C., Jr.; McKee, G. R.; Muscatello, C. M.; Nazikian, R.; Ren, X.; Snyder, P. B.; Solomon, Wm.; Tobias, B. J.; Yan, Z.

    2015-11-01

    In quiescent H-mode (QH) regime, the edge harmonic oscillations (EHO) play an important role in avoiding the transient ELM power fluxes by providing benign and continuous edge particle transport. A detailed theoretical, experimental and modeling comparison has been made of low-n (n <= 5) EHO in DIII-D QH-mode plasmas. The calculated linear eigenmode structure from the extended MHD code M3D-C1 matches closely the coherent EHO properties from external magnetics data and internal measurements using the ECE, BES, ECE-I and MIR diagnostics, as well as the kink/peeling mode properties of the ideal MHD code ELITE. The numerical investigations indicate that the low-n EHO-like solutions from M3D-C1 are destabilized by the toroidal rotational shear while high-n modes are stabilized. This effect is independent of the rotation direction, suggesting that the low-n EHO can be destabilized in principle with rotation in both directions. These modeling results are consistent with experimental observations of the EHO and support the proposed theory of the EHO as a rotational shear driven kink/peeling mode.

  13. Correcting Text Production Errors: Isolating the Effects of Writing Mode from Error Span, Input Mode, and Lexicality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leijten, Marielle; Van Waes, Luuk; Ransdell, Sarah

    2010-01-01

    Error analysis involves detecting, diagnosing, and correcting discrepancies between the text produced so far (TPSF) and the writers mental representation of what the text should be. The use of different writing modes, like keyboard-based word processing and speech recognition, causes different type of errors during text production. While many…

  14. IS THE BLAZHKO EFFECT THE BEATING OF A NEAR-RESONANT DOUBLE-MODE PULSATION?

    SciTech Connect

    Bryant, Paul H.

    2015-03-20

    In this paper it is shown that the Blazhko effect may result from a near-resonant type of multi-mode pulsation, where two (or sometimes more) periodic oscillations with slightly different frequencies gradually slip in phase, producing a beat frequency type of modulation. Typically one of these oscillations is strongly non-sinusoidal. Two oscillations are sufficient for the standard Blazhko effect; additional oscillations are needed to explain multi-frequency modulation. Previous work on this hypothesis by Arthur N. Cox and others is extended in this paper by developing a simple (non-hydrocode) model that can accurately reproduce several important features found in Kepler data for RR Lyr, including the pulsation waveform; the upper and lower Blazhko envelope functions; and the motion, disappearance, and reappearance of the bump feature. The non-sinusoidal oscillation is probably generated by the fundamental mode and the other oscillations are probably generated by nonradial modes. This model provides an explanation for the strong asymmetry observed in the side peak spectra of most RR Lyrae stars. The motion and disappearance of the bump feature are shown to be illusions, just artifacts of combining the oscillations. V445 Lyr is presented as an example with dual modulation. The mysterious double-maxima waveform observed for this star is explained, providing additional strong evidence that this beating-modes hypothesis is correct. Problems with other recent explanations of the Blazhko effect are discussed in some detail.

  15. Band structure effects on resonant tunneling in III-V quantum wells versus two-dimensional vertical heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Philip M.; Tarasov, Alexey; Joiner, Corey A.; Ready, W. Jud; Vogel, Eric M.

    2016-01-01

    Since the invention of the Esaki diode, resonant tunneling devices have been of interest for applications including multi-valued logic and communication systems. These devices are characterized by the presence of negative differential resistance in the current-voltage characteristic, resulting from lateral momentum conservation during the tunneling process. While a large amount of research has focused on III-V material systems, such as the GaAs/AlGaAs system, for resonant tunneling devices, poor device performance and device-to-device variability have limited widespread adoption. Recently, the symmetric field-effect transistor (symFET) was proposed as a resonant tunneling device incorporating symmetric 2-D materials, such as transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs), separated by an interlayer barrier, such as hexagonal boron-nitride. The achievable peak-to-valley ratio for TMD symFETs has been predicted to be higher than has been observed for III-V resonant tunneling devices. This work examines the effect that band structure differences between III-V devices and TMDs has on device performance. It is shown that tunneling between the quantized subbands in III-V devices increases the valley current and decreases device performance, while the interlayer barrier height has a negligible impact on performance for barrier heights greater than approximately 0.5 eV.

  16. Band structure effects on resonant tunneling in III-V quantum wells versus two-dimensional vertical heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, Philip M.; Tarasov, Alexey; Joiner, Corey A.; Vogel, Eric M.; Ready, W. Jud

    2016-01-14

    Since the invention of the Esaki diode, resonant tunneling devices have been of interest for applications including multi-valued logic and communication systems. These devices are characterized by the presence of negative differential resistance in the current-voltage characteristic, resulting from lateral momentum conservation during the tunneling process. While a large amount of research has focused on III-V material systems, such as the GaAs/AlGaAs system, for resonant tunneling devices, poor device performance and device-to-device variability have limited widespread adoption. Recently, the symmetric field-effect transistor (symFET) was proposed as a resonant tunneling device incorporating symmetric 2-D materials, such as transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs), separated by an interlayer barrier, such as hexagonal boron-nitride. The achievable peak-to-valley ratio for TMD symFETs has been predicted to be higher than has been observed for III-V resonant tunneling devices. This work examines the effect that band structure differences between III-V devices and TMDs has on device performance. It is shown that tunneling between the quantized subbands in III-V devices increases the valley current and decreases device performance, while the interlayer barrier height has a negligible impact on performance for barrier heights greater than approximately 0.5 eV.

  17. Photodegradation of parabens by Fe(III)-citrate complexes at circumneutral pH: matrix effect and reaction mechanism.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xiaonan; Chen, Yong; Fang, Yuan; Wang, Xiaoyue; Wang, Zongping; Tao, Tao; Zuo, Yuegang

    2014-02-15

    The photodegradation of four parabens including methyl-, ethyl-, propyl-, and butyl-paraben in the presence of Fe(III)-citrate complexes under simulated sunlight was investigated. The degradation of parabens increased with decreasing pH within the range of 5.0-8.0 at the Fe(III)-to-citrate ratio of 10:150 (μM). The addition of low-molecular-weight carboxylic acids showed different effects on the photodegradation of methylparaben. The low-photoreactive carboxylic acids inhibited the photodegradation of methylparaben in the order of formic acid>succinic acid>acetic acid>malonic acid. In contrast, oxalic acid enhanced the photodegradation and exhibited appreciable synergistic effect with Fe(III)-citrate at concentration higher than 500 μM. Up to 99.0% of substrate was degraded after 30 min at pH6.0 in the Fe(III)-citrate-oxalate system. The various fractions of fulvic acid inhibited the photodegradation of methylparaben. The inhibition increased with increasing nominal molecular weight of fractionated fulvic acid. Moreover, the photodegradation of methylparaben was inhibited in natural waters in the order of Liangzi Lake

  18. Effect of Wubeizi ointment aqueous solution on the expression of type I and III procollagen genes in keloid fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, Xiao-Xiang; Ding, Ji-Cun; Tang, Zhi-Ming; Li, Jing-Guo; Chen, Xiang-Hui; Zhang, Cui-Xia

    2017-01-01

    We evaluated the effect of Wubeizi (WBZ) ointment on keloids. Keloid-derived fibroblast primary cultures were used to evaluate the effect of the different concentration of WBZ ointment on the expression of type I and III procollagen in keloid fibroblast primary cultures using dot blot assay. Type I and II precollagen cDNA probes labeled with non-radioactive digoxin were used for dot blot. Cell cultures were divided into 4 groups: The large dose group received 1 g/ml of WBZ, middle dose, and small dose groups received 0.5 and 0.25 g/ml of WBZ, respectively. The control group received serum-free medium without WBZ. Our results showed that type I and III procollagen mRNA expression was reduced significantly in the large dose and middle dose groups compared to the control group. Type I and III procollagen mRNA expression level in the small dose group had no statistically significant difference with the control group. However, the difference between the large dose group and the small dose group was statistically significant. We concluded that WBZ ointment aqueous solution restricted keloid fibroblast proliferation by downregulating the expression of type I and III procollagen and therefore reducing collagen deposition in keloid tissue.

  19. Band structure of collective modes and effective properties of binary magnonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zivieri, R.; Malagò, P.; Giovannini, L.

    2014-11-01

    In this paper a theoretical study of the band structure of collective modes of binary ferromagnetic systems formed by a submicrometric periodic array of cylindrical cobalt nanodots partially or completely embedded into a permalloy ferromagnetic film is performed. The binary ferromagnetic systems studied are two-dimensional periodic, but they can be regarded as three-dimensional, since the magnetization is non uniform also along the z direction due to the contrast between the saturation magnetizations of the two ferromagnetic materials along the thickness. The dynamical matrix method, a finite-difference micromagnetic approach, formulated for studying the dynamics in one-component periodic ferromagnetic systems is generalized to ferromagnetic systems composed by F ferromagnetic materials. It is then applied to investigate the spin dynamics in four periodic binary ferromagnetic systems differing each other for the volume of cobalt dots and for the relative position of cobalt dots within the primitive cell. The dispersion curves of the most representative frequency modes are calculated for each system for an in-plane applied magnetic field perpendicular to the Bloch wave vector. The dependence of the dispersion curves on the cobalt quantity and position is discussed in terms of distribution of effective "surface magnetic charges" at the interface between the two ferromagnetic materials. The metamaterial properties in the propagative regime are also studied (1) by introducing an effective magnetization and effective "surface magnetic charges" (2) by describing the metamaterial wave dispersion of the most representative mode in each system within an effective medium approximation and in the dipole-exchange regime. It is also shown that the interchange between cobalt and permalloy does not necessarily lead to an interchange of the corresponding mode dispersion. Analogously to the case of electromagnetic waves in two-dimensional photonic crystals, the degree of

  20. Empirical mode decomposition for removal of specular reflections and cast shadow effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhagavatula, Ramamurthy; Savvides, Marios

    2007-04-01

    Facial recognition is fast becoming one of the more popular and effective modalities of biometrics when used in controlled environments. Controlled environments are those in which factors such as facial expression, pose, camera position, and in particular illumination effects are controlled to some degree with respect to better performance. Regulation or normalization of such factors has effects on all facial recognition algorithms, and the factor of illumination effects is one of significant importance. In this paper we describe a method to address illumination effects in the biometric modality of face recognition using Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD) to identify illumination modes that compose the image. Following identification of intrinsic mode functions that correspond to the dominant illumination factors, we reconstruct the facial image minus these negative factors to synthesize a more neutral facial image. We then perform recognition and verification experiments using different algorithms such as Principal Component Analysis (PCA), Fisher Linear Discriminant Analysis (FLDA), and Correlation Filters (CF's) to demonstrate the fundamental effectiveness of EMD as an illumination compensation method. Results are reported on the Carnegie Mellon University Pose-Illumination-Expression (CMU PIE) Database and the Yale Face Database B.

  1. Global hybrid simulations of energetic particle effects on the n=1 mode in tokamaks: Internal kink and fishbone instability

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, G.Y.; Park, W.; Strauss, H.R.; Breslau, J.; Chen, J.; Jardin, S.; Sugiyama, L.E.

    2006-05-15

    Global hybrid simulations of energetic particle effects on the n=1 internal kink mode have been carried out for tokamaks. For the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) [ITER Physics Basis Editors et al., Nucl. Fusion 39, 2137 (1999)], it is shown that alpha particle effects are stabilizing for the internal kink mode. However, the elongation of ITER reduces the stabilization effects significantly. Nonlinear simulations of the precessional drift fishbone instability for circular tokamak plasmas show that the mode saturates due to flattening of the particle distribution function near the resonance region. The mode frequency chirps down rapidly as the flattening region expands radially outward. Fluid nonlinearity reduces the saturation level.

  2. Global Hybrid Simulations of Energetic Particle Effects on the n=1 Mode in Tokamaks: Internal Kink and Fishbone Instability

    SciTech Connect

    G.Y. Fu; W. Park; H.R. Strauss; J. Breslau; J. Chen; S. Jardin; L.E. Sugiyama

    2005-08-09

    Global hybrid simulations of energetic particle effects on the n=1 internal kink mode have been carried out for tokamaks. For the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) [ITER Physics Basis Editors et al., Nucl. Fusion 39:2137 (1999)], it is shown that alpha particle effects are stabilizing for the internal kink mode. However, the elongation of ITER reduces the stabilization effects significantly. Nonlinear simulations of the precessional drift fishbone instability for circular tokamak plasmas show that the mode saturates due to flattening of the particle distribution function near the resonance region. The mode frequency chirps down rapidly as the flattening region expands radially outward. Fluid nonlinearity reduces the saturation level.

  3. Diiron(III)-μ-Fluoro Bisporphyrins: Effect of Bridging Ligand on the Metal Spin State.

    PubMed

    Sil, Debangsu; Kumar, Amit; Rath, Sankar Prasad

    2016-08-01

    A hitherto unknown family of diiron(III)-μ-fluoro bisporphyrins has been synthesized and structurally characterized. Fluoride abstraction from SbF6 (-) and BF4 (-) resulted in the synthesis of the μ-fluoro complexes of ethane- and ethene-bridged diiron(III) bisporphyrins. Two such complexes were structurally characterized, which revealed a single fluoro bridge between two iron centers with a remarkably bent Fe-F-Fe unit. Although isoelectronic with the μ-hydroxo complexes, the μ-fluoro species are quite divergent in terms of the electronic structure and properties. UV/Vis spectroscopy of the μ-fluoro complex exhibits a large redshift (ca. 18 nm) of the Soret band in comparison to their μ-hydroxo analog. Combined analysis by single crystal X-ray structure determination and Mössbauer and (1) H NMR spectroscopy revealed the presence of two equivalent iron(III) centers in the μ-fluoro complexes in both solid and solution phases. In contrast, the iron(III) centers of the μ-hydroxo complexes are known to be inequivalent. Variable-temperature magnetic studies show a weak antiferromagnetic interaction between the iron(III) centers of the μ-fluoro complexes with coupling constants (J) ranging from -33 to -40 cm(-1) . The experimental results were further supported by DFT calculations.

  4. Integral eigenmode analysis of shear flow effects on the ion temperature gradient mode

    SciTech Connect

    Artun, M.; Reynders, J.V.M.; Tang, W.M.

    1993-07-01

    Previous numerical and analytic kinetic studies have investigated the influence of velocity shear on the ion temperature gradient (ITG) mode. These studies relied on a differential approximation to study mode structures with k{sub {perpendicular}}{rho}{sub i} {much_lt} 1. A recently developed gyrokinetic integral code is here used to explore the effects of sheared flows on the ITG mode for arbitrary values of k{sub {perpendicular}}{rho}{sub i}. It is found that both the mode structure and eigenfrequencies predicted by the integral code can differ from the results obtained by the differential approach, even in the k{sub y}{rho}{sub i} {much_lt} 1 limit. Although some trends predicted by the differential approximation are recovered by the integral approach, there are some significant differences. For example, the slight destabilizing effect observed for small values of the perpendicular velocity shear at k{sub {perpendicular}}{rho}{sub i} {much_lt} 1 is amplified when the integral approach is applied. In dealing with the higher radial eigenmodes, which can often exhibit the largest growth rates, it is emphasized that their finer radial structure usually dictates that the integral equation analysis is required. Results from the integral code are presented together with comparisons with results from the differential approach.

  5. Effects of Equilibrium Toroidal Flow on Locked Mode and Plasma Response in a Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Ping; Huang, Wenlong; Yan, Xingting

    2016-10-01

    It is widely believed that plasma flow plays significant roles in regulating the processes of mode locking and plasma response in a tokamak in presence of external resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs). Recently a common analytic relation for both locked mode and plasma response has been developed based on the steady-state solution to the coupled dynamic system of magnetic island evolution and torque balance. The analytic relation predicts the size of the magnetic island of a locked mode or a static nonlinear plasma response for a given RMP amplitude, and rigorously proves a screening effect of the equilibrium toroidal flow. To test the theory, we solve for the locked mode and the nonlinear plasma response in presence of RMP for a circular-shaped limiter tokamak equilibrium with constant toroidal flow, using the initial-value, full MHD simulation code NIMROD. The comparison between the simulation results and the theory prediction, in terms of the quantitative screening effects of equilibrium toroidal flow, will be reported and discussed. Supported by National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program of China Grants 2014GB124002 and 2015GB101004, the 100 Talent Program of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, and U.S. Department of Energy Grants DE-FG02-86ER53218 and DE-FC02-08ER54975.

  6. Effects of locally resonant modes on underwater sound absorption in viscoelastic materials.

    PubMed

    Wen, Jihong; Zhao, Honggang; Lv, Linmei; Yuan, Bo; Wang, Gang; Wen, Xisen

    2011-09-01

    Recently, by introducing locally resonant scatterers with spherical shape proposed in phononic crystals into design of underwater sound absorption materials, the low-frequency underwater sound absorption phenomenon induced by the localized resonances is observed. To reveal this absorption mechanism, the effect of the locally resonant mode on underwater sound absorption should be studied. In this paper, the finite element method, which is testified efficiently by comparing the calculation results with those of the layer multiple scattering method, is introduced to investigate the dynamic modes and the corresponding sound absorption of localized resonance. The relationship between the resonance modes described with the displacement contours of one unit cell and the corresponding absorption spectra is discussed in detail, which shows that the localized resonance leads to the absorption peak, and the mode conversion from longitudinal to transverse waves at the second absorption peak is more efficient than that at the first one. Finally, to show the modeling capability of FEM and investigate shape effects of locally resonant scatterers on underwater sound absorption, the absorption properties of viscoelastic materials containing locally resonant scatterers with ellipsoidal shape are discussed.

  7. Default mode network in the effects of Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) on human executive function.

    PubMed

    Bossong, Matthijs G; Jansma, J Martijn; van Hell, Hendrika H; Jager, Gerry; Kahn, René S; Ramsey, Nick F

    2013-01-01

    Evidence is increasing for involvement of the endocannabinoid system in cognitive functions including attention and executive function, as well as in psychiatric disorders characterized by cognitive deficits, such as schizophrenia. Executive function appears to be associated with both modulation of active networks and inhibition of activity in the default mode network. In the present study, we examined the role of the endocannabinoid system in executive function, focusing on both the associated brain network and the default mode network. A pharmacological functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study was conducted with a placebo-controlled, cross-over design, investigating effects of the endocannabinoid agonist Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) on executive function in 20 healthy volunteers, using a continuous performance task with identical pairs. Task performance was impaired after THC administration, reflected in both an increase in false alarms and a reduction in detected targets. This was associated with reduced deactivation in a set of brain regions linked to the default mode network, including posterior cingulate cortex and angular gyrus. Less deactivation was significantly correlated with lower performance after THC. Regions that were activated by the continuous performance task, notably bilateral prefrontal and parietal cortex, did not show effects of THC. These findings suggest an important role for the endocannabinoid system in both default mode modulation and executive function. This may be relevant for psychiatric disorders associated with executive function deficits, such as schizophrenia and ADHD.

  8. Performance improvement through proactive risk assessment: Using failure modes and effects analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yarmohammadian, Mohammad Hossein; Abadi, Tahereh Naseri Boori; Tofighi, Shahram; Esfahani, Sekine Saghaeiannejad

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Cognizance of any error-prone professional activities has a great impact on the continuity of professional organizations in the competitive atmosphere, particularly in health care industry where every second has critical value in patients’ life saving. Considering invaluable functions of medical record department — as legal document and continuity of health care — “failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA)” utilized to identify the ways a process can fail, and how it can be made safer. Materials and Methods: The structured approach involved assembling a team of experts, employing a trained facilitator, introducing the rating scales and process during team orientation and collectively scoring failure modes. The probability of the failure-effect combination was related to the frequency of occurrence, potential severity, and likelihood of detection before causing any harm to the staff or patients. Frequency, severity and detectability were each given a score from 1 to 10. Risk priority numbers were calculated. Results: In total 56 failure modes were identified and in subsets of Medical Record Department including admission unit dividing emergency, outpatient and inpatient classes, statististic, health data organizing and data processing and Medical Coding units. Although most failure modes were classified as a high risk group, limited resources were, as an impediment to implement recommended actions at the same time. Conclusion: Proactive risk assessment methods, such as FMEA enable health care administrators to identify where and what safeguards are needed to protect against a bad outcome even when an error does occur. PMID:25013821

  9. Noncontact dipole effects on channel permeation. III. Anomalous proton conductance effects in gramicidin

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, LR; Cole, CD; Hendershot, RJ; Cotten, M; Cross, TA; Busath, DD

    1999-01-01

    Proton transport on water wires, of interest for many problems in membrane biology, is analyzed in side-chain analogs of gramicidin A channels. In symmetrical 0.1 N HCl solutions, fluorination of channel Trp(11), Trp-(13), or Trp(15) side chains is found to inhibit proton transport, and replacement of one or more Trps with Phe enhances proton transport, the opposite of the effects on K(+) transport in lecithin bilayers. The current-voltage relations are superlinear, indicating that some membrane field-dependent process is rate limiting. The interfacial dipole effects are usually assumed to affect the rate of cation translocation across the channel. For proton conductance, however, water reorientation after proton translocation is anticipated to be rate limiting. We propose that the findings reported here are most readily interpreted as the result of dipole-dipole interactions between channel waters and polar side chains or lipid headgroups. In particular, if reorientation of the water column begins with the water nearest the channel exit, this hypothesis explains the negative impact of fluorination and the positive impact of headgroup dipole on proton conductance. PMID:20540928

  10. Effect of aging on the structure and phosphate retention of Fe(III)-precipitates formed by Fe(II) oxidation in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senn, Anna-Caterina; Kaegi, Ralf; Hug, Stephan J.; Hering, Janet G.; Mangold, Stefan; Voegelin, Andreas

    2017-04-01

    Iron(III)-precipitates formed by Fe(II) oxidation in aqueous solutions affect the cycling and impact of Fe and other co-precipitated elements in environmental systems. Fresh Fe(III)-precipitates are metastable and their transformation into more stable phases during aging may result in the release of initially co-precipitated ions. Phosphate, silicate, Mg and Ca play key roles in determining the structure and composition of fresh Fe(III)-precipitates. Here we examine how these ions affect the structure and phosphate retention of Fe(III)-precipitates formed by oxidation of 0.5 mM dissolved Fe(II) at pH 7.0 after aging for 30 days at 40 °C. Iron K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) shows that aged precipitates consist of the same structural units as fresh precipitates: Amorphous Fe(III)- or Ca-Fe(III)-phosphate, ferrihydrite, and poorly crystalline lepidocrocite. Mg, Ca, and dissolved phosphate stabilize (Ca-)Fe(III)-phosphate against transformation into ferrihydrite. Silicate further attenuates (Ca-)Fe(III)-phosphate transformation. The crystallinity of lepidocrocite formed in phosphate- and silicate-free solutions slightly increases during aging. The transformation of Fe(III)- and Ca-Fe(III)-phosphate into ferrihydrite and ongoing ferrihydrite crystallization during aging result in the release of co-precipitated phosphate. Dissolved Ca on the other hand limits phosphate concentrations to values consistent with solubility control by octacalciumphosphate. Owing to the combined effects of Ca and silicate, phosphate is most effectively retained by Fe(III)-precipitates formed and aged in Ca- and silicate-containing solutions. The results from this study contribute to an improved understanding of the formation and transformation of Fe(III)-precipitates and emphasize that the complexity of Fe(III)-precipitate dynamics in the presence of multiple interfering solutes must be considered when addressing their impact on major and trace elements in environmental systems.

  11. Effects of electron cyclotron current drive on the evolution of double tearing mode

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Guanglan Dong, Chunying; Duan, Longfang

    2015-09-15

    The effects of electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) on the double tearing mode (DTM) in slab geometry are investigated by using two-dimensional compressible magnetohydrodynamics equations. It is found that, mainly, the double tearing mode is suppressed by the emergence of the secondary island, due to the deposition of driven current on the X-point of magnetic island at one rational surface, which forms a new non-complete symmetric magnetic topology structure (defined as a non-complete symmetric structure, NSS). The effects of driven current with different parameters (magnitude, initial time of deposition, duration time, and location of deposition) on the evolution of DTM are analyzed elaborately. The optimal magnitude or optimal deposition duration of driven current is the one which makes the duration of NSS the longest, which depends on the mutual effect between ECCD and the background plasma. Moreover, driven current introduced at the early Sweet-Parker phase has the best suppression effect; and the optimal moment also exists, depending on the duration of the NSS. Finally, the effects varied by the driven current disposition location are studied. It is verified that the favorable location of driven current is the X-point which is completely different from the result of single tearing mode.

  12. Spectral Analysis of Non-ideal MRI Modes: The Effect of Hall Diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohandas, Gopakumar; Pessah, Martin E.

    2017-03-01

    The effect of magnetic field diffusion on the stability of accretion disks is a problem that has attracted considerable interest of late. In particular, the Hall effect has the potential to bring about remarkable changes in the dynamical behavior of disks that are without parallel. In this paper, we conduct a systematic examination of the linear eigenmodes in a weakly magnetized differentially rotating gas with a special focus on Hall diffusion. We first develop a geometrical representation of the eigenmodes and provide a detailed quantitative description of the polarization properties of the oscillatory modes under the combined influence of the Coriolis and Hall effects. We also analyze the effects of magnetic diffusion on the structure of the unstable modes and derive analytical expressions for the kinetic and magnetic stresses and energy densities associated with the non-ideal magnetorotational instability (MRI). Our analysis explicitly demonstrates that, if the dissipative effects are relatively weak, the kinetic stresses and energies make up the dominant contribution to the total stress and energy density when the equilibrium angular momentum and magnetic field vectors are anti-parallel. This is in sharp contrast to what is observed in the case of the ideal or dissipative MRI. We conduct shearing box simulations and find very good agreement with the results derived from linear theory. Because the modes under consideration are also exact solutions of the nonlinear equations, the unconventional nature of the kinetic and magnetic stresses may have significant implications for the nonlinear evolution in some regions of protoplanetary disks.

  13. Effect of Initial Microtopography and Ultrasonic Treatment Mode on Steel Surface Layer Quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaitsev, K. V.; Lychagin, D. V.; Arkhipova, D. A.

    2016-04-01

    The article presents results of studies on the effect of pre-lathed surface micro-relief on surface micro-hardness after ultrasonic plastic treatment, as well as the effect of ultrasonic treatment on structure and properties of surface layers of steels 20 and 40X. The effect of ultrasonic treatment processing modes on roughness and micro-hardness of the surface layers was studied. It is shown that roughness values as well as form of ridges and grooves, obtained by pre-lathing, effect the growth of micro-hardness values after ultrasonic plastic treatment.

  14. Oxidation of Cr(III) on birnessite surfaces: The effect of goethite and kaolinite.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Laiyuan; Yang, Jiewen; Liu, Liming; Xing, Baoshan

    2015-11-01

    Oxidation of Cr(III) by manganese oxides may pose a potential threat to environments due to the formation of toxic Cr(VI) species. At present, it was still unclear whether the extent of Cr(III) oxidation and fate of Cr(VI) would be changed when manganese oxides co-exist with other minerals, the case commonly occurring in soils. This study investigated the influence of goethite and kaolinite on Cr(III) oxidation by birnessite under acidic pH condition (pH3.5) and background electrolyte of 0.01mol/L NaCl. Goethite was found not to affect Cr(III) oxidation, which was interpreted as the result of overwhelming adsorption of cationic Cr(III) onto the negatively-charged birnessite (point of zero charge (PZC)<3.0) rather than the positively-charged goethite (PZC=8.8). However, more Cr(VI) would be retained by the surface with the increase in addition of goethite because of its strong ability on adsorption of Cr(VI) at low pH. Moreover, either Cr(III) oxidation or distribution of the generated Cr(VI) between the solid and solution phases was not affected by kaolinite (PZC<3.0), indicating its low affinity for Cr species. Reactions occurring in the present mixed systems were suggested, which could be partly representative of those in the soils and further indicates that the mobility and risk of Cr(VI) would be decreased if goethite was present.

  15. The effect of holes in the dispersion relation of propagative surface plasmon modes of nanoperforated semitransparent metallic films

    SciTech Connect

    Kekesi, R. Meneses-Rodríguez, D.; García-Pérez, F.; González, M. U.; García-Martín, A.; Cebollada, A.; Armelles, G.

    2014-10-07

    We have analysed the effect that holes have on the properties of propagative surface plasmon modes in semitransparent nanoperforated Au films. The modes have been excited in Kretschmann configuration. Contrary to continuous films, where only one mode is excited, two modes are observed in Au nanohole array. The origin of this different behavior is discussed using effective optical properties for the nanoperforated films. The presence of the holes affects the effective optical constants of the membranes in two ways: it changes the contribution of the free electrons, and it gives rise to a localized transition due to a hole induced plasmon resonance. This localized transition interacts with the propagative surface plasmon modes, originating the two detected modes.

  16. Cosmic Infrared Background From Population III Stars and Its Effect on Spectra of High-z Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kashlinsky, A.

    2005-01-01

    We discuss the contribution of Population III stars to the near-IR (NIR) cosmic infrared background (CIB) and its effect on spectra of high-z, high-energy gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and other sources. It is shown that if Population III is composed of massive stars, the claimed NIR CIB excess will be reproduced if only approx. 4% plus or minus 2% of all baryons went through these stars. Regardless of the precise amount of the NIR CIB due to them, they likely left enough photons to provide a large optical depth for high-energy photons from distant GRBs. Observations of such GRBs are expected following the planned launch of NASA's GLAST mission. Detecting such damping in the spectra of high-z GRBs will then provide important information on the emissions from the Population III epoch, and the location of this cutoff may serve as an indicator of the GRBs' redshifts. We also point out the difficulty of unambiguously detecting the CIB part originating from Population III in spectra of low-z blazars.

  17. Residual lens effects in 2D mode of auto-stereoscopic lenticular-based switchable 2D/3D displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sluijter, M.; IJzerman, W. L.; de Boer, D. K. G.; de Zwart, S. T.

    2006-04-01

    We discuss residual lens effects in multi-view switchable auto-stereoscopic lenticular-based 2D/3D displays. With the introduction of a switchable lenticular, it is possible to switch between a 2D mode and a 3D mode. The 2D mode displays conventional content, whereas the 3D mode provides the sensation of depth to the viewer. The uniformity of a display in the 2D mode is quantified by the quality parameter modulation depth. In order to reduce the modulation depth in the 2D mode, birefringent lens plates are investigated analytically and numerically, by ray tracing. We can conclude that the modulation depth in the 2D mode can be substantially decreased by using birefringent lens plates with a perfect index match between lens material and lens plate. Birefringent lens plates do not disturb the 3D performance of a switchable 2D/3D display.

  18. Laser-induced hydrodynamics in water-saturated tissue: III. Optoacoustic effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusupov, V. I.; Bulanov, V. V.; Chudnovskii, V. M.; Bagratashvili, V. N.

    2014-01-01

    Studied in this work are specific features of acoustic vibrations generated at the hot blackened tip of an optical fiber (the so-called hot tip) delivering moderate-power (1-10 W) CW laser radiation in contact with water or a water-saturated biotissue. Generated upon such contact is a wideband acoustic signal whose characteristics largely depend on the object exposed and treatment scheme. Placing the hot tip in an acoustic resonator is demonstrated to cause distinct amplitude modulation of the acoustic noise. The formation of laser channels in an intervertebral disc or the intramedullary cavity of a bovine thighbone gives rise to the emission of a quasiperiodic train of pulses associated with the explosive growth and collapse of steam-gas bubbles in the hot-tip-to-biotissue contact region. The resultant pressure pulses, 20 ± 15 MPa in amplitude, cause damage to the adjacent tissue and facilitate the production of a laser channel at a rate of some 0.4-5 mm s-1. During the course of laser treatment the biotissue gradually gets saturated with steam-gas bubbles, which results in the development of low-frequency pressure oscillations in the range 0.1-10 Hz and a gradual pressure rise to around 200 kPa, leading to reduction of the natural frequencies of the resonance modes of the biotissue. The possible effect of these acoustic vibrations on the biotissue is discussed.

  19. Is alternate rapid maxillary expansion and constriction an effective protocol in the treatment of Class III malocclusion? A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Pithon, Matheus Melo; Santos, Nathalia de Lima; dos Santos, Camila Rangel Barreto; Baião, Felipe Carvalho Souza; Pinheiro, Murilo Costa Rangel; Matos, Manoel; Souza, Ianderlei Andrade; de Paula, Rafael Pereira

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: the treatment of Class III malocclusion in early age is one of the greatest challenges for orthodontists, and the establishment of more effective treatment method is a constant concern for these professionals. Thus, the objective of this systematic review is to verify the effectiveness of the therapy protocol for alternate rapid maxillary expansion and constriction (Alt-RAMEC) in the early treatment of Class III malocclusion. Methods: searches were performed in the following electronic databases: Cochrane Library, Medline (EBSCO and PubMed), SciELO, LILACS and Scopus. The following inclusion criteria were used: in vivo studies conducted with early intervention (patient in craniofacial development phase) with the use of the Alt-RAMEC protocol. Reviews, case reports, editorials, and studies with syndromic patients or under use of systemic drug were excluded. Duplicates were also excluded. The studies were assessed for methodological quality using the Cochrane tool for assessment of risk of bias, and classified as high or low risk of bias. Results: 53 articles were found. Duplicates exclusion was thus performed and 35 articles remained. After inclusion analysis, only 5 matched the criteria. Two articles were classified as low risk of bias and three as high risk of bias. It was observed that the Alt-RAMEC enable protraction in less time and with better results, promoting greater effectiveness in the protraction treatment of Class III malocclusion. Conclusions: Although there is positive evidence of the effectiveness of early treatment with the Alt-RAMEC protocol in patients with Class III malocclusion, further studies are needed to confirm its effectiveness using long-term methodology. PMID:28125138

  20. Design of experiments based variation mode and effect analysis of a conceptual air launched SLV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafique, Amer Farhan; Zeeshan, Qasim; Kamran, Ali

    2014-12-01

    Conceptual design stage is where the knowledge about the variation in system is still quite vague and herein we intend to analyze and compare various probable design concepts for Air Launched SLV by the use of basic variation mode and effect analysis. In this paper we present a methodology for the Variation Mode and Effect Analysis using Latin Hypercube Sampling based Design of Experiments for the conceptual Air launched Satellite Launch Vehicle. Variations are induced in the Control Variables based on knowledge and experience. The methodology is used to quantify the effect of Noise Factors on the performance of a conceptual Air Launched SLV. The insertion altitude of the Air Launched SLV is the Key Performance Indicator. Preliminary results of the performance and analysis for the simulated experiments are presented here. The performance of the proposed procedure has been tested and, thus, validated by the Air Launched SLV design problem. The Design of Experiment based Variation mode and effect analysis approach is intended for initial conceptual design purposes, thus, providing an immediate insight to the performance of the system in general and quantification of the sensitivity of the key performance indicator in particular, subject to the variations in noise factors prior to the detailed design phase.

  1. SU-E-T-420: Failure Effects Mode Analysis for Trigeminal Neuralgia Frameless Radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Howe, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Functional radiosurgery has been used successfully in the treatment of trigeminal neuralgia but presents significant challenges to ensuring the high prescription dose is delivered accurately. A review of existing practice should help direct the focus of quality improvement for this treatment regime. Method: Failure modes and effects analysis was used to identify the processes in preparing radiosurgery treatment for TN. The map was developed by a multidisciplinary team including: neurosurgeon, radiation oncology, physicist and therapist. Potential failure modes were identified for each step in the process map as well as potential causes and end effect. A risk priority number was assigned to each cause. Results: The process map identified 66 individual steps (see attached supporting document). Corrective actions were developed for areas of high risk priority number. Wrong site treatment is at higher risk for trigeminal neuralgia treatment due to the lack of site specific pathologic imaging on MR and CT – additional site specific checks were implemented to minimize the risk of wrong site treatment. Failed collision checks resulted from an insufficient collision model in the treatment planning system and a plan template was developed to address this problem. Conclusion: Failure modes and effects analysis is an effective tool for developing quality improvement in high risk radiotherapy procedures such as functional radiosurgery.

  2. Effects of hexaammine cobalt (III) chloride on oxidative stress-related parameters and drug metabolizing enzymes in mice.

    PubMed

    Singh, Amarjit; Kalla, Natwar R; Sharma, Raj P; Sharma, Rajeshwar

    2007-01-01

    Hexaammine cobalt (III) chloride has been advocated as a potential anticarcinogenic compound. There is no information on the effects of this compound on oxidative stress-related parameters in animals. In the present study the effects of administration of hexaammine cobalt (III) chloride in drinking water to balb/c male mice at doses of 25, 50, and 100 ppm for 14 weeks were examined. The tissue distribution of the compound was seen in liver, kidney, lung, intestine, blood, and spleen. The effects of the compound were monitored on levels of lipid peroxidation, GSH content, and activities of SOD, catalase, GST, and Cyt P450, along with the liver and kidney function tests. The results show that the cobalt accumulated maximally in kidney followed by liver, intestine, blood, spleen, and lung in decreasing order, in a dose-dependent manner. GSH and GST also showed increase in a dose-dependent manner while SOD and catalase showed increase with the highest dose only. Liver and kidney function tests showed no untoward change with any dose at the end of the study. The results suggest an antioxidant potentiating effect of the hexaammine cobalt (III) chloride besides nontoxicity to liver and kidney. Since the ability to induce an increase of GSH and GST along with other detoxifying enzymes by anticarcinogenic agents has been reported to correlate with the inhibition of tumorigenesis, the cobalt complex might qualify as a potential cancer chemopreventive agent.

  3. Effectiveness of interceptive treatment of class III malocclusions with skeletal anchorage: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez de Guzmán-Barrera, Jorge; Sáez Martínez, Carla; Boronat-Catalá, Montserrat; Montiel-Company, Jose María; Paredes-Gallardo, Vanessa; Gandía-Franco, José Luís; Almerich-Silla, José Manuel; Bellot-Arcís, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    Recently, new strategies for treating class III malocclusions have appeared. Skeletal anchorage appears to reduce the dentoalveolar effects while maximising the orthopaedic effect in growing patients. The purpose of this systematic review and meta-analysis is to examine the effectiveness of bone anchorage devices for interceptive treatment of skeletal class III malocclusions. Searches were made in the Pubmed, Embase, Scopus and Cochrane databases, as well as in a grey literature database, and were complemented by hand-searching. The criteria for eligibility were: patients who had undergone orthodontic treatment with skeletal anchorage (miniplates and miniscrews). Patients with syndromes or craniofacial deformities or who had undergone maxillofacial surgery were excluded. The following variables were recorded for each article: author, year of publication, type of study, sample size, dropouts, demographic variables, treatment carried out, radiographic study (2D or 3D), follow-up time, and quality of the articles on the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale. The means and confidence intervals of the following variables were employed: Wits, overjet, ANB, SNA and SNB. Initially, 239 articles were identified. After removing the duplicates and applying the selection criteria, 9 were included in the qualitative synthesis and 7 in the quantitative synthesis (meta-analysis). It may be concluded that skeletal anchorage is an effective treatment for improving skeletal Class III malocclusion, but when compared with other traditional treatments such as disjunction and face mask, there is no clear evidence that skeletal anchorage improves the results. PMID:28328995

  4. The costs and effectiveness of large Phase III pre-licensure vaccine clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Black, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Prior to the 1980s, most vaccines were licensed based upon safety and effectiveness studies in several hundred individuals. Beginning with the evaluation of Haemophilus influenzae type b conjugate vaccines, much larger pre-licensure trials became common. The pre-licensure trial for Haemophilus influenzae oligosaccharide conjugate vaccine had more than 60,000 children and that of the seven-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine included almost 38,000 children. Although trial sizes for both of these studies were driven by the sample size required to demonstrate efficacy, the sample size requirements for safety evaluations of other vaccines have subsequently increased. With the demonstration of an increased risk of intussusception following the Rotashield brand rotavirus vaccine, this trend has continued. However, routinely requiring safety studies of 20,000-50,000 or more participants has two major downsides. First, the cost of performing large safety trials routinely prior to licensure of a vaccine is very large, with some estimates as high at US$200 million euros for one vaccine. This high financial cost engenders an opportunity cost whereby the number of vaccines that a company is willing or able to develop to meet public health needs becomes limited by this financial barrier. The second downside is that in the pre-licensure setting, such studies are very time consuming and delay the availability of a beneficial vaccine substantially. One might argue that in some situations, this financial commitment is warranted such as for evaluations of the risk of intussusception following newer rotavirus vaccines. However, it must be noted that while an increased risk of intussusception was not identified in large pre-licensure studies, in post marketing evaluations an increased risk of this outcome has been identified. Thus, even the extensive pre-licensure evaluations conducted did not identify an associated risk. The limitations of large Phase III trials have also been

  5. Comparative investigations on the biological effects of As (III) and As (V) in clam Ruditapes philippinarum using multiple biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Ji, Chenglong; Xu, Hai'e; Wang, Qing; Zhao, Jianmin; Wu, Huifeng

    2015-11-01

    Inorganic arsenic is a known pollutant with two chemical forms, arsenite (As (III)) and arsenate (As (V)), in marine environment. Clam Ruditapes philippinarum is an important fishery species along the Bohai coast. In this study, the biological effects induced by the two arsenic chemical forms (arsenite and arsenate) were compared using multiple biochemical indices in the digestive glands of clam R. philippinarum. The production of reactive oxygen species, antioxidant enzyme activities and metabolic responses exhibited that both As (III) and As (V) induced immune, oxidative and osmotic stresses in clam digestive glands. The differential metabolic biomarkers, histidine and taurine, indicated the differential responsive mechanisms in osmotic regulation in clam digestive glands. In addition, both arsenic treatments enhanced the anaerobiosis metabolism in clam digestive glands. Overall, this work illustrated that arsenite and arsenate induced similar biological effects in clams, which might be accounted for the biological transformation of arsenate to arsenite in clams.

  6. Spectral analysis of Hall-effect thruster plasma oscillations based on the empirical mode decomposition

    SciTech Connect

    Kurzyna, J.; Mazouffre, S.; Lazurenko, A.; Albarede, L.; Bonhomme, G.; Makowski, K.; Dudeck, M.; Peradzynski, Z.

    2005-12-15

    Hall-effect thruster plasma oscillations recorded by means of probes located at the channel exit are analyzed using the empirical mode decomposition (EMD) method. This self-adaptive technique permits to decompose a nonstationary signal into a set of intrinsic modes, and acts as a very efficient filter allowing to separate contributions of different underlying physical mechanisms. Applying the Hilbert transform to the whole set of modes allows to identify peculiar events and to assign them a range of instantaneous frequency and power. In addition to 25 kHz breathing-type oscillations which are unambiguously identified, the EMD approach confirms the existence of oscillations with instantaneous frequencies in the range of 100-500 kHz typical for ion transit-time oscillations. Modeling of high-frequency modes ({nu}{approx}10 MHz) resulting from EMD of measured wave forms supports the idea that high-frequency plasma oscillations originate from electron-density perturbations propagating azimuthally with the electron drift velocity.

  7. Equivalent circuit effects on mode transitions in H{sub 2} inductively coupled plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Hui-Jing; Zhao, Shu-Xia Zhang, Yu-Ru; Gao, Fei; Li, Xue-Chun; Wang, You-Nian

    2015-04-15

    It is well known experimentally that the circuit matching network plays an important role in the mode transition behavior of inductively coupled plasmas. To date, however, there have been no reports of numerical models being used to study the role of the matching circuit in the transition process. In this paper, a new two-dimensional self-consistent fluid model that couples the components of an equivalent circuit module is developed to investigate the effects of the equivalent circuit on the mode transition characteristics of an inductively coupled, hydrogen plasma. The equivalent circuit consists of a current source, impedance matching network, reactor impedance, and plasma transferred impedance. The nonlinear coupling of the external circuit with the internal plasma is investigated by adjusting the matching capacitance at a fixed input current. The electron density and temperature as well as the electromagnetic fields all change suddenly, and the E to H mode transition occurs abruptly at a certain matching capacitance as the impedance matching of the external circuit is varied. We also analyze the fields and the plasma characteristics during the transition process, especially for the case of the capacitive E mode.

  8. Electron temperature anisotropy effects on tearing mode in ion-scale current sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haijima, K.; Tanaka, K. G.; Fujimoto, M.; Shinohara, I.

    Recent two-dimensional (2-D) particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations have shown that there is a critical thickness of a current sheet, above which no significant saturation amplitude of the 2-D tearing (TI) mode can be expected. Here, we have introduced the initial electron temperature anisotropy (αe0 = Te⊥/Te|| > 1), which is known to raise significantly the linear growth rates, and inspected if αe0 > 1 can change the saturation level of the TI in a super-critical current sheet. Varying αe0 and D (D: the current sheet half-thickness) systematically, we have found that while αe0 boosts up the linear growth rate in both sub- and super-critical current sheets, macroscopic effects are obtained only in sub-critical current sheets, that is, energy transfer from the fastest growing short wavelength modes to longer wavelength modes are available only in the sub-critical regime. Since the critical thickness is a fraction of the ion inertial length, the tearing mode assisted by the electron temperature anisotropy alone, despite its significant boost in the linear growth rate, cannot be the agent for reconnection triggering in a current sheet of ion-scale thickness.

  9. The effect of plasma flow on line-tied magnetohydrodynamic modes

    SciTech Connect

    Arcudi, Francesco; Delzanno, Gian Luca; Finn, John M.

    2010-06-15

    The linear stability of a linear pinch to kink modes with line-tying boundary conditions and equilibrium axial flow is studied. Numerical results in visco-resistive magnetohydrodynamics show that for long plasmas, in which the line-tying stabilization effect is weak, plasma flow is stabilizing. For shorter plasmas, near the length at which line-tying stabilizes the mode for zero flow, the flow can be destabilizing. A simple model using reduced ideal magnetohydrodynamics with a step-function current density and an even simpler one-dimensional sound wave model with equilibrium flow elucidate these effects. It is concluded that: (1) The stabilization in long plasmas is due to convective stabilization; (2) the destabilization for short plasmas can be explained using a picture involving the coupling of two stable waves, one propagating in the forward direction and one in the backward direction; and (3) strong magnetic shear suppresses the flow destabilization for short plasmas.

  10. Linear stability of the tearing mode with two-fluid and curvature effects in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Meshcheriakov, Dmytro; Maget, Patrick; Garbet, Xavier; Luetjens, Hinrich; Beyer, Peter

    2012-09-15

    Curvature and diamagnetic effects are both recognized to have a stabilizing influence on tearing modes in the linear regime. In this paper, we investigate the impact of these effects on the linear stability of a (2, 1) magnetic island using non-linear two-fluid MHD simulations and we apply our results to Tore Supra experiments where its stability is not well understood from the single fluid MHD model. Simulations show an initial increase of the linear growth rate and then its reduction until full stability as diamagnetic frequency increases. This mechanism is therefore a plausible explanation for experimental observations where the (2, 1) mode was not observed although the single fluid model predicted its growth. Our simulations also show the importance of curvature for an efficient stabilization. A simple analytical model is derived to support the numerical results.

  11. Pressure Effect on the Einstein-Like Phonon Mode in Superconducting YB6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orendáč, Mat.; Gabáni, S.; Gažo, E.; Pristáš, G.; Flachbart, K.; Mori, T.; Wang, X.; Kamenev, K.

    2016-12-01

    YB6 is known as a conventional type-II BCS superconductor in which the strong coupling superconductivity with 2Δ /kBTc≈ 4.1 is mediated by the Einstein-like phonon mode of Y atoms located at ω E≈ 8 meV. We have investigated the pressure effect on ω E by Raman scattering up to 14 GPa. The received linear pressure increase in this mode dω E/dp≈ 0.21 meV/GPa yields an isothermal Grüneisen coefficient γ T= -partial ln ω E/partial ln V = 3.85 . Moreover, the pressure effect on the electron-phonon interaction λ calculated from the McMillan-Allen-Dynes expression for the superconducting transition temperature was determined to be partial ln λ/partial ln V \\cong 7.2.

  12. Modeling and analysis of polarization effects in Fourier domain mode-locked lasers.

    PubMed

    Jirauschek, Christian; Huber, Robert

    2015-05-15

    We develop a theoretical model for Fourier domain mode-locked (FDML) lasers in a non-polarization-maintaining configuration, which is the most widely used type of FDML source. This theoretical approach is applied to analyze a widely wavelength-swept FDML setup, as used for picosecond pulse generation by temporal compression of the sweeps. We demonstrate that good agreement between simulation and experiment can only be obtained by including polarization effects due to fiber bending birefringence, polarization mode dispersion, and cross-phase modulation into the theoretical model. Notably, the polarization dynamics are shown to have a beneficial effect on the instantaneous linewidth, resulting in improved coherence and thus compressibility of the wavelength-swept FDML output.

  13. Effect of the hemolytic lectin CEL-III from Holothuroidea Cucumaria echinata on the ANS fluorescence responses in sensitive MDCK and resistant CHO cells.

    PubMed

    Oda, T; Shinmura, N; Nishioka, Y; Komatsu, N; Hatakeyama, T; Muramatsu, T

    1999-04-01

    The addition of CEL-III to sensitive MDCK cells preincubated with 8-anilino-1-naphthalenesulfonate (ANS) caused an increase in the fluorescence intensity of the probe. The increase in the ANS fluorescence caused by CEL-III was Ca2+-dependent and strongly inhibited by 0.1 M lactose, indicating that Ca2+-dependent binding of CEL-III to specific carbohydrate receptors on the plasma membrane is responsible for this phenomenon. In contrast, no significant effect of CEL-III on the ANS fluorescence was observed in CHO cells, which are highly resistant to CEL-III cytotoxicity. In MDCK cells, energy transfer from tryptophan residues to bound ANS molecules was observed in the presence of CEL-III, but not in CHO cells. Furthermore, the amount of ANS bound to MDCK cells increased as the concentration of CEL-III increased. Therefore, a simple interpretation is that the CEL-III-induced increase in ANS fluorescence is attributable to an increase of the hydrophobic region in the plasma membrane where ANS could bind. Immunoblotting analysis of proteins from cells treated with CEL-III indicated that CEL-III oligomers were irreversibly bound to the cells, and the amount of oligomer bound to MDCK cells was much greater than that bound to CHO cells under any conditions tested. The oligomerization may be accompanied by an enhancement of the hydrophobicity of CEL-III molecules, which in turn provides new ANS-binding sites. The difference in susceptibility of MDCK and CHO cells to CEL-III cytotoxicity may be due to a difference in oligomerization of bound CEL-III.

  14. 78 FR 20268 - Effective Date of Requirement for Premarket Approval for Three Class III Preamendments Devices...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-04

    ...The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is issuing a proposed administrative order to require the filing of a premarket approval application (PMA) or a notice of completion of a product development protocol (PDP) for the following three class III preamendments devices: Sorbent hemoperfusion devices for the treatment of hepatic coma and metabolic disturbances; cranial electrotherapy stimulator......

  15. REVISITING THE FIRST GALAXIES: THE EFFECTS OF POPULATION III STARS ON THEIR HOST GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Muratov, Alexander L.; Gnedin, Oleg Y.; Zemp, Marcel; Gnedin, Nickolay Y.

    2013-08-01

    We revisit the formation and evolution of the first galaxies using new hydrodynamic cosmological simulations with the adaptive refinement tree code. Our simulations feature a recently developed model for H{sub 2} formation and dissociation, and a star formation recipe that is based on molecular rather than atomic gas. Here, we develop and implement a recipe for the formation of metal-free Population III (Pop III) stars in galaxy-scale simulations that resolve primordial clouds with sufficiently high density. We base our recipe on the results of prior zoom-in simulations that resolved the protostellar collapse in pre-galactic objects. We find the epoch during which Pop III stars dominated the energy and metal budget of the first galaxies to be short-lived. Galaxies that host Pop III stars do not retain dynamical signatures of their thermal and radiative feedback for more than 10{sup 8} years after the lives of the stars end in pair-instability supernovae, even when we consider the maximum reasonable efficiency of the feedback. Though metals ejected by the supernovae can travel well beyond the virial radius of the host galaxy, they typically begin to fall back quickly, and do not enrich a large fraction of the intergalactic medium. Galaxies with a total mass in excess of 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} M{sub Sun} re-accrete most of their baryons and transition to metal-enriched Pop II star formation.

  16. Complexation Effect on Redox Potential of Iron(III)-Iron(II) Couple: A Simple Potentiometric Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rizvi, Masood Ahmad; Syed, Raashid Maqsood; Khan, Badruddin

    2011-01-01

    A titration curve with multiple inflection points results when a mixture of two or more reducing agents with sufficiently different reduction potentials are titrated. In this experiment iron(II) complexes are combined into a mixture of reducing agents and are oxidized to the corresponding iron(III) complexes. As all of the complexes involve the…

  17. 76 FR 50663 - Effective Date of Requirement for Premarket Approval for Three Class III Preamendments Devices

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-16

    ... the filing of a premarket approval application (PMA) or a notice of completion of a product development protocol (PDP) for the following three class III preamendments devices: Ventricular bypass (assist... current (2010) Implicit Price Deflator for the Gross Domestic Product. FDA does not expect this final...

  18. 78 FR 4094 - Effective Date of Requirement for Premarket Approval for Two Class III Preamendments Devices

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-18

    ... the following two class III preamendments devices: Hip joint metal/metal semi- constrained, with a cemented acetabular component, prosthesis; and hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with an uncemented.... Hip Joint Metal/Metal Semi-Constrained, With a Cemented Acetabular Component, Prosthesis (21 CFR...

  19. Risk assessment of the emergency processes: Healthcare failure mode and effect analysis

    PubMed Central

    Taleghani, Yasamin Molavi; Rezaei, Fatemeh; Sheikhbardsiri, Hojat

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ensuring about the patient’s safety is the first vital step in improving the quality of care and the emergency ward is known as a high-risk area in treatment health care. The present study was conducted to evaluate the selected risk processes of emergency surgery department of a treatment-educational Qaem center in Mashhad by using analysis method of the conditions and failure effects in health care. METHODS: In this study, in combination (qualitative action research and quantitative cross-sectional), failure modes and effects of 5 high-risk procedures of the emergency surgery department were identified and analyzed according to Healthcare Failure Mode and Effects Analysis (HFMEA). To classify the failure modes from the “nursing errors in clinical management model (NECM)”, the classification of the effective causes of error from “Eindhoven model” and determination of the strategies to improve from the “theory of solving problem by an inventive method” were used. To analyze the quantitative data of descriptive statistics (total points) and to analyze the qualitative data, content analysis and agreement of comments of the members were used. RESULTS: In 5 selected processes by “voting method using rating”, 23 steps, 61 sub-processes and 217 potential failure modes were identified by HFMEA. 25 (11.5%) failure modes as the high risk errors were detected and transferred to the decision tree. The most and the least failure modes were placed in the categories of care errors (54.7%) and knowledge and skill (9.5%), respectively. Also, 29.4% of preventive measures were in the category of human resource management strategy. CONCLUSION: “Revision and re-engineering of processes”, “continuous monitoring of the works”, “preparation and revision of operating procedures and policies”, “developing the criteria for evaluating the performance of the personnel”, “designing a suitable educational content for needs of employee”,

  20. Spatiotemporal Patterns of a Predator-Prey System with an Allee Effect and Holling Type III Functional Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuanyuan; Wang, Jinfeng

    A diffusive Gause type predator-prey system with Allee effect in prey growth and Holling type III response subject to Neumann boundary conditions is investigated. Existence of nonconstant positive steady state solutions is proved by Leray-Schauder degree theory and bifurcation theory. Global stability of the positive equilibrium of the system is also investigated. Moreover, bifurcations of spatially homogeneous and nonhomogeneous periodic solutions are analyzed. Our rigorous results justify some recent ecological observations.

  1. Symptomatic and neuroprotective effects following activation of nigral group III metabotropic glutamate receptors in rodent models of Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Austin, PJ; Betts, MJ; Broadstock, M; O'Neill, MJ; Mitchell, SN; Duty, S

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: Increased glutamatergic innervation of the substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNpr) and pars compacta (SNpc) may contribute to the motor deficits and neurodegeneration, respectively, in Parkinson's disease (PD). This study aimed to establish whether activation of pre-synaptic group III metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors reduced glutamate release in the SN, and provided symptomatic or neuroprotective relief in animal models of PD. Experimental approach: Broad-spectrum group III mGlu receptor agonists, O-phospho-l-serine (l-SOP) and l-2-amino-4-phosphonobutyrate (l-AP4), were assessed for their ability to inhibit KCl-evoked [3H]-d-aspartate release in rat nigral prisms or inhibit KCl-evoked endogenous glutamate release in the SNpr in vivo using microdialysis. Reversal of akinesia in reserpine-treated rats was assessed following intranigral injection of l-SOP and l-AP4. Finally, the neuroprotective effect of 7 days' supra-nigral treatment with l-AP4 was examined in 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-lesioned rats. Key results: l-SOP and l-AP4 inhibited [3H]-d-aspartate release by 33 and 44% respectively. These effects were blocked by the selective group III mGlu antagonist (RS)-α-cyclopropyl-4-phosphonophenylglycine (CPPG). l-SOP also reduced glutamate release in the SNpr in vivo by 48%. Injection of l-SOP and l-AP4 into the SNpr reversed reserpine-induced akinesia. Following administration above the SNpc, l-AP4 provided neurochemical, histological and functional protection against 6-OHDA lesion of the nigrostriatal tract. Pretreatment with CPPG inhibited these effects. Conclusions and implications: These findings highlight group III mGlu receptors in the SN as potential targets for providing both symptomatic and neuroprotective relief in PD, and indicate that inhibition of glutamate release in the SN may underlie these effects. PMID:20649576

  2. The Effects of Helmet Weight on Hybrid III Head and Neck Responses by Comparing Unhelmeted and Helmeted Impacts.

    PubMed

    Jadischke, Ron; Viano, David C; McCarthy, Joe; King, Albert I

    2016-10-01

    Most studies on football helmet performance focus on lowering head acceleration-related parameters to reduce concussions. This has resulted in an increase in helmet size and mass. The objective of this paper was to study the effect of helmet mass on head and upper neck responses. Two independent test series were conducted. In test series one, 90 pendulum impact tests were conducted with four different headform and helmet conditions: unhelmeted Hybrid III headform, Hybrid III headform with a football helmet shell, Hybrid III headform with helmet shell and facemask, and Hybrid III headform with the helmet and facemask with mass added to the shell (n = 90). The Hybrid III neck was used for all the conditions. For all the configurations combined, the shell only, shell and facemask, and weighted helmet conditions resulted in 36%, 43%, and 44% lower resultant head accelerations (p < 0.0001), respectively, when compared to the unhelmeted condition. Head delta-V reductions were 1.1%, 4.5%, and 4.4%, respectively. In contrast, the helmeted conditions resulted in 26%, 41%, and 49% higher resultant neck forces (p < 0.0001), respectively. The increased neck forces were dominated by neck tension. In test series two, testing was conducted with a pneumatic linear impactor (n = 178). Fourteen different helmet makes and models illustrate the same trend. The increased neck forces provide a possible explanation as to why there has not been a corresponding reduction in concussion rates despite improvements in helmets ability to reduce head accelerations.

  3. Effect of model choice in genetic association studies: DRD4 exon III VNTR and cigarette use in young adults.

    PubMed

    Das, Debjani; Tan, Xiaoyun; Easteal, Simon

    2011-04-01

    A major concern with the vast literature associating the highly polymorphic 48 bp VNTR in exon III of the human dopamine receptor D4 gene (DRD4) with various behavioral phenotypes is the lack of concordance between studies. Part of the problem arises from the absence of a universally accepted scheme for pooling the large number of low frequency genotypes into appropriate categories. Here, we investigated the effect of different pooling strategies and genetic models on the reported association between DRD4-exIII-VNTR polymorphism and cigarette smoking. Genotyping was performed on a large randomly selected community-based sample of 2,274 individuals aged 20-24 years. Participants were grouped into sub-samples based on their genotypes to test specific genetic models. Multiple regression analyses were used to assess the relationship between DRD4-exIII-VNTR genotype and cigarette smoking measures while controlling for confounders. While smoking status and age at start of smoking were not associated with the genotype, a significantly (P = 0.006) higher rate of cigarette consumption was observed among carriers of the 7-repeat (7r) allele. Thus, 7r carriers were not more likely to be smokers but if they did smoke they consumed significantly more cigarettes per day than 4r carriers. Unlike previous studies this association was observed only when comparing carriers of the 7r with the 4r but not the other repeat alleles. Our study demonstrates the need for caution when grouping functionally different DRD4-exIII-VNTR alleles in association studies. It particularly highlights the requirement for better functional characterization of the DRD4-exIII-VNTR alleles for interpreting results from association studies.

  4. Mode of Action of Shigella Toxin: Effects on Ribosome Structure and Function

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-10-18

    clinical symptoms associated with these toxin -producing bacteria are, in part, a result of their effect on protein synthesis. To go one step further...hOC UlL.~ COPY AD_ ____/ iMode of Action of Shigella Toxin : Effects on 00 Ribosome Structure and Function 0Annual Report Tom G. Obrig, Ph.D. October...OF ACTION OF SHIGELLA TOXIN : EFFECTS 2 Aug 83 - 1 Aug 84 ON RIBOSOME STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION 6. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUM BER 7. AUTHOR(. ) S

  5. The effect of periodic wavy profile on suppressing window multipactor under arbitrary electromagnetic mode

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, C.; Liu, Y. S.; Chen, C. H.; Guo, L. T.; Li, S.; Wu, X. L.; Verboncoeur, J.

    2015-01-05

    The three-dimensional periodic ripple profile with each unit of rotational symmetric surface is proposed to suppress multipactor for arbitrary electromagnetic mode with any polarization. The field distribution and multipactor electron dynamics on the wavy surface are studied to illustrate the multipactor inhibition mechanism. High power microwave experiment was conducted to demonstrate the effect of wavy surface on significantly improving the window power capacity.

  6. Preliminary Failure Modes and Effects Analysis of the US Massive Gas Injection Disruption Mitigation System Design

    SciTech Connect

    Lee C. Cadwallader

    2013-10-01

    This report presents the results of a preliminary failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA) of a candidate design for the ITER Disruption Mitigation System. This candidate is the Massive Gas Injection System that provides machine protection in a plasma disruption event. The FMEA was quantified with “generic” component failure rate data as well as some data calculated from operating facilities, and the failure events were ranked for their criticality to system operation.

  7. Preliminary Failure Modes and Effects Analysis of the US DCLL Test Blanket Module

    SciTech Connect

    Lee C. Cadwallader

    2007-08-01

    This report presents the results of a preliminary failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA) of a small tritium-breeding test blanket module design for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor. The FMEA was quantified with “generic” component failure rate data, and the failure events are binned into postulated initiating event families and frequency categories for safety assessment. An appendix to this report contains repair time data to support an occupational radiation exposure assessment for test blanket module maintenance.

  8. Preliminary Failure Modes and Effects Analysis of the US DCLL Test Blanket Module

    SciTech Connect

    Lee C. Cadwallader

    2010-06-01

    This report presents the results of a preliminary failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA) of a small tritium-breeding test blanket module design for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor. The FMEA was quantified with “generic” component failure rate data, and the failure events are binned into postulated initiating event families and frequency categories for safety assessment. An appendix to this report contains repair time data to support an occupational radiation exposure assessment for test blanket module maintenance.

  9. Using causal reasoning for automated failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Daniel; Cox, Lisa; Jackson, Steve; Schaefer, Phil

    The authors have developed a tool that automates the reasoning portion of a failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA). It is built around a flexible causal reasoning module that has been adapted to the FMEA procedure. The approach and software architecture have been proven. A prototype tool has been created and successfully passed a test and evaluation program. The authors are expanding the operational capability and adapting the tool to various CAD/CAE (computer-aided design and engineering) platforms.

  10. U(SMes*)n, (n = 3, 4) and Ln(SMes*)3 (Ln = La, Ce, Pr, Nd): lanthanide(III)/actinide(III) differentiation in agostic interactions and an unprecedented eta3 ligation mode of the arylthiolate ligand, from X-ray diffraction and DFT analysis.

    PubMed

    Roger, Mathieu; Barros, Noémi; Arliguie, Thérèse; Thuéry, Pierre; Maron, Laurent; Ephritikhine, Michel

    2006-07-12

    Reaction of U(NEt(2))(4) with HS-2,4,6-(t)Bu(3)C(6)H(2) (HSMes) gave U(SMes)(3)(NEt(2))(py) (1), whereas similar treatment of U[N(SiMe(3))SiMe(2)CH(2)][N(SiMe(3))(2)](2) afforded U(SMes)[N(SiMe(3))(2)](3) (2) and U(SMes)(3)[N(SiMe(3))(2)]. The first neutral homoleptic uranium(IV) thiolate to have been crystallographically characterized, U(SMes)(4) (4), was isolated from the reaction of U(BH(4))(4) and KSMes. The first homoleptic thiolate complex of uranium(III), U(SMes)(3) (5), was synthesized by protonolysis of U[N(SiMe(3))(2)](3) with HSMes in cyclohexane. The crystal structure of 5 exhibits the novel eta(3) ligation mode for the arylthiolate ligand. Comparison of the crystal structure of 5 with those of the isomorphous lanthanide congeners Ln(SMes)(3) (Ln = La, Ce, Pr, and Nd) indicates that the U-S, U-C(ipso)(), and U-C(ortho)() bond lengths are shorter than the corresponding ones in the 4f-element analogues, when taking into account the variation in the ionic radii of the metals. The distance between the uranium and the carbon atoms involved in the U...H-C epsilon agostic interaction of each thiolate ligand is shorter, by approximately 0.05 A, than that expected from a purely ionic bonding model. The lanthanide(III)/actinide(III) differentiation was analyzed by density functional theory (DFT). The nature of the M-S bond is shown to be ionic strongly polarized at the sulfur for M = U and iono-covalent (i.e. strongly ionic with low orbital interaction), for M = Ln. The strength of the U...H-C epsilon agostic interaction is proposed to be controlled by the maximization of the interaction between U(+) and S(-) under steric constraints. The eta(3) ligation mode of the arylthiolate ligand is also obtained from DFT.

  11. Modeling the Effect of Multiple Matrix Cracking Modes on Cyclic Hysteresis Loops of 2D Woven Ceramic-Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longbiao, Li

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, the effect of multiple matrix cracking modes on cyclic loading/unloading hysteresis loops of 2D woven ceramic-matrix composites (CMCs) has been investigated. The interface slip between fibers and the matrix existed in matrix cracking mode 3 and mode 5, in which matrix cracking and interface debonding occurred in longitudinal yarns, are considered as the major reason for hysteresis loops of 2D woven CMCs. The effects of fiber volume content, peak stress, matrix crack spacing, interface properties, matrix cracking mode proportion and interface wear on interface slip and hysteresis loops have been analyzed. The cyclic loading/unloading hysteresis loops of 2D woven SiC/SiC composite corresponding to different peak stresses have been predicted using the present analysis. It was found that the damage parameter, i.e., the proportion of matrix cracking mode 3 in the entire cracking modes of the composite, increases with increasing peak stress.

  12. Impurity Effects on Caroli-de Gennes-Matricon Mode in Vortex Core in Superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masaki, Yusuke; Kato, Yusuke

    2016-01-01

    We have developed a scheme of Gor'kov Green's functions to treat the impurity effects on the Caroli-de Gennes-Matricon (CdGM) mode in superconductors (SCs) by improving the Kopnin-Kravtsov scheme with respect to the coherence factors and applicability to various SCs. We can study the impurity effects while keeping the discreteness of the energy spectrum, in contrast to the quasiclassical theory. We can thus apply this scheme to SCs with a small quasiclassical parameter kFξ0 (which is the product of the Fermi wavenumber kF and the coherence length ξ0 in a pure SC at zero temperature) and/or in the superclean regime Δ miniτ ≫ 1 (Δmini and τ denote, respectively, the level spacing of the CdGM mode called the minigap and the relaxation time for the CdGM mode and we take ħ = 1). We investigate the impurity effects as a white noise for a vortex in an s-wave SC and two types of vortex in a chiral p-wave SC for various values of the quasiclassical parameter and impurity strength (from the moderately clean regime to the superclean regime) and confirm the validity of this scheme.

  13. Failure mode and effects analysis using intuitionistic fuzzy hybrid weighted Euclidean distance operator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hu-Chen; Liu, Long; Li, Ping

    2014-10-01

    Failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) has shown its effectiveness in examining potential failures in products, process, designs or services and has been extensively used for safety and reliability analysis in a wide range of industries. However, its approach to prioritise failure modes through a crisp risk priority number (RPN) has been criticised as having several shortcomings. The aim of this paper is to develop an efficient and comprehensive risk assessment methodology using intuitionistic fuzzy hybrid weighted Euclidean distance (IFHWED) operator to overcome the limitations and improve the effectiveness of the traditional FMEA. The diversified and uncertain assessments given by FMEA team members are treated as linguistic terms expressed in intuitionistic fuzzy numbers (IFNs). Intuitionistic fuzzy weighted averaging (IFWA) operator is used to aggregate the FMEA team members' individual assessments into a group assessment. IFHWED operator is applied thereafter to the prioritisation and selection of failure modes. Particularly, both subjective and objective weights of risk factors are considered during the risk evaluation process. A numerical example for risk assessment is given to illustrate the proposed method finally.

  14. Failure mode and effects analysis of witnessing protocols for ensuring traceability during IVF.

    PubMed

    Rienzi, Laura; Bariani, Fiorenza; Dalla Zorza, Michela; Romano, Stefania; Scarica, Catello; Maggiulli, Roberta; Nanni Costa, Alessandro; Ubaldi, Filippo Maria

    2015-10-01

    Traceability of cells during IVF is a fundamental aspect of treatment, and involves witnessing protocols. Failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) is a method of identifying real or potential breakdowns in processes, and allows strategies to mitigate risks to be developed. To examine the risks associated with witnessing protocols, an FMEA was carried out in a busy IVF centre, before and after implementation of an electronic witnessing system (EWS). A multidisciplinary team was formed and moderated by human factors specialists. Possible causes of failures, and their potential effects, were identified and risk priority number (RPN) for each failure calculated. A second FMEA analysis was carried out after implementation of an EWS. The IVF team identified seven main process phases, 19 associated process steps and 32 possible failure modes. The highest RPN was 30, confirming the relatively low risk that mismatches may occur in IVF when a manual witnessing system is used. The introduction of the EWS allowed a reduction in the moderate-risk failure mode by two-thirds (highest RPN = 10). In our experience, FMEA is effective in supporting multidisciplinary IVF groups to understand the witnessing process, identifying critical steps and planning changes in practice to enable safety to be enhanced.

  15. Understanding the effect of resonant magnetic perturbations on tearing mode dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Qiming; Rao, Bo; Ding, Yonghua; Zhuang, Ge; Jin, Wei; Hu, Xiwei; Yu, Q.

    2013-09-15

    Numerical understandings of the effect of resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) on 2/1 tearing mode (TM) dynamics observed on J-TEXT tokamak (Hu et al. Nucl. Fusion 52, 083011 (2012)) are presented in this paper. The non-uniform mode rotation frequency, modulated by electromagnetic force (F{sub em}) and viscous force (F{sub vs}), results in the applied RMPs contributing both net stabilizing and braking effect on TM. Numerical evaluation based on analytical theory shows the applied RMP contributes a dominant stabilizing effect, which is responsible for the suppression of TM. The dynamics of the first discovered small locked island are investigated. It is found that the island is locked at the stabilizing phase and the saturated island width is less than the linear layer width. The simulated Mirnov signal indicates the small locked island is likely to be the complete suppression case observed in experiments. Associated with the application of RMP, the shape of Mirnov signal deviates from sinusoidal before mode locking, which is explained by numerical modeling. The comparisons between the numerical and experimental results are in good agreement phenomenally.

  16. Understanding the effect of resonant magnetic perturbations on tearing mode dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Qiming; Rao, Bo; Yu, Q.; Ding, Yonghua; Zhuang, Ge; Jin, Wei; Hu, Xiwei

    2013-09-01

    Numerical understandings of the effect of resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) on 2/1 tearing mode (TM) dynamics observed on J-TEXT tokamak (Hu et al. Nucl. Fusion 52, 083011 (2012)) are presented in this paper. The non-uniform mode rotation frequency, modulated by electromagnetic force (Fem) and viscous force (Fvs), results in the applied RMPs contributing both net stabilizing and braking effect on TM. Numerical evaluation based on analytical theory shows the applied RMP contributes a dominant stabilizing effect, which is responsible for the suppression of TM. The dynamics of the first discovered small locked island are investigated. It is found that the island is locked at the stabilizing phase and the saturated island width is less than the linear layer width. The simulated Mirnov signal indicates the small locked island is likely to be the complete suppression case observed in experiments. Associated with the application of RMP, the shape of Mirnov signal deviates from sinusoidal before mode locking, which is explained by numerical modeling. The comparisons between the numerical and experimental results are in good agreement phenomenally.

  17. Hydration effects on the barrier function of stratum corneum lipids: Raman analysis of ceramides 2, III and 5.

    PubMed

    Tfayli, Ali; Jamal, Dima; Vyumvuhore, Raoul; Manfait, Michel; Baillet-Guffroy, Arlette

    2013-11-07

    The stratum corneum is the outermost layer of the skin; its barrier function is highly dependent on the composition and the structure as well as the organization of lipids in its extracellular matrix. Ceramides, free fatty acids and cholesterol represent the major lipid classes present in this matrix. They play an important role in maintaining the normal hydration levels required for the normal physiological function. Despite the advancement in the understanding of the structure, composition and the function of the stratum corneum (SC), the concern of "dry skin" remains important in dermatology and care research. Most studies focus on the quantification of water in the skin using different techniques including Raman spectroscopy, while the studies that investigate the effect of hydration on the quality of the barrier function of the skin are limited. Raman spectroscopy provides structural, conformational and organizational information that could help elucidate the effect of hydration on the barrier function of the skin. In order to assess the effect of relative humidity on the lipid barrier function; we used Raman spectroscopy to follow-up the evolution of the conformation and the organization of three synthetic ceramides (CER) differing from each other by the nature of their polar heads (sphingosine, phytosphingosine and α hydroxyl sphingosine), CER 2, III and 5 respectively. CER III and 5 showed a more compact and ordered organization with stronger polar interactions at intermediate relative humidity values, while CER 2 showed opposite tendencies to those observed with CER III and 5.

  18. Environmental influence on the single-molecule magnet behavior of [Mn(III)6Cr(III)]3+: molecular symmetry versus solid-state effects.

    PubMed

    Hoeke, Veronika; Heidemeier, Maik; Krickemeyer, Erich; Stammler, Anja; Bögge, Hartmut; Schnack, Jürgen; Postnikov, Andrei; Glaser, Thorsten

    2012-10-15

    The structural, spectroscopic, and magnetic properties of a series of [Mn(III)(6)Cr(III)](3+) (= [{(talen(t-Bu(2)))Mn(III)(3)}(2){Cr(III)(CN)(6)}](3+)) compounds have been investigated by single-crystal X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and electronic absorption spectroscopy, elemental analysis, electro spray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS), cyclic voltammetry, AC and DC magnetic measurements, as well as theoretical analysis. The crystal structures obtained with [Cr(III)(CN)(6)](3-) as a counterion exhibit (quasi-)one-dimensional (1D) chains formed by hydrogen-bonded (1) or covalently linked (2) trications and trianions. The rod-shaped anion lactate enforces a rod packing of the [Mn(III)(6)Cr(III)](3+) complexes in the highly symmetric space group R3[overline] (3) with a collinear arrangement of the molecular S(6) axes. Incorporation of the spherical anion BPh(4)(-) leads to less-symmetric crystal structures (4-6) with noncollinear orientations of the [Mn(III)(6)Cr(III)](3+) complexes, as evidenced by the angle between the approximate molecular C(3) axes taking no specific values in the range of 2°-69°. AC magnetic measurements on freshly isolated crystals (1a and 3a-6a), air-dried crystals (3b-6b), and vacuum-dried powder samples (3c-6c) indicate single-molecule magnet (SMM) behavior for all samples with U(eff) values up to 28 K. The DC magnetic data are analyzed by a full-matrix diagonalization of the appropriate spin-Hamiltonian including isotropic exchange, zero-field splitting, and Zeeman interaction, taking into account the relative orientation of the D-tensors. Simulations for 3a-6a and 3c-6c indicate a weak antiferromagnetic exchange between the Mn(III) ions in the trinuclear subunits (J(Mn-Mn) = -0.70 to -0.85 cm(-1), Ĥ(ex) = -2∑(i

  19. Energetic Particle Effects Can Explain the Low Frequency of Alfvin Modes in the DIII-D Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Gorelenkov, N.N.; Heidbrink, W.W.

    2001-01-31

    During beam injection in the DIII-D tokamak, modes with lower frequencies than expected for toroidicity-induced Alfvin eigenmodes (TAE) are often observed. We present the analysis of one of these ''beta-induced Alfvin eigenmodes'' (BAE) with a high-n stability code HINST that includes the effect of the energetic ions on the mode frequency. It shows that the ''BAE'' could be the theoretically predicted resonant-TAE (RTAE), which is also called an energetic-particle mode (EPM).

  20. Tip Effect of the Tapping Mode of Atomic Force Microscope in Viscous Fluid Environments.

    PubMed

    Shih, Hua-Ju; Shih, Po-Jen

    2015-07-28

    Atomic force microscope with applicable types of operation in a liquid environment is widely used to scan the contours of biological specimens. The contact mode of operation allows a tip to touch a specimen directly but sometimes it damages the specimen; thus, a tapping mode of operation may replace the contact mode. The tapping mode triggers the cantilever of the microscope approximately at resonance frequencies, and so the tip periodically knocks the specimen. It is well known that the cantilever induces extra liquid pressure that leads to drift in the resonance frequency. Studies have noted that the heights of protein surfaces measured via the tapping mode of an atomic force microscope are ~25% smaller than those measured by other methods. This discrepancy may be attributable to the induced superficial hydrodynamic pressure, which is worth investigating. In this paper, we introduce a semi-analytical method to analyze the pressure distribution of various tip geometries. According to our analysis, the maximum hydrodynamic pressure on the specimen caused by a cone-shaped tip is ~0.5 Pa, which can, for example, pre-deform a cell by several nanometers in compression before the tip taps it. Moreover, the pressure calculated on the surface of the specimen is 20 times larger than the pressure without considering the tip effect; these results have not been motioned in other papers. Dominating factors, such as surface heights of protein surface, mechanical stiffness of protein increasing with loading velocity, and radius of tip affecting the local pressure of specimen, are also addressed in this study.

  1. The biowaiver extension for BCS class III drugs: the effect of dissolution rate on the bioequivalence of BCS class III immediate-release drugs predicted by computer simulation.

    PubMed

    Tsume, Yasuhiro; Amidon, Gordon L

    2010-08-02

    The Biopharmaceutical Classification System (BCS) guidance issued by the FDA allows waivers for in vivo bioavailability and bioequivalence studies for immediate-release (IR) solid oral dosage forms only for BCS class I drugs. However, a number of drugs within BCS class III have been proposed to be eligible for biowaivers. The World Health Organization (WHO) has shortened the requisite dissolution time of BCS class III drugs on their Essential Medicine List (EML) from 30 to 15 min for extended biowaivers; however, the impact of the shorter dissolution time on AUC(0-inf) and C(max) is unknown. The objectives of this investigation were to assess the ability of gastrointestinal simulation software to predict the oral absorption of the BCS class I drugs propranolol and metoprolol and the BCS class III drugs cimetidine, atenolol, and amoxicillin, and to perform in silico bioequivalence studies to assess the feasibility of extending biowaivers to BCS class III drugs. The drug absorption from the gastrointestinal tract was predicted using physicochemical and pharmacokinetic properties of test drugs provided by GastroPlus (version 6.0). Virtual trials with a 200 mL dose volume at different drug release rates (T(85%) = 15 to 180 min) were performed to predict the oral absorption (C(max) and AUC(0-inf)) of the above drugs. Both BCS class I drugs satisfied bioequivalence with regard to the release rates up to 120 min. The results with BCS class III drugs demonstrated bioequivalence using the prolonged release rate, T(85%) = 45 or 60 min, indicating that the dissolution standard for bioequivalence is dependent on the intestinal membrane permeability and permeability profile throughout the gastrointestinal tract. The results of GastroPlus simulations indicate that the dissolution rate of BCS class III drugs could be prolonged to the point where dissolution, rather than permeability, would control the overall absorption. For BCS class III drugs with intestinal absorption patterns

  2. Mechanistic investigation of food effect on disintegration and dissolution of BCS class III compound solid formulations: the importance of viscosity.

    PubMed

    Radwan, Asma; Amidon, Gordon L; Langguth, Peter

    2012-10-01

    A negative food effect, i.e. a decrease in bioavailability upon the co-administration of compounds together with food, has been attributed particularly with high solubility/low permeability compounds (BCS class III). Different mechanisms have been proposed including intestinal dilution leading to a lower concentration gradient across the intestinal wall as well as binding of the active pharmaceutical ingredient to food components in the intestine and thereby decreasing the fraction of the dose available for absorption. These mechanisms refer primarily to the compound and not to the dosage form. An increase in viscosity of the dissolution fluid will in particular affect the absorption of BCS type III compounds with preferential absorption in the upper small intestine if the API release is delayed from the dosage form. The present study demonstrated that the increase in viscosity of the dissolution medium, following ingestion of a solid meal, may drastically reduce disintegration and dissolution. For that purpose the viscosity of the standard FDA meal was determined and simulated by solutions of HPMC in buffer. As model formulations, three commercially available tablets containing trospium chloride, a BCS class III m-cholinoreceptor antagonist was used. Trospium chloride drug products have been described to undergo a negative food effect of more than 80% following ingestion with food. The tablets showed prolonged disintegration times and reduced dissolution rates in viscous media, which could be attributed to changes in the liquid penetration rates. The effect was particularly significant for film-coated tablets relative to uncoated dosage forms. The results show the necessity of considering media viscosity when designing in vitro models of drug release for BCS type III drug formulations.

  3. Cytotoxic and antimicrobial effects of indium(iii) complexes with 2-acetylpyridine-derived thiosemicarbazones.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Alexandre A; Perdigão, Gabriele M C; Rodrigues, Luana E; da Silva, Jeferson G; Souza-Fagundes, Elaine M; Takahashi, Jacqueline A; Rocha, Willian R; Beraldo, Heloisa

    2017-01-17

    Complexes [In(2Ac4oClPh)Cl2(MeOH)] (1), [In(2Ac4pFPh)Cl2(MeOH)] (2), [In(2Ac4pClPh)Cl2(MeOH)] (3) and [In(2Ac4pIPh)Cl2(MeOH)] (4) were obtained with N(4)-ortho-chlorophenyl-2-acetylpyridine thiosemicarbazone (H2Ac4oClPh), N(4)-para-fluorophenyl-2-acetylpyridine thiosemicarbazone (H2Ac4pFPh), N(4)-para-chlorophenyl-2-acetylpyridine thiosemicarbazone (H2Ac4pClPh) and N(4)-para-iodophenyl-2-acetylpyridine thiosemicarbazone (H2Ac4pIPh). Theoretical studies suggested that the coordinated methanol molecule can be easily replaced by DMSO used in the preparation of stock solutions, with the formation of [In(L)Cl2(DMSO)] (HL = thiosemicarbazonate ligand), and that the replacement of DMSO by water is unfavorable. However, for all complexes the displacement of one or two chloride ligands by water in aqueous solution is extremely favorable. The cytotoxic activity of the compounds was evaluated against HL-60, Jurkat and THP-1 leukemia and against MDA-MB-231 and HCT-116 solid tumor cell lines, as well as against Vero non-malignant cells. The cytotoxicity and selectivity indexes (SI) increased in several cases for the indium(iii) complexes in comparison with the free thiosemicarbazones. The antimicrobial activity of the compounds was investigated against Candida albicans, Candida dubliniensis, Candida lusitaniae and Candida parapsilosis. In many cases complexation resulted in a substantial increase of the antifungal activity. Complexes (1-4) were revealed to be very active against C. lusitaniae and C. dubliniensis. Structure-activity relationship (SAR) studies were carried out to identify the physico-chemical properties that might be involved in the antifungal action, as well as in the cytotoxic effect of the compounds against HL-60 cells. In both cases, correlations between the bioactivity and physico-chemical properties did not appreciably change when the chloride ligands in [In(L)Cl2(DMSO)] were replaced by water molecules, suggesting [In(L)Cl(H2O)(DMSO)](+) or [In(L)(H2O)2

  4. Application of Failure Mode and Effects Analysis to Intraoperative Radiation Therapy Using Mobile Electron Linear Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Ciocca, Mario; Cantone, Marie-Claire; Veronese, Ivan; Cattani, Federica; Pedroli, Guido; Molinelli, Silvia; Vitolo, Viviana; Orecchia, Roberto

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: Failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) represents a prospective approach for risk assessment. A multidisciplinary working group of the Italian Association for Medical Physics applied FMEA to electron beam intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) delivered using mobile linear accelerators, aiming at preventing accidental exposures to the patient. Methods and Materials: FMEA was applied to the IORT process, for the stages of the treatment delivery and verification, and consisted of three steps: 1) identification of the involved subprocesses; 2) identification and ranking of the potential failure modes, together with their causes and effects, using the risk probability number (RPN) scoring system, based on the product of three parameters (severity, frequency of occurrence and detectability, each ranging from 1 to 10); 3) identification of additional safety measures to be proposed for process quality and safety improvement. RPN upper threshold for little concern of risk was set at 125. Results: Twenty-four subprocesses were identified. Ten potential failure modes were found and scored, in terms of RPN, in the range of 42-216. The most critical failure modes consisted of internal shield misalignment, wrong Monitor Unit calculation and incorrect data entry at treatment console. Potential causes of failure included shield displacement, human errors, such as underestimation of CTV extension, mainly because of lack of adequate training and time pressures, failure in the communication between operators, and machine malfunctioning. The main effects of failure were represented by CTV underdose, wrong dose distribution and/or delivery, unintended normal tissue irradiation. As additional safety measures, the utilization of a dedicated staff for IORT, double-checking of MU calculation and data entry and finally implementation of in vivo dosimetry were suggested. Conclusions: FMEA appeared as a useful tool for prospective evaluation of patient safety in radiotherapy. The

  5. Understanding the vibrational mode-specific polarization effects in femtosecond Raman-induced Kerr-effect spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    McAnally, Michael O; Guo, Yinsheng; Balakrishnan, Gurusamy; Schatz, George C; Van Duyne, Richard P

    2016-11-15

    Optically heterodyne-detected femtosecond Raman-induced Kerr-effect spectroscopy (OHD-FRIKES) was observed in neat cyclohexane. In this Letter, an examination of the effect of the Raman pump ellipticity on the multiplex OHD-FRIKES spectra is discussed. The Raman pump ellipticity scanned OHD-FRIKES results reproduce anomalous observables from previous OHD-FRIKES experiments and suggest new methods of tracking transient vibrational mode polarization in complex systems.

  6. Kinetic effects on geodesic acoustic mode from combined collisions and impurities

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Shangchuan; Xie, Jinlin Liu, Wandong

    2015-04-15

    The dispersion relation for geodesic acoustic mode (GAM) is derived by applying a gyrokinetic model that accounts for the effects from both collisions and impurities. Based on the dispersion relation, an analysis is performed for the non-monotonic behavior of GAM damping versus the characteristic collision rate at various impurity levels. As the effective charge increases, the maximum damping rate is found to shift towards lower collision rates, nearer to the parameter range of a typical tokamak edge plasma. The relative strengths of ion-ion and impurity-induced collision effects, which are illustrated by numerical calculations, are found to be comparable. Impurity-induced collisions help decrease the frequency of GAM, while their effects on the damping rate are non-monotonic, resulting in a weaker total damping in the high collision regime. The results presented suggest considering collision effects as well as impurity effects in GAM analysis.

  7. Use of failure mode and effects analysis for proactive identification of communication and handoff failures from organ procurement to transplantation.

    PubMed

    Steinberger, Dina M; Douglas, Stephen V; Kirschbaum, Mark S

    2009-09-01

    A multidisciplinary team from the University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics transplant program used failure mode and effects analysis to proactively examine opportunities for communication and handoff failures across the continuum of care from organ procurement to transplantation. The team performed a modified failure mode and effects analysis that isolated the multiple linked, serial, and complex information exchanges occurring during the transplantation of one solid organ. Failure mode and effects analysis proved effective for engaging a diverse group of persons who had an investment in the outcome in analysis and discussion of opportunities to improve the system's resilience for avoiding errors during a time-pressured and complex process.

  8. Low-frequency modes and nonbarotropic effects in pseudo-Newtonian accretion disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ipser, James R.

    1994-01-01

    A recently developed formalism is used to reexamine the question of the existence of hydrodynamical modes that pulsate with very low frequencies in the inner regions of accretion disks. The formalism is valid in an exact sense for the adiabatic pulsations of rotating Newtonian fluids that are generally nonbarotropic (such as those with 'nonadiabatic temperature gradients,' for example), and hence its application in the present context represents an improvement over previous analyses that are more approximate. The formalism is applied to thin non-self-gravitating disks, with the gravitational potential of the central source modified in the usual way in order to simulate relativistic effects. In the barotropic limit, the analyses indicate that in many cases nearly Keplerian disks exhibit nonaxisymmetric modes of pulsation that are trapped in the inner disk regions, with pulsation periods much longer than the dynamical timescale. These results are similar to those of earlier calculations that assume disks pulsate without changing the temperature distribution. A method is developed for including lowest order nonbarotropic effects. Previous analyses have been incapable of accurately treating the nonbarotropic regime. The application of the present method to the low-frequency modes reveals that, due to unexpected cancellations among terms, the nonbarotropic correction to the pusation frequency omega is only of order tilde-omega(sub BV exp 2) omega, where tilde-omega(sub BV) is the appropriate dimensionless Brunt-Vaisala frequency. This correction is much smaller than the expected correction of order tilde-omega(sub BV) Omega, where Omega is the rotation angular velocity. The important conclusion drawn from this is that nonbarotropic corrections are generally small and hence that low-frequency modes persist into the nonbarotropic regime. For disk temperatures appropriate to X-ray emission, the adiabatic frequencies of trapped modes are of the same order as the frequencies

  9. Magnetic effects on the viscous boundary layer damping of the r-modes in neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Mendell, Gregory

    2001-08-15

    This paper explores the effects that magnetic fields have on the viscous boundary layers (VBLs) that can form in neutron stars at the crust-core interface, and it investigates the VBL damping of the gravitational-radiation driven r-mode instability. Approximate solutions to the magnetohydrodynamic equations valid in the VBL are found for ordinary-fluid neutron stars. It is shown that magnetic fields above 10{sup 9}(10{sup 10} K/T)G significantly change the structure of the VBL, and that magnetic fields decrease the VBL damping time. Furthermore, VBL damping completely suppresses the r-mode instability for B{approx}>10{sup 12} G (independent of the temperature). These bounds refer to the strength of the radial component of the equilibrium field at the location of the core radius. Magnetic effects on the VBL vanish wherever the radial component of the equilibrium field vanishes. Thus, magnetic fields will profoundly affect the VBL damping of the r-mode instability in hot young pulsars (that are cool enough to have formed a solid crust). One can speculate that magnetic fields can affect the VBL damping of this instability in low-mass x-ray binary systems and other cold old pulsars (if they have sufficiently large internal fields).

  10. Failure modes and effects analysis of a coal-slurry preheater

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, H.A.; Parsly, L.F.; Smith, A.N.

    1981-09-01

    The Fossil Energy performance assurance program is concerned with the application of reliability, safety, and quality assurance techniques in the design and operation of the pilot plants and demonstration plants that exist or are being planned as part of the US Department of Energy fossil energy conversion programs. This report involves the application of one technique, failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA), on the safety and reliability analysis of the coal slurry preheater, a critical component in a typical coal direct liquefaction plant. The analysis identifies 55 potential failure modes. Fourteen of these events, if they should occur, would result in losses of sufficient magnitude to require special consideration in the design or operating phase to assure control of risk at an acceptable level. The report concludes that the FMEA could be a valuable tool in the identification of critical components for coal conversion systems. For maximum effect, FMEA needs to be used during the initial design phase. Its principal value is to determine high-risk failure modes, which could have unacceptable impacts on system safety and reliability/availability. The usefulness of FMEA will be improved if it is supplemented by the development of a failure data base; this data base could also be of value in selected cases as input to a more detaled technique such as fault-tree analysis.

  11. The effect of types I and III interferons on adrenocortical cells and its possible implications for autoimmune Addison's disease.

    PubMed

    Hellesen, A; Edvardsen, K; Breivik, L; Husebye, E S; Bratland, E

    2014-06-01

    Autoimmune Addison's disease (AAD) is caused by selective destruction of the hormone-producing cells of the adrenal cortex. As yet, little is known about the potential role played by environmental factors in this process. Type I and/or type III interferons (IFNs) are signature responses to virus infections, and have also been implicated in the pathogenesis of autoimmune endocrine disorders such as type 1 diabetes and autoimmune thyroiditis. Transient development of AAD and exacerbation of established or subclinical disease, as well as the induction of autoantibodies associated with AAD, have been reported following therapeutic administration of type I IFNs. We therefore hypothesize that exposure to such IFNs could render the adrenal cortex susceptible to autoimmune attack in genetically predisposed individuals. In this study, we investigated possible immunopathological effects of type I and type III IFNs on adrenocortical cells in relation to AAD. Both types I and III IFNs exerted significant cytotoxicity on NCI-H295R adrenocortical carcinoma cells and potentiated IFN-γ- and polyinosine-polycytidylic acid [poly (I : C)]-induced chemokine secretion. Furthermore, we observed increased expression of human leucocyte antigen (HLA) class I molecules and up-regulation of 21-hydroxylase, the primary antigenic target in AAD. We propose that these combined effects could serve to initiate or aggravate an ongoing autoimmune response against the adrenal cortex in AAD.

  12. Proteomic and metabolomic analysis on the toxicological effects of As (III) and As (V) in juvenile mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Deliang; Ji, Chenglong; Zhao, Jianmin; Wu, Huifeng

    2016-05-01

    Inorganic arsenic (As) is a known pollutant including two chemical forms (arsenite (As III) and arsenate (As V)), in marine and coastal environment. Marine mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis is an important environmental monitoring species around the world. In this study, we focused on valence-specific responses of As in juvenile mussel M. galloprovincialis using a combined proteomic and metabolomic approach. Metabolic responses indicated that As (III) mainly caused disturbance in osmotic regulation in juvenile mussels. As (V) caused disturbances in both osmotic regulation and energy metabolism marked by different metabolic responses, including betaine, taurine, glucose and glycogen. Proteomic responses exhibited that As (III) had a significant negative effect on cytoskeleton and cell structure (actin and collagen alpha-6(VI) chain). As (V) affected some key enzymes involved in energy metabolism (cytosolic malate dehydrogenase, cMDH) and cell development (ornithine aminotransferase and astacin). Overall, all these results confirmed the valence-specific responses in juvenile mussels to As exposures. These findings demonstrate that a combined metabolomic and proteomic approach could provide an important insight into the toxicological effects of environmental pollutants in organisms.

  13. DRD4-exonIII-VNTR moderates the effect of childhood adversities on emotional resilience in young-adults.

    PubMed

    Das, Debjani; Cherbuin, Nicolas; Tan, Xiaoyun; Anstey, Kaarin J; Easteal, Simon

    2011-01-01

    Most individuals successfully maintain psychological well-being even when exposed to trauma or adversity. Emotional resilience or the ability to thrive in the face of adversity is determined by complex interactions between genetic makeup, previous exposure to stress, personality, coping style, availability of social support, etc. Recent studies have demonstrated that childhood trauma diminishes resilience in adults and affects mental health. The Dopamine receptor D4 (DRD4) exon III variable number tandem repeat (VNTR) polymorphism was reported to moderate the impact of adverse childhood environment on behaviour, mood and other health-related outcomes. In this study we investigated whether DRD4-exIII-VNTR genotype moderates the effect of childhood adversities (CA) on resilience. In a representative population sample (n = 1148) aged 30-34 years, we observed an interactive effect of DRD4 genotype and CA (β = 0.132; p = 0.003) on resilience despite no main effect of the genotype when effects of age, gender and education were controlled for. The 7-repeat allele appears to protect against the adverse effect of CA since the decline in resilience associated with increased adversity was evident only in individuals without the 7-repeat allele. Resilience was also significantly associated with approach-/avoidance-related personality measures (behavioural inhibition/activation system; BIS/BAS) measures and an interactive effect of DRD4-exIII-VNTR genotype and CA on BAS was observed. Hence it is possible that approach-related personality traits could be mediating the effect of the DRD4 gene and childhood environment interaction on resilience such that when stressors are present, the 7-repeat allele influences the development of personality in a way that provides protection against adverse outcomes.

  14. V/III ratio effects on high quality InAlAs for quantum cascade laser structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demir, Ilkay; Elagoz, Sezai

    2017-04-01

    In this study we report the V/III ratio effects on growth, structural, optical and doping characteristics of low growth rate (∼1 Å/s) heteroepitaxial Metal Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition (MOCVD) grown InxAl1-xAs layers, a part of Quantum Cascade Laser (QCL) structures, on InP substrate. Especially photoluminescence (PL) properties of InAlAs-InP interface show strong dependence on AsH3 overpressure. We have shown that the V/III ratio with fixed metalorganic precursor flow is a crucial parameter on InxAl1-xAs layers to have a good material quality in terms of crystallinity, optical and electrical characteristics with and without doping.

  15. Dispersing artifacts in FT-STS: a comparison of set point effects across acquisition modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macdonald, A. J.; Tremblay-Johnston, Y.-S.; Grothe, S.; Chi, S.; Dosanjh, P.; Johnston, S.; Burke, S. A.

    2016-10-01

    Fourier-transform scanning tunnelling spectroscopy (FT-STS), or quasiparticle interference, has become an influential tool for the study of a wide range of important materials in condensed matter physics. However, FT-STS in complex materials is often challenging to interpret, requiring significant theoretical input in many cases, making it crucial to understand potential artifacts of the measurement. Here, we compare the most common modes of acquiring FT-STS data and show through both experiment and simulations that artifact features can arise that depend on how the tip height is stabilized throughout the course of the measurement. The most dramatic effect occurs when a series of dI/dV maps at different energies are acquired with simultaneous constant current feedback; here a feature that disperses in energy appears that is not observed in other measurement modes. Such artifact features are similar to those arising from real physical processes in the sample and are susceptible to misinterpretation.

  16. The emotional male victim: effects of presentation mode on judged credibility.

    PubMed

    Landström, Sara; Ask, Karl; Sommar, Charlotte

    2015-02-01

    The emotional victim effect (EVE, i.e., that the emotionality of a victim's demeanor affects perceived credibility) is a robust research finding for female victims of rape but much less explored for other types of victims and crimes. In this article, we investigate the EVE with a male assault complainant. In addition, we vary the presentation mode via which the complainant is shown to the assessors. A sample of law students (N = 81) participated in an experiment where they viewed and assessed credibility of a male complainant who appeared either live or on video. The complainant behaved either in an emotional or a neutral manner. Result showed that the presentation mode but not the EVE affected the assessors' credibility assessments: The complainant was perceived as more truthful when communicating live, as opposed to via video. Practical implications, as well as the generality of the EVE, are discussed.

  17. Depletion-mode ZnO nanowire field-effect transistor

    SciTech Connect

    Heo, Y.W.; Tien, L.C.; Kwon, Y.; Norton, D.P.; Pearton, S.J.; Kang, B.S.; Ren, F.

    2004-09-20

    Single ZnO nanowire metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs) were fabricated using nanowires grown by site selective molecular-beam epitaxy. When measured in the dark at 25 deg. C, he depletion-mode transistors exhibit good saturation behavior, a threshold voltage of {approx}-3 V, and a maximum transconductance of order 0.3 mS/mm. Under ultraviolet (366 nm) illumination, the drain-source current increase by approximately a factor of 5 and the maximum transconductance is {approx}5 mS/mm. The channel mobility is estimated to be {approx}3 cm{sup 2}/V s, which is comparable to that reported for thin film ZnO enhancement mode MOSFETs, and the on/off ratio was {approx}25 in the dark and {approx}125 under UV illumination.

  18. Effective dipole moment for the mode coupling instability: Mapping of self-consistent wake models

    SciTech Connect

    Roecker, T. B.; Zhdanov, S. K.; Ivlev, A. V.; Morfill, G. E.; Lampe, M.; Joyce, G.

    2012-07-15

    The theory of the mode coupling instability operating in two-dimensional plasma crystals is generalized, by employing the linear plasma response formalism to describe the interparticle interactions self-consistently. In this approach, the underlying ion distribution function is calculated from first principles. Subthermal and suprathermal regimes of the ion flow are considered. A mapping procedure is proposed, which relates the self-consistent coupling coefficients to the effective dipole moment of the wake-the parameter which characterizes the mode coupling in the framework of the conventionally used Yukawa/point-wake model. The importance of the self-consistent approach is demonstrated by comparing the theoretically obtained dipole moments with the values deduced from experiments.

  19. Effect of set size, age, and mode of stimulus presentation on information-processing speed.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norton, J. C.

    1972-01-01

    First, second, and third grade pupils served as subjects in an experiment designed to show the effect of age, mode of stimulus presentation, and information value on recognition time. Stimuli were presented in picture and printed word form and in groups of 2, 4, and 8. The results of the study indicate that first graders are slower than second and third graders who are nearly equal. There is a gross shift in reaction time as a function of mode of stimulus presentation with increase in age. The first graders take much longer to identify words than pictures, while the reverse is true of the older groups. With regard to set size, a slope appears in the pictures condition in the older groups, while for first graders, a large slope occurs in the words condition and only a much smaller one for pictures.

  20. Wall thickness effect on the resistive wall mode stability in toroidal plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, L.-J.; Kotschenreuther, M.T.

    2005-07-15

    The effect of finite wall thickness on the stability of n=1 resistive wall modes in toroidal plasmas is investigated. A fusion reactor-relevant configuration is examined. The investigation employs a novel ideal-magnetohydrodynamics adaptive shooting code for axisymmetric plasmas, extended to take into account the wall thickness. Although finite wall thickness generally reduces the growth rate of the resistive wall modes, no contribution to stabilization is found to be made by the portion of the wall that is located beyond the critical position for perfectly conducting wall stabilization. Thus, when the inner side of the wall lies near the critical wall position, the scaling of the growth rate versus wall thickness in the realistic thick-wall calculation is significantly different from that of the usual thin-wall theory. The thin-wall estimate is relevant only when the wall is brought very close to the plasma and is not too thick.

  1. Model OA Wind Turbine Generator FEMA (Failure Modes and Effects Analysis)

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, W.E. . Plum Brook Station); Lalli, V.R. . Lewis Research Center)

    1989-10-01

    This report presents the results of Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) conducted for the Wind Turbine Generators. The FMEA was performed for the functional modes of each system, subsystem, or component. The single-point failures were eliminated for most of the systems. The blade system was the only exception. The qualitative probability of a blade separating was estimated at Level D-remote. Many changes were made to the hardware as a result of this analysis. The most significant change was the addition of the safety system. Operational experience and need to improve machine availability have resulted in subsequent changes to the various systems which are also reflected in this FMEA. 2 refs., 3 figs.

  2. Effect of electron flow on the ordinary-extraordinary mode conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Jia Guozhang; Gao Zhe

    2011-10-15

    Ordinary-extraordinary mode conversion in the electron cyclotron frequency range is revisited in the presence of a flowing electron component. The analytical expressions of optimal parallel refraction index and conversion efficiency are obtained from a one-dimensional cold plasma model. The presence of flowing electrons leads to an outward shift of the conversion layer and therefore increases the optimal value of parallel refraction index. If this effect is not considered, the efficiency of mode conversion degenerates. In typical tokamak plasmas, this degeneration is about a few percentages, which may induce the reflection of several tens of kilowatts of power from the cutoff layer when injecting megawatts of ECRF power into fusion plasma.

  3. Using Failure Mode and Effects Analysis to design a comfortable automotive driver seat.

    PubMed

    Kolich, Mike

    2014-07-01

    Given enough time and use, all designs will fail. There are no fail-free designs. This is especially true when it comes to automotive seating comfort where the characteristics and preferences of individual customers are many and varied. To address this problem, individuals charged with automotive seating comfort development have, traditionally, relied on iterative and, as a result, expensive build-test cycles. Cost pressures being placed on today's vehicle manufacturers have necessitated the search for more efficient alternatives. This contribution aims to fill this need by proposing the application of an analytical technique common to engineering circles (but new to seating comfort development), namely Design Failure Mode and Effects Analysis (DFMEA). An example is offered to describe how development teams can use this systematic and disciplined approach to highlight potential seating comfort failure modes, reduce their risk, and bring capable designs to life.

  4. Effect of wind tunnel acoustic modes on linear oscillating cascade aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buffum, D. H.; Fleeter, S.

    1994-01-01

    The aerodynamics of a biconvex airfoil cascade oscillating in torsion is investigated using the unsteady aerodynamic influence coefficient technique. For subsonic flow and reduced frequencies as large as 0.9, airfoil surface unsteady pressures resulting from oscillation of one of the airfoils are measured using flush-mounted high-frequency-response pressure transducers. The influence coefficient data are examined in detail and then used to predict the unsteady aerodynamics of a cascade oscillating at various interblade phase angles. These results are correlated with experimental data obtained in the traveling-wave mode of oscillation and linearized analysis predictions. It is found that the unsteady pressure disturbances created by an oscillating airfoil excite wind tunnel acoustic modes, which have detrimental effects on the experimental results. Acoustic treatment is proposed to rectify this problem.

  5. Effect of wind tunnel acoustic modes on linear oscillating cascade aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buffum, Daniel H.; Fleeter, Sanford

    1993-01-01

    The aerodynamics of a biconvex airfoil cascade oscillating in torsion is investigated using the unsteady aerodynamic influence coefficient technique. For subsonic flow and reduced frequencies as large as 0.9, airfoil surface unsteady pressures resulting from oscillation of one of the airfoils are measured using flush-mounted high-frequency-response pressure transducers. The influence coefficient data are examined in detail and then used to predict the unsteady aerodynamics of a cascade oscillating at various interblade phase angles. These results are correlated with experimental data obtained in the traveling-wave mode of oscillation and linearized analysis predictions. It is found that the unsteady pressure disturbances created by an oscillating airfoil excite wind tunnel acoustic modes which have detrimental effects on the experimental data. Acoustic treatment is proposed to rectify this problem.

  6. The size effect of crystalline inclusions on the fracture modes in glass-ceramic materials.

    PubMed

    Charitidis, C A; Karakasidis, T E; Kavouras, P; Karakostas, Th

    2007-07-04

    The main parameters influencing the mechanical performance of glass-ceramic materials are the shape and mean size of the ceramic phase, i.e. the crystalline inclusions. The aim of the present work is twofold: first, to study the effect of the above parameters on the modes of fracture in two kinds of glass-ceramic materials by the use of the static microindentation technique; second, to interpret the experimental results by the application of a simple physical model. It was found that reduction in the size of granularly shaped crystallite inclusions or reduction of the width of needle-like crystalline inclusions results in an increase of the extent of crack propagation, while the fracture mode shifts from intergranular to transgranular. These observations were successfully interpreted in terms of energetic arguments related to the size of the crystalline inclusions with respect to the width of a disordered zone acting as an interface between them and the amorphous matrix.

  7. The Effect of Mode of Delivery on Postpartum Sexual Functioning in Primiparous Women

    PubMed Central

    Dabiri, Fatemeh; Yabandeh, Asieh Pormehr; Shahi, Arefeh; Kamjoo, Azita; Teshnizi, Saeed Hosseini

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effect of mode of delivery on postpartum sexual functioning in primiparous women. Methods In this cross-sectional descriptive study, 150 primiparous women in postpartum period, who attended the family planning or vaccination clinics, were enrolled for the study. Eighty-one had vaginal delivery with episiotomy and 69 had experienced cesarean section. Sexual function was evaluated by the Female Sexual Function Index within 3 and 6 months postpartum. Results About 29% in vaginal delivery group and 37% in cesarean delivery group had resumed their sexual intercourses four weeks after delivery (p=0.280).There were no significant differences between mode of delivery and sexual functioning, including desire, arousal, lubrication, orgasm, satisfaction and pain. Conclusion The present study showed that postpartum sexual functioning was not associated with the type of delivery. PMID:25170409

  8. Investigation on the co-luminescence effect of europium (III)-lanthanum(III)-dopamine-sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate system and its application.

    PubMed

    Si, Hailin; Zhao, Fang; Cai, Huan

    2013-01-01

    A novel luminescence, enhancement phenomenon in the europium(III)-dopamine-sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate system was observed when lanthanum(III) was added. Based on this, a sensitive co-luminescence method was established for the determination of dopamine. The luminescence signal for the europium (III)-lanthanum(III)-dopamine-sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate system was monitored at λ(ex) = 300 nm, λ(em) = 618 nm and pH 8.3. Under optimized conditions, the enhanced luminescence signal responded linearly to the concentration of dopamine in the range 1.0 × 10(-10)-5.0 × 10(-7) mol/L with a correlation coefficient of 0.9993 (n = 11). The detection limit (3σ) was 2.7 × 10(-11) mol/L and the relative standard deviation for 11 parallel measurements of 3.0 × 10(-8) mol/L dopamine was 1.9%. The presented method was successfully applied for the estimation of dopamine in samples of pharmaceutical preparations, human serum and urine. The possible luminescence enhancement mechanism of the system is discussed briefly.

  9. Practice effects on the WAIS-III across 3- and 6-month intervals.

    PubMed

    Basso, Michael R; Carona, Francine D; Lowery, Natasha; Axelrod, Bradley N

    2002-02-01

    Fifty-one participants (age M = 24.6; education M = 14.4 years) were administered the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale - Third Edition (WAIS-III) at baseline and at an interval of either 3 or 6 months later. Full Scale IQ (FSIQ), Verbal IQ (VIQ), Performance IQ (PIQ), Verbal Comprehension Index (VCI), Perceptual Organization Index (POI), and Processing Speed Index (PSI) scores improved significantly across time, whereas no significant change occurred on the Working Memory Index. Specifically, test scores increased approximately 3, 11, 6, 4, 8, and 7 points, respectively on the VIQ, PIQ, FSIQ, VCI, POI, and PSI for both groups. Notably, the degree of improvement was similar regardless of whether the inter-test interval was 3 or 6 months. These findings suggest that prior exposure to the WAIS-III yields considerable increases in test scores. Reliable change indices indicated that large confidence intervals might be expected. As such, users of the WAIS-III should interpret reevaluations across these intervals cautiously.

  10. Chaotic dynamics of cardioventilatory coupling in humans: effects of ventilatory modes.

    PubMed

    Mangin, Laurence; Clerici, Christine; Similowski, Thomas; Poon, Chi-Sang

    2009-04-01

    Cardioventilatory coupling (CVC), a transient temporal alignment between the heartbeat and inspiratory activity, has been studied in animals and humans mainly during anesthesia. The origin of the coupling remains uncertain, whether or not ventilation is a main determinant in the CVC process and whether the coupling exhibits chaotic behavior. In this frame, we studied sedative-free, mechanically ventilated patients experiencing rapid sequential changes in breathing control during ventilator weaning during a switch from a machine-controlled assistance mode [assist-controlled ventilation (ACV)] to a patient-driven mode [inspiratory pressure support (IPS) and unsupported spontaneous breathing (USB)]. Time series were computed as R to start inspiration (RI) and R to the start of expiration (RE). Chaos was characterized with the noise titration method (noise limit), largest Lyapunov exponent (LLE) and correlation dimension (CD). All the RI and RE time series exhibit chaotic behavior. Specific coupling patterns were displayed in each ventilatory mode, and these patterns exhibited different linear and chaotic dynamics. When switching from ACV to IPS, partial inspiratory loading decreases the noise limit value, the LLE, and the correlation dimension of the RI and RE time series in parallel, whereas decreasing intrathoracic pressure from IPS to USB has the opposite effect. Coupling with expiration exhibits higher complexity than coupling with inspiration during mechanical ventilation either during ACV or IPS, probably due to active expiration. Only 33% of the cardiac time series (RR interval) exhibit complexity either during ACV, IPS, or USB making the contribution of the cardiac signal to the chaotic feature of the coupling minimal. We conclude that 1) CVC in unsedated humans exhibits a complex dynamic that can be chaotic, and 2) ventilatory mode has major effects on the linear and chaotic features of the coupling. Taken together these findings reinforce the role of

  11. Effects of sodium hypochlorite exposure mode on PES/PVP ultrafiltration membrane degradation.

    PubMed

    Causserand, Christel; Pellegrin, Bastien; Rouch, Jean-Christophe

    2015-11-15

    Drinking water production plants using membrane filtration processes report membrane failure issues. According to the literature, membrane degradation is often induced by exposure to sodium hypochlorite, an oxidant widely used during in-place cleanings. The present study focused on quantifying the effect of membrane exposure mode to hypochlorite on properties modifications of a PES/PVP ultrafiltration membrane widely used for drinking water production. For this purpose effects of sodium hypochlorite concentration, contact duration and exposure mode (static or dynamic) were investigated. The pH of the hypochlorite solution was set to 8 as it was demonstrated in numerous previous works that the pH range 7-8 leads to the most severe modification in the membrane characteristics. Membrane degradation was monitored at molecular scale by attenuated total reflectance infrared spectroscopy and at macroscopic scale by pure water permeability and elongation at break measurements. The results obtained in static (soaking) and dynamic (filtration and filtration/backwashing cycles) hypochlorite exposure modes indicated that PES/PVP membrane degradation progress was predominantly governed by hypochlorite oxidation rate. In the tested conditions, mechanical stress (pressure differentials) did not significantly contribute to membrane ageing. The correlation between molecular and macroscopic characterizations demonstrated that PVP degradation is responsible for the membrane integrity loss. A linear relationship between the loss of ductility of the membrane and the progress of the PVP degradation was obtained whatever the exposure mode. Thanks to experiments conducted at various hypochlorite concentrations and exposure durations, the hypochlorite dose parameter (hypochlorite concentration times contact time), widely used in the literature, was demonstrated to be inappropriate to describe the degradation rate: the hypochlorite concentration impact was shown to be dominating the

  12. Global fine-mode aerosol radiative effect, as constrained by comprehensive observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Chul E.; Chu, Jung-Eun; Lee, Yunha; van Noije, Twan; Jeoung, Hwayoung; Ha, Kyung-Ja; Marks, Marguerite

    2016-07-01

    Aerosols directly affect the radiative balance of the Earth through the absorption and scattering of solar radiation. Although the contributions of absorption (heating) and scattering (cooling) of sunlight have proved difficult to quantify, the consensus is that anthropogenic aerosols cool the climate, partially offsetting the warming by rising greenhouse gas concentrations. Recent estimates of global direct anthropogenic aerosol radiative forcing (i.e., global radiative forcing due to aerosol-radiation interactions) are -0.35 ± 0.5 W m-2, and these estimates depend heavily on aerosol simulation. Here, we integrate a comprehensive suite of satellite and ground-based observations to constrain total aerosol optical depth (AOD), its fine-mode fraction, the vertical distribution of aerosols and clouds, and the collocation of clouds and overlying aerosols. We find that the direct fine-mode aerosol radiative effect is -0.46 W m-2 (-0.54 to -0.39 W m-2). Fine-mode aerosols include sea salt and dust aerosols, and we find that these natural aerosols result in a very large cooling (-0.44 to -0.26 W m-2) when constrained by observations. When the contribution of these natural aerosols is subtracted from the fine-mode radiative effect, the net becomes -0.11 (-0.28 to +0.05) W m-2. This net arises from total (natural + anthropogenic) carbonaceous, sulfate and nitrate aerosols, which suggests that global direct anthropogenic aerosol radiative forcing is less negative than -0.35 W m-2.

  13. Nanocrystalline diamond: Effect of confinement, pressure, and heating on phonon modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipp, Magnus J.; Baonza, Valentín García; Evans, William J.; Lorenzana, Hector E.

    1997-09-01

    Micro- and nanocrystalline systems exhibit properties that differ markedly from bulk systems. Diamond, a prototypical system, demonstrates a broadening, shift, and emergence of Raman phonon modes that are believed to originate from finite-size effects. Such information should be useful in constraining confinement models developed to describe the state of these mesoscopic systems. For example, previous investigations have analyzed crystallite size and stresses in scientifically and technologically relevant environments, including chemical-vapor-deposition diamond films and diamond nanocomposites. We have experimentally measured the effect on the diamond Raman phonon modes due to confinement, pressure, and heating effects. At ambient pressure, we present Raman measurements for diamond crystallites ranging from 6 nm to 10 μm, which were synthesized by both static and dynamic techniques. The Raman spectra obtained from the statically synthesized samples exhibit a characteristic strong and narrow diamond band, while those dynamically synthesized exhibit both diamond and graphiticlike features. A redshift of the diamond Raman band is observed for decreasing particle size. However, the pressure dependence of the phonon is about the same as that for the bulk system up to 30 kbar for crystallite sizes between 6 and 10 nm. Our measurements also indicate that heating effects from the incident laser dramatically affect the measured Raman spectra. This result leads us to an explanation for discrepancies among previously published results. We show that crystallite size and stress information cannot be determined without compensating for heating effects. Lastly, the phonon confinement model is able to explain the shifts of the Raman modes with size.

  14. The virus of my virus is my friend: ecological effects of virophage with alternative modes of coinfection.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Bradford P; Cortez, Michael H; Weitz, Joshua S

    2014-08-07

    Virophages are viruses that rely on the replication machinery of other viruses to reproduce within eukaryotic hosts. Two different modes of coinfection have been posited based on experimental observation. In one mode, the virophage and the virus enter the host independently. In the other mode, the virophage adheres to the virus so both virophage and virus enter the host together. Here we ask: what are the ecological effects of these different modes of coinfection? In particular, what ecological effects are common to both infection modes, and what are the differences particular to each mode? We develop a pair of biophysically motivated ODE models of viral-host population dynamics, corresponding to dynamics arising from each mode of infection. We find that both modes of coinfection allow for the coexistence of the virophage, virus, and host either at a stable fixed point or through cyclical dynamics. In both models, virophage tends to be the most abundant population and their presence always reduces the viral abundance and increases the host abundance. However, we do find qualitative differences between models. For example, via extensive sampling of biologically relevant parameter space, we only observe bistability when the virophage and the virus enter the host together. We discuss how such differences may be leveraged to help identify modes of infection in natural environments from population level data.

  15. Phonon and free-charge carrier properties in group-III nitride heterostructures investigated by spectroscopic ellipsometry and optical Hall effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoeche, Stefan

    The material class of group-III nitrides gained tremendous technological importance for optoelectronic and high-power/high-frequency amplification devices. Tunability of the direct band gap from 0.65 eV (InN) to 6.2 eV (AlN) by alloying, high breakthrough voltages and intrinsic mobilities, as well as the formation of highly mobile 2d electron gases (2DEG) at heterointerfaces make these compounds ideal for many applications. GaN and Ga-rich alloys are well studied and current research is mainly device-oriented. For example, choice and quality of the gate dielectric significantly influence device performance in high-electron mobility transistors (HEMT) which utilize highly mobile 2DEGs at heterointerfaces. Experimental access to the 2DEG channel properties without influence from parasitic currents or contact properties are desirable. In- and Al-rich ternary alloys are less explored than Ga-rich compounds. For InN and In-rich alloys, while many material parameters such as stiffness constants or effective mass values are largely unknown, reliable p-type doping is a major challenge, also because p-type conducting channels are buried within highly conductive n-type material formed at the surface and interfaces preventing electrical characterization. For AlN and high-Al content alloys, doping mechanisms are not understood and reliable fabrication of material with high free-charge carrier (FCC) concentrations was achieved just recently. Difficulties to form ohmic contacts impair electrical measurements and optical characterization is impeded by lack of high-energy excitation sources. In this work, spectroscopic ellipsometry over the wide spectral range from the THz to VUV in combination with optical Hall effect (generalized ellipsometry with applied magnetic field) from THz to MIR are applied in order to investigate the phonon modes and FCC properties in group-III nitride heterostructures. Adequate model descriptions and analysis strategies are introduced which allow

  16. Incremental Criterion Validity of the WJ-III COG Clinical Clusters: Marginal Predictive Effects beyond the General Factor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGill, Ryan J.

    2015-01-01

    The current study examined the incremental validity of the clinical clusters from the Woodcock-Johnson III Tests of Cognitive Abilities (WJ-III COG) for predicting scores on the Woodcock-Johnson III Tests of Achievement (WJ-III ACH). All participants were children and adolescents (N = 4,722) drawn from the nationally representative WJ-III…

  17. Soft-Collinear Mode for Jet Rates in Soft-Collinear Effective Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Chien, Yang-Ting; Lee, Christopher; Hornig, Andrew

    2016-01-29

    We propose the addition of a new "soft-collinear" mode to soft collinear effective theory (SCET) below the usual soft scale to factorize and resum logarithms of jet radii R in jet cross sections. We consider exclusive 2-jet cross sections in e+e- collisions with an energy veto Λ on additional jets. The key observation is that there are actually two pairs of energy scales whose ratio is R: the transverse momentum QR of the energetic particles inside jets and their total energy Q, and the transverse momentum ΛR of soft particles that are cut out of the jet cones and their energy Λ. The soft-collinear mode is necessary to factorize and resum logarithms of the latter hierarchy. We show how this factorization occurs in the jet thrust cross section for cone and kT-type algorithms at O(αs) and using the thrust cone algorithm at O(α$2\\atop{s}$). We identify the presence of hard-collinear, in-jet soft, global (veto) soft, and soft-collinear modes in the jet thrust cross section. We also observe here that the in-jet soft modes measured with thrust are actually the "csoft" modes of the theory SCET+. We dub the new theory with both csoft and soft-collinear modes "SCET++". We go on to explain the relation between the "unmeasured" jet function appearing in total exclusive jet cross sections and the hard-collinear and csoft functions in measured jet thrust cross sections. We do not resum logs that are non-global in origin, arising from the ratio of the scales of soft radiation whose thrust is measured at Q${{\\tau}}$/R and of the soft-collinear radiation at 2ΛR. Their resummation would require the introduction of additional operators beyond those we consider here. The steps we outline here are a necessary part of summing logs of R that are global in nature and have not been factorized and resummed beyond leading-log level previously.

  18. Effect of TE Mode Power on the PEP II LER BPM System

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, Cho-K

    2011-08-26

    The beam chamber of the PEP-II B-Factory Low Energy Ring (LER) arc sections is connected to an antechamber for the absorption of synchrotron radiation on discrete photon stops. The presence of the antechamber substantially reduces the cutoff frequency of the vacuum chamber and, in particular, allows the propagation of higher-order-mode (HOM) TE power generated by beamline components at the BPM signal processing frequency. Calculations of the transmission properties of the TE mode in different sections of the vacuum chamber show that the power is trapped between widely separated bellows in the arc sections. Because of the narrow signal bandwidth and weak coupling of the TE mode to the BPM buttons, the noise contributed by the HOM TE power will not produce a noticeable effect on the BPM position signal voltage. The LER arc vacuum chamber employs an antechamber with a discrete photon stop for absorption of synchrotron radiation and with pumps for maintaining pressure below 10 nTorr [1]. The horizontal dimensions of the antechambers at the pumping chamber section and the magnet chamber section are larger or comparable to that of the beam chamber. Because of the increase in the horizontal dimension, the cutoff frequency of the TE10-like mode (in rectangular coordinates) of the vacuum chamber is considerably reduced and, in particular, is less than the BPM signal processing frequency at 952 MHz. TE power propagating in the vacuum chamber will penetrate through the BPM buttons and will affect the pickup signal if its magnitude is not properly controlled. It is the purpose of this note to clarify various issues pertaining to this problem. TE power is generated when the beam passes a noncylindrically symmetric beamline component such as the RF cavity, the injection region, the IR crotch and the IP region. The beampipes connected to these components have TE cutoff frequencies greater than 952 MHz (for example, the TE cutoff frequency of the RF cavity beampipe is 1.8 GHz

  19. Soft-Collinear Mode for Jet Rates in Soft-Collinear Effective Theory

    DOE PAGES

    Chien, Yang-Ting; Lee, Christopher; Hornig, Andrew

    2016-01-29

    We propose the addition of a new "soft-collinear" mode to soft collinear effective theory (SCET) below the usual soft scale to factorize and resum logarithms of jet radii R in jet cross sections. We consider exclusive 2-jet cross sections in e+e- collisions with an energy veto Λ on additional jets. The key observation is that there are actually two pairs of energy scales whose ratio is R: the transverse momentum QR of the energetic particles inside jets and their total energy Q, and the transverse momentum ΛR of soft particles that are cut out of the jet cones and their energy Λ. The soft-collinear mode is necessary to factorize and resum logarithms of the latter hierarchy. We show how this factorization occurs in the jet thrust cross section for cone and kT-type algorithms at O(αs) and using the thrust cone algorithm at O(αmore » $$2\\atop{s}$$). We identify the presence of hard-collinear, in-jet soft, global (veto) soft, and soft-collinear modes in the jet thrust cross section. We also observe here that the in-jet soft modes measured with thrust are actually the "csoft" modes of the theory SCET+. We dub the new theory with both csoft and soft-collinear modes "SCET++". We go on to explain the relation between the "unmeasured" jet function appearing in total exclusive jet cross sections and the hard-collinear and csoft functions in measured jet thrust cross sections. We do not resum logs that are non-global in origin, arising from the ratio of the scales of soft radiation whose thrust is measured at Q$${{\\tau}}$$/R and of the soft-collinear radiation at 2ΛR. Their resummation would require the introduction of additional operators beyond those we consider here. The steps we outline here are a necessary part of summing logs of R that are global in nature and have not been factorized and resummed beyond leading-log level previously.« less

  20. BIOPLUME III

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    BIOPLUME III is a two-dimensional finite difference model for simulating the natural attenuation of organic contaminants in groundwater due to the processes of advection, dispersion, sorption, and biodegradation.