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Sample records for mode stability analysis

  1. Gyrokinetic linear stability analysis of NSTX L-mode plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Ke; Ren, Yang

    2016-10-01

    NSTX offered unique opportunities in studying transport and turbulence with low aspect ratio, strong plasma shaping and strong E ×B shear. NSTX L-mode plasmas have some favorable properties to facilitate the study of the relation between microturbulence and thermal transport: easier to obtain stationary profiles; easier to maintain MHD quiescence; no complications from edge transport barrier. Studies of NSTX RF/NBI-heated L-mode plasmas have provided new insight into the role of ion and electron-scale turbulence in driving anomalous transport. Here we present linear stability analysis of some NSTX L-mode plasmas with GS2 gyrokinetic code. GS2 is an initial value gyrokinetic code which, in its linear mode, finds the fastest growing mode for a given pair of poloidal and radial wavenumbers. The linear simulations used local Miller equilibria and plasma parameters derived from measured experimental profiles with electromagnetic effects, electron and ion collisions and carbon impurity. The work is supported by DOE, China Scholarship Council, the Natural Science Foundation of China (61402138) and the Natural Science Foundation of Heilongjiang Province (E201452).

  2. Perturbed Stability Analysis of External Ideal MHD Modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comer, K. J.; Callen, J. D.; Hegna, C. C.; Garstka, G. D.; Turnbull, A. D.; Garofalo, A. M.; Cowley, S. C.

    2002-11-01

    Traditionally, numerical parameter scans are performed to study the effects of equilibrium shaping and profiles on long wavelength ideal MHD instabilities. Previously, we introduced a new perturbative technique to more efficiently explore these dependencies: changes in delta-W due to small equilibrium variations are found using a perturbation of the energy principle rather than with an eigenvalue-solver instability code. With this approach, the stability properties of similar equilibria can be efficiently explored without generating complete numerical results for every set of parameters (which is time-intensive for accurate representations of several configurations). Here, we apply this approach to toroidal geometry using GATO (an ideal MHD stability code) and experimental equilibria. In particular, we explore ideal MHD stability of external kink modes in the spherical tokamak Pegasus and resistive wall modes in DIII-D.

  3. Fuzzy Current-Mode Control and Stability Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopasakis, George

    2000-01-01

    In this paper a current-mode control (CMC) methodology is developed for a buck converter by using a fuzzy logic controller. Conventional CMC methodologies are based on lead-lag compensation with voltage and inductor current feedback. In this paper the converter lead-lag compensation will be substituted with a fuzzy controller. A small-signal model of the fuzzy controller will also be developed in order to examine the stability properties of this buck converter control system. The paper develops an analytical approach, introducing fuzzy control into the area of CMC.

  4. Mode selection in swirling jet experiments: a linear stability analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallaire, François; Chomaz, Jean-Marc

    2003-11-01

    The primary goal of the study is to identify the selection mechanism responsible for the appearance of a double-helix structure in the pre-breakdown stage of so-called screened swirling jets for which the circulation vanishes away from the jet. The family of basic flows under consideration combines the azimuthal velocity profiles of Carton & McWilliams (1989) and the axial velocity profiles of Monkewitz (1988). This model satisfactorily represents the nozzle exit velocity distributions measured in the swirling jet experiment of Billant et al. (1998). Temporal and absolute/convective instability properties are directly retrieved from numerical simulations of the linear impulse response for different swirl parameter settings. A large range of negative helical modes, winding with the basic flow, are destabilized as swirl is increased, and their characteristics for large azimuthal wavenumbers are shown to agree with the asymptotic analysis of Leibovich & Stewartson (1983). However, the temporal study fails to yield a clear selection principle. The absolute/convective instability regions are mapped out in the plane of the external axial flow and swirl parameters. The absolutely unstable domain is enhanced by rotation and it remains open for arbitrarily large swirl. The swirling jet with zero external axial flow is found to first become absolutely unstable to a mode of azimuthal wavenumber m {=} {-}2, winding with the jet. It is suggested that this selection mechanism accounts for the experimental observation of a double-helix structure.

  5. SAMPEX Spin Stabilized Mode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsai, Dean C.; Markley, F. Landis; Watson, Todd P.

    2008-01-01

    The Solar, Anomalous, and Magnetospheric Particle Explorer (SAMPEX), the first of the Small Explorer series of spacecraft, was launched on July 3, 1992 into an 82' inclination orbit with an apogee of 670 km and a perigee of 520 km and a mission lifetime goal of 3 years. After more than 15 years of continuous operation, the reaction wheel began to fail on August 18,2007. With a set of three magnetic torquer bars being the only remaining attitude actuator, the SAMPEX recovery team decided to deviate from its original attitude control system design and put the spacecraft into a spin stabilized mode. The necessary operations had not been used for many years, which posed a challenge. However, on September 25, 2007, the spacecraft was successfully spun up to 1.0 rpm about its pitch axis, which points at the sun. This paper describes the diagnosis of the anomaly, the analysis of flight data, the simulation of the spacecraft dynamics, and the procedures used to recover the spacecraft to spin stabilized mode.

  6. Complete mode-set stability analysis of magnetically insulated ion diode equilibria

    SciTech Connect

    Slutz, S.A.; Lemke, R.W.

    1993-12-31

    We present the first analysis of the stability of magnetically insulated ion diodes that is fully relativistic and includes electromagnetic perturbations both parallel and perpendicular to the applied magnetic field. Applying this formalism to a simple diode equilibrium model that neglects velocity shear and density gradients, we find a fast growing mode that has all of the important attributes of the low frequency mode observed in numerical simulations of magnetically insulated ion diodes, which may be a major cause of ion divergence. We identify this mode as a modified two-stream instability. Previous stability analyses indicate a variety of unstable modes, but none of these exhibit the same behavior as the low frequency mode observed in the simulations. In addition, we analyze a realistic diode equilibrium model that includes velocity shear and an electron density profile consistent with that observed in the numerical simulations. We find that the diocotron instability is reduced, but not fully quenched by the extension of the electron sheath to the anode. However, the inclusion of perturbations parallel to the applied magnetic field with a wavelength smaller than the diode height does eliminate growth of this instability. This may explain why the diocotron mode has been observed experimentally with proton sources, but not with LiF, since the turn on of LiF is not uniform.

  7. Dynamical investigation and parameter stability region analysis of a flywheel energy storage system in charging mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei-Ya; Li, Yong-Li; Chang, Xiao-Yong; Wang, Nan

    2013-09-01

    In this paper, the dynamic behavior analysis of the electromechanical coupling characteristics of a flywheel energy storage system (FESS) with a permanent magnet (PM) brushless direct-current (DC) motor (BLDCM) is studied. The Hopf bifurcation theory and nonlinear methods are used to investigate the generation process and mechanism of the coupled dynamic behavior for the average current controlled FESS in the charging mode. First, the universal nonlinear dynamic model of the FESS based on the BLDCM is derived. Then, for a 0.01 kWh/1.6 kW FESS platform in the Key Laboratory of the Smart Grid at Tianjin University, the phase trajectory of the FESS from a stable state towards chaos is presented using numerical and stroboscopic methods, and all dynamic behaviors of the system in this process are captured. The characteristics of the low-frequency oscillation and the mechanism of the Hopf bifurcation are investigated based on the Routh stability criterion and nonlinear dynamic theory. It is shown that the Hopf bifurcation is directly due to the loss of control over the inductor current, which is caused by the system control parameters exceeding certain ranges. This coupling nonlinear process of the FESS affects the stability of the motor running and the efficiency of energy transfer. In this paper, we investigate into the effects of control parameter change on the stability and the stability regions of these parameters based on the averaged-model approach. Furthermore, the effect of the quantization error in the digital control system is considered to modify the stability regions of the control parameters. Finally, these theoretical results are verified through platform experiments.

  8. High-finesse fiber Fabry-Perot cavities: stabilization and mode matching analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallego, J.; Ghosh, S.; Alavi, S. K.; Alt, W.; Martinez-Dorantes, M.; Meschede, D.; Ratschbacher, L.

    2016-03-01

    Fiber Fabry-Perot cavities, formed by micro-machined mirrors on the end-facets of optical fibers, are used in an increasing number of technical and scientific applications, where they typically require precise stabilization of their optical resonances. Here, we study two different approaches to construct fiber Fabry-Perot resonators and stabilize their length for experiments in cavity quantum electrodynamics with neutral atoms. A piezo-mechanically actuated cavity with feedback based on the Pound-Drever-Hall locking technique is compared to a novel rigid cavity design that makes use of the high passive stability of a monolithic cavity spacer and employs thermal self-locking and external temperature tuning. Furthermore, we present a general analysis of the mode matching problem in fiber Fabry-Perot cavities, which explains the asymmetry in their reflective line shapes and has important implications for the optimal alignment of the fiber resonators. Finally, we discuss the issue of fiber-generated background photons. We expect that our results contribute toward the integration of high-finesse fiber Fabry-Perot cavities into compact and robust quantum-enabled devices in the future.

  9. A flexible and accurate method to estimate the mode and stability of spontaneous coordinated behaviors: The index-of-stability (IS) analysis.

    PubMed

    Zelic, Gregory; Varoqui, Deborah; Kim, Jeesun; Davis, Chris

    2017-02-24

    Patterns of coordination result from the interaction between (at least) two oscillatory components. This interaction is typically understood by means of two variables: the mode that expresses the shape of the interaction, and the stability that is the robustness of the interaction in this mode. A potent method of investigating coordinated behaviors is to examine the extent to which patterns of coordination arise spontaneously. However, a prominent issue faced by researchers is that, to date, no standard methods exist to fairly assess the stability of spontaneous coordination. In the present study, we introduce a new method called the index-of-stability (IS) analysis. We developed this method from the phase-coupling (PC) analysis that has been traditionally used for examining locomotion-respiration coordinated systems. We compared the extents to which both methods estimate the stability of simulated coordinated behaviors. Computer-generated time series were used to simulate the coordination of two rhythmic components according to a selected mode m:n and a selected degree of stability. The IS analysis was superior to the PC analysis in estimating the stability of spontaneous coordinated behaviors, in three ways: First, the estimation of stability itself was found to be more accurate and more reliable with the IS analysis. Second, the IS analysis is not constrained by the limitations of the PC analysis. Third and last, the IS analysis offers more flexibility, and so can be adapted according to the user's needs.

  10. Stabilization of Ballooning Modes by Nonparaxial Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Arsenin, V.V.; Zvonkov, A.V.; Skovoroda, A.A.

    2005-01-15

    An analysis is made of the effect of high-curvature stabilizing nonparaxial elements (cells) on the MHD plasma stability in open confinement systems and in confinement systems with closed magnetic field lines. It is shown that the population of particles trapped in such cells has a stabilizing effect not only on convective (flute) modes but also on ballooning modes, which govern the maximum possible {beta} value. In the kinetic approach, which distinguishes between the effects of trapped and passing particles, the maximum possible {beta} values consistent with stability can be much higher than those predicted by the MHD model.

  11. Modeling and Analysis for Tearing Mode Stability in DIII-D Hybrid Discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kyungjin; Park, J. M.; Murakami, M.; La Haye, R. J.; Na, Yong-Su; DIII-D Team

    2014-10-01

    Plasma rotation in DIII-D hybrid scenario plasmas is found to change the stability of tearing modes (TMs) in a profound manner. It is important to understand the onset threshold and the evolution of TMs for developing a high-performance steady-state fusion reactor. The modified Rutherford equation (MRE) estimates the growth rate of an island and is used to analyze the TM stability. The change in TM stability was investigated in hybrid plasmas with various conditions including rotation, normalized beta, q profile, and so on. The measured island width is larger in low q95 cases and increased as plasma rotation was reduced. The island width calculated by MRE with TM stability index Δ' assumed from its poloidal mode number, -m/r, showed a good agreement during high rotation, but could not be matched to the experimental island width at lower rotation. Simulations of TMs using resistive MHD codes such as NIMROD and PEST3 will also be presented and compared with experiments to determine the possibility for predicting TM onset by Δ' calculation. Work supported in part by the US DOE under DE-AC05-00OR22725 and DE-FC02-04ER54698.

  12. Analysis of mode stability in a concave mirror vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser with an oxide aperture.

    PubMed

    Ju, Young-Gu

    2005-05-16

    We applied the Fox-Li resonator theory to analyze the mode stability of concave mirror surface-emitting lasers. The numerical modeling incorporates the oxide aperture in the simple classical cavity by adding a non-uniform phase shifting layer to the flat mirror side. The calculation shows that there is a modal loss difference between the fundamental mode and the competing modes. The amount of loss difference depends upon cavity length and the thickness of the oxide aperture. In addition to loss difference, modal gain difference plays a key role in discriminating between the fundamental mode and the higher order transverse modes. The modal gain difference heavily depends upon the size of the oxide aperture and the field intensity distribution. To summarize, the geometry of the concave cavity affects the mode profile and the unique field profile of each transverse mode makes a difference in both modal loss and gain. Finally, this leads to a side-mode suppression.

  13. Comprehensive analysis of bearingless rotors - Model development and experimental correlation of modes, response, trim and stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jambunathan, V.; Murthy, V. R.

    1993-01-01

    A generic mathematical model that is capable of accurately modeling the multiple load path bearingless rotor blade is developed. A comprehensive, finite element based solution for the natural vibration of the rotor blade is developed. An iterative scheme based on harmonic balance is used to evaluate the nonlinear response of the rotor to control inputs and a Newton-Raphson procedure is employed to evaluate the trim of rotorcraft. Linearized perturbation model of the nonlinear system are presented. The model is validated by comparing with existing whirl tower, wind tunnel and flight test results of BMR/BO-105 helicopter. Frequencies of two bearingless rotor blades compare well with results from experiments. Nonlinear response and trim results are presented for the bearingless BMR/BO-105 rotor. Aeroelastic stability in forward flight, evaluated using floquet theory agrees with test data in general.

  14. Direct stability-indicating method development and validation for analysis of etidronate disodium using a mixed-mode column and charged aerosol detector.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-Keng; Fang, Jiang B; Cauchon, Nina; Zhou, Pengzu

    2008-03-13

    This paper describes the development and validation of a rapid, direct, and stability-indicating method for analysis of etidronate, a bisphosphonate compound without a UV chromophore. A mixed-mode column was used to separate etidronate from its impurities in an 8-min gradient method and a charged aerosol detector (CAD) was used for detection. The developed HPLC method was validated with respect to specificity, linearity, accuracy, precision, sensitivity, and stability. The method can be used for release and stability testing of etidronate and has applicability to other similar bisphosphonate compounds.

  15. Mode stability of external cavity diode lasers.

    PubMed

    Saliba, Sebastian D; Junker, Mark; Turner, Lincoln D; Scholten, Robert E

    2009-12-10

    Mode stability is an important performance characteristic of external cavity diode lasers (ECDLs). It has been well established that the continuous mode-hop-free tuning range of a grating-feedback ECDL can be optimized by rotating the grating about a specific pivot location. We show that similar results can be obtained for other more convenient pivot locations by choosing instead the cavity length and grating location. The relative importance of the temperature stability of the diode and of the external cavity is also evaluated. We show that mechanically simple ECDL designs, using mostly standard components, can readily achieve a 35 GHz mode-hop-free tuning range at 780 nm.

  16. Analysis of the stability of an active mode-locking pulsed laser for ultra-short pulses generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bracamontes Rodríguez, Y. E.; Beltrán Pérez, G.; Kuzin, Eugin; Castillo Mixcóatl, J.; Muñoz Aguirre, S.

    2013-11-01

    Pulsed lasers have become very important owing to the great amount of applications, from communications to diverse medicine areas. Many works have reported the development of these kinds of sources which uses quite complex cavity configurations and that present instabilities in the output signal. In this work the analysis of a pulsed laser that uses a ring cavity with a length of 16.5 m is presented. A phase modulator (LiNbO3) controlled by an RF generator operated at a frequency of 12.5108 MHz was used to perform the mode lock. The modulator input has a birrefringent fiber then the light polarization affects the mode lock. Therefore it was necessary to perform an analysis and characterization in the input and output signals of the modulator in order to obtain more stable output pulses without requiring a continuous adjustment. The laser implemented with 2 modes of operation, active mode-lock and passive mode-lock. The obtained pulses whit temporal width of 7 ns FWHM for the frequency fundamental 12.5108 MHz and 781 -261-120-116 ps for the harmonic 5-10-16-20 .The results for the passive mode-lock the obtained pulses whit temporal width 2 ps and average power 200 W.

  17. Stabilizing windings for tilting and shifting modes

    DOEpatents

    Jardin, Stephen C.; Christensen, Uffe R.

    1984-01-01

    This invention relates to passive conducting loops for stabilizing a plasma ring against unstable tilting and/or shifting modes. To this end, for example, plasma ring in a spheromak is stabilized by a set of four figure-8 shaped loops having one pair on one side of the plasma and one pair on the other side with each pair comprising two loops whose axes are transverse to each other.

  18. Linear Feedback Stabilization of Nonlinear Systems with an Uncontrollable Critical Mode

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-11-17

    mode that is uncontrollable. The results complement previous work on the synthesis of nonlinear stabilizing control laws. The present work addresses...analysis and stabilizing control design employ results on stability of bifurcations of parametrized systems.

  19. Stabilization of a satellite in degraded mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morin, P.

    The report considers a rigid satellite, one of whose actuators is in a failure mode, and seeks to find control laws allowing the stabilization of the satellite in a desired orientation. It treats the problem of coupled gas jet actuators located on the satellite's main axes of inertia; it also considers more general actuator configurations to which the results can be applied directly. It synthesizes locally asymptotically stabilizing control laws, but since these lead to a relatively slow rate of trajectory convergence, the author has sought controls that would lead to a more rapid convergence, and obtained exponentially stabilizing control laws by using the properties of homogeneous systems. Lastly, the author studied the reliability characteristics of the various control laws.

  20. Internal tilting mode stability of non-sperical spheromak

    SciTech Connect

    Yamazaki, K.

    1980-06-01

    Fixed boundary tilting mode stability is analyzed for spheromak with arbitrarily shaped cross section. A prolate spheromak can be stabilized against tilting mode by adding a conducting shell of triangular or trapesoidal half-cross section.

  1. On Ideal Stability of Cylindrical Localized Interchange Modes

    SciTech Connect

    Umansky, M V

    2007-05-15

    Stability of cylindrical localized ideal pressure-driven interchange plasma modes is revisited. Converting the underlying eigenvalue problem into the form of the Schroedinger equation gives a new simple way of deriving the Suydam stability criterion and calculating the growth rates of unstable modes. Near the marginal stability limit the growth rate is exponentially small and the mode has a double-peak structure.

  2. Beta-limiting Instabilities and Global Mode Stabilization in NSTX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabbagh, Steven

    2001-10-01

    Low aspect ratio and high edge q theoretically alter the plasma stability and mode structure compared to standard tokamak configurations. Below the no-wall limit, stability calculations with PEST, GATO, and DCON show the perturbed radial field is maximized near the center column and DCON and VALEN calculations show that mode stability is not greatly improved by a nearby conducting wall due to the short poloidal wavelength in this region. In contrast, as beta reaches and exceeds the no-wall limit, the mode becomes strongly ballooning with long poloidal wavelength at large major radius and is highly wall stabilized. In this way, wall stabilization is more effective at higher beta in low aspect ratio geometry. Research on the stability of spherical torus plasmas at and above the no-wall beta limit is being addressed on NSTX, which has produced low aspect ratio plasmas, R/a = 1.27 at plasma current up to 1.4 MA with high energy confinement (TauE/TauE-ITER89P = 2). Toroidal and normalized beta have reached 22%, and 4.3, respectively in q = 7 plasmas. The beta limit is observed to increase with increasing plasma internal inductance, li, and the stability factor betaN/li has reached 5.8, limited by sudden beta collapses at low li that was achieved by use of high-harmonic fast wave heating (HHFW). DCON stability analysis of equilibria reconstructed with EFIT using external magnetics show that the plasmas are below or at the no-wall beta limit for the n = 1 mode, which has characteristics of a current-driven kink. With more peaked current profiles (li greater than 0.7), core MHD instabilities are observed which saturate or slowly degrade beta. Sawteeth with large inversion radii can also cause substantial beta collapses, although current profile modification using HHFW, altered plasma growth, and increased toroidal field have each been successful in mitigating this effect.

  3. Wall mode stabilization at slow plasma rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Bo; Betti, Riccardo; Reimerdes, Holger; Garofalo, Andrea; Manickam, Janardhan

    2007-11-01

    Unstable pressure-driven external kink modes, which become slowly growing resistive wall modes (RWMs) in the presence of a resistive wall, can lead to tokamak plasma disruptions at high beta. It has been shown that RWMs are stabilized by fast plasma rotation (about 1-2% of the Alfv'en frequency) in experiments. Conventional theories attribute the RWM suppression to the dissipation induced by the resonances between plasma rotation and ion bounce/transit or shear Alfv'en frequencies [1]. In those theories, the kinetic effects associated with the plasma diamagnetic frequencies and trapped-particle precession drift frequencies are neglected. It has been observed in recent experiments [2,3] that the RWM suppression also occurs at very slow plasma rotation (about 0.3% of the Alfv'en frequency), where the conventional dissipation is too small to fully suppress the RWMs. Here it is shown, that the trapped-particle kinetic contribution associated with the precession motion [4] is large enough to stabilize the RWM in DIII-D at low rotation. Work supported by the US-DoE OFES. [1] A. Bondeson and M. S. Chu, Physics of Plasmas, 3,3013 (1996). [2] H. Reimerdes et al., Physical Review Letters, 98,055001 (2007). [3] M. Takechi et al., Physical Review Letters, 98,055002 (2007). [4] B. Hu and R. Betti, Physical Review Letters, 93,105002 (2004).

  4. Tearing Mode Stability with Sheared Toroidal Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Ryan; Coppi, Bruno

    2016-10-01

    Toroidal plasma flow induced by neutral beam heating has been found to increase the stability of tearing modes in tokamak plasmas. The need to extrapolate current (experimentally-based) knowledge of tearing mode onset to future machines, requiresa better understanding of the essential physics. We consider the physics of flow near the rational surfaces. For realistic flow profiles, the velocity shear near the rational surface can be treated as a perturbation, and is found to amplify the dominant stabilizing effect of magnetic curvature. This effect can be seen using a cylindrical model if large-aspect-ratio corrections to the magnetic curvature are incorporated. On the other hand, the physical effects of toroidal rotation are completely absent in a cylinder, and require a fully-toroidal calculation to study. The toroidal rotation near the rational surface is found to couple to a geometrical parameter which vanishes for up-down symmetric profiles. Physically, the dominant effects of rotation arise from a Coriolis force, leading to flow directional dependence. This work is supported by the US DOE.

  5. A Low Speed Model Analysis and Demonstration of Active Control Systems for Rigid-Body and Flexible Mode Stability

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-06-01

    58 Antisymmetric Flutter -48’ CR 92 59 Effect of Feedback Gain on Wing Flutter Mode Suppressed With InboarD Aileron 93 60 Wing Flutter Suppressed...With Inboard Aileron 94 61 Wing Flutter Suppressed With Outboard Aileron 95 62 Effect of Phase Shift on inboard Aileron System at 150 Kn 96 63... Wing Flutter 120 84 Comparison of Results of Outboard Aileron on Wing Flutter 121 85 Pitch Feedback Control of Low Frequency Modes 122 vi

  6. Gyrokinetic Stability Studies of the Microtearing Mode in the National Spherical Torus Experiment H-mode

    SciTech Connect

    Baumgaertel, J. A.; Redi, M. H.; Budny, R. V.; Rewoldt, G.; Dorland, W.

    2005-10-19

    Insight into plasma microturbulence and transport is being sought using linear simulations of drift waves on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX), following a study of drift wave modes on the Alcator C-Mod Tokamak. Microturbulence is likely generated by instabilities of drift waves, which cause transport of heat and particles. Understanding this transport is important because the containment of heat and particles is required for the achievement of practical nuclear fusion. Microtearing modes may cause high heat transport through high electron thermal conductivity. It is hoped that microtearing will be stable along with good electron transport in the proposed low collisionality International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). Stability of the microtearing mode is investigated for conditions at mid-radius in a high density NSTX high performance (H-mode) plasma, which is compared to the proposed ITER plasmas. The microtearing mode is driven by the electron temperature gradient, and believed to be mediated by ion collisions and magnetic shear. Calculations are based on input files produced by TRXPL following TRANSP (a time-dependent transport analysis code) analysis. The variability of unstable mode growth rates is examined as a function of ion and electron collisionalities using the parallel gyrokinetic computational code GS2. Results show the microtearing mode stability dependence for a range of plasma collisionalities. Computation verifies analytic predictions that higher collisionalities than in the NSTX experiment increase microtearing instability growth rates, but that the modes are stabilized at the highest values. There is a transition of the dominant mode in the collisionality scan to ion temperature gradient character at both high and low collisionalities. The calculations suggest that plasma electron thermal confinement may be greatly improved in the low-collisionality ITER.

  7. Resistive wall mode stabilization by plasma rotation in advanced tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eriksson, G.

    1996-03-01

    By combining previous results of Betti and Freidberg [Phys. Rev. Lett. 74, 2949 (1995)] and Eriksson [Phys. Plasmas 2, 3095 (1995)], a fully analytical description is obtained for the stabilizing effect of toroidal plasma rotation in a large aspect ratio tokamak surrounded by a resistive wall. As in advanced tokamak configurations with a large fraction of bootstrap current, it is assumed that the current gradient near the plasma edge is large. This assumption enables an analytical analysis of external kink modes with low poloidal mode numbers. An expression is obtained, showing explicitly how the window of stable wall distances depends on the current profile.

  8. Mode stability on the real axis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, Lars; Ma, Siyuan; Paganini, Claudio; Whiting, Bernard F.

    2017-07-01

    A generalization of the mode stability result of Whiting [J. Math. Phys. 30, 1301-1305 (1989)] for the Teukolsky equation is proved for the case of real frequencies. The main result of the paper states that a separated solution of the Teukolsky equation governing massless test fields on the Kerr spacetime, which is purely outgoing at infinity, and purely ingoing at the horizon, must vanish. This has the consequence that for real frequencies, there are linearly independent fundamental solutions of the radial Teukolsky equation Rhor,Rout, which are purely ingoing at the horizon and purely outgoing at infinity, respectively. This fact yields a representation formula for solutions of the inhomogeneous Teukolsky equation and was recently used by Shlapentokh-Rothman [Ann. Henri Poincaré 16, 289-345 (2015)] for the scalar wave equation.

  9. Application of small-signal modeling and measurement techniques to the stability analysis of an integrated switching-mode power system. [onboard Dynamics Explorer Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, R. C.; Owen, H. A., Jr.; Wilson, T. G.; Rodriguez, G. E.

    1980-01-01

    Small-signal modeling techniques are used in a system stability analysis of a breadboard version of a complete functional electrical power system. The system consists of a regulated switching dc-to-dc converter, a solar-cell-array simulator, a solar-array EMI filter, battery chargers and linear shunt regulators. Loss mechanisms in the converter power stage, including switching-time effects in the semiconductor elements, are incorporated into the modeling procedure to provide an accurate representation of the system without requiring frequency-domain measurements to determine the damping factor. The small-signal system model is validated by the use of special measurement techniques which are adapted to the poor signal-to-noise ratio encountered in switching-mode systems. The complete electrical power system with the solar-array EMI filter is shown to be stable over the intended range of operation.

  10. Inclusion of diamagnetic drift effect in the matching method using finite-width inner region for stability analysis of magnetohydrodynamic modes

    SciTech Connect

    Furukawa, M.; Tokuda, S.

    2012-10-15

    A matching method using a finite-width inner region is extended for stability analysis of magnetohydrodynamic mode including diamagnetic drift effect. The inclusion of the diamagnetic drift effect is accomplished by a newly developed ordering scheme in the outer region. The ordering scheme enables us to derive a hierarchy of generalized Newcomb equations. Higher-order equations give us correction of outer solution due to the diamagnetic drift effect as well as inertia and resistivity. By this correction, the accuracy of the dispersion relation is improved. Several numerical results are presented to demonstrate good performance of the matching method. Dropping the diamagnetic drift effect in the outer region leads to less accurate results.

  11. Non-local effects on pedestal kinetic ballooning mode stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saarelma, S.; Martin-Collar, J.; Dickinson, D.; McMillan, B. F.; Roach, C. M.; MAST Team; JET Contributors, The

    2017-06-01

    The H-mode pedestal height plays an important role in determining the global confinement of the tokamak plasma. In type I ELMy H-mode the ultimate limit for the pedestal pressure at constant width is set by the ideal MHD peeling-ballooning modes (PBMs) that are thought to be the trigger for the ELMs. However, the PBM criterion does not uniquely determine the pedestal. Increasing the width of the pedestal, the marginally peeling-ballooning stable pedestal height increases as well. The second criterion for the pedestal is set by the transport processes in the pedestal that limit the gradient between the ELMs. One candidate for driving this transport is the kinetic ballooning mode (KBM) that is driven by the pressure gradient (Snyder et al 2009 Nucl. Fusion 49 085035). The KBM growth rate increases very rapidly after the critical pressure gradient is exceeded leading to very stiff profiles with the pressure gradient clamped near to the stability limit. In the local linear gyrokinetic analysis of experimental MAST and JET plasmas we have found that, like the {n}=∞ ideal MHD ballooning modes, the KBMs can access locally so called second stability if the magnetic shear becomes low enough (Dickinson et al 2011 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 53 115010; Saarelma et al 2013 Nucl. Fusion 53 123012). However, in the pedestal region the local assumption that the equilibrium can be considered radially constant for the investigated modes is no longer justified. In this paper we revisit the KBM analysis using a global code ORB5 to investigate whether second stability access exists for KBMs. We find that counter to the local analysis, the global KBM stability is not sensitive to the magnetic shear in the pedestal region. At sufficiently high β (but still below the ideal peeling-ballooning limit) the pedestal region becomes KBM unstable regardless of the amount of bootstrap current assumed in the equilibrium reconstruction. However, just as in local analysis, the mode is stabilised

  12. Stabilization effect of Weibel modes in relativistic laser fusion plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belghit, Slimen; Sid, Abdelaziz

    2016-06-01

    In this work, the Weibel instability (WI) due to inverse bremsstrahlung (IB) absorption in a laser fusion plasma has been investigated. The stabilization effect due to the coupling of the self-generated magnetic field by WI with the laser wave field is explicitly shown. In this study, the relativistic effects are taken into account. Here, the basic equation is the relativistic Fokker-Planck (F-P) equation. The main obtained result is that the coupling of self-generated magnetic field with the laser wave causes a stabilizing effect of excited Weibel modes. We found a decrease in the spectral range of Weibel unstable modes. This decreasing is accompanied by a reduction of two orders in the growth rate of instable Weibel modes or even stabilization of these modes. It has been shown that the previous analysis of the Weibel instability due to IB has overestimated the values of the generated magnetic fields. Therefore, the generation of magnetic fields by the WI due to IB should not affect the experiences of an inertial confinement fusion.

  13. Stabilization effect of Weibel modes in relativistic laser fusion plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Belghit, Slimen Sid, Abdelaziz

    2016-06-15

    In this work, the Weibel instability (WI) due to inverse bremsstrahlung (IB) absorption in a laser fusion plasma has been investigated. The stabilization effect due to the coupling of the self-generated magnetic field by WI with the laser wave field is explicitly shown. In this study, the relativistic effects are taken into account. Here, the basic equation is the relativistic Fokker-Planck (F-P) equation. The main obtained result is that the coupling of self-generated magnetic field with the laser wave causes a stabilizing effect of excited Weibel modes. We found a decrease in the spectral range of Weibel unstable modes. This decreasing is accompanied by a reduction of two orders in the growth rate of instable Weibel modes or even stabilization of these modes. It has been shown that the previous analysis of the Weibel instability due to IB has overestimated the values of the generated magnetic fields. Therefore, the generation of magnetic fields by the WI due to IB should not affect the experiences of an inertial confinement fusion.

  14. Role of loop dynamics in thermal stability of mesophilic and thermophilic adenylosuccinate synthetase: a molecular dynamics and normal mode analysis study.

    PubMed

    Vemparala, Satyavani; Mehrotra, Sonali; Balaram, Hemalatha

    2011-05-01

    Enzymes from thermophiles are poorly active at temperatures at which their mesophilic homologs exhibit high activity and attain corresponding active states at high temperatures. In this study, comparative molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, supplemented by normal mode analysis, have been performed on an enzyme Adenylosuccinate synthetase (AdSS) from E. coli (mesophilic) and P. horikoshii (thermophilic) systems to understand the effects of loop dynamics on thermal stability of AdSS. In mesophilic AdSS, both ligand binding and catalysis are facilitated through the coordinated movement of five loops on the protein. The simulation results suggest that thermophilic P. horikoshii preserves structure and catalytic function at high temperatures by using the movement of only a subset of loops (two out of five) for ligand binding and catalysis unlike its mesophilic counterpart in E. coli. The pre-arrangement of the catalytic residues in P. horikoshii is well-preserved and salt bridges remain stable at high temperature (363K). The simulations suggest a general mechanism (including pre-arrangement of catalytic residues, increased polar residue content, stable salt bridges, increased rigidity, and fewer loop movements) used by thermophilic enzymes to preserve structure and be catalytically active at elevated temperatures.

  15. Ballooning Modes in the Systems Stabilized by Divertors

    SciTech Connect

    Arsenin, V.V.; Skovoroda, A.A.; Zvonkov, A.V.

    2005-01-15

    MHD stability of a plasma in systems with closed magnetic field lines and open systems containing the nonparaxial stabilizing cells with large field lines curvature, in particular, divertors is analyzed. It is shown that population of particles trapped in such cells has a stabilizing effect not only on flute modes, but also on ballooning modes that determine the {beta} limit. At kinetic description that accounts for different effect of trapped and passing particles on perturbations, {beta} limit permitted by stability may be much greater then it follows from MHD model.

  16. Center Frequency Stabilization in Planar Dual-Mode Resonators during Mode-Splitting Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naji, Adham; Soliman, Mina H.

    2017-03-01

    Shape symmetry in dual-mode planar electromagnetic resonators results in their ability to host two degenerate resonant modes. As the designer enforces a controllable break in the symmetry, the degeneracy is removed and the two modes couple, exchanging energy and elevating the resonator into its desirable second-order resonance operation. The amount of coupling is controlled by the degree of asymmetry introduced. However, this mode coupling (or splitting) usually comes at a price. The centre frequency of the perturbed resonator is inadvertently drifted from its original value prior to coupling. Maintaining centre frequency stability during mode splitting is a nontrivial geometric design problem. In this paper, we analyse the problem and propose a novel method to compensate for this frequency drift, based on field analysis and perturbation theory, and we validate the solution through a practical design example and measurements. The analytical method used works accurately within the perturbational limit. It may also be used as a starting point for further numerical optimization algorithms, reducing the required computational time during design, when larger perturbations are made to the resonator. In addition to enabling the novel design example presented, it is hoped that the findings will inspire akin designs for other resonator shapes, in different disciplines and applications.

  17. Center Frequency Stabilization in Planar Dual-Mode Resonators during Mode-Splitting Control.

    PubMed

    Naji, Adham; Soliman, Mina H

    2017-03-08

    Shape symmetry in dual-mode planar electromagnetic resonators results in their ability to host two degenerate resonant modes. As the designer enforces a controllable break in the symmetry, the degeneracy is removed and the two modes couple, exchanging energy and elevating the resonator into its desirable second-order resonance operation. The amount of coupling is controlled by the degree of asymmetry introduced. However, this mode coupling (or splitting) usually comes at a price. The centre frequency of the perturbed resonator is inadvertently drifted from its original value prior to coupling. Maintaining centre frequency stability during mode splitting is a nontrivial geometric design problem. In this paper, we analyse the problem and propose a novel method to compensate for this frequency drift, based on field analysis and perturbation theory, and we validate the solution through a practical design example and measurements. The analytical method used works accurately within the perturbational limit. It may also be used as a starting point for further numerical optimization algorithms, reducing the required computational time during design, when larger perturbations are made to the resonator. In addition to enabling the novel design example presented, it is hoped that the findings will inspire akin designs for other resonator shapes, in different disciplines and applications.

  18. Center Frequency Stabilization in Planar Dual-Mode Resonators during Mode-Splitting Control

    PubMed Central

    Naji, Adham; Soliman, Mina H.

    2017-01-01

    Shape symmetry in dual-mode planar electromagnetic resonators results in their ability to host two degenerate resonant modes. As the designer enforces a controllable break in the symmetry, the degeneracy is removed and the two modes couple, exchanging energy and elevating the resonator into its desirable second-order resonance operation. The amount of coupling is controlled by the degree of asymmetry introduced. However, this mode coupling (or splitting) usually comes at a price. The centre frequency of the perturbed resonator is inadvertently drifted from its original value prior to coupling. Maintaining centre frequency stability during mode splitting is a nontrivial geometric design problem. In this paper, we analyse the problem and propose a novel method to compensate for this frequency drift, based on field analysis and perturbation theory, and we validate the solution through a practical design example and measurements. The analytical method used works accurately within the perturbational limit. It may also be used as a starting point for further numerical optimization algorithms, reducing the required computational time during design, when larger perturbations are made to the resonator. In addition to enabling the novel design example presented, it is hoped that the findings will inspire akin designs for other resonator shapes, in different disciplines and applications. PMID:28272422

  19. MAP stability, design, and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ericsson-Jackson, A. J.; Andrews, S. F.; O'Donnell, J. R., Jr.; Markley, F. L.

    1998-01-01

    The Microwave Anisotropy Probe (MAP) is a follow-on to the Differential Microwave Radiometer (DMR) instrument on the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) spacecraft. The design and analysis of the MAP attitude control system (ACS) have been refined since work previously reported. The full spacecraft and instrument flexible model was developed in NASTRAN, and the resulting flexible modes were plotted and reduced with the Modal Significance Analysis Package (MSAP). The reduced-order model was used to perform the linear stability analysis for each control mode, the results of which are presented in this paper. Although MAP is going to a relatively disturbance-free Lissajous orbit around the Earth-Sun L(2) Lagrange point, a detailed disturbance-torque analysis is required because there are only a small number of opportunities for momentum unloading each year. Environmental torques, including solar pressure at L(2), aerodynamic and gravity gradient during phasing-loop orbits, were calculated and simulated. Thruster plume impingement torques that could affect the performance of the thruster modes were estimated and simulated, and a simple model of fuel slosh was derived to model its effect on the motion of the spacecraft. In addition, a thruster mode linear impulse controller was developed to meet the accuracy requirements of the phasing loop burns. A dynamic attitude error limiter was added to improve the performance of the ACS during large attitude slews. The result of this analysis is a stable ACS subsystem that meets all of the mission's requirements.

  20. Global MHD Mode Stabilization and Control for Tokamak Disruption Avoidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabbagh, S. A.; Berkery, J. W.; Bialek, J. M.; Hanson, J. M.; Park, Y. S.; Bell, R. E.; Gates, D. A.; Gerhardt, S. P.; Goumiri, I.; Grierson, B.; Holcomb, C.

    2015-11-01

    The near-complete elimination of plasma disruptions in fusion-producing tokamaks is the present ``grand challenge'' for stability research. Meeting this goal requires multiple approaches, important components of which are prediction, stabilization, and control of global MHD instabilities. Research on NSTX and its upgrade is synergizing these elements to make quantified progress on this challenge. Initial results from disruption characterization and prediction analyses describe physical disruption event chains in NSTX. Analysis of NSTX and DIII-D experiments show that stabilization of global modes is dominated by precession drift and bounce orbit resonances respectively. Stability therefore depends on the plasma rotation profile. A model-based rotation profile controller for NSTX-U using both neutral beams and neoclassical toroidal viscosity is shown in simulations to evolve profiles away from unstable states. Active RWM control is addressed using dual field component sensor feedback and a model-based RWM state-space controller. Comparison of measurements and synthetic diagnostics is examined for off-normal event handling. A planned 3D coil system upgrade can allow RWM control close to the ideal n = 1 with-wall limit. Supported by US DOE Contracts DE-FG02-99ER54524 and DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  1. Competing stability modes in vortex structure formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrett, Stephen; Gostelow, J. Paul; Rona, Aldo; McMullan, W. Andrew

    2015-11-01

    Nose cones and turbine blades have rotating components and represent very practical geometries for which the behavior of vortex structures is not completely understood. These two different physical cases demonstrate a common theme of competition between mode and vortex types. The literature concerning boundary-layer transition over rotating cones presents clear evidence of an alternative instability mode leading to counter-rotating vortex pairs, consistent with a centrifugal instability. This is in contrast to co-rotating vortices present over rotating disks that arise from crossflow effects. It is demonstrated analytically that this mode competes with the crossflow mode and is dominant only over slender cones. Predictions are aligned with experimental measurements over slender cones. Concurrent experimental work on the flow over swept cylinders shows that organized fine-scale streamwise vorticity occurs more frequently on convex surfaces than is appreciated. The conventional view of purely two-dimensional laminar boundary layers following blunt leading edges is not realistic and such boundary layers need to be treated three-dimensionally, particularly when sweep is present. The vortical structures are counter-rotating for normal cylinders and co-rotating under high sweep conditions. Crossflow instabilities may have a major role to play in the transition process but the streamline curvature mode is still present, and seemingly unchanged, when the boundary layer becomes turbulent.

  2. Linear stability of low mode number tearing modes in the banana collisionality regime

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzpatrick, R. , Abingdon, OX14 3DB, England )

    1989-12-01

    The semicollisional layer equations governing the linear stability of small mode number tearing modes in a low beta, large aspect ratio, tokamak equilibrium are derived from an expansion of the gyrokinetic equation. In this analysis only the cases where the ion Larmor radius is either much less than, or much greater than, the layer width are considered. Both the electrons and the ions are assumed to lie in the banana collisionality regime. One interesting feature of the derived layer equations, in the limit of small ion Larmor radius, is a substantial reduction in the effective collisionality of the system due to neoclassical ion dynamics. Next, using a shooting code, a dispersion relation is obtained from the layer equations in the limits of small ion Larmor radius and a vanishingly small fraction of trapped particles. As expected, strong semicollisional stabilization of the mode is found, but, in addition, a somewhat weaker destabilizing effect is obtained in the transition region between the collisional and semicollisional regimes.

  3. High beta and second stability region transport and stability analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-06-12

    This document summarizes progress made on the research of high beta and second region transport and stability. In the area second stability region studies we report on an investigation of the possibility of second region access in the center of TFTR supershots.'' The instabilities found may coincide with experimental observation. Significant progress has been made on the resistive stability properties of high beta poloidal supershot'' discharges. For these studies profiles were taken from the TRANSP transport analysis code which analyzes experimental data. Invoking flattening of the pressure profile on mode rational surfaces causes tearing modes to persist into the experimental range of interest. Further, the experimental observation of the modes seems to be consistent with the predictions of the MHD model. In addition, code development in several areas has proceeded.

  4. Ballooning mode stability of elongated high-beta tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauel, Michael E.

    1987-12-01

    The variational principle derived by Choe and Freidberg [Phys. Fluids 29, 1766 (1986)] and used to estimate the geometry of high-beta tokamak equilibria is extended to include elongation. Ballooning mode stability is then investigated, illustrating the influence of elongation on local and global stability.

  5. Tearing Mode Stability of Evolving Toroidal Equilibria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pletzer, A.; McCune, D.; Manickam, J.; Jardin, S. C.

    2000-10-01

    There are a number of toroidal equilibrium (such as JSOLVER, ESC, EFIT, and VMEC) and transport codes (such as TRANSP, BALDUR, and TSC) in our community that utilize differing equilibrium representations. There are also many heating and current drive (LSC and TORRAY), and stability (PEST1-3, GATO, NOVA, MARS, DCON, M3D) codes that require this equilibrium information. In an effort to provide seamless compatibility between the codes that produce and need these equilibria, we have developed two Fortran 90 modules, MEQ and XPLASMA, that serve as common interfaces between these two classes of codes. XPLASMA provides a common equilibrium representation for the heating and current drive applications while MEQ provides common equilibrium and associated metric information needed by MHD stability codes. We illustrate the utility of this approach by presenting results of PEST-3 tearing stability calculations of an NSTX discharge performed on profiles provided by the TRANSP code. Using the MEQ module, the TRANSP equilibrium data are stored in a Fortran 90 derived type and passed to PEST3 as a subroutine argument. All calculations are performed on the fly, as the profiles evolve.

  6. Stability of short wavelength tearing and twisting modes

    SciTech Connect

    Waelbroeck, F.L.

    1998-09-22

    The stability and mutual interaction of tearing and twisting modes in a torus is governed by matrices that generalize the well-known {Delta}{prime} stability index. The diagonal elements of these matrices determine the intrinsic stability of modes that reconnect the magnetic field at a single resonant surface. The off-diagonal elements indicate the strength of the coupling between the different modes. The author shows how the elements of these matrices can be evaluated, in the limit of short wavelength, from the free energy driving radially extended ballooning modes. The author applies the results by calculating the tearing and twisting {Delta}{prime} for a model high-beta equilibrium with circular flux surfaces.

  7. MAP Stability, Design and Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ericsson -Jackson, A.J.; Andrews, S. F.; ODonnell, J. R., Jr.; Markley, F. L.

    1998-01-01

    The Microwave Anisotropy Probe (MAP) is a follow-on to the Differential Microwave Radiometer (DMR) instrument on the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) spacecraft. The design and analysis of the MAP attitude control system (ACS) have been refined since work previously reported. The full spacecraft and instrument flexible model was developed in NASTRAN, and the resulting flexible modes were plotted and reduced with the Modal Significance Analysis Package (MSAP). The reduced-order model was used to perform the linear stability analysis for each control mode, the results of which are presented in this paper. Although MAP is going to a relatively disturbance-free Lissajous orbit around the Earth-Sun L2 Lagrange point, a detailed disturbance-torque analysis is required because there are only a small number of opportunities for momentum unloading each year. Environmental torques, including solar pressure at L2, and aerodynamic and gravity gradient during phasing-loop orbits, were calculated and simulated. A simple model of fuel slosh was derived to model its effect on the motion of the spacecraft. In addition, a thruster mode linear impulse controller was developed to meet the accuracy requirements of the phasing loop burns. A dynamic attitude error limiter was added to improve the performance of the ACS during large attitude slews. The result of this analysis is a stable ACS subsystem that meets all of the mission's requirements.

  8. Ideal Stability of the Tokamak H--mode Edge Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, H. R.

    1998-11-01

    Tokamak performance is often controlled by stability of the edge plasma. Consistent with ``stiff'' transport models, the confinement in tokamak discharges is strongly correlated with the magnitude of the edge pressure pedestal which is limited by MHD stability. Furthermore, the high performance ELM-free H--modes are terminated by low toroidal mode number n, MHD modes driven by high edge pressure gradient, and edge current. We have evaluated low n modes using the δ W code GATO, and both high edge pressure gradient and high edge current density are found to destabilize the n=1, 2, and 3 ideal modes. We have included the self-consistent bootstrap current in the equilibria generation, and have completed a thorough survey of the effects of plasma shape and edge pressure profiles on the edge ballooning stability. The bootstrap current density helps to provide access to the second regime of stability, which is easier for: higher elongation, intermediate triangularity, larger aspect ratio, narrower pedestal width, and higher q_95. The intermediate n stability is being evaluated using a high-mode-number peeling/ ballooning mode model,(J.W. Connor, R.J. Hastie, H.R. Wilson, and R.L. Miller, Phys. Plasmas 5), 2687 (1998). where a critical role is played by the edge current density. This edge model describes the interaction of peeling mode (current driven) and ballooning mode (pressure driven) effects at high, but finite, mode number; a modified ballooning mode formalism is shown to be valid at the plasma edge. Based upon this edge model, a 2D eigenvalue code has been written to determine the stability of these modes for arbitrary shape cross sections, and edge pressure and current profiles including bootstrap current effects. This model suggests a power threshold for L--H transitions and provides a plausible explanation for an ELM cycle. Results will be presented for the pressure gradient and edge current density stability boundaries for a range of shapes and pedestal widths

  9. Viscosity-induced mode splitting and potential energy criterion for mode stability

    SciTech Connect

    Ruzeng, Z.

    1989-06-01

    This paper points out that viscosity can induce mode splitting in a uniform infinite cylinder of an incompressible fluid with self-gravitation, and that the potential energy criterion cannot be appropriate to all normal modes obtained, i.e., there will be stable modes with negative potential energy (..sigma..<0). Therefore the condition ..sigma..>0 is not necessary, although sufficient, for the stability of a mode in an incompressible static fluid or magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) system, which is a correction of both Hare's (Philos. Mag. 8, 1305 (1959)) and Chandrasekhar's (Hydrodynamic and Hydromagnetic Stability (Oxford U.P., Oxford, 1961), p. 604) stability criterion for a mode. These results can also be extended to compressible systems with a polytropic exponent.

  10. Modeling of Neoclassical Tearing Mode Stability for Generalized Toroidal Geometry

    SciTech Connect

    A.L. Rosenberg; D.A. Gates; A. Pletzer; J.E. Menard; S.E. Kruger; C.C. Hegna; F. Paoletti; S. Sabbagh

    2002-08-21

    Neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs) can lead to disruption and loss of confinement. Previous analysis of these modes used large aspect ratio, low beta (plasma pressure/magnetic pressure) approximations to determine the effect of NTMs on tokamak plasmas. A more accurate tool is needed to predict the onset of these instabilities. As a follow-up to recent theoretical work, a code has been written which computes the tearing mode island growth rate for arbitrary tokamak geometry. It calls PEST-3 [A. Pletzer et al., J. Comput. Phys. 115, 530 (1994)] to compute delta prime, the resistive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) matching parameter. The code also calls the FLUXGRID routines in NIMROD [A.H. Glasser et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 41, A747 (1999)] for Dnc, DI and DR [C.C. Hegna, Phys. Plasmas 6, 3980 (1999); A.H. Glasser et al., Phys. Fluids 18, 875 (1975)], which are the bootstrap current driven term and the ideal and resistive interchange mode criterion, respectively. In addition to these components, the NIMROD routines calculate alphas-H, a new correction to the Pfirsch-Schlter term. Finite parallel transport effects were added and a National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [M. Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40, 557 (2000)] equilibrium was analyzed. Another program takes the output of PEST-3 and allows the user to specify the rational surface, island width, and amount of detail near the perturbed surface to visualize the total helical flux. The results of this work will determine the stability of NTMs in an spherical torus (ST) [Y.-K.M. Peng et al., Nucl. Fusion 26, 769 (1986)] plasma with greater accuracy than previously achieved.

  11. Energetic Ion Effects on Tearing Mode Stability in Tokamak Equilibria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halfmoon, Michael; Brennan, Dylan

    2014-10-01

    The 2/1 tearing mode is found to be damped or stabilized by energetic ions in a slowing down distribution, where the interaction between the ions and the mode is similar to their interaction in ideal MHD, which has been extensively studied. This damping effect is mainly due to trapped particle precession resonance and causes the tearing mode to have a finite real frequency. This study focuses on the pressure-driven, slow growing tearing modes; which are the first modes to be driven unstable as pressure increases. The layer physics modifies the mode interaction, and affects the frequency of the mode. In these simulations, a series of equilibria with fixed safety factor and varying pressure are analyzed using a δf hybrid-kinetic MHD code in NIMROD. Our equilibrium consists of a D-shaped poloidal cross section, a peaked pressure profile, and safety factor with finite shear to the magnetic axis. Also, a high aspect ratio toroidal model based on Hu & Betti's work is investigated analytically to gain insight to the physics of mode-particle interactions. We combine our computational and analytic tools in an effort to explain this damping and stabilizing effect.

  12. Global stability of the ballooning mode in a cylindrical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazur, N. G.; Fedorov, E. N.; Pilipenko, V. A.

    2013-07-01

    Ballooning disturbances in a finite-pressure plasma in a curvilinear magnetic field are described by the system of coupled equations for the Alfvén and slow magnetosonic modes. In contrast to most previous works that locally analyzed the stability of small-scale disturbances using the dispersion relationship, a global analysis outside a WKB approximation but within a simple cylindrical geometry, when magnetic field lines are circles with constant curvature, is performed in the present work. This model is relatively simple; nevertheless, it has the singularities necessary for the formation of the ballooning mode: field curvature and non-uniform thermal plasma pressure. If the disturbance finite radial extent is taken into account, the instability threshold increases as compared to a WKB approximation. The simplified model used in this work made it possible to consider the pattern of unstable disturbances at arbitrary values of the azimuthal wavenumber ( k y ). Azimuthally large-scale disturbances can also be unstable, although the increment increases with decreasing azimuthal scale and reaches saturation when the scales are of the order of the pressure nonuniformity dimension.

  13. Stability of Ballooning Modes in Tokamaks with Energetic Particles.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominguez Vergara, Nicolas

    The effects of energetic particles are of interest since fast ions are present in neutral-beam and rf-heated tokamaks and will occur in ignition devices in the form of alpha particles. Moreover, it may be desirable to create such particles by auxiliary heating in order to exploit their stabilizing properties and thus attain a high beta plasma. Here a range of issues related to the stabilization of MHD ballooning modes in tokamaks by using energetic particles is investigated analytically and numerically. The presence of a highly energetic plasma component can stabilize MHD ballooning modes in tokamaks and may allow direct access to the high-beta second stability regime. Here, an improved estimate of such stability has been obtained, in the large-aspect-ratio circular limit, by means of a variational refinement of the lower bound for the energetic particle potential energy. We also investigate the effect of various profiles for the hot particle pressure on stability, and we explore the stability of off-angle modes. Moderately energetic particles, however, can destabilize the plasma through resonant interaction at their curvature drift fre- quency. We study these so-called "balloon-bone" modes, using a delta function model for their resonant response. The complete forms of the Mercier solutions in the MHD region are obtained analytically and numerically. Matched onto the inertia layer, these solutions give a dispersion relation valid for finite shear and poloidal beta values, which then is analyzed by the Nyquist technique. Results are presented for the limit in which Alfvenic effects are negligible, namely, (,)(omega)(,dh) << (omega)(,A), where (,)(omega)(,dh) is the curvature drift frequency and (omega)(,A) is the Alfven frequency, and in which the energetic particles are modeled with a slowing-down distribution in energy. Finally, even if the ideal modes and resonantly -excited modes can be simultaneously stabilized, resistive ballooning instabilities may persist

  14. Stability of internal transport barriers to ideal MHD ballooning modes.

    PubMed

    Connor, J W; Hastie, R J

    2004-02-20

    Internal transport barriers (ITB) in tokamaks can form near a minimum in the q profile, q(min), where magnetic shear is weak. We have analyzed their stability to short wavelength (n>1, where n is the toroidal mode number) ideal MHD ballooning modes, by considering the s-alpha model equilibrium. We show that the ballooning transformation fails in regions of low shear but that one can then adopt a complementary approach based on the recurrence relation describing the toroidal coupling of radially localized modes on adjacent rational surfaces. Inclusion of the stabilizing effects of favorable average curvature or finite-n using this technique leads to stable high-pressure ITB configurations. The theory also shows the advantages of operating with low-order rational values of q(min).

  15. Nonlinear tearing modes stabilization by oscillating the resonant surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaoqing; Wang, Shaojie

    2016-09-01

    The stabilization of the nonlinear tearing mode by rapidly oscillating the resonant surface has been investigated numerically in a large aspect ratio tokamak with a circular cross-section. By means of the radio frequency current drive, the plasma current can be modulated to make the resonant surface (rs) oscillate in time near its mean position. Previous results show that the linear tearing mode can be suppressed by oscillating the resonant surface with a suitable frequency and amplitude. At the nonlinear stage, the tearing mode stabilization shows different properties. The suppression effects not only depend on the modulation frequency and the oscillation width of the resonant surface but also depend on the relative size of χ0 to δ (here, χ0 is the oscillation width of the resonant surface and δ is the width of tearing layer) and the relative width of χ0 to the magnetic island width W.

  16. Ballooning mode second stability region for sequences of tokamak equilibria

    SciTech Connect

    Sugiyama, L.; Mark, J. W-K.

    1980-01-01

    A numerical study of several sequences of tokamak equilibria derived from two flux conserving sequences confirms the tendency of high n ideal MHD ballooning modes to stabilize for values of the plasma beta greater than a second critical beta, for sufficiently favorable equilibria. The major stabilizing effect of increasing the inverse rotational transform profile q(Psi) for equilibria with the same flux surface geometry is shown. The unstable region shifts toward larger shear d ln q/d ln ..gamma.. and the width of the region measured in terms of the poloidal beta or a pressure gradient parameter, for fixed shear, decreases. The smaller aspect ratio sequences are more sensitive to changes in q and have less stringent limits on the attainable value of the plasma beta in the high beta stable region. Finally, the disconnected mode approximation is shown to provide a reasonable description of the second high beta stability boundary.

  17. Frequency stabilization via the mixed mode in three mode HeNe lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, J D; Joo, K; Buice, E S; Spronck, J W; Munnig Schmidt, R H

    2010-02-05

    This paper describes a three mode HeNe laser frequency stabilization technique using the mixed mode frequency to obtain a fractional frequency stability of 2 x 10{sup -11}. The mixed mode frequency occurs due to optical nonlinear interactions with the adjacent modes at each of the three modes. In precision displacement interferometry systems, the laser source frequency must be stabilized to provide an accurate conversion ratio between phase change and displacement. In systems, such as lithography applications, which require high speed, high accuracy and low data age uncertainty, it is also desirable to avoid periodic nonlinearities, which reduces computation time and errors. One method to reduce periodic nonlinearity is to spatially separate the measurement and reference beams to prevent optical mixing, which has been shown for several systems. Using spatially separated beams and the proper optical configuration, the interferometer can be fiber fed, which can increase the interferometer's stability by reducing the number of beam steering optical elements. Additionally, as the number of measurement axes increases, a higher optical power from the laser source is necessary.

  18. Stabilization of ballooning modes with sheared toroidal rotation

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.L.; Waelbroeck, F.L.; Hassam, A.B.; Waltz, R.E.

    1995-10-01

    Stabilization of magnetohydrodynamic ballooning modes by sheared toroidal rotation is demonstrated using a shifted circle equilibrium model. A generalized ballooning mode representation is used to eliminate the fast Alfven wave, and an initial value code solves the resulting equations. The {ital s}{minus}{alpha} diagram (magnetic shear versus pressure gradient) of ballooning mode theory is extended to include rotational shear. In the ballooning representation, the modes shift periodically along the field line to the next point of unfavorable curvature. The shift frequency ({ital d}{Omega}/{ital dq}, where {Omega} is the angular toroidal velocity and {ital q} is the safety factor) is proportional to the rotation shear and inversely proportional to the magnetic shear. Stability improves with increasing shift frequency and direct stable access to the second stability regime occurs when this frequency is approximately one-quarter to one-half the Alfven frequency, {omega}{sub A}={ital V}{sub A}/{ital qR}. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  19. Actively mode-locked diode laser with a mode spacing stability of ∼6 × 10{sup -14}

    SciTech Connect

    Zakharyash, V F; Kashirsky, A V; Klementyev, V M

    2015-10-31

    We have studied mode spacing stability in an actively mode-locked external-cavity semiconductor laser. It has been shown that, in the case of mode spacing pulling to the frequency of a highly stable external microwave signal produced by a hydrogen standard (stability of 4 × 10{sup -14} over an averaging period τ = 10 s), this configuration ensures a mode spacing stability of 5.92 × 10{sup -14} (τ = 10 s). (control of radiation parameters)

  20. Feedback stabilization system for pulsed single longitudinal mode tunable lasers

    DOEpatents

    Esherick, Peter; Raymond, Thomas D.

    1991-10-01

    A feedback stabilization system for pulse single longitudinal mode tunable lasers having an excited laser medium contained within an adjustable length cavity and producing a laser beam through the use of an internal dispersive element, including detection of angular deviation in the output laser beam resulting from detuning between the cavity mode frequency and the passband of the internal dispersive element, and generating an error signal based thereon. The error signal can be integrated and amplified and then applied as a correcting signal to a piezoelectric transducer mounted on a mirror of the laser cavity for controlling the cavity length.

  1. RAB-plate versus sliding hip screw for unstable trochanteric hip fractures: stability of the fixation and modes of failure--radiographic analysis of 218 fractures.

    PubMed

    Buciuto, R; Hammer, R

    2001-03-01

    The sliding hip screw has gained considerable acceptance in the treatment of unstable trochanteric fractures. However, the new type of 120 degrees fixed angle blade-plate with a buttress rod (RAB-plate) showed encouraging clinical results. The purpose of this study was to assess stability of fixation and analyze modes of failure in unstable trochanteric hip fractures treated with these devices. A retrospective radiographic review of 218 unstable fractures was performed. Linear and angular displacements of the major fragments and implant migration into the femoral head during healing were assessed. Additionally, adequacy of the reduction and the location of the implant within the femoral head as predictors of fixation failure were evaluated. The postreduction neck-shaft angle was maintained in the majority of the fractures in both groups. However, there was a significantly higher incidence of varus angulation by 10 degrees or more by the completion of healing among fractures treated with the sliding hip screw (p = 0.04). There was no statistically significant difference in vertical migration of the device into the femoral head between the implants used (p = 0.3). There was a significant relationship between failure of the fixation and varus reduction (p = 0.04) as well as screw/neck angle deviation more than 20 degrees in the lateral projection (p = 0.005) or if the implant was in a superior or posterior position (p = 0.02). The RAB-plate provided a more stable fixation, especially with regard to maintained postoperative alignment. However, positive predictors for fixation failure were identical for both devices. Here, the screw/neck angle deviation has had the strongest significance for prediction of fixation failure.

  2. Stability of Finite-n Global Magnetohydrodynamic Modes Using the GATO Stability Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, M. S.; Wong, S. K.; Lao, L. L.; Turnbull, A. D.; Chance, M. S.

    1999-11-01

    This work extends the capability of the GATO stability code(L.C.Bernard et al.), Comput. Phys. Commun. 24, 377 (1981). to analyze realistic numerical tokamak equilibria for their stability to higher n ( ~5--10) MHD modes. This is motivated by the experimental evidence of these modes being relevant for both plasma termination and the behavior of ELMs. The ballooning angle transformation(R. Gruber et al.), Comput. Phys. Commun. 24, 363 (1981). is applied to the displacement variables in the GATO representation. The potential energy matrix is constructed with the inclusion of extra mapping quantities. The vacuum energy computed from the Green's function is also modified to couple to the transformed displacement at the plasma boundary. The resultant eigenvalue problem is solved with the modified boundary condition in the poloidal direction suitable for these transformed variables. The dependence of the plasma stability as a function of toroidal mode number and plasma equilibrium properties will be presented.

  3. Simulation and Analysis of the Hybrid Operating Mode in ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Kessel, C.E.; Budny, R.V.; Indireshkumar, K.

    2005-09-22

    The hybrid operating mode in ITER is examined with 0D systems analysis, 1.5D discharge scenario simulations using TSC and TRANSP, and the ideal MHD stability is discussed. The hybrid mode has the potential to provide very long pulses and significant neutron fluence if the physics regime can be produced in ITER. This paper reports progress in establishing the physics basis and engineering limitation for the hybrid mode in ITER.

  4. Theoretical modelling of the feedback stabilization of external MHD modes in toroidal geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chance, M. S.; Chu, M. S.; Okabayashi, M.; Turnbull, A. D.

    2002-03-01

    A theoretical framework for understanding the feedback mechanism for stabilization of external MHD modes has been formulated. Efficient computational tools - the GATO stability code coupled with a substantially modified VACUUM code - have been developed to effectively design viable feedback systems against these modes. The analysis assumed a thin resistive shell and a feedback coil structure accurately modelled in θ and phi, albeit with only a single harmonic variation in phi. Time constants and induced currents in the enclosing resistive shell are calculated. An optimized configuration based on an idealized model has been computed for the DIII-D device. Up to 90% of the effectiveness of an ideal wall can be achieved.

  5. Graviton Kaluza-Klein modes in nonflat branes with stabilized modulus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Tanmoy; SenGupta, Soumitra

    2016-04-01

    We consider a generalized two brane Randall-Sundrum model where the branes are endowed with nonzero cosmological constant. In this scenario, we re-examine the modulus stabilization mechanism and the nature of Kaluza-Klein (KK) graviton modes. Our result reveals that while the KK mode graviton masses may change significantly with the brane cosmological constant, the Goldberger-Wise stabilization mechanism, which assumes a negligible backreaction on the background metric, continues to hold even when the branes have a large cosmological constant. The possibility of having a global minimum for the modulus is also discussed. Our results also include an analysis for the radion mass in this nonflat brane scenario.

  6. SDO Delta H Mode Design and Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Paul A.; Starin, Scott R.

    2007-01-01

    While on orbit, disturbance torques on a three axis stabilized spacecraft tend to increase the system momentum, which is stored in the reaction wheels. Upon reaching the predefined momentum capacity (or maximum wheel speed) of the reaction wheel, an external torque must be used to unload the momentum. The purpose of the Delta H mode is to manage the system momentum. This is accomplished by driving the reaction wheels to a target momentum state while the attitude thrusters, which provide an external torque, are used to maintain the attitude. The Delta H mode is designed to meet the mission requirements and implement the momentum management plan. Changes in the requirements or the momentum management plan can lead to design changes in the mode. The momentum management plan defines the expected momentum buildup trend, the desired momentum state and how often the system is driven to the desired momentum state (unloaded). The desired momentum state is chosen based on wheel capacity, wheel configuration, thruster layout and thruster sizing. For the Solar Dynamics Observatory mission, the predefined wheel momentum capacity is a function of the jitter requirements, power, and maximum momentum capacity. Changes in jitter requirements or power limits can lead to changes in the desired momentum state. These changes propagate into the changes in the momentum management plan and therefore the Delta H mode design. This paper presents the analysis and design performed for the Solar Dynamics Observatory Delta H mode. In particular, the mode logic and processing needed to meet requirements is described along with the momentum distribution formulation. The Delta H mode design is validated using the Solar Dynamics Observatory High Fidelity simulator. Finally, a summary of the design is provided along with concluding remarks.

  7. Profile stabilization of tilt mode in a Field Reversed Configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Cobb, J.W.; Tajima, T.; Barnes, D.C.

    1993-06-01

    The possibility of stabilizing the tilt mode in Field Reversed Configurations without resorting to explicit kinetic effects such as large ion orbits is investigated. Various pressure profiles, P({Psi}), are chosen, including ``hollow`` profiles where current is strongly peaked near the separatrix. Numerical equilibria are used as input for an initial value simulation which uses an extended Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model that includes viscous and Hall terms. Tilt stability is found for specific hollow profiles when accompanied by high values of separatrix beta, {beta}{sub sep}. The stable profiles also have moderate to large elongation, racetrack separatrix shape, and lower values of 3, average ratio of Larmor radius to device radius. The stability is unaffected by changes in viscosity, but the neglect of the Hall term does cause stable results to become marginal or unstable. Implications for interpretation of recent experiments are discussed.

  8. Stability of Rotor Hopfield Neural Networks With Synchronous Mode.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Masaki

    2016-12-29

    A complex-valued Hopfield neural network (CHNN) is a model of a Hopfield neural network using multistate neurons. The stability conditions of CHNNs have been widely studied. A CHNN with a synchronous mode will converge to a fixed point or a cycle of length 2. A rotor Hopfield neural network (RHNN) is also a model of a multistate Hopfield neural network. RHNNs have much higher storage capacity and noise tolerance than CHNNs. We extend the theories regarding the stability of CHNNs to RHNNs. In addition, we investigate the stability of RHNNs with the projection rule. Although a CHNN with projection rule can be trapped at a cycle, an RHNN with projection rule converges to a fixed point. This is one of the great advantages of RHNNs.

  9. Beta-limiting instabilities and global mode stabilization in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Sabbagh, S. A.; Peng, Yueng Kay Martin

    2003-01-01

    Research on the stability of spherical torus plasmas at and above the no-wall beta limit is being addressed on the National Spherical Torus Experiment @M. Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40, 557 ~2000!#, that has produced low aspect ratio plasmas, R/a;1.27 at plasma current exceeding 1.4 MA with high energy confinement (TauE/TauE ITER89P.2). Toroidal and normalized beta have exceeded 25% and 4.3, respectively, in q;7 plasmas. The beta limit is observed to increase and then saturate with increasing li . The stability factor bN /li has reached 6, limited by sudden beta collapses. Increased pressure peaking leads to a decrease in bN . Ideal stability analysis of equilibria reconstructed with EFIT @L. L. Lao et al., Nucl. Fusion 25, 1611 ~1985!# shows that the plasmas are at the no-wall beta limit for the n51 kink/ballooning mode. Low aspect ratio and high edge q theoretically alter the plasma stability and mode structure compared to standard tokamak configurations. Below the no-wall limit, stability calculations show the perturbed radial field is maximized near the center column and mode stability is not highly effected by a nearby conducting wall due to the short poloidal wavelength in this region. In contrast, as beta reaches and exceeds the no-wall limit, the mode becomes strongly ballooning with long poloidal wavelength at large major radius and is highly wall stabilized. In this way, wall stabilization is more effective at higher beta in low aspect ratio geometry. The resistive wall mode has been observed in plasmas exceeding the ideal no-wall beta limit and leads to rapid toroidal rotation damping across the plasma core.

  10. Benchmarking kinetic calculations of resistive wall mode stability

    SciTech Connect

    Berkery, J. W.; Sabbagh, S. A.; Liu, Y. Q.; Betti, R.

    2014-05-15

    Validating the calculations of kinetic resistive wall mode (RWM) stability is important for confidently predicting RWM stable operating regions in ITER and other high performance tokamaks for disruption avoidance. Benchmarking the calculations of the Magnetohydrodynamic Resistive Spectrum—Kinetic (MARS-K) [Y. Liu et al., Phys. Plasmas 15, 112503 (2008)], Modification to Ideal Stability by Kinetic effects (MISK) [B. Hu et al., Phys. Plasmas 12, 057301 (2005)], and Perturbed Equilibrium Nonambipolar Transport (PENT) [N. Logan et al., Phys. Plasmas 20, 122507 (2013)] codes for two Solov'ev analytical equilibria and a projected ITER equilibrium has demonstrated good agreement between the codes. The important particle frequencies, the frequency resonance energy integral in which they are used, the marginally stable eigenfunctions, perturbed Lagrangians, and fluid growth rates are all generally consistent between the codes. The most important kinetic effect at low rotation is the resonance between the mode rotation and the trapped thermal particle's precession drift, and MARS-K, MISK, and PENT show good agreement in this term. The different ways the rational surface contribution was treated historically in the codes is identified as a source of disagreement in the bounce and transit resonance terms at higher plasma rotation. Calculations from all of the codes support the present understanding that RWM stability can be increased by kinetic effects at low rotation through precession drift resonance and at high rotation by bounce and transit resonances, while intermediate rotation can remain susceptible to instability. The applicability of benchmarked kinetic stability calculations to experimental results is demonstrated by the prediction of MISK calculations of near marginal growth rates for experimental marginal stability points from the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [M. Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40, 557 (2000)].

  11. Benchmarking kinetic calculations of resistive wall mode stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkery, J. W.; Liu, Y. Q.; Wang, Z. R.; Sabbagh, S. A.; Logan, N. C.; Park, J.-K.; Manickam, J.; Betti, R.

    2014-05-01

    Validating the calculations of kinetic resistive wall mode (RWM) stability is important for confidently predicting RWM stable operating regions in ITER and other high performance tokamaks for disruption avoidance. Benchmarking the calculations of the Magnetohydrodynamic Resistive Spectrum—Kinetic (MARS-K) [Y. Liu et al., Phys. Plasmas 15, 112503 (2008)], Modification to Ideal Stability by Kinetic effects (MISK) [B. Hu et al., Phys. Plasmas 12, 057301 (2005)], and Perturbed Equilibrium Nonambipolar Transport PENT) [N. Logan et al., Phys. Plasmas 20, 122507 (2013)] codes for two Solov'ev analytical equilibria and a projected ITER equilibrium has demonstrated good agreement between the codes. The important particle frequencies, the frequency resonance energy integral in which they are used, the marginally stable eigenfunctions, perturbed Lagrangians, and fluid growth rates are all generally consistent between the codes. The most important kinetic effect at low rotation is the resonance between the mode rotation and the trapped thermal particle's precession drift, and MARS-K, MISK, and PENT show good agreement in this term. The different ways the rational surface contribution was treated historically in the codes is identified as a source of disagreement in the bounce and transit resonance terms at higher plasma rotation. Calculations from all of the codes support the present understanding that RWM stability can be increased by kinetic effects at low rotation through precession drift resonance and at high rotation by bounce and transit resonances, while intermediate rotation can remain susceptible to instability. The applicability of benchmarked kinetic stability calculations to experimental results is demonstrated by the prediction of MISK calculations of near marginal growth rates for experimental marginal stability points from the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [M. Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40, 557 (2000)].

  12. Kinetic stability of the internal kink mode in ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Hu Bo; Betti, R.; Manickam, J.

    2006-11-15

    The kinetic stability of the n=1, m=1 internal kink mode is analyzed for realistic equilibria typical of the standard operation scenario of ITER (the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) [ITER Physics Basis Editors, Nucl. Fusion 39, 2137 (1999)]. The kinetic effects modify the inertia and the perturbed potential energy {delta}W of the mode, the two key elements determining the mode stability. Numerical results are obtained for ITER-like equilibria with different q profiles. For moderate magnetic shear within the q=1 surface, the low frequency magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) branch is fully suppressed by the kinetic effects for the expected profiles and parameters up to twice the expected plasma {beta} while the high frequency fishbone branch is found to be destabilized as the plasma {beta} and the radius of the q=1 surface increase. The MHD branch can be destabilized at higher plasma {beta} or larger radii of the q=1 surface only for q profiles with a low magnetic shear within the q=1 surface.

  13. The impact of 3D fields on tearing mode stability of H-modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buttery, R. J.; Gerhardt, S.; La Haye, R. J.; Liu, Y. Q.; Reimerdes, H.; Sabbagh, S.; Chu, M. S.; Osborne, T. H.; Park, J.-K.; Pinsker, R. I.; Strait, E. J.; Yu, J. H.; DIII-D, the; NSTX Teams

    2011-07-01

    New processes have been discovered in the interaction of 3D fields with tearing mode stability at low torque and modest β on DIII-D and NSTX. These are thought to arise from the plasma response at the tearing resonant surface, which theoretically is expected to depend strongly on plasma rotation and underlying intrinsic tearing stability. This leads to sensitivities additional to those previously identified at low density where the plasma rotation is more readily stopped, or at high βN where ideal MHD responses amplify the fields (where βN is the plasma β divided by the ratio of plasma current to minor radius multiplied by toroidal field). It is found that the threshold size for 3D fields to induce modes tends to zero as the natural tearing βN limit is approached. 3D field sensitivity is further enhanced at low rotation, with magnetic probing detecting an increased response to applied fields in such regimes. Modelling with the MARS-F code confirms the interpretation with the usual plasma screening response breaking down in low rotation plasmas and a tearing response developing, opening the door to additional sensitivities to β and the current profile. Typical field thresholds to induce modes in torque-free βN ~ 1.5 H-modes are well below those in ohmic plasmas or plasmas near the ideal βN limit. The strong interaction with the tearing mode βN limit is identified through rotation shear, which is decreased by the 3D field, leading to decreased tearing stability. Thus both locked and rotating mode field thresholds can be considered in terms of a torque balance, with sufficient braking leading to destabilization of a mode. On this basis new measurements of the principal parameter scalings for error field threshold have been obtained in torque-free H-modes leading to new predictions for error field sensitivity in ITER. The scalings have similar exponents to ohmic plasmas, but with seven times lower threshold at the ITER baseline βN value of 1.8, and a linear

  14. Stability and ELM Characterization in I-Mode Pedestals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walk, J. R.; Hughes, J. W.; Snyder, P. B.; Hubbard, A. E.; Terry, J. L.; White, A. E.; Whyte, D. G.; Baek, S. G.; Cziegler, I.; Edlund, E.

    2014-10-01

    The I-mode is a novel high-confinement regime explored on Alcator C-Mod, notable for its formation of an H-mode-like temperature pedestal without the accompanying density pedestal, maintaining L-mode particle confinement. I-mode exhibits a number of desirable properties for a reactor regime: among them, it naturally lacks large ELMs, avoiding the need for externally-applied ELM suppression. However, under certain conditions small, intermittent ELM-like events are seen. These events exhibit a range of phenomena in terms of edge and pedestal behavior, particularly for the ELM trigger - the majority of events are synchronized with the sawtooth heat pulse reaching the edge. The stationary pedestal structure is stable against peeling-ballooning MHD as calculated by ELITE in all cases, necessitating treatment of transient pedestal modification to characterize these events. We characterize these ELM events in terms of edge behavior, particularly the modification of the temperature pedestal, edge turbulence and fluctuations, and peeling-ballooning MHD stability. This work is supported by USDoE Award DE-FC02-99ER54512.

  15. Length controlled stabilized mode-lock ND:YAG laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sigfred, J. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A method and apparatus for stabilizing the amplitude and repetition rate of mode-locked Nd:YAG laser pulses by controlling the laser length through a feedback loop are described. The end mirror of the laser is mounted on a piezoelectric crystal which is dithered at a low frequency. A portion of fundamental 1.06 micrometer laser radiation is converted into its second harmonic frequency, and the average power of the second harmonic frequency is detected by an integrating detector. The amount of the power of the second harmonic frequency depends on the match between the optical length of the laser cavity and the mode-lock frequency. The length is controlled by a feedback loop which phase compares the output of the second harmonic detector to the piezoelectric crystal dither signal.

  16. Environmental stability of actively mode locked fibre lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Calum H.; Lee, Stephen T.; Reid, Derryck T.; Baili, Ghaya; Davies, John

    2016-10-01

    Lasers developed for defence related applications typically encounter issues with reliability and meeting desired specification when taken from the lab to the product line. In particular the harsh environmental conditions a laser has to endure can lead to difficulties. This paper examines a specific class of laser, namely actively mode-locked fibre lasers (AMLFLs), and discusses the impact of environmental perturbations. Theoretical and experimental results have assisted in developing techniques to improve the stability of a mode-locked pulse train for continuous operation. Many of the lessons learned in this research are applicable to a much broader category of lasers. The AMLFL consists of a fibre ring cavity containing a semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA), an isolator, an output coupler, a circulator, a bandpass filter and a modulator. The laser produces a train of 6-ps pulses at 800 nm with a repetition rate in the GHz regime and a low-noise profile. This performance is realisable in a laboratory environment. However, even small changes in temperature on the order of 0.1 °C can cause a collapse of mode-locked dynamics such that the required stability cannot be achieved without suitable feedback. Investigations into the root causes of this failure were performed by changing the temperature of components that constitute the laser resonator and observing their properties. Several different feedback mechanisms have been investigated to improve laser stability in an environment with dynamic temperature changes. Active cavity length control will be discussed along with DC bias control of the Mach-Zehnder modulator (MZM).

  17. Automated RSO Stability Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, T.

    2016-09-01

    A methodology for assessing the attitude stability of a Resident Space Object (RSO) using visual magnitude data is presented and then scaled to run in an automated fashion across the entire satellite catalog. Results obtained by applying the methodology to the Commercial Space Operations Center (COMSpOC) catalog are presented and summarized, identifying objects that have changed stability. We also examine the timeline for detecting the transition from stable to unstable attitude

  18. Stability of local modes in low-aspect-ratio stellarators

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, L.; Carreras, B.A.; Dominguez, N.

    1989-01-01

    The studies of MHD stability properties of stellarator-type configurations are complicated by the three-dimensional (3-D) nature of the equilibrium of these configurations. Usually, the unstable modes are pressure-driven and very localized around the rational surface. The 3-D Mercier stability criterion for local instabilities is therefore adequate for most of the stability studies. The method has been implemented in different 3-D equilibrium codes and is widely employed in stability calculations for stellarators. We use an average method based on vacuum flux coordinates to study the equilibrium of low-aspect-ratio configurations. The specific vacuum flux coordinates (/rho/,theta,/var phi/) are those described by Boozer. The radial variable is /rho/, while theta and /var phi/ are, respectively, poloidal and toroidal-like angles. The Jacobian is D = B/sub v//sup 2///rho/B/sub 0/g/sub B/. The only vacuum magnetic field covariant component different from zero is B/sub /var phi// = g/sub B/, while B/sub 0/..pi../rho//sup 2/ is the toroidal flux. 7 refs., 1 fig.

  19. Local slope stability analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hattendorf, I.; Hergarten, St.; Neugebauer, H. J.

    Mass movements under the influence of gravity occur as result of diverse disturbing and destabilizing processes, for example of climatic or anthropological origin. The stability of slopes is mainly determined by the geometry of the land-surface and designated slip-horizon. Further contributions are supplied by the pore water pressure, cohesion and friction. All relevant factors have to be integrated in a slope stability model, either by measurements and estimations (like phenomenological laws) or derived from physical equations. As result of stability calculations, it's suitable to introduce an expectation value, the factor-of-safety, for the slip-risk. Here, we present a model based on coupled physical equations to simulate hardly measurable phenomenons, like lateral forces and fluid flow. For the displacements of the soil-matrix we use a modified poroelasticity-equation with a Biot-coupling (Biot 1941) for the water pressure. Latter is described by a generalized Boussinesq equation for saturated-unsaturated porous media (Blendinger 1998). One aim of the calculations is to improve the knowledge about stability-distributions and their temporal variations. This requires the introduction of a local factor-of-safety which is the main difference to common stability models with global stability estimations. The reduction of immediate danger is still the emergent task of the most slope and landslide investigations, but this model is also useful with respect to understand the governing processes of landform evolution.

  20. Principal elementary mode analysis (PEMA).

    PubMed

    Folch-Fortuny, Abel; Marques, Rodolfo; Isidro, Inês A; Oliveira, Rui; Ferrer, Alberto

    2016-03-01

    Principal component analysis (PCA) has been widely applied in fluxomics to compress data into a few latent structures in order to simplify the identification of metabolic patterns. These latent structures lack a direct biological interpretation due to the intrinsic constraints associated with a PCA model. Here we introduce a new method that significantly improves the interpretability of the principal components with a direct link to metabolic pathways. This method, called principal elementary mode analysis (PEMA), establishes a bridge between a PCA-like model, aimed at explaining the maximum variance in flux data, and the set of elementary modes (EMs) of a metabolic network. It provides an easy way to identify metabolic patterns in large fluxomics datasets in terms of the simplest pathways of the organism metabolism. The results using a real metabolic model of Escherichia coli show the ability of PEMA to identify the EMs that generated the different simulated flux distributions. Actual flux data of E. coli and Pichia pastoris cultures confirm the results observed in the simulated study, providing a biologically meaningful model to explain flux data of both organisms in terms of the EM activation. The PEMA toolbox is freely available for non-commercial purposes on http://mseg.webs.upv.es.

  1. Active Resistive Wall Mode Stabilization in Low Rotation, High Beta NSTX Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabbagh, S. A.

    2006-10-01

    An active feedback system to stabilize the resistive wall mode (RWM) in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) is used to maintain plasma stability for greater than 90 RWM growth times. These experiments are the first to demonstrate RWM active stabilization in high beta, low aspect ratio tokamak plasmas with toroidal plasma rotation significantly below the critical rotation profile for passive stability and in the range predicted for ITER. Actively stabilized, low rotation plasmas reached normalized beta of 5.6, and the ratio of normalized beta to the toroidal mode number, n = 1 and 2 ideal no-wall stability limits reached 1.2 and 1.15 respectively, determined by DCON stability analysis of the time-evolving reconstructed experimental equilibria. The significant, controlled reduction of the plasma rotation to less than one percent of the Alfven speed was produced by non-resonant magnetic braking by an applied n = 3 field. The observed plasma rotation damping is in quantitative agreement with neoclassical toroidal viscosity theory including trapped particle effects [1]. The active stabilization system employs a mode control algorithm using RWM sensor input analyzed to distinguish the amplitude and phase of the n = 1 mode. During n = 1 stabilization, the n = 2 mode amplitude increases and surpasses the n = 1 amplitude, but the mode remains stable. By varying the system gain, and relative phase between the measured n = 1 RWM phase and the applied control field, both positive and negative feedback were demonstrated. Contrary to past experience in moderate aspect ratio tokamaks with poloidally continuous stabilizing structure, the RWM can become unstable in certain cases by deforming poloidally, an important consideration for feedback system sensor and control coil design in future devices such as ITER and KSTAR. **In collaboration with R.E. Bell, J.E. Menard, D.A. Gates, A.C. Sontag, J.M. Bialek, B.P. LeBlanc, F.M. Levinton, K. Tritz, H. Yuh. [1] W. Zhu, S

  2. The stability of tidally deformed neutron stars to three- and four-mode coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Venumadhav, Tejaswi; Zimmerman, Aaron; Hirata, Christopher M.

    2014-01-20

    It has recently been suggested that the tidal deformation of a neutron star excites daughter p- and g-modes to large amplitudes via a quasi-static instability. This would remove energy from the tidal bulge, resulting in dissipation and possibly affecting the phase evolution of inspiralling binary neutron stars and hence the extraction of binary parameters from gravitational wave observations. This instability appears to arise because of a large three-mode interaction among the tidal mode and high-order p- and g-modes of similar radial wavenumber. We show that additional four-mode interactions enter into the analysis at the same order as the three-mode terms previously considered. We compute these four-mode couplings by finding a volume-preserving coordinate transformation that relates the energy of a tidally deformed star to that of a radially perturbed spherical star. Using this method, we relate the four-mode coupling to three-mode couplings and show that there is a near-exact cancellation between the destabilizing effect of the three-mode interactions and the stabilizing effect of the four-mode interaction. We then show that the equilibrium tide is stable against the quasi-static decay into daughter p- and g-modes to leading order. The leading deviation from the quasi-static approximation due to orbital motion of the binary is considered; while it may slightly spoil the near-cancellation, any resulting instability timescale is at least of order the gravitational wave inspiral time. We conclude that the p-/g-mode coupling does not lead to a quasi-static instability, and does not impact the phase evolution of gravitational waves from binary neutron stars.

  3. The Role of Kinetic Effects, Including Plasma Rotation and Energetic Particles, in Resistive Wall Mode Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkery, John W.

    2009-11-01

    Continuous, disruption-free operation of tokamaks requires stabilization of the resistive wall mode (RWM). Theoretically, the RWM is thought to be stabilized by energy dissipation mechanisms that depend on plasma rotation and other parameters, with kinetic effects being emphasized.footnotetextB. Hu et al., Phys. Plasmas 12 (2005) 057301. Experiments in NSTX show that the RWM can be destabilized in high rotation plasmas while low rotation plasmas can be stable, which calls into question the concept of a simple critical plasma rotation threshold for stability. The present work tests theoretical stabilization mechanisms against experimental discharges with various plasma rotation profiles created by applying non-resonant n=3 braking, and with various fast particle fractions. Kinetic modification of ideal stability is calculated with the MISK code, using experimental equilibrium reconstructions. Analysis of NSTX discharges with unstable RWMs predicts near-marginal mode growth rates. Trapped ions provide the dominant kinetic resonances, while fast particles contribute an important stabilizing effect. Increasing or decreasing rotation in the calculation drives the prediction farther from the marginal point, showing that unlike simpler critical rotation theories, kinetic theory allows a more complex relationship between plasma rotation and RWM stability. Results from JT-60U show that energetic particle modes can trigger RWMsfootnotetextG. Matsunaga et al., IAEA FEC 2008 Paper EX/5-2.. Kinetic theory may explain how fast particle loss can trigger RWMs through the loss of an important stabilization mechanism. These results are applied to ITER advanced scenario equilibria to determine the impact on RWM stability.

  4. Diamagnetic Stabilization of Cylindrical m = 2 Double-Tearing Modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbott, Stephen; Germaschewski, Kai

    2013-10-01

    Double Tearing Modes (DTMs) have been explored as possible sources of large scale instability in non-monotonic q profiles, as well as generators of strong sheared flows in the late nonlinear phase. The reversed-shear profiles which give rise to DTMs may also be accompanied by an Internal Transport Barrier (ITB). The ITB introduces pressure gradients that both couple the DTM to an ideal instability and (with appropriate physics) induce diamagnetic flows, similar to the ideally unstable m = 1 kink-tearing mode. Using the Hall-MHD code MRC-3D we show that the diamagnetic drifts along the current sheets caused by the equilibrium pressure gradient have a stabilizing effect on the reconnecting linear DTM but may not be sufficient to prevent onset of the `explosive growth phase' if the mode is allowed to evolve into the nonlinear phase. MRC-3D is one of a suite of codes using the `libmrc' computational framework. It supports nonuniform grids in curvilinear coordinates with implicit and massively parallel explicit time integration. Its extended MHD model includes the Hall and electron pressure tensor terms in Ohm's law.

  5. The role of pressure flattening in calculating tearing mode stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ham, C. J.; Connor, J. W.; Cowley, S. C.; Hastie, R. J.; Hender, T. C.; Liu, Y. Q.

    2013-12-01

    Calculations of tearing mode stability in tokamaks split conveniently into one in an external region, where marginally stable ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) is applicable, and one in a resonant layer around the rational surface where sophisticated kinetic physics is needed. These two regions are coupled by the stability parameter Δ‧. Axisymmetric pressure and current perturbations localized around the rational surface significantly alter Δ‧. Equations governing the changes in the external solution and Δ‧ are derived for arbitrary perturbations in axisymmetric toroidal geometry. These equations can be used in two ways: (i) the Δ‧ can be calculated for a physically occurring perturbation to the pressure or current; (ii) alternatively we can use these equations to calculate Δ‧ for profiles with a pressure gradient at the rational surface in terms of the value when the perturbation removes this gradient. It is the second application we focus on here since resistive magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) codes do not contain the appropriate layer physics and therefore cannot predict stability for realistic hot plasma directly. They can, however, be used to calculate Δ‧. Existing methods (Ham et al 2012 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 54 025009) for extracting Δ‧ from resistive codes are unsatisfactory when there is a finite pressure gradient at the rational surface and favourable average curvature because of the Glasser stabilizing effect (Glasser et al 1975 Phys. Fluids 18 875). To overcome this difficulty we introduce a specific artificial pressure flattening function that allows the earlier approach to be used. The technique is first tested numerically in cylindrical geometry with an artificial favourable curvature. Its application to toroidal geometry is then demonstrated using the toroidal tokamak tearing mode stability code T7 (Fitzpatrick et al 1993 Nucl. Fusion 33 1533) which employs an approximate analytic equilibrium. The prospects for applying this

  6. Flow stabilization of the ideal MHD resistive wall mode^1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, S. P.; Jardin, S. C.; Freidberg, J. P.; Guazzotto, L.

    2009-05-01

    We demonstrate for the first time in a numerical calculation that for a typical circular cylindrical equilibrium, the ideal MHD resistive wall mode (RWM) can be completely stabilized by bulk equilibrium plasma flow, V, for a window of wall locations without introducing additional dissipation into the system. The stabilization is due to a resonance between the RWM and the Doppler shifted ideal MHD sound continuum. Our numerical approach introduces^2 u=φξ+ iV .∇ξ and the perturbed wall current^3 as variables, such that the eigenvalue, φ, only appears linearly in the linearized stability equations, which allows for the use of standard eigenvalue solvers. The wall current is related to the plasma displacement at the boundary by a Green's function. With the introduction of the resistive wall, we find that it is essential that the finite element grid be highly localized around the resonance radius where the parallel displacement, ξ, becomes singular. We present numerical convergence studies demonstrating that this singular behavior can be approached in a limiting sense. We also report on progress toward extending this calculation to an axisymmetric toroidal geometry. ^1Work supported by a DOE FES fellowship through ORISE and ORAU. ^2L.Guazzotto, J.P Freidberg, and R. Betti, Phys.Plasmas 15, 072503 (2008). ^3S.P. Smith and S. C. Jardin, Phys. Plasmas 15, 080701 (2008).

  7. Two Modes of Weight Training Programs and Patellar Stabilization

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Yiu-ming; Chan, Suk-tak; Tang, Kwok-wing; Ng, Gabriel Y.F

    2009-01-01

    Context: Underconditioned patellar stabilizing muscles could be a predisposing factor for patellar instability. Objective: To examine the effect of 2 modes of weight training on the size of the vastus medialis obliquus (VMO), the resting position and passive mobility of the patella, and the strength of the knee extensor muscles. Design: Prospective intervention, repeated measures in 3 groups. Setting: Orthopaedic and sports sciences research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: 48 healthy adults free from back and lower extremity injuries. Intervention(s): Participants were randomly assigned to muscle hypertrophy training, muscle strength training, or the control group. Those in the training groups pursued training 3 times per week for 8 weeks. Main Outcome Measure(s): Magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound cross-sectional area of the VMO, patellar tilt angle on magnetic resonance imaging, instrumented passive patellar mobility, and isometric knee extension torque of the dominant leg. Results: Participants in both training groups had comparable gains in VMO size, passive patellar stability, and knee extension force, all of which were greater than for the control group (P < .05). Conclusions: Both short-term muscle hypertrophy and strength training programs can reinforce the patellar stabilizers in previously untrained volunteers. PMID:19478844

  8. Crystallographic analysis of the ternary complex of octanoate and N-acetyl-l-methionine with human serum albumin reveals the mode of their stabilizing interactions.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Akito; Chuang, Victor T G; Kouno, Yosuke; Yamasaki, Keishi; Miyamoto, Shuichi; Anraku, Makoto; Otagiri, Masaki

    2017-08-01

    During pasteurization and storage of albumin products, Sodium octanoate (Oct) and N-acethyl-l-tryptophan (N-AcTrp) are used as the thermal stabilizer and the antioxidant for human serum albumin (HSA), respectively. We recently reported that N-acethyl-l-methionine (N-AcMet) is an antioxidant for HSA, which is superior to N-AcTrp when it is especially exposed to light during storage. The objective of the present study is to clarify the molecular mechanism responsible for the HSA protective effect of Oct and N-AcMet based on their ternary complex structure. Crystal structure of the HSA-Oct-N-AcMet complex showed that one N-AcMet molecule is bound to the entrance of drug site 1 of HSA, and its side chain, which is susceptible to the oxidation, is exposed to the solvent. At the same time, two Oct binding sites are observed in drug sites 1 and 2 of HSA, respectively, and each Oct molecule occupies the hydrophobic cavity in them. These results indicate the molecular mechanism responsible for the HSA stabilization by these small molecules as follows. N-AcMet seals the entrance of drug site 1 while it acts as an antioxidant for HSA. Oct is chiefly bound to drug site 2 of HSA and it increases the thermal stability of HSA because of the occupying the largest intra-cavity of sub-domain IIIA in HSA. These findings suggest that N-AcMet acts positively as useful stabilizer for albumin formulated products such as functionalized HSA and HSA fusion proteins. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Failure mode analysis to predict product reliability.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zemanick, P. P.

    1972-01-01

    The failure mode analysis (FMA) is described as a design tool to predict and improve product reliability. The objectives of the failure mode analysis are presented as they influence component design, configuration selection, the product test program, the quality assurance plan, and engineering analysis priorities. The detailed mechanics of performing a failure mode analysis are discussed, including one suggested format. Some practical difficulties of implementation are indicated, drawn from experience with preparing FMAs on the nuclear rocket engine program.

  10. Access to second stability region for coupled peeling-ballooning modes in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, H.R.

    1999-03-01

    The peeling mode restricts access to the second stability region of the ideal ballooning mode at the tokamak plasma edge. Using a two-dimensional, high toroidal mode number eigenmode code employing a model tokamak equilibrium, it is shown that a window to second stability exists for a sufficiently deep magnetic well. The different mode structures of the various eigenmode branches are studied. In particular, when access to second ballooning stability exists, a ballooning mode perturbation at the first stability boundary can extend deep into the plasma core, and then instability is likely to result in large scale loss of plasma energy. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  11. Enhanced toroidal flow stabilization of edge localized modes with increased plasma density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Shikui; Zhu, Ping; Banerjee, Debabrata

    2017-09-01

    Toroidal flow alone is generally thought to have an important influence on tokamak edge pedestal stability, even though theoretical analysis often predicts merely a weak stabilizing effect of toroidal flow on the edge localized modes (ELMs) in experimental parameter regimes. For the first time, we find from two-fluid MHD calculations that such a stabilization, however, can be significantly enhanced by increasing the edge plasma density. Our finding resolves a long-standing mystery whether or how toroidal rotation can indeed have an effective influence on ELMs, and explains why the ELM mitigation and suppression by toroidal rotation are more favorably achieved in higher collisionality regime in recent experiments. The finding suggests a new control scheme on modulating toroidal flow stabilization of ELMs with plasma density, along with a new additional constraint on the optimal level of plasma density for the desired edge plasma conditions.

  12. Certifiable higher order sliding mode control: Practical stability margins approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panathula, Chandrasekhara Bharath

    The Higher Order Sliding Mode (HOSM) controllers are well known for their robustness/insensitivity to bounded perturbations and for handling any given arbitrary relative degree system. The HOSM controller is to be certified for robustness to unmodeled dynamics, before deploying the controller for practical applications. Phase Margin (PM) and Gain Margin ( GM) are the classical characteristics used in linear systems to quantify the linear controller robustness to unmodeled dynamics, and certain values of these margins are required to certify the controller. These conventional margins (PM and GM) are extended to Practical Stability Phase Margin (PSPM) and Practical Stability Gain Margin (PSGM) in this dissertation, and are used to quantify the HOSM control robustness to unmodeled dynamics, presiding the tool to close the gap for HOSM control certification. The proposed robustness metrics ( PSPM and PSGM) are identified by developing tools/algorithms based on Describing Function-Harmonic Balance method. In order for the HOSM controller to achieve the prescribed values on robustness metrics ( PSPM and PSGM), the HOSM controller is cascaded with a linear compensator. A case study of the application of the proposed metrics (PSPM and PSGM) for the certification of F-16 aircraft HOSM attitude control robustness to cascade unmodeled dynamics is presented. In addition, several simulation examples are presented to verify and to validate the proposed methodology.

  13. Tearing mode analysis in tokamaks, revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimura, Y.; Callen, J.D.; Hegna, C.C.

    1998-12-01

    A new {Delta}{sup {prime}} shooting code has been developed to investigate tokamak plasma tearing mode stability in a cylinder and large aspect ratio ({epsilon}{le}0.25) toroidal geometries, neglecting toroidal mode coupling. A different computational algorithm is used (shooting out from the singular surface instead of into it) to resolve the strong singularities at the mode rational surface, particularly in the presence of the finite pressure term. Numerical results compare favorably with Furth {ital et al.} [H. P. Furth {ital et al.}, Phys. Fluids {bold 16}, 1054 (1973)] results. The effects of finite pressure, which are shown to decrease {Delta}{sup {prime}}, are discussed. It is shown that the distortion of the flux surfaces by the Shafranov shift, which modifies the geometry metric elements, stabilizes the tearing mode significantly, even in a low-{beta} regime before the toroidal magnetic curvature effects come into play. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  14. Stability Analysis of Flow Past a Wingtip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edstrand, Adam; Schmid, Peter; Taira, Kunihiko; Cattafesta, Louis

    2015-11-01

    Trailing vortices are commonly associated with diminished aircraft performance by increasing induced drag and producing a wake hazard on following aircraft. Previously, stability analyses have been performed on the Batchelor vortex (Heaton et al., 2009), which models a far field axisymmetric vortex, and airfoil wakes (Woodley & Peake, 1997). Both analyses have shown various instabilities present in these far field vortex-wake flows. This complicates the design of control devices by excluding consideration of near field interactions between the wake and vortex shed from the wing. In this study, we perform temporal and spatial bi-global stability analyses on the near field wake of the flow field behind a NACA0012 wing computed from direct numerical simulation at a chord Reynolds number of 1000. The results identify multiple instabilities including a vortex instability, wake instability, and mixed instability that includes interaction between the wake and vortex. As these modes exhibit wave packets, we perform a wave packet analysis (Obrist & Schmid, 2010), which enables the prediction of spatial mode structures at low computational cost. Furthermore, a bi-global parabolized stability analysis is performed, highlighting disparities between the parallel and parabolized analysis. ONR Grant N00014010824 and NSF PIRE Grant OISE-0968313.

  15. Tearing mode analysis in tokamaks, revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimura, Y.; Callen, J.D.; Hegna, C.C.

    1997-12-01

    A new {Delta}{prime} shooting code has been developed to investigate tokamak plasma tearing mode stability in a cylinder and large aspect ratio ({epsilon} {le} 0.25) toroidal geometries, neglecting toroidal mode coupling. A different computational algorithm is used (shooting out from the singular surface instead of into it) to resolve the strong singularities at the mode rational surface, particularly in the presence of finite pressure term. Numerical results compare favorably with Furth et al. results. The effects of finite pressure, which are shown to decrease {Delta}{prime}, are discussed. It is shown that the distortion of the flux surfaces by the Shafranov shift, which modifies the geometry metric element stabilizes the tearing mode significantly, even in a low {beta} regime before the toroidal magnetic curvature effects come into play. Double tearing modes in toroidal geometries are examined as well. Furthermore, m {ge} 2 tearing mode stability criteria are compared with three dimensional initial value MHD simulation by the FAR code.

  16. Liapunov stability analysis of spinning flexible spacecraft.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barbera, F. J.; Likins, P.

    1973-01-01

    The attitude stability of a class of spinning flexible spacecraft in a force-free environment is analyzed. The spacecraft is modeled as a rigid core having attached to it a flexible appendage idealized as a collection of elastically interconnected particles. Liapunov stability theorems are employed with the Hamiltonian of the system, constrained through the angular momentum integral so as to admit complete damping, used as a testing function. The Hamiltonian is written in terms of modal coordinates as interpreted by the hybrid coordinate formulation, thus allowing truncation to a level amenable to literal stability analysis. Testing functions are constructed for a spacecraft with an arbitrary (discretized) appendage, and closed form stability criteria are generated for the first mode of a restricted appendage model lying in a plane which contains the center of mass and is orthogonal to the spin axis. The criteria are (except for idealized cases on the stability boundary line in the parameter space) both necessary and sufficient for stability for any spacecraft characterized by the planar appendage model, such as a spacecraft containing solar panels and/or radial booms.

  17. Liapunov stability analysis of spinning flexible spacecraft.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barbera, F. J.; Likins, P.

    1973-01-01

    The attitude stability of a class of spinning flexible spacecraft in a force-free environment is analyzed. The spacecraft is modeled as a rigid core having attached to it a flexible appendage idealized as a collection of elastically interconnected particles. Liapunov stability theorems are employed with the Hamiltonian of the system, constrained through the angular momentum integral so as to admit complete damping, used as a testing function. The Hamiltonian is written in terms of modal coordinates as interpreted by the hybrid coordinate formulation, thus allowing truncation to a level amenable to literal stability analysis. Testing functions are constructed for a spacecraft with an arbitrary (discretized) appendage, and closed form stability criteria are generated for the first mode of a restricted appendage model lying in a plane which contains the center of mass and is orthogonal to the spin axis. The criteria are (except for idealized cases on the stability boundary line in the parameter space) both necessary and sufficient for stability for any spacecraft characterized by the planar appendage model, such as a spacecraft containing solar panels and/or radial booms.

  18. Improved feedback control of wall stabilized kink modes with different plasma-wall couplings and mode rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Q.; Levesque, J. P.; Stoafer, C. C.; Bialek, J.; Byrne, P.; Hughes, P. E.; Mauel, M. E.; Navratil, G. A.; Rhodes, D. J.

    2016-04-01

    A new algorithm for feedback control of rotating, wall-stabilized kink modes in the High Beta Tokamak-Extended Pulse (HBT-EP) device maintains an accurate phase shift between the perturbation and the measured rotating mode through current control, with control power emphasizing fast rotation and phase jumps over fast amplitude changes. In HBT-EP, wall-stabilized kink modes become unstable above the ideal wall stability limit, and feedback suppression is aimed at delaying the onset of discharge disruption through reduction of the kink mode amplitude. Performance of the new feedback algorithm is tested under different experimental conditions, including variation of the plasma-wall coupling, insertion of a ferritic wall, changing mode rotation frequency over the range of 4-8 kHz using an internal biased electrode, and adjusting the feedback phase-angle to accelerate, amplify, or suppress the mode. We find the previously reported excitation of the slowly rotating mode at high feedback gain in HBT-EP is mitigated by the current control scheme. We also find good agreement between the observed and predicted changes to the mode rotation frequency and amplitude. When ferritic material is introduced, or the plasma-wall coupling becomes weaker as the walls are retracted from plasma, the feedback gain needs to be increased to achieve the same level of suppression. When mode rotation is slowed by a biased electrode, the feedback system still achieves mode suppression, and demonstrates wide bandwidth effectiveness.

  19. Slope Stability Analysis Using GIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouajaj, Ahmed; Bahi, Lahcen; Ouadif, Latifa; Awa, Mohamed

    2016-10-01

    An analysis of slope stability using Geographic Information System (GIS) is presented in this paper. The methodology is based on the calculation of the safety factor in 2D and 3D using ArcGis. Hovland's Method in 3D and 2D were used in the stability analysis of the slope located at the 34 kilometer point (K.P.34) on the highway in the North of Morocco connecting Tangier to Ksar Sghir. Results shows that the safety factors obtained in 3D are always higher than those obtained in 2D and the slope becomes unstable when the water table level is less than 1 m.

  20. Finite-time stability and stabilization for stochastic markov jump systems with mode-dependent time delays.

    PubMed

    Yan, Zhiguo; Song, Yunxia; Park, Ju H

    2017-05-01

    This paper is concerned with the problems of finite-time stability and stabilization for stochastic Markov systems with mode-dependent time-delays. In order to reduce conservatism, a mode-dependent approach is utilized. Based on the derived stability conditions, state-feedback controller and observer-based controller are designed, respectively. A new N-mode algorithm is given to obtain the maximum value of time-delay. Finally, an example is used to show the merit of the proposed results. Copyright © 2017 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Stability evaluation of short-circuiting gas metal arc welding based on ensemble empirical mode decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yong; Wang, Kehong; Zhou, Zhilan; Zhou, Xiaoxiao; Fang, Jimi

    2017-03-01

    The arc of gas metal arc welding (GMAW) contains abundant information about its stability and droplet transition, which can be effectively characterized by extracting the arc electrical signals. In this study, ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD) was used to evaluate the stability of electrical current signals. The welding electrical signals were first decomposed by EEMD, and then transformed to a Hilbert–Huang spectrum and a marginal spectrum. The marginal spectrum is an approximate distribution of amplitude with frequency of signals, and can be described by a marginal index. Analysis of various welding process parameters showed that the marginal index of current signals increased when the welding process was more stable, and vice versa. Thus EEMD combined with the marginal index can effectively uncover the stability and droplet transition of GMAW.

  2. Stabilizing effects of enhanced resistivity due to lithium-conditioning on low-n edge localized modes in NSTX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Debabrata; Zhu, Ping; Maingi, Rajesh

    2017-05-01

    The stabilizing effects of enhanced edge resistivity on edge-localized instabilities in high confinement discharges due to lithium-conditioning in the National Spherical Torus Experiment are identified for the first time. Linear stability analysis of the experimentally constrained equilibrium suggests that the change in the equilibrium plasma density and pressure profiles alone due to lithium-conditioning may be insufficient for a complete suppression of low toroidal mode number peeling-ballooning modes. The enhanced resistivity due to the increased effective electric charge number Zeff after lithium-conditioning provides additional stabilization of the edge localized modes. Notably, this stabilizing effect by enhanced edge resistivity becomes evident only in two-fluid magnetohydrodynamic simulations.

  3. A generalized hydrodynamic model for acoustic mode stability in viscoelastic plasma fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borah, B.; Haloi, A.; Karmakar, P. K.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper a generalized hydrodynamic (GH) model to investigate acoustic-mode excitation and stability in simplified strongly coupled bi-component plasma is proposed. The goal is centered in seeing the viscoelasticity-influences on the instability properties. The dispersive and nondispersive features are methodologically explored followed by numerical illustrations. It is seen that, unlike usual plasma acoustic mode, here the mode stability is drastically modified due to the considered viscoelastic effects contributed from both the electronic and ionic fluids. For example, it is found that there exists an excitation threshold value on angular wavenumber, K ≈3 in the K-space on the Debye scale, beyond which only dispersive characteristic features prevail. Further, it is demonstrated that the viscoelastic relaxation time plays a stabilizing influential role on the wave dynamics. In contrast, it is just opposite for the effective viscoelastic relaxation effect. Consistency with the usual viscoelasticity-free situations, with and without plasma approximation taken into account, is also established and explained. It is identified and conjectured that the plasma fluid viscoelasticity acts as unavoidable dispersive agency in attributing several new characteristics to acoustic wave excitation and propagation. The analysis is also exploited to derive a quantitative glimpse on the various basic properties and dimensionless numbers of the viscoelastic plasma. Finally, extended implications of our results tentative to different cosmic, space and astrophysical situations, amid the entailed facts and faults, are highlighted together with indicated future directions.

  4. Stability of the electron-driven fishbone mode

    SciTech Connect

    Merle, Antoine; Decker, Joan; Garbet, Xavier; Sabot, Roland; Nicolas, Timothee; Guimaraes-Filho, Zwinglio

    2012-07-15

    Electron-driven fishbones provide a good test bed for the linear theory of fast-particle driven instabilities as they exhibit a very high sensitivity to the details of both the equilibrium and the electronic distribution function. Thus, they can help validate the models developed for studying instabilities driven by alpha particles in future fusion reactors such as ITER. The fishbone dispersion relation is extended to properly account for resonance with passing particles by including the contribution of the parallel motion to the resonance condition. Barely passing electrons are found to drive the mode unstable at a lower frequency than barely trapped electrons. Although globally destabilizing, the influence of passing electrons quickly decreases away from the trapped-passing boundary. This is confirmed by an analysis using distributions close to those obtained in electron cyclotron resonance heating experiments. The major effect of this new resonance condition is a reduction of the fast-electron density threshold coupled to a reduction of the frequency of the mode.

  5. Resistive stability of 2/1 modes near 1/1 resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Brennan, D. P.; Turnbull, A. D.; Chu, M. S.; La Haye, R. J.; Lao, L. L.; Osborne, T. H.; Galkin, S. A.

    2007-05-15

    The stability of resistive modes is examined using reconstructions of experimental equilibria in the DIII-D tokamak [J. L. Luxon and L. G. Davis, Fusion Technol. 8, 441 (1985)], revealing the important physics in mode onset as discharges evolve to instability. Experimental attempts to access the highest {beta} in tokamak discharges, including 'hybrid' discharges, are typically terminated by the growth of a large 2/1 tearing mode. Model equilibria, based on experimental reconstructions from one of these discharges with steady state axial q{sub 0}{approx_equal}1, are generated varying q{sub 0} and pressure. For each equilibrium, the PEST-III code [A. Pletzer, A. Bondeson, and R. L. Dewar, J. Comput. Phys. 115, 530 (1994)] is used to determine the ideal magnetohydrodynamic solution including both tearing and interchange parities. This outer region solution must be matched to the resistive inner layer solutions at the rational surface to determine resistive mode stability. From this analysis it is found that the approach to q=1 simultaneously causes the 2/1 mode to become unstable and the nonresonant 1/1 displacement to become large, as the ideal {beta} limit rapidly decreases toward the experimental value. However, the 2/2 harmonic on axis, which is also large and is coupled to the saturated steady state 3/2 mode, is thought to contribute to the current drive sustaining q{sub 0} above 1 in these hybrid discharges. Thus, the approach to the q=1 resonance is self-limiting in this context. This work suggests that sustaining q{sub 0} slightly above 1 will avoid the 2/1 instability and will allow access to significantly higher {beta} values in these discharges.

  6. Equilibrium and global MHD stability study of KSTAR high beta plasmas under passive and active mode control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsuro-Hopkins, O.; Sabbagh, S. A.; Bialek, J. M.; Park, H. K.; Bak, J. G.; Chung, J.; Hahn, S. H.; Kim, J. Y.; Kwon, M.; Lee, S. G.; Yoon, S. W.; You, K.-I.; Glasser, A. H.; Lao, L. L.

    2010-02-01

    The Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research, KSTAR, is designed to operate a steady-state, high beta plasma while retaining global magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) stability to establish the scientific and technological basis of an economically attractive fusion reactor. An equilibrium model is established for stability analysis of KSTAR. Reconstructions were performed for the experimental start-up scenario and experimental first plasma operation using the EFIT code. The VALEN code was used to determine the vacuum vessel current distribution. Theoretical high beta equilibria spanning the expected operational range are computed for various profiles including generic L-mode and DIII-D experimental H-mode pressure profiles. Ideal MHD stability calculations of toroidal mode number of unity using the DCON code shows a factor of 2 improvement in the wall-stabilized plasma beta limit at moderate to low plasma internal inductance. The planned stabilization system in KSTAR comprises passive stabilizing plates and actively cooled in-vessel control coils (IVCCs) designed for non-axisymmetric field error correction and stabilization of slow timescale MHD modes including resistive wall modes (RWMs). VALEN analysis using standard proportional gain shows that active stabilization near the ideal wall limit can be reached with feedback using the midplane segment of the IVCC. The RMS power required for control using both white noise and noise taken from NSTX active stabilization experiments is computed for beta near the ideal wall limit. Advanced state-space control algorithms yield a factor of 2 power reduction assuming white noise while remaining robust with respect to variations in plasma beta.

  7. Effect of master oscillator stability over pulse repetition frequency on hybrid semiconductor mode-locked laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro Alves, D.; Abreu, Manuel; Cabral, Alexandre; Rebordão, J. M.

    2015-04-01

    Semiconductor mode-locked lasers are a very attractive laser pulse source for high accuracy length metrology. However, for some applications, this kind of device does not have the required frequency stability. Operating the laser in hybrid mode will increase the laser pulse repetition frequency (PRF) stability. In this study it is showed that the laser PRF is not only locked to the master oscillator but also maintains the same level of stability of the master oscillator. The device used in this work is a 10 mm long mode-locked asymmetrical cladding single section InAs/InP quantum dash diode laser emitting at 1580 nm with a pulse repetition frequency of ≈4.37 GHz. The laser nominal stability in passive mode (no external oscillator) shows direct dependence with the gain current and the stability range goes from 10-4 to 10-7. Several oscillators with different stabilities were used for the hybrid-mode operation (with external oscillator) and the resulting mode-locked laser stability compared. For low cost oscillators with low stability, the laser PRF stability achieves a value of 10-7 and for higher stable oscillation source (such as oven controlled quartz oscillators (OXCO)) the stability can reach values up to 10-12 (τ =1 s).

  8. Frequency Stabilization of a Single Mode Terahertz Quantum Cascade Laser to the Kilohertz Level

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-04-27

    Frequency stabilization of a single mode terahertz quantum cascade laser to the kilohertz level 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT...primarily in a single-longitudinal mode (SLM) up to a bias voltage of 3.7 V and a multi-lodgitudinal mode ( MLM ) at higher voltages. It was mounted in a

  9. Stability analysis of thin-walled fiber reinforced members

    SciTech Connect

    Basu, P.K.; Dey, A.

    1997-07-01

    Finite element and theoretical stability analyses of thin-walled glass fiber reinforced structural members are undertaken to predict the critical load in various modes of buckling and to study the buckling behavior of such members as compared to those made of isotropic materials. The applicability of component plate analysis is evaluated with respect to full three-dimensional analysis.

  10. Stability of coupled tearing and twisting modes in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzpatrick, R.

    1994-03-01

    A dispersion relation is derived for resistive modes of arbitrary parity in a tokamak plasma. At low mode amplitude, tearing and twisting modes which have nonideal MHD behavior at only one rational surface at a time in the plasma are decoupled via sheared rotation and diamagnetic flows. At higher amplitude, more unstable {open_quote}compound{close_quote} modes develop which have nonideal behavior simultaneously at many surfaces. Such modes possess tearing parity layers at some of the nonideal surfaces, and twisting parity layers at others, but mixed parity layers are generally disallowed. At low mode number, {open_quote}compound{close_quote} modes are likely to have tearing parity layers at all of the nonideal surfaces in a very low-{beta} plasma, but twisting parity layers become more probable as the plasma {beta} is increased. At high mode number, unstable twisting modes which exceed a critical amplitude drive conventional magnetic island chains on alternate rational surfaces, to form an interlocking structure in which the O-points and X-points of neighboring chains line up.

  11. Rotational and magnetic shear stabilization of magnetohydrodynamic modes and turbulence in DIII-D high performance discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Lao, L.L.; Burrell, K.H.; Casper, T.S.

    1996-08-01

    The confinement and the stability properties of the DIII-D tokamak high performance discharges are evaluated in terms of rotational and magnetic shear with emphasis on the recent experimental results obtained from the negative central magnetic shear (NCS) experiments. In NCS discharges, a core transport barrier is often observed to form inside the NCS region accompanied by a reduction in core fluctuation amplitudes. Increasing negative magnetic shear contributes to the formation of this core transport barrier, but by itself is not sufficient to fully stabilize the toroidal drift mode (trapped- electron-{eta}{sub i}mode) to explain this formation. Comparison of the Doppler shift shear rate to the growth rate of the {eta}{sub i} mode suggests that the large core {bold E x B} flow shear can stabilize this mode and broaden the region of reduced core transport . Ideal and resistive stability analysis indicates the performance of NCS discharges with strongly peaked pressure profiles is limited by the resistive interchange mode to low {Beta}{sub N} {lt} 2.3. This mode is insensitive to the details of the rotational and the magnetic shear profiles. A new class of discharges which has a broad region of weak or slightly negative magnetic shear (WNS) is described. The WNS discharges have broader pressure profiles and higher values than the NCS discharges together with high confinement and high fusion reactivity.

  12. Stability analysis of ecomorphodynamic equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bärenbold, F.; Crouzy, B.; Perona, P.

    2016-02-01

    In order to shed light on the influence of riverbed vegetation on river morphodynamics, we perform a linear stability analysis on a minimal model of vegetation dynamics coupled with classical one- and two-dimensional Saint-Venant-Exner equations of morphodynamics. Vegetation is modeled as a density field of rigid, nonsubmerged cylinders and affects flow via a roughness change. Furthermore, vegetation is assumed to develop following a logistic dependence and may be uprooted by flow. First, we perform the stability analysis of the reduced one-dimensional framework. As a result of the competitive interaction between vegetation growth and removal through uprooting, we find a domain in the parameter space where originally straight rivers are unstable toward periodic longitudinal patterns. For realistic values of the sediment transport parameter, the dominant longitudinal wavelength is determined by the parameters of the vegetation model. Bed topography is found to adjust to the spatial pattern fixed by vegetation. Subsequently, the stability analysis is repeated for the two-dimensional framework, where the system may evolve toward alternate or multiple bars. On a fixed bed, we find instability toward alternate bars due to flow-vegetation interaction, but no multiple bars. Both alternate and multiple bars are present on a movable, vegetated bed. Finally, we find that the addition of vegetation to a previously unvegetated riverbed favors instability toward alternate bars and thus the development of a single course rather than braiding.

  13. Instantaneous normal mode analysis of melting of finite dust clusters.

    PubMed

    Melzer, André; Schella, André; Schablinski, Jan; Block, Dietmar; Piel, Alexander

    2012-06-01

    The experimental melting transition of finite two-dimensional dust clusters in a dusty plasma is analyzed using the method of instantaneous normal modes. In the experiment, dust clusters are heated in a thermodynamic equilibrium from a solid to a liquid state using a four-axis laser manipulation system. The fluid properties of the dust cluster, such as the diffusion constant, are measured from the instantaneous normal mode analysis. Thereby, the phase transition of these finite clusters is approached from the liquid phase. From the diffusion constants, unique melting temperatures have been assigned to dust clusters of various sizes that very well reflect their dynamical stability properties.

  14. Dynamics and stabilization of peak current-mode controlled buck converter with constant current load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leng, Min-Rui; Zhou, Guo-Hua; Zhang, Kai-Tun; Li, Zhen-Hua

    2015-10-01

    The discrete iterative map model of peak current-mode controlled buck converter with constant current load (CCL), containing the output voltage feedback and ramp compensation, is established in this paper. Based on this model the complex dynamics of this converter is investigated by analyzing bifurcation diagrams and the Lyapunov exponent spectrum. The effects of ramp compensation and output voltage feedback on the stability of the converter are investigated. Experimental results verify the simulation and theoretical analysis. The stability boundary and chaos boundary are obtained under the theoretical conditions of period-doubling bifurcation and border collision. It is found that there are four operation regions in the peak current-mode controlled buck converter with CCL due to period-doubling bifurcation and border-collision bifurcation. Research results indicate that ramp compensation can extend the stable operation range and transfer the operating mode, and output voltage feedback can eventually eliminate the coexisting fast-slow scale instability. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61371033), the Fok Ying-Tung Education Foundation for Young Teachers in the Higher Education Institutions of China (Grant No. 142027), the Sichuan Provincial Youth Science and Technology Fund, China (Grant Nos. 2014JQ0015 and 2013JQ0033), and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, China (Grant No. SWJTU11CX029).

  15. Stabilizing Gyroscopic Modes in Magnetic-Bearing-Supported Flywheels by Using Cross-Axis Proportional Gains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Gerald V.; Kascak, Albert F.; Jansen, Ralph H.; Dever, Timothy P.; Duffy, Kirsten P.

    2006-01-01

    For magnetic-bearing-supported high-speed rotating machines with significant gyroscopic effects, it is necessary to stabilize forward and backward tilt whirling modes. Instability or low damping of these modes can prevent the attainment of desired shaft speed. We show analytically that both modes can be stabilized by using cross-axis proportional gains and high- and low-pass filters in the magnetic bearing controller. Furthermore, at high shaft speeds, where system phase lags degrade the stability of the forward-whirl mode, a phasor advance of the control signal can partially counteract the phase lag. In some range of high shaft speed, the derivative gain for the tilt modes (essential for stability for slowly rotating shafts) can be removed entirely. We show analytically how the tilt eigenvalues depend on shaft speed and on various controller feedback parameters.

  16. Long-term frequency stabilization system for external cavity diode laser based on mode boundary detection.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhouxiang; Huang, Kaikai; Jiang, Yunfeng; Lu, Xuanhui

    2011-12-01

    We have realized a long-term frequency stabilization system for external cavity diode laser (ECDL) based on mode boundary detection method. In this system, the saturated absorption spectroscopy was used. The current and the grating of the ECDL were controlled by a computer-based feedback control system. By checking if there are mode boundaries in the spectrum, the control system determined how to adjust current to avoid mode hopping. This procedure was executed periodically to ensure the long-term stabilization of ECDL in the absence of mode hops. This diode laser system with non-antireflection coating had operated in the condition of long-term mode-hop-free stabilization for almost 400 h, which is a significant improvement of ECDL frequency stabilization system.

  17. Long-term frequency stabilization system for external cavity diode laser based on mode boundary detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhouxiang; Huang, Kaikai; Jiang, Yunfeng; Lu, Xuanhui

    2011-12-01

    We have realized a long-term frequency stabilization system for external cavity diode laser (ECDL) based on mode boundary detection method. In this system, the saturated absorption spectroscopy was used. The current and the grating of the ECDL were controlled by a computer-based feedback control system. By checking if there are mode boundaries in the spectrum, the control system determined how to adjust current to avoid mode hopping. This procedure was executed periodically to ensure the long-term stabilization of ECDL in the absence of mode hops. This diode laser system with non-antireflection coating had operated in the condition of long-term mode-hop-free stabilization for almost 400 h, which is a significant improvement of ECDL frequency stabilization system.

  18. Resonant field amplification with feedback-stabilized regime in current driven resistive wall mode

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Yueqiang; In, Y.; Okabayashi, M.

    2010-07-15

    The stability and resonant field response of current driven resistive wall modes are numerically studied for DIII-D [J. L. Luxon, Nucl. Fusion 42, 614 (2002)] low pressure plasmas. The resonant field response of the feedback-stabilized resistive wall mode is investigated both analytically and numerically, and compared with the response from intrinsically stable or marginally stable modes. The modeling qualitatively reproduces the experimental results. Furthermore, based on some recent results and on the indirect numerical evidence in this work, it is suggested that the mode stability behavior observed in DIII-D experiments is due to the kink-peeling mode stabilization by the separatrix geometry. The phase inversion radius of the computed plasma displacement does not generally coincide with the radial locations of rational surfaces, also supporting experimental observations.

  19. Gyrokinetic verification of the persistence of kinetic ballooning modes in the magnetohydrodynamic second stability regime

    SciTech Connect

    Joiner, N.; Hirose, A.

    2008-08-15

    The kinetic ballooning mode (KBM) has been shown in previous work to be unstable within the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) region (in s-{alpha} space) of second stability [Hirose et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 72, 3993 (2004)]. In this work we verify this result using the gyrokinetic code GS2 [Kotschenreuther et al., Comput. Phys. Commun. 88, 128 (1996)] treating both ions and electrons as kinetic species and retaining the magnetosonic perturbation B{sub parallel}. Growth rates calculated using GS2 differ significantly from the previous differential/shooting code analysis. Calculations without B{sub parallel} find the stability region is preserved, while the addition of B{sub parallel} causes the mode to be more unstable than previously calculated within the region of MHD second stability. The inclusion of parallel ion current and B{sub parallel} into the shooting code does not account for the GS2 results. The evidence presented in this paper leads us to the conclusion that the adiabatic electron approximation employed in previous studies is found to be unsuitable for this type of instability. Based on the findings of this work, the KBM becomes an interesting instability in the context of internal transport barriers, where {alpha} is often large and magnetic shear is small (positive or negative)

  20. The AlGaAs single-mode stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Botez, D.; Ladany, I.

    1983-01-01

    Single-mode spectral behavior with aging in constricted double heterojunction (CDH) lasers was studied. The CDH lasers demonstrated excellent reliability ( or = 1 million years extrapolated room-temperature MTTF) and single-mode operation after 10,000 hours of 70 C aging. The deleterious effects of laser-fiber coupling on the spectra of the diodes were eliminated through the use of wedge-shaped fibers. A novel high-power large optical cavity (LOC)-type laser was developed: the terraced-heterostructure (TH)-LOC laser, which provides the highest power into a single-mode (i.e., 50 mW CW) ever reported.

  1. Frequency-mode structure analysis of the diode-pumped solid state lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duda, Pawel A.; Witkowski, Jerzy S.; Nowicki, Romuald; Abramski, Krzysztof M.

    2000-10-01

    The analysis of pump geometry presented in this work allowed to determine optimal conditions of excitations of diode pumped solid state lasers for oscillation of quasi-Gaussian TEM00 mode. There appears the existence of weak transverse mode structure. The heterodyne analysis for two kinds of laser: Nd:YAG and Nd:YVO4 was performed. We found the strong mode competition effect decreasing long- term frequency stability of the lasers. The offset frequency stability between two Nd:YVO4 lasers for short averaging time is 10-10. Using offset frequency feedback loop, stability of the level of 300kHz has been obtained.

  2. Robust Stabilization of T-S Fuzzy Stochastic Descriptor Systems via Integral Sliding Modes.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinghao; Zhang, Qingling; Yan, Xing-Gang; Spurgeon, Sarah K

    2017-09-19

    This paper addresses the robust stabilization problem for T-S fuzzy stochastic descriptor systems using an integral sliding mode control paradigm. A classical integral sliding mode control scheme and a nonparallel distributed compensation (Non-PDC) integral sliding mode control scheme are presented. It is shown that two restrictive assumptions previously adopted developing sliding mode controllers for Takagi-Sugeno (T-S) fuzzy stochastic systems are not required with the proposed framework. A unified framework for sliding mode control of T-S fuzzy systems is formulated. The proposed Non-PDC integral sliding mode control scheme encompasses existing schemes when the previously imposed assumptions hold. Stability of the sliding motion is analyzed and the sliding mode controller is parameterized in terms of the solutions of a set of linear matrix inequalities which facilitates design. The methodology is applied to an inverted pendulum model to validate the effectiveness of the results presented.

  3. Interactive multi-mode blade impact analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, A.; Cornell, R. W.

    1978-01-01

    The theoretical methodology used in developing an analysis for the response of turbine engine fan blades subjected to soft-body (bird) impacts is reported, and the computer program developed using this methodology as its basis is described. This computer program is an outgrowth of two programs that were previously developed for the purpose of studying problems of a similar nature (a 3-mode beam impact analysis and a multi-mode beam impact analysis). The present program utilizes an improved missile model that is interactively coupled with blade motion which is more consistent with actual observations. It takes into account local deformation at the impact area, blade camber effects, and the spreading of the impacted missile mass on the blade surface. In addition, it accommodates plate-type mode shapes. The analysis capability in this computer program represents a significant improvement in the development of the methodology for evaluating potential fan blade materials and designs with regard to foreign object impact resistance.

  4. Ponderomotive stabilization of flute modes in mirrors Feedback control and numerical results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Similon, P. L.

    1987-01-01

    Ponderomotive stabilization of rigid plasma flute modes is numerically investigated by use of a variational principle, for a simple geometry, without eikonal approximation. While the near field of the studied antenna can be stabilizing, the far field has a small contribution only, because of large cancellation by quasi mode-coupling terms. The field energy for stabilization is evaluated and is a nonnegligible fraction of the plasma thermal energy. A new antenna design is proposed, and feedback stabilization is investigated. Their use drastically reduces power requirements.

  5. Stabilizing the elastic modes of the Space Shuttle vehicle during launch.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greiner, H. G.

    1973-01-01

    The influence of vibration modes on the vehicle control system stabilization problem is examined with a conventional, nonadaptive, single-rate-sensor autopilot. The linear stability analyses are based upon symmetric and antisymmetric modal data generated from flexible-beam models. Primary emphasis is placed upon using only the three orbiter engines as control effectors. Principal control system variables considered are the effective autopilot rate and attitude gains, rate and attitude sensor locations, and lead/lag stability compensation. Results indicate that a multiple-sensor autopilot configuration will be necessary to achieve satisfactory vibration mode stability margins.

  6. Contrast agent stability: a continuous B-mode imaging approach.

    PubMed

    Sboros, V; Moran, C M; Pye, S D; McDicken, W N

    2001-10-01

    The stability of contrast agents in suspensions with various dissolved gas levels has not been reported in the literature. An in vitro investigation has been carried out that studied the combined effect of varying the acoustic pressure along with degassing the suspension environment. In this study, the contrast agents were introduced into suspensions with different oxygen concentration levels, and their relative performance was assessed in terms of decay rate of their backscatter echoes. The partial pressures of oxygen in those solutions ranged between 1.5 and 26 kPa. Two IV and one arterial contrast agents were used: Definity, Quantison, and Myomap. It was found that Quantison and Myomap released free bubbles at high acoustic pressure that also dissolved faster in degassed suspensions. The backscatter decay for Definity did not depend on the air content of the suspensions. The destruction of bubbles was dependent on acoustic pressure. Different backscatter performance was observed by different populations of bubbles of the last two agents. The physical quantity of "overall backscatter" (OB) was defined as the integral of the decay rate over time of the backscatter of the contrast suspensions, and improved significantly the understanding of the behaviour of the agents. A quantitative analysis of the backscatter properties of contrast agents using a continuous imaging approach was difficult to achieve. This is due to the fact that the backscatter in the field of view is representative of a bubble population affected by the ultrasound (US) field, but this bubble population is not representative of the contrast suspension in the whole tank. Single frame insonation is suggested to avoid the effects of decay due to the ultrasonic field, and to measure a tank-representative backscatter. The definition of OB was useful, however, in understanding the behaviour of the agents.

  7. GENERAL: Mode shift and stability control of a current mode controlled buck-boost converter operating in discontinuous conduction mode with ramp compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Bo-Cheng; Xu, Jian-Ping; Liu, Zhong

    2009-11-01

    By establishing the discrete iterative mapping model of a current mode controlled buck-boost converter, this paper studies the mechanism of mode shift and stability control of the buck-boost converter operating in discontinuous conduction mode with a ramp compensation current. With the bifurcation diagram, Lyapunov exponent spectrum, time-domain waveform and parameter space map, the performance of the buck-boost converter circuit utilizing a compensating ramp current has been analysed. The obtained results indicate that the system trajectory is weakly chaotic and strongly intermittent under discontinuous conduction mode. By using ramp compensation, the buck-boost converter can shift from discontinuous conduction mode to continuous conduction mode, and effectively operates in the stable period-one region.

  8. Nonlinear dynamics of a driven mode near marginal stability

    SciTech Connect

    Berk, H.L.; Breizman, B.N.; Pekker, M.

    1995-09-01

    The nonlinear dynamics of a linearly unstable mode in a driven kinetic system is investigated to determine scaling of the saturated fields near the instability threshold. To leading order, this problem reduces to solving an integral equation with a temporally nonlocal cubic term. This equation can exhibit a self-similar solution that blows up in a finite time. When the blow-up occurs, higher nonlinearities become important and the mode saturates due to plateau formation arising from particle trapping in the wave. Otherwise, the simplified equation gives a regular solution that leads to a different saturation scaling reflecting the closeness to the instability threshold.

  9. Resonator stability and higher-order modes in free-electron laser oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathak, Abhishek; Krishnagopal, Srinivas

    2014-08-01

    Three-dimensional simulation codes genesis and opc are used to investigate the dependence of the resonator stability of free-electron laser (FEL) oscillators on the stability parameter, laser wavelength, outcoupling hole size and mirror tilt. We find that to have stable lasing over a wide range of wavelengths, the FEL cavity configuration should be carefully chosen. Broadly, the concentric configuration gives near-Gaussian modes and the best performance. At intermediate configurations the dominant mode often switches to a higher-order mode, which kills lasing. For the same reason, the outcoupled power can also be less. We have constructed a simple analytic model to study resonator stability which gives results that are in excellent agreement with the simulations. This suggests that modes in FEL oscillators are determined more by the cavity configuration and radiation propagation than by the details of the FEL interaction. We find (as in experiments at the CLIO FEL) that tilting the mirror can, for some configurations, lead to more outcoupled power than a perfectly aligned mirror because the mode is now a more compact higher-order mode, which may have implications for the mode quality for user experiments. Finally, we show that the higher-order mode obtained is usually a single Gauss-Laguerre mode, and therefore it should be possible to filter out the mode using suitable intracavity elements, leading to better FEL performance.

  10. Neoclassical effects on the stabilization of tearing mode by current modulation

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Xiaoqing Wang, Shaojie; Yang, Weihong

    2014-02-15

    The neoclassical effects on the stabilization of tearing modes by current modulation have been investigated. Neoclassical effects enhance the resistivity and reduce the resistive diffusion time of the modulation current. Therefore, the oscillating current can penetrate deeper into the plasma. With an oscillating loop voltage, the plasma oscillates radially at the Ware-pinch velocity. These neoclassical effects improve the efficiency of tearing mode stabilization by the current modulation.

  11. Stability and modal analysis of shock/boundary layer interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichols, Joseph W.; Larsson, Johan; Bernardini, Matteo; Pirozzoli, Sergio

    2017-02-01

    The dynamics of oblique shock wave/turbulent boundary layer interactions is analyzed by mining a large-eddy simulation (LES) database for various strengths of the incoming shock. The flow dynamics is first analyzed by means of dynamic mode decomposition (DMD), which highlights the simultaneous occurrence of two types of flow modes, namely a low-frequency type associated with breathing motion of the separation bubble, accompanied by flapping motion of the reflected shock, and a high-frequency type associated with the propagation of instability waves past the interaction zone. Global linear stability analysis performed on the mean LES flow fields yields a single unstable zero-frequency mode, plus a variety of marginally stable low-frequency modes whose stability margin decreases with the strength of the interaction. The least stable linear modes are grouped into two classes, one of which bears striking resemblance to the breathing mode recovered from DMD and another class associated with revolving motion within the separation bubble. The results of the modal and linear stability analysis support the notion that low-frequency dynamics is intrinsic to the interaction zone, but some continuous forcing from the upstream boundary layer may be required to keep the system near a limit cycle. This can be modeled as a weakly damped oscillator with forcing, as in the early empirical model by Plotkin (AIAA J 13:1036-1040, 1975).

  12. Investigation of β-cyclodextrin-norfloxacin inclusion complexes. Part 2. Inclusion mode and stability studies.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Cassiana; Buttchevitz, Aline; Barison, Andersson; Ocampos, Fernanda Maria Marins; Bernardi, Larissa Sakis; Oliveira, Paulo Renato; Silva, Marcos Antônio Segatto

    2015-01-01

    Norfloxacin (NFX) is a broad spectrum antibiotic with low solubility and permeability, which is unstable on exposure to light and humidity. In this study, the mode of NFX inclusion into β-cyclodextrin complexes was evaluated and a complete physical, chemical and microbiological stability study of the inclusion complexes was carried out. Potentiometric titrations were performed to evaluate changes in the pKa of the NFX molecule due to the formation of an inclusion complex and NMR analysis demonstrated that the NFX molecule is included in the β-cyclodextrin cavity. Inclusion complexes obtained by kneading followed by freeze-drying showed improved NFX stability compared with the isolated drug or the physical mixture. This method was effective in terms of protecting the drug from photodegradation and also avoiding hydrolysis. Differences between NFX and the complexes could be evidenced by thermal analysis, infrared spectroscopy and x-ray powder diffraction as well as by determining the solubility and drug content. The antimicrobial potency was also preserved on applying the promising method of kneading. The satisfactory stability indicates that the NFX/β-cyclodextrin complexes could be useful as an alternative to the existing NFX drug formulation.

  13. Failure Mode Identification Through Clustering Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arunajadai, Srikesh G.; Stone, Robert B.; Tumer, Irem Y.; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Research has shown that nearly 80% of the costs and problems are created in product development and that cost and quality are essentially designed into products in the conceptual stage. Currently, failure identification procedures (such as FMEA (Failure Modes and Effects Analysis), FMECA (Failure Modes, Effects and Criticality Analysis) and FTA (Fault Tree Analysis)) and design of experiments are being used for quality control and for the detection of potential failure modes during the detail design stage or post-product launch. Though all of these methods have their own advantages, they do not give information as to what are the predominant failures that a designer should focus on while designing a product. This work uses a functional approach to identify failure modes, which hypothesizes that similarities exist between different failure modes based on the functionality of the product/component. In this paper, a statistical clustering procedure is proposed to retrieve information on the set of predominant failures that a function experiences. The various stages of the methodology are illustrated using a hypothetical design example.

  14. Nonlinear Stability and Saturation of Ballooning Modes in Tokamaks*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ham, C. J.; Cowley, S. C.; Brochard, G.; Wilson, H. R.

    2016-06-01

    The theory of tokamak stability to nonlinear "ballooning" displacements of elliptical magnetic flux tubes is presented. Above a critical pressure profile the energy stored in the plasma may be lowered by finite (but not infinitesimal) displacements of such tubes (metastability). Above a higher pressure profile, the linear stability boundary, such tubes are linearly and nonlinearly unstable. The predicted saturated flux tube displacement can be of the order of the pressure gradient scale length. Plasma transport from these displaced flux tubes may explain the rapid loss of confinement in some experiments.

  15. Impact of ion diamagnetic drift on ideal ballooning mode stability in rotating tokamak plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aiba, N.

    2016-04-01

    Drift magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations have been derived in order to investigate the ion diamagnetic drift effect on the stability to ideal MHD modes in rotating plasmas. These drift MHD equations have been simplified with the Frieman-Rotenberg formalism under the incompressible assumption, and a new code, MINERVA-DI, has been developed to solve the derived extended Frieman-Rotenberg equation. Benchmark results of the MINERVA-DI code show good agreements with the analytic theory discussing the stability to an internal kink mode and that to a ballooning mode in static plasmas. The stability analyses of the ballooning mode with respect to toroidal rotation with the ion diamagnetic drift effect have been performed using MINERVA-DI. The stabilizing effect by the ion diamagnetic drift is found to be negligible when the rotation frequency is large compared to the ion diamagnetic drift frequency. The direction of plasma rotation affects the ballooning mode stability when the ion diamagnetic drift effect is taken into account. It is identified that there are two physics mechanisms responsible for the dependence of MHD stability on the rotation direction. One is the correction of the dynamic pressure effect on MHD stability by the ion diamagnetic drift, and the other is the change of the MHD eigenmode structure by the combined effect of plasma rotation and ion diamagnetic drift.

  16. Study of a harmonic mode lock stability under external continuous-wave injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semaan, Georges; Komarov, Andrey; Salhi, Mohamed; Sanchez, François

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, we investigate experimentally the effect of an injected continuous external optical laser in a stable passive harmonic mode-locked fiber laser operating in the anomalous dispersion regime. Under specific conditions, the continuous-wave significantly increases the stability of the harmonic mode-locked regime. This occurs for a discrete set of wavelengths and below a critical injected power.

  17. Lake Urmia Bridge Stability Assessment: Results from Terrasar-X Spotlight Mode Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseini, F.; Motagh, M.; Vajedian, S.; Sharifi, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    In this study we investigate stability of Lake Urmia bridge, locally also known as Shahid Kalantari's highway bridge, in northwest of Iran using high-resolution satellite radar imagery. The radar dataset includes 22 SAR images acquired in SpotLight mode from 2014 to 2015 in an ascending orbit by TerraSAR-X satellite. A high-resolution Digital Elevation Model (DEM) of the area was constructed from a pair of TanDEM-X bi-static data on June 2012 to remove the effect of topography from interferometry observations. The analysis of X-band interferograms shows high number of displacement fringes, which are interpreted as being caused by thermal dilation due to temperature differences in the imaged area between two SAR acquisitions. This effect, which can often be observed in single interferograms, have important impact on time-series products and should be considered for deformation analysis of bridge structures.

  18. Remarks on bell-shaped lumps: Stability and fermionic modes

    SciTech Connect

    Brihaye, Y.; Delsate, T.

    2008-07-15

    We consider nontopological, 'bell-shaped' localized and regular solutions available in some 1+1-dimensional scalar field theories. Several properties of such solutions are studied, namely, their stability and the occurrence of fermion bound states in the background of a kink and a kink-antikink solution of the sine-Gordon model.

  19. A streamlined failure mode and effects analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, Eric C. Smith, Koren; Terezakis, Stephanie; Croog, Victoria; Gollamudi, Smitha; Gage, Irene; Keck, Jordie; DeWeese, Theodore; Sibley, Greg

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Explore the feasibility and impact of a streamlined failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) using a structured process that is designed to minimize staff effort. Methods: FMEA for the external beam process was conducted at an affiliate radiation oncology center that treats approximately 60 patients per day. A structured FMEA process was developed which included clearly defined roles and goals for each phase. A core group of seven people was identified and a facilitator was chosen to lead the effort. Failure modes were identified and scored according to the FMEA formalism. A risk priority number,RPN, was calculated and used to rank failure modes. Failure modes with RPN > 150 received safety improvement interventions. Staff effort was carefully tracked throughout the project. Results: Fifty-two failure modes were identified, 22 collected during meetings, and 30 from take-home worksheets. The four top-ranked failure modes were: delay in film check, missing pacemaker protocol/consent, critical structures not contoured, and pregnant patient simulated without the team's knowledge of the pregnancy. These four failure modes hadRPN > 150 and received safety interventions. The FMEA was completed in one month in four 1-h meetings. A total of 55 staff hours were required and, additionally, 20 h by the facilitator. Conclusions: Streamlined FMEA provides a means of accomplishing a relatively large-scale analysis with modest effort. One potential value of FMEA is that it potentially provides a means of measuring the impact of quality improvement efforts through a reduction in risk scores. Future study of this possibility is needed.

  20. A streamlined failure mode and effects analysis.

    PubMed

    Ford, Eric C; Smith, Koren; Terezakis, Stephanie; Croog, Victoria; Gollamudi, Smitha; Gage, Irene; Keck, Jordie; DeWeese, Theodore; Sibley, Greg

    2014-06-01

    Explore the feasibility and impact of a streamlined failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) using a structured process that is designed to minimize staff effort. FMEA for the external beam process was conducted at an affiliate radiation oncology center that treats approximately 60 patients per day. A structured FMEA process was developed which included clearly defined roles and goals for each phase. A core group of seven people was identified and a facilitator was chosen to lead the effort. Failure modes were identified and scored according to the FMEA formalism. A risk priority number,RPN, was calculated and used to rank failure modes. Failure modes with RPN > 150 received safety improvement interventions. Staff effort was carefully tracked throughout the project. Fifty-two failure modes were identified, 22 collected during meetings, and 30 from take-home worksheets. The four top-ranked failure modes were: delay in film check, missing pacemaker protocol/consent, critical structures not contoured, and pregnant patient simulated without the team's knowledge of the pregnancy. These four failure modes had RPN > 150 and received safety interventions. The FMEA was completed in one month in four 1-h meetings. A total of 55 staff hours were required and, additionally, 20 h by the facilitator. Streamlined FMEA provides a means of accomplishing a relatively large-scale analysis with modest effort. One potential value of FMEA is that it potentially provides a means of measuring the impact of quality improvement efforts through a reduction in risk scores. Future study of this possibility is needed.

  1. Instability of chiral soliton stabilized by quantization of breathing mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, A.; Otsu, H.; Sawada, S.

    1990-09-01

    We find explicit paths of collapse of the Skyrmion, the solitons in the simplest chiral model of pions (without the Skyrme term); even when the quantum effects of breathing and rotational modes are taken into account. The paths are represented by a parameter of a family of trial profile functions of the hedgehog ansatz which has the asymptotic falloff 1/r2 for r-->∞.

  2. Instability of chiral soliton stabilized by quantization of breathing mode

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, A. ); Otsu, H. ); Sawada, S. )

    1990-09-01

    We find explicit paths of collapse of the Skyrmion, the solitons in the simplest chiral model of pions (without the Skyrme term); even when the quantum effects of breathing and rotational modes are taken into account. The paths are represented by a parameter of a family of trial profile functions of the hedgehog ansatz which has the asymptotic falloff 1/{ital r}{sup 2} for {ital r}{r arrow}{infinity}.

  3. Pedestal structure and stability in H-mode and I-mode: a comparative study on Alcator C-Mod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, J. W.; Snyder, P. B.; Walk, J. R.; Davis, E. M.; Diallo, A.; LaBombard, B.; Baek, S. G.; Churchill, R. M.; Greenwald, M.; Groebner, R. J.; Hubbard, A. E.; Lipschultz, B.; Marmar, E. S.; Osborne, T.; Reinke, M. L.; Rice, J. E.; Theiler, C.; Terry, J.; White, A. E.; Whyte, D. G.; Wolfe, S.; Xu, X. Q.

    2013-04-01

    New experimental data from the Alcator C-Mod tokamak are used to benchmark predictive modelling of the edge pedestal in various high-confinement regimes, contributing to greater confidence in projection of pedestal height and width in ITER and reactors. ELMy H-modes operate near stability limits for ideal peeling-ballooning modes, as shown by calculations with the ELITE code. Experimental pedestal width in ELMy H-mode scales as the square root of βpol at the pedestal top, i.e. the dependence expected from theory if kinetic ballooning modes (KBMs) were responsible for limiting the pedestal width. A search for KBMs in experiment has revealed a short-wavelength electromagnetic fluctuation in the pedestal that is a candidate driver for inter-edge localized mode (ELM) pedestal regulation. A predictive pedestal model (EPED) has been tested on an extended set of ELMy H-modes from C-Mod, reproducing pedestal height and width reasonably well across the data set, and extending the tested range of EPED to the highest absolute pressures available on any existing tokamak and to within a factor of three of the pedestal pressure targeted for ITER. In addition, C-Mod offers access to two regimes, enhanced D-alpha (EDA) H-mode and I-mode, that have high pedestals, but in which large ELM activity is naturally suppressed and, instead, particle and impurity transport are regulated continuously. Pedestals of EDA H-mode and I-mode discharges are found to be ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) stable with ELITE, consistent with the general absence of ELM activity. Invocation of alternative physics mechanisms may be required to make EPED-like predictions of pedestals in these kinds of intrinsically ELM-suppressed regimes, which would be very beneficial to operation in burning plasma devices.

  4. Stabilization and tracking control of X-Z inverted pendulum with sliding-mode control.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jia-Jun

    2012-11-01

    X-Z inverted pendulum is a new kind of inverted pendulum which can move with the combination of the vertical and horizontal forces. Through a new transformation, the X-Z inverted pendulum is decomposed into three simple models. Based on the simple models, sliding-mode control is applied to stabilization and tracking control of the inverted pendulum. The performance of the sliding mode control is compared with that of the PID control. Simulation results show that the design scheme of sliding-mode control is effective for the stabilization and tracking control of the X-Z inverted pendulum.

  5. Feasibility of large-{beta} tokamak stability to ballooning modes due to nonmonotonic q-profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Medvedev, M.V.; Yurchenko, E.I.

    1994-12-01

    The stability of high-temperature nondissipative plasmas to the flute instability ballooning modes in tokamak-like toroidal configurations is investigated at high plasma pressures. The analytical criterion of ballooning-mode stability at large toroidal numbers, discovered by O.P. Pogutse and E.I. Yurchenko, is used for stability assessment. In contrast to systems with monotonic safety-factor q-profiles, nonmonotonic q-profile systems are found to allow a considerable increase in the critical plasma pressure, provided that the pressure profile is properly chosen. The most preferred pressure profiles prove to be the peaked profiles. 13 refs., 12 figs., 5 tabs.

  6. Stabilization of energetic-ion-driven MHD modes by ECCD in Heliotron J

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagasaki, K.; Yamamoto, S.; Kobayashi, S.; Sakamoto, K.; Nagae, Y.; Sugimoto, Y.; Nakamura, Y. I.; Weir, G.; Marushchenko, N.; Mizuuchi, T.; Okada, H.; Minami, T.; Masuda, K.; Ohshima, S.; Konoshima, S.; Shi, N.; Nakamura, Y.; Lee, H. Y.; Zang, L.; Arai, S.; Watada, H.; Fukushima, H.; Hashimoto, K.; Kenmochi, N.; Motojima, G.; Yoshimura, Y.; Mukai, K.; Volpe, F.; Estrada, T.; Sano, F.

    2013-11-01

    Second harmonic electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) has been applied in the stellarator/heliotron (S/H) device, Heliotron J, to stabilize magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modes. The energetic particle mode (EPM) of 60-90 kHz frequency, one of the energetic-ion-driven MHD modes, is excited in a plasma heated by co- and counter-neutral beam injection and electron cyclotron heating (ECH). The EPM has been stabilized by counter-ECCD which decreases the rotational transform. Localized EC current driven by a few kA at the central region modifies the rotational transform profile, ι/2π, leading to the formation of a high magnetic shear at the radius where the mode is excited. An experiment scanning the EC-driven current shows that there is a threshold in magnetic shear and/or rotational transform to stabilize the EPM.

  7. Control-oriented modelling for neoclassical tearing mode stabilization via minimum-seeking techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wehner, W.; Schuster, E.

    2012-07-01

    Suppression of magnetic islands driven by the neoclassical tearing mode (NTM) is necessary for efficient and sustained operation of tokamak fusion reactors. Compensating for the lack of bootstrap current, due to the pressure profile flattening in the magnetic island, by a localized electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) has been proved experimentally as an effective method to stabilize NTMs. The effectiveness of this method is limited in practice by the uncertainties in the width of the island, the relative position between the island and the beam, and the ECCD power threshold for NTM stabilization. Heuristic search and suppress algorithms have been proposed and shown effective in improving the alignment of the ECCD beam with the island, using only an estimate of the island width. Making use of this estimate, real-time, non-model-based, extremum-seeking optimization algorithms have also been proposed not only for beam steering but also for power modulation in order to minimize the island-beam misalignment and the time required for NTM stabilization. A control-oriented dynamic model for the effect of ECCD on the magnetic island is proposed in this work to enable both control design and performance analysis of these minimum-seeking type of controllers. The model expands previous work by including the impact of beam modulation parameters such as the island-beam phase mismatch and the beam duty-cycle on the island width dynamics.

  8. TOPICAL REVIEW Stabilization of the external kink and the resistive wall mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, M. S.; Okabayashi, M.

    2010-12-01

    The pursuit of steady-state economic production of thermonuclear fusion energy has led to research on the stabilization of the external kink and the resistive wall mode. Advances in both experiment and theory, together with improvements in diagnostics, heating and feedback methods have led to substantial and steady progress in the understanding and stabilization of these instabilities. Many of the theory and experimental techniques and results that have been developed are useful not only for the stabilization of the resistive wall mode. They can also be used to improve the general performance of fusion confinement devices. The conceptual foundations and experimental results on the stabilization of the external kink and the resistive wall mode are reviewed.

  9. The effect of an anisotropic pressure of thermal particles on resistive wall mode stability

    SciTech Connect

    Berkery, J. W. Sabbagh, S. A.; Betti, R.; Guazzotto, L.; Manickam, J.

    2014-11-15

    The effect of an anisotropic pressure of thermal particles on resistive wall mode stability in tokamak fusion plasmas is derived through kinetic theory and assessed through calculation with the MISK code [B. Hu et al., Phys. Plasmas 12, 0 57301 (2005)]. The fluid anisotropy is treated as a small perturbation on the plasma equilibrium and modeled with a bi-Maxwellian distribution function. A complete stability treatment without an assumption of high frequency mode rotation leads to anisotropic kinetic terms in the dispersion relation in addition to anisotropy corrections to the fluid terms. With the density and the average pressure kept constant, when thermal particles have a higher temperature perpendicular to the magnetic field than parallel, the fluid pressure-driven ballooning destabilization term is reduced. Additionally, the stabilizing kinetic effects of the trapped thermal ions can be enhanced. Together these two effects can lead to a modest increase in resistive wall mode stability.

  10. Feedback stabilization of resistive wall modes in a reversed-field pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunsell, P. R.; Yadikin, D.; Gregoratto, D.; Paccagnella, R.; Liu, Y. Q.; Cecconello, M.; Drake, J. R.; Manduchi, G.; Marchiori, G.

    2005-09-01

    An array of saddle coils having Nc=16 equally spaced positions along the toroidal direction has been installed for feedback control of resistive wall modes (RWMs) on the EXTRAP T2R reversed-field pinch [P. R. Brunsell, H. Bergsaker, M. Cecconello et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 43, 1457 (2001)]. Using feedback, multiple nonresonant RWMs are simultaneously suppressed for three to four wall times. Feedback stabilization of RWMs results in a significant prolongation of the discharge duration. This is linked to a better sustainment of the plasma and tearing mode toroidal rotation with feedback. Due to the limited number of coils in the toroidal direction, pairs of modes with toroidal mode numbers n ,n' that fulfill the condition ∣n-n'∣=Nc are coupled by the feedback action from the discrete coil array. With only one unstable mode in a pair of coupled modes, the suppression of the unstable mode is successful. If two modes are unstable in a coupled pair, two possibilities exist: partial suppression of both modes or, alternatively, complete stabilization of one target mode while the other is left unstable.

  11. Feedback Stabilization of Resistive Wall Modes in RFX-mod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolzonella, Tommaso

    2006-10-01

    The search of efficient strategies for active control of MHD instabilities is one of the main missions of existing devices and one active field of research where important contributions can come not only from tokamak devices but also from alternative configurations. Resistive Wall Mode (RWM) instabilities are known in particular to limit plasma performances in all toroidal devices with plasma duration exceeding the penetration time of the resistive magnetic boundary surrounding the plasma. RWMs are the main limit for tokamak high-beta advanced scenarios, where a high fraction of non-inductive current is requested to study long (in the limit steady state) operations. Historically RWMs were first observed in Reversed Field Pinch (RFP) devices, where the current gradient plays the role of the drive, typically with multi-mode spectrum whose composition depends on magnetic equilibrium field profiles. RFX-mod device is a large RFP (R=2 m, a=0.46 m) where active control of MHD instabilities is intensively studied by means of a system of 192 active saddle coils placed outside the resistive shell (50 ms for Bv diffusion time) fully covering its external surface and driven by a digital controller. This system provides a very powerful and flexible environment where the study of RWMs physics and their active stabilisation under different experimental conditions is possible. Recent results from RFX-mod show that the complete stabilisation of multi-mode RWM spectrum at high plasma currents (Ip=1 MA) is possible allowing discharges longer than 6 times the diffusion time of the shell. Different control schemes are tested as well, such as open loop operations (intrinsic error field correction and Resonant Field Amplification studies), feedback operations using different measurement systems or incomplete set of coils to simulate systems with partial coverage by active coils.

  12. Nonspherical dynamics and shape mode stability of ultrasound contrast agent microbubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvisi, Michael

    2016-11-01

    Ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) are shell encapsulated microbubbles developed originally for ultrasound imaging enhancement. UCAs are more recently being exploited for therapeutic applications, such as for drug delivery, gene therapy, and tissue ablation. Ultrasound transducer pulses can induce spherical (radial) UCA oscillations, translation, and nonspherical shape oscillations, the dynamics of which are highly coupled. If driven sufficiently strongly, the ultrasound can induce breakup of UCAs, which can facilitate drug or gene delivery but should be minimized for imaging purposes to increase residence time and maximize diagnostic effect. Therefore, an understanding of the interplay between the acoustic driving and nonspherical shape mode stability of UCAs is essential for both diagnostic and therapeutic applications. In this work, we use both analytical and numerical methods to analyze shape mode stability for cases of small and large nonspherical oscillations, respectively. To analyze shape mode stability in the limit of small nonspherical perturbations, we couple a radial model of a lipid-coated microbubble with a model for bubble translation and nonspherical shape oscillation. This hybrid model is used to predict shape mode stability for ultrasound driving frequencies and pressure amplitudes of clinical interest. In addition, calculations of the stability of individual shape modes, residence time, maximum radius, and translation are provided with respect to acoustic driving parameters and compared to an unshelled bubble. The effects of shell elasticity, shell viscosity, and initial radius on stability are investigated. Furthermore, the well-established boundary element method (BEM) is used to investigate the dynamics and shape stability of large amplitude nonspherical oscillations of an ultrasonically-forced, polymer-coated microbubble near a rigid boundary. Different instability modes are identified based on the degree of jetting and proximity to the

  13. Nonlinear {omega}*-stabilization of the m = 1 mode in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, B.; Zakharov, L.

    1995-08-01

    Earlier studies of sawtooth oscillations in Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor supershots (Levinton et al, Phys. Rev. Lett. 72, 2895 (1994); Zakharov, et al, Plasma Phys. and Contr. Nucl. Fus. Res., Proc. 15th Int. Conf., Seville 1994, Vienna) have found an apparent contradiction between conventional linear theory and experiment: even in sawtooth-free discharges, the theory typically predicts instability due to a nearly ideal m = 1 mode. Here, the nonlinear evolution of such mode is analyzed using numerical simulations of a two-fluid magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model. We find the mode saturates nonlinearly at a small amplitude provided the ion and electron drift-frequencies {omega}*{sub i,e} are somewhat above the linear stability threshold of the collisionless m = 1 reconnecting mode. The comparison of the simulation results to m = 1 mode activity in TFTR suggests additional, stabilizing effects outside the present model are also important.

  14. A refined understanding of compressibility effects on the stability of drift ballooning modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhee, T.; Park, G. Y.; Jhang, Hogun; Kim, S. S.; Singh, R.

    2017-07-01

    A study is conducted on the impact of plasma compressibility on the stability of drift ballooning modes. The two-fluid and four-field model developed by Hazeltine et al. [Phys. Fluids 28, 2466 (1985)] is employed in this study. Results of linear numerical simulations show that finite compressibility destabilizes ballooning modes which are otherwise stable due to the ion diamagnetic drift effect. A systematic study reveals that the parallel compressibility originating from the two-fluid effect, rather than the drift-acoustic wave coupling suggested by Hastie et al. [Phys. Plasmas 10, 4405 (2003)], plays the most important role in destabilizing the ballooning modes. An analytic evaluation of the dispersion relation underpins the strong sensitivity of this parallel compressibility term in the ballooning mode stability. The potential impact of this new understanding on the physics of small edge localized modes is discussed.

  15. Linear stability of the tearing mode with two-fluid and curvature effects in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Meshcheriakov, Dmytro; Maget, Patrick; Garbet, Xavier; Luetjens, Hinrich; Beyer, Peter

    2012-09-15

    Curvature and diamagnetic effects are both recognized to have a stabilizing influence on tearing modes in the linear regime. In this paper, we investigate the impact of these effects on the linear stability of a (2, 1) magnetic island using non-linear two-fluid MHD simulations and we apply our results to Tore Supra experiments where its stability is not well understood from the single fluid MHD model. Simulations show an initial increase of the linear growth rate and then its reduction until full stability as diamagnetic frequency increases. This mechanism is therefore a plausible explanation for experimental observations where the (2, 1) mode was not observed although the single fluid model predicted its growth. Our simulations also show the importance of curvature for an efficient stabilization. A simple analytical model is derived to support the numerical results.

  16. Stabilization and synchronization for a mechanical system via adaptive sliding mode control.

    PubMed

    Song, Zhankui; Sun, Kaibiao; Ling, Shuai

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, we investigate the synchronization problem of chaotic centrifugal flywheel governor with parameters uncertainty and lumped disturbances. A slave centrifugal flywheel governor system is considered as an underactuated following-system which a control input is designed to follow a master centrifugal flywheel governor system. To tackle lumped disturbances and uncertainty parameters, a novel synchronization control law is developed by employing sliding mode control strategy and Nussbaum gain technique. Adaptation updating algorithms are derived in the sense of Lyapunov stability analysis such that the lumped disturbances can be suppressed and the adverse effect caused by uncertainty parameters can be compensated. In addition, the synchronization tracking-errors are proven to converge to a small neighborhood of the origin. Finally, simulation results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed control scheme. Copyright © 2017 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Failure modes and effects analysis automation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamhieh, Cynthia H.; Cutts, Dannie E.; Purves, R. Byron

    1988-01-01

    A failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA) assistant was implemented as a knowledge based system and will be used during design of the Space Station to aid engineers in performing the complex task of tracking failures throughout the entire design effort. The three major directions in which automation was pursued were the clerical components of the FMEA process, the knowledge acquisition aspects of FMEA, and the failure propagation/analysis portions of the FMEA task. The system is accessible to design, safety, and reliability engineers at single user workstations and, although not designed to replace conventional FMEA, it is expected to decrease by many man years the time required to perform the analysis.

  18. Failure modes and effects analysis automation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamhieh, Cynthia H.; Cutts, Dannie E.; Purves, R. Byron

    1988-01-01

    A failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA) assistant was implemented as a knowledge based system and will be used during design of the Space Station to aid engineers in performing the complex task of tracking failures throughout the entire design effort. The three major directions in which automation was pursued were the clerical components of the FMEA process, the knowledge acquisition aspects of FMEA, and the failure propagation/analysis portions of the FMEA task. The system is accessible to design, safety, and reliability engineers at single user workstations and, although not designed to replace conventional FMEA, it is expected to decrease by many man years the time required to perform the analysis.

  19. Rotational and magnetic shear stabilization of magnetohydrodynamic modes and turbulence in DIII-D high performance discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Lao, L.L.; Burrell, K.H.; Casper, T.S.; Chan, V.S.; Chu, M.S.; DeBoo, J.C.; Doyle, E.J.; Durst, R.D.; Forest, C.B.; Greenfield, C.M.; Groebner, R.J.; Hinton, F.L.; Kawano, Y.; Lazarus, E.A.; Lin-Liu, Y.R.; Mauel, M.E.; Meyer, W.H.; Miller, R.L.; Navratil, G.A.; Osborne, T.H.; Peng, Q.; Rettig, C.L.; Rewoldt, G.; Rhodes, T.L.; Rice, B.W.; Schissel, D.P.; Stallard, B.W.; Strait, E.J.; Tang, W.M.; Taylor, T.S.; Turnbull, A.D.; Waltz, R.E.; the DIII-D Team

    1996-05-01

    The confinement and the stability properties of the DIII-D tokamak [{ital Plasma} {ital Physics} {ital and} {ital Controlled} {ital Nuclear} {ital Fusion} {ital Research} 1986 (International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, 1987), Vol. 1, p. 159] high-performance discharges are evaluated in terms of rotational and magnetic shear, with an emphasis on the recent experimental results obtained from the negative central magnetic shear (NCS) experiments. In NCS discharges, a core transport barrier is often observed to form inside the NCS region accompanied by a reduction in core fluctuation amplitudes. Increasing negative magnetic shear contributes to the formation of this core transport barrier, but by itself is not sufficient to fully stabilize the toroidal drift mode (trapped-electron-{eta}{sub {ital i}} mode) to explain this formation. Comparison of the Doppler shift shear rate to the growth rate of the {eta}{sub {ital i}} mode suggests that the large core {ital E}{times}{ital B} flow shear can stabilize this mode and broaden the region of reduced core transport. Ideal and resistive stability analysis indicates the performance of NCS discharges with strongly peaked pressure profiles is limited by the resistive interchange mode to low {beta}{sub {ital N}}{le}2.3. This mode is insensitive to the details of the rotational and the magnetic shear profiles. A new class of discharges, which has a broad region of weak or slightly negative magnetic shear (WNS), is described. The WNS discharges have broader pressure profiles and higher {beta} values than the NCS discharges, together with high confinement and high fusion reactivity. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  20. Bouncing ball problem: stability of the periodic modes.

    PubMed

    Barroso, Joaquim J; Carneiro, Marcus V; Macau, Elbert E N

    2009-02-01

    Exploring all its ramifications, we give an overview of the simple yet fundamental bouncing ball problem, which consists of a ball bouncing vertically on a sinusoidally vibrating table under the action of gravity. The dynamics is modeled on the basis of a discrete map of difference equations, which numerically solved fully reveals a rich variety of nonlinear behaviors, encompassing irregular nonperiodic orbits, subharmonic and chaotic motions, chattering mechanisms, and also unbounded nonperiodic orbits. For periodic motions, the corresponding conditions for stability and bifurcation are determined from analytical considerations of a reduced map. Through numerical examples, it is shown that a slight change in the initial conditions makes the ball motion switch from periodic to chaotic orbits bounded by a velocity strip v=+/-Gamma(1-epsilon) , where Gamma is the nondimensionalized shaking acceleration and epsilon the coefficient of restitution which quantifies the amount of energy lost in the ball-table collision.

  1. Cell-cell interactions stabilize emerging collective migration modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Joshua; Guven, Can; Wang, Chenlu; Ott, Ed; Losert, Wolfgang

    2014-03-01

    We propose a coarse-grained mechanistic model for simulating the dynamics of the biological model organism Dictyostelium discoideum, incorporating gradient sensing, random motility via actin protrusions, persistent random motion and signal relay. We demonstrate that our simple cell model does result in the macroscopic group migration patterns seen in no-flow gradient chambers, namely a transition from individual motion to multi-cell ``streaming'' to aggregation as the external signal is decreased. We also find that cell-cell adhesion further stabilizes the contact network independent of chemical signaling, suggesting no indirect feedback between mechanical forces and gradient sensing. We discuss further modifications to the model and as well as further applications to quantifying dynamics using spatio-temporal contact networks. Co-first author

  2. Pump power stability range of single-mode solid-state lasers with rod thermal lensing

    SciTech Connect

    De Silvestri, S.; La Porta, P.; Magni, V.

    1987-11-01

    The pump power stability range of solid-state laser resonators operating in the TEM/sub 00/ mode has been thoroughly investigated. It has been shown that, for a very general resonator containing intracavity optical systems, rod thermal lensing engenders a pump power stability range which is a characteristic parameter of laser material and pump cavity, but is independent of resonator configuration. Stability ranges have been calculated and critically discussed for Nd:YAG, Nd:Glasses, Nd:Cr:GSGG, and alexandrite. The independence of the pump power stability range from the resonator configuration has been experimentally demonstrated for a CW Nd:YAG laser.

  3. Stability Analysis of ISS Medications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wotring, V. E.

    2014-01-01

    the United States Pharmacopeia (USP) to measure the amount of intact active ingredient, identify degradation products and measure their amounts. Some analyses were conducted by an independent analytical laboratory, but certain (Schedule) medications could not be shipped to their facility and were analyzed at JSC. RESULTS Nine medications were analyzed with respect to active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) and degradant amounts. Results were compared to the USP requirements for API and degradants/impurities content for every FDA-approved medication. One medication met USP requirements at 5 months after its expiration date. Four of the nine (44% of those tested) medications tested met USP requirements up to 8 months post-expiration. Another 3 medications (33% of those tested) met USP guidelines 2-3 months before expiration. One medication, a compound classed by the FDA as a dietary supplement and sometimes used as a sleep aid, failed to meet USP requirements at 11 months post-expiration. CONCLUSION Analysis of each medication at a single time point provides limited information on the stability of a medication stored in particular conditions; it is not possible to predict how long a medication may be safe and effective from these data. Notwithstanding, five of the nine medications tested (56%) met USP requirements for API and degradants/impurities at least 5 months past expiration dates. The single compound that failed to meet USP requirements is not regulated as strictly as prescription medications are during manufacture; it is unknown if this medication would have met the requirements prior to flight. Notably, it was the furthest beyond its expiration date. Only more comprehensive analysis of flight-aged samples compared to appropriate ground controls will permit determination of spaceflight effects on medication stability.

  4. Aeromechanical stability analysis of COPTER

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yin, Sheng K.; Yen, Jing G.

    1988-01-01

    A plan was formed for developing a comprehensive, second-generation system with analytical capabilities for predicting performance, loads and vibration, handling qualities, aeromechanical stability, and acoustics. This second-generation system named COPTER (COmprehensive Program for Theoretical Evaluation of Rotorcraft) is designed for operational efficiency, user friendliness, coding readability, maintainability, transportability, modularity, and expandability for future growth. The system is divided into an executive, a data deck validator, and a technology complex. At present a simple executive, the data deck validator, and the aeromechanical stability module of the technology complex were implemented. The system is described briefly, the implementation of the technology module is discussed, and correlation data presented. The correlation includes hingeless-rotor isolated stability, hingeless-rotor ground-resonance stability, and air-resonance stability of an advanced bearingless-rotor in forward flight.

  5. Kelvin waves in ECMWF analysis: normal-mode diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaauw, Marten; Zagar, Nedjeljka

    2013-04-01

    Equatorial Kelvin waves show a large spread in spatial and temporal variability similar to their source of tropical convective forcing. Once decoupled from their source, Kelvin waves are modulated during their ascent by changes in the background wind and stability. In this presentation, we focus on the seasonal and interannual variability of Kelvin waves in relation with variability of (i) tropical convection and (ii) background zonal wind and static stability. Global data is extracted from ECMWF operational analysis from January 2007 till May 2011 on 91 model levels (top level at 0.01 hPa) and ~ 25 km horizontal resolution. Using three-dimensional orthogonal normal-mode expansions, we project input mass and wind data simultaneously onto balanced rotational modes and unbalanced inertia-gravity modes including Kelvin modes. Next, an inverse transformation of Kelvin modes to physical space is performed under the linearity assumption, allowing a study on the spatial and temporal variability of Kelvin wave zonal wind and temperature. Results show an annual cycle in KW zonal wind in agreement with other studies. Minima resp. maxima in zonal wind amplitudes are found in the Indian ocean resp. Western Pacific and are most pronounced in the tropical tropopause at 150 hPa in January and 100 hPa in July. The annual cycle is enhanced (reduced) through interaction with a descending westerly QBO phase and enhanced (reduced) convective forcing. We also note a gradual eastward shift of KW zonal wind maxima till January 2010 in correspondence with an eastward shift of tropical convection.

  6. Particle simulation on radio frequency stabilization of flute modes in a tandem mirror. I. Parallel antenna

    SciTech Connect

    Kadoya, Y.; Abe, H.

    1988-04-01

    A two- and one-half-dimensional electromagnetic particle code (PS2M) (H. Abe and S. Nakajima, J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 53, xxx (1987)) is used to study how an electric field applied parallel to the magnetic field affects the radio frequency stabilization of flute modes in a tandem mirror plasma. The parallel electric field E/sub parallel/ perturbs the electron velocity v/sub parallel/ parallel to the magnetic field and also induces a perpendicular magnetic field perturbation B/sub perpendicular/. The unstable growth of the flute mode in the absence of such a radio frequency electric field is first studied as a basis for comparison. The ponderomotive force originating from the time-averaged product is then shown to stabilize the flute modes. The stabilizing wave power threshold, the frequency dependency, and the dependence on delchemically bondE/sub parallel/chemically bond all agree with the theoretical predictions.

  7. Highly stable RF signal from a mode-locked laser stabilized to multiple saturated absorption lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalev, Anton V.; Uskov, Alexander V.; Polyakov, Vadim M.

    2017-02-01

    We control the optical comb in Nd:YVO4 mode-locked lasers with intracavity frequency doubling based on KTP crystals via changing the cavity length and its dispersion properties and achieve high-purity radiofrequency (RF) signals. The laser output wavelength (532 nm) is in the range of the molecular iodine absorption spectrum with narrow (1.5 kHz) homogeneously broadened lines. We propose to stabilize the two longitudinal modes on two narrow iodine absorption lines. The third derivative of the absorption line could be obtained by heterodyning the absorption signal with the third harmonic of the modulation signal. The resulting RF error signal could be used to stabilize two locked longitudinal modes separated by 1.37 GHz which results in stabilized beat note signal.

  8. Control sensitivity indices for stability analysis of HVdc systems

    SciTech Connect

    Nayak, O.B.; Gole, A.M.; Chapman, D.G.; Davies, J.B.

    1995-10-01

    This paper presents a new concept called the ``Control Sensitivity Index`` of CSI, for the stability analysis of HVdc converters connected to weak ac systems. The CSI for a particular control mode can be defined as the ratio of incremental changes in the two system variables that are most relevant to that control mode. The index provides valuable information on the stability of the system and, unlike other approaches, aids in the design of the controller. It also plays an important role in defining non-linear gains for the controller. This paper offers a generalized formulation of CSI and demonstrates its application through an analysis of the CSI for three modes of HVdc control. The conclusions drawn from the analysis are confirmed by a detailed electromagnetic transients simulation of the ac/dc system. The paper concludes that the CSI can be used to improve the controller design and, for an inverter in a weak ac system, the conventional voltage control mode is more stable than the conventional {gamma} control mode.

  9. Stability criteria for edge flute modes in the two-fluid regime

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, L. )

    1993-05-01

    Necessary and sufficient stability criteria for flute modes localized at the edge of toroidal plasmas are obtained from the Braginskii's two-fluid equations without taking into account the collisional effects. It is assumed that the plasma pressure tends to vanish, but its gradient remains finite at the edge of the plasma. The results show that the free-boundary edge flute modes (namely, the peeling modes) are more dangerous than the fixed-boundary modes (namely, the Mercier modes). Numerical investigation of the criterion for peeling modes shows that the finite ion-gyroradius effect can substantially stabilize the modes, especially for the case [Delta][ge]0, where the equilibrium quantity [Delta][equivalent to]1/2+[ital S][sup [minus]1][lt][bold j][center dot][bold B][vert bar][del][ital v][vert bar][sup [minus]2][gt], with [ital S] denoting the global shear, [bold B] the magnetic field, [bold j] the current density, [ital v] the volume inside the reference magnetic surface, and [lt]...[gt] denoting the average over the magnetic surface. Equilibria with [Delta][ge]0 are shown to be more stable to the peeling modes than those with [Delta][le]0.

  10. Mode signature and stability for a Hamiltonian model of electron temperature gradient turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Tassi, E.; Morrison, P. J.

    2011-03-15

    Stability properties and mode signature for equilibria of a model of electron temperature gradient (ETG) driven turbulence are investigated by Hamiltonian techniques. After deriving new infinite families of Casimir invariants, associated with the noncanonical Poisson bracket of the model, a sufficient condition for stability is obtained by means of the Energy-Casimir method. Mode signature is then investigated for linear motions about homogeneous equilibria. Depending on the sign of the equilibrium 'translated' pressure gradient, stable equilibria can either be energy stable, i.e., possess definite linearized perturbation energy (Hamiltonian), or spectrally stable with the existence of negative energy modes. The ETG instability is then shown to arise through a Krein-type bifurcation, due to the merging of a positive and a negative energy mode, corresponding to two modified drift waves admitted by the system. The Hamiltonian of the linearized system is then explicitly transformed into normal form, which unambiguously defines mode signature. In particular, the fast mode turns out to always be a positive energy mode, whereas the energy of the slow mode can have either positive or negative sign. A reduced model with stable equilibria shear flow that possess a continuous spectrum is also analyzed and brought to normal form by a special integral transform. In this way it is seen how continuous spectra can have signature as well.

  11. Linear mode stability of the Kerr-Newman black hole and its quasinormal modes.

    PubMed

    Dias, Óscar J C; Godazgar, Mahdi; Santos, Jorge E

    2015-04-17

    We provide strong evidence that, up to 99.999% of extremality, Kerr-Newman black holes (KNBHs) are linear mode stable within Einstein-Maxwell theory. We derive and solve, numerically, a coupled system of two partial differential equations for two gauge invariant fields that describe the most general linear perturbations of a KNBH. We determine the quasinormal mode (QNM) spectrum of the KNBH as a function of its three parameters and find no unstable modes. In addition, we find that the lowest radial overtone QNMs that are connected continuously to the gravitational ℓ=m=2 Schwarzschild QNM dominate the spectrum for all values of the parameter space (m is the azimuthal number of the wave function and ℓ measures the number of nodes along the polar direction). Furthermore, the (lowest radial overtone) QNMs with ℓ=m approach Reω=mΩH(ext) and Imω=0 at extremality; this is a universal property for any field of arbitrary spin |s|≤2 propagating on a KNBH background (ω is the wave frequency and ΩH(ext) the black hole angular velocity at extremality). We compare our results with available perturbative results in the small charge or small rotation regimes and find good agreement.

  12. Robust-mode analysis of hydrodynamic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Sukesh; Gord, James R.; Hua, Jia-Chen; Gunaratne, Gemunu H.

    2017-04-01

    The emergence of techniques to extract high-frequency high-resolution data introduces a new avenue for modal decomposition to assess the underlying dynamics, especially of complex flows. However, this task requires the differentiation of robust, repeatable flow constituents from noise and other irregular features of a flow. Traditional approaches involving low-pass filtering and principle components analysis have shortcomings. The approach outlined here, referred to as robust-mode analysis, is based on Koopman decomposition. Three applications to (a) a counter-rotating cellular flame state, (b) variations in financial markets, and (c) turbulent injector flows are provided.

  13. Role of magnetic shear and equilibrium flow on stability of collisionless mixed parity and microtearing modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishna Swamy, Aditya; Verma, Deepak; Ganesh, Rajaraman; Brunner, Stephan; Villard, Laurent

    2016-10-01

    Turbulent transport of energy, particles and momentum is one of the important limiting factors for long time plasma confinement. Modern study using gyrokinetic formalism and simulation has progressed to identify several microinstabilities that cause ion and electron thermal transport. Typically, these have been ballooning parity modes (φ is even and Ã∥ is odd) such as Ion Temperature Gradient mode (ITG), Kinetic Ballooning Mode (KBM) and Electron Temperature Gradient mode (ETG) which cause transport through fluctuations or tearing parity modes (φ is odd and Ã∥ is even) such as Microtearing modes (MTM) which change the local magnetic topology and cause transport through stochastization of the magnetic field. Here, the role of global safety factor profile variation on the MTM instability and global mode structure is studied in large aspect ratio tokamaks. Multiple subdominant branches of MTM are linearly unstable in several shear profiles. At lower shear, linearly unstable Mixed Parity Modes are found to exist. The growth rate spectrum, β-scaling in reverse shear profiles and the role of equilibrium flow on the stability and global mode structures of these modes will be presented.

  14. Global gyrokinetic stability of collisionless microtearing modes in large aspect ratio tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Swamy, Aditya K.; Ganesh, R.; Chowdhury, J.; Brunner, S.; Vaclavik, J.; Villard, L.

    2014-08-15

    Linear full radius gyrokinetic calculations show the existence of unstable microtearing modes (MTMs) in purely collisionless, high temperature, large aspect ratio tokamak plasmas. The present study takes into account fully gyrokinetic highly passing ions and electrons. The global 2-D structures of the collisionless mode with full radius coupling of the poloidal modes is obtained and compared with another electromagnetic mode, namely, the Alfvén Ion Temperature Gradient (AITG) mode (or Kinetic Ballooning Mode, KBM) for the same equilibrium profile. Several important characteristics of the modes are brought out and compared, such as a clear signature in the symmetry properties of the two modes, the plasma–β dependence, and radial and poloidal length scales of the electrostatic and magnetic vector potential fluctuations. Extensive parameter scans for this collisionless microtearing mode reveal the scaling of the growth rate with β and the electron temperature gradient η{sub e}. Scans at different β values show an inverse relationship between the η{sub e} threshold and β, leading to a stability diagram, and implying that the mode might exist at moderate to strong temperature gradients for finite β plasmas in large aspect ratio tokamaks. In contrast to small aspect ratio tokamaks where the trapped electron magnetic drift resonance is found to be important, in large aspect ratio tokamaks, a strong destabilization due to the magnetic drift resonance of passing electrons is observed and is identified as a possible collisionless drive mechanism for the collisionless MTM.

  15. Solar seismology. I - The stability of the solar p-modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldreich, P.; Keeley, D. A.

    1977-01-01

    The stability of the radial p-modes of the sun is investigated by computing nonadiabatic eigenvalues and eigenfunctions for a solar envelope model which extends from an inner radius of about 0.3 solar radius out to an optical depth of about 0.0003. The calculations take into account in a crude fashion the response of the convective flux to the oscillation. The dynamical effect of turbulence in the convection zone is parametrized in terms of a turbulent shear viscosity. The results show that if damping by turbulent viscosity is neglected, all modes with periods longer than 6 minutes are unstable. The familiar kappa-mechanism, which operates in the H ionization-H(-) opacity region, is the dominant source of driving of the oscillations. Modes with periods shorter than 6 minutes are stabilized by radiative damping in the solar atmosphere. When turbulent dissipation of pulsational energy is included, all modes are predicted to be stable. However, the margin of stability is very small. In view of the large uncertainty that must be assigned to the estimate of turbulent damping, it is concluded that theoretical calculations cannot unequivocally resolve the question of the stability of the solar p-modes.

  16. Plasma Density Effects on Toroidal Flow Stabilization of Edge Localized Modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Shikui; Zhu, Ping; Banerjee, Debabrata

    2016-10-01

    Recent EAST experiments have demonstrated mitigation and suppression of edge localized modes (ELMs) with toroidal rotation flow in higher collisionality regime, suggesting potential roles of plasma density. In this work, the effects of plasma density on the toroidal flow stabilization of the high- n edge localized modes have been extensively studied in linear calculations for a circular-shaped limiter H-mode tokamak, using the initial-value extended MHD code NIMROD. In the single MHD model, toroidal flow has a weak stabilizing effects on the high- n modes. Such a stabilization, however, can be significantly enhanced with the increase in plasma density. Furthermore, our calculations show that the enhanced stabilization of high- n modes from toroidal flow with higher edge plasma density persists in the 2-fluid MHD model. These findings may explain the ELM mitigation and suppression by toroidal rotation in higher collisionality regime due to the enhancement of plasma density obtained in EAST experiment. Supported by the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Program of China under Grant Nos. 2014GB124002 and 2015GB101004, the 100 Talent Program and the President International Fellowship Initiative of Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  17. Nonlinear Dynamic Stability of the Viscoelastic Plate Considering Higher Order Modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yuanxiang; Wang, Cheng

    2016-11-01

    -The dynamic stability of viscoelastic plates is investigated in this paper by using chaotic and fractal theory. The nonlinear integro-differential dynamic equation is changed into an autonomic 4-dimensional dynamical system. The numerical time integrations of equations are obtained by using the fourth order Runge-Kutta method. And the Lyapunov exponent spectrum, the fractal dimension of strange attractors and the time evolution of deflection are obtained. The influence of viscoelastic parameter on dynamic buckling of viscoelastic plates is discussed. The effect of higher order modes on dynamic stability of viscoelastic plate is obtained, the necessity of considering higher order modes is discussed.

  18. Stability and quasinormal modes of the massive scalar field around Kerr black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konoplya, R. A.; Zhidenko, A. V.

    2006-06-01

    In this paper, we find quasinormal spectrum of the massive scalar field in the background of the Kerr black holes. We show that all found modes are damped under the quasinormal modes boundary conditions when μM≲1, thereby implying stability of the massive scalar field. This complements the region of stability determined by the Beyer inequality for large masses of the field. We show that, similar to the case of a nonrotating black hole, the massive term of the scalar field does not contribute in the regime of high damping. Therefore, the high damping asymptotic should be the same as for the massless scalar field.

  19. The stability control of fractional order unified chaotic system with sliding mode control theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Dong-Lian; Yang, Jie; Zhang, Jian-Liang

    2010-10-01

    This paper studies the stability of the fractional order unified chaotic system with sliding mode control theory. The sliding manifold is constructed by the definition of fractional order derivative and integral for the fractional order unified chaotic system. By the existing proof of sliding manifold, the sliding mode controller is designed. To improve the convergence rate, the equivalent controller includes two parts: the continuous part and switching part. With Gronwall's inequality and the boundness of chaotic attractor, the finite stabilization of the fractional order unified chaotic system is proved, and the controlling parameters can be obtained. Simulation results are made to verify the effectiveness of this method.

  20. Exploring the stability of ligand binding modes to proteins by molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kai; Watanabe, Etsurou; Kokubo, Hironori

    2017-02-01

    The binding mode prediction is of great importance to structure-based drug design. The discrimination of various binding poses of ligand generated by docking is a great challenge not only to docking score functions but also to the relatively expensive free energy calculation methods. Here we systematically analyzed the stability of various ligand poses under molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. First, a data set of 120 complexes was built based on the typical physicochemical properties of drug-like ligands. Three potential binding poses (one correct pose and two decoys) were selected for each ligand from self-docking in addition to the experimental pose. Then, five independent MD simulations for each pose were performed with different initial velocities for the statistical analysis. Finally, the stabilities of ligand poses under MD were evaluated and compared with the native one from crystal structure. We found that about 94% of the native poses were maintained stable during the simulations, which suggests that MD simulations are accurate enough to judge most experimental binding poses as stable properly. Interestingly, incorrect decoy poses were maintained much less and 38-44% of decoys could be excluded just by performing equilibrium MD simulations, though 56-62% of decoys were stable. The computationally-heavy binding free energy calculation can be performed only for these survived poses.

  1. Exploring the stability of ligand binding modes to proteins by molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kai; Watanabe, Etsurou; Kokubo, Hironori

    2017-01-01

    The binding mode prediction is of great importance to structure-based drug design. The discrimination of various binding poses of ligand generated by docking is a great challenge not only to docking score functions but also to the relatively expensive free energy calculation methods. Here we systematically analyzed the stability of various ligand poses under molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. First, a data set of 120 complexes was built based on the typical physicochemical properties of drug-like ligands. Three potential binding poses (one correct pose and two decoys) were selected for each ligand from self-docking in addition to the experimental pose. Then, five independent MD simulations for each pose were performed with different initial velocities for the statistical analysis. Finally, the stabilities of ligand poses under MD were evaluated and compared with the native one from crystal structure. We found that about 94% of the native poses were maintained stable during the simulations, which suggests that MD simulations are accurate enough to judge most experimental binding poses as stable properly. Interestingly, incorrect decoy poses were maintained much less and 38-44% of decoys could be excluded just by performing equilibrium MD simulations, though 56-62% of decoys were stable. The computationally-heavy binding free energy calculation can be performed only for these survived poses.

  2. Influence of vibration modes on control system stabilization for space shuttle type vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greiner, H. G.

    1972-01-01

    An investigation was made to determine the feasibility of using conventional autopilot techniques to stabilize the vibration modes at the liftoff flight condition for two space shuttle configurations. One configuration is called the dual flyback vehicle in which both the orbiter and booster vehicles have wings and complete flyback capability. The other configuration is called the solid motor vehicle win which the orbiter only has flyback. The results of the linear stability analyses for each of the vehicles are summarized.

  3. Concrete gravity dam stability analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, D.

    1992-09-01

    Under Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) guidelines, dam owners must evaluate the stability of their structures every five years. Because traditional approaches typically yield overly conservative stability estimates, EPRI sponsored the development of a computer code, CG-DAMS, to provide more-realistic assessments that reflect site-specific conditions. This finite-element code-which is available in mainframe, workstation, and personal computer versions-can be used to predict crack growth, shear, and stress under a variety of loads.

  4. A Stability Analysis of Incomplete LU Factorizations.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-02-01

    AD-R52 058 A STABILITY ANALYSIS OF INCOMPLETE LU FRCTORIZRTIONS 1/1 (U) YALE UNIY NEN HRVEN CT DEPT OF COMPUTER SCIENCE H C ELMAN FEB 85 YALEU/DCS/RR... computations involving the triangular factors. Our analysis is similar to stability analysis for methods for ordinary differential equations [10]. It shows...of Goteborg, 1978. Also available as Technical Report 77.04R. 32 [13] Peter Henrici , Elements of Numerical Analysis , John Wiley& Sons, New York, 1964

  5. Sharp boundary analysis of electrostatic flute modes

    SciTech Connect

    Lemons, D. S.

    1989-07-01

    A linear, electrostatic, stability analysis of a magnetized cross-fielddrifting plasma with a sharp boundary is presented. The analysis corrects anerror in a previously published sharp boundary theory (Phys. Fluids /bold 19/,882 (1976)) and extends another theory (Geophys. Res. Lett. /bold 14/, 60(1987)) to include finite electron mass and non-neutral perturbations. Theinstability's long wavelength structure is associated with the classical fluteinstability, while the peak of the growth rate curve, at much shorterwavelengths, is a Buneman-like instability.

  6. Rotational stabilization of the resistive wall modes in tokamaks with a ferritic wall

    SciTech Connect

    Pustovitov, V. D.; Yanovskiy, V. V.

    2015-03-15

    The dynamics of the rotating resistive wall modes (RWMs) is analyzed in the presence of a uniform ferromagnetic resistive wall with μ{sup ^}≡μ/μ{sub 0}≤4 (μ is the wall magnetic permeability, and μ{sub 0} is the vacuum one). This mimics a possible arrangement in ITER with ferromagnetic steel in test blanket modules or in future experiments in JT-60SA tokamak [Y. Kamada, P. Barabaschi, S. Ishida, the JT-60SA Team, and JT-60SA Research Plan Contributors, Nucl. Fusion 53, 104010 (2013)]. The earlier studies predict that such a wall must provide a destabilizing influence on the plasma by reducing the beta limit and increasing the growth rates, compared to the reference case with μ{sup ^}=1. This is true for the locked modes, but the presented results show that the mode rotation changes the tendency to the opposite. At μ{sup ^}>1, the rotational stabilization related to the energy sink in the wall becomes even stronger than at μ{sup ^}=1, and this “external” effect develops at lower rotation frequency, estimated as several kHz at realistic conditions. The study is based on the cylindrical dispersion relation valid for arbitrary growth rates and frequencies. This relation is solved numerically, and the solutions are compared with analytical dependences obtained for slow (s/d{sub w}≫1) and fast (s/d{sub w}≪1) “ferromagnetic” rotating RWMs, where s is the skin depth and d{sub w} is the wall thickness. It is found that the standard thin-wall modeling becomes progressively less reliable at larger μ{sup ^}, and the wall should be treated as magnetically thick. The analysis is performed assuming only a linear plasma response to external perturbations without constraints on the plasma current and pressure profiles.

  7. Stability Analysis for HIFiRE Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Fei; Choudhari, Meelan M.; Chang, Chau-Lyan; White, Jeffery A.; Kimmel, Roger; Adamczak, David; Borg, Matthew; Stanfield, Scott; Smith, Mark S.

    2012-01-01

    The HIFiRE-1 flight experiment provided a valuable database pertaining to boundary layer transition over a 7-degree half-angle, circular cone model from supersonic to hypersonic Mach numbers, and a range of Reynolds numbers and angles of attack. This paper reports selected findings from the ongoing computational analysis of the measured in-flight transition behavior. Transition during the ascent phase at nearly zero degree angle of attack is dominated by second mode instabilities except in the vicinity of the cone meridian where a roughness element was placed midway along the length of the cone. The growth of first mode instabilities is found to be weak at all trajectory points analyzed from the ascent phase. For times less than approximately 18.5 seconds into the flight, the peak amplification ratio for second mode disturbances is sufficiently small because of the lower Mach numbers at earlier times, so that the transition behavior inferred from the measurements is attributed to an unknown physical mechanism, potentially related to step discontinuities in surface height near the locations of a change in the surface material. Based on the time histories of temperature and/or heat flux at transducer locations within the aft portion of the cone, the onset of transition correlated with a linear N-factor, based on parabolized stability equations, of approximately 13.5. Due to the large angles of attack during the re-entry phase, crossflow instability may play a significant role in transition. Computations also indicate the presence of pronounced crossflow separation over a significant portion of the trajectory segment that is relevant to transition analysis. The transition behavior during this re-entry segment of HIFiRE-1 flight shares some common features with the predicted transition front along the elliptic cone shaped HIFiRE-5 flight article, which was designed to provide hypersonic transition data for a fully 3D geometric configuration. To compare and contrast the

  8. Failure-Modes-And-Effects Analysis Of Software Logic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Danny; Hartline, Thomas; Minor, Terry; Statum, David; Vice, David

    1996-01-01

    Rigorous analysis applied early in design effort. Method of identifying potential inadequacies and modes and effects of failures caused by inadequacies (failure-modes-and-effects analysis or "FMEA" for short) devised for application to software logic.

  9. Extraction and stability of pesticide multiresidues from natural water on a mixed-mode admicellar sorbent.

    PubMed

    Luque, Noelia; Rubio, Soledad

    2012-07-27

    The suitability of a mixed-mode sorbent made up of admicelles of sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) and tetrabutylammonium (TBA) to extract and preserve pesticides from river and underground water was assessed. Pesticides belonging to different structural groups (i.e. triazines, carbamates, phenylureas, anilides, chloroacetanilides, organophosphorus and phenoxyacids), most of them well known by their instability, were selected for this purpose. Extraction of pesticides with the admicellar sorbent was optimized. Percolation of 250 mL of sample through the SPE cartridge, elution with 1 mL of methanol (neutral and basic pesticides) or 2 mL of 0.3M NaOH:methanol (90:10, v/v) (acidic pesticides) and direct analysis of the extract by liquid chromatography/UV detection, permitted to obtain method detection limits in the range 2-60 ng L(-1). Their degradation on the SPE cartridges after sample percolation was investigated under a variety of experimental conditions, namely darkness, natural illumination and different temperatures (room temperature, 4 °C and -20 °C) for 3 months. Under darkness, most of pesticides were stable for 1 month at room temperature and 3 months at 4 °C. Only atriazine and clorfenvinfos did not follow this general behaviour. No influence of matrix components on the stabilization of pesticides in the admicellar sorbent was observed. The stabilizing capability of surfactant aggregates surpassed that of C18 and black carbon and was similar to that obtained in some polymeric materials, which have the disadvantage of requiring large volumes of solvents for analyte elution. The stabilization of pesticides on the admicellar sorbent was long enough to permit easy shipping and storage of the cartridges in monitorization campaigns.

  10. Magnetohydrodynamic stability at the edge region in H-mode plasmas with long edge-localized-mode-free phases in the large helical device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toi, K.; Ohdachi, S.; Ueda, R.; Watanabe, K. Y.; Nicolas, T.; Suzuki, Y.; Ogawa, K.; Tanaka, K.; Takemura, Y.; LHD Experiment Group

    2016-09-01

    Clear suppression of magnetic fluctuations associated with resistive interchange modes (RICs) is observed during long edge-localized-mode (ELM)-free phases of the H-mode plasma in an outward-shifted configuration of the Large Helical Decice, in which a steep pressure gradient is generated at the plasma edge in the magnetic hill. The ELM-free H-phase is interrupted by large amplitude ELMs which are thought to be induced through nonlinear evolution of the RICs having m  =  1/n  =  1 dominant component (m: poloidal mode number, n: toroidal one). The m  =  1/n  =  1 RIC amplitude is enhanced about 10 times compared with the H-phase level during each ELM. In most of the H-mode shots, the final ELM-free phase returns to L-phase by a large amplitude ELM. In the L-phase, the RIC amplitude is enhanced by a factor of ~3 compared with that in the H-phase, although the edge pressure gradient is reduced considerably. Linear resistive magnetohydrodynamic stability analysis is attempted using experimentally obtained equilibrium profiles. From the numerical analysis, the distance between the location of the steepest pressure gradient and the main mode resonance surface, i.e. the rotational transform ι  =  1, is found to be important for a large growth of the m  =  1/n  =  1 RIC in the H-phase.

  11. Biacore analysis with stabilized GPCRs

    PubMed Central

    Rich, Rebecca L.; Errey, James; Marshall, Fiona; Myszka, David G.

    2010-01-01

    Using stabilized forms of β1 adrenergic and A2A adenosine G-protein-coupled receptors, we applied Biacore to monitor receptor activity and characterize binding constants of small-molecule antagonists spanning >20,000 fold in affinity. We also illustrate an improved method for tethering His-tagged receptors on NTA chips to yield stable, high-capacity, high-activity surfaces, as well as a novel approach to regenerate receptor-binding sites. Based on our success with this approach, we expect that the combination of stabilized receptors with biosensor technology will become a common method for characterizing members of this receptor family. PMID:20969829

  12. A reduced resistive wall mode kinetic stability model for disruption forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkery, J. W.; Sabbagh, S. A.; Bell, R. E.; Gerhardt, S. P.; LeBlanc, B. P.

    2017-05-01

    Kinetic modification of ideal stability theory from stabilizing resonances of mode-particle interaction has had success in explaining resistive wall mode (RWM) stability limits in tokamaks. With the goal of real-time stability forecasting, a reduced kinetic stability model has been implemented in the new Disruption Event Characterization and Forecasting ( DECAF ) code, which has been written to analyze disruptions in tokamaks. The reduced model incorporates parameterized models for ideal limits on β, a ratio of plasma pressure to magnetic pressure, which are shown to be in good agreement with DCON code calculations. Increased β between these ideal limits causes a shift in the unstable region of δWK space, where δWK is the change in potential energy due to kinetic effects that is solved for by the reduced model, such that it is possible for plasmas to be unstable at intermediate β but stable at higher β, which is sometimes observed experimentally. Gaussian functions for δWK are defined as functions of E × B frequency and collisionality, with parameters reflecting the experience of the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). The reduced model was tested on a database of discharges from NSTX and experimentally stable and unstable discharges were separated noticeably on a stability map in E × B frequency, collisionality space. The reduced model failed to predict an unstable RWM in only 15.6% of cases with an experimentally unstable RWM and performed well on predicting stability for experimentally stable discharges as well.

  13. Numerical Study of Equilibrium, Stability, and Advanced Resistive Wall Mode Feedback Algorithms on KSTAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsuro-Hopkins, Oksana; Sabbagh, S. A.; Bialek, J. M.; Park, H. K.; Kim, J. Y.; You, K.-I.; Glasser, A. H.; Lao, L. L.

    2007-11-01

    Stability to ideal MHD kink/ballooning modes and the resistive wall mode (RWM) is investigated for the KSTAR tokamak. Free-boundary equilibria that comply with magnetic field coil current constraints are computed for monotonic and reversed shear safety factor profiles and H-mode tokamak pressure profiles. Advanced tokamak operation at moderate to low plasma internal inductance shows that a factor of two improvement in the plasma beta limit over the no-wall beta limit is possible for toroidal mode number of unity. The KSTAR conducting structure, passive stabilizers, and in-vessel control coils are modeled by the VALEN-3D code and the active RWM stabilization performance of the device is evaluated using both standard and advanced feedback algorithms. Steady-state power and voltage requirements for the system are estimated based on the expected noise on the RWM sensor signals. Using NSTX experimental RWM sensors noise data as input, a reduced VALEN state-space LQG controller is designed to realistically assess KSTAR stabilization system performance.

  14. Evidence for the Importance of Trapped Particle Resonances for Resistive Wall Mode Stability in High Beta Tokamak Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Reimerdes, H.; Berkery, J. W.; Lanctot, M. J.; Sabbagh, S. A.; Garofalo, A. M.; Strait, E. J.; Hanson, J. M.; In, Y.; Okabayashi, M.

    2011-05-27

    Active measurements of the plasma stability in tokamak plasmas reveal the importance of kinetic resonances for resistive wall mode stability. The rotation dependence of the magnetic plasma response to externally applied quasistatic n=1 magnetic fields clearly shows the signatures of an interaction between the resistive wall mode and the precession and bounce motions of trapped thermal ions, as predicted by a perturbative model of plasma stability including kinetic effects. The identification of the stabilization mechanism is an essential step towards quantitative predictions for the prospects of ''passive'' resistive wall mode stabilization, i.e., without the use of an ''active'' feedback system, in fusion-alpha heated plasmas.

  15. Shaping Effects on Resistive-Plasma Resistive-Wall Mode Stability in a Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhodes, Dov; Cole, A. J.; Navratil, G. A.; Levesque, J. P.; Mauel, M. E.; Brennan, D. P.; Finn, J. M.; Fitzpatrick, R.

    2016-10-01

    A sharp-boundary MHD model is used to explore the effects of toroidal curvature and cross-sectional shaping on resistive-plasma resistive-wall modes in a tokamak. Building on the work of Fitzpatrick, we investigate mode stability with fixed toroidal number n =1 and a broad spectrum of poloidal m-numbers, given varying aspect-ratio, elongation, triangularity and up-down asymmetry. The speed and versatility of the sharp-boundary model facilitate exploration of a large parameter space, revealing qualitative trends to be further investigated by larger codes. In addition, the study addresses the effect of geometric mode-coupling on higher beta stability limits associated with an ideal-plasma or ideal-wall. These beta limits were used by Brennan and Finn to identify plasma response domains for feedback control. Present results show how geometric mode-coupling affects the stability limits and plasma response domains. The results are explained by an analytic reduced-MHD model with two coupled modes having different m-numbers. The next phase of this work will explore feedback control in different tokamak geometries. Supported by U.S. DOE Grant DE-FG02-86ER53222.

  16. Calculating electron cyclotron current drive stabilization of resistive tearing modes in a nonlinear magnetohydrodynamic model

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, Thomas G.; Schnack, Dalton D.; Kruger, Scott E.; Hegna, C. C.; Sovinec, Carl R.

    2010-01-15

    A model which incorporates the effects of electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) into the magnetohydrodynamic equations is implemented in the NIMROD code [C. R. Sovinec et al., J. Comput. Phys. 195, 355 (2004)] and used to investigate the effect of ECCD injection on the stability, growth, and dynamical behavior of magnetic islands associated with resistive tearing modes. In addition to qualitatively and quantitatively agreeing with numerical results obtained from the inclusion of localized ECCD deposition in static equilibrium solvers [A. Pletzer and F. W. Perkins, Phys. Plasmas 6, 1589 (1999)], predictions from the model further elaborate the role which rational surface motion plays in these results. The complete suppression of the (2,1) resistive tearing mode by ECCD is demonstrated and the relevant stabilization mechanism is determined. Consequences of the shifting of the mode rational surface in response to the injected current are explored, and the characteristic short-time responses of resistive tearing modes to spatial ECCD alignments which are stabilizing are also noted. We discuss the relevance of this work to the development of more comprehensive predictive models for ECCD-based mitigation and control of neoclassical tearing modes.

  17. Calculating electron cyclotron current drive stabilization of resistive tearing modes in a nonlinear magnetohydrodynamic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Thomas G.; Kruger, Scott E.; Hegna, C. C.; Schnack, Dalton D.; Sovinec, Carl R.

    2010-01-01

    A model which incorporates the effects of electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) into the magnetohydrodynamic equations is implemented in the NIMROD code [C. R. Sovinec et al., J. Comput. Phys. 195, 355 (2004)] and used to investigate the effect of ECCD injection on the stability, growth, and dynamical behavior of magnetic islands associated with resistive tearing modes. In addition to qualitatively and quantitatively agreeing with numerical results obtained from the inclusion of localized ECCD deposition in static equilibrium solvers [A. Pletzer and F. W. Perkins, Phys. Plasmas 6, 1589 (1999)], predictions from the model further elaborate the role which rational surface motion plays in these results. The complete suppression of the (2,1) resistive tearing mode by ECCD is demonstrated and the relevant stabilization mechanism is determined. Consequences of the shifting of the mode rational surface in response to the injected current are explored, and the characteristic short-time responses of resistive tearing modes to spatial ECCD alignments which are stabilizing are also noted. We discuss the relevance of this work to the development of more comprehensive predictive models for ECCD-based mitigation and control of neoclassical tearing modes.

  18. Numerical study on the stabilization of neoclassical tearing modes by electron cyclotron current drive

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xiaoguang; Zhang, Xiaodong; Wu, Bin; Zhu, Sizheng; Hu, Yemin

    2015-02-15

    It is well known that electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) around the o-point of magnetic island along the plasma current direction can stabilize neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs) in tokamak devices. The effects of the radial misalignment between the island and the driven current, the phase misalignment, and the on-duty ratio for modulated current drive on NTM stabilization are studied numerically in this paper. A small radial misalignment is found to significantly decrease the stabilizing effect. When a sufficiently large phase misalignment occurs for the modulated ECCD, the stabilization effect is also reduced a lot. The optimal on-duty ratio of modulated ECCD to stabilize NTMs is found to be in the range of 60%–70%. A larger on-duty ratio than 50% could also mitigate the effect of phase misalignment if it is not too large. There is no benefit from modulation if the phase misalignment is larger than a threshold.

  19. Global stability analysis of electrified jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivero-Rodriguez, Javier; Pérez-Saborid, Miguel

    2014-11-01

    Electrospinning is a common process used to produce micro and nano polymeric fibers. In this technique, the whipping mode of a very thin electrified jet generated in an electrospray device is nhanced in order to increase its elongation. In this work, we use a theoretical Eulerian model that describes the kinematics and dynamics of the midline of the jet, its radius and convective velocity. The model equations result from balances of mass, linear and angular momentum applied to any differential slice of the jet together with constitutive laws for viscous forces and moments, as well as appropriate expressions for capillary and electrical forces. As a first step towards computing the complete nonlinear, transient dynamics of the electrified jet, we have performed a global stability analysis of the forementioned equations and compared the results with experimental data obtained by Guillaume et al. [2011] and Guerrero-Millán et al. [2014]. The support of the Ministry of Science and Innovation of Spain (Project DPI 2010-20450-C03-02) is acknowledged.

  20. Transient analysis mode participation for modal survey target mode selection using MSC/NASTRAN DMAP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnett, Alan R.; Ibrahim, Omar M.; Sullivan, Timothy L.; Goodnight, Thomas W.

    1994-03-01

    Many methods have been developed to aid analysts in identifying component modes which contribute significantly to component responses. These modes, typically targeted for dynamic model correlation via a modal survey, are known as target modes. Most methods used to identify target modes are based on component global dynamic behavior. It is sometimes unclear if these methods identify all modes contributing to responses important to the analyst. These responses are usually those in areas of hardware design concerns. One method used to check the completeness of target mode sets and identify modes contributing significantly to important component responses is mode participation. With this method, the participation of component modes in dynamic responses is quantified. Those modes which have high participation are likely modal survey target modes. Mode participation is most beneficial when it is used with responses from analyses simulating actual flight events. For spacecraft, these responses are generated via a structural dynamic coupled loads analysis. Using MSC/NASTRAN DMAP, a method has been developed for calculating mode participation based on transient coupled loads analysis results. The algorithm has been implemented to be compatible with an existing coupled loads methodology and has been used successfully to develop a set of modal survey target modes.

  1. Transient analysis mode participation for modal survey target mode selection using MSC/NASTRAN DMAP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnett, Alan R.; Ibrahim, Omar M.; Sullivan, Timothy L.; Goodnight, Thomas W.

    1994-01-01

    Many methods have been developed to aid analysts in identifying component modes which contribute significantly to component responses. These modes, typically targeted for dynamic model correlation via a modal survey, are known as target modes. Most methods used to identify target modes are based on component global dynamic behavior. It is sometimes unclear if these methods identify all modes contributing to responses important to the analyst. These responses are usually those in areas of hardware design concerns. One method used to check the completeness of target mode sets and identify modes contributing significantly to important component responses is mode participation. With this method, the participation of component modes in dynamic responses is quantified. Those modes which have high participation are likely modal survey target modes. Mode participation is most beneficial when it is used with responses from analyses simulating actual flight events. For spacecraft, these responses are generated via a structural dynamic coupled loads analysis. Using MSC/NASTRAN DMAP, a method has been developed for calculating mode participation based on transient coupled loads analysis results. The algorithm has been implemented to be compatible with an existing coupled loads methodology and has been used successfully to develop a set of modal survey target modes.

  2. Mode-independent robust stabilization for uncertain Markovian jump nonlinear systems via fuzzy control.

    PubMed

    Wu, Huai-Ning; Cai, Kai-Yuan

    2006-06-01

    This paper is concerned with the robust-stabilization problem of uncertain Markovian jump nonlinear systems (MJNSs) without mode observations via a fuzzy-control approach. The Takagi and Sugeno (T-S) fuzzy model is employed to represent a nonlinear system with norm-bounded parameter uncertainties and Markovian jump parameters. The aim is to design a mode-independent fuzzy controller such that the closed-loop Markovian jump fuzzy system (MJFS) is robustly stochastically stable. Based on a stochastic Lyapunov function, a robust-stabilization condition using a mode-independent fuzzy controller is derived for the uncertain MJFS in terms of linear matrix inequalities (LMIs). A new improved LMI formulation is used to alleviate the interrelation between the stochastic Lyapunov matrix and the system matrices containing controller variables in the derivation process. Finally, a simulation example is presented to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed design method.

  3. Ideal MHD stability properties of pressure-driven modes in low shear tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Manickam, J.; Pomphrey, N.; Todd, A.M.M.

    1987-03-01

    The role of shear in determining the ideal MHD stability properties of tokamaks is discussed. In particular, we assess the effects of low shear within the plasma upon pressure-driven modes. The standard ballooning theory is shown to break down, as the shear is reduced and the growth rate is shown to be an oscillatory function of n, the toroidal mode number, treated as a continuous parameter. The oscillations are shown to depend on both the pressure and safety-factor profiles. When the shear is sufficiently weak, the oscillations can result in bands of unstable n values which are present even when the standard ballooning theory predicts complete stability. These instabilities are named ''infernal modes.'' The occurrence of these instabilities at integer n is shown to be a sensitive function of q-axis, raising the possibility of a sharp onset as plasma parameters evolve. 20 refs., 31 figs.

  4. Neoclassical Tearing Mode Analysis in Spherical Tokamak Burning Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurita, Daiki; Yamazaki, Kozo; Arimoto, Hideki; Oishi, Tetsutarou; Shoji, Tatsuo

    For stabilization of neoclassical tearing mode (NTM), non-resonant helical field (NRHF) is investigated. The time variation of magnetic island is described by modified Rutherford equation. In this work, plasma parameter change due to NTM is analyzed using 1.5-dimensional transport code TOTAL. In ST plasma, magnetic island at 3/2 mode grows by bootstrap current and the central temperature decreases. If NRHF is added, the effect of bootstrap current decreases and NTM is stabilized.

  5. Wall thickness effect on the resistive wall mode stability in toroidal plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, L.-J.; Kotschenreuther, M.T.

    2005-07-15

    The effect of finite wall thickness on the stability of n=1 resistive wall modes in toroidal plasmas is investigated. A fusion reactor-relevant configuration is examined. The investigation employs a novel ideal-magnetohydrodynamics adaptive shooting code for axisymmetric plasmas, extended to take into account the wall thickness. Although finite wall thickness generally reduces the growth rate of the resistive wall modes, no contribution to stabilization is found to be made by the portion of the wall that is located beyond the critical position for perfectly conducting wall stabilization. Thus, when the inner side of the wall lies near the critical wall position, the scaling of the growth rate versus wall thickness in the realistic thick-wall calculation is significantly different from that of the usual thin-wall theory. The thin-wall estimate is relevant only when the wall is brought very close to the plasma and is not too thick.

  6. Stabilization of the resistive wall mode instability by trapped energetic particles

    SciTech Connect

    Hao, G. Z.; Wang, A. K.; Jiang, H. B.; Lu, Gaimin; He, H. D.; Qiu, X. M.; Liu, Y. Q.

    2011-03-15

    A theoretical model for investigating the effect of the trapped energetic particles (EPs) on the resistive wall mode (RWM) instability is proposed. The results demonstrate that the trapped EPs have a dramatic stabilizing effect on the RWM because of resonant interaction between the mode and the magnetic precession drift motion of the trapped EPs. The results also show that the effect of the trapped EPs depends on the wall position. In addition, the stabilizing effect becomes stronger when the plasma rotation is taken into account. For sufficiently fast plasma rotation, the trapped EPs can lead to the complete stabilization of the RWM. Furthermore, the trapped EPs can induce a finite real frequency of the RWM in the absence of plasma rotation.

  7. ELM triggering by energetic particle driven mode in wall-stabilized high-β plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsunaga, G.; Aiba, N.; Shinohara, K.; Asakura, N.; Isayama, A.; Oyama, N.; the JT-60 Team

    2013-07-01

    In the JT-60U high-β plasmas above the no-wall β limit, a triggering of an edge localized mode (ELM) by an energetic particle (EP)-driven mode has been observed. This EP-driven mode is thought to be driven by trapped EPs and it has been named EP-driven wall mode (EWM) on JT-60U (Matsunaga et al 2009 Phys. Rev. Lett. 103 045001). When the EWM appears in an ELMy H-mode phase, ELM crashes are reproducibly synchronized with the EWM bursts. The EWM-triggered ELM has a higher repetition frequency and less energy loss than those of the natural ELM. In order to trigger an ELM by the EP-driven mode, some conditions are thought to be needed, thus an EWM with large amplitude and growth rate, and marginal edge stability. In the scrape-off layer region, several measurements indicate an ion loss induced by the EWM. The ion transport is considered as the EP transport through the edge region. From these observations, the EP contributions to edge stability are discussed as one of the ELM triggering mechanisms.

  8. Q-mode versus R-mode principal component analysis for linear discriminant analysis (LDA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Loong Chuen; Liong, Choong-Yeun; Jemain, Abdul Aziz

    2017-05-01

    Many literature apply Principal Component Analysis (PCA) as either preliminary visualization or variable con-struction methods or both. Focus of PCA can be on the samples (R-mode PCA) or variables (Q-mode PCA). Traditionally, R-mode PCA has been the usual approach to reduce high-dimensionality data before the application of Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA), to solve classification problems. Output from PCA composed of two new matrices known as loadings and scores matrices. Each matrix can then be used to produce a plot, i.e. loadings plot aids identification of important variables whereas scores plot presents spatial distribution of samples on new axes that are also known as Principal Components (PCs). Fundamentally, the scores matrix always be the input variables for building classification model. A recent paper uses Q-mode PCA but the focus of analysis was not on the variables but instead on the samples. As a result, the authors have exchanged the use of both loadings and scores plots in which clustering of samples was studied using loadings plot whereas scores plot has been used to identify important manifest variables. Therefore, the aim of this study is to statistically validate the proposed practice. Evaluation is based on performance of external error obtained from LDA models according to number of PCs. On top of that, bootstrapping was also conducted to evaluate the external error of each of the LDA models. Results show that LDA models produced by PCs from R-mode PCA give logical performance and the matched external error are also unbiased whereas the ones produced with Q-mode PCA show the opposites. With that, we concluded that PCs produced from Q-mode is not statistically stable and thus should not be applied to problems of classifying samples, but variables. We hope this paper will provide some insights on the disputable issues.

  9. Nonlinear stability analysis of Darcy's flow with viscous heating.

    PubMed

    Celli, Michele; Alves, Leonardo S de B; Barletta, Antonio

    2016-05-01

    The nonlinear stability of a rectangular porous channel saturated by a fluid is here investigated. The aspect ratio of the channel is assumed to be variable. The channel walls are considered impermeable and adiabatic except for the horizontal top which is assumed to be isothermal. The viscous dissipation is acting inside the channel as internal heat generator. A basic throughflow is imposed, and the nonlinear convective stability is investigated by means of the generalized integral transform technique. The neutral stability curve is compared with the one obtained by the linear stability analysis already present in the literature. The growth rate analysis of different unstable modes is performed. The Nusselt number is investigated for several supercritical configurations in order to better understand how the system behaves when conditions far away from neutral stability are considered. The patterns of the neutrally stable convective cells are also reported. Nonlinear simulations support the results obtained by means of the linear stability analysis, confirming that viscous dissipation alone is indeed capable of inducing mixed convection. Low Gebhart or high Péclet numbers lead to a transient overheating of the originally motionless fluid before it settles in its convective steady state.

  10. Stabilizing effect of resistivity towards ELM-free H-mode discharge in lithium-conditioned NSTX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Debabrata; Zhu, Ping; Maingi, Rajesh

    2017-07-01

    Linear stability analysis of the national spherical torus experiment (NSTX) Li-conditioned ELM-free H-mode equilibria is carried out in the context of the extended magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) model in NIMROD. The purpose is to investigate the physical cause behind edge localized mode (ELM) suppression in experiment after the Li-coating of the divertor and the first wall of the NSTX tokamak. Besides ideal MHD modeling, including finite-Larmor radius effect and two-fluid Hall and electron diamagnetic drift contributions, a non-ideal resistivity model is employed, taking into account the increase of Z eff after Li-conditioning in ELM-free H-mode. Unlike an earlier conclusion from an eigenvalue code analysis of these equilibria, NIMROD results find that after reduced recycling from divertor plates, profile modification is necessary but insufficient to explain the mechanism behind complete ELMs suppression in ideal two-fluid MHD. After considering the higher plasma resistivity due to higher Z eff, the complete stabilization could be explained. A thorough analysis of both pre-lithium ELMy and with-lithium ELM-free cases using ideal and non-ideal MHD models is presented, after accurately including a vacuum-like cold halo region in NIMROD to investigate ELMs.

  11. Stabilizing effect of resistivity towards ELM-free H-mode discharge in lithium-conditioned NSTX

    DOE PAGES

    Banerjee, Debabrata; Zhu, Ping; Maingi, Rajesh

    2017-05-12

    Linear stability analysis of the national spherical torus experiment (NSTX) Li-conditioned ELM-free H-mode equilibria is carried out in the context of the extended magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) model in NIMROD. Our purpose is to investigate the physical cause behind edge localized mode (ELM) suppression in experiment after the Li-coating of the divertor and the first wall of the NSTX tokamak. Besides ideal MHD modeling, including finite-Larmor radius effect and two-fluid Hall and electron diamagnetic drift contributions, a non-ideal resistivity model is employed, taking into account the increase of Z eff after Li-conditioning in ELM-free H-mode. And unlike an earlier conclusion from anmore » eigenvalue code analysis of these equilibria, NIMROD results find that after reduced recycling from divertor plates, profile modification is necessary but insufficient to explain the mechanism behind complete ELMs suppression in ideal two-fluid MHD. After considering the higher plasma resistivity due to higher Z eff, the complete stabilization could be explained. Furthermore, a thorough analysis of both pre-lithium ELMy and with-lithium ELM-free cases using ideal and non-ideal MHD models is presented, after accurately including a vacuum-like cold halo region in NIMROD to investigate ELMs.« less

  12. Local kinetic analysis of the ballooning mode in tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirose, Akira

    1990-07-01

    The problem of ballooning marginal stability in tokamaks, in both the incompressible and compressible limits, is examined in terms of a local kinetic dispersion relation by incorporating all possible kinetic resonances of both electrons and ions. In particular, the ion Landau resonance, which has been ignored in previous kinetic theories, is retained. A low-beta, collisionless tokamak discharge with shifted circular magnetic surfaces is assumed; for simplicity, particle trapping is ignored. The analysis indicates that the stability boundary of the ballooning mode in tokamaks is quite insensitive to whether a plasma is compressible or incompressible. The maximum growth rate of the kinetic ballooning mode is smaller than the magneto hydrodynamic counterpart typically by a factor of 5, and it does not exceed the ion transit frequency by a large margin. The findings may imply that the ballooning instability should not be as violent as conjectured to date, and explain the achievement in some tokamaks of stable discharge in the beta regime that should be magnetohydrodynamic ballooning unstable.

  13. The stability of confined radio jets - The role of reflection modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Payne, D. G.; Cohn, H.

    1985-01-01

    The linear stability of a confined radio jet is reinvestigated. The roles of both absolute (temporal) and convected (spatial) instability are considered, and it is demonstrated that the two are related through the group velocity. The dispersion relation is analyzed asymptotically for the fundamental and reflection modes. Numerical results are presented for pinching modes. A geometrical interpretation of the modes is presented in terms of the propagation angle and is visualized by contour plots of the pressure perturbation. A confined jet theta M = arc sine (1 + sq rt eta)/M, where eta is the ratio of the internal to the external gas density and M is the Mach number of the jet. The connection between these linear modes and the cross-shaped shock patterns which are seen in laboratory jets, and the implications of these calculations for the development of large-scale features in extragalactic radio jets, are discussed.

  14. Real-time Stability Analysis for Disruption Avoidance in ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glasser, Alexander; Kolemen, Egemen; Glasser, Alan

    2015-11-01

    ITER is intended to operate at plasma parameters approaching the frontier of achievable stability limits. And yet, plasma disruptions at ITER must be kept to a bare minimum to avoid damage to its plasma-facing structures. These competing goals necessitate real-time plasma stability analysis and feedback control at ITER. This work aims to develop a mechanism for real-time analysis of a large and virulent class of disruptions driven by the rapid growth of ideal MHD unstable modes in tokamak equilibria. Such modes will be identified by a parallelized, low-latency implementation of A.H. Glasser's well-tested DCON (Direct Criterion of Newcomb) code, which measures the energetics of modes in the bulk plasma fluid, as well as M.S. Chance's VACUUM code, which measures the same in the vacuum between the plasma and tokamak chamber wall. Parallelization of these codes is intended to achieve a time-savings of 40x, thereby reducing latency to a timescale of order 100ms and making the codes viable for ideal MHD stability control at ITER. The hardware used to achieve this parallelization will be an Intel Xeon Phi server with 77 cores (308 threads). Supported by the US DOE under DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  15. Stability investigations of airfoil flow by global analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morzynski, Marek; Thiele, Frank

    1992-01-01

    As the result of global, non-parallel flow stability analysis the single value of the disturbance growth-rate and respective frequency is obtained. This complex value characterizes the stability of the whole flow configuration and is not referred to any particular flow pattern. The global analysis assures that all the flow elements (wake, boundary and shear layer) are taken into account. The physical phenomena connected with the wake instability are properly reproduced by the global analysis. This enhances the investigations of instability of any 2-D flows, including ones in which the boundary layer instability effects are known to be of dominating importance. Assuming fully 2-D disturbance form, the global linear stability problem is formulated. The system of partial differential equations is solved for the eigenvalues and eigenvectors. The equations, written in the pure stream function formulation, are discretized via FDM using a curvilinear coordinate system. The complex eigenvalues and corresponding eigenvectors are evaluated by an iterative method. The investigations performed for various Reynolds numbers emphasize that the wake instability develops into the Karman vortex street. This phenomenon is shown to be connected with the first mode obtained from the non-parallel flow stability analysis. The higher modes are reflecting different physical phenomena as for example Tollmien-Schlichting waves, originating in the boundary layer and having the tendency to emerge as instabilities for the growing Reynolds number. The investigations are carried out for a circular cylinder, oblong ellipsis and airfoil. It is shown that the onset of the wake instability, the waves in the boundary layer, the shear layer instability are different solutions of the same eigenvalue problem, formulated using the non-parallel theory. The analysis offers large potential possibilities as the generalization of methods used till now for the stability analysis.

  16. Transitional behavior of convective patterns in porous media: Insights from basin stability analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karani, Hamid; Huber, Christian

    2016-11-01

    The present study investigates the transitional behavior of convective modes in Horton-Rogers-Lapwood convection (HRLC). We first provide new pore-scale numerical and experimental evidences on the variation of the stability level of single-cell and double-cell convection modes in a 2D HRLC problem. In order to interpret this transitional behavior, we employ the concept of basin stability and develop a basin stability diagram of the first four convection modes in HRLC. This is in contrast to the standard bifurcation analysis of HRLC using linear stability analysis and continuation techniques, which only provides local information about the (range of) existence, and any possible co-existence of different convection modes. The present basin stability analysis of HRLC not only provides the local information about the (co-)existence of different patterns, but also, it determines their relative stability as well as how the basin of stability of these modes contract or expands as the Rayleigh number varies. The results of the present study show how establishing the dependence of basin stability on the Rayleigh number is essential to analyze the transition between different convection patterns observed experimentally and numerically.

  17. ASTROP2 users manual: A program for aeroelastic stability analysis of propfans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narayanan, G. V.; Kaza, K. R. V.

    1991-01-01

    A user's manual is presented for the aeroelastic stability and response of propulsion systems computer program called ASTROP2. The ASTROP2 code preforms aeroelastic stability analysis of rotating propfan blades. This analysis uses a two-dimensional, unsteady cascade aerodynamics model and a three-dimensional, normal-mode structural model. Analytical stability results from this code are compared with published experimental results of a rotating composite advanced turboprop model and of nonrotating metallic wing model.

  18. Study of fuzzy adaptive PID controller on thermal frequency stabilizing laser with double longitudinal modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mo, Qingkai; Zhang, Tao; Yan, Yining

    2016-10-01

    There are contradictions among speediness, anti-disturbance performance, and steady-state accuracy caused by traditional PID controller in the existing light source systems of thermal frequency stabilizing laser with double longitudinal modes. In this paper, a new kind of fuzzy adaptive PID controller was designed by combining fuzzy PID control technology and expert system to make frequency stabilizing system obtain the optimal performance. The experiments show that the frequency stability of the designed PID controller is similar to the existing PID controller (the magnitude of frequency stability is less than 10-9 in constant temperature and 10-7 in open air). But the preheating time is shortened obviously (from 10 minutes to 5 minutes) and the anti-disturbance capability is improved significantly (the recovery time needed after strong interference is reduced from 1 minute to 10 seconds).

  19. Broad-area laser diode with stable single-mode output and wavelength stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nappez, Thomas; Ghibaudo, Elise; Rondeau, Philippe; Schlotterbeck, Jean-Pierre; Broquin, Jean-Emmanuel

    2012-01-01

    High power single-mode pump laser diodes operating around 980nm are key components for Erbium-doped devices. Much effort is still currently devoted to improve both their wavelength stability and their achievable output power, while maintaining a stable single-mode operation. Usually, the emission wavelength is stabilized by an external Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG). This configuration requires free-space optics between the laser diode output facet and the fiber or a lensed fiber to ensure an efficient coupling efficiency. This constraint increases fabrication costs, dimensions and mechanical instabilities. Moreover, the maximum achievable output power is limited because a high optical power density can damage the laser facets. To increase the achievable output power, a solution consists in using Broad-Area Laser Diodes (BALD), which are multimode emitters that are composed of large active ribbons with width of some hundreds of micrometers. The objective is then to improve the beam quality by locking the BALD emission on its transverse fundamental mode. We propose in this article to insert an integrated adiabatic transition between the multimode laser and a single-mode FBG. This taper, made by ion-exchange in glass, provides a coupling efficiency of -22.0dB from the multimode laser emission to the single-mode fiber. An optical feedback of -34dB demonstrates the stabilization of the BALD spectrum at the Bragg wavelength. The spectrum of the device is characterized by a maximum side-mode suppression ratio of 35dB, a RMS spectral width of (0.16 +/- 0.04) nm and a frequency shift with current of -12GHz/100mA.

  20. Mode stability in photonic-crystal surface-emitting lasers with large κ{sub 1D}L

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, Yong Okino, Tsuyoshi; Ishizaki, Kenji; Noda, Susumu; Kitamura, Kyoko; Peng, Chao

    2014-01-13

    We study mode stability in photonic-crystal surface-emitting lasers (PCSELs) with large coupling-coefficient-length product κ{sub 1D}L(>6). We observe that mode competition occurs at high current levels above threshold. Our combined experimental and theoretical study provides the first evidence of the mode competition originating from the high-order band-edge modes. The decreased threshold margin between these competing high-order modes and the main lasing mode with increasing cavity length as well as the spatial hole burning effect may deteriorate the single-mode stability. Our finding is essential for designing single-mode high-power PCSELs for which the strategy to suppress the high-order modes must be considered.

  1. Is failure mode and effect analysis reliable?

    PubMed

    Shebl, Nada Atef; Franklin, Bryony Dean; Barber, Nick

    2009-06-01

    To test the reliability of failure mode and effect analysis (FMEA) within a hospital setting in the United Kingdom. Two multidisciplinary groups were recruited, within 2 hospitals from the same National Health Services (NHS) Trust, to conduct separate FMEAs in parallel on the same topic. Each group conducted an FMEA for the use of vancomycin and gentamicin. The groups followed the basic FMEA steps, which included mapping the process of care; identifying potential failures within the process; determining the severity, probability, and detectability scores for these failures; and finally making recommendations to decrease these failures. Both groups described the process with 5 major steps: starting vancomycin or gentamicin, prescribing the antibiotics, administering the antibiotics, monitoring the antibiotics, and finally stopping or continuing the treatment. Although each group identified 50 failures, only 17 (17%) of them were common to both. Furthermore, the severity, detectability, and risk priority number scores for both groups differed markedly resulting in their failures being prioritized differently. Failure mode and effect analysis is a useful tool to aid multidisciplinary groups in understanding a process of care and identifying errors that may occur. However, the results of this study call into question the reliability of the FMEA process that was tested. The 2 groups identified similar steps in the process of care but different potential failures with very different risk priority numbers. Such discrepancies make it impossible to identify reliably those failures that should be prioritized and thus where money, time, and effort should be allocated to avoid these failures. Health care organizations should not solely depend on FMEA findings to improve patient safety.

  2. Dynamics and stability of divertor detachment in H-mode plasmas on JET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Field, A. R.; Balboa, I.; Drewelow, P.; Flanagan, J.; Guillemaut, C.; Harrison, J. R.; Huber, A.; Huber, V.; Lipschultz, B.; Matthews, G.; Meigs, A.; Schmitz, J.; Stamp, M.; Walkden, N.; contributors, JET

    2017-09-01

    The dynamics and stability of divertor detachment in {{{N}}}2 seeded, type-I, ELMy H-mode plasmas with dominant NBI heating in the JET ITER-like wall device is studied by means of an integrated analysis of diagnostic data from several systems, classifying data relative to the ELM times. It is thereby possible to study the response of the detachment evolution to the control parameters (SOL input power, upstream density and impurity fraction) prevailing during the inter-ELM periods and the effect of ELMs on the detached divertor. A relatively comprehensive overview is achieved, including the interaction with the targets at various stages of the ELM cycle, the role of ELMs in affecting the detachment process and the overall performance of the scenario. The results are consistent with previous studies in devices with an ITER-like, metal wall, with the important advance of distinguishing data from intra- and inter-ELM periods. Operation without significant degradation of the core confinement can be sustained in the presence of strong radiation from the x-point region (MARFE).

  3. Effects of centrifugal modification of magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium on resistive wall mode stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiraishi, J.; Aiba, N.; Miyato, N.; Yagi, M.

    2014-08-01

    Toroidal rotation effects are self-consistently taken into account not only in the linear magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) stability analysis but also in the equilibrium calculation. The MHD equilibrium computation is affected by centrifugal force due to the toroidal rotation. To study the toroidal rotation effects on resistive wall modes (RWMs), a new code has been developed. The RWMaC modules, which solve the electromagnetic dynamics in vacuum and the resistive wall, have been implemented in the MINERVA code, which solves the Frieman-Rotenberg equation that describes the linear ideal MHD dynamics in a rotating plasma. It is shown that modification of MHD equilibrium by the centrifugal force significantly reduces growth rates of RWMs with fast rotation in the order of M2 = 0.1 where M is the Mach number. Moreover, it can open a stable window which does not exist under the assumption that the rotation affects only the linear dynamics. The rotation modifies the equilibrium pressure gradient and current density profiles, which results in the change of potential energy including rotational effects.

  4. A semiconductor-based, frequency-stabilized mode-locked laser using a phase modulator and an intracavity etalon.

    PubMed

    Davila-Rodriguez, Josue; Ozdur, Ibrahim; Williams, Charles; Delfyett, Peter J

    2010-12-15

    We report a frequency-stabilized semiconductor-based mode-locked laser that uses a phase modulator and an intracavity Fabry-Perot etalon for both active mode-locking and optical frequency stabilization. A twofold multiplication of the repetition frequency of the laser is inherently obtained in the process. The residual timing jitter of the mode-locked pulse train is 13 fs (1 Hz to 100 MHz), measured after regenerative frequency division of the photodetected pulse train.

  5. Identification of a Low Plasma-Rotation Threshold for Stabilization of the Resistive-Wall Mode

    SciTech Connect

    Takechi, M.; Matsunaga, G.; Aiba, N.; Fujita, T.; Ozeki, T.; Koide, Y.; Sakamoto, Y.; Kurita, G.; Isayama, A.; Kamada, Y.

    2007-02-02

    The plasma rotation necessary for stabilization of resistive-wall modes (RWMs) is investigated by controlling the toroidal plasma rotation with external momentum input by injection of tangential neutral beams. The observed threshold is 0.3% of the Alfven velocity and much smaller than the previous experimental results obtained with magnetic braking. This low critical rotation has a very weak {beta} dependence as the ideal wall limit is approached. These results indicate that for large plasmas such as in future fusion reactors with low rotation, the requirement of the additional feedback control system for stabilizing RWM is much reduced.

  6. Final Report for "Stabilization of resistive wall modes using moving metal walls"

    SciTech Connect

    Forest, Cary B.

    2014-02-05

    The UW experiment used a linear pinch experiment to study the stabilization of MHD by moving metal walls. The methodology of the experiment had three steps. (1) Identify and understand the no-wall MHD instability limits and character, (2) identify and understand the thin-wall MHD instabilities (re- sistive wall mode), and then (3) add the spinning wall and understand its impact on stability properties. During the duration of the grant we accomplished all 3 of these goals, discovered new physics, and completed the experiment as proposed.

  7. CaF2 whispering-gallery-mode-resonator stabilized-narrow-linewidth laser.

    PubMed

    Sprenger, B; Schwefel, H G L; Lu, Z H; Svitlov, S; Wang, L J

    2010-09-01

    A fiber laser is stabilized by introducing a calcium fluoride (CaF(2)) whispering-gallery-mode resonator as a filtering element in a ring cavity. It is set up using a semiconductor optical amplifier as a gain medium. The resonator is critically coupled through prisms, and used as a filtering element to suppress the laser linewidth. A three-cornered-hat method is used and shows a stability of 10(-11) after 10 micros. Using the self-heterodyne beat technique, the linewidth is determined to be 13 kHz. This implies an enhancement factor of 10(3) with respect to the passive cavity linewidth.

  8. Exploring the Frequency Stability Limits of Whispering Gallery Mode Resonators for Metrological Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chembo, Yanne K.; Baumgartel, Lukas; Grudinin, Ivan; Strekalov, Dmitry; Thompson, Robert; Yu, Nan

    2012-01-01

    Whispering gallery mode resonators are attracting increasing interest as promising frequency reference cavities. Unlike commonly used Fabry-Perot cavities, however, they are filled with a bulk medium whose properties have a significant impact on the stability of its resonance frequencies. In this context that has to be reduced to a minimum. On the other hand, a small monolithic resonator provides opportunity for better stability against vibration and acceleration. this feature is essential when the cavity operates in a non-laboratory environment. In this paper, we report a case study for a crystalline resonator, and discuss the a pathway towards the inhibition of vibration-and acceleration-induced frequency fluctuations.

  9. The role of kinetic effects, including plasma rotation and energetic particles, in resistive wall mode stability

    SciTech Connect

    Berkery, J. W.; Sabbagh, S. A.; Reimerdes, H.; Betti, R.; Hu, B.; Bell, R. E.; Gerhardt, S. P.; Manickam, J.; Podesta, M.

    2010-08-15

    The resistive wall mode (RWM) instability in high-beta tokamaks is stabilized by energy dissipation mechanisms that depend on plasma rotation and kinetic effects. Kinetic modification of ideal stability calculated with the 'MISK' code [B. Hu et al., Phys. Plasmas 12, 057301 (2005)] is outlined. For an advanced scenario ITER [R. Aymar et al., Nucl. Fusion 41, 1301 (2001)] plasma, the present calculation finds that alpha particles are required for RWM stability at presently expected levels of plasma rotation. Kinetic stabilization theory is tested in an experiment in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [M. Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40, 557 (2000)] that produced marginally stable plasmas with various energetic particle contents. Plasmas with the highest and lowest energetic particle content agree with calculations predicting that increased energetic particle pressure is stabilizing but does not alter the nonmonotonic dependence of stability on plasma rotation due to thermal particle resonances. Presently, the full MISK model, including thermal particles and an isotropic slowing-down distribution function for energetic particles, overpredicts stability in NSTX experiments. Minor alteration of either effect in the theory may yield agreement; several possibilities are discussed.

  10. Analysis of edge stability for models of heat flux width

    DOE PAGES

    Makowski, Michael A.; Lasnier, Charles J.; Leonard, Anthony W.; ...

    2017-05-12

    Detailed measurements of the ne, and Te, and Ti profiles in the vicinity of the separatrix of ELMing H-mode discharges have been used to examine plasma stability at the extreme edge of the plasma and assess stability dependent models of the heat flux width. The results are strongly contrary to the critical gradient model, which posits that a ballooning instability determines a gradient scale length related to the heat flux width. The results of this analysis are not sensitive to the choice of location to evaluate stability. Significantly, it is also found that the results are completely consistent with themore » heuristic drift model for the heat flux width. Here the edge pressure gradient scales with plasma density and is proportional to the pressure gradient inferred from the equilibrium in accordance with the predictions of that theory.« less

  11. Algorithm Summary and Evaluation: Automatic Implementation of Ringdown Analysis for Electromechanical Mode Identification from Phasor Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Ning; Huang, Zhenyu; Tuffner, Francis K.; Jin, Shuangshuang; Lin, Jenglung; Hauer, Matthew L.

    2010-02-28

    Small signal stability problems are one of the major threats to grid stability and reliability. Prony analysis has been successfully applied on ringdown data to monitor electromechanical modes of a power system using phasor measurement unit (PMU) data. To facilitate an on-line application of mode estimation, this paper develops a recursive algorithm for implementing Prony analysis and proposed an oscillation detection method to detect ringdown data in real time. By automatically detecting ringdown data, the proposed method helps guarantee that Prony analysis is applied properly and timely on the ringdown data. Thus, the mode estimation results can be performed reliably and timely. The proposed method is tested using Monte Carlo simulations based on a 17-machine model and is shown to be able to properly identify the oscillation data for on-line application of Prony analysis. In addition, the proposed method is applied to field measurement data from WECC to show the performance of the proposed algorithm.

  12. Cancellation of drift kinetic effects between thermal and energetic particles on the resistive wall mode stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, S. C.; Liu, Y. Q.; Xu, X. Y.; Wang, Z. R.

    2016-07-01

    Drift kinetic stabilization of the resistive wall mode (RWM) is computationally investigated using MHD-kinetic hybrid code MARS-K following the non-perturbative approach (Liu et al 2008 Phys. Plasmas 15 112503), for both reversed field pinch (RFP) and tokamak plasmas. Toroidal precessional drift resonance effects from trapped energetic ions (EIs) and various kinetic resonances between the mode and the guiding center drift motions of thermal particles are included into the self-consistent toroidal computations. The results show cancellation effects of the drift kinetic damping on the RWM between the thermal particles and EIs contributions, in both RFP and tokamak plasmas, even though each species alone can provide damping and stabilize RWM instability by respective kinetic resonances. The degree of cancellation generally depends on the EIs equilibrium distribution, the particle birth energy, as well as the toroidal flow speed of the plasma.

  13. Stability of the n{=}1 Internal Kink Mode in Plasmas with Centrally Peaked Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozeki, Takahisa; Azumi, Masafumi

    1990-12-01

    The stability of the n{=}1 internal kink mode in a tokamak is numerically analyzed for plasmas with a centrally peaked pressure profile. The effect of pressure profile is studied by the comparison of a strongly peaked pressure inside the q{=}1 surface with a parabolic pressure profile. The effects of shaping, i.e., elongation and triangularity, are also studied for the both pressure profiles. The plasma with the strongly peaked pressure profile has higher limiting value of poloidal beta defined within the q{=}1 surface than that of the parabolic pressure profile. Though the beta limit reduces with the increase of the elongation, the plasma with the peaked pressure profile has larger improvement due to the triangularity than that with the parabolic pressure profile. However, to enter the second stability region of the n{=}1 internal kink mode, the plasma with a flat pressure profile and the large minor radius of the q{=}1 surface is effective.

  14. Optimization of Feedback Control Coils for Resistive Wall Mode Stabilization in DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bialek, J.; Boozer, A. H.; Garofalo, A. M.; Mauel, M. E.; Navratil, G. A.; Turnbull, A. D.

    1999-11-01

    Recent experiments in DIII--D on Resistive Wall Mode (RWM) stabilization with active feedback have been very promising. We investigated extensions to the sensor and control coil set that would further improve RWM stabilization. The VALEN computer code models the RWM as an equivalent current distribution on the unperturbed plasma boundary which duplicates the plasma external magnetic field of the mode, as calculated by GATO. This surface current determines the plasma interaction with all conducting structures. In three dimensions the VALEN code models the unstable plasma, passive structure, proposed sensors, and proposed control coils together with the control logic. The problem may be examined as a transient simulation, or for a linear power supply model, as an eigenvalue calculation. A summary of the configurations examined and their predicted effectiveness will be presented.

  15. Stabilization of a Quadrotor With Uncertain Suspended Load Using Sliding Mode Control

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Xu; Liu, Rui; Zhang, Jiucai; Zhang, Xiaoli

    2016-08-21

    The stability and trajectory control of a quadrotor carrying a suspended load with a fixed known mass has been extensively studied in recent years. However, the load mass is not always known beforehand in practical applications. This mass uncertainty brings uncertain disturbances to the quadrotor system, causing existing controllers to have a worse performance or to be collapsed. To improve the quadrotor's stability in this situation, we investigate the impacts of the uncertain load mass on the quadrotor. By comparing the simulation results of two controllers -- the proportional-derivative (PD) controller and the sliding mode controller (SMC) driven by a sliding mode disturbance of observer (SMDO), the quadrotor's performance is verified to be worse as the uncertainty increases. The simulation results also show a controller with stronger robustness against disturbances is better for practical applications.

  16. Implementation of model predictive control for resistive wall mode stabilization on EXTRAP T2R

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setiadi, A. C.; Brunsell, P. R.; Frassinetti, L.

    2015-10-01

    A model predictive control (MPC) method for stabilization of the resistive wall mode (RWM) in the EXTRAP T2R reversed-field pinch is presented. The system identification technique is used to obtain a linearized empirical model of EXTRAP T2R. MPC employs the model for prediction and computes optimal control inputs that satisfy performance criterion. The use of a linearized form of the model allows for compact formulation of MPC, implemented on a millisecond timescale, that can be used for real-time control. The design allows the user to arbitrarily suppress any selected Fourier mode. The experimental results from EXTRAP T2R show that the designed and implemented MPC successfully stabilizes the RWM.

  17. Effect of nonlinear energy transport on neoclassical tearing mode stability in tokamak plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzpatrick, Richard

    2017-05-01

    An investigation is made into the effect of the reduction in anomalous perpendicular electron heat transport inside the separatrix of a magnetic island chain associated with a neoclassical tearing mode in a tokamak plasma, due to the flattening of the electron temperature profile in this region, on the overall stability of the mode. The onset of the neoclassical tearing mode is governed by the ratio of the divergences of the parallel and perpendicular electron heat fluxes in the vicinity of the island chain. By increasing the degree of transport reduction, the onset of the mode, as the divergence ratio is gradually increased, can be made more and more abrupt. Eventually, when the degree of transport reduction passes a certain critical value, the onset of the neoclassical tearing mode becomes discontinuous. In other words, when some critical value of the divergence ratio is reached, there is a sudden bifurcation to a branch of neoclassical tearing mode solutions. Moreover, once this bifurcation has been triggered, the divergence ratio must be reduced by a substantial factor to trigger the inverse bifurcation.

  18. Stability analysis of free piston Stirling engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bégot, Sylvie; Layes, Guillaume; Lanzetta, François; Nika, Philippe

    2013-03-01

    This paper presents a stability analysis of a free piston Stirling engine. The model and the detailed calculation of pressures losses are exposed. Stability of the machine is studied by the observation of the eigenvalues of the model matrix. Model validation based on the comparison with NASA experimental results is described. The influence of operational and construction parameters on performance and stability issues is exposed. The results show that most parameters that are beneficial for machine power seem to induce irregular mechanical characteristics with load, suggesting that self-sustained oscillations could be difficult to maintain and control.

  19. Stability analysis of zigzag boron nitride nanoribbons

    SciTech Connect

    Rai, Hari Mohan Late, Ravikiran; Saxena, Shailendra K.; Kumar, Rajesh; Sagdeo, Pankaj R.; Jaiswal, Neeraj K.; Srivastava, Pankaj

    2015-05-15

    We have explored the structural stability of bare and hydrogenated zigzag boron nitride nanoribbons (ZBNNRs). In order to investigate the structural stability, we calculate the cohesive energy for bare, one-edge and both edges H-terminated ZBNNRs with different widths. It is found that the ZBNNRs with width Nz=8 are energetically more favorable than the lower-width counterparts (Nz<8). Bare ZBNNRs have been found energetically most stable as compared to the edge terminated ribbons. Our analysis reveals that the structural stability is a function of ribbon-width and it is not affected significantly by the type of edge-passivation (one-edge or both-edges)

  20. Empirical mode decomposition analysis for visual stylometry.

    PubMed

    Hughes, James M; Mao, Dong; Rockmore, Daniel N; Wang, Yang; Wu, Qiang

    2012-11-01

    In this paper, we show how the tools of empirical mode decomposition (EMD) analysis can be applied to the problem of “visual stylometry,” generally defined as the development of quantitative tools for the measurement and comparisons of individual style in the visual arts. In particular, we introduce a new form of EMD analysis for images and show that it is possible to use its output as the basis for the construction of effective support vector machine (SVM)-based stylometric classifiers. We present the methodology and then test it on collections of two sets of digital captures of drawings: a set of authentic and well-known imitations of works attributed to the great Flemish artist Pieter Bruegel the Elder (1525-1569) and a set of works attributed to Dutch master Rembrandt van Rijn (1606-1669) and his pupils. Our positive results indicate that EMD-based methods may hold promise generally as a technique for visual stylometry.

  1. Stability analysis of unsteady ablation fronts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betti, R.; McCrory, R. L.; Verdon, C. P.

    1993-08-01

    The linear stability analysis of unsteady ablation fronts is carried out for a semi-infinite uniform medium. For a laser accelerated target, it is shown that a properly selected modulation of the laser intensity can lead to the dynamic stabilization or growth-rate reduction of a large portion of the unstable spectrum. The theory is in qualitative agreement with the numerical results obtained by using the two-dimensional hydrodynamic code ORCHID.

  2. Stability analysis of unsteady ablation fronts

    SciTech Connect

    Betti, R.; McCrory, R.L.; Verdon, C.P. )

    1993-11-08

    The linear stability analysis of unsteady ablation fronts is carried out for a semi-infinite uniform medium. For a laser accelerated target, it is shown that a properly selected modulation of the laser intensity can lead to the dynamic stabilization or growth-rate reduction of a large portion of the unstable spectrum. The theory is in qualitative agreement with the numerical results obtained by using the two-dimensional hydrodynamic code ORCHID.

  3. Stability analysis of unsteady ablation fronts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betti, R.; McCrory, R. L.; Verdon, C. P.

    1993-11-01

    The linear stability analysis of unsteady ablation fronts is carried out for a semi-infinite uniform medium. For a laser accelerated target, it is shown that a properly selected modulation of the laser intensity can lead to the dynamic stabilization or growth-rate reduction of a large portion of the unstable spectrum. The theory is in qualitative agreement with the numerical results obtained by using the two-dimensional hydrodynamic code orchid.

  4. Stability analysis of unsteady ablation fronts

    SciTech Connect

    Betti, R.; McCrory, R.L.; Verdon, C.P.

    1993-08-01

    The linear stability analysis of unsteady ablation fronts, is carried out for a semi-infinite uniform medium. For a laser accelerated target, it is shown that a properly selected modulation of the laser intensity can lead to the dynamic stabilization or growth-rate reduction of a large portion of the unstable spectrum. The theory is in qualitative agreement with the numerical results obtained by using the two-dimensional hydrodynamic code ORCHID.

  5. Resonators for solid-state lasers with large-volume fundamental mode and high alignment stability

    SciTech Connect

    Magni, V.

    1986-01-01

    Resonators containing a focusing rod are thoroughly analyzed. It is shown that, as a function of the dioptric power of the rod, two stability zones of the same width exist and that the mode volume in the rod always presents a stationary point. At this point, the output power is insensitive to the focal length fluctuations, and the mode volume inside the rod is inversely proportional to the range of the input power for which the resonator is stable. The two zones are markedly different with respect to misalignment sensitivity, which is, in general, much greater in one zone than in the other. Two design procedures are presented for monomode solid-state laser resonators with large mode volume and low sensitivity both to focal length fluctuations and to misalignment.

  6. Alfv'en mode structure/stability properties of stellarators and broken-symmetry tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spong, Don

    2009-05-01

    Energetic particle driven shear Alfv'en wave (SAW) instabilities are frequently observed in both stellarator and tokamak experiments. Three-dimensional effects are present in all toroidal devices and can significantly influence both stability properties of energetic particle populations and their loss patterns on the first wall. Three-dimensional equilibrium variations in stellarators and broken symmetry tokamaks provide new couplings that increase the complexity and density of the Alfv'en mode spectrum. An eigenmode solver, the AE3D code, has been developed for calculating Alfv'en mode structures in such configurations and identifying the most likely modes for resonant energetic tail destabilization. Applications of this model to a variety of stellarators (LHD, TJ-II, HSX, QPS, NCSX) and broken symmetry tokamaks (ITER with TF ripple and ferritic materials) have been made and results will be presented. Possible extensions to include sound wave couplings and gyro-Landau closures will be discussed.

  7. Developments in Cylindrical Shell Stability Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Norman F., Jr.; Starnes, James H., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    Today high-performance computing systems and new analytical and numerical techniques enable engineers to explore the use of advanced materials for shell design. This paper reviews some of the historical developments of shell buckling analysis and design. The paper concludes by identifying key research directions for reliable and robust methods development in shell stability analysis and design.

  8. Vector mode analysis of a young interferometer.

    PubMed

    Gori, Franco; Santarsiero, Massimo; Borghi, Riccardo

    2006-04-01

    It is proved that, when the vector modal theory of coherence is applied to a pair of fixed points, exact results are obtained for the mode structure. In particular, it is shown that the field radiated by the pinholes of a Young interferometer can always be represented by the incoherent superposition of no more than four perfectly correlated and polarized modes. The role of such modes is illustrated through a simple example.

  9. Closed-loop ARS mode for scanning ion conductance microscopy with improved speed and stability for live cell imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Goo-Eun; Noh, Hanaul; Shin, Yong Kyun; Kahng, Se-Jong; Baik, Ku Youn; Kim, Hong-Bae; Cho, Nam-Joon; Cho, Sang-Joon

    2015-06-01

    Scanning ion conductance microscopy (SICM) is an increasingly useful nanotechnology tool for non-contact, high resolution imaging of live biological specimens such as cellular membranes. In particular, approach-retract-scanning (ARS) mode enables fast probing of delicate biological structures by rapid and repeated approach/retraction of a nano-pipette tip. For optimal performance, accurate control of the tip position is a critical issue. Herein, we present a novel closed-loop control strategy for the ARS mode that achieves higher operating speeds with increased stability. The algorithm differs from that of most conventional (i.e., constant velocity) approach schemes as it includes a deceleration phase near the sample surface, which is intended to minimize the possibility of contact with the surface. Analysis of the ion current and tip position demonstrates that the new mode is able to operate at approach speeds of up to 250 μm s-1. As a result of the improved stability, SICM imaging with the new approach scheme enables significantly improved, high resolution imaging of subtle features of fixed and live cells (e.g., filamentous structures & membrane edges). Taken together, the results suggest that optimization of the tip approach speed can substantially improve SICM imaging performance, further enabling SICM to become widely adopted as a general and versatile research tool for biological studies at the nanoscale level.

  10. J-integral evaluation for 2D mixed-mode crack problems employing a meshfree stabilized conforming nodal integration method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Satoyuki; Suzuki, Hirotaka; Sadamoto, Shota; Sannomaru, Shogo; Yu, Tiantang; Bui, Tinh Quoc

    2016-08-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) in-plane mixed-mode fracture mechanics problems are analyzed employing an efficient meshfree Galerkin method based on stabilized conforming nodal integration (SCNI). In this setting, the reproducing kernel function as meshfree interpolant is taken, while employing the SCNI for numerical integration of stiffness matrix in the Galerkin formulation. The strain components are smoothed and stabilized employing Gauss divergence theorem. The path-independent integral ( J-integral) is solved based on the nodal integration by summing the smoothed physical quantities and the segments of the contour integrals. In addition, mixed-mode stress intensity factors (SIFs) are extracted from the J-integral by decomposing the displacement and stress fields into symmetric and antisymmetric parts. The advantages and features of the present formulation and discretization in evaluation of the J-integral of in-plane 2D fracture problems are demonstrated through several representative numerical examples. The mixed-mode SIFs are evaluated and compared with reference solutions. The obtained results reveal high accuracy and good performance of the proposed meshfree method in the analysis of 2D fracture problems.

  11. Stability and natural frequency of nonspherical mode of an encapsulated microbubble in a viscous liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yunqiao; Wang, Qianxi

    2016-06-01

    The dynamics of encapsulated microbubbles (EMBs) subject to an ultrasound wave have wide and important medical applications, including sonography, drug delivery, and sonoporation. The nonspherical shape oscillation of an EMB, termed as shape modes, is one of the core mechanisms of these applications and therefore its natural frequency is a fundamentally important parameter. Based on the linear stability theory, we show that shape modes of an EMB in a viscous Newtonian liquid are stable. We derive an explicit expression for the natural frequency of shape modes, in terms of the equilibrium radius of an EMB, and the parameters of the external liquid, coating, and internal gases. The expression is validated by comparing to the numerical results obtained from the dynamic equations of shape modes of an EMB. The natural frequency of shape modes shifts appreciably due to the viscosity of the liquid, and this trend increases with the mode number. The significant viscous effects are due to the no-slip condition for the liquid flow at the surface of an EMB. Our results show that when subject to an acoustic wave, the shape instability for an EMB is prone to appear if 2ωk/ωd = n, where ωk is the natural frequency of shape modes, ωd is the driving frequency of the acoustic wave, and n is a natural number. The effects of viscosity on the natural frequency is thus critical in setting the driving frequency of ultrasound to avoid or activate shape modes of EMBs, which should be considered in the applications of medical ultrasound.

  12. CONTROL OF LASER RADIATION PARAMETER: On the stability of lateral self-mode locking in an injection laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Logginov, Aleksandr S.; Plisov, Konstantin I.

    2004-09-01

    The problem of coexistence and lateral self-mode locking in the resonator of an injection laser with a parabolically inhomogeneous permittivity is considered. The stability of the self-mode-locking process and factors causing its disturbance are studied. It is shown that the appearance of nonequidistant lateral modes due to the dependence of the refractive-index profile in a medium on the concentration of nonequilibrium carriers is the main cause of disturbing the self-mode-locking regime.

  13. Anderson Localization of Ballooning Modes, Quantum Chaos and the Stability of Compact Quasiaxially Symmetric Stellarators

    SciTech Connect

    M.H. Redi; J.L. Johnson; S. Klasky; J. Canik; R.L. Dewar; W.A. Cooper

    2001-10-31

    The radially local magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) ballooning stability of a compact, quasiaxially symmetric stellarator (QAS), is examined just above the ballooning beta limit with a method that can lead to estimates of global stability. Here MHD stability is analyzed through the calculation and examination of the ballooning mode eigenvalue isosurfaces in the 3-space [s, alpha, theta(subscript ''k'')]; s is the edge normalized toroidal flux, alpha is the field line variable, and q(subscript ''k'') is the perpendicular wave vector or ballooning parameter. Broken symmetry, i.e., deviations from axisymmetry, in the stellarator magnetic field geometry causes localization of the ballooning mode eigenfunction, and gives rise to new types of nonsymmetric eigenvalue isosurfaces in both the stable and unstable spectrum. For eigenvalues far above the marginal point, isosurfaces are topologically spherical, indicative of strong ''quantum chaos.'' The complexity of QAS marginal isosurfaces suggests that finite Larmor radius stabilization estimates will be difficult and that fully three-dimensional, high-n MHD computations are required to predict the beta limit.

  14. Stabilization of Neoclassical Tearing Modes in Tokamaks by Radio Frequency Current Drive

    SciTech Connect

    La Haye, R. J.

    2007-09-28

    Resistive neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs) will be the principal limit on stability and performance in the ITER standard scenario as the resulting islands break up the magnetic surfaces that confine the plasma. Drag from rotating island-induced eddy current in the resistive wall can also slow the plasma rotation, produce locking to the wall, and cause loss of high confinement H-mode and disruption. The NTMs are maintained by helical perturbations to the pressure-gradient driven 'bootstrap' current. Thus, this is a high beta instability even at the modest beta for ITER. A major line of research on NTM stabilization is the use of radio frequency (rf) current drive at the island rational surface. While large, broad current drive from lower hybrid waves has been shown to be stabilizing (COMPASS-D), most research is directed to small, narrow current drive from electron cyclotron waves (ECCD); ECCD stabilization and/or preemptive prevention is successful in ASDEX Upgrade, DIII-D and JT-60U, for example, with as little as a few percent of the total plasma current if the ECCD is kept sufficiently narrow so that the peak off-axis ECCD is comparable to the local bootstrap current.

  15. User's manual for the coupled mode version of the normal modes rotor aeroelastic analysis computer program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergquist, R. R.; Carlson, R. G.; Landgrebe, A. J.; Egolf, T. A.

    1974-01-01

    This User's Manual was prepared to provide the engineer with the information required to run the coupled mode version of the Normal Modes Rotor Aeroelastic Analysis Computer Program. The manual provides a full set of instructions for running the program, including calculation of blade modes, calculations of variable induced velocity distribution and the calculation of the time history of the response for either a single blade or a complete rotor with an airframe (the latter with constant inflow).

  16. Analysis of Linear Conversion to Two Modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brizard, Alain J.; Jaun, Andre; Kaufman, Allan N.; Tracy, Eugene R.

    2003-10-01

    Recent experimental observations [1] and computer simulations [2] show that, in a tokamak plasma with multispecies ions, an incident magnetosonic wave converts either to an ion-hybrid Bernstein wave or to an ion-cyclotron wave, depending on the location of the conversion region in the poloidal cross section. We present a cold-plasma model of simultaneous conversion to these two modes, and obtain explicit expressions for transmission and conversion coefficients. Our approach is based on phase-space analysis of multiple conversion [3], in two or four phase-space dimensions (i.e., one or two spatial dimensions).Our ray-tracing algorithm [4], for detection of conversion and for treatment of ray-splitting due to conversion, will be applied to this process. 1.E Nelson-Melby, M Porkolab, P T Bonoli, Y Lin, A Mazurenko, S J Wukitch, Phys Rev Lett 90 (2003) 155004 2.E F Jaeger, L A Berry, J R Myra, D B Batchelor, E D'Azevedo, P T Bonoli, C K Phillips, D N Smithe, D A D'Ippolito, M D Carter, R J Dumont, J C Wright, R W Harvey, Phys Rev Lett 90 (2003) 195001 3. Y-M Liang, J J Morehead, D R Cook, T Fla, A N Kaufman, Physics Letters A193 (1994) 82 4. E R Tracy, A N Kaufman, A Jaun, Physics Letters A290 (2001) 309

  17. The structure and binding mode of citrate in the stabilization of gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Al-Johani, Hind; Abou-Hamad, Edy; Jedidi, Abdesslem; Widdifield, Cory M; Viger-Gravel, Jasmine; Sangaru, Shiv Shankar; Gajan, David; Anjum, Dalaver H; Ould-Chikh, Samy; Hedhili, Mohamed Nejib; Gurinov, Andrei; Kelly, Michael J; El Eter, Mohamad; Cavallo, Luigi; Emsley, Lyndon; Basset, Jean-Marie

    2017-09-01

    Elucidating the binding mode of carboxylate-containing ligands to gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) is crucial to understand their stabilizing role. A detailed picture of the three-dimensional structure and coordination modes of citrate, acetate, succinate and glutarate to AuNPs is obtained by (13)C and (23)Na solid-state NMR in combination with computational modelling and electron microscopy. The binding between the carboxylates and the AuNP surface is found to occur in three different modes. These three modes are simultaneously present at low citrate to gold ratios, while a monocarboxylate monodentate (1κO(1)) mode is favoured at high citrate:gold ratios. The surface AuNP atoms are found to be predominantly in the zero oxidation state after citrate coordination, although trace amounts of Au(δ)(+) are observed. (23)Na NMR experiments show that Na(+) ions are present near the gold surface, indicating that carboxylate binding occurs as a 2e(-) L-type interaction for each oxygen atom involved. This approach has broad potential to probe the binding of a variety of ligands to metal nanoparticles.

  18. The structure and binding mode of citrate in the stabilization of gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Johani, Hind; Abou-Hamad, Edy; Jedidi, Abdesslem; Widdifield, Cory M.; Viger-Gravel, Jasmine; Sangaru, Shiv Shankar; Gajan, David; Anjum, Dalaver H.; Ould-Chikh, Samy; Hedhili, Mohamed Nejib; Gurinov, Andrei; Kelly, Michael J.; El Eter, Mohamad; Cavallo, Luigi; Emsley, Lyndon; Basset, Jean-Marie

    2017-09-01

    Elucidating the binding mode of carboxylate-containing ligands to gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) is crucial to understand their stabilizing role. A detailed picture of the three-dimensional structure and coordination modes of citrate, acetate, succinate and glutarate to AuNPs is obtained by 13C and 23Na solid-state NMR in combination with computational modelling and electron microscopy. The binding between the carboxylates and the AuNP surface is found to occur in three different modes. These three modes are simultaneously present at low citrate to gold ratios, while a monocarboxylate monodentate (1κO1) mode is favoured at high citrate:gold ratios. The surface AuNP atoms are found to be predominantly in the zero oxidation state after citrate coordination, although trace amounts of Auδ+ are observed. 23Na NMR experiments show that Na+ ions are present near the gold surface, indicating that carboxylate binding occurs as a 2e- L-type interaction for each oxygen atom involved. This approach has broad potential to probe the binding of a variety of ligands to metal nanoparticles.

  19. Advanced stability analysis for laminar flow control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orszag, S. A.

    1981-01-01

    Five classes of problems are addressed: (1) the extension of the SALLY stability analysis code to the full eighth order compressible stability equations for three dimensional boundary layer; (2) a comparison of methods for prediction of transition using SALLY for incompressible flows; (3) a study of instability and transition in rotating disk flows in which the effects of Coriolis forces and streamline curvature are included; (4) a new linear three dimensional instability mechanism that predicts Reynolds numbers for transition to turbulence in planar shear flows in good agreement with experiment; and (5) a study of the stability of finite amplitude disturbances in axisymmetric pipe flow showing the stability of this flow to all nonlinear axisymmetric disturbances.

  20. A code for linear stability analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herbert, Thorwald

    1990-01-01

    A new spectral code, Linear.x, has been written in FORTRAN 77 for the analysis of the linear stability of some basic state. While being generic and unrelated to any particular physical problem, the code provides for various common tasks, including global (eigenvalue spectra), local (single eigenvalues and eigenfunctions), table (one-dimensional and multidimensional tables of eigenvalues), curve (curves in parameter space), and others. A specific problem can be defined as a set of files some of which are included at compile time, while definitions, tasks, and parameters are read during run time. The code is currently used for the stability analysis of compressible flows.

  1. Stabilization of Majorana modes in magnetic vortices in the superconducting phase of topological insulators using topologically trivial bands.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Ching-Kai; Ghaemi, Pouyan; Hughes, Taylor L

    2012-12-07

    It has been shown that doped topological insulators, up to a certain level of doping, still preserve some topological signatures of the insulating phase such as axionic electromagnetic response and the presence of a Majorana mode in the vortices of a superconducting phase. Multiple topological insulators such as HgTe, ScPtBi, and other ternary Heusler compounds have been identified and generically feature the presence of a topologically trivial band between the two topological bands. In this Letter we show that the presence of such a trivial band can stabilize the topological signature over a much wider range of doping. Specifically, we calculate the structure of vortex modes in the superconducting phase of doped topological insulators, a model that captures the features of HgTe and the ternary Heusler compounds. We show that, due to the hybridization with the trivial band, Majorana modes are preserved over a large, extended doping range for p doping. In addition to presenting a viable system where much less fine-tuning is required to observe the Majorana modes, our analysis opens a route to study other topological features of doped compounds that cannot be modeled using the simple Bi(2)Se(3) Dirac model.

  2. Analysis of temporal stability of autostereoscopic 3D displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubiño, Manuel; Salas, Carlos; Pozo, Antonio M.; Castro, J. J.; Pérez-Ocón, Francisco

    2013-11-01

    An analysis has been made of the stability of the images generated by electronic autostereoscopic 3D displays, studying the time course of the photometric and colorimetric parameters. The measurements were made on the basis of the procedure recommended in the European guideline EN 61747-6 for the characterization of electronic liquid-crystal displays (LCD). The study uses 3 different models of autostereoscopic 3D displays of different sizes and numbers of pixels, taking the measurements with a spectroradiometer (model PR-670 SpectraScan of PhotoResearch). For each of the displays, the time course is shown for the tristimulus values and the chromaticity coordinates in the XYZ CIE 1931 system and values from the time periods required to reach stable values of these parameters are presented. For the analysis of how the procedure recommended in the guideline EN 61747-6 for 2D displays influenced the results, and for the adaption of the procedure to the characterization of 3D displays, the experimental conditions of the standard procedure were varied, making the stability analysis in the two ocular channels (RE and LE) of the 3D mode and comparing the results with those corresponding to the 2D. The results of our study show that the stabilization time of a autostereoscopic 3D display with parallax barrier technology depends on the tristimulus value analysed (X, Y, Z) as well as on the presentation mode (2D, 3D); furthermore, it was found that whether the 3D mode is used depends on the ocular channel evaluated (RE, LE).

  3. Stability analysis of chalk sea cliffs using UAV photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barlow, John; Gilham, Jamie

    2017-04-01

    Cliff erosion and instability poses a significant hazard to communities and infrastructure located is coastal areas. We use point cloud and spectral data derived from close range digital photogrammetry to assess the stability of chalk sea cliffs located at Telscombe, UK. Data captured from an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) were used to generate dense point clouds for a 712 m section of cliff face which ranges from 20 to 49 m in height. Generated models fitted our ground control network within a standard error of 0.03 m. Structural features such as joints, bedding planes, and faults were manually mapped and are consistent with results from other studies that have been conducted using direct measurement in the field. Kinematic analysis of these data was used to identify the primary modes of failure at the site. Our results indicate that wedge failure is by far the most likely mode of slope instability. An analysis of sequential surveys taken from the summer of 2016 to the winter of 2017 indicate several large failures have occurred at the site. We establish the volume of failure through change detection between sequential data sets and use back analysis to determine the strength of shear surfaces for each failure. Our results show that data capture through UAV photogrammetry can provide useful information for slope stability analysis over long sections of cliff. The use of this technology offers significant benefits in equipment costs and field time over existing methods.

  4. Reconstruction of Plasma Equilibria and Projected Stabilization of Global MHD Modes in KSTAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Y. S.; Sabbagh, S. A.; Bialek, J. M.; Berkery, J. W.; Jeon, Y. M.; Hahn, S. H.; Lee, S. G.; You, K.-. I.; Park, H. K.; Evans, T. E.; Eidietis, N.; Walker, M.; Leuer, J.

    2010-11-01

    Experimental equilibria of the KSTAR tokamak with plasma current up to 0.34 MA were reconstructed using EFIT. Vessel currents were included by fitting estimated values based on loop voltage measurements and effective resistances from 2 and 3-D vacuum model calculations including a double-walled vessel with large port penetrations and passive stabilizers. Active and passive stabilization of global MHD instabilities for operation above the no-wall beta limit is also projected. The stabilization is applied using a set of segmented internal coils called in-vessel control coils (IVCCs). Passive stability of the resistive wall mode and power requirement for its active stabilization are investigated including conductive casing structures covering the IVCC, and noise effects. The potential for ELM mitigation by resonant magnetic perturbations is also examined by using the TRIP3D code. Favorable configurations of the IVCC based on the Chirikov parameter are determined using a combination of all IVCCs (midplane and off-midplane coils) with a dominant n = 2 field configuration.

  5. Stabilization of the Resistive Wall Mode and Error Field Reduction by a Rotating Conducting Wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paz-Soldan, Carlos

    2011-10-01

    The hypothesis that the Resistive Wall Mode (RWM) can be stabilized by high-speed differentially-rotating conducting walls is tested in a linear device. This geometry allows the use of cylindrical solid metal walls, whereas a torus would require a flowing liquid metal. Experiments over the past year have for the first time explored RWM stability with a rotating copper wall capable of achieving speeds (rΩw) of up to 280 km/h, equivalent to a magnetic Reynolds number (Rm) of 5. The main results are: 1) Wall rotation increases the stability window of the RWM, allowing ~ 25% more plasma current (Ip) at Rm = 5 while maintaining MHD stability. 2) Error field reduction below a critical value allows the observation of initial mode rotation, followed by braking, wall-locking, and subsequent faster growth. 3) Locking is found to depend on the direction of wall rotation (Ω̂w) with respect to the intrinsic plasma rotation, with locking to both the static wall (vacuum vessel) and rotating wall observed. Additionally, indirect effects on RWM stability are observed via the effect of wall rotation on device error fields. Wall rotation shields locking error fields, which reduces the braking torque and inhibits mode-locking. The linear superposition of error fields from guide field (Bz) solenoid misalignments and current-carrying leads is also shown to break symmetry in Ω̂w , with one direction causing stronger error fields and earlier locking irrespective of plasma flow. Vacuum field measurements further show that rotation decreases the error field penetration time and advects the field to a different orientation, as predicted by theory. Experiments are conducted on the Rotating Wall Machine, a 1.2 m long and 16 cm diameter screw-pinch with Bz ~ 500 G, where hollow-cathode injectors are biased to source up to 7 kA of Ip, exciting current-driven RWMs. MHD activity is measured through 120 edge Br, Bθ, Bz probes as well as internal Bdot, Langmuir and Mach probes. RWM

  6. A New Common-Mode Stabilization Method for a CMOS Cascode Class-E Power Amplifier with Driver Stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhisheng; Bauwelinck, Johan; Torfs, Guy; Yin, Xin; Vandewege, Jan

    This paper presents a new common-mode stabilization method for a CMOS differential cascode Class-E power amplifier with LC-tank based driver stage. The stabilization method is based on the identification of the poles and zeros of the closed-loop transfer function at a critical node. By adding a series resistor at the common-gate node of the cascode transistor, the right-half-plane poles are moved to the left half plane, improving the common-mode stability. The simulation results show that the new method is an effective way to stabilize the PA.

  7. Dependency of Tearing Mode Stability on Current and Pressure Profiles in DIII-D Hybrid Discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, K.; Park, J. M.; Murakami, M.; La Haye, R. J.; Na, Y.-S.; SNU/ORAU; ORNL; Atomics, General; SNU; DIII-D Team

    2016-10-01

    Understanding the physics of the onset and evolution of tearing modes (TMs) in tokamak plasmas is important for high- β steady-state operation. Based on DIII-D steady-state hybrid experiments with accurate equilibrium reconstruction and well-measured plasma profiles, the 2/1 tearing mode can be more stable with increasing local current and pressure gradient at rational surface and with lower pressure peaking and plasma inductance. The tearing stability index Δ', estimated by the Rutherford equation with experimental mode growth rate was validated against Δ' calculated by linear eigenvalue solver (PEST3); preliminary comprehensive MHD modeling by NIMROD reproduced the TM onset reasonably well. We present a novel integrated modeling for the purpose of predicting TM onset in experiment by combining a model equilibrium reconstruction using IPS/FASTRAN, linear stability Δ' calculation using PEST3, and fitting formula for critical Δ' from NIMROD. Work supported in part by the US DoE under DE-AC05-06OR23100, DE-AC05-00OR22725, and DEFC02-04ER54698.

  8. Stabilization of the tearing mode by turbulent diffusion and runaway electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Esarey, E.H.

    1986-06-01

    A fully kinetic analysis of the m = 2 tearing mode is performed for a tokamak plasma including the effects of turbulent electron diffusion and runaway electrons. Turbulent diffusion is included in the analysis of applying the normal stochastic approximation (NSA) to the collisionless drift kinetic equation (DKE) for electrons. A kinetic analysis inherently allows for the choice of various equilibrium electron velocity distributions, thus enabling a comparison between a drifted Maxwellian and a runaway-type distribution. This analysis is fully electromagnetic, including the effects a magnetic fluctuation potential A/sub vertical bars/ as well as a finite electrostatic potential phi, and is valid in the low-beta, low-frequency regime. The electron response is obtained by applying the NSA to the DKE, and the ion response is given by the linearized Vlasov equation. Ampere's law and quasineutrality are then used to derive a set of coupled, self-adjoint equations for the fluctuation potentials phi and A/sub vertical bars/. Solutions to this set of equations describe both unstable finite-..beta.. drift waves when analyzed for high m modes and the tearing mode when analyzed for low m modes (where m is the poloidal mode number).

  9. Mod 1 wind turbine generator failure modes and effects analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    A failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA) was directed primarily at identifying those critical failure modes that would be hazardous to life or would result in major damage to the system. Each subsystem was approached from the top down, and broken down to successive lower levels where it appeared that the criticality of the failure mode warranted more detail analysis. The results were reviewed by specialists from outside the Mod 1 program, and corrective action taken wherever recommended.

  10. Stability analysis of cylinders with circular cutouts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Almroth, B. O.; Brogan, F. A.; Marlowe, M. B.

    1973-01-01

    The stability of axially compressed cylinders with circular cutouts is analyzed numerically. An extension of the finite-difference method is used which removes the requirement that displacement components be defined in the directions of the grid lines. The results of this nonlinear analysis are found to be in good agreement with earlier experimental results.

  11. Stability analysis of cylinders with circular cutouts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Almroth, B. O.; Brogan, F. A.; Marlowe, M. B.

    1973-01-01

    The stability of axially compressed cylinders with circular cutouts is analyzed numerically. An extension of the finite-difference method is used which removes the requirement that displacement components be defined in the directions of the grid lines. The results of this nonlinear analysis are found to be in good agreement with earlier experimental results.

  12. Stock market stability: Diffusion entropy analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shouwei; Zhuang, Yangyang; He, Jianmin

    2016-05-01

    In this article, we propose a method to analyze the stock market stability based on diffusion entropy, and conduct an empirical analysis of Dow Jones Industrial Average. Empirical results show that this method can reflect the volatility and extreme cases of the stock market.

  13. Stability Analysis of the Impoundment of Ash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slávik, Ivan

    2013-03-01

    An impoundment is an engineering construction used for the safe deposition of unexploitable waste from industrial and mining facilities. In terms of the legislative requirements of the Slovak Republic, a "Measurements Project" must be developed for each impoundment. In this document the prerequisites for the safe operation of an impoundment, the limit and critical values of the monitored phenomena and the facts influencing the safety of the impoundment and the area endangered by such a site are also defined. The safety and stability of an impoundment are verified according to a "Measurements Project" by considering stability at regular time intervals. This contribution presents, in the form of a parametric study, a stability analysis of an ash impoundment. The stability analysis provides an example of the utilization of an information database of the results of the regular monitoring of the geotechnical properties of the materials forming the impoundment's body and the surrounding rock mass. The stability of the impoundment is expressed for a recent state - without a continuous water level in its body and, at the same time, for a hypothetical limit and critical water level according to the valid "Handling Regulations".

  14. Stability of semidiscrete approximations for hyperbolic initial-boundary-value problems: Stationary modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warming, Robert F.; Beam, Richard M.

    1988-01-01

    Spatially discrete difference approximations for hyperbolic initial-boundary-value problems (IBVPs) require numerical boundary conditions in addition to the analytical boundary conditions specified for the differential equations. Improper treatment of a numerical boundary condition can cause instability of the discrete IBVP even though the approximation is stable for the pure initial-value or Cauchy problem. In the discrete IBVP stability literature there exists a small class of discrete approximations called borderline cases. For nondissipative approximations, borderline cases are unstable according to the theory of the Gustafsson, Kreiss, and Sundstrom (GKS) but they may be Lax-Richtmyer stable or unstable in the L sub 2 norm on a finite domain. It is shown that borderline approximation can be characterized by the presence of a stationary mode for the finite-domain problem. A stationary mode has the property that it does not decay with time and a nontrivial stationary mode leads to algebraic growth of the solution norm with mesh refinement. An analytical condition is given which makes it easy to detect a stationary mode; several examples of numerical boundary conditions are investigated corresponding to borderline cases.

  15. Internal Transport Barrier Broadening through Subdominant Mode Stabilization in Reversed Field Pinch Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenzini, R.; Auriemma, F.; Fassina, A.; Martines, E.; Terranova, D.; Sattin, F.

    2016-05-01

    The reversed field pinch (RFP) device RFX-mod features strong internal transport barriers when the plasma accesses states with a single dominant helicity. Such transport barriers enclose a hot helical region with high confinement whose amplitude may vary from a tiny one to an amplitude encompassing an appreciable fraction of the available volume. The transition from narrow to wide thermal structures has been ascribed so far to the transport reduction that occurs when the dominant mode separatrix, which is a preferred location for the onset of stochastic field lines, disappears. In this Letter we show instead that the contribution from the separatrix disappearance, by itself, is marginal and the main role is instead played by the progressive stabilization of secondary modes. The position and the width of the stochastic boundary encompassing the thermal structures have been estimated by applying the concept of a 3D quasiseparatrix layer, developed in solar physics to treat reconnection phenomena without true separatrices and novel to toroidal laboratory plasmas. Considering the favorable scaling of secondary modes with the Lundquist number, these results open promising scenarios for RFP plasmas at temperatures higher than the presently achieved ones, where lower secondary modes and, consequently, larger thermal structures are expected. Furthermore, this first application of the quasiseparatrix layer to a toroidal plasma indicates that such a concept is ubiquitous in magnetic reconnection, independent of the system geometry under investigation.

  16. Stability of resistive wall modes with plasma rotation and thick wall in ITER scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, L. J.; Kotschenreuther, M.; Chu, M.; Chance, M.; Turnbull, A.

    2004-11-01

    The rotation effect on resistive wall modes (RWMs) is examined for realistically shaped, high-beta tokamak equilibria, including reactor relevant cases with low mach number M and realistic thick walls. For low M, Stabilization of RWMs arises from unusually thin inertial layers. The investigation employs the newly developed adaptive eigenvalue code (AEGIS: Adaptive EiGenfunction Independent Solution), which describes both low and high n modes and is in good agreement with GATO in the benchmark studies. AEGIS is unique in using adaptive methods to resolve such inertial layers with low mach number rotation. This feature is even more desirable for transport barrier cases. Additionally, ITER and reactors have thick conducting walls ( ˜.5-1 m) which are not well modeled as a thin shell. Such thick walls are considered here, including semi-analytical approximations to account for the toroidally segmented nature of real walls.

  17. Stability of short, single-mode erbium-doped fiber lasers.

    PubMed

    Svalgaard, M; Gilbert, S L

    1997-07-20

    We conducted a detailed study of the stability of short, erbium-doped fiber lasers fabricated with two UV-induced Bragg gratings written into the doped fiber. We find that the relative intensity noise of single-longitudinal-mode fiber grating lasers is approximately 3 orders of magnitude lower than that of a single-frequency 1.523-mum helium-neon laser. The frequency noise spectrum contains few resonances, none of which exceeds 0.6 kHz/Hz(1/2) rms; the integrated rms frequency noise from 50 Hz to 63 kHz is 36 kHz. We also demonstrate a simple method for monitoring the laser power and number of oscillating modes during laser fabrication.

  18. Effects of hydraulic pressure on the stability and transition of wetting modes of superhydrophobic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Q-S; Yu, Y; Zhao, Z-H

    2005-12-20

    The underlying mechanisms of stability, metastability, or instability of the Cassie-Baxter and Wenzel wetting modes and their transitions on superhydrophobic surfaces decorated with periodic micropillars are quantitatively studied in this article. Hydraulic pressure, which may be generated by the water-air interfacial tension of water droplets or external factors such as raining impact, is shown to be a key to understanding these mechanisms. A detailed transition process driven by increasing hydraulic pressure is numerically simulated. The maximum sustainable or critical pressure of the Cassie-Baxter wetting state on a pillarlike microstructural surface is formulated for the first time in a simple, unified, and precise form. This analytic result reveals the fact that reducing the microstructural scales (e.g., the pillars' diameters and spacing) is probably the most efficient measure needed to enlarge the critical pressure significantly. We also introduce a dimensionless parameter, the pillar slenderness ratio, to characterize the stability of either the Cassie-Baxter or the Wenzel wetting state and show that the energy barrier for transitioning from the Cassie-Baxter to the Wenzel wetting mode is proportional to both the slenderness ratio and the area fraction. Thus, the Cassie-Baxter wetting mode may collapse under a hydraulic pressure lower than the critical one if the slenderness ratio is improperly small. This quantitative study explains fairly well some experimental observations of contact angles that can be modeled by neither Wenzel nor Cassie-Baxter contact angles and eventually leads to our proposals for a mixed (or coexisting) wetting mode.

  19. Non-Resonant Dynamic Stabilization of the m = 1 Diocotron Mode

    SciTech Connect

    Maero, G.; Paroli, B.; Pozzoli, R.; Rome, M.

    2010-06-16

    The m = 1 diocotron mode of a nonneutral plasma column confined in a Malmberg-Penning trap, i.e. the rotation of the plasma center-of-charge around the longitudinal symmetry axis, is experimentally found to be unstable. We have investigated in the ELTRAP device a control mechanism of the radial drift of the column based on a Radio Frequency drive applied on an azimuthally sectored electrode of the trap. Systematic experiments show the characteristic features of the mechanism, namely the presence of amplitude and frequency thresholds as well as the non-resonant behavior, whose interpretation invokes the concept of dynamic stabilization.

  20. 3D passive stabilization of n = 0 MHD modes in EAST tokamak

    PubMed Central

    Chen, S. L.; Villone, F.; Xiao, B. J.; Barbato, L.; Luo, Z. P.; Liu, L.; Mastrostefano, S.; Xing, Z.

    2016-01-01

    Evidence is shown of the capability of non-axisymmetrical conducting structures in the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) to guarantee the passive stabilization of the n = 0 MHD unstable mode. Suitable numerical modeling of the experiments allows a clear interpretation of the phenomenon. This demonstration and the availability of computational tools able to describe the effect of 3D conductors will have a huge impact on the design of future fusion devices, in which the conducting structures closest to plasma will be highly segmented. PMID:27597182

  1. Whispering gallery mode stabilization of quantum cascade lasers for infrared sensing and spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borri, Simone; Siciliani de Cumis, Mario; Insero, Giacomo; Santambrogio, G.; Savchenkov, Anatoliy; Eliyahu, Danny; Ilchenko, Vladimir; Matsko, Andrey; Maleki, Lute; De Natale, Paolo

    2017-02-01

    Narrow-linewidth lasers are key elements in optical metrology and spectroscopy. From their spectral purity, the measurements accuracy and the overall quality of collected data critically depend. Crystalline micro-resonators have undergone an impressive development in the last decade, opening new ways to photonics from the mm to the μm scale. Their wide transparency range and high Q-factor make them suitable for integration in compact apparatuses for precision spectroscopy from the visible to the mid-IR. Here, we present our recent results on frequency stabilization and linewidth narrowing of quantum cascade lasers using crystalline Whispering Gallery Mode Resonators for mid-IR precision spectroscopy.

  2. 3D passive stabilization of n = 0 MHD modes in EAST tokamak.

    PubMed

    Chen, S L; Villone, F; Xiao, B J; Barbato, L; Luo, Z P; Liu, L; Mastrostefano, S; Xing, Z

    2016-09-06

    Evidence is shown of the capability of non-axisymmetrical conducting structures in the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) to guarantee the passive stabilization of the n = 0 MHD unstable mode. Suitable numerical modeling of the experiments allows a clear interpretation of the phenomenon. This demonstration and the availability of computational tools able to describe the effect of 3D conductors will have a huge impact on the design of future fusion devices, in which the conducting structures closest to plasma will be highly segmented.

  3. Non-Resonant Dynamic Stabilization of the m = 1 Diocotron Mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maero, G.; Paroli, B.; Pozzoli, R.; Romé, M.

    2010-06-01

    The m = 1 diocotron mode of a nonneutral plasma column confined in a Malmberg-Penning trap, i.e. the rotation of the plasma center-of-charge around the longitudinal symmetry axis, is experimentally found to be unstable. We have investigated in the ELTRAP device a control mechanism of the radial drift of the column based on a Radio Frequency drive applied on an azimuthally sectored electrode of the trap. Systematic experiments show the characteristic features of the mechanism, namely the presence of amplitude and frequency thresholds as well as the non-resonant behavior, whose interpretation invokes the concept of dynamic stabilization.

  4. General stability analysis of composite sandwich plates under thermal load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdallah, Shaher A.

    In structures subjected to high temperature change such as high-speed aircraft the panels are stressed more significantly under thermal loading than mechanical loading. This can produce instability within the structure; therefore, the thermal loading may become the primary factor in the design of the structure. For example, buckling and facesheet wrinkling are two major failure modes of the composite sandwich plates subjected to various loadings. The goal of this dissertation is to study the stability analysis of composite sandwich plates due to buckling and wrinkling subjected to thermal loading. The primary objective is to find out the critical failure mode and the associated critical temperature change causing it. For thermal buckling and wrinkling analysis, the critical temperature change Delta Tcr, is of more interest than the critical thermal load. In this study, two different approaches of the stability problem of the composite sandwich plate subjected to thermally induced load are developed. In the first approach, the wrinkling analysis and buckling analysis are performed separately to evaluate their associated critical wrinkling and buckling temperature changes. For the face-wrinkling problem, two different models, the linear decaying Hoff model and exponential decaying Chen model are employed. The global buckling analysis is based on the energy method. The second approach is based on the unified theory of Benson and Mayers. In such an approach, the critical temperature change for both the global buckling and face wrinkling can be evaluated simultaneously. A potential energy based variation principle has been applied to formulate the problem. The Lagrange multipliers are used to satisfy the face-core continuity conditions. The buckling and wrinkling can be analyzed and calculated simultaneously. Therefore, the critical wrinkling temperature and the critical buckling temperature are found in a single analysis. The critical buckling and wrinkling stresses

  5. Bi-material crystalline whispering gallery mode microcavity structure for thermo-opto-mechanical stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itobe, Hiroki; Nakagawa, Yosuke; Mizumoto, Yuta; Kangawa, Hiroi; Kakinuma, Yasuhiro; Tanabe, Takasumi

    2016-05-01

    We fabricated a calcium fluoride (CaF2) whispering gallery mode (WGM) microcavity with a computer controlled ultra-precision cutting process. We observed a thermo-opto-mechanical (TOM) oscillation in the CaF2 WGM microcavity, which may influence the stability of the optical output when the cavity is employed for Kerr comb generation. We studied experimentally and numerically the mechanism of the TOM oscillation and showed that it is strongly dependent on cavity diameter. In addition, our numerical study suggests that a microcavity structure fabricated with a hybrid material (i.e. CaF2 and silicon), which is compatible with an ultra-high Q and high thermal conductivity, will allow us to reduce the TOM oscillation and stabilize the optical output.

  6. Thermal-noise-limited crystalline whispering-gallery-mode resonator for laser stabilization

    SciTech Connect

    Alnis, J.; Wang, C. Y.; Hofer, J.; Haensch, T. W.; Schliesser, A.; Kippenberg, T. J.

    2011-07-15

    We have stabilized an external cavity diode laser to a whispering gallery mode resonator formed by a protrusion of a single-crystal magnesium fluoride cylinder. The cylinder's compact dimensions ((less-or-similar sign)1 cm{sup 3}) reduce the sensitivity to vibrations and simplify the stabilization of its temperature in a compact setup. In a comparison to an ultrastable laser used for precision metrology we determine a minimum Allan deviation of 20 Hz at an optical wavelength of 972 nm, corresponding to a relative Allan deviation of 6x10{sup -14}, at an integration time of 100 ms. This level of instability is compatible with the limits imposed by fundamental fluctuations of the material's refractive index at room temperature.

  7. Finite ion Larmor radius stabilization of m = 1 modes of a high-beta screw pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cayton, T. E.; Freidberg, J. P.

    1981-07-01

    An investigation is conducted of the effects of finite ion gyroradii upon ideal magnetohydrodynamic instabilities of straight, cylindrically symmetric, radially diffuse screw pinch equilibria, using the finite ion Larmor radius model of Pearlstein and Freidberg (1978). The results demonstrate that a combination of finite ion Larmor radius effects and wall effects can eliminate all ideal magnetohydrodynamic instabilities, including m = 1 modes. A stability criterion involving the ion gyroradius and the wall radius is presented. It is pointed out that although m = 1 stabilization is possible, the maximum allowable currents are quite small implying that any experimental verification of this effect would require a very large aspect ratio device because of the small toroidal restoring force.

  8. Flight stability analysis under changes in insect morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noest, Robert; Wang, Z. Jane

    2015-11-01

    Insect have an amazing ability to control their flight, being able to perform both fast aerial maneuvers and stable hovering. The insect's neural system has developed various mechanism by which it can control these flying feats, but we expect that insect morphology is equally important in facilitating the aerial control. We perform a computational study using a quasi-steady instantaneous flapping flight model which allows us to freely adapt the insect's morphological parameters. We picked a fruit fly as the basis for the body shape and wing motion, and study the effect of changes to the morphology for a range of wing stroke amplitudes. In each case we determine the periodic flight mode, with the period equal to a single wing beat, and do a Floquet stability analysis of the flight. To interpret our results we will compare the changed morphology to related insects. We discuss the implications of the insects location on the stability diagram.

  9. Rotation in a reversed field pinch with active feedback stabilization of resistive wall modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cecconello, M.; Menmuir, S.; Brunsell, P. R.; Kuldkepp, M.

    2006-09-01

    Active feedback stabilization of multiple resistive wall modes (RWMs) has been successfully proven in the EXTRAP T2R reversed field pinch. One of the features of plasma discharges operated with active feedback stabilization, in addition to the prolongation of the plasma discharge, is the sustainment of the plasma rotation. Sustained rotation is observed both for the internally resonant tearing modes (TMs) and the intrinsic impurity oxygen ions. Good quantitative agreement between the toroidal rotation velocities of both is found: the toroidal rotation is characterized by an acceleration phase followed, after one wall time, by a deceleration phase that is slower than in standard discharges. The TMs and the impurity ions rotate in the same poloidal direction with also similar velocities. Poloidal and toroidal velocities have comparable amplitudes and a simple model of their radial profile reproduces the main features of the helical angular phase velocity. RWMs feedback does not qualitatively change the TMs behaviour and typical phenomena such as the dynamo and the 'slinky' are still observed. The improved sustainment of the plasma and TMs rotation occurs also when feedback only acts on internally non-resonant RWMs. This may be due to an indirect positive effect, through non-linear coupling between TMs and RWMs, of feedback on the TMs or to a reduced plasma-wall interaction affecting the plasma flow rotation. Electromagnetic torque calculations show that with active feedback stabilization the TMs amplitude remains well below the locking threshold condition for a thick shell. Finally, it is suggested that active feedback stabilization of RWMs and current profile control techniques can be employed simultaneously thus improving both the plasma duration and its confinement properties.

  10. Global energetics analysis using 3-dimensional normal mode decomposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanaka, Hiroshi; Kung, Ernest C.

    1986-01-01

    The Goddard Laboratory for Atmospheric Sciences (GLAS) analysis of the FGGE observations for a 25-day period in January 1979 is examined using the normal mode energetics scheme. The results from the energetics analysis are compared with the data of Tanaka (1985). Kinetic energy spectra of the barotropic mode in the meridional-mode and frequency domains, and the total diabatic process are studied. It is observed that there are significant differences between GLAS and GFDL analyses results in the barotropic energy of gravity modes and the normal energetics scheme is applicable as a diagnostic tool.

  11. Surface plasmon mode analysis of nanoscale metallic rectangular waveguide.

    PubMed

    Kong, Fanmin; Wu, Bae-Ian; Chen, Hongsheng; Kong, Jin Au

    2007-09-17

    A detailed study of guided modes in a nanoscale metallic rectangular waveguide is presented by using the effective dielectric constant approach. The guided modes, including both traditional waveguide mode and surface plasmon mode, are investigated for the silver rectangular waveguide. The mode evolution in narrow waveguide is also discussed with the emphasis on the dependence of mode dispersion with waveguide height. Finally, the red-shift of the cutoff wavelength of the fundamental mode is observed when the waveguide height decreases, contrary to the behavior of regular metallic waveguide with PEC boundary. The comprehensive analysis can provide some guideline in the design of subwavelength optical devices based on the dispersion characteristics of metallic rectangular bore.

  12. Rock Wedge Stability Analysis Using System Reliability Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimenez-Rodriguez, R.; Sitar, N.

    2007-08-01

    We present a system reliability approach to rock wedge stability analysis. Different failure modes are considered, and a disjoint cut-set formulation is employed - with each cut-set corresponding to a different failure mode - to explore the system aspects of the problem, so that the reliability of the system is assessed by computing the probability of failure of the slope under each failure mode. An example case is used to demonstrate different approaches to compute the reliability of the slope design. Our results show that an approximation to the “exact” probability of failure - given by Monte Carlo simulation results - may be obtained using a first order approximation to the failure domain, and that linear programming techniques may be used to obtain bounds of the probability of failure. Furthermore, we identify the most likely failure mode, and we explore the sensitivity of the computed probabilities to changes in the random variables considered. The results indicate that the reliability results are quite sensitive to the geometry of the wedge. Changes in water conditions are also found to have a significant impact on the computed probabilities, while changes in unit weight of the rock have a considerably smaller effect on the reliability.

  13. Further Development of Rotating Rake Mode Measurement Data Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dahl, Milo D.; Hixon, Ray; Sutliff, Daniel L.

    2013-01-01

    The Rotating Rake mode measurement system was designed to measure acoustic duct modes generated by a fan stage. After analysis of the measured data, the mode amplitudes and phases were quantified. For low-speed fans within axisymmetric ducts, mode power levels computed from rotating rake measured data would agree with the far-field power levels on a tone by tone basis. However, this agreement required that the sound from the noise sources within the duct propagated outward from the duct exit without reflection at the exit and previous studies suggested conditions could exist where significant reflections could occur. To directly measure the modes propagating in both directions within a duct, a second rake was mounted to the rotating system with an offset in both the axial and the azimuthal directions. The rotating rake data analysis technique was extended to include the data measured by the second rake. The analysis resulted in a set of circumferential mode levels at each of the two rake microphone locations. Radial basis functions were then least-squares fit to this data to obtain the radial mode amplitudes for the modes propagating in both directions within the duct. The fit equations were also modified to allow evanescent mode amplitudes to be computed. This extension of the rotating rake data analysis technique was tested using simulated data, numerical code produced data, and preliminary in-duct measured data.

  14. Global ideal magnetohydrodynamic stability analysis for the configurational space of Wendelstein 7-X

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nührenberg, Carolin

    1996-06-01

    A survey of the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) stability properties of three-dimensional (3-D) MHD configurations representing the Wendelstein 7-X (W7-X) stellarator experiment [ G. Grieger et al., Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research, 1990 (International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, 1991), Vol. 3, p. 525] was performed with the Code for the Analysis for the Stability of 3-D Equilibria (CAS3D) [C. Schwab, Phys. Fluids B 5, 3195 (1993)] . This study confirms and elaborates previous indications on the structural characteristics of global MHD modes in stellarators. In particular these characteristics pertain to the compressibility of these modes, the equivalence of the decoupled stability problems for the modes with different parities, and the separability of global from fine-scale perturbations within the same mode family. As to the W7-X stellarator experiment, the envisaged configurational class—providing the intended experimental flexibility—appears to offer scenarios of safely stable operation.

  15. Failure mode and effects analysis: an empirical comparison of failure mode scoring procedures.

    PubMed

    Ashley, Laura; Armitage, Gerry

    2010-12-01

    To empirically compare 2 different commonly used failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) scoring procedures with respect to their resultant failure mode scores and prioritization: a mathematical procedure, where scores are assigned independently by FMEA team members and averaged, and a consensus procedure, where scores are agreed on by the FMEA team via discussion. A multidisciplinary team undertook a Healthcare FMEA of chemotherapy administration. This included mapping the chemotherapy process, identifying and scoring failure modes (potential errors) for each process step, and generating remedial strategies to counteract them. Failure modes were scored using both an independent mathematical procedure and a team consensus procedure. Almost three-fifths of the 30 failure modes generated were scored differently by the 2 procedures, and for just more than one-third of cases, the score discrepancy was substantial. Using the Healthcare FMEA prioritization cutoff score, almost twice as many failure modes were prioritized by the consensus procedure than by the mathematical procedure. This is the first study to empirically demonstrate that different FMEA scoring procedures can score and prioritize failure modes differently. It found considerable variability in individual team members' opinions on scores, which highlights the subjective and qualitative nature of failure mode scoring. A consensus scoring procedure may be most appropriate for FMEA as it allows variability in individuals' scores and rationales to become apparent and to be discussed and resolved by the team. It may also yield team learning and communication benefits unlikely to result from a mathematical procedure.

  16. Structure, Stability and ELM Dynamics of the H-Mode Pedestal in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Fenstermacher, M E; Leonard, A W; Osborne, T H; Snyder, P B; Thomas, D M; Boedo, J A; Casper, T A; Colchin, R J; Groebner, R J; Groth, M; Kempenaars, M H; Loarte, A; Saibene, G; VanZeeland, M A; Zeng, L; Xu, X Q

    2004-10-13

    Experiments are described that have increased understanding of the transport and stability physics that set the H-mode edge pedestal width and height, determine the onset of Type-I edge localized modes (ELMs), and produce the nonlinear dynamics of the ELM perturbation in the pedestal and scrape-off layer (SOL). Predictive models now exist for the n{sub e} pedestal profile and the p{sub e} height at the onset of Type-I ELMs, and progress has been made toward predictive models of the T{sub e} pedestal width and nonlinear ELM evolution. Similarity experiments between DIII-D and JET suggested that neutral penetration physics dominates in the relationship between the width and height of the n{sub e} pedestal while plasma physics dominates in setting the T{sub e} pedestal width. Measured pedestal conditions including edge current at ELM onset agree with intermediate-n peeling-ballooning (P-B) stability predictions. Midplane ELM dynamics data show the predicted (P-B) structure at ELM onset, large rapid variations of the SOL parameters, and fast radial propagation in later phases, similar to features in nonlinear ELM simulations.

  17. Edge Stability and Performance of the ELM-Free Quiescent H-Mode and the Quiescent Double Barrier Mode on DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    West, W P; Burrell, K H; Casper, T A; . Doyle, E J; Snyder, P B; Gohil, P; Lao, L L; Lasnier, C J; Leonard, A W; Nave, M F; Osborne, T H; Thomas, D M; Wang, G; Zeng, L

    2004-12-03

    The quiescent H (QH) mode, an edge localized mode (ELM)-free, high-confinement mode, combines well with an internal transport barrier to form quiescent double barrier (QDB) stationary state, high performance plasmas. The QH-mode edge pedestal pressure is similar to that seen in ELMing phases of the same discharge, with similar global energy confinement. The pedestal density in early ELMing phases of strongly pumped counter injection discharges drops and a transition to QH-mode occurs, leading to lower calculated edge bootstrap current. Plasmas current ramp experiment and ELITE code modeling of edge stability suggest that QH-modes lie near an edge current stability boundary. At high triangularity, QH-mode discharges operate at higher pedestal density and pressure, and have achieved ITER level values of {beta}{sub PED} and {nu}*. The QDB achieves performance of {alpha}{sub N}H{sub 89} {approx} 7 in quasi-stationary conditions for a duration of 10 tE, limited by hardware. Recently we demonstrated stationary state QDB discharges with little change in kinetic and q profiles (q{sub 0} > 1) for 2 s, comparable to ELMing ''hybrid scenarios'', yet without the debilitating effects of ELMs. Plasma profile control tools, including electron cyclotron heating and current drive and neutral beam heating, have been demonstrated to control simultaneously the q profile development, the density peaking, impurity accumulation and plasma beta.

  18. The Stability of Radiatively Cooling Jets I. Linear Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardee, Philip E.; Stone, James M.

    1997-01-01

    The results of a spatial stability analysis of a two-dimensional slab jet, in which optically thin radiative cooling is dynamically important, are presented. We study both magnetized and unmagnetized jets at external Mach numbers of 5 and 20. We model the cooling rate by using two different cooling curves: one appropriate to interstellar gas, and the other to photoionized gas of reduced metallicity. Thus, our results will be applicable to both protostellar (Herbig-Haro) jets and optical jets from active galactic nuclei. We present analytical solutions to the dispersion relations in useful limits and solve the dispersion relations numerically over a broad range of perturbation frequencies. We find that the growth rates and wavelengths of the unstable Kelvin-Helmholtz (K-H) modes are significantly different from the adiabatic limit, and that the form of the cooling function strongly affects the results. In particular, if the cooling curve is a steep function of temperature in the neighborhood of the equilibrium state, then the growth of K-H modes is reduced relative to the adiabatic jet. On the other hand, if the cooling curve is a shallow function of temperature, then the growth of K-H modes can be enhanced relative to the adiabatic jet by the increase in cooling relative to heating in overdense regions. Inclusion of a dynamically important magnetic field does not strongly modify the important differences between an adiabatic jet and a cooling jet, provided the jet is highly supermagnetosonic and not magnetic pressure-dominated. In the latter case, the unstable modes behave more like the transmagnetosonic magnetic pressure-dominated adiabatic limit. We also plot fluid displacement surfaces associated with the various waves in a cooling jet in order to predict the structures that might arise in the nonlinear regime. This analysis predicts that low-frequency surface waves and the lowest order body modes will be the most effective at producing observable features in

  19. Cross-machine comparison of resonant field amplification and resistive wall mode stabilization by plasma rotation

    SciTech Connect

    Reimerdes, H.; Sabbagh, S.A.; Bialek, J.M.; Garofalo, A.M.; Navratil, G.A.; Sontag, A.C.; Zhu, W.; Hender, T.C.; Gryaznevich, M.P.; Howell, D F.; Bigi, M.; Vries, P. de; Liu, Y. Q.

    2006-05-15

    Dedicated experiments in the DIII-D tokamak [J. L. Luxon, Nucl. Fusion, 42, 614 (2002)], the Joint European Torus (JET) [P. H. Rebut, R. J. Bickerton, and B. E. Keen, Nucl. Fusion 25, 1011 (1985)], and the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [M. Ono, S. M. Kaye, Y.-K. M. Peng et al., Nucl. Fusion 40, 557 (2000)] reveal the commonalities of resistive wall mode (RWM) stabilization by sufficiently fast toroidal plasma rotation in devices of different size and aspect ratio. In each device the weakly damped n=1 RWM manifests itself by resonant field amplification (RFA) of externally applied n=1 magnetic fields, which increases with the plasma pressure. Probing DIII-D and JET plasmas with similar ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) stability properties with externally applied magnetic n=1 fields, shows that the resulting RFA is independent of the machine size. In each device the drag resulting from RFA slows the toroidal plasma rotation and can lead to the onset of an unstable RWM. The critical plasma rotation required for stable operation in the plasma center decreases with increasing q{sub 95}, which is explained by the inward shift of q surfaces where the critical rotation remains constant. The quantitative agreement of the critical rotation normalized to the inverse Alfven time at the q=2 surface in similar DIII-D and JET plasmas supports the independence of the RWM stabilization mechanism of machine size and indicates the importance of the q=2 surface. At low aspect ratio the required fraction of the Alfven velocity increases significantly. The ratio of the critical rotation in similar NSTX and DIII-D plasmas can be explained by trapped particles not contributing to the RWM stabilization, which is consistent with stabilization mechanisms that are based on ion Landau damping. Alternatively, the ratio of the required rotation to the sound wave velocity remains independent of aspect ratio.

  20. Current/Pressure Profile Effects on Tearing Mode Stability in DIII-D Hybrid Discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, K.; Park, J. M.; Murakami, M.; La Haye, R. J.; Na, Yong-Su

    2015-11-01

    It is important to understand the onset threshold and the evolution of tearing modes (TMs) for developing a high-performance steady state fusion reactor. As initial and basic comparisons to determine TM onset, the measured plasma profiles (such as temperature, density, rotation) were compared with the calculated current profiles between a pair of discharges with/without n=1 mode based on the database for DIII-D hybrid plasmas. The profiles were not much different, but the details were analyzed to determine their characteristics, especially near the rational surface. The tearing stability index calculated from PEST3, Δ' tends to increase rapidly just before the n=1 mode onset for these cases. The modeled equilibrium with varying pressure or current profiles parametrically based on the reference discharge is reconstructed for checking the onset dependency on Δ' or neoclassical effects such as bootstrap current. Simulations of TMs with the modeled equilibrium using resistive MHD codes will also be presented and compared with experiments to determine the sensibility for predicting TM onset. Work supported by US DOE under DE-FC02-04ER54698 and DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  1. Linear stability and nonlinear dynamics of the fishbone mode in spherical tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Feng; Fu, G. Y.; Breslau, J. A.; Liu, J. Y.

    2013-10-01

    Extensive linear and nonlinear simulations have been carried out to investigate the energetic particle-driven fishbone instability in spherical tokamak plasmas with weakly reversed q profile and the qmin slightly above unity. The global kinetic-MHD hybrid code M3D-K is used. Numerical results show that a fishbone instability is excited by energetic beam ions preferentially at higher qmin values, consistent with the observed appearance of the fishbone before the "long-lived mode" in MAST and NSTX experiments. In contrast, at lower qmin values, the fishbone tends to be stable. In this case, the beam ion effects are strongly stabilizing for the non-resonant kink mode. Nonlinear simulations show that the fishbone saturates with strong downward frequency chirping as well as radial flattening of the beam ion distribution. An (m, n) = (2, 1) magnetic island is found to be driven nonlinearly by the fishbone instability, which could provide a trigger for the (2, 1) neoclassical tearing mode sometimes observed after the fishbone instability in NSTX.

  2. Stability of drift-cyclotron loss-cone waves in H-mode plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, W. A.; Morales, G. J.

    2016-05-24

    The drift-cyclotron loss-cone mode was first studied in mirror machines. In such devices, particles with small pitch angles are not confined, creating a hole in the velocity distribution function that is a source of free energy and leads to micro-instabilities in the cyclotron-range of frequencies. In the edge region of tokamak devices operating under H-mode conditions, ion loss also occurs. In this case, gradient drift carries ions moving opposite to the plasma current preferentially into the divertor, creating a one-sided loss cone. A simple analysis shows that for the quiescent H-mode plasmas in DIII-D the critical gradient for instability is exceeded within 2 cm of the separatrix, and the maximum growth rate at the separatrix is 3×107 s-1.

  3. Stability of drift-cyclotron loss-cone waves in H-mode plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, W. A.; Morales, G. J.

    2016-05-24

    The drift-cyclotron loss-cone mode was first studied in mirror machines. In such devices, particles with small pitch angles are not confined, creating a hole in the velocity distribution function that is a source of free energy and leads to micro-instabilities in the cyclotron-range of frequencies. In the edge region of tokamak devices operating under H-mode conditions, ion loss also occurs. In this case, gradient drift carries ions moving opposite to the plasma current preferentially into the divertor, creating a one-sided loss cone. A simple analysis shows that for the quiescent H-mode plasmas in DIII-D the critical gradient for instability is exceeded within 2 cm of the separatrix, and the maximum growth rate at the separatrix is 3×107 s-1.

  4. Stability of drift-cyclotron loss-cone waves in H-mode plasmas

    DOE PAGES

    Farmer, W. A.; Morales, G. J.

    2016-05-24

    The drift-cyclotron loss-cone mode was first studied in mirror machines. In such devices, particles with small pitch angles are not confined, creating a hole in the velocity distribution function that is a source of free energy and leads to micro-instabilities in the cyclotron-range of frequencies. In the edge region of tokamak devices operating under H-mode conditions, ion loss also occurs. In this case, gradient drift carries ions moving opposite to the plasma current preferentially into the divertor, creating a one-sided loss cone. A simple analysis shows that for the quiescent H-mode plasmas in DIII-D the critical gradient for instability ismore » exceeded within 2 cm of the separatrix, and the maximum growth rate at the separatrix is 3×107 s-1.« less

  5. Particle simulation of radio frequency stabilization of the flute mode in a tandem mirror. II. Perpendicular antenna

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, H.; Kadoya, Y.

    1988-10-01

    A two-and-a-half-dimensional electromagnetic particle code PS2M (J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 56, 3899 (1987)) is used to study how an electric field applied perpendicularly to the magnetic field affects the radio frequency stabilization of flute modes in a tandem mirror plasma. The electric field perpendicular to the magnetic field stabilizes or destabilizes the flute mode through the mechanism of the ponderomotive force acting on electrons and ions and through the mechanism of sideband coupling. In the simulations two typical examples have been shown: (i) when the sideband coupling effects (in which the electron terms are dominant) stabilize the flute modes and (ii) when the perpendicular ponderomotive force acting on the electrons destabilizes the flute modes.

  6. Stability of two-dimensional gap solitons in periodic potentials: Beyond the fundamental modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dror, Nir; Malomed, Boris A.

    2013-06-01

    Gross-Pitaevskii or nonlinear-Schrödinger equations with a sinusoidal potential is commonly used to describe nonlinear periodic media, such as photonic lattices in optics and Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) loaded into optical lattices (OLs). Previous studies have shown that the 2D version of this equation, with the self-focusing (SF) nonlinearity, supports stable solitons in the semi-infinite gap. It is known, too, that under both the self-defocusing (SDF) and SF nonlinearities, several families of gap solitons (GSs) exist in finite bandgaps. Here, we investigate the stability of 2D dipole-mode GS families, via the computation of their linear-stability eigenvalues and direct simulations of the perturbed evolution. We demonstrate that, under the SF nonlinearity, one species of dipole GSs is stable in a part of the first finite bandgap, provided that the OL depth exceeds a threshold value, while other dipole and multipole modes are unstable in that case. Bidipole bound states (vertical, horizontal, and diagonal), as well as square- and rhombic-shaped vortices and quadrupoles, built of stable fundamental dipoles, are stable too. Under the SDF nonlinearity, the family of dipole solitons is shown to be stable in a part of the second finite bandgap. Transformations of unstable dipole GSs are studied by means of direct simulations. Direct simulations are also performed to investigate the stability of other GS families, in the first and second bandgaps, under both types of the nonlinearity. In particular, “tripole” solitons, sustained in the second bandgap under the action of the SF nonlinearity, demonstrate stable behavior in the course of long propagation, in a certain region within the bandgap.

  7. Stability analysis of a variable-speed wind turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Bir, G.S.; Wright, A.D.; Butterfield, C.P.

    1996-10-01

    This paper examines the elastomechanical stability of a four-bladed wind turbine over a specific rotor speed range. Stability modes, frequencies, and dampings are extracted using a specialized modal processor developed at NREL that post-processes the response data generated by the ADAMS simulation code. The processor can analyze a turbine with an arbitrary number of rotor blades and offers a novel capability of isolating stability modes that become locked at a single frequency. Results indicate that over a certain rotor speed range, the tower lateral mode and the rotor regressive in-plane mode coalesce, resulting in a self-excited instability. Additional results show the effect of tower and nacelle parameters on the stability boundaries.

  8. Computational stability analysis of dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikishkov, Yuri Gennadievich

    2000-10-01

    Due to increased available computer power, the analysis of nonlinear flexible multi-body systems, fixed-wing aircraft and rotary-wing vehicles is relying on increasingly complex, large scale models. An important aspect of the dynamic response of flexible multi-body systems is the potential presence of instabilities. Stability analysis is typically performed on simplified models with the smallest number of degrees of freedom required to capture the physical phenomena that cause the instability. The system stability boundaries are then evaluated using the characteristic exponent method or Floquet theory for systems with constant or periodic coefficients, respectively. As the number of degrees of freedom used to represent the system increases, these methods become increasingly cumbersome, and quickly unmanageable. In this work, a novel approach is proposed, the Implicit Floquet Analysis, which evaluates the largest eigenvalues of the transition matrix using the Arnoldi algorithm, without the explicit computation of this matrix. This method is far more computationally efficient than the classical approach and is ideally suited for systems involving a large number of degrees of freedom. The proposed approach is conveniently implemented as a postprocessing step to any existing simulation tool. The application of the method to a geometrically nonlinear multi-body dynamics code is presented. This work also focuses on the implementation of trimming algorithms and the development of tools for the graphical representation of numerical simulations and stability information for multi-body systems.

  9. Linear Stability Regime Analysis of the Compressible Reacting Mixing Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Day, M. J.; Reynolds, William C.; Mansour, N. N.; Rai, Man Mohan (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Previous investigations have shown that a compressible reacting mixing layer can develop two peaks in the mean density weighted vorticity profile. Linear stability analyses show that at these peaks two distinct 'outer' instability modes appear in addition to the more common central mode, which exists unaccompanied in incompressible nonreacting flows. The present study parametrically analyzes the effects of compressibility, heat release, stoichiometry, and density ratio on the amplification rate and obliquity of each stability mode. The mean profiles used in the spatial stability calculation are generated by self-similar solutions of the compressible boundary layer equations combined with the assumption of infinitely fast chemistry. It is shown that the influence of stoichiometry and density ratio on the peaks of the density weighted vorticity profile determines which modes will dominate. Of particular interest are the conditions where two modes are equally amplified, causing the mixing layer to develop into a 'colayer' structure.

  10. MHD stability of a hot-ion-mode plasma in the GAMMA 10 tandem mirror

    SciTech Connect

    Inutake, M.; Hattori, K.; Furukawa, S.

    1995-04-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) stability of the GAMMA 10 tandem mirror is extensively studied in ICRF-heated, hot ion plasmas. Stability boundary for a flute interchange mode is predicted to depend on a pressure-weighted curvature integrated along the magnetic field line. It is found that the upper limit of the central-cell beta {beta}{sub C} increases linearly with the anchor-cell beta {beta}{sub A}. The critical beta ratio {beta}{sub C}/{beta}{sub A} above which the plasma cannot be sustained strongly depends on the pressure anisotropy P{sub PRP}/P{sub PLL} of hot ions. Stronger anisotropy greatly expands the stable region up to a higher critical beta ratio, owing to the reduction of the pressure weighting in the bad curvature region of the central cell. On both sides of the quadrupole anchor cells, there are flux-tube-recircularizing transition regions where the normal curvature is highly bad. Then the density and ion temperature of the cold plasma in the transition region are measured. Theoretical prediction on the flute stability boundary calculated by using the measured axial pressure profile of the hot-ion and the cold-plasma pressure can explain well the experimental results. 16 refs., 7 figs.

  11. ECCD-induced tearing mode stabilization in coupled IPS/NIMROD/GENRAY HPC simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Thomas; Kruger, S. E.; Held, E. D.; Harvey, R. W.; Elwasif, W. R.

    2012-03-01

    We summarize ongoing developments toward an integrated, predictive model for determining optimal ECCD-based NTM stabilization strategies in ITER. We demonstrate the capability of the SWIM Project's Integrated Plasma Simulator (IPS) framework to choreograph multiple executions of, and data exchanges between, physics codes modeling various spatiotemporal scales of this coupled RF/MHD problem on several thousand HPC processors. As NIMROD evolves fluid equations to model bulk plasma behavior, self-consistent propagation/deposition of RF power in the ensuing plasma profiles is calculated by GENRAY. Data from both codes is then processed by computational geometry packages to construct the RF-induced quasilinear diffusion tensor; moments of this tensor (entering as additional terms in NIMROD's fluid equations due to the disparity in RF/MHD spatiotemporal scales) influence the dynamics of current, momentum, and energy evolution as well as the MHD closures. Initial results are shown to correctly capture the physics of magnetic island stabilization; we also discuss the development of a numerical plasma control system for active feedback stabilization of tearing modes.

  12. ECCD-induced tearing mode stabilization in coupled IPS/NIMROD/GENRAY HPC simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Thomas; Kruger, S. E.; Held, E. D.; Harvey, R. W.; Elwasif, W. R.; Schnack, D. D.; SWIM Project Team

    2011-10-01

    We present developments toward an integrated, predictive model for determining optimal ECCD-based NTM stabilization strategies in ITER. We demonstrate the capability of the SWIM Project's Integrated Plasma Simulator (IPS) framework to choreograph multiple executions of, and data exchanges between, physics codes modeling various spatiotemporal scales of this coupled RF/MHD problem on several thousand HPC processors. As NIMROD evolves fluid equations to model bulk plasma behavior, self-consistent propagation/deposition of RF power in the ensuing plasma profiles is calculated by GENRAY. A third code (QLCALC) then interfaces with computational geometry packages to construct the RF-induced quasilinear diffusion tensor from NIMROD/GENRAY data, and the moments of this tensor (entering as additional terms in NIMROD's fluid equations due to the disparity in RF/MHD spatiotemporal scales) influence the dynamics of current, momentum, and energy evolution. Initial results are shown to correctly capture the physics of magnetic island stabilization [Jenkins et al., PoP 17, 012502 (2010)]; we also discuss the development of a numerical plasma control system for active feedback stabilization of tearing modes. Funded by USDoE SciDAC.

  13. Stability analysis of White Oak Dam

    SciTech Connect

    1995-04-11

    White Oak Dam is located in the White Oak Creek watershed which provides the primary surface drainage for Oak Ridge National Laboratory. A stability analysis was made on the dam by Syed Ahmed in January 1994 which included an evaluation of the liquefaction potential of the embankment and foundation. This report evaluates the stability of the dam and includes comments on the report prepared by Ahmed. Slope stability analyses were performed on the dam and included cases for sudden drawdown, steady seepage, partial pool and earthquake. Results of the stability analyses indicate that the dam is stable and failure of the structure would not occur for the cases considered. The report prepared by Ahmed leads to the same conclusions as stated above. Review of the report finds that it is complete, well documented and conservative in its selection of soil parameters. The evaluation of the liquefaction potential is also complete and this report is in agreement with the findings that the dam and foundation are not susceptible to liquefaction.

  14. Dynamic Stability Analysis of Linear Time-varying Systems via an Extended Modal Identification Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Zhisai; Liu, Li; Zhou, Sida; Naets, Frank; Heylen, Ward; Desmet, Wim

    2017-03-01

    The problem of linear time-varying(LTV) system modal analysis is considered based on time-dependent state space representations, as classical modal analysis of linear time-invariant systems and current LTV system modal analysis under the "frozen-time" assumption are not able to determine the dynamic stability of LTV systems. Time-dependent state space representations of LTV systems are first introduced, and the corresponding modal analysis theories are subsequently presented via a stability-preserving state transformation. The time-varying modes of LTV systems are extended in terms of uniqueness, and are further interpreted to determine the system's stability. An extended modal identification is proposed to estimate the time-varying modes, consisting of the estimation of the state transition matrix via a subspace-based method and the extraction of the time-varying modes by the QR decomposition. The proposed approach is numerically validated by three numerical cases, and is experimentally validated by a coupled moving-mass simply supported beam experimental case. The proposed approach is capable of accurately estimating the time-varying modes, and provides a new way to determine the dynamic stability of LTV systems by using the estimated time-varying modes.

  15. Relaxation mode analysis and Markov state relaxation mode analysis for chignolin in aqueous solution near a transition temperature.

    PubMed

    Mitsutake, Ayori; Takano, Hiroshi

    2015-09-28

    It is important to extract reaction coordinates or order parameters from protein simulations in order to investigate the local minimum-energy states and the transitions between them. The most popular method to obtain such data is principal component analysis, which extracts modes of large conformational fluctuations around an average structure. We recently applied relaxation mode analysis for protein systems, which approximately estimates the slow relaxation modes and times from a simulation and enables investigations of the dynamic properties underlying the structural fluctuations of proteins. In this study, we apply this relaxation mode analysis to extract reaction coordinates for a system in which there are large conformational changes such as those commonly observed in protein folding/unfolding. We performed a 750-ns simulation of chignolin protein near its folding transition temperature and observed many transitions between the most stable, misfolded, intermediate, and unfolded states. We then applied principal component analysis and relaxation mode analysis to the system. In the relaxation mode analysis, we could automatically extract good reaction coordinates. The free-energy surfaces provide a clearer understanding of the transitions not only between local minimum-energy states but also between the folded and unfolded states, even though the simulation involved large conformational changes. Moreover, we propose a new analysis method called Markov state relaxation mode analysis. We applied the new method to states with slow relaxation, which are defined by the free-energy surface obtained in the relaxation mode analysis. Finally, the relaxation times of the states obtained with a simple Markov state model and the proposed Markov state relaxation mode analysis are compared and discussed.

  16. Analysis of a Stabilized CNLF Method with Fast Slow Wave Splittings for Flow Problems

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Nan; Tran, Hoang A.

    2015-04-01

    In this work, we study Crank-Nicolson leap-frog (CNLF) methods with fast-slow wave splittings for Navier-Stokes equations (NSE) with a rotation/Coriolis force term, which is a simplification of geophysical flows. We propose a new stabilized CNLF method where the added stabilization completely removes the method's CFL time step condition. A comprehensive stability and error analysis is given. We also prove that for Oseen equations with the rotation term, the unstable mode (for which u(n+1) + u(n-1) equivalent to 0) of CNLF is asymptotically stable. Numerical results are provided to verify the stability and the convergence of the methods.

  17. Analysis of a Stabilized CNLF Method with Fast Slow Wave Splittings for Flow Problems

    DOE PAGES

    Jiang, Nan; Tran, Hoang A.

    2015-04-01

    In this work, we study Crank-Nicolson leap-frog (CNLF) methods with fast-slow wave splittings for Navier-Stokes equations (NSE) with a rotation/Coriolis force term, which is a simplification of geophysical flows. We propose a new stabilized CNLF method where the added stabilization completely removes the method's CFL time step condition. A comprehensive stability and error analysis is given. We also prove that for Oseen equations with the rotation term, the unstable mode (for which u(n+1) + u(n-1) equivalent to 0) of CNLF is asymptotically stable. Numerical results are provided to verify the stability and the convergence of the methods.

  18. Integral backstepping sliding mode control for underactuated systems: swing-up and stabilization of the Cart-Pendulum System.

    PubMed

    Adhikary, Nabanita; Mahanta, Chitralekha

    2013-11-01

    In this paper an integral backstepping sliding mode controller is proposed for controlling underactuated systems. A feedback control law is designed based on backstepping algorithm and a sliding surface is introduced in the final stage of the algorithm. The backstepping algorithm makes the controller immune to matched and mismatched uncertainties and the sliding mode control provides robustness. The proposed controller ensures asymptotic stability. The effectiveness of the proposed controller is compared against a coupled sliding mode controller for swing-up and stabilization of the Cart-Pendulum System. Simulation results show that the proposed integral backstepping sliding mode controller is able to reject both matched and mismatched uncertainties with a chattering free control law, while utilizing less control effort than the sliding mode controller.

  19. A Quasi-Steady Flexible Launch Vehicle Stability Analysis Using Steady CFD with Unsteady Aerodynamic Enhancement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartels, Robert E.

    2011-01-01

    Launch vehicles frequently experience a reduced stability margin through the transonic Mach number range. This reduced stability margin is caused by an undamping of the aerodynamics in one of the lower frequency flexible or rigid body modes. Analysis of the behavior of a flexible vehicle is routinely performed with quasi-steady aerodynamic lineloads derived from steady rigid computational fluid dynamics (CFD). However, a quasi-steady aeroelastic stability analysis can be unconservative at the critical Mach numbers where experiment or unsteady computational aeroelastic (CAE) analysis show a reduced or even negative aerodynamic damping. This paper will present a method of enhancing the quasi-steady aeroelastic stability analysis of a launch vehicle with unsteady aerodynamics. The enhanced formulation uses unsteady CFD to compute the response of selected lower frequency modes. The response is contained in a time history of the vehicle lineloads. A proper orthogonal decomposition of the unsteady aerodynamic lineload response is used to reduce the scale of data volume and system identification is used to derive the aerodynamic stiffness, damping and mass matrices. The results of the enhanced quasi-static aeroelastic stability analysis are compared with the damping and frequency computed from unsteady CAE analysis and from a quasi-steady analysis. The results show that incorporating unsteady aerodynamics in this way brings the enhanced quasi-steady aeroelastic stability analysis into close agreement with the unsteady CAE analysis.

  20. Stability analysis of the Witten black hole (cigar soliton) under world-sheet renormalization group flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, Carolyn; Suneeta, Vardarajan

    2012-10-01

    We analyze the stability of the Euclidean Witten black hole (the cigar soliton in mathematics literature) under first-order renormalization group (Ricci) flow of the world-sheet sigma model. This analysis is from the target space point of view. We find that the Witten black hole has no unstable normalizable perturbative modes in a linearized mode analysis in which we consider circularly symmetric perturbations. Finally, we discuss a result from mathematics that implies the existence of a nonnormalizable mode of the Witten black hole under which the geometry flows to the sausage solution studied by Fateev, Onofri and Zamolodchikov.

  1. Stability analysis and trend study of a balloon tethered in a wind, with experimental comparisons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redd, L. T.; Bland, S. R.; Bennett, R. M.

    1973-01-01

    A stability analysis and trend study for a balloon tethered in a steady wind are presented. The linearized, stability-derivative type analysis includes balloon aerodynamics, buoyancy, mass (including apparent mass), and static forces resulting from the tether cable. The analysis has been applied to a balloon 7.64 m in length, and the results are compared with those from tow tests of this balloon. This comparison shows that the analysis gives reasonable predictions for the damping, frequencies, modes of motion, and stability boundaries exhibited by the balloon. A trend study for the 7.64-m balloon was made to illustrate how the stability boundaries are affected by changes in individual stability parameters. The trends indicated in this study may also be applicable to many other tethered-balloon systems.

  2. Distinct pose of discodermolide in taxol binding pocket drives a complementary mode of microtubule stabilization.

    PubMed

    Khrapunovich-Baine, Marina; Menon, Vilas; Verdier-Pinard, Pascal; Smith, Amos B; Angeletti, Ruth Hogue; Fiser, Andras; Horwitz, Susan Band; Xiao, Hui

    2009-12-15

    The microtubule cytoskeleton has proven to be an effective target for cancer therapeutics. One class of drugs, known as microtubule stabilizing agents (MSAs), binds to microtubule polymers and stabilizes them against depolymerization. The prototype of this group of drugs, Taxol, is an effective chemotherapeutic agent used extensively in the treatment of human ovarian, breast, and lung carcinomas. Although electron crystallography and photoaffinity labeling experiments determined that the binding site for Taxol is in a hydrophobic pocket in beta-tubulin, little was known about the effects of this drug on the conformation of the entire microtubule. A recent study from our laboratory utilizing hydrogen-deuterium exchange (HDX) in concert with various mass spectrometry (MS) techniques has provided new information on the structure of microtubules upon Taxol binding. In the current study we apply this technique to determine the binding mode and the conformational effects on chicken erythrocyte tubulin (CET) of another MSA, discodermolide, whose synthetic analogues may have potential use in the clinic. We confirmed that, like Taxol, discodermolide binds to the taxane binding pocket in beta-tubulin. However, as opposed to Taxol, which has major interactions with the M-loop, discodermolide orients itself away from this loop and toward the N-terminal H1-S2 loop. Additionally, discodermolide stabilizes microtubules mainly via its effects on interdimer contacts, specifically on the alpha-tubulin side, and to a lesser extent on interprotofilament contacts between adjacent beta-tubulin subunits. Also, our results indicate complementary stabilizing effects of Taxol and discodermolide on the microtubules, which may explain the synergy observed between the two drugs in vivo.

  3. Molecular Modeling Approaches to Study the Binding Mode on Tubulin of Microtubule Destabilizing and Stabilizing Agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botta, Maurizio; Forli, Stefano; Magnani, Matteo; Manetti, Fabrizio

    Tubulin targeting agents constitute an important class of anticancer drugs. By acting either as microtubule stabilizers or destabilizers, they disrupt microtubule dynamics, thus inducing mitotic arrest and, ultimately, cell death by apoptosis. Three different binding sites, whose exact location on tubulin has been experimentally detected, have been identified so far for antimitotic compound targeting microtubules, namely the taxoid, the colchicine and the vinka alkaloid binding site. A number of ligand- and structure-based molecular modeling studies in this field has been reported over the years, aimed at elucidating the binding modes of both stabilizing and destabilizing agent, as well as the molecular features responsible for their efficacious interaction with tubulin. Such studies are described in this review, focusing on information provided by different modeling approaches on the structural determinants of antitubulin agents and the interactions with the binding pockets on tubulin emerged as fundamental for antitumor activity.To describe molecular modeling approaches applied to date to molecules known to bind microtubules, this paper has been divided into two main parts: microtubule destabilizing (Part 1) and stabilizing (Part 2) agents. The first part includes structure-based and ligand-based approaches to study molecules targeting colchicine (1.1) and vinca alkaloid (1.2) binding sites, respectively. In the second part, the studies performed on microtubule-stabilizing antimitotic agents (MSAA) are described. Starting from the first representative compound of this class, paclitaxel, molecular modeling studies (quantitative structure-activity relationships - QSAR - and structure-based approaches), performed on natural compounds acting with the same mechanism of action and temptative common pharmacophoric hypotheses for all of these compounds, are reported.

  4. Resistive Wall Mode Stability Forecasting in NSTX and NSTX-U

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkery, Jack

    2016-10-01

    Disruption prevention in tokamak fusion plasmas requires accurate identification and prediction of global MHD instabilities. We examine, in the NSTX device and its upgrade NSTX-U, characterization and forecasting of resistive wall modes (RWMs), which are crucial components of disruption event chains. The kinetic RWM growth rate is solved by the MISK code through a dispersion relation combining ideal and kinetic mode energy functionals, δW and δWK . A model for the ideal n = 1 no-wall δW term, depending on parameters measurable in real-time, has been recently developed by using the DCON code on more than 5,000 NSTX equilibria. When applied to NSTX-U discharges at higher aspect ratio, the model accurately predicts the n = 1 no-wall limit calculated by DCON through the aspect ratio dependence of the model. Full MISK calculations of δWK cannot be performed in real time, but a simplified model based on physics insight from MISK takes a form that depends on ExB frequency, collisionality, and energetic particle fraction. The model will examine when the plasma toroidal rotation profile falls into weaker RWM stability regions based upon this kinetic modification to ideal theory, which contains broad stabilizing resonances via mode-particle interaction. This approach enables, for the first time, the ability to anticipate a growing RWM rather than reacting to one. The reduced model results are tested on a database of NSTX discharges with unstable RWMs. For each discharge, a newly-written disruption event characterization code (DECAF) finds the chain of events leading to a disruption by applying criteria that define each of the physical events. With a simple threshold test of mode amplitude an RWM event was found in each case, and 59% were within 20 wall times of the disruption. The earlier RWM warnings are not false positives; they caused significant, transient decreases in βN. Supported by U.S. D.O.E. contracts DE-FG02-99ER54524 and DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  5. Stability analysis of an autocatalytic protein model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Julian

    2016-05-01

    A self-regulatory genetic circuit, where a protein acts as a positive regulator of its own production, is known to be the simplest biological network with a positive feedback loop. Although at least three components—DNA, RNA, and the protein—are required to form such a circuit, stability analysis of the fixed points of this self-regulatory circuit has been performed only after reducing the system to a two-component system, either by assuming a fast equilibration of the DNA component or by removing the RNA component. Here, stability of the fixed points of the three-component positive feedback loop is analyzed by obtaining eigenvalues of the full three-dimensional Hessian matrix. In addition to rigorously identifying the stable fixed points and saddle points, detailed information about the system can be obtained, such as the existence of complex eigenvalues near a fixed point.

  6. Stability Analysis of Flow Induced by the Traveling Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazuruk, Konstantin

    2003-01-01

    Re-circulating flow in molten metal columns can be conveniently induced by the axisymmetric traveling magnetic field. A number of applications can benefit from this technique, such as mixing under microgravity environment, or.crysta1 growth from metallic melts. For small magnetic field excitations, the flow is laminar and stationary. As the imposed field increases, a more complex flow will set up in the cylindrical column. Conditions for stable laminar flow are of importance for practical applications. In this work, a linear stability analysis is performed in order to determine the onset of the bifurcation in the system. Here the analysis is restricted to the axisymmetric modes and the low-frequency regime.

  7. Stability Analysis of Flow Induced by the Traveling Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazuruk, Konstantin

    2003-01-01

    Re-circulating flow in molten metal columns can be conveniently induced by the axisymmetric traveling magnetic field. A number of applications can benefit from this technique, such as mixing under microgravity environment, or crysta1 growth from metallic melts. For small magnetic field excitations, the flow is laminar and stationary. As the imposed field increases, a more complex flow will set up in the cylindrical column. Conditions for stable laminar flow are of importance for practical applications. In this work, a linear stability analysis is performed in order to determine the onset of the bifurcation in the system. Here the analysis is restricted to the axisymmetric modes and the low-frequency regime.

  8. Stability Analysis of Flow Induced by the Traveling Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazuruk, Konstantin

    2003-01-01

    Re-circulating flow in molten metal columns can be conveniently induced by the axisymmetric traveling magnetic field. A number of applications can benefit from this technique, such as mixing under microgravity environment, or crysta1 growth from metallic melts. For small magnetic field excitations, the flow is laminar and stationary. As the imposed field increases, a more complex flow will set up in the cylindrical column. Conditions for stable laminar flow are of importance for practical applications. In this work, a linear stability analysis is performed in order to determine the onset of the bifurcation in the system. Here the analysis is restricted to the axisymmetric modes and the low-frequency regime.

  9. Stability Analysis of Flow Induced by the Traveling Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazuruk, Konstantin

    2003-01-01

    Re-circulating flow in molten metal columns can be conveniently induced by the axisymmetric traveling magnetic field. A number of applications can benefit from this technique, such as mixing under microgravity environment, or.crysta1 growth from metallic melts. For small magnetic field excitations, the flow is laminar and stationary. As the imposed field increases, a more complex flow will set up in the cylindrical column. Conditions for stable laminar flow are of importance for practical applications. In this work, a linear stability analysis is performed in order to determine the onset of the bifurcation in the system. Here the analysis is restricted to the axisymmetric modes and the low-frequency regime.

  10. Perturbation analysis of electromagnetic geodesic acoustic modes

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Haijun

    2014-06-15

    Lagrangian displacement and magnetic field perturbation response to the geodesic acoustic mode is analyzed by using the ideal magnetohydrodynamic equations in a large-aspect-ratio tokamak. δB{sub θ}, the poloidal component of magnetic field perturbation, has poloidal wave number m = 2 created by the poloidal displacement ξ{sub θ}. The parallel perturbation of magnetic field, δB{sub ∥}, has a poloidally asymmetric structure with m = 1 and is on the same order of magnitude with δB{sub θ} to the leading order. The radial displacement ξ{sub r} is of order O(βϵξ{sub θ}) but plays a significant role in determining δB{sub ∥}, where β is the plasma/magnetic pressure ratio and ϵ is the inverse aspect ratio.

  11. Progress Toward the Analysis of the Kinetic Stabilizer Concept

    SciTech Connect

    Post, R F; Byers, J A; Cohen, R H; Fowler, T K; Ryutov, D D; Tung, L S

    2005-02-08

    The Kinetic Stabilizer (K-S) concept [1] represents a means for stabilizing axisymmetric mirror and tandem-mirror (T-M) magnetic fusion systems against MHD interchange instability modes. Magnetic fusion research has given us examples of axisymmetric mirror confinement devices in which radial transport rates approach the classical ''Spitzer'' level, i.e. situations in which turbulence if present at all, is at too low a level to adversely affect the radial transport [2,3,4]. If such a low-turbulence condition could be achieved in a T-M system it could lead to a fusion power system that would be simpler, smaller, and easier to develop than one based on closed-field confinement, e.g., the tokamak, where the transport is known to be dominated by turbulence. However, since conventional axisymmetric mirror systems suffer from the MHD interchange instability, the key to exploiting this new opportunity is to find a practical way to stabilize this mode. The K-S represents one avenue to achieving this goal. The starting point for the K-S concept is a theoretical analysis by Ryutov [5]. He showed that a MHD-unstable plasma contained in an axisymmetric mirror cell can be MHD-stabilized by the presence of a low-density plasma on the expanding field lines outside the mirrors. If this plasma communicates well electrically with the plasma in the then this exterior plasma can stabilize the interior, confined, plasma. This stabilization technique was conclusively demonstrated in the Gas Dynamic Trap (GDT) experiment [6] at Novosibirsk, Russia, at mirror-cell plasma beta values of 40 percent. The GDT operates in a high collisionality regime. Thus the effluent plasma leaking through the mirrors, though much lower in density than that of the confined plasma, is still high enough to satisfy the stabilization criterion. This would not, however, be the case in a fusion T-M with axisymmetric plug and central cell fields. In such a case the effluent plasma would be far too low in density to

  12. Stability of elongated cross-section tokamaks to axisymmetric even poloidal mode number deformations

    SciTech Connect

    Weiner, R.; Jardin, S.C.; Pomphrey, N.

    1989-06-01

    A recent paper by Nakayama, Sato and Matsuoka suggests that elliptical cross section tokamaks with aspect ratio R/a = 3.2 and with elongation kappa = 2.6 are unstable to a splitting (m = 2, n = 0) instability for plasma ..beta.. > 5%, and that kappa /> =/ 4.0 plasmas are unstable to splitting for ..beta.. /> =/ 1%. We have tried to reproduce these results using the MHD evolution code TSC, but find these configurations to be stable, not even near a stability boundary. Even a kappa = 3.7 plasma with ..beta.. = 23.0% is stable to the splitting mode. However, the addition of pinching coils at the waist will cause the plasma to split if the current in these coils exceeds a critical value I/sub c/ which decreases with increasing ..beta... 8 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Characterization of Guided Mode Resonance Filters for Wavelength Stabilization of Thulium Fiber Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dax, Tany; Richardson, Martin; Sims, Andrew

    2009-10-01

    Stable, eye-safe lasers are important for use in medical environments and atmospheric propagation. A Guided Mode Resonance Filter (GMRF) consists of a waveguide between a layer of substrate and a diffractive layer. The GMRFs are produced at UNC Charlotte. The Thulium (Tm) doped fiber used consists of an octagonal undoped fiber with a doped core, and is the gain medium of the fiber laser. The Laser Plasma Laboratory at the UCF College of Optics and Photonics performed the necessary characterization of the output spectra and damage thresholds of the GMRF when used as the feedback element of the Thulium fiber lasers. This summer's Research Experience for Undergraduates project aided in this characterization. The laser reached 10W of stabilized output. Further, the GMRFs withstood thermal changes and focused power with no damage or change in output spectra.

  14. The Combined Effect of EPM and TAE Modes on Energetic Ion Confinement and Sawtooth Stabilization

    SciTech Connect

    S. Bernabei; R. Budny; E.D. Fredrickson; N.N. Gorelenkov; J.C. Hosea; C.K. Phillips; R. White; J.R. Wilson; C.C. Petty; R.I. Pinsker; R.W. Harvey; P. Smirnov

    2000-11-15

    It is shown in this paper for the first time, that the chirping Alfven instabilities observed mostly during ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) heating have been positively identified as Energetic Particle Modes (EPM). This has been possible because of the detailed measurement of the q-profile with the MSE (motional Stark effect) diagnostic in DIII-D. The EPMs are shown to be the leading cause of the monster sawtooth crash. It is also shown that TAEs are excited either directly or indirectly by the EPMs and they cause fast ion losses. A scenario for the stabilization and the crash of the monster sawtooth and for the degradation of the ICRF heating efficiency at high power is presented.

  15. Linear stability analysis in compressible, flat-plate boundary-layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özgen, Serkan; Kırcalı, Senem Atalayer

    2008-01-01

    The stability problem of two-dimensional compressible flat-plate boundary layers is handled using the linear stability theory. The stability equations obtained from three-dimensional compressible Navier-Stokes equations are solved simultaneously with two-dimensional mean flow equations, using an efficient shoot-search technique for adiabatic wall condition. In the analysis, a wide range of Mach numbers extending well into the hypersonic range are considered for the mean flow, whereas both two- and three-dimensional disturbances are taken into account for the perturbation flow. All fluid properties, including the Prandtl number, are taken as temperature-dependent. The results of the analysis ascertain the presence of the second mode of instability (Mack mode), in addition to the first mode related to the Tollmien-Schlichting mode present in incompressible flows. The effect of reference temperature on stability characteristics is also studied. The results of the analysis reveal that the stability characteristics remain almost unchanged for the most unstable wave direction for Mach numbers above 4.0. The obtained results are compared with existing numerical and experimental data in the literature, yielding encouraging agreement both qualitatively and quantitatively.

  16. Linear stability and nonlinear dynamics of the fishbone mode in spherical tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Feng; Liu, J. Y.; Fu, G. Y.; Breslau, J. A.

    2013-10-15

    Extensive linear and nonlinear simulations have been carried out to investigate the energetic particle-driven fishbone instability in spherical tokamak plasmas with weakly reversed q profile and the q{sub min} slightly above unity. The global kinetic-MHD hybrid code M3D-K is used. Numerical results show that a fishbone instability is excited by energetic beam ions preferentially at higher q{sub min} values, consistent with the observed appearance of the fishbone before the “long-lived mode” in MAST and NSTX experiments. In contrast, at lower q{sub min} values, the fishbone tends to be stable. In this case, the beam ion effects are strongly stabilizing for the non-resonant kink mode. Nonlinear simulations show that the fishbone saturates with strong downward frequency chirping as well as radial flattening of the beam ion distribution. An (m, n) = (2, 1) magnetic island is found to be driven nonlinearly by the fishbone instability, which could provide a trigger for the (2, 1) neoclassical tearing mode sometimes observed after the fishbone instability in NSTX.

  17. Modeling of Feedback Stabilization of External MHD Modes in Toroidal Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, M. S.; Chance, M. S.; Okabayashi, M.

    2000-10-01

    The intelligent shell feedback scheme(C.M. Bishop, Plasma Phys. Contr. Nucl. Fusion 31), 1179 (1989). seeks to utilize external coils to suppress the unstable MHD modes slowed down by the resistive shell. We present a new formulation and numerical results of the interaction between the plasma and its outside vacuum region, with complete plasma response and the inclusion of a resistive vessel in general toroidal geometry. This is achieved by using the Green's function technique, which is a generalization of that previously used for the VACUUM(M.S. Chance, Phys. Plasmas 4), 2161 (1997). code and coupled with the ideal MHD code GATO. The effectiveness of different realizations of the intelligent shell concept is gauged by their ability to minimize the available free energy to drive the MHD mode. Computations indicate poloidal coverage of 30% of the total resistive wall surface area and 6 or 7 segments of ``intelligent coil'' arrays superimposed on the resistive wall will allow recovery of up to 90% the effectiveness of the ideal shell in stabilizing the ideal external kink.

  18. Stability analysis of micropipette aspiration of neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    Derganc, J; Bozic, B; Svetina, S; Zeks, B

    2000-01-01

    During micropipette aspiration, neutrophil leukocytes exhibit a liquid-drop behavior, i.e., if a neutrophil is aspirated by a pressure larger than a certain threshold pressure, it flows continuously into the pipette. The point of the largest aspiration pressure at which the neutrophil can still be held in a stable equilibrium is called the critical point of aspiration. Here, we present a theoretical analysis of the equilibrium behavior and stability of a neutrophil during micropipette aspiration with the aim to rigorously characterize the critical point. We take the energy minimization approach, in which the critical point is well defined as the point of the stability breakdown. We use the basic liquid-drop model of neutrophil rheology extended by considering also the neutrophil elastic area expansivity. Our analysis predicts that the behavior at large pipette radii or small elastic area expansivity is close to the one predicted by the basic liquid-drop model, where the critical point is attained slightly before the projection length reaches the pipette radius. The effect of elastic area expansivity is qualitatively different at smaller pipette radii, where our analysis predicts that the critical point is attained at the projection lengths that may significantly exceed the pipette radius. PMID:10866944

  19. A Coupled Aeroelastic Model for Launch Vehicle Stability Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orr, Jeb S.

    2010-01-01

    A technique for incorporating distributed aerodynamic normal forces and aeroelastic coupling effects into a stability analysis model of a launch vehicle is presented. The formulation augments the linear state-space launch vehicle plant dynamics that are compactly derived as a system of coupled linear differential equations representing small angular and translational perturbations of the rigid body, nozzle, and sloshing propellant coupled with normal vibration of a set of orthogonal modes. The interaction of generalized forces due to aeroelastic coupling and thrust can be expressed as a set of augmenting non-diagonal stiffness and damping matrices in modal coordinates with no penalty on system order. While the eigenvalues of the structural response in the presence of thrust and aeroelastic forcing can be predicted at a given flight condition independent of the remaining degrees of freedom, the coupled model provides confidence in closed-loop stability in the presence of rigid-body, slosh, and actuator dynamics. Simulation results are presented that characterize the coupled dynamic response of the Ares I launch vehicle and the impact of aeroelasticity on control system stability margins.

  20. Effects of concentrated leachate injection modes on stabilization of landfilled waste.

    PubMed

    He, Ruo; Wei, Xiao-Meng; Chen, Min; Su, Yao; Tian, Bao-Hu

    2016-02-01

    Injection of concentrated leachate to landfills is a simple and cost-effective technology for concentrated leachate treatment. In this study, the effects of injection mode of concentrated leachate and its hydraulic loading rate on the stabilization of landfilled waste were investigated. Compared with the injection of concentrated leachate, the joint injection of leachate and concentrated leachate (1:1, v/v) was more beneficial to the degradation of landfilled waste and mitigated the discharge amount of pollutants at the hydraulic loading rate of 5.9 L m(-2) day(-1). As the hydraulic loading rate of the joint injection of leachate and concentrated leachate was increased from 5.9 to 17.6 L m(-2) day(-1), the organic matter, biologically degradable matter, and total nitrogen of landfilled waste were degraded more rapidly, with the degradation constant of the first-order kinetics of 0.005, 0.004, and 0.003, respectively. Additionally, NO2(-)-N and NO3(-)-N in the concentrated leachate could be well removed in the landfill bioreactors. These results showed that a joint injection of concentrated leachate and raw leachate might be a good way to relieve the inhibitory effect of high concentrations of toxic pollutants in the concentrated leachate and accelerate the stabilization of landfilled waste.

  1. Equilibrium and ballooning mode stability of an axisymmetric tensor pressure tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, W.A.; Bateman, G.; Nelson, D.B.; Kammash, T.

    1980-08-01

    A force balance relation, a representation for the poloidal beta (..beta../sub p/), and expressions for the current densities are derived from the MHD equilibrium relations for an axisymmetric tensor pressure tokamak. Perpendicular and parallel beam pressure components are evaluated from a distribution function that models high energy neutral particle injection. A double adiabatic energy principle is derived from that of Kruskal and Oberman, with correction terms added. The energy principle is then applied to an arbitrary cross-section axisymmetric tokamak to examine ballooning instabilities of large toroidal mode number. The resulting Euler equation is remarkably similar to that of ideal MHD. Although the field-bending term is virtually unaltered, the driving term is modified because the pressures are no longer constant on a flux surface. Either a necessary or a sufficient marginal stability criterion for a guiding center plasma can be derived from this equation whenever an additional stabilizing element unique to the double adiabatic theory is either kept or neglected, respectively.

  2. Deep Borehole Emplacement Mode Hazard Analysis Revision 0

    SciTech Connect

    Sevougian, S. David

    2015-08-07

    This letter report outlines a methodology and provides resource information for the Deep Borehole Emplacement Mode Hazard Analysis (DBEMHA). The main purpose is identify the accident hazards and accident event sequences associated with the two emplacement mode options (wireline or drillstring), to outline a methodology for computing accident probabilities and frequencies, and to point to available databases on the nature and frequency of accidents typically associated with standard borehole drilling and nuclear handling operations. Risk mitigation and prevention measures, which have been incorporated into the two emplacement designs (see Cochran and Hardin 2015), are also discussed. A key intent of this report is to provide background information to brief subject matter experts involved in the Emplacement Mode Design Study. [Note: Revision 0 of this report is concentrated more on the wireline emplacement mode. It is expected that Revision 1 will contain further development of the preliminary fault and event trees for the drill string emplacement mode.

  3. Terahertz Spectrum Analysis Based on Empirical Mode Decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Yunpeng; Zheng, Xiaoping; Deng, Xiaojiao

    2017-08-01

    Precise identification of terahertz absorption peaks for materials with low concentration and high attenuation still remains a challenge. Empirical mode decomposition was applied to terahertz spectrum analysis in order to improve the performance on spectral fingerprints identification. We conducted experiments on water vapor and carbon monoxide respectively with terahertz time domain spectroscopy. By comparing their absorption spectra before and after empirical mode decomposition, we demonstrated that the first-order intrinsic mode function shows absorption peaks clearly in high-frequency range. By comparing the frequency spectra of the sample signals and their intrinsic mode functions, we proved that the first-order function contains most of the original signal's energy and frequency information so that it cannot be left out or replaced by high-order functions in spectral fingerprints detection. Empirical mode decomposition not only acts as an effective supplementary means to terahertz time-domain spectroscopy but also shows great potential in discrimination of materials and prediction of their concentrations.

  4. Fully Parallel MHD Stability Analysis Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svidzinski, Vladimir; Galkin, Sergei; Kim, Jin-Soo; Liu, Yueqiang

    2015-11-01

    Progress on full parallelization of the plasma stability code MARS will be reported. MARS calculates eigenmodes in 2D axisymmetric toroidal equilibria in MHD-kinetic plasma models. It is a powerful tool for studying MHD and MHD-kinetic instabilities and it is widely used by fusion community. Parallel version of MARS is intended for simulations on local parallel clusters. It will be an efficient tool for simulation of MHD instabilities with low, intermediate and high toroidal mode numbers within both fluid and kinetic plasma models, already implemented in MARS. Parallelization of the code includes parallelization of the construction of the matrix for the eigenvalue problem and parallelization of the inverse iterations algorithm, implemented in MARS for the solution of the formulated eigenvalue problem. Construction of the matrix is parallelized by distributing the load among processors assigned to different magnetic surfaces. Parallelization of the solution of the eigenvalue problem is made by repeating steps of the present MARS algorithm using parallel libraries and procedures. Results of MARS parallelization and of the development of a new fix boundary equilibrium code adapted for MARS input will be reported. Work is supported by the U.S. DOE SBIR program.

  5. Fully Parallel MHD Stability Analysis Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svidzinski, Vladimir; Galkin, Sergei; Kim, Jin-Soo; Liu, Yueqiang

    2014-10-01

    Progress on full parallelization of the plasma stability code MARS will be reported. MARS calculates eigenmodes in 2D axisymmetric toroidal equilibria in MHD-kinetic plasma models. It is a powerful tool for studying MHD and MHD-kinetic instabilities and it is widely used by fusion community. Parallel version of MARS is intended for simulations on local parallel clusters. It will be an efficient tool for simulation of MHD instabilities with low, intermediate and high toroidal mode numbers within both fluid and kinetic plasma models, already implemented in MARS. Parallelization of the code includes parallelization of the construction of the matrix for the eigenvalue problem and parallelization of the inverse iterations algorithm, implemented in MARS for the solution of the formulated eigenvalue problem. Construction of the matrix is parallelized by distributing the load among processors assigned to different magnetic surfaces. Parallelization of the solution of the eigenvalue problem is made by repeating steps of the present MARS algorithm using parallel libraries and procedures. Initial results of the code parallelization will be reported. Work is supported by the U.S. DOE SBIR program.

  6. Fully Parallel MHD Stability Analysis Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svidzinski, Vladimir; Galkin, Sergei; Kim, Jin-Soo; Liu, Yueqiang

    2013-10-01

    Progress on full parallelization of the plasma stability code MARS will be reported. MARS calculates eigenmodes in 2D axisymmetric toroidal equilibria in MHD-kinetic plasma models. It is a powerful tool for studying MHD and MHD-kinetic instabilities and it is widely used by fusion community. Parallel version of MARS is intended for simulations on local parallel clusters. It will be an efficient tool for simulation of MHD instabilities with low, intermediate and high toroidal mode numbers within both fluid and kinetic plasma models, already implemented in MARS. Parallelization of the code includes parallelization of the construction of the matrix for the eigenvalue problem and parallelization of the inverse iterations algorithm, implemented in MARS for the solution of the formulated eigenvalue problem. Construction of the matrix is parallelized by distributing the load among processors assigned to different magnetic surfaces. Parallelization of the solution of the eigenvalue problem is made by repeating steps of the present MARS algorithm using parallel libraries and procedures. Preliminary results of the code parallelization will be reported. Work is supported by the U.S. DOE SBIR program.

  7. Improved feedback control of wall-stabilized kink modes with different plasma-wall couplings and mode rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Q.; Levesque, J. P.; Stoafer, C. C.; Rhodes, D. J.; Hughes, P. E.; Byrne, P. J.; Mauel, M. E.; Navratil, G. A.

    2015-11-01

    The HBT-EP tokamak can excite strong, saturated kink modes whose growth rates and rotation frequencies evolve on a millisecond timescale. To control such modes, HBT-EP uses a GPU-based feedback system in a low latency architecture. When feedback is applied, the mode amplitude and rotation frequency can change quickly. We describe an improved algorithm that captures the rapid phase changes in the mode while also removing transient amplitude jumps. Additionally, the control coil driving signal is implemented using a current-controller instead of a voltage-controller. The feedback performance is improved and has been tested under more unstable regimes, including different wall configurations and plasmas slowed by a bias probe. Feedback suppression is observed in all cases and the feedback parameters' dependency on different experimental conditions is studied. Supported by U.S. DOE Grant DE-FG02-86ER53222.

  8. Frequency stabilization, tuning, and spatial mode control of terahertz quantum cascade lasers for coherent transceiver applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danylov, Andriy

    THz quantum cascade lasers (TQCLs) first demonstrated in 2002 are a promising source of THz coherent radiation for use as both transmitters and local oscillators in coherent heterodyne detection systems. However, present TQCLs have deficiencies which include lack of frequency tunability, as well as inadequate spatial and temporal coherence. In this thesis we have addressed these issues to demonstrate an improved 2.408 TQCL which operated as a transmitter in a coherent heterodyne detection imaging system. The 2.408 THz QCL used in this thesis was grown and fabricated by the Photonics Center (University of Massachusetts Lowell). First, we showed that a short hollow Pyrex tube can act as a dielectric waveguide and transform the multimode, highly diverging TQCL beam into the lowest order dielectric waveguide hybrid mode, EH11, which then couples efficiently to the free-space Gaussian mode, TEMo0. This simple approach should enable TQCLs to be employed in applications where a spatially coherent beam is required. Next, the tunability problem was addressed. A compact, tunable, narrowband terahertz source was demonstrated by mixing a single longitudinal mode, 2.408 THz, free running quantum cascade laser with a 2-20 GHz microwave sweeper in a corner-cube-mounted Schottky diode (SD). The sideband spectra were characterized with a Fourier transform spectrometer, and the radiation was tuned through several D2O rotational transitions to estimate the longer term (t ≥ several seconds) bandwidth of the source. A spectral resolution of 2 MHz in the CW mode was observed. The temporal coherence of the TQCL was improved by assembling a simple analog locking circuit, which stabilizes the beat signal between the TQCL and a 2.40976 THz CO2 optically pumped molecular laser (OPL) line to 4 kHz full width at half maximum (FWHM). This is approximately a tenth of the observed long-term (t ˜ sec) linewidth of the OPL showing that the feedback loop corrects for much of the mechanical and

  9. Accretion onto magnetized neutron stars - Normal mode analysis of the interchange instability at the magnetopause

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arons, J.; Lea, S. M.

    1976-01-01

    Results are reported for a linearized hydromagnetic stability analysis of the magnetopause of an accreting neutron star. The magnetosphere is assumed to be slowly rotating, and the plasma just outside the magnetopause is assumed to be weakly magnetized. The plasma layer is assumed to be bounded above by a shock wave and to be thin compared with the radius of the magnetosphere. Under these circumstances, the growing modes are shown to be localized in the direction parallel to the zero-order magnetic field, but the structure of the modes is still similar to the flute mode. An expression for the growth rate at each magnetic latitude is obtained in terms of the magnitude of the gravitational acceleration normal to the surface, the azimuthal mode number, the radius of the magnetosphere, the height of the shock above the magnetopause, and the effective Atwood number which embodies the stabilizing effects of favorable curvature and magnetic tension. The effective Atwood number is calculated, and the stabilizing effects of viscosity and aligned flow parallel to the magnetopause are discussed.

  10. Analysis of Resistive Wall Modes in RFP Plasmas with Rotation and Dissipative Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, S. C.; Freidberg, J. P.; Nachtrieb, R.

    1998-11-01

    The stability of the non-resonant external kink modes under the resistive wall boundary condition in an RFP is analyzed. This topic is especially relevant to the future long pulse discharges. With respect to previous work(R.Nachtrieb, J.P.Freidberg and R.Betti, Reversed Field Pinch Workshop, Madison, WI October 14-16, 1996), the parallel viscosity (Braginskii's stress tensor) effects have been added into the eigenmode equation. Therefore, both the ion sound wave damping and the viscosity effects together with the plasma rotation are taken into account in the analysis. The influence of the equilibrium parameters on the mode instability is carefully studied by employing the conventional α-Θo equilibrium models. It is found that the behaviours of the RWM is rather sensitive to the reversal parameter F of RFPs. In the low β (or zero β) plasma region, there is a stability window in the wall-plasma distance b/a due to the plasma rotation and viscous dissipative effects. For the typical RFP operating parameters, the required rotation velocity to stabilize the modes is in the range of the ion sound speed or even higher. The effects of the viscosity on the instability of the modes are investigated.

  11. Conceptual Analysis of System Average Water Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H.

    2016-12-01

    Averaging over time and area, the precipitation in an ecosystem (SAP - system average precipitation) depends on the average surface temperature and relative humidity (RH) in the system if uniform convection is assumed. RH depends on the evapotranspiration of the system (SAE - system average evapotranspiration). There is a non-linear relationship between SAP and SAE. Studying this relationship can lead mechanistic understanding of the ecosystem health status and trend under different setups. If SAP is higher than SAE, the system will have a water runoff which flows out through rivers. If SAP is lower than SAE, irrigation is needed to maintain the vegetation status. This presentation will give a conceptual analysis of the stability in this relationship under different assumed areas, water or forest coverages, elevations and latitudes. This analysis shows that desert is a stable system. Water circulation in basins is also stabilized at a specific SAP based on the basin profile. It further shows that deforestation will reduce SAP, and can flip the system to an irrigation required status. If no irrigation is provided, the system will automatically reduce to its stable point - desert, which is extremely difficult to turn around.

  12. [Failure mode effect analysis applied to preparation of intravenous cytostatics].

    PubMed

    Santos-Rubio, M D; Marín-Gil, R; Muñoz-de la Corte, R; Velázquez-López, M D; Gil-Navarro, M V; Bautista-Paloma, F J

    2016-01-01

    To proactively identify risks in the preparation of intravenous cytostatic drugs, and to prioritise and establish measures to improve safety procedures. Failure Mode Effect Analysis methodology was used. A multidisciplinary team identified potential failure modes of the procedure through a brainstorming session. The impact associated with each failure mode was assessed with the Risk Priority Number (RPN), which involves three variables: occurrence, severity, and detectability. Improvement measures were established for all identified failure modes, with those with RPN>100 considered critical. The final RPN (theoretical) that would result from the proposed measures was also calculated and the process was redesigned. A total of 34 failure modes were identified. The initial accumulated RPN was 3022 (range: 3-252), and after recommended actions the final RPN was 1292 (range: 3-189). RPN scores >100 were obtained in 13 failure modes; only the dispensing sub-process was free of critical points (RPN>100). A final reduction of RPN>50% was achieved in 9 failure modes. This prospective risk analysis methodology allows the weaknesses of the procedure to be prioritised, optimize use of resources, and a substantial improvement in the safety of the preparation of cytostatic drugs through the introduction of double checking and intermediate product labelling. Copyright © 2015 SECA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  13. Time-average fringe method for vibration mode analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Xianyu; Zhang, Qican; Wen, Yongfu; Xiang, Liqun

    2010-03-01

    A new optical method of vibration mode analysis using time-average fringe is presented in this paper. A sequence of the deformed and partly blurred sinusoidal fringe images on the surface of a vibrating membrane are grabbed by a low sampling rate commercial CCD camera. By Fourier transform, filtering, inverse Fourier transform, the vibration mode is obtained from the fundamental component of the Fourier spectrum. The theoretical analysis of this approach is given. Computer simulations and experiments have proved to verify its validity. Under different excited vibration frequencies, the vibration modes of a vibrating surface can be qualitatively analyzed. In the experiment, when the excited vibration frequency changes continuously, the changing process of the vibration modes of membrane is observed clearly. Experimental results show that this approach as the features of rapid speed, high accuracy, and simple experimental set-up.

  14. Time-average fringe method for vibration mode analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Xianyu; Zhang, Qican; Wen, Yongfu; Xiang, Liqun

    2009-12-01

    A new optical method of vibration mode analysis using time-average fringe is presented in this paper. A sequence of the deformed and partly blurred sinusoidal fringe images on the surface of a vibrating membrane are grabbed by a low sampling rate commercial CCD camera. By Fourier transform, filtering, inverse Fourier transform, the vibration mode is obtained from the fundamental component of the Fourier spectrum. The theoretical analysis of this approach is given. Computer simulations and experiments have proved to verify its validity. Under different excited vibration frequencies, the vibration modes of a vibrating surface can be qualitatively analyzed. In the experiment, when the excited vibration frequency changes continuously, the changing process of the vibration modes of membrane is observed clearly. Experimental results show that this approach as the features of rapid speed, high accuracy, and simple experimental set-up.

  15. Analysis of the Intrinsic Mode Functions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-01-01

    differential equations and vibration analysis was a major motivation in the development of the Sturm - Liouville theory. In the next section, we list some...relevant properties of the solutions of a self-adjoint ODE’s which will be useful for our analysis. 2.2 Self-adjoint ODE and Sturm - Liouville systems...0 and Q is continuous. More generally we can consider a Sturm - Liouville equation (λ real): d dt ( p(t) df dt ) + (λρ(t)− q(t))f = 0. (2.2) These

  16. Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) Assistant Tool Feasibility Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, Melissa D.; Malin, Jane T.; Fleming, Land D.

    2013-09-01

    An effort to determine the feasibility of a software tool to assist in Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) has been completed. This new and unique approach to FMEA uses model based systems engineering concepts to recommend failure modes, causes, and effects to the user after they have made several selections from pick lists about a component's functions and inputs/outputs. Recommendations are made based on a library using common failure modes identified over the course of several major human spaceflight programs. However, the tool could be adapted for use in a wide range of applications from NASA to the energy industry.

  17. Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) Assistant Tool Feasibility Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flores, Melissa; Malin, Jane T.

    2013-01-01

    An effort to determine the feasibility of a software tool to assist in Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) has been completed. This new and unique approach to FMEA uses model based systems engineering concepts to recommend failure modes, causes, and effects to the user after they have made several selections from pick lists about a component s functions and inputs/outputs. Recommendations are made based on a library using common failure modes identified over the course of several major human spaceflight programs. However, the tool could be adapted for use in a wide range of applications from NASA to the energy industry.

  18. Comparing linear ion-temperature-gradient-driven mode stability of the National Compact Stellarator Experiment and a shaped tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Baumgaertel, J. A.; Hammett, G. W.; Mikkelsen, D. R.

    2013-02-15

    One metric for comparing confinement properties of different magnetic fusion energy configurations is the linear critical gradient of drift wave modes. The critical gradient scale length determines the ratio of the core to pedestal temperature when a plasma is limited to marginal stability in the plasma core. The gyrokinetic turbulence code GS2 was used to calculate critical temperature gradients for the linear, collisionless ion temperature gradient (ITG) mode in the National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX) and a prototypical shaped tokamak, based on the profiles of a JET H-mode shot and the stronger shaping of ARIES-AT. While a concern was that the narrow cross section of NCSX at some toroidal locations would result in steep gradients that drive instabilities more easily, it is found that other stabilizing effects of the stellarator configuration offset this so that the normalized critical gradients for NCSX are competitive with or even better than for the tokamak. For the adiabatic ITG mode, NCSX and the tokamak had similar adiabatic ITG mode critical gradients, although beyond marginal stability, NCSX had larger growth rates. However, for the kinetic ITG mode, NCSX had a higher critical gradient and lower growth rates until a/L{sub T} Almost-Equal-To 1.5 a/L{sub T,crit}, when it surpassed the tokamak's. A discussion of the results presented with respect to a/L{sub T} vs. R/L{sub T} is included.

  19. Time-Frequency Analysis of the Dispersion of Lamb Modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prosser, W. H.; Seale, Michael D.; Smith, Barry T.

    1999-01-01

    Accurate knowledge of the velocity dispersion of Lamb modes is important for ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation methods used in detecting and locating flaws in thin plates and in determining their elastic stiffness coefficients. Lamb mode dispersion is also important in the acoustic emission technique for accurately triangulating the location of emissions in thin plates. In this research, the ability to characterize Lamb mode dispersion through a time-frequency analysis (the pseudo-Wigner-Ville distribution) was demonstrated. A major advantage of time-frequency methods is the ability to analyze acoustic signals containing multiple propagation modes, which overlap and superimpose in the time domain signal. By combining time-frequency analysis with a broadband acoustic excitation source, the dispersion of multiple Lamb modes over a wide frequency range can be determined from as little as a single measurement. In addition, the technique provides a direct measurement of the group velocity dispersion. The technique was first demonstrated in the analysis of a simulated waveform in an aluminum plate in which the Lamb mode dispersion was well known. Portions of the dispersion curves of the AO, A I , So, and S2 Lamb modes were obtained from this one waveform. The technique was also applied for the analysis of experimental waveforms from a unidirectional graphite/epoxy composite plate. Measurements were made both along and perpendicular to the fiber direction. In this case, the signals contained only the lowest order symmetric and antisymmetric modes. A least squares fit of the results from several source to detector distances was used. Theoretical dispersion curves were calculated and are shown to be in good agreement with experimental results.

  20. Time-Frequency Analysis of the Dispersion of Lamb Modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prosser, W. H.; Seale, Michael D.; Smith, Barry T.

    1999-01-01

    Accurate knowledge of the velocity dispersion of Lamb modes is important for ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation methods used in detecting and locating flaws in thin plates and in determining their elastic stiffness coefficients. Lamb mode dispersion is also important in the acoustic emission technique for accurately triangulating the location of emissions in thin plates. In this research, the ability to characterize Lamb mode dispersion through a time-frequency analysis (the pseudo Wigner-Ville distribution) was demonstrated. A major advantage of time-frequency methods is the ability to analyze acoustic signals containing multiple propagation modes, which overlap and superimpose in the time domain signal. By combining time-frequency analysis with a broadband acoustic excitation source, the dispersion of multiple Lamb modes over a wide frequency range can be determined from as little as a single measurement. In addition, the technique provides a direct measurement of the group velocity dispersion. The technique was first demonstrated in the analysis of a simulated waveform in an aluminum plate in which the Lamb mode dispersion was well known. Portions of the dispersion curves of the A(sub 0), A(sub 1), S(sub 0), and S(sub 2)Lamb modes were obtained from this one waveform. The technique was also applied for the analysis of experimental waveforms from a unidirectional graphite/epoxy composite plate. Measurements were made both along, and perpendicular to the fiber direction. In this case, the signals contained only the lowest order symmetric and antisymmetric modes. A least squares fit of the results from several source to detector distances was used. Theoretical dispersion curves were calculated and are shown to be in good agreement with experimental results.

  1. Mode Analysis with Autocorrelation Method (Single Time Series) in Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saadat, Shervin; Salem, Mohammad K.; Goranneviss, Mahmoud; Khorshid, Pejman

    2010-08-01

    In this paper plasma mode analyzed with statistical method that designated Autocorrelation function. Auto correlation function used from one time series, so for this purpose we need one Minov coil. After autocorrelation analysis on mirnov coil data, spectral density diagram is plotted. Spectral density diagram from symmetries and trends can analyzed plasma mode. RHF fields effects with this method ate investigated in IR-T1 tokamak and results corresponded with multichannel methods such as SVD and FFT.

  2. Time-Frequency Analysis of the Dispersion of Lamb Modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prosser, W. H.; Seale, Michael D.; Smith, Barry T.

    1999-01-01

    Accurate knowledge of the velocity dispersion of Lamb modes is important for ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation methods used in detecting and locating flaws in thin plates and in determining their elastic stiffness coefficients. Lamb mode dispersion is also important in the acoustic emission technique for accurately triangulating the location of emissions in thin plates. In this research, the ability to characterize Lamb mode dispersion through a time-frequency analysis (the pseudo-Wigner-Ville distribution) was demonstrated. A major advantage of time-frequency methods is the ability to analyze acoustic signals containing multiple propagation modes, which overlap and superimpose in the time domain signal. By combining time-frequency analysis with a broadband acoustic excitation source, the dispersion of multiple Lamb modes over a wide frequency range can be determined from as little as a single measurement. In addition, the technique provides a direct measurement of the group velocity dispersion. The technique was first demonstrated in the analysis of a simulated waveform in an aluminum plate in which the Lamb mode dispersion was well known. Portions of the dispersion curves of the AO, A I , So, and S2 Lamb modes were obtained from this one waveform. The technique was also applied for the analysis of experimental waveforms from a unidirectional graphite/epoxy composite plate. Measurements were made both along and perpendicular to the fiber direction. In this case, the signals contained only the lowest order symmetric and antisymmetric modes. A least squares fit of the results from several source to detector distances was used. Theoretical dispersion curves were calculated and are shown to be in good agreement with experimental results.

  3. Genome-Wide Analysis of Human MicroRNA Stability

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yang; Li, Zhixin; Zhou, Shixin; Wen, Jinhua; Geng, Bin; Yang, Jichun; Cui, Qinghua

    2013-01-01

    Increasing studies have shown that microRNA (miRNA) stability plays important roles in physiology. However, the global picture of miRNA stability remains largely unknown. Here, we had analyzed genome-wide miRNA stability across 10 diverse cell types using miRNA arrays. We found that miRNA stability shows high dynamics and diversity both within individual cells and across cell types. Strikingly, we observed a negative correlation between miRNA stability and miRNA expression level, which is different from current findings on other biological molecules such as proteins and mRNAs that show positive and not negative correlations between stability and expression level. This finding indicates that miRNA has a distinct action mode, which we called “rapid production, rapid turnover; slow production, slow turnover.” This mode further suggests that high expression miRNAs normally degrade fast and may endow the cell with special properties that facilitate cellular status-transition. Moreover, we revealed that the stability of miRNAs is affected by cohorts of factors that include miRNA targets, transcription factors, nucleotide content, evolution, associated disease, and environmental factors. Together, our results provided an extensive description of the global landscape, dynamics, and distinct mode of human miRNA stability, which provide help in investigating their functions in physiology and pathophysiology. PMID:24187663

  4. Stability Analysis of a Nonlinear System Stabilizing Controller for an Integrated Power System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-01-01

    Survivability: Task 3 Final Report, January 16, 2002. 15. Ibid. 16. Ibid. 17. Ibid. 18. Sudhoff, S., Schmucker, D., Youngs, R., Hegner H. “Stability...ESAC DC Stability Toolbox Version 2.1, January 16, 2002, Release. Sudhoff, S., Schmucker, D., Youngs, R., Hegner H. “Stability Analysis of DC...

  5. Failure Mode, Effects, and Criticality Analysis (FMECA)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-04-01

    necessary to effect repair. Indenture Levels: The levels which identify or describe the relative complexity of an assembly or function. Local Effect...FMECA 9 3.0 FMEA ANALYSIS TECHNIQUES The FMEA can be implemented using a hardware or functional approach. Often, due to system complexity , the FMEA...will be performed as a combination of the two types. The complexity of each design, its state of development and the data available, will dictate the

  6. Stability analysis for laminar flow control, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benney, D. J.; Orszag, S. A.

    1977-01-01

    The basic equations for the stability analysis of flow over three dimensional swept wings are developed and numerical methods for their solution are surveyed. The equations for nonlinear stability analysis of three dimensional disturbances in compressible, three dimensional, nonparallel flows are given. Efficient and accurate numerical methods for the solution of the equations of stability theory were surveyed and analyzed.

  7. Liner stability analysis of the two-dimensional Taylor-Green vortices in a stratified flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Shota; Hirota, Makoto; Hattori, Yuji

    2015-11-01

    The linear stability of the two-dimensional Taylor-Green vortices in a stratified fluid is studied by modal stability analysis and short-wavelength stability analysis. By modal stability analysis it is found that the growth rate of the most unstable mode depends on the horizontal Froude number Fh and the stratification effects on the growth rate change as Fh becomes small or stratification becomes strong. There are three regions of Fh where the stratification effects are different: the stabilizing region where the elliptic instability is dominant at large Fh, the region where the growth rate has maximum, the slightly destabilizing region where the zigzag instability is dominant at small Fh. In order to reveal the mechanism of the behavior of the growth rate in the second region, we investigate the local stability of the flow near the vortex center and the flow near the boundaries between vortices by short-wavelength analysis. As a result, it is found that the competition between stabilizing elliptic instability near the vortex center and destabilizing hyperbolic instability near the boundaries occurs in the weakly stratified region. The relation between modal stability and the competition of short-wavelength stabilities will be discussed.

  8. Procedure for Failure Mode, Effects, and Criticality Analysis (FMECA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    This document provides guidelines for the accomplishment of Failure Mode, Effects, and Criticality Analysis (FMECA) on the Apollo program. It is a procedure for analysis of hardware items to determine those items contributing most to system unreliability and crew safety problems.

  9. A fresh look at electron cyclotron current drive power requirements for stabilization of tearing modes in ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Haye, R. J.

    2015-12-01

    ITER is an international project to design and build an experimental fusion reactor based on the "tokamak" concept. ITER relies upon localized electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) at the rational safety factor q=2 to suppress or stabilize the expected poloidal mode m=2, toroidal mode n=1 neoclassical tearing mode (NTM) islands. Such islands if unmitigated degrade energy confinement, lock to the resistive wall (stop rotating), cause loss of "H-mode" and induce disruption. The International Tokamak Physics Activity (ITPA) on MHD, Disruptions and Magnetic Control joint experiment group MDC-8 on Current Drive Prevention/Stabilization of Neoclassical Tearing Modes started in 2005, after which assessments were made for the requirements for ECCD needed in ITER, particularly that of rf power and alignment on q=2 [1]. Narrow well-aligned rf current parallel to and of order of one percent of the total plasma current is needed to replace the "missing" current in the island O-points and heal or preempt (avoid destabilization by applying ECCD on q=2 in absence of the mode) the island [2-4]. This paper updates the advances in ECCD stabilization on NTMs learned in DIII-D experiments and modeling during the last 5 to 10 years as applies to stabilization by localized ECCD of tearing modes in ITER. This includes the ECCD (inside the q=1 radius) stabilization of the NTM "seeding" instability known as sawteeth (m/n=1/1) [5]. Recent measurements in DIII-D show that the ITER-similar current profile is classically unstable, curvature stabilization must not be neglected, and the small island width stabilization effect from helical ion polarization currents is stronger than was previously thought [6]. The consequences of updated assumptions in ITER modeling of the minimum well-aligned ECCD power needed are all-in-all favorable (and well-within the ITER 24 gyrotron capability) when all effects are included. However, a "wild card" may be broadening of the localized ECCD by the presence of

  10. Truck Roll Stability Data Collection and Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, SS

    2001-07-02

    The principal objective of this project was to collect and analyze vehicle and highway data that are relevant to the problem of truck rollover crashes, and in particular to the subset of rollover crashes that are caused by the driver error of entering a curve at a speed too great to allow safe completion of the turn. The data are of two sorts--vehicle dynamic performance data, and highway geometry data as revealed by vehicle behavior in normal driving. Vehicle dynamic performance data are relevant because the roll stability of a tractor trailer depends both on inherent physical characteristics of the vehicle and on the weight and distribution of the particular cargo that is being carried. Highway geometric data are relevant because the set of crashes of primary interest to this study are caused by lateral acceleration demand in a curve that exceeds the instantaneous roll stability of the vehicle. An analysis of data quality requires an evaluation of the equipment used to collect the data because the reliability and accuracy of both the equipment and the data could profoundly affect the safety of the driver and other highway users. Therefore, a concomitant objective was an evaluation of the performance of the set of data-collection equipment on the truck and trailer. The objective concerning evaluation of the equipment was accomplished, but the results were not entirely positive. Significant engineering apparently remains to be done before a reliable system can be fielded. Problems were identified with the trailer to tractor fiber optic connector used for this test. In an over-the-road environment, the communication between the trailer instrumentation and the tractor must be dependable. In addition, the computer in the truck must be able to withstand the rigors of the road. The major objective--data collection and analysis--was also accomplished. Using data collected by instruments on the truck, a ''bad-curve'' database can be generated. Using this database

  11. Bounded Linear Stability Margin Analysis of Nonlinear Hybrid Adaptive Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Nhan T.; Boskovic, Jovan D.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a bounded linear stability analysis for a hybrid adaptive control that blends both direct and indirect adaptive control. Stability and convergence of nonlinear adaptive control are analyzed using an approximate linear equivalent system. A stability margin analysis shows that a large adaptive gain can lead to a reduced phase margin. This method can enable metrics-driven adaptive control whereby the adaptive gain is adjusted to meet stability margin requirements.

  12. Perpendicular wavenumber dependence of the linear stability of global ion temperature gradient modes on E × B flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, P.; Saarelma, S.; McMillan, B.; Peeters, A.; Verwichte, E.

    2012-06-01

    Sheared E × B flows are known to stabilize turbulence. This paper investigates how the linear stability of the ion-temperature-gradient (ITG) mode depends on k⊥ in both circular and MHD geometry. We study the effects of both rotation profiles of constant shear and of purely toroidal flow taken from experiment, using the global gyrokinetic particle-in-cell code NEMORB. We find that in order to effectively stabilize the linear mode, the fastest growing mode requires a shearing rate (γE) around 1-2 times its linear growth rate without flow (γ0), while both longer and shorter wavelength modes need much larger flow shear compared with their static linear growth rates. Modes with kθρi < 0.2 need γE as much as 10 times their γ0. This variation exists in both large-aspect ratio circular cross-section and small-aspect ratio MHD geometries, with both analytic constant shear and experimental flow profiles. There is an asymmetry in the suppression with respect to the sign of γE, due to competition between equilibrium profile variation and flow shear. The maximum growth rate for cases using the experimental profile in MAST equilibria occurs at shearing rates of 10% the experimental level.

  13. Combined effects of trapped energetic ions and resistive layer damping on the stability of the resistive wall mode

    SciTech Connect

    He, Yuling; Liu, Yue E-mail: liuyue@dlut.edu.cn; Liu, Chao; Xia, Guoliang; Liu, Yueqiang E-mail: liuyue@dlut.edu.cn; Wang, Aike; Hao, Guangzhou; Li, Li; Cui, Shaoyan

    2016-01-15

    A dispersion relation is derived for the stability of the resistive wall mode (RWM), which includes both the resistive layer damping physics and the toroidal precession drift resonance damping from energetic ions in tokamak plasmas. The dispersion relation is numerically solved for a model plasma, for the purpose of systematic investigation of the RWM stability in multi-dimensional plasma parameter space including the plasma resistivity, the radial location of the resistive wall, as well as the toroidal flow velocity. It is found that the toroidal favorable average curvature in the resistive layer contributes a significant stabilization of the RWM. This stabilization is further enhanced by adding the drift kinetic contribution from energetic ions. Furthermore, two traditionally assumed inner layer models are considered and compared in the dispersion relation, resulting in different predictions for the stability of the RWM.

  14. Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA): A Bibliography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA) is a bottom-up analytical process that identifies process hazards, which helps managers understand vulnerabilities of systems, as well as assess and mitigate risk. It is one of several engineering tools and techniques available to program and project managers aimed at increasing the likelihood of safe and successful NASA programs and missions. This bibliography references 465 documents in the NASA STI Database that contain the major concepts, failure modes or failure analysis, in either the basic index of the major subject terms.

  15. Failure mode analysis of a spacecraft power system

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.R.

    1995-12-31

    For the spacecraft power system`s dynamic analyses, dc/dc converters are usually modeled with a linearized model using the state space averaging technique. The linearized model can be used for small-signal ac and transient analyses. However, since the linearized model has limitations in its accuracies, certain types of transient analyses including a failure mode must be performed by using a more accurate cycle-by-cycle model. In this paper, a failure mode analysis is presented with a small-signal analysis and corresponding transient simulations.

  16. Oscillation mode analysis considering the interaction between a DFIG-based wind turbine and the grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Wangping; Xie, Da; Lu, Yupu; Zhao, Zuyi; Yu, Songtao

    2017-01-01

    Sub-synchronous interactions between wind farms and transmission networks with series compensation have drawn great attention. As most large wind farms in Europe and Asia employ doubly fed induction generator turbines, there has recently been a growing interest in studying this phenomenon. To study the stability of wind turbine with doubly fed induction generator after a small disturbance, a complete small signal system is built in this paper. By using eigenvalue and participation factor analysis, the relation between the modes and state variables can be discovered. Thereafter, the oscillation modes are classified into electrical resonance, sub-synchronous resonance, sub-synchronous oscillation, sub-synchronous control interaction, and low frequency oscillation. To verify the oscillation frequency of each oscillation mode, time-domain simulation based on MATLAB/Simulink is presented. The simulation results justify the effectiveness of the small-signal models.

  17. Kinetic stability analysis on electromagnetic filamentary structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Wonjae; Krasheninnikov, Sergei

    2014-10-01

    A coherent radial transport of filamentary structures in SOL region is important for its characteristics that can increase unwanted high fluxes to plasma facing components. In the course of propagation in radial direction, the coherency of the filaments is significantly limited by electrostatic resistive drift instability (Angus et al., 2012). Considering higher plasma pressure, which would have more large impact in heat fluxes, electromagnetic effects will reduce the growth rate of the drift wave instability and increase the instabilities from electron inertial effects. According to a linear stability analysis on equations with fluid approximation, the maximum growth rate of the instability from the electron inertia is higher than that of drift-Alfvén wave instability in high beta filaments such as ELMs. However, the analysis on the high beta filaments requires kinetic approach, since the decreased collisionality will make the fluid approximation broken. Therefore, the kinetic analysis will be presented for the electromagnetic effects on the dynamics of filamentary structures. This work was supported by the USDOE Grants DE-FG02-04ER54739 and DE-SC0010413 at UCSD and also by the Kwanjeong Educational Foundation.

  18. Power System Transient Stability Analysis through a Homotopy Analysis Method

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Shaobu; Du, Pengwei; Zhou, Ning

    2014-04-01

    As an important function of energy management systems (EMSs), online contingency analysis plays an important role in providing power system security warnings of instability. At present, N-1 contingency analysis still relies on time-consuming numerical integration. To save computational cost, the paper proposes a quasi-analytical method to evaluate transient stability through time domain periodic solutions’ frequency sensitivities against initial values. First, dynamic systems described in classical models are modified into damping free systems whose solutions are either periodic or expanded (non-convergent). Second, because the sensitivities experience sharp changes when periodic solutions vanish and turn into expanded solutions, transient stability is assessed using the sensitivity. Third, homotopy analysis is introduced to extract frequency information and evaluate the sensitivities only from initial values so that time consuming numerical integration is avoided. Finally, a simple case is presented to demonstrate application of the proposed method, and simulation results show that the proposed method is promising.

  19. Stabilized and tunable single-longitudinal-mode erbium fiber laser employing ytterbium-doped fiber based interference filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Chien-Hung; Tsai, Ning; Zhuang, Yuan-Hong; Chow, Chi-Wai; Chen, Jing-Heng

    2017-02-01

    In this demonstration, to achieve stabilized and wavelength-selectable single-longitudinal-mode (SLM) erbium-doped fiber (EDF) laser, a short length of ytterbium-doped fiber (YDF) is utilized to serve as a spatial multi-mode interference (MMI) inside a fiber cavity for suppressing multi-longitudinal-mode (MLM) significantly. In the measurement, the output powers and optical signal to noise ratios (OSNRs) of proposed EDF ring laser are measured between -9.85 and -5.71 dBm; and 38.03 and 47.95 dB, respectively, in the tuning range of 1530.0-1560.0 nm. In addition, the output SLM and stability performance are also analyzed and discussed experimentally.

  20. A fresh look at electron cyclotron current drive power requirements for stabilization of tearing modes in ITER

    SciTech Connect

    La Haye, R. J.

    2015-12-10

    ITER is an international project to design and build an experimental fusion reactor based on the “tokamak” concept. ITER relies upon localized electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) at the rational safety factor q=2 to suppress or stabilize the expected poloidal mode m=2, toroidal mode n=1 neoclassical tearing mode (NTM) islands. Such islands if unmitigated degrade energy confinement, lock to the resistive wall (stop rotating), cause loss of “H-mode” and induce disruption. The International Tokamak Physics Activity (ITPA) on MHD, Disruptions and Magnetic Control joint experiment group MDC-8 on Current Drive Prevention/Stabilization of Neoclassical Tearing Modes started in 2005, after which assessments were made for the requirements for ECCD needed in ITER, particularly that of rf power and alignment on q=2 [1]. Narrow well-aligned rf current parallel to and of order of one percent of the total plasma current is needed to replace the “missing” current in the island O-points and heal or preempt (avoid destabilization by applying ECCD on q=2 in absence of the mode) the island [2-4]. This paper updates the advances in ECCD stabilization on NTMs learned in DIII-D experiments and modeling during the last 5 to 10 years as applies to stabilization by localized ECCD of tearing modes in ITER. This includes the ECCD (inside the q=1 radius) stabilization of the NTM “seeding” instability known as sawteeth (m/n=1/1) [5]. Recent measurements in DIII-D show that the ITER-similar current profile is classically unstable, curvature stabilization must not be neglected, and the small island width stabilization effect from helical ion polarization currents is stronger than was previously thought [6]. The consequences of updated assumptions in ITER modeling of the minimum well-aligned ECCD power needed are all-in-all favorable (and well-within the ITER 24 gyrotron capability) when all effects are included. However, a “wild card” may be broadening of the localized

  1. Flexible Launch Vehicle Stability Analysis Using Steady and Unsteady Computational Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartels, Robert E.

    2012-01-01

    Launch vehicles frequently experience a reduced stability margin through the transonic Mach number range. This reduced stability margin can be caused by the aerodynamic undamping one of the lower-frequency flexible or rigid body modes. Analysis of the behavior of a flexible vehicle is routinely performed with quasi-steady aerodynamic line loads derived from steady rigid aerodynamics. However, a quasi-steady aeroelastic stability analysis can be unconservative at the critical Mach numbers, where experiment or unsteady computational aeroelastic analysis show a reduced or even negative aerodynamic damping.Amethod of enhancing the quasi-steady aeroelastic stability analysis of a launch vehicle with unsteady aerodynamics is developed that uses unsteady computational fluid dynamics to compute the response of selected lower-frequency modes. The response is contained in a time history of the vehicle line loads. A proper orthogonal decomposition of the unsteady aerodynamic line-load response is used to reduce the scale of data volume and system identification is used to derive the aerodynamic stiffness, damping, and mass matrices. The results are compared with the damping and frequency computed from unsteady computational aeroelasticity and from a quasi-steady analysis. The results show that incorporating unsteady aerodynamics in this way brings the enhanced quasi-steady aeroelastic stability analysis into close agreement with the unsteady computational aeroelastic results.

  2. Models and Stability Analysis of Boiling Water Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    John Dorning

    2002-04-15

    We have studied the nuclear-coupled thermal-hydraulic stability of boiling water reactors (BWRs) using a model that includes: space-time modal neutron kinetics based on spatial w-modes; single- and two-phase flow in parallel boiling channels; fuel rod heat conduction dynamics; and a simple model of the recirculation loop. The BR model is represented by a set of time-dependent nonlinear ordinary differential equations, and is studied as a dynamical system using the modern bifurcation theory and nonlinear dynamical systems analysis. We first determine the stability boundary (SB) - or Hopf bifurcation set- in the most relevant parameter plane, the inlet-subcooling-number/external-pressure-drop plane, for a fixed control rod induced external reactivity equal to the 100% rod line value; then we transform the SB to the practical power-flow map used by BWR operating engineers and regulatory agencies. Using this SB, we show that the normal operating point at 100% power is very stable, that stability of points on the 100% rod line decreases as the flow rate is reduced, and that operating points in the low-flow/high-power region are least stable. We also determine the SB that results when the modal kinetics is replaced by simple point reactor kinetics, and we thereby show that the first harmonic mode does not have a significant effect on the SB. However, we later show that it nevertheless has a significant effect on stability because it affects the basin of attraction of stable operating points. Using numerical simulations we show that, in the important low-flow/high-power region, the Hopf bifurcation that occurs as the SB is crossed is subcritical; hence, growing oscillations can result following small finite perturbations of stable steady-states on the 100% rod line at points in the low-flow/high-power region. Numerical simulations are also performed to calculate the decay ratios (DRs) and frequencies of oscillations for various points on the 100% rod line. It is

  3. Criterion for stability of Goldstone modes and Fermi liquid behavior in a metal with broken symmetry

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Haruki; Vishwanath, Ashvin

    2014-01-01

    There are few general physical principles that protect the low-energy excitations of a quantum phase. Of these, Goldstone’s theorem and Landau–Fermi liquid theory are the most relevant to solids. We investigate the stability of the resulting gapless excitations—Nambu–Goldstone bosons (NGBs) and Landau quasiparticles—when coupled to one another, which is of direct relevance to metals with a broken continuous symmetry. Typically, the coupling between NGBs and Landau quasiparticles vanishes at low energies, leaving the gapless modes unaffected. If, however, the low-energy coupling is nonvanishing, non-Fermi liquid behavior and overdamped bosons are expected. Here we prove a general criterion that specifies when the coupling is nonvanishing. It is satisfied by the case of a nematic Fermi fluid, consistent with earlier microscopic calculations. In addition, the criterion identifies a new kind of symmetry breaking—of magnetic translations—where nonvanishing couplings should arise, opening a previously unidentified route to realizing non-Fermi liquid phases. PMID:25349386

  4. Aeroelastic Stability of Rotor Blades Using Finite Element Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chopra, I.; Sivaneri, N.

    1982-01-01

    The flutter stability of flap bending, lead-lag bending, and torsion of helicopter rotor blades in hover is investigated using a finite element formulation based on Hamilton's principle. The blade is divided into a number of finite elements. Quasi-steady strip theory is used to evaluate the aerodynamic loads. The nonlinear equations of motion are solved for steady-state blade deflections through an iterative procedure. The equations of motion are linearized assuming blade motion to be a small perturbation about the steady deflected shape. The normal mode method based on the coupled rotating natural modes is used to reduce the number of equations in the flutter analysis. First the formulation is applied to single-load-path blades (articulated and hingeless blades). Numerical results show very good agreement with existing results obtained using the modal approach. The second part of the application concerns multiple-load-path blades, i.e. bearingless blades. Numerical results are presented for several analytical models of the bearingless blade. Results are also obtained using an equivalent beam approach wherein a bearingless blade is modelled as a single beam with equivalent properties. Results show the equivalent beam model.

  5. Increasing the Margin of Stability of Arbitrarily Finite Modes of Flexible Large Space Structures with Damping

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-12-01

    problems: (i) exact boundary controllability for waves and plates: (ii) uniform stabilization ( linear case) and strong stabilization (nonlinear case) by a...investigators in [L- T.10). (ii) Boundary feedback stabilization Linear case: uniform stabilization The principal investigators results on uniform

  6. An improved method for risk evaluation in failure modes and effects analysis of CNC lathe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rachieru, N.; Belu, N.; Anghel, D. C.

    2015-11-01

    Failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) is one of the most popular reliability analysis tools for identifying, assessing and eliminating potential failure modes in a wide range of industries. In general, failure modes in FMEA are evaluated and ranked through the risk priority number (RPN), which is obtained by the multiplication of crisp values of the risk factors, such as the occurrence (O), severity (S), and detection (D) of each failure mode. However, the crisp RPN method has been criticized to have several deficiencies. In this paper, linguistic variables, expressed in Gaussian, trapezoidal or triangular fuzzy numbers, are used to assess the ratings and weights for the risk factors S, O and D. A new risk assessment system based on the fuzzy set theory and fuzzy rule base theory is to be applied to assess and rank risks associated to failure modes that could appear in the functioning of Turn 55 Lathe CNC. Two case studies have been shown to demonstrate the methodology thus developed. It is illustrated a parallel between the results obtained by the traditional method and fuzzy logic for determining the RPNs. The results show that the proposed approach can reduce duplicated RPN numbers and get a more accurate, reasonable risk assessment. As a result, the stability of product and process can be assured.

  7. Propofol sedation Quality and safety. Failure mode and effects analysis.

    PubMed

    Huergo Fernández, Adrián; Amor Martín, Pedro; Fernández Cadenas, Fernando

    2017-08-01

    Sedation is a key component of digestive endoscopy. While ensuring procedural safety and quality represents a primary goal, a detailed assessment of patient-focused risks and improvements is lacking on most occasions. Failure mode and effect analysis (FMEA) is a useful tool in this context as a means of raising barriers and defense mechanisms to prevent adverse events from developing.

  8. Mode Deactivation Therapy (MDT) Family Therapy: A Theoretical Case Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Apsche, J. A.; Ward Bailey, S. R.

    2004-01-01

    This case study presents a theoretical analysis of implementing mode deactivation therapy (MDT) (Apsche & Ward Bailey, 2003) family therapy with a 13 year old Caucasian male. MDT is a form of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) that combines the balance of dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) (Linehan, 1993), the importance of perception from…

  9. Laser dissection sampling modes for direct mass spectral analysis.

    PubMed

    Cahill, John F; Kertesz, Vilmos; Van Berkel, Gary J

    2016-03-15

    Laser microdissection coupled directly with mass spectrometry provides the capability of on-line analysis of substrates with high spatial resolution, high collection efficiency, and freedom on shape and size of the sampling area. Establishing the merits and capabilities of the different sampling modes that the system provides is necessary in order to select the best sampling mode for characterizing analytically challenging samples. The capabilities of laser ablation spot sampling, laser ablation raster sampling, and laser 'cut and drop' sampling modes of a hybrid optical microscopy/laser ablation liquid vortex capture electrospray ionization mass spectrometry system were compared for the analysis of single cells and tissue. Single Chlamydomonas reinhardtii cells were monitored for their monogalactosyldiacylglycerol (MGDG) and diacylglyceryltrimethylhomo-Ser (DGTS) lipid content using the laser spot sampling mode, which was capable of ablating individual cells (~4-15 μm) even when agglomerated together. Turbid Allium Cepa cells (~150 μm) having unique shapes difficult to precisely measure using the other sampling modes could be ablated in their entirety using laser raster sampling. Intact microdissections of specific regions of a cocaine-dosed mouse brain tissue were compared using laser 'cut and drop' sampling. Since in laser 'cut and drop' sampling whole and otherwise unmodified sections are captured into the probe, 100% collection efficiencies were achieved. Laser ablation spot sampling has the highest spatial resolution of any sampling mode, while laser ablation raster sampling has the highest sampling area adaptability of the sampling modes. Laser ablation spot sampling has the highest spatial resolution of any sampling mode, useful in this case for the analysis of single cells. Laser ablation raster sampling was best for sampling regions with unique shapes that are difficult to measure using other sampling modes. Laser 'cut and drop' sampling can be used for

  10. Design and analysis of a mode B and mode JD satellite Earth station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hance, Dennis J.

    1994-06-01

    This thesis focuses on the design, integration, and analysis of an amateur radio service mode B and mode JD satellite earth station. Preliminary designs were investigated to determine the optimum configuration for the earth station. Modern digital modems, cabling structures, an 80386-based computer system, satellite tracking software, transmission and reception antennas, preamplifiers, and sophisticated performance measurement technologies were integrated into a functioning earth station. Initially, component availability and station design dictated the selection and acquisition of the requisite station equipment, integration of the transmitter, receiver preamplifiers, antennas, and computer equipment followed. Preliminary testing of the various components in the integration station occupied a significant amount of time. Empirical test tracking of different amateur and commercial satellites verified proper operation of the earth station. Results are discussed throughout this thesis.

  11. Metallurgy, thermal stability, and failure mode of the commercial Bi-Te-based thermoelectric modules.

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Nancy Y. C.; Morales, Alfredo Martin

    2009-02-01

    Bi-Te-based thermoelectric (TE) alloys are excellent candidates for power generation modules. We are interested in reliable TE modules for long-term use at or below 200 C. It is known that the metallurgical characteristics of TE materials and of interconnect components affect the performance of TE modules. Thus, we have conducted an extensive scientific investigation of several commercial TE modules to determine whether they meet our technical requirements. Our main focus is on the metallurgy and thermal stability of (Bi,Sb){sup 2}(Te,Se){sup 3} TE compounds and of other materials used in TE modules in the temperature range between 25 C and 200 C. Our study confirms the material suite used in the construction of TE modules. The module consists of three major components: AlN cover plates; electrical interconnects; and the TE legs, P-doped (Bi{sub 8}Sb{sub 32})(Te{sub 60}) and N-doped (Bi{sub 37}Sb{sub 3})(Te{sub 56}Se{sub 4}). The interconnect assembly contains Sn (Sb {approx} 1wt%) solder, sandwiched between Cu conductor with Ni diffusion barriers on the outside. Potential failure modes of the TE modules in this temperature range were discovered and analyzed. The results show that the metallurgical characteristics of the alloys used in the P and N legs are stable up to 200 C. However, whole TE modules are thermally unstable at temperatures above 160 C, lower than the nominal melting point of the solder suggested by the manufacture. Two failure modes were observed when they were heated above 160 C: solder melting and flowing out of the interconnect assembly; and solder reacting with the TE leg, causing dimensional swelling of the TE legs. The reaction of the solder with the TE leg occurs as the lack of a nickel diffusion barrier on the side of the TE leg where the displaced solder and/or the preexisting solder beads is directly contact the TE material. This study concludes that the present TE modules are not suitable for long-term use at temperatures above 160 C due

  12. Stability analysis of the pulmonary liquid bilayer.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halpern, David; Grotberg, James

    2010-11-01

    The lung consists of liquid-lined compliant airways that convey air to and from the alveoli where gas exchange takes place. Because the airways are coated with a bilayer consisting of a mucus layer on top of a periciliary fluid layer, a surface tension instability can generate flows within the bilayer and induce the formation of liquid plugs that block the passage of air. This is a problem for example with premature neonates whose lungs do not produce sufficient quantities of surfactant and suffer from respiratory distress syndrome. To study this instability a system of coupled nonlinear evolution equations are derived using lubrication theory for the thicknesses of the two liquid layers which are assumed to be Newtonian. A normal mode analysis is used to investigate the initial growth of the disturbances, and reveals how the grow rate is affected by the ratio of viscosities λ, film thicknesses η and surface tensions δ of the two layers which can change by disease. Numerical solutions of the evolution equations show that there is a critical bilayer thickness ɛc above which closure occurs, and that a more viscous and thicker layer compared to the periciliary layer closes more slowly. However, ɛcis weakly dependent on λ, η and δ. We also examine the potential impact of wall shear stress and normal stress on cell damage. This work is funded by NIH HL85156.

  13. Stabilizing Effect of Resistivity towards ELM-free H-mode Discharge in Lithium-conditioned NSTX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Debabrata; Zhu, Ping; Maingi, Rajesh

    2016-10-01

    The stabilizing effect of edge resistivity on the edge localized modes (ELMs) has been recently recovered through analyzing NSTX experimental profiles of Lithium-conditioned ELM-free H-mode discharge. Comparative studies of ELM-free and a reference NSTX ELMy-H mode equilibriums have been performed using both resistive and 2-fluid MHD models implemented in the initial value extended MHD code NIMROD. Our results indicate that in addition to the pedestal profile refinement in electron pressure, the inclusion of enhanced resistivity due to the increase in the effective electric charge number Zeff, which is observed after Lithium-conditioning in experiment, is further required to account for the full stabilization of the low- n edge localized modes. Such a stabilization from the enhanced edge resistivity only becomes effective when the two-fluid diamagnetic and finite-Larmor-radius (FLR) effects are considered in the MHD model. Supported by the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Program of China under Grant Nos. 2014GB124002 and 2015GB101004, the 100 Talent Program and the President International Fellowship Initiative of the Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  14. A New Method for Shear Stabilization of Advanced Tokamak Reactors via Mode Converted Ion Bernstein Waves*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sund, Richard; Scharer, John

    2002-11-01

    We examine a new method for generating sheared flows in advanced tokamak D-T reactors with the goal of creating and controlling internal transport barriers. Ion-Bernstein waves (IBWs) have the recognized capacity to create internal transport barriers through sheared plasma flows resulting from ion absorption. Under reactor conditions, the IBW can be generated by mode conversion of a fast magnetosonic wave incident from the high-field side (HFS) on the second harmonic resonance of a minority hydrogen component, with near 100200 MHz) minimizes parasitic absorption and permits the converted IBW to approach the fifth tritium harmonic. It also facilitates compact antennas and feeds, and efficient fast wave launch. Placement of the 5T absorption layer on the HFS is advantageous for shear production. The scheme is applicable to reactors with aspect ratio < 3 such that the conversion and absorption layers are both on the high field side of the magnetic axis. Various factors (adequate separation of the mode conversion layer from the magnetic axis, concentration of the fast wave near the midplane, large machine size, and plasma elongation) minimize poloidal field effects in the conversion zone and permit a slab analysis. We use a 1-D full-wave code to analyze the conversion and absorption. A 2-D ray-tracing code incorporating poloidal magnetic fields is used to follow the IBW for various equilibria. Within this analysis a weak bean shape appears most favorable. This is an attractive scheme for future advanced tokamak reactors. *Research supported by the Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison

  15. Influence of pH Regulation Mode in Glucose Fermentation on Product Selection and Process Stability.

    PubMed

    Mohd-Zaki, Zuhaida; Bastidas-Oyanedel, Juan R; Lu, Yang; Hoelzle, Robert; Pratt, Steven; Slater, Fran R; Batstone, Damien J

    2016-01-04

    Mixed culture anaerobic fermentation generates a wide range of products from simple sugars, and is potentially an effective process for producing renewable commodity chemicals. However it is difficult to predict product spectrum, and to control the process. One of the key control handles is pH, but the response is commonly dependent on culture history. In this work, we assess the impact of pH regulation mode on the product spectrum. Two regulation modes were applied: in the first, pH was adjusted from 4.5 to 8.5 in progressive steps of 0.5 and in the second, covered the same pH range, but the pH was reset to 5.5 before each change. Acetate, butyrate, and ethanol were produced throughout all pH ranges, but there was a shift from butyrate at pH < 6.5 to ethanol at pH > 6.5, as well as a strong and consistent shift from hydrogen to formate as pH increased. Microbial analysis indicated that progressive pH resulted in dominance by Klebsiella, while reset pH resulted in a bias towards Clostridium spp., particularly at low pH, with higher variance in community between different pH levels. Reset pH was more responsive to changes in pH, and analysis of Gibbs free energy indicated that the reset pH experiments operated closer to thermodynamic equilibrium, particularly with respect to the formate/hydrogen balance. This may indicate that periodically resetting pH conforms better to thermodynamic expectations.

  16. Influence of pH Regulation Mode in Glucose Fermentation on Product Selection and Process Stability

    PubMed Central

    Mohd-Zaki, Zuhaida; Bastidas-Oyanedel, Juan R.; Lu, Yang; Hoelzle, Robert; Pratt, Steven; Slater, Fran R.; Batstone, Damien J.

    2016-01-01

    Mixed culture anaerobic fermentation generates a wide range of products from simple sugars, and is potentially an effective process for producing renewable commodity chemicals. However it is difficult to predict product spectrum, and to control the process. One of the key control handles is pH, but the response is commonly dependent on culture history. In this work, we assess the impact of pH regulation mode on the product spectrum. Two regulation modes were applied: in the first, pH was adjusted from 4.5 to 8.5 in progressive steps of 0.5 and in the second, covered the same pH range, but the pH was reset to 5.5 before each change. Acetate, butyrate, and ethanol were produced throughout all pH ranges, but there was a shift from butyrate at pH < 6.5 to ethanol at pH > 6.5, as well as a strong and consistent shift from hydrogen to formate as pH increased. Microbial analysis indicated that progressive pH resulted in dominance by Klebsiella, while reset pH resulted in a bias towards Clostridium spp., particularly at low pH, with higher variance in community between different pH levels. Reset pH was more responsive to changes in pH, and analysis of Gibbs free energy indicated that the reset pH experiments operated closer to thermodynamic equilibrium, particularly with respect to the formate/hydrogen balance. This may indicate that periodically resetting pH conforms better to thermodynamic expectations. PMID:27681895

  17. Optical Frequency Metrology of an Iodine-Stabilized He-Ne Laser Using the Frequency Comb of a Quantum-Interference-Stabilized Mode-Locked Laser

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Ryan P.; Roos, Peter A.; Wahlstrand, Jared K.; Pipis, Jessica A.; Rivas, Maria Belmonte; Cundiff, Steven T.

    2007-01-01

    We perform optical frequency metrology of an iodine-stabilized He-Ne laser using a mode-locked Ti:sapphire laser frequency comb that is stabilized using quantum interference of photocurrents in a semiconductor. Using this technique, we demonstrate carrier-envelope offset frequency fluctuations of less than 5 mHz using a 1 s gate time. With the resulting stable frequency comb, we measure the optical frequency of the iodine transition [127I2 R(127) 11-5 i component] to be 473 612 214 712.96 ± 0.66 kHz, well within the uncertainty of the CIPM recommended value. The stability of the quantum interference technique is high enough such that it does not limit the measurements. PMID:27110472

  18. 1.55 μm hydrogen cyanide optical frequency-stabilized and 10 GHz repetition-rate-stabilized mode-locked fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Masato; Yoshida, Kazuki; Kasai, Keisuke; Nakazawa, Masataka

    2016-10-17

    We describe a 1.55 μm hydrogen cyanide (HCN) optical frequency and repetition rate stabilized mode-locked fiber laser, where the optical frequency was locked to the P(10) HCN absorption line and the repetition rate was locked to 9.95328 GHz by using a microwave phase-locked loop. The optical frequency stability of the laser reached 5 x 10-11 with an integration time τ of 1 s. With a bidirectional pumping scheme, the laser output power reached 64.6 mW. To obtain a short pulse train, the average dispersion in the cavity was managed so that it was zero around 1.55 μm, resulting in a 0.95 ps pulse train. In addition, the stabilization of the optical frequency and the repetition rate, meant that the entire spectral profile remained the same for 24 hours.

  19. Satellite time series analysis using Empirical Mode Decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pannimpullath, R. Renosh; Doolaeghe, Diane; Loisel, Hubert; Vantrepotte, Vincent; Schmitt, Francois G.

    2016-04-01

    Geophysical fields possess large fluctuations over many spatial and temporal scales. Satellite successive images provide interesting sampling of this spatio-temporal multiscale variability. Here we propose to consider such variability by performing satellite time series analysis, pixel by pixel, using Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD). EMD is a time series analysis technique able to decompose an original time series into a sum of modes, each one having a different mean frequency. It can be used to smooth signals, to extract trends. It is built in a data-adaptative way, and is able to extract information from nonlinear signals. Here we use MERIS Suspended Particulate Matter (SPM) data, on a weekly basis, during 10 years. There are 458 successive time steps. We have selected 5 different regions of coastal waters for the present study. They are Vietnam coastal waters, Brahmaputra region, St. Lawrence, English Channel and McKenzie. These regions have high SPM concentrations due to large scale river run off. Trend and Hurst exponents are derived for each pixel in each region. The energy also extracted using Hilberts Spectral Analysis (HSA) along with EMD method. Normalised energy computed for each mode for each region with the total energy. The total energy computed using all the modes are extracted using EMD method.

  20. On new non-modal hydrodynamic stability modes and resulting non-exponential growth rates - a Lie symmetry approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberlack, Martin; Nold, Andreas; Sanjon, Cedric Wilfried; Wang, Yongqi; Hau, Jan

    2016-11-01

    Classical hydrodynamic stability theory for laminar shear flows, no matter if considering long-term stability or transient growth, is based on the normal-mode ansatz, or, in other words, on an exponential function in space (stream-wise direction) and time. Recently, it became clear that the normal mode ansatz and the resulting Orr-Sommerfeld equation is based on essentially three fundamental symmetries of the linearized Euler and Navier-Stokes equations: translation in space and time and scaling of the dependent variable. Further, Kelvin-mode of linear shear flows seemed to be an exception in this context as it admits a fourth symmetry resulting in the classical Kelvin mode which is rather different from normal-mode. However, very recently it was discovered that most of the classical canonical shear flows such as linear shear, Couette, plane and round Poiseuille, Taylor-Couette, Lamb-Ossen vortex or asymptotic suction boundary layer admit more symmetries. This, in turn, led to new problem specific non-modal ansatz functions. In contrast to the exponential growth rate in time of the modal-ansatz, the new non-modal ansatz functions usually lead to an algebraic growth or decay rate, while for the asymptotic suction boundary layer a double-exponential growth or decay is observed.

  1. Efficient computation of spatial eigenvalues for hydrodynamic stability analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khorrami, Mehdi R.; Malik, Mujeeb R.

    1993-01-01

    The simple procedure presented for spatial stability computations can substantially reduce the computational requirements of such analyses, as illustrated for the cases of both internal and external cases of compressible and incompressible flows, and both viscous and inviscid instability modes. Excellent estimates of spatial eigenvalues are obtained.

  2. Stability of fundamental couplings: A global analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, C. J. A. P.; Pinho, A. M. M.

    2017-01-01

    Astrophysical tests of the stability of fundamental couplings are becoming an increasingly important probe of new physics. Motivated by the recent availability of new and stronger constraints we update previous works testing the consistency of measurements of the fine-structure constant α and the proton-to-electron mass ratio μ =mp/me (mostly obtained in the optical/ultraviolet) with combined measurements of α , μ and the proton gyromagnetic ratio gp (mostly in the radio band). We carry out a global analysis of all available data, including the 293 archival measurements of Webb et al. and 66 more recent dedicated measurements, and constraining both time and spatial variations. While nominally the full data sets show a slight statistical preference for variations of α and μ (at up to two standard deviations), we also find several inconsistencies between different subsets, likely due to hidden systematics and implying that these statistical preferences need to be taken with caution. The statistical evidence for a spatial dipole in the values of α is found at the 2.3 sigma level. Forthcoming studies with facilities such as ALMA and ESPRESSO should clarify these issues.

  3. Earth recovery mode analysis for a Martian sample return mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, J. P.

    1978-01-01

    The analysis has concerned itself with evaluating alternative methods of recovering a sample module from a trans-earth trajectory originating in the vicinity of Mars. The major modes evaluated are: (1) direct atmospheric entry from trans-earth trajectory; (2) earth orbit insertion by retropropulsion; and (3) atmospheric braking to a capture orbit. In addition, the question of guided vs. unguided entry vehicles was considered, as well as alternative methods of recovery after orbit insertion for modes (2) and (3). A summary of results and conclusions is presented. Analytical results for aerodynamic and propulsive maneuvering vehicles are discussed. System performance requirements and alternatives for inertial systems implementation are also discussed. Orbital recovery operations and further studies required to resolve the recovery mode issue are described.

  4. Linear modal stability analysis of bowed-strings.

    PubMed

    Debut, V; Antunes, J; Inácio, O

    2017-03-01

    Linearised models are often invoked as a starting point to study complex dynamical systems. Besides their attractive mathematical simplicity, they have a central role for determining the stability properties of static or dynamical states, and can often shed light on the influence of the control parameters on the system dynamical behaviour. While the bowed string dynamics has been thoroughly studied from a number of points of view, mainly by time-domain computer simulations, this paper proposes to explore its dynamical behaviour adopting a linear framework, linearising the friction force near an equilibrium state in steady sliding conditions, and using a modal representation of the string dynamics. Starting from the simplest idealisation of the friction force given by Coulomb's law with a velocity-dependent friction coefficient, the linearised modal equations of the bowed string are presented, and the dynamical changes of the system as a function of the bowing parameters are studied using linear stability analysis. From the computed complex eigenvalues and eigenvectors, several plots of the evolution of the modal frequencies, damping values, and modeshapes with the bowing parameters are produced, as well as stability charts for each system mode. By systematically exploring the influence of the parameters, this approach appears as a preliminary numerical characterisation of the bifurcations of the bowed string dynamics, with the advantage of being very simple compared to sophisticated numerical approaches which demand the regularisation of the nonlinear interaction force. To fix the idea about the potential of the proposed approach, the classic one-degree-of-freedom friction-excited oscillator is first considered, and then the case of the bowed string. Even if the actual stick-slip behaviour is rather far from the linear description adopted here, the results show that essential musical features of bowed string vibrations can be interpreted from this simple approach

  5. Spatio-temporal Linear Stability Analysis of Multiple Reacting Wakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunnumpuram Sebastian, Jacob; Emerson, Benjamin; Lieuwen, Tim

    2016-11-01

    Hydrodynamic stability of reacting shear flows plays a key role in controlling a variety of combustor behaviors, such as combustion instability, mixing and entrainment, and blowoff. A significant literature exists on the hydrodynamics of single bluff body flows, but not the multi-bluff body flows that are found in applications. The objective of this work was to compare the spatio-temporal stability of multiple reacting wakes and single reacting wakes, within the framework of linear stability theory. Spatio-temporal stability analyses are conducted on model velocity and density profiles, with key parameters being the density ratio across the flame, bluff body spacing, dimensionless shear, and asymmetry parameters (if the two wakes are dissimilar). The introduction of the additional bluff body can exert both a stabilizing and destabilizing effect on the combined two-wake system, depending on the spatial separation between the bluff bodies. Furthermore, while the most rapidly amplified mode of the single wake mode is the sinuous (asymmetric) one, in the two wake system, the most rapidly amplified mode can be either sinuous or varicose (symmetric), also depending on spatial separation.

  6. A first attempt at few coils and low-coverage resistive wall mode stabilization of EXTRAP T2R

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olofsson, K. Erik J.; Brunsell, Per R.; Drake, James R.; Frassinetti, Lorenzo

    2012-09-01

    The reversed-field pinch features resistive-shell-type instabilities at any (vanishing and finite) plasma pressure. An attempt to stabilize the full spectrum of these modes using both (i) incomplete coverage and (ii) few coils is presented. Two empirically derived model-based control algorithms are compared with a baseline guaranteed suboptimal intelligent-shell-type (IS) feedback. Experimental stabilization could not be achieved for the coil array subset sizes considered by this first study. But the model-based controllers appear to significantly outperform the decentralized IS method.

  7. Sub-kHz lasing of a CaF₂ whispering gallery mode resonator stabilized fiber ring laser.

    PubMed

    Collodo, M C; Sedlmeir, F; Sprenger, B; Svitlov, S; Wang, L J; Schwefel, H G L

    2014-08-11

    We utilize a high quality calcium fluoride whispering-gallery-mode resonator to passively stabilize a simple erbium doped fiber ring laser with an emission frequency of 196THz (wavelength 1530nm) to an instantaneous linewidth below 650Hz. This corresponds to a relative stability of 3.3 × 10(-12) over 16μs. In order to characterize the linewidth we use two identical self-built lasers and a commercial laser to determine the individual lasing linewidth via the three-cornered-hat method. We further show that the lasers are finely tunable throughout the erbium gain region.

  8. Comparison Study of Fourier and SVD Method for Plasma Mode Analysis in Tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saadat, Shervin; Salem, Mohammad K.; Goranneviss, Mahmoud; Khorshid, Pejman

    2011-02-01

    Fourier analysis and Singular Value Decomposition (SVD) are two familiar methods for mode detection in tokamaks. In this article this two methods, fourier and SVD, have compared. The results show fourier analysis in m ≥ 3 and when the energy is balanced between modes could not recognize the correct mode number. The SVD analysis is cited method for all modes.

  9. C-Mod MHD stability analysis with LHCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrahimi, Fatima; Bhattacharjee, A.; Delgado, L.; Scott, S.; Wilson, J. R.; Wallace, G. M.; Shiraiwa, S.; Mumgaard, R. T.

    2016-10-01

    In lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) experiments on the Alcator C-Mod, sawtooth activity could be suppressed as the safety factor q on axis is raised above unity. However, in some of these experiments, after applying LHCD, the onset of MHD mode activity caused the current drive efficiency to significantly drop. Here, we study the stability of these experiments by performing MHD simulations using the NIMROD code starting with experimental EFIT equilibria. First, consistent with the LHCD experiment with no signature of MHD activity, MHD mode activity was also absent in the simulations. Second, for experiments with MHD mode activity, we find that a core n=1 reconnecting mode with dominate poloidal modes of m=2,3 is unstable. This mode is a resistive current-driven mode as its growth rate scales with a negative power of the Lundquist number in the simulations. In addition, with further enhanced reversed-shear q profile in the simulations, a core double tearing mode is found to be unstable. This work is supported by U.S. DOE cooperative agreement DE-FC02-99ER54512 using the Alcator C-Mod tokamak, a DOE Office of Science user facility.

  10. A parabolized stability analysis of a trailing vortex wake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edstrand, Adam; Schmid, Peter; Taira, Kunihiko; Cattafesta, Louis

    2016-11-01

    To aid in understanding how best to control a trailing vortex, we perform a parabolized stability analysis on a flow past a wing at a chord-based Reynolds number of 1000. At the upstream position, the wake instability branch dominates, with only a single vortex instability present in the spectrum. With downstream progression, the growth rate of the wake instability decays, but remains unstable 10 chords downstream. With the wake mode being unstable so far downstream, these results imply that the excitation of the wake instability, despite the varying base flow, will continue to see growth and potentially disrupt the trailing vortex. Conversely, the vortex instability in its formative region rapidly decays to the stable half-plane, then at 11 chords downstream becomes unstable again. We hypothesized the renewed instability growth far downstream is developing as a result of vortex instabilities, however the excitation of these instabilities proves to be challenging in the vortex far field. From these results, control near the two-dimensional wake behind the airfoil may better interfere with the trailing vortex formation; however, to determine the optimal disturbances, an adjoint analysis is required and is included in the future work of the project. ONR Grants N00014-10-1-0832 and N00014-15-1-2403.

  11. Efficient randomized methods for stability analysis of fluids systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, Scott; Rowley, Clarence

    2016-11-01

    We show that probabilistic algorithms that have recently been developed for the approximation of large matrices can be utilized to numerically evaluate the properties of linear operators in fluids systems. In particular, we present an algorithm that is well suited for optimal transient growth (i.e., nonmodal stability) analysis. For non-normal systems, such analysis can be important for analyzing local regions of convective instability, and in identifying high-amplitude transients that can trigger nonlinear instabilities. Our proposed algorithms are easy to wrap around pre-existing timesteppers for linearized forward and adjoint equations, are highly parallelizable, and come with known error bounds. Furthermore, they allow for efficient computation of optimal growth modes for numerous time horizons simultaneously. We compare the proposed algorithm to both direct matrix-forming and Krylov subspace approaches on a number of test problems. We will additionally discuss the potential for randomized methods to assist more broadly in the speed-up of algorithms for analyzing both fluids data and operators. Supported by AFOSR Grant FA9550-14-1-0289.

  12. Fourier mode analysis of source iteration in spatially periodic media

    SciTech Connect

    Zika, M.R.; Larsen, E.W.

    1998-12-31

    The standard Fourier mode analysis is an indispensable tool when designing acceleration techniques for transport iterations; however, it requires the assumption of a homogeneous infinite medium. For problems of practical interest, material heterogeneities may significantly impact iterative performance. Recent work has applied a Fourier analysis to the discretized two-dimensional transport operator with heterogeneous material properties. The results of these analyses may be difficult to interpret because the heterogeneity effects are inherently coupled to the discretization effects. Here, the authors describe a Fourier analysis of source iteration (SI) that allows the calculation of the eigenvalue spectrum for the one-dimensional continuous transport operator with spatially periodic heterogeneous media.

  13. Milling Stability Analysis Based on Chebyshev Segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    HUANG, Jianwei; LI, He; HAN, Ping; Wen, Bangchun

    2016-09-01

    Chebyshev segmentation method was used to discretize the time period contained in delay differential equation, then the Newton second-order difference quotient method was used to calculate the cutter motion vector at each time endpoint, and the Floquet theory was used to determine the stability of the milling system after getting the transfer matrix of milling system. Using the above methods, a two degree of freedom milling system stability issues were investigated, and system stability lobe diagrams were got. The results showed that the proposed methods have the following advantages. Firstly, with the same calculation accuracy, the points needed to represent the time period are less by the Chebyshev Segmentation than those of the average segmentation, and the computational efficiency of the Chebyshev Segmentation is higher. Secondly, if the time period is divided into the same parts, the stability lobe diagrams got by Chebyshev segmentation method are more accurate than those of the average segmentation.

  14. A model for roll stall and the inherent stability modes of low aspect ratio wings at low Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shields, Matt

    The development of Micro Aerial Vehicles has been hindered by the poor understanding of the aerodynamic loading and stability and control properties of the low Reynolds number regime in which the inherent low aspect ratio (LAR) wings operate. This thesis experimentally evaluates the static and damping aerodynamic stability derivatives to provide a complete aerodynamic model for canonical flat plate wings of aspect ratios near unity at Reynolds numbers under 1 x 105. This permits the complete functionality of the aerodynamic forces and moments to be expressed and the equations of motion to solved, thereby identifying the inherent stability properties of the wing. This provides a basis for characterizing the stability of full vehicles. The influence of the tip vortices during sideslip perturbations is found to induce a loading condition referred to as roll stall, a significant roll moment created by the spanwise induced velocity asymmetry related to the displacement of the vortex cores relative to the wing. Roll stall is manifested by a linearly increasing roll moment with low to moderate angles of attack and a subsequent stall event similar to a lift polar; this behavior is not experienced by conventional (high aspect ratio) wings. The resulting large magnitude of the roll stability derivative, Cl,beta and lack of roll damping, Cl ,rho, create significant modal responses of the lateral state variables; a linear model used to evaluate these modes is shown to accurately reflect the solution obtained by numerically integrating the nonlinear equations. An unstable Dutch roll mode dominates the behavior of the wing for small perturbations from equilibrium, and in the presence of angle of attack oscillations a previously unconsidered coupled mode, referred to as roll resonance, is seen develop and drive the bank angle? away from equilibrium. Roll resonance requires a linear time variant (LTV) model to capture the behavior of the bank angle, which is attributed to the

  15. Lubrication mode analysis of articular cartilage using Stribeck surfaces.

    PubMed

    Gleghorn, Jason P; Bonassar, Lawrence J

    2008-01-01

    Lubrication of articular cartilage occurs in distinct modes with various structural and biomolecular mechanisms contributing to the low-friction properties of natural joints. In order to elucidate relative contributions of these factors in normal and diseased tissues, determination and control of lubrication mode must occur. The objectives of these studies were (1) to develop an in vitro cartilage on glass test system to measure friction coefficient, mu; (2) to implement and extend a framework for the determination of cartilage lubrication modes; and (3) to determine the effects of synovial fluid on mu and lubrication mode transitions. Patellofemoral groove cartilage was linearly oscillated against glass under varying magnitudes of compressive strain utilizing phosphate buffered saline (PBS) and equine and bovine synovial fluid as lubricants. The time-dependent frictional properties were measured to determine the lubricant type and strain magnitude dependence for the initial friction coefficient (mu(0)=mu(t-->0)) and equilibrium friction coefficient (mu(eq)=mu(t-->infinity)). Parameters including tissue-glass co-planarity, normal strain, and surface speed were altered to determine the effect of the parameters on lubrication mode via a 'Stribeck surface'. Using this testing apparatus, cartilage exhibited biphasic lubrication with significant influence of strain magnitude on mu(0) and minimal influence on mu(eq), consistent with hydrostatic pressurization as reported by others. Lubrication analysis using 'Stribeck surfaces' demonstrated clear regions of boundary and mixed modes, but hydrodynamic or full film lubrication was not observed even at the highest speed (50mm/s) and lowest strain (5%).

  16. Dynamic Causal Modeling of Hippocampal Links within the Human Default Mode Network: Lateralization and Computational Stability of Effective Connections

    PubMed Central

    Ushakov, Vadim; Sharaev, Maksim G.; Kartashov, Sergey I.; Zavyalova, Viktoria V.; Verkhlyutov, Vitaliy M.; Velichkovsky, Boris M.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to study causal relationships between left and right hippocampal regions (LHIP and RHIP, respectively) within the default mode network (DMN) as represented by its key structures: the medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC), posterior cingulate cortex (PCC), and the inferior parietal cortex of left (LIPC) and right (RIPC) hemispheres. Furthermore, we were interested in testing the stability of the connectivity patterns when adding or deleting regions of interest. The functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data from a group of 30 healthy right-handed subjects in the resting state were collected and a connectivity analysis was performed. To model the effective connectivity, we used the spectral Dynamic Causal Modeling (DCM). Three DCM analyses were completed. Two of them modeled interaction between five nodes that included four DMN key structures in addition to either LHIP or RHIP. The last DCM analysis modeled interactions between four nodes whereby one of the main DMN structures, PCC, was excluded from the analysis. The results of all DCM analyses indicated a high level of stability in the computational method: those parts of the winning models that included the key DMN structures demonstrated causal relations known from recent research. However, we discovered new results as well. First of all, we found a pronounced asymmetry in LHIP and RHIP connections. LHIP demonstrated a high involvement of DMN activity with preponderant information outflow to all other DMN regions. Causal interactions of LHIP were bidirectional only in the case of LIPC. On the contrary, RHIP was primarily affected by inputs from LIPC, RIPC, and LHIP without influencing these or other DMN key structures. For the first time, an inhibitory link was found from MPFC to LIPC, which may indicate the subjects’ effort to maintain a resting state. Functional connectivity data echoed these results, though they also showed links not reflected in the patterns of effective

  17. Dynamic Causal Modeling of Hippocampal Links within the Human Default Mode Network: Lateralization and Computational Stability of Effective Connections.

    PubMed

    Ushakov, Vadim; Sharaev, Maksim G; Kartashov, Sergey I; Zavyalova, Viktoria V; Verkhlyutov, Vitaliy M; Velichkovsky, Boris M

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to study causal relationships between left and right hippocampal regions (LHIP and RHIP, respectively) within the default mode network (DMN) as represented by its key structures: the medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC), posterior cingulate cortex (PCC), and the inferior parietal cortex of left (LIPC) and right (RIPC) hemispheres. Furthermore, we were interested in testing the stability of the connectivity patterns when adding or deleting regions of interest. The functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data from a group of 30 healthy right-handed subjects in the resting state were collected and a connectivity analysis was performed. To model the effective connectivity, we used the spectral Dynamic Causal Modeling (DCM). Three DCM analyses were completed. Two of them modeled interaction between five nodes that included four DMN key structures in addition to either LHIP or RHIP. The last DCM analysis modeled interactions between four nodes whereby one of the main DMN structures, PCC, was excluded from the analysis. The results of all DCM analyses indicated a high level of stability in the computational method: those parts of the winning models that included the key DMN structures demonstrated causal relations known from recent research. However, we discovered new results as well. First of all, we found a pronounced asymmetry in LHIP and RHIP connections. LHIP demonstrated a high involvement of DMN activity with preponderant information outflow to all other DMN regions. Causal interactions of LHIP were bidirectional only in the case of LIPC. On the contrary, RHIP was primarily affected by inputs from LIPC, RIPC, and LHIP without influencing these or other DMN key structures. For the first time, an inhibitory link was found from MPFC to LIPC, which may indicate the subjects' effort to maintain a resting state. Functional connectivity data echoed these results, though they also showed links not reflected in the patterns of effective

  18. Aeroelastic stability analysis of a high-energy turbine blade. [for SSME High Pressure Oxidizer TurboPump first stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Todd E.

    1990-01-01

    The dynamic analysis for the SSME HPOTP first stage turbine blade is presented wherein the rotor aeroelastic stability is assessed. The method employs normal modes analysis to simulate the coupled blade/fluid system. A three-dimensional finite element model of the blade is used in conjunction with a two-dimensional linearized unsteady aerodynamic theory which accounts for steady aerodynamic loading effects. This unsteady aerodynamic model is applied in stacked axisymmetric strips along the airfoil span. The blade dynamic and aerodynamic behaviors are coupled within modal space by expressing the unsteady aerodynamic forces in the frequency domain. A complex eigenvalue problem is solved to determine the stability of the rotor assuming tuned blades. The present analysis indicates that the HPOTP rotor experiences very low aerodynamic damping in the first four vibrational modes. The edgewise mode was found to be dynamically unstable. This mode of the blade became stable when the effect of mechanical damping was considered.

  19. Stability analysis of large electric power systems

    SciTech Connect

    Elwood, D.M.

    1993-01-01

    Modern electric power systems are large and complicated, and, in many regions of the world, the generation and transmission systems are operating near their limits. Ensuring the reliable operation of the power system requires engineers to study the response of the system to various disturbances. The responses to large disturbances are examined by numerically solving the nonlinear differential-algebraic equations describing the power system. The response to small disturbances is typically studied via eigenanalysis. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) recently developed the Extended Transient/Mid-term Stability Program (ETMSP) to study large disturbance stability and the Small Signal Stability Program Package (SSSP) to study small signal stability. The primary objectives of the work described in this report were to (1) explore ways of speeding up ETMSP, especially on mid-term voltage stability problems, (2) explore ways of speeding up the Multi-Area Small-Signal Stability program (MASS), one of the codes in SSSP, and (3) explore ways of increasing the size of problem that can be solved by the Cray version of MASS.

  20. Performance Analysis of Power Saving Mechanism Employing Both Sleep Mode and Idle Mode in IEEE 802.16e

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Eunju; Lee, Yong Hyun; Kim, Kyung Jae; Son, Jung Je; Choi, Bong Dae

    The IEEE 802.16e standard specifies the sleep mode and the idle mode of a mobile station (MS) for power saving. In this paper, to reduce the energy consumption of the MS, we employ the sleep mode while the MS is on-session, and the idle mode while it is off-session. Under the assumption that the time duration from the end of a session to the arrival of a new downlink session request follows an exponential distribution of the mean 1/ν and that arrivals of messages during an on-session follow a Poisson process with rate λ, we analyze the awake mode period and the sleep mode period by using the busy period analysis of the M/G/1 queue, and then we derive the total mean length of an on-session which consists of a geometric number of awake mode periods and sleep mode periods. Since the sum of an on-session and an off-session constitutes a cycle, we can express the average power consumption in terms of the mean lengths of an awake mode period, a sleep mode period and an idle mode period. The average power consumption indicates how much the MS can save energy by employing the sleep mode and the idle mode. We also derive the Laplace Stieltjes transform (and the mean) of the queueing delay of messages to examine a tradeoff between the power consumption and the delay of messages. Analytical results, which are shown to be well-matched by simulations, address that our employment of the sleep mode and the idle mode provides a considerable reduction in the energy consumption of the MS.

  1. Failure Mode Effects Analysis for an Accelerator Control System

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, Steven M

    2009-01-01

    Failure mode effects analysis (FMEA) has been used in industry for design, manufacturing and assembly process quality control. It describes a formal approach for categorizing how a process may fail and for prioritizing failures based on their severity, frequency and likelihood of detection. Experience conducting a partial FMEA of an accelerator subsystem and its related control system will be reviewed. The applicability of the FMEA process to an operational accelerator control system will be discussed.

  2. Double-diffusive two-fluid flow in a slippery channel: A linear stability analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Sukhendu; Usha, R.; Sahu, Kirti Chandra

    2014-12-01

    The effect of velocity slip at the walls on the linear stability characteristics of two-fluid three-layer channel flow (the equivalent core-annular configuration in case of pipe) is investigated in the presence of double diffusive (DD) phenomenon. The fluids are miscible and consist of two solute species having different rates of diffusion. The fluids are assumed to be of the same density, but varying viscosity, which depends on the concentration of the solute species. It is found that the flow stabilizes when the less viscous fluid is present in the region adjacent to the slippery channel walls in the single-component (SC) system but becomes unstable at low Reynolds numbers in the presence of DD effect. As the mixed region of the fluids moves towards the channel walls, a new unstable mode (DD mode), distinct from the Tollman Schlichting (TS) mode, arises at Reynolds numbers smaller than the critical Reynolds number for the TS mode. We also found that this mode becomes more prominent when the mixed layer overlaps with the critical layer. It is shown that the slip parameter has nonmonotonic effect on the stability characteristics in this system. Through energy budget analysis, the dual role of slip is explained. The effect of slip is influenced by the location of mixed layer, the log-mobility ratio of the faster diffusing scalar, diffusivity, and the ratio of diffusion coefficients of the two species. Increasing the value of the slip parameter delays the first occurrence of the DD-mode. It is possible to achieve stabilization or destabilization by controlling the various physical parameters in the flow system. In the present study, we suggest an effective and realistic way to control three-layer miscible channel flow with viscosity stratification.

  3. Long-term performance and stability of molecular shotgun lipidomic analysis of human plasma samples.

    PubMed

    Heiskanen, Laura A; Suoniemi, Matti; Ta, Hung Xuan; Tarasov, Kirill; Ekroos, Kim

    2013-09-17

    The stability of the lipid concentration levels in shotgun lipidomics analysis was tracked over a period of 3.5 years. Concentration levels in several lipid classes, such as phospholipids, were determined in human plasma lipid extracts. Impact of the following factors on the analysis was investigated: sample amount, internal standard amount, and sample dilution factor. Moreover, the reproducibility of lipid profiles obtained in both polarity modes was evaluated. Total number of samples analyzed was approximately 6800 and 7300 samples in negative and positive ion modes, respectively, out of which 610 and 639 instrument control samples were used in stability calculations. The assessed shotgun lipidomics approach showed to be remarkably robust and reproducible, requiring no batch corrections. Coefficients of variation (CVs) of lipid mean concentration measured with optimized analytical parameters were typically less than 15%. The high reproducibility indicated that no lipid degradation occurred during the monitored time period.

  4. On Automating Failure Mode Analysis and Enforcing its Integrity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tai, Ann T.; Tso, Kam S.; Chau, Savio N.

    2005-01-01

    This paper reports our experience on the development of a design-for-safety (DFS) workbench called Risk Assessment and Management Environment (RAME) for microelectronic avionics systems. Our objective is to transform DFS practice from an ad-hoc, inefficient, error-prone approach to a stringent engineering process such that DFS can keep up with the rapidly growing complexity of avionics systems. In particular, RAME is built upon an information infrastructure that comprises a fault model, a knowledge base, and a failure reporting/tracking system. This infrastructure permits systematic learning from prior projects and enables the automation of failure modes, effects and criticality analysis (FMECA). Among other unique features, the most important advantage of RAME is its capability of directly accepting design source code in hardware description languages (HDLs) for automated failure mode analysis, which enables RAME to be compatible and to evolve with most electronic-computer-aided-design systems. Through an initial experimental evaluation of the RAME prototype, we show that our approach to FMECA automation improves failure mode analysis turn-around-time, completeness, and accuracy.

  5. Analysis and prediction of longitudinal stability of airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilruth, R R; White, M D

    1941-01-01

    An analysis has been made of the longitudinal stability characteristics of 15 airplanes as determined in flight. In the correlation of satisfactory and unsatisfactory characteristics with determined values, the derivative that expresses the ratio of static-restoring moments to elevator-control moments was found to represent most nearly the stability characteristics appreciated by the pilots. The analysis was extended to study the effects of various design features on the observed stability characteristics. Design charts and data are included that show the effects on longitudinal stability of relative positions of wing and tail, fuselage size and location, engine nacelles, and horizontal-tail arrangements.

  6. Dual-Mode Mass Spectrometric Imaging for Determination of in Vivo Stability of Nanoparticle Monolayers.

    PubMed

    Elci, S Gokhan; Yesilbag Tonga, Gulen; Yan, Bo; Kim, Sung Tae; Kim, Chang Soo; Jiang, Ying; Saha, Krishnendu; Moyano, Daniel F; Marsico, Alyssa L M; Rotello, Vincent M; Vachet, Richard W

    2017-07-25

    Effective correlation of the in vitro and in vivo stability of nanoparticle-based platforms is a key challenge in their translation into the clinic. Here, we describe a dual imaging method that site-specifically reports the stability of monolayer-functionalized nanoparticles in vivo. This approach uses laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) imaging to monitor the distributions of the nanoparticle core material and laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (LDI-MS) imaging to report on the monolayers on the nanoparticles. Quantitative comparison of the images reveals nanoparticle stability at the organ and suborgan level. The stability of particles observed in the spleen was location-dependent and qualitatively similar to in vitro studies. In contrast, in vivo stability of the nanoparticles in the liver differed dramatically from in vitro studies, demonstrating the importance of in vivo assessment of nanoparticle stability.

  7. Stability analysis of offshore wind farm and marine current farm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shawon, Mohammad Hasanuzzaman

    -trend for large electric energy production using offshore wind generators and marine current generators, respectively. Thus DFIG based offshore wind farm can be an economic solution to stabilize squirrel cage induction generator based marine current farm without installing any addition FACTS devices. This thesis first focuses on the stabilization of fixed speed IG based marine current farm using SDBR. Also stabilization of DFIG based variable speed wind farm utilizing SDBR is studied in this work. Finally a co-operative control strategy is proposed where DFIG is controlled in such a way that it can even provide necessary reactive power demand of induction generator, so that additional cost of FACTS devices can be avoided. In that way, the DFIGs of the offshore wind farm (OWF) will actively compensate the reactive power demand of adjacent IGs of the marine current farm (MCF) during grid fault. Detailed modeling and control scheme for the proposed system are demonstrated considering some realistic scenarios. The power system small signal stability analysis is also carried out by eigenvalue analysis for marine current generator topology, wind turbine generator topology and integrated topology. The relation between the modes and state variables are discussed in light of modal and sensitivity analyses. The results of theoretical analyses are verified by MATLAB/SIMULINK and laboratory standard power system simulator PSCAD/EMTDC.

  8. Vision-based stabilization of nonholonomic mobile robots by integrating sliding-mode control and adaptive approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Zhengcai; Yin, Longjie; Fu, Yili

    2013-01-01

    Vision-based pose stabilization of nonholonomic mobile robots has received extensive attention. At present, most of the solutions of the problem do not take the robot dynamics into account in the controller design, so that these controllers are difficult to realize satisfactory control in practical application. Besides, many of the approaches suffer from the initial speed and torque jump which are not practical in the real world. Considering the kinematics and dynamics, a two-stage visual controller for solving the stabilization problem of a mobile robot is presented, applying the integration of adaptive control, sliding-mode control, and neural dynamics. In the first stage, an adaptive kinematic stabilization controller utilized to generate the command of velocity is developed based on Lyapunov theory. In the second stage, adopting the sliding-mode control approach, a dynamic controller with a variable speed function used to reduce the chattering is designed, which is utilized to generate the command of torque to make the actual velocity of the mobile robot asymptotically reach the desired velocity. Furthermore, to handle the speed and torque jump problems, the neural dynamics model is integrated into the above mentioned controllers. The stability of the proposed control system is analyzed by using Lyapunov theory. Finally, the simulation of the control law is implemented in perturbed case, and the results show that the control scheme can solve the stabilization problem effectively. The proposed control law can solve the speed and torque jump problems, overcome external disturbances, and provide a new solution for the vision-based stabilization of the mobile robot.

  9. Comparative Performance Analysis of Sliding Mode and Q-Controller Algorithms for Buck Converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pati, Nivedita

    2017-08-01

    The switched mode dc-dc converters are some of the simplest power electronic circuits which have received an increasing deal of interest in many areas due to their high efficiency and small size. These converters are non-linear and time-variant in nature; hence the analysis, control and stabilization are the main factors that need to be considered. Many control methodology are used for control of switch mode dc-dc converters but the optimum one is always in demand. This paper presents the linearization of the Buck converter model and a comparison between a linear and non-linear control algorithms for better output voltage regulation along with robustness to change in input voltage and load parameters. The computer –aided design software tool Matlab/Simulink is used for the simulations and the results are presented.

  10. Stability analysis of automobile driver steering control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, R. W.

    1981-01-01

    In steering an automobile, the driver must basically control the direction of the car's trajectory (heading angle) and the lateral deviation of the car relative to a delineated pathway. A previously published linear control model of driver steering behavior which is analyzed from a stability point of view is considered. A simple approximate expression for a stability parameter, phase margin, is derived in terms of various driver and vehicle control parameters, and boundaries for stability are discussed. A field test study is reviewed that includes the measurement of driver steering control parameters. Phase margins derived for a range of vehicle characteristics are found to be generally consistent with known adaptive properties of the human operator. The implications of these results are discussed in terms of driver adaptive behavior.

  11. Analysis and comparison of range — range positioning mode and hyperbolic positioning mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shi-Ru; Xu, Ding-Jie; Sun, Yao

    2002-06-01

    Three key factors are discussed, which affect positioning accuracy of range — range positioning mode and hyperbolic positioning mode. Based on the error elliptical theory, the expressions of positioning error and of positioning geometric factor of range — range positioning mode and hyperbolic positioning mode are derived, and the positioning error and the blind positioning area of two different positioning modes are analyzed. According to the requirement of navigation area, an optimum positional configuration among navigation stations of hyperbolic positioning mode is provided. Some considerable conclusions are obtained, and some graphs of distribution are presented, which are important to study and design a reasonable, precise radio navigation system.

  12. Structural mode significance using INCA. [Interactive Controls Analysis computer program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, Frank H.; Downing, John P.; Thorpe, Christopher J.

    1990-01-01

    Structural finite element models are often too large to be used in the design and analysis of control systems. Model reduction techniques must be applied to reduce the structural model to manageable size. In the past, engineers either performed the model order reduction by hand or used distinct computer programs to retrieve the data, to perform the significance analysis and to reduce the order of the model. To expedite this process, the latest version of INCA has been expanded to include an interactive graphical structural mode significance and model order reduction capability.

  13. Structural mode significance using INCA. [Interactive Controls Analysis computer program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, Frank H.; Downing, John P.; Thorpe, Christopher J.

    1990-01-01

    Structural finite element models are often too large to be used in the design and analysis of control systems. Model reduction techniques must be applied to reduce the structural model to manageable size. In the past, engineers either performed the model order reduction by hand or used distinct computer programs to retrieve the data, to perform the significance analysis and to reduce the order of the model. To expedite this process, the latest version of INCA has been expanded to include an interactive graphical structural mode significance and model order reduction capability.

  14. Linear stability analysis of hypersonic boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guilyardi, E.; Vandervegt, J. J. W.; Ferziger, J. H.

    1991-12-01

    With the aid of temporal linear stability code COSAL, our goal is to generate profiles of the most unstable waves to provide initial data for the direct numerical simulation code written by van der Vegt (1990). The COSAL code was modified in several ways to meet this requirement. Improvements needed in the accuracy of the computation of the eigenfunction were noted in van der Vegt and Ferziger (1990). Various numerical methods and grid adaptation were applied in order to increase the accuracy of the results produced by the linear stability code.

  15. Damping Rates of Energetic Particle Modes and Stability With Changing Equilibrium Conditions in the MST Reversed-Field Pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sears, S. H.; Almagri, A. F.; Anderson, J. K.; Bonofiglo, P. J.; Capecchi, W.; Kim, J.

    2016-10-01

    The damping of Alfvenic waves is an important process, with implications varying from anomalous ion heating in laboratory and astrophysical plasmas to the stability of fusion alpha-driven modes in a burning plasma. With a 1 MW NBI on the MST, a controllable set of energetic particle modes (EPMs) and Alfvenic eigenmodes can be excited. We investigate the damping of these modes as a function of both magnetic and flow shear. Typical EPM damping rates are -104 s-1 in standard RFP discharges. Magnetic shear in the region of large energetic ion density is -2 cm-1 and can be increased up to -2.5 cm-1 by varying the boundary field. Continuum mode damping rates can be reduced up to 50%. New experiments use a bias probe to control the rotation profile. Accelerating the edge plasma relative to the rapidly rotating NBI-driven core decreases the flow shear, while decelerating the edge plasma increases the flow shear in the region of strong energetic ion population. Mode damping rates measured as a function of the local flow shear are compared to ideal MHD predictions. Work supported by US DOE.

  16. On the stability of Suydam modes in a nonuniformly rotating plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Timofeev, A. V.

    2010-08-15

    A simplified wave equation is derived that describes both Suydam modes in a nonuniformly rotating plasma column in a helical magnetic field and related flute modes. A study is made of a low-pressure plasma under the assumption that the azimuthal component of the magnetic field is much weaker than the axial component. It is shown that, when the monotonic radial variation of the plasma rotation velocity is sufficiently sharp, the plasma core becomes stable against short-wavelength Suydam modes. The instabilities that can develop in a nonuniformly rotating plasma are classified.

  17. White Oak Dam stability analysis. Volume I

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, S.B.

    1994-01-01

    A parametric study was conducted to evaluate the stability of the White Oak Dam (WOD) embankment and foundation. Slope stability analyses were performed for the upper and lower bound soil properties at three sections of the dam using the PCSTABL4 computer program. Minimum safety factors were calculated for the applicable seismic and static loading conditions. Liquefaction potential of the dam embankment and foundation solid during the seismic event was assessed by using simplified procedures. The WOD is classified as a low hazard facility and the Evaluation Basis Earthquake (EBE) is defined as an earthquake with a magnitude of m{sub b} = 5.6 and a Peak Ground Accelerator (PGA) of 0.13 g. This event is approximately equivalent to a Modified Mercalli Intensity of VI-VIII. The EBE is used to perform the seismic evaluation for slope stability and liquefaction potential. Results of the stability analyses and the liquefaction assessment lead to the conclusion that the White Oak Dam is safe and stable for the static and the seismic events defined in this study. Ogden Environmental, at the request of MMES, has checked and verified the calculations for the critical loading conditions and performed a peer review of this report. Ogden has determined that the WOD is stable under the defined static and seismic loading conditions and the embankment materials are in general not susceptible to liquefaction.

  18. Analysis of Stabilization Mechanisms in Lifted Flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navarro-Martinez, S.; Kronenburg, A.

    2009-12-01

    Flame stabilization and the mechanisms that govern the dynamics at the flame base have been subject to numerous studies in recent years. Recent results using a combined Large Eddy Simulation-Conditional Moment Closure (LES-CMC) approach to model the turbulent flow field and the turbulence-chemistry interactions has been successful in predicting flame ignition and stabilization by auto-ignition, but LES-CMCs capability of the accurate modelling of the competition between turbulent quenching and laminar and turbulent flame propagation at the anchor point has not been resolved. This paper will consolidate LES-CMC results by analysing a wide range of lifted flame geometries with different prevailing stabilization mechanisms. The simulations allow a clear distinction of the prevailing stabilization mechanisms for the different flames, LES-CMC accurately predicts the competition between turbulence and chemistry during the auto-ignition process, however, the dynamics of the extinction process and turbulent flame propagation are not well captured. The averaging process inherent in the CMC methods does not allow for an instant response of the transported conditionally averaged reactive species to the changes in the flow conditions and any response of the scalars will therefore be delayed. Stationary or quasi-stationary conditions, however, can be well predicted for all flame configurations.

  19. Analysis of the stabilized supralinear network‡

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadian, Yashar; Rubin, Daniel B.; Miller, Kenneth D.

    2014-01-01

    We study a rate-model neural network composed of excitatory and inhibitory neurons in which neuronal input-output functions are power laws with a power greater than 1, as observed in primary visual cortex. This supralinear input-output function leads to supralinear summation of network responses to multiple inputs for weak inputs. We show that for stronger inputs, which would drive the excitatory subnetwork to instability, the network will dynamically stabilize provided feedback inhibition is sufficiently strong. For a wide range of network and stimulus parameters, this dynamic stabilization yields a transition from supralinear to sublinear summation of network responses to multiple inputs. We compare this to the dynamic stabilization in the “balanced network”, which yields only linear behavior. We more exhaustively analyze the 2-dimensional case of 1 excitatory and 1 inhibitory population. We show that in this case dynamic stabilization will occur whenever the determinant of the weight matrix is positive and the inhibitory time constant is sufficiently small, and analyze the conditions for “supersaturation”, or decrease of firing rates with increasing stimulus contrast (which represents increasing input firing rates). In work to be presented elsewhere, we have found that this transition from supralinear to sublinear summation can explain a wide variety of nonlinearities in cerebral cortical processing. PMID:23663149

  20. Assessment of Stability of Craniofacial Implants by Resonant Frequency Analysis.

    PubMed

    Ivanjac, Filip; Konstantinović, Vitomir S; Lazić, Vojkan; Dordević, Igor; Ihde, Stefan

    2016-03-01

    Implant stability is a principal precondition for the success of implant therapy. Extraoral implants (EO) are mainly used for anchoring of maxillofacial epithesis. However, assessment of implant stability is mostly based on principles derived from oral implants. The aim of this study was to investigate clinical stability of EO craniofacial disk implants (single, double, and triple) by resonance frequency analysis at different stages of the bone's healing. Twenty patients with orbital (11), nasal (5), and auricular (4) defects with 50 EO implants placed for epithesis anchorage were included. Implant stability was measured 3 times; after implant placement, at 3 months and at least after 6 months. A significant increase in implant stability values was noted between all of the measurements, except for triple-disk implants between third and sixth months, and screw implants between 0 and third months. Disk implants showed lower implant stability quotient (ISQ) values compared with screw implants. Triple-disk implants showed better stability compared with single and double-disk implants. Based on resonance frequency analysis values, disk implants could be safely loaded when their ISQ values are 38 (single disks), 47 (double disks), and 48 (triple disks). According to resonance frequency analysis, disk implant stability increased over time, which showed good osseointegration and increasing mineralization. Although EO screw implants showed higher ISQ values than disk implants, disk-type implants can be safely loaded even if lower values of stability are measured.

  1. Analysis of the Numerical and Geometrical Parameters Influencing the Simulation of Mode I and Mode II Delamination Growth in Unidirectional and Textile Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacques, S.; De Baere, I.; Van Paepegem, W.

    2015-12-01

    The reliability of composite structures depends, among other damage mechanisms, on their ability to withstand delaminations. In order to have a better understanding of the cohesive zone method technique for delamination simulations, a complete analysis of the multiple parameters influencing the results is necessary. In this paper the work is concentrated on the cohesive zone method using cohesive elements. First a summary of the theory of the cohesive zone method is given. A numerical investigation on the multiple parameters influencing the numerical simulation of the mode I and mode II delamination tests has been performed. The parameters such as the stabilization method, the output frequency, the friction and the computational efficiency have been taken into account. The results will be compared to an analytical solution obtained by linear elastic fracture mechanics. Additionally the numerical simulation results will be compared to the experimental results of a glass-fibre reinforced composite material for the mode I Double Cantilever Beam (DCB) and to a carbon fibre 5-harness satin weave reinforced polyphenylene sulphide composite for the mode I DCB and mode II End Notched Flexure (ENF).

  2. Frequency stabilization and transverse mode discrimination in injection-seeded unstable resonator TEA CO2 lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ancellet, G. M.; Menzies, R. T.; Brothers, A. M.

    1987-01-01

    Longitudinal mode selection by injection has been demonstrated as a viable technique for TEA-CO2 lasers with pulse energies of a Joule or greater. Once reliable generation of single-longitudinal-mode (SLM) pulses is obtained, the characteristics and the causes of intrapulse frequency variation can be studied. These include the effect of the decaying plasma, the thermal gradient due to the energy dissipation associated with the laser mechanism itself, and the pressure shift of the center frequency of the laser transition. The use of the positive-branch unstable resonator as an efficient means of coupling a discharge with large spatial dimensions to an optical cavity mode introduces another concern: namely, what can be done to emphasize transverse mode discrimination in an unstable resonator cavity while maintaining high coupling efficiency. These issues are discussed in this paper, and relevant experimental results are included.

  3. Stability of 3D Textile Composite Reinforcement Simulations: Solutions to Spurious Transverse Modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathieu, S.; Hamila, N.; Dupé, F.; Descamps, C.; Boisse, P.

    2016-08-01

    The simulation of thick 3D composite reinforcement forming brings to light new modeling challenges. The specific anisotropic material behavior due to the possible slippage between fibers induces, among other phenomena, the development of spurious transverse modes in bending-dominated 3D simulations. To obtain coherent finite element responses, two solutions are proposed. The first one uses a simple assumed strain formulation usually prescribed to prevent volumetric locking. This solution avoids spurious transverse modes by stiffening of the hourglass modes. Nevertheless the deformation obtained by this approach still suffers from the inability of the standard continuum mechanics of Cauchy to describe fibrous material deformation. The second proposed approach is based on the introduction of a bending stiffness which both avoids the spurious transverse modes and also improves the global behavior of the element formulation by enriching the underlying continuum. To emphasize the differences between different formulations, element stiffnesses are explicitly calculated and compared.

  4. Bifurcations, stability and mode evolution in segregated quasi-2D condensate mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Sukla; Roy, Arko; Angom, D.

    2017-10-01

    We present new features of low energy Bogoliubov quasiparticle excitations of a two-component Bose–Einstein condensate (TBEC) in quasi-2D geometry at zero temperature using Hartree–Fock–Bogoliubov formalism. We, in particular, consider the TBECs of 133Cs–87Rb and 85Rb–87Rb, and show specific features in the low energy excitation spectrum as a function of the interaction strength. For 85Rb–87Rb TBEC, the appearance of a new zero energy mode is observed. Whereas for 133Cs–87Rb TBEC we report a bifurcation of the slosh mode at the point of transition from miscible to immiscible domain. The lower energy mode, after the bifurcation, goes soft and becomes a new Nambu–Goldstone mode of the system.

  5. NOLB: Nonlinear Rigid Block Normal-Mode Analysis Method.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Alexandre; Grudinin, Sergei

    2017-05-09

    We present a new conceptually simple and computationally efficient method for nonlinear normal-mode analysis called NOLB. It relies on the rotations-translations of blocks (RTB) theoretical basis developed by Y.-H. Sanejouand and colleagues [ Durand et al. Biopolymers 1994 , 34 , 759 - 771 . Tama et al. Proteins: Struct., Funct., Bioinf . 2000 , 41 , 1 - 7 ]. We demonstrate how to physically interpret the eigenvalues computed in the RTB basis in terms of angular and linear velocities applied to the rigid blocks and how to construct a nonlinear extrapolation of motion out of these velocities. The key observation of our method is that the angular velocity of a rigid block can be interpreted as the result of an implicit force, such that the motion of the rigid block can be considered as a pure rotation about a certain center. We demonstrate the motions produced with the NOLB method on three different molecular systems and show that some of the lowest frequency normal modes correspond to the biologically relevant motions. For example, NOLB detects the spiral sliding motion of the TALE protein, which is capable of rapid diffusion along its target DNA. Overall, our method produces better structures compared to the standard approach, especially at large deformation amplitudes, as we demonstrate by visual inspection, energy, and topology analyses and also by the MolProbity service validation. Finally, our method is scalable and can be applied to very large molecular systems, such as ribosomes. Standalone executables of the NOLB normal-mode analysis method are available at https://team.inria.fr/nano-d/software/nolb-normal-modes/ . A graphical user interface created for the SAMSON software platform will be made available at https://www.samson-connect.net .

  6. Subspace dynamic mode decomposition for stochastic Koopman analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeishi, Naoya; Kawahara, Yoshinobu; Yairi, Takehisa

    2017-09-01

    The analysis of nonlinear dynamical systems based on the Koopman operator is attracting attention in various applications. Dynamic mode decomposition (DMD) is a data-driven algorithm for Koopman spectral analysis, and several variants with a wide range of applications have been proposed. However, popular implementations of DMD suffer from observation noise on random dynamical systems and generate inaccurate estimation of the spectra of the stochastic Koopman operator. In this paper, we propose subspace DMD as an algorithm for the Koopman analysis of random dynamical systems with observation noise. Subspace DMD first computes the orthogonal projection of future snapshots to the space of past snapshots and then estimates the spectra of a linear model, and its output converges to the spectra of the stochastic Koopman operator under standard assumptions. We investigate the empirical performance of subspace DMD with several dynamical systems and show its utility for the Koopman analysis of random dynamical systems.

  7. Bifurcation analysis of axial flow compressor stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccaughan, F. E.

    1990-01-01

    With a one-mode truncation it is possible to reduce the Moore-Greitzer model for compressor instability to a set of three ordinary differential equations. These are approached from the point of view of bifurcation theory. Most of the bifurcations emerge from a degenerate Takens-Bogdanov bifurcation point. The bifurcation sets are completed using the numerical branch tracking scheme AUTO. Despite the severity of the truncation, the agreement with experimental results is excellent.

  8. Linear MHD Stability Analysis of the SSPX Spheromak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayakumar, R.; Cohen, B. I.; Hooper, E. B.; Lodestro, L. L.; McLean, H. S.; Pearlstein, L. D.; Wood, R.; Turnbull, A. D.; Sovinec, C.

    2007-11-01

    Good correlation between the toroidal mode numbers of measured magnetic fluctuations in high temperature SSPX plasmas and presence of low-order rational surfaces in the reconstructed q profiles, suggests that the quality of magnetic surfaces in SSPX is sufficiently good for applying standard linear MHD stability analyses. Previously we have reported on benchmarking the code NIMROD against GATO, with good agreement in growth rates for ideal-MHD internal kinks and an external kinks with no current on open field lines (for equilibria imported from the code Corsica). Recent stability analyses also show that presence of low order rational surfaces causes internal modes to become unstable. We will report on the progress in applying these tools for assessing beta limits in SSPX, using NIMROD analyses including current on open field lines and for comparison with experiments.

  9. Mathematical modelling and linear stability analysis of laser fusion cutting

    SciTech Connect

    Hermanns, Torsten; Schulz, Wolfgang; Vossen, Georg; Thombansen, Ulrich

    2016-06-08

    A model for laser fusion cutting is presented and investigated by linear stability analysis in order to study the tendency for dynamic behavior and subsequent ripple formation. The result is a so called stability function that describes the correlation of the setting values of the process and the process’ amount of dynamic behavior.

  10. Application of modern time series analysis to high stability oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrell, B. F.; Mattison, W. M.; Vessot, R. F. C.

    1980-01-01

    Techniques of modern time series analysis useful for investigating the characteristics of high-stability oscillators and identifying systematic perturbations are discussed with reference to an experiment in which the frequencies of superconducting cavity-stabilized oscillators and hydrogen masers were compared. The techniques examined include transformation to stationarity, autocorrelation and cross-correlation, superresolution, and transfer function determination.

  11. Nonlinear stability analysis of Darcy’s flow with viscous heating

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Leonardo S. de B.; Barletta, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    The nonlinear stability of a rectangular porous channel saturated by a fluid is here investigated. The aspect ratio of the channel is assumed to be variable. The channel walls are considered impermeable and adiabatic except for the horizontal top which is assumed to be isothermal. The viscous dissipation is acting inside the channel as internal heat generator. A basic throughflow is imposed, and the nonlinear convective stability is investigated by means of the generalized integral transform technique. The neutral stability curve is compared with the one obtained by the linear stability analysis already present in the literature. The growth rate analysis of different unstable modes is performed. The Nusselt number is investigated for several supercritical configurations in order to better understand how the system behaves when conditions far away from neutral stability are considered. The patterns of the neutrally stable convective cells are also reported. Nonlinear simulations support the results obtained by means of the linear stability analysis, confirming that viscous dissipation alone is indeed capable of inducing mixed convection. Low Gebhart or high Péclet numbers lead to a transient overheating of the originally motionless fluid before it settles in its convective steady state. PMID:27279772

  12. Stability, reliability and cross-mode correlations of tests in a recommended 8-minute performance assessment battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkes, R. L.; Kennedy, R. S.; Dunlap, W. P.; Lane, N. E.

    1986-01-01

    A need exists for an automated performance test system to study drugs, agents, treatments, and stresses of interest to the aviation, space, and environmental medical community. The purpose of this present study is to evaluate tests for inclusion in the NASA-sponsored Automated Performance Test System (APTS). Twenty-one subjects were tested over 10 replications with tests previously identified as good candidates for repeated-measure research. The tests were concurrently administered in paper-and-pencil and microcomputer modes. Performance scores for the two modes were compared. Data from trials 1 to 10 were examined for indications of test stability and reliability. Nine of the ten APT system tests achieved stability. Reliabilities were generally high. Cross-correlation of microbased tests with traditional paper-and-pencil versions revealed similarity of content within tests in the different modes, and implied at least three cognition and two motor factors. This protable, inexpensive, rugged, computerized battery of tests is recommended for use in repeated-measures studies of environmental and drug effects on performance. Identification of other tests compatible with microcomputer testing and potentially capable of tapping previously unidentified factors is recommended. Documentation of APTS sensitivity to environmental agents is available for more than a dozen facilities and is reported briefly. Continuation of such validation remains critical in establishing the efficacy of APTS tests.

  13. An Experimental Evaluation of Generalized Predictive Control for Tiltrotor Aeroelastic Stability Augmentation in Airplane Mode of Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kvaternik, Raymond G.; Piatak, David J.; Nixon, Mark W.; Langston, Chester W.; Singleton, Jeffrey D.; Bennett, Richard L.; Brown, Ross K.

    2001-01-01

    The results of a joint NASA/Army/Bell Helicopter Textron wind-tunnel test to assess the potential of Generalized Predictive Control (GPC) for actively controlling the swashplate of tiltrotor aircraft to enhance aeroelastic stability in the airplane mode of flight are presented. GPC is an adaptive time-domain predictive control method that uses a linear difference equation to describe the input-output relationship of the system and to design the controller. The test was conducted in the Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel using an unpowered 1/5-scale semispan aeroelastic model of the V-22 that was modified to incorporate a GPC-based multi-input multi-output control algorithm to individually control each of the three swashplate actuators. Wing responses were used for feedback. The GPC-based control system was highly effective in increasing the stability of the critical wing mode for all of the conditions tested, without measurable degradation of the damping in the other modes. The algorithm was also robust with respect to its performance in adjusting to rapid changes in both the rotor speed and the tunnel airspeed.

  14. Optically stabilized Erbium fiber frequency comb with hybrid mode-locking and a broad tunable range of repetition rate.

    PubMed

    Yang, Honglei; Wu, Xuejian; Zhang, Hongyuan; Zhao, Shijie; Yang, Lijun; Wei, Haoyun; Li, Yan

    2016-12-01

    We present an optically stabilized Erbium fiber frequency comb with a broad repetition rate tuning range based on a hybrid mode-locked oscillator. We lock two comb modes to narrow-linewidth reference lasers in turn to investigate the best performance of control loops. The control bandwidth of fast and slow piezoelectric transducers reaches 70 kHz, while that of pump current modulation with phase-lead compensation is extended to 32 kHz, exceeding laser intrinsic response. Eventually, simultaneous lock of both loops is realized to totally phase-stabilize the comb, which will facilitate precision dual-comb spectroscopy, laser ranging, and timing distribution. In addition, a 1.8-MHz span of the repetition rate is achieved by an automatic optical delay line that is helpful in manufacturing a secondary comb with a similar repetition rate. The oscillator is housed in a homemade temperature-controlled box with an accuracy of ±0.02  K, which not only keeps high signal-to-noise ratio of the beat notes with reference lasers, but also guarantees self-starting at the same mode-locking every time.

  15. Stability analysis in tachyonic potential chameleon cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Farajollahi, H.; Salehi, A.; Tayebi, F.; Ravanpak, A. E-mail: a.salehi@guilan.ac.ir E-mail: aravanpak@guilan.ac.ir

    2011-05-01

    We study general properties of attractors for tachyonic potential chameleon scalar-field model which possess cosmological scaling solutions. An analytic formulation is given to obtain fixed points with a discussion on their stability. The model predicts a dynamical equation of state parameter with phantom crossing behavior for an accelerating universe. We constrain the parameters of the model by best fitting with the recent data-sets from supernovae and simulated data points for redshift drift experiment generated by Monte Carlo simulations.

  16. Stability analysis of the Gravito-Electrostatic Sheath-based solar plasma equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karmakar, P. K.; Goutam, H. P.; Lal, M.; Dwivedi, C. B.

    2016-08-01

    We present approximate solutions of non-local linear perturbational analysis for discussing the stability properties of the Gravito-Electrostatic Sheath (GES)-based solar plasma equilibrium, which is indeed non-uniform on both the bounded and unbounded scales. The relevant physical variables undergoing perturbations are the self-solar gravity, electrostatic potential and plasma flow along with plasma population density. We methodologically derive linear dispersion relation for the GES fluctuations, and solve it numerically to identify and characterize the existent possible natural normal modes. Three distinct natural normal modes are identified and named as the GES-oscillator mode, GES-wave mode and usual (classical) p-mode. In the solar wind plasma, only the p-mode survives. These modes are found to be linearly unstable in wide-range of the Jeans-normalized wavenumber, k. The local plane-wave approximation marginally limits the validity or reliability of the obtained results in certain radial- and k-domains only. The phase and group velocities, time periods of these fluctuation modes are investigated. It is interesting to note that, the oscillation time periods of these modes are 3-10 min, which match exactly with those of the observed helio-seismic waves and solar surface oscillations. The proposed GES model provides a novel physical view of the waves and oscillations of the Sun from a new perspective of plasma-wall interaction physics. Due to simplified nature of the considered GES equilibrium, it is a neonatal stage to highlight its applicability in the real Sun. The proposed GES model and subsequent fluctuation analysis need further improvements to make it more realistic.

  17. Stability and phase transition of localized modes in Bose–Einstein condensates with both two- and three-body interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Bai, Xiao-Dong; Ai, Qing; Zhang, Mei; Xiong, Jun Yang, Guo-Jian; Deng, Fu-Guo

    2015-09-15

    We investigate the stability and phase transition of localized modes in Bose–Einstein Condensates (BECs) in an optical lattice with the discrete nonlinear Schrödinger model by considering both two- and three-body interactions. We find that there are three types of localized modes, bright discrete breather (DB), discrete kink (DK), and multi-breather (MUB). Moreover, both two- and three-body on-site repulsive interactions can stabilize DB, while on-site attractive three-body interactions destabilize it. There is a critical value for the three-body interaction with which both DK and MUB become the most stable ones. We give analytically the energy thresholds for the destabilization of localized states and find that they are unstable (stable) when the total energy of the system is higher (lower) than the thresholds. The stability and dynamics characters of DB and MUB are general for extended lattice systems. Our result is useful for the blocking, filtering, and transfer of the norm in nonlinear lattices for BECs with both two- and three-body interactions.

  18. Aerodynamic analysis of seamless horizontal stabilizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nithya, S.; Kanimozhi, S.

    2017-05-01

    This project presents an investigative view into the concept of seamless aeroelastic wing and hingeless flexible trailing edge. Wings are designed to provide maximum lift and minimal drag and weight. But with conventional wings where rivets are used and the control surfaces are separately hinged, parasite drag comes into play. This project is about analysing a smooth seamless wing with hinge-less flexible trailing edge. This type of wing reduces the drag considerably and the hinge-less trailing edge leads to a minimal control demand and reduces the noise produced when the aircraft comes for landing. Seamless aeroelastic wing will function as an integrated one piece lifting and control surface. It has been designed to enhance a desirable wing camber for control by deflecting a hinge-less flexible trailing edge part instead of a traditional hinged control surface. This kind of flexible wing can be achieved either by a curved beam and disc actuation mechanism or by piezo-electric materials, whose shape change can be achieved by electricity. The intent of this project is to analyze the effects of introducing the concept of Seamless Wing to the horizontal stabilizer. While the removal of rivets and serrations that hinge the elevators to the stabilizer reduces the overall drag by a reasonable value, the overall concept of a control surface-less stabilizer where the maneuvers are done by deflecting the trailing edge offers better maneuverability.

  19. Frequency-stabilization of mode-locked laser-based photonic microwave oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Nan; Tu, Meirong; Salik, Ertan; Maleki, Lute

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we will describe our recent phase-noise measurements of photonic microwave oscillators. We will aslo discuss our investigation of the frequency stability link between the optical and microwave frequencies in the coupled oscillator.

  20. Stability of Microturbulent Drift Modes during Internal Transport Barrier Formation in the Alcator C-Mod Radio Frequency Heated H-mode

    SciTech Connect

    M.H. Redi; C.L. Fiore; W. Dorland; D.R. Mikkelsen; G. Rewoldt; P.T. Bonoli; D.R. Ernst; J.E. Rice; S.J. Wukitch

    2003-11-20

    Recent H-mode experiments on Alcator C-Mod [I.H. Hutchinson, et al., Phys. Plasmas 1 (1994) 1511] which exhibit an internal transport barrier (ITB), have been examined with flux tube geometry gyrokinetic simulations, using the massively parallel code GS2 [M. Kotschenreuther, G. Rewoldt, and W.M. Tang, Comput. Phys. Commun. 88 (1995) 128]. The simulations support the picture of ion/electron temperature gradient (ITG/ETG) microturbulence driving high xi/ xe and that suppressed ITG causes reduced particle transport and improved ci on C-Mod. Nonlinear calculations for C-Mod confirm initial linear simulations, which predicted ITG stability in the barrier region just before ITB formation, without invoking E x B shear suppression of turbulence. Nonlinear fluxes are compared to experiment, which both show low heat transport in the ITB and higher transport within and outside of the barrier region.

  1. Receive Mode Analysis and Design of Microstrip Reflectarrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rengarajan, Sembiam

    2011-01-01

    Traditionally microstrip or printed reflectarrays are designed using the transmit mode technique. In this method, the size of each printed element is chosen so as to provide the required value of the reflection phase such that a collimated beam results along a given direction. The reflection phase of each printed element is approximated using an infinite array model. The infinite array model is an excellent engineering approximation for a large microstrip array since the size or orientation of elements exhibits a slow spatial variation. In this model, the reflection phase from a given printed element is approximated by that of an infinite array of elements of the same size and orientation when illuminated by a local plane wave. Thus the reflection phase is a function of the size (or orientation) of the element, the elevation and azimuth angles of incidence of a local plane wave, and polarization. Typically, one computes the reflection phase of the infinite array as a function of several parameters such as size/orientation, elevation and azimuth angles of incidence, and in some cases for vertical and horizontal polarization. The design requires the selection of the size/orientation of the printed element to realize the required phase by interpolating or curve fitting all the computed data. This is a substantially complicated problem, especially in applications requiring a computationally intensive commercial code to determine the reflection phase. In dual polarization applications requiring rectangular patches, one needs to determine the reflection phase as a function of five parameters (dimensions of the rectangular patch, elevation and azimuth angles of incidence, and polarization). This is an extremely complex problem. The new method employs the reciprocity principle and reaction concept, two well-known concepts in electromagnetics to derive the receive mode analysis and design techniques. In the "receive mode design" technique, the reflection phase is computed

  2. New type of wavelet-based spectral analysis by which modes with different toroidal mode number are separated

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohdachi, S.

    2016-11-01

    A new type of wavelet-based analysis for the magnetic fluctuations by which toroidal mode number can be resolved is proposed. By using a wavelet, having a different phase toroidally, a spectrogram with a specific toroidal mode number can be obtained. When this analysis is applied to the measurement of the fluctuations observed in the large helical device, MHD activities having similar frequency in the laboratory frame can be separated from the difference of the toroidal mode number. It is useful for the non-stationary MHD activity. This method is usable when the toroidal magnetic probes are not symmetrically distributed.

  3. Detecting Mode Confusion Through Formal Modeling and Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Steven P.; Potts, James N.

    1999-01-01

    Aircraft safety has improved steadily over the last few decades. While much of this improvement can be attributed to the introduction of advanced automation in the cockpit, the growing complexity of these systems also increases the potential for the pilots to become confused about what the automation is doing. This phenomenon, often referred to as mode confusion, has been involved in several accidents involving modern aircraft. This report describes an effort by Rockwell Collins and NASA Langley to identify potential sources of mode confusion through two complementary strategies. The first is to create a clear, executable model of the automation, connect it to a simulation of the flight deck, and use this combination to review of the behavior of the automation and the man-machine interface with the designers, pilots, and experts in human factors. The second strategy is to conduct mathematical analyses of the model by translating it into a formal specification suitable for analysis with automated tools. The approach is illustrated by applying it to a hypothetical, but still realistic, example of the mode logic of a Flight Guidance System.

  4. Attitude stabilization of a rigid spacecraft using gas jet actuators operating in a failure mode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishnan, Hariharan; Reyhanoglu, Mahmut; Mcclamroch, Harris

    1993-01-01

    The attitude stabilization of a rigid spacecraft using control torques supplied by gas jet actuators about only two of its principal axes is considered. First, the case where the uncontrolled principal axis of the spacecraft is not an axis of symmetry is considered. In this case, the complete spacecraft dynamics are small time locally controllable. However, the spacecraft cannot be asymptotically stabilized to an equilibrium attitude using time-invariant continuous feedback. A discontinuous stabilizing feedback control strategy is constructed which stabilizes the spacecraft to an equilibrium attitude. Next, the case where the uncontrolled principal axis of the spacecraft is an axis of symmetry is considered. In this case, the complete spacecraft dynamics are not even accessible. However, the spacecraft dynamics are strongly accessible and small time locally controllable in a reduced sense. The reduced spacecraft dynamics cannot be asymptotically stabilized to an equilibrium attitude using time-invariant continuous feedback, but again a discontinuous stabilizing feedback control strategy is constructed. In both cases, the discontinuous feedback controllers are constructed by switching between one of several feedback functions.

  5. Stability analysis of self-similar behaviors in perfect fluid gravitational collapse

    SciTech Connect

    Mitsuda, Eiji; Tomimatsu, Akira

    2006-06-15

    Stability of self-similar solutions for gravitational collapse is an important problem to be investigated from the perspectives of their nature as an attractor, critical phenomena, and instability of a naked singularity. In this paper we study spherically symmetric non-self-similar perturbations of matter and metrics in spherically symmetric self-similar backgrounds. The collapsing matter is assumed to be a perfect fluid with the equation of state P={alpha}{rho}. We construct a single wave equation governing the perturbations, which makes their time evolution in arbitrary self-similar backgrounds analytically tractable. Further we propose an analytical application of this master wave equation to the stability problem by means of the normal mode analysis for the perturbations having the time dependence given by exp(i{omega}log vertical t vertical bar), and present some sufficient conditions for the absence of nonoscillatory unstable normal modes with purely imaginary {omega}.

  6. Numerical simulation and stability analysis of solutocapillary effect in ultrathin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordeeva, V. Yu.; Lyushnin, A. V.

    2017-04-01

    Polar fluids, like water or polydimethylsiloxane, are widely used in technical and medical applications. Capillary effects arising from surface tension gradients can be significant in thin liquid films. The present paper is dedicated to investigation of capillary flow due to a surfactant added to a polar liquid under conditions when intermolecular forces and disjoining pressure play an important role. Evolution equations are formulated for a film profile and the surfactant concentration. Stability analysis shows that the Marangoni effect destabilizes the film, and oscillatory modes appear at slow evaporation rates. We find that the film has four stability modes of at slow evaporation: monotonic stable, monotonic unstable, oscillatory stable, and oscillatory unstable, depending on the wave number of disturbances.

  7. Failure modes and effects analysis (RADL Item 2-23)

    SciTech Connect

    1980-04-01

    The Pilot Plant is a central receiver design concept. It is comprised of five major subsystems as shown schematically, plus a set of equipment (Plant Support Subsystem) used to support total plant operation. The failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA) is a bottom-up analysis used to identify the failure characteristics of the system (total equipment used to produce electrical power), that is, the failure of a single component is assumed and the effect of that failure upon the system is determined. The FMEA is concerned with the plant from an operational standpoint (i.e., the production of electrical power). This analysis was performed to the component level. This was interpreted as a valve, computer, measurement sensor and its associated signal conditioning, an electronic black box, etc.

  8. Analysis of the Tem Mode Linearly Tapered Slot Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janaswamy, R.; Schaubert, D. H.; Pozar, D. M.

    1985-01-01

    The theoretical analysis of the radiation characteristics of the TEM mode Linearly Tapered Slot Antenna (LTSA) is presented. The theory presented is valid for antennas with air dielectric and forms the basis for analysis of the more popular dielectric-supported antennas. The method of analysis involves two steps. In the first step, the aperture distribution in the flared slot is determined. In the second step, the equivalent magnetic current in the slot is treated as radiating in the presence of a conducting half-plane and the far-field components are obtained. Detailed comparison with experiment is made and excellent agreement is obtained. Design curves for the variation of the 3 dB and 10 dB beamwidths as a function of the antenna length, with the flare angle as a parameter, are presented.

  9. The different modes of hydro-economic analysis (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harou, J. J.; Binions, O.; Erfani, T.

    2013-12-01

    In the face of growing water demands, climate change and spatial and temporal water access variability, accurately assessing the economic impacts of proposed water resource management changes is useful. The objective of this project funded by UK Water Industry Research was to present and demonstrate a framework for identifying and using the ';value of water' to enable water utilities and their regulators to make better decisions. A hydro-economic model can help evaluate water management options in terms of their hydrological and economic impact at different locations throughout a catchment over time. In this talk we discuss three modes in which hydro-economic models can be implemented: evaluative, behavioral and prescriptive. In evaluation mode economic water demand and benefit functions are used to post-process water resource management model results to assess the economic impacts (over space and time) of a policy under consideration. In behavioral hydro-economic models users are represented as agents and the economics is used to help predict their actions. In prescriptive mode optimization is used to find the most economically efficient management actions such as allocation patterns or source selection. These three types of hydro-economic analysis are demonstrated on a UK watershed (Great River Ouse) that includes 97 different water abstractors from amongst the public water supply, agriculture, industry and energy plant cooling sectors. The following issues under dry and normal historical conditions were investigated: Supply/demand investment planning, societal cost of environmental flows, water market prices, and scarcity-sensitive charges for water rights. The talk discusses which hydro-economic modeling mode is used to study each of these issues and why; example results are shown and discussed. The topic of how hydro-economic models can be built and deployed effectively is covered along with how existing water utility operational and planning tools can be

  10. Geodesic acoustic mode in tokamaks: local consideration and eigenvalue analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolesnichenko, Ya I.; Lepiavko, B. S.; Lutsenko, V. V.

    2013-12-01

    A set of magnetohydrodynamic equations describing the geodesic acoustic mode (GAM) in tokamak plasmas is derived. The obtained equations take into account the presence of the energetic ions and allow to study energetic-ion-driven GAM instability perturbatively or non-perturbatively (EGAM mode). They are applicable to plasmas with \\bar{\\beta} q^2 \\lesssim 1 , where \\bar{\\beta} =\\beta_s/(1+\\beta_s) , \\beta_s=c_s^2/v_A^2 , cs is the sound velocity, vA is the Alfvén velocity, q is the tokamak safety factor. Using these equations, GAM/EGAM instability is studied in a local approach and by means of the eigenvalue analysis. It is shown that β-coupling (the coupling of Fourier harmonics of the perturbation due to finite β—ratio of the plasma pressure to the magnetic field pressure—and the curvature of the field lines) can be responsible for the radial structure of the GAM-mode. A conclusion is drawn that conditions for the GAM/EGAM instability to arise are mildest in the case of counter-injection of energetic ions with pitch angles χ2 < 0.6 and large ratio of Larmor radius of the energetic ions to a characteristic length of inhomogeneity of these ions. A numerical code solving the derived equations is developed. Specific calculations are carried out for tokamaks with a non-monotonic safety factor. On the other hand, it is found that due to the presence of the energetic ions the GAM/EGAM continuum can have an extremum even when the safety factor q(r) is monotonic, which indicates that global modes can exist also in this case.

  11. Failure modes and effects analysis in clinical engineering.

    PubMed

    Willis, G

    1992-01-01

    Failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA) is a proactive quality assurance procedure that has been commonly used to address potential design flaws and product misuses during the design stage of a product's life. FMEA is becoming commonplace among manufacturing companies but is relatively unknown outside of manufacturing circles. One potential new application of FMEA is by medical device end-users who could address design or functional concerns specific to their situation. The continued increase in the amount and complexity of medical instrumentation necessitates an aggressive stance towards safety in each hospital, such as is recommended in this paper.

  12. Robust stability analysis of linear systems with parametric uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Ding; Zhang, Qing-Ling; Liu, Guo-Yi

    2012-09-01

    This article is concerned with the problem of robust stability analysis of linear systems with uncertain parameters. By constructing an equivalent system with positive uncertain parameters and using the properties of these parameters, a new stability analysis condition is derived. Due to making use of the properties of uncertain parameters, the new proposed method has potential to give less conservative results than the existing approaches. A numerical example is given to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  13. Temperature stability of transit time delay for a single-mode fibre in a loose tube cable

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergman, L. A.; Eng, S. T.; Johnston, A. R.

    1983-01-01

    The effect of temperature on the transit-time delay of a loose-tube-type single-mode optical-fiber cable is investigated experimentally. A 1058-m length of cable was placed loosely coiled in an oven and used to connect a 820-nm single-mode laser diode to a high-speed avalanche-photodiode detector feeding a vector voltmeter; the signal was provided by a high-stability frequency-synthesized generator. Measurements were made every 2 C from -50 to 60 C and compared to those obtained with a 200-m lacquered bare fiber. The phase change of both fibers varied with temperature at a positive slope of 6-7 ppm/C. This value is significantly better than those reported for other cable types, suggesting the application of loose-fiber cables to long-haul gigabit digital transmissions or precision time-base distribution for VLBI.

  14. Effects of Three-Dimensional Electromagnetic Structures on Resistive-Wall-Mode Stability of Reversed Field Pinches

    SciTech Connect

    Villone, F.

    2008-06-27

    In this Letter, the linear stability of the resistive wall modes (RWMs) in toroidal geometry for a reversed field pinch (RFP) plasma is studied. Three computational models are used: the cylindrical code ETAW, the toroidal MHD code MARS-F, and the CarMa code, able to take fully into account the effects of a three-dimensional conducting structure which mimics the real shell geometry of a reversed field pinch experimental device. The computed mode growth rates generally agree with experimental data. The toroidal effects and the three-dimensional features of the shell, like gaps, allow a novel interpretation of the RWM spectrum in RFP's and remove its degeneracy. This shows the importance of making accurate modeling of conductors for the RWM predictions also in future devices such as ITER.

  15. Temperature stability of transit time delay for a single-mode fibre in a loose tube cable

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergman, L. A.; Eng, S. T.; Johnston, A. R.

    1983-01-01

    The effect of temperature on the transit-time delay of a loose-tube-type single-mode optical-fiber cable is investigated experimentally. A 1058-m length of cable was placed loosely coiled in an oven and used to connect a 820-nm single-mode laser diode to a high-speed avalanche-photodiode detector feeding a vector voltmeter; the signal was provided by a high-stability frequency-synthesized generator. Measurements were made every 2 C from -50 to 60 C and compared to those obtained with a 200-m lacquered bare fiber. The phase change of both fibers varied with temperature at a positive slope of 6-7 ppm/C. This value is significantly better than those reported for other cable types, suggesting the application of loose-fiber cables to long-haul gigabit digital transmissions or precision time-base distribution for VLBI.

  16. Stability of the boundary zero modes in one-dimensional topological superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samokhin, K. V.; Truong, B. P.

    2017-04-01

    We calculate the spectrum of the Andreev bound states in a one-dimensional superconductor with a strong Rashba spin-orbit coupling. We focus on the fate of the zero-energy Andreev modes in the presence of time reversal symmetry breaking perturbations, both at the boundary and in the bulk. It is shown that the zero modes are destroyed by time reversal symmetry breaking fluctuations, even if the mean-field state of the system is time-reversal invariant and topologically nontrivial.

  17. Sensitivity analysis of hydrodynamic stability operators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmid, Peter J.; Henningson, Dan S.; Khorrami, Mehdi R.; Malik, Mujeeb R.

    1992-01-01

    The eigenvalue sensitivity for hydrodynamic stability operators is investigated. Classical matrix perturbation techniques as well as the concept of epsilon-pseudoeigenvalues are applied to show that parts of the spectrum are highly sensitive to small perturbations. Applications are drawn from incompressible plane Couette, trailing line vortex flow and compressible Blasius boundary layer flow. Parametric studies indicate a monotonically increasing effect of the Reynolds number on the sensitivity. The phenomenon of eigenvalue sensitivity is due to the non-normality of the operators and their discrete matrix analogs and may be associated with large transient growth of the corresponding initial value problem.

  18. Stability analysis of doubly regenerative cylindrical grinding process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhaoheng; Payre, Guy

    2007-04-01

    In this paper, we investigate the stability properties of a cylindrical grinding process. The dynamical model of the process includes two inherent delayed forcing terms, one from workpiece regeneration and the other from grinding wheel regeneration. The prediction of chatter onset is carried out by computing the spectrum of the doubly delayed differential equations for any set of physical and operational parameters. Stability diagrams are plotted in parameter space. The stability behavior obtained from this analysis is verified to be consistent with direct simulation results. A sensitivity analysis approach is also proposed, and can be used to lead an unstable process to a stable state by optimally varying one of the operational parameters.

  19. Failure mode analysis of a post-tension anchored dam using linear finite element analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corn, Aimee

    There are currently over 84,000 dams in the United States, and the average age of those dams is 52 years. Concrete gravity dams are the second most common dam type, with more than 3,000 in the United States. Current engineering technology and technical understanding of hydrologic and seismic events has resulted in significant increases to the required design loads for most dams; therefore, many older dams do not have adequate safety for extreme loading events. Concrete gravity dams designed and constructed in the early 20th century did not consider uplift pressures beneath the dam, which reduces the effective weight of the structure. One method that has been used to enhance the stability of older concrete gravity dams includes the post-tension anchor (PTA) system. Post-tensioning infers modifying cured concrete and using self-equilibrating elements to increase the weight of the section, which provides added stability. There is a lack of historical evidence regarding the potential failure mechanisms for PTA concrete gravity dams. Of particular interest, is how these systems behave during large seismic events. The objective of this thesis is to develop a method by which the potential failure modes during a seismic event for a PTA dam can be evaluated using the linear elastic finite element method of analysis. The most likely potential failure modes (PFM) for PTA designs are due to tensile failure and shear failure. A numerical model of a hypothetical project was developed to simulate PTAs in the dam. The model was subjected to acceleration time-history motions that simulated the seismic loads. The results were used to evaluate the likelihood of tendon failure due to both tension and shear. The results from the analysis indicated that the PTA load increased during the seismic event; however, the peak load in the tendons was less than the gross ultimate tensile strength (GUTS) and would not be expected to result in tensile failure at the assumed project. The analysis

  20. Gyrokinetic analysis of ion temperature gradient modes in the presence of sheared flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artun, M.; Tang, W. M.

    1992-05-01

    The linearized gyrokinetic equation governing electrostatic microinstabilities in the presence of sheared equilibrium flows in both the ẑ and ŷ directions has been systematically derived for a sheared slab geometry, where in the large-aspect-ratio limit ẑ and ŷ directions correspond to the toroidal and poloidal directions, respectively. In the familiar long perpendicular wavelength regime (k⊥ρi<1), the analysis leads to a comprehensive kinetic differential eigenmode equation that is solved numerically. The numerical results have been successfully cross-checked against analytic estimates in the fluid limit. For typical conditions, the ion temperature gradient (ηi) modes are found to be stabilized for ŷ direction flows with a velocity shear scale comparable to that of the ion temperature gradient and velocities of a few percent of the sound speed. Sheared flows in the ẑ direction taken alone are usually destabilizing, with the effect being independent of the sign of the flow. However, when both types are simultaneously considered, it is found that in the presence of sheared ẑ-direction flow, sheared ŷ-direction flow can be either stabilizing or destabilizing depending on the relative sign of these flows. However, for sufficiently large values of v'y the mode is completely stabilized regardless of the sign of vzv'y. The importance of a proper kinetic treatment of this problem is supported by comparisons with fluid estimates. In particular, when such effects are favorable, significantly smaller values of sheared ŷ-direction flow are required for stability than fluid estimates would indicate.

  1. Gyrokinetic analysis of ion temperature gradient modes in the presence of sheared flows

    SciTech Connect

    Artun, M.; Tang, W.M.

    1992-01-01

    The linearized gyrokinetic equation governing electrostatic microinstabilities in the presence of sheared equilibrium flow in both the {cflx z} and {cflx y} directions has been systematically derived for a sheared slab geometry, where in the large aspect ratio limit {cflx z} and {cflx y} directions correspond to the toroidal and poloidal directions respectively. In the familiar long perpendicular wavelength regime ({kappa}{perpendicular}{rho}i > 1), the analysis leads to a comprehensive kinetic differential eigenmode equation which is solved numerically. The numerical results have been successfully cross-checked against analytic estimates in the fluid limit. For typical conditions, the Ion Temperature Gradient ({eta}i) modes are found to be stabilized for {cflx y}-direction flows with a velocity shear scale comparable to that of the ion temperature gradient and velocities of a few percent of the sound speed. Sheared flows in the {cflx z}-direction taken along are usually destabilizing, with the effect being independent of the sign of the flow. However, when both types are simultaneously considered, it is found that in the presence of shared {cflx z}-direction flow, sheared {cflx y}-direction flow can be either stabilizing or destabilizing depending on the relative sign of these flows. However, for sufficiently large values of {upsilon}{prime}{sub y} the mode is completely stabilized regardless of the sign of {upsilon}{prime}{sub z} {upsilon}{prime}{sub y}. The importance of a proper kinetic treatment of this problem is supported by comparisons with fluid estimates. In particular, when such effects are favorable, significantly smaller values of sheared {cflx y}-direction flow are required for stability than fluid estimates would indicate.

  2. Theoretical Study of an Actively Mode-Locked Fiber Laser Stabilized by an Intracavity Fabry-Perot Etalon: Linear Regime

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-07-01

    an actively mode-locked fiber laser stabilized by an intracavity Fabry–Perot etalon: linear regime Yurij Parkhomenko,1 Moshe Horowitz,1,* Curtis R... Menyuk ,2 and Thomas F. Carruthers3,4 1Department of Electrical Engineering, Technion–Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 32000, Israel 2Department of...Naval Research aboratory. C. R. Menyuk can be reached via e-mail at enyuk@umbc.edu, and T. F. Carruthers can be reached ia e-mail at tcarruth@nsf.gov

  3. Low noise electro-optic comb generation by fully stabilizing to a mode-locked fiber comb.

    PubMed

    Kuse, Naoya; Schibli, Thomas R; Fermann, Martin E

    2016-07-25

    A fully stabilized EO comb is demonstrated by phase locking the two degrees of freedom of an EO comb to a low noise mode-locked fiber comb. Division/magnification of residual phase noise of locked beats is observed by measuring an out-of-loop beat. By phase locking the 200 th harmonics of the EO comb and a driving cw frequency to a fiber comb, a record low phase noise EO comb across +/- 200 harmonics (from 1544.8 nm to 1577.3 nm) is demonstrated.

  4. TU-AB-BRD-02: Failure Modes and Effects Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Huq, M.

    2015-06-15

    Current quality assurance and quality management guidelines provided by various professional organizations are prescriptive in nature, focusing principally on performance characteristics of planning and delivery devices. However, published analyses of events in radiation therapy show that most events are often caused by flaws in clinical processes rather than by device failures. This suggests the need for the development of a quality management program that is based on integrated approaches to process and equipment quality assurance. Industrial engineers have developed various risk assessment tools that are used to identify and eliminate potential failures from a system or a process before a failure impacts a customer. These tools include, but are not limited to, process mapping, failure modes and effects analysis, fault tree analysis. Task Group 100 of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine has developed these tools and used them to formulate an example risk-based quality management program for intensity-modulated radiotherapy. This is a prospective risk assessment approach that analyzes potential error pathways inherent in a clinical process and then ranks them according to relative risk, typically before implementation, followed by the design of a new process or modification of the existing process. Appropriate controls are then put in place to ensure that failures are less likely to occur and, if they do, they will more likely be detected before they propagate through the process, compromising treatment outcome and causing harm to the patient. Such a prospective approach forms the basis of the work of Task Group 100 that has recently been approved by the AAPM. This session will be devoted to a discussion of these tools and practical examples of how these tools can be used in a given radiotherapy clinic to develop a risk based quality management program. Learning Objectives: Learn how to design a process map for a radiotherapy process Learn how to

  5. Large-mode-area single-polarization single-mode photonic crystal fiber: design and analysis.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ajeet; Saini, Than Singh; Naik, Kishor Dinkar; Sinha, Ravindra Kumar

    2016-07-01

    A rectangular core photonic crystal fiber structure has been presented and analyzed for single-polarization single-mode operation. Single-polarization is obtained with asymmetric design and by introducing different loss for x-polarization and y-polarization of fundamental modes. Single-polarization single-mode operation of the proposed photonic crystal fiber is investigated in detail by using a full vector finite element method with an anisotropic perfectly matched layer. The variations of the confinement loss and effective mode area of x-polarization and y-polarization of fundamental modes have been simulated by varying the structural parameters of the proposed photonic crystal fiber. At the optimized parameters, confinement loss and effective mode area is obtained as 0.94 dB/m and 60.67  μm2 for y-polarization as well as 26.67 dB/m and 67.23  μm2 for x-polarization of fundamental modes, respectively, at 1.55 μm. Therefore simulation results confirmed that, 0.75 m length of fiber will be sufficient to get a y-polarized fundamental mode with an effective mode area as large as 60.67  μm2.

  6. Failure modes and effects analysis of fusion magnet systems

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmermann, M; Kazimi, M S; Siu, N O; Thome, R J

    1988-12-01

    A failure modes and consequence analysis of fusion magnet system is an important contributor towards enhancing the design by improving the reliability and reducing the risk associated with the operation of magnet systems. In the first part of this study, a failure mode analysis of a superconducting magnet system is performed. Building on the functional breakdown and the fault tree analysis of the Toroidal Field (TF) coils of the Next European Torus (NET), several subsystem levels are added and an overview of potential sources of failures in a magnet system is provided. The failure analysis is extended to the Poloidal Field (PF) magnet system. Furthermore, an extensive analysis of interactions within the fusion device caused by the operation of the PF magnets is presented in the form of an Interaction Matrix. A number of these interactions may have significant consequences for the TF magnet system particularly interactions triggered by electrical failures in the PF magnet system. In the second part of this study, two basic categories of electrical failures in the PF magnet system are examined: short circuits between the terminals of external PF coils, and faults with a constant voltage applied at external PF coil terminals. An electromagnetic model of the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT) is used to examine the mechanical load conditions for the PF and the TF coils resulting from these fault scenarios. It is found that shorts do not pose large threats to the PF coils. Also, the type of plasma disruption has little impact on the net forces on the PF and the TF coils. 39 refs., 30 figs., 12 tabs.

  7. Stability analysis of a bilayer contained within a cylindrical tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yuanyuan

    Airways in the lung are coated with a liquid bilayer consisting of a serous layer adjacent to a more viscous mucus layer which is contiguous with the air core. An instability due to surface tension at the interfaces may lead to the formation of a liquid plug that blocks the passage of air. This is known as airway closure. A stability analysis is carried out for the case when a Newtonian and immiscible liquid bilayer coats a compliant tube in the presence of an insoluble surfactant monolayer at the mucus-gas interface. A surface active material such as surfactant lowers the surface tension and also generates a surface stress at the interface, both of which are stabilizing, while the wall compliance may accelerate the formation of the liquid bridge. A system of nonlinear coupled equations for the deflections of the interfaces and the surfactant concentration is derived by using an extended lubrication theory analysis. A linear stability study using normal modes is conducted by linearizing the nonlinear evolution equations. A linear eigenvalue problem for the perturbation amplitudes is obtained. Non-trivial solutions are obtained provided the determinant of a linear system is singular. A fourth order polynomial for the growth rate of the disturbances is derived, whose coefficients depend on the wavenumber of the perturbation, the wall characteristics, the Marangoni number, the thickness of the bilayer, the aspect thickness ratio, the viscosity ratio of two liquid layers, and the surface tension ratio. Both stabilizing and destabilizing effects of various system parameters are investigated. A classical lubrication theory model is also derived for cases where a bilayer coats a rigid tube with insoluble surfactant along the liquid-gas interface, and a bilayer coating in a compliant tube with a clean liquid-gas interface. Results serve as a validation of the extended lubrication theory model. The accuracy of the extended lubrication theory model as the bilayer thickness

  8. Unsteady aerodynamic flow field analysis of the space shuttle configuration. Part 4: 747/orbiter aeroelastic stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reding, J. P.; Ericsson, L. E.

    1976-01-01

    A quasi-steady analysis of the aeroelastic stability of the lateral (antisymmetric) modes of the 747/orbiter vehicle was accomplished. The interference effect of the orbiter wake on the 747 tail furnishes an aerodynamic undamping contribution to the elastic modes. Likewise, the upstream influence of the 747 tail and aft fuselage on the orbiter beaver-tail rail fairing also is undamping. Fortunately these undamping effects cannot overpower the large damping contribution of the 747 tail and the modes are damped for the configurations analyzed. However, significant interference effects of the orbiter on the 747 tail have been observed in the pitch plane. The high response of the 747 vertical tail in the orbiter wave was also considered. Wind tunnel data points to flapping of the OMS pod wakes as the source of the wake resonance phenomenon.

  9. On the nonlinear stability of viscous modes within the Rayleigh problem on an infinite flat plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, J. C.; Otto, S. R.; Lilley, G. M.

    1994-01-01

    The stability has been investigated of the unsteady flow past an infinite flat plate when it is moved impulsively from rest, in its own plane. For small times the instantaneous stability of the flow depends on the linearized equations of motion which reduce in this problem to the Orr-Sommerfeld equation. It is known that the flow for certain values of Reynolds number, frequency and wave number is unstable to Tollmien-Schlichting waves, as in the case of the Blasius boundary layer flow past a flat plate. With increase in time, the unstable waves only undergo growth for a finite time interval, and this growth rate is itself a function of time. The influence of finite amplitude effects is studied by solving the full Navier-Stokes equations. It is found that the stability characteristics are markedly changed both by the consideration of the time evolution of the flow, and by the introduction of finite amplitude effects.

  10. Seismic Stability Analysis of a Himalayan Rock Slope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latha, Gali Madhavi; Garaga, Arunakumari

    2010-11-01

    The seismic slope stability analysis of the right abutment of a railway bridge proposed at about 350 m above the ground level, crossing a river and connecting two huge hillocks in the Himalayas, India, is presented in this paper. The rock slopes are composed of highly jointed rock mass and the joint spacing and orientation are varying at different locations. Seismic slope stability analysis of the slope under consideration is carried out using both pseudo-static approach and time response approach as the site is located in seismic zone V as per the earth quake zonation maps of India. Stability of the slope is studied numerically using program FLAC. The results obtained from the pseudo-static analysis are presented in the form of Factor of Safety (FOS) and the results obtained from the time response analysis of the slope are presented in terms of horizontal and vertical displacements along the slope. The results obtained from both the analyses confirmed the global stability of the slope as the FOS in case of pseudo-static analysis is above 1.0 and the displacements observed in case of time response analysis are within the permissible limits. This paper also presents the results obtained from the parametric analysis performed in the case of time response analysis in order to understand the effect of individual parameters on the overall stability of the slope.

  11. iMODS: internal coordinates normal mode analysis server

    PubMed Central

    López-Blanco, José Ramón; Aliaga, José I.; Quintana-Ortí, Enrique S.; Chacón, Pablo

    2014-01-01

    Normal mode analysis (NMA) in internal (dihedral) coordinates naturally reproduces the collective functional motions of biological macromolecules. iMODS facilitates the exploration of such modes and generates feasible transition pathways between two homologous structures, even with large macromolecules. The distinctive internal coordinate formulation improves the efficiency of NMA and extends its applicability while implicitly maintaining stereochemistry. Vibrational analysis, motion animations and morphing trajectories can be easily carried out at different resolution scales almost interactively. The server is versatile; non-specialists can rapidly characterize potential conformational changes, whereas advanced users can customize the model resolution with multiple coarse-grained atomic representations and elastic network potentials. iMODS supports advanced visualization capabilities for illustrating collective motions, including an improved affine-model-based arrow representation of domain dynamics. The generated all-heavy-atoms conformations can be used to introduce flexibility for more advanced modeling or sampling strategies. The server is free and open to all users with no login requirement at http://imods.chaconlab.org. PMID:24771341

  12. Trace Elements in Coal - Modes of Ocurrence Analysis.

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, C.A.; Kolker, A.; Finkelman, R.B.; Kolb, K.C.; Mroozkowski, S.J.; Crowley, S.S.; Belkin, H.E.; Bullock, J.H., Jr.; Motooka, J.M.

    1997-07-24

    The objective is to provide modes of occurrence information for the CQ Inc. (CQ) effort being performed under DOE Contract entitled HAPs-Rx: Precombustion Removal of Hazardous Air Pollutant Precursors. This work attempts to provide semi-quantative date on modes of occurrence of 15 elements. Coals investigated include as-mined coals and cleaned fines from the Northern Appalachian and Southern Application, and Eastern Interior regions, and as-mined and natural fines from the Powder River Basin. Study techniques include scanning electron microscopy, electron micropole analysis, and leaching procedures. Microprobe data analysis indicate that pyrite grains in Northern Appalachian and Eastern Interior, and Powder River Basin coals and most of the pyrite grains of the Southern Appalachian coal contain low As concentrations, generally in the 100-500 ppm range. However, the Southern Appalachian coal contains some pyrite grains with much higher As contents, in excess of 4.0 wt. percent As. Micropole analyses and data from leaching experiments indicate that arsenic is primarily associated with pyrite in the bituminous coals. These techniques also indicate that Cr is primarily associated with illite. Other HAP`s elements have multiple associations.

  13. Limiter stabilization of high-beta external kink-tearing modes

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.K.; Ohyabu, N.

    1984-12-01

    The stabilizing effects of finite-width poloidal limiters, toroidal limiters, and general mushroom limiters are examined for high-beta finite resistivity tokamak plamas in free boundary. When the plasma pressure and resistivity are small, a poloidal limiter is effective in reducing the growth rate even with a small limiter size, while a toroidal limiter requires a large size for a comparable effect. As the plasma pressure or resistivity increases, a toroidal limiter becomes more effective in reducing the growth rate than a poloidal limiter of the same size. A small optimized mushroom limiter might have a stabilizing effect similar to a conducting shell.

  14. Structure and Stability of Steady Protostellar Accretion Flows - Part Two - Linear Stability Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balluch, M.

    1991-03-01

    Recent developments concerning spherically symmetric (1D-) numerical models of protostellar evolution show that steady protostellar accretion flows (resp. their shockfronts) may be unstable at least in the very early (Tscharnuter 1987a) and late stages (Balluch 1988) of accretion. A global, linear stability analysis of the structure of steady protostellar accretion flows with a shock discontinuity (Balluch 1990) is therefore presented to investigate such flows by different methods. Thereby three characteristic wave types, the radiation-, radiation diffusion- and acoustic modes were found. In the `ideal case' of a perfect gas law and constant opacity, the shockfront appears to be oscillatory unstable due to critical cooling as long as the mass flux rate is larger than a critical one of Mṡcrit = 10-6 Msun yr-1. In the `real case' with more realistic constitutive relations, an additional vibrational instability occurs due to the κ-mechanism in the outer layers of the core. This is shown to be the case in the whole range of core masses between 0.01 and 1 Msun, mass flow rates between 10-3 and 10-7 Msun yr-1 and different outer boundary conditions (corresponding to different states of the surrounding interstellar cloud). Analysing the first, outer protostellar cores before they get dynamically unstable due to H2-dissociation in their interiors, similar instabilities as mentioned above were found. Now the unstable κ-behaviour is due to dust instead of the deep ionisation zone as in the case of second, inner cores. According to the linear analysis, the instabilities should first appear in the velocity and the radiation flux in the settling zone. In the case of first, outer cores, these variations should be accompanied by an oscillation of the radiation flux in the region upstream from the shock up to r = 1014 cm. Sooner or later, the shockfront should oscillate in both cases too. These results are finally compared with the characteristics of the accretion shock

  15. TSC simulation of feedback stabilization of axisymmetric modes in tokamaks using driven halo currents

    SciTech Connect

    Jardin, S.C.; Schmidt, J.A.

    1997-03-01

    The Tokamak Simulation Code (TSC) has been used to model a new method of feedback stabilization of the axisymmetric instability in tokamaks using driven halo (or scrapeoff layer) currents. The method appears to be feasible for a wide range of plasma edge parameters. It may offer significant advantages over the more conventional method of controlling this instability when applied in a reactor environment.

  16. Floquet analysis of Kuznetsov-Ma breathers: A path towards spectral stability of rogue waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuevas-Maraver, J.; Kevrekidis, P. G.; Frantzeskakis, D. J.; Karachalios, N. I.; Haragus, M.; James, G.

    2017-07-01

    In the present work, we aim at taking a step towards the spectral stability analysis of Peregrine solitons, i.e., wave structures that are used to emulate extreme wave events. Given the space-time localized nature of Peregrine solitons, this is a priori a nontrivial task. Our main tool in this effort will be the study of the spectral stability of the periodic generalization of the Peregrine soliton in the evolution variable, namely the Kuznetsov-Ma breather. Given the periodic structure of the latter, we compute the corresponding Floquet multipliers, and examine them in the limit where the period of the orbit tends to infinity. This way, we extrapolate towards the stability of the limiting structure, namely the Peregrine soliton. We find that multiple unstable modes of the background are enhanced, yet no additional unstable eigenmodes arise as the Peregrine limit is approached. We explore the instability evolution also in direct numerical simulations.

  17. Stability analysis of unstructured finite volume methods for linear shallow water flows using pseudospectra and singular value decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beljadid, Abdelaziz; Mohammadian, Abdolmajid; Qiblawey, Hazim

    2016-10-01

    The discretization of the shallow water system on unstructured grids can lead to spurious modes which usually can affect accuracy and/or cause stability problems. This paper introduces a new approach for stability analysis of unstructured linear finite volume schemes for linear shallow water equations with the Coriolis Effect using spectra, pseudospectra, and singular value decomposition. The discrete operator of the scheme is the principal parameter used in the analysis. It is shown that unstructured grids have a large influence on operator normality. In some cases the eigenvectors of the operator can be far from orthogonal, which leads to amplification of solutions and/or stability problems. Large amplifications of the solution can be observed, even for discrete operators which respect the condition of asymptotic stability, and in some cases even for Lax-Richtmyer stable methods. The pseudospectra are shown to be efficient for the verification of stability of finite volume methods for linear shallow water equations. In some cases, the singular value decomposition is employed for further analysis in order to provide more information about the existence of unstable modes. The results of the analysis can be helpful in choosing the type of mesh, the appropriate placements of the variables of the system on the grid, and the suitable discretization method which is stable for a wide range of modes.

  18. Generalized chiral symmetry and stability of zero modes for tilted Dirac cones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawarabayashi, Tohru; Hatsugai, Yasuhiro; Morimoto, Takahiro; Aoki, Hideo

    2011-04-01

    While it is well known that chirality is an important symmetry for Dirac-fermion systems that gives rise to the zero-mode Landau level in graphene, here we explore whether this notion can be extended to tilted Dirac cones as encountered in organic metals. We find that there exists a “generalized chiral symmetry” that encompasses tilted Dirac cones, where a generalized chiral operator γ, satisfying γ†H+Hγ=0 for Hamiltonian H, protects the zero mode. We use this to show that the n=0 Landau level is δ-function-like (with no broadening) by extending the Aharonov-Casher argument. We confirm numerically that a lattice model that possesses generalized chirality has an anomalously sharp Landau level for spatially correlated randomness.

  19. Robust stabilization of underactuated nonlinear systems: A fast terminal sliding mode approach.

    PubMed

    Khan, Qudrat; Akmeliawati, Rini; Bhatti, Aamer Iqbal; Khan, Mahmood Ashraf

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a fast terminal sliding mode based control design strategy for a class of uncertain underactuated nonlinear systems. Strategically, this development encompasses those electro-mechanical underactuated systems which can be transformed into the so-called regular form. The novelty of the proposed technique lies in the hierarchical development of a fast terminal sliding attractor design for the considered class. Having established sliding mode along the designed manifold, the close loop dynamics become finite time stable which, consequently, result in high precision. In addition, the adverse effects of the chattering phenomenon are reduced via strong reachability condition and the robustness of the system against uncertainties is confirmed theoretically. A simulation as well as experimental study of an inverted pendulum is presented to demonstrate the applicability of the proposed technique.

  20. A global strategy for the stability analysis of friction induced vibration problem with parameter variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Do, H. Q.; Massa, F.; Tison, T.; Lallemand, B.

    2017-02-01

    This paper presents a numerical strategy to reanalyze the modified frequency stability analysis of friction induced vibration problem. The stability analysis of a mechanical system relies on several coupling steps, namely a non-linear static analysis followed by linear and complex eigenvalue problems. We thus propose a numerical strategy to perform more rapidly multiple complex eigenvalue analyses. This strategy couples three methods namely, Fuzzy Logic Controllers to manage frictional contact problem, homotopy developments and projection techniques to reanalyze the projection matrices and component mode synthesis to calculate the modified eigensolutions. A numerical application is performed to highlight the efficiency of the strategy and a discussion is proposed in terms of precision and computational time.