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Sample records for model farm recirculating

  1. Envelope model of a heavy-ion recirculator

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, W.M.; Barnard, J.J.; Yu, S.S.

    1990-12-01

    A simple transport code has been developed to model the beam in a heavy-ion recirculating accelerator. The novel feature of the model is the treatment of the beam charge density as a Lagrangian fluid in the axial direction. In addition, the envelope and centroid equations include terms that account for the transverse self-force, image forces, and bend fields in the paraxial limit. The use of compressible'' beam slices makes the code suitable for designing the acceleration and compression schedules. The code has been used primarily to design the lattice of the LLNL recirculator, and preliminary magnet configurations for that machine are presented here. 3 refs., 2 figs.

  2. Mathematical model for analysis of recirculating vertical flow constructed wetlands.

    PubMed

    Sklarz, Menachem Y; Gross, Amit; Soares, M Ines M; Yakirevich, Alexander

    2010-03-01

    The recirculating vertical flow constructed wetland (RVFCW) was developed for the treatment of domestic wastewater (DWW). In this system, DWW is applied to a vertical flow bed through which it trickles into a reservoir located beneath the bed. It is then recirculated back to the root zone of the bed. In this study, a compartmental model was developed to simulate the RVFCW. The model, which addresses transport and removal kinetics of total suspended solids, 5-day biological oxygen demand and nitrogen, was fitted to kinetical results obtained from pilot field setups and a local sensitivity analysis was performed on the model parameters and operational conditions. This analysis showed that after 5h of treatment water quality is affected more by stochastic events than by the model parameter values, emphasizing the stability of the RVFCW system to large variations in operational conditions. Effluent quality after 1h of treatment, when the sensitivity analysis showed the parameter impacts to be largest, was compared to model predictions. The removal rate was found to be dependent on the recirculation rate. The predictions correlated well with experimental observations, leading to the conclusion that the proposed model is a satisfactory tool for studying RVFCWs. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Modelling Farm Animal Welfare

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Lisa M.; Part, Chérie E.

    2013-01-01

    Simple Summary In this review paper we discuss the different modeling techniques that have been used in animal welfare research to date. We look at what questions they have been used to answer, the advantages and pitfalls of the methods, and how future research can best use these approaches to answer some of the most important upcoming questions in farm animal welfare. Abstract The use of models in the life sciences has greatly expanded in scope and advanced in technique in recent decades. However, the range, type and complexity of models used in farm animal welfare is comparatively poor, despite the great scope for use of modeling in this field of research. In this paper, we review the different modeling approaches used in farm animal welfare science to date, discussing the types of questions they have been used to answer, the merits and problems associated with the method, and possible future applications of each technique. We find that the most frequently published types of model used in farm animal welfare are conceptual and assessment models; two types of model that are frequently (though not exclusively) based on expert opinion. Simulation, optimization, scenario, and systems modeling approaches are rarer in animal welfare, despite being commonly used in other related fields. Finally, common issues such as a lack of quantitative data to parameterize models, and model selection and validation are discussed throughout the review, with possible solutions and alternative approaches suggested. PMID:26487411

  4. Thermal modelling of an AMTEC recirculating cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suitor, J. W.; Williams, R. M.; Underwood, M. L.; Ryan, M. A.; Jeffries-Nakamura, B.; O'Connor, D.

    1992-01-01

    A modeling program was developed to determine the impact of various design parameters on the operation of an AMTEC system. Temperature profiles generated by the modeling program were compared to actual experimental data to verify the model accuracy. The model was then extended to predict the impact of device design on operational performance. The effect of heat loss from the liquid sodium supply end was studied for this paper.

  5. Modeling of leachate recirculation using vertical wells in bioreactor landfills.

    PubMed

    Feng, Shi-Jin; Cao, Ben-Yi; Zhang, Xu; Xie, Hai-Jian

    2015-06-01

    Leachate recirculation (LR) in municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills operated as bioreactors offers significant economic and environmental benefits. The subsurface application method of vertical wells is one of the most common LR techniques. The objective of this study was to develop a novel two-dimensional model of leachate recirculation using vertical wells. This novel method can describe leachate flow considering the effects of MSW settlement while also accounting separately for leachate flow in saturated and unsaturated zones. In this paper, a settlement model for MSW when considering the effects of compression and biodegradation on the MSW porosity was adopted. A numerical model was proposed using new governing equations for the saturated and unsaturated zones of a landfill. The following design parameters were evaluated by simulating the recirculated leachate volume and the influence zones of waste under steady-state flow conditions: (1) the effect of MSW settlement, (2) the effect of the initial void ratio, (3) the effect of the injected head, (4) the effect of the unit weight, (5) the effect of the biodegradation rate, and (6) the effect of the compression coefficient. The influence zones of LR when considering the effect of MSW settlement are smaller than those when neglecting the effect. The influence zones and LR volume increased with an increase in the injection pressure head and initial void ratio of MSW. The proposed method and the calculation results can provide important insight into the hydrological behavior of bioreactor landfills.

  6. Performance model of a recirculating stack nickel hydrogen cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, Albert H.

    1994-01-01

    A theoretical model of the nickel hydrogen battery cell has been utilized to describe the chemical and physical changes during charge and overcharge in a recirculating stack nickel hydrogen cell. In particular, the movement of gas and electrolyte have been examined as a function of the amount of electrolyte put into the cell stack during cell activation, and as a function of flooding in regions of the gas screen in this cell design. Additionally, a two-dimensional variation on this model has been utilized to describe the effects of non-uniform loading in the nickel-electrode on the movement of gas and electrolyte within the recirculating stack nickel hydrogen cell. The type of nonuniform loading that has been examined here is that associated with higher than average loading near the surface of the sintered nickel electrode, a condition present to some degree in many nickel electrodes made by electrochemical impregnation methods. The effects of high surface loading were examined primarily under conditions of overcharge, since the movement of gas and electrolyte in the overcharging condition was typically where the greatest effects of non-uniform loading were found. The results indicate that significant changes in the capillary forces between cell components occur as the percentage of free volume in the stack filled by electrolyte becomes very high. These changes create large gradients in gas-filled space and oxygen concentrations near the boundary between the separator and the hydrogen electrode when the electrolyte fill is much greater than about 95 percent of the stack free volume. At lower electrolyte fill levels, these gaseous and electrolyte gradients become less extreme, and shift through the separator towards the nickel electrode. Similarly, flooding of areas in the gas screen cause higher concentrations of oxygen gas to approach the platinum/hydrogen electrode that is opposite the back side of the nickel electrode. These results illustrate the need for

  7. Economic values of growth and feed efficiency for fish farming in recirculating aquaculture system with density and nitrogen output limitations: a case study with African catfish (Clarias gariepinus).

    PubMed

    Besson, M; Komen, H; Aubin, J; de Boer, I J M; Poelman, M; Quillet, E; Vancoillie, C; Vandeputte, M; van Arendonk, J A M

    2014-12-01

    In fish farming, economic values (EV) of breeding goal traits are lacking, even though they are key parameters when defining selection objectives. The aim of this study was to develop a bioeconomic model to estimate EV of 2 traits representing production performances in fish farming: the thermal growth coefficient (TGC) and the feed conversion ratio (FCR). This approach was applied to a farm producing African catfish (Clarias gariepinus) in a recirculating aquaculture system (RAS). In the RAS, 2 factors could limit production level: the nitrogen treatment capacity of the biofilter or the fish density in rearing tanks at harvest. Profit calculation includes revenue from fish sales, cost of juveniles, cost of feed, cost of waste water treatment, and fixed costs. In the reference scenario, profit was modeled to zero. EV were calculated as the difference in profit per kilogram of fish between the current population mean for both traits (µt) and the next generation of selective breeding (µt+Δt) for either TGC or FCR. EV of TGC and FCR were calculated for three generations of hypothetical selection on either TGC or FCR (respectively 6.8% and 7.6% improvement per generation). The results show that changes in TGC and FCR can affect both the number of fish that can be stocked (number of batches per year and number of fish per batch) and the factor limiting production. The EV of TGC and FCR vary and depend on the limiting factors. When dissolved NH3-N is the limiting factor for both µt and µt+Δt, increasing TGC decreases the number of fish that can be stocked but increases the number of batches that can be grown. As a result, profit remains constant and EVTGC is zero. Increasing FCR, however, increases the number of fish stocked and the ratio of fish produced per kilogram of feed consumed ("economic efficiency"). The EVFCR is 0.14 €/kg of fish, and profit per kilogram of fish increases by about 10%. When density is the limiting factor for both µt and µt+Δt, the

  8. Three-dimensional modelling of leachate recirculation using vertical wells in bioreactor landfills.

    PubMed

    Feng, Shi-Jin; Chen, Zheng-Wei; Cao, Ben-Yi

    2016-12-01

    Bioreactor landfills use leachate recirculation to enhance the biodegradation of municipal solid waste and accelerate landfill stabilisation, which can provide significant environmental and economic benefits. Vertical wells are operated as a major method for leachate recirculation systems. The objectives of this article are to analyse the leachate migration in bioreactor landfills using vertical wells and to offer theoretical basis for the design of leachate recirculation systems. A three-dimensional numerical model was built using FLAC-3D, and this model can consider the saturated and unsaturated flow of leachate within anisotropic waste to reflect the actual conditions. First, main influence factors of leachate migration were analysed, including the vertical well height, hydraulic conductivity, and anisotropic coefficient, in a single-well recirculation system. Then, the effects of different configurations of a group-well system were studied and the optimal well spacing was obtained. Some key design parameters (e.g. the recirculation flow rate, volume of impact zone, radius of impact zone and time to reach steady state) were also evaluated. The results show that the hydraulic conductivity has a great impact on the optimal height of vertical wells and uniform configuration is the best option in terms of both volume of impact zone and time to reach steady state. © The Author(s) 2016.

  9. An outbreak of disease caused by Francisella sp. in Nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus at a recirculation fish farm in the UK.

    PubMed

    Jeffery, Keith R; Stone, David; Feist, Stephen W; Verner-Jeffreys, David W

    2010-09-02

    This study details the first diagnosis of Francisella sp. in tilapia in the United Kingdom. Losses of tilapia fry at a recirculation fish farm in England were investigated, giving a presumptive positive diagnosis of infection with Francisella sp. by histopathological examination. Most fish sampled showed moderate to marked pathology of the major organs, with lesions being present in most tissues. The most obvious host response was granuloma formulation. A subsequent follow-up visit provided further evidence for the presence of a Francisella species. PCR amplicons were obtained using Francisella spp.-specific primers that shared 100% sequence identity with the 16S rRNA gene of the type strain of the species F. asiatica previously described as the cause of disease in tilapia in Southeast Asia and Central America. This outbreak and the subsequent investigation emphasise the importance of strict biosecurity at fish farms and the care that needs to be taken when using a new supplier of fish.

  10. Conservation principles suspended solids distribution modelling to support ATS introduction on a recirculating WWTP.

    PubMed

    Gernaey, Krist V; Nielsen, Marinus K; Thornberg, Dines; Höök, Benny; Munk-Nielsen, Thomas; Ingildsen, Pernille; Jørgensen, Sten Bay

    2004-01-01

    A model for the description of the SS distribution in a full-scale recirculating activated sludge WWTP was developed. The model, based on conservation principles, uses on-line plant data as model inputs, and provides a prediction of the SS load in the inlet to the secondary clarifiers and the SS distribution in the WWTP as outputs. The calibrated model produces excellent predictions of the SS load to the secondary clarifiers, an essential variable for the operation of the aeration tank settling (ATS) process. A case study illustrated how the calibrated SS distribution model can be used to evaluate the potential benefit of ATS implementation on a full-scale recirculating WWTP. A reduction of the maximum SS peak load to the secondary clarifiers with 24.9% was obtained with ATS, whereas the cumulative SS load to the clarifiers is foreseen to be reduced with 22.5% for short rain events (4 hours duration) and with 16.6% for long rain events (24 hours duration). The SS distribution model is a useful tool for off-line studies of the potential benefits to be obtained by introducing ATS on a recirculating WWTP. Finally, the successful operation of the ATS process on the full-scale plant is illustrated with data.

  11. Empirical Analysis of Farm Credit Risk under the Structure Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yan, Yan

    2009-01-01

    The study measures farm credit risk by using farm records collected by Farm Business Farm Management (FBFM) during the period 1995-2004. The study addresses the following questions: (1) whether farm's financial position is fully described by the structure model, (2) what are the determinants of farm capital structure under the structure model, (3)…

  12. Empirical Analysis of Farm Credit Risk under the Structure Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yan, Yan

    2009-01-01

    The study measures farm credit risk by using farm records collected by Farm Business Farm Management (FBFM) during the period 1995-2004. The study addresses the following questions: (1) whether farm's financial position is fully described by the structure model, (2) what are the determinants of farm capital structure under the structure model, (3)…

  13. Analysis of two-equation turbulence models for recirculating flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thangam, S.

    1991-01-01

    The two-equation kappa-epsilon model is used to analyze turbulent separated flow past a backward-facing step. It is shown that if the model constraints are modified to be consistent with the accepted energy decay rate for isotropic turbulence, the dominant features of the flow field, namely the size of the separation bubble and the streamwise component of the mean velocity, can be accurately predicted. In addition, except in the vicinity of the step, very good predictions for the turbulent shear stress, the wall pressure, and the wall shear stress are obtained. The model is also shown to provide good predictions for the turbulence intensity in the region downstream of the reattachment point. Estimated long time growth rates for the turbulent kinetic energy and dissipation rate of homogeneous shear flow are utilized to develop an optimal set of constants for the two equation kappa-epsilon model. The physical implications of the model performance are also discussed.

  14. FARM-produced alcohol and methane model

    SciTech Connect

    Broder, J.D.; Waddell, E.L.

    1983-12-01

    TVA has developed a model called FARM that determines the effects of incorporating in alcohol plant and/or an anaerobic digester into farm production systems. The purposes of this model are to calculate an alcohol plant size and digester dimensions, calculate potential alcohol and methane yields, develop livestock rations with and without stillage, and provide yearly energy consumption and production figures.

  15. RECIRCULATING ACCELERATION

    SciTech Connect

    BERG,J.S.; GARREN,A.A.; JOHNSTONE,C.

    2000-04-07

    This paper compares various types of recirculating accelerators, outlining the advantages and disadvantages of various approaches. The accelerators are characterized according to the types of arcs they use: whether there is a single arc for the entire recirculator or there are multiple arcs, and whether the arc(s) are isochronous or non-isochronous.

  16. Wind Farm Power System Model Development: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Muljadi, E.; Butterfield, C. P.

    2004-07-01

    In some areas, wind power has reached a level where it begins to impact grid operation and the stability of local utilities. In this paper, the model development for a large wind farm will be presented. Wind farm dynamic behavior and contribution to stability during transmission system faults will be examined.

  17. Modeling Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Dairy Farms

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Evaluation and mitigation of greenhouse gas emissions from dairy farms requires a comprehensive approach that integrates the impacts and interactions of all important sources and sinks. This approach requires some form of modeling. Types of models commonly used include empirical emission factors, pr...

  18. Flow patterns in carotid bifurcation models using pulsed Doppler ultrasound: effect of concentric vs. eccentric stenosis on turbulence and recirculation.

    PubMed

    Poepping, Tamie L; Rankin, Richard N; Holdsworth, David W

    2010-07-01

    Hemodynamics play a significant role in stroke risk, where thrombus formation may be accelerated in regions of slow or recirculating flow, high shear and increased turbulence. An in vitro investigation was performed with pulsed Doppler ultrasound (DUS) using the complete spectral data to investigate the three-dimensional (3-D) distribution of advanced parameters that may have potential for making a more specific in vivo diagnosis of carotid disease and stroke risk. The effect of stenosis symmetry and the potential of DUS spectral parameters for visualizing regions of recirculation or turbulence were explored. DUS was used to map pulsatile flow in four model geometries representing two different plaque symmetries (eccentricity) and two stenosis severities (mild, severe). Qualitative comparisons were made with flow patterns visualized using digital particle imaging. Color-encoded maps of DUS spectral parameters (mean velocity, spectral-broadening index and turbulence intensity) clearly distinguished regions of slow or recirculating flow and disturbed or turbulent flow. Distinctly different flow patterns resulted from stenoses of equal severity but different eccentricity. Noticeable differences were seen in both the size and location of recirculation zones and in the paths of high-velocity jets. Highly elevated levels of turbulence intensity were seen distal to severe stenosis. Results demonstrated the importance of plaque shape, which is typically not considered in standard diagnosis, in addition to stenosis severity. Copyright 2010 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Modelling growth variability in longline mussel farms as a function of stocking density and farm design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosland, Rune; Bacher, Cédric; Strand, Øivind; Aure, Jan; Strohmeier, Tore

    2011-11-01

    Mussels ( Mytilus edulis) are commonly cultivated on artificial structures like rafts, poles or longlines to facilitate farming operations. Farm structures and dense mussel populations may result in water flow reduction and seston depletion and thus reduced individual mussel growth and spatial growth variability inside a farm. One of the challenges in mussel farming is thus to scale and configure farms in order to optimise total mussel production and individual mussel quality under different environmental regimes. Here we present a spatially resolved model for simulation of flow reduction, seston depletion and individual mussel growth inside a longline farm based on information about farm configuration (spacing between longlines, farm length and stocking density) and background environmental conditions (current speed, seston concentration and temperature). The model simulations are forced by environmental data from two fjords in south-western Norway and the farm configurations are defined within operational ranges. The simulations demonstrate spatial growth patterns at longlines under environmental settings and farm configurations where flow reduction and seston depletion have significant impacts on individual mussel growth. Longline spacing has a strong impact on the spatial distribution of individual growth, and the spacing is characterised by a threshold value. Below the threshold growth reduction and spatial growth variability increase rapidly as a consequence of reduced water flow and seston supply rate, but increased filtration due to higher mussel densities also contributes to the growth reduction. The spacing threshold is moderated by other farm configuration factors and environmental conditions. Comparisons with seston depletion reported from other farm sites show that the model simulations are within observed ranges. A demonstration is provided on how the model can guide farm configuration with the aim of optimising total farm biomass and individual

  20. A simple, analytic model of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell anode recirculation at operating power including nitrogen crossover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Promislow, Keith; St-Pierre, Jean; Wetton, Brian

    A simple, analytic model is presented that describes the steady state profile of anode nitrogen concentration in a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell operated with anode recirculation. The model is appropriate for fuel cells with straight gas channels and includes the effect of nitrogen crossover from cathode to anode through the membrane. The key analytic simplification in the model is that this crossover rate, when scaled to the gas flows in the channels, is small. This is a good approximation when the device is used at operating power levels. The model shows that the characteristic times for the anode nitrogen profiles to reach steady state are of the order of minutes and that the dilution effect of anode nitrogen is severe for pure recirculation. The model shows additionally that a small anode outlet bleed can significantly reduce the nitrogen dilution effect. Within the framework of the model, the energy efficiency of pure recirculation can be compared to hydrogen venting or partial anode bleeding. An optimal bleed rate is identified. The model and optimization analysis can be adapted to other fuel cell designs and operating conditions. Along with operating conditions, only two key parameters are needed: a nitrogen crossover coefficient and the marginal efficiency loss to compressors for increased anode stoichiometric gas flow.

  1. Experimental simulation and fuzzy modelling of landfill biogas production from low-biodegradable MBT waste under leachate recirculation.

    PubMed

    Di Addario, Martina; Ruggeri, Bernardo

    2017-08-10

    In the perspective of a sustainable waste management, biodegradable waste destined to landfilling should be reduced. This work aims to study a combination of waste pretreatments and leachate recirculation. A lab-scale experiment and fuzzy-modelling were chosen to predict cumulative methane production from low-biodegradable waste (LBW) under leachate recirculation. Thanks to moisture increase, the degradation of LBW was reactivated and the cumulative methane production reached 28 NL CH4 kg(-1) after 442 days. The organic fraction was stabilized with a final chemical oxygen demand (COD) of 81 mg L(-1). Fuzzy model was proposed as an alternative to the common deterministic models, affected by high uncertainties. Eleven inputs (pH, Redox potential, COD, volatile fatty acids, ammonium content, age, temperature, moisture content, organic fraction concentration, particle size and recirculation flow rate) were identified as antecedent, and two outputs, or consequents, were chosen: methane production rate and methane fraction in biogas. Antecedents and consequents were linked by 84 IF-THEN rules in a linguistic form. The model was also tested on six literature studies chosen to test different operational conditions and waste qualities. The model outputs fitted the experimental data reasonably well, confirming the potential use of fuzzy macro-approach to model sustainable landfilling.

  2. A farm-level model of VOC emission from silage

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Recent measurements suggest that dairy farms can be a significant emission source of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). However, accurate estimates of farm-level emissions currently do not exist. A preliminary process-based model was developed to estimate VOC emissions from silage on farms and to as...

  3. Mesoscale to microscale wind farm flow modeling and evaluation: Mesoscale to Microscale Wind Farm Models

    SciTech Connect

    Sanz Rodrigo, Javier; Chávez Arroyo, Roberto Aurelio; Moriarty, Patrick; Churchfield, Matthew; Kosović, Branko; Réthoré, Pierre-Elouan; Hansen, Kurt Schaldemose; Hahmann, Andrea; Mirocha, Jeffrey D.; Rife, Daran

    2016-08-31

    The increasing size of wind turbines, with rotors already spanning more than 150 m diameter and hub heights above 100 m, requires proper modeling of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) from the surface to the free atmosphere. Furthermore, large wind farm arrays create their own boundary layer structure with unique physics. This poses significant challenges to traditional wind engineering models that rely on surface-layer theories and engineering wind farm models to simulate the flow in and around wind farms. However, adopting an ABL approach offers the opportunity to better integrate wind farm design tools and meteorological models. The challenge is how to build the bridge between atmospheric and wind engineering model communities and how to establish a comprehensive evaluation process that identifies relevant physical phenomena for wind energy applications with modeling and experimental requirements. A framework for model verification, validation, and uncertainty quantification is established to guide this process by a systematic evaluation of the modeling system at increasing levels of complexity. In terms of atmospheric physics, 'building the bridge' means developing models for the so-called 'terra incognita,' a term used to designate the turbulent scales that transition from mesoscale to microscale. This range of scales within atmospheric research deals with the transition from parameterized to resolved turbulence and the improvement of surface boundary-layer parameterizations. The coupling of meteorological and wind engineering flow models and the definition of a formal model evaluation methodology, is a strong area of research for the next generation of wind conditions assessment and wind farm and wind turbine design tools. Some fundamental challenges are identified in order to guide future research in this area.

  4. A model to predict the power output from wind farms

    SciTech Connect

    Landberg, L.

    1997-12-31

    This paper will describe a model that can predict the power output from wind farms. To give examples of input the model is applied to a wind farm in Texas. The predictions are generated from forecasts from the NGM model of NCEP. These predictions are made valid at individual sites (wind farms) by applying a matrix calculated by the sub-models of WASP (Wind Atlas Application and Analysis Program). The actual wind farm production is calculated using the Riso PARK model. Because of the preliminary nature of the results, they will not be given. However, similar results from Europe will be given.

  5. Wind tunnel measurements of a large wind farm model approaching the infinite wind farm regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bossuyt, Juliaan; Howland, Michael; Meneveau, Charles; Meyers, Johan

    2016-11-01

    A scaled wind farm, with 100 porous disk models of wind turbines, is used to study the effect of wind farm layout on the wind farm power output and its variability, in a wind tunnel study. The wind farm consists of 20 rows and 5 columns. The porous disk models have a diameter of 0 . 03 m and are instrumented with strain gages to measure the thrust force, as a surrogate for wind turbine power output. The frequency response of the measurements goes up to the natural frequency of the models and allows studying the spatio-temporal characteristics of the power output for different layouts. A variety of layouts are considered by shifting the individual rows in the spanwise direction. The reference layout has a regular streamwise spacing of Sx / D = 7 and a spanwise spacing of Sy / D = 5 . The parameter space is further expanded by considering layouts with an uneven streamwise spacing: Sx / D = 3 . 5 & 10 . 5 and Sx / D = 1 . 5 & 12 . 5 . We study how the mean row power changes as a function of wind farm layout and investigate the appearance of an asymptotic limiting behavior as previously described in the literature by application of the top-down model for the spatially averaged wind farm - boundary layer interaction. Work supported by ERC (Grant No. 306471, the ActiveWindFarms project) and by NSF (OISE-1243482, the WINDINSPIRE project).

  6. The dynamics of the Vietnam summer recirculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayler, E.; Liu, Z.

    2003-04-01

    Using TOPEX/Poseidon altimetry, a seasonal pair of recirculations in the South China Sea along the coast of Vietnam is identified in the sea surface height anomalies (SSHA). The dynamics of this recirculation system are further studied in a numerical model. Forced by monsoon winds, the ocean circulation in the South China Sea reverses the western boundary current along Vietnam with each shift in monsoon regime. During the summer southwest monsoon, an anticyclonic recirculation cell develops near 12^o North 111^o East, consistent with large-scale recirculation theory and is labeled the Vietnam Summer Recirculation (VSR). The subsequent transition to the winter northeast monsoon regime destroys this recirculation cell. Employing high-resolution 1.5-layer and 2.0-layer numerical models, we demonstrate the applicability of large-scale recirculation dynamics to the deep basin of the South China Sea, specifically showing that the gyre-scale circulation governs the development of the VSR. This study also explores the significant role of topography in determining the location and magnitude of the recirculation cell. The destruction of this recirculation by the migrating monsoon winds each autumn is also modeled. The monsoon wind forcing highlights the driving role of gyre-scale dynamics in the formation and destruction of the Vietnam Summer Recirculation.

  7. Novel recirculating loop reactor for studies on model catalysts: CO oxidation on Pt/TiO2(110)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenney, Samuel A.; Xie, Kangmin; Monnier, John R.; Rodriguez, Abraham; Galhenage, Randima P.; Duke, Audrey S.; Chen, Donna A.

    2013-10-01

    A novel recirculating loop microreactor coupled to an ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) chamber has been constructed for the kinetic evaluation of model catalysts, which can be fully characterized by UHV surface science techniques. The challenge for this reactor design is to attain sufficient sensitivity to detect reactions on model single-crystal surfaces, which have a low number of active sites compared to conventional catalysts of equivalent mass. To this end, the total dead volume of the reactor system is minimized (32 cm3), and the system is operated in recirculation mode so that product concentrations build up to detectable levels over time. The injection of gas samples into the gas chromatography column and the refilling of the recirculation loop with fresh feed gas are achieved with computer-controlled, automated switching valves. In this manner, product concentrations can be followed over short time intervals (15 min) for extended periods of time (24 h). A proof of principle study in this reactor for CO oxidation at 145-165 °C on Pt clusters supported on a rutile TiO2(110) single crystal yields kinetic parameters that are comparable to those reported in the literature for CO oxidation on Pt clusters on powdered oxide supports, as well as on Pt(100). The calculated activation energy is 16.4 ± 0.7 kcal/mol, the turnover frequency is 0.03-0.06 molecules/(site.s) over the entire temperature range, and the reaction orders in O2 and CO at 160 °C are 0.9 ± 0.2 and -0.82 ± 0.03, respectively.

  8. Turbulent transport modeling of shear flows around an aerodynamic wing. Development of turbulent near-wall model and its application to recirculating flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amano, R. S.

    1982-01-01

    Progress in implementing and refining two near-wall turbulence models in which the near-wall region is divided into either two or three zones is outlined. These models were successfully applied to the computation of recirculating flows. The research was further extended to obtaining experimental results of two different recirculating flow conditions in order to check the validity of the present models. Two different experimental apparatuses were set up: axisymmetric turbulent impinging jets on a flat plate, and turbulent flows in a circular pipe with a abrupt pipe expansion. It is shown that generally better results are obtained by using the present near-wall models, and among the models the three-zone model is superior to the two-zone model.

  9. A canopy-type similarity model for wind farm optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markfort, Corey D.; Zhang, Wei; Porté-Agel, Fernando

    2013-04-01

    The atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) flow through and over wind farms has been found to be similar to canopy-type flows, with characteristic flow development and shear penetration length scales (Markfort et al., 2012). Wind farms capture momentum from the ABL both at the leading edge and from above. We examine this further with an analytical canopy-type model. Within the flow development region, momentum is advected into the wind farm and wake turbulence draws excess momentum in from between turbines. This spatial heterogeneity of momentum within the wind farm is characterized by large dispersive momentum fluxes. Once the flow within the farm is developed, the area-averaged velocity profile exhibits a characteristic inflection point near the top of the wind farm, similar to that of canopy-type flows. The inflected velocity profile is associated with the presence of a dominant characteristic turbulence scale, which may be responsible for a significant portion of the vertical momentum flux. Prediction of this scale is useful for determining the amount of available power for harvesting. The new model is tested with results from wind tunnel experiments, which were conducted to characterize the turbulent flow in and above model wind farms in aligned and staggered configurations. The model is useful for representing wind farms in regional scale models, for the optimization of wind farms considering wind turbine spacing and layout configuration, and for assessing the impacts of upwind wind farms on nearby wind resources. Markfort CD, W Zhang and F Porté-Agel. 2012. Turbulent flow and scalar transport through and over aligned and staggered wind farms. Journal of Turbulence. 13(1) N33: 1-36. doi:10.1080/14685248.2012.709635.

  10. DairyWise, a whole-farm dairy model.

    PubMed

    Schils, R L M; de Haan, M H A; Hemmer, J G A; van den Pol-van Dasselaar, A; de Boer, J A; Evers, A G; Holshof, G; van Middelkoop, J C; Zom, R L G

    2007-11-01

    A whole-farm dairy model was developed and evaluated. The DairyWise model is an empirical model that simulated technical, environmental, and financial processes on a dairy farm. The central component is the FeedSupply model that balanced the herd requirements, as generated by the DairyHerd model, and the supply of homegrown feeds, as generated by the crop models for grassland and corn silage. The output of the FeedSupply model was used as input for several technical, environmental, and economic submodels. The submodels simulated a range of farm aspects such as nitrogen and phosphorus cycling, nitrate leaching, ammonia emissions, greenhouse gas emissions, energy use, and a financial farm budget. The final output was a farm plan describing all material and nutrient flows and the consequences on the environment and economy. Evaluation of DairyWise was performed with 2 data sets consisting of 29 dairy farms. The evaluation showed that DairyWise was able to simulate gross margin, concentrate intake, nitrogen surplus, nitrate concentration in ground water, and crop yields. The variance accounted for ranged from 37 to 84%, and the mean differences between modeled and observed values varied between -5 to +3% per set of farms. We conclude that DairyWise is a powerful tool for integrated scenario development and evaluation for scientists, policy makers, extension workers, teachers and farmers.

  11. Research on large-scale wind farm modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Longfei; Zhang, Baoqun; Gong, Cheng; Jiao, Ran; Shi, Rui; Chi, Zhongjun; Ding, Yifeng

    2017-01-01

    Due to intermittent and adulatory properties of wind energy, when large-scale wind farm connected to the grid, it will have much impact on the power system, which is different from traditional power plants. Therefore it is necessary to establish an effective wind farm model to simulate and analyze the influence wind farms have on the grid as well as the transient characteristics of the wind turbines when the grid is at fault. However we must first establish an effective WTGs model. As the doubly-fed VSCF wind turbine has become the mainstream wind turbine model currently, this article first investigates the research progress of doubly-fed VSCF wind turbine, and then describes the detailed building process of the model. After that investigating the common wind farm modeling methods and pointing out the problems encountered. As WAMS is widely used in the power system, which makes online parameter identification of the wind farm model based on off-output characteristics of wind farm be possible, with a focus on interpretation of the new idea of identification-based modeling of large wind farms, which can be realized by two concrete methods.

  12. Investigation on the Effect of Nozzle Number on the Recirculation Rate and Mixing Time in the RH Process Using VOF + DPM Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Haitao; Li, Fei; Zhang, Lifeng; Conejo, Alberto N.

    2016-06-01

    A mathematical model has been developed to explain the effect of the number of nozzles on recirculation flow rate in the RH process. Experimental data from water modeling were employed to validate the mathematical model. The experimental data included the velocity fields measured with a particle image velocimetry technique and mixing time. The multiphase model volume of fluid was employed to allow a more realistic representation of the free surface in the vacuum chamber while injected argon bubbles were treated as discrete phase particles and modeled using the discrete phase model. Interfacial forces between bubbles and liquid phase were considered, including the lift force. The simulations carried out with the mathematical model involved changes in the gas flow rate from 12 to 36 L/min and a number of nozzles from 4 to 8. The results indicated a logarithmic increment in the recirculation rate as the gas flow rate increased and also corresponded with an exponential decrease in mixing time. The plume area and liquid velocities resulting from individual nozzles were computed. A maximum optimum recirculation rate was defined based on a mechanism proposed to explain the effect of gas flow rate and the number of nozzles on the recirculation rate.

  13. A Mathematical Model of Solute Coupled Water Transport in Toad Intestine Incorporating Recirculation of the Actively Transported Solute

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Erik Hviid; Sørensen, Jakob Balslev; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær

    2000-01-01

    A mathematical model of an absorbing leaky epithelium is developed for analysis of solute coupled water transport. The non-charged driving solute diffuses into cells and is pumped from cells into the lateral intercellular space (lis). All membranes contain water channels with the solute passing those of tight junction and interspace basement membrane by convection-diffusion. With solute permeability of paracellular pathway large relative to paracellular water flow, the paracellular flux ratio of the solute (influx/outflux) is small (2–4) in agreement with experiments. The virtual solute concentration of fluid emerging from lis is then significantly larger than the concentration in lis. Thus, in absence of external driving forces the model generates isotonic transport provided a component of the solute flux emerging downstream lis is taken up by cells through the serosal membrane and pumped back into lis, i.e., the solute would have to be recirculated. With input variables from toad intestine (Nedergaard, S., E.H. Larsen, and H.H. Ussing, J. Membr. Biol. 168:241–251), computations predict that 60–80% of the pumped flux stems from serosal bath in agreement with the experimental estimate of the recirculation flux. Robust solutions are obtained with realistic concentrations and pressures of lis, and with the following features. Rate of fluid absorption is governed by the solute permeability of mucosal membrane. Maximum fluid flow is governed by density of pumps on lis-membranes. Energetic efficiency increases with hydraulic conductance of the pathway carrying water from mucosal solution into lis. Uphill water transport is accomplished, but with high hydraulic conductance of cell membranes strength of transport is obscured by water flow through cells. Anomalous solvent drag occurs when back flux of water through cells exceeds inward water flux between cells. Molecules moving along the paracellular pathway are driven by a translateral flow of water, i.e., the model

  14. Wind farms model aggregation using probabilistic clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, Paula Odete; Ferreira, Ángela Paula

    2013-10-01

    The main objective of this research is the identification of homogeneous groups within wind farms of a major operator playing in the energy sector in Portugal, based on two multivariate analyses: Hierarchical Cluster Analysis and Discriminant Analysis, by using two independent variables: annual liquid hours and net production. From the produced outputs there were identified three homogenous groups of wind farms: (1) medium Installed Capacity and Induction Generator based Technology, (2) high Installed Capacity and Synchronous Generator based Technology and (3) medium Installed Capacity and Synchronous Generator based Technology, which includes the wind farms with the higher annual liquid hours. It has been found that the results obtained by cluster analysis are well classified, with a total percentage of correct classification of 97,1%, which can be considered excellent.

  15. Statistical and physical modelling of large wind farm clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barthelmie, R.; Pryor, S.; Frandsen, S.

    2003-04-01

    As the first large wind farms are constructed the issue of the effect of large wind farms on local climates is being raised. The main concern currently is that, in some countries, areas in which large offshore wind farms can be constructed over the next 10 to 20 years are fairly limited due to technical and economic constraints. This means that wind farms will be built in clusters of up to 100 wind turbines but within 20 km of the nearest cluster. Theoretical considerations suggest that the effects of a wind farm on a downwind wind farm maybe more noticeable offshore than onshore where higher turbulence assists wind speed recovery. Added to this many offshore areas are dominated by stable and neutral atmospheres where wakes propagate over longer distances than on land where unstable conditions also occur for a significant fraction of the time. On the other hand the large turbulence generated by the wind farm itself may be sufficient to assist wind recovery but possibly provide a higher than expected turbulence at the neighbouring wind farm or cluster. While some progress has been made with single wake modelling offshore, these models have not been evaluated for more than 5 wakes. Hence it is difficult to evaluate the impact of large wind farms and to optimise the spacing of clusters. A new project STORPARK is underway which is using statistical and physical modelling methods to make preliminary estimates of large wind farm impacts. The work described in this paper is a combination of statistical methods using observations from offshore wind monitoring sites at Vindeby/Omø Stålgrunde and Rødsand/Gedser in Denmark to evaluate in the first instance how far the effects of land can be detected on wind speed and turbulence intensity. These results will be compared with model simulations from WAsP and the Coastal Discontinuity Model (CDM) where large wind farms are currently represented by large roughness elements in accord with models developed by Crespo, Frandsen and

  16. Spontaneous interannual to decadal scale variations in the Kuroshio and its recirculation in a high-resolution North Pacific Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, I.; Ishizaki, H.

    2004-12-01

    Interannual to decadal scale variations of the Kuroshio and its recirculation are investigated using an eddy-permitting North Pacific numerical model. The model is a z-coordinate free-surface OGCM (one version of MRI.COM; MRI Community Ocean Model). Horizontal resolution is 1/6o in the latitudinal and 1/4o in the longitudinal direction, with 44 vertical levels. The model domain is the Pacific north of 15oS. Integration is carried out for 150 years, including the initial restoring body forcing of temperature and salinity to the observed state for the first six years. Data from the last 50 years of integration are used for analysis. The model is forced by climatological wind stresses, and the temperature and salinity are restored to climatology at the surface, at the southern boundary, and in the Okhotsk and Bering Seas. Without interannual change in the forcing, it is found that there are variations of about three-year period in mass transports of the Kuroshio through the Tokara Strait and the Ryukyu Current, flowing northeastward east of the Ryukyu Islands. The Tokara transport lags that of the Ryukyu Current for about 9 months. The Tokara transport is also found to be in opposite phase with the extent of the recirculation gyre, which is defined here as an area encircled by some closed contour of the barotropic stream function. During the analysis period, the Kuroshio south of Japan takes the large meander path, the strait path, or unstable paths. The path variation is rather irregular in comparison with the mass transport described above. The stable large meander path that persists for longer than a couple of years appears four times within the fifty-year period. Thus, the periods between the transitions from the strait path ( or unstable paths ) to the large meander path are about twelve years on average, which is longer than the time scale of the mass transport variation, and the path variation looks uncorrelated to the mass transport.

  17. Wind farm density and harvested power in very large wind farms: A low-order model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortina, G.; Sharma, V.; Calaf, M.

    2017-07-01

    In this work we create new understanding of wind turbine wakes recovery process as a function of wind farm density using large-eddy simulations of an atmospheric boundary layer diurnal cycle. Simulations are forced with a constant geostrophic wind and a time varying surface temperature extracted from a selected period of the Cooperative Atmospheric Surface Exchange Study field experiment. Wind turbines are represented using the actuator disk model with rotation and yaw alignment. A control volume analysis around each turbine has been used to evaluate wind turbine wake recovery and corresponding harvested power. Results confirm the existence of two dominant recovery mechanisms, advection and flux of mean kinetic energy, which are modulated by the background thermal stratification. For the low-density arrangements advection dominates, while for the highly loaded wind farms the mean kinetic energy recovers through fluxes of mean kinetic energy. For those cases in between, a smooth balance of both mechanisms exists. From the results, a low-order model for the wind farms' harvested power as a function of thermal stratification and wind farm density has been developed, which has the potential to be used as an order-of-magnitude assessment tool.

  18. A hybrid wind farm parameterization for mesoscale and climate models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Y.; Archer, C. L.

    2016-12-01

    To better understand the potential impacts of wind farms on weather and climate at the local to regional scale, a new hybrid wind farm parameterization is proposed here for mesoscale models, such as the Weather Research and Forecasting Model (WRF), or climate models, such as the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM). All previous wind farm parameterizations treat all the wind turbines in the same grid cell as identical (i.e., they all share the same upstream wind velocity) and ignore the effect of wind direction. By contrast, the new hybrid model considers each individual wind turbine, based on its position in the layout and on wind direction. The new parameterization is developed starting from large eddy simulations (LES) of existing wind farms, in which the local flow around each wind turbine is directly simulated at high spatial ( 3.5 m) and temporal ( 0.1 s) resolutions and the effects of subgrid-scale processes are modeled. Based on analytic and statistical relationships between the LES results and several geometric properties of the wind farm layout (such as blockage ratio and blocking distance), the new hybrid parameterization predicts the local upstream wind speed of each individual wind turbine in the same grid cell, and thus successfully account for the effects of layout and wind direction with little computational cost. With the newly predicted upstream velocity, the turbine-induced forces and added turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) in the atmosphere are derived analytically. The wind speed, wind speed deficit, and TKE profiles and power production obtained with the hybrid parameterization for the test case (the 48-turbine Lillgrund wind farm in Sweden) are in better agreement with the LES results than previous parameterizations. Future work includes the insertion of the hybrid parameterization into the WRF code to assess impacts on near-surface properties, such as temperature and heat and momentum fluxes, in the region surrounding the wind farm.

  19. Application of CFD modeling to hydrodynamics of CycloBio fluidized sand bed in recirculating aquaculture systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yao; Song, Xiefa; Liang, Zhenlin; Peng, Lei

    2013-11-01

    To improve the efficiency of a CycloBio fluidized sand bed (CB FSB) in removal of dissolved wastes in recirculating aquaculture systems, the hydrodynamics of solid-liquid flow was investigated using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling tools. The dynamic characteristics of silica sand within the CB FSB were determined using three-dimensional, unsteady-state simulations with the granular Eulerian multiphase approach and the RNG k-ɛ turbulence model, and the simulation results were validated using available lab-scale measurements. The bed expansion of CB FSB increased with the increase in water inflow rate in numerical simulations. Upon validation, the simulation involving 0.55 mm particles, the Gidaspow correlation for drag coefficient model and the Syamlal-O'Brien correlation for kinetic granular viscosity showed the closest match to the experimental results. The volume fraction of numerical simulations peaked as the wall was approached. The hydrodynamics of a pilot-scale CB FSB was simulated in order to predict the range of water flow to avoid the silica sand overflowing. The numerical simulations were in agreement with the experimental results qualitatively and quantitatively, and thus can be used to study the hydrodynamics of solid-liquid multiphase flow in CB FSB, which is of importance to the design, optimization, and amplification of CB FSBs.

  20. TANK MIXING STUDY WITH FLOW RECIRCULATION

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.

    2014-06-25

    The primary objective of this work is to quantify the mixing time when two miscible fluids are mixed by one recirculation pump and to evaluate adequacy of 2.5 hours of pump recirculation to be considered well mixed in SRS tanks, JT-71/72. The work scope described here consists of two modeling analyses. They are the steady state flow pattern analysis during pump recirculation operation of the tank liquid and transient species transport calculations based on the initial steady state flow patterns. The modeling calculations for the mixing time are performed by using the 99% homogeneity criterion for the entire domain of the tank contents.

  1. Proteomics in farm animals models of human diseases.

    PubMed

    Ceciliani, Fabrizio; Restelli, Laura; Lecchi, Cristina

    2014-10-01

    The need to provide in vivo complex environments to understand human diseases strongly relies on the use of animal models, which traditionally include small rodents and rabbits. It is becoming increasingly evident that the few species utilised to date cannot be regarded as universal. There is a great need for new animal species that are naturally endowed with specific features relevant to human diseases. Farm animals, including pigs, cows, sheep and horses, represent a valid alternative to commonly utilised rodent models. There is an ample scope for the application of proteomic techniques in farm animals, and the establishment of several proteomic maps of plasma and tissue has clearly demonstrated that farm animals provide a disease environment that closely resembles that of human diseases. The present review offers a snapshot of how proteomic techniques have been applied to farm animals to improve their use as biomedical models. Focus will be on specific topics of biomedical research in which farm animal models have been characterised through the application of proteomic techniques.

  2. IEA-Task 31 WAKEBENCH: Towards a protocol for wind farm flow model evaluation. Part 2: Wind farm wake models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moriarty, Patrick; Sanz Rodrigo, Javier; Gancarski, Pawel; Chuchfield, Matthew; Naughton, Jonathan W.; Hansen, Kurt S.; Machefaux, Ewan; Maguire, Eoghan; Castellani, Francesco; Terzi, Ludovico; Breton, Simon-Philippe; Ueda, Yuko

    2014-06-01

    Researchers within the International Energy Agency (IEA) Task 31: Wakebench have created a framework for the evaluation of wind farm flow models operating at the microscale level. The framework consists of a model evaluation protocol integrated with a web-based portal for model benchmarking (www.windbench.net). This paper provides an overview of the building-block validation approach applied to wind farm wake models, including best practices for the benchmarking and data processing procedures for validation datasets from wind farm SCADA and meteorological databases. A hierarchy of test cases has been proposed for wake model evaluation, from similarity theory of the axisymmetric wake and idealized infinite wind farm, to single-wake wind tunnel (UMN-EPFL) and field experiments (Sexbierum), to wind farm arrays in offshore (Horns Rev, Lillgrund) and complex terrain conditions (San Gregorio). A summary of results from the axisymmetric wake, Sexbierum, Horns Rev and Lillgrund benchmarks are used to discuss the state-of-the-art of wake model validation and highlight the most relevant issues for future development.

  3. Farmworkers' Irrigation Schools: An Extension Model for Hispanic Farm Laborers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Youmans, David; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Describes a model for Hispanic farm laborer irrigation schools that was developed, implemented, and evaluated by cooperative extension personnel. Success of the approach was due to attention to critical elements in the model, which is applicable to other adult basic education programs. (JOW)

  4. Preoperational test report, recirculation condenser cooling systems

    SciTech Connect

    Clifton, F.T.

    1997-11-04

    This represents a preoperational test report for Recirculation Condenser Systems, Project W-030. Project W-030 provides a ventilation upgrade for the four Aging Waste Facility tanks. The four system provide condenser cooling water for vapor space cooling of tanks AY1O1, AY102, AZ1O1, AZ102. Each system consists of a valved piping loop, a pair of redundant recirculation pumps, a closed-loop evaporative cooling tower, and supporting instrumentation; equipment is located outside the farm on concrete slabs. Piping is routed to the each ventilation condenser inside the farm via below-grade concrete trenches. The tests verify correct system operation and correct indications displayed by the central Monitor and Control System.

  5. Including spatial data in nutrient balance modelling on dairy farms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Leeuwen, Maricke; van Middelaar, Corina; Stoof, Cathelijne; Oenema, Jouke; Stoorvogel, Jetse; de Boer, Imke

    2017-04-01

    The Annual Nutrient Cycle Assessment (ANCA) calculates the nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) balance at a dairy farm, while taking into account the subsequent nutrient cycles of the herd, manure, soil and crop components. Since January 2016, Dutch dairy farmers are required to use ANCA in order to increase understanding of nutrient flows and to minimize nutrient losses to the environment. A nutrient balance calculates the difference between nutrient inputs and outputs. Nutrients enter the farm via purchased feed, fertilizers, deposition and fixation by legumes (nitrogen), and leave the farm via milk, livestock, manure, and roughages. A positive balance indicates to which extent N and/or P are lost to the environment via gaseous emissions (N), leaching, run-off and accumulation in soil. A negative balance indicates that N and/or P are depleted from soil. ANCA was designed to calculate average nutrient flows on farm level (for the herd, manure, soil and crop components). ANCA was not designed to perform calculations of nutrient flows at the field level, as it uses averaged nutrient inputs and outputs across all fields, and it does not include field specific soil characteristics. Land management decisions, however, such as the level of N and P application, are typically taken at the field level given the specific crop and soil characteristics. Therefore the information that ANCA provides is likely not sufficient to support farmers' decisions on land management to minimize nutrient losses to the environment. This is particularly a problem when land management and soils vary between fields. For an accurate estimate of nutrient flows in a given farming system that can be used to optimize land management, the spatial scale of nutrient inputs and outputs (and thus the effect of land management and soil variation) could be essential. Our aim was to determine the effect of the spatial scale of nutrient inputs and outputs on modelled nutrient flows and nutrient use efficiencies

  6. Onshore wind farm modelling using high performance computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folch, A.; Avila, M.; Houzeaux, G.; Egukitza, B.; Prieto, L.

    2013-12-01

    Numerical modelling has become a basic tool for the design and exploitation of wind energy resources. The Barcelona Supercomputing Center, the national supercomputing facility in Spain, and Iberdrola Renovables S.A., an industry world leader in the sector, are working in close cooperation in the development of a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) wind farm modelling strategy in the frame of high performance computing. The first objective is to optimize the design of wind farms using a k-e turbulence model specially designed for atmospheric flow in complex terrains. An actuator disk model is used to account for the wake effects of wind turbines that, for optimization of farm design, are placed using a chimera method. The model has been implemented in Alya, a multi-physics parallel code specially designed for massive parallel execution. The second objective, yet under development, is the short-term forecast of wind farm production considering a nest-down from mesoscale numerical weather prediction models to CFD in order to obtain high-resolution hourly wind fields.

  7. Recirculating rotary gas compressor

    DOEpatents

    Weinbrecht, John F.

    1992-01-01

    A positive displacement, recirculating Roots-type rotary gas compressor which operates on the basis of flow work compression. The compressor includes a pair of large diameter recirculation conduits (24 and 26) which return compressed discharge gas to the compressor housing (14), where it is mixed with low pressure inlet gas, thereby minimizing adiabatic heating of the gas. The compressor includes a pair of involutely lobed impellers (10 and 12) and an associated port configuration which together result in uninterrupted flow of recirculation gas. The large diameter recirculation conduits equalize gas flow velocities within the compressor and minimize gas flow losses. The compressor is particularly suited to applications requiring sustained operation at higher gas compression ratios than have previously been feasible with rotary pumps, and is particularly applicable to refrigeration or other applications requiring condensation of a vapor.

  8. Recirculating rotary gas compressor

    DOEpatents

    Weinbrecht, J.F.

    1992-02-25

    A positive displacement, recirculating Roots-type rotary gas compressor is described which operates on the basis of flow work compression. The compressor includes a pair of large diameter recirculation conduits which return compressed discharge gas to the compressor housing, where it is mixed with low pressure inlet gas, thereby minimizing adiabatic heating of the gas. The compressor includes a pair of involutely lobed impellers and an associated port configuration which together result in uninterrupted flow of recirculation gas. The large diameter recirculation conduits equalize gas flow velocities within the compressor and minimize gas flow losses. The compressor is particularly suited to applications requiring sustained operation at higher gas compression ratios than have previously been feasible with rotary pumps, and is particularly applicable to refrigeration or other applications requiring condensation of a vapor. 12 figs.

  9. Application of a dynamic subgrid-scale model to turbulent recirculating flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zang, Y.; Street, R. L.; Koseff, J. R.

    1993-01-01

    The dynamic subgrid-scale model of Germano et al. is implemented in a finite volume formulation and applied to the simulation of turbulent flow in a three-dimensional lid-driven cavity at Reynolds number of 7500. The filtering operation is carried out in physical space, and the model coefficient is calculated locally. The computed mean and rms velocities as well as the Reynolds stress are compared with experimental data. It is shown that backscatter from small to large scales is necessary to sustain turbulent fluctuations. The model is being applied to the simulation of turbulent flows in a stratified and rotating environment in complex geometries.

  10. Comparative analysis of modeled nitrogen removal by shellfish farms.

    PubMed

    Rose, Julie M; Bricker, Suzanne B; Ferreira, Joao G

    2015-02-15

    The use of shellfish aquaculture for nutrient removal and reduction of coastal eutrophication has been proposed. Published literature has indicated that nitrogen contained in harvested shellfish can be accurately estimated from shell length:nitrogen content ratios. The range of nitrogen that could be removed by a typical farm in a specific estuarine or coastal setting is also of interest to regulators and planners. Farm Aquaculture Resource Management (FARM) model outputs of nitrogen removal at the shellfish farm scale have been summarized here, from 14 locations in 9 countries across 4 continents. Modeled nitrogen removal ranged from 105 lbs acre(-1) year(-1) (12 g m(-2) year(-1)) to 1356 lbs acre(-1) year(-1) (152 g m(-2) year(-1)). Mean nitrogen removal was 520 lbs acre(-1) year(-1) (58 g m(-2) year(-1)). These model results are site-specific in nature, but compare favorably to reported nitrogen removal effectiveness of agricultural best management practices and stormwater control measures. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. DOGBONE GEOMETRY FOR RECIRCULATING ACCELERATORS.

    SciTech Connect

    BERG,J.S.; JOHNSTONE,C.; SUMMERS,D.

    2001-06-18

    Most scenarios for accelerating muons require recirculating acceleration. A racetrack shape for the accelerator requires particles with lower energy in early passes to traverse almost the same length of arc as particles with the highest energy. This extra arc length may lead to excess decays and excess cost. Changing the geometry to a dogbone shape, where there is a single linac and the beam turns completely around at the end of the linac, returning to the same end of the linac from which it exited, addresses this problem. In this design, the arc lengths can be proportional to the particle's momentum. This paper proposes an approximate cost model for a recirculating accelerator, attempts to make cost-optimized designs for both racetrack and dogbone geometries, and demonstrates that the dogbone geometry does appear to be more cost effective.

  12. PORFLOW Modeling Supporting The H-Tank Farm Performance Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, J. M.; Flach, G. P.; Westbrook, M. L.

    2012-08-31

    Numerical simulations of groundwater flow and contaminant transport in the vadose and saturated zones have been conducted using the PORFLOW code in support of an overall Performance Assessment (PA) of the H-Tank Farm. This report provides technical detail on selected aspects of PORFLOW model development and describes the structure of the associated electronic files. The PORFLOW models for the H-Tank Farm PA, Rev. 1 were updated with grout, solubility, and inventory changes. The aquifer model was refined. In addition, a set of flow sensitivity runs were performed to allow flow to be varied in the related probabilistic GoldSim models. The final PORFLOW concentration values are used as input into a GoldSim dose calculator.

  13. The University of Maryland Electron Ring: A Model Recirculator for Intense Beam Physics Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernal, S.; Li, H.; Cui, Y.; Feldman, D.; Godlove, T.; Haber, I.; Huo, Y.; Harris, J.; Kishek, R. A.; Quinn, B.; Reiser, M.; Walter, M.; Wilson, M.; Zou, Y.; O'Shea, P. G.

    2004-12-01

    The University of Maryland Electron Ring (UMER), designed for transport studies of space-charge dominated beams in a strong focusing lattice, is nearing completion. Low energy, high intensity electron beams provide an excellent model system for experimental studies with relevance to all areas that require high quality, intense charged-particle beams. In addition, UMER constitutes an important tool for benchmarking of computer codes. When completed, the UMER lattice will consist of 36 alternating-focusing (FODO) periods over an 11.5-m circumference. Current studies in UMER over about 2/3 of the ring include beam-envelope matching, halo formation, asymmetrical focusing, and longitudinal dynamics (beam bunch erosion and wave propagation.) Near future, multi-turn operation of the ring will allow us to address important additional issues such as resonance-traversal, energy spread and others. The main diagnostics are phosphor screens and capacitive beam position monitors placed at the center of each 200 bending section. In addition, pepper-pot and slit-wire emittance meters are in operation. The range of beam currents used corresponds to space charge tune depressions from 0.2 to 0.8, which is unprecedented for a circular machine.

  14. Integrated watershed- and farm-scale modeling framework for targeting critical source areas while maintaining farm economic viability.

    PubMed

    Ghebremichael, Lula T; Veith, Tamie L; Hamlett, James M

    2013-01-15

    Quantitative risk assessments of pollution and data related to the effectiveness of mitigating best management practices (BMPs) are important aspects of nonpoint source pollution control efforts, particularly those driven by specific water quality objectives and by measurable improvement goals, such as the total maximum daily load (TMDL) requirements. Targeting critical source areas (CSAs) that generate disproportionately high pollutant loads within a watershed is a crucial step in successfully controlling nonpoint source pollution. The importance of watershed simulation models in assisting with the quantitative assessments of CSAs of pollution (relative to their magnitudes and extents) and of the effectiveness of associated BMPs has been well recognized. However, due to the distinct disconnect between the hydrological scale in which these models conduct their evaluation and the farm scale at which feasible BMPs are actually selected and implemented, and due to the difficulty and uncertainty involved in transferring watershed model data to farm fields, there are limited practical applications of these tools in the current nonpoint source pollution control efforts by conservation specialists for delineating CSAs and planning targeting measures. There are also limited approaches developed that can assess impacts of CSA-targeted BMPs on farm productivity and profitability together with the assessment of water quality improvements expected from applying these measures. This study developed a modeling framework that integrates farm economics and environmental aspects (such as identification and mitigation of CSAs) through joint use of watershed- and farm-scale models in a closed feedback loop. The integration of models in a closed feedback loop provides a way for environmental changes to be evaluated with regard to the impact on the practical aspects of farm management and economics, adjusted or reformulated as necessary, and revaluated with respect to effectiveness of

  15. A Predictive Model for Wind Farms Using Dynamic Mode Decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Vaughan; Meneveau, Charles; Gayme, Dennice

    2016-11-01

    In this work we extend traditional dynamic mode decomposition (DMD) to develop a linear predictive model for the time evolution of the velocity field for a multiple-turbine wind farm. Traditional DMD identifies a set of DMD modes which can be used to produce a linear system that approximates the dynamics of the original system. Typically, these DMD modes consist of those that both grow and decay, but in order to develop a predictive model we need a system that evolves along a manifold that neither grows nor decays. Here we modify the DMD calculation to build such a model. We then apply this method to three dimensional large eddy simulations (LES) of a multi-turbine wind farm. Our predictive wind farm model is initialized with a small time series of data independent of the original data used to create the system. When initialized in this manner our DMD based model can reproduce the subsequent time evolution of the velocity field over ten inter-turbine convective timescales with a gradual falloff in performance. This work is supported by the National Science Foundation (Grants ECCS-1230788 and OISE-1243482, the WINDINSPIRE project).

  16. Effect of increasing salinity on biogas production in waste landfills with leachate recirculation: A lab-scale model study.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Yuka; Ishigaki, Tomonori; Nakagawa, Mikako; Yamada, Masato

    2016-06-01

    The effects of salinity on anaerobic waste degradation and microbial communities were investigated, in order to propose an appropriate leachate recirculation process in a waste landfill in a tropical region. A salt concentration of 21 mS cm(-1) of electrical conductivity (EC) did not affect waste degradation, but a salt concentration of 35 mS cm(-1) of EC inhibited CH4 generation. A higher salt concentration of 80 mS cm(-1) of EC inhibited not only CH4 and CO2 generation, but also degradation of organic compounds. The bacterial and archaeal community compositions were affected by high salinity. High salinity can exert selective pressure on bacterial communities, resulting in a change in bacterial community structure. Ammonium caused strong, dominant inhibition of biogas production in the salt concentration range of this study. Quality control, especially of ammonium levels, will be essential for the promotion of waste biodegradation in landfills with leachate recirculation.

  17. Usefulness of thermographic analysis to control temperature homogeneity in the development and implementation of a closed recirculating CO2 chemohyperthermia model.

    PubMed

    Padilla-Valverde, David; Sanchez-Garcia, Susana; García-Santos, Esther; Marcote-Ibañez, Carlos; Molina-Robles, Mercedes; Martín-Fernández, Jesús; Villarejo-Campos, Pedro

    2016-09-30

    To determine the effectiveness of thermography to control the distribution of abdominal temperature in the development of a closed chemohyperthermia model. For thermographic analysis, we divided the abdominopelvic cavity into nine regions according to a modification of carcinomatosis peritoneal index. A difference of 2.5 °C between and within the quadrants, and thermographic colours, were used as asymmetric criteria. Preclinical study:· Rats Model: Six athymic nude rats, male, rnu/rnu. They were treated with closed technique and open technique. Porcine Model: 12 female large white pigs. Four were treated with open technique and eight with closed recirculation CO2 technique. Clinical Pilot Study, EUDRACT 2011-006319-69: 18 patients with ovarian cancer were treated with cytoreductive surgery and hyperthermia intraperitoneal chemotherapy, HIPEC, with a closed recirculating CO2 system. Thermographic control and intra-abdominal temperature assessment was performed at the baseline, when outflow temperature reached 41 °C, and at 30´. The thermographic images showed a higher homogeneity of the intra-abdominal temperature in the closed model respect to the open technique. The thermogram showed a temperature distribution homogeneity when starting the circulation of chemotherapy. There was correlation between the temperature thermographic map in the closed porcine model and pilot study, and reached inflow and outflow temperatures, at half time of HIPEC, of 42/41.4 °C and 42 ± 0.2/41 ± 0.8 °C, respectively. There was no significant impact to the core temperature of patients after reaching the homogeneous temperature distribution. To control homogeneity of temperature distribution is feasible using infra-red digital images in a closed HIPEC with CO2 recirculation.

  18. Recirculation in multiple wave conversions

    SciTech Connect

    Kaufman, A. N.; Brizard, A.J.; Kaufman, A.N.; Tracy, E.R.

    2008-07-30

    A one-dimensional multiple wave-conversion model is constructed that allows energy recirculation in ray phase space. Using a modular eikonal approach, the connection coefficients for this model are calculated by ray phase-space methods. Analytical results (confirmed numerically) show that all connection coefficients exhibit interference effects that depend on an interference phase, calculated from the coupling constants and the area enclosed by the intersecting rays. This conceptual model, which focuses on the topology of intersecting rays in phase space, is used to investigate how mode conversion between primary and secondary waves is modified by the presence of a tertiary wave.

  19. MELODIE: a whole-farm model to study the dynamics of nutrients in dairy and pig farms with crops.

    PubMed

    Chardon, X; Rigolot, C; Baratte, C; Espagnol, S; Raison, C; Martin-Clouaire, R; Rellier, J-P; Le Gall, A; Dourmad, J Y; Piquemal, B; Leterme, P; Paillat, J M; Delaby, L; Garcia, F; Peyraud, J L; Poupa, J C; Morvan, T; Faverdin, P

    2012-10-01

    In regions of intensive pig and dairy farming, nutrient losses to the environment at farm level are a source of concern for water and air quality. Dynamic models are useful tools to evaluate the effects of production strategies on nutrient flows and losses to the environment. This paper presents the development of a new whole-farm model upscaling dynamic models developed at the field or animal scale. The model, called MELODIE, is based on an original structure with interacting biotechnical and decisional modules. Indeed, it is supported by an ontology of production systems and the associated programming platform DIESE. The biotechnical module simulates the nutrient flows in the different animal, soil and crops and manure sub-models. The decision module relies on an annual optimization of cropping and spreading allocation plans, and on the flexible execution of activity plans for each simulated year. These plans are examined every day by an operational management sub-model and their application is context dependent. As a result, MELODIE dynamically simulates the flows of carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, copper, zinc and water within the whole farm over the short and long-term considering both the farming system and its adaptation to climatic conditions. Therefore, it is possible to study both the spatial and temporal heterogeneity of the environmental risks, and to test changes of practices and innovative scenarios. This is illustrated with one example of simulation plan on dairy farms to interpret the Nitrogen farm-gate budget indicator. It shows that this indicator is able to reflect small differences in Nitrogen losses between different systems, but it can only be interpreted using a mobile average, not on a yearly basis. This example illustrates how MELODIE could be used to study the dynamic behaviour of the system and the dynamic of nutrient flows. Finally, MELODIE can also be used for comprehensive multi-criterion assessments, and it also constitutes a generic

  20. Four-Nozzle Benchmark Wind Tunnel Model USA Code Solutions for Simulation of Multiple Rocket Base Flow Recirculation at 145,000 Feet Altitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dougherty, N. S.; Johnson, S. L.

    1993-01-01

    Multiple rocket exhaust plume interactions at high altitudes can produce base flow recirculation with attendant alteration of the base pressure coefficient and increased base heating. A search for a good wind tunnel benchmark problem to check grid clustering technique and turbulence modeling turned up the experiment done at AEDC in 1961 by Goethert and Matz on a 4.25-in. diameter domed missile base model with four rocket nozzles. This wind tunnel model with varied external bleed air flow for the base flow wake produced measured p/p(sub ref) at the center of the base as high as 3.3 due to plume flow recirculation back onto the base. At that time in 1961, relatively inexpensive experimentation with air at gamma = 1.4 and nozzle A(sub e)/A of 10.6 and theta(sub n) = 7.55 deg with P(sub c) = 155 psia simulated a LO2/LH2 rocket exhaust plume with gamma = 1.20, A(sub e)/A of 78 and P(sub c) about 1,000 psia. An array of base pressure taps on the aft dome gave a clear measurement of the plume recirculation effects at p(infinity) = 4.76 psfa corresponding to 145,000 ft altitude. Our CFD computations of the flow field with direct comparison of computed-versus-measured base pressure distribution (across the dome) provide detailed information on velocities and particle traces as well eddy viscosity in the base and nozzle region. The solution was obtained using a six-zone mesh with 284,000 grid points for one quadrant taking advantage of symmetry. Results are compared using a zero-equation algebraic and a one-equation pointwise R(sub t) turbulence model (work in progress). Good agreement with the experimental pressure data was obtained with both; and this benchmark showed the importance of: (1) proper grid clustering and (2) proper choice of turbulence modeling for rocket plume problems/recirculation at high altitude.

  1. Four-nozzle benchmark wind tunnel model USA code solutions for simulation of multiple rocket base flow recirculation at 145,000 feet altitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dougherty, N. S.; Johnson, S. L.

    1993-07-01

    Multiple rocket exhaust plume interactions at high altitudes can produce base flow recirculation with attendant alteration of the base pressure coefficient and increased base heating. A search for a good wind tunnel benchmark problem to check grid clustering technique and turbulence modeling turned up the experiment done at AEDC in 1961 by Goethert and Matz on a 4.25-in. diameter domed missile base model with four rocket nozzles. This wind tunnel model with varied external bleed air flow for the base flow wake produced measured p/p(sub ref) at the center of the base as high as 3.3 due to plume flow recirculation back onto the base. At that time in 1961, relatively inexpensive experimentation with air at gamma = 1.4 and nozzle A(sub e)/A of 10.6 and theta(sub n) = 7.55 deg with P(sub c) = 155 psia simulated a LO2/LH2 rocket exhaust plume with gamma = 1.20, A(sub e)/A of 78 and P(sub c) about 1,000 psia. An array of base pressure taps on the aft dome gave a clear measurement of the plume recirculation effects at p(infinity) = 4.76 psfa corresponding to 145,000 ft altitude. Our CFD computations of the flow field with direct comparison of computed-versus-measured base pressure distribution (across the dome) provide detailed information on velocities and particle traces as well eddy viscosity in the base and nozzle region. The solution was obtained using a six-zone mesh with 284,000 grid points for one quadrant taking advantage of symmetry. Results are compared using a zero-equation algebraic and a one-equation pointwise R(sub t) turbulence model (work in progress). Good agreement with the experimental pressure data was obtained with both; and this benchmark showed the importance of: (1) proper grid clustering and (2) proper choice of turbulence modeling for rocket plume problems/recirculation at high altitude.

  2. Energy savings from air recirculation in peanut curing

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, D.F.; Cundiff, J.S.; Vaughan, D.H.

    1982-12-01

    A thin-layer peanut drying simulation model was adapted to incorporate air recirculation. Laboratory crop dryers were designed and constructed to conduct experiments to verify the model. Five batches of peanuts were dried using different recirculation strategies. The model successfully predicted the results.

  3. Modeling velocity space-time correlations in wind farms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukassen, Laura J.; Stevens, Richard J. A. M.; Meneveau, Charles; Wilczek, Michael

    2016-11-01

    Turbulent fluctuations of wind velocities cause power-output fluctuations in wind farms. The statistics of velocity fluctuations can be described by velocity space-time correlations in the atmospheric boundary layer. In this context, it is important to derive simple physics-based models. The so-called Tennekes-Kraichnan random sweeping hypothesis states that small-scale velocity fluctuations are passively advected by large-scale velocity perturbations in a random fashion. In the present work, this hypothesis is used with an additional mean wind velocity to derive a model for the spatial and temporal decorrelation of velocities in wind farms. It turns out that in the framework of this model, space-time correlations are a convolution of the spatial correlation function with a temporal decorrelation kernel. In this presentation, first results on the comparison to large eddy simulations will be presented and the potential of the approach to characterize power output fluctuations of wind farms will be discussed. Acknowledgements: 'Fellowships for Young Energy Scientists' (YES!) of FOM, the US National Science Foundation Grant IIA 1243482, and support by the Max Planck Society.

  4. Simulating forage crop production in a northern climate with the Integrated Farm System Model

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Whole-farm simulation models are useful tools for evaluating the effect of management practices and climate variability on the agro-environmental and economic performance of farms. A few process-based farm-scale models have been developed, but none have been evaluated in a northern region with a sho...

  5. Farm-specific carbon footprinting to the farm gate for agricultural co-products using the OVERSEER® model.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, D M; Ledgard, S F; Boyes, M

    2013-06-01

    The user inputs to OVERSEER® Nutrient Budgets (Overseer) allow farm-specific greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions to be estimated. Since the development of the original model, life cycle assessment standards (e.g. PAS 2050) have been proposed and adopted for determining GHG or carbon footprints, which are usually reported as emissions per unit of product, for example, per kg milk, meat or wool. New Zealand pastoral farms frequently generate a range of products with different management practices. A robust system is required to allocate the individual sources of GHGs (e.g. methane, nitrous oxide, direct carbon dioxide and embodied carbon dioxide emissions for inputs used on the farm) to each product from a farm. This paper describes a method for allocating emissions to co-products from New Zealand farms. The method requires allocating the emissions, first, to an animal enterprise, separating the emissions between breeding and trading animals, and then allocating to a specific product to give product (e.g. milk, meat, wool, velvet) footprints from the 'cradle-to-farm-gate'. The meat product was based on live-weight gain. Procedures were adopted so that emissions associated with rearing of young stock used in live-weight gain systems, both as a by-product or a primary product could be estimated. This allows the possibility of total emissions for a meat product to be built up from contributing farms along the production chain.

  6. Modeling needs assessment for Hanford Tank Farm Operations. Vadose Zone Characterization Project at the Hanford Tank Farms

    SciTech Connect

    1996-04-01

    This report presents the results of a modeling-needs assessment conducted for Tank Farm Operations at the Hanford Site. The goal of this project is to integrate geophysical logging and subsurface transport modeling into a broader decision-based framework that will be made available to guide Tank Farm Operations in implementing future modeling studies. In support of this goal, previous subsurface transport modeling studies were reviewed, and stakeholder surveys and interviews were completed (1) to identify regulatory, stakeholder, and Native American concerns and the impacts of these concerns on Tank Farm Operations, (2) to identify technical constraints that impact site characterization and modeling efforts, and (3) to assess how subsurface transport modeling can best be used to support regulatory, stakeholder, Native American, and Tank Farm Operations needs. This report is organized into six sections. Following an introduction, Section 2.0 discusses background issues that relate to Tank Farm Operations. Section 3.0 summarizes the technical approach used to appraise the status of modeling and supporting characterization. Section 4.0 presents a detailed description of how the technical approach was implemented. Section 5.0 identifies findings and observations that relate to implementation of numerical modeling, and Section 6.0 presents recommendations for future activities.

  7. Na+ recirculation and isosmotic transport.

    PubMed

    Larsen, E H; Møbjerg, N

    2006-01-01

    The Na(+) recirculation theory for solute-coupled fluid absorption is an expansion of the local osmosis concept introduced by Curran and analyzed by Diamond & Bossert. Based on studies on small intestine the theory assumes that the observed recirculation of Na(+) serves regulation of the osmolarity of the absorbate. Mathematical modeling reproducing bioelectric and hydrosmotic properties of small intestine and proximal tubule, respectively, predicts a significant range of observations such as isosmotic transport, hyposmotic transport, solvent drag, anomalous solvent drag, the residual hydraulic permeability in proximal tubule of AQP1 (-/-) mice, and the inverse relationship between hydraulic permeability and the concentration difference needed to reverse transepithelial water flow. The model reproduces the volume responses of cells and lateral intercellular space (lis) following replacement of luminal NaCl by sucrose as well as the linear dependence of volume absorption on luminal NaCl concentration. Analysis of solvent drag on Na(+) in tight junctions provides explanation for the surprisingly high metabolic efficiency of Na(+) reabsorption. The model predicts and explains low metabolic efficiency in diluted external baths. Hyperosmolarity of lis is governed by the hydraulic permeability of the apical plasma membrane and tight junction with 6-7 mOsm in small intestine and < or = 1 mOsm in proximal tubule. Truly isosmotic transport demands a Na(+) recirculation of 50-70% in small intestine but might be barely measurable in proximal tubule. The model fails to reproduce a certain type of observations: The reduced volume absorption at transepithelial osmotic equilibrium in AQP1 knockout mice, and the stimulated water absorption by gallbladder in diluted external solutions. Thus, it indicates cellular regulation of apical Na(+) uptake, which is not included in the mathematical treatment.

  8. Passive recirculation in the National Launch System's fuel feedlines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, W. R.; Holt, K. A.

    1993-01-01

    This report contains the passive recirculation tests on the fuel feedline of the National Launch System (NLS). The majority of testing was performed in February 1992, at the National Institute of Standards and Technology in Boulder, CO. The primary objective was to characterize passive recirculation in the NLS fuel feedline. The objective was met by observing the passive recirculation in a one-fifth scale model of the feedline with clear glass sections. The testing was recorded on video tape and with photographs. A description of the testing apparatus and support equipment is included. The experiment indicates that passive recirculation was occurring; higher angles from the horizontal transfer more heat.

  9. Mathematical model of the Savannah River Site waste tank farm

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, F.G. III

    1991-07-15

    A mathematical model has been developed to simulate operation of the waste tank farm and the associated evaporator systems at the Savannah River Site. The model solves material balance equations to predict the volumes of liquid waste, salt, and sludge for all of the tanks within each of the evaporator systems. Additional logic is included to model the behavior of waste tanks not directly associated with the evaporators. Input parameters include the Material Management Plan forecast of canyon operations, specification of other waste sources for the evaporator systems, evaporator operating characteristics, and salt and sludge removal schedules. The model determines how the evaporators will operate, when waste transfers can be made, and waste accumulation rates. Output from the model includes waste tank contents, summaries of systems operations, and reports of space gain and the remaining capacity to store waste materials within the tank farm. Model simulations can be made to predict waste tank capacities on a daily basis for up to 20 years. The model is coded as a set of three computer programs designed to run on either IBM compatible or Apple Macintosh II personal computers.

  10. Optimization of wind farm performance using low-order models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabiri, John; Brownstein, Ian

    2015-11-01

    A low order model that captures the dominant flow behaviors in a vertical-axis wind turbine (VAWT) array is used to maximize the power output of wind farms utilizing VAWTs. The leaky Rankine body model (LRB) was shown by Araya et al. (JRSE 2014) to predict the ranking of individual turbine performances in an array to within measurement uncertainty as compared to field data collected from full-scale VAWTs. Further, this model is able to predict array performance with significantly less computational expense than higher fidelity numerical simulations of the flow, making it ideal for use in optimization of wind farm performance. This presentation will explore the ability of the LRB model to rank the relative power output of different wind turbine array configurations as well as the ranking of individual array performance over a variety of wind directions, using various complex configurations tested in the field and simpler configurations tested in a wind tunnel. Results will be presented in which the model is used to determine array fitness in an evolutionary algorithm seeking to find optimal array configurations given a number of turbines, area of available land, and site wind direction profile. Comparison with field measurements will be presented.

  11. Evaluation of commonly-used farm disinfectants in wet and dry models of Salmonella farm contamination.

    PubMed

    McLaren, Ian; Wales, Andrew; Breslin, Mark; Davies, Robert

    2011-02-01

    Two experimental models of Salmonella contamination were used in an attempt to mimic the conditions of disinfectant use on farms. A wet model, for conditions such as boot dips, used disinfectant application to a slurry of poultry faeces inoculated with Salmonella Enteritidis or Salmonella Typhimurium. A dry model, for disinfectant application to surfaces and equipment with adherent or residual organic material, used Salmonella-inoculated poultry faeces that were air-dried onto wooden dowels, immersed in disinfectant solution then left in air at room temperature overnight. All samples were subjected to a disinfectant neutralization step and resuscitation in broth, followed by Salmonella culture on semi-solid then indicator media. Disinfectants were tested at 0.5x, 1x and 2x the concentrations specified for the general control of bacterial pathogens on livestock premises in the UK (Defra General Orders rates). Chlorocresol-based disinfectants provided consistently high rates of Salmonella killing in both wet and dry tests. Formaldehyde-containing disinfectants showed very high efficacy in the dry test but were less effective in the shorter wet test, whereas the efficacy of glutaraldehyde without formaldehyde was variable between products. Other chemical classes tested (quaternary ammonium compounds, amphoteric surfactants, iodine preparations, peroxygens and a substituted phenol blend) were only moderately effective. They often required concentrations above General Orders rates to eliminate the test salmonellas, and frequently elimination was not achieved even under maximal conditions of concentration and exposure.

  12. Preoperational test report, recirculation ventilation systems

    SciTech Connect

    Clifton, F.T.

    1997-11-11

    This represents a preoperational test report for Recirculation Ventilation Systems, Project W-030. Project W-030 provides a ventilation upgrade for the four Aging Waste Facility tanks. The system provides vapor space cooling of tanks AY1O1, AY102, AZ1O1, AZ102 and supports the ability to exhaust air from each tank. Each system consists of a valved piping loop, a fan, condenser, and moisture separator; equipment is located inside each respective tank farm in its own hardened building. The tests verify correct system operation and correct indications displayed by the central Monitor and Control System.

  13. Modelling the interactions between C and N farm balances and GHG emissions from confinement dairy farms in northern Spain.

    PubMed

    Del Prado, A; Mas, K; Pardo, G; Gallejones, P

    2013-11-01

    There is world-wide concern for the contribution of dairy farming to global warming. However, there is still a need to improve the quantification of the C-footprint of dairy farming systems under different production systems and locations since most of the studies (e.g. at farm-scale or using LCA) have been carried out using too simplistic and generalised approaches. A modelling approach integrating existing and new sub-models has been developed and used to simulate the C and N flows and to predict the GHG burden of milk production (from the cradle to the farm gate) from 17 commercial confinement dairy farms in the Basque Country (northern Spain). We studied the relationship between their GHG emissions, and their management and economic performance. Additionally, we explored some of the effects on the GHG results of the modelling methodology choice. The GHG burden values resulting from this study (0.84-2.07 kg CO2-eq kg(-l) milk ECM), although variable, were within the range of values of existing studies. It was evidenced, however, that the methodology choice used for prediction had a large effect on the results. Methane from the rumen and manures, and N2O emissions from soils comprised most of the GHG emissions for milk production. Diet was the strongest factor explaining differences in GHG emissions from milk production. Moreover, the proportion of feed from the total cattle diet that could have directly been used to feed humans (e.g. cereals) was a good indicator to predict the C-footprint of milk. Not only were some other indicators, such as those in relation with farm N use efficiency, good proxies to estimate GHG emissions per ha or per kg milk ECM (C-footprint of milk) but they were also positively linked with farm economic performance.

  14. Whole-farm models to quantify greenhouse gas emissions and their potential use for linking climate change mitigation and adaptation in temperate grassland ruminant-based farming systems.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The farm level is considered the most appropriate scale for evaluating options for mitigating greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, because the farm represents the unit at which management decisions in livestock production are made. To date, a number of farm-based modeling approaches have been developed t...

  15. Modelling microprocessor farms for SSC (Superconducting Super Collider) data acquisition

    SciTech Connect

    Cutts, D.; van Ingen, C.

    1985-01-01

    Data acquisition, involving both data collection and accompanying filtering, is a crucial part of an SSC experiment. The extreme demands on the acquisition system for I/O bandwidth and real-time computation capability that makes irrecoverable event selections requires that the system operation be well designed and fully understood. Modelling is a valuable and perhaps necessary tool for a successful design of such complex systems. As a demonstration of the modelling process we have made a few studies of simple systems consisting of a large number of microprocessors arranged in a ''farm'', a system in which each event is routed from the digitization/readout crates directly to a single microprocessor, one of a large parallel array, which performs the complete software event filter on that event. Subsequent events are transferred in turn to other processor nodes which are idle. The results of our crude simulations agree with the expected performance of such farms, and suggest that realistic modelling of SSC acquisitions will be important. 3 figs.

  16. Farming Systems Modeling Using the Object Modeling System (OMS): Overview, Applications, and Future Plans

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Development of the Object Modeling System (OMS) modeling framework represents a comprehensive partnership between the USDA ARS/NRCS, USGS, and university collaborators. OMS helps streamline the development of integrated farming system models for current and future model delivery using a component-or...

  17. High ratio recirculating gas compressor

    DOEpatents

    Weinbrecht, John F.

    1989-01-01

    A high ratio positive displacement recirculating rotary compressor is disclosed. The compressor includes an integral heat exchanger and recirculation conduits for returning cooled, high pressure discharge gas to the compressor housing to reducing heating of the compressor and enable higher pressure ratios to be sustained. The compressor features a recirculation system which results in continuous and uninterrupted flow of recirculation gas to the compressor with no direct leakage to either the discharge port or the intake port of the compressor, resulting in a capability of higher sustained pressure ratios without overheating of the compressor.

  18. High ratio recirculating gas compressor

    DOEpatents

    Weinbrecht, J.F.

    1989-08-22

    A high ratio positive displacement recirculating rotary compressor is disclosed. The compressor includes an integral heat exchanger and recirculation conduits for returning cooled, high pressure discharge gas to the compressor housing to reducing heating of the compressor and enable higher pressure ratios to be sustained. The compressor features a recirculation system which results in continuous and uninterrupted flow of recirculation gas to the compressor with no direct leakage to either the discharge port or the intake port of the compressor, resulting in a capability of higher sustained pressure ratios without overheating of the compressor. 10 figs.

  19. Investigation of turbine exhaust gas recirculation, base heating, and base pressure in the T-109 TsAGI wind tunnel for the IIAS ATLAS carrier model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neiland, V.; Yereza, A.; Yermak, Y.; Zhirnikov, B.; Kudin, O.; Leites, Y.; Nesterov, Y.; Plyashechnik, V.

    Some quantitative data on gas recirculation in the carrier base region are presented which are obtained by measuring concentrations of chemical compounds and solving a set of equations for balance of chemical elements. The engine jets are simulated by solid fuel combustion products. The information concerning base region heating, base pressure and carrier surface pressure is also presented. The main objective of the investigation carried out is to identify the contribution of different sources to filling the IIAS ATLAS carrier model base region with gases. Four possible sources are considered; the central unit comprising one sustainer and two side liquid boosters, solid-rocket boosters, the turbopump assemblies and the free-stream flow.

  20. Recirculating Air Filtration Significantly Reduces Exposure to Airborne Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Pui, David Y.H.; Qi, Chaolong; Stanley, Nick; Oberdörster, Günter; Maynard, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    Background Airborne nanoparticles from vehicle emissions have been associated with adverse effects in people with pulmonary and cardiovascular disease, and toxicologic studies have shown that nanoparticles can be more hazardous than their larger-scale counterparts. Recirculating air filtration in automobiles and houses may provide a low-cost solution to reducing exposures in many cases, thus reducing possible health risks. Objectives We investigated the effectiveness of recirculating air filtration on reducing exposure to incidental and intentionally produced airborne nanoparticles under two scenarios while driving in traffic, and while generating nanomaterials using gas-phase synthesis. Methods We tested the recirculating air filtration in two commercial vehicles when driving in traffic, as well as in a nonventilation room with a nanoparticle generator, simulating a nanomaterial production facility. We also measured the time-resolved aerosol size distribution during the in-car recirculation to investigate how recirculating air filtration affects particles of different sizes. We developed a recirculation model to describe the aerosol concentration change during recirculation. Results The use of inexpensive, low-efficiency filters in recirculation systems is shown to reduce nanoparticle concentrations to below levels found in a typical office within 3 min while driving through heavy traffic, and within 20 min in a simulated nanomaterial production facility. Conclusions Development and application of this technology could lead to significant reductions in airborne nanoparticle exposure, reducing possible risks to health and providing solutions for generating nanomaterials safely. PMID:18629306

  1. Recirculating air filtration significantly reduces exposure to airborne nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Pui, David Y H; Qi, Chaolong; Stanley, Nick; Oberdörster, Günter; Maynard, Andrew

    2008-07-01

    Airborne nanoparticles from vehicle emissions have been associated with adverse effects in people with pulmonary and cardiovascular disease, and toxicologic studies have shown that nanoparticles can be more hazardous than their larger-scale counterparts. Recirculating air filtration in automobiles and houses may provide a low-cost solution to reducing exposures in many cases, thus reducing possible health risks. We investigated the effectiveness of recirculating air filtration on reducing exposure to incidental and intentionally produced airborne nanoparticles under two scenarios: while driving in traffic, and while generating nanomaterials using gas-phase synthesis. We tested the recirculating air filtration in two commercial vehicles when driving in traffic, as well as in a nonventilation room with a nanoparticle generator, simulating a nanomaterial production facility. We also measured the time-resolved aerosol size distribution during the in-car recirculation to investigate how recirculating air filtration affects particles of different sizes. We developed a recirculation model to describe the aerosol concentration change during recirculation. The use of inexpensive, low-efficiency filters in recirculation systems is shown to reduce nanoparticle concentrations to below levels found in a typical office within 3 min while driving through heavy traffic, and within 20 min in a simulated nanomaterial production facility. Development and application of this technology could lead to significant reductions in airborne nanoparticle exposure, reducing possible risks to health and providing solutions for generating nanomaterials safely.

  2. A stochastic bio-economic pig farm model to assess the impact of innovations on farm performance.

    PubMed

    Ali, B M; Berentsen, P B M; Bastiaansen, J W M; Oude Lansink, A

    2017-10-12

    Recently developed innovations may improve the economic and environmental sustainability of pig production systems. Generic models are needed to assess the impact of innovations on farm performance. Here we developed a stochastic bio-economic farm model for a typical farrow-to-finish pig farm to assess the impact of innovations on private and social profits. The model accounts for emissions of greenhouse gases from feed production and manure by using the shadow price of CO2, and for stochasticity of economic and biological parameters. The model was applied to assess the impact of using locally produced alternative feed sources (i.e. co-products) in the diets of finishing pigs on private and social profits of a typical Brazilian farrow-to-finish pig farm. Three cases were defined: a reference case (with a standard corn-soybean meal-based finishing diet), a macaúba case (with a macaúba kernel cake-based finishing diet) and a co-products case (with a co-products-based finishing diet). Pigs were assumed to be fed to equal net energy intakes in the three cases. Social profits are 34% to 38% lower than private profits in the three cases. Private and social profits are about 11% and 14% higher for the macaúba case than the reference case, whereas they are 3% and 7% lower for the co-products case, respectively. Environmental costs are higher under the alternative cases than the reference case suggesting that other benefits (e.g. costs and land use) should be considered to utilize co-products. The CV of farm profits is between 75% and 87% in the three cases following from the volatility of prices over time and variations in biological parameters between fattening pigs.

  3. An analytical canopy-type model for wind farm-atmosphere interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markfort, C. D.; Zhang, W.; Porte-Agel, F.

    2013-12-01

    We present a new model for the interactions between large-scale wind farms and the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) based on similarity to canopy flows. Wind farms capture momentum from the atmospheric boundary layer both at the leading edge and from above. Based on our recent findings that turbulent flow in and above wind farms is similar to canopy-type flows, we examine this further with an analytical model that can predict the development length of the wind farm flow as well as vertical momentum absorption. Within the region of flow development, momentum is advected into the wind farm and wake turbulence draws excess momentum in from between turbines. This is characterized by large dispersive fluxes of momentum. Once the flow within the farm is developed, the area-averaged velocity profile exhibits an inflection point, characteristic of canopy-type flows. The inflected velocity profile is associated with the presence of a dominant characteristic turbulence scale, which may be responsible for a significant portion of the vertical momentum flux. Prediction of this scale is useful for determining the amount of available power for harvesting. The new model is tested with results from wind tunnel experiments, which characterize the turbulent flow in and above model wind farms. The model is useful for representing wind farms in meteorological and wind resource assessment models, for optimizing wind turbine spacing and layout, and for assessing the impacts of wind farms on nearby wind resources and the environment.

  4. A new wind-farm parameterization for large-scale atmospheric models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abkar, Mahdi; Porté-Agel, Fernando

    2015-04-01

    In this study, a new model is developed to parameterize the effect of wind farms in large-scale atmospheric models such as weather models. In the new model, wind turbines in a wind farm are parameterized as elevated sinks of momentum and sources of turbulence. An analytical approach is used to estimate the turbine-induced forces as well as the turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) generated by the turbines inside the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). In addition, the proposed model can take into account not only the effect of wind-farm density, but also the effect of wind-farm layout and wind direction. The performance of the new model is tested with large-eddy simulations (LESs) of ABL flows over very large wind farms with different turbine configurations. The results show that the new model is capable to accurately predict the turbine-induced forces as well as the TKE generated by the turbines inside the ABL.

  5. The Integrated Farm System Model: A Tool for Whole Farm Nutrient Management Analysis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    With tighter profit margins and increasing environmental constraints, strategic planning of farm production systems is becoming both more important and more difficult. This is especially true for integrated crop and animal production systems. Animal production is complex with a number of interacting...

  6. The impact of recirculating industrial air on aircraft painting operations.

    PubMed

    LaPuma, P T; Bolch, W E

    1999-10-01

    The 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments resulted in new environmental regulations for hazardous air pollutants. Industries such as painting facilities may have to treat large volumes of air, which increases the cost of an air control system. Recirculating a portion of the air back into the facility is an option to reduce the amount of air to be treated. The authors of this study developed a computer model written in Microsoft Excel 97 to analyze the impact of recirculation on worker safety and compliance costs. The model has a chemical database with over 1300 chemicals. The model will predict indoor air concentrations using mass balance calculations and results are compared to occupational exposure limits. A case study is performed on a C-130 aircraft painting facility at Hill Air Force Base, Utah. The model predicts strontium chromate concentrations found in primer paints will reach 1000 times the exposure limit. Strontium chromate and other solid particulates are nearly unaffected by recirculation because the air is filtered during recirculation. The next highest chemical, hexamethylene diisocyanate, increases from 2.6 to 10.5 times the exposure limit at 0 percent and 75 percent recirculation, respectively. Due to the level of respiratory protection required for the strontium chromate, workers are well protected from the modest increases in concentrations caused by recirculating 75 percent of the air. The initial cost of an air control system is $4.5 million with no recirculation and $1.8 million at 75 percent recirculation. The model is an excellent tool to evaluate air control options with a focus on worker safety. In the case study, the model highlights strontium chromate primers as good candidates for substitution. The model shows that recirculating 75 percent of the air at the Hill painting facility has a negligible impact on safety and could save $2.7 million on the initial expenses of a thermal treatment system.

  7. Farm-Level Effects of Soil Conservation and Commodity Policy Alternatives: Model and Data Documentation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutton, John D.

    This report documents a profit-maximizing linear programming (LP) model of a farm typical of a major corn-soybean producing area in the Southern Michigan-Northern Indiana Drift Plain. Following an introduction, a complete description of the farm is provided. The next section presents the LP model, which is structured to help analyze after-tax…

  8. Modelling of paratuberculosis spread between dairy cattle farms at a regional scale.

    PubMed

    Beaunée, Gaël; Vergu, Elisabeta; Ezanno, Pauline

    2015-09-25

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (Map) causes Johne's disease, with large economic consequences for dairy cattle producers worldwide. Map spread between farms is mainly due to animal movements. Locally, herd size and management are expected to influence infection dynamics. To provide a better understanding of Map spread between dairy cattle farms at a regional scale, we describe the first spatio-temporal model accounting simultaneously for population and infection dynamics and indirect local transmission within dairy farms, and between-farm transmission through animal trade. This model is applied to Brittany, a French region characterized by a high density of dairy cattle, based on data on animal trade, herd size and farm management (birth, death, renewal, and culling) from 2005 to 2013 for 12,857 dairy farms. In all simulated scenarios, Map infection highly persisted at the metapopulation scale. The characteristics of initially infected farms strongly impacted the regional Map spread. Network-related features of incident farms influenced their ability to contaminate disease-free farms. At the herd level, we highlighted a balanced effect of the number of animals purchased: when large, it led to a high probability of farm infection but to a low persistence. This effect was reduced when prevalence in initially infected farms increased. Implications of our findings in the current enzootic situation are that the risk of infection quickly becomes high for farms buying more than three animals per year. Even in regions with a low proportion of infected farms, Map spread will not fade out spontaneously without the use of effective control strategies.

  9. Creating a model to detect dairy cattle farms with poor welfare using a national database.

    PubMed

    Krug, C; Haskell, M J; Nunes, T; Stilwell, G

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether dairy farms with poor cow welfare could be identified using a national database for bovine identification and registration that monitors cattle deaths and movements. The welfare of dairy cattle was assessed using the Welfare Quality(®) protocol (WQ) on 24 Portuguese dairy farms and on 1930 animals. Five farms were classified as having poor welfare and the other 19 were classified as having good welfare. Fourteen million records from the national cattle database were analysed to identify potential welfare indicators for dairy farms. Fifteen potential national welfare indicators were calculated based on that database, and the link between the results on the WQ evaluation and the national cattle database was made using the identification code of each farm. Within the potential national welfare indicators, only two were significantly different between farms with good welfare and poor welfare, 'proportion of on-farm deaths' (p<0.01) and 'female/male birth ratio' (p<0.05). To determine whether the database welfare indicators could be used to distinguish farms with good welfare from farms with poor welfare, we created a model using the classifier J48 of Waikato Environment for Knowledge Analysis. The model was a decision tree based on two variables, 'proportion of on-farm deaths' and 'calving-to-calving interval', and it was able to correctly identify 70% and 79% of the farms classified as having poor and good welfare, respectively. The national cattle database analysis could be useful in helping official veterinary services in detecting farms that have poor welfare and also in determining which welfare indicators are poor on each particular farm.

  10. Space-time modelling of the spread of salmon lice between and within Norwegian marine salmon farms.

    PubMed

    Aldrin, Magne; Storvik, Bård; Kristoffersen, Anja Bråthen; Jansen, Peder Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Parasitic salmon lice are potentially harmful to salmonid hosts and farm produced lice pose a threat to wild salmonids. To control salmon lice infections in Norwegian salmonid farming, numbers of lice are regularly counted and lice abundance is reported from all salmonid farms every month. We have developed a stochastic space-time model where monthly lice abundance is modelled simultaneously for all farms. The set of farms is regarded as a network where the degree of contact between farms depends on their seaway distance. The expected lice abundance at each farm is modelled as a function of i) lice abundance in previous months at the same farm, ii) at neighbourhood farms, and iii) other, unspecified sources. In addition, the model includes explanatory variables such as seawater temperature and farm-numbers of fish. The model gives insight into factors that affect salmon lice abundance and contributing sources of infection. New findings in this study were that 66% of the expected salmon lice abundance was attributed to infection within farms, 28% was attributed to infection from neighbourhood farms and 6% to non-specified sources of infection. Furthermore, we present the relative risk of infection between neighbourhood farms as a function of seaway distance, which can be viewed as a between farm transmission kernel for salmon lice. The present modelling framework lays the foundation for development of future scenario simulation tools for examining the spread and abundance of salmon lice on farmed salmonids under different control regimes.

  11. Space-Time Modelling of the Spread of Salmon Lice between and within Norwegian Marine Salmon Farms

    PubMed Central

    Aldrin, Magne; Storvik, Bård; Kristoffersen, Anja Bråthen; Jansen, Peder Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Parasitic salmon lice are potentially harmful to salmonid hosts and farm produced lice pose a threat to wild salmonids. To control salmon lice infections in Norwegian salmonid farming, numbers of lice are regularly counted and lice abundance is reported from all salmonid farms every month. We have developed a stochastic space-time model where monthly lice abundance is modelled simultaneously for all farms. The set of farms is regarded as a network where the degree of contact between farms depends on their seaway distance. The expected lice abundance at each farm is modelled as a function of i) lice abundance in previous months at the same farm, ii) at neighbourhood farms, and iii) other, unspecified sources. In addition, the model includes explanatory variables such as seawater temperature and farm-numbers of fish. The model gives insight into factors that affect salmon lice abundance and contributing sources of infection. New findings in this study were that 66% of the expected salmon lice abundance was attributed to infection within farms, 28% was attributed to infection from neighbourhood farms and 6% to non-specified sources of infection. Furthermore, we present the relative risk of infection between neighbourhood farms as a function of seaway distance, which can be viewed as a between farm transmission kernel for salmon lice. The present modelling framework lays the foundation for development of future scenario simulation tools for examining the spread and abundance of salmon lice on farmed salmonids under different control regimes. PMID:23700455

  12. CFD modeling of wind turbine wake in wind farms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Lijian

    Wind energy is one of the most common and preferred renewable energy sources. Accurate predictions of atmospheric boundary layer flow, wind turbine induced wakes and their interaction are essential to maximize wind power output and efficiently harness wind energy. In this dissertation, a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) flow model is developed utilizing a three dimensional weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) high order Finite Volume Model system including Large Eddy Simulation (LES) and the Actuator Line Method (ALM). The developed model system is thus able to accurately capture and simulate wind turbine wakes and their interaction with the atmospheric boundary layer, thereby providing insight into the phenomenon of turbine wake interaction and its effect on the external aerodynamic loads on wind turbines. This enables the wind energy production to be maximized and also minimizes turbine fatigue loading in the evaluation of wind farm layouts. By using LES model to simulate the Atmospheric Boundary Layer flow rather than the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) model, the error introduced by turbulence modeling is reduced. The Actuator Line Model, ALM, is used to model the rotor by replacing the rotor with radially distributed body forces. It is more accurate than the actuator disc method as it captures the influence of the blade tip vortices. It can focus on a larger portion of the wake without resolving the actual wind turbine blades' geometry, thereby reducing computational cost. It is suitable and a promising method for wind turbine wake simulation. Classic non-trivial turbulent benchmark cases are used to validate the high order LES algorithms. Simulation results are compared with available results whenever possible, with good agreement observed. Results for the atmospheric boundary layer under neutral conditions are presented. By using LES coupled with the Actuator Line model, simulation results are obtained for detailed wake flow features around

  13. High Performance Computing for Modeling Wind Farms and Their Impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mavriplis, D.; Naughton, J. W.; Stoellinger, M. K.

    2016-12-01

    As energy generated by wind penetrates further into our electrical system, modeling of power production, power distribution, and the economic impact of wind-generated electricity is growing in importance. The models used for this work can range in fidelity from simple codes that run on a single computer to those that require high performance computing capabilities. Over the past several years, high fidelity models have been developed and deployed on the NCAR-Wyoming Supercomputing Center's Yellowstone machine. One of the primary modeling efforts focuses on developing the capability to compute the behavior of a wind farm in complex terrain under realistic atmospheric conditions. Fully modeling this system requires the simulation of continental flows to modeling the flow over a wind turbine blade, including down to the blade boundary level, fully 10 orders of magnitude in scale. To accomplish this, the simulations are broken up by scale, with information from the larger scales being passed to the lower scale models. In the code being developed, four scale levels are included: the continental weather scale, the local atmospheric flow in complex terrain, the wind plant scale, and the turbine scale. The current state of the models in the latter three scales will be discussed. These simulations are based on a high-order accurate dynamic overset and adaptive mesh approach, which runs at large scale on the NWSC Yellowstone machine. A second effort on modeling the economic impact of new wind development as well as improvement in wind plant performance and enhancements to the transmission infrastructure will also be discussed.

  14. [Resistance analyses for recirculated membrane bioreactor].

    PubMed

    Yang, Qi; Huang, Xia; Shang, Hai-Tao; Wen, Xiang-Hua; Qian, Yi

    2006-11-01

    The resistance analyses for recirculated membrane bioreactor by the resistance-in-series model and the modified gel-polarization model respectively were extended to the turbulent ultrafiltration system. The experiments are carried out by dye wastewater in a tubular membrane module, it is found that the permeate fluxes are predicted very well by these models for turbinate systems. And the resistance caused by the concentration polarization is studied; the gel layer resistance is the most important of all the resistances.

  15. Modelling one row of Horns Rev wind farm with the Actuator Line Model with coarse resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Draper, M.; Guggeri, A.; Usera, G.

    2016-09-01

    Actuator models have been used to represent the presence of wind turbines in a simulation in the past few years. The Actuator Line Model (ALM) has shown to reproduce with reasonable accuracy the wind flow through wind turbines under different operational conditions. Nevertheless, there are not many simulations of wind farms performed with the ALM mainly because of its computational cost. The aim of the present paper is to evaluate the ALM in spatial resolutions coarser than what is generally recommended, also using larger time steps, in a simulation of a real wind farm. To accomplish this, simulations of one row of Horns Rev wind farm are performed, for different wind directions. It is concluded that the ALM is able to capture the main features of the interaction between wind turbines relaxing its resolution requirements. A sensitivity analysis is performed to assess the influence of the smearing factor and the spatial resolution.

  16. Field tests and modelling of a wind farm with doubly fed induction generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meisingset, Magne; Ohnstad, Trond M.; Uhlen, Kjetil; Strand, Leif R.

    2005-07-01

    Havøygavlen is Norway's second wind farm and started operation in 2002. Several new wind farms are currently under planning at various sites along the Norwegian coast. The Norwegian transmission system operator (TSO) Statnett SF and Sintef Energy Research have jointly developed a dynamic simulation model for Havøygavlen in order to analyse the interaction between wind farms and the transmission grid. Full-scale field tests have been conducted to investigate the dynamic behaviour of the wind farm and to verify the model by comparing simulations with measurements. This article presents results from the field tests, model validation work as well as operating experiences for Havøygavlen wind farm. Copyright

  17. Ammonia emission model for whole farm evaluation of dairy production systems

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Emissions of ammonia (NH3) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) vary considerably among farms as influenced by climate and animal and manure management. Because the measurement of these emissions is difficult and expensive, the use of process based models provides another option for estimating whole farm emis...

  18. Combustion-gas recirculation system

    DOEpatents

    Baldwin, Darryl Dean

    2007-10-09

    A combustion-gas recirculation system has a mixing chamber with a mixing-chamber inlet and a mixing-chamber outlet. The combustion-gas recirculation system may further include a duct connected to the mixing-chamber inlet. Additionally, the combustion-gas recirculation system may include an open inlet channel with a solid outer wall. The open inlet channel may extend into the mixing chamber such that an end of the open inlet channel is disposed between the mixing-chamber inlet and the mixing-chamber outlet. Furthermore, air within the open inlet channel may be at a pressure near or below atmospheric pressure.

  19. Modeling Precipitation and Sorption of Al, U and Co-contaminants during Titration of Acidic Sediments in Recirculation Flow-Through Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Guoping; Luo, Wensui; Brooks, Scott C; Watson, David B; Gu, Baohua

    2013-01-01

    We conducted batch and recirculating column titration tests with contaminated acidic sediments with controlled CO2 in the headspace, and extended the geochemical model by Gu et al. (2003, GCA) to better understand and quantify the reactions governing trace metal fate in the subsurface. The sediment titration curve showed slow pH increase due to strong buffering by Al precipitation and CO2 uptake. Assuming precipitation of basaluminite at low saturation index (SI=-4), and decreasing cation exchange selectivity coefficient (kNa\\Al=0.3), the predictions are close to the observed pH and Al; and the model explains 1) the observed Ca, Mg, and Mn concentration decrease by cation exchange with sorbed Al, and 2) the decrease of U by surface complexation with Fe hydroxides at low pH, and precipitation as liebigite (Ca2UO2(CO3)3:10H2O) at pH>5.5. Without further adjustment geochemical parameters, the model describes reasonably well previous sediment and column titration tests without CO2 in the headspace, as well as the new large column test. The apparent inhibition of U and Ni decrease in the large column can be explained by formation of aqueous carbonate complexes and/or competition with carbonate for surface sites. These results indicated that ignoring labile solid phase Al would underestimate base requirement in titration of acidic aquifers.

  20. Modelling of Wind Turbine Loads nearby a Wind Farm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roscher, B.; Werkmeister, A.; Jacobs, G.; Schelenz, R.

    2017-05-01

    Each wind turbine experiences a variety of loads during its lifetime, especially inside a wind farm due to the wake effect between the turbines. This paper describes a possibility to observe a load spectrum while considering wake effects in a wind farm by through the turbulence intensity. The turbulence intensity is distributed along the wind rose of Alpha Ventus. For each turbulence intensity, a Weibull characteristic is calculated. The resulting wind fields are used to determine the loads through a multibody simulation of an imaginary wind turbine located at FINO-1, representing a closely placed wind turbine at the outer edge of a wind farm. These loads are analyzed and summed up. As expected, the change of the turbulence intensity due to the wake effect has an impact on the internal loading of a wind turbine inside a wind farm. Based on the assumed loading conditions, the maximum loads increased by a factor of almost 2.5.

  1. Using a whole farm model to determine the impacts of mating management on the profitability of pasture-based dairy farms.

    PubMed

    Beukes, P C; Burke, C R; Levy, G; Tiddy, R M

    2010-08-01

    An approach to assessing likely impacts of altering reproductive performance on productivity and profitability in pasture-based dairy farms is described. The basis is the development of a whole farm model (WFM) that simulates the entire farm system and holistically links multiple physical performance factors to profitability. The WFM consists of a framework that links a mechanistic cow model, a pasture model, a crop model, management policies and climate. It simulates individual cows and paddocks, and runs on a day time-step. The WFM was upgraded to include reproductive modeling capability using reference tables and empirical equations describing published relationships between cow factors, physiology and mating management. It predicts reproductive status at any time point for individual cows within a modeled herd. The performance of six commercial pasture-based dairy farms was simulated for the period of 12 months beginning 1 June 2005 (05/06 year) to evaluate the accuracy of the model by comparison with actual outcomes. The model predicted most key performance indicators within an acceptable range of error (residual<10% of observed). The evaluated WFM was then used for the six farms to estimate the profitability of changes in farm "set-up" (farm conditions at the start of the farming year on 1 June) and mating management from 05/06 to 06/07 year. Among the six farms simulated, the 4-week calving rate emerged as an important set-up factor influencing profitability, while reproductive performance during natural bull mating was identified as an area with the greatest opportunity for improvement. The WFM presents utility to explore alternative management strategies to predict likely outcomes to proposed changes to a pasture-based farm system.

  2. Estimating Phosphorus Loss at the Whole-Farm Scale with User-Friendly Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vadas, P.; Powell, M.; Brink, G.; Busch, D.; Good, L.

    2014-12-01

    Phosphorus (P) loss from agricultural fields and delivery to surface waters persists as a water quality impairment issue. For dairy farms, P can be lost from cropland, pastures, barnyards, and open-air cattle lots; and all these sources must be evaluated to determine which ones are a priority for P loss remediation. We used interview surveys to document land use, cattle herd characteristics, and manure management for four grazing-based dairy farms in Wisconsin, USA. We then used the APLE and Snap-Plus models to estimate annual P loss from all areas on these farms and determine their relative contribution to whole-farm P loss. At the whole-farm level, average annual P loss (kg ha-1) from grazing-based dairy farms was low (0.6 to 1.8 kg ha-1), generally because a significant portion of land was in permanently vegetated pastures or hay and had low erosion. However, there were areas on the farms that represented sources of significant P loss. For cropland, the greatest P loss was from areas with exposed soil, typically for corn production, and especially on steeper sloping land. The farm areas with the greatest P loss had concentrated animal housing, including barnyards, and over-wintering and young-stock lots. These areas can represent from about 5% to almost 30% of total farm P loss, depending on lot management and P loss from other land uses. Our project builds on research to show that producer surveys can provide reliable management information to assess whole-farm P loss. It also shows that we can use models like RUSLE2, Snap-Plus, and APLE to rapidly, reliably, and quantitatively estimate P loss in runoff from all areas on a dairy farm and identify areas in greatest need of alternative management to reduce P loss.

  3. Wind farms providing secondary frequency regulation: Evaluating the performance of model-based receding horizon control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapiro, Carl R.; Meyers, Johan; Meneveau, Charles; Gayme, Dennice F.

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the use of wind farms to provide secondary frequency regulation for a power grid. Our approach uses model-based receding horizon control of a wind farm that is tested using a large eddy simulation (LES) framework. In order to enable real-time implementation, the control actions are computed based on a time-varying one-dimensional wake model. This model describes wake advection and interactions, both of which play an important role in wind farm power production. This controller is implemented in an LES model of an 84-turbine wind farm represented by actuator disk turbine models. Differences between the velocities at each turbine predicted by the wake model and measured in LES are used for closed-loop feedback. The controller is tested on two types of regulation signals, “RegA” and “RegD”, obtained from PJM, an independent system operator in the eastern United States. Composite performance scores, which are used by PJM to qualify plants for regulation, are used to evaluate the performance of the controlled wind farm. Our results demonstrate that the controlled wind farm consistently performs well, passing the qualification threshold for all fastacting RegD signals. For the RegA signal, which changes over slower time scales, the controlled wind farm's average performance surpasses the threshold, but further work is needed to enable the controlled system to achieve qualifying performance all of the time.

  4. Modeling Commercial Freshwater Turtle Production on US Farms for Pet and Meat Markets.

    PubMed

    Mali, Ivana; Wang, Hsiao-Hsuan; Grant, William E; Feldman, Mark; Forstner, Michael R J

    2015-01-01

    Freshwater turtles are being exploited for meat, eggs, traditional medicine, and pet trade. As a response, turtle farming became a booming aquaculture industry in the past two decades, specifically in the southeastern states of the United States of America (US) and across Southeast Asia. However, US turtle farms are currently producing turtles only for the pet trade while commercial trappers remain focused on catching the largest individuals from the wild. In our analyses we have created a biological and economic model that describes farming operations on a representative turtle farm in Louisiana. We first modeled current production of hatchling and yearling red-eared slider turtles (Trachemys scripta elegans) (i.e., traditional farming) for foreign and domestic pet markets, respectively. We tested the possibility of harvesting adult turtles from the breeding stock for sale to meat markets to enable alternative markets for the farmers, while decreasing the continued pressures on wild populations (i.e., non-traditional farming). Our economic model required current profit requirements of ~$13/turtle or ~$20.31/kg of meat from non-traditional farming in order to acquire the same profit as traditional farming, a value which currently exceeds market values of red-eared sliders. However, increasing competition with Asian turtle farms and decreasing hatchling prices may force the shift in the US toward producing turtles for meat markets. In addition, our model can be modified and applied to more desirable species on the meat market once more knowledge is acquired about species life histories and space requirements under farmed conditions.

  5. Modeling Commercial Freshwater Turtle Production on US Farms for Pet and Meat Markets

    PubMed Central

    Mali, Ivana; Wang, Hsiao-Hsuan; Grant, William E.; Feldman, Mark; Forstner, Michael R. J.

    2015-01-01

    Freshwater turtles are being exploited for meat, eggs, traditional medicine, and pet trade. As a response, turtle farming became a booming aquaculture industry in the past two decades, specifically in the southeastern states of the United States of America (US) and across Southeast Asia. However, US turtle farms are currently producing turtles only for the pet trade while commercial trappers remain focused on catching the largest individuals from the wild. In our analyses we have created a biological and economic model that describes farming operations on a representative turtle farm in Louisiana. We first modeled current production of hatchling and yearling red-eared slider turtles (Trachemys scripta elegans) (i.e., traditional farming) for foreign and domestic pet markets, respectively. We tested the possibility of harvesting adult turtles from the breeding stock for sale to meat markets to enable alternative markets for the farmers, while decreasing the continued pressures on wild populations (i.e., non-traditional farming). Our economic model required current profit requirements of ~$13/turtle or ~$20.31/kg of meat from non-traditional farming in order to acquire the same profit as traditional farming, a value which currently exceeds market values of red-eared sliders. However, increasing competition with Asian turtle farms and decreasing hatchling prices may force the shift in the US toward producing turtles for meat markets. In addition, our model can be modified and applied to more desirable species on the meat market once more knowledge is acquired about species life histories and space requirements under farmed conditions. PMID:26407157

  6. Regional Offshore Wind Farm Optimization Using Wind Climatology and the Weather Research and Forecasting Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veron, D. E.; Brodie, J. F.; Archer, C. L.; Veron, F.

    2014-12-01

    The impact of turbulent wakes on the power production of wind farms is a very active area of research as society continues to increase its commitment to renewable energy. The areas offshore of the mid-Atlantic and northeast states are highly favorable to the development of offshore wind farms, and determining the optimal layout for these wind farms is key to their success. We utilize the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model to study the influence of wake effects from different wind farm array geometries on the power production of each farm. Using an idealized version of WRF, we are able to use the wind climatology from a NOAA observational buoy near the Delaware Wind Energy Area (WEA) to evaluate the potential wind farm performance during a climatological average year. We then extend these techniques on a regional scale, evaluating performance of farms located in different offshore WEAs. Finally, by using WRF to model the entire region, we evaluate the wind farms' interactions with one another under various meteorological scenarios in order to account for seasonal wind variability and load requirements.

  7. A socio-hydrologic model of coupled water-agriculture dynamics with emphasis on farm size.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brugger, D. R.; Maneta, M. P.

    2015-12-01

    Agricultural land cover dynamics in the U.S. are dominated by two trends: 1) total agricultural land is decreasing and 2) average farm size is increasing. These trends have important implications for the future of water resources because 1) growing more food on less land is due in large part to increased groundwater withdrawal and 2) larger farms can better afford both more efficient irrigation and more groundwater access. However, these large-scale trends are due to individual farm operators responding to many factors including climate, economics, and policy. It is therefore difficult to incorporate the trends into watershed-scale hydrologic models. Traditional scenario-based approaches are valuable for many applications, but there is typically no feedback between the hydrologic model and the agricultural dynamics and so limited insight is gained into the how agriculture co-evolves with water resources. We present a socio-hydrologic model that couples simplified hydrologic and agricultural economic dynamics, accounting for many factors that depend on farm size such as irrigation efficiency and returns to scale. We introduce an "economic memory" (EM) state variable that is driven by agricultural revenue and affects whether farms are sold when land market values exceed expected returns from agriculture. The model uses a Generalized Mixture Model of Gaussians to approximate the distribution of farm sizes in a study area, effectively lumping farms into "small," "medium," and "large" groups that have independent parameterizations. We apply the model in a semi-arid watershed in the upper Columbia River Basin, calibrating to data on streamflow, total agricultural land cover, and farm size distribution. The model is used to investigate the sensitivity of the coupled system to various hydrologic and economic scenarios such as increasing market value of land, reduced surface water availability, and increased irrigation efficiency in small farms.

  8. A comparison of fuzzy logic and cluster renewal approaches for heat transfer modeling in a 1296 t/h CFB boiler with low level of flue gas recirculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Błaszczuk, Artur; Krzywański, Jarosław

    2017-03-01

    The interrelation between fuzzy logic and cluster renewal approaches for heat transfer modeling in a circulating fluidized bed (CFB) has been established based on a local furnace data. The furnace data have been measured in a 1296 t/h CFB boiler with low level of flue gas recirculation. In the present study, the bed temperature and suspension density were treated as experimental variables along the furnace height. The measured bed temperature and suspension density were varied in the range of 1131-1156 K and 1.93-6.32 kg/m3, respectively. Using the heat transfer coefficient for commercial CFB combustor, two empirical heat transfer correlation were developed in terms of important operating parameters including bed temperature and also suspension density. The fuzzy logic results were found to be in good agreement with the corresponding experimental heat transfer data obtained based on cluster renewal approach. The predicted bed-to-wall heat transfer coefficient covered a range of 109-241 W/(m2K) and 111-240 W/(m2K), for fuzzy logic and cluster renewal approach respectively. The divergence in calculated heat flux recovery along the furnace height between fuzzy logic and cluster renewal approach did not exceeded ±2%.

  9. The impact of global warming on Kuroshio Extension and its southern recirculation using CMIP5 experiments with a high-resolution climate model MIROC4h

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xing; Wang, Qiang; Mu, Mu

    2017-02-01

    Responses of the Kuroshio Extension (KE) and its southern recirculation gyre (SRG) to global warming are investigated using CMIP5 experiments with a high-resolution climate model MIROC4h. The results show that MIROC4h well reproduces the essential features of the KE system and its low-frequency variations. In three-member-ensemble future climate experiments (with a medium mitigation emissions scenario RCP4.5), the strengths of the KE and its SRG increase, relative to the prescribed historical run with natural and anthropogenic forcing. By investigating the mechanism resulting in these variations of the KE and its SRG, it turns out that wind stress changes and ocean stratification changes both contribute to the enhancement of the KE and its SRG. Specifically, the wind stress changes increase upper ocean momentum in the SRG region. Meanwhile, the increased stratifications hinder the transfer of momentum from the upper ocean to the deeper ocean. Besides, the strengthened ocean stratification could enhance the eddy kinetic energy (EKE) in the downstream KE region, which can feedback to intensify the SRG. As a result, the strength of the SRG increases under global warming condition. Then the intensification of the SRG leads to large acceleration of the KE. Eventually, both the KE and its SRG intensify.

  10. Integrating Water Flow, Solute Transport and Crop Production Models At The Farm-scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assinck, F. B. T.; de Vos, J. A.

    Minimising nitrate pollution of ground and surface water and optimising agricultural yields are problems which have to be addressed at the farm-scale. However, simulation models usually operate at the field-scale. We coupled the subsurface hydrology model SWAP with other existing deterministic (sub)models for solute transport, organic mat- ter dynamics, crop growth, and dairy farm management at the farm-scale, resulting in the model WATERPAS. The (sub)models are coupled in a Framework environment obeying the principles of object oriented modelling. Based on daily weather data, groundwater regimes, soil and farm characteristics WATERPAS is able to simulate the water and nutrient balances, grass production, economical benefits, nitrate leaching and greenhouse gas emissions at a farm. Problems of coupling, such as data-transfer, quality checks, over-parameterisation, complexity and sensitivity of the systems are discussed. Application of deducted simpler models and expert judgement can be use- ful for practical use. However, we believe that integrated models are a powerful tool to understand the complex relationships between the different processes. It also gives opportunities to perform scenario analysis for future boundary conditions, i.e. due to changing farm management, (sea) water levels and climate change.

  11. Eddy-driven recirculation of Atlantic Water in Fram Strait

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hattermann, Tore; Isachsen, Pâl. Erik; Appen, Wilken-Jon; Albretsen, Jon; Sundfjord, Arild

    2016-04-01

    Eddy-resolving regional ocean model results in conjunction with synthetic float trajectories and observations provide new insights into the recirculation of the Atlantic Water (AW) in Fram Strait that significantly impacts the redistribution of oceanic heat between the Nordic Seas and the Arctic Ocean. The simulations confirm the existence of a cyclonic gyre around the Molloy Hole near 80°N, suggesting that most of the AW within the West Spitsbergen Current recirculates there, while colder AW recirculates in a westward mean flow south of 79°N that primarily relates to the eastern rim of the Greenland Sea Gyre. The fraction of waters recirculating in the northern branch roughly doubles during winter, coinciding with a seasonal increase of eddy activity along the Yermak Plateau slope that also facilitates subduction of AW beneath the ice edge in this area.

  12. Modeling Parasite Dynamics on Farmed Salmon for Precautionary Conservation Management of Wild Salmon

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Luke A.; Peacock, Stephanie J.; McKenzie, Peter; DeDominicis, Sharon; Jones, Simon R. M.; Chandler, Peter; Foreman, Michael G. G.; Revie, Crawford W.; Krkošek, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Conservation management of wild fish may include fish health management in sympatric populations of domesticated fish in aquaculture. We developed a mathematical model for the population dynamics of parasitic sea lice (Lepeophtheirus salmonis) on domesticated populations of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) in the Broughton Archipelago region of British Columbia. The model was fit to a seven-year dataset of monthly sea louse counts on farms in the area to estimate population growth rates in relation to abiotic factors (temperature and salinity), local host density (measured as cohort surface area), and the use of a parasiticide, emamectin benzoate, on farms. We then used the model to evaluate management scenarios in relation to policy guidelines that seek to keep motile louse abundance below an average three per farmed salmon during the March–June juvenile wild Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.) migration. Abiotic factors mediated the duration of effectiveness of parasiticide treatments, and results suggest treatment of farmed salmon conducted in January or early February minimized average louse abundance per farmed salmon during the juvenile wild salmon migration. Adapting the management of parasites on farmed salmon according to migrations of wild salmon may therefore provide a precautionary approach to conserving wild salmon populations in salmon farming regions. PMID:23577082

  13. Modelling the wind-borne spread of highly pathogenic avian influenza virus between farms.

    PubMed

    Ssematimba, Amos; Hagenaars, Thomas J; de Jong, Mart C M

    2012-01-01

    A quantitative understanding of the spread of contaminated farm dust between locations is a prerequisite for obtaining much-needed insight into one of the possible mechanisms of disease spread between farms. Here, we develop a model to calculate the quantity of contaminated farm-dust particles deposited at various locations downwind of a source farm and apply the model to assess the possible contribution of the wind-borne route to the transmission of Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza virus (HPAI) during the 2003 epidemic in the Netherlands. The model is obtained from a Gaussian Plume Model by incorporating the dust deposition process, pathogen decay, and a model for the infection process on exposed farms. Using poultry- and avian influenza-specific parameter values we calculate the distance-dependent probability of between-farm transmission by this route. A comparison between the transmission risk pattern predicted by the model and the pattern observed during the 2003 epidemic reveals that the wind-borne route alone is insufficient to explain the observations although it could contribute substantially to the spread over short distance ranges, for example, explaining 24% of the transmission over distances up to 25 km.

  14. Whole-farm models to quantify greenhouse gas emissions and their potential use for linking climate change mitigation and adaptation in temperate grassland ruminant-based farming systems.

    PubMed

    Del Prado, A; Crosson, P; Olesen, J E; Rotz, C A

    2013-06-01

    The farm level is the most appropriate scale for evaluating options for mitigating greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, because the farm represents the unit at which management decisions in livestock production are made. To date, a number of whole farm modelling approaches have been developed to quantify GHG emissions and explore climate change mitigation strategies for livestock systems. This paper analyses the limitations and strengths of the different existing approaches for modelling GHG mitigation by considering basic model structures, approaches for simulating GHG emissions from various farm components and the sensitivity of GHG outputs and mitigation measures to different approaches. Potential challenges for linking existing models with the simulation of impacts and adaptation measures under climate change are explored along with a brief discussion of the effects on other ecosystem services.

  15. LES of wind farm response to transient scenarios using a high fidelity actuator disk model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moens, M.; Duponcheel, M.; Winckelmans, G.; Chatelain, P.

    2016-09-01

    Large eddy simulations coupled to Actuator Disks are used to investigate wake effects in wind farms. An effort is made on the wind turbine model: it uses the prevailing velocities at each point of the disk to estimate the aerodynamic loads and is improved using a tip-loss correction and realistic control schemes. This accurate and efficient tool is used to study the wind farm response in terms of flow and power production during an unsteady scenario: this work focuses on an emergency shutdown of one rotor inside a wind farm.

  16. Bittersweet Farms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kay, Bettye Ruth

    1990-01-01

    The article describes Bittersweet Farms, a rural Ohio farm community for autistic adults. The program is based on the rural, extended family community as a model and includes work components (horticulture, animal care, woodworking and carpentry, maintenance, housekeeping, food preparation), recreational activities, community integration, physical…

  17. Bittersweet Farms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kay, Bettye Ruth

    1990-01-01

    The article describes Bittersweet Farms, a rural Ohio farm community for autistic adults. The program is based on the rural, extended family community as a model and includes work components (horticulture, animal care, woodworking and carpentry, maintenance, housekeeping, food preparation), recreational activities, community integration, physical…

  18. A regional sediment transport modeling for assessing dispersal and recirculation of land-derived radionuclides in the Fukushima coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamanishi, T.; Uchiyama, Y.; Tsumune, D.; Miyazawa, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Fluvial discharge from the rivers is viewed as a missing piece in the inventory of the radionuclides in the ocean during the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FNPP). The land-derived input introduces a time lag behind the direct release through hydrological process because these radionuclides mostly attach to suspended fine particles (sediments) that are transported quite differently to the dissolved matter. Therefore, we implement a sediment transport model proposed by Blaas et al. (2007) consisting of a multi-class non-cohesive sediment transport model, a wave-enhanced bed boundary layer model, and a stratigraphy model into ROMS. A 128 x 256 km domain with the grid resolution of dx = 250 m centered at FNPP is configured as a test bed embedded in the existing ROMS model domain at dx = 1 km (Uchiyama et al., 2012, 2013). A spectral wave model SWAN at dx = 1 km nested in the JMA GPV-CWM wave reanalysis is used for the wave forcing field. A surface runoff model (Toyota et al., 2009) provides daily-mean discharges and associated sediment fluxes at the mouths of 20 rivers in the study area.The model results show that bed stresses are enhanced in the coastal area about 10 to 20 km from the shore, most part of the semi-sheltered Sendai Bay, and on the continental shelf slope at about 600 m deep. In contrast, band-like structures are formed between the nearshore and the shelf slope where bed stresses are found to be modest. This low stress bands correspond to the areas where fine particles such as silt and clay are predominant in the bed. Since the cesium 137 is quite readily attached to fine particles rather than coarse sediments (sand), this result suggests that the band acts as a hot spot of the sediment-attached radionuclides. Indeed, a qualitative correlation is found between the low stress band with high radioactivity of cesium 137 in the bed sediment off FNPP based on the field measurement (Ambe et al., 2013).

  19. Building a stakeholder's vision of an offshore wind-farm project: A group modeling approach.

    PubMed

    Château, Pierre-Alexandre; Chang, Yang-Chi; Chen, Hsin; Ko, Tsung-Ting

    2012-03-15

    This paper describes a Group Model Building (GMB) initiative that was designed to discuss the various potential effects that an offshore wind-farm may have on its local ecology and socioeconomic development. The representatives of various organizations in the study area, Lu-Kang, Taiwan, have held several meetings, and structured debates have been organized to promote the emergence of a consensual view on the main issues and their implications. A System Dynamics (SD) model has been built and corrected iteratively with the participants through the GMB process. The diverse interests within the group led the process toward the design of multifunctional wind-farms with different modalities. The scenario analyses, using the SD model under various policies, including no wind-farm policy, objectively articulates the vision of the local stakeholders. The results of the SD simulations show that the multifunctional wind-farms may have superior economic effects and the larger wind-farms with bird corridors could reduce ecological impact. However, the participants of the modeling process did not appreciate any type of offshore wind-farm development when considering all of the identified key factors of social acceptance. The insight gained from the study can provide valuable information to actualize feasible strategies for the green energy technique to meet local expectations.

  20. Impacts of Wake Effect and Time Delay on the Dynamic Analysis of Wind Farms Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    El-Fouly, Tarek H. M.; El-Saadany, Ehab F.; Salama, Magdy M. A.

    2008-01-01

    This article investigates the impacts of proper modeling of the wake effects and wind speed delays, between different wind turbines' rows, on the dynamic performance accuracy of the wind farms models. Three different modeling scenarios were compared to highlight the impacts of wake effects and wind speed time-delay models. In the first scenario,…

  1. Impacts of Wake Effect and Time Delay on the Dynamic Analysis of Wind Farms Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    El-Fouly, Tarek H. M.; El-Saadany, Ehab F.; Salama, Magdy M. A.

    2008-01-01

    This article investigates the impacts of proper modeling of the wake effects and wind speed delays, between different wind turbines' rows, on the dynamic performance accuracy of the wind farms models. Three different modeling scenarios were compared to highlight the impacts of wake effects and wind speed time-delay models. In the first scenario,…

  2. Evaluation of drag forcing models for vertical axis wind turbine farms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierce, Brian; Moin, Parviz; Dabiri, John

    2013-11-01

    Vertical axis wind turbines (VAWTs) have the potential to produce more power per unit area than horizontal axis wind turbines (HAWTs) in a wind farm setting (Kinzel et al. J. Turb. [2012]), but further understanding of the flow physics is required to design such farms. In this study we will model a large wind farm of VAWTs as an array of 100 circular cylinders which will allow a comparison with a laboratory experiment (Craig et al. DFD 2013). The geometric complexity and high Reynolds numbers necessitate phenomenological modeling of the interaction of the turbine with the fluid, which is done through point drag models similar to those found in canopy flow simulations (e.g. Dupont et al. J. Fluid Mech. [2010]). We will present a detailed study of the point drag model performance for flow over one cylinder, providing an evaluation of the model's fidelity as it relates to quantities of interest for the VAWT farm. Next we will present results for flow through the cylinder array, emphasizing validation of the model and insight into VAWT wind farm dynamics. We will also discuss the effect of wall modeling on the calculations, as the Reynolds number of the problem requires the application of wall modeling of the turbulent boundary layer above the ground to keep the cost manageable. Brian Pierce acknowledges support from the Stanford Graduate Fellowship.

  3. Prediction of turbulent recirculating flow field behind a V-shaped bluff body using a nonlinear low Reynolds number k-epsilon model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Zhan

    1998-09-01

    A new localized smoothing filter based on the least squares is proposed in this study. It has been found the use of an appropriate smoothing method is critical to the success of numerical prediction of separating flow problems with nonlinear turbulence models. The new smoothing filter effectively eliminated numerical fluctuations due to the nonlineality of the turbulence model and the higher order approximation. The efficiency of using this scheme is very attractive; less than 20% more CPU time is needed for the extra computation in simulations. Modification has been made to the nonlinear model to take into consideration of low Reynolds number effects. The two-dimensional turbulent recirculating flow field behind a V-shaped bluff body has been investigated numerically. Similar bluff bodies are used in combustion chambers for flame stabilization. The study helps to gain a comprehensive understanding of the mechanism of the flame stability and major factors that affect this stability, and thereby establishes a more reasonable physical model. The validation test of turbulent flow over a backward facing step shows that the modified nonlinear turbulence model significantly improved the overall prediction. Predicted results for both mean flow field and turbulence quantities agreed very well experimental results. The prediction error for the characteristic reattachment length has been reduced from 18% to 4% compared with the experimental data. The results of simulation of flow field behind the bluff body are also improved by using this model. The degree of improvement varies for different flow variables. Parametric investigation of the flow field by varying the shape and size of the bluff body is also performed. It has been found that the axial distributions of normalized reverse mass flow rate for different configurations are similar. The maximum reverse mass flow rate increases monotonically with the base height as well as with the included angle of the bluff body, but

  4. Statistical meandering wake model and its application to yaw-angle optimisation of wind farms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thøgersen, E.; Tranberg, B.; Herp, J.; Greiner, M.

    2017-05-01

    The wake produced by a wind turbine is dynamically meandering and of rather narrow nature. Only when looking at large time averages, the wake appears to be static and rather broad, and is then well described by simple engineering models like the Jensen wake model (JWM). We generalise the latter deterministic models to a statistical meandering wake model (SMWM), where a random directional deflection is assigned to a narrow wake in such a way that on average it resembles a broad Jensen wake. In a second step, the model is further generalised to wind-farm level, where the deflections of the multiple wakes are treated as independently and identically distributed random variables. When carefully calibrated to the Nysted wind farm, the ensemble average of the statistical model produces the same wind-direction dependence of the power efficiency as obtained from the standard Jensen model. Upon using the JWM to perform a yaw-angle optimisation of wind-farm power output, we find an optimisation gain of 6.7% for the Nysted wind farm when compared to zero yaw angles and averaged over all wind directions. When applying the obtained JWM-based optimised yaw angles to the SMWM, the ensemble-averaged gain is calculated to be 7.5%. This outcome indicates the possible operational robustness of an optimised yaw control for real-life wind farms.

  5. Case study of controlled recirculation at a Wyoming trona mine

    PubMed Central

    Pritchard, C.; Scott, D.; Frey, G.

    2015-01-01

    Controlled recirculation has been used in the metal/nonmetal mining industry for energy savings when heating and cooling air, in undersea mining and for increasing airflow to mining areas. For safe and effective use of controlled district recirculation, adequate airflow to dilute contaminants must exist prior to implementation, ventilation circuit parameters must be accurately quantified, ventilation network modeling must be up to date, emergency planning scenarios must be performed and effective monitoring and control systems must be installed and used. Safety and health issues that must be considered and may be improved through the use of controlled district recirculation include blasting fumes, dust, diesel emissions, radon and contaminants from mine fires. Controlled recirculation methods are expected to become more widely used as mines reach greater working depths, requiring that these health and safety issues be well understood. The U.S. National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) conducted two controlled recirculation tests over three days at a Wyoming trona mine, utilizing an inline booster fan to improve airflow to a remote and difficult-to-ventilate development section. Test results were used to determine the effect that recirculation had on air qualities and quantities measured in that section and in other adjacent areas. Pre-test conditions, including ventilation quantities and pressures, were modeled using VnetPC. During each test, ventilation quantities and pressures were measured, as well as levels of total dust. Sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) tracer gas was used to simulate a mine contaminant to monitor recirculation wave cycles. Results showed good correlation between the model results and measured values for airflows, pressure differentials, tracer gas arrival times, mine gasses and dust levels. PMID:26251567

  6. A mechanistic model for electricity consumption on dairy farms: definition, validation, and demonstration.

    PubMed

    Upton, J; Murphy, M; Shalloo, L; Groot Koerkamp, P W G; De Boer, I J M

    2014-01-01

    Our objective was to define and demonstrate a mechanistic model that enables dairy farmers to explore the impact of a technical or managerial innovation on electricity consumption, associated CO2 emissions, and electricity costs. We, therefore, (1) defined a model for electricity consumption on dairy farms (MECD) capable of simulating total electricity consumption along with related CO2 emissions and electricity costs on dairy farms on a monthly basis; (2) validated the MECD using empirical data of 1yr on commercial spring calving, grass-based dairy farms with 45, 88, and 195 milking cows; and (3) demonstrated the functionality of the model by applying 2 electricity tariffs to the electricity consumption data and examining the effect on total dairy farm electricity costs. The MECD was developed using a mechanistic modeling approach and required the key inputs of milk production, cow number, and details relating to the milk-cooling system, milking machine system, water-heating system, lighting systems, water pump systems, and the winter housing facilities as well as details relating to the management of the farm (e.g., season of calving). Model validation showed an overall relative prediction error (RPE) of less than 10% for total electricity consumption. More than 87% of the mean square prediction error of total electricity consumption was accounted for by random variation. The RPE values of the milk-cooling systems, water-heating systems, and milking machine systems were less than 20%. The RPE values for automatic scraper systems, lighting systems, and water pump systems varied from 18 to 113%, indicating a poor prediction for these metrics. However, automatic scrapers, lighting, and water pumps made up only 14% of total electricity consumption across all farms, reducing the overall impact of these poor predictions. Demonstration of the model showed that total farm electricity costs increased by between 29 and 38% by moving from a day and night tariff to a flat

  7. Barriers to movement: Modelling energetic costs of avoiding marine wind farms amongst breeding seabirds.

    PubMed

    Masden, Elizabeth A; Haydon, Daniel T; Fox, Anthony D; Furness, Robert W

    2010-07-01

    Proposals for wind farms in areas of known importance for breeding seabirds highlight the need to understand the impacts of these structures. Using an energetic modelling approach, we examine the effects of wind farms as barriers to movement on seabirds of differing morphology. Additional costs, expressed in relation to typical daily energetic expenditures, were highest per unit flight for seabirds with high wing loadings, such as cormorants. Taking species-specific differences into account, costs were relatively higher in terns, due to the high daily frequency of foraging flights. For all species, costs of extra flight to avoid a wind farm appear much less than those imposed by low food abundance or adverse weather, although such costs will be additive to these. We conclude that adopting a species-specific approach is essential when assessing the impacts of wind farms on breeding seabird populations, to fully anticipate the effects of avoidance flights.

  8. Verification and Calibration of a Reduced Order Wind Farm Model by Wind Tunnel Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreiber, J.; Nanos, E. M.; Campagnolo, F.; Bottasso, C. L.

    2017-05-01

    In this paper an adaptation of the FLORIS approach is considered that models the wind flow and power production within a wind farm. In preparation to the use of this model for wind farm control, this paper considers the problem of its calibration and validation with the use of experimental observations. The model parameters are first identified based on measurements performed on an isolated scaled wind turbine operated in a boundary layer wind tunnel in various wind-misalignment conditions. Next, the wind farm model is verified with results of experimental tests conducted on three interacting scaled wind turbines. Although some differences in the estimated absolute power are observed, the model appears to be capable of identifying with good accuracy the wind turbine misalignment angles that, by deflecting the wake, lead to maximum power for the investigated layouts.

  9. Enhanced Kalman Filtering for a 2D CFD NS Wind Farm Flow Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doekemeijer, B. M.; van Wingerden, J. W.; Boersma, S.; Pao, L. Y.

    2016-09-01

    Wind turbines are often grouped together for financial reasons, but due to wake development this usually results in decreased turbine lifetimes and power capture, and thereby an increased levelized cost of energy (LCOE). Wind farm control aims to minimize this cost by operating turbines at their optimal control settings. Most state-of-the-art control algorithms are open-loop and rely on low fidelity, static flow models. Closed-loop control relying on a dynamic model and state observer has real potential to further decrease wind's LCOE, but is often too computationally expensive for practical use. In this paper two time-efficient Kalman filter (KF) variants are outlined incorporating the medium fidelity, dynamic flow model “WindFarmSimulator” (WFSim). This model relies on a discretized set of Navier-Stokes equations in two dimensions to predict the flow in wind farms at low computational cost. The filters implemented are an Ensemble KF and an Approximate KF. Simulations in which a high fidelity simulation model represents the true wind farm show that these filters are 101 —102 times faster than a regular KF with comparable or better performance, correcting for wake dynamics that are not modeled in WFSim (noticeably, wake meandering and turbine hub effects). This is a first big step towards real-time closed-loop control for wind farms.

  10. Stackelberg Game Model of Wind Farm and Electric Vehicle Battery Switch Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Zhe; Li, Zhimin; Li, Wenbo; Wang, Mingqiang; Wang, Mengxia

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, a cooperation method between wind farm and Electric vehicle battery switch station (EVBSS) was proposed. In the pursuit of maximizing their own benefits, the cooperation between wind farm and EVBSS was formulated as a Stackelberg game model by treating them as decision makers in different status. As the leader, wind farm will determine the charging/discharging price to induce the charging and discharging behavior of EVBSS reasonably. Through peak load shifting, wind farm could increase its profits by selling more wind power to the power grid during time interval with a higher purchase price. As the follower, EVBSS will charge or discharge according to the price determined by wind farm. Through optimizing the charging /discharging strategy, EVBSS will try to charge with a lower price and discharge with a higher price in order to increase its profits. Since the possible charging /discharging strategy of EVBSS is known, the wind farm will take the strategy into consideration while deciding the charging /discharging price, and will adjust the price accordingly to increase its profits. The case study proved that the proposed cooperation method and model were feasible and effective.

  11. Climate Impacts of Large-scale Wind Farms as Parameterized in a Global Climate Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitch, Anna

    2015-04-01

    The local, regional and global climate impacts of a large-scale global deployment of wind power in regionally high densities over land is investigated for a 60 year period. Wind farms are represented as elevated momentum sinks, as well as enhanced turbulence to represent turbine blade mixing in a global climate model, the Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5). For a total installed capacity of 2.5 TW, to provide 16% of the world's projected electricity demand in 2050, minimal impacts are found, both regionally and globally, on temperature, sensible and latent heat fluxes, cloud and precipitation. A mean near-surface warming of 0.12+/-0.07 K is seen within the wind farms. Impacts on wind speed and turbulence are more pronounced, but largely confined to within the wind farm areas. Increasing the wind farm areas to provide an installed capacity of 10 TW, or 65% of the 2050 electricity demand, causes further impacts, however, they remain slight overall. Maximum temperature changes are less than 0.5 K in the wind farm areas. Impacts, both within the wind farms and beyond, become more pronounced with a doubling in turbine density, to provide 20 TW of installed capacity, or 130% of the 2050 electricity demand. However, maximum temperature changes remain less than 0.7 K. Representing wind farms instead as an increase in surface roughness generally produces similar mean results, however, maximum changes increase and influences on wind and turbulence are exaggerated. Overall, wind farm impacts are much weaker than those expected from greenhouse gas emissions, with global mean climate impacts very slight.

  12. Assessing the impact of marine wind farms on birds through movement modelling

    PubMed Central

    Masden, Elizabeth A.; Reeve, Richard; Desholm, Mark; Fox, Anthony D.; Furness, Robert W.; Haydon, Daniel T.

    2012-01-01

    Advances in technology and engineering, along with European Union renewable energy targets, have stimulated a rapid growth of the wind power sector. Wind farms contribute to carbon emission reductions, but there is a need to ensure that these structures do not adversely impact the populations that interact with them, particularly birds. We developed movement models based on observed avoidance responses of common eider Somateria mollissima to wind farms to predict, and identify potential measures to reduce, impacts. Flight trajectory data that were  collected post-construction of the Danish Nysted offshore wind farm were used to parameterize competing models of bird movements around turbines. The model most closely fitting the observed data incorporated individual variation in the minimum distance at which birds responded to the turbines. We show how such models can contribute to the spatial planning of wind farms by assessing their extent, turbine spacing and configurations on the probability of birds passing between the turbines. Avian movement models can make new contributions to environmental assessments of wind farm developments, and provide insights into how to reduce impacts that can be identified at the planning stage. PMID:22552921

  13. Assessing the impact of marine wind farms on birds through movement modelling.

    PubMed

    Masden, Elizabeth A; Reeve, Richard; Desholm, Mark; Fox, Anthony D; Furness, Robert W; Haydon, Daniel T

    2012-09-07

    Advances in technology and engineering, along with European Union renewable energy targets, have stimulated a rapid growth of the wind power sector. Wind farms contribute to carbon emission reductions, but there is a need to ensure that these structures do not adversely impact the populations that interact with them, particularly birds. We developed movement models based on observed avoidance responses of common eider Somateria mollissima to wind farms to predict, and identify potential measures to reduce, impacts. Flight trajectory data that were collected post-construction of the Danish Nysted offshore wind farm were used to parameterize competing models of bird movements around turbines. The model most closely fitting the observed data incorporated individual variation in the minimum distance at which birds responded to the turbines. We show how such models can contribute to the spatial planning of wind farms by assessing their extent, turbine spacing and configurations on the probability of birds passing between the turbines. Avian movement models can make new contributions to environmental assessments of wind farm developments, and provide insights into how to reduce impacts that can be identified at the planning stage.

  14. A process-based emission model of volatile organic compounds from silage sources on farms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonifacio, H. F.; Rotz, C. A.; Hafner, S. D.; Montes, F.; Cohen, M.; Mitloehner, F. M.

    2017-03-01

    Silage on dairy farms can emit large amounts of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), a precursor in the formation of tropospheric ozone. Because of the challenges associated with direct measurements, process-based modeling is another approach for estimating emissions of air pollutants from sources such as those from dairy farms. A process-based model for predicting VOC emissions from silage was developed and incorporated into the Integrated Farm System Model (IFSM, v. 4.3), a whole-farm simulation of crop, dairy, and beef production systems. The performance of the IFSM silage VOC emission model was evaluated using ethanol and methanol emissions measured from conventional silage piles (CSP), silage bags (SB), total mixed rations (TMR), and loose corn silage (LCS) at a commercial dairy farm in central California. With transport coefficients for ethanol refined using experimental data from our previous studies, the model performed well in simulating ethanol emission from CSP, TMR, and LCS; its lower performance for SB could be attributed to possible changes in face conditions of SB after silage removal that are not represented in the current model. For methanol emission, lack of experimental data for refinement likely caused the underprediction for CSP and SB whereas the overprediction observed for TMR can be explained as uncertainty in measurements. Despite these limitations, the model is a valuable tool for comparing silage management options and evaluating their relative effects on the overall performance, economics, and environmental impacts of farm production. As a component of IFSM, the silage VOC emission model was used to simulate a representative dairy farm in central California. The simulation showed most silage VOC emissions were from feed lying in feed lanes and not from the exposed face of silage storages. This suggests that mitigation efforts, particularly in areas prone to ozone non-attainment status, should focus on reducing emissions during feeding. For

  15. Enhanced Layout Optimization and Wind Aerodynamic Models for Wind Farm Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Yen Jim

    The proposed project is motivated by the need to develop wake models and optimization algorithms that can accurately capture the wake losses in an array of wind turbines and optimize the turbine placements. In the past 4 years, we have developed capabilities to improve the layout design of wind farms located on complex terrains, as contributions from four major tasks. The outcome of the first task was the creation of a wake interaction model capable of describing the effects of overlapping wakes that can be used in combination with existing mathematical optimization tools for wind farm layout design. Such a model was derived and evaluated against existing wake interaction methods. This wake interaction model enables a mechanistic approach to account for multiple overlapping wakes while remaining compatible with established mathematical optimization methods. In the second task, this wake interaction model was used in conjunction with full-scale CFD simulations to design wind farm layouts. We developed an optimization algorithm that intelligently integrates a mathematical optimization approach to design wind farm layout on complex terrains with full-scale CFD simulations. The two subsequent tasks were focused on developing a wake model capable of producing comparable accuracy as full-scale CFD simulations but at a significantly lower computational cost. The third task focused on studying the effects of turbine blade geometry and atmospheric turbulence on turbine wake development. The findings of this step contributed to the fourth task of developing a new wake model capable of simulating wakes on complex terrains. This model has been validated against full-scale CFD simulations of a turbine placed on the terrain of the Gros-Morne Wind Farm in Quebec. The proposed model allows for fast simulation of wakes, making it ideal for designing wind farm layouts on complex terrains.

  16. Modelling potential changes in marine biogeochemistry due to large-scale offshore wind farms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Molen, Johan; Rees, Jon; Limpenny, Sian

    2013-04-01

    Large-scale renewable energy generation by offshore wind farms may lead to changes in marine ecosystem processes through the following mechanism: 1) wind-energy extraction leads to a reduction in local surface wind speeds; 2) these lead to a reduction in the local wind wave height; 3) as a consequence there's a reduction in SPM resuspension and concentrations; 4) this results in an improvement in under-water light regime, which 5) may lead to increased primary production, which subsequently 6) cascades through the ecosystem. A three-dimensional coupled hydrodynamics-biogeochemistry model (GETM_ERSEM) was used to investigate this process for a hypothetical wind farm in the central North Sea, by running a reference scenario and a scenario with a 10% reduction (as was found in a case study of a small farm in Danish waters) in surface wind velocities in the area of the wind farm. The ERSEM model included both pelagic and benthic processes. The results showed that, within the farm area, the physical mechanisms were as expected, but with variations in the magnitude of the response depending on the ecosystem variable or exchange rate between two ecosystem variables (3-28%, depending on variable/rate). Benthic variables tended to be more sensitive to the changes than pelagic variables. Reduced, but noticeable changes also occurred for some variables in a region of up to two farm diameters surrounding the wind farm. An additional model run in which the 10% reduction in surface wind speed was applied only for wind speeds below the generally used threshold of 25 m/s for operational shut-down showed only minor differences from the run in which all wind speeds were reduced. These first results indicate that there is potential for measurable effects of large-scale offshore wind farms on the marine ecosystem, mainly within the farm but for some variables up to two farm diameters away. However, the wave and SPM parameterisations currently used in the model are crude and need to be

  17. Dynamic Flow Model for Real-Time Application in Wind Farm Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rott, Andreas; Boersma, Sjoerd; van Wingerden, Jan-Willem; Kühn, Martin

    2017-05-01

    For short-term power predictions and estimations of the available power during curtailment of a wind farm, it is necessary to consider the flow dynamics and aerodynamic interactions of the turbines. In this paper, a control-oriented dynamic two-dimensional wind farm model is introduced that aims to incorporate real-time measurements such as flow velocities at turbine locations to estimate the ambient wind farm flow. The model is intended to derive flow predictions for real-time applications. Since fully resolved computational fluid dynamics are too CPU-intensive for such a task, the dynamic model presented in this paper relies on an approximation of the flow equations in a two-dimensional framework. A semi-Lagrangian advection scheme and a step-wise flow solver together offer fast calculation speed, which scales linearly with the number of grid points. In order to emulate effects of realistic three-dimensional wind farm flow, a relaxation of the two-dimensional continuity equation is presented. Furthermore, with little extra computational expense, additional dynamic state variables for various possible applications can be propagated along the wind flow. For instance, a dynamic confidence parameter can provide estimations of the accuracy of flow predictions, while a turbulence parameter adds the possibility to estimate wake induced loads on downstream turbines. In order to demonstrate the performance and validity of the new model it is compared with other models. At first a two turbine reference case is compared with a steady-state model and secondly with results obtained by the dynamic wind farm flow model WFSim. Finally a small wind farm is simulated in order to show the computational scaling of the model.

  18. A high performance finite element model for wind farm modeling in forested areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owen, Herbert; Avila, Matias; Folch, Arnau; Cosculluela, Luis; Prieto, Luis

    2015-04-01

    Wind energy has grown significantly during the past decade and is expected to continue growing in the fight against climate change. In the search for new land where the impact of the wind turbines is small several wind farms are currently being installed in forested areas. In order to optimize the distribution of the wind turbines within the wind farm the Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes equations are solved over the domain of interest using either commercial or in house codes. The existence of a canopy alters the Atmospheric Boundary Layer wind profile close to the ground. Therefore in order to obtain a more accurate representation of the flow in forested areas modification to both the Navier Stokes and turbulence variables equations need to be introduced. Several existing canopy models have been tested in an academic problem showing that the one proposed by Sogachev et. al gives the best results. This model has been implemented in an in house CFD solver named Alya. It is a high performance unstructured finite element code that has been designed from scratch to be able to run in the world's biggest supercomputers. Its scalabililty has recently been tested up to 100000 processors in both American and European supercomputers. During the past three years the code has been tuned and tested for wind energy problems. Recent efforts have focused on the canopy model following industry needs. In this work we shall benchmark our results in a wind farm that is currently being designed by Scottish Power and Iberdrola in Scotland. This is a very interesting real case with extensive experimental data from five different masts with anemometers at several heights. It is used to benchmark both the wind profiles and the speed up obtained between different masts. Sixteen different wind directions are simulated. The numerical model provides very satisfactory results for both the masts that are affected by the canopy and those that are not influenced by it.

  19. Monitoring, modeling and mitigating impacts of wind farms on local meteorology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baidya Roy, Somnath; Traiteur, Justin; Kelley, Neil

    2010-05-01

    Wind power is one of the fastest growing sources of energy. Most of the growth is in the industrial sector comprising of large utility-scale wind farms. Recent modeling studies have suggested that such wind farms can significantly affect local and regional weather and climate. In this work, we present observational evidence of the impact of wind farms on near-surface air temperatures. Data from perhaps the only meteorological field campaign in an operational wind farm shows that downwind temperatures are lower during the daytime and higher at night compared to the upwind environment. Corresponding radiosonde profiles at the nearby Edwards Air Force Base WMO meteorological station show that the diurnal environment is unstable while the nocturnal environment is stable during the field campaign. This behavior is consistent with the hypothesis proposed by Baidya Roy et al. (JGR 2004) that states that turbulence generated in the wake of rotors enhance vertical mixing leading to a warming/cooling under positive/negative potential temperature lapse rates. We conducted a set of 306 simulations with the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS) to test if regional climate models can capture the thermal effects of wind farms. We represented wind turbines with a subgrid parameterization that assumes rotors to be sinks of momentum and sources of turbulence. The simulated wind farms consistently generated a localized warming/cooling under positive/negative lapse rates as hypothesized. We found that these impacts are inversely correlated with background atmospheric boundary layer turbulence. Thus, if the background turbulence is high due to natural processes, the effects of additional turbulence generated by wind turbine rotors are likely to be small. We propose the following strategies to minimize impacts of wind farms: • Engineering solution: design rotors that generate less turbulence in their wakes. Sensitivity simulations show that these turbines also increase the

  20. ENDOW (efficient development of offshore wind farms): modelling wake and boundary layer interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barthelmie, Rebecca; Larsen, Gunner; Pryor, Sara; Jørgensen, Hans; Bergström, Hans; Schlez, Wolfgang; Rados, Kostas; Lange, Bernhard; Vølund, Per; Neckelmann, Søren; Mogensen, Søren; Schepers, Gerard; Hegberg, Terry; Folkerts, Luuk; Magnusson, Mikael

    2004-07-01

    While experience gained through the offshore wind energy projects currently operating is valuable, a major uncertainty in estimating power production lies in the prediction of the dynamic links between the atmosphere and wind turbines in offshore regimes. The objective of the ENDOW project was to evaluate, enhance and interface wake and boundary layer models for utilization offshore. The project resulted in a significant advance in the state of the art in both wake and marine boundary layer models, leading to improved prediction of wind speed and turbulence profiles within large offshore wind farms. Use of new databases from existing offshore wind farms and detailed wake profiles collected using sodar provided a unique opportunity to undertake the first comprehensive evaluation of wake models in the offshore environment. The results of wake model performance in different wind speed, stability and roughness conditions relative to observations provided criteria for their improvement. Mesoscale model simulations were used to evaluate the impact of thermal flows, roughness and topography on offshore wind speeds. The model hierarchy developed under ENDOW forms the basis of design tools for use by wind energy developers and turbine manufacturers to optimize power output from offshore wind farms through minimized wake effects and optimal grid connections. The design tools are being built onto existing regional-scale models and wind farm design software which was developed with EU funding and is in use currently by wind energy developers. Copyright

  1. Large scale modelling of salmon lice (Lepeophtheirus salmonis) infection pressure based on lice monitoring data from Norwegian salmonid farms.

    PubMed

    Kristoffersen, Anja B; Jimenez, Daniel; Viljugrein, Hildegunn; Grøntvedt, Randi; Stien, Audun; Jansen, Peder A

    2014-12-01

    Infection by parasitic sea lice is a substantial problem in industrial scale salmon farming. To control the problem, Norwegian salmonid farms are not permitted to exceed a threshold level of infection on their fish, and farms are required to monitor and report lice levels on a weekly basis to ensure compliance with the regulation. In the present study, we combine the monitoring data with a deterministic model for salmon lice population dynamics to estimate farm production of infectious lice stages. Furthermore, we use an empirical estimate of the relative risk of salmon lice transmission between farms, that depend on inter-farm distances, to estimate the external infection pressure at a farm site, i.e. the infection pressure from infective salmon lice of neighbouring farm origin. Finally, we test whether our estimates of infection pressure from neighbouring farms as well as internal within farm infection pressure, predicts subsequent development of infection in cohorts of farmed salmonids in their initial phase of marine production. We find that estimated external infection pressure is a main predictor of salmon lice population dynamics in newly stocked cohorts of salmonids. Our results emphasize the importance of keeping the production of infectious lice stages at low levels within local networks of salmon farms. Our model can easily be implemented for real time estimation of infection pressure at the national scale, utilizing the masses of data generated through the compulsory lice monitoring in salmon farms. The implementation of such a system should give the salmon industry greater predictability with respect to salmon lice infection levels, and aid the decision making process when the development of new farm sites are planned.

  2. A survey of modelling methods for high-fidelity wind farm simulations using large eddy simulation.

    PubMed

    Breton, S-P; Sumner, J; Sørensen, J N; Hansen, K S; Sarmast, S; Ivanell, S

    2017-04-13

    Large eddy simulations (LES) of wind farms have the capability to provide valuable and detailed information about the dynamics of wind turbine wakes. For this reason, their use within the wind energy research community is on the rise, spurring the development of new models and methods. This review surveys the most common schemes available to model the rotor, atmospheric conditions and terrain effects within current state-of-the-art LES codes, of which an overview is provided. A summary of the experimental research data available for validation of LES codes within the context of single and multiple wake situations is also supplied. Some typical results for wind turbine and wind farm flows are presented to illustrate best practices for carrying out high-fidelity LES of wind farms under various atmospheric and terrain conditions.This article is part of the themed issue 'Wind energy in complex terrains'.

  3. Recirculated and Energy Recovered Linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Geoffrey Krafft

    2003-05-01

    Linacs that are recirculated share many characteristics with ordinary linacs, including the ability to accelerate electron beams from an injector to high energy with relatively little (normalized) emittance growth and the ability to deliver ultrashort bunch duration pulses to users. When such linacs are energy recovered, the additional possibility of accelerating very high average beam current arises. Because this combination of beam properties is not possible from either a conventional linac, or from storage rings where emittance and pulse length are set by the equilibrium between radiation damping and quantum excitation of oscillations about the closed orbit, energy recovered linacs are being considered for an increasing variety of applications. These possibilities extend from high power free-electron lasers and recirculated linac light sources, to electron coolers for high energy colliders or actual electron-ion colliding- beam machines based on an energy recovered linac for the electrons.

  4. Confined Turbulent Swirling Recirculating Flow Predictions. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abujelala, M. T.

    1984-01-01

    Turbulent swirling flow, the STARPIC computer code, turbulence modeling of turbulent flows, the k-xi turbulence model and extensions, turbulence parameters deduction from swirling confined flow measurements, extension of the k-xi to confined swirling recirculating flows, and general predictions for confined turbulent swirling flow are discussed.

  5. Investigation of induced recirculation during planned ventilation system maintenance

    PubMed Central

    Pritchard, C.J.; Scott, D.F.; Noll, J.D.; Voss, B.; Leonis, D.

    2015-01-01

    (DPM) levels showed a high increase in district intake mass flow, but minor increases in exposure levels related to the recirculation percentage. Utilization of DPM mass flow rates allows input into ventilation modeling programs to better understand and plan for ventilation changes and district recirculation effects on miners’ health. PMID:26190862

  6. Analytical Model for Mean Flow and Fluxes of Momentum and Energy in Very Large Wind Farms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markfort, Corey D.; Zhang, Wei; Porté-Agel, Fernando

    2017-08-01

    As wind-turbine arrays continue to be installed and the array size continues to grow, there is an increasing need to represent very large wind-turbine arrays in numerical weather prediction models, for wind-farm optimization, and for environmental assessment. We propose a simple analytical model for boundary-layer flow in fully-developed wind-turbine arrays, based on the concept of sparsely-obstructed shear flows. In describing the vertical distribution of the mean wind speed and shear stress within wind farms, our model estimates the mean kinetic energy harvested from the atmospheric boundary layer, and determines the partitioning between the wind power captured by the wind turbines and that absorbed by the underlying land or water. A length scale based on the turbine geometry, spacing, and performance characteristics, is able to estimate the asymptotic limit for the fully-developed flow through wind-turbine arrays, and thereby determine if the wind-farm flow is fully developed for very large turbine arrays. Our model is validated using data collected in controlled wind-tunnel experiments, and its usefulness for the prediction of wind-farm performance and optimization of turbine-array spacing are described. Our model may also be useful for assessing the extent to which the extraction of wind power affects the land-atmosphere coupling or air-water exchange of momentum, with implications for the transport of heat, moisture, trace gases such as carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxide, and ecologically important oxygen.

  7. A beef herd model for simulating feed intake, animal performance, and manure excretion in farm systems.

    PubMed

    Rotz, C A; Buckmaster, D R; Comerford, J W

    2005-01-01

    A beef herd submodel was created for integration with other farm components to form a whole-farm model capable of simulating a wide range of beef production systems. This herd submodel determined the best available feed or feed mix to meet the fiber, energy, and protein requirements for each of up to six animal groups on the farm. The groups comprised any combination of cows, nursing calves, young heifers, yearling heifers, stockers, and finishing cattle. Protein, energy, and mineral requirements were determined for each group using the Cornell Net Carbohydrate and Protein System, Level 1. Diets were formulated to meet these requirements with available feeds, and the resulting feed intake, growth, and manure DM and nutrient (N, P, and K) excretions were predicted. Required feed characteristics included CP, ruminally degradable protein, acid detergent insoluble protein, NDF, P, and K concentrations. Feed intake was predicted by considering energy intake, potentially limited by fill, and exceeding a minimum roughage requirement. Fill and roughage limits were functions of feed NDF concentrations adjusted to consider particle size distribution and the relative rate of ruminal digestibility or the physical effectiveness of the fiber. The herd submodel was verified to predict feed intakes, nutrient requirements, diets, and manure excretions similar to those recommended or measured for beef animals. Incorporation of the beef herd submodel with other farm components, including crop growth (alfalfa, grass, corn, small grain, and soybean), harvest, storage, feeding, grazing, and manure handling, provided the Integrated Farm System Model. This comprehensive farm-simulation model is a useful research and teaching tool for evaluating and comparing the long-term performance, economics, and environmental impact of beef, dairy, and crop production systems.

  8. Trade-offs between pasture production and farmland bird conservation: exploration of options using a dynamic farm model.

    PubMed

    Sabatier, R; Teillard, F; Rossing, W A H; Doyen, L; Tichit, M

    2015-05-01

    In European grassland landscapes, grazing and mowing play a key role for the maintenance of high-quality habitats that host important bird populations. As grasslands are also key resources for cattle feeding, there is a need to develop management strategies that achieve the double objective of production and biodiversity conservation. The objective of this study was to use a modelling approach to generate recognisable patterns of bird dynamics in farms composed of different land use proportions, and to compare their production and ecological dimensions. We developed a dynamic model, which linked grassland management to bird population dynamics at the field and farm levels. The model was parameterised for two types of suckling farms corresponding to contrasting levels of grassland intensification and for two bird species of high conservation value. A viability algorithm was used to define and assess viable management strategies for production and ecological performance so as to draw the shape of the relationship between both types of performances for the two types of farms. Our results indicated that, at the farm level, there was a farming system effect with a negative and non-linear relationship linking performance. Improving bird population maintenance was less costly in extensive farms compared with intensive farms. At the field level, the model predicted the timing and intensity of land use, maximising either production or ecological performance. The results suggested that multi-objective grassland management would benefit from public policies that consider levels of organisation higher than the field level, such as the farm or the landscape.

  9. Simulation of a 7.7 MW onshore wind farm with the Actuator Line Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guggeri, A.; Draper, M.; Usera, G.

    2017-05-01

    Recently, the Actuator Line Model (ALM) has been evaluated with coarser resolution and larger time steps than what is generally recommended, taking into account an atmospheric sheared and turbulent inflow condition. The aim of the present paper is to continue these studies, assessing the capability of the ALM to represent the wind turbines’ interactions in an onshore wind farm. The ‘Libertad’ wind farm, which consists of four 1.9MW Vestas V100 wind turbines, was simulated considering different wind directions, and the results were compared with the wind farm SCADA data, finding good agreement between them. A sensitivity analysis was performed to evaluate the influence of the spatial resolution, finding acceptable agreement, although some differences were found. It is believed that these differences are due to the characteristics of the different Atmospheric Boundary Layer (ABL) simulations taken as inflow condition (precursor simulations).

  10. Wind Speed Estimation and Wake model Re-calibration for Downregulated Offshore Wind Farms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Göçmen Bozkurt, Tuhfe; Giebel, Gregor; Kjølstad Poulsen, Niels; Réthoré, Pierre-Elouan; Mirzaei, Mahmood

    2014-05-01

    In recent years, the wind farm sizes have increased tremendously and with increasing installed capacity, the wind farms are requested to downregulate from their maximum possible power more frequently, especially in the offshore environment. Determination of the possible (or available) power is crucial not only because the reserve power has considerable market value but also for wind farm developers to be properly compensated for the loss during downregulation. While the available power calculation is straightforward for a single turbine, it gets rather complicated for the whole wind farm due to the change in the wake characteristics. In fact, the wake losses generated by the upstream turbine(s) decrease during downregulation and the downstream turbines therefore see more wind compared to the normal operation case. Currently, the Transmission System Operators (TSOs) have no real way to determine exactly the available power of a whole wind farm which is downregulated. Therefore, the PossPOW project aims to develop a verified and internationally accepted way to determine the possible power of a down-regulated offshore wind farm. The first phase of the project is to estimate the rotor effective wind speed. Since the nacelle anemometers are not readily available and are known to have reliability issues, the proposed method is to use power, pitch angle and rotational speed as inputs and combine it with a generic Cp model to estimate the wind speed. The performance of the model has been evaluated for both normal operation and downregulation periods using two different case studies: Horns Rev-I wind farm and NREL 5MW single turbine. During downregulation, the wake losses are not as severe and the velocity deficits at the downstream turbines are smaller as if also the wake is "downregulated". On the other hand, in order to calculate the available power, the wakes that would have been produced normally (if the turbines were not curtailed) are of importance, not the

  11. Teaching Diversified Organic Crop Production Using the Community Supported Agriculture Farming System Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falk, Constance L.; Pao, Pauline; Cramer, Christopher S.

    2005-01-01

    An organic garden operated as a community supported agriculture (CSA) venture on the New Mexico State University (NMSU) main campus was begun in January 2002. Students enroll in an organic vegetable production class during spring and fall semesters to help manage and work on the project. The CSA model of farming involves the sale of shares to…

  12. Teaching Diversified Organic Crop Production Using the Community Supported Agriculture Farming System Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falk, Constance L.; Pao, Pauline; Cramer, Christopher S.

    2005-01-01

    An organic garden operated as a community supported agriculture (CSA) venture on the New Mexico State University (NMSU) main campus was begun in January 2002. Students enroll in an organic vegetable production class during spring and fall semesters to help manage and work on the project. The CSA model of farming involves the sale of shares to…

  13. LES studies of wind farms including wide turbine spacings and comparisons with the CWBL engineering model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Richard; Gayme, Dennice; Meyers, Johan; Meneveau, Charles

    2015-11-01

    We present results from large eddy simulations (LES) of wind farms consisting of tens to hundreds of turbines with respective streamwise and spanwise spacings approaching 35 and 12 turbine diameters. Even in staggered farms where the distance between consecutive turbines in the flow direction is more than 50 turbine diameters, we observe visible wake effects. In aligned farms, the performance of the turbines in the fully developed regime, where the power output as function of the downstream position becomes constant, is shown to primarily depend on the streamwise distance between consecutive turbine rows. However, for other layouts the power production in the fully developed regime mainly depends on the geometrical mean turbine spacing (inverse turbine density). These findings agree very well with predictions from our recently developed coupled wake boundary layer (CWBL) model, which introduces a two way coupling between the wake (Jensen) and top-down model approaches (Stevens et al. JRSE 7, 023115, 2015). To further validate the CWBL model we apply it to the problem of determining the optimal wind turbine thrust coefficient for power maximization over the entire farm. The CWBL model predictions agree very well with recent LES results (Goit & Meyers, JFM 768, 5-50, 2015). FOM Fellowships for Young Energy Scientists (YES!), NSF (IIA 1243482, the WINDINSPIRE project), ERC (FP7-Ideas, 306471).

  14. Mathematical modeling of influenza A virus dynamics within swine farms and the effects of vaccination.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Jennifer J H; Torremorell, Montserrat; Craft, Meggan E

    2014-01-01

    Influenza A virus infections are widespread in swine herds across the world. Influenza negatively affects swine health and production, and represents a significant threat to public health due to the risk of zoonotic infections. Swine herds can act as reservoirs for potentially pandemic influenza strains. In this study, we develop mathematical models based on experimental data, representing typical breeding and wean-to-finish swine farms. These models are used to explore and describe the dynamics of influenza infection at the farm level, which are at present not well understood. In addition, we use the models to assess the effectiveness of vaccination strategies currently employed by swine producers, testing both homologous and heterologous vaccines. An important finding is that following an influenza outbreak in a breeding herd, our model predicts a persistently high level of infectious piglets. Sensitivity analysis indicates that this finding is robust to changes in both transmission rates and farm size. Vaccination does not eliminate influenza throughout the breeding farm population. In the wean-to-finish herd, influenza infection may persist in the population only if recovered individuals become susceptible to infection again. A homologous vaccine administered to the entire wean-to-finish population after the loss of maternal antibodies eliminates influenza, but a vaccine that only induces partial protection (heterologous vaccine) has little effect on influenza infection levels. Our results have important implications for the control of influenza in swine herds, which is crucial in order to reduce both losses for swine producers and the risk to public health.

  15. A process-based emission model for volatile organic compounds from silage sources on farms

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Silage on dairy farms can emit large amounts of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), a precursor in the formation of tropospheric ozone. Because of the challenges associated with direct measurements, process-based modeling is another approach for estimating emissions of air pollutants from sources suc...

  16. Integrative modeling and novel particle swarm-based optimal design of wind farms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, Souma

    To meet the energy needs of the future, while seeking to decrease our carbon footprint, a greater penetration of sustainable energy resources such as wind energy is necessary. However, a consistent growth of wind energy (especially in the wake of unfortunate policy changes and reported under-performance of existing projects) calls for a paradigm shift in wind power generation technologies. This dissertation develops a comprehensive methodology to explore, analyze and define the interactions between the key elements of wind farm development, and establish the foundation for designing high-performing wind farms. The primary contribution of this research is the effective quantification of the complex combined influence of wind turbine features, turbine placement, farm-land configuration, nameplate capacity, and wind resource variations on the energy output of the wind farm. A new Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) algorithm, uniquely capable of preserving population diversity while addressing discrete variables, is also developed to provide powerful solutions towards optimizing wind farm configurations. In conventional wind farm design, the major elements that influence the farm performance are often addressed individually. The failure to fully capture the critical interactions among these factors introduces important inaccuracies in the projected farm performance and leads to suboptimal wind farm planning. In this dissertation, we develop the Unrestricted Wind Farm Layout Optimization (UWFLO) methodology to model and optimize the performance of wind farms. The UWFLO method obviates traditional assumptions regarding (i) turbine placement, (ii) turbine-wind flow interactions, (iii) variation of wind conditions, and (iv) types of turbines (single/multiple) to be installed. The allowance of multiple turbines, which demands complex modeling, is rare in the existing literature. The UWFLO method also significantly advances the state of the art in wind farm optimization by

  17. Spatial downscaling of soil prediction models based on weighted generalized additive models in smallholder farm settings.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yiming; Smith, Scot E; Grunwald, Sabine; Abd-Elrahman, Amr; Wani, Suhas P; Nair, Vimala D

    2017-09-11

    Digital soil mapping (DSM) is gaining momentum as a technique to help smallholder farmers secure soil security and food security in developing regions. However, communications of the digital soil mapping information between diverse audiences become problematic due to the inconsistent scale of DSM information. Spatial downscaling can make use of accessible soil information at relatively coarse spatial resolution to provide valuable soil information at relatively fine spatial resolution. The objective of this research was to disaggregate the coarse spatial resolution soil exchangeable potassium (Kex) and soil total nitrogen (TN) base map into fine spatial resolution soil downscaled map using weighted generalized additive models (GAMs) in two smallholder villages in South India. By incorporating fine spatial resolution spectral indices in the downscaling process, the soil downscaled maps not only conserve the spatial information of coarse spatial resolution soil maps but also depict the spatial details of soil properties at fine spatial resolution. The results of this study demonstrated difference between the fine spatial resolution downscaled maps and fine spatial resolution base maps is smaller than the difference between coarse spatial resolution base maps and fine spatial resolution base maps. The appropriate and economical strategy to promote the DSM technique in smallholder farms is to develop the relatively coarse spatial resolution soil prediction maps or utilize available coarse spatial resolution soil maps at the regional scale and to disaggregate these maps to the fine spatial resolution downscaled soil maps at farm scale.

  18. Wind Farm Flow Modeling using an Input-Output Reduced-Order Model

    SciTech Connect

    Annoni, Jennifer; Gebraad, Pieter; Seiler, Peter

    2016-08-01

    Wind turbines in a wind farm operate individually to maximize their own power regardless of the impact of aerodynamic interactions on neighboring turbines. There is the potential to increase power and reduce overall structural loads by properly coordinating turbines. To perform control design and analysis, a model needs to be of low computational cost, but retains the necessary dynamics seen in high-fidelity models. The objective of this work is to obtain a reduced-order model that represents the full-order flow computed using a high-fidelity model. A variety of methods, including proper orthogonal decomposition and dynamic mode decomposition, can be used to extract the dominant flow structures and obtain a reduced-order model. In this paper, we combine proper orthogonal decomposition with a system identification technique to produce an input-output reduced-order model. This technique is used to construct a reduced-order model of the flow within a two-turbine array computed using a large-eddy simulation.

  19. Modeling and simulation of offshore wind farm O&M processes

    SciTech Connect

    Joschko, Philip; Widok, Andi H.; Appel, Susanne; Greiner, Saskia; Albers, Henning; Page, Bernd

    2015-04-15

    This paper describes a holistic approach to operation and maintenance (O&M) processes in the domain of offshore wind farm power generation. The acquisition and process visualization is followed by a risk analysis of all relevant processes. Hereafter, a tool was designed, which is able to model the defined processes in a BPMN 2.0 notation, as well as connect and simulate them. Furthermore, the notation was enriched with new elements, representing other relevant factors that were, to date, only displayable with much higher effort. In that regard a variety of more complex situations were integrated, such as for example new process interactions depending on different weather influences, in which case a stochastic weather generator was combined with the business simulation or other wind farm aspects important to the smooth running of the offshore wind farms. In addition, the choices for different methodologies, such as the simulation framework or the business process notation will be presented and elaborated depending on the impact they had on the development of the approach and the software solution. - Highlights: • Analysis of operation and maintenance processes of offshore wind farms • Process modeling with BPMN 2.0 • Domain-specific simulation tool.

  20. A Bayesian network approach to knowledge integration and representation of farm irrigation: 1. Model development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Q. J.; Robertson, D. E.; Haines, C. L.

    2009-02-01

    Irrigation is important to many agricultural businesses but also has implications for catchment health. A considerable body of knowledge exists on how irrigation management affects farm business and catchment health. However, this knowledge is fragmentary; is available in many forms such as qualitative and quantitative; is dispersed in scientific literature, technical reports, and the minds of individuals; and is of varying degrees of certainty. Bayesian networks allow the integration of dispersed knowledge into quantitative systems models. This study describes the development, validation, and application of a Bayesian network model of farm irrigation in the Shepparton Irrigation Region of northern Victoria, Australia. In this first paper we describe the process used to integrate a range of sources of knowledge to develop a model of farm irrigation. We describe the principal model components and summarize the reaction to the model and its development process by local stakeholders. Subsequent papers in this series describe model validation and the application of the model to assess the regional impact of historical and future management intervention.

  1. Integrated Farm System Model Version 4.3 and Dairy Gas Emissions Model Version 3.3 Software development and distribution

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Modeling routines of the Integrated Farm System Model (IFSM version 4.2) and Dairy Gas Emission Model (DairyGEM version 3.2), two whole-farm simulation models developed and maintained by USDA-ARS, were revised with new components for: (1) simulation of ammonia (NH3) and greenhouse gas emissions gene...

  2. Recirculation and growth of raindrops in simulated shallow cumulus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naumann, A. K.; Seifert, A.

    2016-06-01

    This study investigates growth processes of raindrops and the role of recirculation of raindrops for the formation of precipitation in shallow cumulus. Two related cases of fields of lightly precipitating shallow cumulus are simulated using Large-Eddy Simulation combined with a Lagrangian drop model for raindrop growth and a cloud tracking algorithm. Statistics from the Lagrangian drop model yield that most raindrops leave the cloud laterally and then evaporate in the subsaturated cloud environmental air. Only 1%-3% of the raindrops contribute to surface precipitation. Among this subsample of raindrops that contribute to surface precipitation, two growth regimes are identified: those raindrops that are dominated by accretional growth from cloud water, and those raindrops that are dominated by selfcollection among raindrops. The mean cloud properties alone are not decisive for the growth of an individual raindrop but the in-cloud variability is crucial. Recirculation of raindrops is found to be common in shallow cumulus, especially for those raindrops that contribute to surface precipitation. The fraction of surface precipitation that is attributed to recirculating raindrops differs from cloud to cloud but can be larger than 50%. This implies that simple conceptual models of raindrop growth that neglect the effect of recirculation disregard a substantial portion of raindrop growth in shallow cumulus.

  3. High-resolution computational algorithms for simulating offshore wind turbines and farms: Model development and validation

    SciTech Connect

    Calderer, Antoni; Yang, Xiaolei; Angelidis, Dionysios; Feist, Chris; Guala, Michele; Ruehl, Kelley; Guo, Xin; Boomsma, Aaron; Shen, Lian; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2015-10-30

    The present project involves the development of modeling and analysis design tools for assessing offshore wind turbine technologies. The computational tools developed herein are able to resolve the effects of the coupled interaction of atmospheric turbulence and ocean waves on aerodynamic performance and structural stability and reliability of offshore wind turbines and farms. Laboratory scale experiments have been carried out to derive data sets for validating the computational models.

  4. A system-level cost-of-energy wind farm layout optimization with landowner modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Le; MacDonald, Erin

    2013-10-01

    This work applies an enhanced levelized wind farm cost model, including landowner remittance fees, to determine optimal turbine placements under three landowner participation scenarios and two land-plot shapes. Instead of assuming a continuous piece of land is available for the wind farm construction, as in most layout optimizations, the problem formulation represents landowner participation scenarios as a binary string variable, along with the number of turbines. The cost parameters and model are a combination of models from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, and Windustiy. The system-level cost-of-energy (COE) optimization model is also tested under two land-plot shapes: equally-sized square land plots and unequal rectangle land plots. The optimal COEs results are compared to actual COE data and found to be realistic. The results show that landowner remittances account for approximately 10% of farm operating costs across all cases. Irregular land-plot shapes are easily handled by the model. We find that larger land plots do not necessarily receive higher remittance fees. The model can help site developers identify the most crucial land plots for project success and the optimal positions of turbines, with realistic estimates of costs and profitability. (C) 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Gas recirculator for acyclic machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balsa, T. F.

    1985-05-01

    The present invention relates to acyclic machines of the type using liquid metal collectors, and more particularly to an improvement for retaining the liquid metal in such machines. Radial type acyclic motors and generators generally include a metallic disk rotor rotating on a shaft between electromagnetic stator poles excited by field coils wound concentric with the shaft. Instead of solid brush, current collectors at the rotor periphery, liquid metal collectors are sometimes used to close the electrical current loop between the shaft and the rotor, and an inert pressurized cover gas fills the gaps between the rotating components and the stationary housing. A cover has recirculator in an acyclic generator having liquid metal collectors for reducing entrainment of the liquid metal in the gas. Radial passages in the stator housing provide natural recirculating paths for the cover gas to flow radially outward along the sides of the rotor and return inwardly through the passages. Scoops or lips located inward of the liquid metal collector divert the outward gas flow into the passages to minimize contact of the gas with the liquid metal.

  6. Modeling the Impacts of Farming Practices on Water Quality in the Little Miami River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Susanna T. Y.; Naramngam, Sarawuth

    2007-06-01

    Since intensive farming practices are essential to produce enough food for the increasing population, farmers have been using more inorganic fertilizers, pesticides, and herbicides. Agricultural lands are currently one of the major sources of non-point source pollution. However, by changing farming practices in terms of tillage and crop rotation, the levels of contamination can be reduced and the quality of soil and water resources can be improved. Thus, there is a need to investigate the amalgamated hydrologic effects when various tillage and crop rotation practices are operated in tandem. In this study, the Soil Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) was utilized to evaluate the individual and combined impacts of various farming practices on flow, sediment, ammonia, and total phosphorus loads in the Little Miami River basin. The model was calibrated and validated using the 1990-1994 and 1980-1984 data sets, respectively. The simulated results revealed that the SWAT model provided a good simulation performance. For those tested farming scenarios, no-tillage (NT) offered more environmental benefits than moldboard plowing (MP). Flow, sediment, ammonia, and total phosphorus under NT were lower than those under MP. In terms of crop rotation, continuous soybean and corn-soybean rotation were able to reduce sediment, ammonia, and total phosphorus loads. When the combined effects of tillage and crop rotation were examined, it was found that NT with continuous soybean or corn-soybean rotation could greatly restrain the loss of sediments and nutrients to receiving waters. Since corn-soybean rotation provides higher economic revenue, a combination of NT and corn-soybean rotation can be a viable system for successful farming.

  7. Modeling the impacts of farming practices on water quality in the Little Miami River Basin.

    PubMed

    Tong, Susanna T Y; Naramngam, Sarawuth

    2007-06-01

    Since intensive farming practices are essential to produce enough food for the increasing population, farmers have been using more inorganic fertilizers, pesticides, and herbicides. Agricultural lands are currently one of the major sources of non-point source pollution. However, by changing farming practices in terms of tillage and crop rotation, the levels of contamination can be reduced and the quality of soil and water resources can be improved. Thus, there is a need to investigate the amalgamated hydrologic effects when various tillage and crop rotation practices are operated in tandem. In this study, the Soil Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) was utilized to evaluate the individual and combined impacts of various farming practices on flow, sediment, ammonia, and total phosphorus loads in the Little Miami River basin. The model was calibrated and validated using the 1990-1994 and 1980-1984 data sets, respectively. The simulated results revealed that the SWAT model provided a good simulation performance. For those tested farming scenarios, no-tillage (NT) offered more environmental benefits than moldboard plowing (MP). Flow, sediment, ammonia, and total phosphorus under NT were lower than those under MP. In terms of crop rotation, continuous soybean and corn-soybean rotation were able to reduce sediment, ammonia, and total phosphorus loads. When the combined effects of tillage and crop rotation were examined, it was found that NT with continuous soybean or corn-soybean rotation could greatly restrain the loss of sediments and nutrients to receiving waters. Since corn-soybean rotation provides higher economic revenue, a combination of NT and corn-soybean rotation can be a viable system for successful farming.

  8. Gis-Based Wind Farm Site Selection Model Offshore Abu Dhabi Emirate, Uae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saleous, N.; Issa, S.; Mazrouei, J. Al

    2016-06-01

    The United Arab Emirates (UAE) government has declared the increased use of alternative energy a strategic goal and has invested in identifying and developing various sources of such energy. This study aimed at assessing the viability of establishing wind farms offshore the Emirate of Abu Dhabi, UAE and to identify favourable sites for such farms using Geographic Information Systems (GIS) procedures and algorithms. Based on previous studies and on local requirements, a set of suitability criteria was developed including ocean currents, reserved areas, seabed topography, and wind speed. GIS layers were created and a weighted overlay GIS model based on the above mentioned criteria was built to identify suitable sites for hosting a new offshore wind energy farm. Results showed that most of Abu Dhabi offshore areas were unsuitable, largely due to the presence of restricted zones (marine protected areas, oil extraction platforms and oil pipelines in particular). However, some suitable sites could be identified, especially around Delma Island and North of Jabal Barakah in the Western Region. The environmental impact of potential wind farm locations and associated cables on the marine ecology was examined to ensure minimal disturbance to marine life. Further research is needed to specify wind mills characteristics that suit the study area especially with the presence of heavy traffic due to many oil production and shipping activities in the Arabian Gulf most of the year.

  9. The effect of flow recirculation on abdominal aortic aneurysm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taib, Ishkrizat; Amirnordin, Shahrin Hisham; Madon, Rais Hanizam; Mustafa, Norrizal; Osman, Kahar

    2012-06-01

    The presences of flow recirculation at the abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) region yield the unpredictable failure of aneurismal wall. The failure of the aneurismal wall is closely related to the hemodynamic factor. Hemodynamic factor such as pressure and velocity distribution play a significance role of aneurysm growth and rupture. By using the computational approach, the influence of hemodynamic factor is investigated using computational fluid dynamic (CFD) method on the virtual AAA model. The virtual 3D AAAs model was reconstructed from Spiral Computed Tomography scan (CT-scan). The blood flow is assumed as being transient, laminar and Newtonian within a rigid section of the vessel. The blood flow also driven by an imposed of pressure gradient in the form of physiological waveform. The pulsating blood flow is also considered in this simulation. The results on pressure distribution and velocity profile are analyzed to interpret the behaviour of flow recirculation. The results show the forming of vortices is seen at the aneurysm bulge. This vortices is form at the aneurysm region then destroyed rapidly by flow recirculation. Flow recirculation is point out much higher at distal end of aneurysm closed to iliac bifurcation. This phenomenon is managed to increase the possibility of aneurysm growth and rupture.

  10. A generic bio-economic farm model for environmental and economic assessment of agricultural systems.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Sander; Louhichi, Kamel; Kanellopoulos, Argyris; Zander, Peter; Flichman, Guillermo; Hengsdijk, Huib; Meuter, Eelco; Andersen, Erling; Belhouchette, Hatem; Blanco, Maria; Borkowski, Nina; Heckelei, Thomas; Hecker, Martin; Li, Hongtao; Oude Lansink, Alfons; Stokstad, Grete; Thorne, Peter; van Keulen, Herman; van Ittersum, Martin K

    2010-12-01

    Bio-economic farm models are tools to evaluate ex-post or to assess ex-ante the impact of policy and technology change on agriculture, economics and environment. Recently, various BEFMs have been developed, often for one purpose or location, but hardly any of these models are re-used later for other purposes or locations. The Farm System Simulator (FSSIM) provides a generic framework enabling the application of BEFMs under various situations and for different purposes (generating supply response functions and detailed regional or farm type assessments). FSSIM is set up as a component-based framework with components representing farmer objectives, risk, calibration, policies, current activities, alternative activities and different types of activities (e.g., annual and perennial cropping and livestock). The generic nature of FSSIM is evaluated using five criteria by examining its applications. FSSIM has been applied for different climate zones and soil types (criterion 1) and to a range of different farm types (criterion 2) with different specializations, intensities and sizes. In most applications FSSIM has been used to assess the effects of policy changes and in two applications to assess the impact of technological innovations (criterion 3). In the various applications, different data sources, level of detail (e.g., criterion 4) and model configurations have been used. FSSIM has been linked to an economic and several biophysical models (criterion 5). The model is available for applications to other conditions and research issues, and it is open to be further tested and to be extended with new components, indicators or linkages to other models.

  11. A Generic Bio-Economic Farm Model for Environmental and Economic Assessment of Agricultural Systems

    PubMed Central

    Louhichi, Kamel; Kanellopoulos, Argyris; Zander, Peter; Flichman, Guillermo; Hengsdijk, Huib; Meuter, Eelco; Andersen, Erling; Belhouchette, Hatem; Blanco, Maria; Borkowski, Nina; Heckelei, Thomas; Hecker, Martin; Li, Hongtao; Oude Lansink, Alfons; Stokstad, Grete; Thorne, Peter; van Keulen, Herman; van Ittersum, Martin K.

    2010-01-01

    Bio-economic farm models are tools to evaluate ex-post or to assess ex-ante the impact of policy and technology change on agriculture, economics and environment. Recently, various BEFMs have been developed, often for one purpose or location, but hardly any of these models are re-used later for other purposes or locations. The Farm System Simulator (FSSIM) provides a generic framework enabling the application of BEFMs under various situations and for different purposes (generating supply response functions and detailed regional or farm type assessments). FSSIM is set up as a component-based framework with components representing farmer objectives, risk, calibration, policies, current activities, alternative activities and different types of activities (e.g., annual and perennial cropping and livestock). The generic nature of FSSIM is evaluated using five criteria by examining its applications. FSSIM has been applied for different climate zones and soil types (criterion 1) and to a range of different farm types (criterion 2) with different specializations, intensities and sizes. In most applications FSSIM has been used to assess the effects of policy changes and in two applications to assess the impact of technological innovations (criterion 3). In the various applications, different data sources, level of detail (e.g., criterion 4) and model configurations have been used. FSSIM has been linked to an economic and several biophysical models (criterion 5). The model is available for applications to other conditions and research issues, and it is open to be further tested and to be extended with new components, indicators or linkages to other models. PMID:21113782

  12. Analysis and Prediction of Winds at the Wind Farms in Westcentral US: Modeling Tools and Challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yubao; Mahoney, Bill; Warner, Tom; Cheng, Will Y. Y.; Roux, Gregory; Liu, Yuewei; Delle Monache, Luca; Parks, Keith; Vincent, Claire; Wan, Yih-Huei

    2010-05-01

    Accurate wind and severe-weather forecasts are crucial for wind-energy production and grid-load management. Most of the prevailing wind power forecast methods rely heavily on statistical approaches that typically do not deal directly with weather processes. Currently employed numerical weather prediction (NWP) models are deemed insufficiently accurate by many industry stakeholders for wind power prediction, even though they have been used for such applications. The reason is partly because the NWP products used for power forecasting are typically produced by the coarse-resolution models at the major operational weather centers. Although a few of high-resolution models are run by some wind energy industries, most of these model do not contain advanced data assimilation capabilities that are required to initialize the model prediction with the important high-resolution weather information. In this presentation, we introduce the NCAR Real-Time Four Dimensional Data Assimilation (RTFDDA) and forecasting system that has been developed to specifically analyze and predict meteorological conditions over small regions. Operational RTFDDA systems have been implemented across the United States and other global regions to support tens of other weather-critical applications in the last nine years. The system provides rapidly updated, multi-scale weather analyses and forecasts with the fine-mesh domain having a 0.5 - 3 km grid increment. The presentation will focus on the modification and improvements to the NWP technologies in RTFDDA for wind energy applications. The technologies include the use of a) an advanced mesoscale weather model (WRF, Weather Research and Forecasting model) with a continuous 4-D data assimilation scheme, b) an effective data quality-control procedures that handles the ingestion of diverse weather data sources, c) special algorithms for the assimilation of wind-farm measurements including met-tower and turbine nacelle wind speeds, d) ensemble

  13. Projecting carbon footprint of Canadian dairy farms under future climate conditions with the integrated farm system model

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Dairy farms are an important sector of Canadian agriculture, and there is an on-going effort to assess their environmental impact. In Canada, like many northern areas of the world, climate change is expected to increase agricultural productivity. This will likely come along with changes in environme...

  14. Coupling dairy manure storage with injection to improve nitrogen management: whole-farm simulation using the integrated farm system Model

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Application of livestock manure to farm soils represents a priority nutrient management concern in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed. Historically strong emphasis has been placed on adding manure storage to dairy operations, and, there has been recognition that manure application methods can be improved....

  15. Recirculation in venovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Xie, Ashleigh; Yan, Tristan D; Forrest, Paul

    2016-12-01

    Despite the increasing use of venovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) to treat severe respiratory failure, recirculation remains a common complication that may result in severe hypoxemia and end-organ damage. The present review, therefore, examines updated evidence for the causes, measurement, and management of recirculation. Six electronic databases were searched from their dates of inception to January 2016, and 38 relevant studies were selected for analysis. This review revealed that, currently, recirculation is typically calculated from measurement of blood oxygen saturations, although limited evidence suggests that oxygen content may provide a more accurate measure. Dilutional ultrasound may play an additional role in dynamic quantitative monitoring of recirculation, but further human studies are required to validate its clinical use. Although cannula configuration appears to be a key contributor to recirculation in addition to factors such as ECMO flow rate, there are insufficient comparative clinical studies to recommend an optimal cannulation technique for minimizing recirculation. Existing evidence suggests that the dual-lumen cannula may have a low recirculation fraction, but only if correctly positioned. This review underscores the need for more robust clinical and laboratory studies to effectively evaluate and address the persistent problem of recirculation.

  16. Integrated Farm System Model Version 4.1 and Dairy Gas Emissions Model Version 3.1 software release and distribution

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Animal facilities are significant contributors of gaseous emissions including ammonia (NH3) and nitrous oxide (N2O). Previous versions of the Integrated Farm System Model (IFSM version 4.0) and Dairy Gas Emissions Model (DairyGEM version 3.0), two whole-farm simulation models developed by USDA-ARS, ...

  17. Environmental and economic impacts of decision-making at an arable farm: an integrative modeling approach.

    PubMed

    Lindgren, Urban; Elmquist, Helena

    2005-06-01

    This study examines the dependency between physical and anthropogenic systems in arable farming. The dynamic simulation model, which has its methodological origins in the modeling traditions of environmental systems analysis and microsimulation, reproduces the mutual links between the physical flows (e.g. energy, materials, emissions, and products), the farmer as a decision-making agent, and structural conditions influencing the farm. In running the model, the intention is to answer the question: What are the impacts on profitability and the environment (i.e. greenhouse gas effects, eutrophication, acidification, and energy use) of variations in prices, subsidies, the farmer's environmental values, and the farmer's skill in making production allocation choices? The results of the model simulations indicate, for example, that in terms of economic performance, a farmer can choose between two relatively sustainable strategies--either to specialize in organic production (thereby benefiting from higher subsidies and output prices), or to focus on conventional cultivation and use of pesticides and fertilizers (thereby benefiting from large yields). Regarding environmental impacts, there was no clear-cut divide between organic and conventional farming due to difficulties in allocating the use of manure. This finding is essentially related to the choice of system boundary, which is thoroughly discussed in the paper.

  18. Modelling Infectious Hematopoietic Necrosis Virus Dispersion from Marine Salmon Farms in the Discovery Islands, British Columbia, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Foreman, Michael G. G.; Guo, Ming; Garver, Kyle A.; Stucchi, Dario; Chandler, Peter; Wan, Di; Morrison, John; Tuele, Darren

    2015-01-01

    Finite volume ocean circulation and particle tracking models are used to simulate water-borne transmission of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) among Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) farms in the Discovery Islands region of British Columbia, Canada. Historical simulations for April and July 2010 are carried out to demonstrate the seasonal impact of river discharge, wind, ultra-violet (UV) radiation, and heat flux conditions on near-surface currents, viral dispersion and survival. Numerical particles released from infected farm fish in accordance with IHNV shedding rates estimated through laboratory experiments are dispersed by model oceanic flows. Viral particles are inactivated by ambient UV radiation levels and by the natural microbial community at rates derived through laboratory studies. Viral concentration maps showing temporal and spatial changes are produced and combined with lab-determined minimum infectious dosages to estimate the infective connectivity among farms. Results demonstrate that neighbouring naïve farms can become exposed to IHNV via water-borne transport from an IHNV diseased farm, with a higher risk in April than July, and that many events in the sequence of farm outbreaks in 2001-2002 are consistent with higher risks in our farm connectivity matrix. Applications to other diseases, transfers between farmed and wild fish, and the effect of vaccinations are also discussed. PMID:26114643

  19. Modelling Infectious Hematopoietic Necrosis Virus Dispersion from Marine Salmon Farms in the Discovery Islands, British Columbia, Canada.

    PubMed

    Foreman, Michael G G; Guo, Ming; Garver, Kyle A; Stucchi, Dario; Chandler, Peter; Wan, Di; Morrison, John; Tuele, Darren

    2015-01-01

    Finite volume ocean circulation and particle tracking models are used to simulate water-borne transmission of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) among Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) farms in the Discovery Islands region of British Columbia, Canada. Historical simulations for April and July 2010 are carried out to demonstrate the seasonal impact of river discharge, wind, ultra-violet (UV) radiation, and heat flux conditions on near-surface currents, viral dispersion and survival. Numerical particles released from infected farm fish in accordance with IHNV shedding rates estimated through laboratory experiments are dispersed by model oceanic flows. Viral particles are inactivated by ambient UV radiation levels and by the natural microbial community at rates derived through laboratory studies. Viral concentration maps showing temporal and spatial changes are produced and combined with lab-determined minimum infectious dosages to estimate the infective connectivity among farms. Results demonstrate that neighbouring naïve farms can become exposed to IHNV via water-borne transport from an IHNV diseased farm, with a higher risk in April than July, and that many events in the sequence of farm outbreaks in 2001-2002 are consistent with higher risks in our farm connectivity matrix. Applications to other diseases, transfers between farmed and wild fish, and the effect of vaccinations are also discussed.

  20. Engineering models for merging wakes in wind farm optimization applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machefaux, E.; Larsen, G. C.; Murcia Leon, J. P.

    2015-06-01

    The present paper deals with validation of 4 different engineering wake superposition approaches against detailed CFD simulations and covering different turbine interspacing, ambient turbulence intensities and mean wind speeds. The first engineering model is a simple linear superposition of wake deficits as applied in e.g. Fuga. The second approach is the square root of sums of squares approach, which is applied in the widely used PARK program. The third approach, which is presently used with the Dynamic Wake Meandering (DWM) model, assumes that the wake affected downstream flow field to be determined by a superposition of the ambient flow field and the dominating wake among contributions from all upstream turbines at any spatial position and at any time. The last approach developed by G.C. Larsen is a newly developed model based on a parabolic type of approach, which combines wake deficits successively. The study indicates that wake interaction depends strongly on the relative wake deficit magnitude, i.e. the deficit magnitude normalized with respect to the ambient mean wind speed, and that the dominant wake assumption within the DWM framework is the most accurate.

  1. In Situ Biotreatment of TBA with Recirculation/Oxygenation

    PubMed Central

    North, Katharine P.; Mackay, Douglas M.; Kayne, Julian S.; Petersen, Daniel; Rasa, Ehsan; Rastegarzadeh, Laleh; Holland, Reef B.; Scow, Kate M.

    2012-01-01

    The potential for in situ biodegradation of tert-butyl alcohol (TBA) by creation of aerobic conditions in the subsurface with recirculating well pairs was investigated in two field studies conducted at Vandenberg Air Force Base (VAFB). In the first experiment, a single recirculating well pair with bromide tracer and oxygen amendment successfully delivered oxygen to the subsurface for 42 days. TBA concentrations were reduced from approximately 500 μg/L to below the detection limit within the treatment zone and the treated water was detected in a monitoring transect several meters downgradient. In the second experiment, a site-calibrated model was used to design a double recirculating well pair with oxygen amendment, which successfully delivered oxygen to the subsurface for 291 days and also decreased TBA concentrations to below the detection limit. Methylibium petroleiphilum strain PM1, a known TBA-degrading bacterium, was detectable at the study site but addition of oxygen had little impact on the already low baseline population densities, suggesting that there was not enough carbon within the groundwater plume to support significant new growth in the PM1 population. Given favorable hydrogeologic and geochemical conditions, the use of recirculating well pairs to introduce dissolved oxygen into the subsurface is a viable method to stimulate in situ biodegradation of TBA or other aerobically-degradable aquifer contaminants. PMID:23358537

  2. Modelling farm vulnerability to flooding: A step toward vulnerability mitigation policies appraisal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brémond, P.; Abrami, G.; Blanc, C.; Grelot, F.

    2009-04-01

    flood. In the case of farm activities, vulnerability mitigation consists in implementing measures which can be: physical (equipment or electric power system elevation), organizational (emergency or recovery plan) or financial (insurance). These measures aim at decreasing the total damage incurred by farmers in case of flooding. For instance, if equipment is elevated, it will not suffer direct damage such as degradation. As a consequence, equipment will be available to continue production or recovery tasks, thus, avoiding indirect damage such as delays, indebtedness… The effects of these policies on farms, in particular vulnerability mitigation cannot be appraised using current methodologies mainly because they do not consider farm as a whole and focus on direct damage at the land plot scale (loss of yield). Moreover, since vulnerability mitigation policies are quite recent, few examples of implementation exist and no feedback experience can be processed. Meanwhile, decision makers and financial actors require more justification of the efficiency of public fund by economic appraisal of the projects. On the Rhône River, decision makers asked for an economic evaluation of the program of farm vulnerability mitigation they plan to implement. This implies to identify the effects of the measures to mitigate farm vulnerability, and to classify them by comparing their efficacy (avoided damage) and their cost of implementation. In this presentation, we propose and discuss a conceptual model of vulnerability at the farm scale. The modelling, in Unified Modelling Language, enabled to represent the ties between spatial, organizational and temporal dimensions, which are central to understanding of farm vulnerability and resilience to flooding. Through this modelling, we encompass three goals: To improve the comprehension of farm vulnerability and create a framework that allow discussion with experts of different disciplines as well as with local farmers; To identify data which

  3. The relation between modeled odor exposure from livestock farming and odor annoyance among neighboring residents.

    PubMed

    Boers, D; Geelen, L; Erbrink, H; Smit, L A M; Heederik, D; Hooiveld, M; Yzermans, C J; Huijbregts, M; Wouters, I M

    2016-04-01

    Odor annoyance is an important environmental stressor for neighboring residents of livestock farms and may affect their quality of life and health. However, little is known about the relation between odor exposure due to livestock farming and odor annoyance. Even more, the relation between odor exposure and odor annoyance is rather complicated due to variable responses among individuals to comparable exposure levels and a large number of factors (such as age, gender, education) that may affect the relation. In this study, we (1) investigated the relation between modeled odor exposure and odor annoyance; (2) investigated whether other factors can affect this relation; and (3) compared our dose-response relation to a dose-response relation established in a previous study carried out in the Netherlands, more than 10 years ago, in order to investigate changes in odor perception and appreciation over time. We used data from 582 respondents who participated in a questionnaire survey among neighboring residents of livestock farms in the south of the Netherlands. Odor annoyance was established by two close-ended questions in a questionnaire; odor exposure was estimated using the Stacks dispersion model. The results of our study indicate a statistically significant and positive relation between modeled odor exposure and reported odor annoyance from livestock farming (OR 1.92; 95 % CI 1.53-2.41). Furthermore, age, asthma, education and perceived air pollution in the environment are all related to odor annoyance, although they hardly affect the relation between estimated livestock odor exposure and reported odor annoyance. We also found relatively more odor annoyance reported among neighboring residents than in a previous study conducted in the Netherlands. We found a strong relation between modeled odor exposure and odor annoyance. However, due to some uncertainties and small number of studies on this topic, further research and replication of results is recommended.

  4. Predictive modeling of Bacillus cereus spores in farm tank milk during grazing and housing periods.

    PubMed

    Vissers, M M M; Te Giffel, M C; Driehuis, F; De Jong, P; Lankveld, J M G

    2007-01-01

    The shelf life of pasteurized dairy products depends partly on the concentration of Bacillus cereus spores in raw milk. Based on a translation of contamination pathways into chains of unit-operations, 2 simulation models were developed to quantitatively identify factors that have the greatest effect on the spore concentration in milk. In addition, the models can be used to determine the reduction in concentration that could be achieved via measures at the farm level. One model predicts the concentration when soil is the source of spores, most relevant during grazing of cows. The other model predicts the concentration when feed is the main source of spores, most relevant during housing of cows. It was estimated that when teats are contaminated with soil, 33% of the farm tank milk (FTM) contains more than 3 log(10) spores/L of milk. When feed is the main source, this is only 2%. Based on the predicted spore concentrations in FTM, we calculated that the average spore concentration in raw milk stored at the dairy processor during the grazing period is 3.5 log(10) spores/L of milk and during the housing period is 2.1 log(10) spores/L. It was estimated that during the grazing period a 99% reduction could be achieved if all farms minimize the soil contamination of teats and teat cleaning is optimized. During housing, reduction of the concentration by 60% should be feasible by ensuring spore concentrations in feed below 3 log(10) spores/g and a pH of the ration offered to the cows below 5. Implementation of these measures at the farm level ensures that the concentration of B. cereus spores in raw milk never exceeds 3 log(10) spores/L.

  5. Incorporating atmospheric stability effects into the FLORIS engineering model of wakes in wind farms

    DOE PAGES

    Gebraad, Pieter M. O.; Churchfield, Matthew J.; Fleming, Paul A.

    2016-10-03

    Atmospheric stability conditions have an effect on wind turbine wakes. This is an important factor in wind farms in which the wake properties affect the performance of downstream turbines. In the stable atmosphere, wind direction shear has a lateral skewing effect on the wakes. In this study, we describe changes to the FLOw Redirection and Induction in Steady-state (FLORIS) wake engineering model to incorporate and parameterize this effect.

  6. Modelling impacts of offshore wind farms on trophic web: the Courseulles-sur-Mer case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raoux, Aurore; Pezy, Jean-Philippe; Dauvin, Jean-Claude; Tecchio, samuele; Degraer, Steven; Wilhelmsson, Dan; Niquil, Nathalie

    2016-04-01

    The French government is planning the construction of three offshore wind farms in Normandy. These offshore wind farms will integrate into an ecosystem already subject to a growing number of anthropogenic disturbances such as transportation, fishing, sediment deposit, and sediment extraction. The possible effects of this cumulative stressors on ecosystem functioning are still unknown, but they could impact their resilience, making them susceptible to changes from one stable state to another. Understanding the behaviour of these marine coastal complex systems is essential in order to anticipate potential state changes, and to implement conservation actions in a sustainable manner. Currently, there are no global and integrated studies on the effects of construction and exploitation of offshore wind farms. Moreover, approaches are generally focused on the conservation of some species or groups of species. Here, we develop a holistic and integrated view of ecosystem impacts through the use of trophic webs modelling tools. Trophic models describe the interaction between biological compartments at different trophic levels and are based on the quantification of flow of energy and matter in ecosystems. They allow the application of numerical methods for the characterization of emergent properties of the ecosystem, also called Ecological Network Analysis (ENA). These indices have been proposed as ecosystem health indicators as they have been demonstrated to be sensitive to different impacts on marine ecosystems. We present here in detail the strategy for analysing the potential environmental impacts of the construction of the Courseulles-sur-Mer offshore wind farm (Bay of Seine) such as the reef effect through the use of the Ecopath with Ecosim software. Similar Ecopath simulations will be made in the future on the Le Tréport offshore wind farm site. Results will contribute to a better knowledge of the impacts of the offshore wind farms on ecosystems. They also allow to

  7. Dynamic modelling and analysis of multi-machine power systems including wind farms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabesh, Ahmadreza

    2005-11-01

    This thesis introduces a small-signal dynamic model, based on a frequency response approach, for the analysis of a multi-machine power system with special focus on an induction machine based wind farm. The proposed approach is an alternative method to the conventional eigenvalue analysis method which is widely employed for small-signal dynamic analyses of power systems. The proposed modelling approach is successfully applied and evaluated for a power system that (i) includes multiple synchronous generators, and (ii) a wind farm based on either fixed-speed, variable-speed, or doubly-fed induction machine based wind energy conversion units. The salient features of the proposed method, as compared with the conventional eigenvalue analysis method, are: (i) computational efficiency since the proposed method utilizes the open-loop transfer-function matrix of the system, (ii) performance indices that are obtainable based on frequency response data and quantitatively describe the dynamic behavior of the system, and (iii) capability to formulate various wind energy conversion unit, within a wind farm, in a modular form. The developed small-signal dynamic model is applied to a set of multi-machine study systems and the results are validated based on comparison (i) with digital time-domain simulation results obtained from PSCAD/EMTDC software tool, and (ii) where applicable with eigenvalue analysis results.

  8. Modelling the cost-effectiveness of mitigation methods for multiple pollutants at farm scale.

    PubMed

    Gooday, R D; Anthony, S G; Chadwick, D R; Newell-Price, P; Harris, D; Duethmann, D; Fish, R; Collins, A L; Winter, M

    2014-01-15

    Reductions in agricultural pollution are essential for meeting nationally and internationally agreed policy targets for losses to both air and water. Numerous studies quantify the impact of relevant mitigation methods by field experimentation or computer modelling. The majority of these studies have addressed individual methods and frequently also individual pollutants. This paper presents a conceptual model for the synthesis of the evidence base to calculate the impact of multiple methods addressing multiple pollutants in order to identify least cost solutions for multiple policy objectives. The model is implemented as a farm scale decision support tool that quantifies baseline pollutant losses for identifiable sources, areas and pathways and incorporates a genetic algorithm based multi-objective procedure for determining optimal suites of mitigation methods. The tool is generic as baseline losses can be replaced with measured data and the default library of mitigation methods can be edited and expanded. The tool is demonstrated through application to two contrasting farm systems, using survey data on agricultural practices typical of England and Wales. These examples show how the tool could be used to help target the adoption of mitigation options for the control of diffuse pollution from agriculture. The feedback from workshops where Farmscoper was demonstrated is included to highlight the potential role of Farmscoper as part of the farm advisory process. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. H2A Biomethane Model Documentation and a Case Study for Biogas From Dairy Farms

    SciTech Connect

    Saur, G.; Jalalzadeh, A.

    2010-12-01

    The new H2A Biomethane model was developed to estimate the levelized cost of biomethane by using the framework of the vetted original H2A models for hydrogen production and delivery. For biomethane production, biogas from sources such as dairy farms and landfills is upgraded by a cleanup process. The model also estimates the cost to compress and transport the product gas via the pipeline to export it to the natural gas grid or any other potential end-use site. Inputs include feed biogas composition and cost, required biomethane quality, cleanup equipment capital and operations and maintenance costs, process electricity usage and costs, and pipeline delivery specifications.

  10. KL-optimal experimental design for discriminating between two growth models applied to a beef farm.

    PubMed

    Campos-Barreiro, Santiago; López-Fidalgo, Jesús

    2016-02-01

    The body mass growth of organisms is usually represented in terms of what is known as ontogenetic growth models, which represent the relation of dependence between the mass of the body and time. The paper is concerned with a problem of finding an optimal experimental design for discriminating between two competing mass growth models applied to a beef farm. T-optimality was first introduced for discrimination between models but in this paper, KL-optimality based on the Kullback-Leibler distance is used to deal with correlated obsevations since, in this case, observations on a particular animal are not independent.

  11. Diffusion of a Sustainable Farming Technique in Sri Lanka: An Agent-Based Modeling Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobi, J. H.; Gilligan, J. M.; Carrico, A. R.; Truelove, H. B.; Hornberger, G.

    2012-12-01

    We live in a changing world - anthropogenic climate change is disrupting historic climate patterns and social structures are shifting as large scale population growth and massive migrations place unprecedented strain on natural and social resources. Agriculture in many countries is affected by these changes in the social and natural environments. In Sri Lanka, rice farmers in the Mahaweli River watershed have seen increases in temperature and decreases in precipitation. In addition, a government led resettlement project has altered the demographics and social practices in villages throughout the watershed. These changes have the potential to impact rice yields in a country where self-sufficiency in rice production is a point of national pride. Studies of the climate can elucidate physical effects on rice production, while research on social behaviors can illuminate the influence of community dynamics on agricultural practices. Only an integrated approach, however, can capture the combined and interactive impacts of these global changes on Sri Lankan agricultural. As part of an interdisciplinary team, we present an agent-based modeling (ABM) approach to studying the effects of physical and social changes on farmers in Sri Lanka. In our research, the diffusion of a sustainable farming technique, the system of rice intensification (SRI), throughout a farming community is modeled to identify factors that either inhibit or promote the spread of a more sustainable approach to rice farming. Inputs into the ABM are both physical and social and include temperature, precipitation, the Palmer Drought Severity Index (PDSI), community trust, and social networks. Outputs from the ABM demonstrate the importance of meteorology and social structure on the diffusion of SRI throughout a farming community.

  12. Lattice Design for the LHEC Recirculating Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Yipeng; Eide, Anders; Zimmermann, Frank; Adolphsen, Chris; /SLAC

    2011-05-20

    In this paper, we present a lattice design for the Large Hadron Electron Collider (LHeC) recirculating linac. The recirculating linac consists of one roughly 3-km long linac hosting superconducting RF (SRF) accelerating cavities, two arcs and one transfer line for the recirculation. In two passes through a pulsed SRF linac the electron beam can get a maximum energy of 140 GeV. Alternatively, in the Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) option the beam passes through a CW linac four times (two passes for acceleration and two for deceleration) for a maximum energy of 60 GeV.

  13. Regional climate model simulations indicate limited climatic impacts by operational and planned European wind farms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vautard, Robert; Thais, Françoise; Tobin, Isabelle; Bréon, François-Marie; de Lavergne, Jean-Guy Devezeaux; Colette, Augustin; Yiou, Pascal; Ruti, Paolo Michele

    2014-02-01

    The rapid development of wind energy has raised concerns about environmental impacts. Temperature changes are found in the vicinity of wind farms and previous simulations have suggested that large-scale wind farms could alter regional climate. However, assessments of the effects of realistic wind power development scenarios at the scale of a continent are missing. Here we simulate the impacts of current and near-future wind energy production according to European Union energy and climate policies. We use a regional climate model describing the interactions between turbines and the atmosphere, and find limited impacts. A statistically significant signal is only found in winter, with changes within ±0.3 °C and within 0-5% for precipitation. It results from the combination of local wind farm effects and changes due to a weak, but robust, anticyclonic-induced circulation over Europe. However, the impacts remain much weaker than the natural climate interannual variability and changes expected from greenhouse gas emissions.

  14. Investigation of sonar transponders for offshore wind farms: modeling approach, experimental setup, and results.

    PubMed

    Fricke, Moritz B; Rolfes, Raimund

    2013-11-01

    The installation of offshore wind farms in the German Exclusive Economic Zone requires the deployment of sonar transponders to prevent collisions with submarines. The general requirements for these systems have been previously worked out by the Research Department for Underwater Acoustics and Marine Geophysics of the Bundeswehr. In this article, the major results of the research project "Investigation of Sonar Transponders for Offshore Wind Farms" are presented. For theoretical investigations a hybrid approach was implemented using the boundary element method to calculate the source directivity and a three-dimensional ray-tracing algorithm to estimate the transmission loss. The angle-dependence of the sound field as well as the weather-dependence of the transmission loss are compared to experimental results gathered at the offshore wind farm alpha ventus, located 45 km north of the island Borkum. While theoretical and experimental results are in general agreement, the implemented model slightly underestimates scattering at the rough sea surface. It is found that the source level of 200 dB re 1 μPa at 1 m is adequate to satisfy the detectability of the warning sequence at distances up to 2 NM (≈3.7 km) within a horizontal sector of ±60° if realistic assumptions about signal-processing and noise are made. An arrangement to enlarge the angular coverage is discussed.

  15. Regional climate model simulations indicate limited climatic impacts by operational and planned European wind farms.

    PubMed

    Vautard, Robert; Thais, Françoise; Tobin, Isabelle; Bréon, François-Marie; Devezeaux de Lavergne, Jean-Guy; Colette, Augustin; Yiou, Pascal; Ruti, Paolo Michele

    2014-01-01

    The rapid development of wind energy has raised concerns about environmental impacts. Temperature changes are found in the vicinity of wind farms and previous simulations have suggested that large-scale wind farms could alter regional climate. However, assessments of the effects of realistic wind power development scenarios at the scale of a continent are missing. Here we simulate the impacts of current and near-future wind energy production according to European Union energy and climate policies. We use a regional climate model describing the interactions between turbines and the atmosphere, and find limited impacts. A statistically significant signal is only found in winter, with changes within ±0.3 °C and within 0-5% for precipitation. It results from the combination of local wind farm effects and changes due to a weak, but robust, anticyclonic-induced circulation over Europe. However, the impacts remain much weaker than the natural climate interannual variability and changes expected from greenhouse gas emissions.

  16. A novel spatial and stochastic model to evaluate the within- and between-farm transmission of classical swine fever virus. I. General concepts and description of the model.

    PubMed

    Martínez-López, B; Ivorra, B; Ramos, A M; Sánchez-Vizcaíno, J M

    2011-01-27

    A new stochastic and spatial model was developed to evaluate the potential spread of classical swine fever virus (CSFV) within- and between-farms, and considering the specific farm-to-farm contact network. Within-farm transmission was simulated using a modified SI model. Between-farm transmission was assumed to occur by direct contacts (i.e. animal movement) and indirect contacts (i.e. local spread, vehicle and person contacts) and considering the spatial location of farms. Control measures dictated by the European legislation (i.e. depopulation of infected farms, movement restriction, zoning, surveillance, contact tracing) were also implemented into the model. Model experimentation was performed using real data from Segovia, one of the provinces with highest density of pigs in Spain, and results were presented using the mean, 95% probability intervals [95% PI] and risk maps. The estimated mean [95% PI] number of infected, quarantined and depopulated farms were 3 [1,17], 23 [0,76] and 115 [0,318], respectively. The duration of the epidemic was 63 [26,177] days and the most important way of transmission was associated with local spread (61.4% of the infections). Results were consistent with the spread of previous CSFV introductions into the study region. The model and results presented here may be useful for the decision making process and for the improvement of the prevention and control programmes for CSFV.

  17. A recirculating stream aquarium for ecological studies.

    Treesearch

    Gordon H. Reeves; Fred H. Everest; Carl E. McLemore

    1983-01-01

    Investigations of the ecological behavior of fishes often require studies in both natural and artificial stream environments. We describe a large, recirculating stream aquarium and its controls, constructed for ecological studies at the Forestry Sciences Laboratory in Corvallis.

  18. Development of a simple ecosystem model and its application to fish farms at Hazamaura

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Joji; Hirano, Tadahiko; Horiguchi, Fumio

    Fish farms often cause environmental degradation to the surrounding aquatic areas when they operate for a long time. In this study, a simple numerical model was developed to evaluate the water quality (dissolved inorganic nitrogen, dissolved oxygen) of fish farms. This model consisted of a conventional ecosystem model with an added "cultured fish" component. This model was applied to represent the material cycling in a red sea bream culture at Hazamaura, Gokasho Bay, Japan.The analysis was carried out on the basis of field data collected from 1986-1989. In order to verify the model, the simulated concentrations of dissolved inorganic nitrogen and dissolved oxygen were compared to observed concentrations. The simulated results were in good agreement with the observational data for the whole year. In the simulated nitrogen and dissolved oxygen cycle, we found that the factors causing water pollution (eutrophication, anoxia, etc.) were: excretion by the cultured fishes, river load and benthic regeneration in summer, an increase in organic substances from feed scraps and an increase in dissolved inorganic nitrogen through mineralization in winter.

  19. Assessing manure management strategies through small-plot research and whole-farm modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garcia, A.M.; Veith, T.L.; Kleinman, P.J.A.; Rotz, C.A.; Saporito, L.S.

    2008-01-01

    Plot-scale experimentation can provide valuable insight into the effects of manure management practices on phosphorus (P) runoff, but whole-farm evaluation is needed for complete assessment of potential trade offs. Artificially-applied rainfall experimentation on small field plots and event-based and long-term simulation modeling were used to compare P loss in runoff related to two dairy manure application methods (surface application with and without incorporation by tillage) on contrasting Pennsylvania soils previously under no-till management. Results of single-event rainfall experiments indicated that average dissolved reactive P losses in runoff from manured plots decreased by up to 90% with manure incorporation while total P losses did not change significantly. Longer-term whole farm simulation modeling indicated that average dissolved reactive P losses would decrease by 8% with manure incorporation while total P losses would increase by 77% due to greater erosion from fields previously under no-till. Differences in the two methods of inference point to the need for caution in extrapolating research findings. Single-event rainfall experiments conducted shortly after manure application simulate incidental transfers of dissolved P in manure to runoff, resulting in greater losses of dissolved reactive P. However, the transfer of dissolved P in applied manure diminishes with time. Over the annual time frame simulated by whole farm modeling, erosion processes become more important to runoff P losses. Results of this study highlight the need to consider the potential for increased erosion and total P losses caused by soil disturbance during incorporation. This study emphasizes the ability of modeling to estimate management practice effectiveness at the larger scales when experimental data is not available.

  20. Microbial diversity of biological filters in recirculating aquaculture systems.

    PubMed

    Schreier, Harold J; Mirzoyan, Natella; Saito, Keiko

    2010-06-01

    Development of environmentally sustainable farming of marine and freshwater species using recirculating aquaculture systems (RASs) requires a complete understanding of the biological component involved in wastewater treatment. This component integrates biofilters composed of microbial communities whose structure, dynamics, and activities are responsible for system success. Engineering highly efficient, environmentally sound, disease-free, and economically viable systems necessitates a thorough knowledge of microbial processes involved in all facets of RAS biofilters and has only recently been the focus of comprehensive studies. These studies have included the application of molecular tools to characterize community diversity and have identified key processes useful for improving system performance. In this paper we summarize the current understanding of the microbial diversity and physiology of RAS biofilters and discuss directions for future studies.

  1. Recirculating cross-correlation detector

    DOEpatents

    Andrews, W.H. Jr.; Roberts, M.J.

    1985-01-18

    A digital cross-correlation detector is provided in which two time-varying signals are correlated by repetitively comparing data samples stored in digital form to detect correlation between the two signals. The signals are sampled at a selected rate converted to digital form, and stored in separate locations in separate memories. When the memories are filled, the data samples from each memory are first fed word-by-word through a multiplier and summing circuit and each result is compared to the last in a peak memory circuit and if larger than the last is retained in the peak memory. Then the address line to leading signal memory is offset by one byte to affect one sample period delay of a known amount in that memory and the data in the two memories are then multiplied word-by-word once again and summed. If a new result is larger than a former sum, it is saved in the peak memory together with the time delay. The recirculating process continues with the address of the one memory being offset one additional byte each cycle until the address is shifted through the length of the memory. The correlation between the two signals is indicated by the peak signal stored in the peak memory together with the delay time at which the peak occurred. The circuit is faster and considerably less expensive than comparable accuracy correlation detectors.

  2. Wind Power Curve Modeling Using Statistical Models: An Investigation of Atmospheric Input Variables at a Flat and Complex Terrain Wind Farm

    SciTech Connect

    Wharton, S.; Bulaevskaya, V.; Irons, Z.; Qualley, G.; Newman, J. F.; Miller, W. O.

    2015-09-28

    The goal of our FY15 project was to explore the use of statistical models and high-resolution atmospheric input data to develop more accurate prediction models for turbine power generation. We modeled power for two operational wind farms in two regions of the country. The first site is a 235 MW wind farm in Northern Oklahoma with 140 GE 1.68 turbines. Our second site is a 38 MW wind farm in the Altamont Pass Region of Northern California with 38 Mitsubishi 1 MW turbines. The farms are very different in topography, climatology, and turbine technology; however, both occupy high wind resource areas in the U.S. and are representative of typical wind farms found in their respective areas.

  3. Post-stenotic Recirculating Flow May Cause Hemodynamic Perforator Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Bum Joon; Ha, Hojin; Huh, Hyung Kyu; Kim, Guk Bae; Kim, Jong S.; Kim, Namkug; Lee, Sang-Joon; Kang, Dong-Wha; Kwon, Sun U.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose The primary mechanism underlying paramedian pontine infarction (PPI) is atheroma obliterating the perforators. Here, we encountered a patient with PPI in the post-stenotic area of basilar artery (BA) without a plaque, shown by high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (HR-MRI). We performed an experiment using a 3D-printed BA model and a particle image velocimetry (PIV) to explore the hemodynamic property of the post-stenotic area and the mechanism of PPI. Methods 3D-model of a BA stenosis was reconstructed with silicone compound using a 3D-printer based on the source image of HR-MRI. Working fluid seeded with fluorescence particles was used and the velocity of those particles was measured horizontally and vertically. Furthermore, microtubules were inserted into the posterior aspect of the model to measure the flow rates of perforators (pre-and post-stenotic areas). The flow rates were compared between the microtubules. Results A recirculating flow was observed from the post-stenotic area in both directions forming a spiral shape. The velocity of the flow in these regions of recirculation was about one-tenth that of the flow in other regions. The location of recirculating flow well corresponded with the area with low-signal intensity at the time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography and the location of PPI. Finally, the flow rate through the microtubule inserted into the post-stenotic area was significantly decreased comparing to others (P<0.001). Conclusions Perforator infarction may be caused by a hemodynamic mechanism altered by stenosis that induces a recirculation flow. 3D-printed modeling and PIV are helpful understanding the hemodynamics of intracranial stenosis. PMID:26687122

  4. Evaluation of traditional and consolidated rice farms in Guilan Province, Iran, using life cycle assessment and fuzzy modeling.

    PubMed

    Khoshnevisan, Benyamin; Rajaeifar, Mohammad Ali; Clark, Sean; Shamahirband, Shahaboddin; Anuar, Nor Badrul; Mohd Shuib, Nor Liyana; Gani, Abdullah

    2014-05-15

    In this study the environmental impact of consolidated rice farms (CF) - farms which have been integrated to increase the mechanization index - and traditional farms (TF) - small farms with lower mechanization index - in Guilan Province, Iran, were evaluated and compared using Life cycle assessment (LCA) methodology and adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS). Foreground data were collected from farmers using face-to-face questionnaires and background information about production process and inventory data was taken from the EcoInvent®2.0 database. The system boundary was confined to within the farm gate (cradle to farm gate) and two functional units (land and mass based) were chosen. The study also included a comparison of the input-output energy flows of the farms. The results revealed that the average amount of energy consumed by the CFs was 57 GJ compared to 74.2 GJ for the TFs. The energy ratios for CFs and TFs were 1.6 and 0.9, respectively. The LCA results indicated that CFs produced fewer environmental burdens per ton of produced rice. When compared according to the land-based FU the same results were obtained. This indicates that the differences between the two types of farms were not caused by a difference in their production level, but rather by improved management on the CFs. The analysis also showed that electricity accounted for the greatest share of the impact for both types of farms, followed by P-based and N-based chemical fertilizers. These findings suggest that the CFs had superior overall environmental performance compared to the TFs in the study area. The performance metrics of the model based on ANFIS show that it can be used to predict the environmental burdens of rice production with high accuracy and minimal error.

  5. Epidemiological modelling for the assessment of bovine tuberculosis surveillance in the dairy farm network in Emilia-Romagna (Italy).

    PubMed

    Rossi, Gianluigi; De Leo, Giulio A; Pongolini, Stefano; Natalini, Silvano; Vincenzi, Simone; Bolzoni, Luca

    2015-06-01

    Assessing the performance of a surveillance system for infectious diseases of domestic animals is a challenging task for health authorities. Therefore, it is important to assess what strategy is the most effective in identifying the onset of an epidemic and in minimizing the number of infected farms. The aim of the present work was to evaluate the performance of the bovine tuberculosis (bTB) surveillance system in the network of dairy farms in the Emilia-Romagna (ER) Region, Italy. A bTB-free Region since 2007, ER implements an integrated surveillance strategy based on three components, namely routine on-farm tuberculin skin-testing performed every 3 years, tuberculin skin-testing of cattle exchanged between farms, and post-mortem inspection at slaughterhouses. We assessed the effectiveness of surveillance by means of a stochastic network model of both within-farm and between-farm bTB dynamics calibrated on data available for ER dairy farms. Epidemic dynamics were simulated for five scenarios: the current ER surveillance system, a no surveillance scenario that we used as the benchmark to characterize epidemic dynamics, three additional scenarios in which one of the surveillance components was removed at a time so as to outline its significance in detecting the infection. For each scenario we ran Monte Carlo simulations of bTB epidemics following the random introduction of an infected individual in the network. System performances were assessed through the comparative analysis of a number of statistics, including the time required for epidemic detection and the total number of infected farms during the epidemic. Our analysis showed that slaughterhouse inspection is the most effective surveillance component in reducing the time for disease detection, while routine surveillance in reducing the number of multi-farms epidemics. On the other hand, testing exchanged cattle improved the performance of the surveillance system only marginally. Copyright © 2015 The Authors

  6. Experimental and numerical study of a turbulent recirculation zone with combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreau, P.; Labbe, J.; Dupoirieux, F.; Borghi, R.

    An experimental and computational study has been carried out on recirculation zones as related to afterburner devices for turbojet engines. The following conclusions can be pointed out: (1) the recirculation zone behind a bluff body in a confined flow is shortened when the combustion is stabilized by this bluff body; (2) the shortening is well reproduced by the calculation results and probably the effect is related to the increase of massic volume of combusting gases behind the recirculation zone and not to the turbulence modification; (3) the turbulence within the recirculation zone is clearly modified when combustion occurs with the anisotropy of the turbulence enhanced, the Reynolds stress increased, and the location of the maximum of turbulence kinetic energy displaced; and (4) the length of the recirculation region, and the mean velocity profiles can be computed with a good agreement with a constant eddy viscosity model (without and with combustion). The classical k-epsilon model leads to a bader agreement; qualitatively, the modification of the turbulence within the recirculation zone when the combustion is operated does not appear well reproduced by the classical k-epsilon model.

  7. Site assessment for wind farms in Austria - ground-based remote-sensing and modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumann-Stanzer, K.; Tran, H. V.; Kaufmann, H.; Koch, E.; Lotteraner, C.; Piringer, M.

    2012-04-01

    Site assessment concerning the wind potential, shading and icing for planned wind farms in Austria is conducted based on spatially highly resolved wind field modelling. Surface roughness, terrain and obstacles in the vicinity of the site are taken into account in the modelling approach as well as technical details of the planned wind farm. Representative wind measurements are essential for the correctness of the predicted energy yield. Climatological wind information is retrieved from the long time-series of the Austrian meteorological observational network. To achieve better wind conditions (high wind speed and low turbulence) higher hub heights of the new wind turbine types are planned, e.g. nowadays, the standard hub heights of about 3.0 MW turbine classes are over 135m. Because wind measurements with conventional wind masts at this altitude are difficult to perform and the application of logarithmic wind profiles of wind models close to the boundary layer are associated with uncertainty, nowadays measurements are carried out with remote sensing techniques. Advanced ground-based remote sensing techniques as RASS (radio-acoustic sounding system) and LIDAR render wind, turbulence and temperature (RASS only) profiles including the vertical range that will be reached by the moving blades of the wind turbine. Benefits and limitations of the sounding systems are discussed.

  8. Regional scale hydrodynamic modelling of offshore wind farm development areas off the east coast of Scotland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Hara Murray, Rory; Gallego, Alejandro

    2013-04-01

    There is considerable interest in Scotland, supported by the Scottish Government, in the expansion of renewable energy production. In particular, significant offshore wind energy developments are already planned in coastal waters to the east of the Forth and Tay estuaries. It is important to understand the local and cumulative environmental impact of such developments within this region, to aid licensing decisions but also to inform marine spatial planning in general. Substantial wind farm developments may affect physical processes within the region, such as tidal-, wind-, and wave-driven circulation, as well as coastal sediment transport and more complex estuarine dynamics. Such physical impacts could have ecological and, ultimately, socio-economic consequences. The Firth of Forth and Tay areas both exhibit complex estuarine characteristics due to fresh water input, complex bathymetry and coastline, and tidal mixing. Our goal is to construct an unstructured grid hydrodynamic model of the wider Firth of Forth and Tay region using the Finite-Volume Coastal Ocean Model (FVCOM), resolving the complex estuarine hydrography of the area and representing offshore wind developments. Hydrodynamic modelling will provide an accurate baseline of the hydrography in this region but also allow the assessment of the effect on the physical environment of multiple wind farm development scenarios.

  9. Stochastic bio-economic modeling of mastitis in Ethiopian dairy farms.

    PubMed

    Getaneh, Abraham Mekibeb; Mekonnen, Sefinew Alemu; Hogeveen, Henk

    2017-03-01

    Mastitis is an inflammation of the mammary gland that is considered to be one of the most frequent and costly diseases in the dairy industry. Also in Ethiopia, bovine mastitis is one of the most frequently encountered diseases of dairy cows. However, there was no study, so far, regarding the costs of clinical mastitis and only two studies were reported on costs of subclinical mastitis. Presenting an appropriate and complete study of the costs of mastitis will help farmers in making management decisions for mastitis control. The objective of this study was to estimate the economic effects of mastitis on Ethiopian market-oriented dairy farms. Market-oriented dairy farming is driven by making profits through selling milk in the market on a regular basis. A dynamic stochastic Monte-Carlo simulation model (bio-economic model) was developed taking into account both clinical and subclinical mastitis. Production losses, culling, veterinarian costs, treatment, discarded milk, and labour were the main cost factors which were modeled in this study. The annual incidence of clinical mastitis varied from 0 to 50% with a mean annual incidence of 21.6%, whereas the mean annual incidence of subclinical mastitis was 36.2% which varied between 0 and 75%. The total costs due to mastitis for a default farm size of 8 lactating cows were 6,709 ETB per year (838 ETB per cow per year). The costs varied considerably, with 5th and 95th percentiles of 109 ETB and 22,009 ETB, respectively. The factor most contributing to the total annual cost of mastitis was culling. On average a clinical case costs 3,631 ETB, varying from 0 to 12,401, whereas a sub clinical case costs 147 ETB, varying from 0 to 412. The sensitivity analysis showed that the total costs at the farm level were most sensitive for variation in the probability of occurrence of clinical mastitis and the probability of culling. This study helps farmers to raise awareness about the actual costs of mastitis and motivate them to timely

  10. Modelling the fate of pesticides in paddy rice-fish pond farming system in Northern Vietnam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamers, M.; Nguyen, N.; Streck, T.

    2012-04-01

    During the last decade rice production in Vietnam has tremendously increased due to the introduction of new high yield, short duration rice varieties and an increased application of pesticides. Since pesticides are toxic by design, there is a natural concern on the possible impacts of their presence in the environment on human health and environment quality. In North Vietnam, lowland and upland rice fields were identified to be a major non-point source of agrochemical pollution to surface and ground water, which are often directly used for domestic purposes. Field measurements, however, are time consuming, costly and logistical demanding. Hence, quantification, forecast and risk assessment studies are hampered by a limited amount of field data. One potential way to cope with this shortcoming is the use of process-based models. In the present study we developed a model for simulating short-term pesticide dynamics in combined paddy rice field - fish pond farming systems under the specific environmental conditions of south-east Asia. Basic approaches and algorithms to describe the key underlying biogeochemical processes were mainly adopted from the literature to assure that the model reflects the current standard of scientific knowledge and commonly accepted theoretical background. The model was calibrated by means of the Gauss-Marquardt-Levenberg algorithm and validated against measured pesticide concentrations (dimethoate and fenitrothion) during spring and summer rice crop season 2008, respectively, of a paddy field - fish pond system typical for northern Vietnam. First simulation results indicate that our model is capable to simulate the fate of pesticides in such paddy - fish pond farming systems. The model efficiency for the period of calibration, for example, was 0.97 and 0.95 for dimethoate and fenitrothion, respectively. For the period of validation, however, the modeling efficiency slightly decreased to 0.96 and 0.81 for dimethoate and fenitrothion

  11. A simple rule based model for scheduling farm management operations in SWAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schürz, Christoph; Mehdi, Bano; Schulz, Karsten

    2016-04-01

    For many interdisciplinary questions at the watershed scale, the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT; Arnold et al., 1998) has become an accepted and widely used tool. Despite its flexibility, the model is highly demanding when it comes to input data. At SWAT's core the water balance and the modeled nutrient cycles are plant growth driven (implemented with the EPIC crop growth model). Therefore, land use and crop data with high spatial and thematic resolution, as well as detailed information on cultivation and farm management practices are required. For many applications of the model however, these data are unavailable. In order to meet these requirements, SWAT offers the option to trigger scheduled farm management operations by applying the Potential Heat Unit (PHU) concept. The PHU concept solely takes into account the accumulation of daily mean temperature for management scheduling. Hence, it contradicts several farming strategies that take place in reality; such as: i) Planting and harvesting dates are set much too early or too late, as the PHU concept is strongly sensitivity to inter-annual temperature fluctuations; ii) The timing of fertilizer application, in SWAT this often occurs simultaneously on the same date in in each field; iii) and can also coincide with precipitation events. Particularly, the latter two can lead to strong peaks in modeled nutrient loads. To cope with these shortcomings we propose a simple rule based model (RBM) to schedule management operations according to realistic farmer management practices in SWAT. The RBM involves simple strategies requiring only data that are input into the SWAT model initially, such as temperature and precipitation data. The user provides boundaries of time periods for operation schedules to take place for all crops in the model. These data are readily available from the literature or from crop variety trials. The RBM applies the dates by complying with the following rules: i) Operations scheduled in the

  12. Changes in the Welfare of an Injured Working Farm Dog Assessed Using the Five Domains Model.

    PubMed

    Littlewood, Katherine E; Mellor, David J

    2016-09-21

    The present structured, systematic and comprehensive welfare evaluation of an injured working farm dog using the Five Domains Model is of interest in its own right. It is also an example for others wanting to apply the Model to welfare evaluations in different species and contexts. Six stages of a fictitious scenario involving the dog are considered: (1) its on-farm circumstances before one hind leg is injured; (2) its entanglement in barbed wire, cutting it free and transporting it to a veterinary clinic; (3) the initial veterinary examination and overnight stay; (4) amputation of the limb and immediate post-operative recovery; (5) its first four weeks after rehoming to a lifestyle block; and (6) its subsequent life as an amputee and pet. Not all features of the scenario represent average-to-good practice; indeed, some have been selected to indicate poor practice. It is shown how the Model can draw attention to areas of animal welfare concern and, importantly, to how welfare enhancement may be impeded or facilitated. Also illustrated is how the welfare implications of a sequence of events can be traced and evaluated, and, in relation to specific situations, how the degrees of welfare compromise and enhancement may be graded. In addition, the choice of a companion animal, contrasting its welfare status as a working dog and pet, and considering its treatment in a veterinary clinical setting, help to highlight various welfare impacts of some practices. By focussing attention on welfare problems, the Model can guide the implementation of remedies, including ways of promoting positive welfare states. Finally, wider applications of the Five Domains Model are noted: by enabling both negative and positive welfare-relevant experiences to be graded, the Model can be applied to quality of life assessments and end-of-life decisions and, with particular regard to negative experiences, the Model can also help to strengthen expert witness testimony during prosecutions for

  13. A Modeling Framework to Describe the Transmission of Bluetongue Virus within and between Farms in Great Britain

    PubMed Central

    Szmaragd, Camille; Wilson, Anthony J.; Carpenter, Simon; Wood, James L. N.; Mellor, Philip S.; Gubbins, Simon

    2009-01-01

    Background Recently much attention has been given to developing national-scale micro-simulation models for livestock diseases that can be used to predict spread and assess the impact of control measures. The focus of these models has been on directly transmitted infections with little attention given to vector-borne diseases such as bluetongue, a viral disease of ruminants transmitted by Culicoides biting midges. Yet BT has emerged over the past decade as one of the most important diseases of livestock. Methodology/Principal Findings We developed a stochastic, spatially-explicit, farm-level model to describe the spread of bluetongue virus (BTV) within and between farms. Transmission between farms was modeled by a generic kernel, which includes both animal and vector movements. Once a farm acquired infection, the within-farm dynamics were simulated based on the number of cattle and sheep kept on the farm and on local temperatures. Parameter estimates were derived from the published literature and using data from the outbreak of bluetongue in northern Europe in 2006. The model was validated using data on the spread of BTV in Great Britain during 2007. The sensitivity of model predictions to the shape of the transmission kernel was assessed. Conclusions/Significance The model is able to replicate the dynamics of BTV in Great Britain. Although uncertainty remains over the precise shape of the transmission kernel and certain aspects of the vector, the modeling approach we develop constitutes an ideal framework in which to incorporate these aspects as more and better data become available. Moreover, the model provides a tool with which to examine scenarios for the spread and control of BTV in Great Britain. PMID:19890400

  14. Large eddy simulation of unsteady wind farm behavior using advanced actuator disk models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moens, Maud; Duponcheel, Matthieu; Winckelmans, Gregoire; Chatelain, Philippe

    2014-11-01

    The present project aims at improving the level of fidelity of unsteady wind farm scale simulations through an effort on the representation and the modeling of the rotors. The chosen tool for the simulations is a Fourth Order Finite Difference code, developed at Universite catholique de Louvain; this solver implements Large Eddy Simulation (LES) approaches. The wind turbines are modeled as advanced actuator disks: these disks are coupled with the Blade Element Momentum method (BEM method) and also take into account the turbine dynamics and controller. A special effort is made here to reproduce the specific wake behaviors. Wake decay and expansion are indeed initially governed by vortex instabilities. This is an information that cannot be obtained from the BEM calculations. We thus aim at achieving this by matching the large scales of the actuator disk flow to high fidelity wake simulations produced using a Vortex Particle-Mesh method. It is obtained by adding a controlled excitation at the disk. We apply this tool to the investigation of atmospheric turbulence effects on the power production and on the wake behavior at a wind farm level. A turbulent velocity field is then used as inflow boundary condition for the simulations. We gratefully acknowledge the support of GDF Suez for the fellowship of Mrs Maud Moens.

  15. Computational modelling of a large dimension wind farm cluster using domain coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Costa Gomes, V. M. M. G.; Palma, J. M. L. M.

    2016-09-01

    The accuracy of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) models for Atmospheric Boundary Layer (ABL) flows relies largely on the placement of the domain boundaries and the quality of the imposed flow conditions, the inlet boundary in particular. Exploiting the parabolic nature of many ABL flows and of CFD modelled ABL flow in particular, a precursor simulation is used as source of flow data to improve the target domain's inlet flow description over the standard synthetic boundary conditions, one-directionally coupling the solutions to the two simulations. Using the approach, a case of flow over a two wind farm offshore cluster is modelled using two small coupled simulations, matching the results of a single simulation including the full cluster at a significant computational time saving, in the order of 70%. Further savings were shown to be possible by reducing the resolution of the precursor simulation, with negligible impact on the results at the target domain.

  16. Investigation of modified AD/RANS models for wind turbine wake predictions in large wind farm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, L. L.; Zhu, W. J.; Shen, W. Z.; Sørensen, J. N.; Zhao, N.

    2014-06-01

    Average power losses due to multiple wind turbine wakes in the large offshore wind farm is studied in this paper using properly modified k-ω SST turbulence models. The numerical simulations are carried out by the actuator disc methodology implemented in the flow solver EllipSys3D. In these simulations, the influence of different inflow conditions such as wind direction sectors are considered and discussed. Comparisons with measurements in terms of wake speed ratio and the corresponding power outputs show that the modified turbulence models had significant improvements; especially the SST-Csust model reflects the best ability in predicting the wake defect. The investigations of various inflow angles reveal that the agreement between predicted and measured data is improved for the wider sector case than the narrow case because of the wind direction uncertainty.

  17. Wind tunnel measurements of wake structure and wind farm power for actuator disk model wind turbines in yaw

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howland, Michael; Bossuyt, Juliaan; Kang, Justin; Meyers, Johan; Meneveau, Charles

    2016-11-01

    Reducing wake losses in wind farms by deflecting the wakes through turbine yawing has been shown to be a feasible wind farm control approach. In this work, the deflection and morphology of wakes behind a wind turbine operating in yawed conditions are studied using wind tunnel experiments of a wind turbine modeled as a porous disk in a uniform inflow. First, by measuring velocity distributions at various downstream positions and comparing with prior studies, we confirm that the nonrotating wind turbine model in yaw generates realistic wake deflections. Second, we characterize the wake shape and make observations of what is termed a "curled wake," displaying significant spanwise asymmetry. Through the use of a 100 porous disk micro-wind farm, total wind farm power output is studied for a variety of yaw configurations. Strain gages on the tower of the porous disk models are used to measure the thrust force as a substitute for turbine power. The frequency response of these measurements goes up to the natural frequency of the model and allows studying the spatiotemporal characteristics of the power output under the effects of yawing. This work has been funded by the National Science Foundation (Grants CBET-113380 and IIA-1243482, the WINDINSPIRE project). JB and JM are supported by ERC (ActiveWindFarms, Grant No. 306471).

  18. Flume simulation of sedimentation in recirculating flow

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, J.C. ); Rubin, D.M. ); Ikeda, H. )

    1990-05-01

    A 4-m-wide flume at the University of Tsukuba Environmental Research Center was used to simulate flow conditions near debris fans in bedrock gorges. Flow was constricted to 2 m by a semicircular obstruction. During the authors experiments (discharge = 600 L/sec; Froude number of constricted flow = 1) a zone of recirculating current extended 25-30 m downstream from the separation point at the constriction. The pattern and velocity of surface flow was determined using time-lapse photography; subsurface velocity was measured with a two-dimensional electromagnetic current meter. During 32-hr of run time, a fine, very coarse sand mixture was fed into the flow at a rate between 0.5-1 kg/sec. Oscillation ripples developed beneath the separation surface that bounds the recirculation zone, and upstream-migrating dunes and ripples developed within the recirculation zone upstream from the reattachment point. A mid-channel expansion bar was deposited downstream from the reattachment point. Sedimentation within the recirculation zone continued by vertical aggradation and by upstream migration of dunes and ripples. Sediments within the recirculation zone were areally sorted with the finest sediment deposited near the separation point. These patterns are consistent with field observations of bars along the Colorado River in the Grand Canyon.

  19. NGL recovery increase through natural gasoline recirculation

    SciTech Connect

    Rivas M., M.; Bracho, J.L.; Murray, J.

    1997-12-31

    Given that the gas being processed in the compression plants Tia Juana 2 (PCTJ-2) and Tia Juana 3 (PCTJ-3) of Lagoven, S.A., an operating affiliate of Petroleos de Venezuela, S.A. has become learner through time, current production of natural gas liquids (NGL) and plant efficiency are significantly lower, compared to design and first obtained values. In this sense and aimed at increasing propane production, an optimization study on condensate stream recirculation and absorber installation was carried out to affect the process equilibrium constants thereby obtaining deeper extraction. Recirculation streams options were recirculation of natural gasoline obtained from the downstream fractionation process and recirculation of a conditioned, unfractionated, deethanized condensate stream. From the study, the natural gasoline recirculation scheme was determined to be the most efficient NGL recovery process. Accordingly, Lagoven, S.A. has undertaken a project to carry out this optimization scheme in PCTJ-2 and PCTJ-3. Construction stages are currently underway with completion scheduled at the end of 1997.

  20. Hydroxyl time series and recirculation in turbulent nonpremixed swirling flames

    SciTech Connect

    Guttenfelder, Walter A.; Laurendeau, Normand M.; Ji, Jun; King, Galen B.; Gore, Jay P.; Renfro, Michael W.

    2006-10-15

    Time-series measurements of OH, as related to accompanying flow structures, are reported using picosecond time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence (PITLIF) and particle-imaging velocimetry (PIV) for turbulent, swirling, nonpremixed methane-air flames. The [OH] data portray a primary reaction zone surrounding the internal recirculation zone, with residual OH in the recirculation zone approaching chemical equilibrium. Modeling of the OH electronic quenching environment, when compared to fluorescence lifetime measurements, offers additional evidence that the reaction zone burns as a partially premixed flame. A time-series analysis affirms the presence of thin flamelet-like regions based on the relation between swirl-induced turbulence and fluctuations of [OH] in the reaction and recirculation zones. The OH integral time-scales are found to correspond qualitatively to local mean velocities. Furthermore, quantitative dependencies can be established with respect to axial position, Reynolds number, and global equivalence ratio. Given these relationships, the OH time-scales, and thus the primary reaction zone, appear to be dominated by convection-driven fluctuations. Surprisingly, the OH time-scales for these nominally swirling flames demonstrate significant similarities to previous PITLIF results in nonpremixed jet flames. (author)

  1. A high-efficient batch-recirculated photoreactor packed with immobilized TiO2-P25 nanoparticles onto glass beads for photocatalytic degradation of phenazopyridine as a pharmaceutical contaminant: artificial neural network modeling.

    PubMed

    Shargh, Mahdie; Behnajady, Mohammad A

    2016-01-01

    In this study, removal efficiency of phenazopyridine (PhP) as a model pharmaceutical contaminant was investigated in a batch-recirculated photoreactor packed with immobilized TiO2-P25 nanoparticles on glass beads. Influence of various operational parameters such as irradiation time, initial concentration of PhP, volume of solution, volumetric flow rate, pH and power of light source was investigated. Results indicated that removal percentage increases with the rise of irradiation time, volumetric flow rate and power of light source but decreases with the rise of initial concentration of PhP and volume of solution. Highest removal percentage was obtained in the natural pH of PhP solution (pH = 5.9). Results of mineralization studies also showed a decreasing trend of total organic carbon (TOC) and producing mineralization products such as NO3(-), NO2(-) and NH4(+). Modeling of the process using artificial neural network showed that the most effective parameters in the degradation of PhP were volume of solution and power of light source. The packed bed photoreactor with TiO2-P25 nanoparticles coated onto glass beads in consecutive repeats have the proper ability for PhP degradation. Therefore, this system can be a promising alternative for the removal of recalcitrant organic pollutants such as PhP from aqueous solutions.

  2. Sustainable grassland systems: a modelling perspective based on the North Wyke Farm Platform.

    PubMed

    Wu, L; Zhang, X; Griffith, B A; Misselbrook, T H

    2016-07-01

    The North Wyke Farm Platform (NWFP) provides data from the field- to the farm-scale, enabling the research community to address key issues in sustainable agriculture better and to test models that are capable of simulating soil, plant and animal processes involved in the systems. The tested models can then be used to simulate how agro-ecosystems will respond to changes in the environment and management. In this study, we used baseline datasets generated from the NWFP to validate the Soil-Plant-Atmosphere Continuum System (SPACSYS) model in relation to the dynamics of soil water content, water loss from runoff and forage biomass removal. The validated model, together with future climate scenarios for the 2020s, 2050s and 2080s (from the International Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Special Report on Emissions Scenarios (SRES): medium (A1B) and large (A1F1) emission scenarios), were used to simulate the long-term responses of the system with three contrasting treatments on the NWFP. Simulation results demonstrated that the SPACSYS model could estimate reliably the dynamics of soil water content, water loss from runoff and drainage, and cut biomass for a permanent sward. The treatments responded in different ways under the climate change scenarios. More carbon (C) is fixed and respired by the swards treated with an increased use of legumes, whereas less C was lost through soil respiration with the planned reseeding. The deep-rooting grass in the reseeding treatment reduced N losses through leaching, runoff and gaseous emissions, and water loss from runoff compared with the other two treatments.

  3. Water-quality modeling of Klamath Straits Drain recirculation, a Klamath River wetland, and 2011 conditions for the Link River to Keno Dam reach of the Klamath River, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sullivan, Annett B.; Sogutlugil, I. Ertugrul; Deas, Michael L.; Rounds, Stewart A.

    2014-01-01

    The upper Klamath River and adjacent Lost River are interconnected basins in south-central Oregon and northern California. Both basins have impaired water quality with Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs) in progress or approved. In cooperation with the Bureau of Reclamation, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and Watercourse Engineering, Inc., have conducted modeling and research to inform management of these basins for multiple purposes, including agriculture, endangered species protection, wildlife refuges, and adjacent and downstream water users. A water-quality and hydrodynamic model (CE-QUAL-W2) of the Link River to Keno Dam reach of the Klamath River for 2006–09 is one of the tools used in this work. The model can simulate stage, flow, water velocity, ice cover, water temperature, specific conductance, suspended sediment, nutrients, organic matter in bed sediment and the water column, three algal groups, three macrophyte groups, dissolved oxygen, and pH. This report documents two model scenarios and a test of the existing model applied to year 2011, which had exceptional water quality. The first scenario examined the water-quality effects of recirculating Klamath Straits Drain flows into the Ady Canal, to conserve water and to decrease flows from the Klamath Straits Drain to the Klamath River. The second scenario explicitly incorporated a 2.73×106 m2 (675 acre) off-channel connected wetland into the CE-QUAL-W2 framework, with the wetland operating from May 1 through October 31. The wetland represented a managed treatment feature to decrease organic matter loads and process nutrients. Finally, the summer of 2011 showed substantially higher dissolved-oxygen concentrations in the Link-Keno reach than in other recent years, so the Link-Keno model (originally developed for 2006–09) was run with 2011 data as a test of model parameters and rates and to develop insights regarding the reasons for the improved water-quality conditions.

  4. Whole-farm models to quantify greenhouse gas emissions and their potential use for linking climate change mitigation and adaptation in ruminant-based farming systems

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The farm level is the most appropriate scale for evaluating options for mitigating greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The farm represents the unit at which management decisions in livestock production are made and farm profit must be maintained for sustainable production. To date, a number of whole far...

  5. A Novel Wind Speed Forecasting Model for Wind Farms of Northwest China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jian-Zhou; Wang, Yun

    2017-01-01

    Wind resources are becoming increasingly significant due to their clean and renewable characteristics, and the integration of wind power into existing electricity systems is imminent. To maintain a stable power supply system that takes into account the stochastic nature of wind speed, accurate wind speed forecasting is pivotal. However, no single model can be applied to all cases. Recent studies show that wind speed forecasting errors are approximately 25% to 40% in Chinese wind farms. Presently, hybrid wind speed forecasting models are widely used and have been verified to perform better than conventional single forecasting models, not only in short-term wind speed forecasting but also in long-term forecasting. In this paper, a hybrid forecasting model is developed, the Similar Coefficient Sum (SCS) and Hermite Interpolation are exploited to process the original wind speed data, and the SVM model whose parameters are tuned by an artificial intelligence model is built to make forecast. The results of case studies show that the MAPE value of the hybrid model varies from 22.96% to 28.87 %, and the MAE value varies from 0.47 m/s to 1.30 m/s. Generally, Sign test, Wilcoxon's Signed-Rank test, and Morgan-Granger-Newbold test tell us that the proposed model is different from the compared models.

  6. Modeling and resonance issues of wind farm integration with related facts applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auddy, Soubhik

    shown that the performance of the TCSC is superior to SVC for damping SSR. These two FACTS devices are primarily employed for achieving other objectives, such as, power transfer improvement and are simultaneously utilized for damping SSR. This thesis also examines for the first time the potential for overvoltages due to ferroresonance and self-excitation while connecting large wind farms to EHV lines. A detailed analysis of the factors influencing self-excitation and ferroresonance has been performed. The impacts of different generator models on the overvoltage issues are examined. Different measures of alleviating these overvoltages are proposed which include line differential protection and wind turbine generator excitation system control. This study has been conducted using EMTDC/PSCAD for an upcoming large wind farm in Ontario. In an effort to validate a doubly fed induction generator (DFIG) model an additional study has been done to validate the DFIG model available in PSS/E from an extensive field validation study of Hydro One Network Inc. Keywords. Power system stability, Transient stability, Inter-area oscillations, Remote Signals, Wide Area Measurement (WAM), Subsynchronous Resonance (SSR), Flexible AC Transmission Systems (FACTS), Static VAR Compensator (SVC), Thyristor Controlled Series Capacitor (TCSC), Wind Farm, Wind Energy Conversion Systems (WECS), Wind Power Systems (WPS), Wind Turbine Generator (WTG), Self-excited induction generator (SEIG), Doubly Fed Induction Generator (DFIG), Ferroresonance, Self-excitation.

  7. Wake interaction and power production of variable height model wind farms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vested, M. H.; Hamilton, N.; Sørensen, J. N.; Cal, R. B.

    2014-06-01

    Understanding wake dynamics is an ongoing research topic in wind energy, since wakes have considerable effects on the power production when wind turbines are placed in a wind farm. Wind tunnel experiments have been conducted to study the wake to wake interaction in a model wind farm in tandem with measurements of the extracted power. The aim is to investigate how alternating mast height influences the interaction of the wakes and the power production. Via the use of stereo-particle image velocimetry, the flow field was obtained in the first and last rows of the wind turbine array as a basis of comparison. It was found that downstream of the exit row wind turbine, the power was increased by 25% in the case of a staggered height configuration. This is partly due to the fact that the taller turbines reach into a flow area with a softened velocity gradient. Another aspect is that the wake downstream of a tall wind turbine to some extent passes above the standard height wind turbine. Overall the experiments show that the velocity field downstream of the exit row changes considerably when the mast height is alternating.

  8. Using heterogeneity in the population structure of U.S. swine farms to compare transmission models for porcine epidemic diarrhoea.

    PubMed

    O'Dea, Eamon B; Snelson, Harry; Bansal, Shweta

    2016-03-07

    In 2013, U.S. swine producers were confronted with the disruptive emergence of porcine epidemic diarrhoea (PED). Movement of animals among farms is hypothesised to have played a role in the spread of PED among farms. Via this or other mechanisms, the rate of spread may also depend on the geographic density of farms and climate. To evaluate such effects on a large scale, we analyse state-level counts of outbreaks with variables describing the distribution of farm sizes and types, aggregate flows of animals among farms, and an index of climate. Our first main finding is that it is possible for a correlation analysis to be sensitive to transmission model parameters. This finding is based on a global sensitivity analysis of correlations on simulated data that included a biased and noisy observation model based on the available PED data. Our second main finding is that flows are significantly associated with the reports of PED outbreaks. This finding is based on correlations of pairwise relationships and regression modeling of total and weekly outbreak counts. These findings illustrate how variation in population structure may be employed along with observational data to improve understanding of disease spread.

  9. Using heterogeneity in the population structure of U.S. swine farms to compare transmission models for porcine epidemic diarrhoea

    PubMed Central

    O’Dea, Eamon B.; Snelson, Harry; Bansal, Shweta

    2016-01-01

    In 2013, U.S. swine producers were confronted with the disruptive emergence of porcine epidemic diarrhoea (PED). Movement of animals among farms is hypothesised to have played a role in the spread of PED among farms. Via this or other mechanisms, the rate of spread may also depend on the geographic density of farms and climate. To evaluate such effects on a large scale, we analyse state-level counts of outbreaks with variables describing the distribution of farm sizes and types, aggregate flows of animals among farms, and an index of climate. Our first main finding is that it is possible for a correlation analysis to be sensitive to transmission model parameters. This finding is based on a global sensitivity analysis of correlations on simulated data that included a biased and noisy observation model based on the available PED data. Our second main finding is that flows are significantly associated with the reports of PED outbreaks. This finding is based on correlations of pairwise relationships and regression modeling of total and weekly outbreak counts. These findings illustrate how variation in population structure may be employed along with observational data to improve understanding of disease spread. PMID:26947420

  10. Water use on nonirrigated pasture-based dairy farms: Combining detailed monitoring and modeling to set benchmarks.

    PubMed

    Higham, C D; Horne, D; Singh, R; Kuhn-Sherlock, B; Scarsbrook, M R

    2017-01-01

    Water use in intensively managed, confinement dairy systems has been widely studied, but few reports exist regarding water use on pasture-based dairy farms. The objective of this study was to quantify the seasonal pattern of water use to develop a prediction model of water use for pasture-based dairy farms. Stock drinking, milking parlor, and total water use was measured on 35 pasture-based, seasonal calving dairy farms in New Zealand over 2 yr. Average stock drinking water was 60 L/cow per day, with peak use in summer. We estimated that, on average, 26% of stock drinking water was lost through leakage from water-distribution systems. Average corrected stock drinking water (equivalent to voluntary water intake) was 36 L/cow per day, and peak water consumption was 72 L/cow per day in summer. Milking parlor water use increased sharply at the start of lactation (July) and plateaued (August) until summer (February), after which it decreased with decreasing milk production. Average milking parlor water use was 58 L/cow per day (between September and February). Water requirements were affected by parlor type, with rotary milking parlor water use greater than herringbone parlor water use. Regression models were developed to predict stock drinking and milking parlor water use. The models included a range of climate, farm, and milk production variables. The main drivers of stock drinking water use were maximum daily temperature, potential evapotranspiration, radiation, and yield of milk and milk components. The main drivers for milking parlor water use were average per cow milk production and milking frequency. These models of water use are similar to those used in confinement dairy systems, where milk yield is commonly used as a variable. The models presented fit the measured data more accurately than other published models and are easier to use on pasture-based dairy farms, as they do not include feed and variables that are difficult to measure on pasture-based farms.

  11. Understanding African Swine Fever infection dynamics in Sardinia using a spatially explicit transmission model in domestic pig farms.

    PubMed

    Mur, L; Sánchez-Vizcaíno, J M; Fernández-Carrión, E; Jurado, C; Rolesu, S; Feliziani, F; Laddomada, A; Martínez-López, B

    2017-03-13

    African swine fever virus (ASFV) has been endemic in Sardinia since 1978, resulting in severe losses for local pig producers and creating important problems for the island's veterinary authorities. This study used a spatially explicit stochastic transmission model followed by two regression models to investigate the dynamics of ASFV spread amongst domestic pig farms, to identify geographic areas at highest risk and determine the role of different susceptible pig populations (registered domestic pigs, non-registered domestic pigs [brado] and wild boar) in ASF occurrence. We simulated transmission within and between farms using an adapted version of the previously described model known as Be-FAST. Results from the model revealed a generally low diffusion of ASF in Sardinia, with only 24% of the simulations resulting in disease spread, and for each simulated outbreak on average only four farms and 66 pigs were affected. Overall, local spread (indirect transmission between farms within a 2 km radius through fomites) was the most common route of transmission, being responsible for 98.6% of secondary cases. The risk of ASF occurrence for each domestic pig farm was estimated from the spread model results and integrated in two regression models together with available data for brado and wild boar populations. There was a significant association between the density of all three populations (domestic pigs, brado, and wild boar) and ASF occurrence in Sardinia. The most significant risk factors were the high densities of brado (OR = 2.2) and wild boar (OR = 2.1). The results of both analyses demonstrated that ASF epidemiology and infection dynamics in Sardinia create a complex and multifactorial disease situation, where all susceptible populations play an important role. To stop ASF transmission in Sardinia, three main factors (improving biosecurity on domestic pig farms, eliminating brado practices and better management of wild boars) need to be addressed.

  12. Developing COMET-Farm and the DayCent Model for California Specialty Crops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steenwerth, K. L.; Barker, X. Z.; Carlson, M.; Killian, K.; Easter, M.; Swan, A.; Thompson, L.; Williams, S.; Paustian, K.

    2016-12-01

    Specialty crops are hugely important to the agricultural economy of California, which grows over 400 specialty crops and produces at least a third of the nations' vegetables and more than two thirds of its fruit and nut tree crops. Since the passage of AB32 Global Warming Solutions Act in 2006, the state has made strong investments in reducing greenhouse gas emissions and developing climate adaptation solutions. Most recently, Governor J. Brown (CA) has issued an executive order to establish reductions to 40% below 1990 levels. While agriculture in California is not regulated for greenhouse gas emissions under AB32, efforts are being made to develop tools to support practices that can enhance soil health and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. USDA-NRCS supports one such tool known as COMET-Farm, which is intended for future use with incentive programs and soil conservation plans managed by the agency. The underlying model that that simulates entity-scale greenhouse gas emissions in COMET-Farm is DayCent. Members of the California Climate Hub are collaborating with the Natural Resource Ecology Laboratory at Colorado State University in Fort Collins, CO to develop DayCent for 15 California specialty crops. These specialty crops include woody perennials like stone fruit like almonds and peaches, walnuts, citrus, wine grapes, raisins and table grapes. Annual specialty crops include cool season vegetables like lettuce and broccoli, tomatoes, and strawberries. DayCent has been parameterized for these crops using existing published and unpublished studies. Practice based information has also been gathered in consultation with growers. Aspects of the model have been developed for woody biomass production and competition between herbaceous vegetation and woody perennial crops. We will report on model performance for these crops and opportunities for model improvement.

  13. Changes in the Welfare of an Injured Working Farm Dog Assessed Using the Five Domains Model

    PubMed Central

    Littlewood, Katherine E.; Mellor, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Simple Summary The Five Domains Model is now increasingly used to assess the welfare status of a wide range of species in markedly different circumstances. Particular strengths are that the Model facilitates structured, systematic and comprehensive evaluations of animals’ negative and positive mental experiences, the overall balance of which underlies their welfare status or quality of life. Importantly, the Model also clarifies the specific internal and external factors that give rise to those experiences. The welfare evaluation published here is the first to use the most up-to-date version of the Model, and stands as a detailed example that may assist others undertaking such welfare evaluations in other species and contexts. Moreover, it is the first such evaluation of a companion animal. It employs a fictitious scenario involving a working farm dog before, during and after it sustains a serious hind leg injury requiring amputation and its subsequent rehoming as a pet. A wide range of negative and positive experiences are graded, interactions between them are revealed, and the balance between negative and positive states at different stages of the scenario is described. Such Model evaluations can highlight current practices that merit re-evaluation. More generally, when major welfare issues are identified, use of the Model could enhance expert witness participation in related prosecutions by highlighting scientifically supported connections between indicative physical/functional states and behaviours and their associated negative experiences in ill-treated animals. Five Domains Model evaluations can also facilitate quality of life assessments and end-of-life decisions. Abstract The present structured, systematic and comprehensive welfare evaluation of an injured working farm dog using the Five Domains Model is of interest in its own right. It is also an example for others wanting to apply the Model to welfare evaluations in different species and contexts. Six

  14. Impact hypothesis for offshore wind farms: Explanatory models for species distribution at extremely exposed rocky areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schläppy, Marie-Lise; Šaškov, Aleksej; Dahlgren, Thomas G.

    2014-07-01

    The increasing need for renewable and clean energy production is likely to result in a diversification of locations for the implementation of offshore wind farms which have been so far predominantly sited on soft substrata. In contrast, offshore wind turbines placed on rocky reefs in highly exposed areas are much less common and the impacts on local flora and fauna can only be hypothesized. On the Western coast of Norway, a rocky reef with a highly complex topography has been chosen to be the first full-scale offshore wind farm in the country. Underwater video analyses and multibeam bathymetry data with a generalized linear model were used opportunistically to investigate the influence of geomorphic explanatory variables on the occurrence of selected taxa (algae, sea urchins and sea stars) identified in the study area. Combining video observations and multibeam bathymetry in a generalized linear model revealed that the geomorphic descriptors: aspect, slope, rugosity, and benthic position indexes (BPI), were of significance for algae, sea urchins and sea stars at Havsul and served in showing their habitat preferences. Kelp occurred in areas of high rugosity, on gentle slopes, at elevated areas with a southerly orientation and on the sheltered side of rock or bedrock. Thus, construction disturbance that modify those variables may lead to a change in the area preferred by kelp. Turbines that shade southerly aspects may affect small kelp plants in reducing their available habitat. Sea urchins were more abundant on steep slopes and both sea stars and sea urchins showed a preference for a complex local relief (high rugosity) and heterogeneity in fine and broad elevation (shown by BPI). Thus, foundations and cable route preparation may significantly change the slope, rugosity of BPI broad, which will change the basis for sea urchin populations. It may likewise significantly change the rugosity or BPI (fine or broad), which may change the distribution of sea stars. The

  15. Small recirculating filters for nitrogen reduction.

    PubMed

    Piluk, R J; Byers, B R

    2001-09-01

    Concerned about the negative impacts of nitrogen loading from septic systems on the Chesapeake Bay watershed, Maryland's Anne Arundel County Health Department has pioneered the use of small recirculating sand filters to reduce nitrogen in effluent from residential septic systems. Recirculating sand filters can reduce the total nitrogen in septic-tank effluent by up to 70 percent. Years of experience and the county's participation in the National Onsite Demonstration Project have led to modifications that make the filters more acceptable to homeowners. Use of alternative media, changes in flow patterns, and homeowner education have increased acceptance by homeowners.

  16. Peach bottom recirculation piping replacement ALARA program

    SciTech Connect

    Englesson, G.A.; Hilsmeier, A.E.; Mann, B.J.

    1986-01-01

    In late 1983, Philadelphia Electric Company (PECo) began detailed planning to replace the recirculation, residual heat removal, and part of the reactor water cleanup piping of the Peach Bottom Unit 2 reactor. Included in this work was an estimate of the collective exposure expected during piping replacement. That initial estimate, 1945 man-rem, is compared with the actual collective dose incurred during the piping replacement program. Also included are the exposures incurred during two additional tasks (safe end replacement and recirculation pump disassembly and decontamination) not considered in the initial estimate.

  17. Optimizing wind farm layout via LES-calibrated geometric models inclusive of wind direction and atmospheric stability effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archer, Cristina; Ghaisas, Niranjan

    2015-04-01

    that can potentially block it. Based on blockage ratio and distance, an optimization procedure is proposed that explores many different layout variables and identifies, given actual wind direction and stability distributions, the optimal wind farm layout, i.e., the one with the highest wind energy production. The optimization procedure is applied to both the calibration wind farm (Lillgrund) and a test wind farm (Horns Rev) and a number of layouts more efficient than the existing ones are identified. The optimization procedure based on geometric models proposed here can be applied very quickly (within a few hours) to any proposed wind farm, once enough information on wind direction frequency and, if available, atmospheric stability frequency has been gathered and once the number of turbines and/or the areal extent of the wind farm have been identified.

  18. Wind tunnel measurements of the power output variability and unsteady loading in a micro wind farm model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bossuyt, Juliaan; Howland, Michael; Meneveau, Charles; Meyers, Johan

    2015-11-01

    To optimize wind farm layouts for a maximum power output and wind turbine lifetime, mean power output measurements in wind tunnel studies are not sufficient. Instead, detailed temporal information about the power output and unsteady loading from every single wind turbine in the wind farm is needed. A very small porous disc model with a realistic thrust coefficient of 0.75 - 0.85, was designed. The model is instrumented with a strain gage, allowing measurements of the thrust force, incoming velocity and power output with a frequency response up to the natural frequency of the model. This is shown by reproducing the -5/3 spectrum from the incoming flow. Thanks to its small size and compact instrumentation, the model allows wind tunnel studies of large wind turbine arrays with detailed temporal information from every wind turbine. Translating to field conditions with a length-scale ratio of 1:3,000 the frequencies studied from the data reach from 10-4 Hz up to about 6 .10-2 Hz. The model's capabilities are demonstrated with a large wind farm measurement consisting of close to 100 instrumented models. A high correlation is found between the power outputs of stream wise aligned wind turbines, which is in good agreement with results from prior LES simulations. Work supported by ERC (ActiveWindFarms, grant no. 306471) and by NSF (grants CBET-113380 and IIA-1243482, the WINDINSPIRE project).

  19. Integration of hydrodynamics into a statistical model on the spread of pancreas disease (PD) in salmon farming.

    PubMed

    Viljugrein, H; Staalstrøm, A; Molvaelr, J; Urke, H A; Jansen, P A

    2009-12-22

    Pancreas disease (PD) is an emerging disease in salmon farming caused by the salmonid alphavirus (SAV). SAV is evidently spread horizontally between neighbouring salmon farms, but whether such transmission occurs by passive drift in the water current or via fomites is not known. We tested whether hydrodynamic modelling contributes to explain the spread of PD, in which case SAV is likely to spread by passive drift. We present a simple logistic regression model that accounts for the effect of PD in the neighbourhood on the probability of acquiring PD in cohorts of farmed salmonids from an area on the west coast of Norway between 2005 and 2008. For a given cohort, we calculated infection pressure (IP) based on Euclidean distance, seaway distance or estimated water contact to sites with PD, and compared the amount of variance explained in the regression model by the different variants of IP. Water contact between a discharging farm site and a receiving site was calculated by simulating particle discharge using a hydrodynamic model. IP estimated by water contact was the best predictor of PD cases and controls in the model, which performed significantly better than IP estimated by seaway distance or Euclidean distance. Since the spread of PD in the study area was best explained by modelled water velocity, we conclude that PD is likely to be spread by passive drift of SAV in the water current.

  20. Simulations of an Offshore Wind Farm Using Large-Eddy Simulation and a Torque-Controlled Actuator Disc Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creech, Angus; Früh, Wolf-Gerrit; Maguire, A. Eoghan

    2015-05-01

    We present here a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation of Lillgrund offshore wind farm, which is located in the Øresund Strait between Sweden and Denmark. The simulation combines a dynamic representation of wind turbines embedded within a large-eddy simulation CFD solver and uses hr-adaptive meshing to increase or decrease mesh resolution where required. This allows the resolution of both large-scale flow structures around the wind farm, and the local flow conditions at individual turbines; consequently, the response of each turbine to local conditions can be modelled, as well as the resulting evolution of the turbine wakes. This paper provides a detailed description of the turbine model which simulates the interaction between the wind, the turbine rotors, and the turbine generators by calculating the forces on the rotor, the body forces on the air, and instantaneous power output. This model was used to investigate a selection of key wind speeds and directions, investigating cases where a row of turbines would be fully aligned with the wind or at specific angles to the wind. Results shown here include presentations of the spin-up of turbines, the observation of eddies moving through the turbine array, meandering turbine wakes, and an extensive wind farm wake several kilometres in length. The key measurement available for cross-validation with operational wind farm data is the power output from the individual turbines, where the effect of unsteady turbine wakes on the performance of downstream turbines was a main point of interest. The results from the simulations were compared to the performance measurements from the real wind farm to provide a firm quantitative validation of this methodology. Having achieved good agreement between the model results and actual wind farm measurements, the potential of the methodology to provide a tool for further investigations of engineering and atmospheric science problems is outlined.

  1. Fast All-Sky Radiation Model for Solar Applications (FARMS): A Brief Overview of Mechanisms, Performance, and Applications: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Yu; Sengupta, Manajit

    2016-06-01

    Solar radiation can be computed using radiative transfer models, such as the Rapid Radiation Transfer Model (RRTM) and its general circulation model applications, and used for various energy applications. Due to the complexity of computing radiation fields in aerosol and cloudy atmospheres, simulating solar radiation can be extremely time-consuming, but many approximations--e.g., the two-stream approach and the delta-M truncation scheme--can be utilized. To provide a new fast option for computing solar radiation, we developed the Fast All-sky Radiation Model for Solar applications (FARMS) by parameterizing the simulated diffuse horizontal irradiance and direct normal irradiance for cloudy conditions from the RRTM runs using a 16-stream discrete ordinates radiative transfer method. The solar irradiance at the surface was simulated by combining the cloud irradiance parameterizations with a fast clear-sky model, REST2. To understand the accuracy and efficiency of the newly developed fast model, we analyzed FARMS runs using cloud optical and microphysical properties retrieved using GOES data from 2009-2012. The global horizontal irradiance for cloudy conditions was simulated using FARMS and RRTM for global circulation modeling with a two-stream approximation and compared to measurements taken from the U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Southern Great Plains site. Our results indicate that the accuracy of FARMS is comparable to or better than the two-stream approach; however, FARMS is approximately 400 times more efficient because it does not explicitly solve the radiative transfer equation for each individual cloud condition. Radiative transfer model runs are computationally expensive, but this model is promising for broad applications in solar resource assessment and forecasting. It is currently being used in the National Solar Radiation Database, which is publicly available from the National Renewable Energy

  2. The economic efficiency of conservation measures for amphibians in organic farming--results from bio-economic modelling.

    PubMed

    Schuler, Johannes; Sattler, Claudia; Helmecke, Angela; Zander, Peter; Uthes, Sandra; Bachinger, Johann; Stein-Bachinger, Karin

    2013-01-15

    This paper presents a whole farm bio-economic modelling approach for the assessment and optimisation of amphibian conservation conditions applied at the example of a large scale organic farm in North-Eastern Germany. The assessment focuses mainly on the habitat quality as affected by conservation measures such as through specific adapted crop production activities (CPA) and in-field buffer strips for the European tree frog (Hyla arborea), considering also interrelations with other amphibian species (i.e. common spadefoot toad (Pelobates fuscus), fire-bellied toad (Bombina bombina)). The aim of the approach is to understand, analyse and optimize the relationships between the ecological and economic performance of an organic farming system, based on the expectation that amphibians are differently impacted by different CPAs. The modelling system consists of a set of different sub-models that generate a farm model on the basis of environmentally evaluated CPAs. A crop-rotation sub-model provides a set of agronomically sustainable crop rotations that ensures overall sufficient nitrogen supply and controls weed, pest and disease infestations. An economic sub-model calculates the gross margins for each possible CPA including costs of inputs such as labour and machinery. The conservation effects of the CPAs are assessed with an ecological sub-model evaluates the potential negative or positive effect that each work step of a CPA has on amphibians. A mathematical programming sub-model calculates the optimal farm organization taking into account the limited factors of the farm (e.g. labour, land) as well as ecological improvements. In sequential model runs, the habitat quality is to be improved by the model, while the highest possible gross margin is still to be achieved. The results indicate that the model can be used to show the scope of action that a farmer has to improve habitat quality by reducing damage to amphibian population on its land during agricultural activities

  3. Laboratory modelling of resonant wave-current interaction in the vicinity wind farm masts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunnoo, Hans; Abcha, Nizar; Garcia-Hermosa, Maria-Isabel; Ezersky, Alexander

    2015-04-01

    In the nearest future, by 2020, about 4% of electricity in Europe will be supplied by sea stations operating from renewable sources: ocean thermal energy, wave and tidal energy, wind farms. By now the wind stations located in the coastal zone, provide the most part of electricity in different European countries. Meanwhile, effects of wind farms on the environment are not sufficiently studied. We report results of laboratory simulations aimed at investigation of hydrodynamic fields arising in the vicinity of wind farm masts under the action of currents and surface waves. The main attention is paid to modeling the resonance effects when the amplitude of velocity pulsations in the vicinity of the masts under the joint action of currents and harmonic waves demonstrate significant growth. This resonance can lead to an increase in Reynolds stress on the bottom, intensification of sediment transport and sound generation. The experiments are performed in the 17 meters hydrodynamical channel of laboratory Morphodynamique Continentale et Côtière UMR CNRS 6143. Mast are modeled by vertical cylinder placed in a steady flow. Behind the cylinder turbulent Karman vortex street occurs. Results are obtained in interval of Reynolds numbers Re=103 - 104(Re=Ud/v, where U is the velocity of the flow, d is diameter of the cylinder, ν is cinematic viscosity). Harmonic surface waves of small amplitude propagating upstream are excited by computer controlled wave maker. In the absence of surface waves, turbulent Karman street with averaged frequency f is observed. It is revealed experimentally that harmonic surface waves with a frequencies closed to 2f can synchronize vortex shedding and increase the amplitude of velocity fluctuations in the wake of the cylinder. Map of regimes is found on the parameter plane amplitude of the surface wave - wave frequency. In order to distinguish the synchronization regimes, we defined phase of oscillations using the Hilbert transform technique. We

  4. Engineering systems designs for a recirculating heavy ion induction accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Newton, M.A.; Barnard, J.J.; Reginato, L.L.; Yu, S.S.

    1991-05-01

    Recirculating heavy ion induction accelerators are being investigated as possible drivers for heavy ion fusion. Part of this investigation has included the generation of a conceptual design for a recirculator system. This paper will describe the overall engineering conceptual design of this recirculator, including discussions of the dipole magnet system, the superconducting quadrupole system and the beam acceleration system. Major engineering issues, evaluation of feasibility, and cost tradeoffs of the complete recirculator system will be presented and discussed. 5 refs., 4 figs.

  5. Dermal exposure assessment to pesticides in farming systems in developing countries: comparison of models.

    PubMed

    Lesmes-Fabian, Camilo; Fabian, Camilo Lesmes; Binder, Claudia R

    2015-04-29

    In the field of occupational hygiene, researchers have been working on developing appropriate methods to estimate human exposure to pesticides in order to assess the risk and therefore to take the due decisions to improve the pesticide management process and reduce the health risks. This paper evaluates dermal exposure models to find the most appropriate. Eight models (i.e., COSHH, DERM, DREAM, EASE, PHED, RISKOFDERM, STOFFENMANAGER and PFAM) were evaluated according to a multi-criteria analysis and from these results five models (i.e., DERM, DREAM, PHED, RISKOFDERM and PFAM) were selected for the assessment of dermal exposure in the case study of the potato farming system in the Andean highlands of Vereda La Hoya, Colombia. The results show that the models provide different dermal exposure estimations which are not comparable. However, because of the simplicity of the algorithm and the specificity of the determinants, the DERM, DREAM and PFAM models were found to be the most appropriate although their estimations might be more accurate if specific determinants are included for the case studies in developing countries.

  6. Dermal Exposure Assessment to Pesticides in Farming Systems in Developing Countries: Comparison of Models

    PubMed Central

    Lesmes Fabian, Camilo; Binder, Claudia R.

    2015-01-01

    In the field of occupational hygiene, researchers have been working on developing appropriate methods to estimate human exposure to pesticides in order to assess the risk and therefore to take the due decisions to improve the pesticide management process and reduce the health risks. This paper evaluates dermal exposure models to find the most appropriate. Eight models (i.e., COSHH, DERM, DREAM, EASE, PHED, RISKOFDERM, STOFFENMANAGER and PFAM) were evaluated according to a multi-criteria analysis and from these results five models (i.e., DERM, DREAM, PHED, RISKOFDERM and PFAM) were selected for the assessment of dermal exposure in the case study of the potato farming system in the Andean highlands of Vereda La Hoya, Colombia. The results show that the models provide different dermal exposure estimations which are not comparable. However, because of the simplicity of the algorithm and the specificity of the determinants, the DERM, DREAM and PFAM models were found to be the most appropriate although their estimations might be more accurate if specific determinants are included for the case studies in developing countries. PMID:25938911

  7. Nitrogen removal in recirculated duckweed ponds system.

    PubMed

    Benjawan, L; Koottatep, T

    2007-01-01

    Duckweed-based ponds (DWBPs) have the potential for nitrogen (N) removal from wastewater; however, operational problems such as duckweed die-off regularly occur. In this study, effluent recirculation was applied to the DWBPs to solve the above problem as well as to investigate N removal mechanisms. Two pilot scale recirculated DWBPs were employed to treat municipal wastewater. The average removal efficiencies for TN, TKN and NH4-N were 75%, 89% and 92%, respectively at TN loading of 1.3 g/m2.d and were 73%, 74% and 76%, respectively at TN loading of 3.3 g/m2.d. The effluent of the system under both operational conditions had stable quality and met the effluent standard. Duckweed die-off was not observed during the study, which proves the system stability and effluent recirculation which is thought to be a reason. N-mass balance revealed that nitrification-denitrification and duckweed uptake play major roles in these recirculated DWBPs. The rates of nitrification-denitrification were increased as TN loading was higher, which might be an influence from an abundance of N and a suitable condition. The rates of N uptake by duckweed were found similar and did not depend on the higher TN loading applied, as the duckweed has limited capacity to assimilate it.

  8. Recirculating sprayer for fiber-filled paints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Major, R. K.

    1980-01-01

    Recirculating paint sprayer applies spray of coarse filler in highly volatile solvent. Sprayer was developed for applying insulation material containing epxoy resin, glass fibers, and inert fillers suspended in chlorinated solvents. Sprayer resists abrasive action of fiberglass filler and chemical activity of solvent. Pump and position ensure more uniform pressure at spray gun without backpressure regulator, which tended to clog in old sprayer.

  9. Recirculation as a Form of Conservation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Jeffrey J.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses nine forms of conservation practices: sustained yield, repair, careful use, greater efficiency, lower consumption, doing without, substitution, new resources, and recycling. Suggests recirculation (saving goods from discard and from being broken down in a new manufacturing stage) as a 10th form of conservation practice. (Author/JN)

  10. Production of cobia in recirculating systems

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Only limited information exists with respect to rearing juvenile cobia Rachycentron canadum to stocker and marketable sizes using recirculating aquaculture systems (RAS). To investigate this topic, two rearing trials were conducted using commercial scale RAS. In Trial 1, juvenile cobia (29 g) we...

  11. Offshore wind farms in the southwestern Baltic Sea: A model study of regional impacts on oxygen conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janßen, Holger; Schröder, Toni; Zettler, Michael L.; Pollehne, Falk

    2015-01-01

    Offshore wind farm piles are secondary hard substrate and hence an attractive colonization surface for many species. Especially in marine areas dominated by soft sediments, wind farms may lead to a significant increase in biomass by enlarging habitats from benthos layers into the pelagic column. A concomitant effect is the increase in oxygen consumption through respiration of living biomass and especially through degradation of dead biomass, mainly Mytilus edulis. This leads to impacts on the regional oxygen budget, and local anoxia in the direct vicinity of wind farm piles has been documented in scientific literature. The present study investigates the regional impact of multiple wind farms on oxygen concentration levels and on the appearance of hypoxia. A five-year data sampling with a steel cylinder and fouling plates delivered data for a 3D ecosystem model. The results show that wind farms do not lead to a significant decrease in oxygen on the mesoscale level. But additional anoxia may occur locally, which may lead to the release of hydrogen sulfide on microscale level and potential subsequent regional impacts.

  12. Validation of Individual-Based Markov-Like Stochastic Process Model of Insect Behavior and a "Virtual Farm" Concept for Enhancement of Site-Specific IPM.

    PubMed

    Lux, Slawomir A; Wnuk, Andrzej; Vogt, Heidrun; Belien, Tim; Spornberger, Andreas; Studnicki, Marcin

    2016-01-01

    The paper reports application of a Markov-like stochastic process agent-based model and a "virtual farm" concept for enhancement of site-specific Integrated Pest Management. Conceptually, the model represents a "bottom-up ethological" approach and emulates behavior of the "primary IPM actors"-large cohorts of individual insects-within seasonally changing mosaics of spatiotemporally complex faming landscape, under the challenge of the local IPM actions. Algorithms of the proprietary PESTonFARM model were adjusted to reflect behavior and ecology of R. cerasi. Model parametrization was based on compiled published information about R. cerasi and the results of auxiliary on-farm experiments. The experiments were conducted on sweet cherry farms located in Austria, Germany, and Belgium. For each farm, a customized model-module was prepared, reflecting its spatiotemporal features. Historical data about pest monitoring, IPM treatments and fruit infestation were used to specify the model assumptions and calibrate it further. Finally, for each of the farms, virtual IPM experiments were simulated and the model-generated results were compared with the results of the real experiments conducted on the same farms. Implications of the findings for broader applicability of the model and the "virtual farm" approach-were discussed.

  13. A Fast All-sky Radiation Model for Solar applications (FARMS): Algorithm and performance evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Yu; Sengupta, Manajit; Dudhia, Jimy

    2016-10-01

    Radiative transfer (RT) models simulating broadband solar radiation have been widely used by atmospheric scientists to model solar resources for various energy applications such as operational forecasting. Due to the complexity of solving the RT equation, the computation under cloudy conditions can be extremely time-consuming, though many approximations (e.g., two-stream approach and delta-M truncation scheme) have been utilized. Thus, a more efficient RT model is crucial for model developers as a new option for approximating solar radiation at the land surface with minimal loss of accuracy. In this study, we developed a fast all-sky radiation model for solar applications (FARMS) using the simplified clear-sky RT model, REST2, and simulated cloud transmittances and reflectances from the Rapid Radiation Transfer Model (RRTM) with a 16-stream Discrete Ordinates Radiative Transfer (DISORT). Simulated lookup tables (LUTs) of cloud transmittances and reflectances are created by varying cloud optical thicknesses, cloud particle sizes, and solar zenith angles. Equations with optimized parameters are fitted to the cloud transmittances and reflectances to develop the model. The all-sky solar irradiance at the land surface can then be computed rapidly by combining REST2 with the cloud transmittances and reflectances. This new RT model is more than 1,000 times faster than those currently utilized in solar resource assessment and forecasting because it does not explicitly solve the RT equation for each individual cloud condition. Our results indicate that the accuracy of the fast radiative transfer model is comparable to or better than two-stream approximation in term of computing cloud transmittance and solar radiation.

  14. 21 CFR 880.5045 - Medical recirculating air cleaner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Medical recirculating air cleaner. 880.5045... Therapeutic Devices § 880.5045 Medical recirculating air cleaner. (a) Identification. A medical recirculating air cleaner is a device used to remove particles from the air for medical purposes. The device...

  15. 21 CFR 880.5045 - Medical recirculating air cleaner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Medical recirculating air cleaner. 880.5045... Therapeutic Devices § 880.5045 Medical recirculating air cleaner. (a) Identification. A medical recirculating air cleaner is a device used to remove particles from the air for medical purposes. The device...

  16. 21 CFR 880.5045 - Medical recirculating air cleaner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Medical recirculating air cleaner. 880.5045... Therapeutic Devices § 880.5045 Medical recirculating air cleaner. (a) Identification. A medical recirculating air cleaner is a device used to remove particles from the air for medical purposes. The device...

  17. 21 CFR 880.5045 - Medical recirculating air cleaner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Medical recirculating air cleaner. 880.5045... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL HOSPITAL AND PERSONAL USE DEVICES General Hospital and Personal Use Therapeutic Devices § 880.5045 Medical recirculating air cleaner. (a) Identification. A medical recirculating...

  18. 21 CFR 880.5045 - Medical recirculating air cleaner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Medical recirculating air cleaner. 880.5045... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL HOSPITAL AND PERSONAL USE DEVICES General Hospital and Personal Use Therapeutic Devices § 880.5045 Medical recirculating air cleaner. (a) Identification. A medical recirculating...

  19. Application of a large-eddy simulation model to the analysis of flow conditions in offshore wind farms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinfeld, Gerald; Tambke, Jens; Peinke, Joachim; Heinemann, Detlev

    2010-05-01

    Flows in the atmospheric boundary layer over a sea surface are characterised by a lower ambient turbulence intensity than boundary layer flows over land surfaces. Thus, offshore the wake turbulence behind a wind turbine might have a stronger impact on subsequent wind turbines than onshore. Due to the lower ambient turbulence intensity and therefore reduced turbulent diffusion, offshore the velocity minimum behind a wind turbine can probably be detected over a longer distance than onshore. Moreover, as the meandering of the wake flow might be due to the ambient atmospheric turbulence, also the meandering of the wake flow offshore might be different. Maps, showing projected wind farms in the North Sea, reveal that also rather small distances between two adjacent wind farms will occur. Therefore, not only single wind turbines within a wind farm but also complete wind farms will affect each other. Up to now all these potential impacts are not taken into account satisfactory when wind farms are planned. Most of the models applied today for estmating the yield of offshore wind farms have been derived about twenty years ago based on measurements at comparatively small onshore, sometimes near-coast, but never offshore sites. Moreover, the models are based on measurements at much smaller wind turbines as those used today. Due to the monotone increase of the wind velocity with height observed in the atmosphere, today's wind turbines experience a much larger variation of the mean wind velocity than their predecessors twenty years ago - increasing the potential for a vertical asymmetry of the wake flow. The measurements carried out by the RAVE initiative at the German offshore test site "alpha ventus" will allow a validation and further development of models that estimate the flow conditions within a wind farm consisting of multi-MW wind turbines under the special conditions of the marine atmospheric boundary layer. ForWind at the University of Oldenburg supplements the data

  20. A Farm Transmission Model for Salmonella in Pigs, Applicable to E.U. Member States.

    PubMed

    Hill, Andrew A; Simons, Robin R L; Kelly, Louise; Snary, Emma L

    2016-03-01

    The burden of Salmonella entering pig slaughterhouses across the European Union is considered a primary food safety concern. To assist E.U. member states with the development of national control plans, we have developed a farm transmission model applicable to all member states. It is an individual-based stochastic susceptible-infected model that takes into account four different sources of infection of pigs (sows, feed, external contaminants such as rodents, and new stock) and various management practices linked to Salmonella transmission/protection (housing, flooring, feed, all-in-all-out production). A novel development within the model is the assessment of dynamic shedding rates. The results of the model, parameterized for two case study member states (one high and one low prevalence) suggest that breeding herd prevalence is a strong indicator of slaughter pig prevalence. Until a member state's' breeding herd prevalence is brought below 10%, the sow will be the dominant source of infection to pigs raised for meat production; below this level of breeding herd prevalence, feed becomes the dominant force of infection. © 2015 Society for Risk Analysis.

  1. Farm Living.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marcoux, Mary F.

    1990-01-01

    Described are activities using ants. Ant hunting, a list of books on the topic, information, and ant farming are included. The procedures for assembling and maintenance of an ant farm are presented. (KR)

  2. Assessing regional differences in nitrogen losses from U.S. dairy farms using the integrated farm systems model

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Nitrogen (N) enters and leaves a dairy production system through many pathways and in many forms: undergoing numerous transformations as it passes from feed to animal to milk or manure and back again. Due to the complexity of the dairy system, estimates of N flows and losses require the use of model...

  3. Development of a farm-firm modelling system for evaluation of herbaceous energy crops

    SciTech Connect

    English, B.C.; Alexander, R.R.; Loewen, K.H.; Coady, S.A.; Cole, G.V.; Goodman, W.R. . Dept. of Agricultural Economics and Rural Sociology)

    1992-01-01

    A complete analysis is performed to simulate biomass production incorporated into a realistic whole farm situation, including or replacing a typical crop mix. Representative farms are constructed to accommodate such simulation. Four management systems are simulated for each firm, with each simulation depicting a different crop mix and/or use of different farming technologies and production methods. The first simulation was a base farm plan in which the operator would maintain the historical crop mix for the area, participate in all price support programs, and not participate in either a conservative reserve or a biomass production program. In the second simulation, the operator would again maintain the historical crop mix, would not participate in a conservation reserve or biomass production program, and would be ineligible to participate in any price support system. The third simulation introduced the Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) and included participation in all price support programs. The fourth simulation introduced a biomass crop production enterprise (switchgrass) as an alternative to enrolling highly erodible cropland in the CRP and allowed participation in price support programs. Simulations were made for three farms, two in West Tennessee and on in South Georgia. Results indicate that erosion is likely to be reduced more by the diversion of cropland to permanent vegetative cover on farms similar to the more highly erodible West Tennessee farms than on the less erodible Tift County, Georgia farm. Equivalent reductions in erosion rates result from entering highly erodible cropland in the CRP and from production of switchgrass as a biomass energy crop. Both switchgrass and CRP farm plans result in decreased net returns from the base plan, although the biomass farm plans are, in general, more profitable than the CRP plans.

  4. Increasing the delivery of health care services to migrant farm worker families through a community partnership model.

    PubMed

    Connor, Ann; Rainer, Laura P; Simcox, Jordan B; Thomisee, Karen

    2007-01-01

    The Farm Worker Family Health Program (FWFHP) is a 13-year community partnership model designed to increase delivery of health care services for migrant farm worker families. During a yearly 2-week immersion experience, 90 students and faculty members provide health care services, including physical examinations, health screenings, health education, physical therapy, and dental care for 1,000 migrant farm workers and migrant children. Students and faculty members gain a deeper appreciation of the health and social issues that migrant farm worker families face by providing health care services in the places where migrant families live, work, and are educated. Although the model is not unique, it is significant because of its sustained history, interdisciplinary collaboration among community and academic partners, mutual trust and connections among the partners, and the way the program is tailored to meet the needs of the population served. The principles of social responsibility and leadership frame the FWFHP experience. This community partnership model can be replicated by others working with at-risk populations in low-resource settings.

  5. Evaluating conceptual modeling frameworks for farm scale groundwater pathogen transport associated with animal farming and municipal wastewater recharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, S. J.; Li, X.; Watanabe, N.; Atwill, R.; Puente, C. E.; Harter, T.

    2010-12-01

    Land applications to crops of diluted animal manure associated with concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) and field discharges from municipal wastewater treatment plants are potential pathways for the contamination of shallow domestic and agricultural wells by pathogenic microorganisms. Sampling of soil and groundwater for the indicator and pathogenic microorganisms; Enterococcus spp., Escherichia coli, Campylobacter spp. and Salmonella was undertaken at two CAFOs in the San Joaquin Valley, California between 2006 and 2009. Observed concentrations are highly variable in both magnitude and frequency of detection and indicated no clear relationship to field applications or seasonal effects. To investigate if the observed variability in microorganism concentrations in groundwater could be attributed to aquifer heterogeneity, we developed multiple conceptual frameworks employing nonpoint source loading functions and groundwater transport models to simulate a shallow agricultural monitoring well catchment. We developed both, homogenous and heterogeneous aquifer representations, the latter using stochastic transition probability Markov chain representation. Also, we developd homogeneous and spatio-temporally heterogeneous loading models. Model sensitivity to conceptual frameworks, transport parameters, and spatio-temporal variations in diffuse pathogen loading at the water table was determined by comparing simulated frequency of pathogen detection with measured monitoring well breakthrough curves. Model results indicate that field scale aquifer heterogeneity cannot fully account for the variation in concentrations observed in shallow monitoring wells and that microorganism loading at the water table must also be highly heterogeneous. A two dimensional Neyman-Scott cluster process was found to provide the best representation of heterogeneity in recharge concentration and is conceptually consistent with the presence of low attenuation transport pathways in the

  6. Bio-inspired robotic legs drive viscous recirculating flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takagi, Daisuke; Hayashi, Rintaro

    2015-11-01

    Crustaceans actuate multiple legs in a well-coordinated sequence to generate suitable flow for feeding and swimming. Inspired by tiny crustacean larvae operating at low Reynolds number, we study a scaled-up model in which slender rods oscillate independently in a bath of glycerol. Experiments reveal qualitatively different flow patterns depending on the phase and orientation of actuated rods. The observations are analyzed in the framework of slender-body theory for Stokes flow. This study shows that simple oscillatory motion of multiple legs can produce complex recirculating flows, with potential applications for mixing and pumping.

  7. Unstructured grid modelling of offshore wind farm impacts on seasonally stratified shelf seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cazenave, Pierre William; Torres, Ricardo; Allen, J. Icarus

    2016-06-01

    Shelf seas comprise approximately 7% of the world's oceans and host enormous economic activity. Development of energy installations (e.g. Offshore Wind Farms (OWFs), tidal turbines) in response to increased demand for renewable energy requires a careful analysis of potential impacts. Recent remote sensing observations have identified kilometre-scale impacts from OWFs. Existing modelling evaluating monopile impacts has fallen into two camps: small-scale models with individually resolved turbines looking at local effects; and large-scale analyses but with sub-grid scale turbine parameterisations. This work straddles both scales through a 3D unstructured grid model (FVCOM): wind turbine monopiles in the eastern Irish Sea are explicitly described in the grid whilst the overall grid domain covers the south-western UK shelf. Localised regions of decreased velocity extend up to 250 times the monopile diameter away from the monopile. Shelf-wide, the amplitude of the M2 tidal constituent increases by up to 7%. The turbines enhance localised vertical mixing which decreases seasonal stratification. The spatial extent of this extends well beyond the turbines into the surrounding seas. With significant expansion of OWFs on continental shelves, this work highlights the importance of how OWFs may impact coastal (e.g. increased flooding risk) and offshore (e.g. stratification and nutrient cycling) areas.

  8. Farm to Work: Development of a Modified Community-Supported Agriculture Model at Worksites, 2007–2012

    PubMed Central

    Horton, Karissa D.; Loyo, Jennifer; Jowers, Esbelle M.; Rodgers, Lindsay Faith; Smiley, Andrew W.; Leversen, Eric; Hoelscher, Deanna M.

    2015-01-01

    Background The Farm to Work program is a modified community-supported agriculture model at worksites in Texas. Community Context The objective of the Farm to Work program is to increase fruit and vegetable intake among employees and their households by decreasing cost, improving convenience, and increasing access while also creating a new market for local farmers at worksites. The objectives of this article were to describe the development, implementation, and outcome of a 5-year participation trend analysis and to describe the community relationships that were formed to enable the successful implementation of the program. Methods The Farm to Work program began in November 2007 as a collaborative effort between the nonprofit Sustainable Food Center, the Texas Department of State Health Services, the Web development company WebChronic Consulting LLC, and Naegelin Farm. The program provides a weekly or biweekly opportunity for employees to order a basket of produce online to be delivered to the worksite by a local farmer. A 5-year participation trend analysis, including seasonal variation and sales trends, was conducted using sales data from November 2007 through December 2012. Outcome The total number of baskets delivered from November 2007 through December 2012 was 38,343; of these, 37,466 were sold and 877 were complimentary. The total value of sold and complimentary baskets was $851,035 and $21,925, respectively. Participation in the program increased over time and was highest in 2012. Interpretation The Farm to Work program increased access to locally grown fruits and vegetables for employees and created a new market for farmers. Increased program participation indicates that Farm to Work can increase employees’ fruit and vegetable consumption and thus help prevent chronic diseases in this population PMID:26491816

  9. Farm to Work: Development of a Modified Community-Supported Agriculture Model at Worksites, 2007-2012.

    PubMed

    Thi, Christina A; Horton, Karissa D; Loyo, Jennifer; Jowers, Esbelle M; Rodgers, Lindsay Faith; Smiley, Andrew W; Leversen, Eric; Hoelscher, Deanna M

    2015-10-22

    The Farm to Work program is a modified community-supported agriculture model at worksites in Texas. The objective of the Farm to Work program is to increase fruit and vegetable intake among employees and their households by decreasing cost, improving convenience, and increasing access while also creating a new market for local farmers at worksites. The objectives of this article were to describe the development, implementation, and outcome of a 5-year participation trend analysis and to describe the community relationships that were formed to enable the successful implementation of the program. The Farm to Work program began in November 2007 as a collaborative effort between the nonprofit Sustainable Food Center, the Texas Department of State Health Services, the Web development company WebChronic Consulting LLC, and Naegelin Farm. The program provides a weekly or biweekly opportunity for employees to order a basket of produce online to be delivered to the worksite by a local farmer. A 5-year participation trend analysis, including seasonal variation and sales trends, was conducted using sales data from November 2007 through December 2012. The total number of baskets delivered from November 2007 through December 2012 was 38,343; of these, 37,466 were sold and 877 were complimentary. The total value of sold and complimentary baskets was $851,035 and $21,925, respectively. Participation in the program increased over time and was highest in 2012. The Farm to Work program increased access to locally grown fruits and vegetables for employees and created a new market for farmers. Increased program participation indicates that Farm to Work can increase employees' fruit and vegetable consumption and thus help prevent chronic diseases in this population.

  10. Modelling transmission dynamics of paratuberculosis of red deer under pastoral farming conditions.

    PubMed

    Heuer, C; Mitchell, R M; Schukken, Y H; Lu, Z; Verdugo, C; Wilson, P R

    2012-09-01

    This study aimed to develop a mathematical model describing the dynamics of paratuberculosis (PTB) in red deer (Cervus elaphus) under pastoral farming conditions in New Zealand. The model examined infectivity differences between ovine and bovine strains of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) and seasonality of MAP survival. We also evaluate variable use of pasture and the effect of management interventions on the infection prevalence and annual clinical incidence of PTB. A state-transition model was developed and calibrated to observed data on both prevalence of infection and incidence of clinical PTB. To accommodate specific PTB features for deer, the model included a fast and a slow track for progression of infection to disease. MAP on pasture was the source for horizontal transmission and infected dams for vertical transmission. In the presence of a single strain, an infectivity reduction of up to 80% allowed MAP to persist in the herd (R(0)>1). For mixed infection by two strains however, a 30% reduction in infectivity of one strain was sufficient to outcompete a strain with lower infectivity, suggesting that mixed infection of MAP strains with different infectivity may not be common in deer. The model showed that seasonal variation of MAP survival on pasture had little impact on transmission dynamics, and that rotational grazing with pasture spelling vs. permanent grazing of the same paddock reduced both infection prevalence and clinical PTB by about 50%. Based on model outputs, early detection of young deer in a high-shedding state was the most effective means of controlling PTB among the tested scenarios.

  11. Farm systems assessment of bioenergy feedstock production: Integrating bio-economic models and life cycle analysis approaches.

    PubMed

    Glithero, N J; Ramsden, S J; Wilson, P

    2012-06-01

    Climate change and energy security concerns have driven the development of policies that encourage bioenergy production. Meeting EU targets for the consumption of transport fuels from bioenergy by 2020 will require a large increase in the production of bioenergy feedstock. Initially an increase in 'first generation' biofuels was observed, however 'food competition' concerns have generated interest in second generation biofuels (SGBs). These SGBs can be produced from co-products (e.g. cereal straw) or energy crops (e.g. miscanthus), with the former largely negating food competition concerns. In order to assess the sustainability of feedstock supply for SGBs, the financial, environmental and energy costs and benefits of the farm system must be quantified. Previous research has captured financial costs and benefits through linear programming (LP) approaches, whilst environmental and energy metrics have been largely been undertaken within life cycle analysis (LCA) frameworks. Assessing aspects of the financial, environmental and energy sustainability of supplying co-product second generation biofuel (CPSGB) feedstocks at the farm level requires a framework that permits the trade-offs between these objectives to be quantified and understood. The development of a modelling framework for Managing Energy and Emissions Trade-Offs in Agriculture (MEETA Model) that combines bio-economic process modelling and LCA is presented together with input data parameters obtained from literature and industry sources. The MEETA model quantifies arable farm inputs and outputs in terms of financial, energy and emissions results. The model explicitly captures fertiliser: crop-yield relationships, plus the incorporation of straw or removal for sale, with associated nutrient impacts of incorporation/removal on the following crop in the rotation. Key results of crop-mix, machinery use, greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions per kg of crop product and energy use per hectare are in line with previous

  12. Farm systems assessment of bioenergy feedstock production: Integrating bio-economic models and life cycle analysis approaches

    PubMed Central

    Glithero, N.J.; Ramsden, S.J.; Wilson, P.

    2012-01-01

    Climate change and energy security concerns have driven the development of policies that encourage bioenergy production. Meeting EU targets for the consumption of transport fuels from bioenergy by 2020 will require a large increase in the production of bioenergy feedstock. Initially an increase in ‘first generation’ biofuels was observed, however ‘food competition’ concerns have generated interest in second generation biofuels (SGBs). These SGBs can be produced from co-products (e.g. cereal straw) or energy crops (e.g. miscanthus), with the former largely negating food competition concerns. In order to assess the sustainability of feedstock supply for SGBs, the financial, environmental and energy costs and benefits of the farm system must be quantified. Previous research has captured financial costs and benefits through linear programming (LP) approaches, whilst environmental and energy metrics have been largely been undertaken within life cycle analysis (LCA) frameworks. Assessing aspects of the financial, environmental and energy sustainability of supplying co-product second generation biofuel (CPSGB) feedstocks at the farm level requires a framework that permits the trade-offs between these objectives to be quantified and understood. The development of a modelling framework for Managing Energy and Emissions Trade-Offs in Agriculture (MEETA Model) that combines bio-economic process modelling and LCA is presented together with input data parameters obtained from literature and industry sources. The MEETA model quantifies arable farm inputs and outputs in terms of financial, energy and emissions results. The model explicitly captures fertiliser: crop-yield relationships, plus the incorporation of straw or removal for sale, with associated nutrient impacts of incorporation/removal on the following crop in the rotation. Key results of crop-mix, machinery use, greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions per kg of crop product and energy use per hectare are in line with

  13. A concentrated solar cavity absorber with direct heat transfer through recirculating metallic particles

    SciTech Connect

    Sarker, M. R. I. Saha, Manabendra E-mail: manab04me@gmail.com; Beg, R. A.

    2016-07-12

    A recirculating flow solar particle cavity absorber (receiver) is modeled to investigate the flow behavior and heat transfer characteristics of a novel developing concept. It features a continuous recirculating flow of non-reacting metallic particles (black silicon carbide) with air which are used as a thermal enhancement medium. The aim of the present study is to numerically investigate the thermal behavior and flow characteristics of the proposed concept. The proposed solar particle receiver is modeled using two phase discrete particle model (DPM), RNG k-flow model and discrete ordinate (DO) radiation model. Numerical analysis is carried out considering a solar receiver with only air and the mixture of non-reacting particles and air as a heat transfer as well as heat carrying medium. The parametric investigation is conducted considering the incident solar flux on the receiver aperture and changing air flow rate and recirculation rate inside the receiver. A stand-alone feature of the recirculating flow solar particle receiver concept is that the particles are directly exposed to concentrated solar radiation monotonously through recirculating flow inside the receiver and results in efficient irradiation absorption and convective heat transfer to air that help to achieve high temperature air and consequently increase in thermal efficiency. This paper presents, results from the developed concept and highlights its flow behavior and potential to enhance the heat transfer from metallic particles to air by maximizing heat carrying capacity of the heat transfer medium. The imposed milestones for the present system will be helpful to understand the radiation absorption mechanism of the particles in a recirculating flow based receiver, the thermal transport between the particles, the air and the cavity, and the fluid dynamics of the air and particle in the cavity.

  14. Heat and mass transfer in turbulent flows with several recirculated flow eddies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baake, E.; Nacke, B.; Jakovics, A.; Umbrashko, A.

    2001-06-01

    Numerical modeling of the concentration and temperature distribution in axial symmetrical systems with several recirculated flow eddies, which is based on various 2D stationary k-ɛ models and commercial codes, e.g. ANSYS and FLUENT, leads to results, which are significantly different from experimental data. Therefore additional user-defined subroutines were included in the commercial program code to improve the turbulent heat and mass transfer in the zone between the recirculated flow eddies. In addition transient 3D calculations were performed to investigate scientifically the flow dynamics. Figs 9, Refs 8.

  15. Early animal farming and zoonotic disease dynamics: modelling brucellosis transmission in Neolithic goat populations.

    PubMed

    Fournié, Guillaume; Pfeiffer, Dirk U; Bendrey, Robin

    2017-02-01

    Zoonotic pathogens are frequently hypothesized as emerging with the origins of farming, but evidence of this is elusive in the archaeological records. To explore the potential impact of animal domestication on zoonotic disease dynamics and human infection risk, we developed a model simulating the transmission of Brucella melitensis within early domestic goat populations. The model was informed by archaeological data describing goat populations in Neolithic settlements in the Fertile Crescent, and used to assess the potential of these populations to sustain the circulation of Brucella. Results show that the pathogen could have been sustained even at low levels of transmission within these domestic goat populations. This resulted from the creation of dense populations and major changes in demographic characteristics. The selective harvesting of young male goats, likely aimed at improving the efficiency of food production, modified the age and sex structure of these populations, increasing the transmission potential of the pathogen within these populations. Probable interactions between Neolithic settlements would have further promoted pathogen maintenance. By fostering conditions suitable for allowing domestic goats to become reservoirs of Brucella melitensis, the early stages of agricultural development were likely to promote the exposure of humans to this pathogen.

  16. Early animal farming and zoonotic disease dynamics: modelling brucellosis transmission in Neolithic goat populations

    PubMed Central

    Pfeiffer, Dirk U.; Bendrey, Robin

    2017-01-01

    Zoonotic pathogens are frequently hypothesized as emerging with the origins of farming, but evidence of this is elusive in the archaeological records. To explore the potential impact of animal domestication on zoonotic disease dynamics and human infection risk, we developed a model simulating the transmission of Brucella melitensis within early domestic goat populations. The model was informed by archaeological data describing goat populations in Neolithic settlements in the Fertile Crescent, and used to assess the potential of these populations to sustain the circulation of Brucella. Results show that the pathogen could have been sustained even at low levels of transmission within these domestic goat populations. This resulted from the creation of dense populations and major changes in demographic characteristics. The selective harvesting of young male goats, likely aimed at improving the efficiency of food production, modified the age and sex structure of these populations, increasing the transmission potential of the pathogen within these populations. Probable interactions between Neolithic settlements would have further promoted pathogen maintenance. By fostering conditions suitable for allowing domestic goats to become reservoirs of Brucella melitensis, the early stages of agricultural development were likely to promote the exposure of humans to this pathogen. PMID:28386446

  17. Farming in Prehistoric Europe: modelling the impact of the first agriculturists on the landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Beek, Rens; Feiken, Rik

    2013-04-01

    The meso-scale landscape dynamics model, CALEROS, has been developed to simulate the interactions between climate, soil production and erosion, vegetation and land use on geomorphological to human time scales in Mediterranean environments. In this study we re-evaluate the scenarios of Gregg (1988) to explore the options open to the first, Neolithic farmers in such an environment. Starting from a static model, we evaluate optimal farming strategies across a Mediterranean landscape gradient in and compare this to the outcome of Gregg's study for temperate Europe in order to reveal inter-regional and local differences and the sensitivity to the underlying assumptions. Subsequently, the impact of agriculture on the landscape is implemented and dynamically evaluated in terms of primary production and sediment yield. Thus, the stability of the first agricultural ecosystems is explored and the ultimate carrying capacity of the Neolithic landscape determined. Gregg, S.A. (1988): Foragers and Farmers: Population Interaction and Agricultural Expansion in Prehistoric Europe. In: Butzer & Freeman (Eds.), Prehistoric Archeology and Ecology Series. The University of Chicago Press, Chicago, pp. 275.

  18. Farm Animal Models of Organic Dust Exposure and Toxicity: Insights and Implications for Respiratory Health

    PubMed Central

    McClendon, Chakia J.; Gerald, Carresse L.; Waterman, Jenora T.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review Modern food animal production is a major contributor to the global economy, owing to advanced intensive indoor production facilities aimed at increasing market readiness and profit. Consequences of these advances are accumulation of dusts, gases and microbial products that diminish air quality within production facilities. Chronic inhalation exposure contributes to onset and exacerbation of respiratory symptoms and diseases in animals and workers. This article reviews literature regarding constituents of farm animal production facility dusts; animal responses to production building and organic dust exposure, and the effect of chronic inhalation exposure on pulmonary oxidative stress and inflammation. Recent findings –Porcine models of production facility and organic dust exposures reveal striking similarities to observations of human cells, tissues and clinical data. Oxidative stress plays a key role in mediating respiratory diseases in animals and humans, and enhancement of antioxidant levels through nutritional supplements can improve respiratory health. Summary – Pigs are well adapted to the exposures common to swine production buildings and thus serve as excellent models for facility workers. Insight for understanding mechanisms governing organic dust associated respiratory diseases may come from parallel comparisons between farmers and the animals they raise. PMID:25636160

  19. Simulation of between-farm transmission of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus in Ontario, Canada using the North American Animal Disease Spread Model.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Krishna K; Revie, Crawford W; Hurnik, Daniel; Poljak, Zvonimir; Sanchez, Javier

    2015-03-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS), a viral disease of swine, has major economic impacts on the swine industry. The North American Animal Disease Spread Model (NAADSM) is a spatial, stochastic, farm level state-transition modeling framework originally developed to simulate highly contagious and foreign livestock diseases. The objectives of this study were to develop a model to simulate between-farm spread of a homologous strain of PRRS virus in Ontario swine farms via direct (animal movement) and indirect (sharing of trucks between farms) contacts using the NAADSM and to compare the patterns and extent of outbreak under different simulated conditions. A total of 2552 swine farms in Ontario province were allocated to each census division of Ontario and geo-locations of the farms were randomly generated within the agriculture land of each Census Division. Contact rates among different production types were obtained using pig movement information from four regions in Canada. A total of 24 scenarios were developed involving various direct (movement of infected animals) and indirect (pig transportation trucks) contact parameters in combination with alternating the production type of the farm in which the infection was seeded. Outbreaks were simulated for one year with 1000 replications. The median number of farms infected, proportion of farms with multiple outbreaks and time to reach the peak epidemic were used to compare the size, progression and extent of outbreaks. Scenarios involving spread only by direct contact between farms resulted in outbreaks where the median percentage of infected farms ranged from 31.5 to 37% of all farms. In scenarios with both direct and indirect contact, the median percentage of infected farms increased to a range from 41.6 to 48.6%. Furthermore, scenarios with both direct and indirect contact resulted in a 44% increase in median epidemic size when compared to the direct contact scenarios. Incorporation of both animal

  20. Wind Farm Layout Optimization through a Crossover-Elitist Evolutionary Algorithm performed over a High Performing Analytical Wake Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirchner-Bossi, Nicolas; Porté-Agel, Fernando

    2017-04-01

    Wind turbine wakes can significantly disrupt the performance of further downstream turbines in a wind farm, thus seriously limiting the overall wind farm power output. Such effect makes the layout design of a wind farm to play a crucial role on the whole performance of the project. An accurate definition of the wake interactions added to a computationally compromised layout optimization strategy can result in an efficient resource when addressing the problem. This work presents a novel soft-computing approach to optimize the wind farm layout by minimizing the overall wake effects that the installed turbines exert on one another. An evolutionary algorithm with an elitist sub-optimization crossover routine and an unconstrained (continuous) turbine positioning set up is developed and tested over an 80-turbine offshore wind farm over the North Sea off Denmark (Horns Rev I). Within every generation of the evolution, the wind power output (cost function) is computed through a recently developed and validated analytical wake model with a Gaussian profile velocity deficit [1], which has shown to outperform the traditionally employed wake models through different LES simulations and wind tunnel experiments. Two schemes with slightly different perimeter constraint conditions (full or partial) are tested. Results show, compared to the baseline, gridded layout, a wind power output increase between 5.5% and 7.7%. In addition, it is observed that the electric cable length at the facilities is reduced by up to 21%. [1] Bastankhah, Majid, and Fernando Porté-Agel. "A new analytical model for wind-turbine wakes." Renewable Energy 70 (2014): 116-123.

  1. Field Scale Spatial Modelling of Surface Soil Quality Attributes in Controlled Traffic Farming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guenette, Kris; Hernandez-Ramirez, Guillermo

    2017-04-01

    The employment of controlled traffic farming (CTF) can yield improvements to soil quality attributes through the confinement of equipment traffic to tramlines with the field. There is a need to quantify and explain the spatial heterogeneity of soil quality attributes affected by CTF to further improve our understanding and modelling ability of field scale soil dynamics. Soil properties such as available nitrogen (AN), pH, soil total nitrogen (STN), soil organic carbon (SOC), bulk density, macroporosity, soil quality S-Index, plant available water capacity (PAWC) and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity (Km) were analysed and compared among trafficked and un-trafficked areas. We contrasted standard geostatistical methods such as ordinary kriging (OK) and covariate kriging (COK) as well as the hybrid method of regression kriging (ROK) to predict the spatial distribution of soil properties across two annual cropland sites actively employing CTF in Alberta, Canada. Field scale variability was quantified more accurately through the inclusion of covariates; however, the use of ROK was shown to improve model accuracy despite the regression model composition limiting the robustness of the ROK method. The exclusion of traffic from the un-trafficked areas displayed significant improvements to bulk density, macroporosity and Km while subsequently enhancing AN, STN and SOC. The ability of the regression models and the ROK method to account for spatial trends led to the highest goodness-of-fit and lowest error achieved for the soil physical properties, as the rigid traffic regime of CTF altered their spatial distribution at the field scale. Conversely, the COK method produced the most optimal predictions for the soil nutrient properties and Km. The use of terrain covariates derived from light ranging and detection (LiDAR), such as of elevation and topographic position index (TPI), yielded the best models in the COK method at the field scale.

  2. A simplified model for assessing the impact to groundwater of swine farms at regional level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massabo, Marco; Viterbo, Angelo

    2013-04-01

    Swine manure can be an excellent source of nutrients for crop production. Several swine farms are present in the territory of Regione Umbria and more than 200.000 of swine heads are present yearly in the whole territory while some municipalities host more than 30.000 heads over a relatively limited land. Municipality with elevated number of swine heads has registered particularly higher Nitrate concentration in groundwater that requires a management plan and intervention in order to determine the maximum allowed N loads in the specific region. Use of manure and fertilizers in agricultural field produce diffuse nitrogen (N) losses that are a major cause of excessive nitrate concentrations in ground and surface waters and have been of concern since decades. Excessive nitrate concentrations in groundwater can have toxic effects when used as drinking water and cause eutrophication in surface waters. For management and environmental planning purposes, it is necessary to assess the magnitude of diffuse N losses from agricultural fields and how they are influenced by factors such as management practices, type of fertilizers -organic or inorganic - climate and soil etc. There are several methods for assessing N leaching, they span from methods based on field test to complex models that require many input data. We use a simple index method that accounts for the type of fertilizer used - inorganic, swine or cattle manure- and hydrological and hydrogeological conditions. Hydrological conditions such as infiltration rates are estimated by a fully distributed hydrological model. Data on inorganic and organic fertilization are estimated at municipal level by using the nutrient crops needs and the statistics of swine and cattle heads within the municipality. The index method has been calibrated by using groundwater concentration as a proxy of N losses from agriculture. A time series of three years of data has been analyzed. The application of the simple index method allowed to

  3. Coupling the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model and Large Eddy Simulations with Actuator Disk Model: predictions of wind farm power production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia Cartagena, Edgardo Javier; Santoni, Christian; Ciri, Umberto; Iungo, Giacomo Valerio; Leonardi, Stefano

    2015-11-01

    A large-scale wind farm operating under realistic atmospheric conditions is studied by coupling a meso-scale and micro-scale models. For this purpose, the Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF) is coupled with an in-house LES solver for wind farms. The code is based on a finite difference scheme, with a Runge-Kutta, fractional step and the Actuator Disk Model. The WRF model has been configured using seven one-way nested domains where the child domain has a mesh size one third of its parent domain. A horizontal resolution of 70 m is used in the innermost domain. A section from the smallest and finest nested domain, 7.5 diameters upwind of the wind farm is used as inlet boundary condition for the LES code. The wind farm consists in six-turbines aligned with the mean wind direction and streamwise spacing of 10 rotor diameters, (D), and 2.75D in the spanwise direction. Three simulations were performed by varying the velocity fluctuations at the inlet: random perturbations, precursor simulation, and recycling perturbation method. Results are compared with a simulation on the same wind farm with an ideal uniform wind speed to assess the importance of the time varying incoming wind velocity. Numerical simulations were performed at TACC (Grant CTS070066). This work was supported by NSF, (Grant IIA-1243482 WINDINSPIRE).

  4. Anaerobic degradation of dairy wastewater in intermittent UASB reactors: influence of effluent recirculation.

    PubMed

    Couras, C S; Louros, V L; Gameiro, T; Alves, N; Silva, A; Capela, M I; Arroja, L M; Nadais, H

    2015-01-01

    This work studied the influence of effluent recirculation upon the kinetics of anaerobic degradation of dairy wastewater in the feedless phase of intermittent upflow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB) reactors. Several laboratory-scale tests were performed with different organic loads in closed circuit UASB reactors inoculated with adapted flocculent sludge. The data obtained were used for determination of specific substrate removal rates and specific methane production rates, and adjusted to kinetic models. A high initial substrate removal was observed in all tests due to adsorption of organic matter onto the anaerobic biomass which was not accompanied by biological substrate degradation as measured by methane production. Initial methane production rate was about 45% of initial soluble and colloidal substrate removal rate. This discrepancy between methane production rate and substrate removal rate was observed mainly on the first day of all experiments and was attenuated on the second day, suggesting that the feedless period of intermittent UASB reactors treating dairy wastewater should be longer than one day. Effluent recirculation expressively raised the rate of removal of soluble and colloidal substrate and methane productivity, as compared with results for similar assays in batch reactors without recirculation. The observed bed expansion was due to the biogas production and the application of effluent recirculation led to a sludge bed contraction after all the substrates were degraded. The settleability of the anaerobic sludge improved by the introduction of effluent recirculation this effect being more pronounced for the higher loads.

  5. PBPK modeling to unravel nonlinear pharmacokinetics of verapamil to estimate the fractional clearance for verapamil N-demethylation in the recirculating rat liver preparation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qi Joy; Si, Luqin; Tang, Hui; Sveigaard, Helle H; Chow, Edwin C Y; Pang, K Sandy

    2015-04-01

    We applied physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling to study the dose-dependent metabolism and excretion of verapamil and its preformed metabolite, norverapamil, to unravel the kinetics of norverapamil formation via N-demethylation. Various initial verapamil (1, 50, and 100 μM) and preformed norverapamil (1.5 and 5 μM) concentrations, perfused at 12 ml/min, were investigated in the perfused rat liver preparation. Perfusate and bile were collected over 90 minutes, and livers were harvested at the end of perfusion for high-performance liquid chromatography analysis. After correction for the adsorption of 10%-25% dose verapamil and norverapamil onto Tygon tubing and binding to albumin and red blood cell, fitting of verapamil and formed and preformed norverapamil data with ADAPT5 revealed nonlinearity for protein binding, N-demethylation (V(max,met1)(VER --> NOR) = 96.6 ± 33.4 nmol/min; K(m,met1)(VER --> NOR) = 10.4 ± 4.1 μM), formation of other metabolites (V(max,met2(VER -->others) 288 ± 51 nmol/min; K(m.met2)(VER -->others )= 14.1 ± 4.9 μM), as well as biliary excretion (V(max,sec)(VER)= 0.911 ± 0.505 nmol/min; K(m,sec)(VER) = 4.75 ± 2.29 μM). The hepatic clearance of verapamil (CL(L)(VER) decreased with the dose (8.16-10.2 ml/min), with values remaining high relative to perfusate blood flow rate among the doses. The hepatic clearance of preformed norverapamil (11 ml/min) remained unchanged for the concentrations studied and approximated perfusate blood flow rate, suggesting a high norverapamil extraction ratio. The fractional formation of norverapamil and biliary excretion of verapamil based on fitted constants were 31.1% and 0.64% of CL(L)(VER), respectively. Enantiomeric disposition and auto-inhibition of verapamil failed to perturb these estimaties according to PBPK modeling, due to the low values of the Michaelis-Menten constant, Km, and inhibition parameter, kI.

  6. High-power picosecond laser pulse recirculation.

    PubMed

    Shverdin, M Y; Jovanovic, I; Semenov, V A; Betts, S M; Brown, C; Gibson, D J; Shuttlesworth, R M; Hartemann, F V; Siders, C W; Barty, C P J

    2010-07-01

    We demonstrate a nonlinear crystal-based short pulse recirculation cavity for trapping the second harmonic of an incident high-power laser pulse. This scheme aims to increase the efficiency and flux of Compton-scattering-based light sources. We demonstrate up to 40x average power enhancement of frequency-doubled submillijoule picosecond pulses, and 17x average power enhancement of 177 mJ, 10 ps, 10 Hz pulses.

  7. Numerical computations of swirling recirculating flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, R.; Mongia, H. C.

    1980-01-01

    Swirling, recirculating, nonreacting flows were computed using a 2D elliptic program consisting of three tasks. The computations in Task 1 and 2 were made using an independent analysis for the two coaxial swirling flows. The Task 2 computations were made using the measured profiles of the mixing region. In Task 3, a modified 2D elliptic program was employed to include the effects of interaction between the inner and outer streams.

  8. High Power Picosecond Laser Pulse Recirculation

    SciTech Connect

    Shverdin, M Y; Jovanovic, I; Semenov, V A; Betts, S M; Brown, C; Gibson, D J; Shuttlesworth, R M; Hartemann, F V; Siders, C W; Barty, C P

    2010-04-12

    We demonstrate a nonlinear crystal-based short pulse recirculation cavity for trapping the second harmonic of an incident high power laser pulse. This scheme aims to increase the efficiency and flux of Compton-scattering based light sources. We demonstrate up to 36x average power enhancement of frequency doubled sub-millijoule picosecond pulses, and 17x average power enhancement of 177 mJ, 10 ps, 10 Hz pulses.

  9. Recirculating gas separator for electric submersible

    SciTech Connect

    Powers, M.L.

    1991-01-01

    This patent describes a gas separator apparatus for a submersible well pump. It comprises: a rotary gas separator means; and recirculating means for recirculating a portion of the liquid discharged from the discharge outlet back to the separating chamber so that a gas-to-liquid ratio in the separator means is substantially lower than a gas-to-liquid ratio of well fluid entering the well fluid inlet wherein the recirculating means. This patent also describes a method of pumping liquid from a well producing well fluids having a relatively high gas-to-liquid ratio. It comprises: centrifugally separating the well fluid into a liquid and a gas with a separator located downhole in the well; directing the separated liquid toward an inlet of a submersible well pump; recycling a portion of the separated liquid to the separator; and providing an effective gas-to-liquid ratio in the separator substantially lower than a gas-to-liquid ratio of the well fluid prior to separation.

  10. Linear microbunching analysis for recirculation machines

    DOE PAGES

    Tsai, C. -Y.; Douglas, D.; Li, R.; ...

    2016-11-28

    Microbunching instability (MBI) has been one of the most challenging issues in designs of magnetic chicanes for short-wavelength free-electron lasers or linear colliders, as well as those of transport lines for recirculating or energy-recovery-linac machines. To quantify MBI for a recirculating machine and for more systematic analyses, we have recently developed a linear Vlasov solver and incorporated relevant collective effects into the code, including the longitudinal space charge, coherent synchrotron radiation, and linac geometric impedances, with extension of the existing formulation to include beam acceleration. In our code, we semianalytically solve the linearized Vlasov equation for microbunching amplification factor formore » an arbitrary linear lattice. In this study we apply our code to beam line lattices of two comparative isochronous recirculation arcs and one arc lattice preceded by a linac section. The resultant microbunching gain functions and spectral responses are presented, with some results compared to particle tracking simulation by elegant (M. Borland, APS Light Source Note No. LS-287, 2002). These results demonstrate clearly the impact of arc lattice design on the microbunching development. Lastly, the underlying physics with inclusion of those collective effects is elucidated and the limitation of the existing formulation is also discussed.« less

  11. Linear microbunching analysis for recirculation machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, C.-Y.; Douglas, D.; Li, R.; Tennant, C.

    2016-11-01

    Microbunching instability (MBI) has been one of the most challenging issues in designs of magnetic chicanes for short-wavelength free-electron lasers or linear colliders, as well as those of transport lines for recirculating or energy-recovery-linac machines. To quantify MBI for a recirculating machine and for more systematic analyses, we have recently developed a linear Vlasov solver and incorporated relevant collective effects into the code, including the longitudinal space charge, coherent synchrotron radiation, and linac geometric impedances, with extension of the existing formulation to include beam acceleration. In our code, we semianalytically solve the linearized Vlasov equation for microbunching amplification factor for an arbitrary linear lattice. In this study we apply our code to beam line lattices of two comparative isochronous recirculation arcs and one arc lattice preceded by a linac section. The resultant microbunching gain functions and spectral responses are presented, with some results compared to particle tracking simulation by elegant (M. Borland, APS Light Source Note No. LS-287, 2002). These results demonstrate clearly the impact of arc lattice design on the microbunching development. The underlying physics with inclusion of those collective effects is elucidated and the limitation of the existing formulation is also discussed.

  12. A Simple Model to Rank Shellfish Farming Areas Based on the Risk of Disease Introduction and Spread.

    PubMed

    Thrush, M A; Pearce, F M; Gubbins, M J; Oidtmann, B C; Peeler, E J

    2016-03-09

    The European Union Council Directive 2006/88/EC requires that risk-based surveillance (RBS) for listed aquatic animal diseases is applied to all aquaculture production businesses. The principle behind this is the efficient use of resources directed towards high-risk farm categories, animal types and geographic areas. To achieve this requirement, fish and shellfish farms must be ranked according to their risk of disease introduction and spread. We present a method to risk rank shellfish farming areas based on the risk of disease introduction and spread and demonstrate how the approach was applied in 45 shellfish farming areas in England and Wales. Ten parameters were used to inform the risk model, which were grouped into four risk themes based on related pathways for transmission of pathogens: (i) live animal movement, (ii) transmission via water, (iii) short distance mechanical spread (birds) and (iv) long distance mechanical spread (vessels). Weights (informed by expert knowledge) were applied both to individual parameters and to risk themes for introduction and spread to reflect their relative importance. A spreadsheet model was developed to determine quantitative scores for the risk of pathogen introduction and risk of pathogen spread for each shellfish farming area. These scores were used to independently rank areas for risk of introduction and for risk of spread. Thresholds were set to establish risk categories (low, medium and high) for introduction and spread based on risk scores. Risk categories for introduction and spread for each area were combined to provide overall risk categories to inform a risk-based surveillance programme directed at the area level. Applying the combined risk category designation framework for risk of introduction and spread suggested by European Commission guidance for risk-based surveillance, 4, 10 and 31 areas were classified as high, medium and low risk, respectively.

  13. Medawar redux - an overview on the use of farm animal models to elucidate principles of reproductive immunology.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Peter J

    2010-10-01

    Farm animals have been important models for the development of reproductive immunology. Two of the major concepts underpinning reproductive immunology, the idea of the fetal allograft and progesterone's role in regulation of uterine immunity, were developed using the bovine as a model. This volume of the American Journal of Reproductive Immunology is composed of review articles that highlight the continued relevance of farm animals as models for research in mammalian biology. It is important that a diverse array of genotypes are used to elucidate biological principles relevant to mammalian biology and human health because the nature of mammalian evolution has resulted in a situation where the genome of the most commonly used animal model, the laboratory mouse, is less similar to the human than other species like the cow. Moreover, the evolution of placental function has been accompanied by formation of new genes during recent evolution so that orthologs do not exist in any but closely related species. Given the infrastructure needs to study farm animal species, optimal utilization of these animals as models for biomedical research will require significant increases in funding to reverse a historical erosion of resources devoted to animal agricultural research.

  14. Development of an advanced actuator disk model for Large-Eddy Simulation of wind farms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moens, Maud; Duponcheel, Matthieu; Winckelmans, Gregoire; Chatelain, Philippe

    2015-11-01

    This work aims at improving the fidelity of the wind turbine modelling for Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) of wind farms, in order to accurately predict the loads, the production, and the wake dynamics. In those simulations, the wind turbines are accounted for through actuator disks. i.e. a body-force term acting over the regularised disk swept by the rotor. These forces are computed using the Blade Element theory to estimate the normal and tangential components (based on the local simulated flow and the blade characteristics). The local velocities are modified using the Glauert tip-loss factor in order to account for the finite number of blades; the computation of this correction is here improved thanks to a local estimation of the effective upstream velocity at every point of the disk. These advanced actuator disks are implemented in a 4th order finite difference LES solver and are compared to a classical Blade Element Momentum method and to high fidelity wake simulations performed using a Vortex Particle-Mesh method in uniform and turbulent flows.

  15. Climate change impact of biochar cook stoves in western Kenyan farm households: system dynamics model analysis.

    PubMed

    Whitman, Thea; Nicholson, Charles F; Torres, Dorisel; Lehmann, Johannes

    2011-04-15

    Cook stoves that produce biochar as well as heat for cooking could help mitigate indoor air pollution from cooking fires and could enhance local soils, while their potential reductions in carbon (C) emissions and increases in soil C sequestration could offer access to C market financing. We use system dynamics modeling to (i) investigate the climate change impact of prototype and refined biochar-producing pyrolytic cook stoves and improved combustion cook stoves in comparison to conventional cook stoves; (ii) assess the relative sensitivity of the stoves' climate change impacts to key parameters; and (iii) quantify the effects of different climate change impact accounting decisions. Simulated reductions in mean greenhouse gas (GHG) impact from a traditional, 3-stone cook stove baseline are 3.50 tCO(2)e/household/year for the improved combustion stove and 3.69-4.33 tCO(2)e/household/year for the pyrolytic stoves, of which biochar directly accounts for 26-42%. The magnitude of these reductions is about 2-5 times more sensitive to baseline wood fuel use and the fraction of nonrenewable biomass (fNRB) of off-farm wood that is used as fuel than to soil fertility improvement or stability of biochar. Improved cookstoves with higher wood demand are less sensitive to changes in baseline fuel use and rely on biochar for a greater proportion of their reductions.

  16. Extent of flow recirculation governs expression of atherosclerotic and thrombotic biomarkers in arterial bifurcations

    PubMed Central

    Martorell, Jordi; Santomá, Pablo; Kolandaivelu, Kumaran; Kolachalama, Vijaya B.; Melgar-Lesmes, Pedro; Molins, José J.; Garcia, Lawrence; Edelman, Elazer R.; Balcells, Mercedes

    2014-01-01

    Aims Atherogenesis, evolution of plaque, and outcomes following endovascular intervention depend heavily on the unique vascular architecture of each individual. Patient-specific, multiscale models able to correlate changes in microscopic cellular responses with relevant macroscopic flow, and structural conditions may help understand the progression of occlusive arterial disease, providing insights into how to mitigate adverse responses in specific settings and individuals. Methods and results Vascular architectures mimicking coronary and carotid bifurcations were derived from clinical imaging and used to generate conjoint computational meshes for in silico analysis and biocompatible scaffolds for in vitro models. In parallel with three-dimensional flow simulations, geometrically realistic scaffolds were seeded with human smooth muscle cells (SMC) or endothelial cells and exposed to relevant, physiological flows. In vitro surrogates of endothelial health, atherosclerotic progression, and thrombosis were locally quantified and correlated best with an quantified extent of flow recirculation occurring within the bifurcation models. Oxidized low-density lipoprotein uptake, monocyte adhesion, and tissue factor expression locally rose up to three-fold, and phosphorylated endothelial nitric oxide synthase and Krüppel-like factor 2 decreased up to two-fold in recirculation areas. Isolated testing in straight-tube idealized constructs subject to static, oscillatory, and pulsatile conditions, indicative of different recirculant conditions corroborated these flow-mediated dependencies. Conclusions Flow drives variations in vascular reactivity and vascular beds. Endothelial health was preserved by arterial flow but jeopardized in regions of flow recirculation in a quasi-linear manner. Similarly, SMC exposed to flow were more thrombogenic in large recirculating regions. Health, thrombosis, and atherosclerosis biomarkers correlate with the extent of recirculation in vascular

  17. In situ treatment of VOCs by recirculation technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, O.F.; Siegrist, R.L.; Ally, M.R.; Sanford, W.E.; Kearl, P.M.; Zutman, J.L.

    1994-06-01

    Confronted with contaminated land from the world wars and the postwar industrialization period, German researchers and practicing professionals have worked to develop processes for effective environmental restoration. This presentation documents efforts by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) researchers to (1) identify collaborators and German technologies exhibiting near-term potential for clean-up of volatile organic contaminated soil and groundwater at Department of Energy sites, (2) critically assess performance, and (3) inform interested agencies. The project was limited to identification and preliminary evaluation and included engineering computations, groundwater flow modeling, and treatment process modeling. Two processes were identified: (1) the vacuum vaporizer well/groundwater recirculation well and (2) the porous pipe/horizontal well (PP/HW). Both technologies induce a recirculation flow field in the aquifer and enable simultaneous down hole treatment of the aquifer and vadose zone. University of Karlsruhe researchers have demonstrated the UVB/GZB technology in shallow aquifers with moderately high saturated thickness and hydraulic conductivities. The PP/HW technology offers potential for VOC treatment in sites with thin aquifers or heterogeneities. This paper describes identified German technologies and includes critical evaluations of well performance, associated treatment processes, operating variables, and aquifer-well interactions.

  18. Vortex formation and recirculation zones in left anterior descending artery stenoses: computational fluid dynamics analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katritsis, D. G.; Theodorakakos, A.; Pantos, I.; Andriotis, A.; Efstathopoulos, E. P.; Siontis, G.; Karcanias, N.; Redwood, S.; Gavaises, M.

    2010-03-01

    Flow patterns may affect the potential of thrombus formation following plaque rupture. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) were employed to assess hemodynamic conditions, and particularly flow recirculation and vortex formation in reconstructed arterial models associated with ST-elevation myocardial infraction (STEMI) or stable coronary stenosis (SCS) in the left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD). Results indicate that in the arterial models associated with STEMI, a 50% diameter stenosis immediately before or after a bifurcation creates a recirculation zone and vortex formation at the orifice of the bifurcation branch, for most of the cardiac cycle, thus allowing the creation of stagnating flow. These flow patterns are not seen in the SCS model with an identical stenosis. Post-stenotic recirculation in the presence of a 90% stenosis was evident at both the STEMI and SCS models. The presence of 90% diameter stenosis resulted in flow reduction in the LAD of 51.5% and 35.9% in the STEMI models and 37.6% in the SCS model, for a 10 mmHg pressure drop. CFD simulations in a reconstructed model of stenotic LAD segments indicate that specific anatomic characteristics create zones of vortices and flow recirculation that promote thrombus formation and potentially myocardial infarction.

  19. Generation of Flat Optical Frequency Comb based on Mach-Zehnder Modulator and Recirculating Frequency Shifter Loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shibao; Li, Yulong; Fei, Yue; Hu, Faze

    2014-06-01

    We propose a novel scheme to generate optical frequency comb by using Mach-Zehnder modulator and recirculating frequency shifter loop based on IQ modulator driven by radio frequency clock signals. A system of 4 flat and stable comb lines generation based on Mach-Zehnder modulator is set as the seed light source of the recirculating loop. Through theorical analysis and simulation it is shown that the proposed theoretical model is proved in good agreement with simulation results.

  20. Interaction of Particles with Recirculating Flow Regions inside Cavities of Inertial Microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haddadi, Hamed; di Carlo, Dino

    2015-11-01

    Confined inertial flow over cavities of a microfluidic device leads to formation of recirculating flow regions, i.e flow cells, inside cavities which can entrap particles from the free stream. Besides its significance as a fundamental problem in fluid mechanics of mixtures, understanding particle interaction with recirculating flow regions inside cavities is important in biomedical applications, such as Circulating Tumor Cell (CTC) separation and platelet deposition in arterial stenosis. In the present work, a lattice-Boltzmann model with resolved particle-corner interaction combined with microfluidic experiments enabled improved understanding of the particle exchange within flow cells in confined inertial flow. Formation of a limit cycle trajectory, observed in experiments and numerical simulations, is a key feature in particle accumulation. By varying the dimensions of the cavity and channel Reynolds number, The length and location of the limit cycle trajectory also varies, altering of the rate of particle exchange and level of accumulation with recirculating zones inside cavities.

  1. Hybrid heat exchange for the compression capture of CO2 from recirculated flue gas

    SciTech Connect

    Oryshchyn, Danylo B.; Ochs, Thomas L.; Summers, Cathy A.

    2004-01-01

    An approach proposed for removal of CO2 from flue gas cools and compresses a portion of a recirculated flue-gas stream, condensing its volatile materials for capture. Recirculating the flue gas concentrates SOx, H2O and CO2 while dramatically reducing N2 and NOx, enabling this approach, which uses readily available industrial components. A hybrid system of indirect and direct-contact heat exchange performs heat and mass transfer for pollutant removal and energy recovery. Computer modeling and experimentation combine to investigate the thermodynamics, heat and mass transfer, chemistry and engineering design of this integrated pollutant removal (IPR) system.

  2. Contribution of seawater recirculation to submarine groundwater discharge and related nutrient fluxes in two tropical bays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vautier, Camille; Dulaiova, Henrietta

    2017-04-01

    Hawaiian coastal waters suffer from excess terrestrial nutrient loading, most of which comes from submarine groundwater discharge (SGD). This study quantifies and distinguishes the role of the fresh terrestrial and tidally pumped salt water components of SGD into the nearshore zone of two reefs on the island of Oahu: Maunalua Bay and Kāneohe Bay. The two components of SGD are characterized using isotopic techniques, and the study mainly focuses on the less understood recirculation component. A two-step approach is implemented: first, a conceptual model of groundwater circulation is established; second, nutrient fluxes associated with seawater recirculation are quantified. Groundwater circulation through the beach berm is quantified and characterized using 222Rn and 224Ra activity measurements. Nutrient fluxes are obtained by coupling nutrient concentration measurements and discharge estimates. The isotopic signatures inform us about the influence of the tidal cycle on groundwater circulation. 222Rn, 224Ra, and δ18O isotopes are used to derive apparent ages of the infiltrated seawater and allow us to quantify recirculation rates. The method is also complemented with the use of silicate concentration as tracers of the recirculation process. The trends in apparent ages observed in pore water in Maunalua match previously published conceptual groundwater circulation models and show a sequentially aging pore water circulation loop. However, the ages obtained in Kāneohe suggest a different tidal pumping dynamic that lacks a circulation loop, perhaps resulting from the absence of freshwater discharge. Derived nutrient fluxes show that the autochthonous production of inorganic nitrogen and phosphorus that occurs during seawater recirculation has a significant impact on nutrient cycles in the nearshore areas of the bays. This result suggests that seawater recirculation should be taken into account in biogeochemical studies of coastal areas.

  3. Performance assessment of nitrate leaching models for highly vulnerable soils used in low-input farming based on lysimeter data.

    PubMed

    Groenendijk, Piet; Heinen, Marius; Klammler, Gernot; Fank, Johann; Kupfersberger, Hans; Pisinaras, Vassilios; Gemitzi, Alexandra; Peña-Haro, Salvador; García-Prats, Alberto; Pulido-Velazquez, Manuel; Perego, Alessia; Acutis, Marco; Trevisan, Marco

    2014-11-15

    The agricultural sector faces the challenge of ensuring food security without an excessive burden on the environment. Simulation models provide excellent instruments for researchers to gain more insight into relevant processes and best agricultural practices and provide tools for planners for decision making support. The extent to which models are capable of reliable extrapolation and prediction is important for exploring new farming systems or assessing the impacts of future land and climate changes. A performance assessment was conducted by testing six detailed state-of-the-art models for simulation of nitrate leaching (ARMOSA, COUPMODEL, DAISY, EPIC, SIMWASER/STOTRASIM, SWAP/ANIMO) for lysimeter data of the Wagna experimental field station in Eastern Austria, where the soil is highly vulnerable to nitrate leaching. Three consecutive phases were distinguished to gain insight in the predictive power of the models: 1) a blind test for 2005-2008 in which only soil hydraulic characteristics, meteorological data and information about the agricultural management were accessible; 2) a calibration for the same period in which essential information on field observations was additionally available to the modellers; and 3) a validation for 2009-2011 with the corresponding type of data available as for the blind test. A set of statistical metrics (mean absolute error, root mean squared error, index of agreement, model efficiency, root relative squared error, Pearson's linear correlation coefficient) was applied for testing the results and comparing the models. None of the models performed good for all of the statistical metrics. Models designed for nitrate leaching in high-input farming systems had difficulties in accurately predicting leaching in low-input farming systems that are strongly influenced by the retention of nitrogen in catch crops and nitrogen fixation by legumes. An accurate calibration does not guarantee a good predictive power of the model. Nevertheless all

  4. Model for ranking freshwater fish farms according to their risk of infection and illustration for viral haemorrhagic septicaemia.

    PubMed

    Oidtmann, Birgit C; Pearce, Fiona M; Thrush, Mark A; Peeler, Edmund J; Ceolin, Chiara; Stärk, Katharina D C; Dalla Pozza, Manuela; Afonso, Ana; Diserens, Nicolas; Reese, R Allan; Cameron, Angus

    2014-08-01

    We developed a model to calculate a quantitative risk score for individual aquaculture sites. The score indicates the risk of the site being infected with a specific fish pathogen (viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV); infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus, Koi herpes virus), and is intended to be used for risk ranking sites to support surveillance for demonstration of zone or member state freedom from these pathogens. The inputs to the model include a range of quantitative and qualitative estimates of risk factors organised into five risk themes (1) Live fish and egg movements; (2) Exposure via water; (3) On-site processing; (4) Short-distance mechanical transmission; (5) Distance-independent mechanical transmission. The calculated risk score for an individual aquaculture site is a value between zero and one and is intended to indicate the risk of a site relative to the risk of other sites (thereby allowing ranking). The model was applied to evaluate 76 rainbow trout farms in 3 countries (42 from England, 32 from Italy and 2 from Switzerland) with the aim to establish their risk of being infected with VHSV. Risk scores for farms in England and Italy showed great variation, clearly enabling ranking. Scores ranged from 0.002 to 0.254 (mean score 0.080) in England and 0.011 to 0.778 (mean of 0.130) for Italy, reflecting the diversity of infection status of farms in these countries. Requirements for broader application of the model are discussed. Cost efficient farm data collection is important to realise the benefits from a risk-based approach. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Modelling overbank flow on farmed catchments taking into account spatial hydrological discontinuities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moussa, R.; Tilma, M.; Chahinian, N.; Huttel, O.

    2003-04-01

    In agricultural catchments, hydrological processes are largely variable in space due to human impact causing hydrological discontinuities such as ditch network, field limits and terraces. The ditch network accelerates runoff by concentrating flows, drains the water table or replenishes it by reinfiltration of the runoff water. During extreme flood events, overbank flow occurs and surface pathflows are modified. The purpose of this study is to assess the influence of overbank flow on hydrograph shape during flood events. For that, MHYDAS, a physically based distributed hydrological model, was especially developed to take into account these hydrological discontinuities. The model considers the catchment as a series of interconnected hydrological unit. Runoff from each unit is estimated using a deterministic model based on the pounding-time algorithm and then routed through the ditch network using the diffusive wave equation. Overbank flow is modelled by modifying links between the hydrological units and the ditch network. The model was applied to simulate the main hydrological processes on a small headwater farmed Mediterranean catchment located in Southern France. The basic hydrometeorological equipment consists of a meteorological station, rain gauges, a tensio-neutronic and a piezometric measurement network, and eight water flow measurements. A multi-criteria and multi-scale approach was used. Three independent error criteria (Nash, error on volume and error on peak flow) were calculated and combined using the Pareto technique. Then, a multi-scale approach was used to calibrate and validate the model for the eight water flow measurements. The application of MHYDAS on the extreme ten flood events of the last decade enables to identify the ditches where overbank flows occur and to calculate discharge at various points of the ditch network. Results show that for the extreme flood event, more than 45% of surface runoff occur due to overbank flow. Discussion shows that

  6. Mixing and recirculation in two-layer exchange flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    StenströM, Petter

    2003-08-01

    Mixing and recirculation due to interfacial friction in two-layer exchange flows through topographic constrictions are investigated using a nonhydrostatic, three-dimensional numerical model. The simulated exchange flows are always lower than what inviscid hydraulic theory predicts; the reduction is greater for a contraction than for a sill, with intermediate values for sill-contraction combinations. A large fraction of a tracer flux in one layer is lost to the other layer from an inflow section at the entrance of the contraction (foot of the sill) up to the throat of the contraction (sill crest). For a contraction this fraction is about equal for the two layers, whereas for a sill the loss from the upper to the lower layer is about 6 times as high as the loss from the lower to the upper layer. Sill-contraction combinations show similar behavior to a contraction toward the dense reservoir and to a sill toward the light reservoir. The variation in recirculation fractions over a tidal cycle is small for flow over a sill, but greater for flow through a contraction. The peak rate of loss from a layer occurs when the flow in the other layer has its maximum, i.e., at maximum negative barotropic flow for the lower layer and at maximum positive barotropic flow for the upper layer.

  7. Interactive method for computation of viscous flow with recirculation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandeis, J.; Rom, J.

    1981-01-01

    An interactive method is proposed for the solution of two-dimensional, laminar flow fields with identifiable regions of recirculation, such as the shear-layer-driven cavity flow. The method treats the flow field as composed of two regions, with an appropriate mathematical model adopted for each region. The shear layer is computed by the compressible boundary layer equations, and the slowly recirculating flow by the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. The flow field is solved iteratively by matching the local solutions in the two regions. For this purpose a new matching method utilizing an overlap between the two computational regions is developed, and shown to be most satisfactory. Matching of the two velocity components, as well as the change in velocity with respect to depth is amply accomplished using the present approach, and the stagnation points corresponding to separation and reattachment of the dividing streamline are computed as part of the interactive solution. The interactive method is applied to the test problem of a shear layer driven cavity. The computational results are used to show the validity and applicability of the present approach.

  8. Vortical Structures in Wall-Bounded Turbulent Flow with Recirculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imran Shah, Syed

    2011-12-01

    Hairpin or horse-shoe vortices are a widely-accepted feature of the wall-bounded flows. These vortical structures have mostly been studied in canonical flows. Relatively few studies have been conducted on the characteristics of the vortical structures in wall-bounded flows with adverse pressure gradient and still fewer on the detached flows with recirculation. In the present contribution, vortices have been educed using a DNS database of incompressible flow over a 2-dimensional surface bump in a converging-diverging channel at a Reynolds number Reτ of 617, based on the friction velocity at inlet. Vortices have been educed from the instantaneous velocity field in streamwise/wall-normal and spanwise/wall-normal planes using the signed swirling strength criterion. Vortex validation is done through a fit of the vortex velocity field to the Oseen vortex model. The effects of a strong adverse pressure gradient and flow reciruclation on the population density and sizes of the streamwise and spanwise-oriented vortices have been studied. It has been found that a strong adverse pressure gradient and flow recirculation leads to the generation of a new near-wall peak of small spanwise prograde vortex population. Furthermore, this peak of vortex density has been found to coincide and hence relate to the outward movement of the peak of streamwise rms velocity fluctuations typical of adverse pressure gradient wall-bounded turbulent flows.

  9. Interactive method for computation of viscous flow with recirculation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandeis, J.; Rom, J.

    1981-01-01

    An interactive method is proposed for the solution of two-dimensional, laminar flow fields with identifiable regions of recirculation, such as the shear-layer-driven cavity flow. The method treats the flow field as composed of two regions, with an appropriate mathematical model adopted for each region. The shear layer is computed by the compressible boundary layer equations, and the slowly recirculating flow by the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. The flow field is solved iteratively by matching the local solutions in the two regions. For this purpose a new matching method utilizing an overlap between the two computational regions is developed, and shown to be most satisfactory. Matching of the two velocity components, as well as the change in velocity with respect to depth is amply accomplished using the present approach, and the stagnation points corresponding to separation and reattachment of the dividing streamline are computed as part of the interactive solution. The interactive method is applied to the test problem of a shear layer driven cavity. The computational results are used to show the validity and applicability of the present approach.

  10. Exhaust gas recirculation system for an internal combustion engine

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Ko-Jen

    2013-05-21

    An exhaust gas recirculation system for an internal combustion engine comprises an exhaust driven turbocharger having a low pressure turbine outlet in fluid communication with an exhaust gas conduit. The turbocharger also includes a low pressure compressor intake and a high pressure compressor outlet in communication with an intake air conduit. An exhaust gas recirculation conduit fluidly communicates with the exhaust gas conduit to divert a portion of exhaust gas to a low pressure exhaust gas recirculation branch extending between the exhaust gas recirculation conduit and an engine intake system for delivery of exhaust gas thereto. A high pressure exhaust gas recirculation branch extends between the exhaust gas recirculation conduit and the compressor intake and delivers exhaust gas to the compressor for mixing with a compressed intake charge for delivery to the intake system.

  11. CFD Study of the Performance of an Operational Wind Farm and its Impact on the Local Climate: CFD sensitivity to forestry modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wylie, Scott; Watson, Simon

    2013-04-01

    Any past, current or projected future wind farm developments are highly dependent on localised climatic conditions. For example the mean wind speed, one of the main factors in assessing the economic feasibility of a wind farm, can vary significantly over length scales no greater than the size of a typical wind farm. Any additional heterogeneity at a potential site, such as forestry, can affect the wind resource further not accounting for the additional difficulty of installation. If a wind farm is sited in an environmentally sensitive area then the ability to predict the wind farm performance and possible impacts on the important localised climatic conditions are of increased importance. Siting of wind farms in environmentally sensitive areas is not uncommon, such as areas of peat-land as in this example. Areas of peat-land are important sinks for carbon in the atmosphere but their ability to sequester carbon is highly dependent on the local climatic conditions. An operational wind farm's impact on such an area was investigated using CFD. Validation of the model outputs were carried out using field measurements from three automatic weather stations (AWS) located throughout the site. The study focuses on validation of both wind speed and turbulence measurement, whilst also assessing the models ability to predict wind farm performance. The use of CFD to model the variation in wind speed over heterogeneous terrain, including wind turbines effects, is increasing in popularity. Encouraging results have increased confidence in the ability of CFD performance in complex terrain with features such as steep slopes and forests, which are not well modelled by the widely used linear models such as WAsP and MS-Micro. Using concurrent measurements from three stationary AWS across the wind farm will allow detailed validation of the model predicted flow characteristics, whilst aggregated power output information will allow an assessment of how accurate the model setup can predict

  12. Exhaust gas recirculation in a homogeneous charge compression ignition engine

    DOEpatents

    Duffy, Kevin P [Metamora, IL; Kieser, Andrew J [Morton, IL; Rodman, Anthony [Chillicothe, IL; Liechty, Michael P [Chillicothe, IL; Hergart, Carl-Anders [Peoria, IL; Hardy, William L [Peoria, IL

    2008-05-27

    A homogeneous charge compression ignition engine operates by injecting liquid fuel directly in a combustion chamber, and mixing the fuel with recirculated exhaust and fresh air through an auto ignition condition of the fuel. The engine includes at least one turbocharger for extracting energy from the engine exhaust and using that energy to boost intake pressure of recirculated exhaust gas and fresh air. Elevated proportions of exhaust gas recirculated to the engine are attained by throttling the fresh air inlet supply. These elevated exhaust gas recirculation rates allow the HCCI engine to be operated at higher speeds and loads rendering the HCCI engine a more viable alternative to a conventional diesel engine.

  13. Wind-Farm Forecasting Using the HARMONIE Weather Forecast Model and Bayes Model Averaging for Bias Removal.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Enda; McKinstry, Alastair; Ralph, Adam

    2015-04-01

    Building on previous work presented at EGU 2013 (http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1876610213016068 ), more results are available now from a different wind-farm in complex terrain in southwest Ireland. The basic approach is to interpolate wind-speed forecasts from an operational weather forecast model (i.e., HARMONIE in the case of Ireland) to the precise location of each wind-turbine, and then use Bayes Model Averaging (BMA; with statistical information collected from a prior training-period of e.g., 25 days) to remove systematic biases. Bias-corrected wind-speed forecasts (and associated power-generation forecasts) are then provided twice daily (at 5am and 5pm) out to 30 hours, with each forecast validation fed back to BMA for future learning. 30-hr forecasts from the operational Met Éireann HARMONIE model at 2.5km resolution have been validated against turbine SCADA observations since Jan. 2014. An extra high-resolution (0.5km grid-spacing) HARMONIE configuration has been run since Nov. 2014 as an extra member of the forecast "ensemble". A new version of HARMONIE with extra filters designed to stabilize high-resolution configurations has been run since Jan. 2015. Measures of forecast skill and forecast errors will be provided, and the contributions made by the various physical and computational enhancements to HARMONIE will be quantified.

  14. Risk factors and geospatial modelling for the presence of Fasciola hepatica infection in sheep and goat farms in the Greek temperate Mediterranean environment.

    PubMed

    Kantzoura, V; Kouam, M K; Demiris, N; Feidas, H; Theodoropoulos, G

    2011-06-01

    Risk factors related to herd and farmer status, farm and pasture management, and environmental factors derived by satellite data were examined for their association with the prevalence of F. hepatica in sheep and goat farms in Thessaly, Greece. Twelve farms (16.2%) and 58 farms (78.4%) of 74 had evidence of infection using coproantigen and serology respectively. The average normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) of farm location for 12 months before sampling was the most significant environmental risk factor for F. hepatica infection based on high seropositivity. The risk of infection increased by 1% when the value of NDVI increased by 0.01 degree. A geospatial map was constructed to show the relative risk (RR) of Fasciola infection in sheep and goat farms in Thessaly. In addition, geospatial maps of the model-based predicted RR for the presence of Fasciola infection in farms in Thessaly and the entire area of Greece were constructed from the developed model based on NDVI. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that Thessaly should be regarded as an endemic region for Fasciola infection and it represents the first prediction model of Fasciola infection in small ruminants in the Mediterranean basin.

  15. In-tank recirculating arsenic treatment system

    DOEpatents

    Brady, Patrick V [Albuquerque, NM; Dwyer, Brian P [Albuquerque, NM; Krumhansl, James L [Albuquerque, NM; Chwirka, Joseph D [Tijeras, NM

    2009-04-07

    A low-cost, water treatment system and method for reducing arsenic contamination in small community water storage tanks. Arsenic is removed by using a submersible pump, sitting at the bottom of the tank, which continuously recirculates (at a low flow rate) arsenic-contaminated water through an attached and enclosed filter bed containing arsenic-sorbing media. The pump and treatment column can be either placed inside the tank (In-Tank) by manually-lowering through an access hole, or attached to the outside of the tank (Out-of-Tank), for easy replacement of the sorption media.

  16. Recirculating Linear Accelerators for Future Muon Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    S.A. Bogacz, K.B.Beard, R.P. Johnson

    2010-05-01

    Neutrino Factories (NF) and Muon Colliders (MC) require rapid acceleration of short-lived muons to multi-GeV and TeV energies. A Recirculating Linear Accelerator (RLA) that uses superconducting RF structures can provide exceptionally fast and economical acceleration to the extent that the focusing range of the RLA quadrupoles allows each muon to pass several times through each high-gradient cavity. A new concept of rapidly changing the strength of the RLA focusing quadrupoles as the muons gain energy is being developed to increase the number of passes that each muon will make in the RF cavities, leading to greater cost effectiveness.

  17. Measurement of unsteady loading and power output variability in a micro wind farm model in a wind tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bossuyt, Juliaan; Howland, Michael F.; Meneveau, Charles; Meyers, Johan

    2017-01-01

    Unsteady loading and spatiotemporal characteristics of power output are measured in a wind tunnel experiment of a microscale wind farm model with 100 porous disk models. The model wind farm is placed in a scaled turbulent boundary layer, and six different layouts, varied from aligned to staggered, are considered. The measurements are done by making use of a specially designed small-scale porous disk model, instrumented with strain gages. The frequency response of the measurements goes up to the natural frequency of the model, which corresponds to a reduced frequency of 0.6 when normalized by the diameter and the mean hub height velocity. The equivalent range of timescales, scaled to field-scale values, is 15 s and longer. The accuracy and limitations of the acquisition technique are documented and verified with hot-wire measurements. The spatiotemporal measurement capabilities of the experimental setup are used to study the cross-correlation in the power output of various porous disk models of wind turbines. A significant correlation is confirmed between streamwise aligned models, while staggered models show an anti-correlation.

  18. An approach to holistically assess (dairy) farm eco-efficiency by combining Life Cycle Analysis with Data Envelopment Analysis models and methodologies.

    PubMed

    Soteriades, A D; Faverdin, P; Moreau, S; Charroin, T; Blanchard, M; Stott, A W

    2016-11-01

    Eco-efficiency is a useful guide to dairy farm sustainability analysis aimed at increasing output (physical or value added) and minimizing environmental impacts (EIs). Widely used partial eco-efficiency ratios (EIs per some functional unit, e.g. kg milk) can be problematic because (i) substitution possibilities between EIs are ignored, (ii) multiple ratios can complicate decision making and (iii) EIs are not usually associated with just the functional unit in the ratio's denominator. The objective of this study was to demonstrate a 'global' eco-efficiency modelling framework dealing with issues (i) to (iii) by combining Life Cycle Analysis (LCA) data and the multiple-input, multiple-output production efficiency method Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA). With DEA each dairy farm's outputs and LCA-derived EIs are aggregated into a single, relative, bounded, dimensionless eco-efficiency score, thus overcoming issues (i) to (iii). A novelty of this study is that a model providing a number of additional desirable properties was employed, known as the Range Adjusted Measure (RAM) of inefficiency. These properties altogether make RAM advantageous over other DEA models and are as follows. First, RAM is able to simultaneously minimize EIs and maximize outputs. Second, it indicates which EIs and/or outputs contribute the most to a farm's eco-inefficiency. Third it can be used to rank farms in terms of eco-efficiency scores. Thus, non-parametric rank tests can be employed to test for significant differences in terms of eco-efficiency score ranks between different farm groups. An additional DEA methodology was employed to 'correct' the farms' eco-efficiency scores for inefficiencies attributed to managerial factors. By removing managerial inefficiencies it was possible to detect differences in eco-efficiency between farms solely attributed to uncontrollable factors such as region. Such analysis is lacking in previous dairy studies combining LCA with DEA. RAM and the 'corrective

  19. Non-premixed conditions in the flameholding recirculation region behind a step in supersonic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thakur, Amit

    Flameholding in supersonic flow depends on local conditions in the recirculation region, and on mass transfer into and out of this region. Large gradients in local gas composition and temperature exist in the recirculation region. Hence, stability parameter correlations developed for premixed flames cannot be used to determine blowout stability limits for non-premixed flames encountered in practical devices. In the present study, mixture samples were extracted at different locations in the recirculation region and the shear layer formed behind a rearward-facing step in supersonic flow, and analyzed by mass spectrometry to determine the species concentration distribution in the region. The point-wise mass spectrometer measurements were complemented by acetone planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) measurements to get a planar distribution of fuel mole fraction in the recirculation region. Non-reacting flow tests and combustion experiments were performed by varying various fuel related parameters such as injection location, injection pressure and fuel type. Fuel injection upstream of the step was not effective in supplying enough fuel to the recirculation region and did not sustain the flame in combustion experiments. Fuel injection at the step base was effective in sustaining the flame. For base injection, the local fuel mole fraction in the recirculation region determined from experiments was an order of magnitude higher than the global fuel mole fraction based on total moles of air flowing through the test section and total fuel injected in the test section. This suggests substantial difference in flame stability curve for non-premixed conditions in the scramjet engine compared to premixed flow. For base injection, fuel remained in the recirculation region even at higher injection pressure. Due to slower diffusion rate, the heavier fuel had higher local mole fraction in the recirculation region compared to lighter fuel for a unit global fuel mole fraction

  20. Farm-system modeling to evaluate environmental losses, profitability, and best management practice cost-effectiveness

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    To meet Chesapeake Bay Total Maximum Daily Load requirements for agricultural pollution, conservation districts and farmers are tasked with implementing best management practices (BMPs) that reduce farm losses of nutrients and sediment. The importance of the agricultural industry to the regional eco...

  1. A model to estimate hydrological processes and water budget in an irrigation farm pond

    Treesearch

    Ying Ouyang; Joel O. Paz; Gary Feng; John J. Read; Ardeshir Adeli; Johnie N. Jenkins

    2017-01-01

    With increased interest to conserve groundwater resources without reducing crop yield potential, more on-farm water storage ponds have been constructed in recent years in USA and around the world. However, the hydrological processes, water budget, and environmental benefits and consequences of these ponds have not yet been fully quantified. This study developed a...

  2. Computation of recirculating compressible flow in axisymmetric geometries

    SciTech Connect

    Isaac, K.M.; Nejad, A.S.

    1985-01-01

    A computational study of compressible, turbulent, recirculating flow in axisymmetric geometries is reported in this paper. The SIMPLE algorithm was used in the differencing scheme and the k-epsilon model for turbulence was used for turbulence closure. Special attention was given to the specification of the boundary conditions. The study revealed the significant influence of the boundary conditions on the solution. The eddy length scale at the inlet to the solution domain was the most uncertain parameter in the specification of the boundary conditions. The predictions were compared with the recent data based on laser velocimetry. The two are seen to be in good agreement. The present study underscores the need to have a more reliable means of specifying the inlet boundary conditions for the k-epsilon turbulence model.

  3. Energy stability in recirculating, energy-recovering linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Merminga, L.; Bisognano, J.J.; Delayen, J.R.

    1996-07-01

    Recirculating, energy-recovering linacs can be used as driver accelerators for high power FELs. Instabilities which arise from fluctuations of the cavity fields are investigated. Energy changes can cause beam loss on apertures, or, when coupled to M{sub 56}, phase oscillations. Both effects change the beam induced voltage in the cavities and can lead to unstable variations of the accelerating field. Stability analysis for small perturbations from equilibrium is performed and threshold currents are determined. Furthermore, the analytical model is extended to include amplitude and phase feedback, with the transfer function in the feedback path presently modeled as a low-pass filter. The feedback gain and bandwidth required for stability are calculated for the high power UV FEL proposed for construction at CEBAF. 4 refs.

  4. High speed exhaust gas recirculation valve

    SciTech Connect

    Fensom, Rod; Kidder, David J.

    2005-01-18

    In order to minimize pollutants such as Nox, internal combustion engines typically include an exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) valve that can be used to redirect a portion of exhaust gases to an intake conduit, such as an intake manifold, so that the redirected exhaust gases will be recycled. It is desirable to have an EGR valve with fast-acting capabilities, and it is also desirable to have the EGR valve take up as little space as possible. An exhaust gas recirculation valve is provided that includes an exhaust passage tube, a valve element pivotally mounted within the exhaust passage tube, a linear actuator; and a gear train. The gear train includes a rack gear operatively connected to the linear actuator, and at least one rotatable gear meshing with the rack gear and operatively connected to the valve element to cause rotation of the valve element upon actuation of the linear actuator. The apparatus provides a highly compact package having a high-speed valve actuation capability.

  5. Using the coupled wake boundary layer model to evaluate the effect of turbulence intensity on wind farm performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Richard J. A. M.; Gayme, Dennice; Meneveau, Charles

    2015-06-01

    We use the recently introduced coupled wake boundary layer (CWBL) model to predict the effect of turbulence intensity on the performance of a wind farm. The CWBL model combines a standard wake model with a “top-down” approach to get improved predictions for the power output compared to a stand-alone wake model. Here we compare the CWBL model results for different turbulence intensities with the Horns Rev field measurements by Hansen et al., Wind Energy 15, 183196 (2012). We show that the main trends as function of the turbulence intensity are captured very well by the model and discuss differences between the field measurements and model results based on comparisons with LES results from Wu and Porté-Agel, Renewable Energy 75, 945-955 (2015).

  6. The Socioeconomic Basis of Farm Enterprise Diversification Decisions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anosike, Nnamdi; Coughenour, C. Milton

    1990-01-01

    Examines research relating farm size inversely to specialization and directly to farm-enterprise diversification. Develops model of farm management decision making. Tests model using survey examining land tenure, off-farm work, education, and environmental factors. Concludes diversification linked to farm size, human capital, and environmental…

  7. Optimal management of on-farm resources in small-scale dairy systems of Central Mexico: model development and evaluation.

    PubMed

    Castelán-Ortega, Octavio Alonso; Martínez-García, Carlos Galdino; Mould, Fergus L; Dorward, Peter; Rehman, Tahir; Rayas-Amor, Adolfo Armando

    2016-06-01

    This study evaluates the available on-farm resources of five case studies typified as small-scale dairy systems in central Mexico. A comprehensive mixed-integer linear programming model was developed and applied to two case studies. The optimal plan suggested the following: (1) instruction and utilization of maize silage, (2) alfalfa hay making that added US$140/ha/cut to the total net income, (3) allocation of land to cultivated pastures in a ratio of 27:41(cultivated pastures/maize crop) rather than at the current 14:69, and dairy cattle should graze 12 h/day, (4) to avoid grazing of communal pastures because this activity represented an opportunity cost of family labor that reduced the farm net income, and (5) that the highest farm net income was obtained when liquid milk and yogurt sales were included in the optimal plan. In the context of small-scale dairy systems of central Mexico, the optimal plan would need to be implemented gradually to enable farmers to develop required skills and to change management strategies from reliance on forage and purchased concentrate to pasture-based and conserved forage systems.

  8. Recirculation of Air Pollutants During Lake Breeze Events in Chicago

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmeling, M.; Hodzic, A.; Massie, S. T.

    2009-12-01

    Chicago is located at the southwestern end of Lake Michigan and experiences lake breezes on a regular basis during the summer months. In order to study transport and evolution of air pollution during such lake breeze events reactive trace gases NOx and ozone were measured as well as aerosol samples collected in summer 2003. The aerosol samples were analyzed for major ionic species by ion chromatography and for elemental species by total reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometry. Several lake breeze events occurred during the field collections with one set of events on June 30 and July 1, 2003 standing out due to high levels of NOx and some aerosol species such as nitrate, iron and lead. The fully coupled chemistry-meteorology model WRF/CHEM was applied to simulate atmospheric conditions on these two days. The simulations show that a temperature and wind field front developed in the course of the lake breeze event creating a local cell of about 150km in diameter. Air and pollutants trapped in this cell appear to be re-circulating above Chicago and western Lake Michigan. The model results provide important insight on the evolution of ozone precursors, photolysis rates and ozone production during transport above the lake, and allow for quantifying the influence of this recirculation on the observed levels of local pollutants in Chicago. Whereas the June 30/July 1, 2003 lake breeze seems to be very pronounced, other lake breeze situations showed also enhanced NOx and nitrate mixing ratios compared to non-lake breeze days. Interestingly ozone mixing ratios were found to be lower in average during lake breeze events as compared to non-lake breeze conditions. To understand the development of the local lake breeze cell and possible recirculation of pollutants we plan to simulate temperature, wind field and pollutant level on other lake breeze days as well. Satellite data from the moderate resolution imaging spectrometer (MODIS) and Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) will

  9. Recirculation of the Canary Current in fall 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-Guerra, Alonso; Espino-Falcón, Elisabet; Vélez-Belchí, Pedro; Dolores Pérez-Hernández, M.; Martínez-Marrero, Antonio; Cana, Luis

    2017-10-01

    Hydrographic measurements together with Ship mounted Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers and Lowered Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers (LADCP) obtained in October 2014 are used to describe water masses, geostrophic circulation and mass transport of the Canary Current System, as the Eastern Boundary of the North Atlantic Subtropical Gyre. Geostrophic velocities are adjusted to velocities from LADCP data to estimate an initial velocity at the reference layer. The adjustment results in a northward circulation at the thermocline layers over the African slope from an initial convergent flow. Final reference velocities and consequently absolute circulation are estimated from an inverse box model applied to an ocean divided into 13 neutral density layers. This allows us to evaluate mass fluxes consistent with the thermal wind equation and mass conservation. Ekman transport is estimated from the wind data derived from the Weather Research and Forecasting model. Ekman transport is added to the first layer and adjusted with the inverse model. The Canary Current located west of Lanzarote Island transports to the south a mass of - 1.5 ± 0.7 Sv (1 Sv = 106 m3 s- 1 ≈ 109 kg s- 1) of North Atlantic Central Water at the surface and thermocline layers ( 0-700 m). In fall 2014, hydrographic data shows that the Canary Current in the thermocline (below at about 80 m depth to 700 m) recirculates to the north over the African slope and flows through the Lanzarote Passage. At intermediate layers ( 700-1400 m), the Intermediate Poleward Undercurrent transports northward a relatively fresh Antarctic Intermediate Water in the range of 0.8 ± 0.4 Sv through the Lanzarote Passage and west of Lanzarote Island beneath the recirculation of the Canary Current.

  10. The Impact of Tropical Recirculation on Stratospheric Mean Age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strahan, S. E.; Schoeberl, M. R.; Steenrod, S. D.

    2008-05-01

    Ten years ago, many models failed in the comparison with mean age at 20 km, but with recent improvements in advection schemes, many models now have reasonable mean age in the lower stratosphere. However, a good mean age alone does not validate model transport because compensating transport errors can conspire to give reasonable mean age in spite of poor representation of physical processes. A better diagnostic is the age spectrum The first peak of the age spectrum reveals the most common transit time to a given point in the stratosphere (the modal age) while the mean of the age spectrum reflects the average transit time. The separation of the mean and modal ages is a measure of the integrated effects of mixing during transport. In the tropical lower stratosphere, horizontal mixing across the subtropics is weak and transport is dominated by vertical advection. Using a 15-yr time series of AURA MLS and UARS HALOE tropical water vapor, Schoeberl et al. [2008] determined the phase speed of the water vapor anomaly, providing an empirical determination of modal age. Together, the modal age and mean age, derived from CO2 and SF6, give the two main components of the age spectrum. We use the empirically derived mean and modal ages in the tropical stratosphere, 18-35 km, to separately diagnose mean vertical advection and tropical recirculation in the GEOS4-GCM. We link the behavior of the age tracer to CH4 and demonstrate how tropical age affects age in the Antarctic. We show that tropical vertical advection in the GEOS4-GCM is very well simulated and that its young tropical mean age stems from too much tropical isolation. A related set of meteorological fields from the GEOS4-DAS has older mean age as a result of greater tropical recirculation. A simulation using GEOS4-DAS fields has better agreement with HALOE CH4 in the Antarctic, supporting the hypothesis that deficiencies in tropical age affect age throughout the stratosphere.

  11. 40 CFR 1065.127 - Exhaust gas recirculation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Exhaust gas recirculation. 1065.127 Section 1065.127 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Equipment Specifications § 1065.127 Exhaust gas recirculation. Use...

  12. 40 CFR 1065.127 - Exhaust gas recirculation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Exhaust gas recirculation. 1065.127 Section 1065.127 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Equipment Specifications § 1065.127 Exhaust gas recirculation. Use...

  13. 40 CFR 1065.127 - Exhaust gas recirculation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Exhaust gas recirculation. 1065.127 Section 1065.127 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Equipment Specifications § 1065.127 Exhaust gas recirculation. Use...

  14. 40 CFR 1065.127 - Exhaust gas recirculation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Exhaust gas recirculation. 1065.127 Section 1065.127 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Equipment Specifications § 1065.127 Exhaust gas recirculation. Use...

  15. 40 CFR 1065.127 - Exhaust gas recirculation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Exhaust gas recirculation. 1065.127 Section 1065.127 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Equipment Specifications § 1065.127 Exhaust gas recirculation. Use...

  16. Energy conservation by partial recirculation of peanut drying air

    SciTech Connect

    Young, J.H.

    1983-06-01

    Conventional, recirculating, and intermittent type peanut dryers were compared in a three-year study. Comparisons indicate that partial recirculation of peanut drying air may reduce energy consumption per unit of water removed by approximately 25% while also reducing required drying time and maintaining high quality.

  17. Recirculating industrial air: The impact on air compliance and workers` safety case study -- Hill Air Force Base C-130 painting operations. Final report, September 1996--July 1998

    SciTech Connect

    LaPuma, P.T.

    1998-07-20

    Recent Clean Air Act regulations require industries, including aircraft painting facilities, to capture volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions. Because aircraft painting contaminates large airflows with traces of VOCs, conventional air control systems would be prohibitively expensive to apply. Recirculating a portion of the air back into the facility is an option to reduce the amount of air to be treated. A computer model is presented that will calculate air control costs and chemical concentrations at selected recirculation levels. Air concentrations are compared to occupational exposure limits (OELs) to analyze worker safety. The model has a chemical database containing over 1300 chemicals. A case study has been performed on a C-130 aircraft painting facility at Hill Air Force Base, Utah. The model predicts strontium chromate concentrations during application of primer paints will reach 1000 times the OEL, and that the concentration will increase by only 1 or 2% at 90% recirculation. Exposures to strontium chromate and other particulate contaminants are affected only slightly by recirculation because airborne solids are removed efficiently when the air is filtered prior to recirculation. The respiratory protection required for the strontium chromate adequately protects workers from increased concentrations of volatile chemicals, which are caused by recirculation. The model demonstrates that recirculating 75% of the air at the Hill AFB facility has a negligible impact on safety and could save $2.7 million on the initial expenses of a VOC control system.

  18. Local effects of blue mussels around turbine foundations in an ecosystem model of Nysted off-shore wind farm, Denmark

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maar, Marie; Bolding, Karsten; Petersen, Jens Kjerulf; Hansen, Jørgen L. S.; Timmermann, Karen

    2009-08-01

    The development of off-shore wind farms along the coastline of north-west Europe is rapidly increasing; it is therefore important to study how this will affect the marine environment. The present study modelled the growth and feed-backs of blue mussels in natural beds and on turbine foundations in an off-shore wind farm (OWF) located in a shallow coastal ecosystem by coupling a dynamic energy budget (DEB) model to a small-scale 3D hydrodynamic-biogeochemical model. The model results showed that blue mussels located higher up in the water column on turbine pillars achieved a 7-18 times higher biomass than those located on the scour protection because the former experience an enhanced advective food supply. Secondly, the high biomasses of blue mussels on foundations created local 'hot spots' of biological activity and changed ecosystem dynamics due to their feed-backs e.g. ingestion of microplankton and copepods, excretion of ammonium and egestion of faecal pellets. The model results were supported by field measurements around foundations of Chl a concentrations and biomasses of the fauna community. Our study emphasised that OWFs seem to be particularly favourable for blue mussels in the western Baltic Sea and that the functioning of the OWFs as artificial reef ecosystems depends upon how the blue mussels interact with their local pelagic and benthic environment.

  19. Farm Animals

    MedlinePlus

    ... the Back of a Horse Chickens in the City Diseases Cat-Scratch Disease E. coli Infection Ringworm ... animals when even when they appear healthy and clean. Although it usually doesn’t make farm animals ...

  20. Effects of spent liquor recirculation in hydrothermal carbonization.

    PubMed

    Kabadayi Catalkopru, Arzu; Kantarli, Ismail Cem; Yanik, Jale

    2017-02-01

    In this study, the effect of the recirculation of spent liquor from hydrothermal carbonization was investigated depending on the biomass type (grape pomace, orange pomace and poultry litter). The yield and fuel properties of hydrochars and spent liquor characteristics were determined for each recirculation step. By recirculation, mass and energy yields of the hydrochar increased, but their combustion characteristics changed: the ignition temperature and combustion reactivity decreased. The organic and inorganic load of liquor was increased with recirculation number, but not as much as would be expected after the first recycle. It was concluded that the load of organic and inorganic species in spent liquor decreased the leaching of some inorganics and diffusion of the degraded soluble fragments from biomass in the subsequent hydrothermal carbonization. Overall, this study showed that spent liquor recirculation makes the overall hydrothermal carbonization process environmentally friendly.

  1. NGL recovery being hiked by natural-gasoline recirculation

    SciTech Connect

    Rivas M, M.; Bracho, J.L.; Murray, J.E.

    1997-07-07

    Construction will be completed later this year at two compression plants operated by Lagoven, S.A., to install natural-gasoline recirculation to improve NGL recovery. The project is the result of a study of condensate-stream recirculation and absorber operations at the compression plants Tia Juana 2 (PCTJ-2) and Tia Juana 3 (PCTJ-3), offshore Lake Maracaibo in western Venezuela. The PCTJ-2 and PCTJ-3 gas compression plants have two systems: gas compression and NGL extraction. Previous analysis of the NGL extraction and fractionation processes of Lagoven determined that there are two practical and attractive alternatives for the recirculation of the condensate streams in PCTJ-2 and 3: recirculation of natural gasoline from the Ule LPG plant; recirculation of a conditioned condensate from the de-ethanizer tower of each plant. Both alternatives are discussed. Also described are fractionation capacity, and modifications for adding absorption and fractionation.

  2. Modeling turbine wakes and power losses within the Horns Rev offshore wind farm using large-eddy simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yu-Ting; Porte-Agel, Fernando

    2013-04-01

    A recently-developed large-eddy simulations (LES) framework is implemented to predict multiple wake flows and the associated power losses within the Horns Rev offshore wind farm under near-neutral stability conditions. A tuning-free Lagrangian scale-dependent dynamic subgrid-scale (SGS) model is used for the parametrization of the SGS stresses. The turbine-generated power outputs and the turbine-induced forces (e.g., thrust, lift, drag) are parameterized using two models: (a) the traditional actuator-disk model without rotation (ADM-NR), which uses the 1D momentum theory to relate the power output and the thrust force with a representative velocity over the rotor (e.g., the disk-averaged velocity); and (b) the actuator-disk model with rotation (ADM-R), which adopts blade element theory to calculate the lift and drag forces (that produce thrust, rotor shaft torque, and power) based on the local blade and flow characteristics. In general, the predicted power outputs obtained using the ADM-R are in good agreement with observed power data from the Horns Rev wind farm. The ADM-NR tends to underestimate the power output. A similar under-prediction is obtained using industry-standard wind-farm models such as the Wind Atlas Analysis and Application Program (WAsP). Simulations using different inflow conditions show that the mean wind direction has a strong effect on the spatial distributions of the time-averaged velocity and the turbulence intensity within the farm. These, in turn, affect the power output and the fatigue loads on the turbines. When the prevailing wind direction is parallel to the turbine rows (i.e., a full wake condition), the velocity deficit and the power losses are largest, and the turbulence intensity levels are highest and have a symmetric pattern (dual-peak at hub height) on both sides of the turbine wakes. A detailed analysis of the turbulence kinetic energy budget in the full wake condition shows an important effect of the increased turbulence level

  3. Pulsed-focusing recirculating linacs for muon acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Rolland

    2014-12-31

    Since the muon has a short lifetime, fast acceleration is essential for high-energy applications such as muon colliders, Higgs factories, or neutrino factories. The best one can do is to make a linear accelerator with the highest possible accelerating gradient to make the accelerating time as short as possible. However, the cost of such a single linear accelerator is prohibitively large due to expensive power sources, cavities, tunnels, and related infrastructure. As was demonstrated in the Thomas Jefferson Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab) Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF), an elegant solution to reduce cost is to use magnetic return arcs to recirculate the beam through the accelerating RF cavities many times, where they gain energy on each pass. In such a Recirculating Linear Accelerator (RLA), the magnetic focusing strength diminishes as the beam energy increases in a conventional linac that has constant strength quadrupoles. After some number of passes the focusing strength is insufficient to keep the beam from going unstable and being lost. In this project, the use of fast pulsed quadrupoles in the linac sections was considered for stronger focusing as a function of time to allow more successive passes of a muon beam in a recirculating linear accelerator. In one simulation, it was shown that the number of passes could be increased from 8 to 12 using pulsed magnet designs that have been developed and tested. This could reduce the cost of linac sections of a muon RLA by 8/12, where more improvement is still possible. The expense of a greater number of passes and corresponding number of return arcs was also addressed in this project by exploring the use of ramped or FFAG-style magnets in the return arcs. A better solution, invented in this project, is to use combined-function dipole-quadrupole magnets to simultaneously transport two beams of different energies through one magnet string to reduce costs of return arcs by almost a factor of

  4. Practical Solutions for Pesticide Safety: A Farm and Research Team Participatory Model.

    PubMed

    Galvin, Kit; Krenz, Jen; Harrington, Marcy; Palmández, Pablo; Fenske, Richard A

    2016-01-01

    Development of the Practical Solutions for Pesticide Safety guide used participatory research strategies to identify and evaluate solutions that reduce pesticide exposures for workers and their families and to disseminate these solutions. Project principles were (1) workplace chemicals belong in the workplace, and (2) pesticide handlers and farm managers are experts, with direct knowledge of production practices. The project's participatory methods were grounded in self-determination theory. Practical solutions were identified and evaluated based on five criteria: practicality, adaptability, health and safety, novelty, and regulatory compliance. Research activities that had more personal contact provided better outcomes. The Expert Working Group, composed of farm managers and pesticide handlers, was key to the identification of solutions, as were farm site visits. Audience participation, hands-on testing, and orchard field trials were particularly effective in the evaluation of potential solutions. Small work groups in a Regional Advisory Committee provided the best direction and guidance for a "user-friendly" translational document that provided evidence-based practical solutions. The "farmer to farmer" format of the guide was endorsed by both the Expert Working Group and the Regional Advisory Committee. Managers and pesticide handlers wanted to share their solutions in order to "help others stay safe," and they appreciated attribution in the guide. The guide is now being used in educational programs across the region. The fundamental concept that farmers and farmworkers are innovators and experts in agricultural production was affirmed by this study. The success of this process demonstrates the value of participatory industrial hygiene in agriculture.

  5. Let's put this in perspective: using dynamic simulation modelling to assess the impacts of farm-scale land management change on catchment-scale water quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivers, Mark; Clarendon, Simon; Coles, Neil

    2013-04-01

    Natural Resource Management and Agri-industry development groups in Australia have invested considerable resources into the investigation of the economic, social and, particularly, environmental impacts of varying farming activities in a "catchment context". This research has resulted in the development of a much-improved understanding of the likely impacts of changed management practices at the farm-scale as well as the development of a number of conceptual models which place farming within this broader catchment context. The project discussed in this paper transformed a conceptual model of dairy farm phosphorus (P) management and transport processes into a more temporally and spatially dynamic model. This was then loaded with catchment-specific data and used as a "policy support tool" to allow the Australian dairy industry to examine the potential farm and catchment-scale impacts of varying dairy farm management practices within some key dairy farming regions. Models were developed, validated and calibrated using "STELLA©" dynamic modelling software for three catchments in which dairy is perceived as a significant land use. The models describe P movement and cycling within and through dairy farms in great detail and also estimate P transport through major source, sink and flow sectors of the catchments. A series of scenarios were executed for all three catchments which examined three main "groups" of tests: changes to farm P input rates; implementation of perceived environmental "Best Management Practices" (BMPs), and; changes to land use mosaics. Modifications to actual P input rates into dairy farms (not surprisingly) had a major effect on nutrient transport within and from the farms with a significant rise in nutrient loss rates at all scales with increasing fertiliser use. More surprisingly, however, even extensive environmental BMP implementation did not have marked effects on off-farm nutrient loss rates. On and off-farm riparian management implemented

  6. AP1000 Features Prevent Potential Containment Recirculation Screen Plugging

    SciTech Connect

    Andreychek, Timothy; Anderson, Richard; Schulz, Terry

    2004-07-01

    This paper presents the results of plant design development and evaluations that demonstrate that the AP1000 plant is not subject to potential containment recirculation screen plugging following a loss-of-coolant-accident (LOCA). Following a LOCA in a pressurized water reactor, it is necessary to recirculate water from the containment back into the reactor to maintain long term core cooling. The AP1000 utilizes passive safety systems to provide containment recirculation for long term core cooling following a LOCA. The AP1000 also has non-safety pumps which provide a backup means of providing recirculation. Screens are provided around the recirculation pipes to prevent debris from blocking recirculation flow and core cooling passages. Debris may be generated by the LOCA blowdown from insulation and coatings used inside containment. Even with effective cleanliness programs, there may be some resident debris such as dust and dirt. The potential for plugging the recirculation screens is a current PWR licensing issue. The AP1000 design provides inherent advantages with respect to the potential plugging of containment recirculation screens. These characteristics include prevention of fibrous debris generation, improved debris settling and improved recirculation screen design. Debris settling analysis demonstrates that failure of coatings does not result in debris being transported to the screens before it settles to the floor. Additional analysis also shows that the plant can tolerate conservative amounts of resident debris being transported to the screens. The AP1000 significantly reduces the probability of plugging the containment recirculation screens and significantly reduces inspection and maintenance of coatings used inside containment. (authors)

  7. The benefits of powdered activated carbon recirculation for micropollutant removal in advanced wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Meinel, F; Zietzschmann, F; Ruhl, A S; Sperlich, A; Jekel, M

    2016-03-15

    PAC adsorption is a widespread option for the removal of organic micropollutants (OMP) from secondary effluent. For an optimal exploitation of the adsorption capacity, PAC recirculation is nowadays a common practice, although the mechanistic interrelations of the complex recirculation process are not fully resolved. In this work, extensive multi-stage batch adsorption testing with repeated PAC and coagulant dosage was performed to evaluate the continuous-flow recirculation system. Partly loaded PAC showed a distinct amount of remaining capacity, as OMP and DOC removals considerably increased with each additional adsorption stage. At a low PAC dose of 10 mg PAC L(-1), removals of benzotriazole and carbamazepine were shown to rise from <40% in the first stage up to >80% in the 11th stage at 30 min adsorption time per stage. At a high PAC dose of 30 mg PAC L(-1), OMP and DOC removals were significantly higher and reached 98% (for benzotriazole and carbamazepine) after 11 stages. Coagulant dosage showed no influence on OMP removal, whereas a major part of DOC removal can be attributed to coagulation. Multi-stage adsorption is particularly beneficial for small PAC doses and significant PAC savings are feasible. A new model approach for predicting multi-stage OMP adsorption on the basis of a single-stage adsorption experiment was developed. It proved to predict OMP removals and PAC loadings accurately and thus contributes towards understanding the PAC recirculation process.

  8. CCR7 Controls Thymus Recirculation, but Not Production and Emigration, of Foxp3(+) T Cells.

    PubMed

    Cowan, Jennifer E; McCarthy, Nicholas I; Anderson, Graham

    2016-02-09

    Current models of Foxp3(+) regulatory T cell (Treg) development involve CCR7-mediated migration of thymocytes into the thymus medulla to enable essential interactions with medullary epithelium. However, increased Foxp3(+) thymic Treg numbers in Ccr7(-/-) mice challenge this view, and the role of CCR7 in Treg development, emigration, and/or recirculation is unknown. Here, we have examined CCR7 and Rag2pGFP levels during Treg development and generated Rag2pGFPCcr7(-/-) mice to study its impact on the intrathymic Treg pool. We reveal surprising developmental heterogeneity in thymocytes described as Treg precursors, showing that they contain recirculating CCR6(+)CCR7(-)Rag2pGFP(-) T cells. Although CCR7 defines bona fide Rag2GFP(+) Treg precursors, it is not required for Treg production and emigration. Rather, we show that lack of CCR7 renders the thymus more receptive to Treg thymus homing. Our study reveals a role for CCR7 in limiting Treg recirculation back to the thymus and enables separation of the mechanisms controlling Treg production and thymic recirculation.

  9. Empirical models to identify mechanisms driving reductions in tissue mercury concentration during culture of farmed southern bluefin tuna Thunnus maccoyii.

    PubMed

    Balshaw, S; Edwards, J W; Ross, K E; Ellis, D; Padula, D J; Daughtry, B J

    2008-12-01

    Two empirical models are presented to elucidate the mechanisms driving reductions in the mercury concentration of southern bluefin tuna (SBT) during culture. Model 1 predicts temporal fluctuations in mercury concentration in response to growth dilution. Model 2 predicts the combined effects of growth dilution and linear mercury accumulation. Model 2 was found to be the more accurate model. Over a typical farming period of 136 days, growth dilution resulted in a reduction in mean mercury concentration of SBT edible tissues from 0.51 mg/kg down to 0.33 mg/kg. Extended culture beyond 136 days resulted in an increase in mercury concentration due to the combined effects of mercury accumulation and seasonal lipid depletion. Results indicate that under current industry practice, cultured SBT can be consumed twice as frequently as that of wild caught SBT while maintaining total dietary mercury intake below national recommendations.

  10. Evaluating the effect of remote sensing image spatial resolution on soil exchangeable potassium prediction models in smallholder farm settings.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yiming; Smith, Scot E; Grunwald, Sabine; Abd-Elrahman, Amr; Wani, Suhas P

    2017-09-15

    Major end users of Digital Soil Mapping (DSM) such as policy makers and agricultural extension workers are faced with choosing the appropriate remote sensing data. The objective of this research is to analyze the spatial resolution effects of different remote sensing images on soil prediction models in two smallholder farms in Southern India called Kothapally (Telangana State), and Masuti (Karnataka State), and provide empirical guidelines to choose the appropriate remote sensing images in DSM. Bayesian kriging (BK) was utilized to characterize the spatial pattern of exchangeable potassium (Kex) in the topsoil (0-15 cm) at different spatial resolutions by incorporating spectral indices from Landsat 8 (30 m), RapidEye (5 m), and WorldView-2/GeoEye-1/Pleiades-1A images (2 m). Some spectral indices such as band reflectances, band ratios, Crust Index and Atmospherically Resistant Vegetation Index from multiple images showed relatively strong correlations with soil Kex in two study areas. The research also suggested that fine spatial resolution WorldView-2/GeoEye-1/Pleiades-1A-based and RapidEye-based soil prediction models would not necessarily have higher prediction performance than coarse spatial resolution Landsat 8-based soil prediction models. The end users of DSM in smallholder farm settings need select the appropriate spectral indices and consider different factors such as the spatial resolution, band width, spectral resolution, temporal frequency, cost, and processing time of different remote sensing images. Overall, remote sensing-based Digital Soil Mapping has potential to be promoted to smallholder farm settings all over the world and help smallholder farmers implement sustainable and field-specific soil nutrient management scheme. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Geothermal eel farm in Slovakia

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, J.W.; Thomka, J.; Sarlinova, K.

    1998-12-01

    Turcianske Teplice, a small town in west-central Slovakia, has written records of using thermal waters since 1281. In 1992, an eel raising farm was started on the outskirts of the town and since 1994, it has been operated by the firm of Janex Slovensko. The farm, using a specialized water recirculation system, raises a species of migrating eels (Anguilla anguilla). A 220-meter deep well at 42 C provides 48 gpm to the facility for heating through a plate heat exchanger. This is the maximum flow permitted, so as not to influence the springs and wells at the spa about 1 km away. For this reason, the flow is monitored carefully by the state. A second geothermal well at 52 C and 1,500 meters deep is used only as an observation well. Cold water, which is heated by the geothermal water, is pumped from wells near the Turiec River 1.8 km away at 8 to 12 C, depending upon the season, for use in the various holding or raising tanks. The operation of the farm is described.

  12. Recirculating Molten Metal Supply System And Method

    DOEpatents

    Kinosz, Michael J.; Meyer, Thomas N.

    2003-07-01

    The melter furnace includes a heating chamber (16), a pump chamber (18), a degassing chamber (20), and a filter chamber (22). The pump chamber (18) is located adjacent the heating chamber (16) and houses a molten metal pump (30). The degassing chamber (20) is located adjacent and in fluid communication with the pump chamber (18), and houses a degassing mechanism (36). The filter chamber (22) is located adjacent and in fluid communication with the degassing chamber (20). The filter chamber (22) includes a molten metal filter (38). The melter furnace (12) is used to supply molten metal to an externally located holder furnace (14), which then recirculates molten metal back to the melter furnace (12).

  13. Nutrient Management in Recirculating Hydroponic Culture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bugbee, Bruce

    2004-01-01

    There is an increasing need to recirculate and reuse nutrient solutions in order to reduce environmental and economic costs. However, one of the weakest points in hydroponics is the lack of information on managing the nutrient solution. Many growers and research scientists dump out nutrient solutions and refill at weekly intervals. Other authors have recommended measuring the concentrations of individual nutrients in solution as a key to nutrient control and maintenance. Dumping and replacing solution is unnecessary. Monitoring ions in solution is not always necessary; in fact the rapid depletion of some nutrients often causes people to add toxic amounts of nutrients to the solution. Monitoring ions in solution is interesting, but it is not the key to effective maintenance.

  14. Industrial Energy Conservation, Forced Internal Recirculation Burner

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph Rabovitser

    2003-06-19

    The overall objective of this research project is to develop and evaluate an industrial low NOx burner for existing and new gas-fired combustion systems for intermediate temperature (1400 degree to 2000 degree F) industrial heating devices such as watertube boilers and process fluid heaters. A multi-phase effort is being pursued with decision points to determine advisability of continuance. The current contract over Phases II and III of this work. The objectives of each phase are as follows. Phase II - to design, fabricate, and evaluate prototype burners based on the Forced Internal Recirculation (FIR) concept. Phase III - to evaluate the performance of an FIR burner under actual operating conditions in a full-scale field test and establish the performance necessary for subsequent commercialization

  15. Recirculating Linac Accelerators For Future Muon Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Yves Roblin, Alex Bogacz, Vasiliy Morozov, Kevin Beard

    2012-04-01

    Neutrino Factories (NF) and Muon Colliders (MC) require rapid acceleration of shortlived muons to multi-GeV and TeV energies. A Recirculating Linear Accelerator (RLA) that uses superconducting RF structures can provide exceptionally fast and economical acceleration to the extent that the focusing range of the RLA quadrupoles allows each muon to pass several times through each high-gradient cavity. A new concept of rapidly changing the strength of the RLA focusing quadrupoles as the muons gain energy is being developed to increase the number of passes that each muon will make in the RF cavities, leading to greater cost effectiveness. We discuss the optics and technical requirements for RLA designs, using RF cavities capable of simultaneous acceleration of both m+ and m- species. The design will include the optics for the multi-pass linac and droplet-shaped return arcs.

  16. Nutrient Management in Recirculating Hydroponic Culture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bugbee, Bruce

    2004-01-01

    There is an increasing need to recirculate and reuse nutrient solutions in order to reduce environmental and economic costs. However, one of the weakest points in hydroponics is the lack of information on managing the nutrient solution. Many growers and research scientists dump out nutrient solutions and refill at weekly intervals. Other authors have recommended measuring the concentrations of individual nutrients in solution as a key to nutrient control and maintenance. Dumping and replacing solution is unnecessary. Monitoring ions in solution is not always necessary; in fact the rapid depletion of some nutrients often causes people to add toxic amounts of nutrients to the solution. Monitoring ions in solution is interesting, but it is not the key to effective maintenance.

  17. Recirculation bubbler for glass melter apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Guerrero, Hector; Bickford, Dennis

    2007-06-05

    A gas bubbler device provides enhanced recirculation of molten glass within a glass melter apparatus. The bubbler device includes a tube member disposed within a pool of molten glass contained in the melter. The tube member includes a lower opening through which the molten glass enters and upper slots disposed close to (above or below) the upper surface of the pool of molten glass and from which the glass exits. A gas (air) line is disposed within the tube member and extends longitudinally thereof. A gas bubble distribution device, which is located adjacent to the lower end of the tube member and is connected to the lower end of the gas line, releases gas through openings therein so as to produce gas bubbles of a desired size in the molten glass and in a distributed pattern across the tube member.

  18. Recirculating planar magnetrons: simulations and experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Franzi, Matthew; Gilgenbach, Ronald; French, David; Lau, Y.Y.; Simon, David; Hoff, Brad; Luginsland, John W.

    2011-07-01

    The Recirculating Planar Magnetron (RPM) is a novel crossed-field device whose geometry is expected to reduce thermal load, enhance current yield as well as ease the geometric limitations in scaling to high RF frequencies as compared to the conventional cylindrical magnetrons. The RPM has two different adaptations: A. Axial B field and radial E field; B. Radial B field and axial E field. The preliminary configuration (A) to be used in experiments at the University of Michigan consists of two parallel planar sections which join on either end by cylindrical regions to form a concentric extruded ellipse. Similar to conventional magnetrons, a voltage across the AK gap in conjunction with an axial magnetic field provides the electrons with an ExB drift. The device is named RPM because the drifting electrons recirculate from one planar region to the other. The drifting electrons interact with the resonantly tuned slow wave structure on the anode causing spoke formation. These electron spokes drive a RF electric field in the cavities from which RF power may be extracted to Waveguides. The RPM may be designed in either a conventional configuration with the anode on the outside, for simplified extraction, or as an inverted magnetron with the anode at the inner conductor, for fast start-up. Currently, experiments at the Pulsed Power and Microwave Laboratory at the University of Michigan are in the setup and design phase. A conventional RPM with planar cavities is to be installed on the Michigan Electron Long Beam Accelerator (MELBA) and is anticipated to operate at -200kV, 0.2T with a beam current of 1-10 kA at 1GHz. The conventional RPM consists of 12 identical planar cavities, 6 on each planar side, with simulated quality factor of 20.

  19. Three-dimensional geologic modeling to determine the spatial attributes of hydrocarbon contamination, Noval Facility Fuel Farm, El Centro, California

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, C.; Mutch, S.; Padgett, D.; Roche, L. )

    1994-04-01

    An investigation was conducted at the Naval Air Facility located in El Centro (NAFEC), to determine the vertical and horizontal extent of hydrocarbon contamination at the facilities fuel farm. The fuel products are the result of tank and pipeline leakage, past tank cleaning, and past disposal of fuel dispensing and filter cleaning practices. Subsurface soil and groundwater data was collected via soil borings, monitoring wells, and CPT probes. Soil, groundwater, and analytical data were integrated using the LYNX geoscience modeling system (GMS). Interactive sessions with the data visualizer helped guide the modeling and identify data gaps. Modeling results indicate a continuous surface confining clay layer to a depth of about 12 to 15 ft. Groundwater is confined beneath this clay layer and monitoring wells indicate about 3 to 5 ft of artesian head. Hydrocarbon contamination is concentrated within this clay layer from about 5 to 12 ft below the ground surface. Residual fuel products located in the groundwater are attributed to slow leakage through the confirming clay layer. LYNX was also used to compute volumes of contaminated soil to aid in remediation cost analysis. Preliminary figures indicate about 60,000 yards[sup 3] of contaminated soil. Since the contamination is primarily confined to relatively impermeable clayey soils, site remediation will likely be ex-situ land farming.

  20. Modelling the aeolian transport of ammonia emitted from poultry farms and its deposition to a coastal waterbody

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiegand, Aaron N.; Menzel, Sarah; King, Rob; Tindale, Neil

    2011-10-01

    In response to the absence of monitoring data, the Air Pollution Model (TAPM), a 3D prognostic model that predicts both meteorology and air pollution concentrations, was used to investigate the transport of ammonia across part of the Sunshine Coast region (South East Queensland, Australia), following its emission to the atmosphere from 41 poultry farms (egg and broiler) in the district, which cumulatively house approximately 9.8 million fowl. The study estimated the total amount of ammonia that is deposited directly into the Pumicestone Passage waterbody (63 km2) and onto the surrounding catchment (1184 km2), through both wet and dry deposition processes over a twelve-month period. The results indicate that wet deposition is the dominant deposition process into the waterbody (89%) and catchment area (94%). Most of the ammonia deposition is predicted to occur within a relatively short distance from the farms, due to higher concentrations at these locations. In the base case simulation, the estimated 1823 tonnes of annual ammonia emissions were predicted to result in the direct deposition of approximately 2.3 tonnes of ammonia into the Pumicestone Passage waterbody and approximately 53.5 tonnes onto the Pumicestone Passage catchment land surface, where there was potential for its subsequent run-off into the waterbody. This annual loading into the waterbody is not insignificant and is likely to contribute to the formation of algal blooms. The fate of the remaining 91% of the ammonia estimated to be emitted from the farms was not accounted for in the deposition totals. This ammonia most likely remains suspended in the atmosphere and is transported outside of the simulation study area.

  1. Recirculation technology – The future of aquaculture

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The production of farmed fish is eclipsing that of wild caught fish and will be supplying half of the total fish and shellfish for human consumption. With limited resources to increase the wild harvest fishing industry, the U. S. and foreign countries are expanding their aquaculture production. Betw...

  2. Recirculating induction accelerators for inertial fusion: Prospects and status

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, A.; Barnard, J.J.; Cable, M.D.

    1995-11-29

    The U.S. is developing the physics and technology of induction accelerators for heavy-ion beam-driven inertial fusion. The recirculating induction accelerator repeatedly passes beams through the same set of accelerating and focusing elements, thereby reducing both the length and gradient of the accelerator structure. This promises an attractive driver cost, if the technical challenges associated with recirculation can be met. Point designs for recirculator drivers were developed in a multi-year study by LLNL, LBNL, and FM Technologies, and that work is briefly reviewed here. To validate major elements of the recirculator concept, we are developing a small (4.5-m diameter) prototype recirculator which will accelerate a space-charge-dominated beam of K{sup +} ions through 15 laps, from 80 to 320 keV and from 2 to 8 mA. Transverse beam confinement is effected via permanent-magnet quadrupoles; bending is via electric dipoles. This {open_quotes}Small Recirculator{close_quotes} is being developed through a sequence of experiments. An injector, matching section, and linear magnetic channel using seven half-lattice periods of permanent-magnet quadrupole lenses are operational. A prototype recirculator half-lattice period is being fabricated. This paper outlines the research program, and presents initial experimental results.

  3. Recirculating induction accelerators for inertial fusion: Prospects and status

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, A.; Barnard, J.J.; Cable, M.D.

    1995-09-03

    The US is developing the physics and technology of induction accelerators for heavy-ion beam-driven inertial fusion. The recirculating induction accelerator repeatedly passes beams through the same set of accelerating and focusing elements, thereby reducing both the length and gradient of the accelerator structure. This promises an attractive driver cost, if the technical challenges associated with recirculation can be met. Point designs for recirculator drivers were developed in a multi-year study by LLNL, LBNL, and FM Technologies, and that work is briefly reviewed here. To validate major elements of the recirculator concept, we are developing a small (4-5-m diameter) prototype recirculator which will accelerate a space-charge-dominated beam of K{sup +} ions through 15 laps, from 80 to 320 keV and from 2 to 8 mA. Transverse beam confinement is effected via permanent-magnet quadrupoles; bending is via electric dipoles. This ``Small Recirculator`` is being developed in a build-and-test sequence of experiments. An injector, matching section, and linear magnetic channel using seven half-lattice periods of permanent-magnet quadrupole lenses are operational. A prototype recirculator half-lattice period is being fabricated. This paper outlines the research program, and presents initial experimental results.

  4. Exhaust gas recirculation method for internal combustion engines

    SciTech Connect

    Kawanabe, T.; Kimura, K.; Asakura, M.; Shiina, T.

    1988-07-19

    This patent describes a method of controlling exhaust gas recirculation in an internal combustion engine having an exhaust passage, an intake passage, an exhaust gas recirculating passage communicating the exhaust passage with the intake passage, and exhaust gas recirculating valve; and a transmission having a shift lever. The valve opening of the exhaust gas recirculating valve is controlled in response to operating conditions of the engine so as to regulate the amount of exhaust gas recirculation to values appropriate to the operating conditions of the engine. The method comprising the steps of (1) determining whether or not the engine is in at least one of a predetermined accelerating condition and a predetermined decelerating condition; (2) varying the valve opening of the exhaust gas recirculating valve by a predetermined value when the engine is determined to be in at least one of the predetermined accelerating condition and the predetermined decelerating condition; (3) detecting a position of the shift lever of the transmission; and (4) correcting the predetermined value in accordance with the detected position of the shift lever so as to increase the valve opening of the exhaust gas recirculating valve as the shift lever of the transmission is set to a higher speed position.

  5. Control of Groundwater Pollution from Animal Feeding Operations: A Farm-Level Dynamic Model for Policy Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.; Baerenklau, K.

    2012-12-01

    Consolidation in livestock production generates higher farm incomes due to economies of scale, but it also brings waste disposal problems. Over-application of animal waste on adjacent land produces adverse environmental and health effects, including groundwater nitrate pollution. The situation is particularly noticeable in California. In respond to this increasingly severe problem, EPA published a type of command-and-control regulation for concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) in 2003. The key component of the regulation is its nutrient management plans (NMPs), which intend to limit the land application rates of animal waste. Although previous studies provide a full perspective on potential economic impacts for CAFOs to meet nutrient standards, their models are static and fail to reflect changes in management practices other than spreading manure on additional land and changing cropping patterns. We develop a dynamic environmental-economic modeling framework for representative CAFOs. The framework incorporates four models (i.e., animal model, crop model, hydrologic model, and economic model) that include various components such as herd management, manure handling system, crop rotation, water sources, irrigation system, waste disposal options, and pollutant emissions. We also include the dynamics of soil characteristics in the rootzone as well as the spatial heterogeneity of the irrigation system. The operator maximizes discounted total farm profit over multiple periods subject to environmental regulations. Decision rules from the dynamic optimization problem demonstrate best management practices for CAFOs to improve their economic and environmental performance. Results from policy simulations suggest that direct quantity restrictions of emission or incentive-based emission policies are much more cost-effective than the standard approach of limiting the amount of animal waste that may be applied to fields (as shown in the figure below); reason being

  6. Murine Depression Model and its Potential Applications for Discovering Foods and Farm Products with Antidepressant-Like Effects

    PubMed Central

    Goto, Tatsuhiko; Tomonaga, Shozo; Okayama, Tsuyoshi; Toyoda, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Advanced societies face increased health problems related to various stresses. Chronic psychological stress is a major risk factor for psychiatric disorders such as depression. Although therapeutic agents reduce several symptoms of depression, most have side effects in a broad range of the population. Furthermore, some victims of depression do not show significant improvement with any drugs, so alternative approaches are needed. Good dietary habits may potentially reduce depressive symptoms, but there is little scientific evidence thus far. Murine depression models are useful to test nutritional approaches in vivo. Our model mice subjected to a subchronic mild social defeat stress (sCSDS) paradigm show several alterations in physiological parameters and social behavior. These stress-induced symptoms in sCSDS mice can be used as cues to identify antidepressant-like natural resources including foods and farm products. We previously discovered that sCSDS mice show more vulnerability to social stress by changing dietary condition. In addition, we developed a more objective system for analyzing mouse behavior using a 3D depth-sensing camera to understand relationships between diet and behavior. The combination of sCSDS mice with 3D behavioral analysis is a powerful method for screening ingredients in foods and farm products for antidepressant-like effects. PMID:26973450

  7. SIMS(DAIRY): a modelling framework to identify sustainable dairy farms in the UK. Framework description and test for organic systems and N fertiliser optimisation.

    PubMed

    Del Prado, A; Misselbrook, T; Chadwick, D; Hopkins, A; Dewhurst, R J; Davison, P; Butler, A; Schröder, J; Scholefield, D

    2011-09-01

    Multiple demands are placed on farming systems today. Society, national legislation and market forces seek what could be seen as conflicting outcomes from our agricultural systems, e.g. food quality, affordable prices, a healthy environmental, consideration of animal welfare, biodiversity etc., Many of these demands, or desirable outcomes, are interrelated, so reaching one goal may often compromise another and, importantly, pose a risk to the economic viability of the farm. SIMS(DAIRY), a farm-scale model, was used to explore this complexity for dairy farm systems. SIMS(DAIRY) integrates existing approaches to simulate the effect of interactions between farm management, climate and soil characteristics on losses of nitrogen, phosphorus and carbon. The effects on farm profitability and attributes of biodiversity, milk quality, soil quality and animal welfare are also included. SIMS(DAIRY) can also be used to optimise fertiliser N. In this paper we discuss some limitations and strengths of using SIMS(DAIRY) compared to other modelling approaches and propose some potential improvements. Using the model we evaluated the sustainability of organic dairy systems compared with conventional dairy farms under non-optimised and optimised fertiliser N use. Model outputs showed for example, that organic dairy systems based on grass-clover swards and maize silage resulted in much smaller total GHG emissions per l of milk and slightly smaller losses of NO(3) leaching and NO(x) emissions per l of milk compared with the grassland/maize-based conventional systems. These differences were essentially because the conventional systems rely on indirect energy use for 'fixing' N compared with biological N fixation for the organic systems. SIMS(DAIRY) runs also showed some other potential benefits from the organic systems compared with conventional systems in terms of financial performance and soil quality and biodiversity scores. Optimisation of fertiliser N timings and rates showed a

  8. Nonresonant Recirculating Type II Second-Harmonic Generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, T. Sean; Moore, Gerald T.

    2004-04-01

    We show an experimental proof of concept for a nonresonant recirculation method to increase the conversion efficiency of second-harmonic generation (SHG) with type II phase matching. As much as a factor-of-4 efficiency increase compared with that of single-pass SHG is possible, provided that the recirculation length is within the coherence length of the pump laser. Nonresonant recirculating SHG may be valuable in systems in which intracavity doubling is not practicable, such as high-power cw bulk solid-state or fiber lasers.

  9. Mean Kinetic Energy Budget of Wakes Within Model Wind Farms: Comparison of an Array of Model Wind Turbines and Porous Discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camp, E.; Cal, R. B.

    2015-12-01

    To optimize the power production of large wind farms, it is important to understand the flow within the wind turbine array as well as its interaction with the surrounding atmosphere. Computational simulations are often employed to study both the velocity field within and immediately above wind farms. In many computational studies, wind turbines are modeled as stationary, porous actuator discs. A wind tunnel study is done in order to compare the wakes within an array of porous discs and an equivalent array of model wind turbines. To characterize the wakes within a 4×3 model wind farm, stereoscopic particle image velocimetry (SPIV) is employed. SPIV measurements focus on the region along the centerline of the array upstream and downstream of the center turbine in the fourth row. The computed mean flow fields and turbulent stresses provide a basis to compare the near and far wakes of the turbines with those of the porous discs. The detailed analysis of the wakes for each case focus on the mean kinetic energy budget within the wakes. Examining the mean kinetic energy budget is done via computing the mean kinetic energy, flux of kinetic energy, and production of turbulence which are analogous to a measure of extracted power.

  10. Incorporating a prediction of postgrazing herbage mass into a whole-farm model for pasture-based dairy systems.

    PubMed

    Gregorini, P; Galli, J; Romera, A J; Levy, G; Macdonald, K A; Fernandez, H H; Beukes, P C

    2014-07-01

    The DairyNZ whole-farm model (WFM; DairyNZ, Hamilton, New Zealand) consists of a framework that links component models for animal, pastures, crops, and soils. The model was developed to assist with analysis and design of pasture-based farm systems. New (this work) and revised (e.g., cow, pasture, crops) component models can be added to the WFM, keeping the model flexible and up to date. Nevertheless, the WFM does not account for plant-animal relationships determining herbage-depletion dynamics. The user has to preset the maximum allowable level of herbage depletion [i.e., postgrazing herbage mass (residuals)] throughout the year. Because residuals have a direct effect on herbage regrowth, the WFM in its current form does not dynamically simulate the effect of grazing pressure on herbage depletion and consequent effect on herbage regrowth. The management of grazing pressure is a key component of pasture-based dairy systems. Thus, the main objective of the present work was to develop a new version of the WFM able to predict residuals, and thereby simulate related effects of grazing pressure dynamically at the farm scale. This objective was accomplished by incorporating a new component model into the WFM. This model represents plant-animal relationships, for example sward structure and herbage intake rate, and resulting level of herbage depletion. The sensitivity of the new version of the WFM was evaluated and then the new WFM was tested against an experimental data set previously used to evaluate the WFM and to illustrate the adequacy and improvement of the model development. Key outputs variables of the new version pertinent to this work (milk production, herbage dry matter intake, intake rate, harvesting efficiency, and residuals) responded acceptably to a range of input variables. The relative prediction errors for monthly and mean annual residual predictions were 20 and 5%, respectively. Monthly predictions of residuals had a line bias (1.5%), with a proportion

  11. Farm Equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1980-01-01

    In production of tractor and a line of farm vehicles, Deere and Company used a COSMIC computer program called FEATS for Finite Element Analysis of Thermal Stress in computer analysis of diesel engine pistons, connecting rods and rocker arms. Company reports that use of FEATS afforded considerable savings and improved analytical accuracies, process efficiencies and product reliability.

  12. Engine with pulse-suppressed dedicated exhaust gas recirculation

    DOEpatents

    Keating, Edward J.; Baker, Rodney E.

    2016-06-07

    An engine assembly includes an intake assembly, a spark-ignited internal combustion engine, and an exhaust assembly. The intake assembly includes a charge air cooler disposed between an exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) mixer and a backpressure valve. The charge air cooler has both an inlet and an outlet, and the back pressure valve is configured to maintain a minimum pressure difference between the inlet of the charge air cooler and an outlet of the backpressure valve. A dedicated exhaust gas recirculation system is provided in fluid communication with at least one cylinder and with the EGR mixer. The dedicated exhaust gas recirculation system is configured to route all of the exhaust gas from the at least one cylinder to the EGR mixer for recirculation back to the engine.

  13. Pulsed Magnet Arc Designs for Recirculating Linac Muon Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    K.B. Beard, R.P. Johnson, S.A. Bogacz, G.M. Wang

    2009-05-01

    Recirculating linear accelerators (RLAs) using both pulsed quadrupoles and pulsed dipoles can be used to quickly accelerate muons in the 3 – 2000 GeV range. Estimates on the requirements for the pulsed quadrupoles and dipoles are presented.

  14. Future of recirculating systems in the US aquaculture industry

    SciTech Connect

    Malone, R.F.

    1994-08-01

    Recirculating systems consist of a culture unit, a recirculating pump, and a treatment block which facilitate extended re-use of water in the rearing of aquatic animals. As water re-use is extended from a few hours to months or even years, the complexity of the treatment block increases. Classified as either `open` with greater than 10 percent water replacement per day or `closed` with less than 10 percent daily replacement, most recirculating systems include aerators, clarifiers, and biofilters as key core elements. The aquaculture industry is increasingly facing a variety of socio-economic issues which will dramatically influence its future development. These problems range from increased competition for water rights through price depression and foreign imports to predation by protected migratory birds. As water-use, environmental, and conservation conflicts grow, the cost differences between the flow-through and closed production technologies will narrow, increasing the industry`s use of recirculating systems.

  15. An advanced anaerobic biofilter with effluent recirculation for phenol removal and methane production in treatment of coal gasification wastewater.

    PubMed

    Li, Yajie; Tabassum, Salma; Zhang, Zhenjia

    2016-09-01

    An advanced anaerobic biofilter (AF) was introduced for the treatment of coal gasification wastewater (CGW), and effluent recirculation was adopted to enhance phenol removal and methane production. The results indicated that AF was reliable in treating diluted CGW, while its efficiency and stability were seriously reduced when directly treating raw CGW. However, its performance could be greatly enhanced by effluent recirculation. Under optimal effluent recirculation of 0.5 to the influent, concentrations of chemical oxygen demand (COD) and total phenol in the effluent could reach as low as 234.0 and 14.2mg/L, respectively. Also, the rate of methane production reached 169.0mLCH4/L/day. Though CGW seemed to restrain the growth of anaerobic microorganisms, especially methanogens, the inhibition was temporary and reversible, and anaerobic bacteria presented strong tolerance. The activities of methanogens cultivated in CGW could quickly recover on feeding with glucose wastewater (GW). However, the adaptability of anaerobic bacteria to the CGW was very poor and the activity of methanogens could not be improved by long-term domestication. By analysis using the Haldane model, it was further confirmed that high effluent recirculation could result in high activity for hydrolytic bacteria and substrate affinity for toxic matters, but only suitable effluent recirculation could result in high methanogenic activity. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Family services for migrant and seasonal farm workers: the Redlands Christian Migrant Association (RCMA) model.

    PubMed

    Liebman, Amy K; Mainster, Barbara; Lee, Barbara C

    2014-01-01

    Agricultural employers and work supervisors strive to keep children out of worksites, but oftentimes migrating farm worker parents lack accessible or affordable options for childcare in a trusted environment. Thus, children may not have a safe, appropriate place to be while their parents are conducting agricultural work. Redlands Christian Migrant Association (RCMA) of Florida is a community development organization that creates and fosters opportunities for the children of migrant and other low-income rural families. To better understand the RCMA system, an in-depth assessment of its program was undertaken to identify both its standard and unique features. Results revealed many attributes contributing to RCMA's success. Based upon RCMA's 48-year track record, employers, agribusinesses, and communities are encouraged to adopt strategies to meet local and regional childcare needs where parents are working in agriculture.

  17. Role of enterohepatic recirculation in drug disposition: cooperation and complications.

    PubMed

    Malik, Mohd Yaseen; Jaiswal, Swati; Sharma, Abhisheak; Shukla, Mahendra; Lal, Jawahar

    2016-05-01

    Enterohepatic recirculation (EHC) concerns many physiological processes and notably affects pharmacokinetic parameters such as plasma half-life and AUC as well as estimates of bioavailability of drugs. Also, EHC plays a detrimental role as the compounds/drugs are allowed to recycle. An in-depth comprehension of this phenomenon and its consequences on the pharmacological effects of affected drugs is important and decisive in the design and development of new candidate drugs. EHC of a compound/drug occurs by biliary excretion and intestinal reabsorption, sometimes with hepatic conjugation and intestinal deconjugation. EHC leads to prolonged elimination half-life of the drugs, altered pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. Study of the EHC of any drug is complicated due to unavailability of the apposite model, sophisticated procedures and ethical concerns. Different in vitro and in vivo methods for studies in experimental animals and humans have been devised, each having its own merits and demerits. Involvement of the different transporters in biliary excretion, intra- and inter-species, pathological and biochemical variabilities obscure the study of the phenomenon. Modeling of drugs undergoing EHC has always been intricate and exigent models have been exploited to interpret the pharmacokinetic profiles of drugs witnessing multiple peaks due to EHC. Here, we critically appraise the mechanisms of bile formation, factors affecting biliary drug elimination, methods to estimate biliary excretion of drugs, EHC, multiple peak phenomenon and its modeling.

  18. A closed recirculated sea-water system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    1967-01-01

    Study of a virus disease in the chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) necessitated the use of a marine environment to study the long range effects of the disease and to complete the life cycle of its etiologic agent. A closed recirculated sea-water system was designed for use under experimental laboratory conditions so that controlled studies of the disease could be made. As others may wish to do marine environment studies in the laboratory, the design and operation of our system are presented. Other systems currently in use have been described by Chin (1959), DeWitt and Salo (1960), McCrimmon and Berst (1966), and the authors of collected papers edited by Clark and Clark (1964). Preparatory to the design and construction of the system in use in this laboratory, visits were made to marine systems in use at the University of Washington's College of Fisheries, Seattle, -washington, and Friday Harbor Laboratory, San Juan Island, Washington; the Washington State Department of Fisheries' Point whitney Shellfish Laboratory, Brinnon, Washington; Humboldt State College, Arcata, California; and the Steinhart Aquarium of the California Academy of Science, San Francisco, California.

  19. LONGITUDINAL REFERENCE PARTICLE MOTION IN NEARLY ISOCHRONOUS FFAG RECIRCULATING ACCELERATORS.

    SciTech Connect

    BERG,J.S.

    2001-07-01

    A Fixed Field Alternating Gradient (FFAG) arc can be used to reduce the cost of a recirculating accelerator. Path length variation with energy in such an arc can limit its usefulness, however, due to phase offset at the linac. This paper examines the dynamics of the reference particle in an FFAG recirculating accelerator, and describes the limitations on the design because of path length variation with energy.

  20. The Pebble Recirculation Experiment (PREX) for the AHTR

    SciTech Connect

    Bardet, P.; An, J.Y.; Franklin, J.T.; Huang, D.; Lee, K.; Mai, A.; Toulouse, M.; Peterson, P.F.

    2007-07-01

    Conceptual design studies for the liquid-salt cooled Advanced High Temperature Reactor (AHTR) have identified three candidate TRISO fuel geometries: prismatic, pebble, and stringer fuels. This paper presents experimental results from the integral Pebble Recirculation Experiment (PREX) that verifies the viability of pebble recirculation in a Pebble Bed AHTR (PB-AHTR). The experiments conducted include injection and extraction of buoyant pebbles, measurements of packing density and pressure losses, and observations of pebble landing dynamics and bed formation. (authors)

  1. Demonstration of Spray Booth Recirculation and Partitioning - Phase II

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-01-01

    electrostatic paint spray enclosures, such as the high volume, low pressure ( HVLP ) systems employed at Barstow MCLB, a minimum linear velocity of 100 fpm must be...SUBTITLE 5. FUNDING NUMBERS Demonstration of Spray Booth Recirculation and Partitioning - Phase II N/A 6. AUTHOR(S) D. Proffitt, R.K. Clayton, & J...ANSI Std. Z39-18 298-102 * , 85-1996 Demonstration of Spray Booth Recirculation and Partitioning - Phase II David Proffitt and Russell K. Clayton

  2. A field and statistical modeling study to estimate irrigation water use at Benchmark Farms study sites in southwestern Georgia, 1995-96

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fanning, Julia L.; Schwarz, Gregory E.; Lewis, William C.

    2001-01-01

    A benchmark irrigation monitoring network of farms located in a 32-county area in southwestern Georgia was established in 1995 to improve estimates of irrigation water use. A stratified random sample of 500 permitted irrigators was selected from a data base--maintained by the Georgia Department of Natural Resources, Georgia Environmental Protection Division, Water Resources Management Branch--to obtain 180 voluntary participants in the study area. Site-specific irrigation data were collected at each farm using running-time totalizers and noninvasive flowmeters. Data were collected and compiled for 50 farms for 1995 and 130 additional farms for the 1996 growing season--a total of 180 farms. Irrigation data collected during the 1996 growing season were compiled for 180 benchmark farms and used to develop a statistical model to estimate irrigation water use in 32 counties in southwestern Georgia. The estimates derived were developed from using a statistical approach know as "bootstrap analysis" that allows for the estimation of precision. Five model components--whether-to-irrigate, acres irrigated, crop selected, seasonal-irrigation scheduling, and the amount of irrigation applied--compose the irrigation model and were developed to reflect patterns in the data collected at Benchmark Farms Study area sites. The model estimated that peak irrigation for all counties in the study area occurred during July with significant irrigation also occurring during May, June, and August. Irwin and Tift were the most irrigated and Schley and Houston were the least irrigated counties in the study area. High irrigation intensity primarily was located along the eastern border of the study area; whereas, low irrigation intensity was located in the southwestern quadrant where ground water was the dominant irrigation source. Crop-level estimates showed sizable variations across crops and considerable uncertainty for all crops other than peanuts and pecans. Counties having the most

  3. Comparison of Greenhouse Gas Emissions between Two Dairy Farm Systems (Conventional vs. Organic Management) in New Hampshire Using the Manure DNDC Biogeochemical Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorich, C.; Contosta, A.; Li, C.; Brito, A.; Varner, R. K.

    2013-12-01

    Agriculture contributes 20 to 25 % of the total anthropogenic greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions globally. These agricultural emissions are primarily in the form of methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) with these GHG accounting for roughly 40 and 80 % of the total anthropogenic emissions of CH4 and N2O, respectively. Due to varied management and the complexities of agricultural ecosystems, it is difficult to estimate these CH4 and N2O emissions. The IPCC emission factors can be used to yield rough estimates of CH4 and N2O emissions but they are often based on limited data. Accurate modeling validated by measurements is needed in order to identify potential mitigation areas, reduce GHG emissions from agriculture, and improve sustainability of farming practices. The biogeochemical model Manure DNDC was validated using measurements from two dairy farms in New Hampshire, USA in order to quantify GHG emissions under different management systems. One organic and one conventional dairy farm operated by the University of New Hampshire's Agriculture Experiment Station were utilized as the study sites for validation of Manure DNDC. Compilation of management records started in 2011 to provide model inputs. Model results were then compared to field collected samples of soil carbon and nitrogen, above-ground biomass, and GHG fluxes. Fluxes were measured in crop, animal, housing, and waste management sites on the farms in order to examine the entire farm ecosystem and test the validity of the model. Fluxes were measured by static flux chambers, with enteric fermentation measurements being conducted by the SF6 tracer test as well as a new method called Greenfeeder. Our preliminary GHG flux analysis suggests higher emissions than predicted by IPCC emission factors and equations. Results suggest that emissions from manure management is a key concern at the conventional dairy farm while bedded housing at the organic dairy produced large quantities of GHG.

  4. Long Island Solar Farm

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, R.

    2013-05-01

    The Long Island Solar Farm (LISF) is a remarkable success story, whereby very different interest groups found a way to capitalize on unusual circumstances to develop a mutually beneficial source of renewable energy. The uniqueness of the circumstances that were necessary to develop the Long Island Solar Farm make it very difficult to replicate. The project is, however, an unparalleled resource for solar energy research, which will greatly inform large-scale PV solar development in the East. Lastly, the LISF is a superb model for the process by which the project developed and the innovation and leadership shown by the different players.

  5. A spatially distributed hydroeconomic model to assess the effects of drought on land use, farm profits, and agricultural employment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maneta, M. P.; Torres, M. O.; Wallender, W. W.; Vosti, S.; Howitt, R.; Rodrigues, L.; Bassoi, L. H.; Panday, S.

    2009-11-01

    In this paper a high-resolution linked hydroeconomic model is demonstrated for drought conditions in a Brazilian river basin. The economic model of agriculture includes 13 decision variables that can be optimized to maximize farmers' yearly net revenues. The economic model uses a multi-input multioutput nonlinear constant elasticity of substitution (CES) production function simulating agricultural production. The hydrologic component is a detailed physics-based three-dimensional hydrodynamic model that simulates changes in the hydrologic system derived from agricultural activity while in turn providing biophysical constraints to the economic system. The linked models capture the effects of the interactions between the hydrologic and the economic systems at high spatial and temporal resolutions, ensuring that the model converges to an optimal economic scenario that takes into account the spatial and temporal distribution of the water resources. The operation and usefulness of the models are demonstrated in a rural catchment area of about 10 km2 within the São Francisco River Basin in Brazil. Two droughts of increasing intensity are simulated to investigate how farmers behave under rain shortfalls of different severity. The results show that farmers react to rainfall shortages to minimize their effects on farm profits, and that the impact on farmers depends, among other things, on their location in the watershed and on their access to groundwater.

  6. Recirculation, stagnation and ventilation: The 2014 legionella episode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo, Ana; Soares, Pedro M. M.; Gouveia, Célia M.; Cardoso, Rita M.; Trigo, Ricardo M.

    2017-04-01

    Legionella transmission through the atmosphere is unusual, but not unprecedented. A scientific paper published in 2006 reports a surge in Pas-de-Calais, France, in which 86 people have been infected by bacteria released by a cooling tower more than 6 km away [3]. Similarly, in Norway, in 2005, there was another case where contamination spread beyond 10 km, although more concentrated within a radius of 1 km from an industrial unit [2]. An unprecedented large Legionella outbreak occurred in November 2014 nearby Lisbon, Portugal. As of 7 November 2014, 375 individuals become hill and 12 died infected by the Legionella pneumophila bacteria, contracted by inhalation of steam droplets of contaminated water (aerosols). These droplets are so small that can carry the bacteria directly to the lungs, depositing it in the alveoli. One way of studying the propagation of legionella episodes is through the use of aerosol dispersion models. However, such approaches often require detailed 3D high resolution wind data over the region, which isn't often available for long periods. The likely impact of wind on legionella transmission can also be understood based on the analysis of special types of flow conditions such as stagnation, recirculation and ventilation [1, 4]. The Allwine and Whiteman (AW) approach constitutes a straightforward method to assess the assimilative and dispersal capacities of different airsheds [1,4], as it only requires hourly wind components. Thus, it has the advantage of not needing surface and upper air meteorological observations and a previous knowledge of the atmospheric transport and dispersion conditions. The objective of this study is to analyze if the legionella outbreak event which took place in November 2014 had extreme potential recirculation and/or stagnation characteristics. In order to accomplish the proposed objective, the AW approach was applied for a hindcast time-series covering the affected area (1989-2007) and then for an independent

  7. CFB combustor with internal solids recirculation -- Pilot testing and design applications

    SciTech Connect

    Belin, F.; Maryamchik, M.; Fuller, T.A.; Perna, M.A.

    1995-12-31

    The new generation of B and W`s CFB boilers with entirely internal recirculation of solids collected by the primary impact separator is uniquely compact and features a simple, low-maintenance solids collection system. Thorough testing of the new concept at the Cold CFB Model and the 2.5 MWth Pilot CFB combustor confirmed its effective performance equal to that of a CFB unit with external solids recirculation from the primary separator. While providing overall advantages of compactness and simplicity, the new design is especially valuable for repowering of the existing power plants where B and W`s CFB boiler fits into the plan area of PC-fired boilers.

  8. AIR AND RADON PATHWAY MODELING FOR THE F AREA TANK FARM

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, K.; Phifer, M.

    2010-07-30

    An air and radon pathways analysis was conducted for the F-Area Tank Farm (FTF) to estimate the flux of volatile radionuclides and radon at the ground surface due to residual waste remaining in the tanks following closure. This analysis was used as the basis to estimate the dose to the maximally exposed individual (MEI) for the air pathway per Curie (Ci) of each radionuclide remaining in the combined FTF waste tanks. For the air pathway analysis, several gaseous radionuclides were considered. These included carbon-14 (C-14), chlorine-36 (Cl-36), iodine-129 (I-129), selenium-79 (Se-79), antimony-125 (Sb-125), tin-126 (Sn-126), tritium (H-3), and technetium-99 (Tc-99). The dose to the MEI was estimated at the SRS Boundary during the 100 year institutional control period. For the 10,000 year post closure compliance period, the dose to the MEI was estimated at the 100 m compliance point. Additionally, the dose to the MEI was estimated at a seepage outcrop located 1600 m from the facility. For the radon pathway analysis, five parent radionuclides and their progeny were analyzed. These parent radionuclides included uranium-238 (U-238), plutonium-238 (Pu-238), uranium-234 (U-234), thorium-230 (Th-230), and radium-226 (Ra-226). The peak flux of radon-222 due to each parent radionuclide was estimated for the simulation period of 10,100 years.

  9. The skin, a novel niche for recirculating B cells1

    PubMed Central

    Geherin, Skye A.; Fintushel, Sarah R.; Lee, Michael H.; Wilson, R. Paul; Patel, Reema T.; Alt, Carsten; Young, Alan J.; Hay, John B.; Debes, Gudrun F.

    2012-01-01

    B cells infiltrate the skin in many chronic inflammatory diseases caused by autoimmunity or infection. Despite potential contribution to disease, skin-associated B cells remain poorly characterized. Using an ovine model of granulomatous skin inflammation, we demonstrate that B cells increase in the skin and skin-draining afferent lymph during inflammation. Surprisingly, skin B cells are a heterogeneous population that is distinct from lymph node B cells, with more large lymphocytes as well as B-1-like B cells that co-express high levels IgM and CD11b. Skin B cells have increased MHCII, CD1, and CD80/86 expression compared with lymph node B cells, suggesting that they are well-suited for T cell activation at the site of inflammation. Furthermore, we show that skin accumulation of B cells and antibody-secreting cells during inflammation increases local antibody titers, which could augment host defense and autoimmunity. While skin B cells express typical skin homing receptors such as E-selectin ligand and alpha-4 and beta-1 integrins, they are unresponsive to ligands for chemokine receptors associated with T cell homing into skin. Instead, skin B cells migrate toward the cutaneously expressed CCR6 ligand CCL20. Our data support a model in which B cells use CCR6-CCL20 to recirculate through the skin, fulfilling a novel role in skin immunity and inflammation. PMID:22561151

  10. In situ treatment of VOCs by recirculation technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Siegrist, R.L.; Webb, O.F.; Ally, M.R.; Sanford, W.E.; Kearl, P.M.; Zutman, J.L.

    1993-06-01

    The project described herein was conducted by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to identify processes and technologies developed in Germany that appeared to have near-term potential for enhancing the cleanup of volatile organic compound (VOC) contaminated soil and groundwater at DOE sites. Members of the ORNL research team identified and evaluated selected German technologies developed at or in association with the University of Karlsruhe (UoK) for in situ treatment of VOC contaminated soils and groundwater. Project activities included contacts with researchers within three departments of the UoK (i.e., Applied Geology, Hydromechanics, and Soil and Foundation Engineering) during fall 1991 and subsequent visits to UoK and private industry collaborators during February 1992. Subsequent analyses consisted of engineering computations, groundwater flow modeling, and treatment process modeling. As a result of these project efforts, two processes were identified as having near-term potential for DOE: (1) the vacuum vaporizer well/groundwater recirculation well and (2) the porous pipe/horizontal well. This document was prepared to summarize the methods and results of the assessment activities completed during the initial year of the project. The project is still ongoing, so not all facets of the effort are completely described in this document. Recommendations for laboratory and field experiments are provided.

  11. Analysis of the sodium recirculation theory of solute-coupled water transport in small intestine

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Erik Hviid; Sørensen, Jakob Balslev; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær

    2002-01-01

    Our previous mathematical model of solute-coupled water transport through the intestinal epithelium is extended for dealing with electrolytes rather than electroneutral solutes. A 3Na+–2K+ pump in the lateral membranes provides the energy-requiring step for driving transjunctional and translateral flows of water across the epithelium with recirculation of the diffusible ions maintained by a 1Na+-1K+–2Cl− cotransporter in the plasma membrane facing the serosal compartment. With intracellular non-diffusible anions and compliant plasma membranes, the model describes the dependence on membrane permeabilities and pump constants of fluxes of water and electrolytes, volumes and ion concentrations of cell and lateral intercellular space (lis), and membrane potentials and conductances. Simulating physiological bioelectrical features together with cellular and paracellular fluxes of the sodium ion, computations predict that the concentration differences between lis and bathing solutions are small for all three ions. Nevertheless, the diffusion fluxes of the ions out of lis significantly exceed their mass transports. It is concluded that isotonic transport requires recirculation of all three ions. The computed sodium recirculation flux that is required for isotonic transport corresponds to that estimated in experiments on toad small intestine. This result is shown to be robust and independent of whether the apical entrance mechanism for the sodium ion is a channel, a SGLT1 transporter driving inward uphill water flux, or an electroneutral Na+–K+–2Cl− cotransporter. PMID:12096047

  12. Effect of enhanced leachate recirculated (ELR) landfill operation and gas extraction on greenhouse gas emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samir, Sonia

    emission resumed its original state before the recirculation. It should be noted that the change in emission was only limited near the pipe. No overall change in emission was observed from the cell due to the recirculation. The comparison between the emissions from the conventional and ELR cell showed an overall higher emission from the ELR cell which could be attributed to the overall higher gas generation from the ELR cell as well. The gas extraction had a direct impact on emission, the emission dropped substantially right after the gas extraction from the landfill. However, the gas was extracted once in a month and comparison with the amount of gas extraction and emission showed that the emission decreased as the gas extraction increased. An attempt was made to incorporate the effect of ELR operation and the gas extraction in the estimating the methane emission from the landfills. Multiple linear regression (MLR) model was developed using the statistical tool SAS. The developed model was validated and the model showed an excellent agreement between the predicted emission and the measured emission from the landfills (average variation 9.6%).

  13. SWAT Model Application to Assess the Impact of Intensive Corn‐farming on Runoff, Sediments and Phosphorous loss from an Agricultural Watershed in Wisconsin

    EPA Science Inventory

    The potential future increase in corn-based biofuel may be expected to have a negative impact on water quality in streams and lakes of the Midwestern US due to increased agricultural chemicals usage. This study used the SWAT model to assess the impact of continuous-corn farming o...

  14. SWAT Model Application to Assess the Impact of Intensive Corn‐farming on Runoff, Sediments and Phosphorous loss from an Agricultural Watershed in Wisconsin

    EPA Science Inventory

    The potential future increase in corn-based biofuel may be expected to have a negative impact on water quality in streams and lakes of the Midwestern US due to increased agricultural chemicals usage. This study used the SWAT model to assess the impact of continuous-corn farming o...

  15. Control of endemic swine flu persistence in farrow-to-finish pig farms: a stochastic metapopulation modeling assessment.

    PubMed

    Cador, Charlie; Andraud, Mathieu; Willem, Lander; Rose, Nicolas

    2017-10-03

    Swine influenza viruses (swIAVs) are known to persist endemically in farrow-to-finish pig farms, leading to repeated swine flu outbreaks in successive batches of pigs at a similar age (mostly around 8 weeks of age). This persistence in European swine herds involves swIAVs from European lineages including H1avN1, H1huN2, H3N2, the 2009 H1N1 pandemic virus and their reassortants. The specific population dynamics of farrow-to-finish pig farms, the immune status of the animals at infection-time, the co-circulation of distinct subtypes leading to consecutive or concomitant infections have been evidenced as factors favouring swIAV persistence within herds. We developed a stochastic metapopulation model representing the co-circulation of two distinct swIAVs within a typical farrow-to-finish pig herd to evaluate the risk of reassortant viruses generation due to co-infection events. Control strategies related to herd management and/or vaccination schemes (batch-to-batch or mass vaccination of the sow herd and vaccination of growing pigs) were implemented to assess their relative efficacy regarding viral persistence. The overall probability of a co-infection event for France, possibly leading to reassortment, was evaluated to 16.8%. The export of consecutive piglets batches was identified as the most efficient measure facilitating swIAV infection fade-out. Although some vaccination schemes (batch-to-batch vaccination) had a beneficial effect in breeding sows by reducing the persistence of swIAVs within this subpopulation, none of vaccination strategies achieved swIAVs fade-out within the entire farrow-to-finish pig herd.

  16. Aerobic and anoxic growth and nitrate removal capacity of a marine denitrifying bacterium isolated from a recirculation aquaculture system.

    PubMed

    Borges, Maria-Teresa; Sousa, André; De Marco, Paolo; Matos, Ana; Hönigová, Petra; Castro, Paula M L

    2008-01-01

    Bacterial biofilters used in marine recirculation aquaculture systems need improvements to enhance nitrogen removal efficiency. Relatively little is known about biofilter autochthonous population structure and function. The present study was aimed at isolating and characterizing an autochthonous denitrifying bacterium from a marine biofilter installed at a recirculation aquaculture system. Colonization of four different media in a marine fish farm was followed by isolation of various denitrifying strains and molecular classification of the most promising one, strain T2, as a novel member of the Pseudomonas fluorescens cluster. This strain exhibits high metabolic versatility regarding N and C source utilization and environmental conditions for growth. It removed nitrate through aerobic assimilatory metabolism at a specific rate of 116.2 mg NO(3)-N g dw(-1) h(-1). Dissimilatory NO(3)-N removal was observed under oxic conditions at a limited rate, where transient NO(2)-N formed represented 22% (0.17 mg L(-1)) of the maximum transient NO(2)-N observed under anoxic conditions. Dissimilatory NO(3)-N removal under anoxic conditions occurred at a specific rate of 53.5 mg NO(3)-N g dw(-1) h(-1). The isolated denitrifying strain was able to colonize different materials, such as granular activated carbon (GAC), Filtralite and Bioflow plastic rings, which allow the development of a prototype bioreactor for strain characterization under dynamic conditions and mimicking fish-farm operating conditions.

  17. e-Dairy: a dynamic and stochastic whole-farm model that predicts biophysical and economic performance of grazing dairy systems.

    PubMed

    Baudracco, J; Lopez-Villalobos, N; Holmes, C W; Comeron, E A; Macdonald, K A; Barry, T N

    2013-05-01

    A whole-farm, stochastic and dynamic simulation model was developed to predict biophysical and economic performance of grazing dairy systems. Several whole-farm models simulate grazing dairy systems, but most of them work at a herd level. This model, named e-Dairy, differs from the few models that work at an animal level, because it allows stochastic behaviour of the genetic merit of individual cows for several traits, namely, yields of milk, fat and protein, live weight (LW) and body condition score (BCS) within a whole-farm model. This model accounts for genetic differences between cows, is sensitive to genotype × environment interactions at an animal level and allows pasture growth, milk and supplements price to behave stochastically. The model includes an energy-based animal module that predicts intake at grazing, mammary gland functioning and body lipid change. This whole-farm model simulates a 365-day period for individual cows within a herd, with cow parameters randomly generated on the basis of the mean parameter values, defined as input and variance and co-variances from experimental data sets. The main inputs of e-Dairy are farm area, use of land, type of pasture, type of crops, monthly pasture growth rate, supplements offered, nutritional quality of feeds, herd description including herd size, age structure, calving pattern, BCS and LW at calving, probabilities of pregnancy, average genetic merit and economic values for items of income and costs. The model allows to set management policies to define: dry-off cows (ceasing of lactation), target pre- and post-grazing herbage mass and feed supplementation. The main outputs are herbage dry matter intake, annual pasture utilisation, milk yield, changes in BCS and LW, economic farm profit and return on assets. The model showed satisfactory accuracy of prediction when validated against two data sets from farmlet system experiments. Relative prediction errors were <10% for all variables, and concordance

  18. Cannula Design and Recirculation During Venovenous Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation

    PubMed Central

    Palmér, Oscar; Palmér, Kenneth; Hultman, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is used as a lifesaving rescue treatment in refractory respiratory or cardiac failure. During venovenous (VV) ECMO, the presence of recirculation is known, but quantification and actions to minimize recirculation after measurement are to date not routinely practiced. In the current study, we investigated the effect of draining cannula design on recirculation fraction (Rf) during VV ECMO; conventional mesh cannula was compared with a multistage cannula. The effect of adjusting cannula position was also studied. Recirculation was measured with ultrasound dilution technique at different ECMO flows and after cannula repositioning. All patients who were admitted to our unit between October 2014 and July 2015 catheterized by the atrio-femoral single lumen method were included. A total of 108 measurements were conducted in 14 patients. The multistage cannula showed significantly less recirculation (19.0 ± 12.2%) compared with the conventional design (38.0 ± 13.7). Pooled data in cases improved from adjustment showing reduced Rf by 7%. In conclusion, the choice of cannula matters, as does adjustment of the draining cannula position during atrio-femoral VV ECMO. By utilizing the ultrasound dilution technique to measure Rf before and after repositioning, effective ECMO flow can be improved for a more effective ECMO treatment. PMID:27660904

  19. Wind Speed Estimation and Parametrization of Wake Models for Downregulated Offshore Wind Farms within the scope of PossPOW Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Göçmen Bozkurt, Tuhfe; Giebel, Gregor; Kjølstad Poulsen, Niels; Mirzaei, Mahmood

    2014-06-01

    With increasing installed capacity, wind farms are requested to downregulate more frequently, especially in the offshore environment. Determination and verification of possible (or available) power of downregulated offshore wind farms are the aims of the PossPOW project (see PossPOW.dtu.dk). Two main challenges encountered in the project so far are the estimation of wind speed and the recreation of the flow inside the downregulated wind farm as if it is operating ideally. The rotor effective wind speed was estimated using power, pitch angle and rotational speed as inputs combined with a generic Cp model. The results have been compared with Horns Rev-I dataset and NREL 5MW simulations under both downregulation and normal operation states. For the real-time flow recreation, the GCLarsen single wake model was re-calibrated using a 1-s dataset from Horns Rev and tested for the downregulated period. The re-calibrated model has to be further parametrized to include dynamic effects such as wind direction variability and meandering also considering different averaging time scales before implemented in full scale wind farms.

  20. Bio-desulfurization of biogas using acidic biotrickling filter with dissolved oxygen in step feed recirculation.

    PubMed

    Chaiprapat, Sumate; Charnnok, Boonya; Kantachote, Duangporn; Sung, Shihwu

    2015-03-01

    Triple stage and single stage biotrickling filters (T-BTF and S-BTF) were operated with oxygenated liquid recirculation to enhance bio-desulfurization of biogas. Empty bed retention time (EBRT 100-180 s) and liquid recirculation velocity (q 2.4-7.1 m/h) were applied. H2S removal and sulfuric acid recovery increased with higher EBRT and q. But the highest q at 7.1 m/h induced large amount of liquid through the media, causing a reduction in bed porosity in S-BTF and H2S removal. Equivalent performance of S-BTF and T-BTF was obtained under the lowest loading of 165 gH2S/m(3)/h. In the subsequent continuous operation test, it was found that T-BTF could maintain higher H2S elimination capacity and removal efficiency at 175.6±41.6 gH2S/m(3)/h and 89.0±6.8% versus S-BTF at 159.9±42.8 gH2S/m(3)/h and 80.1±10.2%, respectively. Finally, the relationship between outlet concentration and bed height was modeled. Step feeding of oxygenated liquid recirculation in multiple stages clearly demonstrated an advantage for sulfide oxidation.

  1. A Generic Mechanism for Splitting and Shedding of Vortices and Recirculation Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassel, Kevin; Boghosian, Michael

    2014-11-01

    Vortex shedding is a common feature in many high-Reynolds number internal and external flows. While several mechanisms have been put forth to explain this important phenomenon in specific settings, a general framework that unifies these mechanisms and applies in a broad class of flows has not been forthcoming. A surprisingly simple minimal flow unit is identified in the present study and shown to apply in a wide variety of settings in which vortices or recirculation regions are found to split and shed in the vicinity of smooth surfaces. There are two necessary conditions for this mechanism: 1) a region of low momentum fluid (as found at the center of a slowly moving vortex or recirculation region), and 2) a pressure or body force having a particular structure acting on the region of low momentum. While the impetuous for the pressure or body force may vary, its action on the vortex or recirculation region is generic. The basic framework is illustrated and causality established through calculation of several simple model problems, and computational results for some canonical flows, such as shedding behind a circular cylinder and flow over a forward-facing step, are used to illustrate how the generic mechanism can be identified in real flows.

  2. [The Iowa Family Farm.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardesty, Carolyn, Ed.

    1990-01-01

    This issue of the "Goldfinch" focuses on the family farm of the past. All aspects of farm life are covered: what was grown on farms, how the chores were done and who was responsible for them, what the houses were like, and what tools and equipment were used. Comparisons are made between modern farms and farms of 50 or 150 years ago, and…

  3. AIR AND RADON PATHWAY MODELING FOR THE F-AREA TANK FARM

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, K; Mark Phifer, M

    2007-09-17

    The F-Area Tank Farm (FTF) is located within F-Area in the General Separations Area (GSA) of the Savannah River Site (SRS) as seen in Figure 1. The GSA contains the F and H Area Separations Facilities, the S-Area Defense Waste Processing Facility, the Z-Area Saltstone Facility, and the E-Area Low-Level Waste Disposal Facilities. The FTF is a nearly rectangular shaped area and comprises approximately 20 acres, which is bounded by SRS coordinates N 76,604.5 to N 77,560.0 and E 52,435.0 to E 53,369.0. SRS is in the process of preparing a Performance Assessment (PA) to support FTF closure. As part of the PA process, an analysis was conducted to evaluate the potential magnitude of gaseous release of radionuclides from the FTF over the 100-year institutional control period and 10,000-year post-closure compliance period. Specifically, an air and radon pathways analysis has been conducted to estimate the flux of volatile radionuclides and radon at the ground surface due to residual waste remaining in the tanks following closure. This analysis was used as the basis to estimate the dose to the maximally exposed individual (MEI) for the air pathway per Curie (Ci) of each radionuclide remaining in the combined FTF waste tanks. For the air pathway analysis, several gaseous radionuclides were considered. These included carbon-14 (C-14), chlorine-36 (Cl-36), iodine-129 (I-129), selenium-79 (Se-79), antimony-125 (Sb-125), tin-126 (Sn-126), tritium (H-3), and technetium-99 (Tc-99). The dose to the MEI was estimated at the SRS Boundary during the 100 year institutional control period. For the 10,000 year post closure compliance period, the dose to the MEI was estimated at the 100 m compliance point. For the radon pathway analysis, five parent radionuclides and their progeny were analyzed. These parent radionuclides included uranium-238 (U-238), plutonium-238 (Pu-238), uranium-234 (U-234), thorium-230 (Th-230), and radium-226 (Ra-226). The peak flux of radon-222 due to each parent

  4. Acceleration schedules for a recirculating heavy-ion accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, W.M.; Grote, D.P.

    2002-05-01

    Recent advances in solid-state switches have made it feasible to design programmable, high-repetition-rate pulsers for induction accelerators. These switches could lower the cost of recirculating induction accelerators, such as the ''small recirculator'' at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), by substantially reducing the number of induction modules. Numerical work is reported here to determine what effects the use of fewer pulsers at higher voltage would have on the beam quality of the LLNL small recirculator. Lattices with different numbers of pulsers are examined using the fluid/envelope code CIRCE, and several schedules for acceleration and compression are compared for each configuration. For selected schedules, the phase-space dynamics is also studied using the particle-in-cell code WARP3d.

  5. Hydrothermal carbonization: process water characterization and effects of water recirculation.

    PubMed

    Stemann, Jan; Putschew, Anke; Ziegler, Felix

    2013-09-01

    Poplar wood chips were treated hydrothermally and the increase of process efficiency by water recirculation was examined. About 15% of the carbon in the biomass was dissolved in the liquid phase when biomass was treated in de-ionized water at 220 °C for 4 h. The dissolved organic matter contained oxygen and was partly aerobically biodegradable. About 30-50% of the total organic carbon originated from organic acids. A polar and aromatic fraction was extracted and a major portion of the organic load was of higher molecular weight. By process water recirculation organic acids in the liquid phase concentrated and catalyzed dehydration reactions. As a consequence, functional groups in hydrothermally synthesized coal declined and dewaterability was enhanced. Recirculated reactive substances polymerized and formed additional solid substance. As a result, carbon and energetic yields of the produced coal rose to 84% and 82%, respectively.

  6. Boosting devices with integral features for recirculating exhaust gas

    DOEpatents

    Wu, Ko-Jen

    2015-12-22

    According to one embodiment of the invention, a turbine housing includes a turbine inlet in fluid communication with a turbine volute configured to house a turbine wheel, the turbine inlet configured to direct an exhaust gas flow from an engine to the turbine wheel. The turbine housing also includes a turbine outlet in fluid communication with the turbine volute, the turbine outlet configured to direct the exhaust gas flow to an exhaust gas conduit and a first exhaust gas recirculation supply port located on and in fluid communication with the turbine outlet, the first exhaust gas recirculation supply port being configured to direct a portion of the exhaust gas flow to an exhaust gas recirculation supply conduit.

  7. Using Stochastically Downscaled Climate Models and Multiproxy Lake Sediment Data to Connect Climatic Variations Over the Past 1000 Years and the History of Prehistoric Maize Farming in Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomson, M. J.; MacDonald, G. M.

    2015-12-01

    We are investigating the relationship between climatic variations over the past 1000 years and the history of prehistoric maize farming expansion and decline in the American Southwest, with a focus on Utah. We are examining both the downscaled climate models and high resolution analyses of lake cores and dendrochronological data matched with occupation information. We are testing the specific utility of stochastically downscaled general circulation models (viz. ECHO-G) to reconstruct local conditions for sites with documented prehistoric dryland farming through the so-called Medieval Climate Anomaly (MCA) and transition to the Little Ice Age (LIA). We are testing our model-based reconstructions with proxies of temperature and aridity from three subalpine lake sediment cores transecting Utah. We compare the patterns of climate change from the downscaled models and the paleoclimate records to a database of 837 radiocarbon dates over 169 locations of archaeological Native American maize-farmer site occupations in Utah.

  8. Modelling the Spread of Farming in the Bantu-Speaking Regions of Africa: An Archaeology-Based Phylogeography

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Thembi; Silva, Fabio; Steele, James

    2014-01-01

    We use archaeological data and spatial methods to reconstruct the dispersal of farming into areas of sub-Saharan Africa now occupied by Bantu language speakers, and introduce a new large-scale radiocarbon database and a new suite of spatial modelling techniques. We also introduce a method of estimating phylogeographic relationships from archaeologically-modelled dispersal maps, with results produced in a format that enables comparison with linguistic and genetic phylogenies. Several hypotheses are explored. The ‘deep split’ hypothesis suggests that an early-branching eastern Bantu stream spread around the northern boundary of the equatorial rainforest, but recent linguistic and genetic work tends not to support this. An alternative riverine/littoral hypothesis suggests that rivers and coastlines facilitated the migration of the first farmers/horticulturalists, with some extending this to include rivers through the rainforest as conduits to East Africa. More recently, research has shown that a grassland corridor opened through the rainforest at around 3000–2500 BP, and the possible effect of this on migrating populations is also explored. Our results indicate that rivers and coasts were important dispersal corridors, but do not resolve the debate about a ‘Deep Split’. Future work should focus on improving the size, quality and geographical coverage of the archaeological 14C database; on augmenting the information base to establish descent relationships between archaeological sites and regions based on shared material cultural traits; and on refining the associated physical geographical reconstructions of changing land cover. PMID:24498213

  9. Modelling the spread of farming in the Bantu-speaking regions of Africa: an archaeology-based phylogeography.

    PubMed

    Russell, Thembi; Silva, Fabio; Steele, James

    2014-01-01

    We use archaeological data and spatial methods to reconstruct the dispersal of farming into areas of sub-Saharan Africa now occupied by Bantu language speakers, and introduce a new large-scale radiocarbon database and a new suite of spatial modelling techniques. We also introduce a method of estimating phylogeographic relationships from archaeologically-modelled dispersal maps, with results produced in a format that enables comparison with linguistic and genetic phylogenies. Several hypotheses are explored. The 'deep split' hypothesis suggests that an early-branching eastern Bantu stream spread around the northern boundary of the equatorial rainforest, but recent linguistic and genetic work tends not to support this. An alternative riverine/littoral hypothesis suggests that rivers and coastlines facilitated the migration of the first farmers/horticulturalists, with some extending this to include rivers through the rainforest as conduits to East Africa. More recently, research has shown that a grassland corridor opened through the rainforest at around 3000-2500 BP, and the possible effect of this on migrating populations is also explored. Our results indicate that rivers and coasts were important dispersal corridors, but do not resolve the debate about a 'Deep Split'. Future work should focus on improving the size, quality and geographical coverage of the archaeological (14)C database; on augmenting the information base to establish descent relationships between archaeological sites and regions based on shared material cultural traits; and on refining the associated physical geographical reconstructions of changing land cover.

  10. Applying Bayesian network modelling to understand the links between on-farm biosecurity practice during the 2007 equine influenza outbreak and horse managers' perceptions of a subsequent outbreak.

    PubMed

    Firestone, Simon M; Lewis, Fraser I; Schemann, Kathrin; Ward, Michael P; Toribio, Jenny-Ann L M L; Taylor, Melanie R; Dhand, Navneet K

    2014-10-01

    Australia experienced its first ever outbreak of equine influenza in August 2007. Horses on 9359 premises were infected over a period of 5 months before the disease was successfully eradicated through the combination of horse movement controls, on-farm biosecurity and vaccination. In a previous premises-level case-control study of the 2007 equine influenza outbreak in Australia, the protective effect of several variables representing on-farm biosecurity practices were identified. Separately, factors associated with horse managers' perceptions of the effectiveness of biosecurity measures have been identified. In this analysis we applied additive Bayesian network modelling to describe the complex web of associations linking variables representing on-farm human behaviours during the 2007 equine influenza outbreak (compliance or lack thereof with advised personal biosecurity measures) and horse managers' perceptions of the effectiveness of such measures in the event of a subsequent outbreak. Heuristic structure discovery enabled identification of a robust statistical model for 31 variables representing biosecurity practices and perceptions of the owners and managers of 148 premises. The Bayesian graphical network model we present statistically describes the associations linking horse managers' on-farm biosecurity practices during an at-risk period in the 2007 outbreak and their perceptions of whether such measures will be effective in a future outbreak. Practice of barrier infection control measures were associated with a heightened perception of preparedness, whereas horse managers that considered their on-farm biosecurity to be more stringent during the outbreak period than normal practices had a heightened perception of the effectiveness of other measures such as controlling access to the premises. Past performance in an outbreak setting may indeed be a reliable predictor of future perceptions, and should be considered when targeting infection control guidance to

  11. A study of NO{sub x} reduction by fuel injection recirculation. Topical report, June--December, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Turns, S.R.; Feese, J.J.

    1996-01-01

    Flue-gas recirculation (FGR) is a well-known method used to control oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}) in industrial burner applications. Recent small- and large-scale experiments have shown that introducing the recirculated flue gases with the fuel results in a much greater reduction in NO{sub x}, per unit mass of gas recirculated, in comparison to introducing the flue gases with the combustion air. That fuel injection recirculation (FIR) is more effective than windbox FGR is quite remarkable. At present, however, there is no definitive understanding of why FIR is more effective than conventional FGR. The objective of this research is to ascertain whether or not chemical and/or molecular transport effects alone can explain the differences in NO{sub x} reduction observed between FIR and FGR. This knowledge will aid in the rational application and optimization of FIR in a wide variety of industrial applications. A combined modeling and experimental program is in progress to achieve the research objectives. This report discusses, first, computer modeling studies of counterflow diffusion flames employing detailed chemical kinetics for methane combustion and NO{sub x} formation, and, second, experimental studies of laminar, CH{sub 4}-air, jet flames.

  12. Phase Transfer Measurements at the Jefferson Lab Recirculated Linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Geoffrey Krafft; J. Hovater; B. Bowling; M. Crofford

    2005-06-01

    Bunch length or longitudinal phase space distribution measurements are often used to evaluate if the electron beam meets RF criteria for a recirculated linac. Unfortunately, in many instances when the beam fails to meet the needed criteria, such measurements provide little guidance as to which machine element is problematic. All of the Jefferson Lab recirculated linacs have employed longitudinal phase transfer measurement systems to provide both useful information on the initial understanding of the dynamics of the longitudinal phase space in these accelerators, and much more useful diagnosis of out-of-specification performance of machine RF elements. These systems can provide precision transfer function measurements in time scales convenient for machine operations.

  13. A recirculating cooling system for improved topical cardiac hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Rosenfeldt, F L; Fambiatos, A; Pastoriza-Pinol, J; Stirling, G R

    1981-10-01

    A simple system is described that recirculates cooling fluid for topical cardiac hypothermia. This disposable system can produce a flow of 1,500 ml/min at 2 degrees to 4 degrees C. The recirculating cooler produced significantly lower myocardial temperatures than a conventional fluid-discard system in 22 patients having coronary operation. This system has been used as part of the technique of hypothermic cardioplegia in more than 600 patients. During various cardiac procedures, septal temperatures were maintained well below 20 degrees C for 60 minutes or more without the need to reinfuse the cardioplegic solution.

  14. Boosting devices with integral features for recirculating exhaust gas

    DOEpatents

    Wu, Ko -Jen

    2015-09-15

    According to one embodiment of the invention, a compressor housing includes a compressor inlet in fluid communication with a compressor volute configured to house a compressor wheel, the compressor inlet configured to provide a first air flow to the compressor wheel and a compressor outlet in fluid communication with the compressor volute, the compressor outlet configured to direct a compressed gas to an intake manifold. The compressor housing further includes an exhaust gas recirculation inlet port in fluid communication with the compressor volute, the exhaust gas recirculation inlet port being configured to combine an exhaust gas flow with the air flow to the compressor wheel.

  15. Full-scale demonstration of in situ cometabolic biodegradation of trichloroethylene in groundwater 1. Dynamics of a recirculating well system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gandhi, Rahul K.; Hopkins, Gary D.; Goltz, Mark N.; Gorelick, Steven M.; McCarty, Perry L.

    2002-04-01

    Recirculating well systems provide an engine for the in situ treatment of subsurface contaminants. Although numerous recirculating wells have been installed in the field, for such systems, there is a paucity of comprehensive monitoring data and models constrained to data appearing in the research literature. Here we present an extensive data set combined with detailed inverse and simulation analyses for a two-well groundwater recirculation system used for in situ bioremediation at Edwards Air Force Base in southern California. The ``conveyor belt'' flow system, which was established for in situ treatment of trichloroethylene (TCE) in two bioactive zones, was created by pumping water upward in one well and downward in another well, each well being screened in both the upper and lower aquifers. A bromide tracer test was conducted and extensively monitored for 60 days. Combined inverse analysis was conducted on hydraulic heads from 38 monitoring wells, 32 bromide concentration histories, and a constraint on the degree of recirculation that was based on TCE concentration data. Four different formulations involving alternative weighting schemes used in a nonlinear weighted least squares simulation-regression analysis were explored. The best formulation provided parameter estimates with tight bounds on estimated covariances, suggesting that the model provides a reasonable description of the hydrogeologic system. Our investigation indicates the geometry of the recirculation zone and the degree of recirculation under two different sets of operating conditions. Surprisingly, our analysis suggests that the effects of aquifer heterogeneity are not significant at this site under the conditions of forced recirculation. Furthermore, anomalous flow through an open monitoring well created significant vertical short-circuiting between the generally insulated aquifers. Flow through this small open conduit was equivalent to as much as 33% of the flow through the pumping wells. Using

  16. A multilevel model of the impact of farm-level best management practices on phosphorus runoff

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Multilevel or hierarchical models have been applied for a number of years in the social sciences but only relatively recently in the environmental sciences. These models can be developed in either a frequentist or Bayesian context and have similarities to other methods such as empirical Bayes analys...

  17. Dynamics of Salmonella transmission on a British pig grower-finisher farm: a stochastic model

    PubMed Central

    HILL, A. A.; SNARY, E. L.; ARNOLD, M. E.; ALBAN, L.; COOK, A. J. C.

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY Previous modelling studies have estimated that between 1% and 10% of human salmonella infections are attributable to pig meat consumption. In response to this food safety threat the British pig industry have initiated a salmonella monitoring programme. It is anticipated that this programme will contribute to achieving a UK Food Standards Agency target for reducing salmonella levels in pigs at slaughter by 50% within 5 years. In order to better inform the monitoring programme, we have developed a stochastic transmission model for salmonella in a specialist grower-finisher pig herd, where data from a Danish longitudinal study have been used to estimate some of the key model parameters. The model estimates that about 17% of slaughter-age pigs will be infected with salmonella, and that of these infected pigs about 4% will be excreting the organism. In addition, the model shows that the most effective control strategies will be those that reduce between-pen transmission. PMID:17475090

  18. Advanced Modeling System for Optimization of Wind Farm Layout and Wind Turbine Sizing Using a Multi-Level Extended Pattern Search Algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    DuPont, Bryony; Cagan, Jonathan; Moriarty, Patrick

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents a system of modeling advances that can be applied in the computational optimization of wind plants. These modeling advances include accurate cost and power modeling, partial wake interaction, and the effects of varying atmospheric stability. To validate the use of this advanced modeling system, it is employed within an Extended Pattern Search (EPS)-Multi-Agent System (MAS) optimization approach for multiple wind scenarios. The wind farm layout optimization problem involves optimizing the position and size of wind turbines such that the aerodynamic effects of upstream turbines are reduced, which increases the effective wind speed and resultant power at each turbine. The EPS-MAS optimization algorithm employs a profit objective, and an overarching search determines individual turbine positions, with a concurrent EPS-MAS determining the optimal hub height and rotor diameter for each turbine. Two wind cases are considered: (1) constant, unidirectional wind, and (2) three discrete wind speeds and varying wind directions, each of which have a probability of occurrence. Results show the advantages of applying the series of advanced models compared to previous application of an EPS with less advanced models to wind farm layout optimization, and imply best practices for computational optimization of wind farms with improved accuracy.

  19. Comparing SEBAL and METRIC: Evapotranspiration Models Applied to Paramount Farms Almond Orchards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furey, B. J.; Kefauver, S. C.

    2011-12-01

    Two evapotranspiration models were applied to almond and pistachio orchards in California. The SEBAL model, developed by W.G.M. Bastiaanssen, was programmed in MatLab for direct comparison to the METRIC model, developed by R.G. Allen and the IDWR. Remote sensing data from the NASA SARP 2011 Airborne Research Program was used in the application of these models. An evaluation of the models showed that they both followed the same pattern in evapotranspiration (ET) rates for different types of ground cover. The models exhibited a slightly different range of values and appeared to be related (non-linearly). The models both underestimated the actual ET at the CIMIS weather station. However, SEBAL overestimated the ET of the almond orchards by 0.16 mm/hr when applying its crop coefficient to the reference ET. This is compared to METRIC, which underestimated the ET of the almond orchards by only 0.10 mm/hr. Other types of ground cover were similarly compared. Temporal variability in ET rates between the morning and afternoon were also observed.

  20. An integrated modelling framework to aid smallholder farming system management in the Olifants River Basin, South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magombeyi, M. S.; Taigbenu, A. E.

    Computerised integrated models from science contribute to better informed and holistic assessments of multifaceted policies and technologies than individual models. This view has led to considerable effort being devoted to developing integrated models to support decision-making under integrated water resources management (IWRM). Nevertheless, an appraisal of previous and ongoing efforts to develop such decision support systems shows considerable deficiencies in attempts to address the hydro-socio-economic effects on livelihoods. To date, no universal standard integration method or framework is in use. For the existing integrated models, their application failures have pointed to the lack of stakeholder participation. In an endeavour to close this gap, development and application of a seasonal time-step integrated model with prediction capability is presented in this paper. This model couples existing hydrology, agronomy and socio-economic models with feedbacks to link livelihoods of resource-constrained smallholder farmers to water resources at catchment level in the semi-arid Olifants subbasin in South Africa. These three models, prior to coupling, were calibrated and validated using observed data and participation of local stakeholders. All the models gave good representation of the study conditions, as indicated by the statistical indicators. The integrated model is of general applicability, hence can be extended to other catchments. The impacts of untied ridges, planting basins and supplemental irrigation were compared to conventional rainfed tillage under maize crop production and for different farm typologies. Over the 20 years of simulation, the predicted benefit of untied ridges and planting basins versus conventional rainfed tillage on surface runoff (Mm 3/year) reduction was 14.3% and 19.8%, respectively, and about 41-46% sediment yield (t/year) reduction in the catchment. Under supplemental irrigation, maize yield improved by up to 500% from the long

  1. The recirculation of the intermediate western boundary current at the Tubarão Bight - Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Vladimir S.; Mill, Guilherme N.; Gabioux, Mariela; Grossmann-Matheson, Guisela S.; Paiva, Afonso M.

    2017-02-01

    Lagrangian floats and current meter measurements from two moored arrays are analyzed, in combination with altimetry data, in order to investigate the recirculation of Antarctic Intermediate Waters (AAIW), and of the Intermediate Western Boundary Current (IWBC) at the Tubarão Bight, in the vicinity of the Vitória-Trindade Ridge (VTR), Brazil. Results from a high-resolution numerical simulation provide a complementary view of the flow at intermediate and surface levels. The data depict a topographically-induced cyclonic recirculation at intermediate levels, and five Argo floats are successively trapped inside the bight for two-and-a-half years, performing a total of 10 closed clockwise gyres during this period of time. In situ measurements at the western side of the bight show an intense alongshore flow at intermediate levels, with averaged velocities at 800 m of 30 cm/s, and peak velocities exceeding 50 cm/s, magnitudes comparable to the Brazil Current (BC) flow at surface levels. The recirculation extends from at least 1000 m deep up to 370 m, reaching sometimes depths as shallow as 150 m, but is mostly uncoupled from the surface flow during the one-and-a-half year long current meter record. Three different flow patterns are observed, and simulated, at surface levels inside the bight during the time the recirculation is well established at intermediate levels: a shallow cyclonic circulation, somewhat akin to the Vitória Eddy; a recurrent anticyclonic flow that encompasses the entire bight; and a southwestward-oriented circulation, associated with the BC being reorganized in a coherent flow after negotiating its way through the VTR channels. A significant portion (about 50% according to the model) of the inflow of intermediate waters recirculates, enhancing the flow of the IWBC within the bight, and increasing the age of AAIW that will eventually cross the VTR on its way to lower latitudes. Although the data are not conclusive about a preferential pathway of the

  2. In-tank aeration, a necessary compliment of loaded systems in an airlift recirculating aquaculture system

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Water treatment components in recirculating aquaculture systems in generally address solids removal, nitrification, circulation, aeration, and degasification. Airlift pumps in a recirculating aquaculture system can address water circulation, aeration, and degasification. Recent data indicates oxygen...

  3. Physical Properties Models for Simulation of Processes to Treat INEEL Tank Farm Waste: Thermodynamic Equilibrium

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, Todd Travis; Taylor, Dean Dalton

    2002-07-01

    A status is presented of the development during FY2002 of a database for physical properties models for the simulation of the treatment of Sodium-Bearing Waste (SBW) at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. An activity coefficient model is needed for concentrated, aqueous, multi-electrolyte solutions that can be used by process design practitioners. Reasonable first-order estimates of activity coefficients in the relevant media are needed rather than an incremental improvement in theoretical approaches which are not usable by practitioners. A comparison of the Electrolyte Non-Random Two-Liquid (ENRTL) and Pitzer ion-interaction models for the thermodynamic representation of SBW is presented. It is concluded that Pitzer's model is superior to ENRTL in modeling treatment processes for SBW. The applicability of the Pitzer treatment to high concentrations of pertinent species and to the determination of solubilities and chemical equilibria is addressed. Alternate values of Pitzer parameters for HCl, H2SO4, and HNO3 are proposed, applicable up to 16m, and 12m, respectively. Partial validation of the implementation of Pitzer's treatment within the commercial process simulator ASPEN Plus was performed.

  4. Physical Properties Models for Simulation of Processes to Treat INEEL Tank Farm Waste: Thermodynamic Equilibrium

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, T.T.; Taylor, D.D.

    2002-07-18

    A status is presented of the development during FY2002 of a database for physical properties models for the simulation of the treatment of Sodium-Bearing Waste (SBW) at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. An activity coefficient model is needed for concentrated, aqueous, multi-electrolyte solutions that can be used by process design practitioners. Reasonable first-order estimates of activity coefficients in the relevant media are needed rather than an incremental improvement in theoretical approaches which are not usable by practitioners. A comparison of the Electrolyte Non-Random Two-Liquid (ENRTL) and Pitzer ion-interaction models for the thermodynamic representation of SBW is presented. It is concluded that Pitzer's model is superior to ENRTL in modeling treatment processes for SBW. The applicability of the Pitzer treatment to high concentrations of pertinent species and to the determination of solubilities and chemical equilibria is addressed. Alternate values of Pitzer parameters for HCl, H2SO4, and HNO3 are proposed, applicable up to 16m, and 12m, respectively. Partial validation of the implementation of Pitzer's treatment within the commercial process simulator ASPEN Plus was performed.

  5. The effects of the pulsatile period on the size of recirculation bubble in the vicinity of stent struts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, B.; Thondapu, V.; Barlis, P.; Poon, E. K. W.; Ooi, A. S. H.

    2017-04-01

    Incomplete stent apposition (ISA) is sometimes found in stent deployment at complex lesions, and it is considered to be one of the causes of post-stenting complications, such as late stent thrombosis and restenosis. The presence of ISA leads to large recirculation bubbles behind the stent struts, which can reduce shear stress at the arterial wall that retards neointimal formation process and thus lead to complications. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations are performed on simplified two-dimensional axisymmetric arterial models with stents struts of square and circular cross-sectional shapes at a malapposition distance of 120 μm from the arterial wall. To investigate the effects of pulsatile flow period on the dynamics of the recirculation bubbles, high fidelity simulations are carried out with pulsatile flows of period 0.4 s and 0.8 s. Under the condition of the same flow rate, both square and circular strut cases show that shorter period provides greater flow deceleration, leading to the formation of a larger recirculation bubble. With the same thickness, circular strut has a significant improvement over the square strut in terms of the size of the recirculation bubble, and therefore less likely to lead to complications.

  6. Reduction in performance due to recirculation in mechanical-draft cooling towers

    SciTech Connect

    Kroger, D.G. )

    1989-01-01

    The influence of recirculating warm plume air on the performance of mechanical-draft cooling towers is investigated analytically, numerically and experimentally. It is shown that the amount of recirculation that occurs is a function of the flow and the thermal and geometric characteristics of the tower. The presence of a wind wall tends to reduce the mount of recirculation. An equation is presented with which the performance effectiveness due to recirculation can be evaluated approximately for a mechanical-draft cooling tower.

  7. Household and farm transitions in environmental context.

    PubMed

    Leonard, Susan Hautaniemi; Deane, Glenn D; Gutmann, Myron P

    2011-06-01

    Recent debate in the literature on population, environment, and land use questions the applicability of theory that patterns of farm extensification and intensification correspond to the life course of farmers and to the life cycle of farm families. This paper extends the debate to the agricultural development of the United States Great Plains region, using unique data from 1875 to 1930 that link families to farms over time in 25 environmentally diverse Kansas townships. Results of multilevel statistical modeling indicate that farmer's age, household size, and household structure are simultaneously related to both the extent of farm operations and the intensity of land use, taking into account local environmental conditions and time trends as Kansas was settled and developed. These findings validate farm- and life cycle theories and offer support for intergenerational motivations for farm development that include both daughters and sons. Environmental variation in aridity was a key driver of farm structure.

  8. Household and farm transitions in environmental context

    PubMed Central

    Deane, Glenn D.; Gutmann, Myron P.

    2010-01-01

    Recent debate in the literature on population, environment, and land use questions the applicability of theory that patterns of farm extensification and intensification correspond to the life course of farmers and to the life cycle of farm families. This paper extends the debate to the agricultural development of the United States Great Plains region, using unique data from 1875 to 1930 that link families to farms over time in 25 environmentally diverse Kansas townships. Results of multilevel statistical modeling indicate that farmer’s age, household size, and household structure are simultaneously related to both the extent of farm operations and the intensity of land use, taking into account local environmental conditions and time trends as Kansas was settled and developed. These findings validate farm- and life cycle theories and offer support for intergenerational motivations for farm development that include both daughters and sons. Environmental variation in aridity was a key driver of farm structure. PMID:21643468

  9. Low head oxygenator performance characterization for marine recirculating aquaculture systems

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This study evaluated the effect of temperature (20 and 25 ºC), salinity (10, 15, and 20 ppt), and dissolved oxygen levels within low head oxygenator (LHO) outlet water on oxygen transfer efficiency (OTE) of LHOs for a planned marine recirculating aquaculture system (RAS). Test results indicated tha...

  10. An Inexpensive Recirculating Aquaculture System with Multiple Use Capabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scurlock, Gerald Don, Jr.; Cook, S. Bradford; Scurlock, Carrie Ann

    1999-01-01

    Describes the construction of an inexpensive recirculating aquaculture system that can hold up to 46 pounds of fish, invertebrates, and mussels for classroom use. The system is versatile, requires little maintenance, and can be used for both teaching and research purposes. (WRM)

  11. High-Power Picosecond Pulse Recirculation for Inverse Compton Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jovanovic, Igor; Shverdin, Miro; Gibson, David; Brown, Curtis; Gronberg, Jeff

    2008-11-01

    In the next generation of linear colliders, inverse Compton scattering (ICS) of intense laser pulses on relativistic electron bunches will enable a mode of operation based on energetic γe and γγ collisions, with a significant complementary scientific potential. The efficiency of γ-ray generation via ICS is constrained by the Thomson scattering cross section, resulting in typical laser photon-to- γ efficiencies of <10 -9. Furthermore, repetition rates of the state-of-art high-energy short-pulse lasers are poorly matched with those available from electron accelerators. Laser recirculation has been proposed as a method to address those limitations, but has been limited to only small pulse energies and peak powers. We propose and experimentally demonstrate an alternative, non-interferometric method for laser pulse recirculation that is uniquely capable of recirculating short pulses with energies exceeding 1 J [ I. Jovanovic, M. Shverdin, D. Gibson, and C. Brown, Nucl. Instrum. Methods A 578 160 (2007)]. ICS of recirculated Joule-level laser pulses is compatible with the proposed pulse structure for ILC and has a potential to produce unprecedented peak and average γ-ray brightness in the next generation of sources.

  12. Towards Non-thrombogenic Performance of Blood Recirculating Devices

    PubMed Central

    Bluestein, D.; Chandran, K. B.; Manning, K. B.

    2010-01-01

    Implantable blood recirculating devices have provided life saving solutions to patients with severe cardiovascular diseases. However, common problems of hemolysis and thromboembolism remain an impediment to these devices. In this article, we present a brief review of the work by several groups in the field that has led to the development of new methodologies that may facilitate achieving the daunting goal of optimizing the thrombogenic performance of blood recirculating devices. The aim is to describe work which pertains to the interaction between flow-induced stresses and the blood constituents, and that supports the hypothesis that thromboembolism in prosthetic blood recirculating devices is initiated and maintained primarily by the non-physiological flow patterns and stresses that activate and enhance the aggregation of blood platelets, increasing the risk of thromboembolism and cardioembolic stroke. Such work includes state-of-the-art numerical and experimental tools used to elucidate flow-induced mechanisms leading to thromboembolism in prosthetic devices. Following the review, the paper describes several efforts conducted by some of the groups active in the field, and points to several directions that should be pursued in the future in order to achieve the goal for blood recirculating prosthetic devices becoming more effective as destination therapy in the future. PMID:20131098

  13. Use of low temperature blowers for recirculation of hot gases

    DOEpatents

    Maru, H.C.; Forooque, M.

    1982-08-19

    An apparatus is described for maintaining motors at low operating temperatures during recirculation of hot gases in fuel cell operations and chemical processes such as fluidized bed coal gasification. The apparatus includes a means for separating the hot process gas from the motor using a secondary lower temperature gas, thereby minimizing the temperature increase of the motor and associated accessories.

  14. 33 CFR 159.127 - Safety coliform count: Recirculating devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Safety coliform count: Recirculating devices. 159.127 Section 159.127 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION MARINE SANITATION DEVICES Design, Construction, and Testing §...

  15. 33 CFR 159.127 - Safety coliform count: Recirculating devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Safety coliform count: Recirculating devices. 159.127 Section 159.127 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION MARINE SANITATION DEVICES Design, Construction, and Testing §...

  16. 33 CFR 159.127 - Safety coliform count: Recirculating devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Safety coliform count: Recirculating devices. 159.127 Section 159.127 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION MARINE SANITATION DEVICES Design, Construction, and Testing §...

  17. 33 CFR 159.127 - Safety coliform count: Recirculating devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Safety coliform count: Recirculating devices. 159.127 Section 159.127 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION MARINE SANITATION DEVICES Design, Construction, and Testing §...

  18. 33 CFR 159.127 - Safety coliform count: Recirculating devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Safety coliform count: Recirculating devices. 159.127 Section 159.127 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION MARINE SANITATION DEVICES Design, Construction, and Testing §...

  19. An Inexpensive Recirculating Aquaculture System with Multiple Use Capabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scurlock, Gerald Don, Jr.; Cook, S. Bradford; Scurlock, Carrie Ann

    1999-01-01

    Describes the construction of an inexpensive recirculating aquaculture system that can hold up to 46 pounds of fish, invertebrates, and mussels for classroom use. The system is versatile, requires little maintenance, and can be used for both teaching and research purposes. (WRM)

  20. Modelling drivers of mangrove propagule dispersal and restoration of abandoned shrimp farms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Nitto, D.; Erftemeijer, P. L. A.; van Beek, J. K. L.; Dahdouh-Guebas, F.; Higazi, L.; Quisthoudt, K.; Jayatissa, L. P.; Koedam, N.

    2013-07-01

    Propagule dispersal of four mangrove species Rhizophora mucronata, R. apiculata, Ceriops tagal and Avicennia officinalis in the Pambala-Chilaw Lagoon Complex (Sri Lanka) was studied by combining a hydrodynamic model with species-specific knowledge on propagule dispersal behaviour. Propagule transport was simulated using a finite-volume advection-diffusion model to investigate the effect of dispersal vectors (tidal flow, freshwater discharge and wind), trapping agents (retention by vegetation) and seed characteristics (buoyancy) on propagule dispersal patterns. Sensitivity analysis showed that smaller propagules, like the oval-shaped propagules of Avicennia officinalis, dispersed over larger distances and were most sensitive to changing values of retention by mangrove vegetation compared to larger, torpedo-shaped propagules of Rhizophora spp. and C. tagal. Directional propagule dispersal in this semi-enclosed lagoon with a small tidal range was strongly concentrated towards the edges of the lagoon and channels. Short distance dispersal appeared to be the main dispersal strategy for all four studied species, with most of the propagules being retained within the vegetation. Only a small proportion (max. 5%) of propagules left the lagoon through a channel connecting the lagoon with the open sea. Wind significantly influenced dispersal distance and direction once propagules entered the lagoon or adjacent channels. Implications of these findings for mangrove restoration were tested by simulating partial removal in the model of dikes around abandoned shrimp ponds to restore tidal hydrology and facilitate natural recolonisation by mangroves. The specific location of dike removal, (with respect to the vicinity of mangroves and independently suitable hydrodynamic flows), was found to significantly affect the resultant quantities and species of inflowing propagules and hence the potential effectiveness of natural regeneration. These results demonstrate the value of propagule

  1. Modelling drivers of mangrove propagule dispersal and restoration of abandoned shrimp farms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Nitto, D.; Erftemeijer, P. L. A.; van Beek, J. K. L.; Dahdouh-Guebas, F.; Higazi, L.; Quisthoudt, K.; Jayatissa, L. P.; Koedam, N.

    2013-01-01

    Propagule dispersal of four mangrove species Rhizophora mucronata, R. apiculata, Ceriops tagal and Avicennia officinalis in the Pambala-Chilaw Lagoon Complex (Sri Lanka) was studied by combining a hydrodynamic model with species-specific knowledge on propagule dispersal behaviour. Propagule transport was simulated using a finite-volume advection-diffusion model to investigate the effect of dispersal vectors (tidal flow, freshwater discharge and wind), trapping agents (retention by vegetation) and seed characteristics (buoyancy) on propagule dispersal patterns. Sensitivity analysis showed that smaller propagules, like the oval-shaped propagules of Avicennia officinalis, dispersed over larger distances and were most sensitive to changing values of retention by mangrove vegetation compared to larger, torpedo-shaped propagules of Rhizophora spp. and C. tagal. Directional propagule dispersal in this semi-enclosed lagoon with a small tidal range was strongly concentrated towards the edges of the lagoon and channels. Short distance dispersal appeared to be the main dispersal strategy for all four studied species, with most of the propagules being retained within the vegetation. Only a small proportion (max. 5%) of propagules left the lagoon through a channel connecting the lagoon with the open sea. Wind significantly influenced dispersal distance and direction once propagules entered the lagoon or adjacent channels. Implications of these findings for mangrove restoration were tested by simulating partial removal in the model of dikes around abandoned shrimp ponds to restore tidal hydrology and facilitate natural recolonisation by mangroves. The specific location of dike removal, (with respect to the vicinity of mangroves and independently suitable hydrodynamic flows), was found to significantly affect the resultant quantities and species of inflowing of propagules and hence the potential effectiveness of natural regeneration. These results demonstrate the value of

  2. Inferring heat recirculation and albedo for exoplanetary atmospheres: Comparing optical phase curves and secondary eclipse data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Paris, P.; Gratier, P.; Bordé, P.; Selsis, F.

    2016-03-01

    Context. Basic atmospheric properties, such as albedo and heat redistribution between day- and nightsides, have been inferred for a number of planets using observations of secondary eclipses and thermal phase curves. Optical phase curves have not yet been used to constrain these atmospheric properties consistently. Aims: We model previously published phase curves of CoRoT-1b, TrES-2b, and HAT-P-7b, and infer albedos and recirculation efficiencies. These are then compared to previous estimates based on secondary eclipse data. Methods: We use a physically consistent model to construct optical phase curves. This model takes Lambertian reflection, thermal emission, ellipsoidal variations, and Doppler boosting, into account. Results: CoRoT-1b shows a non-negligible scattering albedo (0.11 < AS < 0.3 at 95% confidence) as well as small day-night temperature contrasts, which are indicative of moderate to high re-distribution of energy between dayside and nightside. These values are contrary to previous secondary eclipse and phase curve analyses. In the case of HAT-P-7b, model results suggest a relatively high scattering albedo (AS ≈ 0.3). This confirms previous phase curve analysis; however, it is in slight contradiction to values inferred from secondary eclipse data. For TrES-2b, both approaches yield very similar estimates of albedo and heat recirculation. Discrepancies between recirculation and albedo values as inferred from secondary eclipse and optical phase curve analyses might be interpreted as a hint that optical and IR observations probe different atmospheric layers, hence temperatures.

  3. IEA-Task 31 WAKEBENCH: Towards a protocol for wind farm flow model evaluation. Part 1: Flow-over-terrain models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanz Rodrigo, Javier; Gancarski, Pawel; Chavez Arroyo, Roberto; Moriarty, Patrick; Chuchfield, Matthew; Naughton, Jonathan W.; Hansen, Kurt S.; Machefaux, Ewan; Koblitz, Tilman; Maguire, Eoghan; Castellani, Francesco; Terzi, Ludovico; Breton, Simon-Philippe; Ueda, Yuko; Prospathopoulos, John; Oxley, Gregory S.; Peralta, Carlos; Zhang, Xiadong; Witha, Björn

    2014-06-01

    The IEA Task 31 Wakebench is setting up a framework for the evaluation of wind farm flow models operating at microscale level. The framework consists on a model evaluation protocol integrated on a web-based portal for model benchmarking (www.windbench.net). This paper provides an overview of the building-block validation approach applied to flow-over-terrain models, including best practices for the benchmarking and data processing procedures for the analysis and qualification of validation datasets from wind resource assessment campaigns. A hierarchy of test cases has been proposed for flow-over-terrain model evaluation, from Monin- Obukhov similarity theory for verification of surface-layer properties, to the Leipzig profile for the near-neutral atmospheric boundary layer, to flow over isolated hills (Askervein and Bolund) to flow over mountaneous complex terrain (Alaiz). A summary of results from the first benchmarks are used to illustrate the model evaluation protocol applied to flow-over-terrain modeling in neutral conditions.

  4. The Relationship of Dairy Farm Eco-Efficiency with Intensification and Self-Sufficiency. Evidence from the French Dairy Sector Using Life Cycle Analysis, Data Envelopment Analysis and Partial Least Squares Structural Equation Modelling.

    PubMed

    Soteriades, Andreas Diomedes; Stott, Alistair William; Moreau, Sindy; Charroin, Thierry; Blanchard, Melanie; Liu, Jiayi; Faverdin, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    We aimed at quantifying the extent to which agricultural management practices linked to animal production and land use affect environmental outcomes at a larger scale. Two practices closely linked to farm environmental performance at a larger scale are farming intensity, often resulting in greater off-farm environmental impacts (land, non-renewable energy use etc.) associated with the production of imported inputs (e.g. concentrates, fertilizer); and the degree of self-sufficiency, i.e. the farm's capacity to produce goods from its own resources, with higher control over nutrient recycling and thus minimization of losses to the environment, often resulting in greater on-farm impacts (eutrophication, acidification etc.). We explored the relationship of these practices with farm environmental performance for 185 French specialized dairy farms. We used Partial Least Squares Structural Equation Modelling to build, and relate, latent variables of environmental performance, intensification and self-sufficiency. Proxy indicators reflected the latent variables for intensification (milk yield/cow, use of maize silage etc.) and self-sufficiency (home-grown feed/total feed use, on-farm energy/total energy use etc.). Environmental performance was represented by an aggregate 'eco-efficiency' score per farm derived from a Data Envelopment Analysis model fed with LCA and farm output data. The dataset was split into two spatially heterogeneous (bio-physical conditions, production patterns) regions. For both regions, eco-efficiency was significantly negatively related with milk yield/cow and the use of maize silage and imported concentrates. However, these results might not necessarily hold for intensive yet more self-sufficient farms. This requires further investigation with latent variables for intensification and self-sufficiency that do not largely overlap- a modelling challenge that occurred here. We conclude that the environmental 'sustainability' of intensive dairy farming

  5. Land use as a Parameter of Distributed Hydrological Modeling at the CATIE Farm, Turrialba, Costa Rica.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toohey, R.; Boll, J.; Brooks, E.; Jones, J.

    2007-05-01

    As distributed hydrological models continue to develop, their amount of spatial detail requires the evaluation of a larger set of variables. Deforestation is often cited as a principal cause of changing hydrological regimes in the tropics. However, many studies debate the exact mechanism of change. Also, much of the tropics have been permanently deforested for agricultural expansion. Therefore, in this study we instrumented fields (1-6 ha) of four common land uses (forest, coffee agroforestry, sugar cane, and pasture) with meteorological stations, soil moisture probes, and H-flumes. Additional field measurements have shown differences in bulk density, saturated hydraulic conductivity, and soil moisture dynamics between land uses. Hydrograph analysis suggests that the pasture site responds differently to rainfall than the other land uses. Runoff from the pasture site results in higher intensity, greater volume, and shorter duration runoff events than the other land uses. However, the other land uses respond more frequently with lower maximum event intensities, lower volumes and longer durations. In the forest and coffee sites, soil moisture dynamics suggest the importance of lateral preferential flow paths due to root influenced soil structure for runoff response. Therefore, while vertical Ksat values may be greater at all sites than most rainfall intensities, lateral Ksat values may differ significantly between sites. Field measurements and the distributed physically based Soil Moisture Routing (SMR) model are being used test hypotheses, and direct further field research. These results will prove important to understand hydrological connectivity in fragmented landscapes, and the potential recovery of hydrological services within a typical humid tropical environment.

  6. Integrated water flow model and modflow-farm process: A comparison of theory, approaches, and features of two integrated hydrologic models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dogrul, Emin C.; Schmid, Wolfgang; Hanson, Randall T.; Kadir, Tariq; Chung, Francis

    2016-01-01

    Effective modeling of conjunctive use of surface and subsurface water resources requires simulation of land use-based root zone and surface flow processes as well as groundwater flows, streamflows, and their interactions. Recently, two computer models developed for this purpose, the Integrated Water Flow Model (IWFM) from the California Department of Water Resources and the MODFLOW with Farm Process (MF-FMP) from the US Geological Survey, have been applied to complex basins such as the Central Valley of California. As both IWFM and MFFMP are publicly available for download and can be applied to other basins, there is a need to objectively compare the main approaches and features used in both models. This paper compares the concepts, as well as the method and simulation features of each hydrologic model pertaining to groundwater, surface water, and landscape processes. The comparison is focused on the integrated simulation of water demand and supply, water use, and the flow between coupled hydrologic processes. The differences in the capabilities and features of these two models could affect the outcome and types of water resource problems that can be simulated.

  7. Hot-electron recirculation in ultraintense laser pulse interactions with thin foils

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Yongsheng; Lan Xiaofei; Duan Xiaojiao; Tan Zhixin; Wang Naiyan; Shi Yijin; Tang Xiuzhang; He Yexi

    2007-10-15

    A model, called the Step Model, is proposed to describe hot-electron recirculation. A formula to estimate electron density at the rear side sheath is described. With a fixed initial hot-electron density for some target thicknesses, the results from the Step Model are compared with several experiments. The influences of laser pulse absorption efficiency, laser pulse duration, the opening angle of hot-electrons, hot-electron recirculation, and target thickness on the ion acceleration are discussed. When the target thickness is far less than the laser focus radius, the initial electron density will be proportional to the laser pulse absorption efficiency, and the angular effect and the thickness effect can both be ignored. For any target thickness, the maximum ion velocity accelerated by the rear side sheath can be calculated using the Step Model. As an application to some experiments, the Step Model provides a half-analytic method to achieve the dependence of the laser pulse absorption efficiency on target thickness and the influence of amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) duration on the laser absorption efficiency.

  8. Disease spread models to estimate highly uncertain emerging diseases losses for animal agriculture insurance policies: an application to the U.S. farm-raised catfish industry.

    PubMed

    Zagmutt, Francisco J; Sempier, Stephen H; Hanson, Terril R

    2013-10-01

    Emerging diseases (ED) can have devastating effects on agriculture. Consequently, agricultural insurance for ED can develop if basic insurability criteria are met, including the capability to estimate the severity of ED outbreaks with associated uncertainty. The U.S. farm-raised channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) industry was used to evaluate the feasibility of using a disease spread simulation modeling framework to estimate the potential losses from new ED for agricultural insurance purposes. Two stochastic models were used to simulate the spread of ED between and within channel catfish ponds in Mississippi (MS) under high, medium, and low disease impact scenarios. The mean (95% prediction interval (PI)) proportion of ponds infected within disease-impacted farms was 7.6% (3.8%, 22.8%), 24.5% (3.8%, 72.0%), and 45.6% (4.0%, 92.3%), and the mean (95% PI) proportion of fish mortalities in ponds affected by the disease was 9.8% (1.4%, 26.7%), 49.2% (4.7%, 60.7%), and 88.3% (85.9%, 90.5%) for the low, medium, and high impact scenarios, respectively. The farm-level mortality losses from an ED were up to 40.3% of the total farm inventory and can be used for insurance premium rate development. Disease spread modeling provides a systematic way to organize the current knowledge on the ED perils and, ultimately, use this information to help develop actuarially sound agricultural insurance policies and premiums. However, the estimates obtained will include a large amount of uncertainty driven by the stochastic nature of disease outbreaks, by the uncertainty in the frequency of future ED occurrences, and by the often sparse data available from past outbreaks. © 2013 Society for Risk Analysis.

  9. Modeling the effects of tile drain placement on the hydrologic function of farmed prairie wetlands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Werner, Brett; Tracy, John; Johnson, W. Carter; Voldseth, Richard A.; Guntenspergen, Glenn R.; Millett, Bruce

    2016-01-01

    The early 2000s saw large increases in agricultural tile drainage in the eastern Dakotas of North America. Agricultural practices that drain wetlands directly are sometimes limited by wetland protection programs. Little is known about the impacts of tile drainage beyond the delineated boundaries of wetlands in upland catchments that may be in agricultural production. A series of experiments were conducted using the well-published model WETLANDSCAPE that revealed the potential for wetlands to have significantly shortened surface water inundation periods and lower mean depths when tile is placed in certain locations beyond the wetland boundary. Under the soil conditions found in agricultural areas of South Dakota in North America, wetland hydroperiod was found to be more sensitive to the depth that drain tile is installed relative to the bottom of the wetland basin than to distance-based setbacks. Because tile drainage can change the hydrologic conditions of wetlands, even when deployed in upland catchments, tile drainage plans should be evaluated more closely for the potential impacts they might have on the ecological services that these wetlands currently provide. Future research should investigate further how drainage impacts are affected by climate variability and change.

  10. Modeling emissions from CAFO poultry farms in Poland and evaluating potential risk to surrounding populations.

    PubMed

    Pohl, H R; Citra, M; Abadin, H A; Szadkowska-Stańczyk, I; Kozajda, A; Ingerman, L; Nguyen, A; Murray, H E

    2017-03-01

    The world-wide use of concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) for livestock production demands the need to evaluate the potential impact to public health. We estimated the exposure of various airborne pollutants for populations residing in close proximity to 10 poultry CAFOs located in Central Poland. Ammonia (NH3), carbon dioxide (CO2), carbon monoxide (CO), hydrogen sulfide (H2S), methane (CH4), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), nitrous oxide (N2O), sulfur dioxide (SO2), and organic dust were the pollutants of interest for this study. Because no monitoring data were available, we used the steady-state Gaussian dispersion model AERMOD to estimate pollutant concentrations for the exposed population in order to calculate the hazard index (HI) for a combined mixture of chemicals. Our results indicate that while the levels of certain pollutants are expected to exceed background levels commonly found in the environment they did not result in calculated hazard indexes which exceeded unity suggesting low potential for adverse health effects for the surrounding community for the mixture of chemicals. The study was conducted through a cooperation between the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) in the USA and the Nofer Institute of Occupational Medicine (NIOM) in Poland.

  11. Three-dimensional predictions of reactive turbulent recirculating flow of a cylindrical MHD type combustor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J. J.

    1990-01-01

    A computational procedure is employed to predict the axisymmetric reactive turbulent recirculating flow-field within a cylindrical MHD combustor. The procedure used in the analysis is an extended version of the three-dimensional Combustor Performance Program developed at the Garrett Turbine Engine Company. The separated flow created by four liquid fuel nozzles and 148 oxidizer holes passing through an injector plate is examined. Numerical results for flow, heat/mass transfer and combustion are presented to describe these complex three-dimensional interactions. The detailed analysis achieved by the numerical model is useful for evaluating combustor performance and in the interpretation of laboratory test data.

  12. Farm Safety

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, G. S.

    1966-01-01

    Accident and safety are related terms; the higher the accident rate in any industry, the greater is the need for safety measures designed to prevent accidents. This article discusses the accident and safety problems in agriculture, which includes horticulture and forestry. There is still a tendency among townspeople to think of the countryside as peaceful and tranquil, a place where nothing happens very quickly and far removed from violent death or crippling injury. This pleasant rustic picture has undergone a striking change in the last 30 years owing to considerable agricultural mechanization and the development of chemical pesticides, which have brought new dangers to those who live and work on the land. Although men have readily adapted themselves to new machines and methods, they have not proved as able to recognize new dangers and learn how to guard against them. In consequence, accidents have increased to such an extent that the whole industry has realized the need for positive preventive measures. In this country, it is generally accepted that an employer of labour has a responsibility to provide safe working conditions for those he employs. Farm safety legislation goes a little further and usually requires an employer to provide necessary safeguards, with the added requirement on a worker to make use of them. It is a feature of accident prevention work that it never reaches a stage when it can be regarded as complete. Even when a reduction in accidents has been achieved, the effort must be sustained or the trend will be quickly reversed. Images PMID:5904095

  13. Improving Environmental Management on Small-scale Farms: Perspectives of Extension Educators and Horse Farm Operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebecca, Perry-Hill; Linda, Prokopy

    2015-01-01

    Although the number of small-scale farms is increasing in North America and Europe, few studies have been conducted to better understand environmental management in this sector. We investigate this issue by examining environmental management on horse farms from both the perspective of the "expert" extension educator and horse farm operator. We conducted a Delphi survey and follow-up interviews with extension educators in Indiana and Kentucky. We also conducted interviews and farm assessments with 15 horse farm operators in the two states. Our results suggest a disconnection between the perceptions of extension educators and horse farm operators. Extension educators believed that operators of small horse farms are unfamiliar with conservation practices and their environmental benefits and they found it difficult to target outreach to this audience. In the interviews with horse farm operators, we found that the majority were somewhat familiar with conservation practices like rotational grazing, soil testing, heavy use area protection, and manure composting. It was not common, however, for practices to be implemented to generally recognized standards. The horse farm respondents perceived these practices as interrelated parts of a system of farm management that has developed over time to best deal with the physical features of the property, needs of the horses, and available resources. Because conservation practices must be incorporated into a complex farm management system, traditional models of extension (i.e., diffusion of innovations) may be inappropriate for promoting better environmental management on horse farms.

  14. Improving environmental management on small-scale farms: perspectives of extension educators and horse farm operators.

    PubMed

    Rebecca, Perry-Hill; Linda, Prokopy

    2015-01-01

    Although the number of small-scale farms is increasing in North America and Europe, few studies have been conducted to better understand environmental management in this sector. We investigate this issue by examining environmental management on horse farms from both the perspective of the "expert" extension educator and horse farm operator. We conducted a Delphi survey and follow-up interviews with extension educators in Indiana and Kentucky. We also conducted interviews and farm assessments with 15 horse farm operators in the two states. Our results suggest a disconnection between the perceptions of extension educators and horse farm operators. Extension educators believed that operators of small horse farms are unfamiliar with conservation practices and their environmental benefits and they found it difficult to target outreach to this audience. In the interviews with horse farm operators, we found that the majority were somewhat familiar with conservation practices like rotational grazing, soil testing, heavy use area protection, and manure composting. It was not common, however, for practices to be implemented to generally recognized standards. The horse farm respondents perceived these practices as interrelated parts of a system of farm management that has developed over time to best deal with the physical features of the property, needs of the horses, and available resources. Because conservation practices must be incorporated into a complex farm management system, traditional models of extension (i.e., diffusion of innovations) may be inappropriate for promoting better environmental management on horse farms.

  15. Multi-agent modeling and simulation of farmland use change in the farming-pastoral zone: A case study of Qianjingou Town in Inner Mongolia, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, H.

    2015-12-01

    Farmland is the most basic material conditions for guaranteeing rural livelihoods and national food security, and exploring management strategies that take both of the sustainable rural livelihoods and sustainable farmland use into account has vital significance of theory and practice. Farmland is a complex and self-adaptive system that couples human and natural systems together, and natural factors and social factors that are related to its changing process need to be considered when modeling farmland changing process. This paper takes Qianjingou Town in Inner Mongolia farming-pastoral zone as study area. From the perspective of the relationship between households' livelihoods and farmland use, this study builds the process mechanism of farmland use change based on questionnaires data, and constructs multi-agent simulation model of farmland use change with the help of Eclipse and Repast toolbox. Through simulating the relationship between natural factors (with geographical location) and households' behaviors, this paper systematically simulates households' renting and abandoning farmland behaviors, and truly describes dynamic interactions between households' livelihoods and factors related to farmland use change. These factors include natural factors (net primary productivity, road accessibility, slope and relief amplitude) and social factors (households' family structures, economic development and government policies). In the end, this study scientifically predicts farmland use change trend in the future 30 years. The simulation results show that, the number of abandoned and sublet farmland plots has a gradually increasing trend, the number of non-farm households and pure-outwork households has a remarkable increasing trend, and the number of part-farm households and pure-farm households shows a decreasing trend. Households' livelihoods sustainability in the study area is confronted with increasing pressure, and households' nonfarm employment has an increasing

  16. Monitoring and Modeling the Fate and Transport of Nitrate in the Vadose Zone beneath a Suwannee River Basin Vegetable Farm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, M. A.; Graham, W. D.; Graetz, D.

    2002-05-01

    The Suwannee River basin has received much attention in recent years due to increased nitrogen levels in the groundwater-fed rivers of the basin that could seriously affect the welfare of this ecosystem. Nitrogen levels have increased from 0.1mg/l NO3-N to more than 5 mg/L NO3-N in many springs in the Suwannee Basin over the past 40 years. Nitrate concentrations in the Suwannee River itself have been increasing at the rate of .02 mg/L per year over the past 20 years. Suwannee River nitrate loads increase from 2300 kg/day to 6000 kg/day over a 33 mile stretch of the river between Dowling Park and Branford, Florida. Within this stretch of river, 89% of the nitrate loading appeared to come from the lower two-thirds, where agriculture is the dominant land use. The objective of this research is to monitor and model the impacts of alternative nutrient and water management practices on soil water quality, groundwater quality and crop yield at a commercial vegetable farm in the Suwannee River Basin. Groundwater monitoring wells, suction lysimeters, soil cores and TDR probes are used to monitor water and nitrogen transport at the site. Periodic plant biomass sampling is conducted to determine nitrogen uptake by the plants and to estimate crop yield. Field data show that two-thirds of the nitrogen applied to the spring 2001 potato crop leached to groundwater due to excessive irrigation and poor nitrogen uptake efficiency by the potatoes. The DSSAT35-Potato Crop model and the LEACHM vadose-zone model were calibrated for the spring 2001 potato crop and used to predict nitrogen leaching and crop yield for alternative management practices. Simulation results show that by reducing the duration of irrigation, reducing the fertilizer application rate, and improving the timing of fertilizer applications, nitrogen leaching can be reduced by approximately 50% while maintaining acceptable crop yields. Results of this project will ultimately be used to develop best management practices

  17. Influence of farm resource endowment on possibilities for sustainable development: a case study for vegetable farms in South Uruguay.

    PubMed

    Dogliotti, S; van Ittersum, M K; Rossing, W A H

    2006-02-01

    In different parts of the world, there is an urgent need for redesigning and innovating farming systems. Such a process may be supported by model-based explorations that enable ex-ante evaluation of a broad range of alternatives. Since a variety of viable patterns of farm development exists related to farm resource endowment and farmer's strategy, model-based explorations should be able to capture the existing variation in resource endowment and strategies in order to have impact on strategic farm management. In this paper, we present an overview of the model-based explorative method based on the MILP model Farm Images, applied to explore options for sustainable development of vegetable farms in Canelón Grande, Uruguay. The method is used to gain insight into the impact of current farm resource endowment on the possibilities for sustainable development and on the resource use efficiency at farm scale. We maximized farm income for 128 different farm types in an environment-oriented scenario and in an income-oriented scenario. Farm types were defined by combining 4 farm sizes, 2 labor endowments, 4 irrigation endowments, 2 soil quality combinations and 2 mechanization levels. The results demonstrate a strong impact of farm resource endowment on possibilities for sustainable development, as well as synergy between labor, land and irrigated area on resource-use efficiency at farm scale. Farms with 10ha of land or less, representing 47% of the farms in the Canelón Grande region, could only achieve a family income higher than the average income of Uruguayan families when the irrigated area was ca. 40% of the farm area. The achievement of environmental targets was less costly in terms of income on farms with a low rather than high labor availability per unit area and on farms with irrigation facilities.

  18. The Relationship of Dairy Farm Eco-Efficiency with Intensification and Self-Sufficiency. Evidence from the French Dairy Sector Using Life Cycle Analysis, Data Envelopment Analysis and Partial Least Squares Structural Equation Modelling

    PubMed Central

    Soteriades, Andreas Diomedes; Stott, Alistair William; Moreau, Sindy; Charroin, Thierry; Blanchard, Melanie; Liu, Jiayi; Faverdin, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    We aimed at quantifying the extent to which agricultural management practices linked to animal production and land use affect environmental outcomes at a larger scale. Two practices closely linked to farm environmental performance at a larger scale are farming intensity, often resulting in greater off-farm environmental impacts (land, non-renewable energy use etc.) associated with the production of imported inputs (e.g. concentrates, fertilizer); and the degree of self-sufficiency, i.e. the farm’s capacity to produce goods from its own resources, with higher control over nutrient recycling and thus minimization of losses to the environment, often resulting in greater on-farm impacts (eutrophication, acidification etc.). We explored the relationship of these practices with farm environmental performance for 185 French specialized dairy farms. We used Partial Least Squares Structural Equation Modelling to build, and relate, latent variables of environmental performance, intensification and self-sufficiency. Proxy indicators reflected the latent variables for intensification (milk yield/cow, use of maize silage etc.) and self-sufficiency (home-grown feed/total feed use, on-farm energy/total energy use etc.). Environmental performance was represented by an aggregate ‘eco-efficiency’ score per farm derived from a Data Envelopment Analysis model fed with LCA and farm output data. The dataset was split into two spatially heterogeneous (bio-physical conditions, production patterns) regions. For both regions, eco-efficiency was significantly negatively related with milk yield/cow and the use of maize silage and imported concentrates. However, these results might not necessarily hold for intensive yet more self-sufficient farms. This requires further investigation with latent variables for intensification and self-sufficiency that do not largely overlap- a modelling challenge that occurred here. We conclude that the environmental ‘sustainability’ of intensive dairy

  19. Mountain Pesticide Education and Safety Outreach program: a model for community collaboration to enhance on-farm safety and health.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Jim; Sidebottom, Jill

    2011-01-01

    This article showcases the outcomes of the Mountain Pesticide Education and Safety Outreach program, a collaborative effort between Christmas tree growers, cooperative extension, farmworkers, farmworker health outreach staff, and others to reduce pesticide exposure and on-farm injuries. Lessons learned during the project that can be adopted by other communities will also be shared.

  20. Data Farming and Defense Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horne, Gary; Meyer, Ted

    2011-01-01

    .Data farm,ing uses simulation modeling, high performance computing, experimental design and analysis to examine questions of interest with large possibility spaces. This methodology allows for the examination of whole landscapes of potential outcomes and provides the capability of executing enough experiments so that outliers might be captured and examined for insights. It can be used to conduct sensitivity studies, to support validation and verification of models, to iteratively optimize outputs using heuristic search and discovery, and as an aid to decision-makers in understanding complex relationships of factors. In this paper we describe efforts at the Naval Postgraduate School in developing these new and emerging tools. We also discuss data farming in the context of application to questions inherent in military decision-making. The particular application we illustrate here is social network modeling to support the countering of improvised explosive devices.

  1. Validation of model calculation of ammonia deposition in the neighbourhood of a poultry farm using measured NH 3 concentrations and N deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sommer, S. G.; Østergård, H. S.; Løfstrøm, P.; Andersen, H. V.; Jensen, L. S.

    Substantial emission of ammonia (NH 3) from animal houses and the related high local deposition of NH 3-N are a threat to semi-natural nitrogen-deficient ecosystems situated near the NH 3 source. In Denmark, there are regulations limiting the level of NH 3 emission from livestock houses near N-deficient ecosystems that are likely to change due to nitrogen (N) enrichment caused by NH 3 deposition. The models used for assessing NH 3 emission from livestock production, therefore, need to be precise, as the regulation will affect both the nature of the ecosystem and the economy of the farmer. Therefore a study was carried out with the objective of validating the Danish model used to monitor NH 3 transport, dispersion and deposition from and in the neighbourhood of a chicken farm. In the study we measured NH 3 emission with standard flux measuring methods, NH 3 concentrations at increasing distances from the chicken houses using passive diffusion samplers and deposition using 15N-enriched biomonitors and field plot studies. The dispersion and deposition of NH 3 were modelled using the Danish OML-DEP model. It was also shown that model calculations clearly reflect the measured NH 3 concentration and N deposition. Deposition of N measured by biomonitors clearly reflected the variation in NH 3 concentrations and showed that deposition was not significantly different from zero ( P < 0.05) at distances greater than 150-200 m from these chicken houses. Calculations confirmed this, as calculated N deposition 320 m away from the chicken farm was only marginally affected by the NH 3 emission from the farm. There was agreement between calculated and measured deposition showing that the model gives true estimates of the deposition in the neighbourhood of a livestock house emitting NH 3.

  2. Modelling farmers' action: decision rules capture methodology and formalisation structure: a case of biomass flow operations in dairy farms of a tropical island.

    PubMed

    Vayssières, J; Lecomte, P; Guerrin, F; Nidumolu, U B

    2007-06-01

    Studies on decision-making processes are generally aimed at identifying farmers' needs and predicting farmers' reactions to technical innovations. In the present paper we study these decision-making processes, with reference to dairy farms, to build a whole-farm computer model (WFM) which simulates farmers' actions. In this study, (i) a multi-tool and multi-step methodology is proposed, which can also be qualified as an iterative and interactive methodology to reveal decision rules and (ii) a generic structure to formalise how action is conducted, termed 'structure for action modelling' (SAM). In the case of forage crop-dairy cattle systems, we have tested the current methodology to capture the decision rules and the SAM to represent action concerning farm management. An 'immersion' approach, inspired by the ethnographic approach has been adapted to access operational technical decisions (taken on a daily basis). This study helped in understanding how detailed and large approaches can be complementary and can facilitate identification of what can be generalised in a conceptual model. To define the generic structure (SAM), a set of descriptive variables concerning technical operations has been selected. The conceptual model generated is composed of decision rules reconstructed by researchers with farmers' committed participation. The validation method is based on participatory approaches and on comparing of actions simulated by the model with practices on the ground. Not contesting the fact that farmers plan their action, this study also revealed the importance of adjustments in action. For example, 20 to 55% of the time the planned food ration is not distributed to the milking cows because of forage unavailability. We also discuss how this structure can facilitate integration of decision mechanisms in biophysical models and how such an integration of adjustment decision rules can produce more realistic simulations of technical actions. Error of biotechnical

  3. Engine with exhaust gas recirculation system and variable geometry turbocharger

    DOEpatents

    Keating, Edward J.

    2015-11-03

    An engine assembly includes an intake assembly, an internal combustion engine defining a plurality of cylinders and configured to combust a fuel and produce exhaust gas, and an exhaust assembly in fluid communication with a first subset of the plurality of cylinders. Each of the plurality of cylinders are provided in fluid communication with the intake assembly. The exhaust assembly is provided in fluid communication with a first subset of the plurality of cylinders, and a dedicated exhaust gas recirculation system in fluid communication with both a second subset of the plurality of cylinders and with the intake assembly. The dedicated exhaust gas recirculation system is configured to route all of the exhaust gas from the second subset of the plurality of cylinders to the intake assembly. Finally, the engine assembly includes a turbocharger having a variable geometry turbine in fluid communication with the exhaust assembly.

  4. Digital feedwater and recirculation flow control for GPUN Oyster Creek

    SciTech Connect

    Burjorjee, D. ); Gan, B. )

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes the digital system for feedwater and recirculation control that GPU Nuclear will be installing at Oyster Creek during its next outage - expected circa December 1992. The replacement was motivated by considerations of reliability and obsolescence - the analog equipment was aging and reaching the end of its useful life. The new system uses Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd.'s software platform running on dual, redundant, industrial-grade 386 computers with opto-isolated field input/output (I/O) accessed through a parallel bus. The feedwater controller controls three main feed regulating valves, two low flow regulating valves, and two block valves. The recirculation controller drives the five scoop positioners of the hydraulic couplers. The system also drives contacts that lock up the actuators on detecting an open circuit in their current loops.

  5. Research on leachate recirculation from different types of landfills

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Qi . E-mail: wangqi@craes.org.cn; Matsufuji, Yasushi; Dong Lu; Huang Qifei; Hirano, Fumiaki; Tanaka, Ayako

    2006-07-01

    Landfills can produce a great amount of leachate containing highly concentrated organic matter. This is especially true for the initial leachate from landfilled municipal solid wastes (MSW) that generally has concentrations of COD{sub Cr} and BOD{sub 5} up to 80,000 and 50,000 mg/L, respectively. The leachate could be disposed by means of recirculating technique, which decomposes the organics through the action of proliferating microorganisms and thereby purifies the leachate, and simultaneously accelerates organic decomposition through water saturation control. Data from experimental results indicated that leachate recirculating could reduce the organic concentration considerably, with a maximum reduction rate of COD{sub Cr} over 95%; and, using a semi-aerobic process, NH{sub 3}-N concentration of treated leachate could be under 10 mg/L. In addition, the organic concentration in MSW decreased greatly.

  6. Steering algorithms for a small recirculating heavy-ion accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, W.M.; Grote, D.P.; Hemandez, G.W.

    1997-11-07

    Beam-steering algorithms are proposed for a small recirculating induction accelerator being built at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The principal problem is that the transverse position and velocity of the beam must be inferred from capacitive position monitors, and this determination is complicated by the limited probe resolution and by the lattice errors within steering modules. The fluid/envelope code CIRCE is used to evaluate these algorithms.

  7. Control of synchrotron radiation effects during recirculation with bunch compression

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas, David; Benson, Stephen; Li, Rui; Roblin, Yves; Tennant, Christopher; Krafft, Geoffrey; Terzic, Balsa; Tsai, Cheng

    2015-05-01

    Studies of beam quality during recirculation have been extended to an arc providing bunch compression with positive momentum compaction. It controls both incoherent and coherent synchrotron radiation (ISR and CSR) using methods including optics balance and generates little microbunching gain. We detail the dynamical basis for the design, discuss the design process, give an example, and provide simulations of ISR and CSR effects. Reference will be made to a complete analysis of microbunching effects.

  8. Improved numerical methods for turbulent viscous recirculating flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turan, A.

    1985-01-01

    The hybrid-upwind finite difference schemes employed in generally available combustor codes possess excessive numerical diffusion errors which preclude accurate quantative calculations. The present study has as its primary objective the identification and assessment of an improved solution algorithm as well as discretization schemes applicable to analysis of turbulent viscous recirculating flows. The assessment is carried out primarily in two dimensional/axisymetric geometries with a view to identifying an appropriate technique to be incorporated in a three-dimensional code.

  9. Improved numerical methods for turbulent viscous recirculating flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandoormaal, J. P.; Turan, A.; Raithby, G. D.

    1986-01-01

    The objective of the present study is to improve both the accuracy and computational efficiency of existing numerical techniques used to predict viscous recirculating flows in combustors. A review of the status of the study is presented along with some illustrative results. The effort to improve the numerical techniques consists of the following technical tasks: (1) selection of numerical techniques to be evaluated; (2) two dimensional evaluation of selected techniques; and (3) three dimensional evaluation of technique(s) recommended in Task 2.

  10. Tracking studies in eRHIC energy-recovery recirculator

    SciTech Connect

    Meot, F.; Brooks, S.; Ptitsyn, V.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.

    2015-07-13

    Beam and polarization tracking studies in eRHIC energy recovery electron recirculator are presented, based on a very preliminary design of the FFAG lattice. These simulations provide examples of some of the beam and spin optics aspects of the linear FFAG lattice concept and its application in eRHIC, they provide code benchmarking for synchrotron radiation and spin diffusion in addition, and pave the way towards end-to-end 6-D(phasespace)+3D(spin) tracking simulations.

  11. LONGITUDINAL DYNAMICS IN HIGH FREQUENCY FFAG RECIRCULATING ACCELERATORS.

    SciTech Connect

    BERG,J.S.

    2002-04-08

    A recirculating accelerator accelerates the beam by passing through accelerating cavities multiple times. An FFAG recirculating accelerator uses a single arc to connect the linacs together, as opposed to multiple arcs for the different energies. For most scenarios using high-frequency RF, it is impractical to change the phase of the RF on each pass, at least for lower energy accelerators. Ideally, therefore, the WAG arc will be isochronous, so that the particles come back to the same phase (on-crest) on each linac pass. However, it is not possible to make the FFAG arcs isochronous (compared to the RF period) over a large energy range. This paper demonstrates that one can nonetheless make an WAG recirculating accelerator work. Given the arc's path length as a function of energy and the number of turns to accelerate for, one can find the minimum voltage (and corresponding initial conditions) required to accelerate a reference particle to the desired energy. I also briefly examine how the longitudinal acceptance varies with the number of turns that one accelerates.

  12. Cyclone reactor with internal separation and axial recirculation

    DOEpatents

    Becker, F.E.; Smolensky, L.A.

    1988-07-19

    A cyclone combustor apparatus contains a circular partition plate containing a central circular aperture is described. The partition plate divides the apparatus into a cylindrical precombustor chamber and a combustor chamber. A coal-water slurry is passed axially into the inlet end of the precombustor chamber, and primary air is passed tangentially into said chamber to establish a cyclonic air flow. Combustion products pass through the partition plate aperture and into the combustor chamber. Secondary air may also be passed tangentially into the combustor chamber adjacent the partition plate to maintain the cyclonic flow. Flue gas is passed axially out of the combustor chamber at the outlet end and ash is withdrawn tangentially from the combustor chamber at the outlet end. A first mixture of flue gas and ash may be tangentially withdrawn from the combustor chamber at the outlet end and recirculated to the axial inlet of the precombustor chamber with the coal-water slurry. A second mixture may be tangentially withdrawn from the outlet end and passed to a heat exchanger for cooling. Cooled second mixture is then recirculated to the axial inlet of the precombustor chamber. In another embodiment a single cyclone combustor chamber is provided with both the recirculation streams of the first mixture and the second mixture. 10 figs.

  13. Cyclone reactor with internal separation and axial recirculation

    DOEpatents

    Becker, Frederick E.; Smolensky, Leo A.

    1989-01-01

    A cyclone combustor apparatus contains a circular partition plate containing a central circular aperture. The partition plate divides the apparatus into a cylindrical precombustor chamber and a combustor chamber. A coal-water slurry is passed axially into the inlet end of the precombustor chamber, and primary air is passed tangentially into said chamber to establish a cyclonic air flow. Combustion products pass through the partition plate aperture and into the combustor chamber. Secondary air may also be passed tangentially into the combustor chamber adjacent the partition plate to maintain the cyclonic flow. Flue gas is passed axially out of the combustor chamber at the outlet end and ash is withdrawn tangentially from the combuston chamber at the outlet end. A first mixture of flue gas and ash may be tangentially withdrawn from the combustor chamber at the outlet end and recirculated to the axial inlet of the precombustor chamber with the coal-water slurry. A second mixture of flue gas and ash may be tangentially withdrawn from the outlet end of the combustor chamber and passed to a heat exchanger for cooling. Cooled second mixture is then recirculated to the axial inlet of the precombustor chamber. In another embodiment a single cyclone combustor chamber is provided with both the recirculation streams of the first mixture and the second mixture.

  14. Pulsed power requirements for the Sandia recirculating electron beam linac

    SciTech Connect

    Tucker, W.K.; Shope, S.L.; Hasti, D.E.

    1987-01-01

    Compact, high gradient, linear induction accelerators may be achieved by recirculating the electron beam in phase with a repeating accelerating voltage. A two-cavity recirculating accelerator has been designed and operated in a single-pass mode. The prototype accelerator uses a 2.5-MV, 20-kA, 25-ns duration injector and an accelerating cavity that will produce a total accelerating voltage of 5.3 MV for four passes. The design of this machine involved key areas of development in pulsed power, specifically, low-jitter spark gaps and vacuum-liquid interfaces for bipolar electric fields. The extension of this technology to multiple-pulse machines will require advances in liquid dielectric breakdown strength and switch surface flashover, as well as additional improvements in lower inductance switching and vacuum-liquid interface flashover. This paper will discuss the recirculation concept, pulsed-power design parameters, machine scaling relationships that are valid for state-of-the-art and near-term pulsed-power parameters, and summarize the pulsed-power and beam transport experiments.

  15. Numerical prediction of a turbulent evaporating fuel spray in a recirculating flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xi-Qing; Pereira, Fernandes

    1994-03-01

    A comprehensive spray evaporation model, based on a Eulerian model of the gas field and a Lagrangian model of the droplet field in conjunction with the stochastic description of gas turbulence effect on the droplet motion, is applied to a turbulent evaporating spray in a recirculating flow and validated by comparison between predictions and measurements. Unlike many previous numerical predictions this note has been able to avoid the usual problem of a lack of detailed initial droplet-size and velocity-distribution conditions, and incorporated the turbulent temporal and directional correlation. We have adopted Zhou and Leschziner's methodology to include turbulent temporal and directional correlations in the numerical modeling, which has proved to be an improvement over the conventional particle-eddy modeling in simple flows.

  16. Modelling sources of variation and risk factors for spinal deformity in farmed Atlantic salmon using hierarchical- and cross-classified multilevel models.

    PubMed

    Aunsmo, Arnfinn; Øvretveit, Siri; Breck, Olav; Valle, Paul S; Larssen, Rolf B; Sandberg, Marianne

    2009-07-01

    Sources of variation and risk factors for spinal deformity were investigated in a 2002-2004 year-class database of farmed Atlantic salmon using multilevel modelling. The prevalence of spinal deformity, recorded on subsamples of Atlantic salmon at individual days of harvest, was used as the outcome variable in the study. The dataset consisted of a multilevel structure with days of harvest (n=1441) nested within sea water pens (n=544), which were nested within sea water sites (n=39), which again were cross-classified with fresh water plants (n=21). A four level combined hierarchical- and cross-classified linear mixed model was built in MLwiN using Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) estimation of variance components and fixed effects. Results revealed that a large part of the variance could be explained as sampling and classification random errors, accounting for 32% of the variation in the random intercept model and 41% of the variation in the final mixed effect model. Of the remaining "biological variation" in the random intercept model, 33% was explained by fixed effects where both the use half-year and 1.5 year old photo-manipulated autumn smolts (compared to using one year old spring smolt), and the use of six component vaccines (compared to using four and five component vaccines), were significantly associated with spinal deformity. The results suggest that the physiological changes at time of smoltification make Atlantic salmon susceptible to stressors causing vertebral deformation and that this is most evident in photo-manipulated fish smoltifying when temperature and growth is at its peak. The study further shows the potential of using multilevel modelling in epidemiological studies based on data from industrial aquaculture.

  17. Recirculation zones induce non-Fickian transport in three-dimensional periodic porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crevacore, Eleonora; Tosco, Tiziana; Sethi, Rajandrea; Boccardo, Gianluca; Marchisio, Daniele L.

    2016-11-01

    In this work, the influence of pore space geometry on solute transport in porous media is investigated performing computational fluid dynamics pore-scale simulations of fluid flow and solute transport. The three-dimensional periodic domains are obtained from three different pore structure configurations, namely, face-centered-cubic (fcc), body-centered-cubic (bcc), and sphere-in-cube (sic) arrangements of spherical grains. Although transport simulations are performed with media having the same grain size and the same porosity (in fcc and bcc configurations), the resulting breakthrough curves present noteworthy differences, such as enhanced tailing. The cause of such differences is ascribed to the presence of recirculation zones, even at low Reynolds numbers. Various methods to readily identify recirculation zones and quantify their magnitude using pore-scale data are proposed. The information gained from this analysis is then used to define macroscale models able to provide an appropriate description of the observed anomalous transport. A mass transfer model is applied to estimate relevant macroscale parameters (hydrodynamic dispersion above all) and their spatial variation in the medium; a functional relation describing the spatial variation of such macroscale parameters is then proposed.

  18. Recirculation zones induce non-Fickian transport in three-dimensional periodic porous media.

    PubMed

    Crevacore, Eleonora; Tosco, Tiziana; Sethi, Rajandrea; Boccardo, Gianluca; Marchisio, Daniele L

    2016-11-01

    In this work, the influence of pore space geometry on solute transport in porous media is investigated performing computational fluid dynamics pore-scale simulations of fluid flow and solute transport. The three-dimensional periodic domains are obtained from three different pore structure configurations, namely, face-centered-cubic (fcc), body-centered-cubic (bcc), and sphere-in-cube (sic) arrangements of spherical grains. Although transport simulations are performed with media having the same grain size and the same porosity (in fcc and bcc configurations), the resulting breakthrough curves present noteworthy differences, such as enhanced tailing. The cause of such differences is ascribed to the presence of recirculation zones, even at low Reynolds numbers. Various methods to readily identify recirculation zones and quantify their magnitude using pore-scale data are proposed. The information gained from this analysis is then used to define macroscale models able to provide an appropriate description of the observed anomalous transport. A mass transfer model is applied to estimate relevant macroscale parameters (hydrodynamic dispersion above all) and their spatial variation in the medium; a functional relation describing the spatial variation of such macroscale parameters is then proposed.

  19. Recirculation of Laser Power in an Atomic Fountain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Enzer, Daphna G.; Klipstein, WIlliam M.; Moore, James D.

    2007-01-01

    A new technique for laser-cooling atoms in a cesium atomic fountain frequency standard relies on recirculation of laser light through the atom-collection region of the fountain. The recirculation, accomplished by means of reflections from multiple fixed beam-splitter cubes, is such that each of two laser beams makes three passes. As described below, this recirculation scheme offers several advantages over prior designs, including simplification of the laser system, greater optical power throughput, fewer optical and electrical connections, and simplification of beam power balancing. A typical laser-cooled cesium fountain requires the use of six laser beams arranged as three orthogonal pairs of counter-propagating beams to decelerate the atoms and hold them in a three-dimensional optical trap in vacuum. Typically, these trapping/cooling beams are linearly polarized and are positioned and oriented so that (1) counter-propagating beams in each pair have opposite linear polarizations and (2) three of the six orthogonal beams have the sum of their propagation directions pointing up, while the other three have the sum of their propagation directions pointing down. In a typical prior design, two lasers are used - one to generate the three "up" beams, the other to generate the three "down" beams. For this purpose, the output of each laser is split three ways, then the resulting six beams are delivered to the vacuum system, independently of each other, via optical fibers. The present recirculating design also requires two lasers, but the beams are not split before delivery. Instead, only one "up" beam and one oppositely polarized "down" beam are delivered to the vacuum system, and each of these beams is sent through the collection region three times. The polarization of each beam on each pass through the collection region is set up to yield the same combination of polarization and propagation directions as described above. In comparison with the prior design, the present

  20. Field evaluation of a horizontal well recirculation system for groundwater treatment: Pilot test at the Clean Test Site Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Piketon, Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    Muck, M.T.; Kearl, P.M.; Siegrist, R.L.

    1998-08-01

    This report presents the results of field testing a horizontal well recirculation system at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS). The recirculation system uses a pair of horizontal wells, one for groundwater extraction and treatment and the other for reinjection of treated groundwater, to set up a recirculation flow field. The induced flow field from the injection well to the extraction well establishes a sweeping action for the removal and treatment of groundwater contaminants. The overall purpose of this project is to study treatment of mixed groundwater contaminants that occur in a thin water-bearing zone not easily targeted by traditional vertical wells. The project involves several research elements, including treatment-process evaluation, hydrodynamic flow and transport modeling, pilot testing at an uncontaminated site, and pilot testing at a contaminated site. The results of the pilot test at an uncontaminated site, the Clean Test Site (CTS), are presented in this report.

  1. Simultaneously reducing CO2 and particulate exposures via fractional recirculation of vehicle cabin air.

    PubMed

    Jung, Heejung S; Grady, Michael L; Victoroff, Tristan; Miller, Arthur L

    2017-07-01

    Prior studies demonstrate that air recirculation can reduce exposure to nanoparticles in vehicle cabins. However when people occupy confined spaces, air recirculation can lead to carbon dioxide (CO2) accumulation which can potentially lead to deleterious effects on cognitive function. This study proposes a fractional air recirculation system for reducing nanoparticle concentration while simultaneously suppressing CO2 levels in the cabin. Several recirculation scenarios were tested using a custom-programmed HVAC (heat, ventilation, air conditioning) unit that varied the recirculation door angle in the test vehicle. Operating the recirculation system with a standard cabin filter reduced particle concentrations to 1000 particles/cm(3), although CO2 levels rose to 3000 ppm. When as little as 25% fresh air was introduced (75% recirculation), CO2 levels dropped to 1000 ppm, while particle concentrations remained below 5000 particles/cm(3). We found that nanoparticles were removed selectively during recirculation and demonstrated the trade-off between cabin CO2 concentration and cabin particle concentration using fractional air recirculation. Data showed significant increases in CO2 levels during 100% recirculation. For various fan speeds, recirculation fractions of 50-75% maintained lower CO2 levels in the cabin, while still reducing particulate levels. We recommend fractional recirculation as a simple method to reduce occupants' exposures to particulate matter and CO2 in vehicles. A design with several fractional recirculation settings could allow air exchange adequate for reducing both particulate and CO2 exposures. Developing this technology could lead to reductions in airborne nanoparticle exposure, while also mitigating safety risks from CO2 accumulation.

  2. Investigation on inlet recirculation characteristics of double suction centrifugal compressor with unsymmetrical inlet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ce; Wang, Yingjun; Lao, Dazhong; Tong, Ding; Wei, Longyu; Liu, Yixiong

    2016-08-01

    The inlet recirculation characteristics of double suction centrifugal compressor with unsymmetrical inlet structures were studied in numerical method, mainly focused on three issues including the amounts and differences of the inlet recirculation in different working conditions, the circumferential non-uniform distributions of the inlet recirculation, the recirculation velocity distributions of the upstream slot of the rear impeller. The results show that there are some differences between the recirculation of the front impeller and that of the rear impeller in whole working conditions. In design speed, the recirculation flow rate of the rear impeller is larger than that of the front impeller in the large flow range, but in the small flow range, the recirculation flow rate of the rear impeller is smaller than that of the front impeller. In different working conditions, the recirculation velocity distributions of the front and rear impeller are non-uniform along the circumferential direction and their non-uniform extents are quite different. The circumferential non-uniform extent of the recirculation velocity varies with the working conditions change. The circumferential non-uniform extent of the recirculation velocity of front impeller and its distribution are determined by the static pressure distribution of the front impeller, but that of the rear impeller is decided by the coupling effects of the inlet flow distortion of the rear impeller, the circumferential unsymmetrical distribution of the upstream slot and the asymmetric structure of the volute. In the design flow and small flow conditions, the recirculation velocities at different circumferential positions of the mean line of the upstream slot cross-section of the rear impeller are quite different, and the recirculation velocities distribution forms at both sides of the mean line are different. The recirculation velocity distributions in the cross-section of the upstream slot depend on the static pressure

  3. Simultaneously reducing CO2 and particulate exposures via fractional recirculation of vehicle cabin air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Heejung S.; Grady, Michael L.; Victoroff, Tristan; Miller, Arthur L.

    2017-07-01

    Prior studies demonstrate that air recirculation can reduce exposure to nanoparticles in vehicle cabins. However when people occupy confined spaces, air recirculation