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Sample records for model jedi ii

  1. Jobs and Economic Development Impacts from Small Wind: JEDI Model in the Works (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Tegen, S.

    2012-06-01

    This presentation covers the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's role in economic impact analysis for wind power Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) models, JEDI results, small wind JEDI specifics, and a request for information to complete the model.

  2. International Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (I-JEDI) Model

    SciTech Connect

    2016-09-01

    International Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (I-JEDI) is a freely available economic model that estimates gross economic impacts from wind, solar, biomass, and geothermal energy projects. Building on a similar model for the United States, I-JEDI was developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory under the U.S. government's Enhancing Capacity for Low Emission Development Strategies (EC-LEDS) program to support partner countries in assessing economic impacts of LEDS actions in the energy sector.

  3. JEDI: Jobs and Economic Development Impacts Model Fact Sheet

    SciTech Connect

    S. Hendrickson; S.Tegen

    2009-12-01

    The Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) models are user-friendly tools that estimate the economic impacts of constructing and operating power generation and biofuel plants at the local(usually state) level. First developed by NREL's Wind Powering America program to model wind energy jobs and impacts, JEDI has been expanded to biofuels,concentrating solar power, coal, and natural gas power plants.

  4. JEDI Marine and Hydrokinetic Model: User Reference Guide

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, M.; Previsic, M.

    2011-04-01

    The Jobs and Economic Development Impact Model (JEDI) for Marine and Hydrokinetics (MHK) is a user-friendly spreadsheet-based tool designed to demonstrate the economic impacts associated with developing and operating MHK power systems in the United States. The JEDI MHK User Reference Guide was developed to assist users in using and understanding the model. This guide provides information on the model's underlying methodology, as well as the sources and parameters used to develop the cost data utilized in the model. This guide also provides basic instruction on model add-in features, operation of the model, and a discussion of how the results should be interpreted.

  5. JEDI: Jobs and Economic Development Impacts Model, National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2009-12-01

    The Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) models are user-friendly tools that estimate the economic impacts of constructing and operating power generation and biofuel plants at the local (usually state) level. First developed by NREL's Wind Powering America program to model wind energy jobs and impacts, JEDI has been expanded to biofuels, concentrating solar power, coal, and natural gas power plants. Based on project-specific and default inputs (derived from industry norms), JEDI estimates the number of jobs and economic impacts to a local area (usually a state) that could reasonably be supported by a power generation project. For example, JEDI estimates the number of in-state construction jobs from a new wind farm. This fact sheet provides an overview of the JEDI model as it pertains to wind energy projects.

  6. JEDI: Jobs and Economic Development Impact Model; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect

    2015-08-01

    The Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) models are user-friendly tools that estimate the economic impacts of constructing and operating power generation and biofuel plants at the local (usually state) level. First developed by NREL’s researchers to model wind energy jobs and impacts, JEDI has been expanded to also estimate the economic impacts of biofuels, coal, conventional hydro, concentrating solar power, geothermal, marine and hydrokinetic power, natural gas, photovoltaics, and transmission lines. This fact sheet focuses on JEDI for wind energy projects.

  7. Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Model: Offshore Wind User Reference Guide

    SciTech Connect

    Lantz, E.; Goldberg, M.; Keyser, D.

    2013-06-01

    The Offshore Wind Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) model, developed by NREL and MRG & Associates, is a spreadsheet based input-output tool. JEDI is meant to be a user friendly and transparent tool to estimate potential economic impacts supported by the development and operation of offshore wind projects. This guide describes how to use the model as well as technical information such as methodology, limitations, and data sources.

  8. Transmission Line Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Model User Reference Guide

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, M.; Keyser, D.

    2013-10-01

    The Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) models, developed through the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), are freely available, user-friendly tools that estimate the potential economic impacts of constructing and operating power generation projects for a range of conventional and renewable energy technologies. The Transmission Line JEDI model can be used to field questions about the economic impacts of transmission lines in a given state, region, or local community. This Transmission Line JEDI User Reference Guide was developed to provide basic instruction on operating the model and understanding the results. This guide also provides information on the model's underlying methodology, as well as the parameters and references used to develop the cost data contained in the model.

  9. Assessment of the Value, Impact, and Validity of the Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) Suite of Models

    SciTech Connect

    Billman, L.; Keyser, D.

    2013-08-01

    The Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) models, developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), use input-output methodology to estimate gross (not net) jobs and economic impacts of building and operating selected types of renewable electricity generation and fuel plants. This analysis provides the DOE with an assessment of the value, impact, and validity of the JEDI suite of models. While the models produce estimates of jobs, earnings, and economic output, this analysis focuses only on jobs estimates. This validation report includes an introduction to JEDI models, an analysis of the value and impact of the JEDI models, and an analysis of the validity of job estimates generated by JEDI model through comparison to other modeled estimates and comparison to empirical, observed jobs data as reported or estimated for a commercial project, a state, or a region.

  10. Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) User Reference Guide: Fast Pyrolysis Biorefinery Model

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yimin; Goldberg, Marshall

    2015-02-01

    This guide -- the JEDI Fast Pyrolysis Biorefinery Model User Reference Guide -- was developed to assist users in operating and understanding the JEDI Fast Pyrolysis Biorefinery Model. The guide provides information on the model's underlying methodology, as well as the parameters and data sources used to develop the cost data utilized in the model. This guide also provides basic instruction on model add-in features and a discussion of how the results should be interpreted. Based on project-specific inputs from the user, the JEDI Fast Pyrolysis Biorefinery Model estimates local (e.g., county- or state-level) job creation, earnings, and output from total economic activity for a given fast pyrolysis biorefinery. These estimates include the direct, indirect and induced economic impacts to the local economy associated with the construction and operation phases of biorefinery projects.Local revenue and supply chain impacts as well as induced impacts are estimated using economic multipliers derived from the IMPLAN software program. By determining the local economic impacts and job creation for a proposed biorefinery, the JEDI Fast Pyrolysis Biorefinery Model can be used to field questions about the added value biorefineries might bring to a local community.

  11. Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Model Geothermal User Reference Guide

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, C.; Augustine, C.; Goldberg, M.

    2012-09-01

    The Geothermal Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) model, developed through the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), is an Excel-based user-friendly tools that estimates the economic impacts of constructing and operating hydrothermal and Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) power generation projects at the local level for a range of conventional and renewable energy technologies. The JEDI Model Geothermal User Reference Guide was developed to assist users in using and understanding the model. This guide provides information on the model's underlying methodology, as well as the parameters and references used to develop the cost data utilized in the model. This guide also provides basic instruction on model add-in features, operation of the model, and a discussion of how the results should be interpreted.

  12. Petroleum Refinery Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Model User Reference Guide

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, M.

    2013-12-31

    The Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) models, developed through the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), are user-friendly tools utilized to estimate the economic impacts at the local level of constructing and operating fuel and power generation projects for a range of conventional and renewable energy technologies. The JEDI Petroleum Refinery Model User Reference Guide was developed to assist users in employing and understanding the model. This guide provides information on the model's underlying methodology, as well as the parameters and references used to develop the cost data utilized in the model. This guide also provides basic instruction on model add-in features, operation of the model, and a discussion of how the results should be interpreted. Based on project-specific inputs from the user, the model estimates job creation, earning and output (total economic activity) for a given petroleum refinery. This includes the direct, indirect and induced economic impacts to the local economy associated with the refinery's construction and operation phases. Project cost and job data used in the model are derived from the most current cost estimations available. Local direct and indirect economic impacts are estimated using economic multipliers derived from IMPLAN software. By determining the regional economic impacts and job creation for a proposed refinery, the JEDI Petroleum Refinery model can be used to field questions about the added value refineries may bring to the local community.

  13. Job and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Model: A User-Friendly Tool to Calculate Economic Impacts from Wind Projects; Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Sinclair, K.; Milligan, M.; Goldberg, M.

    2004-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy/National Renewable Energy Laboratory (DOE/NREL) has developed a spreadsheet-based wind model (Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI)) that incorporates economic multipliers for jobs, income, and output. Originally developed with state-specific parameters, it can also be used to conduct county and regional analyses. NREL has enlisted the Wind Powering America (WPA) State Wind Working Groups (SWWGs) to conduct county-specific economic impact analyses and has encouraged them to use JEDI if they do not have their own economic model. The objective of the analyses is to identify counties within WPA target states, and preferably counties with a significant agricultural sector, that could economically benefit from wind development. These counties could then explore opportunities to tap into the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Farm Bill Section 9006 grants and loans to stimulate wind development. This paper describes the JEDI model and how i t can be used. We will also summarize a series of analyses that were completed to fulfill a General Accounting Office (GAO) request to provide estimates of the economic development benefits of wind power.

  14. Joint Exchange Development Initiative (JEDI) with the SKA Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oozeer, Nadeem; Bassett, Bruce A.

    2015-01-01

    The teaching is a process whereby one mediates between another person and the materials. There exists many teaching models from lectures, discussion, questioning, to independent learning and self-teaching. The Joint Exchange Development Initiative (JEDI) is a way to maximize on the teaching methodologies. The JEDI is a concept to enhance development and education via direct transfer of skills and expertise in any specific field. It is an initiative to provide development via joint exchange among stakeholders. In this paper, we describe the various JEDI workshops carried out in the Square Kilometre Array (SKA Africa) partner countries and demonstrate how these workshops are proving to be successful.

  15. Job and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Model: A User-Friendly Tool to Calculate Economic Impacts from Wind Projects (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2004-03-01

    This quadfold brochure provides an overview of JEDI, a free online tool to calculate the economic impacts from wind projects. The brochure lists the features of the tool, the inputs and outputs that a user can expect, visuals of the screens, and contact information. This brochure will be distributed to state wind working groups and at major wind industry conferences to inform stakeholders of this valuable tool for calculating economic impacts from wind energy projects.

  16. JEDI -- The Jupiter Energetic Particle Detector for the Juno mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haggerty, D. K.; Mauk, B. H.; Paranicas, C. P.

    2008-12-01

    The Juno mission provides the first opportunity to conduct an in-depth exploration of Jupiter's polar magnetosphere. The high-inclination, low-periapsis orbit provides in-situ access to three critical regions: the auroral magnetic field lines, the equatorial magnetosphere, and the polar ionosphere. The Jupiter Energetic Particle Detector Instrument (JEDI) is one of several Juno magnetospheric instruments that will work together to resolve critical scientific questions about these novel environments, most importantly how Jupiter's dramatic aurora is generated. JEDI measures the energy, spectra, mass species (H, He, O, S), and angular distributions of the higher energy charged particles that: 1) are accelerated at low altitude by Jovian auroral processes, 2) precipitate into Jupiter's upper atmosphere, 3) heat and ionize the Jovian upper atmosphere, and 4) populate Jupiter's inner magnetosphere. JEDI is a compact, light-weight, time-of-flight (TOF) spectrometer that makes 3-parameter TOF and energy ion measurements, 2-parameter TOF-only ion measurements, and single parameter electron measurements in the 10-keV to 10-MeV ion and the 25-keV to 1-MeV electron energy range. The rapid spacecraft motion and slow spacecraft rotation requires that JEDI simultaneously and continuously resolve both magnetic loss cones at every position inside of ~3RJ. To achieve these measurements JEDI uses multiple sensors, each with six angular sectors evenly distributed in a 160° x 12° fan. Through these multiple views JEDI continuously samples within a 360° plane roughly normal to the spacecraft spin axis with full-sky coplanar coverage achieved each spacecraft spin. JEDI with its low resource requirements and rad-hard, high-speed electronics will make the demanding scientific observations required by the Juno mission.

  17. von Willebrand factor, Jedi knight of the bloodstream.

    PubMed

    Springer, Timothy A

    2014-08-28

    When blood vessels are cut, the forces in the bloodstream increase and change character. The dark side of these forces causes hemorrhage and death. However, von Willebrand factor (VWF), with help from our circulatory system and platelets, harnesses the same forces to form a hemostatic plug. Force and VWF function are so closely intertwined that, like members of the Jedi Order in the movie Star Wars who learn to use "the Force" to do good, VWF may be considered the Jedi knight of the bloodstream. The long length of VWF enables responsiveness to flow. The shape of VWF is predicted to alter from irregularly coiled to extended thread-like in the transition from shear to elongational flow at sites of hemostasis and thrombosis. Elongational force propagated through the length of VWF in its thread-like shape exposes its monomers for multimeric binding to platelets and subendothelium and likely also increases affinity of the A1 domain for platelets. Specialized domains concatenate and compact VWF during biosynthesis. A2 domain unfolding by hydrodynamic force enables postsecretion regulation of VWF length. Mutations in VWF in von Willebrand disease contribute to and are illuminated by VWF biology. I attempt to integrate classic studies on the physiology of hemostatic plug formation into modern molecular understanding, and point out what remains to be learned.

  18. Jedi-1 and MEGF10 signal engulfment of apoptotic neurons through the tyrosine kinase Syk.

    PubMed

    Scheib, Jami L; Sullivan, Chelsea S; Carter, Bruce D

    2012-09-19

    During the development of the peripheral nervous system there is extensive apoptosis, and these neuronal corpses need to be cleared to prevent an inflammatory response. Recently, Jedi-1 and MEGF10, both expressed in glial precursor cells, were identified in mouse as having an essential role in this phagocytosis (Wu et al., 2009); however, the mechanisms by which they promote engulfment remained unknown. Both Jedi-1 and MEGF10 are homologous to the Drosophila melanogaster receptor Draper, which mediates engulfment through activation of the tyrosine kinase Shark. Here, we identify Syk, the mammalian homolog of Shark, as a signal transducer for both Jedi-1 and MEGF10. Syk interacted with each receptor independently through the immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motifs (ITAMs) in their intracellular domains. The interaction was enhanced by phosphorylation of the tyrosines in the ITAMs by Src family kinases (SFKs). Jedi association with Syk and activation of the kinase was also induced by exposure to dead cells. Expression of either Jedi-1 or MEGF10 in HeLa cells facilitated engulfment of carboxylated microspheres to a similar extent, and there was no additive effect when they were coexpressed. Mutation of the ITAM tyrosines of Jedi-1 and MEGF10 prevented engulfment. The SFK inhibitor PP2 or a selective Syk inhibitor (BAY 61-3606) also blocked engulfment. Similarly, in cocultures of glial precursors and dying sensory neurons from embryonic mice, addition of PP2 or knock down of endogenous Syk decreased the phagocytosis of apoptotic neurons. These results indicate that both Jedi-1 and MEGF10 can mediate phagocytosis independently through the recruitment of Syk.

  19. 78 FR 25532 - Requested Administrative Waiver of the Coastwise Trade Laws: Vessel OCEAN JEDI; Invitation for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-01

    ...-7 day charters.'' Geographic Region: New York, Florida, North Carolina, South Carolina, California... Maritime Administration Requested Administrative Waiver of the Coastwise Trade Laws: Vessel OCEAN JEDI... Administration (MARAD), is authorized to grant waivers of the U.S.-build requirement of the coastwise laws...

  20. Jedi Public Health: Co-creating an Identity-Safe Culture to Promote Health Equity.

    PubMed

    Geronimus, Arline T; James, Sherman A; Destin, Mesmin; Graham, Louis A; Hatzenbuehler, Mark; Murphy, Mary; Pearson, Jay A; Omari, Amel; Thompson, James Phillip

    2016-12-01

    The extent to which socially-assigned and culturally mediated social identity affects health depends on contingencies of social identity that vary across and within populations in day-to-day life. These contingencies are structurally rooted and health damaging inasmuch as they activate physiological stress responses. They also have adverse effects on cognition and emotion, undermining self-confidence and diminishing academic performance. This impact reduces opportunities for social mobility, while ensuring those who "beat the odds" pay a physical price for their positive efforts. Recent applications of social identity theory toward closing racial, ethnic, and gender academic achievement gaps through changing features of educational settings, rather than individual students, have proved fruitful. We sought to integrate this evidence with growing social epidemiological evidence that structurally-rooted biopsychosocial processes have population health effects. We explicate an emergent framework, Jedi Public Health (JPH). JPH focuses on changing features of settings in everyday life, rather than individuals, to promote population health equity, a high priority, yet, elusive national public health objective. We call for an expansion and, in some ways, a re-orienting of efforts to eliminate population health inequity. Policies and interventions to remove and replace discrediting cues in everyday settings hold promise for disrupting the repeated physiological stress process activation that fuels population health inequities with potentially wide application.

  1. Inert doublet model and LEP II limits

    SciTech Connect

    Lundstroem, Erik; Gustafsson, Michael; Edsjoe, Joakim

    2009-02-01

    The inert doublet model is a minimal extension of the standard model introducing an additional SU(2) doublet with new scalar particles that could be produced at accelerators. While there exists no LEP II analysis dedicated for these inert scalars, the absence of a signal within searches for supersymmetric neutralinos can be used to constrain the inert doublet model. This translation however requires some care because of the different properties of the inert scalars and the neutralinos. We investigate what restrictions an existing DELPHI Collaboration study of neutralino pair production can put on the inert scalars and discuss the result in connection with dark matter. We find that although an important part of the inert doublet model parameter space can be excluded by the LEP II data, the lightest inert particle still constitutes a valid dark matter candidate.

  2. User Guide for the International Jobs and Economic Development Impacts Model

    SciTech Connect

    Keyser, David; Flores-Espino, Francisco; Uriarte, Caroline; Cox, Sadie

    2016-09-01

    The International Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (I-JEDI) model is a freely available economic model that estimates gross economic impacts from wind, solar, and geothermal energy projects for several different countries. Building on the original JEDI model, which was developed for the United States, I-JEDI was developed under the USAID Enhancing Capacity for Low Emission Development Strategies (EC-LEDS) program to support countries in assessing economic impacts of LEDS actions in the energy sector. I-JEDI estimates economic impacts by characterizing the construction and operation of energy projects in terms of expenditures and the portion of these expenditures made within the country of analysis. These data are then used in a country-specific input-output (I-O) model to estimate employment, earnings, gross domestic product (GDP), and gross output impacts. Total economic impacts are presented as well as impacts by industry. This user guide presents general information about how to use I-JEDI and interpret results as well as detailed information about methodology and model limitations.

  3. Line emission from H II blister models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubin, R. H.

    1984-01-01

    Numerical techniques to calculate the thermal and geometric properties of line emission from H II 'blister' regions are presented. It is assumed that the density distributions of the H II regions are a function of two dimensions, with rotational symmetry specifying the shape in three-dimensions. The thermal and ionization equilibrium equations of the problem are solved by spherical modeling, and a spherical sector approximation is used to simplify the three-dimensional treatment of diffuse ionizing radiation. The global properties of H II 'blister' regions near the edges of a molecular cloud are simulated by means of the geometry/density distribution, and the results are compared with observational data. It is shown that there is a monotonic increase of peak surface brightness from the i = 0 deg (pole-on) observational position to the i = 90 deg (edge-on) position. The enhancement of the line peak intensity from the edge-on to the pole-on positions is found to depend on the density, stratification, ionization, and electron temperature weighting. It is found that as i increases, the position of peak line brightness of the lower excitation species is displaced to the high-density side of the high excitation species.

  4. Effects of Mg II and Ca II ionization on ab-initio solar chromosphere models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rammacher, W.; Cuntz, M.

    1991-01-01

    Acoustically heated solar chromosphere models are computed considering radiation damping by (non-LTE) emission from H(-) and by Mg II and Ca II emission lines. The radiative transfer equations for the Mg II k and Ca II K emission lines are solved using the core-saturation method with complete redistribution. The Mg II k and Ca II K cooling rates are compared with the VAL model C. Several substantial improvements over the work of Ulmschneider et al. (1987) are included. It is found that the rapid temperature rises caused by the ionization of Mg II are not formed in the middle chromosphere, but occur at larger atmospheric heights. These models represent the temperature structure of the 'real' solar chromosphere much better. This result is a major precondition for the study of ab-initio models for solar flux tubes based on MHD wave propagation and also for ab-initio models for the solar transition layer.

  5. Spectral modeling of Type II SNe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dessart, Luc

    2015-08-01

    The red supergiant phase represents the final stage of evolution in the life of moderate mass (8-25Msun) massive stars. Hidden from view, the core changes considerably its structure, progressing through the advanced stages of nuclear burning, and eventually becomes degenerate. Upon reaching the Chandrasekhar mass, this Fe or ONeMg core collapses, leading to the formation of a proto neutron star. A type II supernova results if the shock that forms at core bounce, eventually wins over the envelope accretion and reaches the progenitor surface.The electromagnetic display of such core-collapse SNe starts with this shock breakout, and persists for months as the ejecta releases the energy deposited initially by the shock or continuously through radioactive decay. Over a timescale of weeks to months, the originally optically-thick ejecta thins out and turns nebular. SN radiation contains a wealth of information about the explosion physics (energy, explosive nucleosynthesis), the progenitor properties (structure and composition). Polarised radiation also offers signatures that can help constrain the morphology of the ejecta.In this talk, I will review the current status of type II SN spectral modelling, and emphasise that a proper solution requires a time dependent treatment of the radiative transfer problem. I will discuss the wealth of information that can be gleaned from spectra as well as light curves, from both the early times (photospheric phase) and late times (nebular phase). I will discuss the diversity of Type SNe properties and how they are related to the diversity of red supergiant stars from which they originate.SN radiation offers an alternate means of constraining the properties of red-supergiant stars. To wrap up, I will illustrate how SNe II-P can also be used as probes, for example to constrain the metallicity of their environment.

  6. Finite State Machines and Modal Models in Ptolemy II

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-11-01

    Finite State Machines and Modal Models in Ptolemy II Edward A. Lee Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences University of California at Berkeley...DATES COVERED 00-00-2009 to 00-00-2009 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Finite State Machines and Modal Models in Ptolemy II 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b...describes the usage and semantics of finite-state machines (FSMs) and modal models in Ptolemy II. FSMs are actors whose behavior is described using a

  7. Modeling Topaz-II system performance

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, H.H.; Klein, A.C. )

    1993-01-01

    The US acquisition of the Topaz-11 in-core thermionic space reactor test system from Russia provides a good opportunity to perform a comparison of the Russian reported data and the results from computer codes such as MCNP (Ref. 3) and TFEHX (Ref. 4). The comparison study includes both neutronic and thermionic performance analyses. The Topaz II thermionic reactor is modeled with MCNP using actual Russian dimensions and parameters. The computation of the neutronic performance considers several important aspects such as the fuel enrichment and location of the thermionic fuel elements (TFES) in the reactor core. The neutronic analysis included the calculation of both radial and axial power distribution, which are then used in the TFEHX code for electrical performance. The reactor modeled consists of 37 single-cell TFEs distributed in a 13-cm-radius zirconium hydride block surrounded by 8 cm of beryllium metal reflector. The TFEs use 90% enriched [sup 235]U and molybdenum coated with a thin layer of [sup 184]W for emitter surface. Electrons emitted are captured by a collector surface with a gap filled with cesium vapor between the collector and emitter surfaces. The collector surface is electrically insulated with alumina. Liquid NaK provides the cooling system for the TFEs. The axial thermal power distribution is obtained by dividing the TFE into 40 axial nodes. Comparison of the true axial power distribution with that produced by electrical heaters was also performed.

  8. Modeling interactions of Hg(II) and bauxitic soils.

    PubMed

    Weerasooriya, Rohan; Tobschall, Heinz J; Bandara, Atula

    2007-11-01

    The adsorptive interactions of Hg(II) with gibbsite-rich soils (hereafter SOIL-g) were modeled by 1-pK surface complexation theory using charge distribution multi-site ion competition model (CD MUSIC) incorporating basic Stern layer model (BSM) to account for electrostatic effects. The model calibrations were performed for the experimental data of synthetic gibbsite-Hg(II) adsorption. When [NaNO(3)] > or = 0.01M, the Hg(II) adsorption density values, of gibbsite, Gamma(Hg(II)), showed a negligible variation with ionic strength. However, Gamma(Hg(II)) values show a marked variation with the [Cl(-)]. When [Cl(-)] > or = 0.01M, the Gamma(Hg(II)) values showed a significant reduction with the pH. The Hg(II) adsorption behavior in NaNO(3) was modeled assuming homogeneous solid surface. The introduction of high affinity sites, i.e., >Al(s)OH at a low concentration (typically about 0.045 sites nm(-2)) is required to model Hg(II) adsorption in NaCl. According to IR spectroscopic data, the bauxitic soil (SOIL-g) is characterized by gibbsite and bayerite. These mineral phases were not treated discretely in modeling of Hg(II) and soil interactions. The CD MUSIC/BSM model combination can be used to model Hg(II) adsorption on bauxitic soil. The role of organic matter seems to play a role on Hg(II) binding when pH>8. The Hg(II) adsorption in the presence of excess Cl(-) ions required the selection of high affinity sites in modeling.

  9. Climate Model Datasets on Earth System Grid II (ESG II)

    DOE Data Explorer

    Earth System Grid (ESG) is a project that combines the power and capacity of supercomputers, sophisticated analysis servers, and datasets on the scale of petabytes. The goal is to provide a seamless distributed environment that allows scientists in many locations to work with large-scale data, perform climate change modeling and simulation,and share results in innovative ways. Though ESG is more about the computing environment than the data, still there are several catalogs of data available at the web site that can be browsed or search. Most of the datasets are restricted to registered users, but several are open to any access.

  10. PARALLEL MEASUREMENT AND MODELING OF TRANSPORT IN THE DARHT II BEAMLINE ON ETA II

    SciTech Connect

    Chambers, F W; Raymond, B A; Falabella, S; Lee, B S; Richardson, R A; Weir, J T; Davis, H A; Schultze, M E

    2005-05-31

    To successfully tune the DARHT II transport beamline requires the close coupling of a model of the beam transport and the measurement of the beam observables as the beam conditions and magnet settings are varied. For the ETA II experiment using the DARHT II beamline components this was achieved using the SUICIDE (Simple User Interface Connecting to an Integrated Data Environment) data analysis environment and the FITS (Fully Integrated Transport Simulation) model. The SUICIDE environment has direct access to the experimental beam transport data at acquisition and the FITS predictions of the transport for immediate comparison. The FITS model is coupled into the control system where it can read magnet current settings for real time modeling. We find this integrated coupling is essential for model verification and the successful development of a tuning aid for the efficient convergence on a useable tune. We show the real time comparisons of simulation and experiment and explore the successes and limitations of this close coupled approach.

  11. A pesticide emission model (PEM) Part II: model evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholtz, M. T.; Voldner, E.; Van Heyst, B. J.; McMillan, A. C.; Pattey, E.

    In the first part of the paper, the development of a numerical pesticide emission model (PEM) is described for predicting the volatilization of pesticides applied to agricultural soils and crops through soil incorporation, surface spraying, or in the furrow at the time of planting. In this paper the results of three steps toward the evaluation of PEM are reported. The evaluation involves: (i) verifying the numerical algorithms and computer code through comparison of PEM simulations with an available analytical solution of the advection/diffusion equation for semi-volatile solutes in soil; (ii) comparing hourly heat, moisture and emission fluxes of trifluralin and triallate modeled by PEM with fluxes measured using the relaxed eddy-accumulation technique; and (iii) comparison of the PEM predictions of persistence half-life for 29 pesticides with the ranges of persistence found in the literature. The overall conclusion from this limited evaluation study is that PEM is a useful model for estimating the volatilization rates of pesticides from agricultural soils and crops. The lack of reliable estimates of chemical and photochemical degradation rates of pesticide on foliage, however, introduces large uncertainties in the estimates from any model of the volatilization of pesticide that impacts the canopy.

  12. Model of the expansion of H II region RCW 82

    SciTech Connect

    Krasnobaev, K. V.; Kotova, G. Yu.; Tagirova, R. R. E-mail: gviana2005@gmail.com

    2014-05-10

    This paper aims to resolve the problem of formation of young objects observed in the RCW 82 H II region. In the framework of a classical trigger model the estimated time of fragmentation is larger than the estimated age of the H II region. Thus the young objects could not have formed during the dynamical evolution of the H II region. We propose a new model that helps resolve this problem. This model suggests that the H II region RCW 82 is embedded in a cloud of limited size that is denser than the surrounding interstellar medium. According to this model, when the ionization-shock front leaves the cloud it causes the formation of an accelerating dense gas shell. In the accelerated shell, the effects of the Rayleigh-Taylor (R-T) instability dominate and the characteristic time of the growth of perturbations with the observed magnitude of about 3 pc is 0.14 Myr, which is less than the estimated age of the H II region. The total time t {sub ∑}, which is the sum of the expansion time of the H II region to the edge of the cloud, the time of the R-T instability growth, and the free fall time, is estimated as 0.44 < t {sub ∑} < 0.78 Myr. We conclude that the young objects in the H II region RCW 82 could be formed as a result of the R-T instability with subsequent fragmentation into large-scale condensations.

  13. Modeling the Arm II core in MicroCap IV

    SciTech Connect

    Dalton, A.C.

    1996-11-01

    This paper reports on how an electrical model for the core of the Arm II machine was created and how to use this model. We wanted to get a model for the electrical characteristics of the ARM II core, in order to simulate this machine and to assist in the design of a future machine. We wanted this model to be able to simulate saturation, variable loss, and reset. Using the Hodgdon model and the circuit analysis program MicroCap IV, this was accomplished. This paper is written in such a way as to allow someone not familiar with the project to understand it.

  14. Standard solar model. II - g-modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guenther, D. B.; Demarque, P.; Pinsonneault, M. H.; Kim, Y.-C.

    1992-01-01

    The paper presents the g-mode oscillation for a set of modern solar models. Each solar model is based on a single modification or improvement to the physics of a reference solar model. Improvements were made to the nuclear reaction rates, the equation of state, the opacities, and the treatment of the atmosphere. The error in the predicted g-mode periods associated with the uncertainties in the model physics is predicted and the specific sensitivities of the g-mode periods and their period spacings to the different model structures are described. In addition, these models are compared to a sample of published observations. A remarkably good agreement is found between the 'best' solar model and the observations of Hill and Gu (1990).

  15. Aqueous Solution Vessel Thermal Model Development II

    SciTech Connect

    Buechler, Cynthia Eileen

    2015-10-28

    The work presented in this report is a continuation of the work described in the May 2015 report, “Aqueous Solution Vessel Thermal Model Development”. This computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model aims to predict the temperature and bubble volume fraction in an aqueous solution of uranium. These values affect the reactivity of the fissile solution, so it is important to be able to calculate them and determine their effects on the reaction. Part A of this report describes some of the parameter comparisons performed on the CFD model using Fluent. Part B describes the coupling of the Fluent model with a Monte-Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) neutron transport model. The fuel tank geometry is the same as it was in the May 2015 report, annular with a thickness-to-height ratio of 0.16. An accelerator-driven neutron source provides the excitation for the reaction, and internal and external water cooling channels remove the heat. The model used in this work incorporates the Eulerian multiphase model with lift, wall lubrication, turbulent dispersion and turbulence interaction. The buoyancy-driven flow is modeled using the Boussinesq approximation, and the flow turbulence is determined using the k-ω Shear-Stress-Transport (SST) model. The dispersed turbulence multiphase model is employed to capture the multiphase turbulence effects.

  16. Predictive Models and Computational Toxicology (II IBAMTOX)

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA’s ‘virtual embryo’ project is building an integrative systems biology framework for predictive models of developmental toxicity. One schema involves a knowledge-driven adverse outcome pathway (AOP) framework utilizing information from public databases, standardized ontologies...

  17. Nyala and Bushbuck II: A Harvesting Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fay, Temple H.; Greeff, Johanna C.

    1999-01-01

    Adds a cropping or harvesting term to the animal overpopulation model developed in Part I of this article. Investigates various harvesting strategies that might suggest a solution to the overpopulation problem without actually culling any animals. (ASK)

  18. On The Modeling of Educational Systems: II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grauer, Robert T.

    1975-01-01

    A unified approach to model building is developed from the separate techniques of regression, simulation, and factorial design. The methodology is applied in the context of a suburban school district. (Author/LS)

  19. Engineer Modeling Study. Volume II. Users Manual.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-09-01

    to have some experience with automated data processing (ADP) systems. Instructions are given for model operation on the Boeing Computer system. To...AM.y Vpor 62074 ATTII, ATA-TE-SI Riyadh 09038 Sharpe Army Dopot 95331 ATm: ATZA-PE ok I..0d 61201 s.... Ar y opot 14541 Am: Bear. Libary

  20. Argonne Bubble Experiment Thermal Model Development II

    SciTech Connect

    Buechler, Cynthia Eileen

    2016-07-01

    This report describes the continuation of the work reported in “Argonne Bubble Experiment Thermal Model Development”. The experiment was performed at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) in 2014. A rastered 35 MeV electron beam deposited power in a solution of uranyl sulfate, generating heat and radiolytic gas bubbles. Irradiations were performed at three beam power levels, 6, 12 and 15 kW. Solution temperatures were measured by thermocouples, and gas bubble behavior was observed. This report will describe the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model that was developed to calculate the temperatures and gas volume fractions in the solution vessel during the irradiations. The previous report described an initial analysis performed on a geometry that had not been updated to reflect the as-built solution vessel. Here, the as-built geometry is used. Monte-Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) calculations were performed on the updated geometry, and these results were used to define the power deposition profile for the CFD analyses, which were performed using Fluent, Ver. 16.2. CFD analyses were performed for the 12 and 15 kW irradiations, and further improvements to the model were incorporated, including the consideration of power deposition in nearby vessel components, gas mixture composition, and bubble size distribution. The temperature results of the CFD calculations are compared to experimental measurements.

  1. Oxygen and seizure dynamics: II. Computational modeling

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Yina; Ullah, Ghanim; Ingram, Justin

    2014-01-01

    Electrophysiological recordings show intense neuronal firing during epileptic seizures leading to enhanced energy consumption. However, the relationship between oxygen metabolism and seizure patterns has not been well studied. Recent studies have developed fast and quantitative techniques to measure oxygen microdomain concentration during seizure events. In this article, we develop a biophysical model that accounts for these experimental observations. The model is an extension of the Hodgkin-Huxley formalism and includes the neuronal microenvironment dynamics of sodium, potassium, and oxygen concentrations. Our model accounts for metabolic energy consumption during and following seizure events. We can further account for the experimental observation that hypoxia can induce seizures, with seizures occurring only within a narrow range of tissue oxygen pressure. We also reproduce the interplay between excitatory and inhibitory neurons seen in experiments, accounting for the different oxygen levels observed during seizures in excitatory vs. inhibitory cell layers. Our findings offer a more comprehensive understanding of the complex interrelationship among seizures, ion dynamics, and energy metabolism. PMID:24671540

  2. PEP-II vacuum system pressure profile modeling using EXCEL

    SciTech Connect

    Nordby, M.; Perkins, C.

    1994-06-01

    A generic, adaptable Microsoft EXCEL program to simulate molecular flow in beam line vacuum systems is introduced. Modeling using finite-element approximation of the governing differential equation is discussed, as well as error estimation and program capabilities. The ease of use and flexibility of the spreadsheet-based program is demonstrated. PEP-II vacuum system models are reviewed and compared with analytical models.

  3. Mortality Probability Model III and Simplified Acute Physiology Score II

    PubMed Central

    Vasilevskis, Eduard E.; Kuzniewicz, Michael W.; Cason, Brian A.; Lane, Rondall K.; Dean, Mitzi L.; Clay, Ted; Rennie, Deborah J.; Vittinghoff, Eric; Dudley, R. Adams

    2009-01-01

    Background: To develop and compare ICU length-of-stay (LOS) risk-adjustment models using three commonly used mortality or LOS prediction models. Methods: Between 2001 and 2004, we performed a retrospective, observational study of 11,295 ICU patients from 35 hospitals in the California Intensive Care Outcomes Project. We compared the accuracy of the following three LOS models: a recalibrated acute physiology and chronic health evaluation (APACHE) IV-LOS model; and models developed using risk factors in the mortality probability model III at zero hours (MPM0) and the simplified acute physiology score (SAPS) II mortality prediction model. We evaluated models by calculating the following: (1) grouped coefficients of determination; (2) differences between observed and predicted LOS across subgroups; and (3) intraclass correlations of observed/expected LOS ratios between models. Results: The grouped coefficients of determination were APACHE IV with coefficients recalibrated to the LOS values of the study cohort (APACHE IVrecal) [R2 = 0.422], mortality probability model III at zero hours (MPM0 III) [R2 = 0.279], and simplified acute physiology score (SAPS II) [R2 = 0.008]. For each decile of predicted ICU LOS, the mean predicted LOS vs the observed LOS was significantly different (p ≤ 0.05) for three, two, and six deciles using APACHE IVrecal, MPM0 III, and SAPS II, respectively. Plots of the predicted vs the observed LOS ratios of the hospitals revealed a threefold variation in LOS among hospitals with high model correlations. Conclusions: APACHE IV and MPM0 III were more accurate than SAPS II for the prediction of ICU LOS. APACHE IV is the most accurate and best calibrated model. Although it is less accurate, MPM0 III may be a reasonable option if the data collection burden or the treatment effect bias is a consideration. PMID:19363210

  4. Multiwell experiment: reservoir modeling analysis, Volume II

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, A.I.

    1985-05-01

    This report updates an ongoing analysis by reservoir modelers at the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) of well test data from the Department of Energy's Multiwell Experiment (MWX). Results of previous efforts were presented in a recent METC Technical Note (Horton 1985). Results included in this report pertain to the poststimulation well tests of Zones 3 and 4 of the Paludal Sandstone Interval and the prestimulation well tests of the Red and Yellow Zones of the Coastal Sandstone Interval. The following results were obtained by using a reservoir model and history matching procedures: (1) Post-minifracture analysis indicated that the minifracture stimulation of the Paludal Interval did not produce an induced fracture, and extreme formation damage did occur, since a 65% permeability reduction around the wellbore was estimated. The design for this minifracture was from 200 to 300 feet on each side of the wellbore; (2) Post full-scale stimulation analysis for the Paludal Interval also showed that extreme formation damage occurred during the stimulation as indicated by a 75% permeability reduction 20 feet on each side of the induced fracture. Also, an induced fracture half-length of 100 feet was determined to have occurred, as compared to a designed fracture half-length of 500 to 600 feet; and (3) Analysis of prestimulation well test data from the Coastal Interval agreed with previous well-to-well interference tests that showed extreme permeability anisotropy was not a factor for this zone. This lack of permeability anisotropy was also verified by a nitrogen injection test performed on the Coastal Red and Yellow Zones. 8 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Competitive sorption of Pb(II), Cu(II) and Ni(II) on carbonaceous nanofibers: A spectroscopic and modeling approach.

    PubMed

    Ding, Congcong; Cheng, Wencai; Wang, Xiangxue; Wu, Zhen-Yu; Sun, Yubing; Chen, Changlun; Wang, Xiangke; Yu, Shu-Hong

    2016-08-05

    The competitive sorption of Pb(II), Cu(II) and Ni(II) on the uniform carbonaceous nanofibers (CNFs) was investigated in binary/ternary-metal systems. The pH-dependent sorption of Pb(II), Cu(II) and Ni(II) on CNFs was independent of ionic strength, indicating that inner-sphere surface complexation dominated sorption Pb(II), Cu(II) and Ni(II) on CNFs. The maximum sorption capacities of Pb(II), Cu(II) and Ni(II) on CNFs in single-metal systems at a pH 5.5±0.2 and 25±1°C were 3.84 (795.65mg/g), 3.21 (204.00mg/g) and 2.67 (156.70mg/g)mmol/g, respectively. In equimolar binary/ternary-metal systems, Pb(II) exhibited greater inhibition of the sorption of Cu(II) and Ni(II), demonstrating the stronger affinity of CNFs for Pb(II). The competitive sorption of heavy metals in ternary-metal systems was predicted quite well by surface complexation modeling derived from single-metal data. According to FTIR, XPS and EXAFS analyses, Pb(II), Cu(II) and Ni(II) were specifically adsorbed on CNFs via covalent bonding. These observations should provide an essential start in simultaneous removal of multiple heavy metals from aquatic environments by CNFs, and open the doorways for the application of CNFs.

  6. THE HYDRODYNAMICAL MODELS OF THE COMETARY COMPACT H ii REGION

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Feng-Yao; Zhu, Qing-Feng; Li, Juan; Wang, Jun-Zhi; Zhang, Jiang-Shui E-mail: zhuqf@ustc.edu.cn E-mail: jzwang@shao.ac.cn

    2015-10-10

    We have developed a full numerical method to study the gas dynamics of cometary ultracompact H ii regions, and associated photodissociation regions (PDRs). The bow-shock and champagne-flow models with a 40.9/21.9 M{sub ⊙} star are simulated. In the bow-shock models, the massive star is assumed to move through dense (n = 8000 cm{sup −3}) molecular material with a stellar velocity of 15 km s{sup −1}. In the champagne-flow models, an exponential distribution of density with a scale height of 0.2 pc is assumed. The profiles of the [Ne ii] 12.81 μm and H{sub 2} S(2) lines from the ionized regions and PDRs are compared for two sets of models. In champagne-flow models, emission lines from the ionized gas clearly show the effect of acceleration along the direction toward the tail due to the density gradient. The kinematics of the molecular gas inside the dense shell are mainly due to the expansion of the H ii region. However, in bow-shock models the ionized gas mainly moves in the same direction as the stellar motion. The kinematics of the molecular gas inside the dense shell simply reflects the motion of the dense shell with respect to the star. These differences can be used to distinguish two sets of models.

  7. SDSS-II: Determination of shape and color parameter coefficients for SALT-II fit model

    SciTech Connect

    Dojcsak, L.; Marriner, J.; /Fermilab

    2010-08-01

    In this study we look at the SALT-II model of Type IA supernova analysis, which determines the distance moduli based on the known absolute standard candle magnitude of the Type IA supernovae. We take a look at the determination of the shape and color parameter coefficients, {alpha} and {beta} respectively, in the SALT-II model with the intrinsic error that is determined from the data. Using the SNANA software package provided for the analysis of Type IA supernovae, we use a standard Monte Carlo simulation to generate data with known parameters to use as a tool for analyzing the trends in the model based on certain assumptions about the intrinsic error. In order to find the best standard candle model, we try to minimize the residuals on the Hubble diagram by calculating the correct shape and color parameter coefficients. We can estimate the magnitude of the intrinsic errors required to obtain results with {chi}{sup 2}/degree of freedom = 1. We can use the simulation to estimate the amount of color smearing as indicated by the data for our model. We find that the color smearing model works as a general estimate of the color smearing, and that we are able to use the RMS distribution in the variables as one method of estimating the correct intrinsic errors needed by the data to obtain the correct results for {alpha} and {beta}. We then apply the resultant intrinsic error matrix to the real data and show our results.

  8. Predictive data modeling of human type II diabetes related statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaenisch, Kristina L.; Jaenisch, Holger M.; Handley, James W.; Albritton, Nathaniel G.

    2009-04-01

    During the course of routine Type II treatment of one of the authors, it was decided to derive predictive analytical Data Models of the daily sampled vital statistics: namely weight, blood pressure, and blood sugar, to determine if the covariance among the observed variables could yield a descriptive equation based model, or better still, a predictive analytical model that could forecast the expected future trend of the variables and possibly eliminate the number of finger stickings required to montior blood sugar levels. The personal history and analysis with resulting models are presented.

  9. Variables Affecting Economic Development of Wind Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Lantz, E.; Tegen, S.

    2008-07-01

    NREL's JEDI Wind model performed an analysis of wind-power-related economic development drivers. Economic development benefits for wind and coal were estimated using NREL's JEDI Wind and JEDI Coal models.

  10. Adhesion ability of angiotensin II with model membranes.

    PubMed

    Preu, Julia; Tiefenauer, Louis; Gutberlet, Thomas

    2017-02-01

    The octa-peptide angiotensin II (Ang II, (H2NAspArgValTyrIleHisProPheCOOH)) is one of the key player on blood pressure regulation in mammals. Predominantly binding to the Angiotensin type 1 and 2 receptors, the hormone is one of several peptide ligands binding to G protein coupled receptors (GPCR). The active hormone derives from a high molecular weight precursor sequentially cleaved by the proteases renin and the angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE). The chemical nature of the amino acid sequence has an impact on the behavior in the proximity of membranes, demonstrated using different membrane model systems and biophysical methods. Applying electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and small angle X-ray scattering a detailed view on the adhesion of the peptide with model membrane surfaces was performed. The role of specific amino acids involved in the interaction with the phospholipid head group were investigated and, studying a truncated version of Ang II, Ang (1-7), the key role of the C-terminal phenylalanine was proven. Truncation of the C-terminal amino acid abolishes the binding of the peptide to the membrane surface. A shift in pH, altering the protonation state of the central histidine residue impairs the adhesion of Ang II.

  11. Reservoir modeling of the Phase II Hot Dry Rock System

    SciTech Connect

    Zyvoloski, G.

    1984-01-01

    The Phase II system has been created with a series of hydraulic fracturing experiments at the Fenton Hill Hot Dry Rock site. Experiment 2032, the largest of the fracturing operations, involved injecting 5.6 million gallons (21,200m/sup 3/) of water into wellbore EE-2 over the period December 6-9, 1983. The experiment has been modeled using geothermal simulator FEHM developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The modeling effort has produced strong evidence of a large highly fractured reservoir. Two long term heat extraction schemes for the reservoir are studied with the model.

  12. Simplified modeling of the EBR-II control rods

    SciTech Connect

    Angelo, P.L.

    1995-06-25

    Simplified models of EBR-II control and safety rods have been developed for core modeling under various operational and shutdown conditions. A parametric study was performed on normal worth, high worth, and safety rod type control rods. A summary of worth changes due to individual modeling approximations is tabulated. Worth effects due to structural modeling simplification are negligible. Fuel region homogenization and burnup compression contributes more than any other factor. Reference case C/E values (ratio of calculated worth from detailed model to measured worth) of 1.072 and 1.142 for safety and normal worth rods indicate acceptable errors when the approximations are used. Fuel burnup effect illustrates rod worth sensitivity to the modeling approximation. Aggregate effects are calculated under a reduced mesh.

  13. Comprehensive Modeling of the Apache with CAMRAD II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Henry E.; Kunz, Donald L.

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents a report of a multi year study of the U.S. Army LONGBOW APACHE (AH-64D) aircraft. The goals of this study were to provide the Apache Project Managers Office (PMO) with a broad spectrum of calibrated comprehensive and CFD models of the AH-64D aircraft. The goal of this paper is to present an overview of the comprehensive model which has been developed. The CAMRAD II computer code was chosen to complete this task. The paper first discusses issues that must be addressed when modeling the Apache using CAMRAD. The work required the acquisition of a data base for the aircraft and the development and application of a multidisciplinary computer model. Sample results from various parts of the model are presented. Conclusions with regard to the strengths and weaknesses of simulations based on this model are discussed.

  14. Comprehensive Modeling of the Apache With CAMRAD II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Henry E.; Kunz, Donald L.

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents a report of a multi year study of the U.S. Army LONGBOW APACHE (AH-64D) aircraft. The goals of this study were to provide the Apache Project Managers Office (PMO) with a broad spectrum of calibrated comprehensive and CFD models of the AH-64D aircraft. The goal of this paper is to present an overview of the comprehensive model which has been developed. The CAMRAD II computer code was chosen to complete this task. The paper first discusses issues that must be addressed when modeling the Apache using CAMRAD. The work required the acquisition of a data base for the aircraft and the development and application of a multidisciplinary computer model. Sample results from various parts of the model are presented. Conclusions with regard to the strengths and weaknesses of simulations based on this model are discussed.

  15. Atomic Data and Spectral Model for Fe II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bautista, Manuel A.; Fivet, Vanessa; Ballance, Connor; Quinet, Pascal; Ferland, Gary; Mendoza, Claudio; Kallman, Timothy R.

    2015-08-01

    We present extensive calculations of radiative transition rates and electron impact collision strengths for Fe ii. The data sets involve 52 levels from the 3d7, 3d64s, and 3{d}54{s}2 configurations. Computations of A-values are carried out with a combination of state-of-the-art multiconfiguration approaches, namely the relativistic Hartree-Fock, Thomas-Fermi-Dirac potential, and Dirac-Fock methods, while the R-matrix plus intermediate coupling frame transformation, Breit-Pauli R-matrix, and Dirac R-matrix packages are used to obtain collision strengths. We examine the advantages and shortcomings of each of these methods, and estimate rate uncertainties from the resulting data dispersion. We proceed to construct excitation balance spectral models, and compare the predictions from each data set with observed spectra from various astronomical objects. We are thus able to establish benchmarks in the spectral modeling of [Fe ii] emission in the IR and optical regions as well as in the UV Fe ii absorption spectra. Finally, we provide diagnostic line ratios and line emissivities for emission spectroscopy as well as column densities for absorption spectroscopy. All atomic data and models are available online and through the AtomPy atomic data curation environment.

  16. Gas dynamics modeling of the HYLIFE-II reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Jantzen, C.

    1995-08-01

    Gas dynamics in the IFE reactor, HYLIFE-II is modeled using the code, TSUNAMI. This code is a 2-D shock-solver that uses the Godunov method with operator splitting. Results from a cylindrically symmetric simulation indicate an initial, low density, burst of high energy particles enters the final focus transport lens within 40 microseconds after the blast, much faster than the proposed 1 millisecond shutter closing time. After approximately 100 microseconds the chamber debris flux levels off to one eighth its peak value and maintains this intensity until the shutter closes. Although initial protective jet ablation is considered, neither secondary radiation nor condensation are modeled. Therefore results are conservative.

  17. An integrated model of the TOPAZ-II electromagnetic pump

    SciTech Connect

    El-Genk, M.S.; Paramonov, D.V. . Inst. of Space Nuclear Power Studies)

    1994-11-01

    A detailed model of the electromagnetic pump of the TOPAZ-II space nuclear reactor power system is developed and compared with experimental data. The magnetic field strength in the pump depends not only on the current supplied by the pump thermionic fuel elements in the reactor core but also on the temperature of the coolant, the magnetic coil, and the pump structure. All electric and thermal properties of the coolant, wall material of the pump ducts, and electric leads are taken to be temperature dependent. The model predictions are in good agreement with experimental data.

  18. Photon number conserving models of H II bubbles during reionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paranjape, Aseem; Choudhury, T. Roy; Padmanabhan, Hamsa

    2016-08-01

    Traditional excursion-set-based models of H II bubble growth during the epoch of reionization are known to violate photon number conservation, in the sense that the mass fraction in ionized bubbles in these models does not equal the ratio of the number of ionizing photons produced by sources and the number of hydrogen atoms in the intergalactic medium. E.g. for a Planck13 cosmology with electron scattering optical depth τ ≃ 0.066, the discrepancy is ˜15 per cent for x_{H II}=0.1 and ˜5 per cent for x_{H II}=0.5. We demonstrate that this problem arises from a fundamental conceptual shortcoming of the excursion-set approach (already recognized in the literature on this formalism) which only tracks average mass fractions instead of the exact, stochastic source counts. With this insight, we build an approximately photon number conserving Monte Carlo model of bubble growth based on partitioning regions of dark matter into haloes. Our model, which is formally valid for white noise initial conditions (ICs), shows dramatic improvements in photon number conservation, as well as substantial differences in the bubble size distribution, as compared to traditional models. We explore the trends obtained on applying our algorithm to more realistic ICs, finding that these improvements are robust to changes in the ICs. Since currently popular seminumerical schemes of bubble growth also violate photon number conservation, we argue that it will be worthwhile to pursue new, explicitly photon number conserving approaches. Along the way, we clarify some misconceptions regarding this problem that have appeared in the literature.

  19. A MODEL STUDY OF TRANSVERSE MODE COUPLING INSTABILITY AT NATIONAL SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCE-II (NSLS-II).

    SciTech Connect

    BLEDNYKH, A.; WANG, J.M.

    2005-05-15

    The vertical impedances of the preliminary designs of National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) Mini Gap Undulators (MGU) are calculated by means of GdfidL code. The Transverse Mode Coupling Instability (TMCI) thresholds corresponding to these impedances are estimated using an analytically solvable model.

  20. Dynamical modeling of elliptical galaxies. II. numerical prolate models

    SciTech Connect

    Lake, G.

    1981-01-01

    The analytical solutions of Paper I are generalized using the self-consistent field method. These prolate models are constructed using only two integrals of motion, the energy (E) and the angular momentum about the axis of symmetry, (L/sub z/). They are the first models with flattening greater than E4 which possess elliptical isophotes and realistic density profiles. The singularity in the surface brightness which characterized the models of Paper I has been removed by smoothing the extreme suppression of L/sub z/. The new models (like those of Paper I) still show a sharp rise in the velocity dispersion at the center. This feature is due to the strongly anisotropic velocity dispersions, rather than the existence of a supermassive object.

  1. Model selection as a science driver for dark energy surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Pia; Parkinson, David; Corasaniti, Pier Stefano; Liddle, Andrew R.; Kunz, Martin

    2006-07-01

    A key science goal of upcoming dark energy surveys is to seek time-evolution of the dark energy. This problem is one of model selection, where the aim is to differentiate between cosmological models with different numbers of parameters. However, the power of these surveys is traditionally assessed by estimating their ability to constrain parameters, which is a different statistical problem. In this paper, we use Bayesian model selection techniques, specifically forecasting of the Bayes factors, to compare the abilities of different proposed surveys in discovering dark energy evolution. We consider six experiments - supernova luminosity measurements by the Supernova Legacy Survey, SNAP, JEDI and ALPACA, and baryon acoustic oscillation measurements by WFMOS and JEDI - and use Bayes factor plots to compare their statistical constraining power. The concept of Bayes factor forecasting has much broader applicability than dark energy surveys.

  2. Kinetic modelling for zinc (II) ions biosorption onto Luffa cylindrica

    SciTech Connect

    Oboh, I.; Aluyor, E.; Audu, T.

    2015-03-30

    The biosorption of Zinc (II) ions onto a biomaterial - Luffa cylindrica has been studied. This biomaterial was characterized by elemental analysis, surface area, pore size distribution, scanning electron microscopy, and the biomaterial before and after sorption, was characterized by Fourier Transform Infra Red (FTIR) spectrometer. The kinetic nonlinear models fitted were Pseudo-first order, Pseudo-second order and Intra-particle diffusion. A comparison of non-linear regression method in selecting the kinetic model was made. Four error functions, namely coefficient of determination (R{sup 2}), hybrid fractional error function (HYBRID), average relative error (ARE), and sum of the errors squared (ERRSQ), were used to predict the parameters of the kinetic models. The strength of this study is that a biomaterial with wide distribution particularly in the tropical world and which occurs as waste material could be put into effective utilization as a biosorbent to address a crucial environmental problem.

  3. Model light curves of linear Type II supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Swartz, D.A.; Wheeler, J.C.; Harkness, R.P. )

    1991-06-01

    Light curves computed from hydrodynamic models of supernova are compared graphically with the average observed B and V-band light curves of linear Type II supernovae. Models are based on the following explosion scenarios: carbon deflagration within a C + O core near the Chandrasekhar mass, electron-capture-induced core collapse of an O-Ne-Mg core of the Chandrasekhar mass, and collapse of an Fe core in a massive star. A range of envelope mass, initial radius, and composition is investigated. Only a narrow range of values of these parameters are consistent with observations. Within this narrow range, most of the observed light curve properties can be obtained in part, but none of the models can reproduce the entire light curve shape and absolute magnitude over the full 200 day comparison period. The observed lack of a plateau phase is explained in terms of a combination of small envelope mass and envelope helium enhancement. The final cobalt tail phase of the light curve can be reproduced only if the mass of explosively synthesized radioactive Ni-56 is small. The results presented here, in conjunction with the observed homogeneity among individual members of the supernova subclass, argue favorably for the O-Ne-Mg core collapse mechanism as an explanation for linear Type II supernovae. The Crab Nebula may arisen from such an explosion. Carbon deflagrations may lead to brighter events like SN 1979C. 62 refs.

  4. Modeling the World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule II using non-parametric item response models.

    PubMed

    Galindo-Garre, Francisca; Hidalgo, María Dolores; Guilera, Georgina; Pino, Oscar; Rojo, J Emilio; Gómez-Benito, Juana

    2015-03-01

    The World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule II (WHO-DAS II) is a multidimensional instrument developed for measuring disability. It comprises six domains (getting around, self-care, getting along with others, life activities and participation in society). The main purpose of this paper is the evaluation of the psychometric properties for each domain of the WHO-DAS II with parametric and non-parametric Item Response Theory (IRT) models. A secondary objective is to assess whether the WHO-DAS II items within each domain form a hierarchy of invariantly ordered severity indicators of disability. A sample of 352 patients with a schizophrenia spectrum disorder is used in this study. The 36 items WHO-DAS II was administered during the consultation. Partial Credit and Mokken scale models are used to study the psychometric properties of the questionnaire. The psychometric properties of the WHO-DAS II scale are satisfactory for all the domains. However, we identify a few items that do not discriminate satisfactorily between different levels of disability and cannot be invariantly ordered in the scale. In conclusion the WHO-DAS II can be used to assess overall disability in patients with schizophrenia, but some domains are too general to assess functionality in these patients because they contain items that are not applicable to this pathology.

  5. Eagle II: A prototype for multi-resolution combat modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, D.R.; Hutchinson, J.L.

    1993-02-01

    Eagle 11 is a prototype analytic model derived from the integration of the low resolution Eagle model with the high resolution SIMNET model. This integration promises a new capability to allow for a more effective examination of proposed or existing combat systems that could not be easily evaluated using either Eagle or SIMNET alone. In essence, Eagle II becomes a multi-resolution combat model in which simulated combat units can exhibit both high and low fidelity behavior at different times during model execution. This capability allows a unit to behave in a highly manner only when required, thereby reducing the overall computational and manpower requirements for a given study. In this framework, the SIMNET portion enables a highly credible assessment of the performance of individual combat systems under consideration, encompassing both engineering performance and crew capabilities. However, when the assessment being conducted goes beyond system performance and extends to questions of force structure balance and sustainment, then SISMNET results can be used to ``calibrate`` the Eagle attrition process appropriate to the study at hand. Advancing technologies, changes in the world-wide threat, requirements for flexible response, declining defense budgets, and down-sizing of military forces motivate the development of manpower-efficient, low-cost, responsive tools for combat development studies. Eagle and SIMNET both serve as credible and useful tools. The integration of these two models promises enhanced capabilities to examine the broader, deeper, more complex battlefield of the future with higher fidelity, greater responsiveness and low overall cost.

  6. LHC phenomenology of SO(10) models with Yukawa unification. II.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anandakrishnan, Archana; Bryant, B. Charles; Raby, Stuart

    2014-07-01

    In this paper we study Yukawa-unified SO(10) supersymmetric (SUSY) grand unified theories (GUTs) with two types of SO(10) boundary conditions: (i) universal gaugino masses and (ii) nonuniversal gaugino masses with effective "mirage" mediation. With these boundary conditions, we perform a global χ2 analysis to obtain the parameters consistent with 11 low energy observables, including the top, bottom, and tau masses. Both boundary conditions have universal scalar masses and "just so" splitting for the up- and down-type Higgs masses. In these models, the third family scalars are lighter than the first two families and the gauginos are lighter than all the scalars. We therefore focus on the gluino phenomenology in these models. In particular, we estimate the lowest allowed gluino mass in our models coming from the most recent LHC data and compare this to limits obtained using simplified models. We find that the lower bound on Mg ˜ in Yukawa-unified SO(10) SUSY GUTs is generically ˜1.2 TEV at the 1σ level unless there is considerable degeneracy between the gluino and the lightest supersymmetric particle, in which case the bounds are much weaker. Hence many of our benchmark points are not ruled out by the present LHC data and are still viable models which can be tested at LHC 14.

  7. Modeling fluid dynamics on type II quantum computers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scoville, James; Weeks, David; Yepez, Jeffrey

    2006-03-01

    A quantum algorithm is presented for modeling the time evolution of density and flow fields governed by classical equations, such as the diffusion equation, the nonlinear Burgers equation, and the damped wave equation. The algorithm is intended to run on a type-II quantum computer, a parallel quantum computer consisting of a lattice of small type I quantum computers undergoing unitary evolution and interacting via information interchanges represented by an orthogonal matrices. Information is effectively transferred between adjacent quantum computers over classical communications channels because of controlled state demolition following local quantum mechanical qubit-qubit interactions within each quantum computer. The type-II quantum algorithm presented in this paper describes a methodology for generating quantum logic operations as a generalization of classical operations associated with finite-point group symmetries. The quantum mechanical evolution of multiple qubits within each node is described. Presented is a proof that the parallel quantum system obeys a finite-difference quantum Boltzman equation at the mesoscopic scale, leading in turn to various classical linear and nonlinear effective field theories at the macroscopic scale depending on the details of the local qubit-qubit interactions.

  8. Comparison with CLPX II airborne data using DMRT model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Xu, X.; Liang, D.; Andreadis, K.M.; Tsang, L.; Josberger, E.G.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we considered a physical-based model which use numerical solution of Maxwell Equations in three-dimensional simulations and apply into Dense Media Radiative Theory (DMRT). The model is validated in two specific dataset from the second Cold Land Processes Experiment (CLPX II) at Alaska and Colorado. The data were all obtain by the Ku-band (13.95GHz) observations using airborne imaging polarimetric scatterometer (POLSCAT). Snow is a densely packed media. To take into account the collective scattering and incoherent scattering, analytical Quasi-Crystalline Approximation (QCA) and Numerical Maxwell Equation Method of 3-D simulation (NMM3D) are used to calculate the extinction coefficient and phase matrix. DMRT equations were solved by iterative solution up to 2nd order for the case of small optical thickness and full multiple scattering solution by decomposing the diffuse intensities into Fourier series was used when optical thickness exceed unity. It was shown that the model predictions agree with the field experiment not only co-polarization but also cross-polarization. For Alaska region, the input snow structure data was obtain by the in situ ground observations, while for Colorado region, we combined the VIC model to get the snow profile. ??2009 IEEE.

  9. Photoionization models of the CALIFA H II regions. I. Hybrid models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morisset, C.; Delgado-Inglada, G.; Sánchez, S. F.; Galbany, L.; García-Benito, R.; Husemann, B.; Marino, R. A.; Mast, D.; Roth, M. M.

    2016-10-01

    Photoionization models of H ii regions require as input a description of the ionizing spectral energy distribution (SED) and of the gas distribution, in terms of ionization parameter U and chemical abundances (e.g., O/H and N/O).A strong degeneracy exists between the hardness of the SED and U, which in turn leads to high uncertainties in the determination of the other parameters, including abundances. One way to resolve the degeneracy is to fix one of the parameters using additional information. For each of the ~20 000 sources of the CALIFA H ii regions catalog, a grid of photoionization models is computed assuming the ionizing SED to be described by the underlying stellar population obtained from spectral synthesis modeling. The ionizing SED is then defined as the sum of various stellar bursts of different ages and metallicities. This solves the degeneracy between the shape of the ionizing SED and U. The nebular metallicity (associated with O/H) is defined using the classical strong line method O3N2 (which gives our models the status of "hybrids"). The remaining free parameters are the abundance ratio N/O and the ionization parameter U, which are determined by looking for the model fitting [N ii]/Hα and [O iii]/Hβ. The models are also selected to fit [O ii]/Hβ. This process leads to a set of ~3200 models that reproduce the three observations simultaneously. We find that the regions associated with young stellar bursts (i.e., ionized by OB stars) are affected by leaking of ionizing photons,the proportion of escaping photons having a median of 80%. The set of photoionization models satisfactorily reproduces the electron temperature derived from the [O iii]λ4363/5007 line ratio. We determine new relations between the nebular parameters, like the ionization parameter U and the [O ii]/[O iii] or [S ii]/[S iii] line ratios. A new relation between N/O and O/H is obtained, mostly compatible with previous empirical determinations (and not with previous results obtained

  10. Type II seesaw model and multilepton signatures at hadron colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, Manimala; Niyogi, Saurabh; Spannowsky, Michael

    2017-02-01

    We investigate multilepton signatures, arising from the decays of doubly charged and singly charged Higgs bosons in the Type II seesaw model. Depending on the vacuum expectation value of the triplet vΔ , the doubly and singly charged Higgs bosons can decay into a large variety of multilepton final states. We explore all possible decay modes corresponding to different regimes of vΔ that generate distinguishing four and five leptonic signatures. We focus on the 13 TeV Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and further extend the study to a very high energy proton-proton collider (VLHC) with a center-of-mass energy of 100 TeV. We find that a doubly charged Higgs boson of masses around 375 GeV can be discovered at immediate LHC runs. A heavier mass of 630 GeV can instead be discovered at the high-luminosity run of the LHC or at the VLHC with 30 fb-1 .

  11. An Analytic Model of Dusty, Stratified, Spherical H II Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Ramírez, J. C.; Raga, A. C.; Lora, V.; Cantó, J.

    2016-12-01

    We study analytically the effect of radiation pressure (associated with photoionization processes and with dust absorption) on spherical, hydrostatic H ii regions. We consider two basic equations, one for the hydrostatic balance between the radiation-pressure components and the gas pressure, and another for the balance among the recombination rate, the dust absorption, and the ionizing photon rate. Based on appropriate mathematical approximations, we find a simple analytic solution for the density stratification of the nebula, which is defined by specifying the radius of the external boundary, the cross section of dust absorption, and the luminosity of the central star. We compare the analytic solution with numerical integrations of the model equations of Draine, and find a wide range of the physical parameters for which the analytic solution is accurate.

  12. Real-time C Code Generation in Ptolemy II for the Giotto Model of Computation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-20

    Real-time C Code Generation in Ptolemy II for the Giotto Model of Computation Shanna-Shaye Forbes Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences...MAY 2009 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2009 to 00-00-2009 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Real-time C Code Generation in Ptolemy II for the Giotto...periodic and there are multiple modes of operation. Ptolemy II is a university based open source modeling and simulation framework that supports model

  13. ThreadedComposite: A Mechanism for Building Concurrent and Parallel Ptolemy II Models

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-12-07

    ThreadedComposite: A Mechanism for Building Concurrent and Parallel Ptolemy II Models Edward A. Lee Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences...Concurrent and Parallel Ptolemy II Models 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK...Instruments, and Toyota. ThreadedComposite: A Mechanism for Building Concurrent and Parallel Ptolemy II Models ∗ Edward A. Lee UC Berkeley eal

  14. Higgs potential in the type II seesaw model

    SciTech Connect

    Arhrib, A.; Benbrik, R.; Chabab, M.; Rahili, L.; Ramadan, J.; Moultaka, G.; Peyranere, M. C.

    2011-11-01

    The standard model Higgs sector, extended by one weak gauge triplet of scalar fields with a very small vacuum expectation value, is a very promising setting to account for neutrino masses through the so-called type II seesaw mechanism. In this paper we consider the general renormalizable doublet/triplet Higgs potential of this model. We perform a detailed study of its main dynamical features that depend on five dimensionless couplings and two mass parameters after spontaneous symmetry breaking, and highlight the implications for the Higgs phenomenology. In particular, we determine (i) the complete set of tree-level unitarity constraints on the couplings of the potential and (ii) the exact tree-level boundedness from below constraints on these couplings, valid for all directions. When combined, these constraints delineate precisely the theoretically allowed parameter space domain within our perturbative approximation. Among the seven physical Higgs states of this model, the mass of the lighter (heavier) CP{sub even} state h{sup 0} (H{sup 0}) will always satisfy a theoretical upper (lower) bound that is reached for a critical value {mu}{sub c} of {mu} (the mass parameter controlling triple couplings among the doublet/triplet Higgses). Saturating the unitarity bounds, we find an upper bound m{sub h}{sup 0} or approx. {mu}{sub c} and {mu} < or approx. {mu}{sub c}. In the first regime the Higgs sector is typically very heavy, and only h{sup 0} that becomes SM-like could be accessible to the LHC. In contrast, in the second regime, somewhat overlooked in the literature, most of the Higgs sector is light. In particular, the heaviest state H{sup 0} becomes SM-like, the lighter states being the CP{sub odd} Higgs, the (doubly) charged Higgses, and a decoupled h{sup 0}, possibly

  15. Implementing a predictive modeling program, part II: Use of motivational interviewing in a predictive modeling program.

    PubMed

    Calhoun, Jean; Admire, Kaye S

    2005-01-01

    This is the second article of a two-part series about issues encountered in implementing a predictive modeling program. Part I looked at how to effectively implement a program and discussed helpful hints and lessons learned for case managers who are required to change their approach to patients. In Part II, we discuss the readiness to change model, examine the spirit of motivational interviewing and related techniques, and explore how motivational interviewing is different from more traditional interviewing and assessment methods.

  16. Modeling of fluidized-bed combustion of coal: Phase II, final reports. Volume II. Detailed description of the model

    SciTech Connect

    Louis, J.F.; Tung, S.E.

    1980-10-01

    This document is the second of a seven volume series of our Phase II Final Report. This volume deals with detailed descriptions of the structure of each program member (subroutines and functions), the interrelation between the members of a submodel, and the interrelation between the various submodels as such. The systems model for fluidized bed combustors (FBC-II) consists of a systematic combination of the following interrelated areas: fluid mechanics and bubble growth, char combustion and associated kinetics for particle burnout, sulfur capture, NO/sub x/ formation and reduction, freeboard reactions, and heat transfer. Program outline is shown in Figure 1.1. Input variables (supplied by the user are inspected to check that they lie inside the allowed range of values and are input to the various routines as needed. The necessary physical and fluid mechanical properties are calculated and utilized in estimating char combustion and sulfur capture in the bed and the freeboard. NO/sub x/ and CO emissions are estimated by taking into account all relevant chemical reactions. A material and energy balance is made over the bed. Figure 1.1 shows a block diagram of the systems program. In this diagram, the overall structure of the FBC program is illustrated in terms of the various submodels that together constitute the systems program. A more detailed outline of the systems program is shown in Figure 1.2. In this figure, all important subroutine members of the FBC program are shown, and their linkage to each other, as well as to the main program is indicated. A description of the exact sequence in which these various routines are called at time of program execution is provided in Chapter 8 under the executive routine MAIN.

  17. Heterogeneous Concurrent Modeling and Design in Java (Volume 3: Ptolemy II Domains)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-04-15

    Heterogeneous Concurrent Modeling and Design in Java (Volume 3: Ptolemy II Domains) Christopher Brooks Edward A. Lee Xiaojun Liu Stephen Neuendorffer...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Heterogeneous Concurrent Modeling and Design in Java (Volume 3: Ptolemy II Domains) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c...State of California Micro Program, and the following companies: Agilent, Bosch, HSBC, Lockheed-Martin, National Instruments, and Toyota. PTOLEMY II

  18. Heterogeneous Concurrent Modeling and Design in Java (Volume 2: Ptolemy II Software Architecture)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-04-01

    Heterogeneous Concurrent Modeling and Design in Java (Volume 2: Ptolemy II Software Architecture) Christopher Brooks Edward A. Lee Xiaojun Liu...00-2008 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Heterogeneous Concurrent Modeling and Design in Java (Volume 2: Ptolemy II Software Architecture) 5a. CONTRACT...the State of California Micro Program, and the following companies: Agilent, Bosch, HSBC, Lockheed-Martin, National Instruments, and Toyota. PTOLEMY II

  19. Radiation-hydrodynamical modelling of underluminous Type II plateau supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pumo, M. L.; Zampieri, L.; Spiro, S.; Pastorello, A.; Benetti, S.; Cappellaro, E.; Manicò, G.; Turatto, M.

    2017-01-01

    With the aim of improving our knowledge about the nature of the progenitors of low-luminosity Type II plateau supernovae (LL SNe IIP), we made radiation-hydrodynamical models of the well-sampled LL SNe IIP 2003Z, 2008bk and 2009md. For these three SNe, we infer explosion energies of 0.16-0.18 foe, radii at explosion of 1.8-3.5 × 1013 cm and ejected masses of 10-11.3 M⊙. The estimated progenitor mass on the main sequence is in the range ˜13.2-15.1 M⊙ for SN 2003Z and ˜11.4-12.9 M⊙ for SNe 2008bk and 2009md, in agreement with estimates from observations of the progenitors. These results together with those for other LL SNe IIP modelled in the same way enable us also to conduct a comparative study on this SN sub-group. The results suggest that (a) the progenitors of faint SNe IIP are slightly less massive and have less energetic explosions than those of intermediate-luminosity SNe IIP; (b) both faint and intermediate-luminosity SNe IIP originate from low-energy explosions of red (or yellow) supergiant stars of low to intermediate mass; (c) some faint objects may also be explained as electron-capture SNe from massive super-asymptotic giant branch stars; and (d) LL SNe IIP form the underluminous tail of the SNe IIP family, where the main parameter `guiding' the distribution seems to be the ratio of the total explosion energy to the ejected mass. Further hydrodynamical studies should be performed and compared to a more extended sample of LL SNe IIP before drawing any conclusion on the relevance of fall-back to this class of events.

  20. Unified Field Theoretical Models from Generalized Affine Geometries II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cirilo-Lombardo, Diego Julio

    2011-06-01

    The space-time structure of the new Unified Field Theory presented in previous reference (Int. J. Theor. Phys. 49:1288-1301, 2010) is analyzed from its SL(2C) underlying structure in order to make precise the notion of minimal coupling. To this end, the framework is the language of tensors and particularly differential forms and the condition a priory of the existence of a potential for the torsion is relaxed. We shown trough exact cosmological solutions from this model, where the geometry is Euclidean R⊗ O 3˜ R⊗ SU(2), the relation between the space-time geometry and the structure of the gauge group. Precisely this relation is directly connected with the relation of the spin and torsion fields. The solution of this model is explicitly compared with our previous ones and we find that: (i) the torsion is not identified directly with the Yang Mills type strength field, (ii) there exists a compatibility condition connected with the identification of the gauge group with the geometric structure of the space-time: this fact lead the identification between derivatives of the scale factor a( τ) with the components of the torsion in order to allows the Hosoya-Ogura ansatz (namely, the alignment of the isospin with the frame geometry of the space-time), (iii) this compatibility condition precisely mark the fact that local gauge covariance, coordinate independence and arbitrary space time geometries are harmonious concepts and (iv) of two possible structures of the torsion the "tratorial" form (the only one studied here) forbids wormhole configurations, leading only, cosmological instanton space-time in eternal expansion.

  1. Longitudinal Stability of the Beck Depression Inventory II: A Latent Trait-State-Occasion Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Pei-Chen

    2016-01-01

    In a six-wave longitudinal study with two cohorts (660 adolescents and 630 young adults), this study investigated the longitudinal stability of the Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II) using the Trait-State-Occasion (TSO) model. The results revealed that the full TSO model was the best fitting representation of the depression measured by the…

  2. MICS-Asia II: Modeling gaseous pollutants and evaluating an advanced modeling system over East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Joshua S.; Jang, Carey J.; Streets, David G.; Li, Zuopan; Kwok, Roger; Park, Rokjin; Han, Zhiwei

    An advanced modeling system with a "one-atmosphere" perspective, Models-3/Community Multi-scale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeling system, driven by MM5/NCEP reanalysis data as the meteorology, and GEOS-Chem outputs as boundary values was applied to simulate the O 3, and other gaseous pollutants (SO 2 and NO 2) evolution among other atmospheric chemicals for July 2001. Comparisons had been made with other models in the MICS-II exercise for the same period. Statistics of both monthly and daily means show that the model skill is very good in reproducing O 3 and SO 2 with small to moderate RMSE. The model species capture the day-to-day and spatial variability of the observations. The same O 3 model concentrations that overpredict most of the EANET observations in the MICS-II study may have underpredicted ones from monitoring networks in Beijing area that is not included in this paper. Vertical O 3 profiles at 4 ozonesonde sites are well predicted in July 2001. In fact, our model is among the best of those MICS-II models within the 2-km surface layer. The meteorology near surface and lower troposphere is well reproduced. Compared to SO 2 and O 3, the NO 2 gas concentrations are simulated less well, but the correlation coefficient is still significant. The choice of reanalysis meteorological fields and different boundary conditions generated by different global models may result in diverse spatial patterns exhibited by MICS-II models and ours. Our spatial distributions of O 3 shows a high concentration patch covering Beijing, a moderate to high pattern across Korea and Japan Sea, and a low but extensive pattern enclosing southern China, Taiwan, and East Sea. Extension of the pattern to southern China coincides with the existence of pollution problems in Guangdong and Taiwan, but overprediction of O 3 over the region deserves further improvement by various factors. One of them can be the grid resolution to resolve the complex orography in or close to the ocean. Another factor

  3. An energetic comparison of different models for the oxygen evolving complex of photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Siegbahn, Per E M

    2009-12-30

    The computed total energy from a cluster model DFT calculation is used to discriminate between different suggested models for the oxygen evolving complex of photosystem II. The comparison between different structures rules out several suggestions. Only one suggested structure remains.

  4. Analytic Models for Radiation Induced Loss in Optical Fibers II. A Physical Model,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-06-01

    and identify by Mock number) PIEL GRUP UB.GR. Optical fibers Analytical models Radiation effects 19. ABSTRACT (ConinueII. anl mwr,f fneciua,, and...conditions specified in the derivation of the equations existed during the irradiations. This is because the functional form of the equations is not...tion is not necessarily incorrect. If one assumes a relatively simple form of re- covery as a function of time, such as an exponential recovery, it can

  5. Modeling and Simulation in Support of MALSP II Report of Findings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-08

    relationships. The classification trees and regression models confirm that Demand Frequency Type, Buffer, number of aircraft, Design TRR, and Delta are...project employs modeling and simulation analysis in an effort to assess various aspects of the Marine Aviation Logistics Support Program II (MALSP II...process improvement in order to improve logistical support to deployed Marine air assets. The model develop in this project is a Discrete Event

  6. Outer atmospheres of cool stars. VI - Models for Epsilon Eridani based on IUE spectra of C II, Mg II, Si II, and Si III

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, T.; Kelch, W. L.; Linsky, J. L.

    1980-01-01

    Observations of the ultraviolet line spectrum of the active chromosphere star, Epsilon Eridani, obtained with the IUE satellite have been analyzed. The coupled statistical equilibrium and radiative transfer equations for the prominent transitions of C II, Mg II, Si II, and Si III. A satisfactory fit to all of the line strengths can be achieved with a model similar to that recently proposed to explain bright points on the quiet sun. A surface pressure at the base of the transition region of 0.5 dynes/sq cm is derived, which is a factor of 3 higher than the quiet sun value, but a factor of 3 smaller than predicted by scaling laws, assuming a conductively heated stellar transition region. It is found that the surface fluxes of the C II 1334, 1335 and Si III 1892 emission lines are good diagnostics of pressure at the base of the transition region, but line ratio techniques using the 1892 line for estimating electron densities may be valid.

  7. MICS-Asia II: The model intercomparison study for Asia Phase II methodology and overview of findings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmichael, G. R.; Sakurai, T.; Streets, D.; Hozumi, Y.; Ueda, H.; Park, S. U.; Fung, C.; Han, Z.; Kajino, M.; Engardt, M.; Bennet, C.; Hayami, H.; Sartelet, K.; Holloway, T.; Wang, Z.; Kannari, A.; Fu, J.; Matsuda, K.; Thongboonchoo, N.; Amann, M.

    Results from the Model Intercomparison Study Asia Phase II (MICS-Asia II) are presented. Nine different regional modeling groups simulated chemistry and transport of ozone (O 3), secondary aerosol, acid deposition, and associated precursors, using common emissions and boundary conditions derived from a global model. Four-month-long periods, representing 2 years and three seasons (i.e., March, July, and December in 2001, and March in 2002), are analyzed. New observational data, obtained under the EANET (the Acid Deposition Monitoring Network in East Asia) monitoring program, were made available for this study, and these data provide a regional database to compare with model simulations. The analysis focused around seven subject areas: O 3 and related precursors, aerosols, acid deposition, global inflow of pollutants and precursor to Asia, model sensitivities to aerosol parameterization, analysis of emission fields, and detailed analyses of individual models, each of which is presented in a companion paper in this issue of Atmospheric Environment. This overview discusses the major findings of the study, as well as information on common emissions, meteorological conditions, and observations.

  8. Molecular Models of Ruthenium(II) Organometallic Complexes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, William F.

    2007-01-01

    This article presents the featured molecules for the month of March, which appear in the paper by Ozerov, Fafard, and Hoffman, and which are related to the study of the reactions of a number of "piano stool" complexes of ruthenium(II). The synthesis of compound 2a offers students an alternative to the preparation of ferrocene if they are only…

  9. Modeling of Copper(II), Cadmium(II), and Lead(II) Adsorption on Red Mud from Metal-EDTA Mixture Solutions.

    PubMed

    Güçlü; Apak

    2000-08-15

    The adsorption of toxic heavy metal cations, i.e., Cu(II), Cd(II), and Pb(II), from metal-EDTA mixture solutions on a composite adsorbent having a heterogeneous surface, i.e., bauxite waste red mud, has been investigated and modeled with the aid of a modified surface complexation approach in respect to pH and complexant dependency of heavy metal adsorption. EDTA was selected as the modeling ligand in view of its wide usage as an anthropogenic chelating agent and abundance in natural waters. The adsorption experiments were conducted for metal salts (nitrates), metal-EDTA complexes alone, or in mixtures containing (metal+metal-EDTA). The adsorption equilibrium constants for the metal ions and metal-EDTA complexes were calculated. For all studied cases, the solid adsorbent phase concentrations of the adsorbed metal and metal-EDTA complexes were found by using the derived model equations with excellent compatibility of experimental and theoretically generated adsorption isotherms. The model was useful for metal and metal-EDTA mixture solutions either at their natural pH of equilibration with the sorbent, or after pH elevation with NaOH titration up to a certain pH. Thus adsorption of every single species (M(2+) or MY(2-)) or of possible mixtures (M(2+)+MY(2-)) at natural pH or after NaOH titration could be calculated by the use of simple quadratic model equations, once the initial concentrations of the corresponding species, i.e., [M(2+)](0) or [MY(2-)](0), were known. The compatibility of theoretical and experimental data pairs of adsorbed species concentrations was verified by means of nonlinear regression analysis. The findings of this study can be further developed so as to serve environmental risk assessment concerning the expansion of a heavy metal contaminant plume with groundwater move ment in soil consisting of hydrated-oxide type minerals. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  10. Computational evaluation of unsaturated carbonitriles as neutral receptor model for beryllium(II) recognition.

    PubMed

    Rosli, Ahmad Nazmi; Ahmad, Mohd Rais; Alias, Yatimah; Zain, Sharifuddin Md; Lee, Vannajan Sanghiran; Woi, Pei Meng

    2014-12-01

    Design of neutral receptor molecules (ionophores) for beryllium(II) using unsaturated carbonitrile models has been carried out via density functional theory, G3, and G4 calculations. The first part of this work focuses on gas phase binding energies between beryllium(II) and 2-cyano butadiene (2-CN BD), 3-cyano propene (3-CN P), and simpler models with two separate fragments; acrylonitrile and ethylene. Interactions between beryllium(II) and cyano nitrogen and terminal olefin in the models have been examined in terms of geometrical changes, distribution of charge over the entire π-system, and rehybridization of vinyl carbon orbitals. NMR shieldings and vibrational frequencies probed charge centers and strength of interactions. The six-membered cyclic complexes have planar structures with the rehybridized carbon slightly out of plane (16° in 2-CN BD). G3 results show that in 2-CN BD complex participation of vinyl carbon further stabilizes the cyclic adduct by 16.3 kcal mol(-1), whereas, in simpler models, interaction between beryllium(II) and acetonitrile is favorable by 46.4 kcal mol(-1) compared with that of ethylene. The terminal vinyl carbon in 2-CN BD rehybridizes to sp (3) with an increase of 7 % of s character to allow interaction with beryllium(II). G4 calculations show that the Be(II) and 2-CN BD complex is more strongly bound than those with Mg(II) and Ca(II) by 98.5 and 139.2 kcal mol(-1) (-1), respectively. QST2 method shows that the cyclic and acyclic forms of Be(II)-2-CN BD complexes are separated by 12.3 kcal mol(-1) barrier height. Overlap population analysis reveals that Ca(II) can be discriminated based on its tendency to form ionic interaction with the receptor models.

  11. NSLS-II: Nonlinear Model Calibration for Synchrotrons

    SciTech Connect

    Bengtsson, J.

    2010-10-08

    This tech note is essentially a summary of a lecture we delivered to the Acc. Phys. Journal Club Apr, 2010. However, since the estimated accuracy of these methods has been naive and misleading in the field of particle accelerators, i.e., ignores the impact of noise, we will elaborate on this in some detail. A prerequisite for a calibration of the nonlinear Hamiltonian is that the quadratic part has been understood, i.e., that the linear optics for the real accelerator has been calibrated. For synchrotron light source operations, this problem has been solved by the interactive LOCO technique/tool (Linear Optics from Closed Orbits). Before that, in the context of hadron accelerators, it has been done by signal processing of turn-by-turn BPM data. We have outlined how to make a basic calibration of the nonlinear model for synchrotrons. In particular, we have shown how this was done for LEAR, CERN (antiprotons) in the mid-80s. Specifically, our accuracy for frequency estimation was {approx} 1 x 10{sup -5} for 1024 turns (to calibrate the linear optics) and {approx} 1 x 10{sup -4} for 256 turns for tune footprint and betatron spectrum. For a comparison, the estimated tune footprint for stable beam for NSLS-II is {approx}0.1. Since the transverse damping time is {approx}20 msec, i.e., {approx}4,000 turns. There is no fundamental difference for: antiprotons, protons, and electrons in this case. Because the estimated accuracy for these methods in the field of particle accelerators has been naive, i.e., ignoring the impact of noise, we have also derived explicit formula, from first principles, for a quantitative statement. For e.g. N = 256 and 5% noise we obtain {delta}{nu} {approx} 1 x 10{sup -5}. A comparison with the state-of-the-arts in e.g. telecomm and electrical engineering since the 60s is quite revealing. For example, Kalman filter (1960), crucial for the: Ranger, Mariner, and Apollo (including the Lunar Module) missions during the 60s. Or Claude Shannon et al

  12. Analysis of the photosystem II by modelling the fluorescence yield transients during 10 seconds after a 10 ns pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyaeva, Natalya E.; Schmitt, Franz-Josef; Paschenko, Vladimir Z.; Riznichenko, Galina Yu.; Rubin, Andrew B.

    2014-10-01

    The dynamics of the photosystem II (PS II) redox states is imitated over nine orders of magnitude in time. Our simulations focus on the information of the chlorophyll a fluorescence induced by a 10 ns laser flash. The PS II model analyzes differences in the PS II reaction between leaves (A. Thaliana, spinach) and thermophilic Chlorella cells.

  13. Alternative Models of Service, Centralized Machine Operations. Phase II Report. Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Technology Management Corp., Alexandria, VA.

    A study was conducted to determine if the centralization of playback machine operations for the national free library program would be feasible, economical, and desirable. An alternative model of playback machine services was constructed and compared with existing network operations considering both cost and service. The alternative model was…

  14. Stably transfected adherent cancer cell models with decreased expression of 5'-nucleotidase cN-II.

    PubMed

    Bricard, Gabriel; Cros-Perrial, Emeline; Machon, Christelle; Dumontet, Charles; Jordheim, Lars Petter

    2016-12-01

    The 5'-nucleotidase cN-II has been shown to be associated with the sensitivity to nucleoside analogues, the survival of cytarabine treated leukemia patients and to cell proliferation. Due to the lack of relevant cell models for solid tumors, we developed four cell lines with low cN-II expression and characterized them concerning their in vitro sensitivity to cancer drugs and their intracellular nucleotide pools. All four cell models had an important decrease of cN-II expression but did not show modified sensitivity, cell proliferation or nucleotide pools. Our cell models will be important for the study of the role of cN-II in human cancer cells.

  15. A model for the separation of cloud and aerosol in SAGE II occultation data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kent, G. S.; Winker, D. M.; Osborn, M. T.; Skeens, K. M.

    1993-01-01

    The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) II satellite experiment measures the extinction due to aerosols and thin cloud, at wavelengths of 0.525 and 1.02 micrometers, down to an altitude of 6 km. The wavelength dependence of the extinction due to aerosols differs from that of the extinction due to cloud and is used as the basis of a model for separating these two components. The model is presented and its validation using airborne lidar data, obtained coincident with SAGE II observations, is described. This comparison shows that smaller SAGE II cloud extinction values correspond to the presence of subvisible cirrus cloud in the lidar record. Examples of aerosol and cloud data products obtained using this model to interpret SAGE II upper tropospheric and lower stratospheric data are also shown.

  16. Multidimensional realistic modelling of Cepheid-like variables - II. Analysis of a Cepheid model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mundprecht, Eva; Muthsam, Herbert J.; Kupka, Friedrich

    2015-05-01

    Non-local, time-dependent convection models have been used to explain the location of double-mode pulsations in Cepheids in the HR diagram as well as the existence and location of the red edge of the instability strip. These properties are highly sensitive to model parameters. We use 2D radiation-hydrodynamical simulations with realistic microphysics and grey radiative transfer to model a short-period Cepheid. The simulations show that the strength of the convection zone varies significantly over the pulsation period and exhibits a phase shift relative to the variations in radius. We evaluate the convective flux and the work integral as predicted by the most common convection models. It turns out that over one pulsation cycle the model parameter αc, has to be varied by up to a factor of beyond 2 to match the convective flux obtained from the simulations. To bring convective fluxes integrated over the He II convection zone and the overshoot zone below into agreement, this parameter has to be varied by a factor of up to ˜7.5 (Kuhfuß). We then present results on the energetics of the convection and overshoot zone by radially symmetric and fluctuating quantities. To successfully model this scenario by a static, 1D or even by a simple time-dependent model appears extremely challenging. We conclude that significant improvements are needed to make predictions based on 1D models more robust and to improve the reliability of conclusions on the convection-pulsation coupling drawn from them. Multidimensional simulations can provide guidelines for developing descriptions of convection then applied in traditional 1D modelling.

  17. SCIENTIFIC UNCERTAINTIES IN ATMOSPHERIC MERCURY MODELS III: BOUNDARY AND INITIAL CONDITIONS, MODEL GRID RESOLUTION, AND HG(II) REDUCTION MECHANISMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this study we investigate the CMAQ model response in terms of simulated mercury concentration and deposition to boundary/initial conditions (BC/IC), model grid resolution (12- versus 36-km), and two alternative Hg(II) reduction mechanisms. The model response to the change of g...

  18. Models and the dynamics of theory-building in physics. Part II-Case studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emch, Gérard G.

    In Part I, it was argued that models are best explained by considering the strategies from which they issue. A distinction was proposed between two classes of modeling that contribute to theory-building: H-modeling and L-modeling. Case studies are presented in this Part II to illustrate the characteristic features of these modeling strategies; examples are drawn from classical statistical mechanics and quantum physics.

  19. Low-order dynamic modeling of the Experimental Breeder Reactor II

    SciTech Connect

    Berkan, R.C. . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering); Upadhyaya, B.R.; Kisner, R.A. )

    1990-07-01

    This report describes the development of a low-order, linear model of the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II), including the primary system, intermediate heat exchanger, and steam generator subsystems. The linear model is developed to represent full-power steady state dynamics for low-level perturbations. Transient simulations are performed using model building and simulation capabilities of the computer software Matrix{sub x}. The inherently safe characteristics of the EBR-II are verified through the simulation studies. The results presented in this report also indicate an agreement between the linear model and the actual dynamics of the plant for several transients. Such models play a major role in the learning and in the improvement of nuclear reactor dynamics for control and signal validation studies. This research and development is sponsored by the Advanced Controls Program in the Instrumentation and Controls Division of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. 17 refs., 67 figs., 15 tabs.

  20. Standard model Higgs boson searches at CDF in Run II

    SciTech Connect

    Chuang, Shan-Huei; /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2004-10-01

    The SM Higgs boson has been searched in two channels: (1) q{bar q} {yields} WH {yields} {ell}{nu}b{bar b} for Higgs masses 110 < M{sub H} < 150 GeV and (2) gg {yields} H {yields} WW {yields} {ell}{nu}{ell}{nu} for 140 M{sub H} < 180 GeV, where {ell} {element_of} {l_brace}e,{mu}{r_brace}, using about 200 pb{sup -1} CDF Run II data. 95% C.L. limits on each Higgs production at Tevatron at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV were set as a function of Higgs mass by fitting the distribution of dijet mass (1) and dilepton azimuthal angular separation (2). They have significantly advanced the sensitivity to the SM Higgs boson cf. Run I.

  1. Surface complexation modeling calculation of Pb(II) adsorption onto the calcined diatomite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Shu-Cui; Zhang, Ji-Lin; Sun, De-Hui; Liu, Gui-Xia

    2015-12-01

    Removal of noxious heavy metal ions (e.g. Pb(II)) by surface adsorption of minerals (e.g. diatomite) is an important means in the environmental aqueous pollution control. Thus, it is very essential to understand the surface adsorptive behavior and mechanism. In this work, the Pb(II) apparent surface complexation reaction equilibrium constants on the calcined diatomite and distributions of Pb(II) surface species were investigated through modeling calculations of Pb(II) based on diffuse double layer model (DLM) with three amphoteric sites. Batch experiments were used to study the adsorption of Pb(II) onto the calcined diatomite as a function of pH (3.0-7.0) and different ionic strengths (0.05 and 0.1 mol L-1 NaCl) under ambient atmosphere. Adsorption of Pb(II) can be well described by Freundlich isotherm models. The apparent surface complexation equilibrium constants (log K) were obtained by fitting the batch experimental data using the PEST 13.0 together with PHREEQC 3.1.2 codes and there is good agreement between measured and predicted data. Distribution of Pb(II) surface species on the diatomite calculated by PHREEQC 3.1.2 program indicates that the impurity cations (e.g. Al3+, Fe3+, etc.) in the diatomite play a leading role in the Pb(II) adsorption and dominant formation of complexes and additional electrostatic interaction are the main adsorption mechanism of Pb(II) on the diatomite under weak acidic conditions.

  2. Altered Chondrocyte Differentiation and Extracellular Matrix Homeostasis in a Zebrafish Model for Mucolipidosis II

    PubMed Central

    Flanagan-Steet, Heather; Sias, Christina; Steet, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Mucolipidosis II (ML-II) is a pediatric disorder caused by defects in the biosynthesis of mannose 6-phosphate, the carbohydrate recognition signal responsible for targeting certain acid hydrolases to lysosomes. The mechanisms underlying the developmental defects of ML-II are largely unknown due in part to the lack of suitable animal models. To overcome these limitations, we developed a model for ML-II in zebrafish by inhibiting the expression of N-acetylglucosamine-1-phosphotransferase, the enzyme that initiates mannose 6-phosphate biosynthesis. Morphant embryos manifest craniofacial defects, impaired motility, and abnormal otolith and pectoral fin development. Decreased mannose phosphorylation of several lysosomal glycosidases was observed in morphant lysates, consistent with the reduction in phosphotransferase activity. Investigation of the craniofacial defects in the morphants uncovered striking changes in the timing and localization of both type II collagen and Sox9 expression, suggestive of an accelerated chondrocyte differentiation program. Accumulation of type II collagen was also noted within misshapen cartilage elements at later stages of development. Furthermore, we observed abnormal matrix formation and calcium deposition in morphant otoliths. Collectively, these data provide new insight into the developmental pathology of ML-II and suggest that altered production and/or homeostasis of extracellular matrix proteins are integral to the disease process. These findings highlight the potential of the zebrafish system in studying lysosomal disease pathogenesis. PMID:19834066

  3. Models of cuspy triaxial stellar systems - II. Regular orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muzzio, J. C.; Navone, H. D.; Zorzi, A. F.

    2013-02-01

    In the first paper of this series we used the N-body method to build a dozen cuspy (γ ≃ 1) triaxial models of stellar systems, and we showed that they were highly stable over time intervals of the order of a Hubble time, even though they had very large fractions of chaotic orbits (more than 85 per cent in some cases). The models were grouped in four sets, each one comprising models morphologically resembling E2, E3, E4 and E5 galaxies, respectively. The three models within each set, although different, had the same global properties and were statistically equivalent. In the present paper we use frequency analysis to classify the regular orbits of those models. The bulk of those orbits are short-axis tubes, with a significant fraction of long-axis tubes (LATs) in the E2 models that decreases in the E3 and E4 models to become negligibly small in the E5 models. Most of the LATs in the E2 and E3 models are outer LATs, but the situation reverses in the E4 and E5 models where the few LATs are mainly inner LATs. As could be expected for cuspy models, most of the boxes are resonant orbits, i.e. boxlets. Nevertheless, only the (x, y) fishes of models E3 and E4 amount to about 10 per cent of the regular orbits, with most of the fractions of the other boxlets being of the order of 1 per cent or less.

  4. Simple inflationary quintessential model. II. Power law potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Haro, Jaume; Amorós, Jaume; Pan, Supriya

    2016-09-01

    The present work is a sequel of our previous work [Phys. Rev. D 93, 084018 (2016)] which depicted a simple version of an inflationary quintessential model whose inflationary stage was described by a Higgs-type potential and the quintessential phase was responsible due to an exponential potential. Additionally, the model predicted a nonsingular universe in past which was geodesically past incomplete. Further, it was also found that the model is in agreement with the Planck 2013 data when running is allowed. But, this model provides a theoretical value of the running which is far smaller than the central value of the best fit in ns , r , αs≡d ns/d l n k parameter space where ns, r , αs respectively denote the spectral index, tensor-to-scalar ratio and the running of the spectral index associated with any inflationary model, and consequently to analyze the viability of the model one has to focus in the two-dimensional marginalized confidence level in the allowed domain of the plane (ns,r ) without taking into account the running. Unfortunately, such analysis shows that this model does not pass this test. However, in this sequel we propose a family of models runs by a single parameter α ∈[0 ,1 ] which proposes another "inflationary quintessential model" where the inflation and the quintessence regimes are respectively described by a power law potential and a cosmological constant. The model is also nonsingular although geodesically past incomplete as in the cited model. Moreover, the present one is found to be more simple compared to the previous model and it is in excellent agreement with the observational data. In fact, we note that, unlike the previous model, a large number of the models of this family with α ∈[0 ,1/2 ) match with both Planck 2013 and Planck 2015 data without allowing the running. Thus, the properties in the current family of models compared to its past companion justify its need for a better cosmological model with the successive

  5. Rhode Island Model Evaluation & Support System: Support Professional. Edition II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhode Island Department of Education, 2015

    2015-01-01

    Rhode Island educators believe that implementing a fair, accurate, and meaningful evaluation and support system for support professionals will help improve student outcomes. The primary purpose of the Rhode Island Model Support Professional Evaluation and Support System (Rhode Island Model) is to help all support professionals do their best work…

  6. [Application of multilevel models in the evaluation of bioequivalence (II).].

    PubMed

    Liu, Qiao-lan; Shen, Zhuo-zhi; Li, Xiao-song; Chen, Feng; Yang, Min

    2010-03-01

    The main purpose of this paper is to explore the applicability of multivariate multilevel models for bioequivalence evaluation. Using an example of a 4 x 4 cross-over test design in evaluating bioequivalence of homemade and imported rosiglitazone maleate tablets, this paper illustrated the multivariate-model-based method for partitioning total variances of ln(AUC) and ln(C(max)) in the framework of multilevel models. It examined the feasibility of multivariate multilevel models in directly evaluating average bioequivalence (ABE), population bioequivalence (PBE) and individual bioequivalence (IBE). Taking into account the correlation between ln(AUC) and ln(C(max)) of rosiglitazone maleate tablets, the proposed models suggested no statistical difference between the two effect measures in their ABE bioequivalence via joint tests, whilst a contradictive conclusion was derived based on univariate multilevel models. Furthermore, the PBE and IBE for both ln(AUC) and ln(C(max)) of the two types of tablets were assessed with no statistical difference based on estimates of variance components from the proposed models. Multivariate multilevel models could be used to analyze bioequivalence of multiple effect measures simultaneously and they provided a new way of statistical analysis to evaluate bioequivalence.

  7. LP II--A GOAL PROGRAMMING MODEL FOR MEDIA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CHARNES, A.; AND OTHERS

    A GOAL PROGRAMING MODEL FOR SELECTING MEDIA IS PRESENTED WHICH ALTERS THE OBJECTIVE AND EXTENDS PREVIOUS MEDIA MODELS BY ACCOUNTING FOR CUMULATIVE DUPLICATING AUDIENCES OVER A VARIETY OF TIME PERIODS. THIS PERMITS DETAILED CONTROL OF THE DISTRIBUTION OF MESSAGE FREQUENCIES DIRECTED AT EACH OF NUMEROUS MARKETING TARGETS OVER A SEQUENCE OF…

  8. Multiscale geometric modeling of macromolecules II: Lagrangian representation

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Xin; Xia, Kelin; Chen, Zhan; Tong, Yiying; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2013-01-01

    Geometric modeling of biomolecules plays an essential role in the conceptualization of biolmolecular structure, function, dynamics and transport. Qualitatively, geometric modeling offers a basis for molecular visualization, which is crucial for the understanding of molecular structure and interactions. Quantitatively, geometric modeling bridges the gap between molecular information, such as that from X-ray, NMR and cryo-EM, and theoretical/mathematical models, such as molecular dynamics, the Poisson-Boltzmann equation and the Nernst-Planck equation. In this work, we present a family of variational multiscale geometric models for macromolecular systems. Our models are able to combine multiresolution geometric modeling with multiscale electrostatic modeling in a unified variational framework. We discuss a suite of techniques for molecular surface generation, molecular surface meshing, molecular volumetric meshing, and the estimation of Hadwiger’s functionals. Emphasis is given to the multiresolution representations of biomolecules and the associated multiscale electrostatic analyses as well as multiresolution curvature characterizations. The resulting fine resolution representations of a biomolecular system enable the detailed analysis of solvent-solute interaction, and ion channel dynamics, while our coarse resolution representations highlight the compatibility of protein-ligand bindings and possibility of protein-protein interactions. PMID:23813599

  9. Synthetic Model of the Oxygen-Evolving Center: Photosystem II under the Spotlight.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yang; Hu, Cheng; Liu, Xiaohong; Wang, Jiangyun

    2015-09-21

    The oxygen-evolving center (OEC) in photosystem II catalyzes a water splitting reaction. Great efforts have already been made to artificially synthesize the OEC, in order to elucidate the structure-function relationship and the mechanism of the reaction. Now, a new synthetic model makes the best mimic yet of the OEC. This recent study opens up the possibility to study the mechanism of photosystem II and photosynthesis in general for applications in renewable energy and synthetic biology.

  10. Filament winding cylinders. II - Validation of the process model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calius, Emilio P.; Lee, Soo-Yong; Springer, George S.

    1990-01-01

    Analytical and experimental studies were performed to validate the model developed by Lee and Springer for simulating the manufacturing process of filament wound composite cylinders. First, results calculated by the Lee-Springer model were compared to results of the Calius-Springer thin cylinder model. Second, temperatures and strains calculated by the Lee-Springer model were compared to data. The data used in these comparisons were generated during the course of this investigation with cylinders made of Hercules IM-6G/HBRF-55 and Fiberite T-300/976 graphite-epoxy tows. Good agreement was found between the calculated and measured stresses and strains, indicating that the model is a useful representation of the winding and curing processes.

  11. [Collaboration among health professionals (II). Usefulness of a model].

    PubMed

    D'Amour, Danielle; San Martín Rodríguez, Leticia

    2006-09-01

    This second article provides a model which helps one to better understand the process of collaboration by interprofessional teams and makes it possible to evaluate the quality of the aforementioned collaboration. To this end, the authors first present a structural model of inter-professional collaboration followed by a typology of collaboration which is derived from the functionality of said model. This model is composed by four interrelated dimensions; the functionality of these has given rise to a typology of collaboration at three intensities: in action, in construction and collaboration during inertia. The model and the typology constitute a useful tool for managers and for health professionals since they help to better understand, manage and develop collaboration among the distinct professionals inside of the same organization as among those who belong to distinct organizations.

  12. New hexadentate macrocyclic ligand and their copper(II) and nickel(II) complexes: Spectral, magnetic, electrochemical, thermal, molecular modeling and antimicrobial studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, Sulekh; Ruchi; Qanungo, Kushal; Sharma, Saroj. K.

    Ni(II) and Cu(II) complexes were synthesized with a hexadentate macrocyclic ligand [3,4,8,9tetraoxo-2,5,7,10tetraaza-1,6dithio-(3,4,8,9) dipyridinedodecane(L)] and characterized by elemental analysis, molar conductance measurements, mass, NMR, IR, electronic, EPR spectral, thermal and molecular modeling studies. All the complexes are 1:2 electrolytes in nature and may be formulated as [M(L)]X2 [where, M = Ni(II) and Cu(II) and X = Cl-, NO3-, ½SO42-, CH3COO-]. On the basis of IR, electronic and EPR spectral studies an octahedral geometry has been assigned for Ni(II) complexes and tetragonal geometry for Cu(II) complexes. The antimicrobial activities and LD50 values of the ligand and its complexes, as growth inhibiting agents, have been screened in vitro against two different species of bacteria and plant pathogenic fungi.

  13. Conceptual Modeling in the Time of the Revolution: Part II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mylopoulos, John

    Conceptual Modeling was a marginal research topic at the very fringes of Computer Science in the 60s and 70s, when the discipline was dominated by topics focusing on programs, systems and hardware architectures. Over the years, however, the field has moved to centre stage and has come to claim a central role both in Computer Science research and practice in diverse areas, such as Software Engineering, Databases, Information Systems, the Semantic Web, Business Process Management, Service-Oriented Computing, Multi-Agent Systems, Knowledge Management, and more. The transformation was greatly aided by the adoption of standards in modeling languages (e.g., UML), and model-based methodologies (e.g., Model-Driven Architectures) by the Object Management Group (OMG) and other standards organizations. We briefly review the history of the field over the past 40 years, focusing on the evolution of key ideas. We then note some open challenges and report on-going research, covering topics such as the representation of variability in conceptual models, capturing model intentions, and models of laws.

  14. Measurement and modeling of advanced coal conversion processes, Volume II

    SciTech Connect

    Solomon, P.R.; Serio, M.A.; Hamblen, D.G.

    1993-06-01

    A two dimensional, steady-state model for describing a variety of reactive and nonreactive flows, including pulverized coal combustion and gasification, is presented. The model, referred to as 93-PCGC-2 is applicable to cylindrical, axi-symmetric systems. Turbulence is accounted for in both the fluid mechanics equations and the combustion scheme. Radiation from gases, walls, and particles is taken into account using a discrete ordinates method. The particle phase is modeled in a lagrangian framework, such that mean paths of particle groups are followed. A new coal-general devolatilization submodel (FG-DVC) with coal swelling and char reactivity submodels has been added.

  15. The Clinical Teacher for Special Education. Final Report: Volume II; Evaluating the Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Louis; Oseroff, Andrew

    Effectiveness of the clinical teaching model (CTM) developed at Florida State University is documented in Volume II of the project's final report. Reviewed is literature related to teacher effectiveness and conceptual changes, conceptual models and instructional systems, and evaluation research in education. Research design and procedures are…

  16. Distributed routing rainfall-runoff model; version II

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alley, W.M.; Smith, P.E.

    1982-01-01

    A computer program of a watershed model for routing storm runoff through a branched system of pipes and (or) natural channels using rainfall as input is described. The model provides detailed simulation of storm-runoff periods selected by the user and a daily soil-moisture accounting between storms. A drainage basin is represented as a set of overland-flow, channel, and reservoir seqments which ,jointly describe the drainage features of the basin. Kinematic wave theory is used for routing flows over contributing overland-flow areas and through the channel network. A set of model segments can be arranged into a network that will represent many complex drainage basins. The model is intended primarily for application to urban watersheds, but may have limited applications to rural watersheds.

  17. Bayesian analysis. II. Signal detection and model selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bretthorst, G. Larry

    In the preceding. paper, Bayesian analysis was applied to the parameter estimation problem, given quadrature NMR data. Here Bayesian analysis is extended to the problem of selecting the model which is most probable in view of the data and all the prior information. In addition to the analytic calculation, two examples are given. The first example demonstrates how to use Bayesian probability theory to detect small signals in noise. The second example uses Bayesian probability theory to compute the probability of the number of decaying exponentials in simulated T1 data. The Bayesian answer to this question is essentially a microcosm of the scientific method and a quantitative statement of Ockham's razor: theorize about possible models, compare these to experiment, and select the simplest model that "best" fits the data.

  18. GSTARS computer models and their applications, Part II: Applications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simoes, F.J.M.; Yang, C.T.

    2008-01-01

    In part 1 of this two-paper series, a brief summary of the basic concepts and theories used in developing the Generalized Stream Tube model for Alluvial River Simulation (GSTARS) computer models was presented. Part 2 provides examples that illustrate some of the capabilities of the GSTARS models and how they can be applied to solve a wide range of river and reservoir sedimentation problems. Laboratory and field case studies are used and the examples show representative applications of the earlier and of the more recent versions of GSTARS. Some of the more recent capabilities implemented in GSTARS3, one of the latest versions of the series, are also discussed here with more detail. ?? 2008 International Research and Training Centre on Erosion and Sedimentation and the World Association for Sedimentation and Erosion Research.

  19. Modeling an electro-photographic printer, part II: color systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kriss, Michael A.

    2007-01-01

    This paper will outline a simplified model for the development of toner dots on a reflective support in a color electro-photographic system. A model developed for a monochrome system will be adapted to a color imaging system where four pigments, each capable of scatting light, is used to form a digital halftone image. The combination of physical and optical dot gains, interlayer scattering, on-dot and off-dot digital halftones will be explored and the results demonstrated in terms color shifts due to layer order and dot gain due to halftone geometry.

  20. Spatial Moran models, II: cancer initiation in spatially structured tissue

    PubMed Central

    Foo, J; Leder, K

    2016-01-01

    We study the accumulation and spread of advantageous mutations in a spatial stochastic model of cancer initiation on a lattice. The parameters of this general model can be tuned to study a variety of cancer types and genetic progression pathways. This investigation contributes to an understanding of how the selective advantage of cancer cells together with the rates of mutations driving cancer, impact the process and timing of carcinogenesis. These results can be used to give insights into tumor heterogeneity and the “cancer field effect,” the observation that a malignancy is often surrounded by cells that have undergone premalignant transformation. PMID:26126947

  1. A general model of invariant chain association with class II major histocompatibility complex proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, C; McConnell, H M

    1995-01-01

    The binding of invariant chain to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) proteins is an important step in processing of MHC class II proteins and in antigen presentation. The question of how invariant chain can bind to all MHC class II proteins is central to understanding these processes. We have employed molecular modeling to predict the structure of class II-associated invariant chain peptide (CLIP)-MHC protein complexes and to ask whether the predicted mode of association could be general across all MHC class II proteins. CLIP fits identically into the MHC class II alleles HLA-DR3, I-Ak, I-Au, and I-Ad, with a consistent pattern of hydrogen bonds, contacts, and hydrophobic burial and without bad contacts. Our model predicts the burial of CLIP residues Met-91 and Met-99 in the deep P1 and P9 anchor pockets and other detailed interactions, which we have compared with available data. The predicted pattern of I-A allele-specific effects on CLIP binding is very similar to that observed experimentally by alanine-scanning mutations of CLIP. Together, these results indicate that CLIP may bind in a single, general way across products of MHC class II alleles. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:7667280

  2. Modeling Degradation in Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cells - Volume II

    SciTech Connect

    Manohar Motwani

    2011-09-01

    Idaho National Laboratory has an ongoing project to generate hydrogen from steam using solid oxide electrolysis cells (SOECs). To accomplish this, technical and degradation issues associated with the SOECs will need to be addressed. This report covers various approaches being pursued to model degradation issues in SOECs. An electrochemical model for degradation of SOECs is presented. The model is based on concepts in local thermodynamic equilibrium in systems otherwise in global thermodynamic non-equilibrium. It is shown that electronic conduction through the electrolyte, however small, must be taken into account for determining local oxygen chemical potential,, within the electrolyte. The within the electrolyte may lie out of bounds in relation to values at the electrodes in the electrolyzer mode. Under certain conditions, high pressures can develop in the electrolyte just near the oxygen electrode/electrolyte interface, leading to oxygen electrode delamination. These predictions are in accordance with the reported literature on the subject. Development of high pressures may be avoided by introducing some electronic conduction in the electrolyte. By combining equilibrium thermodynamics, non-equilibrium (diffusion) modeling, and first-principles, atomic scale calculations were performed to understand the degradation mechanisms and provide practical recommendations on how to inhibit and/or completely mitigate them.

  3. Demonstrations in Solute Transport Using Dyes: Part II. Modeling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butters, Greg; Bandaranayake, Wije

    1993-01-01

    A solution of the convection-dispersion equation is used to describe the solute breakthrough curves generated in the demonstrations in the companion paper. Estimation of the best fit model parameters (solute velocity, dispersion, and retardation) is illustrated using the method of moments for an example data set. (Author/MDH)

  4. STREAM TEMPERATURE SIMULATION OF FORESTED RIPARIAN AREAS: II. MODEL APPLICATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The SHADE-HSPF modeling system described in a companion paper has been tested and applied to the Upper Grande Ronde (UGR) watershed in northeast Oregon. Sensitivities of stream temperature to the heat balance parameters in Hydrologic Simulation Program-FORTRAN (HSPF) and the ripa...

  5. Simulation of reactive nanolaminates using reduced models: II. Normal propagation

    SciTech Connect

    Salloum, Maher; Knio, Omar M.

    2010-03-15

    Transient normal flame propagation in reactive Ni/Al multilayers is analyzed computationally. Two approaches are implemented, based on generalization of earlier methodology developed for axial propagation, and on extension of the model reduction formalism introduced in Part I. In both cases, the formulation accommodates non-uniform layering as well as the presence of inert layers. The equations of motion for the reactive system are integrated using a specially-tailored integration scheme, that combines extended-stability, Runge-Kutta-Chebychev (RKC) integration of diffusion terms with exact treatment of the chemical source term. The detailed and reduced models are first applied to the analysis of self-propagating fronts in uniformly-layered materials. Results indicate that both the front velocities and the ignition threshold are comparable for normal and axial propagation. Attention is then focused on analyzing the effect of a gap composed of inert material on reaction propagation. In particular, the impacts of gap width and thermal conductivity are briefly addressed. Finally, an example is considered illustrating reaction propagation in reactive composites combining regions corresponding to two bilayer widths. This setup is used to analyze the effect of the layering frequency on the velocity of the corresponding reaction fronts. In all cases considered, good agreement is observed between the predictions of the detailed model and the reduced model, which provides further support for adoption of the latter. (author)

  6. Nutrient Dynamics in Flooded Wetlands. II: Model Application

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this paper we applied and evaluated the wetland nutrient model described in an earlier paper. Hydrologic and water quality data from a small restored wetland located on Kent Island, Maryland, which is part of the Delmarva Peninsula on the Eastern shores of the Chesapeake Bay...

  7. Physics Of Eclipsing Binaries. II. Toward the Increased Model Fidelity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prša, A.; Conroy, K. E.; Horvat, M.; Pablo, H.; Kochoska, A.; Bloemen, S.; Giammarco, J.; Hambleton, K. M.; Degroote, P.

    2016-12-01

    The precision of photometric and spectroscopic observations has been systematically improved in the last decade, mostly thanks to space-borne photometric missions and ground-based spectrographs dedicated to finding exoplanets. The field of eclipsing binary stars strongly benefited from this development. Eclipsing binaries serve as critical tools for determining fundamental stellar properties (masses, radii, temperatures, and luminosities), yet the models are not capable of reproducing observed data well, either because of the missing physics or because of insufficient precision. This led to a predicament where radiative and dynamical effects, insofar buried in noise, started showing up routinely in the data, but were not accounted for in the models. PHOEBE (PHysics Of Eclipsing BinariEs; http://phoebe-project.org) is an open source modeling code for computing theoretical light and radial velocity curves that addresses both problems by incorporating missing physics and by increasing the computational fidelity. In particular, we discuss triangulation as a superior surface discretization algorithm, meshing of rotating single stars, light travel time effects, advanced phase computation, volume conservation in eccentric orbits, and improved computation of local intensity across the stellar surfaces that includes the photon-weighted mode, the enhanced limb darkening treatment, the better reflection treatment, and Doppler boosting. Here we present the concepts on which PHOEBE is built and proofs of concept that demonstrate the increased model fidelity.

  8. The use of MAVIS II to integrate the modeling and analysis of explosive valve interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, R.; Kwon, D.M.

    1998-12-31

    The MAVIS II computer program provides for the modeling and analysis of explosive valve interactions. This report describes the individual components of the program and how MAVIS II is used with other available tools to integrate the design and understanding of explosive valves. The rationale and model used for each valve interaction is described. Comparisons of the calculated results with available data have demonstrated the feasibility and accuracy of using MAVIS II for analytical studies of explosive valve interactions. The model used for the explosive or pyrotechnic used as the driving force in explosive valves is the most critical to be understood and modeled. MAVIS II is an advanced version that incorporates a plastic, as well as elastic, modeling of the deformations experienced when plungers are forced into a bore. The inclusion of a plastic model has greatly expanded the use of MAVIS for all categories (opening, closure, or combined) of valves, especially for the closure valves in which the sealing operation requires the plastic deformation of either a plunger or bore over a relatively large area. In order to increase its effectiveness, the use of MAVIS II should be integrated with the results from available experimental hardware. Test hardware such as the Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector (VISAR) and Velocity Generator test provide experimental data for accurate comparison of the actual valve functions. Variable Explosive Chamber (VEC) and Constant Explosive Volume (CEV) tests are used to provide the proper explosive equation-of-state for the MAVIS calculations of the explosive driving forces. The rationale and logistics of this integration is demonstrated through an example. A recent valve design is used to demonstrate how MAVIS II can be integrated with experimental tools to provide an understanding of the interactions in this valve.

  9. Calpain-10 Activity Underlies Angiotensin II-Induced Aldosterone Production in an Adrenal Glomerulosa Cell Model

    PubMed Central

    Seremwe, Mutsa; Schnellmann, Rick G.

    2015-01-01

    Aldosterone is a steroid hormone important in the regulation of blood pressure. Aberrant production of aldosterone results in the development and progression of diseases including hypertension and congestive heart failure; therefore, a complete understanding of aldosterone production is important for developing more effective treatments. Angiotensin II (AngII) regulates steroidogenesis, in part through its ability to increase intracellular calcium levels. Calcium can activate calpains, proteases classified as typical or atypical based on the presence or absence of penta-EF-hands, which are involved in various cellular responses. We hypothesized that calpain, in particular calpain-10, is activated by AngII in adrenal glomerulosa cells and underlies aldosterone production. Our studies showed that pan-calpain inhibitors reduced AngII-induced aldosterone production in 2 adrenal glomerulosa cell models, primary bovine zona glomerulosa and human adrenocortical carcinoma (HAC15) cells, as well as CYP11B2 expression in the HAC15 cells. Although AngII induced calpain activation in these cells, typical calpain inhibitors had no effect on AngII-elicited aldosterone production, suggesting a lack of involvement of classical calpains in this process. However, an inhibitor of the atypical calpain, calpain-10, decreased AngII-induced aldosterone production. Consistent with this result, small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown of calpain-10 inhibited aldosterone production and CYP11B2 expression, whereas adenovirus-mediated overexpression of calpain-10 resulted in increased AngII-induced aldosterone production. Our results indicate that AngII-induced activation of calpain-10 in glomerulosa cells underlies aldosterone production and identify calpain-10 or its downstream pathways as potential targets for the development of drug therapies for the treatment of hypertension. PMID:25836666

  10. Differential geometry based solvation model II: Lagrangian formulation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhan; Baker, Nathan A.; Wei, G. W.

    2010-01-01

    Solvation is an elementary process in nature and is of paramount importance to more sophisticated chemical, biological and biomolecular processes. The understanding of solvation is an essential prerequisite for the quantitative description and analysis of biomolecular systems. This work presents a Lagrangian formulation of our differential geometry based solvation model. The Lagrangian representation of biomolecular surfaces has a few utilities/advantages. First, it provides an essential basis for biomolecular visualization, surface electrostatic potential map and visual perception of biomolecules. Additionally, it is consistent with the conventional setting of implicit solvent theories and thus, many existing theoretical algorithms and computational software packages can be directly employed. Finally, the Lagrangian representation does not need to resort to artificially enlarged van der Waals radii as often required by the Eulerian representation in solvation analysis. The main goal of the present work is to analyze the connection, similarity and difference between the Eulerian and Lagrangian formalisms of the solvation model. Such analysis is important to the understanding of the differential geometry based solvation model. The present model extends the scaled particle theory (SPT) of nonpolar solvation model with a solvent-solute interaction potential. The nonpolar solvation model is completed with a Poisson-Boltzmann (PB) theory based polar solvation model. The differential geometry theory of surfaces is employed to provide a natural description of solvent-solute interfaces. The minimization of the total free energy functional, which encompasses the polar and nonpolar contributions, leads to coupled potential driven geometric flow and Poisson-Boltzmann equations. Due to the development of singularities and nonsmooth manifolds in the Lagrangian representation, the resulting potential-driven geometric flow equation is embedded into the Eulerian representation for

  11. Electric currents above Saint-Santin. II - Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazaudier, C.; Blanc, M.

    1982-04-01

    An empirical model of local horizontal electric current flow seasonal variations above Saint-Santin, France, is generated by means of Ohm's law and a combination of ionosphere electrodynamic parameter local models derived from previous incoherent scatter studies. The Hall and Pedersen, neutral wind-driven and electric field-driven contributions to the total current are explicitly obtained, and the local time variations of the two components of the total, height-integrated horizontal current are compared with the magnetic variation at another location. The zonal component is found to be weak in all seasons, due to the equal and opposite contributions of the electric field and neutral winds. Both the net northward flow of charges revealed by the ionospheric data, and the observed discrepancy between calculated ionospheric currents and magnetic data, suggest that field-aligned currents are flowing from the northern to the southern hemisphere in the authors' longitude sector during at least part of the day.

  12. Solving seismological problems using sgraph program: II-waveform modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Abdelwahed, Mohamed F.

    2012-09-26

    One of the seismological programs to manipulate seismic data is SGRAPH program. It consists of integrated tools to perform advanced seismological techniques. SGRAPH is considered a new system for maintaining and analyze seismic waveform data in a stand-alone Windows-based application that manipulate a wide range of data formats. SGRAPH was described in detail in the first part of this paper. In this part, I discuss the advanced techniques including in the program and its applications in seismology. Because of the numerous tools included in the program, only SGRAPH is sufficient to perform the basic waveform analysis and to solve advanced seismological problems. In the first part of this paper, the application of the source parameters estimation and hypocentral location was given. Here, I discuss SGRAPH waveform modeling tools. This paper exhibits examples of how to apply the SGRAPH tools to perform waveform modeling for estimating the focal mechanism and crustal structure of local earthquakes.

  13. Model scattering envelopes of young stellar objects. II - Infalling envelopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitney, Barbara A.; Hartmann, Lee

    1993-01-01

    We present scattered light images for models of young stellar objects surrounded by dusty envelopes. The envelopes are assumed to have finite angular momentum and are falling in steady flow onto a disk. The model envelopes include holes, such as might be created by energetic bipolar flows. We calculate images using the Monte Carlo method to follow the light scattered in the dusty envelope and circumstellar disk, assuming that the photons originate from the central source. Adopting typical interstellar medium dust opacities and expected mass infall rates for protostars of about 10 exp -6 solar mass/yr, we find that detectable amounts of optical radiation can escape from envelopes falling into a disk as small as about 10-100 AU, depending upon the viewing angle and the size of the bipolar flow cavity. We suggest that the extended optical and near-IR light observed around several young stars is scattered by dusty infalling envelopes rather than disks.

  14. Differential geometry based solvation model II: Lagrangian formulation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhan; Baker, Nathan A; Wei, G W

    2011-12-01

    Solvation is an elementary process in nature and is of paramount importance to more sophisticated chemical, biological and biomolecular processes. The understanding of solvation is an essential prerequisite for the quantitative description and analysis of biomolecular systems. This work presents a Lagrangian formulation of our differential geometry based solvation models. The Lagrangian representation of biomolecular surfaces has a few utilities/advantages. First, it provides an essential basis for biomolecular visualization, surface electrostatic potential map and visual perception of biomolecules. Additionally, it is consistent with the conventional setting of implicit solvent theories and thus, many existing theoretical algorithms and computational software packages can be directly employed. Finally, the Lagrangian representation does not need to resort to artificially enlarged van der Waals radii as often required by the Eulerian representation in solvation analysis. The main goal of the present work is to analyze the connection, similarity and difference between the Eulerian and Lagrangian formalisms of the solvation model. Such analysis is important to the understanding of the differential geometry based solvation model. The present model extends the scaled particle theory of nonpolar solvation model with a solvent-solute interaction potential. The nonpolar solvation model is completed with a Poisson-Boltzmann (PB) theory based polar solvation model. The differential geometry theory of surfaces is employed to provide a natural description of solvent-solute interfaces. The optimization of the total free energy functional, which encompasses the polar and nonpolar contributions, leads to coupled potential driven geometric flow and PB equations. Due to the development of singularities and nonsmooth manifolds in the Lagrangian representation, the resulting potential-driven geometric flow equation is embedded into the Eulerian representation for the purpose of

  15. Slag Behavior in Gasifiers. Part II: Constitutive Modeling of Slag

    SciTech Connect

    Massoudi, Mehrdad; Wang, Ping

    2013-02-07

    The viscosity of slag and the thermal conductivity of ash deposits are among two of the most important constitutive parameters that need to be studied. The accurate formulation or representations of the (transport) properties of coal present a special challenge of modeling efforts in computational fluid dynamics applications. Studies have indicated that slag viscosity must be within a certain range of temperatures for tapping and the membrane wall to be accessible, for example, between 1,300 °C and 1,500 °C, the viscosity is approximately 25 Pa·s. As the operating temperature decreases, the slag cools and solid crystals begin to form. Since slag behaves as a non-linear fluid, we discuss the constitutive modeling of slag and the important parameters that must be studied. We propose a new constitutive model, where the stress tensor not only has a yield stress part, but it also has a viscous part with a shear rate dependency of the viscosity, along with temperature and concentration dependency, while allowing for the possibility of the normal stress effects. In Part I, we reviewed, identify and discuss the key coal ash properties and the operating conditions impacting slag behavior.

  16. THE FORMATION OF IRIS DIAGNOSTICS. I. A QUINTESSENTIAL MODEL ATOM OF Mg II AND GENERAL FORMATION PROPERTIES OF THE Mg II h and k LINES

    SciTech Connect

    Leenaarts, J.; Pereira, T. M. D.; Carlsson, M.; De Pontieu, B.; Uitenbroek, H. E-mail: tiago.pereira@astro.uio.no E-mail: bdp@lmsal.com

    2013-08-01

    NASA's Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) space mission will study how the solar atmosphere is energized. IRIS contains an imaging spectrograph that covers the Mg II h and k lines as well as a slit-jaw imager centered at Mg II k. Understanding the observations will require forward modeling of Mg II h and k line formation from three-dimensional (3D) radiation-MHD models. This paper is the first in a series where we undertake this forward modeling. We discuss the atomic physics pertinent to h and k line formation, present a quintessential model atom that can be used in radiative transfer computations, and discuss the effect of partial redistribution (PRD) and 3D radiative transfer on the emergent line profiles. We conclude that Mg II h and k can be modeled accurately with a four-level plus continuum Mg II model atom. Ideally radiative transfer computations should be done in 3D including PRD effects. In practice this is currently not possible. A reasonable compromise is to use one-dimensional PRD computations to model the line profile up to and including the central emission peaks, and use 3D transfer assuming complete redistribution to model the central depression.

  17. Corroborative models of the cobalt(II) inhibited Fe/Mn superoxide dismutases.

    PubMed

    Scarpellini, Marciela; Wu, Amy J; Kampf, Jeff W; Pecoraro, Vincent L

    2005-07-11

    Attempting to model superoxide dismutase (SOD) enzymes, we designed two new N3O-donor ligands to provide the same set of donor atoms observed in the active site of these enzymes: K(i)Pr2TCMA (potassium 1,4-diisopropyl-1,4,7-triazacyclononane-N-acetate) and KBPZG (potassium N,N-bis(3,5-dimethylpyrazolylmethyl) glycinate). Five new Co(II) complexes (1-5) were obtained and characterized by X-ray crystallography, mass spectrometry, electrochemistry, magnetochemistry, UV-vis, and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopies. The crystal structures of 1 and 3-5 revealed five-coordinate complexes, whereas complex 2 is six-coordinate. The EPR data of complexes 3 and 4 agree with those of the Co(II)-substituted SOD, which strongly support the proposition that the active site of the enzyme structurally resembles these models. The redox behavior of complexes 1-5 clearly demonstrates the stabilization of the Co(II) state in the ligand field provided by these ligands. The irreversibility displayed by all of the complexes is probably related to an electron-transfer process followed by a rearrangement of the geometry around the metal center for complexes 1 and 3-5 that probably changes from a trigonal bipyramidal (high spin, d7) to octahedral (low spin, d6) as Co(II) is oxidized to Co(III), which is also expected to be accompanied by a spin-state conversion. As the redox potentials to convert the Co(II) to Co(III) are high, it can be inferred that the redox potential of the Co(II)-substituted SOD may be outside the range required to convert the superoxide radical (O2*-) to hydrogen peroxide, and this is sufficient to explain the inactivity of the enzyme. Finally, the complexes reported here are the first corroborative structural models of the Co(II)-substituted SOD.

  18. A Long-Term Memory Competitive Process Model of a Common Procedural Error. Part II: Working Memory Load and Capacity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-01

    A Long-Term Memory Competitive Process Model of a Common Procedural Error, Part II: Working Memory Load and Capacity Franklin P. Tamborello, II...00-00-2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE A Long-Term Memory Competitive Process Model of a Common Procedural Error, Part II: Working Memory Load and...07370024.2011.601692 Tamborello, F. P., & Trafton, J. G. (2013). A long-term competitive process model of a common procedural error. In Proceedings of the 35th

  19. Modeling direct interband tunneling. II. Lower-dimensional structures

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Andrew; Chui, Chi On

    2014-08-07

    We investigate the applicability of the two-band Hamiltonian and the widely used Kane analytical formula to interband tunneling along unconfined directions in nanostructures. Through comparisons with k·p and tight-binding calculations and quantum transport simulations, we find that the primary correction is the change in effective band gap. For both constant fields and realistic tunnel field-effect transistors, dimensionally consistent band gap scaling of the Kane formula allows analytical and numerical device simulations to approximate non-equilibrium Green's function current characteristics without arbitrary fitting. This allows efficient first-order calibration of semiclassical models for interband tunneling in nanodevices.

  20. Quantum chaos in the nuclear collective model. II. Peres lattices.

    PubMed

    Stránský, Pavel; Hruska, Petr; Cejnar, Pavel

    2009-06-01

    This is a continuation of our paper [Phys. Rev. E 79, 046202 (2009)] devoted to signatures of quantum chaos in the geometric collective model of atomic nuclei. We apply the method by Peres to study ordered and disordered patterns in quantum spectra drawn as lattices in the plane of energy vs average of a chosen observable. Good qualitative agreement with standard measures of chaos is manifested. The method provides an efficient tool for studying structural changes in eigenstates across quantum spectra of general systems.

  1. Simulation of Slag Freeze Layer Formation: Part II: Numerical Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guevara, Fernando J.; Irons, Gordon A.

    2011-08-01

    The experiments from Part I with CaCl2-H2O solidification in a differentially heated, square cavity were simulated in two dimensions using a control volume technique in a fixed grid. The test conditions and physical properties of the fluid resulted in Prandtl and Rayleigh numbers in the range of 50 and 2.1 × 108, respectively, and the solidification was observed to be planar with dispersed solid particles. In the mathematical model, temperature-dependent viscosity and density functions were employed. To suppress velocities in the solid phase, various models were tested, and a high effective viscosity was found most appropriate. The results compare well with the experiments in terms of solid layer growth, horizontal and vertical velocities, heat transfer coefficients, and temperature distributions. Hydrodynamic boundary layers on the solidified front and on the hot vertical wall tend to be nonsymmetric, as well on the top and bottom adiabatic walls. The high viscosity value imposed on the two-phase zone affects the velocity profile close to the solid front and modifies the heat transfer rate.

  2. DETAILED DECOMPOSITION OF GALAXY IMAGES. II. BEYOND AXISYMMETRIC MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Chien Y.; Ho, Luis C.; Impey, Chris D.; Rix, Hans-Walter E-mail: lho@obs.carnegiescience.ed E-mail: rix@mpia-hd.mpg.d

    2010-06-15

    We present a two-dimensional (2D) fitting algorithm (GALFIT, ver. 3) with new capabilities to study the structural components of galaxies and other astronomical objects in digital images. Our technique improves on previous 2D fitting algorithms by allowing for irregular, curved, logarithmic and power-law spirals, ring, and truncated shapes in otherwise traditional parametric functions like the Sersic, Moffat, King, Ferrer, etc., profiles. One can mix and match these new shape features freely, with or without constraints, and apply them to an arbitrary number of model components of numerous profile types, so as to produce realistic-looking galaxy model images. Yet, despite the potential for extreme complexity, the meaning of the key parameters like the Sersic index, effective radius, or luminosity remains intuitive and essentially unchanged. The new features have an interesting potential for use to quantify the degree of asymmetry of galaxies, to quantify low surface brightness tidal features beneath and beyond luminous galaxies, to allow more realistic decompositions of galaxy subcomponents in the presence of strong rings and spiral arms, and to enable ways to gauge the uncertainties when decomposing galaxy subcomponents. We illustrate these new features by way of several case studies that display various levels of complexity.

  3. Functional Models for the Oxygen-Evolving Complex of Photosystem II

    PubMed Central

    Cady, Clyde W.; Crabtree, Robert H.; Brudvig, Gary W.

    2010-01-01

    In the last ten years, a number of advances have been made in the study of the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) of photosystem II (PSII). Along with this new understanding of the natural system has come rapid advance in chemical models of this system. The advance of PSII model chemistry is seen most strikingly in the area of functional models where the few known systems available when this topic was last reviewed has grown into two families of model systems. In concert with this work, numerous mechanistic proposals for photosynthetic water oxidation have been proposed. Here, we review the recent efforts in functional model chemistry of the oxygen-evolving complex of photosystem II. PMID:21037800

  4. Modeling extracellular electrical stimulation: II. Computational validation and numerical results.

    PubMed

    Tahayori, Bahman; Meffin, Hamish; Dokos, Socrates; Burkitt, Anthony N; Grayden, David B

    2012-12-01

    The validity of approximate equations describing the membrane potential under extracellular electrical stimulation (Meffin et al 2012 J. Neural Eng. 9 065005) is investigated through finite element analysis in this paper. To this end, the finite element method is used to simulate a cylindrical neurite under extracellular stimulation. Laplace's equations with appropriate boundary conditions are solved numerically in three dimensions and the results are compared to the approximate analytic solutions. Simulation results are in agreement with the approximate analytic expressions for longitudinal and transverse modes of stimulation. The range of validity of the equations describing the membrane potential for different values of stimulation and neurite parameters are presented as well. The results indicate that the analytic approach can be used to model extracellular electrical stimulation for realistic physiological parameters with a high level of accuracy.

  5. Polarized Molecular Orbital Model Chemistry. II. The PMO Method

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Peng; Fiedler, Luke; Leverentz, Hannah R.; Truhlar, Donald G.; Gao, Jiali

    2012-01-01

    We present a new semiempirical molecular orbital method based on neglect of diatomic differential overlap. This method differs from previous NDDO-based methods in that we include p orbitals on hydrogen atoms to provide a more realistic modeling of polarizability. As in AM1-D and PM3-D, we also include damped dispersion. The formalism is based on the original MNDO one, but in the process of parameterization we make some specific changes to some of the functional forms. The present article is a demonstration of the capability of the new approach, and it presents a successful parametrization for compounds composed only of hydrogen and oxygen atoms, including the important case of water clusters. PMID:23378824

  6. nIFTy galaxy cluster simulations - II. Radiative models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sembolini, Federico; Elahi, Pascal Jahan; Pearce, Frazer R.; Power, Chris; Knebe, Alexander; Kay, Scott T.; Cui, Weiguang; Yepes, Gustavo; Beck, Alexander M.; Borgani, Stefano; Cunnama, Daniel; Davé, Romeel; February, Sean; Huang, Shuiyao; Katz, Neal; McCarthy, Ian G.; Murante, Giuseppe; Newton, Richard D. A.; Perret, Valentin; Puchwein, Ewald; Saro, Alexandro; Schaye, Joop; Teyssier, Romain

    2016-07-01

    We have simulated the formation of a massive galaxy cluster (M_{200}^crit = 1.1 × 1015 h-1 M⊙) in a Λ cold dark matter universe using 10 different codes (RAMSES, 2 incarnations of AREPO and 7 of GADGET), modelling hydrodynamics with full radiative subgrid physics. These codes include smoothed-particle hydrodynamics (SPH), spanning traditional and advanced SPH schemes, adaptive mesh and moving mesh codes. Our goal is to study the consistency between simulated clusters modelled with different radiative physical implementations - such as cooling, star formation and thermal active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback. We compare images of the cluster at z = 0, global properties such as mass, and radial profiles of various dynamical and thermodynamical quantities. We find that, with respect to non-radiative simulations, dark matter is more centrally concentrated, the extent not simply depending on the presence/absence of AGN feedback. The scatter in global quantities is substantially higher than for non-radiative runs. Intriguingly, adding radiative physics seems to have washed away the marked code-based differences present in the entropy profile seen for non-radiative simulations in Sembolini et al.: radiative physics + classic SPH can produce entropy cores, at least in the case of non cool-core clusters. Furthermore, the inclusion/absence of AGN feedback is not the dividing line -as in the case of describing the stellar content - for whether a code produces an unrealistic temperature inversion and a falling central entropy profile. However, AGN feedback does strongly affect the overall stellar distribution, limiting the effect of overcooling and reducing sensibly the stellar fraction.

  7. Expression of collagen types I and II on articular cartilage in a rat knee contracture model.

    PubMed

    Hagiwara, Yoshihiro; Ando, Akira; Chimoto, Eiichi; Tsuchiya, Masahiro; Takahashi, Ichiro; Sasano, Yasuyuki; Onoda, Yoshito; Suda, Hideaki; Itoi, Eiji

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to clarify the expression patterns of collagen types I and II on articular cartilage after immobilization in a rat knee contracture model in 3 specific areas (noncontact area, transitional area, contact area). The unilateral knee joints of adult male rats were rigidly immobilized at 150 degrees of flexion using screws and a rigid plastic plate. Sham-operated animals had holes drilled in the femur and the tibia and screws inserted but were not plated. The expression patterns of collagen types I and II in each area were evaluated by in situ hybridization (ISH), immunohistochemistry (IHC), and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). The expression of collagen type II in the noncontact area was decreased by ISH but appeared unchanged when examined by IHC. In the transitional and contact areas, the expression of collagen type II was initially shown to have decreased and then increased at the hypertrophic chondrocytes by ISH but appeared decreased by IHC. Quantitative PCR revealed the decreased expression of type II collagen in the contact area. Immunostaining of collagen type I was increased at the noncontact area and transitional areas. Alterations of collagen types I and II expression may also affect the degeneration of articular cartilage after immobilization and the changes were different in the three areas.

  8. Electronic structure of nickel(II) and zinc(II) borohydrides from spectroscopic measurements and computational modeling.

    PubMed

    Desrochers, Patrick J; Sutton, Christopher A; Abrams, Micah L; Ye, Shengfa; Neese, Frank; Telser, Joshua; Ozarowski, Andrew; Krzystek, J

    2012-03-05

    The previously reported Ni(II) complex, Tp*Ni(κ(3)-BH(4)) (Tp* = hydrotris(3,5-dimethylpyrazolyl)borate anion), which has an S = 1 spin ground state, was studied by high-frequency and -field electron paramagnetic resonance (HFEPR) spectroscopy as a solid powder at low temperature, by UV-vis-NIR spectroscopy in the solid state and in solution at room temperature, and by paramagnetic (11)B NMR. HFEPR provided its spin Hamiltonian parameters: D = 1.91(1) cm(-1), E = 0.285(8) cm(-1), g = [2.170(4), 2.161(3), 2.133(3)]. Similar, but not identical parameters were obtained for its borodeuteride analogue. The previously unreported complex, Tp*Zn(κ(2)-BH(4)), was prepared, and IR and NMR spectroscopy allowed its comparison with analogous closed shell borohydride complexes. Ligand-field theory was used to model the electronic transitions in the Ni(II) complex successfully, although it was less successful at reproducing the zero-field splitting (zfs) parameters. Advanced computational methods, both density functional theory (DFT) and ab initio wave function based approaches, were applied to these Tp*MBH(4) complexes to better understand the interaction between these metals and borohydride ion. DFT successfully reproduced bonding geometries and vibrational behavior of the complexes, although it was less successful for the spin Hamiltonian parameters of the open shell Ni(II) complex. These were instead best described using ab initio methods. The origin of the zfs in Tp*Ni(κ(3)-BH(4)) is described and shows that the relatively small magnitude of D results from several spin-orbit coupling (SOC) interactions of large magnitude, but with opposite sign. Spin-spin coupling (SSC) is also shown to be significant, a point that is not always appreciated in transition metal complexes. Overall, a picture of bonding and electronic structure in open and closed shell late transition metal borohydrides is provided, which has implications for the use of these complexes in catalysis and

  9. Modeling the distribution of Mg II absorbers around galaxies using background galaxies and quasars

    SciTech Connect

    Bordoloi, R.; Lilly, S. J.; Kacprzak, G. G.; Churchill, C. W.

    2014-04-01

    We present joint constraints on the distribution of Mg II absorption around high redshift galaxies obtained by combining two orthogonal probes, the integrated Mg II absorption seen in stacked background galaxy spectra and the distribution of parent galaxies of individual strong Mg II systems as seen in the spectra of background quasars. We present a suite of models that can be used to predict, for different two- and three-dimensional distributions, how the projected Mg II absorption will depend on a galaxy's apparent inclination, the impact parameter b and the azimuthal angle between the projected vector to the line of sight and the projected minor axis. In general, we find that variations in the absorption strength with azimuthal angles provide much stronger constraints on the intrinsic geometry of the Mg II absorption than the dependence on the inclination of the galaxies. In addition to the clear azimuthal dependence in the integrated Mg II absorption that we reported earlier in Bordoloi et al., we show that strong equivalent width Mg II absorbers (W{sub r} (2796) ≥ 0.3 Å) are also asymmetrically distributed in azimuth around their host galaxies: 72% of the absorbers in Kacprzak et al., and 100% of the close-in absorbers within 35 kpc of the center of their host galaxies, are located within 50° of the host galaxy's projected semi minor axis. It is shown that either composite models consisting of a simple bipolar component plus a spherical or disk component, or a single highly softened bipolar distribution, can well represent the azimuthal dependencies observed in both the stacked spectrum and quasar absorption-line data sets within 40 kpc. Simultaneously fitting both data sets, we find that in the composite model the bipolar cone has an opening angle of ∼100° (i.e., confined to within 50° of the disk axis) and contains about two-thirds of the total Mg II absorption in the system. The single softened cone model has an exponential fall off with azimuthal

  10. Triad model of education (II) and instructional engineering.

    PubMed

    Vargas, E A

    2007-11-01

    Despite the money and sweat that go into new instructional technologies, they do not produce the overall high level of student performances that societies seek. More effective teaching calls for a profound solution. It requires a coordinate triad of factors: a proper science, the correct organizational structure, and an engineering instructional technology. This second of a series of articles on the Triad Model of Education concentrates on instructional engineering. The instructional engineering drawn from the science is contingency-based. Contingency-based instructional systems always handle the inevitable two components of instruction: the repertoires of students and the setups that shape those repertoires. The setup component features five elements: subject matter, objectives, quality control, presentation modes, and logistics. The repertoire component consists of the governance of repertoires-event and lingual governed, the type of repertoire-knowing, solving, and creating, and the variability of the repertoire--convergent and divergent. These elements, and their required engineering, reveal an instructional task more complex than previously considered. Progress with such complexity occurs only when all components of the triad are in place.

  11. Prehension synergies during nonvertical grasping, II: Modeling and optimization.

    PubMed

    Pataky, Todd C; Latash, Mark L; Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M

    2004-10-01

    This study examines various optimization criteria as potential sources of constraints that eliminate (or at least reduce the degree of) mechanical redundancy in prehension. A model of nonvertical grasping mimicking the experimental conditions of Pataky et al. (current issue) was developed and numerically optimized. Several cost functions compared well with experimental data including energylike functions, entropylike functions, and a ''motor command'' function. A tissue deformation function failed to predict finger forces. In the prehension literature, the ''safety margin'' (SM) measure has been used to describe grasp quality. We demonstrate here that the SM is an inappropriate measure for nonvertical grasps. We introduce a new measure, the ''generalized safety margin'' (GSM), which reduces to the SM for vertical and two-digit grasps. It was found that a close-to-constant GSM accounts for many of the finger force patterns that are observed when grasping an object oriented arbitrarily with respect to the gravity field. It was hypothesized that, when determining finger forces, the CNS assumes that a grasped object is more slippery than it actually is. An ''operative friction coefficient'' of approximately 30% of the actual coefficient accounted for the offset between experimental and optimized data. The data suggest that the CNS utilizes an optimization strategy when coordinating finger forces during grasping.

  12. Theory of stellar convection - II. First stellar models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasetto, S.; Chiosi, C.; Chiosi, E.; Cropper, M.; Weiss, A.

    2016-07-01

    We present here the first stellar models on the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram, in which convection is treated according to the new scale-free convection theory (SFC theory) by Pasetto et al. The aim is to compare the results of the new theory with those from the classical, calibrated mixing-length (ML) theory to examine differences and similarities. We integrate the equations describing the structure of the atmosphere from the stellar surface down to a few per cent of the stellar mass using both ML theory and SFC theory. The key temperature over pressure gradients, the energy fluxes, and the extension of the convective zones are compared in both theories. The analysis is first made for the Sun and then extended to other stars of different mass and evolutionary stage. The results are adequate: the SFC theory yields convective zones, temperature gradients ∇ and ∇e, and energy fluxes that are very similar to those derived from the `calibrated' MT theory for main-sequence stars. We conclude that the old scale dependent ML theory can now be replaced with a self-consistent scale-free theory able to predict correct results, as it is more physically grounded than the ML theory. Fundamentally, the SFC theory offers a deeper insight of the underlying physics than numerical simulations.

  13. An Extended Equation of State Modeling Method II. Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalabrin, G.; Marchi, P.; Stringari, P.; Richon, D.

    2006-09-01

    This work is the extension of previous work dedicated to pure fluids. The same method is extended to the representation of thermodynamic properties of a mixture through a fundamental equation of state in terms of the Helmholtz energy. The proposed technique exploits the extended corresponding-states concept of distorting the independent variables of a dedicated equation of state for a reference fluid using suitable scale factor functions to adapt the equation to experimental data of a target system. An existing equation of state for the target mixture is used instead of an equation for the reference fluid, completely avoiding the need for a reference fluid. In particular, a Soave-Redlich-Kwong cubic equation with van der Waals mixing rules is chosen. The scale factors, which are functions of temperature, density, and mole fraction of the target mixture, are expressed in the form of a multilayer feedforward neural network, whose coefficients are regressed by minimizing a suitable objective function involving different kinds of mixture thermodynamic data. As a preliminary test, the model is applied to five binary and two ternary haloalkane mixtures, using data generated from existing dedicated equations of state for the selected mixtures. The results show that the method is robust and straightforward for the effective development of a mixture- specific equation of state directly from experimental data.

  14. Control of gravitropic orientation. II. Dual receptor model for gravitropism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaMotte, Clifford E.; Pickard, Barbara G.

    2004-01-01

    Gravitropism of vascular plants has been assumed to require a single gravity receptor mechanism. However, based on the evidence in Part I of this study, we propose that maize roots require two. The first mechanism is without a directional effect and, by itself, cannot give rise to tropism. Its role is quantitative facilitation of the second mechanism, which is directional like the gravitational force itself and provides the impetus for tropic curvature. How closely coupled the two mechanisms may be is, as yet, unclear. The evidence for dual receptors supports a general model for roots. When readiness for gravifacilitation, or gravifacilitation itself, is constitutive, orthogravitropic curvature can go to completion. If not constitutively enabled, gravifacilitation can be weak in the absence of light and water deficit or strong in the presence of light and water deficit. In either case, it can decay and permit roots to assume reproducible non-vertical orientations (plagiogravitropic or plagiotropic orientations) without using non-vertical setpoints. In this way roots are deployed in a large volume of soil. Gravitropic behaviours in shoots are more diverse than in roots, utilising oblique and horizontal as well as vertical setpoints. As a guide to future experiments, we assess how constitutive v. non-constitutive modes of gravifacilitation might contribute to behaviours based on each kind of setpoint.

  15. Unified Model of the rf Plasma Sheath, Part II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riley, Merle

    1996-10-01

    By developing an approximation to the first integral of the Poisson equation, one can obtain solutions for the current-voltage characteristics of an rf plasma sheath that are valid over the whole range of inertial response of the ions to an imposed rf voltage or current. (M.E.Riley, 1995 GEC, abstract QA5, published in Bull. Am. Phys. Soc., 40, 1587 (1995).) The theory has been shown to adequately reproduce current-voltage characteristics of two extreme cases (M.A. Lieberman, IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 16, 638 (1988). A. Metze, D.W. Ernie, and H.J.Oskam, J.Appl.Phys., 60, 3081 (1986).) of ion response. In this work I show the effect of different conventions for connecting the sheath model to the bulk plasma. Modifications of the Mach number and a finite electric field at the Bohm point are natural choices. The differences are examined for a sheath in a high density Ar plasma and are found to be insignificant. A theoretical argument favors the electric field modification. *Work performed at Sandia National Labs and supported by US DoE under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  16. Dynamic spreading of nanofluids on solids part II: modeling.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kuan-Liang; Kondiparty, Kirtiprakash; Nikolov, Alex D; Wasan, Darsh

    2012-11-27

    Recent studies on the spreading phenomena of liquid dispersions of nanoparticles (nanofluids) have revealed that the self-layering and two-dimensional structuring of nanoparticles in the three-phase contact region exert structural disjoining pressure, which drives the spreading of nanofluids by forming a continuous wedge film between the liquid (e.g., oil) and solid surface. Motivated by the practical applications of the phenomenon and experimental results reported in Part I of this two-part series, we thoroughly investigated the spreading dynamics of nanofluids against an oil drop on a solid surface. With the Laplace equation as a starting point, the spreading process is modeled by Navier-Stokes equations through the lubrication approach, which considers the structural disjoining pressure, gravity, and van der Waals force. The temporal interface profile and advancing inner contact line velocity of nanofluidic films are analyzed through varying the effective nanoparticle concentration, the outer contact angle, the effective nanoparticle size, and capillary pressure. It is found that a fast and spontaneous advance of the inner contact line movement can be obtained by increasing the nanoparticle concentration, decreasing the nanoparticle size, and/or decreasing the interfacial tension. Once the nanofluidic film is formed, the advancing inner contact line movement reaches a constant velocity, which is independent of the outer contact angle if the interfacial tension is held constant.

  17. Double Higgs production at LHC, see-saw type-II and Georgi-Machacek model

    SciTech Connect

    Godunov, S. I. Vysotsky, M. I. Zhemchugov, E. V.

    2015-03-15

    The double Higgs production in the models with isospin-triplet scalars is studied. It is shown that in the see-saw type-II model, the mode with an intermediate heavy scalar, pp → H + X → 2h + X, may have the cross section that is comparable with that in the Standard Model. In the Georgi-Machacek model, this cross section could be much larger than in the Standard Model because the vacuum expectation value of the triplet can be large.

  18. Competitive sorption and selective sequence of Cu(II) and Ni(II) on montmorillonite: Batch, modeling, EPR and XAS studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shitong; Ren, Xuemei; Zhao, Guixia; Shi, Weiqun; Montavon, Gilles; Grambow, Bernd; Wang, Xiangke

    2015-10-01

    Heavy metal ions that leach from various industrial and agricultural processes are simultaneously present in the contaminated soil and water systems. The competitive sorption of these toxic metal ions on the natural soil components and sediments significantly influences their migration, bioavailability and ecotoxicity in the geochemical environment. In this study, the competitive sorption and selectivity order of Cu(II) and Ni(II) on montmorillonite are investigated by combining the batch experiments, X-ray diffraction (XRD), electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), surface complexation modeling and X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS). The batch experimental data show that the coexisting Ni(II) exhibits a negligible influence on the sorption behavior of Cu(II), whereas the coexisting Cu(II) reduces the Ni(II) sorption percentage and changes the shape of the Ni(II) sorption isotherm. The sorption species of Cu(II) and Ni(II) on montmorillonite over the acidic and near-neutral pH range are well simulated by the surface complexation modeling. However, this model cannot identify the occurrence of surface nucleation and the co-precipitation processes at a highly alkaline pH. Based on the results of the EPR and XAS analyses, the microstructures of Cu(II) on montmorillonite are identified as the hydrated free Cu(II) ions at pH 5.0, inner-sphere surface complexes at pH 6.0 and the surface dimers/Cu(OH)2(s) precipitate at pH 8.0 in the single-solute and the binary-solute systems. For the Ni(II) sorption in the single-solute system, the formed microstructure varies from the hydrated free Ni(II) ions at the pH values of 5.0 and 6.0 to the inner-sphere surface complexes at pH 8.0. For the Ni(II) sorption in the binary-solute system, the coexisting Cu(II) induces the formation of the inner-sphere complexes at pH 6.0. In contrast, Ni(II) is adsorbed on montmorillonite via the formation of Ni phyllosilicate co-precipitate/α-Ni(OH)2(s) precipitate at pH 8.0. The selective sequence

  19. Mathematical modeling of copper(II) ion inhibition on COD removal in an activated sludge unit.

    PubMed

    Pamukoglu, M Yunus; Kargi, Fikret

    2007-07-19

    A mathematical model was developed to describe the Cu(II) ion inhibition on chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal from synthetic wastewater containing 15 mg l(-1) Cu(II) in an activated sludge unit. Experimental data obtained at different sludge ages (5-30 days) and hydraulic residence times (HRT) (5-25 h) were used to determine the kinetic, stoichiometric and inhibition constants for the COD removal rate in the presence and absence of Cu(II) ions. The inhibition pattern was identified as non-competitive, since Cu(II) ion inhibitions were observed both on maximum specific substrate removal rate (k) and on the saturation constant (Ks) with the inhibition constants of 97 and 18 mg l(-1), respectively, indicating more pronounced inhibition on Ks. The growth yield coefficient (Y) decreased and the death rate constant (b) increased in the presence of Cu(II) ions due to copper ion toxicity on microbial growth with inhibition constants of 29 and 200 mg l(-1), respectively indicating more effective inhibition on the growth yield coefficient or higher maintenance requirements. The mathematical model with the predetermined kinetic constants was able to predict the system performance reasonably well especially at high HRT operations.

  20. Phospholipid interactions in model membrane systems. II. Theory.

    PubMed Central

    Stigter, D; Mingins, J; Dill, K A

    1992-01-01

    -group model to semiconcentrated monolayers, in agreement with the surface potential data in the foregoing paper. PMID:1617141

  1. A synthetic model for the oxygen-evolving complex in Sr(2+)-containing photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Chen, Changhui; Zhang, Chunxi; Dong, Hongxing; Zhao, Jingquan

    2014-08-25

    A novel heterometallic MnSr complex containing the Mn3SrO4 cuboidal moiety and all types of μ-O(2-) moieties observed in the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) in Sr(2+)-containing photosystem II (PSII) has been synthesized and characterized, which provides a new synthetic model of the OEC.

  2. Mathematical models and illustrative results for the RINGBEARER II monopole/dipole beam-propagation code

    SciTech Connect

    Chambers, F.W.; Masamitsu, J.A.; Lee, E.P.

    1982-05-24

    RINGBEARER II is a linearized monopole/dipole particle simulation code for studying intense relativistic electron beam propagation in gas. In this report the mathematical models utilized for beam particle dynamics and pinch field computation are delineated. Difficulties encountered in code operations and some remedies are discussed. Sample output is presented detailing the diagnostics and the methods of display and analysis utilized.

  3. Catalytic Oxygen Evolution by a Bioinorganic Model of the Photosystem II Oxygen-Evolving Complex

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, Derrick L.; Tinoco, Arthur D.; Brudvig, Gary W.; Vrettos, John S.; Allen, Bertha Connie

    2005-01-01

    Bioinorganic models of the manganese Mn4 cluster are important not only as aids in understanding the structure and function of the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC), but also in developing artificial water-oxidation catalysts. The mechanism of water oxidation by photosystem II (PSII) is thought to involve the formation of a high-valent terminal Mn-oxo…

  4. 78 FR 5765 - Wireline Competition Bureau Releases Connect America Phase II Cost Model Virtual Workshop...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-28

    ...] Wireline Competition Bureau Releases Connect America Phase II Cost Model Virtual Workshop Discussion Topics... Competition Bureau releases for discussion a number of virtual workshop topics related to the development and... comments. Virtual Workshop: In addition to the usual methods for filing electronic comments, the...

  5. ESEEM Analysis of Multi-Histidine Cu(II)-Coordination in Model Complexes, Peptides, and Amyloid-β

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We validate the use of ESEEM to predict the number of 14N nuclei coupled to a Cu(II) ion by the use of model complexes and two small peptides with well-known Cu(II) coordination. We apply this method to gain new insight into less explored aspects of Cu(II) coordination in amyloid-β (Aβ). Aβ has two coordination modes of Cu(II) at physiological pH. A controversy has existed regarding the number of histidine residues coordinated to the Cu(II) ion in component II, which is dominant at high pH (∼8.7) values. Importantly, with an excess amount of Zn(II) ions, as is the case in brain tissues affected by Alzheimer’s disease, component II becomes the dominant coordination mode, as Zn(II) selectively substitutes component I bound to Cu(II). We confirm that component II only contains single histidine coordination, using ESEEM and set of model complexes. The ESEEM experiments carried out on systematically 15N-labeled peptides reveal that, in component II, His 13 and His 14 are more favored as equatorial ligands compared to His 6. Revealing molecular level details of subcomponents in metal ion coordination is critical in understanding the role of metal ions in Alzheimer’s disease etiology. PMID:25014537

  6. Flight Model Development of Tokyo Tech Nano-Satellite Cute-1.7 + APD II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashida, Hiroki; Nishida, Junichi; Omagari, Kuniyuki; Fujiwara, Ken; Konda, Yasumi; Yamanaka, Tomio; Tanaka, Yohei; Maeno, Masaki; Fujihashi, Kota; Inagawa, Shinichi; Miura, Yoshiyuki; Matunaga, Saburo

    The Laboratory for Space Systems at the Tokyo Institute of Technology has developed the nano-satellite Cute-1.7+APD. The satellite was launched by JAXA M-V-8 rocket on February 22, 2006 and operated for about a month. A successor to the Cute-1.7+APD was developed and is named Cute-1.7+APD II. This new satellite is based on its predecessor but has some modifications. In this paper an overview of the Cute-1.7 series and flight model development of Cute-1.7+APD II are introduced.

  7. Cosmological Parameter Uncertainties from SALT-II Type Ia Supernova Light Curve Models

    SciTech Connect

    Mosher, J.; Guy, J.; Kessler, R.; Astier, P.; Marriner, J.; Betoule, M.; Sako, M.; El-Hage, P.; Biswas, R.; Pain, R.; Kuhlmann, S.; Regnault, N.; Frieman, J. A.; Schneider, D. P.

    2014-08-29

    We use simulated type Ia supernova (SN Ia) samples, including both photometry and spectra, to perform the first direct validation of cosmology analysis using the SALT-II light curve model. This validation includes residuals from the light curve training process, systematic biases in SN Ia distance measurements, and a bias on the dark energy equation of state parameter w. Using the SN-analysis package SNANA, we simulate and analyze realistic samples corresponding to the data samples used in the SNLS3 analysis: ~120 low-redshift (z < 0.1) SNe Ia, ~255 Sloan Digital Sky Survey SNe Ia (z < 0.4), and ~290 SNLS SNe Ia (z ≤ 1). To probe systematic uncertainties in detail, we vary the input spectral model, the model of intrinsic scatter, and the smoothing (i.e., regularization) parameters used during the SALT-II model training. Using realistic intrinsic scatter models results in a slight bias in the ultraviolet portion of the trained SALT-II model, and w biases (w (input) – w (recovered)) ranging from –0.005 ± 0.012 to –0.024 ± 0.010. These biases are indistinguishable from each other within the uncertainty, the average bias on w is –0.014 ± 0.007.

  8. Cosmological parameter uncertainties from SALT-II type Ia supernova light curve models

    SciTech Connect

    Mosher, J.; Sako, M.; Guy, J.; Astier, P.; Betoule, M.; El-Hage, P.; Pain, R.; Regnault, N.; Marriner, J.; Biswas, R.; Kuhlmann, S.; Schneider, D. P.

    2014-09-20

    We use simulated type Ia supernova (SN Ia) samples, including both photometry and spectra, to perform the first direct validation of cosmology analysis using the SALT-II light curve model. This validation includes residuals from the light curve training process, systematic biases in SN Ia distance measurements, and a bias on the dark energy equation of state parameter w. Using the SN-analysis package SNANA, we simulate and analyze realistic samples corresponding to the data samples used in the SNLS3 analysis: ∼120 low-redshift (z < 0.1) SNe Ia, ∼255 Sloan Digital Sky Survey SNe Ia (z < 0.4), and ∼290 SNLS SNe Ia (z ≤ 1). To probe systematic uncertainties in detail, we vary the input spectral model, the model of intrinsic scatter, and the smoothing (i.e., regularization) parameters used during the SALT-II model training. Using realistic intrinsic scatter models results in a slight bias in the ultraviolet portion of the trained SALT-II model, and w biases (w {sub input} – w {sub recovered}) ranging from –0.005 ± 0.012 to –0.024 ± 0.010. These biases are indistinguishable from each other within the uncertainty; the average bias on w is –0.014 ± 0.007.

  9. Two Higgs doublet model of type II facing flavor physics data

    SciTech Connect

    Deschamps, Olivier; Monteil, Stephane; Niess, Valentin; Descotes-Genon, Sebastien; T'Jampens, Stephane; Tisserand, Vincent

    2010-10-01

    We discuss tests of the charged Higgs sector of the two Higgs doublet model (2HDM) of type II in the light of recent flavor physics data. Particular attention is paid to recent measurement of purely leptonic decays of heavy-light mesons, which depart more or less significantly from the standard model (SM) predictions. We derive constraints on the parameters of the 2HDM type II from leptonic and semileptonic {Delta}F=1 decays as well as loop processes (b{yields}s{gamma}, BB mixing, or Z{yields}bb) sensitive to charged Higgs contributions. The outcome of this work is that while 2HDM type II can fit the individual observable through fine-tuning schemes, in a combined analysis it does not perform better than the standard model by favoring a decoupling solution. Assuming that 2HDM type II is realized in nature, constraints on its parameters (m{sub H}{sup +} and tan{beta}) are derived. A limit on the charged Higgs mass m{sub H}{sup +}>316 GeV at 95% CL is obtained irrespective of the value of tan{beta}. This limit is dominated by the b{yields}s{gamma} branching ratio measurement. All results have been obtained with the CKMfitter analysis package, featuring the frequentist statistical approach Rfit to handle theoretical uncertainties.

  10. Controlling FAMA by the Ptolemy II model of ion beam transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balvanović, R.; Rađenović, B.; Beličev, P.; Nešković, N.

    2009-08-01

    FAMA is a facility for modification and analysis of materials with ion beams. Due to the wide range of ion beams and energies used in the facility and its future expansion, the need has arisen for faster tuning of ion beams transport control parameters. With this aim, a new approach to modeling ion-beam transport system was developed, based on the Ptolemy II modeling and design framework. A model in Ptolemy II is a hierarchical aggregation of components called actors, which communicate with other actors using tokens, or pieces of data. Each ion optical element is modeled by a composite actor implementing beam matrix transformation function, while tokens carry beam matrix data. A basic library of models of typical ion optical elements is developed, and a complex model of FAMA ion beam transport system is hierarchically integrated with bottom-up approach. The model is extended to include control functions. The developed model is modular, flexible and extensible. The results obtained by simulation on the model demonstrate easy and efficient tuning of beam line control parameters. Fine tuning of control parameters, due to uncertainties inherent to modeling, still has to be performed on-line.

  11. Development and comparison of a TOPAZ-II system model with experimental data

    SciTech Connect

    Paramonov, D.V.; El-Genk, M.S. . Inst. for Space Nuclear Power Studies)

    1994-11-01

    An integrated model of the TOPAZ-II space nuclear reactor system is developed and compared with measurements from the TOPAZ-II, V-71 unit tests. For a given reactor thermal power, the model calculates the coolant flow rate, temperature, and pressure throughout the system; load electric power; and overall system efficiency. Model predictions showed good agreement with the experimental data. The calculated coolant temperatures and pressure are within 15 K (< 2%) and 12% of the measurements, respectively. Analysis showed that at the nominal operating thermal power of the system (115 kW), and NaK coolant is highly subcooled. The largest subcooling of 365 K occurs at the exit of the electromagnetic pump, where coolant pressure is highest, and the lowest subcooling of 275 K occurs at the exit of the reactor core, where coolant temperature is highest.

  12. Mn(II) and Cu(II) complexes of a bidentate Schiff's base ligand: Spectral, thermal, molecular modelling and mycological studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyagi, Monika; Chandra, Sulekh; Tyagi, Prateek

    2014-01-01

    Complexes of manganese(II) and copper(II) of general composition M(L)2X2 have been synthesized [L = 2-acetyl thiophene thiosemicarbazone and X = Cl- and NO3-]. The elemental analysis, molar conductance measurements, magnetic susceptibility measurements, mass, IR, UV, NMR and EPR spectral studies of the compounds led to the conclusion that the ligand acts as a bidentate manner. The Schiff's base ligand forms hexacoordinated complexes having octahedral geometry for Mn(II) and tetragonal geometry for Cu(II) complexes. The thermal studies suggested that the complexes are more stable as compared to ligand. In molecular modelling the geometries of Schiff's base and metal complexes were fully optimized with respect to the energy using the 6-31g(d,p) basis set. The mycological studies of the compounds were examined against the plant pathogenic fungi i.e. Rhizoctonia bataticola, Macrophomina phaseolina, Fusarium odum.

  13. Mn(II) and Cu(II) complexes of a bidentate Schiff's base ligand: spectral, thermal, molecular modelling and mycological studies.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Monika; Chandra, Sulekh; Tyagi, Prateek

    2014-01-03

    Complexes of manganese(II) and copper(II) of general composition M(L)2X2 have been synthesized [L=2-acetyl thiophene thiosemicarbazone and X=Cl(-) and NO3(-)]. The elemental analysis, molar conductance measurements, magnetic susceptibility measurements, mass, IR, UV, NMR and EPR spectral studies of the compounds led to the conclusion that the ligand acts as a bidentate manner. The Schiff's base ligand forms hexacoordinated complexes having octahedral geometry for Mn(II) and tetragonal geometry for Cu(II) complexes. The thermal studies suggested that the complexes are more stable as compared to ligand. In molecular modelling the geometries of Schiff's base and metal complexes were fully optimized with respect to the energy using the 6-31g(d,p) basis set. The mycological studies of the compounds were examined against the plant pathogenic fungi i.e. Rhizoctonia bataticola, Macrophomina phaseolina, Fusarium odum.

  14. Application of Bayesian hierarchical models for phase I/II clinical trials in oncology.

    PubMed

    Yada, Shinjo; Hamada, Chikuma

    2017-03-01

    Treatment during cancer clinical trials sometimes involves the combination of multiple drugs. In addition, in recent years there has been a trend toward phase I/II trials in which a phase I and a phase II trial are combined into a single trial to accelerate drug development. Methods for the seamless combination of phases I and II parts are currently under investigation. In the phase II part, adaptive randomization on the basis of patient efficacy outcomes allocates more patients to the dose combinations considered to have higher efficacy. Patient toxicity outcomes are used for determining admissibility to each dose combination and are not used for selection of the dose combination itself. In cases where the objective is not to find the optimum dose combination solely for efficacy but regarding both toxicity and efficacy, the need exists to allocate patients to dose combinations with consideration of the balance of existing trade-offs between toxicity and efficacy. We propose a Bayesian hierarchical model and an adaptive randomization with consideration for the relationship with toxicity and efficacy. Using the toxicity and efficacy outcomes of patients, the Bayesian hierarchical model is used to estimate the toxicity probability and efficacy probability in each of the dose combinations. Here, we use Bayesian moving-reference adaptive randomization on the basis of desirability computed from the obtained estimator. Computer simulations suggest that the proposed method will likely recommend a higher percentage of target dose combinations than a previously proposed method.

  15. Reactive Transport Modeling of Microbe-mediated Fe (II) Oxidation for Enhanced Oil Recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surasani, V.; Li, L.

    2011-12-01

    Microbially Enhanced Oil Recovery (MEOR) aims to improve the recovery of entrapped heavy oil in depleted reservoirs using microbe-based technology. Reservoir ecosystems often contain diverse microbial communities those can interact with subsurface fluids and minerals through a network of nutrients and energy fluxes. Microbe-mediated reactions products include gases, biosurfactants, biopolymers those can alter the properties of oil and interfacial interactions between oil, brine, and rocks. In addition, the produced biomass and mineral precipitates can change the reservoir permeability profile and increase sweeping efficiency. Under subsurface conditions, the injection of nitrate and Fe (II) as the electron acceptor and donor allows bacteria to grow. The reaction products include minerals such as Fe(OH)3 and nitrogen containing gases. These reaction products can have large impact on oil and reservoir properties and can enhance the recovery of trapped oil. This work aims to understand the Fe(II) oxidation by nitrate under conditions relevant to MEOR. Reactive transport modeling is used to simulate the fluid flow, transport, and reactions involved in this process. Here we developed a complex reactive network for microbial mediated nitrate-dependent Fe (II) oxidation that involves both thermodynamic controlled aqueous reactions and kinetic controlled Fe (II) mineral reaction. Reactive transport modeling is used to understand and quantify the coupling between flow, transport, and reaction processes. Our results identify key parameter controls those are important for the alteration of permeability profile under field conditions.

  16. [A model of photosystem II for the analysis of a fast fluorescence rise in plant leaves].

    PubMed

    Beliaeva, N E; Bulychev, A A; Riznichenko, G Iu; Rubin, A B

    2011-01-01

    The polyphasic patterns of fluorescence induction rise in pea leaves in vivo and after the treatment with ionophores have been studied using a plant efficiency analyzer. To analyze in detail photosystem II (PS II) electron transfer processes, an extended PS II model was applied, which included the sums of exponential functions to specify explicitly the light-driven formation of the transmembrane electric potential (delta psi(t)) as well as pH in the lumen (pHL(t)) and stroma (pHs(t)). PS II model parameters and numerical coefficients in delta psi(t), and pHs(t) were evaluated to fit fluorescence induction data for different experimental conditions: leaf in vivo or after ionophore treatment at low or high light intensity. The model imitated changes in the pattern of fluorescence induction rise due to the elimination of transmembrane potential in the presence of ionophores, when delta psi = 0 and pHL(t), pHS(t) altered to small extent relative to control values in vivo, with maximum delta psi(t) approximately 90 MB and delta psi(t) approximately 40 MB, for the stationary state at deltapH aproximately equal to 1.8. As the light intensity was increased from 300 to 1200 micromol x m(-2) x s(-1), the heat dissipation rate constants increased threefold for nonradiative recombination of P680+Phe- and by approximately 30% for P680+Q(A)-. The parameters delta psi, pH(S) and pH(L) were analyzed as factors of PS II redox state populations and fluorescence yield. The kinetic mechanism of qE quenching is discussed, which is related with light induced pH(L) lumen acidification, when Q(A)- and P680+ recombination probability increases to regulate the QA reduction.

  17. Seizure modeling of Pb(II) and Cd(II) from aqueous solution by chemically modified sugarcane bagasse fly ash: isotherms, kinetics, and column study.

    PubMed

    Shah, Bhavna; Mistry, Chirag; Shah, Ajay

    2013-04-01

    Heavy metal pollution is a common environmental problem all over the world. The purpose of the research is to examine the applicability of bagasse fly ash (BFA)-an agricultural waste of sugar industry used for the synthesis of zeolitic material. The zeolitic material are used for the uptake of Pb(II) and Cd(II) heavy metal. Bagasse fly ash is used as a native material for the synthesis of zeolitic materials by conventional hydrothermal treatment without (conventional zeolitic bagasse fly ash (CZBFA)) and with electrolyte (conventional zeolitic bagasse fly ash in electrolyte media (ECZBFA)) media. Heavy metal ions Pb(II) and Cd(II) were successfully seized from aqueous media using these synthesized zeolitic materials. In this study, the zeolitic materials were well characterized by different instrumental methods such as Brunauer-Emmett-Teller, XRF, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffraction, and scanning electron microscopic microphotographs. The presence of analcime, phillipsite, and zeolite P in adsorbents confirms successful conversion of native BFA into zeolitic materials. Seizure modeling of Pb(II) and Cd(II) was achieved by batch sorption experiments, isotherms, and kinetic studies. These data were used to compare and evaluate the zeolitic materials as potential sorbents for the uptake of heavy metal ions from an aqueous media. The Langmuir isotherm correlation coefficient parameters best fit the equilibrium data which indicate the physical sorption. Pseudo-second-order and intra-particle diffusion model matches best which indicates that the rate of sorption was controlled by film diffusion. The column studies were performed for the practical function of sorbents, and breakthrough curves were obtained, which revealed higher sorption capacity as compared to batch method. Synthesized zeolitic material (CZBFA and ECZBFA), a low-cost sorbent, was proven as potential sorbent for the uptake of Pb(II) and Cd(II) heavy metal ions.

  18. A dynamical model for FR II type radio sources with terminated jet activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuligowska, Elżbieta

    2017-02-01

    Context. The extension of the KDA analytical model of FR II-type source evolution originally assuming a continuum injection process in the jet-IGM interaction towards a case of the jet's termination is presented and briefly discussed. Aims: The dynamical evolution of FR II-type sources predicted with this extended model, hereafter referred to as KDA EXT, and its application to the chosen radio sources. Methods: Following the classical approach based on the source's continuous injection and self-similarity, I propose the effective formulae describing the length and luminosity evolution of the lobes during an absence of the jet flow, and present the resulting diagrams for the characteristics mentioned. Results: Using an algorithm based on the numerical integration of a modified formula for jet power, the KDA EXT model is fitted to three radio galaxies. Their predicted spectra are then compared to the observed spectra, proving that these fits are better than the best spectral fit provided by the original KDA model of the FR II-type sources dynamical evolution.

  19. Constructing kinetic models to elucidate structural dynamics of a complete RNA polymerase II elongation cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jin; Da, Lin-Tai; Huang, Xuhui

    2015-02-01

    The RNA polymerase II elongation is central in eukaryotic transcription. Although multiple intermediates of the elongation complex have been identified, the dynamical mechanisms remain elusive or controversial. Here we build a structure-based kinetic model of a full elongation cycle of polymerase II, taking into account transition rates and conformational changes characterized from both single molecule experimental studies and computational simulations at atomistic scale. Our model suggests a force-dependent slow transition detected in the single molecule experiments corresponds to an essential conformational change of a trigger loop (TL) opening prior to the polymerase translocation. The analyses on mutant study of E1103G and on potential sequence effects of the translocation substantiate this proposal. Our model also investigates another slow transition detected in the transcription elongation cycle which is independent of mechanical force. If this force-independent slow transition happens as the TL gradually closes upon NTP binding, the analyses indicate that the binding affinity of NTP to the polymerase has to be sufficiently high. Otherwise, one infers that the slow transition happens pre-catalytically but after the TL closing. Accordingly, accurate determination of intrinsic properties of NTP binding is demanded for an improved characterization of the polymerase elongation. Overall, the study provides a working model of the polymerase II elongation under a generic Brownian ratchet mechanism, with most essential structural transition and functional kinetics elucidated.

  20. SAGE II aerosol data validation based on retrieved aerosol model size distribution from SAGE II aerosol measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Pi-Huan; Mccormick, M. P.; Mcmaster, L. R.; Chu, W. P.; Swissler, T. J.; Osborn, M. T.; Russell, P. B.; Oberbeck, V. R.; Livingston, J.; Rosen, J. M.

    1989-01-01

    Consideration is given to aerosol correlative measurements experiments for the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) II, conducted between November 1984 and July 1986. The correlative measurements were taken with an impactor/laser probe, a dustsonde, and an airborne 36-cm lidar system. The primary aerosol quantities measured by the ground-based instruments are compared with those calculated from the aerosol size distributions from SAGE II aerosol extinction measurements. Good agreement is found between the two sets of measurements.

  1. Structural Model of RNA Polymerase II Elongation Complex with Complete Transcription Bubble Reveals NTP Entry Routes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lu; Silva, Daniel-Adriano; Pardo-Avila, Fátima; Wang, Dong; Huang, Xuhui

    2015-07-01

    The RNA polymerase II (Pol II) is a eukaryotic enzyme that catalyzes the synthesis of the messenger RNA using a DNA template. Despite numerous biochemical and biophysical studies, it remains elusive whether the "secondary channel" is the only route for NTP to reach the active site of the enzyme or if the "main channel" could be an alternative. On this regard, crystallographic structures of Pol II have been extremely useful to understand the structural basis of transcription, however, the conformation of the unpaired non-template DNA part of the full transcription bubble (TB) is still unknown. Since diffusion routes of the nucleoside triphosphate (NTP) substrate through the main channel might overlap with the TB region, gaining structural information of the full TB is critical for a complete understanding of Pol II transcription process. In this study, we have built a structural model of Pol II with a complete transcription bubble based on multiple sources of existing structural data and used Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations together with structural analysis to shed light on NTP entry pathways. Interestingly, we found that although both channels have enough space to allow NTP loading, the percentage of MD conformations containing enough space for NTP loading through the secondary channel is twice higher than that of the main channel. Further energetic study based on MD simulations with NTP loaded in the channels has revealed that the diffusion of the NTP through the main channel is greatly disfavored by electrostatic repulsion between the NTP and the highly negatively charged backbones of nucleotides in the non-template DNA strand. Taken together, our results suggest that the secondary channel is the major route for NTP entry during Pol II transcription.

  2. Angiotensin II, hypertension, and angiotensin II receptor antagonism: Roles in the behavioural and brain pathology of a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Wiesmann, Maximilian; Roelofs, Monica; van der Lugt, Robert; Heerschap, Arend; Kiliaan, Amanda J; Claassen, Jurgen Ahr

    2016-01-01

    Elevated angiotensin II causes hypertension and contributes to Alzheimer's disease by affecting cerebral blood flow. Angiotensin II receptor blockers may provide candidates to reduce (vascular) risk factors for Alzheimer's disease. We studied effects of two months of angiotensin II-induced hypertension on systolic blood pressure, and treatment with the angiotensin II receptor blockers, eprosartan mesylate, after one month of induced hypertension in wild-type C57bl/6j and AβPPswe/PS1ΔE9 (AβPP/PS1/Alzheimer's disease) mice. AβPP/PS1 showed higher systolic blood pressure than wild-type. Subsequent eprosartan mesylate treatment restored this elevated systolic blood pressure in all mice. Functional connectivity was decreased in angiotensin II-infused Alzheimer's disease and wild-type mice, and only 12 months of Alzheimer's disease mice showed impaired cerebral blood flow. Only angiotensin II-infused Alzheimer's disease mice exhibited decreased spatial learning in the Morris water maze. Altogether, angiotensin II-induced hypertension not only exacerbated Alzheimer's disease-like pathological changes such as impairment of cerebral blood flow, functional connectivity, and cognition only in Alzheimer's disease model mice, but it also induced decreased functional connectivity in wild-type mice. However, we could not detect hypertension-induced overexpression of Aβ nor increased neuroinflammation. Our findings suggest a link between midlife hypertension, decreased cerebral hemodynamics and connectivity in an Alzheimer's disease mouse model. Eprosartan mesylate treatment restored and beneficially affected cerebral blood flow and connectivity. This model could be used to investigate prevention/treatment strategies in early Alzheimer's disease.

  3. Relaxin Treatment in an Ang-II-Based Transgenic Preeclamptic-Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Haase, Nadine; Golic, Michaela; Herse, Florian; Rugor, Julianna; Linz, Dominik; Solano, Maria Emilia; Müller, Dominik N.; Dechend, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    Relaxin is a peptide related to pregnancy that induces nitric oxide-related and gelatinase-related effects, allowing vasodilation and pregnancy-related adjustments permitting parturition to occur. Relaxin controls the hemodynamic and renovascular adaptive changes that occur during pregnancy. Interest has evolved regarding relaxin and a therapeutic principle in preeclampsia and heart failure. Preeclampsia is a pregnancy disorder, featuring hypertension, proteinuria and placental anomalies. We investigated relaxin in an established transgenic rat model of preeclampsia, where the phenotype is induced by angiotensin (Ang)-II production in mid pregnancy. We gave recombinant relaxin to preeclamtic rats at day 9 of gestation. Hypertension and proteinuria was not ameliorated after relaxin administration. Intrauterine growth retardation of the fetus was unaltered by relaxin. Heart-rate responses and relaxin levels documented drug effects. In this Ang-II-based model of preeclampsia, we could not show a salubrious effect on preeclampsia. PMID:26963382

  4. Multi-Model Comparison of Southern Ocean and Sea Ice Trends in CORE-II and CMIP5 Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Downes, S. M.; Griffies, S. M.; Farneti, R.; Marsland, S. J.; Uotila, P.; Hogg, A.

    2014-12-01

    The Southern Ocean circulation, influenced by buoyancy, momentum and sea ice processes, varies on seasonal to centennial timescales. Incomplete spatio-temporal observations of the full ocean water column, overlying ocean-ice-atmosphere fluxes, and adjacent polar dynamics challenge our ability to model the Southern Ocean. However, several studies have indicated this region is particularly important in the evolving climate, including the anthropogenic influences. Models coherently capture large-scale Southern Ocean patterns, however it is the magnitude and location of these patterns that varies widely. In particular, difficulties with modelling of small scale processes remains an outstanding issue. Here we review the representation of the Southern Ocean circulation, including fluxes at the ocean-ice and ocean-atmosphere interfaces, in numerous coupled climate models from two international modeling efforts, namely the Coordinated Ocean-ice Reference Experiments Phase II (CORE-II) and Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5). We focus on the relationships between large scale and mesoscale overturning circulation, formation of key water masses and the associated deep winter mixed layers, buoyancy and wind fluxes, and sea ice. We identify major uncertainties in the modelling of past, present and projected large-scale ocean processes, and provide insights for future modelling directions.

  5. Vertical Chromium Distribution in the Atmospheres of CP Stars. II. Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savanov, I. S.; Kochukhov, O. P.; Tsymbal, V. V.

    2001-04-01

    Vertical chromium distributions in the atmospheres of several Ap and Am stars are fitted using detailed modeling of the profiles of CrII lines. The vertical distributions obtained for Ap stars are consistent with Babel's results of an investigation of Cr lines in the spectrum of the Ap star 53 Cam. It is shown that the observational data cannot be interpreted in terms of the hypothesis that microturbulent velocity varies with depth.

  6. Detailed p- and s-wave velocity models along the LARSE II transect, Southern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Murphy, J.M.; Fuis, G.S.; Ryberg, T.; Lutter, W.J.; Catchings, R.D.; Goldman, M.R.

    2010-01-01

    Structural details of the crust determined from P-wave velocity models can be improved with S-wave velocity models, and S-wave velocities are needed for model-based predictions of strong ground motion in southern California. We picked P- and S-wave travel times for refracted phases from explosive-source shots of the Los Angeles Region Seismic Experiment, Phase II (LARSE II); we developed refraction velocity models from these picks using two different inversion algorithms. For each inversion technique, we calculated ratios of P- to S-wave velocities (VP/VS) where there is coincident P- and S-wave ray coverage.We compare the two VP inverse velocity models to each other and to results from forward modeling, and we compare the VS inverse models. The VS and VP/VS models differ in structural details from the VP models. In particular, dipping, tabular zones of low VS, or high VP/VS, appear to define two fault zones in the central Transverse Ranges that could be parts of a positive flower structure to the San Andreas fault. These two zones are marginally resolved, but their presence in two independent models lends them some credibility. A plot of VS versus VP differs from recently published plots that are based on direct laboratory or down-hole sonic measurements. The difference in plots is most prominent in the range of VP = 3 to 5 km=s (or VS ~ 1:25 to 2:9 km/s), where our refraction VS is lower by a few tenths of a kilometer per second from VS based on direct measurements. Our new VS - VP curve may be useful for modeling the lower limit of VS from a VP model in calculating strong motions from scenario earthquakes.

  7. RNA Pol II transcription model and interpretation of GRO-seq data.

    PubMed

    Lladser, Manuel E; Azofeifa, Joseph G; Allen, Mary A; Dowell, Robin D

    2017-01-01

    A mixture model and statistical method is proposed to interpret the distribution of reads from a nascent transcriptional assay, such as global run-on sequencing (GRO-seq) data. The model is annotation agnostic and leverages on current understanding of the behavior of RNA polymerase II. Briefly, it assumes that polymerase loads at key positions (transcription start sites) within the genome. Once loaded, polymerase either remains in the initiation form (with some probability) or transitions into an elongating form (with the remaining probability). The model can be fit genome-wide, allowing patterns of Pol II behavior to be assessed on each distinct transcript. Furthermore, it allows for the first time a principled approach to distinguishing the initiation signal from the elongation signal; in particular, it implies a data driven method for calculating the pausing index, a commonly used metric that informs on the behavior of RNA polymerase II. We demonstrate that this approach improves on existing analyses of GRO-seq data and uncovers a novel biological understanding of the impact of knocking down the Male Specific Lethal (MSL) complex in Drosophilia melanogaster.

  8. The Jena Diversity Model: Towards a Richer Representation of the Terrestrial Biosphere for Earth System Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlick, R.; Reu, B.; Bohn, K.; Dyke, J.; Kleidon, A.

    2010-12-01

    The terrestrial biosphere is a complex, self-organizing system which is continually both adapting to and altering its global environment. It also exhibits a vast diversity of vegetation forms and functioning. However, the terrestrial biosphere components within current state-of-the-art Earth System Models abstract this diversity in to a handful of relatively static plant functional types. These coarse and static representations of functional diversity might contribute to overly pessimistic projections regarding terrestrial ecosystem responses to scenarios of global change (e.g. Amazonian and boreal forest diebacks). In the Jena Diversity (JeDi) model, we introduce a new approach to vegetation modelling with a richer representation of functional diversity, based not on plant functional types, but on unavoidable plant ecophysiological trade-offs, which we hypothesize should be more stable in time. The JeDi model tests a large number of plant growth strategies. Each growth strategy is simulated using a set of randomly generated parameter values, which characterize its functioning in terms of carbon allocation, ecophysiology, and phenology, which are then linked to the growing conditions at the land surface. The model is constructed in such a way that these parameters inherently lead to ecophysiological trade-offs, which determine whether a growth strategy is able to survive and reproduce under the prevalent climatic conditions. Kleidon and Mooney (2000) demonstrated that this approach is capable of reproducing the geographic distribution of species richness. More recently, we have shown the JeDi model can explain other biogeographical phenomena including the present-day global pattern of biomes (Reu et al., accepted), ecosystem evenness (Kleidon et al. 2009), and possible mechanisms for biome shifts and biodiversity changes under scenarios of global warming (Reu et al., submitted). We have also evaluated the simulated biogeochemical fluxes from JeDi against a variety

  9. Kinetic and isotope analyses of tetrachloroethylene and trichloroethylene degradation by model Fe(II)-bearing minerals.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xiaoming; Philp, R Paul; Butler, Elizabeth C

    2009-03-01

    The kinetics and in some cases stable carbon isotope fractionation associated with abiotic reductive dechlorination of tetrachloroethylene (PCE) and trichloroethylene (TCE) by model Fe(II)-bearing minerals present in anaerobic soils were measured. The minerals studied were chloride green rust (GR-Cl), sulfate green rust (GR-SO(4)), pyrite, magnetite, and adsorbed Fe(II) or FeS formed at the surface of goethite by treatment with dissolved Fe(II) or S(-II). We observed some abiotic transformation of PCE and TCE in every system studied, as evidenced by the presence of abiotic reaction products. Bulk enrichment factors (epsilon(bulk) values) for TCE transformation by GR-Cl and pyrite were -23.0+/-1.8 per thousand and -21.7+/-1.0 per thousand, respectively, which are more negative than reported values for microbial TCE dechlorination and could provide one means for distinguishing microbial from abiotic dechlorination of TCE in the environment. Considering the time scale of subsurface remediation technologies, including natural attenuation, minerals such as green rusts, pyrite, and magnetite have the potential to contribute to the transformation of PCE and TCE at contaminated sites.

  10. Modeling of G333.6-0.2 as a spherical H II region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubin, R. H.; Hollenbach, D. J.; Erickson, E. F.

    1983-01-01

    The radio and IR observations of the H II region G333.6-0.2 are matched with a detailed spherical model with a density distribution which has a uniform-density core of radius 0.05 pc, a power-law intermediate zone, and a uniform-density halo. A stellar radiation field is required that is somewhat different from those predicted by available model atmospheres. Of the stellar models of Kurucz, the Teff = 34,000 K and log g = 3.5 model best fits the observed ratio of helium to hydrogen recombination lines. A good fit to all the observations in obtained with an S(2+) ionizing flux which is a factor of 20 times less than predicted by the Kurucz atmosphere. Current model atmospheres may not be appropriate because a single stable star with Teff = 34,000 K fails by at least an order of magnitude to produce the ionizing luminosity. The small radius of the constant-density core implies a short dynamical lifetime of approximately 5000 years for this spherical model; this may indicate that a nonspherical blister geometry is more appropriate for this H II region.

  11. Transient PVT measurements and model predictions for vessel heat transfer. Part II.

    SciTech Connect

    Felver, Todd G.; Paradiso, Nicholas Joseph; Winters, William S., Jr.; Evans, Gregory Herbert; Rice, Steven F.

    2010-07-01

    Part I of this report focused on the acquisition and presentation of transient PVT data sets that can be used to validate gas transfer models. Here in Part II we focus primarily on describing models and validating these models using the data sets. Our models are intended to describe the high speed transport of compressible gases in arbitrary arrangements of vessels, tubing, valving and flow branches. Our models fall into three categories: (1) network flow models in which flow paths are modeled as one-dimensional flow and vessels are modeled as single control volumes, (2) CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) models in which flow in and between vessels is modeled in three dimensions and (3) coupled network/CFD models in which vessels are modeled using CFD and flows between vessels are modeled using a network flow code. In our work we utilized NETFLOW as our network flow code and FUEGO for our CFD code. Since network flow models lack three-dimensional resolution, correlations for heat transfer and tube frictional pressure drop are required to resolve important physics not being captured by the model. Here we describe how vessel heat transfer correlations were improved using the data and present direct model-data comparisons for all tests documented in Part I. Our results show that our network flow models have been substantially improved. The CFD modeling presented here describes the complex nature of vessel heat transfer and for the first time demonstrates that flow and heat transfer in vessels can be modeled directly without the need for correlations.

  12. MICS-Asia II: Model intercomparison and evaluation of particulate sulfate, nitrate and ammonium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayami, Hiroshi; Sakurai, T.; Han, Z.; Ueda, H.; Carmichael, G. R.; Streets, D.; Holloway, T.; Wang, Z.; Thongboonchoo, N.; Engardt, M.; Bennet, C.; Fung, C.; Chang, A.; Park, S. U.; Kajino, M.; Sartelet, K.; Matsuda, K.; Amann, M.

    Eight chemical transport models participate in a model intercomparison study for East Asia, MICS-Asia II. This paper analyzes calculated results for particulate matter of sulfate, nitrate and ammonium through comparisons with each other and with monthly measurements at EANET (the acid deposition monitoring network in East Asia) and daily measurements at Fukue, Japan. To the EANET measurements, model ensemble means better agree with model individual results for sulfate and total ammonium, although total nitrate is consistently and considerably underestimated. To measurements at Fukue, the models show better agreement than for the EANET measurements. This is likely because Fukue is centered in many of the model domains, whereas the EANET stations are mostly in Southeast Asia and Russia. Moreover, it would be important that Fukue is in Northeast Asia, where the emission inventory is more reliable than Southeast Asia. The model-model comparisons are made in view of the total amount in the atmosphere, vertical profile, coefficient of variation in surface concentrations, and transformation changes with distance. All the models show reasonable tendencies in vertical profiles and composition ratios. However, total amounts in the atmosphere are discrepant among the models. The consistency of the total amount in the atmosphere would influence source-receptor analysis. It seems that model results would be consistent, if the models take into account the primitive processes like emission, advection/diffusion, chemical transformation and dry/wet deposition, no matter the processes are modeled simply or comprehensively. Through the comparison study, we learned that it would be difficult to find any problems from one comparison (model-observation comparison with one data or many but at one station or in a short period). Modelers tend to examine model performances only from model-observation comparisons. However, taking budget in a certain or whole model domain would be important

  13. Performance Evaluation of Alcohol-Gasoline Blends in 1980 Model Automobiles. Phase II. Methanol-Gasoline Blends.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-01-01

    renovation, re-inspection, and acceptance by CRC. These cars comprised three models by three automobile makers and two engine-emissions control groups for...EVALUATION OF ALCOHOL.GASOLINE BLENDS IN 1980 MODEL AUTOMOBILES PHASE II METHANOL-GASOLINE BLENDS January 1984 APPROVrD FOR pUBLIC RELEASE" DISTRIBUTION...Members: PERFORMANCE EVALUATION OF ALCOHOL-GASOLINE BLENDS IN 1980 MODEL AUTOMOBILES : PHASE II - METHANOL-GASOLINE BLENDS (CRC Report No. 536) -I

  14. Comparative modeling of the three-dimensional structure of type II antifreeze protein.

    PubMed Central

    Sönnichsen, F. D.; Sykes, B. D.; Davies, P. L.

    1995-01-01

    Type II antifreeze proteins (AFP), which inhibit the growth of seed ice crystals in the blood of certain fishes (sea raven, herring, and smelt), are the largest known fish AFPs and the only class for which detailed structural information is not yet available. However, a sequence homology has been recognized between these proteins and the carbohydrate recognition domain of C-type lectins. The structure of this domain from rat mannose-binding protein (MBP-A) has been solved by X-ray crystallography (Weis WI, Drickamer K, Hendrickson WA, 1992, Nature 360:127-134) and provided the coordinates for constructing the three-dimensional model of the 129-amino acid Type II AFP from sea raven, to which it shows 19% sequence identity. Multiple sequence alignments between Type II AFPs, pancreatic stone protein, MBP-A, and as many as 50 carbohydrate-recognition domain sequences from various lectins were performed to determine reliably aligned sequence regions. Successive molecular dynamics and energy minimization calculations were used to relax bond lengths and angles and to identify flexible regions. The derived structure contains two alpha-helices, two beta-sheets, and a high proportion of amino acids in loops and turns. The model is in good agreement with preliminary NMR spectroscopic analyses. It explains the observed differences in calcium binding between sea raven Type II AFP and MBP-A. Furthermore, the model proposes the formation of five disulfide bridges between Cys 7 and Cys 18, Cys 35 and Cys 125, Cys 69 and Cys 100, Cys 89 and Cys 111, and Cys 101 and Cys 117.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7540906

  15. Dynamical Models of Mira Atmospheres: Shocks, Limb Functions, and MG II Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beach, Thomas Eugene

    1990-01-01

    Dynamic atmosphere models of Mira-type stars, prepared using a code developed by G. H. Bowen, were analyzed to determine observational implications of the models and suggest improvements to the code and model parameters. Three specific areas were addressed: Shock morphology, limb functions, and Mg II emission. The long-period, fundamental-mode models used in this study exhibit an unexpected shock morphology. In addition to the "main" shock, which forms as the radially pulsating surface of the Mira moves outward and is observed to travel out through atmosphere, a "preliminary" shock structure forms as rebounding layers of the atmosphere fall back onto lower layers. The preliminary shock remains deep in the atmosphere until overrun by the outward-moving main shock. The energy dissipated by the preliminary shock usually exceeds that dissipated by the main shock, and has important effects on the light curve. The dynamic atmosphere models exhibit radial extension of the atmosphere and post-shock emission that alter the limb function (limb darkening/brightening) of the models. The effects on stellar angular diameters measured by lunar occultation technique are calculated. The results show that the usual procedure of fitting occultation observations assuming a uniform brightness disk and then correcting the resulting diameter for limb darkening can give erroneous results. The dynamic effects cause Miras to appear larger and cooler than they actually are. A post-shock relaxation zone code developed by J. N. Pierce was modified and interfaced with the Bowen code to follow the ionization state and cooling radiation emitted by Hydrogen, Helium, and 23 metals in the models. Mg II emission data were used to prepare a light curve that is compared with Mg II light curves observed with the IUE satellite. The relaxation models show that the periodic passage of shocks through the atmosphere results in much lower concentrations of molecular hydrogen and higher ionization fractions

  16. Developing multisite empirical force field models for Pt(II) and cisplatin.

    PubMed

    Cvitkovic, John P; Kaminski, George A

    2017-01-30

    We have developed empirical force field parameters for Pt(II) and cisplatin. Two force field frameworks were used-modified OPLS-AA and our second-order polarizable POSSIM. A seven-site model was used for the Pt(II) ion. The goal was to create transferable parameter sets compatible with the force field models for proteins and general organic compounds. A number of properties of the Pt(II) ion and its coordination compounds have been considered, including geometries and energies of the complexes, hydration free energy, and radial distribution functions in water. Comparison has been made with experimental and quantum mechanical results. We have demonstrated that both versions are generally capable of reproducing key properties of the system, but the second-order polarizable POSSIM formalism permits more accurate quantitative results to be obtained. For example, the energy of formation of cisplatin as calculated with the modified OPLS-AA exhibited an error of 9.9%, while the POSSIM error for the same quantity was 6.2%. The produced parameter sets are transferable and suitable to be used in protein-metal binding simulations in which position or even coordination of the ion does not have to be constrained using preexisting knowledge. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Saturation magnetization of Ni(II) in metalloproteins and model compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Sendova, M.; Day, E.P.; Kiick, K.; Johnson, M.; Ma, L.; Scott, B.; Hausinger, R.; Todd, M.; Peterson, J. Univ. of Georgia, Athens Michigan State Univ., East Lansing Univ. of Alabama, Tuscaloosa )

    1992-01-01

    The Ni(II) sites of urease (from Klebsiella aerogenes and jack bean), coenzyme F[sub 430] (from Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum), and several model compounds having octahedral symmetry have been studied using the saturation megnetization technique. Data were collected at four fixed fields over the temperature range from 2 - 200K. Theoretical curves calculated from the spin Hamiltonian were used to fit the experimentally obtained magnetization curves. The following parameters were determined: the spine state (S), the amount of the sample in this spin state ([S]), the gyromagnetic ratio (g), and the zero field splitting parameters (D, E/D). The amount of S=1 paramagnetism of the Ni(II) sites was found to depend on the pH of the buffer and on the concentration of the protein in D[sub 2]O (for coenzyme F[sub 430]). The relationship of the strength of the ligand field to the zero field splitting parameter was studied for the model compounds. There was no evidence for exchange coupling between the two Ni(II) ions at the active sites of either plant or bacterial urease.

  18. Large-scale Validation of AMIP II Land-surface Simulations: Preliminary Results for Ten Models

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, T J; Henderson-Sellers, A; Irannejad, P; McGuffie, K; Zhang, H

    2005-12-01

    This report summarizes initial findings of a large-scale validation of the land-surface simulations of ten atmospheric general circulation models that are entries in phase II of the Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project (AMIP II). This validation is conducted by AMIP Diagnostic Subproject 12 on Land-surface Processes and Parameterizations, which is focusing on putative relationships between the continental climate simulations and the associated models' land-surface schemes. The selected models typify the diversity of representations of land-surface climate that are currently implemented by the global modeling community. The current dearth of global-scale terrestrial observations makes exacting validation of AMIP II continental simulations impractical. Thus, selected land-surface processes of the models are compared with several alternative validation data sets, which include merged in-situ/satellite products, climate reanalyses, and off-line simulations of land-surface schemes that are driven by observed forcings. The aggregated spatio-temporal differences between each simulated process and a chosen reference data set then are quantified by means of root-mean-square error statistics; the differences among alternative validation data sets are similarly quantified as an estimate of the current observational uncertainty in the selected land-surface process. Examples of these metrics are displayed for land-surface air temperature, precipitation, and the latent and sensible heat fluxes. It is found that the simulations of surface air temperature, when aggregated over all land and seasons, agree most closely with the chosen reference data, while the simulations of precipitation agree least. In the latter case, there also is considerable inter-model scatter in the error statistics, with the reanalyses estimates of precipitation resembling the AMIP II simulations more than to the chosen reference data. In aggregate, the simulations of land-surface latent and sensible

  19. Synthesis, spectroscopic characterization, molecular modeling and antimicrobial activities of Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) complexes containing the tetradentate aza Schiff base ligand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, Sulekh; Ruchi

    2013-02-01

    Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II), and Cu(II) complexes with a tetradentate macrocyclic ligand [1.2.5.6tetraoxo-3,4,7,8tetraaza-(1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8)tetrabenzene(L)] were synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, molar conductance measurements, mass, nmr, i.r., electronic and e.p.r. spectral studies. All the complexes are non electrolytes in nature and may be formulated as [M(L)X2] [where, M = Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and X = Cl-, CH3COO-]. On the basis of i.r., electronic and e.p.r. spectral studies a distorted octahedral geometry has been assigned for all complexes. The antimicrobial activities and LD50 values of the ligand and its complexes, as growth inhibiting agents, have been screened in vitro against two different species of bacteria and plant pathogenic fungi.

  20. Proposal for a "phase II" multicenter trial model for preclinical new antiepilepsy therapy development.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Terence J; Ben-Menachem, Elinor; Bertram, Edward H; Collins, Stephen D; Kokaia, Merab; Lerche, Holger; Klitgaard, Henrik; Staley, Kevin J; Vaudano, Elisabetta; Walker, Matthew C; Simonato, Michele

    2013-08-01

    There is a pressing need to address the current major gaps in epilepsy treatment, in particular drug-resistant epilepsy, antiepileptogenic therapies, and comorbidities. A major concern in the development of new therapies is that current preclinical testing is not sufficiently predictive for clinical efficacy. Methodologic limitations of current preclinical paradigms may partly account for this discrepancy. Here we propose and discuss a strategy for implementing a "phase II" multicenter preclinical drug trial model based on clinical phase II/III studies designed to generate more rigorous preclinical data for efficacy. The goal is to improve the evidence resulting from preclinical studies for investigational new drugs that have shown strong promise in initial preclinical "phase I" studies. This should reduce the risk for expensive clinical studies in epilepsy and therefore increase the appeal for funders (industry and government) to invest in their clinical development.

  1. Progresses in tritium accident modelling in the frame of IAEA EMRAS II

    SciTech Connect

    Galeriu, D.; Melintescu, A.

    2015-03-15

    The assessment of the environmental impact of tritium release from nuclear facilities is a topic of interest in many countries. In the IAEA's Environmental Modelling for Radiation Safety (EMRAS I) programme, progresses for routine releases were done and in the EMRAS II programme a dedicated working group (WG 7 - Tritium Accidents) focused on the potential accidental releases (liquid and atmospheric pathways). The progresses achieved in WG 7 were included in a complex report - a technical document of IAEA covering both liquid and atmospheric accidental release consequences. A brief description of the progresses achieved in the frame of EMRAS II WG 7 is presented. Important results have been obtained concerning washout rate, the deposition on the soil of HTO and HT, the HTO uptake by leaves and the subsequent conversion to OBT (organically bound tritium) during daylight. Further needs of the processes understanding and the experimental efforts are emphasised.

  2. BESS-Polar II Hydrogen and Helium Isotope Measurements to Constrain Cosmic-Ray Propagation Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picot-Clemente, Nicolas; BESS-Polar Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The Balloon-borne Experiment with Superconducting Spectrometer BESS-Polar II flew over Antarctica for 24.5 days from December 2007 through January 2008, during the 23rd solar cycle minimum. The instrument is made of complementary particle detectors which allow to precisely measure the charge, velocity and rigidity of incoming cosmic rays. It can accurately separate cosmic-ray hydrogen and helium isotopes from 0.2 to 1.5 GeV/nucleon. Flux and secondary-to-primary ratios of these particles can bring important information to better understand the cosmic-ray propagation history in the Galaxy. BESS-Polar II provides the most precise isotope measurements to date between 0.2 and 1.5 GeV/nucleon. These data will be reported and constraints on cosmic-ray propagation models, using the GALPROP program, will be discussed.

  3. Zn(II)-curcumin protects against hemorheological alterations, oxidative stress and liver injury in a rat model of acute alcoholism.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chuan; Mei, Xue-Ting; Zheng, Yan-Ping; Xu, Dong-Hui

    2014-03-01

    Curcumin can chelate metal ions, forming metallocomplexes. We compared the effects of Zn(II)-curcumin with curcumin against hemorheological alterations, oxidative stress and liver injury in a rat model of acute alcoholism. Oral administration of Zn(II)-curcumin dose-dependently prevented the ethanol-induced elevation of serum malondialdehyde (MDA) content and reductions in glutathione level and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity. Zn(II)-curcumin also inhibited ethanol-induced liver injury. Additionally, Zn(II)-curcumin dose-dependently inhibited hemorheological abnormalities, including the ethanol-induced elevation of whole blood viscosity, plasma viscosity, blood viscosity at corrected hematocrit (45%), erythrocyte aggregation index, erythrocyte rigidity index and hematocrit. Compared to curcumin at the same dose, Zn(II)-curcumin more effectively elevated SOD activity, ameliorated liver injury and improved hemorheological variables. These results suggest that Zn(II)-curcumin protected the rats from ethanol-induced liver injury and hemorheological abnormalities via the synergistic effect of curcumin and zinc.

  4. Modelling the Pan-Spectral Energy Distribution of Starburst Galaxies: II. Control of the H II Region Parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Dopita, M A; Fischera, J; Sutherland, R S; Kewley, L J; Tuffs, R J; Popescu, C C; van Breugel, W; Groves, B A; Leitherer, C

    2006-03-01

    We examine from a theoretical viewpoint how the physical parameters of H II regions are controlled both in normal galaxies and in starburst environments. These parameters are the H II region luminosity function, the time-dependent size, the covering fraction of molecular clouds, the pressure in the ionized gas and the ionization parameter. The factors which control them are the initial mass function of the exciting stars, the cluster mass function, the metallicity and the mean pressure in the surrounding interstellar medium. We investigate the sensitivity of the H{alpha} luminosity to the IMF, and find that this can translate to about 30% variation in derived star formation rates. The molecular cloud dissipation timescale is estimated from a case study of M17 to be {approx} 1 Myr. Based upon H II luminosity function fitting for nearby galaxies, we propose that the cluster mass function has a log-normal form peaking at {approx} 185M{sub {circle_dot}}. This suggests that the cluster mass function is the continuation of the stellar IMF to higher mass. The pressure in the H II regions is controlled by the mechanical luminosity flux from the central cluster. Since this is closely related to the ionizing photon flux, we show that the ionization parameter is not a free variable, and that the diffuse ionized medium may be composed of many large, faint and old H II regions. Finally, we derive theoretical probability distributions for the ionization parameter as a function of metallicity and compare these to those derived for SDSS galaxies.

  5. Models of H II regions - Heavy element opacity, variation of temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubin, R. H.

    1985-01-01

    A detailed set of H II region models that use the same physics and self-consistent input have been computed and are used to examine where in parameter space the effects of heavy element opacity is important. The models are briefly described, and tabular data for the input parameters and resulting properties of the models are presented. It is found that the opacities of C, Ne, O, and to a lesser extent N play a vital role over a large region of parameter space, while S and Ar opacities are negligible. The variation of the average electron temperature T(e) of the models with metal abundance, density, and T(eff) is investigated. It is concluded that by far the most important determinator of T(e) is metal abundance; an almost 7000 K difference is expected over the factor of 10 change from up to down abundances.

  6. A GLOBAL MODEL OF THE LIGHT CURVES AND EXPANSION VELOCITIES OF TYPE II-PLATEAU SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Pejcha, Ondřej; Prieto, Jose L.

    2015-02-01

    We present a new self-consistent and versatile method that derives photospheric radius and temperature variations of Type II-Plateau supernovae based on their expansion velocities and photometric measurements. We apply the method to a sample of 26 well-observed, nearby supernovae with published light curves and velocities. We simultaneously fit ∼230 velocity and ∼6800 mag measurements distributed over 21 photometric passbands spanning wavelengths from 0.19 to 2.2 μm. The light-curve differences among the Type II-Plateau supernovae are well modeled by assuming different rates of photospheric radius expansion, which we explain as different density profiles of the ejecta, and we argue that steeper density profiles result in flatter plateaus, if everything else remains unchanged. The steep luminosity decline of Type II-Linear supernovae is due to fast evolution of the photospheric temperature, which we verify with a successful fit of SN 1980K. Eliminating the need for theoretical supernova atmosphere models, we obtain self-consistent relative distances, reddenings, and nickel masses fully accounting for all internal model uncertainties and covariances. We use our global fit to estimate the time evolution of any missing band tailored specifically for each supernova, and we construct spectral energy distributions and bolometric light curves. We produce bolometric corrections for all filter combinations in our sample. We compare our model to the theoretical dilution factors and find good agreement for the B and V filters. Our results differ from the theory when the I, J, H, or K bands are included. We investigate the reddening law toward our supernovae and find reasonable agreement with standard R{sub V}∼3.1 reddening law in UBVRI bands. Results for other bands are inconclusive. We make our fitting code publicly available.

  7. Visual imagery and the user model applied to fuel handling at EBR-II

    SciTech Connect

    Brown-VanHoozer, S.A.

    1995-06-01

    The material presented in this paper is based on two studies involving visual display designs and the user`s perspective model of a system. The studies involved a methodology known as Neuro-Linguistic Programming (NLP), and its use in expanding design choices which included the ``comfort parameters`` and ``perspective reality`` of the user`s model of the world. In developing visual displays for the EBR-II fuel handling system, the focus would be to incorporate the comfort parameters that overlap from each of the representation systems: visual, auditory and kinesthetic then incorporate the comfort parameters of the most prominent group of the population, and last, blend in the other two representational system comfort parameters. The focus of this informal study was to use the techniques of meta-modeling and synesthesia to develop a virtual environment that closely resembled the operator`s perspective of the fuel handling system of Argonne`s Experimental Breeder Reactor - II. An informal study was conducted using NLP as the behavioral model in a v reality (VR) setting.

  8. Synthesis, spectroscopic characterization, molecular modeling and potentiometric studies of Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) complexes with 1,1-diaminobutane-Schiff base

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alaghaz, Abdel-Nasser M. A.

    2014-08-01

    Complexes of cobalt(II), nickel(II), copper(II) and zinc(II) of general composition [M(L)(H2O)2]·2H2O have been synthesized [L = N,N";-bis(2-hydroxybenzylidene)-1,1-diaminobutane]. The elemental analysis, molar conductance measurements, magnetic susceptibility measurements, mass, IR, UV, NMR, SEM, EDX, thermal and EPR spectral studies of the compounds led to the conclusion that the ligand acts as a tetradentate manner. The molar conductance of the complexes in fresh solution of DMSO lies in the range of 7.46-9.13 Ω-1 cm2 mol-1 indicating their non-electrolytic behavior. On the basis of analytical and spectroscopic techniques, octahedral geometry of the complexes was proposed. The Schiff base acts as tetradentate ligand, coordinated through deprotonated phenolic oxygen and azomethine nitrogen atoms. The ligand field parameters were calculated for Co(II), Ni(II) and Cu(II) complexes and their values were found in the range reported for a octahedral structure. The molecular parameters of the ligand and its Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) complexes have been calculated. Protonation constants of Schiff base and stability constants of their binary metal complexes have been determined potentiometrically in 50% DMSO-water media at 25 °C and ionic strength 0.10 M sodium perchlorate.

  9. MICS-Asia II: Model inter-comparison and evaluation of acid deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zifa; Xie, Fuying; Sakurai, T.; Ueda, H.; Han, Zhiwei; Carmichael, G. R.; Streets, D.; Engardt, M.; Holloway, T.; Hayami, H.; Kajino, M.; Thongboonchoo, N.; Bennet, C.; Park, S. U.; Fung, C.; Chang, A.; Sartelet, K.; Amann, M.

    This paper focuses on the comparison of chemical deposition of eight regional chemical models used in Model Inter-Comparison Study for Asia (MICS-Asia) II. Monthly-mean depositions of chemical species simulated by these models, including dry deposition of SO 2, HNO 3, NH 3, sulfate, nitrate and ammonium and wet deposition of SO 42-, NO 3- and NH 4+, have been provided for four periods (March, July, December 2001 and March 2002) in this work. Observations at 37 sites of the Acid Deposition Monitoring Network in East Asia (EANET) are compared with SO 42-, NO 3- and NH 4+ wet deposition model results. Significant correlations appeared between the observation and computed ensemble mean of participant models. Also, differences among modeled sulfur and nitrogen dry depositions have been studied at the EANET sites. Based on the analysis of acid deposition for various species from different models, total depositions of sulfur (SO 2 and sulfate) and nitrogen (nitrate and ammonium) have been evaluated as the ensemble mean of the eight models. In general, all models capture the observed spatial distribution of sulfur and nitrogen deposition, although the absolute values may differ from measurements. High deposition often occurs in eastern China, Japan, the Republic of Korea, Thailand, Vietnam, Philippines and other parts of Southeast Asia. The magnitude of model bias is quite large for many of the models. In examining the reasons for model-measurement disagreement, we find that differences in chemical processes, deposition parameterization, and modeled precipitation are the main reasons for large model disparities.

  10. National Aviation Fuel Scenario Analysis Program (NAFSAP). Volume I. Model description. Volume II. User manual. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Vahovich, S.G.

    1980-03-01

    This report forecasts air carrier jet fuel usage by body type for three user defined markets. The model contains options which allow the user to easily change the composition of the future fleet so that fuel usage scenarios can be 'run'. Both Volumes I and II are contained in this report. Volume I describes the structure of the model. Volume II is a computer users manual.

  11. Removal of Cd(II), Zn(II) and Pb(II) from aqueous solutions by brown marine macro algae: kinetic modelling.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Olga M M; Martins, Ramiro J E; Delerue-Matos, Cristina M; Boaventura, Rui A R

    2008-05-01

    Specific marine macro algae species abundant at the Portuguese coast (Laminaria hyperborea, Bifurcaria bifurcata, Sargassum muticum and Fucus spiralis) were shown to be effective for removing toxic metals (Cd(II), Zn(II) and Pb(II)) from aqueous solutions. The initial metal concentrations in solution were about 75-100 mg L(-1). The observed biosorption capacities for cadmium, zinc and lead ions were in the ranges of 23.9-39.5, 18.6-32.0 and 32.3-50.4 mg g(-1), respectively. Kinetic studies revealed that the metal uptake rate was rather fast, with 75% of the total amount occurring in the first 10 min for all algal species. Experimental data were well fitted by a pseudo-second order rate equation. The contribution of internal diffusion mechanism was significant only to the initial biosorption stage. Results indicate that all the studied macro algae species can provide an efficient and cost-effective technology for eliminating heavy metals from industrial effluents.

  12. Modeling Disease Progression: Angiotensin II Indirectly Inhibits Nitric Oxide Production via ADMA Accumulation in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Haidong; Jiang, Hao; Liu, Haochen; Zhang, Xue; Ran, Guimei; He, Hua; Liu, Xiaoquan

    2016-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) production impairment is involved in the onset and development of hypertension. Although NO production impairment in spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) has been reported in a variety of researches, the time course of this progressive procedure, as well as its relationship with asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) and angiotensin II (Ang II), has not been quantified. The aim of this research is to establish a mechanism-based disease progression model to assess Ang II and ADMA's inhibition of NO production in SHR's disease progression with/without ramipril's intervention. SHR were randomly divided into three groups: one disease group (n = 8) and two treatment groups (n = 8 for each group): standard treatment group (receiving ramipril 2 mg/kg*day) and intensive treatment group (receiving ramipril 10 mg/kg*day). ADMA, Ang II, NO, and SBP were determined weekly. Intensive treatment with ramipril was found to have no further attenuation of plasma NO and ADMA than standard treatment beyond its significantly stronger antihypertensive effects. Four linked turnover models were developed to characterize the profiles of ADMA, Ang II, NO, and SBP during hypertensive disease progression with/without ramipril intervention. Our model described Ang II and ADMA's contribution to NO production impairment and their responses to ramipril treatment throughout the disease progression in SHR. Model simulations suggested that Ang II affected NO production mainly through inhibiting ADMA elimination rather than affecting nitric oxide synthase (NOS) directly. PMID:27909412

  13. Chronic kidney disease accelerates cognitive impairment in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease, through angiotensin II.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Takashi; Hasegawa, Yu; Uekawa, Ken; Kim-Mitsuyama, Shokei

    2017-01-01

    Epidemiological studies suggest that chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a significant risk factor in the development of cognitive decline. However, the exact role of CKD in cognitive impairment or dementia is unclear. This work was performed to examine the potential impact of CKD on cognitive impairment in Alzheimer's disease (AD), focusing on angiotensin II. (1) CKD was induced in 5XFAD mice, an AD model mouse, and wild-type mice by feeding an adenine-containing diet and the effect on cognitive function was compared between both strains. There was no significant difference regarding the severity of CKD induced by adenine between the strains. In 5XFAD mice, the CKD group exhibited significant cognitive impairment while the control group (control diet-fed group) did not, as evidenced by a passive avoidance test. On the other hand, in wild-type mice, neither the CKD group nor the control group showed cognitive impairment. Thus, CKD itself appears to accelerate cognitive impairment in AD mice. (2) We also examined the effect of olmesartan, an angiotensin II receptor blocker, on 5XFAD mice with CKD to elucidate the potential involvement of angiotensin II. As evidenced by the findings of the water maze test, olmesartan treatment significantly ameliorated the impairment of spatial learning and memory function induced by CKD in 5XFAD mice. Olmesartan treatment significantly ameliorated blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption induced by CKD in 5XFAD mice. Furthermore, olmesartan reduced hippocampal oxidative stress in 5XFAD with CKD to similar levels to the control group of 5XFAD fed standard diet. Hence, the amelioration of CKD-induced cognitive impairment in 5XFAD mice by olmesartan appears to be mediated by the suppression of BBB disruption or oxidative stress. In conclusion, we obtained the evidence suggesting that CKD itself accelerates cognitive impairment in AD mice, through angiotensin II. Thus, our work provides a novel insight into the underlying mechanism of the link

  14. Time-dependent toroidal compactification proposals and the Bianchi type II model: Classical and quantum solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Socorro, J.; Toledo Sesma, L.

    2016-03-01

    In this work we construct an effective four-dimensional model by compactifying a ten-dimensional theory of gravity coupled with a real scalar dilaton field on a time-dependent torus without the contributions of fluxes as first approximation. This approach is applied to anisotropic cosmological Bianchi type II model for which we study the classical coupling of the anisotropic scale factors with the two real scalar moduli produced by the compactification process. Also, we present some solutions to the corresponding Wheeler-DeWitt (WDW) equation in the context of Standard Quantum Cosmology and we claim that these quantum solution are generic in the moduli scalar field for all Bianchi Class A models. Also we give the relation to these solutions for asymptotic behavior to large argument in the corresponding quantum solution in the gravitational variables and compare with Bohm's solutions, finding that this corresponds to the lowest-order WKB approximation.

  15. Testing the littlest Higgs model with T-parity at the LHC Run-II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Qing-Hong; Chen, Chuan-Ren; Liu, Yandong

    2016-09-01

    We study the littlest Higgs model with T-parity (LHT) in the process of p p →WH+WH-→W+W-AHAH at the 14 TeV LHC. With the W -jet tagging technique, we demonstrate that the bulk of the model parameter space can be probed at the level of more than 5 σ in the signature of two fat W jets plus large missing energy. Furthermore, we propose a novel strategy of measuring the principle parameter f that is crucial to test the LHT model and to fix mass spectrum, including the dark matter particle. Our proposal can be easily incorporated into the current experimental program of diboson searches at the LHC Run-II.

  16. FORUM - FutureTox II: In vitro Data and In Silico Models for ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    FutureTox II, a Society of Toxicology Contemporary Concepts in Toxicology workshop, was held in January, 2014. The meeting goals were to review and discuss the state of the science in toxicology in the context of implementing the NRC 21st century vision of predicting in vivo responses from in vitro and in silico data, and to define the goals for the future. Presentations and discussions were held on priority concerns such as predicting and modeling of metabolism, cell growth and differentiation, effects on sensitive subpopulations, and integrating data into risk assessment. Emerging trends in technologies such as stem cell-derived human cells, 3D organotypic culture models, mathematical modeling of cellular processes and morphogenesis, adverse outcome pathway development, and high-content imaging of in vivo systems were discussed. Although advances in moving towards an in vitro/in silico based risk assessment paradigm were apparent, knowledge gaps in these areas and limitations of technologies were identified. Specific recommendations were made for future directions and research needs in the areas of hepatotoxicity, cancer prediction, developmental toxicity, and regulatory toxicology. This article reports on the outcome of FutureTox II1,2, the second in a series of Society of Toxicology (SOT) Contemporary Concepts in Toxicology (CCT) Workshops, which was attended by invitees and participants from governmental and regulatory agencies, research institutes, academ

  17. Calcium-manganese oxides as structural and functional models for active site in oxygen evolving complex in photosystem II: lessons from simple models.

    PubMed

    Najafpour, Mohammad Mahdi

    2011-01-01

    The oxygen evolving complex in photosystem II which induces the oxidation of water to dioxygen in plants, algae and certain bacteria contains a cluster of one calcium and four manganese ions. It serves as a model to split water by sunlight. Reports on the mechanism and structure of photosystem II provide a more detailed architecture of the oxygen evolving complex and the surrounding amino acids. One challenge in this field is the development of artificial model compounds to study oxygen evolution reaction outside the complicated environment of the enzyme. Calcium-manganese oxides as structural and functional models for the active site of photosystem II are explained and reviewed in this paper. Because of related structures of these calcium-manganese oxides and the catalytic centers of active site of the oxygen evolving complex of photosystem II, the study may help to understand more about mechanism of oxygen evolution by the oxygen evolving complex of photosystem II.

  18. Hierarchical competition models with the Allee effect II: the case of immigration.

    PubMed

    Assas, Laila; Dennis, Brian; Elaydi, Saber; Kwessi, Eddy; Livadiotis, George

    2015-01-01

    This is part II of an earlier paper that dealt with hierarchical models with the Allee effect but with no immigration. In this paper, we greatly simplify the proofs in part I and provide a proof of the global dynamics of the non-hyperbolic cases that were previously conjectured. Then, we show how immigration to one of the species or to both would, drastically, change the dynamics of the system. It is shown that if the level of immigration to one or to both species is above a specified level, then there will be no extinction region where both species go to extinction.

  19. National Aviation Fuel Scenario Analysis Program (NAFSAP). Volume I. Model Description. Volume II. User Manual.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-03-01

    TESI CHART NATIONAI RUREAt (F ANDA[)Rt 1V4 A NATIONAL. AVIATION ~ FUEL SCENARIO.. ANALYSIS PROGRAM 49!! VOLUM I: MODEL DESCRIA~v 4<C VOLUME II: tr)ER...O %a 0 CD -00 a0 Dcc% %D Ln n q F u-u - ON 4w - u-u-MN N En -4C u-u-u-u- u- .- u-- - u--4uu 41 4t 1- The second major class of inputs to NAFSAP is the...this option determines the specific form of the number of new purchases (NOBUYS) computation. 14 L " - - .. .... . .I li I I q i . .. . . . . . r I I i

  20. Sorption modelling on illite. Part II: Actinide sorption and linear free energy relationships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradbury, M. H.; Baeyens, B.

    2009-02-01

    Sorption edge data for Ni(II), Co(II), Eu(III) and Sn(IV) [Bradbury M. H. and Baeyens B. (2009) Sorption modelling on illite. Part I: titration measurements and sorption of Ni(II), Co(II), Eu(III) and Sn(IV), Part I] on purified Na-Illite du Puy are available from some previous work, and some new measurements for Am(III), Th(IV), Pa(V) and U(VI) are presented here. All of these sorption edge measurements have been modelled with a 2 site protolysis non-electrostatic surface complexation and cation exchange (2SPNE SC/CE) sorption model for which the site types, site capacities and protolysis constants were fixed [Bradbury M. H. and Baeyens B. (2009), Part I]. In addition, two further data sets for the sorption of Am(III) and Np(V) on Illite du Puy, obtained from the literature, were also modelled in this work. Thus, surface complexation constants for the strong sites in the 2SPNE SC/CE sorption model for nine metals with valence states from II to VI have been obtained. A linear relationship between the logarithm of strong site metal binding constants, SK x-1, and the logarithm of the corresponding aqueous hydrolysis stability constant, OHK x, extending over nearly 35 orders of magnitude is established here for illite for these nine metals. Such correlations are often termed linear free energy relationships (LFER), and although they are quite common in aqueous phase chemistry, they are much less so in surface chemistry, especially over this large range. The LFER for illite could be described by the equation: logSK=7.9±0.4+(0.83±0.02)logOHKx where, " x" is an integer. A similar relationship has been previously obtained for montmorillonite, thus LFERs relating to the sorption on two of the most important clay minerals present in natural systems have been established. Such an LFER approach is an extremely useful tool for estimating surface complexation constants for metals in a chemically consistent manner. It provides a means of obtaining sorption values for

  1. Fracture prediction for the proximal femur using finite element models: Part II--Nonlinear analysis.

    PubMed

    Lotz, J C; Cheal, E J; Hayes, W C

    1991-11-01

    In Part I we reported the results of linear finite element models of the proximal femur generated using geometric and constitutive data collected with quantitative computed tomography. These models demonstrated excellent agreement with in vitro studies when used to predict ultimate failure loads. In Part II, we report our extension of those finite element models to include nonlinear behavior of the trabecular and cortical bone. A highly nonlinear material law, originally designed for representing concrete, was used for trabecular bone, while a bilinear material law was used for cortical bone. We found excellent agreement between the model predictions and in vitro fracture data for both the onset of bone yielding and bone fracture. For bone yielding, the model predictions were within 2 percent for a load which simulated one-legged stance and 1 percent for a load which simulated a fall. For bone fracture, the model predictions were within 1 percent and 17 percent, respectively. The models also demonstrated different fracture mechanisms for the two different loading configurations. For one-legged stance, failure within the primary compressive trabeculae at the subcapital region occurred first, leading to load transfer and, ultimately, failure of the surrounding cortical shell. However, for a fall, failure of the cortical and trabecular bone occurred simultaneously within the intertrochanteric region. These results support our previous findings that the strength of the subcapital region is primarily due to trabecular bone whereas the strength of the intertrochanteric region is primarily due to cortical bone.

  2. Modelling the Pan-Spectral Energy Distribution of Starburst Galaxies: III. Emission Line Diagnostics of Ensembles of H II Regions

    SciTech Connect

    Dopita, M A; Fischera, J; Sutherland, R S; Kewley, L J; Leitherer, C; Tuffs, R J; Popescu, C C; van Breugel, W; Groves, B A

    2006-05-10

    We have built, as far as possible, fully self-consistent models of H II regions around aging clusters of stars. These produce strong emission line diagnostics applicable to either individual H II regions in galaxies, or to the integrated emission line spectra of disk or starburst galaxies. The models assume that the expansion and internal pressure of individual H II regions is driven by the net input of mechanical energy from the central cluster, be it through winds or supernova events. This eliminates the ionization parameter as a free variable, replacing it with a parameter which depends on the ratio of the cluster mass to the pressure in the surrounding interstellar medium. These models explain why H II regions with low abundances have high excitation, and demonstrate that at least part of the warm ionized medium is the result of overlapping faint, old, large, and low pressure H II regions. We present a number of line ratios (at both optical and IR wavelengths) that provide reliable abundance diagnostics for either single H II regions or for integrated galaxy spectra, and others that are sensitive to the age of the cluster stars exciting individual H II regions.

  3. Modeling of "Stripe" Wave Phenomena Seen by the CHARM II and ACES Sounding Rockets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dombrowski, M. P.; Labelle, J. W.

    2010-12-01

    Two recent sounding-rocket missions—CHARM II and ACES—have been launched from Poker Flat Research Range, carrying the Dartmouth High-Frequency Experiment (HFE) among their primary instruments. The HFE is a receiver system which effectively yields continuous (100% duty cycle) E-field waveform measurements up to 5 MHz. The CHARM II sounding rocket was launched 9:49 UT on 15 February 2010 into a substorm, while the ACES mission consisted of two rockets, launched into quiet aurora at 9:49 and 9:50 UT on 29 January 2009. At approximately 350 km on CHARM II and the ACES High-Flyer, the HFE detected short (~2s) bursts of broadband (200-500 kHz) noise with a 'stripe' pattern of nulls imposed on it. These nulls have 10 to 20 kHz width and spacing, and many show a regular, non-linear frequency-time relation. These events are different from the 'stripes' discussed by Samara and LaBelle [2006] and Colpitts et al. [2010], because of the density of the stripes, the non-linearity, and the appearance of being an absorptive rather than emissive phenomenon. These events are similar to 'stripe' features reported by Brittain et al. [1983] in the VLF range, explained as an interference pattern between a downward-traveling whistler-mode wave and its reflection off the bottom of the ionosphere. Following their analysis method, we modeled our stripes as higher-frequency interfering whistlers reflecting off of a density gradient. This model predicts the near-hyperbolic frequency-time curves and high density of the nulls, and therefore shows promise at explaining the new observations.

  4. Type II supernova energetics and comparison of light curves to shock-cooling models

    DOE PAGES

    Rubin, Adam; Gal-Yam, Avishay; De Cia, Annalisa; ...

    2016-03-16

    During the first few days after explosion, Type II supernovae (SNe) are dominated by relatively simple physics. Theoretical predictions regarding early-time SN light curves in the ultraviolet (UV) and optical bands are thus quite robust. We present, for the first time, a sample of 57 R-band SN II light curves that are well-monitored during their rise, withmore » $$\\gt 5$$ detections during the first 10 days after discovery, and a well-constrained time of explosion to within 1–3 days. We show that the energy per unit mass (E/M) can be deduced to roughly a factor of five by comparing early-time optical data to the 2011 model of Rabinak & Waxman, while the progenitor radius cannot be determined based on R-band data alone. We find that SN II explosion energies span a range of E/M = (0.2–20) × 1051 erg/(10 $${M}_{\\odot }$$), and have a mean energy per unit mass of $$\\langle E/M\\rangle =0.85\\times {10}^{51}$$ erg/(10 $${M}_{\\odot }$$), corrected for Malmquist bias. Assuming a small spread in progenitor masses, this indicates a large intrinsic diversity in explosion energy. Moreover, E/M is positively correlated with the amount of 56Ni produced in the explosion, as predicted by some recent models of core-collapse SNe. We further present several empirical correlations. The peak magnitude is correlated with the decline rate ($${\\rm{\\Delta }}{m}_{15}$$), the decline rate is weakly correlated with the rise time, and the rise time is not significantly correlated with the peak magnitude. Faster declining SNe are more luminous and have longer rise times. Lastly, this limits the possible power sources for such events.« less

  5. Type II Supernova Energetics and Comparison of Light Curves to Shock-cooling Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubin, Adam; Gal-Yam, Avishay; De Cia, Annalisa; Horesh, Assaf; Khazov, Danny; Ofek, Eran O.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Arcavi, Iair; Manulis, Ilan; Yaron, Ofer; Vreeswijk, Paul; Kasliwal, Mansi M.; Ben-Ami, Sagi; Perley, Daniel A.; Cao, Yi; Cenko, S. Bradley; Rebbapragada, Umaa D.; Woźniak, P. R.; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Clubb, K. I.; Nugent, Peter E.; Pan, Y.-C.; Badenes, C.; Howell, D. Andrew; Valenti, Stefano; Sand, David; Sollerman, J.; Johansson, Joel; Leonard, Douglas C.; Horst, J. Chuck; Armen, Stephen F.; Fedrow, Joseph M.; Quimby, Robert M.; Mazzali, Paulo; Pian, Elena; Sternberg, Assaf; Matheson, Thomas; Sullivan, M.; Maguire, K.; Lazarevic, Sanja

    2016-03-01

    During the first few days after explosion, Type II supernovae (SNe) are dominated by relatively simple physics. Theoretical predictions regarding early-time SN light curves in the ultraviolet (UV) and optical bands are thus quite robust. We present, for the first time, a sample of 57 R-band SN II light curves that are well-monitored during their rise, with \\gt 5 detections during the first 10 days after discovery, and a well-constrained time of explosion to within 1-3 days. We show that the energy per unit mass (E/M) can be deduced to roughly a factor of five by comparing early-time optical data to the 2011 model of Rabinak & Waxman, while the progenitor radius cannot be determined based on R-band data alone. We find that SN II explosion energies span a range of E/M = (0.2-20) × 1051 erg/(10 {M}⊙ ), and have a mean energy per unit mass of < E/M> =0.85× {10}51 erg/(10 {M}⊙ ), corrected for Malmquist bias. Assuming a small spread in progenitor masses, this indicates a large intrinsic diversity in explosion energy. Moreover, E/M is positively correlated with the amount of 56Ni produced in the explosion, as predicted by some recent models of core-collapse SNe. We further present several empirical correlations. The peak magnitude is correlated with the decline rate ({{Δ }}{m}15), the decline rate is weakly correlated with the rise time, and the rise time is not significantly correlated with the peak magnitude. Faster declining SNe are more luminous and have longer rise times. This limits the possible power sources for such events.

  6. Type II supernova energetics and comparison of light curves to shock-cooling models

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, Adam; Gal-Yam, Avishay; De Cia, Annalisa; Horesh, Assaf; Khazov, Danny; Ofek, Eran O.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Arcavi, Iair; Manulis, Ilan; Yaron, Ofer; Vreeswijk, Paul; Kasliwal, Mansi M.; Ben-Ami, Sagi; Perley, Daniel A.; Cao, Yi; Cenko, S. Bradley; Rebbapragada, Umaa D.; Wozniak, P. R.; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Clubb, K. I.; Nugent, Peter E.; Pan, Y. -C.; Badenes, C.; Howell, D. Andrew; Valenti, Stefano; Sand, David; Sollerman, J.; Johansson, Joel; Leonard, Douglas C.; Horst, J. Chuck; Armen, Stephen F.; Fedrow, Joseph M.; Quimby, Robert M.; Mazzali, Paulo; Pian, Elena; Sternberg, Assaf; Matheson, Thomas; Sullivan, M.; Maguire, K.; Lazarevic, Sanja

    2016-03-16

    During the first few days after explosion, Type II supernovae (SNe) are dominated by relatively simple physics. Theoretical predictions regarding early-time SN light curves in the ultraviolet (UV) and optical bands are thus quite robust. We present, for the first time, a sample of 57 R-band SN II light curves that are well-monitored during their rise, with $\\gt 5$ detections during the first 10 days after discovery, and a well-constrained time of explosion to within 1–3 days. We show that the energy per unit mass (E/M) can be deduced to roughly a factor of five by comparing early-time optical data to the 2011 model of Rabinak & Waxman, while the progenitor radius cannot be determined based on R-band data alone. We find that SN II explosion energies span a range of E/M = (0.2–20) × 1051 erg/(10 ${M}_{\\odot }$), and have a mean energy per unit mass of $\\langle E/M\\rangle =0.85\\times {10}^{51}$ erg/(10 ${M}_{\\odot }$), corrected for Malmquist bias. Assuming a small spread in progenitor masses, this indicates a large intrinsic diversity in explosion energy. Moreover, E/M is positively correlated with the amount of 56Ni produced in the explosion, as predicted by some recent models of core-collapse SNe. We further present several empirical correlations. The peak magnitude is correlated with the decline rate (${\\rm{\\Delta }}{m}_{15}$), the decline rate is weakly correlated with the rise time, and the rise time is not significantly correlated with the peak magnitude. Faster declining SNe are more luminous and have longer rise times. Lastly, this limits the possible power sources for such events.

  7. A multimedia fate and chemical transport modeling system for pesticides: II. Model evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Rong; Scholtz, M. Trevor; Yang, Fuquan; Sloan, James J.

    2011-07-01

    Pesticides have adverse health effects and can be transported over long distances to contaminate sensitive ecosystems. To address problems caused by environmental pesticides we developed a multimedia multi-pollutant modeling system, and here we present an evaluation of the model by comparing modeled results against measurements. The modeled toxaphene air concentrations for two sites, in Louisiana (LA) and Michigan (MI), are in good agreement with measurements (average concentrations agree to within a factor of 2). Because the residue inventory showed no soil residues at these two sites, resulting in no emissions, the concentrations must be caused by transport; the good agreement between the modeled and measured concentrations suggests that the model simulates atmospheric transport accurately. Compared to the LA and MI sites, the measured air concentrations at two other sites having toxaphene soil residues leading to emissions, in Indiana and Arkansas, showed more pronounced seasonal variability (higher in warmer months); this pattern was also captured by the model. The model-predicted toxaphene concentration fraction on particles (0.5-5%) agrees well with measurement-based estimates (3% or 6%). There is also good agreement between modeled and measured dry (1:1) and wet (within a factor of less than 2) depositions in Lake Ontario. Additionally this study identified erroneous soil residue data around a site in Texas in a published US toxaphene residue inventory, which led to very low modeled air concentrations at this site. Except for the erroneous soil residue data around this site, the good agreement between the modeled and observed results implies that both the US and Mexican toxaphene soil residue inventories are reasonably good. This agreement also suggests that the modeling system is capable of simulating the important physical and chemical processes in the multimedia compartments.

  8. Mechanical, Mathematical, and Computer Modeling in Penetration Mechanics - IV (Hybrid Models for Nanostructured Ceramics - II)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-11-30

    model of penetration of long elastically deformable projectiles into semi- infinite targets 3 Introduction 3 1. Basic model equations of penetration...of non- deformable projectiles into semi-infinite target 4 1.1. Geometrical scheme of penetration model of non- deformable projectile 4 1.2. Velocity...c. 20 1.3. Pulverized region (a < r < b). 22 2. Example 25 III. Investigation of deformation process at high-speed loadings of ceramic materials

  9. Inhibition of new vessel growth in mouse model of laser-induced choroidal neovascularization by adiponectin peptide II

    PubMed Central

    Lyzogubov, Valeriy V.; Tytarenko, Ruslana G.; Thotakura, Sushma; Viswanathan, Tito; Bora, Nalini S.; Bora, Puran S.

    2012-01-01

    We have investigated the effect of adiponectin (APN) peptide II on new vessel growth in mouse model of choroidal neovascularization (CNV) or wet type age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Mice were injected intraperitoneally with APN peptide II, control peptide, or PBS on day 1–7 or day 5–14. APN, AdipoR1, PCNA, and VEGF localization was investigated using confocal microscopy, immunohistochemistry, and RT-PCR. APN peptide II decreased the relative area of FITC-dextran perfused vessels by 4-fold, PCNA expression by 3-fold, and the number of PCNA stained HUVEC and MAVEC cells by 38 and 46%, respectively. We concluded that APN peptide II inhibits CNV size on days 7 and 14 by inhibiting the proliferation of endothelial cells in vivo and in vitro. APN peptide II may have therapeutic potential to inhibit CNV or wet AMD. PMID:19422927

  10. FISPACT-II: An Advanced Simulation System for Activation, Transmutation and Material Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sublet, J.-Ch.; Eastwood, J. W.; Morgan, J. G.; Gilbert, M. R.; Fleming, M.; Arter, W.

    2017-01-01

    Fispact-II is a code system and library database for modelling activation-transmutation processes, depletion-burn-up, time dependent inventory and radiation damage source terms caused by nuclear reactions and decays. The Fispact-II code, written in object-style Fortran, follows the evolution of material irradiated by neutrons, alphas, gammas, protons, or deuterons, and provides a wide range of derived radiological output quantities to satisfy most needs for nuclear applications. It can be used with any ENDF-compliant group library data for nuclear reactions, particle-induced and spontaneous fission yields, and radioactive decay (including but not limited to TENDL-2015, ENDF/B-VII.1, JEFF-3.2, JENDL-4.0u, CENDL-3.1 processed into fine-group-structure files, GEFY-5.2 and UKDD-16), as well as resolved and unresolved resonance range probability tables for self-shielding corrections and updated radiological hazard indices. The code has many novel features including: extension of the energy range up to 1 GeV; additional neutron physics including self-shielding effects, temperature dependence, thin and thick target yields; pathway analysis; and sensitivity and uncertainty quantification and propagation using full covariance data. The latest ENDF libraries such as TENDL encompass thousands of target isotopes. Nuclear data libraries for Fispact-II are prepared from these using processing codes PREPRO, NJOY and CALENDF. These data include resonance parameters, cross sections with covariances, probability tables in the resonance ranges, PKA spectra, kerma, dpa, gas and radionuclide production and energy-dependent fission yields, supplemented with all 27 decay types. All such data for the five most important incident particles are provided in evaluated data tables. The Fispact-II simulation software is described in detail in this paper, together with the nuclear data libraries. The Fispact-II system also includes several utility programs for code-use optimisation

  11. The circumstellar structure of the Be shell star φ Persei. II. Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hummel, W.; Štefl, S.

    2001-03-01

    We model Fe Ii 5317 emission lines and phase resolved He I 6678 and 5876 emission lines of the bright B2e&sdO shell binary phi Per to find the size and shape of the excitation region inside the circumprimary disk. We find the Fe Ii 5317 emission to originate within 9 stellar radii in an axisymmetric disk around the primary. Orbital phase variations of He I 6678 are fit in terms of a disk sector with disk radius of 10 stellar radii and opening angle of =~ 120degr facing the secondary. This region can be alternatively described by an intersection of a sphere around the secondary and the circumprimary disk with a penetration depth of about 7 R_*. Similar fit values are found for He I 5876. The enigmatic orbital phase precedence of shell occurrence in the He I emission features is discussed. We favor a model in which the inner He I shell is deformed because of differential rotation in combination with a finite recombination time. Based on observations collected at the Ondřejov Observatory (of the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic), the German-Spanish Astronomical Center (DSAZ) -- Calar Alto (operated by the Max-Plank-Institut für Astronomie Heidelberg jointly with the Spanish National Commission for Astronomy) and Observatoire de Haute-Provence (OHP; CNRS, France).

  12. Radial electric field computations with DKES and neoclassical models in TJ-II stellarator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinell, Julio; Gutierrez-Tapia, Cesar; Lopez-Bruna, Daniel

    2015-11-01

    Radial electric fields arise due to the non-ambipolar transport in stellarator plasmas and play an important role in determining some improved confinement regimes. In order to calculate this electric field it is necessary to take all particle fluxes that are not ambipolar. The most important contribution to these fluxes comes from neoclassical transport. Here we use particle fluxes obtained from kinetic equation computations using the code DKES to evaluate the radial electric field profiles for certain discharges of the heliac TJ-II. Experimental profiles for the density and temperatures are used together with the diffusion coefficients obtained with DKES. A similar computation of the electric field is performed with three analytical neoclassical models that use an approximation for the magnetic geometry. The ambipolar electric field from the models is compared with the one given by DKES and we find that they are all qualitatively similar. They are also compared with experimental measurements of the electric field obtained with HIBP. It is shown that, although the electric field is reasonably well reproduced by the neoclassical computations, especially in high temperature regimes, the particle fluxes are not. Thus, neoclassical theory provides good Er estimates in TJ-II. Support from CONACyT 152905 and DGAPA IN109115 projects is acknowledged.

  13. Blooms' separation of the final exam of Engineering Mathematics II: Item reliability using Rasch measurement model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuaad, Norain Farhana Ahmad; Nopiah, Zulkifli Mohd; Tawil, Norgainy Mohd; Othman, Haliza; Asshaari, Izamarlina; Osman, Mohd Hanif; Ismail, Nur Arzilah

    2014-06-01

    In engineering studies and researches, Mathematics is one of the main elements which express physical, chemical and engineering laws. Therefore, it is essential for engineering students to have a strong knowledge in the fundamental of mathematics in order to apply the knowledge to real life issues. However, based on the previous results of Mathematics Pre-Test, it shows that the engineering students lack the fundamental knowledge in certain topics in mathematics. Due to this, apart from making improvements in the methods of teaching and learning, studies on the construction of questions (items) should also be emphasized. The purpose of this study is to assist lecturers in the process of item development and to monitor the separation of items based on Blooms' Taxonomy and to measure the reliability of the items itself usingRasch Measurement Model as a tool. By using Rasch Measurement Model, the final exam questions of Engineering Mathematics II (Linear Algebra) for semester 2 sessions 2012/2013 were analysed and the results will provide the details onthe extent to which the content of the item providesuseful information about students' ability. This study reveals that the items used in Engineering Mathematics II (Linear Algebra) final exam are well constructed but the separation of the items raises concern as it is argued that it needs further attention, as there is abig gap between items at several levels of Blooms' cognitive skill.

  14. Analysis of TOPAZ II and SPACE-R space nuclear power plants using a modified thermionic model

    SciTech Connect

    Habedank, O.D.

    1993-03-01

    Models based on the TDS thermionic diode model were developed for the TOPAZ II and SPACE-R nuclear power systems. Due to computer code limitations inherent in the TDS model, only the TOPAZ II system model ran successfully. Several parameter studies were conducted on the TOPAZ II model. These studies determined system performance and efficiency while varying the following: (1) the coolant flow inlet temperatures; (2) the rate of coolant temperature change; (3) the power profile of the core; and (4) the cesium reservoir temperature. Analysis of the results indicate that the model accurately represented the TOPAZ II system, underestimating published data by 10%. Coolant flow parameter studies indicate that raising coolant flow temperatures up to 100 K higher increases system power by put to 5%. Additional increases in temperature result in gradual performance degradation. Varying the axial power profile of the core from the actual peaked profile to a flat profile results in a negligible 0.3% change in total system performance. The peaked profile used in TOPAZ II produces the highest system efficiency of all the profiles modeled. The cesium pressure study indicates that the system is operating above optimum cesium pressure and that system performance is strongly dependent on cesium pressure. Increasing cesium reservoir temperature above design temperature by 30 K decreases system efficiency by 30%.

  15. Mathematics in Marine Botany: Examples of the Modelling Process. Part II: Continuous Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nyman, Melvin A.; Brown, Murray T.

    1996-01-01

    Describes some continuous models for growth of the seaweed Macrocystis pyrifera. Uses observed growth rates over several months to derive first-order differential equations as models for growth rates of individual fronds. The nature of the solutions is analyzed and comparison between these theoretical results and documented characteristics of…

  16. A model of neurovascular coupling and the BOLD response PART II.

    PubMed

    Mathias, E J; Plank, M J; David, T

    2017-04-01

    A mathematical model is developed which describes a signalling mechanism of neurovascular coupling with a model of a pyramidal neuron and its corresponding fMRI BOLD response. In the first part of two papers (Part I) we described the integration of the neurovascular coupling unit extended to include a complex neuron model, which includes the important Na/K ATPase pump, with a model that provides a BOLD signal taking its input from the cerebral blood flow and the metabolic rate of oxygen consumption. We showed that this produced a viable signal in terms of initial dip, positive and negative BOLD signals. In this paper (PART II) our model predicts the variations of the BOLD response due to variations in neuronal activity and indicates that the BOLD signal could be used as an initial biomarker for neuronal dysfunction or variations in the perfusion of blood to the cerebral tissue. We have compared the simulated hypoxic BOLD response to experimental BOLD signals observed in the hippocampus during hypoxia showing good agreement. This approach of combined quantitative modelling of neurovascular coupling response and its BOLD response will enable more specific assessment of a brain region.

  17. Zero-{beta} modeling of coaxial helicity injection in the HIT-II spherical torus

    SciTech Connect

    Bayliss, R. A.; Sovinec, C. R.; Redd, A. J.

    2011-09-15

    Coaxial helicity injection in the HIT-II [A. J. Redd et al., Phys. Plasmas 9, 2006 (2002)] spherical torus is modeled with time-dependent resistive magnetohydrodynamics computations run to steady state for conditions without strong relaxation. Laboratory and computed results on injector current and plasma current agree reasonably well as toroidal magnetic field and injector flux are scaled. The scalings are consistent with a dimensional estimate from the Grad-Shafranov equation that provides a new perspective on a previously published model based on a current-sheet equilibrium and the magnetic pressure required for the ''bubble-burst'' criterion. Numerical solutions of the Grad-Shafranov equation with an assumed current profile also indicate large qualitative changes as the predicted criterion is crossed.

  18. Realistic tight-binding model for the electronic structure of II-VI semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapra, Sameer; Shanthi, N.; Sarma, D. D.

    2002-11-01

    We analyze the electronic structure of group II-VI semiconductors obtained within linearized muffin-tin-orbital approach in order to arrive at a realistic and minimal tight-binding model, parametrized to provide an accurate description of both valence and conduction bands. It is shown that a nearest-neighbor sp3 d5 model is fairly sufficient to describe the electronic structure of these systems over a wide energy range, obviating the use of any fictitious s* orbital. The obtained hopping parameters obey the universal scaling law proposed by Harrison, ensuring transferability to other systems. Furthermore, we show that certain subtle features in the bonding of these compounds require the inclusion of anion-anion interactions in addition to the nearest-neighbor cation-anion interactions.

  19. LRS Bianchi type-II string cosmological models in a modified theory of gravitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanakavalli, T.; Ananda Rao, G.; Reddy, D. R. K.

    2017-03-01

    This paper is devoted to the investigation of spatially homogeneous anisotropic LRS Bianchi type-II cosmological models with string source in a modified theory of gravitation formulated by Harko et al. (Phys. Rev. D 84:024020, 2011) which is universally known as f( R, T) gravity. Here R is the Ricci scalar and T is the trace of the energy momentum tensor. By solving the field equation we have presented massive string and Takabyasi or p-string models in this theory. However it is interesting to note that geometric string in this space-time does not exist in this theory. Physical and geometrical properties of the strings obtained are also discussed.

  20. HIERARCHICAL METHODOLOGY FOR MODELING HYDROGEN STORAGE SYSTEMS PART II: DETAILED MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Hardy, B; Donald L. Anton, D

    2008-12-22

    There is significant interest in hydrogen storage systems that employ a media which either adsorbs, absorbs or reacts with hydrogen in a nearly reversible manner. In any media based storage system the rate of hydrogen uptake and the system capacity is governed by a number of complex, coupled physical processes. To design and evaluate such storage systems, a comprehensive methodology was developed, consisting of a hierarchical sequence of models that range from scoping calculations to numerical models that couple reaction kinetics with heat and mass transfer for both the hydrogen charging and discharging phases. The scoping models were presented in Part I [1] of this two part series of papers. This paper describes a detailed numerical model that integrates the phenomena occurring when hydrogen is charged and discharged. A specific application of the methodology is made to a system using NaAlH{sub 4} as the storage media.

  1. Modeling FAMA ion beam diagnostics based on the Ptolemy II model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balvanović, R.; Beličev, P.; Radjenović, B.

    2012-10-01

    The previously developed model of ion beam transport control of the FAMA facility is further enhanced by equipping it with the model of ion beam diagnostics. The model of control, executing once, is adjusted so that it executes in iterative mode, where each iteration samples the input beam normally distributed over initial phase space and calculates a single trajectory through the facility beam lines. The model takes into account only the particles that manage to pass through all the beam line apertures, emulating in this way a Faraday cup and a beam profile meter. Generated are also beam phase space distributions and horizontal and vertical beam profiles at the end of the beam transport lines the FAMA facility consists of. By adding the model of ion beam diagnostics to the model of ion beam transport control, the process of determining optimal ion beam control parameters is eased and speeded up, and the understanding of influence of control parameters on the ion beam characteristics is improved.

  2. Modeling of surface myoelectric signals--Part II: Model-based signal interpretation.

    PubMed

    Merletti, R; Roy, S H; Kupa, E; Roatta, S; Granata, A

    1999-07-01

    Experimental electromyogram (EMG) data from the human biceps brachii were simulated using the model described in [10] of this work. A multichannel linear electrode array, spanning the length of the biceps, was used to detect monopolar and bipolar signals, from which double differential signals were computed, during either voluntary or electrically elicited isometric contractions. For relatively low-level voluntary contractions (10%-30% of maximum force) individual firings of three to four-different motor units were identified and their waveforms were closely approximated by the model. Motor unit parameters such as depth, size, fiber orientation and length, location of innervation and tendonous zones, propagation velocity, and source width were estimated using the model. Two applications of the model are described. The first analyzes the effects of electrode rotation with respect to the muscle fiber direction and shows the possibility of conduction velocity (CV) over- and under-estimation. The second focuses on the myoelectric manifestations of fatigue during a sustained electrically elicited contraction and the interrelationship between muscle fiber CV, spectral and amplitude variables, and the length of the depolarization zone. It is concluded that a) surface EMG detection using an electrode array, when combined with a model of signal propagation, provides a useful method for understanding the physiological and anatomical determinants of EMG waveform characteristics and b) the model provides a way for the interpretation of fatigue plots.

  3. A kinetic model for type I and II IP3R accounting for mode changes.

    PubMed

    Siekmann, Ivo; Wagner, Larry E; Yule, David; Crampin, Edmund J; Sneyd, James

    2012-08-22

    Based upon an extensive single-channel data set, a Markov model for types I and II inositol trisphosphate receptors (IP(3)R) is developed. The model aims to represent accurately the kinetics of both receptor types of IP(3)R depending on the concentrations of inositol trisphosphate (IP(3)), adenosine trisphosphate (ATP), and intracellular calcium (Ca(2+)). In particular, the model takes into account that for some combinations of ligands the IP(3)R switches between extended periods of inactivity alternating with intervals of bursting activity (mode changes). In a first step, the inactive and active modes are modeled separately. It is found that, within modes, both receptor types are ligand-independent. In a second step, the submodels are connected by transition rates. Ligand-dependent regulation of the channel activity is achieved by modulating these transitions between active and inactive modes. As a result, a compact representation of the IP(3)R is obtained that accurately captures stochastic single-channel dynamics including mode changes in a model with six states and 10 rate constants, only two of which are ligand-dependent.

  4. Multiscale modeling, simulations, and experiments of coating growth on nanofibers. Part II. Deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Buldum, A.; Clemons, C.B.; Dill, L.H.; Kreider, K.L.; Young, G.W.; Zheng, X.; Evans, E.A.; Zhang, G.; Hariharan, S.I.

    2005-08-15

    This work is Part II of an integrated experimental/modeling investigation of a procedure to coat nanofibers and core-clad nanostructures with thin-film materials using plasma-enhanced physical vapor deposition. In the experimental effort, electrospun polymer nanofibers are coated with aluminum materials under different operating conditions to observe changes in the coating morphology. This procedure begins with the sputtering of the coating material from a target. Part I [J. Appl. Phys. 98, 044303 (2005)] focused on the sputtering aspect and transport of the sputtered material through the reactor. That reactor level model determines the concentration field of the coating material. This field serves as input into the present species transport and deposition model for the region surrounding an individual nanofiber. The interrelationships among processing factors for the transport and deposition are investigated here from a detailed modeling approach that includes the salient physical and chemical phenomena. Solution strategies that couple continuum and atomistic models are used. At the continuum scale, transport dynamics near the nanofiber are described. At the atomic level, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are used to study the deposition and sputtering mechanisms at the coating surface. Ion kinetic energies and fluxes are passed from the continuum sheath model to the MD simulations. These simulations calculate sputtering and sticking probabilities that in turn are used to calculate parameters for the continuum transport model. The continuum transport model leads to the definition of an evolution equation for the coating-free surface. This equation is solved using boundary perturbation and level set methods to determine the coating morphology as a function of operating conditions.

  5. Final Report for Dynamic Models for Causal Analysis of Panel Data. Models for Change in Quantitative Variables, Part II Scholastic Models. Part II, Chapter 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hannan, Michael T.

    This document is part of a series of chapters described in SO 011 759. Stochastic models for the sociological analysis of change and the change process in quantitative variables are presented. The author lays groundwork for the statistical treatment of simple stochastic differential equations (SDEs) and discusses some of the continuities of…

  6. Propeller aircraft interior noise model. II - Scale-model and flight-test comparisons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, C. M.; Mayes, W. H.

    1987-01-01

    A program for predicting the sound levels inside propeller driven aircraft arising from sidewall transmission of airborne exterior noise is validated through comparisons of predictions with both scale-model test results and measurements obtained in flight tests on a turboprop aircraft. The program produced unbiased predictions for the case of the scale-model tests, with a standard deviation of errors of about 4 dB. For the case of the flight tests, the predictions revealed a bias of 2.62-4.28 dB (depending upon whether or not the data for the fourth harmonic were included) and the standard deviation of the errors ranged between 2.43 and 4.12 dB. The analytical model is shown to be capable of taking changes in the flight environment into account.

  7. Emergency Response Equipment and Related Training: Airborne Radiological Computer System (Model II)

    SciTech Connect

    David P. Colton

    2007-02-28

    The materials included in the Airborne Radiological Computer System, Model-II (ARCS-II) were assembled with several considerations in mind. First, the system was designed to measure and record the airborne gamma radiation levels and the corresponding latitude and longitude coordinates, and to provide a first overview look of the extent and severity of an accident's impact. Second, the portable system had to be light enough and durable enough that it could be mounted in an aircraft, ground vehicle, or watercraft. Third, the system must control the collection and storage of the data, as well as provide a real-time display of the data collection results to the operator. The notebook computer and color graphics printer components of the system would only be used for analyzing and plotting the data. In essence, the provided equipment is composed of an acquisition system and an analysis system. The data can be transferred from the acquisition system to the analysis system at the end of the data collection or at some other agreeable time.

  8. Atomistic modeling of structure II gas hydrate mechanics: Compressibility and equations of state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlasic, Thomas M.; Servio, Phillip; Rey, Alejandro D.

    2016-08-01

    This work uses density functional theory (DFT) to investigate the poorly characterized structure II gas hydrates, for various guests (empty, propane, butane, ethane-methane, propane-methane), at the atomistic scale to determine key structure and mechanical properties such as equilibrium lattice volume and bulk modulus. Several equations of state (EOS) for solids (Murnaghan, Birch-Murnaghan, Vinet, Liu) were fitted to energy-volume curves resulting from structure optimization simulations. These EOS, which can be used to characterize the compressional behaviour of gas hydrates, were evaluated in terms of their robustness. The three-parameter Vinet EOS was found to perform just as well if not better than the four-parameter Liu EOS, over the pressure range in this study. As expected, the Murnaghan EOS proved to be the least robust. Furthermore, the equilibrium lattice volumes were found to increase with guest size, with double-guest hydrates showing a larger increase than single-guest hydrates, which has significant implications for the widely used van der Waals and Platteeuw thermodynamic model for gas hydrates. Also, hydrogen bonds prove to be the most likely factor contributing to the resistance of gas hydrates to compression; bulk modulus was found to increase linearly with hydrogen bond density, resulting in a relationship that could be used predictively to determine the bulk modulus of various structure II gas hydrates. Taken together, these results fill a long existing gap in the material chemical physics of these important clathrates.

  9. Use of amino acids as counterions improves the solubility of the BCS II model drug, indomethacin.

    PubMed

    ElShaer, Amr; Khan, Sheraz; Perumal, Dhaya; Hanson, Peter; Mohammed, Afzal R

    2011-07-01

    The number of new chemical entities (NCE) is increasing every day after the introduction of combinatorial chemistry and high throughput screening to the drug discovery cycle. One third of these new compounds have aqueous solubility less than 20µg/mL [1]. Therefore, a great deal of interest has been forwarded to the salt formation technique to overcome solubility limitations. This study aims to improve the drug solubility of a Biopharmaceutical Classification System class II (BCS II) model drug (Indomethacin; IND) using basic amino acids (L-arginine, L-lysine and L-histidine) as counterions. Three new salts were prepared using freeze drying method and characterised by FT-IR spectroscopy, proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)HNMR), Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) and Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The effect of pH on IND solubility was also investigated using pH-solubility profile. Both arginine and lysine formed novel salts with IND, while histidine failed to dissociate the free acid and in turn no salt was formed. Arginine and lysine increased IND solubility by 10,000 and 2296 fold, respectively. An increase in dissolution rate was also observed for the novel salts. Since these new salts have improved IND solubility to that similar to BCS class I drugs, IND salts could be considered for possible waivers of bioequivalence.

  10. The role of myosin II in glioma invasion: A mathematical model

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wanho; Lim, Sookkyung; Kim, Yangjin

    2017-01-01

    Gliomas are malignant tumors that are commonly observed in primary brain cancer. Glioma cells migrate through a dense network of normal cells in microenvironment and spread long distances within brain. In this paper we present a two-dimensional multiscale model in which a glioma cell is surrounded by normal cells and its migration is controlled by cell-mechanical components in the microenvironment via the regulation of myosin II in response to chemoattractants. Our simulation results show that the myosin II plays a key role in the deformation of the cell nucleus as the glioma cell passes through the narrow intercellular space smaller than its nuclear diameter. We also demonstrate that the coordination of biochemical and mechanical components within the cell enables a glioma cell to take the mode of amoeboid migration. This study sheds lights on the understanding of glioma infiltration through the narrow intercellular spaces and may provide a potential approach for the development of anti-invasion strategies via the injection of chemoattractants for localization. PMID:28166231

  11. Kinetic modeling of a multiple immobilized enzyme system. Ii. Application of the model

    SciTech Connect

    Mercer, D.G.; O'Driscoll, K.F.

    1981-11-01

    The mathematical model for the reaction sequence catalyzed by immobilized invertase and glucose oxidase discussed in the preceding article has been used successfully to duplicate experimental findings. In addition, it has been used as a tool for the simulation and prediction of effects derived from alterations to system-related and gel-related parameters. The effects of gel diffusivity on the overall conversion of sucrose substrate to reaction products was investigated through use of this model. Changes in the enzyme loading within a gel and the results of varying the ratio of invertase activity to glucose activity were also evaluated. Through use of concentrations of the molecular species determined at the collocation points within a gel particle and in the bulk liquid phase, an estimate of the thickness of the diffusion boundary layer around the gel particle was determined which was in close agreement with values obtained from classical mass transfer relationships. For most of this study, the enzymes were coimmobilized within the same polymeric matrix. However, a number of tests were run with the enzymes immobilized individually and placed in separate reactors in a sequential reactor system. The experimental results from these tests were duplicated successfully by means of the model with little modification to the basic computer program. Such an example illustrates the potential flexibility of the model and its overall versatility. (Refs. 5).

  12. A dynamic, embedded Lagrangian model for ocean climate models, Part II: Idealised overflow tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bates, Michael L.; Griffies, Stephen M.; England, Matthew H.

    2012-12-01

    Dense gravity current overflows occur in several regions throughout the world and are an important process in the meridional overturning circulation. Overflows are poorly represented in coarse resolution level coordinate ocean climate models. Here, the embedded Lagrangian model formulated in the companion paper of Bates et al. (2012) is used in two idealised test cases to examine the effect on the representation of dense gravity driven plumes, as well as the effect on the circulation of the bulk ocean in the Eulerian model. The results are compared with simulations with no parameterisation for overflows, as well as simulations that use traditional hydrostatic overflow schemes. The use of Lagrangian "blobs" is shown to improve three key characteristics that are poorly represented in coarse resolution level coordinate models: (1) the depth of the plume, (2) the along slope velocity of the plume, and (3) the response of the bulk ocean to the bottom boundary layer. These improvements are associated with the more appropriate set of dynamics satisfied by the blobs, leading to a more physically sound representation. Experiments are also conducted to examine sensitivity to blob parameters. The blob parameters are examined over a large parameter space.

  13. Design of Training Systems, Phase II Report, Volume II; Detailed Model Descriptions. TAEG Report No. 12-2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naval Training Equipment Center, Orlando, FL. Training Analysis and Evaluation Group.

    The Design of Training Systems (DOTS) project was initiated by the Department of Defense (DOD) to develop tools for the effective management of military training organizations. Phase 2 involved the design and development of three computer-based mathematical models, described in detail in this report. The models described are the System…

  14. MODELING THE NEAR-UV BAND OF GK STARS. II. NON-LTE MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Ian Short, C.; Campbell, Eamonn A.; Pickup, Heather; Hauschildt, Peter H. E-mail: yeti@hs.uni-hamburg.de

    2012-03-10

    We present a grid of atmospheric models and synthetic spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for late-type dwarfs and giants of solar and 1/3 solar metallicity with many opacity sources computed in self-consistent non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE), and compare them to the LTE grid of Short and Hauschildt (Paper I). We describe, for the first time, how the NLTE treatment affects the thermal equilibrium of the atmospheric structure (T({tau}) relation) and the SED as a finely sampled function of T{sub eff}, log g, and [A/H] among solar metallicity and mildly metal-poor red giants. We compare the computed SEDs to the library of observed spectrophotometry described in Paper I across the entire visible band, and in the blue and red regions of the spectrum separately. We find that for the giants of both metallicities, the NLTE models yield best-fit T{sub eff} values that are 30-90 K lower than those provided by LTE models, while providing greater consistency between log g values, and, for Arcturus, T{sub eff} values, fitted separately to the blue and red spectral regions. There is marginal evidence that NLTE models give more consistent best-fit T{sub eff} values between the red and blue bands for earlier spectral classes among the solar metallicity GK giants than they do for the later classes, but no model fits the blue-band spectrum well for any class. For the two dwarf spectral classes that we are able to study, the effect of NLTE on derived parameters is less significant. We compare our derived T{sub eff} values to several other spectroscopic and photometric T{sub eff} calibrations for red giants, including one that is less model dependent based on the infrared flux method (IRFM). We find that the NLTE models provide slightly better agreement to the IRFM calibration among the warmer stars in our sample, while giving approximately the same level of agreement for the cooler stars.

  15. A rule-based kinetic model of RNA polymerase II C-terminal domain phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Aitken, Stuart; Alexander, Ross D.; Beggs, Jean D.

    2013-01-01

    The complexity of many RNA processing pathways is such that a conventional systems modelling approach is inadequate to represent all the molecular species involved. We demonstrate that rule-based modelling permits a detailed model of a complex RNA signalling pathway to be defined. Phosphorylation of the RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) C-terminal domain (CTD; a flexible tail-like extension of the largest subunit) couples pre-messenger RNA capping, splicing and 3′ end maturation to transcriptional elongation and termination, and plays a central role in integrating these processes. The phosphorylation states of the serine residues of many heptapeptide repeats of the CTD alter along the coding region of genes as a function of distance from the promoter. From a mechanistic perspective, both the changes in phosphorylation and the location at which they take place on the genes are a function of the time spent by RNAPII in elongation as this interval provides the opportunity for the kinases and phosphatases to interact with the CTD. On this basis, we synthesize the available data to create a kinetic model of the action of the known kinases and phosphatases to resolve the phosphorylation pathways and their kinetics. PMID:23804443

  16. Evaluation of the aerosol vertical distribution in global aerosol models through comparison against CALIOP measurements: AeroCom phase II results: AEROSOL PROFILES IN AEROCOM II GCM

    SciTech Connect

    Koffi, Brigitte; Schulz, Michael; Bréon, François-Marie; Dentener, Frank; Steensen, Birthe Marie; Griesfeller, Jan; Winker, David; Bauer, Susanne E.; Bellouin, Nicolas; Berntsen, Terje; Bian, Huisheng; Chin, Mian; Diehl, Thomas; Easter, Richard; Ghan, Steven; Hauglustaine, Didier A.; Iversen, Trond; Kirkevåg, Alf; Liu, Xiaohong; Lohmann, Ulrike; Myhre, Gunnar; Rasch, Phil; Seland, Øyvind; Skeie, Ragnhild B.; Steenrod, Stephen D.; Stier, Philip; Tackett, Jason; Takemura, Toshihiko; Tsigaridis, Kostas; Vuolo, Maria Raffaella; Yoon, Jinho; Zhang, Kai

    2016-06-27

    The ability of eleven models in simulating the aerosol vertical distribution from regional to global scales, as part of the second phase of the AeroCom model inter-comparison initiative (AeroCom II) is assessed and compared to results of the first phase. The evaluation is performed using a global monthly gridded dataset of aerosol extinction profiles built on purpose from the CALIOP (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization) Layer Product 3.01. Results over 12 sub-continental regions show that five models improved whereas three degraded in reproducing the Zα 0-6 km mean extinction height diagnostic, which is computed over the 0-6 km altitude range for each studied region and season. While the models’ performance remains highly variable, it has generally improved in terms of inter-regional diversity and seasonality. The biases in Zα 0-6 km have notably decreased in the U.S. and European industrial and downwind maritime regions, whereas the timing of the Zα 0-6 km peak season has improved for all but two models. However, most of the models now show a Zα 0-6 km underestimation over land, notably in the dust and biomass burning regions in Asia and Africa. At global scale, the AeroCom II models better reproduce the Zα 0-6 km latitudinal variability over ocean than over land. Hypotheses for the (changes in the) the performance of the individual models and for the inter-model diversity are discussed. We also provide an analysis of the CALIOP limitations and uncertainties that can contribute to the differences between the simulations and observations.

  17. Survey of non-linear hydrodynamic models of type-II Cepheids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smolec, R.

    2016-03-01

    We present a grid of non-linear convective type-II Cepheid models. The dense model grids are computed for 0.6 M⊙ and a range of metallicities ([Fe/H] = -2.0, -1.5, -1.0), and for 0.8 M⊙ ([Fe/H] = -1.5). Two sets of convective parameters are considered. The models cover the full temperature extent of the classical instability strip, but are limited in luminosity; for the most luminous models, violent pulsation leads to the decoupling of the outermost model shell. Hence, our survey reaches only the shortest period RV Tau domain. In the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram, we detect two domains in which period-doubled pulsation is possible. The first extends through the BL Her domain and low-luminosity W Vir domain (pulsation periods ˜2-6.5 d). The second domain extends at higher luminosities (W Vir domain; periods >9.5 d). Some models within these domains display period-4 pulsation. We also detect very narrow domains (˜10 K wide) in which modulation of pulsation is possible. Another interesting phenomenon we detect is double-mode pulsation in the fundamental mode and in the fourth radial overtone. Fourth overtone is a surface mode, trapped in the outer model layers. Single-mode pulsation in the fourth overtone is also possible on the hot side of the classical instability strip. The origin of the above phenomena is discussed. In particular, the role of resonances in driving different pulsation dynamics as well as in shaping the morphology of the radius variation curves is analysed.

  18. Deriving remote sensing reflectance from turbid Case II waters using green-shortwave infrared bands based model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jun; Yin, Shoujing; Xiao, Rulin; Xu, Qianxiang; Lin, Changsong

    2014-04-01

    The objectives of this study are to validate the applicability of a shortwave infrared atmospheric correction model (SWIR-based model) in deriving remote sensing reflectance in turbid Case II waters, and to improve that model using a proposed green-shortwave infrared model (GSWIR-based model). In a GSWIR-based model, the aerosol type is determined by a SWIR-based model and the reflectance due to aerosol scattering is calculated using spectral slope technology. In this study, field measurements collected from three independent cruises from two different Case II waters were used to compare models. The results indicate that both SWIR- and GSWIR-based models can be used to derive the remote sensing reflectance at visible wavelengths in turbid Case II waters, but GSWIR-based models are superior to SWIR-based models. Using the GSWIR-based model decreases uncertainty in remote sensing reflectance retrievals in turbid Case II waters by 2.6-12.1%. In addition, GSWIR-based model’s sensitivity to user-supplied parameters was determined using the numerical method, which indicated that the GSWIR-based model is more sensitive to the uncertainty of spectral slope technology than to that of aerosol type retrieval methodology. Due to much lower noise tolerance of GSWIR-based model in the blue and near-infrared regions, the GSWIR-based model performs poorly in determining remote sensing reflectance at these wavelengths, which is consistent with the GSWIR-based model’s accuracy evaluation results.

  19. The Sortie-Generation Model System. Volume II. Sortie-Generation Model User’s Guide,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-09-01

    NMR OF PART-TYPES BEING MODELED. Ci*. RESUPP(K) - (K=I,....WARTS) EXPECTED MJMBER OF TYPE--K PARTS C’.* IN RESIPPLY AT THE START OF THE SCENARIO. USED...PROCESS C+* IS ORGAN4IZED IN THE FOLLOWING MANNER. FIRST, N19CELLANEOJ.JS C"’* OPERATIONS AR PERFORMED, THEN SPRS INITIALIZATION, AND C’"" FINALLY

  20. Dynamics of stochastic predator-prey models with Holling II functional response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qun; Zu, Li; Jiang, Daqing

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we consider the dynamics of stochastic predator-prey models with Holling II functional response. For the stochastic systems, we firstly establish sufficient conditions for the existence of the globally positive solutions. Then we investigate the asymptotic moment estimations of the positive solutions and study the ultimately bounded in the mean of them. Thirdly, by constructing some suitable Lyapunov functions, we verify that there are unique stationary distributions and they are ergodic. The obtained results show that the systems still retain some stability in the sense of weak stability provided that the intensity of the white noise is relatively small. Finally, some numerical simulations are introduced to illustrate our main results.

  1. Toward a Network Model of MHC Class II-Restricted Antigen Processing

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Michael A.; Ganesan, Asha Purnima V.; Eisenlohr, Laurence C.

    2013-01-01

    The standard model of Major Histocompatibility Complex class II (MHCII)-restricted antigen processing depicts a straightforward, linear pathway: internalized antigens are converted into peptides that load in a chaperone dependent manner onto nascent MHCII in the late endosome, the complexes subsequently trafficking to the cell surface for recognition by CD4+ T cells (TCD4+). Several variations on this theme, both moderate and radical, have come to light but these alternatives have remained peripheral, the conventional pathway generally presumed to be the primary driver of TCD4+ responses. Here we continue to press for the conceptual repositioning of these alternatives toward the center while proposing that MHCII processing be thought of less in terms of discrete pathways and more in terms of a network whose major and minor conduits are variable depending upon many factors, including the epitope, the nature of the antigen, the source of the antigen, and the identity of the antigen-presenting cell. PMID:24379819

  2. High resolution meteorological modelling of the Inntal valley atmosphere, Part II: applications to dispersion modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, D.; Schicker, I.; Seibert, P.

    2009-09-01

    Orography and local meteorology play a major role in Alpine valleys, as they are linked with valley and slope wind systems, stagnation and recirculation, temperature inversions and turbulence. Thus, they have a strong influence of transport and dilution of pollutants in the valley, affecting human health, and sound propagation. Shallow stable layers at the valley floor and low wind speed conditions, especially in autumn and winter, trap pollutants and thus cause unfavourable dispersion conditions , possibly leading to exceedances of air pollution limits. Moreover, under certain synoptic conditions such as persistent high-pressure systems inversion conditions prevail for days. Emissions may accumulate in the valley from day to day and thus critical levels of pollutants may be reached. With the current computer capabilities, numerical meteorological models and particle dispersion models are powerful tools to investigate such situations and their impact on emission-side measures. Output from the limited area meteorological model MM5 for selected synoptic periods of special interest regarding air quality conditions (see contribution by Schicker et al., this session) will be used as input to the Lagrangian particle dispersion model FLEXPARTv6.2. Currently two specific versions of FLEXPART exist to work in the meso and local scale, WRF-FLEXPARTv6.2 and MM5v3-7.FLEXPARTv6.2, which use WRF and MM5 fields as meteorological input, respectively. Extensive tests will be performed with the MM5-driven version and additional preliminary ones with the WRF version. Dispersion calculations for CO and NOx will be performed in a receptor-oriented approach for three stations and with different meteorological input resolutions. The target stations will be Innsbruck, located at the bottom of the Inn valley, and Nordkette, located on the northern slopes of the valley. Source-receptor sensitivities (SRS) will be obtained to see the major sources which contribute to the measurements for

  3. Analysis of the impact of Seasat scatterometer data and horizontal resolution on GLA model simulations of the QE II storm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lenzen, Allen J.; Johnson, Donald R.; Atlas, Robert

    1993-01-01

    The impact of the Seasat-A satellite scatterometer wind data and the increased horizontal resolution on the Goddard Laboratory for Atmospheres model predictions of the Queen Elizabeth II (QE II) storm of 9-11 September 1978 was evaluated for four different GLA model simulations of the QE II storm. It is shown that the largest impact on the simulation was caused by doubling the model's horizontal resolution from 4 deg x 5 deg to 2 deg x 2.5 deg. The increased resolution resulted in a storm track which was much closer to the one observed, with a much deeper surface development, a stronger mass circulation, stronger heating, and stronger increase of angular momentum.

  4. Thermohaline Circulation Stability: A Box Model Study. Part II: Coupled Atmosphere-Ocean Model.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucarini, Valerio; Stone, Peter H.

    2005-02-01

    A thorough analysis of the stability of a coupled version of an interhemispheric three-box model of thermohaline circulation (THC) is presented. This study follows a similarly structured analysis of an uncoupled version of the same model presented in Part I of this paper. The model consists of a northern high-latitude box, a tropical box, and a southern high-latitude box, which can be thought of as corresponding to the northern, tropical, and southern Atlantic Ocean, respectively. This paper examines how the strength of THC changes when the system undergoes forcings representing global warming conditions.Since a coupled model is used, a direct representation of the radiative forcing is possible because the main atmospheric physical processes responsible for freshwater and heat fluxes are formulated separately. Each perturbation to the initial equilibrium is characterized by the total radiative forcing realized, by the rate of increase, and by the north-south asymmetry. Although only weakly asymmetric or symmetric radiative forcings are representative of physically reasonable conditions, general asymmetric forcings are considered in order to get a more complete picture of the mathematical properties of the system. The choice of suitably defined metrics makes it possible to determine the boundary dividing the set of radiative forcing scenarios that lead the system to equilibria characterized by a THC pattern similar to the present one, from those that drive the system to equilibria where the THC is reversed. This paper also considers different choices for the atmospheric transport parameterizations and for the ratio between the high-latitude and tropical radiative forcing. It is generally found that fast forcings are more effective than slow forcings in disrupting the present THC pattern, forcings that are stronger in the northern box are also more effective in destabilizing the system, and very slow forcings do not destabilize the system whatever their asymmetry

  5. Modelling reverberation mapping data - II. Dynamical modelling of the Lick AGN Monitoring Project 2008 data set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pancoast, Anna; Brewer, Brendon J.; Treu, Tommaso; Park, Daeseong; Barth, Aaron J.; Bentz, Misty C.; Woo, Jong-Hak

    2014-12-01

    We present dynamical modelling of the broad-line region (BLR) for a sample of five Seyfert 1 galaxies using reverberation mapping data taken by the Lick AGN Monitoring Project in 2008. By modelling the AGN continuum light curve and Hβ line profiles directly, we are able to constrain the geometry and kinematics of the BLR and make a measurement of the black hole mass that does not depend upon the virial factor, f, needed in traditional reverberation mapping analysis. We find that the geometry of the BLR is generally a thick disc viewed close to face-on. While the Hβ emission is found to come preferentially from the far side of the BLR, the mean size of the BLR is consistent with the lags measured with cross-correlation analysis. The BLR kinematics are found to be consistent with either inflowing motions or elliptical orbits, often with some combination of the two. We measure black hole masses of log _{10}(M_ BH/M_{odot })=6.62^{+0.10}_{-0.13} for Arp 151, 7.42^{+0.26}_{-0.27} for Mrk 1310, 7.59^{+0.24}_{-0.21} for NGC 5548, 6.37^{+0.21}_{-0.16} for NGC 6814, and 6.99^{+0.32}_{-0.25} for SBS 1116+583A. The f factors measured individually for each AGN are found to correlate with inclination angle, although not with M BH, L5100, or FWHM/σ of the emission line profile.

  6. FutureTox II: In vitro Data and In Silico Models for Predictive Toxicology

    PubMed Central

    Knudsen, Thomas B.; Keller, Douglas A.; Sander, Miriam; Carney, Edward W.; Doerrer, Nancy G.; Eaton, David L.; Fitzpatrick, Suzanne Compton; Hastings, Kenneth L.; Mendrick, Donna L.; Tice, Raymond R.; Watkins, Paul B.; Whelan, Maurice

    2015-01-01

    FutureTox II, a Society of Toxicology Contemporary Concepts in Toxicology workshop, was held in January, 2014. The meeting goals were to review and discuss the state of the science in toxicology in the context of implementing the NRC 21st century vision of predicting in vivo responses from in vitro and in silico data, and to define the goals for the future. Presentations and discussions were held on priority concerns such as predicting and modeling of metabolism, cell growth and differentiation, effects on sensitive subpopulations, and integrating data into risk assessment. Emerging trends in technologies such as stem cell-derived human cells, 3D organotypic culture models, mathematical modeling of cellular processes and morphogenesis, adverse outcome pathway development, and high-content imaging of in vivo systems were discussed. Although advances in moving towards an in vitro/in silico based risk assessment paradigm were apparent, knowledge gaps in these areas and limitations of technologies were identified. Specific recommendations were made for future directions and research needs in the areas of hepatotoxicity, cancer prediction, developmental toxicity, and regulatory toxicology. PMID:25628403

  7. Identification of age-dependent motor and neuropsychological behavioural abnormalities in a mouse model of Mucopolysaccharidosis Type II

    PubMed Central

    Gleitz, Hélène F. E.; O’Leary, Claire; Holley, Rebecca J.

    2017-01-01

    Severe mucopolysaccharidosis type II (MPS II) is a progressive lysosomal storage disease caused by mutations in the IDS gene, leading to a deficiency in the iduronate-2-sulfatase enzyme that is involved in heparan sulphate and dermatan sulphate catabolism. In constitutive form, MPS II is a multi-system disease characterised by progressive neurocognitive decline, severe skeletal abnormalities and hepatosplenomegaly. Although enzyme replacement therapy has been approved for treatment of peripheral organs, no therapy effectively treats the cognitive symptoms of the disease and novel therapies are in development to remediate this. Therapeutic efficacy and subsequent validation can be assessed using a variety of outcome measures that are translatable to clinical practice, such as behavioural measures. We sought to consolidate current knowledge of the cognitive, skeletal and motor abnormalities present in the MPS II mouse model by performing time course behavioural examinations of working memory, anxiety, activity levels, sociability and coordination and balance, up to 8 months of age. Cognitive decline associated with alterations in spatial working memory is detectable at 8 months of age in MPS II mice using spontaneous alternation, together with an altered response to novel environments and anxiolytic behaviour in the open-field. Coordination and balance on the accelerating rotarod were also significantly worse at 8 months, and may be associated with skeletal changes seen in MPS II mice. We demonstrate that the progressive nature of MPS II disease is also seen in the mouse model, and that cognitive and motor differences are detectable at 8 months of age using spontaneous alternation, the accelerating rotarod and the open-field tests. This study establishes neurological, motor and skeletal measures for use in pre-clinical studies to develop therapeutic approaches in MPS II. PMID:28207863

  8. Viscoelastic Model for Lung Parenchyma for Multi-Scale Modeling of Respiratory System, Phase II: Dodecahedral Micro-Model

    SciTech Connect

    Freed, Alan D.; Einstein, Daniel R.; Carson, James P.; Jacob, Rick E.

    2012-03-01

    In the first year of this contractual effort a hypo-elastic constitutive model was developed and shown to have great potential in modeling the elastic response of parenchyma. This model resides at the macroscopic level of the continuum. In this, the second year of our support, an isotropic dodecahedron is employed as an alveolar model. This is a microscopic model for parenchyma. A hopeful outcome is that the linkage between these two scales of modeling will be a source of insight and inspiration that will aid us in the final year's activity: creating a viscoelastic model for parenchyma.

  9. A Novel Mouse Model of a Patient Mucolipidosis II Mutation Recapitulates Disease Pathology*

    PubMed Central

    Paton, Leigh; Bitoun, Emmanuelle; Kenyon, Janet; Priestman, David A.; Oliver, Peter L.; Edwards, Benjamin; Platt, Frances M.; Davies, Kay E.

    2014-01-01

    Mucolipidosis II (MLII) is a lysosomal storage disorder caused by loss of N-acetylglucosamine-1-phosphotransferase, which tags lysosomal enzymes with a mannose 6-phosphate marker for transport to the lysosome. In MLII, the loss of this marker leads to deficiency of multiple enzymes and non-enzymatic proteins in the lysosome, leading to the storage of multiple substrates. Here we present a novel mouse model of MLII homozygous for a patient mutation in the GNPTAB gene. Whereas the current gene knock-out mouse model of MLII lacks some of the characteristic features of the human disease, our novel mouse model more fully recapitulates the human pathology, showing growth retardation, skeletal and facial abnormalities, increased circulating lysosomal enzymatic activities, intracellular lysosomal storage, and reduced life span. Importantly, MLII behavioral deficits are characterized for the first time, including impaired motor function and psychomotor retardation. Histological analysis of the brain revealed progressive neurodegeneration in the cerebellum with severe Purkinje cell loss as the underlying cause of the ataxic gait. In addition, based on the loss of Npc2 (Niemann-Pick type C 2) protein expression in the brain, the mice were treated with 2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin, a drug previously reported to rescue Purkinje cell death in a mouse model of Niemann-Pick type C disease. No improvement in brain pathology was observed. This indicates that cerebellar degeneration is not primarily triggered by loss of Npc2 function. This study emphasizes the value of modeling MLII patient mutations to generate clinically relevant mouse mutants to elucidate the pathogenic molecular pathways of MLII and address their amenability to therapy. PMID:25107912

  10. Towards multi-resolution global climate modeling with ECHAM6-FESOM. Part II: climate variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rackow, T.; Goessling, H. F.; Jung, T.; Sidorenko, D.; Semmler, T.; Barbi, D.; Handorf, D.

    2016-06-01

    This study forms part II of two papers describing ECHAM6-FESOM, a newly established global climate model with a unique multi-resolution sea ice-ocean component. While part I deals with the model description and the mean climate state, here we examine the internal climate variability of the model under constant present-day (1990) conditions. We (1) assess the internal variations in the model in terms of objective variability performance indices, (2) analyze variations in global mean surface temperature and put them in context to variations in the observed record, with particular emphasis on the recent warming slowdown, (3) analyze and validate the most common atmospheric and oceanic variability patterns, (4) diagnose the potential predictability of various climate indices, and (5) put the multi-resolution approach to the test by comparing two setups that differ only in oceanic resolution in the equatorial belt, where one ocean mesh keeps the coarse ~1° resolution applied in the adjacent open-ocean regions and the other mesh is gradually refined to ~0.25°. Objective variability performance indices show that, in the considered setups, ECHAM6-FESOM performs overall favourably compared to five well-established climate models. Internal variations of the global mean surface temperature in the model are consistent with observed fluctuations and suggest that the recent warming slowdown can be explained as a once-in-one-hundred-years event caused by internal climate variability; periods of strong cooling in the model (`hiatus' analogs) are mainly associated with ENSO-related variability and to a lesser degree also to PDO shifts, with the AMO playing a minor role. Common atmospheric and oceanic variability patterns are simulated largely consistent with their real counterparts. Typical deficits also found in other models at similar resolutions remain, in particular too weak non-seasonal variability of SSTs over large parts of the ocean and episodic periods of almost absent

  11. ANG II-induced hypertension in the VCD mouse model of menopause is prevented by estrogen replacement during perimenopause.

    PubMed

    Pollow, Dennis P; Romero-Aleshire, Melissa J; Sanchez, Jessica N; Konhilas, John P; Brooks, Heddwen L

    2015-12-15

    Premenopausal females are resistant to the development of hypertension, and this protection is lost after the onset of menopause, resulting in a sharp increase in disease onset and severity. However, it is unknown how a fluctuating ovarian hormone environment during the transition from perimenopause to menopause impacts the onset of hypertension, and whether interventions during perimenopause prevent disease onset after menopause. A gradual transition to menopause was induced by repeated daily injections of 4-vinylcyclohexene diepoxide (VCD). ANG II (800 ng·kg(-1)·min(-1)) was infused into perimenopausal and menopausal female mice for 14 days. A separate cohort of mice received 17β-estradiol replacement during perimenopause. ANG II infusion produced significantly higher mean arterial pressure (MAP) in menopausal vs. cycling females, and 17β-estradiol replacement prevented this increase. In contrast, MAP was not significantly different when ANG II was infused into perimenopausal and cycling females, suggesting that female resistance to ANG II-induced hypertension is intact during perimenopause. ANG II infusion caused a significant glomerular hypertrophy, and hypertrophy was not impacted by hormonal status. Expression levels of aquaporin-2 (AQP2), a collecting duct protein, have been suggested to reflect blood pressure. AQP2 protein expression was significantly downregulated in the renal cortex of the ANG II-infused menopause group, where blood pressure was increased. AQP2 expression levels were restored to control levels with 17β-estradiol replacement. This study indicates that the changing hormonal environment in the VCD model of menopause impacts the severity of ANG II-induced hypertension. These data highlight the utility of the ovary-intact VCD model of menopause as a clinically relevant model to investigate the physiological mechanisms of hypertension that occur in women during the transition into menopause.

  12. Dysfunctional Transforming Growth Factor-β Receptor II Accelerates Prostate Tumorigenesis in the TRAMP Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Pu, Hong; Collazo, Joanne; Jones, Elisabeth; Gayheart, Dustin; Sakamoto, Shinichi; Vogt, Adam; Mitchell, Bonnie; Kyprianou, Natasha

    2009-01-01

    The contribution of a dysfunctional TGF-β type II receptor (TGFβRII) to prostate cancer initiation and progression was investigated in an in vivo mouse model. Transgenic mice harboring the dominant-negative mutant TGF-β type II receptor (DNTGFβRII) in mouse epithelial cell were crossed with the TRAMP prostate cancer transgenic mouse to characterize the in vivo consequences of inactivated TGF-β signaling on prostate tumor initiation and progression. Histopathological diagnosis of prostate specimens from the TRAMP+/DNTGFβRII double transgenic mice, revealed the appearance of early malignant changes and subsequently highly aggressive prostate tumors at a younger age, compared to littermates TRAMP+/Wt TGFβRII mice. Immunohistochemical and western blotting analysis revealed significantly increased proliferative and apoptotic activities, as well as vascularity and macrophage infiltration that correlated with an elevated VEGF and MCP-1 protein levels in prostates from TRAMP+/DNTGFβRII+ mice. An epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT)-effect was also detected in prostates of TRAMP+/DNTGFβRII mice, as documented by the loss of epithelial markers (E-cadherin and β-catenin) and upregulation of mesenchymal markers (N-cadherin) and EMT-transcription factor Snail. A significant increase in the androgen receptor (AR) mRNA and protein levels was associated with the early onset of prostate tumorigenesis in TRAMP+/DNTGFβRII mice. Our results indicate that in vivo disruption of TGF-β signaling accelerates the pathological malignant changes in the prostate by altering the kinetics of prostate growth and inducing EMT. The study also suggests that a dysfunctional TGFβRII augments AR expression and promotes inflammation in early stage tumor growth thus conferring a significant contribution by TGF-β to prostate cancer progression. PMID:19738062

  13. Analysis of TOPAZ II and SPACE-R space nuclear power plants using a modified thermionic model. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Habedank, O.D.

    1993-03-01

    Models based on the TDS thermionic diode model were developed for TOPAZ II and SPACER nuclear power systems. Several parameter studies were conducted with the TOPAZ II model. These determined system performance and efficiency while varying the following: (1) Coolant flow inlet temperatures. (2) Rate of coolant temperature change. (3) Power profile of the core. (4) Cesium reservoir temperature. Analysis of results indicate the model accurately represented the TOPAZ II system, underestimating published data by 10%. Coolant flow studies indicate that raising coolant temperatures up to 100 K higher increases system power by up to 5%. Additional increases in temperature result in gradual performance degradation. Varying the axial power profile of the core from the actual peaked profile to a flat profile results in a negligible 0.3% change in system performance. The peaked profile used in TOPAZ II produces the highest system efficiency of all the profiles modeled. The cesium pressure study indicates the system is operating above optimum cesium pressure and system performance is strongly dependent on cesium pressure. Increasing cesium reservoir temperature above design temperature by 30 K decreases system efficiency by 30%.

  14. Icosahedral quasicrystal decoration models. II. Optimization under realistic Al-Mn potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Mihalkovic, M. |; Zhu, W.; Henley, C.L.; Phillips, R.

    1996-04-01

    We have constructed and relaxed over 200 different finite structure models for the quasicrystal {ital i}-AlMn based on decorations of the {open_quote}{open_quote}canonical-cell tiling.{close_quote}{close_quote} We adopted {ital ab} {ital initio}-based pair potentials with strong Friedel oscillations, which reproduce the phase diagram of real Al-Mn intermetallic crystal structures fairly well. Our various decoration rules encompass cases with face-centered icosahedral (FCI) symmetry and with simple icosahedral (SI) symmetry, and include additional variations in the occupancy and/or chemistry of certain site types. Each decoration was applied to 11 distinct periodic approximants of the tiling. We found that (i) the relaxed atomic positions of each site type can be closely approximated by fixed positions on each tile type, even though the environments (beyond the first neighbor) are inequivalent. (ii) Models with simple icosahedral (SI) space-group symmetry were better than those with face-centered icosahedral (FCI) space-group symmetry. (iii) {open_quote}{open_quote}Loose{close_quote}{close_quote} decorations, containing voids almost large enough for an atom, were better than the {open_quote}{open_quote}dense{close_quote}{close_quote} decorations which were suggested by packing considerations. (iv) Our results depended on using the realistic potentials; {ital short}-range potentials favor the {open_quote}{open_quote}dense{close_quote}{close_quote} structures, and many details depend on the second or further oscillations in the potentials. (v) For our best model, there is relatively little variation of the energy when tiles are rearranged, i.e., a {ital random}-{ital tiling} {ital model} is a good zero-order description of the system. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  15. The treatment of mixing in core helium burning models - II. Constraints from cluster star counts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constantino, Thomas; Campbell, Simon W.; Lattanzio, John C.; van Duijneveldt, Adam

    2016-03-01

    The treatment of convective boundaries during core helium burning is a fundamental problem in stellar evolution calculations. In the first paper of this series, we showed that new asteroseismic observations of these stars imply they have either very large convective cores or semiconvection/partially mixed zones that trap g modes. We probe this mixing by inferring the relative lifetimes of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) and horizontal branch (HB) from R2, the observed ratio of these stars in recent HST photometry of 48 Galactic globular clusters. Our new determinations of R2 are more self-consistent than those of previous studies and our overall calculation of R2 = 0.117 ± 0.005 is the most statistically robust now available. We also establish that the luminosity difference between the HB and the AGB clump is Δ log {L}_HB^AGB = 0.455 ± 0.012. Our results accord with earlier findings that standard models predict a lower R2 than is observed. We demonstrate that the dominant sources of uncertainty in models are the prescription for mixing and the stochastic effects that can result from its numerical treatment. The luminosity probability density functions that we derive from observations feature a sharp peak near the AGB clump. This constitutes a strong new argument against core breathing pulses, which broaden the predicted width of the peak. We conclude that the two mixing schemes that can match the asteroseismology are capable of matching globular cluster observations, but only if (i) core breathing pulses are avoided in models with a semiconvection/partially mixed zone, or (ii) that models with large convective cores have a particular depth of mixing beneath the Schwarzschild boundary during subsequent early-AGB `gravonuclear' convection.

  16. Infertility and recurrent miscarriage with complex II deficiency-dependent mitochondrial oxidative stress in animal models.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Takamasa; Yasuda, Kayo; Miyazawa, Masaki; Mitsushita, Junji; Johnson, Thomas E; Hartman, Phil S; Ishii, Naoaki

    2016-04-01

    Oxidative stress is associated with some forms of both male and female infertility. However, there is insufficient knowledge of the influence of oxidative stress on the maintenance of a viable pregnancy, including pregnancy complications and fetal development. There are a number of animal models for understanding age-dependent decrease of reproductive ability and diabetic embryopathy, especially abnormal spermatogenesis, oogenesis and embryogenesis with mitochondrial dysfunctions. Several important processes occur in mitochondria, including ATP synthesis, calcium ion storage, induction of apoptosis and production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). These events have different effects on the several aspects of reproductive function. Tet-mev-1 conditional transgenic mice, developed after studies with the mev-1 mutant of the nematode C. elegans, offer the ability to carefully regulate expression of doxycycline-induced mutated SDHC(V69E) levels and hence modulate endogenous oxidative stress. The mev-1 models have served to illuminate the effects of complex II deficiency-dependent mitochondrial ROS production, although interestingly they maintain normal mitochondrial and intracellular ATP levels. In this review, the reproductive dysfunctions are presented focusing on fertility potentials in each gamete, early embryogenesis, maternal conditions with placental function and neonatal development.

  17. Atlantic-Arctic exchange in a series of ocean model simulations (CORE-II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Christina; Behrens, Erik; Biastoch, Arne

    2014-05-01

    In this study we aim to improve the understanding of exchange processes between the North Atlantic and the Arctic Ocean. The Nordic Sea builds an important connector between these regions, by receiving and modifying warm and saline Atlantic waters, and by providing dense overflow as a backbone of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC). Using a hierarchy of global ocean/sea-ice models, the specific role of the Nordic Seas, both providing a feedback with the AMOC, but also as a modulator of the Atlantic water flowing into the Arctic Ocean, is examined. The models have been performed under the CORE-II protocol, in which atmospheric forcing of the past 60 years was applied in a subsequent series of 5 iterations. During the course of this 300-year long integration, the AMOC shows substantial changes, which are correlated with water mass characteristics in the Denmark Strait overflow characteristics. Quantitative analyses using Lagrangian trajectories explore the impact of these trends on the Arctic Ocean through the Barents Sea and the Fram Strait.

  18. Simulation and modeling of the Gamble II self-pinched ion beam transport experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, D.V.; Ottinger, P.F.; Hinshelwood, D.D.

    1999-07-01

    Progress in numerical simulations and modeling of the self-pinched ion beam transport experiment at the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) is reviewed. In the experiment, a 1.2-MeV, 100-kA proton beam enters a 1-m long, transport region filled with a low pressure gas (30--250 mTorr helium, or 1 Torr air). The time-dependent velocity distribution function of the injected ion beam is determined from an orbit code that uses a pinch-reflex ion diode model and the measured voltage and current from this diode on the Gamble II generator at NRL. This distribution function is used as the beam input condition for numerical simulations carried out using the hybrid particle-in-cell code IPROP. Results of the simulations will be described, and detailed comparisons will be made with various measurements, including line-integrated electron-density, proton-fluence, and beam radial-profile measurements. As observed in the experiment, the simulations show evidence of self-pinching for helium pressures between 35 and 80 mTorr. Simulations and measurements in 1 Torr air show ballistic transport. The relevance of these results to ion-driven inertial confinement fusion will be discussed.

  19. CBSD Version II component models of the IR celestial background. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Kennealy, J.P.; Glaudell, G.A.

    1990-12-07

    CBSD Version II addresses the development of algorithms and software which implement realistic models of all the primary celestial background phenomenologies, including solar system, galactic, and extra-galactic features. During 1990, the CBSD program developed and refined IR scene generation models for the zodiacal emission, thermal emission from asteroids and planets, and the galactic point source background. Chapters in this report are devoted to each of those areas. Ongoing extensions to the point source module for extended source descriptions of nebulae and HII regions are briefly discussed. Treatment of small galaxies will also be a natural extension of the current CBSD point source module. Although no CBSD module yet exists for interstellar IR cirrus, MRC has been working closely with the Royal Aerospace Establishment in England to achieve a data-base understanding of cirrus fractal characteristics. The CBSD modules discussed in Chapters 2, 3, and 4 are all now operational and have been employed to generate a significant variety of scenes. CBSD scene generation capability has been well accepted by both the IR astronomy community and the DOD user community and directly supports the SDIO SSGM program.

  20. [Opiate dependence type II or antisocial: Cloninger's Psychobiological Model and its usefullness in addictions].

    PubMed

    Benito, Ana; Haro, Gonzalo; Orengo, Teresa; González, Marisa; Fornés, Teresa; Mateu, César

    2012-01-01

    The aim was to analyze the relationship between Cloninger's dimensions and Personality Disorders (PD) (with DSM-IV criteria) in opiate dependents. The study was Cross-sectional. The sampling of 196 patients with opiate dependence was consecutive. All were receiving treatment in an inpatient detoxification unit. Cloninger's Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI), International Personality Disorders Examination (IPDE) and a Substance Use Questionnaire were used. Character's dimensions as Self-directness and Cooperation were related with PD when scored low. Opposite to Cloninger descriptions, high scores of Self-transcendence were related with presence of PD. Related to temperamental dimensions, cluster A was related with low scores of Reward Dependence (RD) and cluster C with high scores of Harm Avoidance (HA). Otherwise, in cluster B, while Borderline PD had high scores of Novelty Seeking (as high HA), the Antisocial PD only were related to low scores of RD. RD dimension seems useful to differ from presence or absence of Antisocial PD, also when alcohol consumption is considered. Cloninger's Model of Personality is useful in drug dependents for the definition of the different PD, as well as for probable PD's aggregation. This model also helps to create subtypes in opiate dependents as the antisocial or type II.

  1. A Pressure-dependent Model for the Regulation of Lipoprotein Lipase by Apolipoprotein C-II*

    PubMed Central

    Meyers, Nathan L.; Larsson, Mikael; Olivecrona, Gunilla; Small, Donald M.

    2015-01-01

    Apolipoprotein C-II (apoC-II) is the co-factor for lipoprotein lipase (LPL) at the surface of triacylglycerol-rich lipoproteins. LPL hydrolyzes triacylglycerol, which increases local surface pressure as surface area decreases and amphipathic products transiently accumulate at the lipoprotein surface. To understand how apoC-II adapts to these pressure changes, we characterized the behavior of apoC-II at multiple lipid/water interfaces. ApoC-II adsorption to a triacylglycerol/water interface resulted in large increases in surface pressure. ApoC-II was exchangeable at this interface and desorbed on interfacial compressions. These compressions increase surface pressure and mimic the action of LPL. Analysis of gradual compressions showed that apoC-II undergoes a two-step desorption, which indicates that lipid-bound apoC-II can exhibit at least two conformations. We characterized apoC-II at phospholipid/triacylglycerol/water interfaces, which more closely mimic lipoprotein surfaces. ApoC-II had a large exclusion pressure, similar to that of apoC-I and apoC-III. However, apoC-II desorbed at retention pressures higher than those seen with the other apoCs. This suggests that it is unlikely that apoC-I and apoC-III inhibit LPL via displacement of apoC-II from the lipoprotein surface. Upon rapid compressions and re-expansions, re-adsorption of apoC-II increased pressure by lower amounts than its initial adsorption. This indicates that apoC-II removed phospholipid from the interface upon desorption. These results suggest that apoC-II regulates the activity of LPL in a pressure-dependent manner. ApoC-II is provided as a component of triacylglycerol-rich lipoproteins and is the co-factor for LPL as pressure increases. Above its retention pressure, apoC-II desorbs and removes phospholipid. This triggers release of LPL from lipoproteins. PMID:26026161

  2. Equilibrium and kinetic modelling of cadmium(II) biosorption by nonliving algal biomass Oedogonium sp. from aqueous phase.

    PubMed

    Gupta, V K; Rastogi, A

    2008-05-01

    The biosorption of cadmium(II) ions on Oedogonium sp. is studied in a batch system with respect to initial pH, algal dose, contact time and the temperature. The algal biomass exhibited the highest cadmium(II) uptake capacity at 25 degrees C, at the initial pH value of 5.0 in 55 min and at the initial cadmium(II) ion concentration of 200 mg L(-1). Biosorption capacity decreased from 88.9 to 80.4 mg g(-1) with an increase in temperature from 25 to 45 degrees C at this initial cadmium(II) concentration. Uptake kinetics follows the pseudo-second-order model and equilibrium is well described by Langmuir isotherm. Isotherms have been used to determine thermodynamic parameters of the process, viz., free energy change, enthalpy change and entropy change. FTIR analysis of algal biomass revealed the presence of amino, carboxyl, hydroxyl and carbonyl groups, which are responsible for biosorption of metal ions. Acid pretreatments did not substantially increase metal sorption capacity but alkali like NaOH pretreatment slightly enhanced the metal removal ability of the biomass. During repeated sorption/desorption cycles at the end of fifth cycle, Cd(II) sorption decreased by 18%, with 15-20% loss of biomass. Nevertheless, Oedogonium sp. appears to be a good sorbent for removing metal Cd(II) from aqueous phase.

  3. Kinetic and isotherm modeling of Cd (II) adsorption by L-cysteine functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes as adsorbent.

    PubMed

    Taghavi, Mahmoud; Zazouli, Mohammad Ali; Yousefi, Zabihollah; Akbari-adergani, Behrouz

    2015-11-01

    In this study, multi-walled carbon nanotubes were functionalized by L-cysteine to show the kinetic and isotherm modeling of Cd (II) ions onto L-cysteine functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes. The adsorption behavior of Cd (II) ion was studied by varying parameters including dose of L-MWCNTs, contact time, and cadmium concentration. Equilibrium adsorption isotherms and kinetics were also investigated based on Cd (II) adsorption tests. The results showed that an increase in contact time and adsorbent dosage resulted in increase of the adsorption rate. The optimum condition of the Cd (II) removal process was found at pH=7.0, 15 mg/L L-MWCNTs dosage, 6 mg/L cadmium concentration, and contact time of 60 min. The removal percent was equal to 89.56 at optimum condition. Langmuir and Freundlich models were employed to analyze the experimental data. The data showed well fitting with the Langmuir model (R2=0.994) with q max of 43.47 mg/g. Analyzing the kinetic data by the pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order equations revealed that the adsorption of cadmium using L-MWSNTs following the pseudo-second-order kinetic model with correlation coefficients (R2) equals to 0.998, 0.992, and 0.998 for 3, 6, and 9 mg/L Cd (II) concentrations, respectively. The experimental data fitted very well with the pseudo-second-order. Overall, treatment of polluted solution to Cd (II) by adsorption process using L-MWCNT can be considered as an effective technology.

  4. INFLUENCE OF TYPE II DIABETES, OBESITY, AND EXPOSURE TO 2, 3, 7, 8-TETRACHLORODIBENZO-P-DIOXIN (TCDD) EXPOSURE ON THE EXPRESSION OF HEPATIC CYP1A2 IN A MURIN MODEL OF TYPE II DIABETES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Influence of type II diabetes, obesity and exposure 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) exposure on the expression of hepatic CYPIA2 in a murine model of type II diabetes. SJ Godin', VM Richardson2, JJ Diliberto2, LS Birnbaum', MJ DeVito2; 'Curriculum In Toxicology, UNC-CH...

  5. Experiment, modeling and optimization of liquid phase adsorption of Cu(II) using dried and carbonized biomass of Lyngbya majuscula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushwaha, Deepika; Dutta, Susmita

    2015-07-01

    The present work aims at evaluation of the potential of cyanobacterial biomass to remove Cu(II) from simulated wastewater. Both dried and carbonized forms of Lyngbya majuscula, a cyanobacterial strain, have been used for such purpose. The influences of different experimental parameters viz., initial Cu(II) concentration, solution pH and adsorbent dose have been examined on sorption of Cu(II). Kinetic and equilibrium studies on Cu(II) removal from simulated wastewater have been done using both dried and carbonized biomass individually. Pseudo-second-order model and Langmuir isotherm have been found to fit most satisfactorily to the kinetic and equilibrium data, respectively. Maximum 87.99 and 99.15 % of Cu(II) removal have been achieved with initial Cu(II) concentration of 10 and 25 mg/L for dried and carbonized algae, respectively, at an adsorbent dose of 10 g/L for 20 min of contact time and optimum pH 6. To optimize the removal process, Response Surface Methodology has been employed using both the dried and carbonized biomass. Removal with initial Cu(II) concentration of 20 mg/L, with 0.25 g adsorbent dose in 50 mL solution at pH 6 has been found to be optimum with both the adsorbents. This is the first ever attempt to make a comparative study on Cu(II) removal using both dried algal biomass and its activated carbon. Furthermore, regeneration of matrix was attempted and more than 70% and 80% of the adsorbent has been regenerated successfully in the case of dried and carbonized biomass respectively upto the 3rd cycle of regeneration study.

  6. Coordination of two high-affinity hexamer peptides to copper(II) and palladium(II) models of the peptide-metal chelation site on IMAC resins

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y.; Pasquinelli, R.; Ataai, M.; Koepsel, R.R.; Kortes, R.A.; Shepherd, R.E.

    2000-03-20

    The coordination of peptides Ser-Pro-His-His-Gly-Gly (SPHHGG) and (His){sub 6} (HHHHHH) to [Pd{sup II}(mida)(D{sub 2}O)] (mida{sup 2{minus}} = N-methyliminodiacetate) was studied by {sup 1}H NMR as model reactions for Cu{sup II}(iminodiacetate)-immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) sites. This is the first direct physical description of peptide coordination for IMAC. A three-site coordination is observed which involves the first, third, and fourth residues along the peptide chain. The presence of proline in position 2 of SPHHGG achieves the best molecular mechanics and bonding angles in the coordinated peptide and enhances the interaction of the serine amino nitrogen. Histidine coordination of H{sub 1}, H{sub 3}, and H{sub 4} of (His){sub 6} and H{sub 3} and H{sub 4} of SPHHGG was detected by {sup 1}H NMR contact shifts and H/D exchange of histidyl protons. The EPR spectra of SPHHGG and HHHHHH attached to the [Cu{sup II}(mida)] unit were obtained for additional modeling of IMAC sites. EPR parameters of the parent [Cu(mida)(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}] complex are representative: g{sub zz} = 2.31; g{sub yy} = 2.086; g{sub xx} = 2.053; A{sub {vert_bar}{vert_bar}} = 161 G; A{sub N} = 19G (three line, one N coupling). Increased rhombic distortion is detected relative to the starting aqua complex in the order of [Cu(mida)L] for distortion of HHHHHH > SPHHGG > (H{sub 2}O){sub 2}. The lowering of symmetry is also seen in the decrease in the N-shf coupling, presumably to the imino nitrogen of mida{sup 2{minus}} in the order 19 G (H{sub 2}O), 16 G (SPHHGG) and 11 G (HHHHHH). Visible spectra of the [Cu(mida)(SPHHGG)] and [Cu(mida)(HHHHHH)] as a function of pH indicate coordination of one histidyl donor at ca. 4.5, two in the range of pH 5--7, and two chelate ring attachments involving the terminal amino donor for SPHHGG or another histidyl donor of HHHHHH in the pH domain of 7--8 in agreement with the [Pd{sup II}(mida)L] derivatives which form the two

  7. A simple model for polyproline II structure in unfolded states of alanine-based peptides

    PubMed Central

    Pappu, Rohit V.; Rose, George D.

    2002-01-01

    The striking similarity between observed circular dichroism spectra of nonprolyl homopolymers and that of regular left-handed polyproline II (PII) helices prompted Tiffany and Krimm to propose in 1968 that unordered peptides and unfolded proteins are built of PII segments linked by sharp bends. A large body of experimental evidence, accumulated over the past three decades, provides compelling evidence in support of the original hypothesis of Tiffany and Krimm. Of particular interest are the recent experiments of Shi et al. who find significant PII structure in a short unfolded alanine-based peptide. What is the physical basis for PII helices in peptide and protein unfolded states? The widely accepted view is that favorable chain-solvent hydrogen bonds lead to a preference for dynamical fluctuations about noncooperative PII helices in water. Is this preference simply a consequence of hydrogen bonding or is it a manifestation of a more general trend for unfolded states which are appropriately viewed as chains in a good solvent? The prevalence of closely packed interiors in folded proteins suggests that under conditions that favor folding, water—which is a better solvent for itself than for any polypeptide chain—expels the chain from its midst, thereby maximizing chain packing. Implicit in this view is a complementary idea: under conditions that favor unfolding, chain-solvent interactions are preferred and in a so-called good solvent, chain packing density is minimized. In this work we show that minimization of chain packing density leads to preferred fluctuations for short polyalanyl chains around canonical, noncooperative PII-like conformations. Minimization of chain packing is modeled using a purely repulsive soft-core potential between polypeptide atoms. Details of chain-solvent interactions are ignored. Remarkably, the simple model captures the essential physics behind the preference of short unfolded alanine-based peptides for PII helices. Our results are

  8. Comprehensive Study of Educational Technology Programs Authorized from 1989-1992. Volume III: Level II Model Technology School Projects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Far West Lab. for Educational Research and Development, San Francisco, CA.

    This report, the third in a series of six, evaluates the 10 school districts that received grants from the California Department of Education to develop Level II Model Technology School (MTS) Projects intended to enhance instruction and student learning through a combination of curriculum improvement and integration of technology within a single…

  9. Model I & II Organizations: Examining Organizational Learning in Institutions Participating in the Academy for the Assessment of Student Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haywood, Antwione Maurice

    2012-01-01

    The Academy was an assessment enhancement program created by the HLC to help institutions strengthen and improve the assessment of student learning. Using a multiple case study approach, this study applies Argyis and Schon's (1976) Theory of Action to explore the espoused values and existence of Model I and II behavior characteristics. Argyis…

  10. Comprehensive Study of Educational Technology Programs Authorized from 1989-1992. Volume II: Model Technology Schools, Level I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Far West Lab. for Educational Research and Development, San Francisco, CA.

    This report, the second in a series of six, presents the findings of evaluative studies of six Level I Model Technology School sites which were conducted as part of Phase II of the California Educational Technology Assessment Program. The project sites are: Alhambra City School District (two schools); Cupertino Union Elementary District and…

  11. Model based design and analysis of phase II HIV-1 trials.

    PubMed

    Rekić, Dinko; Röshammar, Daniel; Simonsson, Ulrika S H

    2013-08-01

    This work explores the advantages of a model based drug development (MBDD) approach for the design and analysis of antiretroviral phase II trials. Two different study settings were investigated: (1) a 5-arm placebo-controlled parallel group dose-finding/proof of concept (POC) study and (2) a comparison of investigational drug and competitor. Studies were simulated using a HIV-1 dynamics model in NONMEM. The Monte-Carlo Mapped Power method determined the sample size required for detecting a dose-response relationship and a significant difference in effect compared to the competitor using a MBDD approach. Stochastic simulation and re-estimation were used for evaluation of model parameter precision and bias given different sample sizes. Results were compared to those from an unpaired, two-sided t test and ANOVA (p ≤ 0.05). In all scenarios, the MBDD approach resulted in smaller study sizes and more precisely estimated treatment effect than conventional statistical analysis. Using a MBDD approach, a sample size of 15 patients could be used to show POC and estimate ED50 with a good precision (relative standard error, 25.7 %). A sample size of 10 patients per arm was needed using the MBDD approach for detecting a difference in treatment effect of ≥20 % at 80 % power, a 3.4-fold reduction in sample size compared to a t test. The MBDD approach can be used to achieve more precise dose-response characterization facilitating decision making and dose selection. If necessitated, the sample size needed to reach a desired power can potentially be reduced compared to traditional statistical analyses. This may allow for comparison against competitors already in early clinical studies.

  12. Dinuclear zinc(II) complexes with hydrogen bond donors as structural and functional phosphatase models.

    PubMed

    Bosch, Simone; Comba, Peter; Gahan, Lawrence R; Schenk, Gerhard

    2014-09-02

    It is becoming increasingly apparent that the secondary coordination sphere can have a crucial role in determining the functional properties of biomimetic metal complexes. We have therefore designed and prepared a variety of ligands as metallo-hydrolase mimics, where hydrogen bonding in the second coordination sphere is able to influence the structure of the primary coordination sphere and the substrate binding. The assessment of a structure-function relationship is based on derivates of 2,6-bis{[bis(pyridin-2-ylmethyl)amino]methyl}-4-methylphenol (HBPMP = HL(1)) and 2-{[bis(pyridin-2-ylmethyl)amino]methyl}-6-{[(2-hydroxybenzyl)(pyridin-2-ylmethyl)amino]methyl}-4-methylphenol (H2BPBPMP = H2L(5)), well-known phenolate-based ligands for metallo-hydrolase mimics. The model systems provide similar primary coordination spheres but site-specific modifications in the secondary coordination sphere. Pivaloylamide and amine moieties were chosen to mimic the secondary coordination sphere of the phosphatase models, and the four new ligands H3L(2), H3L(3), HL(4), and H4L(6) vary in the type and geometric position of the H-bond donors and acceptors, responsible for the positioning of the substrate and release of the product molecules. Five dinuclear Zn(II) complexes were prepared and structurally characterized in the solid, and four also in solution. The investigation of the phosphatase activity of four model complexes illustrates the impact of the H-bonding network: the Michaelis-Menten constants (catalyst-substrate binding) for all complexes that support hydrogen bonding are smaller than for the reference complex, and this generally leads to higher catalytic efficiency and higher turnover numbers.

  13. A model of large-scale instabilities in the Jovian troposphere. I - Linear model. II - Quasi-linear model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orsolini, Y.; Leovy, C. B.

    1993-12-01

    A quasi-geostrophic midlatitude beta-plane linear model is here used to study whether the decay with height and meridional circulations of near-steady jets in the tropospheric circulation of Jupiter arise as a means of stabilizing a deep zonal flow that extends into the upper troposphere. The model results obtained are analogous to the stabilizing effect of meridional shear on baroclinic instabilities. In the second part of this work, a quasi-linear model is used to investigate how an initially barotropically unstable flow develops a quasi-steady shear zone in the lower scale heights of the model domain, due to the action of the eddy fluxes.

  14. Modeling and control of tubular solid-oxide fuel cell systems: II. Nonlinear model reduction and model predictive control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanandaji, Borhan M.; Vincent, Tyrone L.; Colclasure, Andrew M.; Kee, Robert J.

    This paper describes a systematic method for developing model-based controllers for solid-oxide fuel cell (SOFC) systems. To enhance the system efficiency and to avoid possible damages, the system must be controlled within specific operating conditions, while satisfying a load requirement. Model predictive control (MPC) is a natural choice for control implementation. However, to implement MPC, a low-order model is needed that captures the dominant dynamic behavior over the operating range. A linear parameter varying (LPV) model structure is developed and applied to obtain a control-oriented dynamic model of the SOFC stack. This approach effectively reduces a detailed physical model to a form that is compatible with MPC. The LPV structure includes nonlinear scheduling functions that blend the dynamics of locally linear models to represent nonlinear dynamic behavior over large operating ranges. Alternative scheduling variables are evaluated, with cell current being shown to be an appropriate choice. Using the reduced-order model, an MPC controller is designed that can respond to the load requirement over a wide range of operation changes while maintaining input-output variables within specified constraints. To validate the approach, the LPV-based MPC controller is applied to the high-order physical model.

  15. Salt II: Illusion and Reality. World Order Models Project. Working Paper Number Nine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johansen, Robert C.

    The document discusses miscalculations by public officials, arms control experts, journalists, and the general public regarding the Strategic Arms Limitation Talks; assesses the Salt II treaty; and suggests criteria for appraising Salt II. The objective is to stimulate research, education, dialogue, and political action which will contribute to a…

  16. Search for non-standard model signatures in the WZ/ZZ final state at CDF run II

    SciTech Connect

    Norman, Matthew

    2009-01-01

    This thesis discusses a search for non-Standard Model physics in heavy diboson production in the dilepton-dijet final state, using 1.9 fb -1 of data from the CDF Run II detector. New limits are set on the anomalous coupling parameters for ZZ and WZ production based on limiting the production cross-section at high š. Additionally limits are set on the direct decay of new physics to ZZ andWZ diboson pairs. The nature and parameters of the CDF Run II detector are discussed, as are the influences that it has on the methods of our analysis.

  17. Pulsed Bessel-Gauss beams: a depleted wave model for type II second-harmonic generation.

    PubMed

    Sabaeian, Mohammad; Motazedian, Alireza; Mohammad Rezaee, Mostafa; Jalil-Abadi, Fatemeh Sedaghat

    2014-11-10

    In this work, a three-dimensional and time-dependent nonlinear wave model to describe the generation of pulsed Bessel-Gauss second-harmonic waves (SHWs) is presented. Three coupled equations, two for ordinary and extraordinary fundamental waves and one for extraordinary SHWs, describing type II second-harmonic generation (SHG) in a KTiOPO4 (KTP) crystal were solved by considering the depletion of fundamental waves (FWs). The results examined the validity of nondepleted wave approximation against the energy of pulses, beam spot size, and interaction length. It was shown that for pulses with spot sizes of ωf=80  μm and energy of 0.8j, the nonlinear interaction was accomplished over a distance of ∼5  mm. Therefore, for KTP crystals with lengths longer than 5 mm, the nondepleted wave approximation can no longer be valid. To be valid, the crystal must be shorter than the interaction length, i.e., 5 mm.

  18. CHROMOSPHERIC DIAGNOSIS WITH Ca II LINES: FORWARD MODELING IN FORWARD SCATTERING. I

    SciTech Connect

    Carlin, E. S.; Ramos, A. Asensio

    2015-03-01

    This paper presents a synthetic tomography of the quiet solar chromosphere formed by spatial maps of scattering polarization. It has been calculated for the Ca II 8498, 8542, and 3934 Å lines by solving the non-LTE radiative transfer problem of the second kind in a three-dimensional atmosphere model obtained from realistic magneto-hydrodynamical simulations. Our investigation focuses on the linear polarization signals induced by kinematics, radiation field anisotropy, and the Hanle effect in forward-scattering geometry. Thus, instead of considering slit profiles at the limb as normally done in the study of the second solar spectrum, we synthesize and analyze spatial maps of polarization at the disk center. This allows us to understand the spatial signatures of dynamics and magnetic field in the linear polarization in order to discriminate them observationally. Our results suggest some ideas for chromospheric diagnosis that will be developed throughout a series of papers. In particular, Hanle polarity inversion lines and dynamic Hanle diagrams are two concepts introduced in the present work. We find that chromospheric dynamics and magnetic field topology create spatial polarization fingerprints that trace the dynamic situation of the plasma and the magnetic field. This allows us to reconstruct the magnetic field intensity in the middle chromosphere using Stokes V along grooves of null linear polarization. We finally address the problems of diagnosing Hanle saturation and kinematic amplification of scattering signals using Hanle diagrams.

  19. Human mast cells decrease SLPI levels in type II – like alveolar cell model, in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Hollander, Camilla; Nyström, Max; Janciauskiene, Sabina; Westin, Ulla

    2003-01-01

    Background Mast cells are known to accumulate at sites of inflammation and upon activation to release their granule content, e.g. histamine, cytokines and proteases. The secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI) is produced in the respiratory mucous and plays a role in regulating the activity of the proteases. Result We have used the HMC-1 cell line as a model for human mast cells to investigate their effect on SLPI expression and its levels in cell co-culture experiments, in vitro. In comparison with controls, we found a significant reduction in SLPI levels (by 2.35-fold, p < 0.01) in a SLPI-producing, type II-like alveolar cell line, (A549) when co-cultured with HMC-1 cells, but not in an HMC-1-conditioned medium, for 96 hours. By contrast, increased SLPI mRNA expression (by 1.58-fold, p < 0.05) was found under the same experimental conditions. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed mast cell transmigration in co-culture with SLPI-producing A549 cells for 72 and 96 hours. Conclusion These results indicate that SLPI-producing cells may assist mast cell migration and that the regulation of SLPI release and/or consumption by mast cells requires interaction between these cell types. Therefore, a "local relationship" between mast cells and airway epithelial cells might be an important step in the inflammatory response. PMID:12952550

  20. Modeling Pb (II) adsorption from aqueous solution by ostrich bone ash using adaptive neural-based fuzzy inference system.

    PubMed

    Amiri, Mohammad J; Abedi-Koupai, Jahangir; Eslamian, Sayed S; Mousavi, Sayed F; Hasheminejad, Hasti

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the performance of Adaptive Neural-Based Fuzzy Inference System (ANFIS) model in estimating the efficiency of Pb (II) ions removal from aqueous solution by ostrich bone ash, a batch experiment was conducted. Five operational parameters including adsorbent dosage (C(s)), initial concentration of Pb (II) ions (C(o)), initial pH, temperature (T) and contact time (t) were taken as the input data and the adsorption efficiency (AE) of bone ash as the output. Based on the 31 different structures, 5 ANFIS models were tested against the measured adsorption efficiency to assess the accuracy of each model. The results showed that ANFIS5, which used all input parameters, was the most accurate (RMSE = 2.65 and R(2) = 0.95) and ANFIS1, which used only the contact time input, was the worst (RMSE = 14.56 and R(2) = 0.46). In ranking the models, ANFIS4, ANFIS3 and ANFIS2 ranked second, third and fourth, respectively. The sensitivity analysis revealed that the estimated AE is more sensitive to the contact time, followed by pH, initial concentration of Pb (II) ions, adsorbent dosage, and temperature. The results showed that all ANFIS models overestimated the AE. In general, this study confirmed the capabilities of ANFIS model as an effective tool for estimation of AE.

  1. Validated Competing Event Model for the Stage I-II Endometrial Cancer Population

    SciTech Connect

    Carmona, Ruben; Gulaya, Sachin; Murphy, James D.; Rose, Brent S.; Wu, John; Noticewala, Sonal; McHale, Michael T.; Yashar, Catheryn M.; Vaida, Florin; Mell, Loren K.

    2014-07-15

    Purpose/Objectives(s): Early-stage endometrial cancer patients are at higher risk of noncancer mortality than of cancer mortality. Competing event models incorporating comorbidity could help identify women most likely to benefit from treatment intensification. Methods and Materials: 67,397 women with stage I-II endometrioid adenocarcinoma after total hysterectomy diagnosed from 1988 to 2009 were identified in Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) and linked SEER-Medicare databases. Using demographic and clinical information, including comorbidity, we sought to develop and validate a risk score to predict the incidence of competing mortality. Results: In the validation cohort, increasing competing mortality risk score was associated with increased risk of noncancer mortality (subdistribution hazard ratio [SDHR], 1.92; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.60-2.30) and decreased risk of endometrial cancer mortality (SDHR, 0.61; 95% CI, 0.55-0.78). Controlling for other variables, Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI) = 1 (SDHR, 1.62; 95% CI, 1.45-1.82) and CCI >1 (SDHR, 3.31; 95% CI, 2.74-4.01) were associated with increased risk of noncancer mortality. The 10-year cumulative incidences of competing mortality within low-, medium-, and high-risk strata were 27.3% (95% CI, 25.2%-29.4%), 34.6% (95% CI, 32.5%-36.7%), and 50.3% (95% CI, 48.2%-52.6%), respectively. With increasing competing mortality risk score, we observed a significant decline in omega (ω), indicating a diminishing likelihood of benefit from treatment intensification. Conclusion: Comorbidity and other factors influence the risk of competing mortality among patients with early-stage endometrial cancer. Competing event models could improve our ability to identify patients likely to benefit from treatment intensification.

  2. Equilibrium and kinetic modelling of Cd(II) biosorption by algae Gelidium and agar extraction algal waste.

    PubMed

    Vilar, Vítor J P; Botelho, Cidália M S; Boaventura, Rui A R

    2006-01-01

    In this study an industrial algal waste from agar extraction has been used as an inexpensive and effective biosorbent for cadmium (II) removal from aqueous solutions. This biosorbent was compared with the algae Gelidium itself, which is the raw material for agar extraction. Equilibrium data follow both Langmuir and Redlich-Peterson models. The parameters of Langmuir equilibrium model are q(max)=18.0 mgg(-1), b=0.19 mgl(-1) and q(max)=9.7 mgg(-1), b=0.16 mgl(-1), respectively for Gelidium and the algal waste. Kinetic experiments were conducted at initial Cd(II) concentrations in the range 6-91 mgl(-1). Data were fitted to pseudo-first- and second-order Lagergren models. For an initial Cd(II) concentration of 91 mgl(-1) the parameters of the pseudo-first-order Lagergren model are k(1,ads)=0.17 and 0.87 min(-1); q(eq)=16.3 and 8.7 mgg(-1), respectively, for Gelidium and algal waste. Kinetic constants vary with the initial metal concentration. The adsorptive behaviour of biosorbent particles was modelled using a batch reactor mass transfer kinetic model. The model successfully predicts Cd(II) concentration profiles and provides significant insights on the biosorbents performance. The homogeneous diffusivity, D(h), is in the range 0.5-2.2 x10(-8) and 2.1-10.4 x10(-8)cm(2)s(-1), respectively, for Gelidium and algal waste.

  3. New LUX and PandaX-II results illuminating the simplest Higgs-portal dark matter models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xiao-Gang; Tandean, Jusak

    2016-12-01

    Direct searches for dark matter (DM) by the LUX and PandaX-II Collaborations employing xenon-based detectors have recently come up with the most stringent limits to date on the spin-independent elastic scattering of DM off nucleons. For Higgs-portal scalar DM models, the new results have precluded any possibility of accommodating low-mass DM as suggested by the DAMA and CDMS II Si experiments utilizing other target materials, even after invoking isospin-violating DM interactions with nucleons. In the simplest model, SM+D, which is the standard model plus a real singlet scalar named darkon acting as the DM candidate, the LUX and PandaX-II limits rule out DM masses roughly from 4 to 450 GeV, except a small range around the resonance point at half of the Higgs mass where the interaction cross-section is near the neutrino-background floor. In the THDM II+D, which is the type-II two-Higgs-doublet model combined with a darkon, the region excluded in the SM+D by the direct searches can be recovered due to suppression of the DM effective interactions with nucleons at some values of the ratios of Higgs couplings to the up and down quarks, making the interactions significantly isospin-violating. However, in either model, if the 125-GeV Higgs boson is the portal between the dark and SM sectors, DM masses less than 50 GeV or so are already ruled out by the LHC constraint on the Higgs invisible decay. In the THDM II+D, if the heavier CP -even Higgs boson is the portal, theoretical restrictions from perturbativity, vacuum stability, and unitarity requirements turn out to be important instead and exclude much of the region below 100 GeV. For larger DM masses, the THDM II+D has plentiful parameter space that corresponds to interaction cross-sections under the neutrino-background floor and therefore is likely to be beyond the reach of future direct searches without directional sensitivity.

  4. Integrated structural model and membrane targeting mechanism of the human ESCRT-II complex

    PubMed Central

    Im, Young Jun; Hurley, James H.

    2008-01-01

    Summary ESCRT-II plays a pivotal role in receptor downregulation and multivesicular body biogenesis, and is conserved from yeast to humans. The crystal structures of two human ESCRT-II complex structures have been determined at 2.6 and 2.9 Å resolution, respectively. The complex has three lobes and contains one copy each of VPS22 and VPS36, and two copies of VPS25. The structure reveals a dynamic helical domain to which both the VPS22 and VPS36 subunits contribute, which connects the GLUE domain to the rest of the ESCRT-II core. Hydrodynamic analysis shows that intact ESCRT-II has a compact, closed conformation. ESCRT-II binds to the ESCRT-I VPS28 C-terminal domain subunit through a helix immediately C-terminal to the VPS36-GLUE domain. ESCRT-II is targeted to endosomal membranes by the lipid binding activities of both the Vps36 GLUE domain and the first helix of Vps22. These data provide a unifying structural and functional framework for the ESCRT-II complex. PMID:18539118

  5. Integrated structural model and membrane targeting mechanism of the human ESCRT-II complex

    SciTech Connect

    Im, Young Jun; Hurley, James H.

    2009-01-15

    ESCRT-II plays a pivotal role in receptor downregulation and multivesicular body biogenesis and is conserved from yeast to humans. The crystal structures of two human ESCRT-II complex structures have been determined at 2.6 and 2.9 {angstrom} resolution, respectively. The complex has three lobes and contains one copy each of VPS22 and VPS36 and two copies of VPS25. The structure reveals a dynamic helical domain to which both the VPS22 and VPS36 subunits contribute that connects the GLUE domain to the rest of the ESCRT-II core. Hydrodynamic analysis shows that intact ESCRT-II has a compact, closed conformation. ESCRT-II binds to the ESCRT-I VPS28 C-terminal domain subunit through a helix immediately C-terminal to the VPS36-GLUE domain. ESCRT-II is targeted to endosomal membranes by the lipid-binding activities of both the Vps36 GLUE domain and the first helix of Vps22. These data provide a unifying structural and functional framework for the ESCRT-II complex.

  6. Coordination mode of pentadentate ligand derivative of 5-amino-1,3,4-thiadiazole-2-thiol with nickel(II) and copper(II) metal ions: Synthesis, spectroscopic characterization, molecular modeling and fungicidal study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, Sulekh; Gautam, Seema; Kumar, Amit; Madan, Molly

    2015-02-01

    Complexes of nickel(II), and copper(II) were synthesized with pantadentate ligand i.e. 3,3‧-thiodipropionicacid-bis(5-amino-1,3,4-thiadiazole-2-thiol) (L). The ligand was synthesized by the condensation of thiodipropionic acid and 5-amino-1,3,4-thiadiazole-2-thiol in 1:2 ratio, respectively. Synthesized ligand was characterized by elemental analysis, mass, 1H NMR, IR, and molecular modeling. All the complexes were characterized by elemental analysis, molar conductance, magnetic moment, IR, electronic spectra, ESR, and molecular modeling. The newly synthesized complexes possessed general composition [M(L)X2] where M = Ni(II), Cu(II), L = pantadentate ligand and X = Cl-, CH3COO-. The IR spectral data indicated that the ligand behaved as a pantadentate ligand and coordinated to the metal ion through N2S3 donor atoms. The molar conductance value of Ni(II), and Cu(II) complexes in DMSO corresponded to their electrolytic behavior. On the basis of spectral study, octahedral and tetragonal geometry was assigned for Ni(II) and Cu(II) complexes, respectively. In vitro fungicidal study of ligand and its complexes was investigated against fungi Candida albicans, Candida parapsilosis, Candidia krusei, and Candida tropicalis by means of well diffusion method.

  7. Coordination mode of pentadentate ligand derivative of 5-amino-1,3,4-thiadiazole-2-thiol with nickel(II) and copper(II) metal ions: synthesis, spectroscopic characterization, molecular modeling and fungicidal study.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Sulekh; Gautam, Seema; Kumar, Amit; Madan, Molly

    2015-02-05

    Complexes of nickel(II), and copper(II) were synthesized with pantadentate ligand i.e. 3,3'-thiodipropionicacid-bis(5-amino-1,3,4-thiadiazole-2-thiol) (L). The ligand was synthesized by the condensation of thiodipropionic acid and 5-amino-1,3,4-thiadiazole-2-thiol in 1:2 ratio, respectively. Synthesized ligand was characterized by elemental analysis, mass, (1)H NMR, IR, and molecular modeling. All the complexes were characterized by elemental analysis, molar conductance, magnetic moment, IR, electronic spectra, ESR, and molecular modeling. The newly synthesized complexes possessed general composition [M(L)X2] where M = Ni(II), Cu(II), L = pantadentate ligand and X = Cl(-), CH3COO(-). The IR spectral data indicated that the ligand behaved as a pantadentate ligand and coordinated to the metal ion through N2S3 donor atoms. The molar conductance value of Ni(II), and Cu(II) complexes in DMSO corresponded to their electrolytic behavior. On the basis of spectral study, octahedral and tetragonal geometry was assigned for Ni(II) and Cu(II) complexes, respectively. In vitro fungicidal study of ligand and its complexes was investigated against fungi Candida albicans, Candida parapsilosis, Candidia krusei, and Candida tropicalis by means of well diffusion method.

  8. A two-dimensional model study of the QBO signal in SAGE II NO2 and O3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chipperfield, M. P.; Gray, L. J.; Kinnersley, J. S.; Zawodny, J.

    1994-01-01

    Calculations of the quasi biennial oscillation (QBO) signal in Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) II O3 and NO2 data between 1984 and 1991 are presented and have been investigated by using a two-dimensional model. The isentropic 2D model is a fully interactive radiative-dynamical-chemical model in which the eddy fluxes of chemical species are calculated in a consistent manner. The QBO in the model has been forced by relaxing the equatorial zonal wind toward the observations at Singapore allowing the comparison of the model with observations from specific years. The model reproduces the observed vertical structure of the equatorial ozone anomaly with the well-known transition from dynamical to photochemical control at around 28km. The model also reproduces the observed vertical structure of the SAGE II observed NO2 anomaly. The model studies have shown that it is the QBO modulation of NO2 which the main cause of QBO signal in O3 above 30 km. The model also reproduces the observed latitudinal structure of the QBO signals in O3 and NO2. Due to the differing horizontal distribution of O3 and NO(y) the ozone signal shows a distinct phase change in the subtropics whereas the NO2 anomaly gives a broader signal.

  9. The Chemical Properties of Milky Way and M31 Globular Clusters. II. Stellar Population Model Predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beasley, Michael A.; Brodie, Jean P.; Strader, Jay; Forbes, Duncan A.; Proctor, Robert N.; Barmby, Pauline; Huchra, John P.

    2005-03-01

    We derive ages, metallicities, and abundance ratios ([α/Fe]) from the integrated spectra of 23 globular clusters in M31 by employing multivariate fits to two different stellar population models. We also perform a parallel analysis on 21 Galactic globular clusters as a consistency check and in order to facilitate a differential analysis. Our analysis shows that the M31 globular clusters separate into three distinct components in age and metallicity; we identify an old, metal-poor group (seven clusters), an old, metal-rich group (10 clusters), and an intermediate-age (3-6 Gyr), intermediate-metallicity ([Z/H]~-1) group (six clusters). This third group is not identified in the Galactic globular cluster sample. We also see evidence that the old, metal-rich Galactic globular clusters are 1-2 Gyr older than their counterparts in M31. The majority of globular clusters in both samples appear to be enhanced in α-elements, but the degree of enhancement is rather model-dependent. The intermediate-age globular clusters appear to be the most enhanced, with [α/Fe]~0.4. These clusters are clearly depressed in CN with respect to the models and the bulk of the M31 and Milky Way sample. Compared with the bulge of M31, M32, and NGC 205, these clusters most resemble the stellar populations in NGC 205 in terms of age, metallicity, and CN abundance. We infer horizontal branch morphologies for the M31 clusters using the Rose Ca II index and demonstrate that blue horizontal branches are not leading to erroneous age estimates in our analysis. We discuss and reject as unlikely the hypothesis that these objects are in fact foreground stars contaminating the optical catalogs. The intermediate-age clusters have generally higher velocities than the bulk of the M31 cluster population. Spatially, three of these clusters are projected onto the bulge region, and the remaining three are distributed at large radii. We discuss these objects within the context of the build-up of the M31 halo and

  10. Mixed ligand Cu(II)N2O2 complexes: biomimetic synthesis, activities in vitro and biological models, theoretical calculations.

    PubMed

    Li, Chen; Yin, Bing; Kang, Yifan; Liu, Ping; Chen, Liang; Wang, Yaoyu; Li, Jianli

    2014-12-15

    Three new mixed ligand Cu(II)N2O2 complexes, namely, [Cu(II)(2-A-6-MBT)2(m-NB)2] (1), [Cu(II)(2-ABT)2(m-NB)2] (2), and [Cu(II)(2-ABT)2(o-NB)2] (3), (2-A-6-MBT = 2-amino-6-methoxybenzothiazole, m-NB = m-nitrobenzoate, 2-ABT = 2-aminobenzothiazole, and o-NB = o-nitrobenzoate), have been prepared by the biomimetic synthesis strategy, and their structures were determined by X-ray crystallography studies and spectral methods. These complexes exhibited the effective superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity and catecholase activity. On the basis of the experimental data and computational studies, the structure-activity relationship for these complexes was investigated. The results reveal that electron-accepting abilities of these complexes and coordination geometries have significant effects on the SOD activity and catecholase activity. Then, we found that 1 and 2 exerted potent intracellular antioxidant capacity in the model of H2O2-induced oxidative stress based on HeLa cervical cancer cells, which were screened out by the cytotoxicity assays of different kinds of cells. Furthermore, 1-3 showed the favorable biocompatibility in two different biological models: Saccharomyces cerevisiae and human vascular endothelial cells. These biological experimental data are indicative of the promising application potential of these complexes in biology and pharmacology.

  11. Heterogeneous Concurrent Modeling and Design in Java (Volume 1: Introduction to Ptolemy II)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-04-01

    which receives support from the National Science Foundation (NSF awards #0720882 ( CSR -EHS: PRET), #0647591 ( CSR -SGER), and #0720841 ( CSR -CPS)), the U...Foundation (NSF awards #0720882 ( CSR -EHS: PRET), #0647591 ( CSR -SGER), and #0720841 ( CSR -CPS)), the U. S. Army Research Office (ARO #W911NF-07-2...Ptolemy II configuration [26]. The ability to create such separately branded and packaged subsets of Ptolemy II is a major feature. The semantics of hybrid

  12. Raman Scattered He II 4332 and Photoionization Model in the Symbiotic Star V1016 Cygni

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, H.-W.; Heo, J.-E.; Lee, B.-C.

    2014-08-01

    Symbiotic stars are wide binary systems of a white dwarf and a mass losing giant. They exhibit unique Raman scattered features as a result of inelastic scattering of far UV line photons by atomic hydrogen. Co-existence of a far UV He II emission region and a thick H I region in symbiotic stars is necessary for the formation of Raman-scattered features blueward of hydrogen Balmer emission lines. Being a single electron atom, He II has the same atomic structure as the hydrogen atom and hence emits far UV emission lines that are slightly blueward of hydrogen Lyman lines. These far UV He II emission lines can be Raman scattered to appear blueward of hydrogen Balmer lines. In particular, the symbiotic star V1016 Cyg is found to exhibit Raman scattered He II 4332 feature in the BOES high resolution spectrum. Our profile fitting of Raman scattered He II 4332 is consistent with the mass loss geometry proposed by Jung & Lee (2004). We use the photoionization code ‘ CLOUDY' to estimate the far UV He II emission lines and make comparisons with the observed Raman scattered He II 4332 blueward of Hγ in the high resolution echelle V1016 Cyg. The emission nebula is assumed to be of uniform density of 108 cm-3 that is illuminated by a black body characterized by its temperature and total luminosity. With our comparisons we conclude that the Raman scattered He II features are consistent with the existence of a photoionized nebula by a hot black body source with temperature 7-8× 104 K with a luminosity 1038erg s-1.

  13. Final Report: Phase II Nevada Water Resources Data, Modeling, and Visualization (DMV) Center

    SciTech Connect

    Jackman, Thomas; Minor, Timothy; Pohll, Gregory

    2013-07-22

    Water is unquestionably a critical resource throughout the United States. In the semi-arid west -- an area stressed by increase in human population and sprawl of the built environment -- water is the most important limiting resource. Crucially, science must understand factors that affect availability and distribution of water. To sustain growing consumptive demand, science needs to translate understanding into reliable and robust predictions of availability under weather conditions that could be average but might be extreme. These predictions are needed to support current and long-term planning. Similar to the role of weather forecast and climate prediction, water prediction over short and long temporal scales can contribute to resource strategy, governmental policy and municipal infrastructure decisions, which are arguably tied to the natural variability and unnatural change to climate. Change in seasonal and annual temperature, precipitation, snowmelt, and runoff affect the distribution of water over large temporal and spatial scales, which impact the risk of flooding and the groundwater recharge. Anthropogenic influences and impacts increase the complexity and urgency of the challenge. The goal of this project has been to develop a decision support framework of data acquisition, digital modeling, and 3D visualization. This integrated framework consists of tools for compiling, discovering and projecting our understanding of processes that control the availability and distribution of water. The framework is intended to support the analysis of the complex interactions between processes that affect water supply, from controlled availability to either scarcity or deluge. The developed framework enables DRI to promote excellence in water resource management, particularly within the Lake Tahoe basin. In principle, this framework could be replicated for other watersheds throughout the United States. Phase II of this project builds upon the research conducted during

  14. Plumes and Blooms: Modeling the Case II Waters of the Santa Barbara Channel. Chapter 15

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, D. A.; Maritorena, S.; Nelson, N. B.

    2003-01-01

    The goal of the Plumes and Blooms (PnB) project is to develop, validate and apply to imagery state-of-the-art ocean color algorithms for quantifying sediment plumes and phytoplankton blooms for the Case II environment of the Santa Barbara Channel. We conduct monthly to twice-monthly transect observations across the Santa Barbara Channel to develop an algorithm development and product validation data set. The PnB field program started in the summer of 1996. At each of the 7 PnB stations, a complete verification bio-geo-optical data set is collected. Included are redundant measures of apparent optical properties (remote sensing reflectance and diffuse attenuation spectra), as well as in situ profiles of spectral absorption, beam attenuation and backscattering coefficients. Water samples are analyzed for component in vivo absorption spectra, fluorometric chlorophyll, phytoplankton pigment (by the SDSU CHORS laboratory), and inorganic nutrient concentrations. A primary goal is to use the PnB field data set to objectively tune semi-analytical models of ocean color for this site and apply them using available satellite imagery (SeaWiFS and MODIS). In support of this goal, we have also been addressing SeaWiFS ocean color and AVHRR SST imagery. We also are using the PnB data set to address time/space variability of water masses in the Santa Barbara Channel and its relationship to the 1997/1998 El Nino. However, the comparison between PnB field observations and satellite estimates of primary products has been disappointing. We find that field estimates of water-leaving radiance, L(sub wN)(lambda), correspond poorly to satellite estimates for both SeaWiFS and MODIS local area coverage imagery. We believe this is due to poor atmospheric correction due to complex mixtures of aerosol types found in these near-coastal regions. Last, we remain active in outreach activities.

  15. Electronic Structure of a Cu(II)-Alkoxide Complex Modeling Intermediates in Copper-Catalyzed Alcohol Oxidations.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Ellen C; Porter, Thomas R; Barrows, Charles J; Kaminsky, Werner; Mayer, James M; Stoll, Stefan

    2016-03-30

    In the copper-catalyzed oxidation of alcohols to aldehydes, a Cu(II)-alkoxide (Cu(II)-OR) intermediate is believed to modulate the αC-H bond strength of the deprotonated substrate to facilitate the oxidation. As a structural model for these intermediates, we characterized the electronic structure of the stable compound Tp(tBu)Cu(II)(OCH2CF3) (Tp(tBu) = hydro-tris(3-tert-butyl-pyrazolyl)borate) and investigated the influence of the trifluoroethoxide ligand on the electronic structure of the complex. The compound exhibits an electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrum with an unusually large gzz value of 2.44 and a small copper hyperfine coupling Azz of 40 × 10(-4) cm(-1) (120 MHz). Single-crystal electron nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) spectra show that the unpaired spin population is highly localized on the copper ion (≈68%), with no more than 15% on the ethoxide oxygen. Electronic absorption and magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) spectra show weak ligand-field transitions between 5000 and 12,000 cm(-1) and an intense ethoxide-to-copper charge transfer (LMCT) transition at 24,000 cm(-1), resulting in the red color of this complex. Resonance Raman (rR) spectroscopy reveals a Cu-O stretch mode at 592 cm(-1). Quantum chemical calculations support the interpretation and assignment of the experimental data. Compared to known Cu(II)-thiolate and Cu(II)-alkylperoxo complexes from the literature, we found an increased σ interaction in the Cu(II)-OR bond that results in the spectroscopic features. These insights lay the basis for further elucidating the mechanism of copper-catalyzed alcohol oxidations.

  16. Electronic Structure of a CuII-Alkoxide Complex Modeling Intermediates in Copper-Catalyzed Alcohol Oxidations

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, Ellen C.; Porter, Thomas R.; Barrows, Charles J.; Kaminsky, Werner; Mayer, James M.; Stoll, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    In the copper-catalyzed oxidation of alcohols to aldehydes, a CuII-alkoxide (CuII-OR) intermediate is believed to modulate the αC-H bond strength of the deprotonated substrate to facilitate the oxidation. As a structural model for these intermediates, we characterized the electronic structure of the stable compound TptBuCuII(OCH2CF3) (TptBu = (hydro-tris (3-tert-butyl-pyrazolyl) borate) and investigated the influence of the trifluoroethoxide ligand on the electronic structure of the complex. The compound exhibits an electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrum with an unusually large gzz value of 2.44 and a small copper hyperfine coupling Azz of 40·10−4 cm−1 (120 MHz). Single-crystal electron nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) spectra show that the unpaired spin population is highly localized on the copper ion (≈ 68 %), with no more than 15 % on the ethoxide oxygen. Electronic absorption and magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) spectra show weak ligand-field transitions between 5000 and 12000 cm−1 and an intense ethoxide-to-copper charge transfer (LMCT) transition at 24000 cm−1, resulting in the red color of this complex. Resonance Raman (rR) spectroscopy reveals a Cu-O stretch mode at 592 cm−1. Quantum chemical calculations support the interpretation and assignment of the experimental data. Compared to known CuII-thiolate and CuII-alkylperoxo complexes from the literature, we found an increased σ interaction in the CuII-OR bond that results in the spectroscopic features. These insights lay the basis for further elucidating the mechanism of copper-catalyzed alcohol oxidations. PMID:26907976

  17. An exploratory study of proficient undergraduate Chemistry II students' application of Lewis's model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Sumudu R.

    This exploratory study was based on the assumption that proficiency in chemistry must not be determined exclusively on students' declarative and procedural knowledge, but it should be also described as the ability to use variety of reasoning strategies that enrich and diversify procedural methods. The study furthermore assumed that the ability to describe the structure of a molecule using Lewis's model and use it to predict its geometry as well as some of its properties is indicative of proficiency in the essential concepts of covalent bonding and molecule structure. The study therefore inquired into the reasoning methods and procedural techniques of proficient undergraduate Chemistry II students when solving problems, which require them to use Lewis's model. The research design included an original survey, designed by the researcher for this study, and two types of interviews, with students and course instructors. The purpose of the survey was two-fold. First and foremost, the survey provided a base for the student interview selection, and second it served as the foundation for the inquiry into the strategies the student use when solving survey problems. Twenty two students were interviewed over the course of the study. The interview with six instructors allowed to identify expected prior knowledge and skills, which the students should have acquired upon completion of the Chemistry I course. The data, including videos, audios, and photographs of the artifacts produced by students during the interviews, were organized and analyzed manually and using QSR NVivo 10. The research found and described the differences between proficient and non-proficient students' reasoning and procedural strategies when using Lewis's model to describe the structure of a molecule. One of the findings clearly showed that the proficient students used a variety of cues to reason, whereas other students used one memorized cue, or an algorithm, which often led to incorrect representations in

  18. A model of nitrous oxide evolution from soil driven by rainfall events. I - Model structure and sensitivity. II - Model applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Changsheng, LI; Frolking, Steve; Frolking, Tod A.

    1992-01-01

    Simulations of N2O and CO2 emissions from soils were conducted with a rain-event driven, process-oriented model (DNDC) of nitrogen and carbon cycling processes in soils. The magnitude and trends of simulated N2O (or N2O + N2) and CO2 emissions were consistent with the results obtained in field experiments. The successful simulation of these emissions from the range of soil types examined demonstrates that the DNDC will be a useful tool for the study of linkages among climate, soil-atmosphere interactions, land use, and trace gas fluxes.

  19. Assessing Inter-Model Continuity Between the Section II and Section III Conceptualizations of Borderline Personality Disorder in DSM-5.

    PubMed

    Evans, Chloe M; Simms, Leonard J

    2017-03-02

    DSM-5 includes 2 competing models of borderline personality disorder (BPD) in Sections II and III. Empirical comparisons between these models are required to understand and improve intermodel continuity. We compared Section III BPD traits to Section II BPD criteria assessed via semistructured interviews in 455 current/recent psychiatric patients using correlation and regression analyses, and also evaluated the incremental predictive power of other Section III traits. In addition, we tested the hypothesis that self-harm would incrementally predict BPD Criterion 5 over the Section III traits. Results supported Section III BPD traits as an adequate representation of traditional BPD symptomatology, although modifications that would increase intermodel continuity were identified. Finally, we found support for the incremental validity of suspiciousness, anhedonia, perceptual dysregulation, and self-harm, suggesting possible gaps in the Section III PD trait definitions. (PsycINFO Database Record

  20. MEDSLIK-II, a Lagrangian marine oil spill model for short-term forecasting - Part 1: Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Dominicis, M.; Pinardi, N.; Zodiatis, G.

    2013-03-01

    The processes of transport, diffusion and transformation of surface oil in seawater can be simulated using a Lagrangian model formalism coupled with Eulerian circulation models. This paper describes the formalism and the conceptual assumptions of a Lagrangian marine oil slick numerical model and re-writes the constitutive equations in a modern mathematical framework. The Lagrangian numerical representation of the oil slick requires three different state variables: the slick, the particle and the structural state variables. Transformation processes (evaporation, spreading, dispersion and coastal adhesion) act on the slick state variables, while particles variables are used to model the transport and diffusion processes. The slick and particle variables are recombined together to compute the oil concentration in water, a structural state variable. The mathematical and numerical formulation of oil transport, diffusion and transformation processes described in this paper, together with the many simplifying hypothesis and parameterizations, form the basis of a new, open source Lagrangian surface oil spill model, so-called MEDSLIK-II. Part 2 of this paper describes the applications of MEDSLIK-II to oil spill simulations that allow the validation of the model results and the study of the sensitivity of the simulated oil slick to different model numerical parameterizations.

  1. Dynamic regime marginal structural mean models for estimation of optimal dynamic treatment regimes, Part II: proofs of results.

    PubMed

    Orellana, Liliana; Rotnitzky, Andrea; Robins, James M

    2010-03-03

    In this companion article to "Dynamic Regime Marginal Structural Mean Models for Estimation of Optimal Dynamic Treatment Regimes, Part I: Main Content" [Orellana, Rotnitzky and Robins (2010), IJB, Vol. 6, Iss. 2, Art. 7] we present (i) proofs of the claims in that paper, (ii) a proposal for the computation of a confidence set for the optimal index when this lies in a finite set, and (iii) an example to aid the interpretation of the positivity assumption.

  2. Dynamic Regime Marginal Structural Mean Models for Estimation of Optimal Dynamic Treatment Regimes, Part II: Proofs of Results*

    PubMed Central

    Orellana, Liliana; Rotnitzky, Andrea; Robins, James M.

    2010-01-01

    In this companion article to “Dynamic Regime Marginal Structural Mean Models for Estimation of Optimal Dynamic Treatment Regimes, Part I: Main Content” [Orellana, Rotnitzky and Robins (2010), IJB, Vol. 6, Iss. 2, Art. 7] we present (i) proofs of the claims in that paper, (ii) a proposal for the computation of a confidence set for the optimal index when this lies in a finite set, and (iii) an example to aid the interpretation of the positivity assumption. PMID:20405047

  3. Structural models for Cu(II) bound to the fragment 92-96 of the human prion protein.

    PubMed

    Grande-Aztatzi, Rafael; Rivillas-Acevedo, Lina; Quintanar, Liliana; Vela, Alberto

    2013-01-24

    The prion protein (PrP(C)) binds Cu(II) in its N-terminal region, and it is associated to a group of neurodegenerative diseases termed transmissible spongiform encephalopaties (TSEs). The isoform PrP(Sc), derived from the normal PrP(C), is the pathogenic agent of TSEs. Using spectroscopic techniques (UV-vis absorption, circular dichroism, and electron paramagnetic resonance) and electronic structure calculations, we obtained a structural description for the different pH-dependent binding modes of Cu(II) to the PrP(92-96) fragment. We have also evaluated the possibility of water molecule ligation to the His96-bound copper ion. Geometry-optimized structural models that reproduce the spectroscopic features of these complexes are presented. Two Cu(II) binding modes are relevant at physiological pH: 4N and 3NO equatorial coordination modes; these are best described by models with no participation of water molecules in the coordination sphere of the metal ion. In contrast, the 2N2O and N3O coordination modes that are formed at lower pH involve the coordination of an axial water molecule. This study underscores the importance of including explicit water molecules when modeling copper binding sites in PrP(C).

  4. Complex of manganese (II) with curcumin: Spectroscopic characterization, DFT study, model-based analysis and antiradical activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorgannezhad, Lena; Dehghan, Gholamreza; Ebrahimipour, S. Yousef; Naseri, Abdolhossein; Nazhad Dolatabadi, Jafar Ezzati

    2016-04-01

    The complex formation between curcumin (Cur) and Manganese (II) chloride tetrahydrate (MnCl2.4H2O) was studied by UV-Vis and IR spectroscopy. Spectroscopic data suggest that Cur can chelate Manganese cations. A simple multi-wavelength model-based method was used to define stability constant for complexation reaction regardless of the spectra overlapping of components. Also, pure spectra and concentration profiles of all components were extracted using this method. Density functional theory (DFT) was also used to view insight into complexation mechanism. Antioxidant activity of Cur and Cur-Mn(II) complex was evaluated using 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) scavenging method. Bond dissociation energy (BDE), the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO), lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) and Molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) of Cur and the complex also were calculated at PW91/TZ2P level of theory using ADF 2009.01 package. The experimental results show that Cur has a higher DPPH radical scavenging activity than Cur-Mn(II). This observation is theoretically justified by means of lower BDE and higher HOMO and LUMO energy values of Cur ligand as compared with those of Cur-Mn(II) complex.

  5. Combined Modeling of Acceleration, Transport, and Hydrodynamic Response in Solar Flares. II. Inclusion of Radiative Transfer with RADYN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubio da Costa, Fatima; Liu, Wei; Petrosian, Vahé; Carlsson, Mats

    2015-11-01

    Solar flares involve complex processes that are coupled and span a wide range of temporal, spatial, and energy scales. Modeling such processes self-consistently has been a challenge in the past. Here we present results from simulations that couple particle kinetics with hydrodynamics (HD) of the atmospheric plasma. We combine the Stanford unified Fokker-Planck code that models particle acceleration and transport with the RADYN HD code that models the atmospheric response to collisional heating by accelerated electrons through detailed radiative transfer calculations. We perform simulations using two different electron spectra, one an ad hoc power law and the other predicted by the model of stochastic acceleration by turbulence or plasma waves. Surprisingly, the later model, even with energy flux \\ll {10}10 {erg} {{{s}}}-1 {{cm}}-2, can cause “explosive” chromospheric evaporation and drive stronger up- and downflows (and HD shocks). This is partly because our acceleration model, like many others, produces a spectrum consisting of a quasi-thermal component plus a power-law tail. We synthesize emission-line profiles covering different heights in the lower atmosphere, including Hα 6563 Å, He ii 304 Å, Ca ii K 3934 Å, and Si iv 1393 Å. One interesting result is the unusual high temperature (up to a few times 105 K) of the formation site of He ii 304 Å, which is expected owing to photoionization-recombination under flare conditions, compared to those in the quiet Sun dominated by collisional excitation. When compared with observations, our results can constrain the properties of nonthermal electrons and thus the poorly understood particle acceleration mechanism.

  6. Phylogenetic relationships and protein modelling revealed two distinct subfamilies of group II HKT genes between crop and model grasses.

    PubMed

    Ariyarathna, H A Chandima K; Francki, Michael G

    2016-07-01

    Molecular evolution of large protein families in closely related species can provide useful insights on structural functional relationships. Phylogenetic analysis of the grass-specific group II HKT genes identified two distinct subfamilies, I and II. Subfamily II was represented in all species, whereas subfamily I was identified only in the small grain cereals and possibly originated from an ancestral gene duplication post divergence from the coarse grain cereal lineage. The core protein structures were highly analogous despite there being no more than 58% amino acid identity between members of the two subfamilies. Distinctly variable regions in known functional domains, however, indicated functional divergence of the two subfamilies. The subsets of codons residing external to known functional domains predicted signatures of positive Darwinian selection potentially identifying new domains of functional divergence and providing new insights on the structural function and relationships between protein members of the two subfamilies.

  7. Solar Irradiance Variations Modelled from Ca II K Excess and Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogler, F. L.; Brandt, P. N.; Otruba, W.; Hanslmeier, A.

    The facular contribution (Δ S(λ)/S(λ))_{f} to the variation of the total solar irradiance Δ S(λ)/S(λ), for two continuum wavelengths and for a period of 60 not consecutive days in 1999, is calculated according to two different methods, namely via RISE/PSPT Ca II K images and via magnetograms of the MDI instrument on board of the SOHO spacecraft. The results are correlated with the values of the total irradiance channel of the VIRGO instrument on board of SOHO. The correlation coefficient for the first method (via Ca II K images) is 0.55, and 0.23 for the second method (via magnetograms). Particularly with regard to faculae, Ca II K irradiance appears to be much more representative than the line-of-sight magnetic field. For use of the magnetograms the relationship between the Ca II K excess E_{k} and the line-of-sight magnetic flux density |B| is analysed. E_{k} is measured in dependence on the two variables μ and |B|. A multivariate fit yields a compact presentation of this function and the exponent β of the power law E_{k}=α\\cdot|B|^{β} is determined; the values 0.48≤ β ≤ 0.57 agree with those found by Harvey and White (1999).

  8. FORUM - FutureTox II: In vitro Data and In Silico Models for Predictive Toxicology

    EPA Science Inventory

    FutureTox II, a Society of Toxicology Contemporary Concepts in Toxicology workshop, was held in January, 2014. The meeting goals were to review and discuss the state of the science in toxicology in the context of implementing the NRC 21st century vision of predicting in vivo resp...

  9. DISPOSITION OF TCDD IN A MOUSE MODEL OF OBESITY AND TYPE II DIABETESE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent epidemiology studies have shown an association between type II diabetes and exposure to TCDD (2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin). A possible explanation is that diabetics have a slower elimination of TCDD than non-diabetics. The objective of the present study was to ex...

  10. Phase II Contaminant Transport Parameters for the Groundwater Flow and Contaminant Transport Model of Corrective Action Unit 98: Frenchman Flat, Nye County, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0

    SciTech Connect

    DeNovio, Nicole M.; Bryant, Nathan; King, Chrissi B.; Bhark, Eric; Drellack, Sigmund L.; Pickens, John F.; Farnham, Irene; Brooks, Keely M.; Reimus, Paul; Aly, Alaa

    2005-04-01

    This report documents pertinent transport data and data analyses as part of the Phase II Corrective Action Investigation (CAI) for Frenchman Flat (FF) Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 98. The purpose of this data compilation and related analyses is to provide the primary reference to support parameterization of the Phase II FF CAU transport model.

  11. Person Heterogeneity of the BDI-II-C and Its Effects on Dimensionality and Construct Validity: Using Mixture Item Response Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Pei-Chen; Huang, Tsai-Wei

    2010-01-01

    This study was to apply the mixed Rasch model to investigate person heterogeneity of Beck Depression Inventory-II-Chinese version (BDI-II-C) and its effects on dimensionality and construct validity. Person heterogeneity was reflected by two latent classes that differ qualitatively. Additionally, person heterogeneity adversely affected the…

  12. Comparison of the EXAFS Spectra of Heteronuclear MnCa/Sr Model Complexes to the Oxygen-Evolving Mn(4)Ca Complex of Photosystem II

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, A.; Yano, J.; Pushkar, Y.; Abboud, K.A.; Yachandra, V.K.; Christou, G.

    2009-06-03

    Heterometallic Mn-Ca and Mn-Sr complexes have been prepared and employed as model complexes for Ca and Sr EXAFS spectral comparisons with the Oxygen-Evolving Complex (OEC) of Photosystem II (PS II); these have revealed similarities that support the presence of at least one O atom bridge between the Mn and Ca/Sr in the OEC.

  13. Phase II Hydrologic Data for the Groundwater Flow and Contaminant Transport Model of Corrective Action Unit 98: Frenchman Flat, Nye County, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0

    SciTech Connect

    John McCord

    2004-12-01

    This report documents pertinent hydrologic data and data analyses as part of the Phase II Corrective Action Investigation (CAI) for Frenchman Flat (FF) Corrective Action Unit (CAU): CAU 98. The purpose of this data compilation and related analyses is to provide the primary reference to support the development of the Phase II FF CAU groundwater flow model.

  14. TEMPORAL EVOLUTION OF THE SCATTERING POLARIZATION OF THE Ca II IR TRIPLET IN HYDRODYNAMICAL MODELS OF THE SOLAR CHROMOSPHERE

    SciTech Connect

    Carlin, E. S.; Asensio Ramos, A.; Trujillo Bueno, J.

    2013-02-10

    Velocity gradients in a stellar atmospheric plasma have an effect on the anisotropy of the radiation field that illuminates each point within the medium, and this may in principle influence the scattering line polarization that results from the induced atomic level polarization. Here, we analyze the emergent linear polarization profiles of the Ca II infrared triplet after solving the radiative transfer problem of scattering polarization in time-dependent hydrodynamical models of the solar chromosphere, taking into account the effect of the plasma macroscopic velocity on the atomic level polarization. We discuss the influence that the velocity and temperature shocks in the considered chromospheric models have on the temporal evolution of the scattering polarization signals of the Ca II infrared lines as well as on the temporally averaged profiles. Our results indicate that the increase of the linear polarization amplitudes caused by macroscopic velocity gradients may be significant in realistic situations. We also study the effect of the integration time, the microturbulent velocity, and the photospheric dynamical conditions, and discuss the feasibility of observing with large-aperture telescopes the temporal variation of the scattering polarization profiles. Finally, we explore the possibility of using a Hanle effect line-ratio technique in the IR triplet of Ca II to facilitate magnetic field diagnostics in dynamic situations.

  15. Biosorption of cobalt(II) with sunflower biomass from aqueous solutions in a fixed bed column and neural networks modelling.

    PubMed

    Oguz, Ensar; Ersoy, Muhammed

    2014-01-01

    The effects of inlet cobalt(II) concentration (20-60 ppm), feed flow rate (8-19 ml/min) and bed height (5-15 cm), initial solution pH (3-5) and particle size (0.25II) concentration, 5 cm bed height and 8 ml/min flow rate, pH 6.5 and 0.25model and experimental data was conducted. The ANN model yielded determination coefficient of (R(2) 0.972), standard deviation ratio (0.166), mean absolute error (0.0158) and root mean square error (0.0141). The results indicated that the shells of the sunflower biomass is a suitable biosorbent for the uptake of cobalt(II) in fixed bed columns.

  16. Modeling the adsorption of mercury(II) on (hydr)oxides. 2: {alpha}-FeOOH (goethite) and amorphous silica

    SciTech Connect

    Bonnissel-Gissinger, P.; Alnot, M.; Ehrhardt, J.J.; Lickes, J.P.; Behra, P.

    1999-07-15

    The surface complexation model is used to describe sorption experiments of inorganic mercury(II) in the presence of an amorphous silica, Aerosil 200, or an iron (hydr)oxide, the goethite {alpha}-FeOOH (Bayferrox 910). In the simulations, one assumes the formation of a monodentate surface complex {triple_bond}S{single_bond}OHgOH and {triple_bond}S{single_bond}OHgCl, when chlorides are present in solution. Participation of the complex {triple_bond}S{single_bond}OHgCl has been especially evidenced. Comparisons with other data from the literature have been made to investigate the influence of the nature of the oxide on the mechanism of mercury(II) adsorption. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to characterize the surface of the (hydr)oxides prior to adsorption and to observe when possible the mercury surface compounds.

  17. Ultraviolet C II and Si III Transit Spectroscopy and Modeling of the Evaporating Atmosphere of GJ436b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parke Loyd, R. O.; Koskinen, T. T.; France, Kevin; Schneider, Christian; Redfield, Seth

    2017-01-01

    Hydrogen gas evaporating from the atmosphere of the hot-Neptune GJ436b absorbs over 50% of the stellar Lyα emission during transit. Given the planet’s atmospheric composition and energy-limited escape rate, this hydrogen outflow is expected to entrain heavier atoms such as C and O. We searched for C and Si in the escaping atmosphere of GJ436b using far-ultraviolet Hubble Space Telescope COS G130M observations made during the planet’s extended H i transit. These observations show no transit absorption in the C ii 1334,1335 Å and Si iii 1206 Å lines integrated over [‑100, 100] km s‑1, imposing 95% (2σ) upper limits of 14% (C ii) and 60% (Si iii) depth on the transit of an opaque disk and 22% (C ii) and 49% (Si iii) depth on an extended highly asymmetric transit similar to that of H i Lyα. C+ is likely present in the outflow according to a simulation we carried out using a spherically symmetric photochemical-hydrodynamical model. This simulation predicts an ∼2% transit over the integrated bandpass, consistent with the data. At line center, we predict the C ii transit depth to be as high as 19%. Our model predicts a neutral hydrogen escape rate of 1.6× {10}9 g s‑1 (3.1× {10}9 g s‑1 for all species) for an upper atmosphere composed of hydrogen and helium.

  18. A new 3D finite element model of the IEC 60318-1 artificial ear: II. Experimental and numerical validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bravo, Agustín; Barham, Richard; Ruiz, Mariano; López, Juan Manuel; De Arcas, Guillermo; Alonso, Jesus

    2012-12-01

    In part I, the feasibility of using three-dimensional (3D) finite elements (FEs) to model the acoustic behaviour of the IEC 60318-1 artificial ear was studied and the numerical approach compared with classical lumped elements modelling. It was shown that by using a more complex acoustic model that took account of thermo-viscous effects, geometric shapes and dimensions, it was possible to develop a realistic model. This model then had clear advantages in comparison with the models based on equivalent circuits using lumped parameters. In fact results from FE modelling produce a better understanding about the physical phenomena produced inside ear simulator couplers, facilitating spatial and temporal visualization of the sound fields produced. The objective of this study (part II) is to extend the investigation by validating the numerical calculations against measurements on an ear simulator conforming to IEC 60318-1. For this purpose, an appropriate commercially available device is taken and a complete 3D FE model developed for it. The numerical model is based on key dimensional data obtained with a non-destructive x-ray inspection technique. Measurements of the acoustic transfer impedance have been carried out on the same device at a national measurement institute using the method embodied in IEC 60318-1. Having accounted for the actual device dimensions, the thermo-viscous effects inside narrow slots and holes and environmental conditions, the results of the numerical modelling were found to be in good agreement with the measured values.

  19. Modeling the water circulation in the North Atlantic in the scope of the CORE-II experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ushakov, K. V.; Grankina, T. B.; Ibraev, R. A.

    2016-07-01

    A numerical experiment on the reproduction of the variability in the state of North Atlantic water in 1948-2007 with a spatial resolution of 0.25° has been performed using the global ocean model developed at Institute of Numerical Mathematics, Russian Academy of Sciences (INM RAS), and the Shirshov Institute of Oceanology (IO RAS) (the INM-IO model). The data on the state of the atmosphere, radiation fluxes, and bulk formulas of the CORE-II protocol are used as boundary conditions. Five successive 60-year calculation cycles have been performed in order to obtain the quasi-equilibrium state of a model ocean. For the last 20 years, the main elements of large-scale ocean circulation have been analyzed and compared with the WOA09 atlas data and the results of other models.

  20. Primordial 4He abundance: a determination based on the largest sample of H II regions with a methodology tested on model H II regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izotov, Y. I.; Stasińska, G.; Guseva, N. G.

    2013-10-01

    We verified the validity of the empirical method to derive the 4He abundance used in our previous papers by applying it to CLOUDY (v13.01) models. Using newly published He i emissivities for which we present convenient fits as well as the output CLOUDY case B hydrogen and He i line intensities, we found that the empirical method is able to reproduce the input CLOUDY 4He abundance with an accuracy of better than 1%. The CLOUDY output data also allowed us to derive the non-recombination contribution to the intensities of the strongest Balmer hydrogen Hα, Hβ, Hγ, and Hδ emission lines and the ionisation correction factors for He. With these improvements we used our updated empirical method to derive the 4He abundances and to test corrections for several systematic effects in a sample of 1610 spectra of low-metallicity extragalactic H ii regions, the largest sample used so far. From this sample we extracted a subsample of 111 H ii regions with Hβ equivalent width EW(Hβ) ≥ 150 Å, with excitation parameter x = O2+/O ≥ 0.8, and with helium mass fraction Y derived with an accuracy better than 3%. With this subsample we derived the primordial 4He mass fraction Yp = 0.254 ± 0.003 from linear regression Y - O/H. The derived value of Yp is higher at the 68% confidence level (CL) than that predicted by the standard big bang nucleosynthesis (SBBN) model, possibly implying the existence of different types of neutrino species in addition to the three known types of active neutrinos. Using the most recently derived primordial abundances D/H = (2.60 ± 0.12) × 10-5 and Yp = 0.254 ± 0.003 and the χ2 technique, we found that the best agreement between abundances of these light elements is achieved in a cosmological model with baryon mass density Ωbh2 = 0.0234 ± 0.0019 (68% CL) and an effective number of the neutrino species Neff = 3.51 ± 0.35 (68% CL). Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Chile, programs 073.B-0283(A), 081.C-0113(A

  1. Comparison of original EuroSCORE, EuroSCORE II and STS risk models in a Turkish cardiac surgical cohort†

    PubMed Central

    Kunt, Ayse Gul; Kurtcephe, Murat; Hidiroglu, Mete; Cetin, Levent; Kucuker, Aslihan; Bakuy, Vedat; Ruchan Akar, Ahmet; Sener, Erol

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The aim of this study was to compare additive and logistic European System for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation (EuroSCORE), EuroSCORE II and the Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS) models in calculating mortality risk in a Turkish cardiac surgical population. METHODS The current patient population consisted of 428 patients who underwent isolated coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) between 2004 and 2012, extracted from the TurkoSCORE database. Observed and predicted mortalities were compared for the additive/logistic EuroSCORE, EuroSCORE II and STS risk calculator. The area under the receiver operating characteristics curve (AUC) values were calculated for these models to compare predictive power. RESULTS The mean patient age was 74.5 ± 3.9 years at the time of surgery, and 35.0% were female. For the entire cohort, actual hospital mortality was 7.9% (n = 34; 95% confidence interval [CI] 5.4–10.5). However, the additive EuroSCORE-predicted mortality was 6.4% (P = 0.23 vs observed; 95% CI 6.2–6.6), logistic EuroSCORE-predicted mortality was 7.9% (P = 0.98 vs observed; 95% CI 7.3–8.6), EuroSCORE II- predicted mortality was 1.7% (P = 0.00 vs observed; 95% CI 1.6–1.8) and STS predicted mortality was 5.8% (P = 0.10 vs observed; 95% CI 5.4–6.2). The mean predictive performance of the analysed models for the entire cohort was fair, with 0.7 (95% CI 0.60–0.79). AUC values for additive EuroSCORE, logistic EuroSCORE, EuroSCORE II and STS risk calculator were 0.70 (95% CI 0.60–0.79), 0.70 (95% CI 0.59–0.80), 0.72 (95% CI 0.62–0.81) and 0.62 (95% CI 0.51–0.73), respectively. CONCLUSIONS EuroSCORE II significantly underestimated mortality risk for Turkish cardiac patients, whereas additive and logistic EuroSCORE and STS risk calculators were well calibrated. PMID:23403767

  2. Modeling Lost-Particle Backgrounds in PEP-II Using LPTURTLE

    SciTech Connect

    Fieguth, T.; Barlow, R.; Kozanecki, W.; /DAPNIA, Saclay

    2005-05-17

    Background studies during the design, construction, commissioning, operation and improvement of BaBar and PEP-II have been greatly influenced by results from a program referred to as LPTURTLE (Lost Particle TURTLE) which was originally conceived for the purpose of studying gas background for SLC. This venerable program is still in use today. We describe its use, capabilities and improvements and refer to current results now being applied to BaBar.

  3. Toward a Kinetic Model of Silicon Carbide Condensation in Type II Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deneault, Ethan A. N.

    2017-01-01

    One of the most interesting types of dust grain extracted from terrestrial meteorites is the silicon carbide X-grain (SiC-X). These grains bear distinct isotopic signatures which classify them as supernova condensates, but their formation within the ejecta has not been well-studied. Using a kinetic chemistry network, we investigate possible pathways that lead to the formation of silicon carbide grains in the cooling outflows of type II supernovae.

  4. TJ-II data retrieving by means of a client/server model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vega, J.; Sánchez, E.; Crémy, C.; Portas, A.; Dulya, C. M.; Nilsson, J.

    1999-01-01

    The database of the TJ-II flexible heliac is centralized in a Unix server. This computer also commands the on-line processes related to data acquisition during TJ-II discharges: programming of measurement systems, connectivity with control systems, data visualization, and computations. The server has to provide access to the data so that signal analysis can be performed by local users or even from remote hosts. Data retrieving is accomplished by means of a client/server architecture in which two data servers are permanently running in the background of the Unix computer. One of them serves data requests from local clients and the other one sends data to remote clients. The communication protocol in both cases has been developed by using TCP/IP and Berkeley sockets. The client part consists of a set of routines (FORTRAN and C callable), which, in a transparent way, provide connectivity with the servers. This structure allows access to TJ-II data exactly in the same way from any computer, hiding not only specific aspects of the database, but hardware architecture of the server computer as well. In addition, the remote access makes it possible to distribute computations and to reduce the load on the Unix server from analysis and visualization tasks. At present, this software is running in four different environments: the Unix server itself, various types of Unix workstations, a CRAY J90 and a CRAY T3E. Finally, due to the fact that visualization is essential for TJ-II data analysis, a powerful and a very flexible visualization tool has been developed. It is a point and click application based on X Window/Motif. Data access is carried out through the client/server processes mentioned above and the software runs in the client computer.

  5. Spectroscopic characterization and molecular modeling of novel palladium(II) complexes with carbazates and hydrazides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa, L. M.; Corbi, P. P.; Formiga, A. L. B.; Lancellotti, Marcelo; Marzano, I. M.; Pereira-Maia, E. C.; Von Poelhsitz, G.; Guerra, W.

    2015-10-01

    Palladium(II) complexes of the type trans-[Pd(L)2Cl2], where L = 4-methoxybenzylcarbazate (4-MC), benzyl carbazate (BC), 4-fluorophenoxyacetic acid hydrazide (4-FH), 3-methoxybenzoic acid hydrazide (3-MH), ethyl carbazate (EC) and tert-butyl carbazate (TC) were synthesized by the slow addition of the ligand to K2PdCl4 previously dissolved in water or ethanol. These complexes were characterized by elemental analyses, conductivity measurements, TG/DTA, FT-IR, mass spectrometric and NMR spectroscopy (solution and solid-state). All coordination compounds exhibit a square planar coordination geometry in which the palladium(II) ion coordinates to two nitrogen atoms and two chlorine atoms. The structures of the palladium(II) complexes were optimized and theoretical data show that the trans isomer is more stable, in accordance with the experimental data. Preliminary in vitro tests of some these new palladium complexes in a chronic myelogenous leukemia cell line (k562 cells) are also reported.

  6. Dipeptide interactions with Zn(II)-cyclen artificial model for molecular recognition.

    PubMed

    Rostášová, I; Vilková, M; Vargová, Z; Walko, M; Almáši, M; Imrich, J; Hermann, P; Lukeš, I

    2015-04-01

    The Zn(II)-cyclen-dipeptide ternary systems (where cyclen is abbreviated as L and dipeptide is glycylglycine (HL(1)) or glycyl-(S)-alanine (HL(2))) were investigated by potentiometry applying both "out-of-cell" and direct titrations and by (1) H NMR spectroscopy. Especially, the (1)H NMR study was found to be very efficient to estimate speciation in the systems. The results obtained under full equilibria indicated two main species, [Zn(L)(HL(1,2))](2+) and [Zn(L)(L(1,2))](+), in both the systems. In the [Zn(L)(HL(1,2))](2+) complex, presence of carbonyl-carboxylate chelate was confirmed, and in the [Zn(L)(L(1,2))](+) species, the peptide coordination is re-organized to carbonyl-amine chelate or only terminal amino group is coordinated. Equilibrium constants describing [Zn(L)](2+)-dipeptide interaction are relatively low, log K = 3.4 for Gly-Gly and 4.1 for Gly-(S)-Ala, respectively. Nevertheless, the values are slightly higher than stability constants for interaction of Zn(II) with the dipeptides (i.e. [Zn(L(1,2))](+) species) where a chelate formation is expected. It indicates that interaction between Zn(II) ion in [Zn(L)](2+) and the dipeptides should be supported by some additional interactions. Potentiometry carried out under non-equilibrum condition showed different species where these additional stabilizing forces play more important role.

  7. An investigation of climate patterns on Earth-like planets using the NASA GISS global climate model II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elowitz, Robert Mark

    To determine the capability of NASA's GISS GCM-II global climate model, the user-friendly EdGCM interface to the 3-D climate model code was evaluated by simulating global climate patterns that Earth-like planets may experience. The simulation scenarios involved different greenhouse gas emissions trends, planetary orbital parameters, and solar irradiance variations. It is found that the EdGCM interface to the GCM-II 3-D climate model is capable of studying climate patterns on hypothetical Earth-like planets, with some limitations involved. Studying extreme climate patterns on Earth-like planets as a function of planetary obliquity, orbital eccentricity, atmospheric composition, solar irradiance variations, and location with the host star's habitable zone is needed to determine whether such planets are habitable for life as we know it. Studying the behavior of climate on hypothetical Earth-like planet also provides insight into the future climate of our own planet. A database of climate models based on hypothetical Earth-like worlds will provide a valuable resource to the astrobiology community in support of future detections of exoplanets with masses, sizes, and composition similar to Earth. At present, most studies involved the use of 1-D, or 2-D climate models to explore planetary climate on Earth-like planets. This is due to the difficulty of using very complex 3-D climate model codes that typically have poor user interfaces or interfaces that are very difficult to use. EdGCM provides scientists with a user-friendly interface to a full 3-D climate model capable of simulating the climate on Earth-like planets. However, EdGCM is extremely limited in studying global climate on exo-Earth planets outside our solar system. The user is able to change the simulation initial conditions, including different greenhouse gas concentrations and their associated trends, solar irradiance and its trend over time, planetary obliquity and orbit eccentricity, and heliocentric

  8. Heavy metals in wastewater: Modelling the hydroxide precipitation of copper(II) from wastewater using lime as the precipitant

    SciTech Connect

    Baltpurvins, K.A.; Burns, R.C.; Lawrance, G.A.

    1996-12-31

    The effect of effluent composition (Cl{sup {minus}}, SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} or CO{sub 3}{sup 2{minus}}) on the efficiency of the hydroxide precipitation of Cu(II) modelling lime (CaO) as the precipitant has been predicted using the solubility domain approach and has been experimentally validated. Solubility domains were based on the phases that were found to be solubility-limiting for systems representing potential effluent chemical composition limits. The generated solubility domains generally encompassed the experimentally observed solubilities, thereby providing effluent treatment quality assurance ranges for the hydroxide precipitation process. The presence of gypsum (CaSO{sub 4{center_dot}}2H{sub 2}O) and calcite (CaCO{sub 3}) as secondary precipitates had little effect on the observed residual Cu(II) solubilities, with Cu(II) mobility being governed by the least-soluble kinetically precipitated (rather than thermodynamically favored) phase in the system under study.

  9. A new class of LRS Bianchi type-II dark energy models with variable EoS parameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, Anirudh; Amirhashchi, Hassan; Jaiswal, Rekha

    2011-08-01

    A new class of dark energy models in a Locally Rotationally Symmetric Bianchi type-II (LRS B-II) space-time with variable equation of state (EoS) parameter and constant deceleration parameter have been investigated in the present paper. The Einstein's field equations have been solved by applying a variation law for generalized Hubble's parameter given by Berman: Nuovo Cimento 74:182 (1983) which generates two types of solutions for the average scale factor, one is of power-law type and other is of the exponential-law form. Using these two forms, Einstein's field equations are solved separately that correspond to expanding singular and non-singular models of the universe respectively. The dark energy EoS parameter ω is found to be time dependent and its existing range for both models is in good agreement with the three recent observations of (i) SNe Ia data (Knop et al.: Astrophys. J. 598:102 (2003)), (ii) SNe Ia data collaborated with CMBR anisotropy and galaxy clustering statistics (Tegmark et al.: Astrophys. J. 606:702 (2004)) and latest (iii) a combination of cosmological datasets coming from CMB anisotropies, luminosity distances of high redshift type Ia supernovae and galaxy clustering (Hinshaw et al.: Astrophys. J. Suppl. 180:225 (2009); Komatsu et al. Astrophys. J. Suppl. 180:330 (2009)). The cosmological constant Λ is found to be a positive decreasing function of time and it approaches a small positive value at late time (i.e. the present epoch) which is corroborated by results from recent supernovae Ia observations. The physical and geometric behaviour of the universe have also been discussed in detail.

  10. Constraining the reservoir model of an injected CO2 plume with crosswell CASSM at the Frio-II brine plot

    SciTech Connect

    Daley, T.M.; Ajo-Franklin, J.; Doughty, C.A.

    2011-02-15

    Crosswell CASSM (continuous active-source seismic monitoring) data was acquired as part of the Frio-II brine pilot CO{sub 2} injection experiment. To gain insight into the CO{sub 2} plume evolution, we have integrated the 3D multiphase flow modeling code TOUGH2 with seismic simulation codes via a petrophysical model that predicts seismic velocity for a given CO{sub 2} saturation. Results of forward seismic modeling based on the CO{sub 2} saturation distribution produced by an initial TOUGH2 model compare poorly with the CASSM data, indicating that the initial flow model did not capture the actual CO{sub 2} plume dynamics. Updates to the TOUGH2 model required to better match the CASSM field data indicate vertical flow near the injection well, with increased horizontal plume growth occurring at the top of the reservoir sand. The CASSM continuous delay time data are ideal for constraining the modeled spatiotemporal evolution of the CO{sub 2} plume and allow improvement in reservoir model and estimation of CO{sub 2} plume properties.

  11. MEDSLIK-II, a Lagrangian marine surface oil spill model for short-term forecasting - Part 1: Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Dominicis, M.; Pinardi, N.; Zodiatis, G.; Lardner, R.

    2013-11-01

    The processes of transport, diffusion and transformation of surface oil in seawater can be simulated using a Lagrangian model formalism coupled with Eulerian circulation models. This paper describes the formalism and the conceptual assumptions of a Lagrangian marine surface oil slick numerical model and rewrites the constitutive equations in a modern mathematical framework. The Lagrangian numerical representation of the oil slick requires three different state variables: the slick, the particle and the structural state variables. Transformation processes (evaporation, spreading, dispersion and coastal adhesion) act on the slick state variables, while particle variables are used to model the transport and diffusion processes. The slick and particle variables are recombined together to compute the oil concentration in water, a structural state variable. The mathematical and numerical formulation of oil transport, diffusion and transformation processes described in this paper, together with the many simplifying hypothesis and parameterizations, form the basis of a new, open source Lagrangian surface oil spill model, the so-called MEDSLIK-II, based on its precursor MEDSLIK (Lardner et al., 1998, 2006; Zodiatis et al., 2008a). Part 2 of this paper describes the applications of the model to oil spill simulations that allow the validation of the model results and the study of the sensitivity of the simulated oil slick to different model numerical parameterizations.

  12. Modelling Energy Loss Mechanisms and a Determination of the Electron Energy Scale for the CDF Run II W Mass Measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Riddick, Thomas

    2012-06-15

    The calibration of the calorimeter energy scale is vital to measuring the mass of the W boson at CDF Run II. For the second measurement of the W boson mass at CDF Run II, two independent simulations were developed. This thesis presents a detailed description of the modification and validation of Bremsstrahlung and pair production modelling in one of these simulations, UCL Fast Simulation, comparing to both geant4 and real data where appropriate. The total systematic uncertainty on the measurement of the W boson mass in the W → eve channel from residual inaccuracies in Bremsstrahlung modelling is estimated as 6.2 ±3.2 MeV/c2 and the total systematic uncertainty from residual inaccuracies in pair production modelling is estimated as 2.8± 2.7 MeV=c2. Two independent methods are used to calibrate the calorimeter energy scale in UCL Fast Simulation; the results of these two methods are compared to produce a measurement of the Z boson mass as a cross-check on the accuracy of the simulation.

  13. First Infilling of the Venda Nova II Unlined High-Pressure Tunnel: Observed Behaviour and Numerical Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamas, Luís N.; Leitão, Noemí S.; Esteves, Carlos; Plasencia, Nadir

    2014-05-01

    The underground structures of the Venda Nova II reversible hydroelectric power scheme present features that make it an interesting case study. Worthy of mention are the inclination and length of the unlined pressure tunnel, the high water head and the great depth of the powerhouse cavern. In projects of this type, the main effect of the internal water pressure in the pressure tunnel is the establishment of seepage from the tunnel into the rock mass, which can reach the adits and the powerhouse cavern. This seepage is influenced by several factors, such as the geometry of the underground openings, the rock mass properties—namely, the joints characteristics—and the stress state resulting from the excavation and from the internal water pressure. This article presents the main features of the underground structures of the Venda Nova II scheme and a detailed description of the observed behaviour during the first infilling of the pressure tunnel. A three-dimensional multi-laminated numerical model of the rock mass hydromechanical behaviour was developed to help understand the observed behaviour. The model assumptions in regard to the geometry of the openings, the jointing pattern, the rock mass hydraulic and mechanical behaviour, as well as the hydromechanical interaction, are described. Results obtained with the numerical model are presented and compared with the observed behaviour. Finally, the validity and importance of the numerical tools for the interpretation of the rock mass hydromechanical behaviour is discussed.

  14. Response surface modeling of Pb(II) removal from aqueous solution by Pistacia vera L.: Box-Behnken experimental design.

    PubMed

    Yetilmezsoy, Kaan; Demirel, Sevgi; Vanderbei, Robert J

    2009-11-15

    A three factor, three-level Box-Behnken experimental design combining with response surface modeling (RSM) and quadratic programming (QP) was employed for maximizing Pb(II) removal from aqueous solution by Antep pistachio (Pistacia vera L.) shells based on 17 different experimental data obtained in a lab-scale batch study. Three independent variables (initial pH of solution (pH(0)) ranging from 2.0 to 5.5, initial concentration of Pb(II) ions (C(0)) ranging from 5 to 50 ppm, and contact time (t(C)) ranging from 5 to 120 min) were consecutively coded as x(1), x(2) and x(3) at three levels (-1, 0 and 1), and a second-order polynomial regression equation was then derived to predict responses. The significance of independent variables and their interactions were tested by means of the analysis of variance (ANOVA) with 95% confidence limits (alpha=0.05). The standardized effects of the independent variables and their interactions on the dependent variable were also investigated by preparing a Pareto chart. The optimum values of the selected variables were obtained by solving the quadratic regression model, as well as by analysing the response surface contour plots. The optimum coded values of three test variables were computed as x(1)=0.125, x(2)=0.707, and x(3)=0.107 by using a LOQO/AMPL optimization algorithm. The experimental conditions at this global point were determined to be pH(0)=3.97, C(0)=43.4 ppm, and t(C)=68.7 min, and the corresponding Pb(II) removal efficiency was found to be about 100%.

  15. AUTH Regional Climate Model Contributions to EURO-CORDEX. Part II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katragkou, E.; Gkotovou, I.; Kartsios, S.; Pavlidis, V.; Tsigaridis, K.; Trail, M.; Nazarenko, L.; Karacostas, Theodore S.

    2017-01-01

    Regional climate downscaling techniques are being increasingly used to provide higher-resolution climate information than is available directly from contemporary global climate models. The Coordinated Regional Climate Downscaling Experiment (CORDEX) initiative was build to foster communication and knowledge exchange between regional climate modelers. The Department of Meteorology and Climatology of the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki has been contributing to the CORDEX initiative since 2010, with regional climate model simulations over the European domain (EURO-CORDEX). Results of this work are presented here, including two hindcasts and a historical simulation with the Weather Research Forecasting model (WRF), driven by ERA-interim reanalysis and the NASA Earth System Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) ModelE2, respectively. Model simulations are evaluated with the EOBS climatology and the model performance is assessed.

  16. An Interactive Activation Model of the Effect of Context in Perception. Part II. Report No. 8003.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rumelhart, David E.; McClelland, James L.

    This report is the second in a two-part series introducing an interactive activation model of context effects in perception. In the first part, a model for the perception of letters in words and other contexts was described and applied to a number of experiments. This second part applies the same model to a number of new experiments designed to…

  17. SCIENTIFIC UNCERTAINTIES IN ATMOSPHERIC MERCURY MODELS II: SENSITIVITY ANALYSIS IN THE CONUS DOMAIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this study, we present the response of model results to different scientific treatments in an effort to quantify the uncertainties caused by the incomplete understanding of mercury science and by model assumptions in atmospheric mercury models. Two sets of sensitivity simulati...

  18. METHANOGENESIS AND SULFATE REDUCTION IN CHEMOSTATS: II. MODEL DEVELOPMENT AND VERIFICATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A comprehensive dynamic model is presented that simulates methanogenesis and sulfate reduction in a continuously stirred tank reactor (CSTR). This model incorporates the complex chemistry of anaerobic systems. A salient feature of the model is its ability to predict the effluent ...

  19. Kinetics modelling of Cu(II) biosorption on to coconut shell and Moringa oleifera seeds from tropical regions.

    PubMed

    Acheampong, Mike A; Pereira, Joana P C; Meulepas, Roel J W; Lens, Piet N L

    2012-01-01

    Adsorption kinetic studies are of great significance in evaluating the performance of a given adsorbent and gaining insight into the underlying mechanism. This work investigated the sorption kinetics of Cu(II) on to coconut shell and Moringa oleifera seeds using batch techniques. To understand the mechanisms of the biosorption process and the potential rate-controlling steps, kinetic models were used to fit the experimental data. The results indicate that kinetic data were best described by the pseudo-second-order model with correlation coefficients (R2) of 0.9974 and 0.9958 for the coconut shell and Moringa oleifera seeds, respectively. The initial sorption rates obtained for coconut shell and Moringa oleifera seeds were 9.6395 x 10(-3) and 8.3292 x 10(-2) mg g(-1) min(-1), respectively. The values of the mass transfer coefficients obtained for coconut shell (1.2106 x 10(-3) cm s(-1)) and Moringa oleifera seeds (8.965 x 10(-4) cm s(-1)) indicate that the transport of Cu(II) from the bulk liquid to the solid phase was quite fast for both materials investigated. The results indicate that intraparticle diffusion controls the rate of sorption in this study; however, film diffusion cannot be neglected, especially at the initial stage of sorption.

  20. VCD Robustness of the Amide-I and Amide-II Vibrational Modes of Small Peptide Models.

    PubMed

    Góbi, Sándor; Magyarfalvi, Gábor; Tarczay, György

    2015-09-01

    The rotational strengths and the robustness values of amide-I and amide-II vibrational modes of For(AA)n NHMe (where AA is Val, Asn, Asp, or Cys, n = 1-5 for Val and Asn; n = 1 for Asp and Cys) model peptides with α-helix and β-sheet backbone conformations were computed by density functional methods. The robustness results verify empirical rules drawn from experiments and from computed rotational strengths linking amide-I and amide-II patterns in the vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) spectra of peptides with their backbone structures. For peptides with at least three residues (n ≥ 3) these characteristic patterns from coupled amide vibrational modes have robust signatures. For shorter peptide models many vibrational modes are nonrobust, and the robust modes can be dependent on the residues or on their side chain conformations in addition to backbone conformations. These robust VCD bands, however, provide information for the detailed structural analysis of these smaller systems.

  1. Unbound position II in MXCXXC metallochaperone model peptides impacts metal binding mode and reactivity: Distinct similarities to whole proteins.

    PubMed

    Shoshan, Michal S; Dekel, Noa; Goch, Wojciech; Shalev, Deborah E; Danieli, Tsafi; Lebendiker, Mario; Bal, Wojciech; Tshuva, Edit Y

    2016-06-01

    The effect of position II in the binding sequence of copper metallochaperones, which varies between Thr and His, was investigated through structural analysis and affinity and oxidation kinetic studies of model peptides. A first Cys-Cu(I)-Cys model obtained for the His peptide at acidic and neutral pH, correlated with higher affinity and more rapid oxidation of its complex; in contrast, the Thr peptide with the Cys-Cu(I)-Met coordination under neutral conditions demonstrated weaker and pH dependent binding. Studies with human antioxidant protein 1 (Atox1) and three of its mutants where S residues were replaced with Ala suggested that (a) the binding affinity is influenced more by the binding sequence than by the protein fold (b) pH may play a role in binding reactivity, and (c) mutating the Met impacted the affinity and oxidation rate more drastically than did mutating one of the Cys, supporting its important role in protein function. Position II thus plays a dominant role in metal binding and transport.

  2. Model for oxygen recombination on silicon-dioxide surfaces. II - Implications toward reentry heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jumper, E. J.; Seward, W. A.

    1992-01-01

    This paper briefly reviews the model for recombination of oxygen on a silicon-dioxide surface presented in detail in a previous paper. New data supporting the model is also presented. The ramifications of the model toward the production of excited molecular oxygen is examined as it pertains to surface heating. A reentry simulation is given and compared to STS-2 reentry data, and conclusions are drawn as to the implications of the recombination model toward reentry heating. A possible buffering of the heating above a critical temperature associated with the physics of the model is also discussed.

  3. MICS-Asia II: Model intercomparison and evaluation of ozone and relevant species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Z.; Sakurai, T.; Ueda, H.; Carmichael, G. R.; Streets, D.; Hayami, H.; Wang, Z.; Holloway, T.; Engardt, M.; Hozumi, Y.; Park, S. U.; Kajino, M.; Sartelet, K.; Fung, C.; Bennet, C.; Thongboonchoo, N.; Tang, Y.; Chang, A.; Matsuda, K.; Amann, M.

    Eight regional Eulerian chemical transport models (CTMs) are compared with each other and with an extensive set of observations including ground-level concentrations from EANET, ozone soundings from JMA and vertical profiles from the TRACE-P experiment to evaluate the models' abilities in simulating O 3 and relevant species (SO 2, NO, NO 2, HNO 3 and PAN) in the troposphere of East Asia and to look for similarities and differences among model performances. Statistical analysis is conducted to help estimate the consistency and discrepancy between model simulation and observation in terms of various species, seasons, locations, as well as altitude ranges. In general, all models show a good skill of simulating SO 2 for both ground level and the lower troposphere, although two of the eight models systematically overpredict SO 2 concentration. The model skills for O 3 vary largely with region and season. For ground-level O 3, model results are best correlated with observations in July 2001. Comparing with O 3 soundings measured in the afternoon reveals the best consistency among models in March 2001 and the largest disparity in O 3 magnitude in July 2001, although most models produce the best correlation in July as well. In terms of the statistics for the four flights of TRACE-P experiment, most models appear to be able to accurately capture the variability in the lower troposphere. The model performances for NO x are relatively poor, with lower correlation and with almost all models tending to underpredict NO x levels, due to larger uncertainties in either emission estimates or complex chemical mechanism represented. All models exhibit larger RMSE at altitudes <2 km than 2-5.5 km, mainly due to a consistent tendency of these models towards underprediction of the magnitude of intense plumes that often originate from near surface. Relatively lower correlation at altitudes 2-5.5 km may be attributed to the models' limitation in representing convection or potential

  4. Elastic and Piezoelectric Properties of Boron Nitride Nanotube Composites. Part II; Finite Element Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, H. Alicia; Hardie, Robert; Yamakov, Vesselin; Park, Cheol

    2015-01-01

    This paper is the second part of a two-part series where the first part presents a molecular dynamics model of a single Boron Nitride Nanotube (BNNT) and this paper scales up to multiple BNNTs in a polymer matrix. This paper presents finite element (FE) models to investigate the effective elastic and piezoelectric properties of (BNNT) nanocomposites. The nanocomposites studied in this paper are thin films of polymer matrix with aligned co-planar BNNTs. The FE modelling approach provides a computationally efficient way to gain an understanding of the material properties. We examine several FE models to identify the most suitable models and investigate the effective properties with respect to the BNNT volume fraction and the number of nanotube walls. The FE models are constructed to represent aligned and randomly distributed BNNTs in a matrix of resin using 2D and 3D hollow and 3D filled cylinders. The homogenisation approach is employed to determine the overall elastic and piezoelectric constants for a range of volume fractions. These models are compared with an analytical model based on Mori-Tanaka formulation suitable for finite length cylindrical inclusions. The model applies to primarily single-wall BNNTs but is also extended to multi-wall BNNTs, for which preliminary results will be presented. Results from the Part 1 of this series can help to establish a constitutive relationship for input into the finite element model to enable the modeling of multiple BNNTs in a polymer matrix.

  5. The ARIC predictive model reliably predicted risk of type II diabetes in Asian populations

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Identification of high-risk individuals is crucial for effective implementation of type 2 diabetes mellitus prevention programs. Several studies have shown that multivariable predictive functions perform as well as the 2-hour post-challenge glucose in identifying these high-risk individuals. The performance of these functions in Asian populations, where the rise in prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus is expected to be the greatest in the next several decades, is relatively unknown. Methods Using data from three Asian populations in Singapore, we compared the performance of three multivariate predictive models in terms of their discriminatory power and calibration quality: the San Antonio Health Study model, Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities model and the Framingham model. Results The San Antonio Health Study and Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities models had better discriminative powers than using only fasting plasma glucose or the 2-hour post-challenge glucose. However, the Framingham model did not perform significantly better than fasting glucose or the 2-hour post-challenge glucose. All published models suffered from poor calibration. After recalibration, the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities model achieved good calibration, the San Antonio Health Study model showed a significant lack of fit in females and the Framingham model showed a significant lack of fit in both females and males. Conclusions We conclude that adoption of the ARIC model for Asian populations is feasible and highly recommended when local prospective data is unavailable. PMID:22497781

  6. The STEM-II regional scale acid deposition and photochemical oxidant model—I. An overview of model development and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmichael, Gregory R.; Peters, Leonard K.; Saylor, Rick D.

    The STEM-II pollutant transport/transformation/removal model has been enhanced to include scavenging by clouds and precipitation. The Advanced Scavenging Model (ASM) and Reactive Scavenging Model (RSM) have been coupled to STEM-II to enable comprehensive simulation and diagnosis analysis of field experiments designed to study acid deposition. In this paper, the STEM-II/ASM/RSM model is described. The coupled model is being used to analyze the PRECP-I field studies on an urban/suburban scale (Philadelphia), mesoscale (lower Ohio River Valley), and regional scale (eastern U.S.). The time period selected for detailed simulations and analysis is 29 April-5 May 1985. Subsequent papers will detail the results of these simulations.

  7. H-atom abstraction reaction for organic substrates via mononuclear copper(II)-superoxo species as a model for DbetaM and PHM.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Tatsuya; Yamaguchi, Syuhei; Hirota, Shun; Masuda, Hideki

    2008-01-07

    Hydrogen atom abstraction reactions have been implicated in oxygenation reactions catalyzed by copper monooxygenases such as peptidylglycine alpha-hydroxylating monooxygenase (PHM) and dopamine beta-monooxygenase (DbetaM). We have investigated mononuclear copper(I) and copper(II) complexes with bis[(6-neopentylamino-2-pyridyl)methyl][(2-pyridyl)methyl]amine (BNPA) as functional models for these enzymes. The reaction of [Cu(II)(bnpa)]2+ with H2O2, affords a quasi-stable mononuclear copper(II)-hydroperoxo complex, [Cu(II)(bnpa)(OOH)]+ (4) which is stabilized by hydrophobic interactions and hydrogen bonds in the vicinity of the copper(II) ion. On the other hand, the reaction of [Cu(I)(bnpa)]+ (1) with O2 generates a trans-mu-1,2-peroxo dicopper(II) complex [Cu(II)2(bnpa)2(O2(2-]2+ (2). Interestingly, the same reactions carried out in the presence of exogenous substrates such as TEMPO-H, produce a mononuclear copper(II)-hydroperoxo complex 4. Under these conditions, the H-atom abstraction reaction proceeds via the mononuclear copper(II)-superoxo intermediate [Cu(II)(bnpa)(O2-)]+ (3), as confirmed from indirect observations using a spin trap reagent. Reactions with several substrates having different bond dissociation energies (BDE) indicate that, under our experimental conditions the H-atom abstraction reaction proceeds for substrates with a weak X-H bond (BDE < 72.6 kcal mol(-1)). These investigations indicate that the copper(II)-hydroperoxo complex is a useful tool for elucidation of H-atom abstraction reaction mechanisms for exogenous substrates. The useful functionality of the complex has been achieved via careful control of experimental conditions and the choice of appropriate ligands for the complex.

  8. Bianisotropic-critical-state model to study flux cutting in type-II superconductors at parallel geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero-Salazar, C.

    2016-04-01

    A critical-state model is postulated that incorporates, for the first time, the structural anisotropy and flux-line cutting effect in a type-II superconductor. The model is constructed starting from the theoretical scheme of Romero-Salazar and Pérez-Rodríguez to study the anisotropy induced by flux cutting. Here, numerical calculations of the magnetic induction and static magnetization are presented for samples under an alternating magnetic field, orthogonal to a static dc-bias one. The interplay of the two anisotropies is analysed by comparing the numerical results with available experimental data for an yttrium barium copper oxide (YBCO) plate, and a vanadium-titanium (VTi) strip, subjected to a slowly oscillating field {H}y({H}z) in the presence of a static field {H}z({H}y).

  9. Phase II Testing of Liquid Cooling Garments Using a Sweating Manikin, Controlled by a Human Physiological Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paul, Heather; Trevino, Luis; Bue,Grant; Rugh, John

    2006-01-01

    An Advanced Automotive Manikin (ADAM) developed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is used to evaluate NASA's liquid cooling garments (LCGs) used in advanced space suits for extravehicular applications. The manikin has 120 separate heated/sweating zones and is controlled by a finite element physiological model of the human thermoregulatory system. Previous testing showed the thermal sensation and comfort followed the expected trends as the LCG inlet fluid temperature was changed. The Phase II test data demonstrates the repeatability of ADAM by retesting the baseline LCG. Skin and core temperature predictions using ADAM in an LCG/Arctic suit combination are compared to NASA physiological data to validate the manikin/model. Additional LCG configurations are assessed using the manikin and compared to the baseline LCG. Results can extend to other personal protective clothing, including HAZMAT suits, nuclear/biological/chemical protective suits, and fire protection suits.

  10. Steady flow in a model of the human carotid bifurcation. Part II--laser-Doppler anemometer measurements.

    PubMed

    Bharadvaj, B K; Mabon, R F; Giddens, D P

    1982-01-01

    The evidence for hypothesizing a relationship between hemodynamics and atherogenesis as well as the motivation for selecting the carotid bifurcation for extensive fluid dynamic studies has been discussed in Part I of this two-paper sequence. Part II deals with velocity measurements within the bifurcation model described by Fig. 1 and Table 1 of the previous paper. A plexiglass model conforming to the dimensions of the average carotid bifurcation was machined and employed for velocity measurements with a laser-Doppler anemometer (LDA). The objective of this phase of the study was to obtain quantitative information on the velocity field and to estimate levels and directions of wall shear stress in the region of the bifurcation.

  11. Signal classification using global dynamical models, Part II: SONAR data analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kremliovsky, M.; Kadtke, J.

    1996-06-01

    In Part I of this paper, we described a numerical method for nonlinear signal detection and classification which made use of techniques borrowed from dynamical systems theory. Here in Part II of the paper, we will describe an example of data analysis using this method, for data consisting of open ocean acoustic (SONAR) recordings of marine mammal transients, supplied from NUWC sources. The purpose here is two-fold: first to give a more operational description of the technique and provide rules-of-thumb for parameter choices; and second to discuss some new issues raised by the analysis of non-ideal (real-world) data sets. The particular data set considered here is quite non-stationary, relatively noisy, is not clearly localized in the background, and as such provides a difficult challenge for most detection/classification schemes. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  12. Use of ELVIS II platform for random process modelling and analysis of its probability density function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maslennikova, Yu. S.; Nugmanov, I. S.

    2016-08-01

    The problem of probability density function estimation for a random process is one of the most common in practice. There are several methods to solve this problem. Presented laboratory work uses methods of the mathematical statistics to detect patterns in the realization of random process. On the basis of ergodic theory, we construct algorithm for estimating univariate probability density distribution function for a random process. Correlational analysis of realizations is applied to estimate the necessary size of the sample and the time of observation. Hypothesis testing for two probability distributions (normal and Cauchy) is used on the experimental data, using χ2 criterion. To facilitate understanding and clarity of the problem solved, we use ELVIS II platform and LabVIEW software package that allows us to make the necessary calculations, display results of the experiment and, most importantly, to control the experiment. At the same time students are introduced to a LabVIEW software package and its capabilities.

  13. Microscopic Modeling of Intersubband Optical Processes in Type II Semiconductor Quantum Wells: Linear Absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jian-Zhong; Kolokolov, Kanstantin I.; Ning, Cun-Zheng

    2003-01-01

    Linear absorption spectra arising from intersubband transitions in semiconductor quantum well heterostructures are analyzed using quantum kinetic theory by treating correlations to the first order within Hartree-Fock approximation. The resulting intersubband semiconductor Bloch equations take into account extrinsic dephasing contributions, carrier-longitudinal optical phonon interaction and carrier-interface roughness interaction which is considered with Ando s theory. As input for resonance lineshape calculation, a spurious-states-free 8-band kp Hamiltonian is used, in conjunction with the envelop function approximation, to compute self-consistently the energy subband structure of electrons in type II InAs/AlSb single quantum well structures. We demonstrate the interplay of nonparabolicity and many-body effects in the mid-infrared frequency range for such heterostructures.

  14. Modeling of Iron K Lines: Radiative and Auger Decay Data for Fe II-Fe IX

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmeri, P.; Mendoza, C.; Kallman, T. R.; Bautista, M. A.; Melendez, M.

    2003-01-01

    A detailed analysis of the radiative and Auger de-excitation channels of K-shell vacancy states in Fe II-Fe IX has been carried out. Level energies, wavelengths, A-values, Auger rates and fluorescence yields have been calculated for the lowest fine-structure levels populated by photoionization of the ground state of the parent ion. Different branching ratios, namely K alpha 2/K alpha 1, K beta/K alpha, KLM/KLL, KMM/KLL, and the total K-shell fluorescence yields, omega(sub k), obtained in the present work have been compared with other theoretical data and solid-state measurements, finding good general agreement with the latter. The Kalpha 2/K alpha l ratio is found to be sensitive to the excitation mechanism. From these comparisons it has been possible to estimate an accuracy of approx.10% for the present transition probabilities.

  15. Signal classification using global dynamical models, Part II: SONAR data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kremliovsky, Michael; Kadtke, James

    1996-06-01

    In Part I of this paper, we described a numerical method for nonlinear signal detection and classification which made use of techniques borrowed from dynamical systems theory. Here in Part II of the paper, we will describe an example of data analysis using this method, for data consisting of open ocean acoustic (SONAR) recordings of marine mammal transients, supplied from NUWC sources. The purpose here is two-fold: first to give a more operational description of the technique and provide rules-of-thumb for parameter choices; and second to discuss some new issues raised by the analysis of non-ideal (real-world) data sets. The particular data set considered here is quite non-stationary, relatively noisy, is not clearly localized in the background, and as such provides a difficult challenge for most detection/classification schemes.

  16. AERMOD: A DISPERSION MODEL FOR INDUSTRIAL SOURCE APPLICATIONS PART II: MODEL PERFORMANCE AGAINST 17 FIELD STUDY DATABASES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The formulations of the AMS/EPA Regulatory Model Improvement Committee's applied air dispersion model (AERMOD) are described. This is the second in a series of three articles. Part I describes the model's methods for characterizing the atmospheric boundary layer and complex ter...

  17. Modeling powder encapsulation in dosator-based machines: II. Experimental evaluation.

    PubMed

    Khawam, Ammar; Schultz, Leon

    2011-12-15

    A theoretical model was previously derived to predict powder encapsulation in dosator-based machines. The theoretical basis of the model was discussed earlier. In this part; the model was evaluated experimentally using two powder formulations with substantially different flow behavior. Encapsulation experiments were performed using a Zanasi encapsulation machine under two sets of experimental conditions. Model predicted outcomes such as encapsulation fill weight and plug height were compared to those experimentally obtained. Results showed a high correlation between predicted and actual outcomes demonstrating the model's success in predicting the encapsulation of both formulations. The model is a potentially useful in silico analysis tool that can be used for capsule dosage form development in accordance to quality by design (QbD) principles.

  18. Understanding Shock Dynamics in the Inner Heliosphere with Modeling and Type II Radio Data: the 2010-04-03 Event

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xie, Hong Na; Odstrcil, Dusan; Mays, L.; Cyr, O. C. St.; Gopalswamy, N.; Cremades, H.

    2012-01-01

    The 2010 April 03 solar event was studied using observations from STEREO SECCHI, SOHO LASCO, and Wind kilometric Type II data (kmTII) combined with WSA-Cone-ENLIL model simulations performed at the Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC). In particular, we identified the origin of the coronal mass ejection (CME) using STEREO EUVI and SOHO EIT images. A flux-rope model was fit to the SECCHI A and B, and LASCO images to determine the CMEs direction, size, and actual speed. J-maps from STEREO COR2HI-1HI-2 and simulations fromCCMC were used to study the formation and evolution of the shock in the inner heliosphere. In addition, we also studied the time-distance profile of the shock propagation from kmTII radio burst observations. The J-maps together with in-situ datafrom the Wind spacecraft provided an opportunity to validate the simulation results andthe kmTII prediction. Here we report on a comparison of two methods of predictinginterplanetary shock arrival time: the ENLIL model and the kmTII method; andinvestigate whether or not using the ENLIL model density improves the kmTIIprediction. We found that the ENLIL model predicted the kinematics of shock evolutionwell. The shock arrival times (SAT) and linear-fit shock velocities in the ENLILmodel agreed well with those measurements in the J-maps along both the CME leading edge and the Sun-Earth line. The ENLIL model also reproduced most of the largescale structures of the shock propagation and gave the SAT prediction at Earth with an error of 17 hours. The kmTII method predicted the SAT at Earth with an error of 15 hours when using n0 4.16 cm3, the ENLIL model plasma density near Earth; but itimproved to 2 hours when using n0 6.64 cm3, the model density near the CMEleading edge at 1 AU.

  19. Picroside II Attenuates Airway Inflammation by Downregulating the Transcription Factor GATA3 and Th2-Related Cytokines in a Mouse Model of HDM-Induced Allergic Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin seok; Lee, Jae-Won; Park, Hyun Ah; Ryu, Hyung Won; Lee, Su Ui; Hwang, Kwang Woo; Yun, Won-Kee; Kim, Hyoung-Chin; Ahn, Kyung-Seop; Oh, Sei-Ryang

    2016-01-01

    Picroside II isolated from Pseudolysimachion rotundum var. subintegrum has been used as traditional medicine to treat inflammatory diseases. In this study, we assessed whether picroside II has inhibitory effects on airway inflammation in a mouse model of house dust mite (HDM)-induced asthma. In the HDM-induced asthmatic model, picroside II significantly reduced inflammatory cell counts in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), the levels of total immunoglobulin (Ig) E and HDM-specific IgE and IgG1 in serum, airway inflammation, and mucus hypersecretion in the lung tissues. ELISA analysis showed that picroside II down-regulated the levels of Th2-related cytokines (including IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13) and asthma-related mediators, but it up-regulated Th1-related cytokine, IFNγ in BALF. Picroside II also inhibited the expression of Th2 type cytokine genes and the transcription factor GATA3 in the lung tissues of HDM-induced mice. Finally, we demonstrated that picroside II significantly decreased the expression of GATA3 and Th2 cytokines in developing Th2 cells, consistent with in vivo results. Taken together, these results indicate that picroside II has protective effects on allergic asthma by reducing GATA3 expression and Th2 cytokine bias. PMID:27870920

  20. Smoothed particle hydrodynamics model for phase separating fluid mixtures. II. Diffusion in a binary mixture.

    PubMed

    Thieulot, Cedric; Janssen, L P B M; Español, Pep

    2005-07-01

    A previously formulated smoothed particle hydrodynamics model for a phase separating mixture is tested for the case when viscous processes are negligible and only mass and energy diffusive processes take place. We restrict ourselves to the case of a binary mixture that can exhibit liquid-liquid phase separation. The thermodynamic consistency of the model is assessed and the potential of the model to study complex pattern formation in the presence of various thermal boundaries is illustrated.

  1. Modeling of the HiPco process for carbon nanotube production. II. Reactor-scale analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gokcen, Tahir; Dateo, Christopher E.; Meyyappan, M.

    2002-01-01

    The high-pressure carbon monoxide (HiPco) process, developed at Rice University, has been reported to produce single-walled carbon nanotubes from gas-phase reactions of iron carbonyl in carbon monoxide at high pressures (10-100 atm). Computational modeling is used here to develop an understanding of the HiPco process. A detailed kinetic model of the HiPco process that includes of the precursor, decomposition metal cluster formation and growth, and carbon nanotube growth was developed in the previous article (Part I). Decomposition of precursor molecules is necessary to initiate metal cluster formation. The metal clusters serve as catalysts for carbon nanotube growth. The diameter of metal clusters and number of atoms in these clusters are some of the essential information for predicting carbon nanotube formation and growth, which is then modeled by the Boudouard reaction with metal catalysts. Based on the detailed model simulations, a reduced kinetic model was also developed in Part I for use in reactor-scale flowfield calculations. Here this reduced kinetic model is integrated with a two-dimensional axisymmetric reactor flow model to predict reactor performance. Carbon nanotube growth is examined with respect to several process variables (peripheral jet temperature, reactor pressure, and Fe(CO)5 concentration) with the use of the axisymmetric model, and the computed results are compared with existing experimental data. The model yields most of the qualitative trends observed in the experiments and helps to understanding the fundamental processes in HiPco carbon nanotube production.

  2. Reaction of Pb(II) and Zn(II) with Ethyl Linoleate To Form Structured Hybrid Inorganic–Organic Complexes: A Model for Degradation in Historic Paint Films

    SciTech Connect

    MacDonald, Margaret G.; Palmer, Michael R.; Suchomel, Matthew R.; Berrie, Barbara H.

    2016-09-23

    To investigate soap formation in drying oils in historic paints, the reaction between metal acetates (K+, Zn2+, Pb2+) and ethyl linoleate (EL) was studied using optical microscopy, X-ray powder diffraction, and electron microscopy. Pb(II) and Zn(II) react rapidly with EL to form highly structured, spherulitic, luminescent crystallites that aggregate. Evidence from Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray analysis and high-resolution synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction indicates that these are organic–inorganic hybrid complexes or coordination polymers. FTIR absorbance peaks at ca. 1540 cm–1 for Pb(II) and ca. 1580 cm–1 for Zn(II) are consistent with the formation of carboxylate complexes. The complexes formed offer insight into the degradation processes observed in oil paint films, suggesting that soap formation is rapid when metal ions are solubilized and can occur with unsaturated fatty acids that are present in fresh oils. These complexes may account for the atypical luminescence observed in lead-containing cured oil paint films.

  3. Structure-activity relationships of β-hydroxyphosphonate nucleoside analogues as cytosolic 5'-nucleotidase II potential inhibitors: synthesis, in vitro evaluation and molecular modeling studies.

    PubMed

    Meurillon, Maïa; Marton, Zsuzsanna; Hospital, Audrey; Jordheim, Lars Petter; Béjaud, Jérôme; Lionne, Corinne; Dumontet, Charles; Périgaud, Christian; Chaloin, Laurent; Peyrottes, Suzanne

    2014-04-22

    The cytosolic 5'-nucleotidase II (cN-II) has been proposed as an attractive molecular target for the development of novel drugs circumventing resistance to cytotoxic nucleoside analogues currently used for treating leukemia and other malignant hemopathies. In the present work, synthesis of β-hydroxyphosphonate nucleoside analogues incorporating modifications either on the sugar residue or the nucleobase, and their in vitro evaluation towards the purified enzyme were carried out in order to determine their potency towards the inhibition of cN-II. In addition to the biochemical investigations, molecular modeling studies revealed important structural features for binding affinities towards the target enzyme.

  4. Improving the modelling of redshift-space distortions- II. A pairwise velocity model covering large and small scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchi, Davide; Percival, Will J.; Bel, Julien

    2016-12-01

    We develop a model for the redshift-space correlation function, valid for both dark matter particles and haloes on scales >5 h-1 Mpc. In its simplest formulation, the model requires the knowledge of the first three moments of the line-of-sight pairwise velocity distribution plus two well-defined dimensionless parameters. The model is obtained by extending the Gaussian-Gaussianity prescription for the velocity distribution, developed in a previous paper, to a more general concept allowing for local skewness, which is required to match simulations. We compare the model with the well-known Gaussian streaming model and the more recent Edgeworth streaming model. Using N-body simulations as a reference, we show that our model gives a precise description of the redshift-space clustering over a wider range of scales. We do not discuss the theoretical prescription for the evaluation of the velocity moments, leaving this topic to further investigation.

  5. On the quasi-steady aerodynamics of normal hovering flight part II: model implementation and evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Nabawy, Mostafa R. A.; Crowther, William J.

    2014-01-01

    This paper introduces a generic, transparent and compact model for the evaluation of the aerodynamic performance of insect-like flapping wings in hovering flight. The model is generic in that it can be applied to wings of arbitrary morphology and kinematics without the use of experimental data, is transparent in that the aerodynamic components of the model are linked directly to morphology and kinematics via physical relationships and is compact in the sense that it can be efficiently evaluated for use within a design optimization environment. An important aspect of the model is the method by which translational force coefficients for the aerodynamic model are obtained from first principles; however important insights are also provided for the morphological and kinematic treatments that improve the clarity and efficiency of the overall model. A thorough analysis of the leading-edge suction analogy model is provided and comparison of the aerodynamic model with results from application of the leading-edge suction analogy shows good agreement. The full model is evaluated against experimental data for revolving wings and good agreement is obtained for lift and drag up to 90° incidence. Comparison of the model output with data from computational fluid dynamics studies on a range of different insect species also shows good agreement with predicted weight support ratio and specific power. The validated model is used to evaluate the relative impact of different contributors to the induced power factor for the hoverfly and fruitfly. It is shown that the assumption of an ideal induced power factor (k = 1) for a normal hovering hoverfly leads to a 23% overestimation of the generated force owing to flapping. PMID:24554578

  6. On the quasi-steady aerodynamics of normal hovering flight part II: model implementation and evaluation.

    PubMed

    Nabawy, Mostafa R A; Crowther, William J

    2014-05-06

    This paper introduces a generic, transparent and compact model for the evaluation of the aerodynamic performance of insect-like flapping wings in hovering flight. The model is generic in that it can be applied to wings of arbitrary morphology and kinematics without the use of experimental data, is transparent in that the aerodynamic components of the model are linked directly to morphology and kinematics via physical relationships and is compact in the sense that it can be efficiently evaluated for use within a design optimization environment. An important aspect of the model is the method by which translational force coefficients for the aerodynamic model are obtained from first principles; however important insights are also provided for the morphological and kinematic treatments that improve the clarity and efficiency of the overall model. A thorough analysis of the leading-edge suction analogy model is provided and comparison of the aerodynamic model with results from application of the leading-edge suction analogy shows good agreement. The full model is evaluated against experimental data for revolving wings and good agreement is obtained for lift and drag up to 90° incidence. Comparison of the model output with data from computational fluid dynamics studies on a range of different insect species also shows good agreement with predicted weight support ratio and specific power. The validated model is used to evaluate the relative impact of different contributors to the induced power factor for the hoverfly and fruitfly. It is shown that the assumption of an ideal induced power factor (k = 1) for a normal hovering hoverfly leads to a 23% overestimation of the generated force owing to flapping.

  7. The model SIRANE for atmospheric urban pollutant dispersion; PART II, validation of the model on a real case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soulhac, L.; Salizzoni, P.; Mejean, P.; Didier, D.; Rios, I.

    2012-03-01

    We analyse the performance of the model SIRANE by comparing its outputs to field data measured within an urban district. SIRANE is the first urban dispersion model based on the concept of street network, and contains specific parametrical law to explicitly simulate the main transfer mechanisms within the urban canopy. The model validation is performed by means of field data collected during a 15 days measurement campaign in an urban district in Lyon, France. The campaign provided information on traffic fluxes and cars emissions, meteorological conditions, background pollution levels and pollutant concentration in different location within the district. This data set, together with complementary modelling tools needed to estimate the spatial distribution of traffic fluxes, allowed us to estimate the input data required by the model. The data set provide also the information essential to evaluate the accuracy of the model outputs. Comparison between model predictions and field measurements was performed in two ways. By evaluate the reliability of the model in simulating the spatial distribution of the pollutant and of their time variability. The study includes a sensitivity analysis to identify the key input parameters influencing the performance of the model, namely the emissions rates and the wind velocity. The analysis focuses only on the influence of varying input parameters in the modelling chain in the model predictions and complements the analyses provided by wind tunnel studies focussing on the parameterisation implemented in the model. The study also elucidates the critical role of background concentrations that represent a significant contribution to local pollution levels. The overall model performance, measured using the Chang and Hanna (2004) criteria can be considered as 'good' except for NO and some of BTX species. The results suggest that improvements of the performances on NO require testing new photochemical models, whereas the improvement on BTX

  8. Evaluation of Vocational Technical Education. Phase II. A Skeletal Model with Suggested Research and Development Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New Educational Directions, Crawfordsville, IN.

    Phase 2 of this project presents a skeletal model for evaluating vocational education programs which can be applied to secondary, post-secondary, and adult education programs. The model addresses 13 main components of the vocational education system: descriptive information, demonstration of need, student recruitment and selection, curriculum,…

  9. The "Psychosomatic Family" Reconsidered II: Recalling a Defective Model and Looking Ahead.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coyne, James C.; Anderson, Barbara J.

    1989-01-01

    Comments on psychosomatic family concept. Reviews decline of psychosomatic models of illness that assume that arousal is the only or primary means by which psychosocial factors influence illness. Focuses on brittle diabetes, noting the potential for family theorists to develop more adequate models of poor self-care and medical crises as…

  10. Instructional Design for Facilitating Higher Order Thinking. Volume II: Instructional Design Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Ruth G.; Englund, Michelle

    This study applied previously identified cognitive theory and research to the development of an instructional design model for teaching mental aspects underlying work and family activities in a context of rapid change and high technology. The model was tested by developing a prototype, materials required by the prototype were developed, and the…

  11. Game Object Model Version II: A Theoretical Framework for Educational Game Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amory, Alan

    2007-01-01

    Complex computer and video games may provide a vehicle, based on appropriate theoretical concepts, to transform the educational landscape. Building on the original game object model (GOM) a new more detailed model is developed to support concepts that educational computer games should: be relevant, explorative, emotive, engaging, and include…

  12. Assessing Wildlife Habitat Value of New England Salt Marshes: II. Model Testing and Validation

    EPA Science Inventory

    We test a previously described model to assess the wildlife habitat value of New England salt marshes by comparing modeled habitat values and scores with bird abundance and species richness at sixteen salt marshes in Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island USA. Assessment scores ranged f...

  13. PREDICTING ER BINDING AFFINITY FOR EDC RANKING AND PRIORITIZATION: MODEL II

    EPA Science Inventory

    The training set used to derive a common reactivity pattern (COREPA) model for estrogen receptor (ER) binding affinity in Model I (see Abstract I in this series) was extended to include 47 rat estrogen receptor (rER) relative binding affinity (RBA) measurements in addition to the...

  14. The 1995 revision of the joint US/UK geomagnetic field models. II: Main field

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Quinn, J.M.; Coleman, R.J.; Macmillan, S.; Barraclough, D.R.

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents the 1995 main-field revision of the World Magnetic Model (WMM-95). It is based on Project MAGNET high-level (??? 15,000 ft.) vector aeromagnetic survey data collected between 1988 and 1994 and on scalar total intensity data collected by the Polar Orbiting Geomagnetic Survey (POGS) satellite during the period 1991 through 1993. The spherical harmonic model produced from these data describes that portion of the Earth's magnetic field generated internal to the Earth's surface at the 1995.0 Epoch. When combined with the spherical harmonic model of the Earth's secular variation described in paper I, the Earth's main magnetic field is fully characterized between the years 1995 and 2000. Regional magnetic field models for the conterminous United States, Alaska and, Hawaii were generated as by-products of the global modeling process.

  15. Modeling of fluidized-bed combustion of coal: Phase II, final reports. Volume 1. Model evolution and development

    SciTech Connect

    Louis, J.F.; Tung, S.E.

    1980-10-01

    The Energy Laboratory of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (M.I.T.), under Department of Energy (DOE) sponsorship, has been engaged in the development of a comprehensive mechanistic model of Fluidized Bed Combustors (FBC). The primary aims of this modeling effort are the generation and to the extent possible, validation of an analytical framework for the design and scale-up of fluidized bed combustors. In parallel with this modeling effort, M.I.T. also embarked upon the development of an FBC-Data Base Management System (FBC-DBMS) aimed at facilitating the coordination, interpretation and utilization of the experimental data that are or will become available from diverse sources, as well as in the identification of areas of large uncertainty or having a paucity of experimental results. The synergistic operation of the FBC-Model and FBC-Data Base promises to offer a powerful tool for the design and optimization of FBC's and represents the ultimate goal of the M.I.T. effort. The modeling effort was initially focused upon evaluation and application of state-of-the-art models. The initial system model was divided into five basic components: fluid dynamics, combustion, sulfur capture, heat transfer and emissions. Due to the technical complexity of modeling FBC operation and the initial primitive nature of models for these components, it was deemed necessary to be able to incorporate evolutionary improvements in understanding and correlating FBC phenomena: the M.I.T. system model is, therefore, modular in nature, i.e., each sub-model can be replaced by an updated or equivalent sub-model without necessitating reprogramming of the entire system model.

  16. Assessing the wildlife habitat value of New England salt marshes: II. Model testing and validation.

    PubMed

    McKinney, Richard A; Charpentier, Michael A; Wigand, Cathleen

    2009-07-01

    We tested a previously described model to assess the wildlife habitat value of New England salt marshes by comparing modeled habitat values and scores with bird abundance and species richness at sixteen salt marshes in Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island USA. As a group, wildlife habitat value assessment scores for the marshes ranged from 307-509, or 31-67% of the maximum attainable score. We recorded 6 species of wading birds (Ardeidae; herons, egrets, and bitterns) at the sites during biweekly survey. Species richness (r (2)=0.24, F=4.53, p=0.05) and abundance (r (2)=0.26, F=5.00, p=0.04) of wading birds significantly increased with increasing assessment score. We optimized our assessment model for wading birds by using Akaike information criteria (AIC) to compare a series of models comprised of specific components and categories of our model that best reflect their habitat use. The model incorporating pre-classification, wading bird habitat categories, and natural land surrounding the sites was substantially supported by AIC analysis as the best model. The abundance of wading birds significantly increased with increasing assessment scores generated with the optimized model (r (2)=0.48, F=12.5, p=0.003), demonstrating that optimizing models can be helpful in improving the accuracy of the assessment for a given species or species assemblage. In addition to validating the assessment model, our results show that in spite of their urban setting our study marshes provide substantial wildlife habitat value. This suggests that even small wetlands in highly urbanized coastal settings can provide important wildlife habitat value if key habitat attributes (e.g., natural buffers, habitat heterogeneity) are present.

  17. VizieR Online Data Catalog: SSP in NIR. II. Synthesis models (Meneses-Goytia+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meneses-Goytia, S.; Peletier, R. F.; Trager, S. C.; Vazdekis, A.

    2015-08-01

    The present Single Stellar Populations (SSP) models are derived from my Ph.D.'s thesis and this paper. The following nomenclature is used throughout the paper and the website (http://smg.astro-research.net/ssp-models/the-models/) to describe the models, e.g. MarS models use the M08 isochrones (Mar) and the Salpeter (S) IMF. General information about the models is given in table1. For further information, please refer to the paper. Each set of models and their corresponding predictions are available in the website and VIZIER. The spectral energy distributions (SEDs) can be downloaded in a zip-file from those pages in ascii format . The spectral energy distributions (SEDs) can be downloaded in a zip-file from t hose pages in ascii format . The nomenclature of each SED is as follows: isochroneIMFsedXXXXHZX.XXXXXXXXXTgXX.XXXXXXXe+XX - where XXXX tells whether those models contain C-stars or no (COMBO or NOCS respectively) H is the spectral band in which normalization occurred Z_X.XXXXXXXXX is the metallicity in terms of Z Tg_XX.XXXXXXXe+XX is the age in years. Each set of models contains MarS - 96 SEDs GirS - 96 SEDs BaSS - 116 SEDs We have also included in the websites the Integrated colours and line-strength indices from all our models (MarS, GirS and BaSS). The SEDs were convolved to a velocity dispersion of 350km/s before calculating indices. (5 data files).

  18. Using DFT methodology for more reliable predictive models: Design of inhibitors of Golgi α-Mannosidase II.

    PubMed

    Bobovská, Adela; Tvaroška, Igor; Kóňa, Juraj

    2016-05-01

    Human Golgi α-mannosidase II (GMII), a zinc ion co-factor dependent glycoside hydrolase (E.C.3.2.1.114), is a pharmaceutical target for the design of inhibitors with anti-cancer activity. The discovery of an effective inhibitor is complicated by the fact that all known potent inhibitors of GMII are involved in unwanted co-inhibition with lysosomal α-mannosidase (LMan, E.C.3.2.1.24), a relative to GMII. Routine empirical QSAR models for both GMII and LMan did not work with a required accuracy. Therefore, we have developed a fast computational protocol to build predictive models combining interaction energy descriptors from an empirical docking scoring function (Glide-Schrödinger), Linear Interaction Energy (LIE) method, and quantum mechanical density functional theory (QM-DFT) calculations. The QSAR models were built and validated with a library of structurally diverse GMII and LMan inhibitors and non-active compounds. A critical role of QM-DFT descriptors for the more accurate prediction abilities of the models is demonstrated. The predictive ability of the models was significantly improved when going from the empirical docking scoring function to mixed empirical-QM-DFT QSAR models (Q(2)=0.78-0.86 when cross-validation procedures were carried out; and R(2)=0.81-0.83 for a testing set). The average error for the predicted ΔGbind decreased to 0.8-1.1kcalmol(-1). Also, 76-80% of non-active compounds were successfully filtered out from GMII and LMan inhibitors. The QSAR models with the fragmented QM-DFT descriptors may find a useful application in structure-based drug design where pure empirical and force field methods reached their limits and where quantum mechanics effects are critical for ligand-receptor interactions. The optimized models will apply in lead optimization processes for GMII drug developments.

  19. Development and Evaluation of a Reactive-Dispersive Plume Model: TexAQS II 2006 Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yong Hoon; Kim, Hyun Soo; Song, Chul Han

    2015-04-01

    We describe the development and evaluation of a reactive-dispersive plume model (RDPM) that combines a photo-chemistry model with a plume dilution driven by turbulent dispersion of a power-plant plume. The plume transport and turbulent dispersion are derived from a Gaussian plume model and the plume chemistry model uses 71 HxOy-NxOy-CH4 chemistry-related reactions and 184 NMHC-related reactions. Emissions from large-scale point sources have continuously increased due to the rapid industrial growth. To extensively understand and assess atmospheric impacts of the power-plant emissions, a general RDPM was applied to simultaneously simulate the dynamics and photo-chemistry of the Texas power-plant plumes. During the second Texas Air Quality Study 2006 (TexAQS II 2006) on 16 September 2006, pollutant concentrations were measured by NOAA WP-3D aircraft with successive transects across power-plant plumes in Texas, USA. The simulation performances of the RDPM were evaluated by a comparison study, using the observation data obtained from the measurements of a NOAA WP-3D flight during TexAQS II 2006 airborne field campaign. On 16 September, the WP-3D aircraft observed mainly meteorological parameters and particulate species concentrations, traversing the Monticello and Welsh power-plant plumes four times from transects A to D. In addition, some meteorological variables in an initial condition for model simulation were obtained from the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model output for the specific objects. These power-plant plume cases were selected in this study, because a large number of nitrogen oxides and sulfur dioxide concentrations inside the power-plant plumes were measured without any interruption of other emission sources. For the Monticello and Welsh power-plant plumes, the model-predicted concentrations showed good agreements with the observed concentrations of ambient species (e.g., nitrogen oxides, ozone, sulfur dioxide, etc.) at the four transects. Based

  20. Efficient catalytic phosphate ester cleavage by binuclear zinc(II) pyrazolate complexes as functional models of metallophosphatases.

    PubMed

    Penkova, Larysa V; Maciag, Anna; Rybak-Akimova, Elena V; Haukka, Matti; Pavlenko, Vadim A; Iskenderov, Turganbay S; Kozłowski, Henryk; Meyer, Franc; Fritsky, Igor O

    2009-07-20

    A series of dizinc(II) complexes based on the pyrazolate ligands 3-[(1E)-N-hydroxyethanimidoyl]-4-methyl-1H-pyrazole-5-carboxylic acid (H(3)L(1)), (1E,1'E)-1,1'-(4-methyl-1H-pyrazole-3,5-diyl)diethanone dihydrazone (HL(2)), (E,E)-(4-methyl-1H-pyrazole-3,5-diyl)bis(methylmethanone) dioxime (H(3)L(3)), (E,E)-(4-phenyl-1H-pyrazole-3,5-diyl)bis(phenylmethanone) dioxime (H(3)L(4)), and 1H-pyrazole-3,5-dicarboxylic acid (H(3)L(5)) have been synthesized and investigated as functional models of phosphoesterases, focusing on correlations between the hydrolytic activity and molecular parameters of the bimetallic core. Speciation of the various dizinc complexes in solution has been determined potentiometrically, and the structures in the solid state have been established by X-ray crystallography. The hydrolysis of two phosphoesters, an RNA model 2-hydroxypropyl-p-nitrophenyl phosphate (HPNP) and the pesticide paraoxon-ethyl (POE), promoted by the dinuclear phosphoesterase model complexes has been investigated in DMSO/buffered water (1:1) at 50 degrees C as a function of complex concentration, substrate concentration, and pH. Drastic differences in the hydrolytic activities of [Zn(2)(HL(1))(2)](0), [Zn(2)(L(2))(2)](2+), [Zn(2)(H(2)L(3))(2)](2+), and [Zn(2)(HL(5))(2)](2-) are observed and can be attributed to molecular peculiarities. Pyrazolate-bridged dinuclear zinc(II) complexes seem to provide a sufficient number of coordination sites for both activating the substrate and generating the nucleophile, where the phosphate esters are preferentially bound in a bidentate bridging fashion (in the case of HPNP) and in a monodentate fashion (in the case of POE).

  1. Systems approach to excitation-energy and electron transfer reaction networks in photosystem II complex: model studies for chlorophyll a fluorescence induction kinetics.

    PubMed

    Matsuoka, Takeshi; Tanaka, Shigenori; Ebina, Kuniyoshi

    2015-09-07

    Photosystem II (PS II) is a protein complex which evolves oxygen and drives charge separation for photosynthesis employing electron and excitation-energy transfer processes over a wide timescale range from picoseconds to milliseconds. While the fluorescence emitted by the antenna pigments of this complex is known as an important indicator of the activity of photosynthesis, its interpretation was difficult because of the complexity of PS II. In this study, an extensive kinetic model which describes the complex and multi-timescale characteristics of PS II is analyzed through the use of the hierarchical coarse-graining method proposed in the authors׳ earlier work. In this coarse-grained analysis, the reaction center (RC) is described by two states, open and closed RCs, both of which consist of oxidized and neutral special pairs being in quasi-equilibrium states. Besides, the PS II model at millisecond scale with three-state RC, which was studied previously, could be derived by suitably adjusting the kinetic parameters of electron transfer between tyrosine and RC. Our novel coarse-grained model of PS II can appropriately explain the light-intensity dependent change of the characteristic patterns of fluorescence induction kinetics from O-J-I-P, which shows two inflection points, J and I, between initial point O and peak point P, to O-J-D-I-P, which shows a dip D between J and I inflection points.

  2. Prediction and assimilation of surf-zone processes using a Bayesian network: Part II: Inverse models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Plant, Nathaniel G.; Holland, K. Todd

    2011-01-01

    A Bayesian network model has been developed to simulate a relatively simple problem of wave propagation in the surf zone (detailed in Part I). Here, we demonstrate that this Bayesian model can provide both inverse modeling and data-assimilation solutions for predicting offshore wave heights and depth estimates given limited wave-height and depth information from an onshore location. The inverse method is extended to allow data assimilation using observational inputs that are not compatible with deterministic solutions of the problem. These inputs include sand bar positions (instead of bathymetry) and estimates of the intensity of wave breaking (instead of wave-height observations). Our results indicate that wave breaking information is essential to reduce prediction errors. In many practical situations, this information could be provided from a shore-based observer or from remote-sensing systems. We show that various combinations of the assimilated inputs significantly reduce the uncertainty in the estimates of water depths and wave heights in the model domain. Application of the Bayesian network model to new field data demonstrated significant predictive skill (R2 = 0.7) for the inverse estimate of a month-long time series of offshore wave heights. The Bayesian inverse results include uncertainty estimates that were shown to be most accurate when given uncertainty in the inputs (e.g., depth and tuning parameters). Furthermore, the inverse modeling was extended to directly estimate tuning parameters associated with the underlying wave-process model. The inverse estimates of the model parameters not only showed an offshore wave height dependence consistent with results of previous studies but the uncertainty estimates of the tuning parameters also explain previously reported variations in the model parameters.

  3. A dynamical systems analysis of afferent control in a neuromechanical model of locomotion: II. Phase asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spardy, Lucy E.; Markin, Sergey N.; Shevtsova, Natalia A.; Prilutsky, Boris I.; Rybak, Ilya A.; Rubin, Jonathan E.

    2011-10-01

    In this paper we analyze a closed loop neuromechanical model of locomotor rhythm generation. The model is composed of a spinal central pattern generator (CPG) and a single-joint limb, with CPG outputs projecting via motoneurons to muscles that control the limb and afferent signals from the muscles feeding back to the CPG. In a preceding companion paper (Spardy et al 2011 J. Neural Eng. 8 065003), we analyzed how the model generates oscillations in the presence or absence of feedback, identified curves in a phase plane associated with the limb that signify where feedback levels induce phase transitions within the CPG, and explained how increasing feedback strength restores oscillations in a model representation of spinal cord injury; from these steps, we derived insights about features of locomotor rhythms in several scenarios and made predictions about rhythm responses to various perturbations. In this paper, we exploit our analytical observations to construct a reduced model that retains important characteristics from the original system. We prove the existence of an oscillatory solution to the reduced model using a novel version of a Melnikov function, adapted for discontinuous systems, and also comment on the uniqueness and stability of this solution. Our analysis yields a deeper understanding of how the model must be tuned to generate oscillations and how the details of the limb dynamics shape overall model behavior. In particular, we explain how, due to the feedback signals in the model, changes in the strength of a tonic supra-spinal drive to the CPG yield asymmetric alterations in the durations of different locomotor phases, despite symmetry within the CPG itself.

  4. A dynamical systems analysis of afferent control in a neuromechanical model of locomotion. II. Phase asymmetry

    PubMed Central

    Spardy, Lucy E.; Markin, Sergey N.; Shevtsova, Natalia A.; Prilutsky, Boris I.; Rybak, Ilya A.; Rubin, Jonathan E.

    2012-01-01

    We analyze a closed loop neuromechanical model of locomotor rhythm generation. The model is composed of a spinal central pattern generator (CPG) and a single-joint limb, with CPG outputs projecting via motoneurons to muscles that control the limb and afferent signals from the muscles feeding back to the CPG. In a preceding companion paper, we analyzed how the model generates oscillations in the presence or absence of feedback, identified curves in a phase plane associated with the limb that signify where feedback levels induce phase transitions within the CPG, and explained how increasing feedback strength restores oscillations in a model representation of spinal cord injury; from these steps, we derived insights about features of locomotor rhythms in several scenarios and made predictions about rhythm responses to various perturbations. In this paper, we exploit our analytical observations to construct a reduced model that retains important characteristics from the original system. We prove the existence of an oscillatory solution to the reduced model using a novel version of a Melnikov function, adapted for discontinuous systems and also comment on the uniqueness and stability of this solution. Our analysis yields a deeper understanding of how the model must be tuned to generate oscillations and how the details of the limb dynamics shape overall model behavior. In particular, we explain how, due to the feedback signals in the model, changes in the strength of a tonic supra-spinal drive to the CPG yield asymmetric alterations in the durations of different locomotor phases, despite symmetry within the CPG itself. PMID:22058275

  5. Modeling the Effects of Ecosystem Fragmentation and Restoration: Management Models for Mobile Animals. Volume 1. Appendices I-II

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    mesquite in mesquite (no edge effect ) How to Run the Model Open an existing or new ArcView GIS project. Open a View, and if not already present, add...values, which in the same example would be 0.7 and 25, respectively. To model no edge effect (the null model) for any one edge type, enter a value of...units for dmax are the same as the map units of the habitat spatial data. For edge types in which no edge effect will be modeled, enter a “basal

  6. Modeling Contamination Migration on the Chandra X-ray Observatory - II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Dell, Stephen L.; Swartz, Douglas A.; Tice, Neil W.; Plucinsky, Paul P.; Grant, Catherine E.; Marshall, Herman L.; Vikhlinin, Alexey A.; Tennant, Allyn F.

    2013-01-01

    During its first 14 years of operation, the cold (about -60C) optical blocking filter of the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS), aboard the Chandra X-ray Observatory, has accumulated a growing layer of molecular contamination that attenuates low-energy x rays. Over the past few years, the accumulation rate, spatial distribution, and composition have changed. This evolution has motivated further analysis of contamination migration within and near the ACIS cavity. To this end, the current study employs a higher-fidelity geometric model of the ACIS cavity, detailed thermal modeling based upon temperature data, and a refined model of the molecular transport.

  7. Synthesis, structure determination and 3D molecular modeling of some novel manganese(II) complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hari Kumaran Nair, M. L.; Lalitha, K. P.

    2013-06-01

    Some novel manganese(II) complexes with the ligand (z)-4-((2-hydroxy-4-methoxyphenyl)diazenyl)-1,5-dimethyl-2-phenyl-1H-pyrazol-3(2H)-one, MPAAP, 3-methoxy phenol azoantipyrine, L1, having the formulae [Mn(L1)2(X)2], [Mn(L1)2(Y)2], where X = Cl- / Br-; Y = NCS- were synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, molar conductance and magnetic susceptibility measurements, spectral (IR, UV-Visible, EPR, FAB mass) studies, thermogravimetric analysis, powder XRD and cyclic voltammetric studies and by SEM image. An octahedral structure is tentatively proposed for the complexes with respect to the above studies. The [Mn(L1)2(Y)2] was subjected to γ-ray irradiation and the internal changes accompanied were evaluated. The energy minimized configuration of the complex [Mn(L1)2(Y)2] was made with CHEM Bio 3D Ultra 11.0 and the respective parameters are computed. The ligand and its complex [Mn(L1)2(Y)2] were screened for their possible antimicrobial activities.

  8. Modeling of iron K lines: Radiative and Auger decay data for Fe II-Fe IX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmeri, P.; Mendoza, C.; Kallman, T. R.; Bautista, M. A.; Meléndez, M.

    2003-10-01

    A detailed analysis of the radiative and Auger de-excitation channels of K-shell vacancy states in Fe II-Fe IX has been carried out. Level energies, wavelengths, A-values, Auger rates and fluorescence yields have been calculated for the lowest fine-structure levels populated by photoionization of the ground state of the parent ion. Different branching ratios, namely Kalpha2 /Kalpha1, Kbeta/Kalpha, KLM/KLL, KMM/KLL, and the total K-shell fluorescence yields, omegaK, obtained in the present work have been compared with other theoretical data and solid-state measurements, finding good general agreement with the latter. The Kalpha2/Kalpha1 ratio is found to be sensitive to the excitation mechanism. From these comparisons it has been possible to estimate an accuracy of ~ 10% for the present transition probabilities. Tables 3 and 4 are only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/410/359

  9. Comparison of Analytical Models of Propagation of CMEs and its Validation Using Type II Radio Bursts Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez Alanis, C. A.; Aguilar-Rodriguez, E.; Corona Romero, P.

    2015-12-01

    Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) are large-scale eruptive events arising from the solar corona that are expelled into the interplanetary (IP) medium. The CMEs can be associated with interplanetary shocks and this associated with type II radio-burst emissions. Some of the CMEs carry a magnetic configuration that can generate geomagnetic storm, the main interest in space weather. It is therefore important to predict arrival times of CMEs that are potential to generate a geomagnetic storm. We used a number of hydrodynamic (viscous and inertial) drag force models to approximate the trajectory of a CME. We focus on obtaining proportionality constants to achieve good approximations to CME arrivals. We analized a set of fast CMEs by finding the appropiate drag coefficients that simultaneusly approximated: the in-situ arrivals of the events, their associated type II radio-burst and satellite observations of these phenomena. Our results suggest that quadratic and inertial drag are the dynamic agent that prevails for fast CMEs propagation. Our studies may contribute to future 'space weather forescasting' at the Earth.

  10. Arene C(sp(2))-H Metalation at Ni(II) Modeled with a Reactive PONCPh Ligand.

    PubMed

    Jongbloed, Linda S; García-López, Diego; van Heck, Richard; Siegler, Maxime A; Carbó, Jorge J; van der Vlugt, Jarl Ivar

    2016-08-15

    Coordination of the reactive phosphinitopyridylphenyl PONCPh ligand L(H) to NiBr2 initially yields paramagnetic brown NiBr2(L(H)) (1), but addition of triethylamine results in fast and facile cyclometalation at Ni(II), giving NiBr(κ(3)-P,N,C-L) (2) as well-defined species. This is a rare example of direct cyclometalation at Ni(II) from a C-H bond in a ligand structure other than encumbering ligands (e.g., ECE pincers). Diamagnetic yellow complex 2 reacts instantaneously with HBF4 to give purple [NiBr(κ(3)-P,N-L(H))]BF4 (3). A very unusual (an)agostic Ni(CPh-H) interaction in the solid-state structure of 3 was unequivocally demonstrated using single-crystal X-ray crystallography and was interpreted by density functional theory calculations (quantum theory of atoms in molecules and electron localization function analysis). These compounds may be viewed as models for key intermediates in the Ni-catalyzed C-H functionalization of arenes.

  11. Applicability of Isolates and Fractions of Plant Extracts in Murine Models in Type II Diabetes: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Vanessa Soares; do Amaral, Laura Vieira; Novaes, Rômulo Dias

    2016-01-01

    Type II diabetes mellitus is one of the most common public health problems worldwide. Its increasing prevalence in several countries and the difficult metabolic control of individuals with the disease justify studying strategies for primary prevention. The population has sought alternative and cheaper ways to treat the disease, including the use of plants considered medicinal by the population. In this study, we carried out a systematic review on the applicability of isolates and fractions of plant extracts in animal models in type II diabetes. A literature search was performed in MEDLINE/PubMed and Scopus databases. Studies using other experimental animals (horses, rabbits, and monkeys) and humans as well as articles in Chinese, German, and Russian were excluded. We assessed the quality of the studies included by using the criteria described in the ARRIVE guidelines. In general, the animals that received fractions or isolates presented reduced blood glucose levels, normalization of body weight and plasma insulin levels, and reduced total triglycerides and cholesterol. In addition, we observed wide variation among the analyzed parameters, which hindered comparison between the studies found. In further studies, standardized reports and experimental design would help to establish comparable study groups and advance the overall knowledge, thus facilitating translatability from animal data to human clinical conditions. PMID:27843476

  12. Behavior of human serum albumin on strong cation exchange resins: II. model analysis.

    PubMed

    Voitl, Agnes; Butté, Alessandro; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2010-08-20

    Experiments with human serum albumin on a strong cation exchange resin exhibit a peculiar elution pattern: the protein elutes with two peaks in a modifier gradient. This behavior is modeled with a general rate model, where the two elution peaks are modeled with two binding conformations, one of which is at equilibrium conditions, while for the other, the adsorption process is rate limited. Isocratic experiments under nonadsorbing conditions were used to characterize the mass transfer process. The isotherm of both adsorption conformations as well as the kinetic of adsorption and desorption for the second conformation are functions of the modifier concentration. They are evaluated with linear modifier gradient experiments and step experiments with various adsorption times. All experimental features are well reproduced by the proposed modified general rate model.

  13. Development of a comprehensive analysis for rotorcraft. II - Aircraft model, solution procedure and applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W.

    1981-01-01

    The development of a comprehensive analytical model of rotorcraft aerodynamics and dynamics is described. Particular emphasis is given to describing the reasons behind the choices and decisions involved in constructing the model. The analysis is designed to calculate rotor performance, loads and noise; helicopter vibration and gust response; flight dynamics and handling qualities; and system aeroelastic stability. It is intended for use in the design, testing and evaluation of a wide class of rotors and rotorcraft and to be the basis for further development of rotary wing theories. The general characteristics of the geometric, structural, inertial and aerodynamic models used for the rotorcraft components are described, including the assumptions introduced by the chosen models and the resulting capabilities and limitations. Finally, some examples from recent applications of the analysis are given.

  14. A physical model of the bidirectional reflectance of vegetation canopies. I - Theory. II - Inversion and validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verstraete, Michel M.; Pinty, Bernard; Dickinson, Robert E.

    1990-01-01

    A new physically based analytical model of the bidirectional reflectance of vegetation canopies is derived. The model expresses the bidirectional reflectance field of a semiinfinite canopy as a combination of functions describing (1) the optical properties of the leaves through their single-scattering albedo and their phase function, (2) the average distribution of leaf orientations, and (3) the architecture of the canopy. The model is validated against laboratory and ground-based measurements in the visible and IR spectral regions, taken over two vegetation covers. The intrinsic optical properties of leaves and the information on the geometrical canopy arrangements in space were obtained using an inversion procedure based on a nonlinear optimization technique. Model predictions of bidirectional reflectances obtained using the inversion procedure compare well with actual observations.

  15. Charge-state-dependent energy loss of slow ions. II. Statistical atom model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelm, Richard A.; Möller, Wolfhard

    2016-05-01

    A model for charge-dependent energy loss of slow ions is developed based on the Thomas-Fermi statistical model of atoms. Using a modified electrostatic potential which takes the ionic charge into account, nuclear and electronic energy transfers are calculated, the latter by an extension of the Firsov model. To evaluate the importance of multiple collisions even in nanometer-thick target materials we use the charge-state-dependent potentials in a Monte Carlo simulation in the binary collision approximation and compare the results to experiment. The Monte Carlo results reproduce the incident charge-state dependence of measured data well [see R. A. Wilhelm et al., Phys. Rev. A 93, 052708 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevA.93.052708], even though the experimentally observed charge exchange dependence is not included in the model.

  16. Application of nonlocal models to nano beams. Part II: Thickness length scale effect.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jun-Sik

    2014-10-01

    Applicability of nonlocal models to nano-beams is discussed in terms of the Eringen's nonlocal Euler-Bernoulli (EB) beam model. In literature, most work has taken the axial coordinate derivative in the Laplacian operator presented in nonlocal elasticity. This causes that the non-locality always makes the beam soften as compared to the local counterpart. In this paper, the thickness scale effect is solely considered to investigate if the nonlocal model can simulate stiffening effect. Taking the thickness derivative in the Laplacian operator leads to the presence of a surface stress state. The governing equation derived is compared to that of the EB model with the surface stress. The results obtained reveal that the nonlocality tends to decrease the bending moment stiffness whereas to increase the bending rigidity in the governing equation. This tendency also depends on the surface conditions.

  17. The brain decade in debate: II. Panic or anxiety? From animal models to a neurobiological basis.

    PubMed

    Andreatini, R; Blanchard, C; Blanchard, R; Brandão, M L; Carobrez, A P; Griebel, G; Guimarães, F S; Handley, S L; Jenck, F; Leite, J R; Rodgers, J; Schenberg, L C; Da Cunha, C; Graeff, F G

    2001-02-01

    This article is a transcription of an electronic symposium sponsored by the Brazilian Society of Neuroscience and Behavior (SBNeC). Invited researchers from the European Union, North America and Brazil discussed two issues on anxiety, namely whether panic is a very intense anxiety or something else, and what aspects of clinical anxiety are reproduced by animal models. Concerning the first issue, most participants agreed that generalized anxiety and panic disorder are different on the basis of clinical manifestations, drug response and animal models. Also, underlying brain structures, neurotransmitter modulation and hormonal changes seem to involve important differences. It is also common knowledge that existing animal models generate different types of fear/anxiety. A challenge for future research is to establish a good correlation between animal models and nosological classification.

  18. An Apple II Implementation of Man-Mod Manpower Planning Model.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-03-01

    Ut Ofmm 4968 01111 a"P mW m10 1 0W This thesis presents an Apple 11 Markov chain model software package pro- grained to be flexible, practical, and...chain model software package programmed to be flexible, practical, and user interactive. The program addresses the future de- termination of manpower...7 MICROCOMPUTER SYSTEM ............................. 1 SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT ............................. 8 MAN-MOD

  19. The macroscopic entrainment processes of simulated cumulus ensemble. Part II: Testing the entraining-plume model

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Chichung; Arakawa, Akio

    1997-04-15

    According to Part I of this paper, is seems that ignoring the contribution from descendent cloud air in a cloud model for cumulus parameterization (CMCP), such as the spectral cumulus ensemble model in the Arakawa-Schubert parameterization, is an acceptable simplification for tropical deep convection. Since each subensemble in the spectral cumulus ensemble model is formally analogous to an entraining plume, the latter is examined using the simulated data from a cloud-resolving model (CRM). The authors first follow the analysis procedure of Warner. With the data from a nonprecipitating experiment, the authors show that the entraining-plume model cannot simultaneously predict the mean liquid water profile and cloud top height of the clouds simulated by the CRM. However, the mean properties of active elements of clouds, which are characterized by strong updrafts, can be described by an entraining plume of similar top height. With data from a precipitating experiment, the authors examine the spectral cumulus ensemble model using the Paluch diagram. It is found that the spectral cumulus ensemble model appears adequate if different types of clouds in the spectrum are interpreted as subcloud elements with different entrainment characteristics. The resolved internal structure of clouds can thus be viewed as a manifestation of a cloud spectrum. To further investigate whether the fractional rate of entrainment is an appropriate parameter for characterizing cloud types in the spectral cumulus ensemble model, the authors stratify the simulated saturated updrafts (subcloud elements) into different types according to their eventual heights and calculate the cloud mass flux and mean moist static energy for each type. Entrainment characteristics are then inferred through the cloud mass flux and in-cloud moist static energy. It is found that different types of subcloud elements have distinguishable thermodynamic properties and entrainment characteristics. 16 refs., 8 figs.

  20. [Spatial aspects of the dynamics of blood coagulation. II. Phenomenological model].

    PubMed

    Ataullakhanov, F I; Guriia, G T; Safroshkina, A Iu

    1994-01-01

    Pattern formation dynamics of the blood clotting system was investigated using a reaction-diffusion model based on modern biochemical concepts. It is shown through analysis of the model that the pattern formation mechanism in the blood significantly differs from the well known fundamental Turing's mechanism. Within the mechanism discovered the human blood is treated as the specific new-type active medium, in which the pattern formation is determined by the interplay of two autowaves.

  1. Predictive modeling of infrared radiative heating in tomato dry-peeling process: Part II. Model validation and sensitivity analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A predictive mathematical model was developed to simulate heat transfer in a tomato undergoing double sided infrared (IR) heating in a dry-peeling process. The aims of this study were to validate the developed model using experimental data and to investigate different engineering parameters that mos...

  2. A unifying neuro-fasciagenic model of somatic dysfunction - Underlying mechanisms and treatment - Part II.

    PubMed

    Tozzi, Paolo

    2015-07-01

    This paper offers an extensive review of the main fascia-mediated mechanisms underlying various therapeutic processes of clinical relevance for manual therapy. The concept of somatic dysfunction is revisited in light of the several fascial influences that may come into play during and after manual treatment. A change in perspective is thus proposed: from a nociceptive model that for decades has viewed somatic dysfunction as a neurologically-mediated phenomenon, to a unifying neuro-fascial model that integrates neural influences into a multifactorial and multidimensional interpretation of manual therapeutic effects as being partially, if not entirely, mediated by the fascia. By taking into consideration a wide spectrum of fascia-related factors - from cell-based mechanisms to cognitive and behavioural influences - a model emerges suggesting, amongst other results, a multidisciplinary-approach to the intervention of somatic dysfunction. Finally, it is proposed that a sixth osteopathic 'meta-model' - the connective tissue-fascial model - be added to the existing five models in osteopathic philosophy as the main interface between all body systems, thus providing a structural and functional framework for the body's homoeostatic potential and its inherent abilities to heal.

  3. Appendicularian ecophysiology. II. Modeling nutrition, metabolism, growth and reproduction of the appendicularian Oikopleura dioica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombard, Fabien; Sciandra, Antoine; Gorsky, Gabriel

    2009-11-01

    A model has been developed to simulate the growth of an individual appendicularian ( Oikopleura dioica) from egg to spawning. This model uses a new set of experimental data presented in a companion paper in this volume and estimates growth rates and generation times as well as clearance rates, house and fecal pellet production and reproductive capacity at different temperatures and food concentrations. According to the model outputs, the weight of a single house represents 11.5% of the individual's total weight, a lower value than previously estimated. The relative weight of one fecal pellet varies as a function of food concentration. The model also confirms that the minimum food concentration for growth is about 20-30 µg C l - 1 and that growth is maximal for a 100 µg C l - 1 feeding concentration. The limits of the growth optimum in relation to food concentration and temperature can be considered as a first description of the fundamental ecological niche of appendicularians. This model can be used both for predicting (1) the impact of in situ observed populations on the pico- and nanoseston and (2) the production of large aggregates. These two pieces of information are often needed for large-scale biogeochemical models.

  4. Computational models of music perception and cognition II: Domain-specific music processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purwins, Hendrik; Grachten, Maarten; Herrera, Perfecto; Hazan, Amaury; Marxer, Ricard; Serra, Xavier

    2008-09-01

    In Part I [Purwins H, Herrera P, Grachten M, Hazan A, Marxer R, Serra X. Computational models of music perception and cognition I: The perceptual and cognitive processing chain. Physics of Life Reviews 2008, in press, doi:10.1016/j.plrev.2008.03.004], we addressed the study of cognitive processes that underlie auditory perception of music, and their neural correlates. The aim of the present paper is to summarize empirical findings from music cognition research that are relevant to three prominent music theoretic domains: rhythm, melody, and tonality. Attention is paid to how cognitive processes like category formation, stimulus grouping, and expectation can account for the music theoretic key concepts in these domains, such as beat, meter, voice, consonance. We give an overview of computational models that have been proposed in the literature for a variety of music processing tasks related to rhythm, melody, and tonality. Although the present state-of-the-art in computational modeling of music cognition definitely provides valuable resources for testing specific hypotheses and theories, we observe the need for models that integrate the various aspects of music perception and cognition into a single framework. Such models should be able to account for aspects that until now have only rarely been addressed in computational models of music cognition, like the active nature of perception and the development of cognitive capacities from infancy to adulthood.

  5. Pulsations of rapidly rotating stars. II. Realistic modelling for intermediate-mass stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouazzani, R.-M.; Roxburgh, I. W.; Dupret, M.-A.

    2015-07-01

    Context. Very high precision seismic space missions such as CoRoT and Kepler provide the means for testing the modelling of transport processes in stellar interiors. For some stars, such as δ Scuti, γ Doradus, and Be stars, the observed pulsation spectra are modified by rotation to such an extent that it prevents any fruitful interpretation. Aims: Our aim is to characterise acoustic pulsation spectra of realistic stellar models in order to be able to interpret asteroseismic data from such stars. Methods: The 2D oscillation code ACOR, which treats rotation in a non-perturbative manner, is used to study pulsation spectra of highly distorted evolved models of stars. Two-dimensional models of stars are obtained by a self-consistent method that distorts spherically averaged stellar models a posteriori, at any stage of evolution, and for any type of rotation law. Results: Four types of modes are calculated in a very dense frequency spectrum, among which are island modes. The regularity of the island modes spectrum is confirmed and yields a new set of quantum numbers, with which an échelle diagram can be built. Mixed gravito-acoustic modes are calculated in rapidly rotating models for the first time.

  6. Explicit Finite Element Modeling of Multilayer Composite Fabric for Gas Turbine Engine Containment Systems, Phase II. Part 3; Material Model Development and Simulation of Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simmons, J.; Erlich, D.; Shockey, D.

    2009-01-01

    A team consisting of Arizona State University, Honeywell Engines, Systems & Services, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Glenn Research Center, and SRI International collaborated to develop computational models and verification testing for designing and evaluating turbine engine fan blade fabric containment structures. This research was conducted under the Federal Aviation Administration Airworthiness Assurance Center of Excellence and was sponsored by the Aircraft Catastrophic Failure Prevention Program. The research was directed toward improving the modeling of a turbine engine fabric containment structure for an engine blade-out containment demonstration test required for certification of aircraft engines. The research conducted in Phase II began a new level of capability to design and develop fan blade containment systems for turbine engines. Significant progress was made in three areas: (1) further development of the ballistic fabric model to increase confidence and robustness in the material models for the Kevlar(TradeName) and Zylon(TradeName) material models developed in Phase I, (2) the capability was improved for finite element modeling of multiple layers of fabric using multiple layers of shell elements, and (3) large-scale simulations were performed. This report concentrates on the material model development and simulations of the impact tests.

  7. DO-BOD modeling of River Yamuna for national capital territory, India using STREAM II, a 2D water quality model.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Deepshikha; Singh, Ram Karan

    2009-12-01

    The study illustrates the utility of STREAM II as a modeling package to determine the pollution load due to organic matter in the River Yamuna during its course through the National Capital Territory that is Delhi, India. The study was done for a period from 1995-2005. Model simulates the dissolved oxygen and biochemical oxygen demand parameters in a two-dimensional fashion by performing the numerical solution to a set of differential equations representing aquatic life with the help of Crank-Nicholson finite difference method. The model was simulated and calibrated through the field water-quality primary data and the secondary data which were taken from Central Pollution Control Board. The main reasons for the high river pollution is increasing population of Delhi and other states, leading to generation of huge amounts of domestic sewage into the river Yamuna. The model gave a good agreement between calibrated and observed data, thus, actualizing the validity of the model. However, discrepancies noticed during model calibrations were attributed to the assumptions adopted in the model formulation and to lack of field data.

  8. The Development of Midlatitude Cirrus Models for MODIS Using FIRE-I, FIRE-II, and ARM In Situ Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nasiri, Shaima L.; Baum, Bryan A.; Heymsfield, Andrew J.; Yang, Ping; Poellot, Michael R.; Kratz, David P.; Hu, Yong-Xiang

    2002-01-01

    Detailed in situ data from cirrus clouds have been collected during dedicated field Campaigns, but the use of the size and habit distribution data has been lagging in the development of more realistic cirrus scattering models. In this study, the authors examine the use of in situ cirrus data collected during three field campaigns to develop more realistic midlatitude cirrus microphysical models. Data are used from the First International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) Regional Experiment (FIRE)-I (1986) and FIRE-II (1991) campaigns and from a recent Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program campaign held in March-April of 2000. The microphysical models are based on measured vertical distributions of both particle size and particle habit and are used to develop new scattering models for a suite of moderate-resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) bands spanning visible. near-infrared, and infrared wavelengths. The sensitivity of the resulting scattering properties to the underlying assumptions of the assumed particle size and habit distributions are examined. It is found that the near-infrared bands are sensitive not only to the discretization of the size distribution but also to the assumed habit distribution. In addition. the results indicate that the effective diameter calculated from a given size distribution tends to be sensitive to the number of size bins that are used to discretize the data and also to the ice-crystal habit distribution.

  9. Black liquor combustion validated recovery boiler modeling: Final year report. Volume 2 (Appendices I, section 5 and II, section 1)

    SciTech Connect

    Grace, T.M.; Frederick, W.J.; Salcudean, M.; Wessel, R.A.

    1998-08-01

    This project was initiated in October 1990, with the objective of developing and validating a new computer model of a recovery boiler furnace using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code specifically tailored to the requirements for solving recovery boiler flows, and using improved submodels for black liquor combustion based on continued laboratory fundamental studies. The key tasks to be accomplished were as follows: (1) Complete the development of enhanced furnace models that have the capability to accurately predict carryover, emissions behavior, dust concentrations, gas temperatures, and wall heat fluxes. (2) Validate the enhanced furnace models, so that users can have confidence in the predicted results. (3) Obtain fundamental information on aerosol formation, deposition, and hardening so as to develop the knowledge base needed to relate furnace model outputs to plugging and fouling in the convective sections of the boiler. (4) Facilitate the transfer of codes, black liquid submodels, and fundamental knowledge to the US kraft pulp industry. Volume 2 contains the last section of Appendix I, Radiative heat transfer in kraft recovery boilers, and the first section of Appendix II, The effect of temperature and residence time on the distribution of carbon, sulfur, and nitrogen between gaseous and condensed phase products from low temperature pyrolysis of kraft black liquor.

  10. Viscoelastic-damage interface model formulation with friction to simulate the delamination growth in mode II shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodarzi, Mohammad Saeed; Hosseini-Toudeshky, Hossein

    2017-02-01

    In this paper a formulation of a viscoelastic-damage interface model with friction in mode-II is presented. The cohesive constitutive law contains elastic and damage regimes. It has been assumed that the shear stress in the elastic regime follows the viscoelastic properties of the matrix material. The three element Voigt model has been used for the formulation of relaxation modulus of the material. Damage evolution proceeds according to the bilinear cohesive constitutive law combined with friction stress consideration. Combination of damage and friction is based on the presumption that the damaged area, related to an integration point, can be dismembered into the un-cracked area with the cohesive damage and cracked area with friction. Samples of a one element model have been presented to see the effect of parameters on the cohesive constitutive law. A comparison between the predicted results with available results of end-notched flexure specimens in the literature is also presented to verify the model. Transverse crack tension specimens are also simulated for different applied displacement velocities.

  11. The modelling of an SF6 arc in a supersonic nozzle: II. Current zero behaviour of the nozzle arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Q.; Liu, J.; Yan, J. D.; Fang, M. T. C.

    2016-08-01

    The present work (part II) forms the second part of an investigation into the behaviour of SF6 nozzle arc. It is concerned with the aerodynamic and electrical behaviour of a transient nozzle arc under a current ramp specified by a rate of current decay (di/dt) before current zero and a voltage ramp (dV/dt) after current zero. The five flow models used in part I [1] for cold gas flow and DC nozzle arcs have been applied to study the transient arc at three stagnation pressures (P 0) and two values of di/dt for the current ramp, representing a wide range of arcing conditions. An analysis of the physical mechanisms encompassed in each flow model is given with an emphasis on the adequacy of a particular model in describing the rapidly varying arc around current zero. The critical rate of rise of recovery voltage (RRRV) is found computationally and compared with test results of Benenson et al [2]. For transient nozzle arcs, the RRRV is proportional to the square of P 0, rather than to the square root of P 0 for DC nozzle arcs. The physical mechanisms responsible for the strong dependence of RRRV on P 0 have been investigated. The relative merits of the flow models employed are discussed.

  12. Circularly-symmetric complex normal ratio distribution for scalar transmissibility functions. Part II: Probabilistic model and validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Wang-Ji; Ren, Wei-Xin

    2016-12-01

    In Part I of this study, some new theorems, corollaries and lemmas on circularly-symmetric complex normal ratio distribution have been mathematically proved. This part II paper is dedicated to providing a rigorous treatment of statistical properties of raw scalar transmissibility functions at an arbitrary frequency line. On the basis of statistics of raw FFT coefficients and circularly-symmetric complex normal ratio distribution, explicit closed-form probabilistic models are established for both multivariate and univariate scalar transmissibility functions. Also, remarks on the independence of transmissibility functions at different frequency lines and the shape of the probability density function (PDF) of univariate case are presented. The statistical structures of probabilistic models are concise, compact and easy-implemented with a low computational effort. They hold for general stationary vector processes, either Gaussian stochastic processes or non-Gaussian stochastic processes. The accuracy of proposed models is verified using numerical example as well as field test data of a high-rise building and a long-span cable-stayed bridge. This study yields new insights into the qualitative analysis of the uncertainty of scalar transmissibility functions, which paves the way for developing new statistical methodologies for modal analysis, model updating or damage detection using responses only without input information.

  13. Pseudo Order Kinetics Model to Predict the Adsorption Interaction of Corn-Stalk Adsorbent Surface with Metal Ion Adsorbate Cu (II) and Fe (II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haryanto, B.; Singh, W. B.; Barus, E. S.; Ridho, A.; Rawa, M. R.

    2017-01-01

    The adsorption process using cornstalk as adsorbent was used to remove the single metal ion such as copper ion and cadmium ion. The adsorption kinetics of each contaminant then used to predict the interaction type of metal ion on surface of corn stalk by calculating pseudo order 1st and 2nd. The identification type as chemically or physically interaction was predicted from the quality of r2 by plotting the adsorption capacity (q) and time (t). The r2 were 0.01 and 0.99 for pseudo order 1st and 2nd respectively for Fe (II). The r2 were 0.26 and 0.999 for pseudo order 1st and 2nd respectively for Cu (II). The result of adsorption interaction of metal ion and surface function of corn stalk is chemical type. SEM/EDX confirmed the Cu2+ presence on cornstalk surface.

  14. Modelling air pollution for epidemiologic research--part II: predicting temporal variation through land use regression.

    PubMed

    Mölter, A; Lindley, S; de Vocht, F; Simpson, A; Agius, R

    2010-12-01

    Over recent years land use regression (LUR) has become a frequently used method in air pollution exposure studies, as it can model intra-urban variation in pollutant concentrations at a fine spatial scale. However, very few studies have used the LUR methodology to also model the temporal variation in air pollution exposure. The aim of this study is to estimate annual mean NO(2) and PM(10) concentrations from 1996 to 2008 for Greater Manchester using land use regression models. The results from these models will be used in the Manchester Asthma and Allergy Study (MAAS) birth cohort to determine health effects of air pollution exposure. The Greater Manchester LUR model for 2005 was recalibrated using interpolated and adjusted NO(2) and PM(10) concentrations as dependent variables for 1996-2008. In addition, temporally resolved variables were available for traffic intensity and PM(10) emissions. To validate the resulting LUR models, they were applied to the locations of automatic monitoring stations and the estimated concentrations were compared against measured concentrations. The 2005 LUR models were successfully recalibrated, providing individual models for each year from 1996 to 2008. When applied to the monitoring stations the mean prediction error (MPE) for NO(2) concentrations for all stations and years was -0.8μg/m³ and the root mean squared error (RMSE) was 6.7μg/m³. For PM(10) concentrations the MPE was 0.8μg/m³ and the RMSE was 3.4μg/m³. These results indicate that it is possible to model temporal variation in air pollution through LUR with relatively small prediction errors. It is likely that most previous LUR studies did not include temporal variation, because they were based on short term monitoring campaigns and did not have historic pollution data. The advantage of this study is that it uses data from an air dispersion model, which provided concentrations for 2005 and 2010, and therefore allowed extrapolation over a longer time period.

  15. Spectroscopic investigation of new water soluble Mn(II)(2) and Mg(II)(2) complexes for the substrate binding models of xylose/glucose isomerases.

    PubMed

    Patra, Ayan; Bera, Manindranath

    2014-01-30

    In methanol, the reaction of stoichiometric amounts of Mn(OAc)(2)·4H(2)O and the ligand H(3)hpnbpda [H(3)hpnbpda=N,N'-bis(2-pyridylmethyl)-2-hydroxy-1,3-propanediamine-N,N'-diacetic acid] in the presence of NaOH, afforded a new water soluble dinuclear manganese(II) complex, [Mn2(hpnbpda)(μ-OAc)] (1). Similarly, the reaction of Mg(OAc)(2)·4H(2)O and the ligand H3hpnbpda in the presence of NaOH, in methanol, yielded a new water soluble dinuclear magnesium(II) complex, [Mg2(hpnbpda)(μ-OAc)(H2O)2] (2). DFT calculations have been performed for the structural optimization of complexes 1 and 2. The DFT optimized structure of complex 1 shows that two manganese(II) centers are in a distorted square pyramidal geometry, whereas the DFT optimized structure of complex 2 reveals that two magnesium(II) centers adopt a six-coordinate distorted octahedral geometry. To understand the mode of substrate binding and the mechanistic details of the active site metals in xylose/glucose isomerases (XGI), we have investigated the binding interactions of biologically important monosaccharides d-glucose and d-xylose with complexes 1 and 2, in aqueous alkaline solution by a combined approach of FTIR, UV-vis, fluorescence, and (13)C NMR spectroscopic techniques. Fluorescence spectra show the binding-induced gradual decrease in emission of complexes 1 and 2 accompanied by a significant blue shift upon increasing the concentration of sugar substrates. The binding modes of d-glucose and d-xylose with complex 2 are indicated by their characteristic coordination induced shift (CIS) values in (13)C NMR spectra for C1 and C2 carbon atoms.

  16. Intrinsic galaxy shapes and alignments - II. Modelling the intrinsic alignment contamination of weak lensing surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joachimi, B.; Semboloni, E.; Hilbert, S.; Bett, P. E.; Hartlap, J.; Hoekstra, H.; Schneider, P.

    2013-11-01

    Intrinsic galaxy alignments constitute the major astrophysical systematic of forthcoming weak gravitational lensing surveys but also yield unique insights into galaxy formation and evolution. We build analytic models for the distribution of galaxy shapes based on halo properties extracted from the Millennium Simulation, differentiating between early- and late-type galaxies as well as central galaxies and satellites. The resulting ellipticity correlations are investigated for their physical properties and compared to a suite of current observations. The best-faring model is then used to predict the intrinsic alignment contamination of planned weak lensing surveys. We find that late-type galaxy models generally have weak intrinsic ellipticity correlations, marginally increasing towards smaller galaxy separation and higher redshift. The signal for early-type models at fixed halo mass strongly increases by three orders of magnitude over two decades in galaxy separation, and by one order of magnitude from z = 0 to z = 2. The intrinsic alignment strength also depends strongly on halo mass, but not on galaxy luminosity at fixed mass, or galaxy number density in the environment. We identify models that are in good agreement with all observational data, except that all models overpredict alignments of faint early-type galaxies. The best model yields an intrinsic alignment contamination of a Euclid-like survey between 0.5 and 10 per cent at z > 0.6 and on angular scales larger than a few arcminutes. Cutting 20 per cent of red foreground galaxies using observer-frame colours can suppress this contamination by up to a factor of 2.

  17. Evaluation of climate-related carbon turnover processes in global vegetation models for boreal and temperate forests.

    PubMed

    Thurner, Martin; Beer, Christian; Ciais, Philippe; Friend, Andrew D; Ito, Akihiko; Kleidon, Axel; Lomas, Mark R; Quegan, Shaun; Rademacher, Tim T; Schaphoff, Sibyll; Tum, Markus; Wiltshire, Andy; Carvalhais, Nuno

    2017-02-13

    Turnover concepts in state-of-the-art global vegetation models (GVMs) account for various processes, but are often highly simplified and may not include an adequate representation of the dominant processes that shape vegetation carbon turnover rates in real forest ecosystems at a large spatial scale. Here we evaluate vegetation carbon turnover processes in GVMs participating in the Inter-Sectoral Impact Model Intercomparison Project (ISI-MIP; including HYBRID4, JeDi, JULES, LPJml, ORCHIDEE, SDGVM, and VISIT) using estimates of vegetation carbon turnover rate (k) derived from a combination of remote sensing based products of biomass and net primary production (NPP). We find that current model limitations lead to considerable biases in the simulated biomass and in k (severe underestimations by all models except JeDi and VISIT compared to observation-based average k), likely contributing to underestimation of positive feedbacks of the northern forest carbon balance to climate change caused by changes in forest mortality. A need for improved turnover concepts related to frost damage, drought and insect outbreaks in order to better reproduce observation-based spatial patterns in k is identified. Since direct frost damage effects on mortality are usually not accounted for in these GVMs, simulated relationships between k and winter length in boreal forests are not consistent between different regions and strongly biased compared to the observation-based relationships. Some models show a response of k to drought in temperate forests as a result of impacts of water availability on NPP, growth efficiency or carbon balance dependent mortality as well as soil or litter moisture effects on leaf turnover or fire. However, further direct drought effects like carbon starvation (only in HYBRID4) or hydraulic failure are usually not taken into account by the investigated GVMs. While they are considered dominant large-scale mortality agents, mortality mechanisms related to insects

  18. Towards an accurate and computationally-efficient modelling of Fe(II)-based spin crossover materials.

    PubMed

    Vela, Sergi; Fumanal, Maria; Ribas-Arino, Jordi; Robert, Vincent

    2015-07-07

    The DFT + U methodology is regarded as one of the most-promising strategies to treat the solid state of molecular materials, as it may provide good energetic accuracy at a moderate computational cost. However, a careful parametrization of the U-term is mandatory since the results may be dramatically affected by the selected value. Herein, we benchmarked the Hubbard-like U-term for seven Fe(ii)N6-based pseudo-octahedral spin crossover (SCO) compounds, using as a reference an estimation of the electronic enthalpy difference (ΔHelec) extracted from experimental data (T1/2, ΔS and ΔH). The parametrized U-value obtained for each of those seven compounds ranges from 2.37 eV to 2.97 eV, with an average value of U = 2.65 eV. Interestingly, we have found that this average value can be taken as a good starting point since it leads to an unprecedented mean absolute error (MAE) of only 4.3 kJ mol(-1) in the evaluation of ΔHelec for the studied compounds. Moreover, by comparing our results on the solid state and the gas phase of the materials, we quantify the influence of the intermolecular interactions on the relative stability of the HS and LS states, with an average effect of ca. 5 kJ mol(-1), whose sign cannot be generalized. Overall, the findings reported in this manuscript pave the way for future studies devoted to understand the crystalline phase of SCO compounds, or the adsorption of individual molecules on organic or metallic surfaces, in which the rational incorporation of the U-term within DFT + U yields the required energetic accuracy that is dramatically missing when using bare-DFT functionals.

  19. Stability of nonrotating stellar systems. II - Prolate shell-orbit models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merritt, David; Hernquist, Lars

    1991-08-01

    The dynamical stability of nonrotating prolate galaxy models constructed from thin long-axis tube orbits ('shell' orbits) are investigated. Models more elongated than about E6 (axis ratio of about 2:5) are unstable to bending modes than rapidly increase the velocity dispersion perpendicular to the long axis and decrease the model's elongation. Approximate representations of the spatial forms of the fastest growing modes and their growth rates are obtained. Most of the evolution is due to two modes: a symmetric (banana-shaped) bending and an antisymmetric (S-shaped) bending. The instability is similar to the 'firehose' instability of a thin self-gravitating slab, except that it persists in models with velocity anisotropies that are much less extreme than the critical value for instability of the slab. A simple model is given that reproduces the basic features of the instability in the prolate geometry. These results provide support for the hypothesis of Fridman and Polyachenko (1984) that the absence of elliptical galaxies flatter than about E6 is due to dynamical instability.

  20. Surface complexation modeling of Cd(II) sorption to montmorillonite, bacteria, and their composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ning; Du, Huihui; Huang, Qiaoyun; Cai, Peng; Rong, Xingmin; Feng, Xionghan; Chen, Wenli

    2016-10-01

    Surface complexation modeling (SCM) has emerged as a powerful tool for simulating heavy metal adsorption processes on the surface of soil solid components under different geochemical conditions. The component additivity (CA) approach is one of the strategies that have been widely used in multicomponent systems. In this study, potentiometric titration, isothermal adsorption, zeta potential measurement, and extended X-ray absorption fine-structure (EXAFS) spectra analysis were conducted to investigate Cd adsorption on 2 : 1 clay mineral montmorillonite, on Gram-positive bacteria Bacillus subtilis, and their mineral-organic composite. We developed constant capacitance models of Cd adsorption on montmorillonite, bacterial cells, and mineral-organic composite. The adsorption behavior of Cd on the surface of the composite was well explained by CA-SCM. Some deviations were observed from the model simulations at pH < 5, where the values predicted by the model were lower than the experimental results. The Cd complexes of X2Cd, SOCd+, R-COOCd+, and R-POCd+ were the predominant species on the composite surface over the pH range of 3 to 8. The distribution ratio of the adsorbed Cd between montmorillonite and bacterial fractions in the composite as predicted by CA-SCM closely coincided with the estimated value of EXAFS at pH 6. The model could be useful for the prediction of heavy metal distribution at the interface of multicomponents and their risk evaluation in soils and associated environments.

  1. Mathematical models of proprioceptors. II. Structure and function of the Golgi tendon organ.

    PubMed

    Mileusnic, Milana P; Loeb, Gerald E

    2006-10-01

    We developed a physiologically realistic mathematical model of the Golgi tendon organ (GTO) whose elements correspond to anatomical features of the biological receptor. The mechanical interactions of these elements enable it to capture all salient aspects of GTO afferent behavior reported in the literature. The model accurately describes the GTO's static and dynamic responses to activation of single motor units whose muscle fibers insert into the GTO, including the different static and dynamic sensitivities that exist for different types of muscle fibers (S, FR, and FF). Furthermore, it captures the phenomena of self- and cross-adaptation wherein the GTO dynamic response during motor unit activation is reduced by prior activation of the same or a different motor unit, respectively. The model demonstrates various degrees of nonlinear summation of GTO responses resulting from simultaneous activation of multiple motor units. Similarly to the biological GTO, the model suggests that the activation of every additional motor unit to already active motor units that influence the receptor will have a progressively weaker incremental effect on the GTO afferent activity. Finally, the proportional relationship between the cross-adaptation and summation recorded for various pairs of motor units was captured by the model, but only by incorporating a particular type of occlusion between multiple transduction regions that were previously suggested. This occlusion mechanism is consistent with the anatomy of the afferent innervation and its arrangement with respect to the collagen strands inserting into the GTO.

  2. A partitioner-centric model for SAMR partitioning trade-off optimization : Part II.

    SciTech Connect

    Steensland, Johan; Ray, Jaideep

    2004-03-01

    Optimal partitioning of structured adaptive mesh applications necessitates dynamically determining and optimizing for the most time-inhibiting factor, such as data migration and communication volume. However, a trivial monitoring of an application evaluates the current partitioning rather than the inherent properties of the grid hierarchy. We present a model that given a structured adaptive grid, determines ab initio to what extent the partitioner should focus on reducing the amount of data migration to reduce execution time. This model contributes to the meta-partitioner, our ultimate aim of being able to select and configure the optimal partitioner based on the dynamic properties of the grid hierarchy and the computer. We validate the predictions of this model by comparing them with actual measurements (via traces) from four different adaptive simulations. The results show that the proposed model generally captures the inherent optimization-need in SAMR applications. We conclude that our model is a useful contribution, since tracking and adapting to the dynamic behavior of such applications lead to potentially large decreases in execution times.

  3. Evaluating Impacts of CO2 Intrusion into an Unconsolidated Aquifer: II. Modeling Results

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Liange; Qafoku, Nikolla; Lawter, Amanda R.; Wang, Guohui; Shao, Hongbo; Brown, Christopher F.

    2015-08-04

    Large scale deployment of CO2 geological sequestration requires the assessment of the risks. One of the potential risks is the impact of CO2 leakage on shallow groundwater overlying the sequestration site.The understanding of the key chemical processes and parameters are critical for building numerical models for risk assessment. Model interpretation of laboratory and field tests is an effective way to enhance such understanding. Column experiments in which CO2 charged synthetic groundwater flowed through a column packed with material from High Plains aquifer was conducted and concentration of several constituents in the effluent water was analyzed. In this paper, reactive transport model was developed to interpret the observed concentration changes, attempting to shed light on the chemical reactions and key parameters that control the concentration changes of these constituents. The reactive transport model catches the concentration changes of pH, Ca, Mg, Ba, Sr, Cs, As and Pb fairly well. Calcite dissolution and Ca-driven cation exchange reactions are the major drivers for the concentration changes of Ca, Ba, Sr, and Cs. The pH-driven adsorption/desorption reactions lead to a concentration increase of As and Pb. The volume fraction and reactive surface area of calcite, CEC and sorption capacity are key parameters in determining the magnitude of concentration increase. Model results also show that the dissolution of calcite with Ba impurity could be an alternative explanation of the increase in Ba concentration.

  4. Effective single-band models for the high-Tc cuprates. II. Role of apical oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raimondi, R.; Jefferson, J. H.; Feiner, L. F.

    1996-04-01

    An effective single-band model for the cuprates is derived by a cell-perturbation method from a five-band model which includes d3z2-r2 orbitals on copper and pz orbitals on apical oxygen. In addition to the usual Zhang-Rice singlets of A1 symmetry, there are two-hole cell states of B1 symmetry, which can become low in energy and depend sensitively on the apical oxygen ions. Provided that hybridization with the apical oxygen orbital is sufficiently weak to permit reduction to a t-t'-J model, the main effect of the B1-symmetry states is to renormalize the effective next-nearest-neighbor hopping (t') of doped holes. This effect can be quite large and may even change the sign of t'. The variation of t' between various compounds due to differences in crystal structure is shown to correlate with Tmaxc, the critical temperature at optimum doping, suggesting that t' may be a crucial parameter for the low-energy physics, which moreover differentiates between the various cuprates. The effective single-band model is shown to break down when the apex level approaches the in-plane oxygen level, and to describe that situation, which cannot be ruled out completely for the cuprates with present experimental evidence, we propose a specific minimal effective (two-band) model.

  5. Simulation of Potato Late Blight in the Andes. II: Validation of the LATEBLIGHT Model.

    PubMed

    Andrade-Piedra, Jorge L; Hijmans, Robert J; Juárez, Henry S; Forbes, Gregory A; Shtienberg, Dani; Fry, William E

    2005-10-01

    ABSTRACT LATEBLIGHT, a mathematical model that simulates the effect of weather, host growth and resistance, and fungicide use on asexual development and growth of Phytophthora infestans on potato foliage, was validated for the Andes of Peru. Validation was needed due to recent modifications made to the model, and because the model had not been formally tested outside of New York State. Prior to validation, procedures to estimate the starting time of the epidemic, the amount of initial inoculum, and leaf wetness duration were developed. Observed data for validation were from field trials with three potato cultivars in the Peruvian locations of Comas and Huancayo in the department of Junín, and Oxapampa in the department of Pasco in 1999 and 2000 for a total of 12 epidemics. These data had not been used previously for estimating model parameters. Observed and simulated epidemics were compared graphically using disease progress curves and numerically using the area under the disease progress curve in a confidence interval test, an equivalence test, and an envelope of acceptance test. The level of agreement between observed and simulated epidemics was high, and the model was found to be valid according to subjective and objective performance criteria. The approach of measuring fitness components of potato cultivars infected with isolates of a certain clonal lineage of P. infestans under controlled conditions and then using the experimental results as parameters of LATEBLIGHT proved to be effective. Fungicide treatments were not considered in this study.

  6. The clustering of baryonic matter. II: halo model and hydrodynamic simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Fedeli, C.; Semboloni, E.; Velliscig, M.; Daalen, M. Van; Schaye, J.; Hoekstra, H. E-mail: sembolon@strw.leidenuniv.nl E-mail: daalen@strw.leidenuniv.nl E-mail: hoekstra@strw.leidenuniv.nl

    2014-08-01

    We recently developed a generalization of the halo model in order to describe the spatial clustering properties of each mass component in the Universe, including hot gas and stars. In this work we discuss the complementarity of the model with respect to a set of cosmological simulations including hydrodynamics of different kinds. We find that the mass fractions and density profiles measured in the simulations do not always succeed in reproducing the simulated matter power spectra, the reason being that the latter encode information from a much larger range in masses than that accessible to individually resolved structures. In other words, this halo model allows one to extract information on the growth of structures from the spatial clustering of matter, that is complementary with the information coming from the study of individual objects. We also find a number of directions for improvement of the present implementation of the model, depending on the specific application one has in mind. The most relevant one is the necessity for a scale dependence of the bias of the diffuse gas component, which will be interesting to test with future detections of the Warm-Hot Intergalactic Medium. This investigation confirms the possibility to gain information on the physics of galaxy and cluster formation by studying the clustering of mass, and our next work will consist of applying the halo model to use future high-precision cosmic shear surveys to this end.

  7. The shape of dark matter haloes - II. The GALACTUS H I modelling & fitting tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, S. P. C.; van der Kruit, P. C.; Allen, R. J.; Freeman, K. C.

    2017-01-01

    We present a new H I modelling tool called GALACTUS. The program has been designed to perform automated fits of disc-galaxy models to observations. It includes a treatment for the self-absorption of gas. The software has been released into the public domain. We describe the design philosophy and inner workings of the program. After this, we model the face-on galaxy NGC 2403 using both self-absorption and optically thin models, showing that self-absorption occurs even in face-on galaxies. These results are then used to model an edge-on galaxy. It is shown that the maximum surface brightness plateaus seen in Paper I of this series are indeed signs of self-absorption. The apparent H I mass of an edge-on galaxy can be drastically lower compared with that same galaxy seen face-on. The Tully-Fisher relation is found to be relatively free from self-absorption issues.

  8. Electromagnetic backscattering from one-dimensional drifting fractal sea surface II: Electromagnetic backscattering model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Xie; William, Perrie; Shang-Zhuo, Zhao; He, Fang; Wen-Jin, Yu; Yi-Jun, He

    2016-07-01

    Sea surface current has a significant influence on electromagnetic (EM) backscattering signals and may constitute a dominant synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging mechanism. An effective EM backscattering model for a one-dimensional drifting fractal sea surface is presented in this paper. This model is used to simulate EM backscattering signals from the drifting sea surface. Numerical results show that ocean currents have a significant influence on EM backscattering signals from the sea surface. The normalized radar cross section (NRCS) discrepancies between the model for a coupled wave-current fractal sea surface and the model for an uncoupled fractal sea surface increase with the increase of incidence angle, as well as with increasing ocean currents. Ocean currents that are parallel to the direction of the wave can weaken the EM backscattering signal intensity, while the EM backscattering signal is intensified by ocean currents propagating oppositely to the wave direction. The model presented in this paper can be used to study the SAR imaging mechanism for a drifting sea surface. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 41276187), the Global Change Research Program of China (Grant No. 2015CB953901), the Priority Academic Program Development of Jiangsu Higher Education Institutions, China, the Program for the Innovation Research and Entrepreneurship Team in Jiangsu Province, China, the Canadian Program on Energy Research and Development, and the Canadian World Class Tanker Safety Service Program.

  9. Universal tight binding model for chemical reactions in solution and at surfaces. II. Water.

    PubMed

    Lozovoi, A Y; Sheppard, T J; Pashov, D L; Kohanoff, J J; Paxton, A T

    2014-07-28

    A revised water model intended for use in condensed phase simulations in the framework of the self consistent polarizable ion tight binding theory is constructed. The model is applied to water monomer, dimer, hexamers, ice, and liquid, where it demonstrates good agreement with theoretical results obtained by more accurate methods, such as DFT and CCSD(T), and with experiment. In particular, the temperature dependence of the self diffusion coefficient in liquid water predicted by the model, closely reproduces experimental curves in the temperature interval between 230 K and 350 K. In addition, and in contrast to standard DFT, the model properly orders the relative densities of liquid water and ice. A notable, but inevitable, shortcoming of the model is underestimation of the static dielectric constant by a factor of two. We demonstrate that the description of inter and intramolecular forces embodied in the tight binding approximation in quantum mechanics leads to a number of valuable insights which can be missing from ab initio quantum chemistry and classical force fields. These include a discussion of the origin of the enhanced molecular electric dipole moment in the condensed phases, and a detailed explanation for the increase of coordination number in liquid water as a function of temperature and compared with ice--leading to insights into the anomalous expansion on freezing. The theory holds out the prospect of an understanding of the currently unexplained density maximum of water near the freezing point.

  10. [Pain sensitivity changes in schizophrenic patients and animal models--Part II].

    PubMed

    Tuboly, Gábor; Horváth, Gyöngyi

    2009-05-30

    Diminished pain sensitivity in schizophrenic patients has been reported for more than 50 years, however little is known about the substrate and the basic mechanisms underlying altered pain sensitivity in this disease, therefore, relevant animal models are of decisive importance in the study of psychiatric diseases. The authors report a review consisting of two parts focusing on pain sensitivity changes in patients and in different animal models which proved the eligibility as schizophrenia models and pain sensitivities have also been determined. The second part of this article analyzed the results regarding knock out mice as schizophrenia models. These data proved that several genes have significant role in the pathomechanism of schizophrenia; therefore deficiency in one gene does not produce animals showing all signs of this disease. As regards the pain sensitivity changes, only a few data are available with controversial results. Data originated from complex chronic animal models indicate that they might be more adequate methods for studying the mechanisms of schizophrenia including the pain-sensitivity changes.

  11. Interaction of Iron II Complexes with B-DNA. Insights from Molecular Modeling, Spectroscopy and Cellular Biology.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gattuso, Hugo; Duchanois, Thibaut; Besancenot, Vanessa; Barbieux, Claire; Assfeld, Xavier; Becuwe, Philippe; Gros, Philippe; Grandemange, Stephanie; Monari, Antonio

    2015-12-01

    We report the characterization of the interaction between B-DNA and three terpyridin iron II complexes. Relatively long time-scale molecular dynamics is used in order to characterize the stable interaction modes. By means of molecular modeling and UV-vis spectroscopy, we prove that they may lead to stable interactions with the DNA duplex. Furthermore, the presence of larger π-conjugated moieties also leads to the appearance of intercalation binding mode. Non-covalent stabilizing interactions between the iron complexes and the DNA are also characterized and evidenced by the analysis of the gradient of the electronic density. Finally, the structural deformations induced on the DNA in the different binding modes are also evidenced. The synthesis and chemical characterization of the three complexes is reported, as well as their absorption spectra in presence of DNA duplexes to prove the interaction with DNA. Finally, their effects on human cell cultures have also been evidenced to further enlighten their biological effects.

  12. A synthetic model of the Mn₃Ca subsite of the oxygen-evolving complex in photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Kanady, Jacob S; Tsui, Emily Y; Day, Michael W; Agapie, Theodor

    2011-08-05

    Within photosynthetic organisms, the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) of photosystem II generates dioxygen from water using a catalytic Mn(4)CaO(n) cluster (n varies with the mechanism and nature of the intermediate). We report here the rational synthesis of a [Mn(3)CaO(4)](6+) cubane that structurally models the trimanganese-calcium-cubane subsite of the OEC. Structural and electrochemical comparison between Mn(3)CaO(4) and a related Mn(4)O(4) cubane alongside characterization of an intermediate calcium-manganese multinuclear complex reveals potential roles of calcium in facilitating high oxidation states at manganese and in the assembly of the biological cluster.

  13. Inclusive search for standard model Higgs boson production in the WW decay channel using the CDF II detector.

    PubMed

    Aaltonen, T; Adelman, J; Alvarez González, B; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Appel, J; Apresyan, A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Asaadi, J; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Barria, P; Bartos, P; Bauer, G; Beauchemin, P-H; Bedeschi, F; Beecher, D; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bizjak, I; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Bridgeman, A; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buzatu, A; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Calancha, C; Camarda, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carls, B; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Chwalek, T; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Corbo, M; Cordelli, M; Cox, C A; Cox, D J; Crescioli, F; Cuenca Almenar, C; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cully, J C; Dagenhart, D; d'Ascenzo, N; Datta, M; Davies, T; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lorenzo, G; Dell'Orso, M; Deluca, C; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; d'Errico, M; Di Canto, A; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Donati, S; Dong, P; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Ebina, K; Elagin, A; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Ershaidat, N; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Ferrazza, C; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Frank, M J; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garberson, F; Garcia, J E; Garfinkel, A F; Garosi, P; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D; Gessler, A; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Giannetti, P; Gibson, K; Gimmell, J L; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Group, R C; Grundler, U; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Han, B-Y; Han, J Y; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, D; Hare, M; Harr, R F; Hartz, M; Hatakeyama, K; Hays, C; Heck, M; Heinrich, J; Herndon, M; Heuser, J; Hewamanage, S; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S-C; Hughes, R E; Hurwitz, M; Husemann, U; Hussein, M; Huston, J; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeon, E J; Jha, M K; Jindariani, S; Johnson, W; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Jung, J E; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Kar, D; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kephart, R; Ketchum, W; Keung, J; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, H W; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krop, D; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kuhr, T; Kulkarni, N P; Kurata, M; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; LeCompte, T; Lee, E; Lee, H S; Lee, J S; Lee, S W; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C-J; Linacre, J; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, C; Liu, T; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Lovas, L; Lucchesi, D; Lueck, J; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lys, J; Lysak, R; MacQueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Makhoul, K; Maksimovic, P; Malde, S; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marino, C; Marino, C P; Martin, A; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Martínez-Ballarín, R; Mastrandrea, P; Mathis, M; Mattson, M E; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Menzione, A; Mesropian, C; Miao, T; Mietlicki, D; Miladinovic, N; Miller, R; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Mitra, A; Mitselmakher, G; Miyake, H; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Mondragon, M N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M J; Morlock, J; Movilla Fernandez, P; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Naganoma, J; Nakamura, K; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Nett, J; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Neubauer, S; Nielsen, J; Nodulman, L; Norman, M; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Oakes, L; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Osterberg, K; Pagan Griso, S; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Papadimitriou, V; Papaikonomou, A; Paramanov, A A; Parks, B; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Peiffer, T; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pianori, E; Pinera, L; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Potamianos, K; Poukhov, O; Prokoshin, F; Pronko, A; Ptohos, F; Pueschel, E; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, A; Ramakrishnan, V; Ranjan, N; Redondo, I; Renton, P; Renz, M; Rescigno, M; Richter, S; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rodriguez, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Roy, P; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Rutherford, B; Saarikko, H; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Santi, L; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Saveliev, V; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, A; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M A; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sforza, F; Sfyrla, A; Shalhout, S Z; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Shimojima, M; Shiraishi, S; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Simonenko, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Slaughter, A J; Slaunwhite, J; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Strycker, G L; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Suslov, I; Taffard, A; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Tanaka, R; Tang, J; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Thom, J; Thome, J; Thompson, G A; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Ttito-Guzmán, P; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Totaro, P; Trovato, M; Tsai, S-Y; Tu, Y; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Uozumi, S; van Remortel, N; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Vidal, M; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vogel, M; Volobouev, I; Volpi, G; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, W; Wagner-Kuhr, J; Wakisaka, T; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waters, D; Weinberger, M; Weinelt, J; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Wilbur, S; Williams, G; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wolfe, H; Wright, T; Wu, X; Würthwein, F; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yi, K; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanetti, A; Zeng, Y; Zhang, X; Zheng, Y; Zucchelli, S

    2010-02-12

    We present a search for standard model (SM) Higgs boson production using pp collision data at square root(s) = 1.96 TeV, collected with the CDF II detector and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.8 fb(-1). We search for Higgs bosons produced in all processes with a significant production rate and decaying to two W bosons. We find no evidence for SM Higgs boson production and place upper limits at the 95% confidence level on the SM production cross section (sigma(H)) for values of the Higgs boson mass (sigma(H)) in the range from 110 to 200 GeV. These limits are the most stringent for m(H) > 130 GeV and are 1.29 above the predicted value of sigma(H) for c = 165 GeV.

  14. Inclusive Search for Standard Model Higgs Boson Production in the WW Decay Channel Using the CDF II Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; González, B. Álvarez; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Attal, A.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauer, G.; Beauchemin, P.-H.; Bedeschi, F.; Beecher, D.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Binkley, M.; Bisello, D.; Bizjak, I.; Blair, R. E.; Blocker, C.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Boisvert, V.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brau, B.; Bridgeman, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brubaker, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Budd, S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buzatu, A.; Byrum, K. L.; Cabrera, S.; Calancha, C.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, M.; Canelli, F.; Canepa, A.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Carron, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chang, S. H.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Chlebana, F.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Chou, J. P.; Chung, K.; Chung, W. H.; Chung, Y. S.; Chwalek, T.; Ciobanu, C. I.; Ciocci, M. A.; Clark, A.; Clark, D.; Compostella, G.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Crescioli, F.; Almenar, C. Cuenca; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Cully, J. C.; Dagenhart, D.; D'Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; Davies, T.; de Barbaro, P.; de Cecco, S.; Deisher, A.; de Lorenzo, G.; Dell'Orso, M.; Deluca, C.; Demortier, L.; Deng, J.; Deninno, M.; D'Errico, M.; di Canto, A.; di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; D'Onofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dong, P.; Dorigo, T.; Dube, S.; Ebina, K.; Elagin, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Ershaidat, N.; Eusebi, R.; Fang, H. C.; Farrington, S.; Fedorko, W. T.; Feild, R. G.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J. P.; Ferrazza, C.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Frank, M. J.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Furic, I.; Gallinaro, M.; Galyardt, J.; Garberson, F.; Garcia, J. E.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerdes, D.; Gessler, A.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibson, K.; Gimmell, J. L.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giordani, M.; Giromini, P.; Giunta, M.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldschmidt, N.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gresele, A.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Grundler, U.; da Costa, J. Guimaraes; Gunay-Unalan, Z.; Haber, C.; Hahn, S. R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Han, B.-Y.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, D.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Hartz, M.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heck, M.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Heuser, J.; Hewamanage, S.; Hidas, D.; Hill, C. S.; Hirschbuehl, D.; Hocker, A.; Hou, S.; Houlden, M.; Hsu, S.-C.; Hughes, R. E.; Hurwitz, M.; Husemann, U.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Incandela, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jha, M. K.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, W.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Jung, J. E.; Junk, T. R.; Kamon, T.; Kar, D.; Karchin, P. E.; Kato, Y.; Kephart, R.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Khotilovich, V.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, H. W.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kirsch, L.; Klimenko, S.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Krop, D.; Krumnack, N.; Kruse, M.; Krutelyov, V.; Kuhr, T.; Kulkarni, N. P.; Kurata, M.; Kwang, S.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lami, S.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lander, R. L.; Lannon, K.; Lath, A.; Latino, G.; Lazzizzera, I.; Lecompte, T.; Lee, E.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Lee, S. W.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Lin, C.-J.; Linacre, J.; Lindgren, M.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Litvintsev, D. O.; Liu, C.; Liu, T.; Lockyer, N. S.; Loginov, A.; Lovas, L.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; MacQueen, D.; Madrak, R.; Maeshima, K.; Makhoul, K.; Maksimovic, P.; Malde, S.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, C.; Marino, C. P.; Martin, A.; Martin, V.; Martínez, M.; Martínez-Ballarín, R.; Mastrandrea, P.; Mathis, M.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzanti, P.; McFarland, K. S.; McIntyre, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Menzione, A.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Miladinovic, N.; Miller, R.; Mills, C.; Milnik, M.; Mitra, A.; Mitselmakher, G.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Mondragon, M. N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Morlock, J.; Fernandez, P. Movilla; Mülmenstädt, J.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakamura, K.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Neubauer, M. S.; Neubauer, S.; Nielsen, J.; Nodulman, L.; Norman, M.; Norniella, O.; Nurse, E.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Osterberg, K.; Griso, S. Pagan; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Papadimitriou, V.; Papaikonomou, A.; Paramanov, A. A.; Parks, B.; Pashapour, S.; Patrick, J.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Peiffer, T.; Pellett, D. E.; Penzo, A.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pinera, L.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Potamianos, K.; Poukhov, O.; Prokoshin, F.; Pronko, A.; Ptohos, F.; Pueschel, E.; Punzi, G.; Pursley, J.; Rademacker, J.; Rahaman, A.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Ranjan, N.; Redondo, I.; Renton, P.; Renz, M.; Rescigno, M.; Richter, S.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodriguez, T.; Rogers, E.; Rolli, S.; Roser, R.; Rossi, M.; Rossin, R.; Roy, P.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Rutherford, B.; Saarikko, H.; Safonov, A.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Santi, L.; Sartori, L.; Sato, K.; Saveliev, V.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schmidt, M. A.; Schmidt, M. P.; Schmitt, M.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scribano, A.; Scuri, F.; Sedov, A.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sexton-Kennedy, L.; Sforza, F.; Sfyrla, A.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Shimojima, M.; Shiraishi, S.; Shochet, M.; Shon, Y.; Shreyber, I.; Simonenko, A.; Sinervo, P.; Sisakyan, A.; Slaughter, A. J.; Slaunwhite, J.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Snihur, R.; Soha, A.; Somalwar, S.; Sorin, V.; Squillacioti, P.; Stanitzki, M.; St. Denis, R.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Strycker, G. L.; Suh, J. S.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Taffard, A.; Takashima, R.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tanaka, R.; Tang, J.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Thom, J.; Thome, J.; Thompson, G. A.; Thomson, E.; Tipton, P.; Ttito-Guzmán, P.; Tkaczyk, S.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Trovato, M.; Tsai, S.-Y.; Tu, Y.; Turini, N.; Ukegawa, F.; Uozumi, S.; van Remortel, N.; Varganov, A.; Vataga, E.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Vidal, M.; Vila, I.; Vilar, R.; Vogel, M.; Volobouev, I.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, R. G.; Wagner, R. L.; Wagner, W.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Wakisaka, T.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S. M.; Warburton, A.; Waters, D.; Weinberger, M.; Weinelt, J.; Wester, W. C., III; Whitehouse, B.; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wicklund, E.; Wilbur, S.; Williams, G.; Williams, H. H.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, C.; Wolfe, H.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Würthwein, F.; Yagil, A.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamaoka, J.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W. M.; Yeh, G. P.; Yi, K.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Yu, S. S.; Yun, J. C.; Zanetti, A.; Zeng, Y.; Zhang, X.; Zheng, Y.; Zucchelli, S.; CDF Collaboration

    2010-02-01

    We present a search for standard model (SM) Higgs boson production using pp¯ collision data at s=1.96TeV, collected with the CDF II detector and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.8fb-1. We search for Higgs bosons produced in all processes with a significant production rate and decaying to two W bosons. We find no evidence for SM Higgs boson production and place upper limits at the 95% confidence level on the SM production cross section (σH) for values of the Higgs boson mass (mH) in the range from 110 to 200 GeV. These limits are the most stringent for mH>130GeV and are 1.29 above the predicted value of σH for mH=165GeV.

  15. Mid-Holocene and last glacial maximum climate simulations with the IPSL model: part II: model-data comparisons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kageyama, Masa; Braconnot, Pascale; Bopp, Laurent; Mariotti, Véronique; Roy, Tilla; Woillez, Marie-Noëlle; Caubel, Arnaud; Foujols, Marie-Alice; Guilyardi, Eric; Khodri, Myriam; Lloyd, James; Lombard, Fabien; Marti, Olivier

    2013-05-01

    The climates of the mid-Holocene (MH, 6,000 years ago) and the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM, 21,000 years ago) have been extensively documented and as such, have become targets for the evaluation of climate models for climate contexts very different from the present. In Part 1 of the present work, we have studied the MH and LGM simulations performed with the last two versions of the IPSL model: IPSL_CM4, run for the PMIP2/CMIP3 (Coupled Model Intercomparion Project) projects and IPSL_CM5A, run for the most recent PMIP3/CMIP5 projets. We have shown that not only are these models different in their simulations of the PI climate, but also in their simulations of the climatic anomalies for the MH and LGM. In the Part 2 of this paper, we first examine whether palaeo-data can help discriminate between the model performances. This is indeed the case for the African monsoon for the MH or for North America south of the Laurentide ice sheet, the South Atlantic or the southern Indian ocean for the LGM. For the LGM, off-line vegetation modelling appears to offer good opportunities to distinguish climate model results because glacial vegetation proves to be very sensitive to even small differences in LGM climate. For other cases such as the LGM North Atlantic or the LGM equatorial Pacific, the large uncertainty on the SST reconstructions, prevents model discrimination. We have examined the use of other proxy-data for model evaluation, which has become possible with the inclusion of the biogeochemistry morel PISCES in the IPSL_CM5A model. We show a broad agreement of the LGM-PI export production changes with reconstructions. These changes are related to the mixed layer depth in most regions and to sea-ice variations in the high latitudes. We have also modelled foraminifer abundances with the FORAMCLIM model and shown that the changes in foraminifer abundance in the equatorial Pacific are mainly forced by changes in SSTs, hence confirming the SST-foraminifer abundance relationship

  16. Determination of the enzymatic activity of cytosolic 5'-nucleotidase cN-II in cancer cells: development of a simple analytical method and related cell line models.

    PubMed

    Jordheim, Lars Petter; Puy, Jean-Yves; Cros-Perrial, Emeline; Peyrottes, Suzanne; Lefebvre, Isabelle; Périgaud, Christian; Dumontet, Charles

    2015-07-01

    The cytosolic 5'-nucleotidase (cN-II) has been shown to be involved in the response of cancer cells to cytotoxic agents, and the quantification of its activity in biological samples is of great interest. In this context, we developed and validated an analytical method for determination of cN-II activity in cultured cancer cells. This non-radioactive method, using a Hypercarb column as stationary phase, was validated with a lower limit of quantification of 0.1 μM inosine. We used it to characterize cell line models with modified cN-II expression obtained with stable transfections. We show that the short hairpin RNA (shRNA)-mediated inhibition of cN-II expression in various malignant blood cells is associated with decreased protein expression and enzymatic activity (1.7-6.2-fold) as well as an increased sensitivity to cytotoxic agents (up to 14-fold). On the other hand, expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-fused wild type or hyperactive mutant (R367Q) cN-II increased the activity and also decreased the sensitivity to nucleoside analogues. Our results confirm the biological relevance of modulating cN-II in cancer cells, and we present a straightforward validated method for the determination of cN-II activity in cellular samples.

  17. Renoprotective and blood pressure-lowering effect of dietary soy protein via protein kinase C beta II inhibition in a rat model of metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Palanisamy, Nallasamy; Viswanathan, Periyasamy; Ravichandran, Mambakkam Katchapeswaran; Anuradha, Carani Venkataraman

    2010-01-01

    We studied whether substitution of soy protein for casein can improve insulin sensitivity, lower blood pressure (BP), and inhibit protein kinase C betaII (PKCbetaII) activation in kidney in an acquired model of metabolic syndrome. Adult male rats were fed 4 different diets: (i) starch (60%) and casein (20%) (CCD), (ii) fructose (60%) and casein (20%) (FCD), (iii) fructose (60%) and soy protein (20%) (FSD), and (iv) starch (60%) and soy protein (20%) (CSD). Renal function parameters, BP, pressor mechanisms, PKCbetaII expression, oxidative stress, and renal histology were evaluated after 60 days. FCD rats displayed insulin resistance and significant changes in body weight, kidney weight, urine volume, plasma and urine electrolytes accompanied by significant changes in renal function parameters compared with CCD rats. Elevated BP, plasma angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) activity, renal oxidative stress, and reduced nitrite (NO) and kallikrein activity were observed. Western blot analysis revealed enhanced renal expression of membrane-associated PKCbetaII in the FCD group. Histology showed fatty infiltration and thickening of glomeruli while urinary protein profile revealed a 5-fold increase in albumin. Substitution of soy protein for casein improved insulin sensitivity, lowered BP and PKCbetaII activation and restored renal function. Antioxidant action, inhibitory effect on ACE and PKCbetaII activation, and increased availability of kinins and NO could be contributing mechanisms for the benefits of dietary soy protein.

  18. The influence of load misalignment during uniaxial low-cycle fatigue testing. I - Modeling. II - Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandil, F. A.; Dyson, B. F.

    1993-05-01

    A quantitative model for predicting the extent of lifetime scatter in low-cycle fatigue due to the bending effect caused by load misalignment is proposed. The model is based on the bending mechanism and the type of extensometer used to control strain and the fatigue characteristics of the material. A consequence of a lateral offset in the center-lines of the load-train with respect to either a machine's frame or ram is found to be the most damaging bending mechanism. Two types of scatter under consideration include repeatability scatter due to testing practice within a single laboratory and reproducibility scatter among laboratories. The model is applied to four alloys, including AISI 316L, Nimonic 101, 9 Cr-1 Mo, and IN 718. Results show that in all four materials a major fraction of the data scatter could be attributed to bending. At the lowest strain range the predicted bending component represents the highest proportion of the experimental interlaboratory scatter.

  19. Modeling Contamination Migration on the Chandra X-ray Observatory II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Dell, Steve; Swartz, Doug; Tice, Neil; Plucinsky, Paul; Grant, Catherine; Marshall, Herman; Vikhlinin, Alexey

    2013-01-01

    During its first 14 years of operation, the cold (about -60degC) optical blocking filter of the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS), aboard the Chandra X-ray Observatory, has accumulated a growing layer of molecular contamination that attenuates low-energy x rays. Over the past few years, the accumulation rate, spatial distribution, and composition may have changed, perhaps partially related to changes in the operating temperature of the ACIS housing. This evolution of the accumulation of the molecular contamination has motivated further analysis of contamination migration on the Chandra X-ray Observatory, particularly within and near the ACIS cavity. To this end, the current study employs a higher-fidelity geometric model of the ACIS cavity, detailed thermal modeling based upon monitored temperature data, and an accordingly refined model of the molecular transport.

  20. Fluctuating currents in stochastic thermodynamics. II. Energy conversion and nonequilibrium response in kinesin models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altaner, Bernhard; Wachtel, Artur; Vollmer, Jürgen

    2015-10-01

    Unlike macroscopic engines, the molecular machinery of living cells is strongly affected by fluctuations. Stochastic thermodynamics uses Markovian jump processes to model the random transitions between the chemical and configurational states of these biological macromolecules. A recently developed theoretical framework [A. Wachtel, J. Vollmer, and B. Altaner, Phys. Rev. E 92, 042132 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevE.92.042132] provides a simple algorithm for the determination of macroscopic currents and correlation integrals of arbitrary fluctuating currents. Here we use it to discuss energy conversion and nonequilibrium response in different models for the molecular motor kinesin. Methodologically, our results demonstrate the effectiveness of the algorithm in dealing with parameter-dependent stochastic models. For the concrete biophysical problem our results reveal two interesting features in experimentally accessible parameter regions: the validity of a nonequilibrium Green-Kubo relation at mechanical stalling as well as a negative differential mobility for superstalling forces.

  1. Hydrodynamics of giant planet formation. II - Model equations and critical mass. III - Jupiter's nucleated instability

    SciTech Connect

    Wuchterl, G. )

    1991-05-01

    A spherically symmetric protoplanetary model with a growing rigid core and a gaseous envelope of solar composition is used to investigate the character and evolution of the nucleated instability; the model equations formulated are used to follow the static evolution of a protogiant planet in the 'Kyoto' solar nebula, lying at Jupiter's solar distance, to its critical core mass. Convective energy transfer has been formulated for inclusion in implicit radiation hydrodynamical computations. It is established that collapse need not occur at the critical mass, which in agreement with earlier investigations is found to be of the order of 13.1 earth masses. This model is then used as an initial condition for a radiation hydrodynamical calculation of the nucleated instability. It is found that nonlinear hydrodynamic waves are excited by a kappa mechanism, and that an outflow is driven. 56 refs.

  2. Recent developments in modeling of hot rolling processes: Part II - Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirt, Gerhard; Bambach, Markus; Seuren, Simon; Henke, Thomas; Lohmar, Johannes

    2013-05-01

    This publication gives a short overview of current developments in modeling and simulation of hot rolling processes of metals at the Institute of Metal Forming of RWTH Aachen University. It is based on the fundamentals treated in Part I also contained in this conference issue. It features applications in the field of fast on-line models, where a fast multi-stage rolling model and an analytical approach for predicting the through-thickness shear distribution are presented. In addition, a new concept for sensitivity analysis by automatic differentiation is introduced and discussed. Finally, applications of rolling simulations in the field of integrated computational materials engineering are presented with a focus on TWIP and linepipe steels as well as aluminum.

  3. Models of central pattern generators for quadruped locomotion. II. Secondary gaits.

    PubMed

    Buono, P L

    2001-04-01

    We continue the analysis of the network of symmetrically coupled cells modeling central pattern generators (CPG) for quadruped locomotion proposed by Golubitsky, Stewart, Buono and Collins by studying secondary gaits. Secondary gaits are modeled by output signals from the CPG where each cell emits one of two different output signals along with exact phase shifts. Examples of secondary gaits are transverse gallop, rotary gallop, and canter. We classify secondary gaits that bifurcate when the Poincaré map of a primary gait has a real eigenvalue crossing the unit circle. In particular, we show that periodic solutions modeling transverse gallop and rotary gallop bifurcate from primary gaits. Moreover, we find gaits from period-doubling bifurcations and analyze plausible footfall patterns. Numerical simulations are performed using the Morris-Lecar equations as cell dynamics.

  4. The dayside Venus ionosphere. II - Combined numerical model of ion and neutral composition above 120 km

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shimazaki, T.; Whitten, R. C.; Knudsen, W. C.; Miller, K. L.; Woodward, H. T.

    1984-01-01

    The median vertical profile of ion densities for the dayside Venusian ionosphere obtained by the orbiter retarding potential analyzer (ORPA) is simulated by one-dimensional model calculations. The model includes both neutral and ionic chemistry, eddy and molecular diffusion for neutral constituents, and ion-plasma diffusion for ionic constituents. The electron and ion temperatures measured by the ORPA are used to calculate the plasma diffusion coefficients and scale heights for ions. The predicted O2(+) densities below about 200 km agree particularly well with observations by the ORPA, but the model values are significantly less than those measured by the orbiter ion mass spectrometer. The observed ion composition is interpreted in terms of densities of the neutral atmosphere and its composition.

  5. International Space Station Human Behavior and Performance Competency Model: Volume II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, Lacey

    2008-01-01

    This document further defines the behavioral markers identified in the document "Human Behavior and Performance Competency Model" Vol. I. The Human Behavior and Performance (HBP) competencies were recommended as requirements to participate in international long duration missions, and form the basis for determining the HBP training curriculum for long duration crewmembers. This document provides details, examples, knowledge areas, and affective skills to support the use of the HBP competencies in training and evaluation. This document lists examples and details specific to HBP competencies required of astronauts/cosmonauts who participate in ISS expedition and other international long-duration missions. Please note that this model does not encompass all competencies required. While technical competencies are critical for crewmembers, they are beyond the scope of this document. Additionally, the competencies in this model (and subsequent objectives) are not intended to limit the internal activities or training programs of any international partner.

  6. Effect of Cu(II), Cd(II) and Zn(II) on Pb(II) biosorption by algae Gelidium-derived materials.

    PubMed

    Vilar, Vítor J P; Botelho, Cidália M S; Boaventura, Rui A R

    2008-06-15

    Biosorption of Pb(II), Cu(II), Cd(II) and Zn(II) from binary metal solutions onto the algae Gelidium sesquipedale, an algal industrial waste and a waste-based composite material was investigated at pH 5.3, in a batch system. Binary Pb(II)/Cu(II), Pb(II)/Cd(II) and Pb(II)/Zn(II) solutions have been tested. For the same equilibrium concentrations of both metal ions (1 mmol l(-1)), approximately 66, 85 and 86% of the total uptake capacity of the biosorbents is taken by lead ions in the systems Pb(II)/Cu(II), Pb(II)/Cd(II) and Pb(II)/Zn(II), respectively. Two-metal results were fitted to a discrete and a continuous model, showing the inhibition of the primary metal biosorption by the co-cation. The model parameters suggest that Cd(II) and Zn(II) have the same decreasing effect on the Pb(II) uptake capacity. The uptake of Pb(II) was highly sensitive to the presence of Cu(II). From the discrete model it was possible to obtain the Langmuir affinity constant for Pb(II) biosorption. The presence of the co-cations decreases the apparent affinity of Pb(II). The experimental results were successfully fitted by the continuous model, at different pH values, for each biosorbent. The following sequence for the equilibrium affinity constants was found: Pb>Cu>Cd approximately Zn.

  7. Enthalpy-Based Thermal Evolution of Loops: II. Improvements to the Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cargill, P. J.; Bradshaw, S. J.; Klimchuk, J. A.

    2011-01-01

    This paper further develops the zero-dimensional (0D) hydrodynamic coronal loop model "Enthalpy-based Thermal Evolution of Loops" (EBTEL) originally proposed by Klimchuk et al (2008), which studies the plasma response to evolving coronal heating. It has typically been applied to impulsive heating events. The basis of EBTEL is the modelling of mass exchange between the corona and transition region and chromosphere in response to heating variations, with the key parameter being the ratio of transition region to coronal radiation. We develop new models for this parameter that now include gravitational stratification and a physically motivated approach to radiative cooling. A number of examples are presented, including nanoflares in short and long loops, and a small flare. It is found that while the evolution of the loop temperature is rather insensitive to the details of the model, accurate tracking of the density requires the inclusion of our new features. In particular, we are able to now obtain highly over-dense loops in the late cooling phase and decreases to the coronal density arising due to stratification. The 0D results are compared to a 1D hydro code (Hydrad). The agreement is acceptable, with the exception of the flare case where some versions of Hydrad can give significantly lower densities. This is attributed to the method used to model the chromosphere in a flare. EBTEL is suitable for general use as a tool for (a) quick-look results of loop evolution in response to a given heating function and (b) situations where the modelling of hundreds or thousands of elemental loops is needed. A single run takes a few seconds on a contemporary laptop.

  8. Three-dimensional modeling of diesel engine intake flow, combustion and emissions-II

    SciTech Connect

    Reitz, R.D.; Rutland, C.J.

    1993-09-01

    A three-dimensional computer code, KIVA, is being modified to include state-of-the-art submodels for diesel engine flow and combustion. Improved and/or new submodels which have already been implemented and previously reported are: Wall heat transfer with unsteadiness and compressibility, laminar-turbulent characteristic time combustion with unburned HC and Zeldo`vich NO{sub x}, and spray/wall impingement with rebounding and sliding drops. Progress on the implementation of improved spray drop drag and drop breakup models, the formulation and testing of a multistep kinetics ignition model and preliminary soot modeling results are described in this report. In addition, the use of a block structured version of KIVA to model the intake flow process is described. A grid generation scheme has been developed for modeling realistic (complex) engine geometries, and computations have been made of intake flow in the ports and combustion chamber of a two-intake-valve engine. The research also involves the use of the code to assess the effects of subprocesses on diesel engine performance. The accuracy of the predictions is being tested by comparisons with engine experiments. To date, comparisons have been made with measured engine cylinder pressure, temperature and heat flux data, and the model results are in good agreement with the experiments. Work is in progress that will allow validation of in-cylinder flow and soot formation predictions. An engine test facility is described that is being used to provide the needed validation data. Test results have been obtained showing the effect of injection rate and split injections on engine performance and emissions.

  9. Dendritic solidification. I - Analysis of current theories and models. II - A model for dendritic growth under an imposed thermal gradient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laxmanan, V.

    1985-01-01

    A critical review of the present dendritic growth theories and models is presented. Mathematically rigorous solutions to dendritic growth are found to rely on an ad hoc assumption that dendrites grow at the maximum possible growth rate. This hypothesis is found to be in error and is replaced by stability criteria which consider the conditions under which a dendrite tip advances in a stable fashion in a liquid. The important elements of a satisfactory model for dendritic solidification are summarized and a theoretically consistent model for dendritic growth under an imposed thermal gradient is proposed and described. The model is based on the modification of an analysis due to Burden and Hunt (1974) and predicts correctly in all respects, the transition from a dendritic to a planar interface at both very low and very large growth rates.

  10. An Introduction to Flow and Transport in Fractal Models of Porous Media: Part II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Jianchao; San José Martínez, Fernando; Martín, Miguel Angel; Hu, Xiangyun

    2015-03-01

    This is the second part of the special issue on fractal geometry and its applications to the modeling of flow and transport in porous media, in which 10 original research articles and one review article are included. Combining to the first part of 11 original research articles, these two issues summarized current research on fractal models applied to porous media that will help to further advance this multidisciplinary development. This whole special issue is published also to celebrate the 70th birthday of Professor Boming Yu for his distinguished researches on fractal geometry and its application to transport physics of porous media.

  11. Exact Gell-Mann-Low function of supersymmetric Kähler σ-models (II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perelomov, A. M.; Prati, M. C.

    We extend the analysis carried out in [1] to a new class of Kähler supersymmetric σ-models in the two-dimensional space-time. Here the fields take values in the flag space F n, n = 1, 2 … and there are n topological charges. It turns out that also for these models the Gell-Mann-Low β-function to all orders coincides with the one-loop approximation, for which we calculate explicitly the exact value of the multiplicative constant.

  12. A Highly Anisotropic Nonlinear Elasticity Model for Vesicles II: Derivation of the Thin Bilayer Bending Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merlet, Benoît

    2015-08-01

    We study the thin-shell limit of the nonlinear elasticity model for vesicles introduced in part I. We consider vesicles of width with elastic energy of order . In this regime, we show that the limit model is a bending theory for generalized hypersurfaces—namely, co-dimension one oriented varifolds without boundary. Up to a positive factor, the limit functional is the Willmore energy. In the language of -convergence, we establish a compactness result, a lower bound result and the matching upper bound in the smooth case.

  13. Attracted to de Sitter II: cosmology of the shift-symmetric Horndeski models

    SciTech Connect

    Martín-Moruno, Prado; Nunes, Nelson J. E-mail: njnunes@fc.ul.pt

    2015-09-01

    Horndeski models with a de Sitter critical point for any kind of material content may provide a mechanism to alleviate the cosmological constant problem. Moreover, they could allow us to understand the current accelerated expansion of the universe as the result of the dynamical approach to the critical point when it is an attractor. We show that this critical point is indeed an attractor for the shift-symmetric subfamily of models with these characteristics. We study the cosmological scenario that results when considering radiation and matter content, and conclude that their background dynamics is compatible with the latest observational data.

  14. Analytic modeling of instabilities driven by higher-order modes in the HLS II RF system with a higher-harmonic cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yu-Ning; Li, Wei-Min; Wu, Cong-Feng; Wang, Lin

    2013-08-01

    The utility of a passive fourth-harmonic cavity plays a key role in suppressing longitudinal beam instabilities in the electron storage ring and lengthens the bunch by a factor of 2.6 for the phase II project of the Hefei Light Source (HLS II). Meanwhile, instabilities driven by higher-order modes (HOM) may limit the performance of the higher-harmonic cavity. In this paper, the parasitic coupled-bunch instability, which is driven by narrow band parasitic modes, and the microwave instability, which is driven by broadband HOM, are both modeled analytically. The analytic modeling results are in good agreement with those of our previous simulation study and indicate that the passive fourth-harmonic cavity suppresses parasitic coupled-bunch instabilities and microwave instability. The modeling suggests that a fourth-harmonic cavity may be successfully used at the HLS II.

  15. Software package for modeling spin–orbit motion in storage rings

    SciTech Connect

    Zyuzin, D. V.

    2015-12-15

    A software package providing a graphical user interface for computer experiments on the motion of charged particle beams in accelerators, as well as analysis of obtained data, is presented. The software package was tested in the framework of the international project on electric dipole moment measurement JEDI (Jülich Electric Dipole moment Investigations). The specific features of particle spin motion imply the requirement to use a cyclic accelerator (storage ring) consisting of electrostatic elements, which makes it possible to preserve horizontal polarization for a long time. Computer experiments study the dynamics of 10{sup 6}–10{sup 9} particles in a beam during 10{sup 9} turns in an accelerator (about 10{sup 12}–10{sup 15} integration steps for the equations of motion). For designing an optimal accelerator structure, a large number of computer experiments on polarized beam dynamics are required. The numerical core of the package is COSY Infinity, a program for modeling spin–orbit dynamics.

  16. Nanoparticle mass transfer from lung airways to systemic regions--Part II: Multi-compartmental modeling.

    PubMed

    Kolanjiyil, Arun V; Kleinstreuer, Clement

    2013-12-01

    This is the second article of a two-part paper, combining high-resolution computer simulation results of inhaled nanoparticle deposition in a human airway model (Kolanjiyil and Kleinstreuer, 2013, "Nanoparticle Mass Transfer From Lung Airways to Systemic Regions--Part I: Whole-Lung Aerosol Dynamics," ASME J. Biomech. Eng., 135(12), p. 121003) with a new multicompartmental model for insoluble nanoparticle barrier mass transfer into systemic regions. Specifically, it allows for the prediction of temporal nanoparticle accumulation in the blood and lymphatic systems and in organs. The multicompartmental model parameters were determined from experimental retention and clearance data in rat lungs and then the validated model was applied to humans based on pharmacokinetic cross-species extrapolation. This hybrid simulator is a computationally efficient tool to predict the nanoparticle kinetics in the human body. The study provides critical insight into nanomaterial deposition and distribution from the lungs to systemic regions. The quantitative results are useful in diverse fields such as toxicology for exposure-risk analysis of ubiquitous nanomaterial and pharmacology for nanodrug development and targeting.

  17. Simulation of Mental Disorders: II. Computer Models, Purposes and Future Directions.

    PubMed

    Gold, Azgad; Dudai, Yadin

    2016-01-01

    The complexity of the human brain and the difficulties in identifying and dissecting the biological, social and contextual underpinnings of mental functions confound the study of the etiology and pathophysiology of mental disorders. Simulating mental disorders in animal models or in computer programs may contribute to the understanding of such disorders. In the companion paper (30), we discussed selected concepts and pragmatics pertaining to mental illness simulation in general, and then focused on issues pertaining to animal models of mental disease. In this paper, we focus on selected aspects of the merits and limitations of the use of large scale computer simulation in investigating mental disorders. We argue that at the current state of knowledge, the biological-phenomenological gap in understanding mental disorders markedly limits the ability to generate high-fidelity computational models of mental illness. We conclude that similarly to the animal model approach, brain simulation focusing on limited realistic objectives, such as mimicking the emergence of selected distinct attributes of specific mental symptoms in a virtual brain or parts thereof, may serve as a useful tool in exploring mental disorders.

  18. The Rossby Centre Regional Atmospheric Climate Model part II: application to the Arctic climate.

    PubMed

    Jones, Colin G; Wyser, Klaus; Ullerstig, Anders; Willén, Ulrika

    2004-06-01

    The Rossby Centre regional climate model (RCA2) has been integrated over the Arctic Ocean as part of the international ARCMIP project. Results have been compared to observations derived from the SHEBA data set. The standard RCA2 model overpredicts cloud cover and downwelling longwave radiation, during the Arctic winter. This error was improved by introducing a new cloud parameterization, which significantly improves the annual cycle of cloud cover. Compensating biases between clear sky downwelling longwave radiation and longwave radiation emitted from cloud base were identified. Modifications have been introduced to the model radiation scheme that more accurately treat solar radiation interaction with ice crystals. This leads to a more realistic representation of cloud-solar radiation interaction. The clear sky portion of the model radiation code transmits too much solar radiation through the atmosphere, producing a positive bias at the top of the frequent boundary layer clouds. A realistic treatment of the temporally evolving albedo, of both sea-ice and snow, appears crucial for an accurate simulation of the net surface energy budget. Likewise, inclusion of a prognostic snow-surface temperature seems necessary, to accurately simulate near-surface thermodynamic processes in the Arctic.

  19. A General Pressure Gradient Formulation for Ocean Models - Part II: Energy, Momentum, and Bottom Torque Consistency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Song, Y.; Wright, D.

    1998-01-01

    A formulation of the pressure gradient force for use in models with topography-following coordinates is proposed and diagnostically analyzed by Song. We investigate numerical consistency with respect to global energy conservation, depth-integrated momentum changes, and the represent of the bottom pressure torque.

  20. Framework for a Quantitative Systemic Toxicity Model (FutureToxII)

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA’s ToxCast program profiles the bioactivity of chemicals in a diverse set of ~700 high throughput screening (HTS) assays. In collaboration with L’Oreal, a quantitative model of systemic toxicity was developed using no effect levels (NEL) from ToxRefDB for 633 chemicals with HT...

  1. Thermochemical pretreatment of lignocellulose to enhance methane fermentation: II. Evaluation and application of pretreatment model.

    PubMed

    Baugh, K D; Levy, J A; McCarty, P L

    1988-01-01

    A model was developed and evaluated as a tool for predicting the formation of soluble products from staged thermochemical treatment of lignocellulosic materials under acidic conditions typical of autohydrolysis. The model was used to predict the general trend of hemi-cellulose and cellulose hydrolysis between pH 2 and 4 and temperatures of 170-230 degrees C, and results were compared with experimental data. When the model was evaluated for this range of temperatures and pH values, results indicated: (1) a relatively low temperature (175 degrees C) during the first stage allows hydrolysis of the hemi-cellulose polysaccharides without significant mono-saccharide decomposition, (2) subsequent stages at higher temperatures (equal or greater than 200 degrees C) are needed for significant cellulose hydrolysis, but glucose decomposition will also occur, and, (3) a pH in the range of 2-2.5 will enhance polysaccharide hydrolysis while limiting monosaccharide decomposition. The model's predictions, indicating that the formation of biodegradable products could be optimized using Pretreatments at pH 2-2.5 for the pH range evaluated, were confirmed in experiments with white fir as a representative lig nocellulose.

  2. A New Look at Stratospheric Sudden Warmings. Part II: Evaluation of Numerical Model Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charlton, Andrew J.; Polvani, Lorenza M.; Perlwitz, Judith; Sassi, Fabrizio; Manzini, Elisa; Shibata, Kiyotaka; Pawson, Steven; Nielsen, J. Eric; Rind, David

    2007-01-01

    The simulation of major midwinter stratospheric sudden warmings (SSWs) in six stratosphere-resolving general circulation models (GCMs) is examined. The GCMs are compared to a new climatology of SSWs, based on the dynamical characteristics of the events. First, the number, type, and temporal distribution of SSW events are evaluated. Most of the models show a lower frequency of SSW events than the climatology, which has a mean frequency of 6.0 SSWs per decade. Statistical tests show that three of the six models produce significantly fewer SSWs than the climatology, between 1.0 and 2.6 SSWs per decade. Second, four process-based diagnostics are calculated for all of the SSW events in each model. It is found that SSWs in the GCMs compare favorably with dynamical benchmarks for SSW established in the first part of the study. These results indicate that GCMs are capable of quite accurately simulating the dynamics required to produce SSWs, but with lower frequency than the climatology. Further dynamical diagnostics hint that, in at least one case, this is due to a lack of meridional heat flux in the lower stratosphere. Even though the SSWs simulated by most GCMs are dynamically realistic when compared to the NCEP-NCAR reanalysis, the reasons for the relative paucity of SSWs in GCMs remains an important and open question.

  3. Interstellar Neutral Helium in the Heliosphere from IBEX Observations. II. The Warsaw Test Particle Model (WTPM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokół, J. M.; Kubiak, M. A.; Bzowski, M.; Swaczyna, P.

    2015-10-01

    We have developed a refined and optimized version of the Warsaw Test Particle Model of interstellar neutral gas in the heliosphere, specially tailored for analysis of IBEX-Lo observations. The former version of the model was used in the analysis of neutral He observed by IBEX that resulted in an unexpected conclusion that the interstellar neutral He flow vector was different than previously thought and that a new population of neutral He, dubbed the Warm Breeze, exists in the heliosphere. It was also used in the reanalysis of Ulysses observations that confirmed the original findings on the flow vector, but suggested a significantly higher temperature. The present version of the model has two strains targeted for different applications, based on an identical paradigm, but differing in the implementation and in the treatment of ionization losses. We present the model in detail and discuss numerous effects related to the measurement process that potentially modify the resulting flux of ISN He observed by IBEX, and identify those of them that should not be omitted in the simulations to avoid biasing the results. This paper is part of a coordinated series of papers presenting the current state of analysis of IBEX-Lo observations of ISN He. Details of the analysis method are presented by Swaczyna et al. and results of the analysis are presented by Bzowski et al.

  4. Kim model of stress induced by flux pinning in type-II superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yong, Hua-Dong; Zhou, You-He

    2008-06-01

    Magnetoelastic effects, which are caused by flux pinning in the superconductors, often induce fatal cracking of the bulk high temperature superconductors (HTS). In the present work, the Kim model is considered for the critical state in which the critical current density is assumed to depend on the flux density. Based on the plane strain approach, the analytic expression of the stress under the magnetic field is derived for a specimen having a slab geometry and infinitely along the other two directions. The stress field is obtained in the slab for the Kim model, and the stress behavior is discussed for two magnetization processes: the decreasing field and the field cooling. It is shown that the effects of the parameter p on the stress are related to the magnetization process. Compared to the Bean model, the results for the Kim model show the same trend with respect to the external field Ba during field cooling. Generally speaking, these results are of clear interest to experimentalists and to the successful application of bulk superconductors.

  5. QUANTIFYING SEASONAL SHIFTS IN NITROGEN SOURCES TO OREGON ESTUARIES: PART II: TRANSPORT MODELING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Identifying the sources of dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) in estuaries is complicated by the multiple sources, temporal variability in inputs, and variations in transport. We used a hydrodynamic model to simulate the transport and uptake of three sources of DIN (oceanic, riv...

  6. An engineering treatise on the CARE II dual mode and coverage models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    A mathematical model used to calculate the reliability of any dual-mode, spare-switching computer system was described, and some illustrative examples were presented. The possibility of extending the resultant computer program further was also examined, enabling it, in particular, to accommodate computer configurations involving more than two modes of operation.

  7. Lagrangian photochemical modeling studies of the 1987 Antarctic spring vortex. II - Seasonal trends in ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Austin, J.; Jones, R. L.; Mckenna, D. S.; Buckland, A. T.; Anderson, J. G.; Fahey, D. W.; Farmer, C. B.; Heidt, L. E.; Proffitt, M. H.; Vedder, J. F.

    1989-01-01

    A photochemical model consisting of 40 species and 107 reactions is integrated along 80-day air parcel trajectories calculated in the lower stratosphere for the springtime Antarctic. For the trajectory starting at 58 deg S, which may be regarded as outside the circumpolar vortex, only a small change in O3 occurs in the model. In contrast, for the air parcel starting in the vortex at 74 deg S, the O3 concentration is reduced by 93 percent during the 80 days from the beginning of August to late October. The model results for several species are compared with measurements from the Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment and, in general, good agreement is obtained. In the model, the dentrification of the air parcels in polar stratospheric clouds increases the amount of chlorine present in active form. Heterogeneous reactions maintain high active chlorine which destroys O3 via the formation of the ClO dimer. Results of calculations with reduced concentrations of inorganic chlorine show considerably reduced O3 destruction rates and compare favorably with the behavior of total O3 since the late 1970s. The remaining major uncertainties in the photochemical aspects of the Antarctic ozone hole are highlighted.

  8. ENTHALPY-BASED THERMAL EVOLUTION OF LOOPS. II. IMPROVEMENTS TO THE MODEL

    SciTech Connect

    Cargill, P. J.; Bradshaw, S. J.; Klimchuk, J. A.

    2012-06-20

    This paper develops the zero-dimensional (0D) hydrodynamic coronal loop model 'Enthalpy-based Thermal Evolution of Loops' (EBTEL) proposed by Klimchuk et al., which studies the plasma response to evolving coronal heating, especially impulsive heating events. The basis of EBTEL is the modeling of mass exchange between the corona and transition region (TR) and chromosphere in response to heating variations, with the key parameter being the ratio of the TR to coronal radiation. We develop new models for this parameter that now include gravitational stratification and a physically motivated approach to radiative cooling. A number of examples are presented, including nanoflares in short and long loops, and a small flare. The new features in EBTEL are important for accurate tracking of, in particular, the density. The 0D results are compared to a 1D hydro code (Hydrad) with generally good agreement. EBTEL is suitable for general use as a tool for (1) quick-look results of loop evolution in response to a given heating function, (2) extensive parameter surveys, and (3) situations where the modeling of hundreds or thousands of elemental loops is needed. A single run takes a few seconds on a contemporary laptop.

  9. Thermodynamical model of mixed aggregation of ligands with caffeine in aqueous solution. Part II.

    PubMed

    Zdunek, M; Piosik, J; Kapuscinski, J

    2000-02-14

    A statistical-thermodynamical model of mixed association in which one component's self-association is unlimited while the second component does not self-aggregate is described. The model was tested with 4',6-diamidino-2-phenyl-indole-dihydrochloride (DAPI) and ethidium bromide (EB) using light absorption spectroscopy and calorimetry. The system is controlled by two parameters, which represent self-aggregation 'neighborhood' association constant KCC and mixed 'neighborhood' association constant KAC. Calculated, using this model, KAC = 58.2 +/- 1 M-1, KAC = 64.6 +/- 2 M-1 for DAPI and EB, respectively, are in good agreement with known values of stacking interactions. The titration microcalorimetric measurement of DAPI-CAF interaction delta H = -11.1 +/- 0.4 kcal/mol is also consistent with this type of reaction. The structures of the stacking complexes were also confirmed by semi-empirical molecular modeling in the presence of water. The data indicate that CAF forms stacking complexes with DAPI and EB, thus effectively lowering the concentration of the free ligands in the solution, and therefore, CAF can be used to modulate aromatic compound activity.

  10. Heavy metals in urban soils of East St. Louis, IL. Part II: Leaching characteristics and modeling.

    PubMed

    Kaminski, M D; Landsberger, S

    2000-09-01

    The city of East St. Louis, IL, has a history of abundant industrial activities including smelters of ferrous and non-ferrous metals, a coal-fired power plant, companies that produced organic and inorganic chemicals, and petroleum refineries. Following a gross assessment of heavy metals in the community soils (see Part I of this two-part series), leaching tests were performed on specific soils to elucidate heavy metal-associated mineral fractions and general leachability. Leaching experiments, including the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TLCP) and column tests, and sequential extractions, illustrated the low leachability of metals in East St. Louis soils. The column leachate results were modeled using a formulation developed for fly ash leaching. The importance of instantaneous dissolution was evident from the model. By incorporating desorption/adsorption terms into the source term, the model was adapted very well to the time-dependent heavy metal leachate concentrations. The results demonstrate the utility of a simple model to describe heavy metal leaching from contaminated soils.

  11. Heavy Metals in Urban Soils of East St. Louis, IL Part II: Leaching Characteristics and Modeling.

    PubMed

    Kaminski, Michael D; Landsberger, Sheldon

    2000-09-01

    The city of East St. Louis, IL, has a history of abundant industrial activities including smelters of ferrous and non-ferrous metals, a coal-fired power plant, companies that produced organic and inorganic chemicals, and petroleum refineries. Following a gross assessment of heavy metals in the community soils (see Part I of this two-part series), leaching tests were performed on specific soils to elucidate heavy metal-associated mineral fractions and general leachability. Leaching experiments, including the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TLCP) and column tests, and sequential extractions, illustrated the low leachability of metals in East St. Louis soils. The column leachate results were modeled using a formulation developed for fly ash leaching. The importance of instantaneous dissolution was evident from the model. By incorporating desorption/adsorption terms into the source term, the model was adapted very well to the time-dependent heavy metal leachate concentrations. The results demonstrate the utility of a simple model to describe heavy metal leaching from contaminated soils.

  12. ZERODUR for stressed mirror polishing II: improved modeling of the material behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jedamzik, Ralf; Kunisch, Clemens; Westerhoff, Thomas; Müller, Ulrich; Daniel, Jay

    2012-09-01

    In the preceding part I of this paper stressed mirror polishing was stated as one of the processes assumed for the polishing of non-axisymmetric mirror blanks like those for the two ELT projects (the ESO E-ELT and the TMT). For this process it is important to have a precise knowledge of the elastic behavior of the glass ceramic mirror substrate materials. In reality glasses and glass ceramics do not react instantaneously to stresses at room temperature. This effect is called "delayed elasticity". It was shown that the delayed elasticity effect of ZERODUR is small in size (less than approximately 1% of the applied deformation) and fully reversible in time. A mathematical model on the relaxation of shear modulus and bulk modulus of ZERODUR has been introduced to predict the delayed elasticity at room temperature and different load cases. This second paper is focusing on an updated model approach with the target to improve the model prediction accuracy. The model results will be compared to measurements of the effect on a 1.5 m E-ELT mirror blank at L-3 Communications, Tinsley.

  13. Enthalpy-based Thermal Evolution of Loops. II. Improvements to the Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cargill, P. J.; Bradshaw, S. J.; Klimchuk, J. A.

    2012-06-01

    This paper develops the zero-dimensional (0D) hydrodynamic coronal loop model "Enthalpy-based Thermal Evolution of Loops" (EBTEL) proposed by Klimchuk et al., which studies the plasma response to evolving coronal heating, especially impulsive heating events. The basis of EBTEL is the modeling of mass exchange between the corona and transition region (TR) and chromosphere in response to heating variations, with the key parameter being the ratio of the TR to coronal radiation. We develop new models for this parameter that now include gravitational stratification and a physically motivated approach to radiative cooling. A number of examples are presented, including nanoflares in short and long loops, and a small flare. The new features in EBTEL are important for accurate tracking of, in particular, the density. The 0D results are compared to a 1D hydro code (Hydrad) with generally good agreement. EBTEL is suitable for general use as a tool for (1) quick-look results of loop evolution in response to a given heating function, (2) extensive parameter surveys, and (3) situations where the modeling of hundreds or thousands of elemental loops is needed. A single run takes a few seconds on a contemporary laptop.

  14. Characterisation and optimisation of flexible transfer lines for liquid helium. Part II: Thermohydraulic modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittmar, N.; Haberstroh, Ch.; Hesse, U.; Krzyzowski, M.

    2016-10-01

    In part one of this publication experimental results for a single-channel transfer line used at liquid helium (LHe) decant stations are presented. The transfer of LHe into mobile dewars is an unavoidable process since the places of storage and usage are generally located apart from each other. T