Science.gov

Sample records for model linking clinical

  1. Validity of Quinpirole Sensitization Rat Model of OCD: Linking Evidence from Animal and Clinical Studies

    PubMed Central

    Stuchlik, Ales; Radostová, Dominika; Hatalova, Hana; Vales, Karel; Nekovarova, Tereza; Koprivova, Jana; Svoboda, Jan; Horacek, Jiri

    2016-01-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a neuropsychiatric disorder with 1–3% prevalence. OCD is characterized by recurrent thoughts (obsessions) and repetitive behaviors (compulsions). The pathophysiology of OCD remains unclear, stressing the importance of pre-clinical studies. The aim of this article is to critically review a proposed animal model of OCD that is characterized by the induction of compulsive checking and behavioral sensitization to the D2/D3 dopamine agonist quinpirole. Changes in this model have been reported at the level of brain structures, neurotransmitter systems and other neurophysiological aspects. In this review, we consider these alterations in relation to the clinical manifestations in OCD, with the aim to discuss and evaluate axes of validity of this model. Our analysis shows that some axes of validity of quinpirole sensitization model (QSM) are strongly supported by clinical findings, such as behavioral phenomenology or roles of brain structures. Evidence on predictive validity is contradictory and ambiguous. It is concluded that this model is useful in the context of searching for the underlying pathophysiological basis of the disorder because of the relatively strong biological similarities with OCD. PMID:27833539

  2. Validity of Quinpirole Sensitization Rat Model of OCD: Linking Evidence from Animal and Clinical Studies.

    PubMed

    Stuchlik, Ales; Radostová, Dominika; Hatalova, Hana; Vales, Karel; Nekovarova, Tereza; Koprivova, Jana; Svoboda, Jan; Horacek, Jiri

    2016-01-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a neuropsychiatric disorder with 1-3% prevalence. OCD is characterized by recurrent thoughts (obsessions) and repetitive behaviors (compulsions). The pathophysiology of OCD remains unclear, stressing the importance of pre-clinical studies. The aim of this article is to critically review a proposed animal model of OCD that is characterized by the induction of compulsive checking and behavioral sensitization to the D2/D3 dopamine agonist quinpirole. Changes in this model have been reported at the level of brain structures, neurotransmitter systems and other neurophysiological aspects. In this review, we consider these alterations in relation to the clinical manifestations in OCD, with the aim to discuss and evaluate axes of validity of this model. Our analysis shows that some axes of validity of quinpirole sensitization model (QSM) are strongly supported by clinical findings, such as behavioral phenomenology or roles of brain structures. Evidence on predictive validity is contradictory and ambiguous. It is concluded that this model is useful in the context of searching for the underlying pathophysiological basis of the disorder because of the relatively strong biological similarities with OCD.

  3. A Domain Analysis Model for eIRB Systems: Addressing the Weak Link in Clinical Research Informatics

    PubMed Central

    He, Shan; Narus, Scott P.; Facelli, Julio C.; Lau, Lee Min; Botkin, Jefferey R.; Hurdle, John F.

    2014-01-01

    Institutional Review Boards (IRBs) are a critical component of clinical research and can become a significant bottleneck due to the dramatic increase, in both volume and complexity of clinical research. Despite the interest in developing clinical research informatics (CRI) systems and supporting data standards to increase clinical research efficiency and interoperability, informatics research in the IRB domain has not attracted much attention in the scientific community. The lack of standardized and structured application forms across different IRBs causes inefficient and inconsistent proposal reviews and cumbersome workflows. These issues are even more prominent in multi-institutional clinical research that is rapidly becoming the norm. This paper proposes and evaluates a domain analysis model for electronic IRB (eIRB) systems, paving the way for streamlined clinical research workflow via integration with other CRI systems and improved IRB application throughput via computer-assisted decision support. PMID:24929181

  4. A domain analysis model for eIRB systems: addressing the weak link in clinical research informatics.

    PubMed

    He, Shan; Narus, Scott P; Facelli, Julio C; Lau, Lee Min; Botkin, Jefferey R; Hurdle, John F

    2014-12-01

    Institutional Review Boards (IRBs) are a critical component of clinical research and can become a significant bottleneck due to the dramatic increase, in both volume and complexity of clinical research. Despite the interest in developing clinical research informatics (CRI) systems and supporting data standards to increase clinical research efficiency and interoperability, informatics research in the IRB domain has not attracted much attention in the scientific community. The lack of standardized and structured application forms across different IRBs causes inefficient and inconsistent proposal reviews and cumbersome workflows. These issues are even more prominent in multi-institutional clinical research that is rapidly becoming the norm. This paper proposes and evaluates a domain analysis model for electronic IRB (eIRB) systems, paving the way for streamlined clinical research workflow via integration with other CRI systems and improved IRB application throughput via computer-assisted decision support. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Large animal models of heart failure: a critical link in the translation of basic science to clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Jennifer A; Spinale, Francis G

    2009-05-01

    Congestive heart failure (HF) is a clinical syndrome, with hallmarks of fatigue and dyspnea, that continues to be highly prevalent and morbid. Because of the growing burden of HF as the population ages, the need to develop new pharmacological treatments and therapeutic interventions is of paramount importance. Common pathophysiologic features of HF include changes in left ventricle structure, function, and neurohormonal activation. The recapitulation of the HF phenotype in large animal models can allow for the translation of basic science discoveries into clinical therapies. Models of myocardial infarction/ischemia, ischemic cardiomyopathy, ventricular pressure and volume overload, and pacing-induced dilated cardiomyopathy have been created in dogs, pigs, and sheep for the investigation of HF and potential therapies. Large animal models recapitulating the clinical HF phenotype and translating basic science to clinical applications have successfully traveled the journey from bench to bedside. Undoubtedly, large animal models of HF will continue to play a crucial role in the elucidation of biological pathways involved in HF and the development and refinement of HF therapies.

  6. Link Layer Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mühleisen, M.; Bültmann, D.; Klagges, K.; Schinnenburg, M.

    The Data Link Layer (DLL) is located above the PHY layer described in the previous chapter and below the network layer described in Chapter 16. All data received from these layers is digital. Today most parts of the DLL are implemented in software, either as device drivers running on general purpose Central Processing Units (CPUs) or as firmware running on dedicated network interface hardware.

  7. School-Based and School-Linked Clinics. Update 1991.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waszak, Cynthia; Neidell, Shara

    Since 1986, the Center for Population Options (CPO)/Support Center for School-Based Clinics (SBCs) has conducted an annual survey. Over time the SBC has become a prototype for other adolescent health service models. Perhaps the oldest is the school-linked clinic (SLC), a free-standing adolescent health clinic. Located away from the school campus,…

  8. Modelling health care processes for eliciting user requirements: a way to link a quality paradigm and clinical information system design.

    PubMed

    Staccini, P; Joubert, M; Quaranta, J F; Fieschi, D; Fieschi, M

    2001-12-01

    Healthcare institutions are looking at ways to increase their efficiency by reducing costs while providing care services with a high level of safety. Thus, hospital information systems have to support quality improvement objectives. The elicitation of the requirements has to meet users' needs in relation to both the quality (efficacy, safety) and the monitoring of all health care activities (traceability). Information analysts need methods to conceptualise clinical information systems that provide actors with individual benefits and guide behavioural changes. A methodology is proposed to elicit and structure users' requirements using a process-oriented analysis, and it is applied to the blood transfusion process. An object-oriented data model of a process has been defined in order to organise the data dictionary. Although some aspects of activity, such as 'where', 'what else', and 'why' are poorly represented by the data model alone, this method of requirement elicitation fits the dynamic of data input for the process to be traced. A hierarchical representation of hospital activities has to be found for the processes to be interrelated, and for their characteristics to be shared, in order to avoid data redundancy and to fit the gathering of data with the provision of care.

  9. Modelling health care processes for eliciting user requirements: a way to link a quality paradigm and clinical information system design.

    PubMed

    Staccini, P; Joubert, M; Quaranta, J F; Fieschi, D; Fieschi, M

    2000-01-01

    Hospital information systems have to support quality improvement objectives. The design issues of health care information system can be classified into three categories: 1) time-oriented and event-labelled storage of patient data; 2) contextual support of decision-making; 3) capabilities for modular upgrading. The elicitation of the requirements has to meet users' needs in relation to both the quality (efficacy, safety) and the monitoring of all health care activities (traceability). Information analysts need methods to conceptualize clinical information systems that provide actors with individual benefits and guide behavioural changes. A methodology is proposed to elicit and structure users' requirements using a process-oriented analysis, and it is applied to the field of blood transfusion. An object-oriented data model of a process has been defined in order to identify its main components: activity, sub-process, resources, constrains, guidelines, parameters and indicators. Although some aspects of activity, such as "where", "what else", and "why" are poorly represented by the data model alone, this method of requirement elicitation fits the dynamic of data input for the process to be traced. A hierarchical representation of hospital activities has to be found for this approach to be generalised within the organisation, for the processes to be interrelated, and for their characteristics to be shared.

  10. X linked mental retardation: a clinical guide.

    PubMed

    Raymond, F L

    2006-03-01

    Mental retardation is more common in males than females in the population, assumed to be due to mutations on the X chromosome. The prevalence of the 24 genes identified to date is low and less common than expansions in FMR1, which cause Fragile X syndrome. Systematic screening of all other X linked genes in X linked families with mental retardation is currently not feasible in a clinical setting. The phenotypes of genes causing syndromic and non-syndromic mental retardation (NLGN3, NLGN4, RPS6KA3(RSK2), OPHN1, ATRX, SLC6A8, ARX, SYN1, AGTR2, MECP2, PQBP1, SMCX, and SLC16A2) are first discussed, as these may be the focus of more targeted mutation analysis. Secondly, the relative prevalence of genes causing only non-syndromic mental retardation (IL1RAPL1, TM4SF2, ZNF41, FTSJ1, DLG3, FACL4, PAK3, ARHGEF6, FMR2, and GDI) is summarised. Thirdly, the problem of recurrence risk where a molecular genetics diagnosis has not been made and what proportion of the male excess of mental retardation is due to monogenic disorders of the X chromosome are discussed.

  11. [Clinical heterogeneity of X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy ].

    PubMed

    Rudenskaia, G E; Shekhter, O V; Zakharova, E Iu; Dadali, E L; Solokha, O A; Lomonosova, E Z; Goncharov, V M; Karmanov, M E

    2002-01-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is a relatively common world spread disease characterized by significant clinical heterogeneity. Clinico-biochemical examination in the Medico-genetic research center identified, 20 X-ALD cases in 17 families over 5 years. Prevalence of children (60%) and adolescence (25%) cerebral forms is explained, in part, by patients referring for medical-genetic counseling. Adrenomyeloneuropathy was diagnosed in one patient. In two healthy siblings presymptomatic stage was found. A main X-ALD biochemical marker is an increase of very long chain fatty acids (VLCFA) level, which does not depend on clinical form of the disease. Most interesting appeared to be a family including 5 patients in 3 generations with intrafamilial combination of childhood and adolescence cerebral forms, and atypically mild disease course in proband. Regarding symptoms of childhood and adolescence cerebral forms, attention has been drawn to 3 patients with tics, which mask organic nature of the disease on its initial stage. X-ALD is so far incurable, but its timely diagnosis provides an adequate medico-genetic help on the base of modern prenatal diagnosis.

  12. Open loop model for WDM links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D, Meena; Francis, Fredy; T, Sarath K.; E, Dipin; Srinivas, T.; K, Jayasree V.

    2014-10-01

    Wavelength Division Multiplexing (WDM) techniques overfibrelinks helps to exploit the high bandwidth capacity of single mode fibres. A typical WDM link consisting of laser source, multiplexer/demultiplexer, amplifier and detectoris considered for obtaining the open loop gain model of the link. The methodology used here is to obtain individual component models using mathematical and different curve fitting techniques. These individual models are then combined to obtain the WDM link model. The objective is to deduce a single variable model for the WDM link in terms of input current to system. Thus it provides a black box solution for a link. The Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) associated with each of the approximated models is given for comparison. This will help the designer to select the suitable WDM link model during a complex link design.

  13. Reconceptualizing the Linked Courses Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baxter, Mary

    2008-01-01

    To help students meet the demands of society, the University of Houston is using the framework of learning communities and constructivism to create a cross-disciplinary approach to teaching to provide media-rich thematically linked courses to engage a diverse student population. A case study investigated three semesters of thematically linked…

  14. Optimal Linking Design for Response Model Parameters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrett, Michelle D.; van der Linden, Wim J.

    2017-01-01

    Linking functions adjust for differences between identifiability restrictions used in different instances of the estimation of item response model parameters. These adjustments are necessary when results from those instances are to be compared. As linking functions are derived from estimated item response model parameters, parameter estimation…

  15. Clinical Science-linking basic science to disease mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Touyz, Rhian M

    2017-04-01

    For more than 50 years, Clinical Science has been at the interface linking basic science to disease mechanisms. Here, Rhian Touyz, the Editor-in-Chief, describes the journal, its aims and scope, and recent developments.

  16. An Integrated Approach to Falls Prevention: A Model for Linking Clinical and Community Interventions through the Massachusetts Prevention and Wellness Trust Fund

    PubMed Central

    Coe, Laura J.; St. John, Julie Ann; Hariprasad, Santhi; Shankar, Kalpana N.; MacCulloch, Patricia A.; Bettano, Amy L.; Zotter, Jean

    2017-01-01

    Older adult falls continue to be a public health priority across the United States—Massachusetts (MA) being no exception. The MA Prevention and Wellness Trust Fund (PWTF) program within the MA Department of Public Health aims to reduce the physical and economic burdens of chronic health conditions by linking evidence-based clinical care with community intervention programs. The PWTF partnerships that focused on older adult falls prevention integrated the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Stopping Elderly Accidents, Death and Injuries toolkit into clinical settings. Partnerships also offer referrals for home safety assessments, Tai Chi, and Matter of Balance programs. This paper describes the PWTF program implementation process involving 49 MA organizations, while highlighting the successes achieved and lessons learned. With the unprecedented expansion of the U.S. Medicare beneficiary population, and the escalating incidence of falls, widespread adoption of effective prevention strategies will become increasingly important for both public health and for controlling healthcare costs. The lessons learned from this PWTF initiative offer insights and recommendations for future falls prevention program development and implementation. PMID:28321393

  17. Semantically Linking In Silico Cancer Models

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, David; Connor, Anthony J; McKeever, Steve; Wang, Zhihui; Deisboeck, Thomas S; Quaiser, Tom; Shochat, Eliezer

    2014-01-01

    Multiscale models are commonplace in cancer modeling, where individual models acting on different biological scales are combined within a single, cohesive modeling framework. However, model composition gives rise to challenges in understanding interfaces and interactions between them. Based on specific domain expertise, typically these computational models are developed by separate research groups using different methodologies, programming languages, and parameters. This paper introduces a graph-based model for semantically linking computational cancer models via domain graphs that can help us better understand and explore combinations of models spanning multiple biological scales. We take the data model encoded by TumorML, an XML-based markup language for storing cancer models in online repositories, and transpose its model description elements into a graph-based representation. By taking such an approach, we can link domain models, such as controlled vocabularies, taxonomic schemes, and ontologies, with cancer model descriptions to better understand and explore relationships between models. The union of these graphs creates a connected property graph that links cancer models by categorizations, by computational compatibility, and by semantic interoperability, yielding a framework in which opportunities for exploration and discovery of combinations of models become possible. PMID:25520553

  18. Semantically linking in silico cancer models.

    PubMed

    Johnson, David; Connor, Anthony J; McKeever, Steve; Wang, Zhihui; Deisboeck, Thomas S; Quaiser, Tom; Shochat, Eliezer

    2014-01-01

    Multiscale models are commonplace in cancer modeling, where individual models acting on different biological scales are combined within a single, cohesive modeling framework. However, model composition gives rise to challenges in understanding interfaces and interactions between them. Based on specific domain expertise, typically these computational models are developed by separate research groups using different methodologies, programming languages, and parameters. This paper introduces a graph-based model for semantically linking computational cancer models via domain graphs that can help us better understand and explore combinations of models spanning multiple biological scales. We take the data model encoded by TumorML, an XML-based markup language for storing cancer models in online repositories, and transpose its model description elements into a graph-based representation. By taking such an approach, we can link domain models, such as controlled vocabularies, taxonomic schemes, and ontologies, with cancer model descriptions to better understand and explore relationships between models. The union of these graphs creates a connected property graph that links cancer models by categorizations, by computational compatibility, and by semantic interoperability, yielding a framework in which opportunities for exploration and discovery of combinations of models become possible.

  19. X-linked creatine transporter deficiency: clinical aspects and pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    van de Kamp, Jiddeke M; Mancini, Grazia M; Salomons, Gajja S

    2014-09-01

    Creatine transporter deficiency was discovered in 2001 as an X-linked cause of intellectual disability characterized by cerebral creatine deficiency. This review describes the current knowledge regarding creatine metabolism, the creatine transporter and the clinical aspects of creatine transporter deficiency. The condition mainly affects the brain while other creatine requiring organs, such as the muscles, are relatively spared. Recent studies have provided strong evidence that creatine synthesis also occurs in the brain, leading to the intriguing question of why cerebral creatine is deficient in creatine transporter deficiency. The possible mechanisms explaining the cerebral creatine deficiency are discussed. The creatine transporter knockout mouse provides a good model to study the disease. Over the past years several treatment options have been explored but no treatment has been proven effective. Understanding the pathogenesis of creatine transporter deficiency is of paramount importance in the development of an effective treatment.

  20. Optical Performance Models for FDDI Links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimball, Robert M.

    1990-01-01

    A loss budget model to predict optical performance of Fiber Distributed Data Interface (FDDI) type networks in the premises distribution environment has been developed. This model tailors existing statistical loss budget models to the FDDI standard. It is expected that as FDDI becomes popular, fiber based distribution systems will become common. When designing a fiber distribution system it is important to understand the constraints placed on link performance by the cable plant. To determine these constraints, the model is examined numerically using a large range of initial conditions. The total link length is used as the dependent variable. This set of initial conditions corresponds to an ensemble of possible link configurations. These link configurations are studied in the context of the premises distribution environment. The model is extended to include the use of optical bypass switches. Laboratory measurement data is presented to verify the accuracy of the bypass switch model. The extended model, including the bypass switch, is examined numerically for a similar set of initial conditions. These constraints are applied to the use of bypass switches in wiring closets, between floors, and at the work location. Distance limitations are determined for FDDI links utilizing optical bypass switches.

  1. Clinical evidence for Japanese population based on prospective studies--linking clinical trials and clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Hisao; Kojima, Sunao

    2009-10-01

    "Evidence-based medicine (EBM)" implies effective and high quality practice for patients based on well-grounded medical science. The success of clinical trials in Japan is essential to build original evidence specific for Japanese patients. Based on this concept, we have performed several large-scale clinical trials to provide EBM, including the Japanese Antiplatelets Myocardial Infarction Study [JAMIS; clinical improvement in acute myocardial infarction (AMI) patients with antiplatelet therapy], the Japanese beta-Blockers and Calcium Antagonists Myocardial Infarction (JBCMI; comparison of the effects of beta-blockers and calcium antagonists on cardiovascular events in post-AMI patients), a multicenter study for aggressive lipid-lowering strategy by HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors in patients with AMI (MUSASHI; effects of statin therapy on cardiovascular events in patients with AMI), and the Japanese Primary Prevention of Atherosclerosis with Aspirin for Diabetes (JPAD trial; efficacy of low-dose aspirin therapy for primary prevention of atherosclerotic events in type 2 diabetic patients). The results of these prospective studies were directly linked with clinical practice. We have acquired the know-how of large-scale clinical trials; an important point is to have passion for "buildup evidence specific for the Japanese" and to recruit subjects for enrollment after explaining the significance of "clinical trials for the Japanese".

  2. X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy: clinical, biochemical and pathogenetic aspects.

    PubMed

    Berger, Johannes; Gärtner, Jutta

    2006-12-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is a clinically heterogeneous disorder ranging from the severe childhood cerebral form to asymptomatic persons. The overall incidence is 1:16,800 including hemizygotes as well as heterozygotes. The principal molecular defect is due to inborn mutations in the ABCD1 gene encoding the adrenoleukodystrophy protein (ALDP), a transporter in the peroxisome membrane. ALDP is involved in the transport of substrates from the cytoplasm into the peroxisomal lumen. ALDP defects lead to characteristic accumulation of saturated very long-chain fatty acids, the diagnostic disease marker. The pathogenesis is unclear. Different molecular mechanisms seem to induce inflammatory demyelination, neurodegeneration and adrenocortical insufficiency involving the primary ABCD1 defect, environmental factors and modifier genes. Important information has been derived from the X-ALD mouse models; species differences however complicate the interpretation of results. So far, bone marrow transplantation is the only effective long-term treatment for childhood cerebral X-ALD, however, only when performed at an early-stage of disease. Urgently needed novel therapeutic strategies are under consideration ranging from dietary approaches to gene therapy.

  3. Modelling computerised clinical pathways.

    PubMed

    Chu, S; Cesnik, B

    1998-01-01

    Since the mid 1980s, paper clinical pathways have been used in defining the road map of patient care. They have been used with varying degree of success for providing more cost-effective healthcare and helped to establish quality improvement models for healthcare delivery. Many attempts have been made to produce electronic versions of the paper clinical pathways in order to maximise benefits of the paper based systems. However, all paper systems are designed based on linear sequential model with little decision support capability. Current electronic versions of the paper systems produce only minimal improvements on the functionality of their paper counterparts. A state-transition information model (STIM) grounded in the Object Oriented system design paradigm is used to reconceptualise a computerised clinical pathways design. A computerised clinical pathways prototype is currently being developed based on this STIM model. The prototype will demonstrate improved functionality: better information management and decision support capabilities.

  4. Clinical professional governance for detailed clinical models.

    PubMed

    Goossen, William; Goossen-Baremans, Anneke

    2013-01-01

    This chapter describes the need for Detailed Clinical Models for contemporary Electronic Health Systems, data exchange and data reuse. It starts with an explanation of the components related to Detailed Clinical Models with a brief summary of knowledge representation, including terminologies representing clinic relevant "things" in the real world, and information models that abstract these in order to let computers process data about these things. Next, Detailed Clinical Models are defined and their purpose is described. It builds on existing developments around the world and accumulates in current work to create a technical specification at the level of the International Standards Organization. The core components of properly expressed Detailed Clinical Models are illustrated, including clinical knowledge and context, data element specification, code bindings to terminologies and meta-information about authors, versioning among others. Detailed Clinical Models to date are heavily based on user requirements and specify the conceptual and logical levels of modelling. It is not precise enough for specific implementations, which requires an additional step. However, this allows Detailed Clinical Models to serve as specifications for many different kinds of implementations. Examples of Detailed Clinical Models are presented both in text and in Unified Modelling Language. Detailed Clinical Models can be positioned in health information architectures, where they serve at the most detailed granular level. The chapter ends with examples of projects that create and deploy Detailed Clinical Models. All have in common that they can often reuse materials from earlier projects, and that strict governance of these models is essential to use them safely in health care information and communication technology. Clinical validation is one point of such governance, and model testing another. The Plan Do Check Act cycle can be applied for governance of Detailed Clinical Models

  5. Clinical decision modeling system

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Haiwen; Lyons-Weiler, James

    2007-01-01

    Background Decision analysis techniques can be applied in complex situations involving uncertainty and the consideration of multiple objectives. Classical decision modeling techniques require elicitation of too many parameter estimates and their conditional (joint) probabilities, and have not therefore been applied to the problem of identifying high-performance, cost-effective combinations of clinical options for diagnosis or treatments where many of the objectives are unknown or even unspecified. Methods We designed a Java-based software resource, the Clinical Decision Modeling System (CDMS), to implement Naïve Decision Modeling, and provide a use case based on published performance evaluation measures of various strategies for breast and lung cancer detection. Because cost estimates for many of the newer methods are not yet available, we assume equal cost. Our use case reveals numerous potentially high-performance combinations of clinical options for the detection of breast and lung cancer. Results Naïve Decision Modeling is a highly practical applied strategy which guides investigators through the process of establishing evidence-based integrative translational clinical research priorities. CDMS is not designed for clinical decision support. Inputs include performance evaluation measures and costs of various clinical options. The software finds trees with expected emergent performance characteristics and average cost per patient that meet stated filtering criteria. Key to the utility of the software is sophisticated graphical elements, including a tree browser, a receiver-operator characteristic surface plot, and a histogram of expected average cost per patient. The analysis pinpoints the potentially most relevant pairs of clinical options ('critical pairs') for which empirical estimates of conditional dependence may be critical. The assumption of independence can be tested with retrospective studies prior to the initiation of clinical trials designed to

  6. Clinical fracture of cross-linked UHMWPE acetabular liners.

    PubMed

    Furmanski, Jevan; Anderson, Martin; Bal, Sonny; Greenwald, A Seth; Halley, David; Penenberg, Brad; Ries, Michael; Pruitt, Lisa

    2009-10-01

    Highly cross-linked ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) is increasingly used as a bearing material in total hip replacements. Cross-linking of UHMWPE has been shown to increase wear resistance but decrease its fracture resistance. We analyzed the clinical fracture failure of four cross-linked UHMWPE total hip replacement components of four different designs via microscopic observation of the fracture surfaces, and found that in all cases fractures initiated at stress concentrations in an unsupported region of the component (termed the elevated rim). Finite element analyses (FEA) of each individual implant design were then conducted. Results from this analysis demonstrated that the predicted magnitude and orientation of maximum principal stress due to mechanical loading of the elevated rim was sufficient to propagate initiated fatigue cracks in each case. FEA also predicted that cracks may arrest after some amount of growth due to a steep stress gradient near the initiation site. Further, while anatomical positioning of the implant and material properties affect the risk of fracture, we examined whether these failures are strongly related to the notched elevated rim design feature that is common to the four failed cases presented here. We believe that cross-linked UHMWPE remains an excellent bearing material for total hip replacements but that designs employing this material should mitigate stress concentrations or other design features that increase the risk of fracture.

  7. UWB Radio Link Modeling for Multipath Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uguen, B.; Talom, F. T.; Chassay, G.

    Ultra-wideband (UWB) systems have the potential to provide very high data rates over short distances. This paper details the construction of the received signal from a pulse waveform on the transmission line at the transmitter to the received signal at the receiver allowing a fine analysis of antennas impact on UWB systems. This is used for deterministic modeling based on ray tracing (RT) and geometrical optics (GO). The paper presents the way of sizing the pulse amplitude in order to satisfy a given power spectral density (PSD) mask for a given modulation. The proposed approach is demonstrated to be coherent with classical power link budget.

  8. Key-linked on-line databases for clinical research.

    PubMed

    Müller, Thomas H

    2012-01-01

    Separating patient identification data from clinical data and/or information about biomaterial samples is an effective data protection measure, especially in clinical research employing "on-line", i.e., web-based, data capture. In this paper, we show that this specialised technique can be generalised into a network architecture of interconnected on-line databases potentially serving a variety of purposes. The basic idea of this approach consists of maintaining logical links, i.e., common record keys, between corresponding data structures in pairs of databases while keeping the actual key values hidden from clients. For client systems, simultaneous access to corresponding records is mediated by temporary access tokens. At the relational level, these links are represented by arbitrary unique record keys common to both databases. This architecture allows for integration of related data in different databases without replicating or permanently sharing this data in one place. Each participating on-line database can determine the degree of integration by specifying linkage keys only for those data structures that may be logically connected to other data. Logical links can de designed for specific use cases. In addition, each database controls user access by enforcing its own authorisation scheme. Another advantage is that individual database owners retain considerable leeway in adapting to changing local requirements without compromising the integration into the network. Beyond protecting individual subject identification data, this architecture permits splitting a cooperatively used data pool to achieve many kinds of objectives. Application examples could be clinical registries needing subject contact information for follow-up, biomaterial banks with or without genetic information, and automatic or assisted integration of data from electronic medical records into research data.

  9. A clinical and educational telemedicine link between Bulgaria and Greece.

    PubMed

    Anogianakis, George; Ilonidis, George; Anogeianaki, Antonia; Milliaras, Spyros; Klisarova, Anelia; Temelkov, Temel; Vlachakis-Milliaras, Emmanuel

    2003-01-01

    During its transition to a market economy, Bulgaria benefited from foreign aid provided by Greece. One of the projects was the clinical and educational telemedicine link between the Medical University of Varna in Bulgaria and the Faculty of Medicine of Aristotle University of Thessaloniki in Greece. This began in 1997. In terms of the educational activities, the Bulgarian side of the network supports: an electronic classroom equipped with personal workstations, multimedia projectors and videoconference facilities; electronic design and publishing activities; Web hosting and mail server activities; and satellite communications. Communications are via ISDN. The main clinical experience has been remote consultations in immunology. This experience (admittedly limited) demonstrates that telemedicine can be used to provide assistance to remote colleagues. In addition, the use of telemedicine can greatly improve the quality of care available to travellers and migrant workers in cases where the patient cannot communicate with the attending physician because of a language barrier.

  10. Linking Essential Tremor to the Cerebellum: Clinical Evidence.

    PubMed

    Benito-León, Julián; Labiano-Fontcuberta, Andrés

    2016-06-01

    Essential tremor (ET) might be a family of diseases unified by the presence of kinetic tremor, but also showing etiological, pathological, and clinical heterogeneity. In this review, we will describe the most significant clinical evidence, which suggests that ET is linked to the cerebellum. Data for this review were identified by searching PUBMED (January 1966 to May 2015) crossing the terms "essential tremor" (ET) and "cerebellum," which yielded 201 entries, 11 of which included the term "cerebellum" in the article title. This was supplemented by articles in the author's files that pertained to this topic. The wide spectrum of clinical features of ET that suggest that it originates as a cerebellar or cerebellar outflow problem include the presence of intentional tremor, gait and balance abnormalities, subtle features of dysarthria, and oculomotor abnormalities, as well as deficits in eye-hand coordination, motor learning deficits, incoordination during spiral drawing task, abnormalities in motor timing and visual reaction time, impairment of social abilities, improvement in tremor after cerebellar stroke, efficacy of deep brain stimulation (which blocks cerebellar outflow), and cognitive dysfunction. It is unlikely, however, that cerebellar dysfunction, per se, fully explains ET-associated dementia, because the cognitive deficits that have been described in patients with cerebellar lesions are generally mild. Overall, a variety of clinical findings suggest that in at least a sizable proportion of patients with ET, there is an underlying abnormality of the cerebellum and/or its pathways.

  11. Nephrolithiasis and hypertension: possible links and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Cupisti, Adamasco; D'Alessandro, Claudia; Samoni, Sara; Meola, Mario; Egidi, Maria Francesca

    2014-10-01

    A definite epidemiological association exists between kidney stone disease and arterial hypertension, but the pathophysiological mechanisms are still not fully understood. Hypercalciuria or inflammation and oxidative stress have been proposed as possible links. However, there is more convincing evidence that the association between nephrolithiasis and hypertension may be considered as a part of the association between kidney stone disease, metabolic syndrome and atherosclerosis. From a clinical point of view, this association represents a crucial aspect of the clinical management of patients affected by kidney stone disease. In order to implement early prevention and treatment of cardiovascular and/or renal damage physicians should be encouraged to assess individual cardiovascular risk factors in any adult with kidney stones. Consequently, patients with kidney stones need a comprehensive approach rather than an intervention limited to the urinary tract and focused on stone resolution and recurrence prevention. It is time to view kidney stone disease as a systemic disorder, associated to or predictive of hypertension, chronic kidney disease, bone and cardiovascular damage. All these conditions negatively affect patient prognosis. This multi-systemic approach could increase the clinical impact of the kidney stone clinic.

  12. Common data link (CDL) interference model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerasoli, Caramen; Zhao, Wiley; Santapietro, John J.; McAlinden, R. E.; Smith, B. F.; Jacyk, P. A.

    2002-07-01

    The increasing use of airwaves for military communication and surveillance and commercial applications places burdens on spectrum use. This crowding of the spectrum presents two broad problem categories. The first is "co-site interference" where numerous transmitters and receivers are physically located in a small area and share a given portion of the spectrum. Under these conditions, a receiver can be "victim" to a co-located transmitter. The second category involves numerous transmitters (typically airborne) well separated from each other but communicating to receivers placed in a relatively small area. The Common Data Link (CDL) refers to a standard protocol for military data delivery and communication. Surveillance platforms such as Tactical Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (TUAV), JSTARS, U2's, Global Hawks will stream high rate surveillance data (radar, visual and/or infrared imagery, etc.) down to ground terminals. As such, bandwidths are wide (100's MHz) and the potential exists for ground receivers to be victim to signals from airborne transmitters other than its desired source. MITRE has developed a CDL Interference Model to assess potential problems in realistic tactical surveillance scenarios. This paper documents the physical basis of the CDL Interference Model as well as the visualization software architecture that integrates the model with ModSAF/OneSAF.

  13. X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy: clinical, metabolic, genetic and pathophysiological aspects.

    PubMed

    Kemp, Stephan; Berger, Johannes; Aubourg, Patrick

    2012-09-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is the most frequent peroxisomal disease. The two main clinical phenotypes of X-ALD are adrenomyeloneuropathy (AMN) and inflammatory cerebral ALD that manifests either in children or more rarely in adults. About 65% of heterozygote females develop symptoms by the age of 60years. Mutations in the ABCD1 gene affect the function of the encoded protein ALDP, an ATP-binding-cassette (ABC) transporter located in the peroxisomal membrane protein. ALDP deficiency impairs the peroxisomal beta-oxidation of very long-chain fatty acids (VLCFA) and facilitates their further chain elongation by ELOVL1 resulting in accumulation of VLCFA in plasma and tissues. While all patients have mutations in the ABCD1 gene, there is no general genotype-phenotype correlation. Environmental factors and a multitude of modifying genes appear to determine the clinical manifestation in this monogenetic but multifactorial disease. This review focuses on the clinical, biochemical, genetic and pathophysiological aspects of X-ALD. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. X linked adrenoleukodystrophy: clinical presentation, diagnosis, and therapy

    PubMed Central

    van Geel, B. M; Assies, J.; Wanders, R.; Barth, P.

    1997-01-01

    X linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is an inherited disorder of peroxisomal metabolism, biochemically characterised by accumulation of saturated very long chain fatty acids. Accumulation of these fatty acids is associated with cerebral demyelination, peripheral nerve abnormalities, and adrenocortical and testicular insufficiency. The lowest estimated birth incidence is one per 100 000. At least six phenotypes can be distinguished, of which the two most frequent are childhood cerebral ALD and adrenomyeloneuropathy. The X-ALD gene has been identified, but thus far no relation between genotype and phenotype has been found. Diagnosis is relatively easy and can be confirmed reliably, and prenatal testing is possible in affected families. Several therapeutic options, some with promising perspectives, are available. Neurologists and other physicians seem not to be familiar with the many facets of X-ALD. In this review, the clinical presentation, the relative frequencies of the different phenotypes, and the diagnostic and therapeutic options are presented.

 PMID:9221959

  15. A clinical and educational telemedicine link between Bulgaria and Greece.

    PubMed

    Anogianakis, George; Ilonidis, George; Anogeianaki, Antonia; Milliaras, Spyros; Klisarova, Anelia; Temelkov, Temel; Vlachakis-Milliaras, Emmanuel

    2004-01-01

    During its transition to a free economy, Bulgaria benefited from foreign aid provided by Greece. One of the projects was the clinical and educational telemedicine link between the Medical University of Varna in Bulgaria and the Faculty of Medicine of Aristotle University of Thessaloniki in Greece. This began in 1997. In terms of the educational activities, the Bulgarian side of the network supports (a) electronic design and publishing activities, (b) web hosting and mail server activities and (c) satellite communications. In addition it supports an electronic classroom equipped with personal workstations, multimedia projectors and videoconference facilities. Communications are via the ISDN network. In terms of its telemedicine activities, the network provides remote medical assistance to "language handicapped" travellers and to migrant workers in both countries. The main clinical experience is remote consultations in immunology. This admittedly limited experience demonstrates that telemedicine can be used to provide assistance to remote colleagues. In cases where the patient cannot communicate with the attending physician, the use of telemedicine can greatly improve the quality of care available to travellers and migrant workers.

  16. Publication, discovery and interoperability of Clinical Decision Support Systems: A Linked Data approach.

    PubMed

    Marco-Ruiz, Luis; Pedrinaci, Carlos; Maldonado, J A; Panziera, Luca; Chen, Rong; Bellika, J Gustav

    2016-08-01

    The high costs involved in the development of Clinical Decision Support Systems (CDSS) make it necessary to share their functionality across different systems and organizations. Service Oriented Architectures (SOA) have been proposed to allow reusing CDSS by encapsulating them in a Web service. However, strong barriers in sharing CDS functionality are still present as a consequence of lack of expressiveness of services' interfaces. Linked Services are the evolution of the Semantic Web Services paradigm to process Linked Data. They aim to provide semantic descriptions over SOA implementations to overcome the limitations derived from the syntactic nature of Web services technologies. To facilitate the publication, discovery and interoperability of CDS services by evolving them into Linked Services that expose their interfaces as Linked Data. We developed methods and models to enhance CDS SOA as Linked Services that define a rich semantic layer based on machine interpretable ontologies that powers their interoperability and reuse. These ontologies provided unambiguous descriptions of CDS services properties to expose them to the Web of Data. We developed models compliant with Linked Data principles to create a semantic representation of the components that compose CDS services. To evaluate our approach we implemented a set of CDS Linked Services using a Web service definition ontology. The definitions of Web services were linked to the models developed in order to attach unambiguous semantics to the service components. All models were bound to SNOMED-CT and public ontologies (e.g. Dublin Core) in order to count on a lingua franca to explore them. Discovery and analysis of CDS services based on machine interpretable models was performed reasoning over the ontologies built. Linked Services can be used effectively to expose CDS services to the Web of Data by building on current CDS standards. This allows building shared Linked Knowledge Bases to provide machine

  17. Caries assessment: establishing mathematical link of clinical and benchtop method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaechi, Bennett T.

    2009-02-01

    It is well established that the development of new technologies for early detection and quantitative monitoring of dental caries at its early stage could provide health and economic benefits ranging from timely preventive interventions to reduction of the time required for clinical trials of anti-caries agents. However, the new technologies currently used in clinical setting cannot assess and monitor caries using the actual mineral concentration within the lesion, while a laboratory-based microcomputed tomography (MCT) has been shown to possess this capability. Thus we envision the establishment of mathematical equations relating the measurements of each of the clinical technologies to that of MCT will enable the mineral concentration of lesions detected and assessed in clinical practice to be extrapolated from the equation, and this will facilitate preventitive care in dentistry to lower treatment cost. We utilize MCT and the two prominent clinical caries assessment devices (Quantitative Light-induced Fluorescence [QLF] and Diagnodent) to longitudinally monitor the development of caries in a continuous flow mixed-organisms biofilm model (artificial mouth), and then used the collected data to establish mathematical equation relating the measurements of each of the clinical technologies to that of MCT. A linear correlation was observed between the measurements of MicroCT and that of QLF and Diagnodent. Thus mineral density in a carious lesion detected and measured using QLF or Diagnodent can be extrapolated using the developed equation. This highlights the usefulness of MCT for monitoring the progress of an early caries being treated with therapeutic agents in clinical practice or trials.

  18. Linking Doses with Clinical Scores of Hematopoietic Acute Radiation Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shaowen

    2016-10-01

    In radiation accidents, determining the radiation dose the victim received is a key step for medical decision making and patient prognosis. To reconstruct and evaluate the absorbed dose, researchers have developed many physical devices and biological techniques during the last decades. However, using the physical parameter "absorbed dose" alone is not sufficient to predict the clinical development of the various organs injured in an individual patient. In operational situations for radiation accidents, medical responders need more urgently to classify the severity of the radiation injury based on the signs and symptoms of the patient. In this work, the author uses a unified hematopoietic model to describe dose-dependent dynamics of granulocytes, lymphocytes, and platelets, and the corresponding clinical grading of hematopoietic acute radiation syndrome. This approach not only visualizes the time course of the patient's probable outcome in the form of graphs but also indirectly gives information of the remaining stem and progenitor cells, which are responsible for the autologous recovery of the hematopoietic system. Because critical information on the patient's clinical evolution can be provided within a short time after exposure and only peripheral cell counts are required for the simulation, these modeling tools will be useful to assess radiation exposure and injury in human-involved radiation accident/incident scenarios.

  19. X-linked acrogigantism syndrome: clinical profile and therapeutic responses.

    PubMed

    Beckers, Albert; Lodish, Maya Beth; Trivellin, Giampaolo; Rostomyan, Liliya; Lee, Misu; Faucz, Fabio R; Yuan, Bo; Choong, Catherine S; Caberg, Jean-Hubert; Verrua, Elisa; Naves, Luciana Ansaneli; Cheetham, Tim D; Young, Jacques; Lysy, Philippe A; Petrossians, Patrick; Cotterill, Andrew; Shah, Nalini Samir; Metzger, Daniel; Castermans, Emilie; Ambrosio, Maria Rosaria; Villa, Chiara; Strebkova, Natalia; Mazerkina, Nadia; Gaillard, Stéphan; Barra, Gustavo Barcelos; Casulari, Luis Augusto; Neggers, Sebastian J; Salvatori, Roberto; Jaffrain-Rea, Marie-Lise; Zacharin, Margaret; Santamaria, Beatriz Lecumberri; Zacharieva, Sabina; Lim, Ee Mun; Mantovani, Giovanna; Zatelli, Maria Chaira; Collins, Michael T; Bonneville, Jean-François; Quezado, Martha; Chittiboina, Prashant; Oldfield, Edward H; Bours, Vincent; Liu, Pengfei; W de Herder, Wouter; Pellegata, Natalia; Lupski, James R; Daly, Adrian F; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2015-06-01

    X-linked acrogigantism (X-LAG) is a new syndrome of pituitary gigantism, caused by microduplications on chromosome Xq26.3, encompassing the gene GPR101, which is highly upregulated in pituitary tumors. We conducted this study to explore the clinical, radiological, and hormonal phenotype and responses to therapy in patients with X-LAG syndrome. The study included 18 patients (13 sporadic) with X-LAG and microduplication of chromosome Xq26.3. All sporadic cases had unique duplications and the inheritance pattern in two families was dominant, with all Xq26.3 duplication carriers being affected. Patients began to grow rapidly as early as 2-3 months of age (median 12 months). At diagnosis (median delay 27 months), patients had a median height and weight standard deviation scores (SDS) of >+3.9 SDS. Apart from the increased overall body size, the children had acromegalic symptoms including acral enlargement and facial coarsening. More than a third of cases had increased appetite. Patients had marked hypersecretion of GH/IGF1 and usually prolactin, due to a pituitary macroadenoma or hyperplasia. Primary neurosurgical control was achieved with extensive anterior pituitary resection, but postoperative hypopituitarism was frequent. Control with somatostatin analogs was not readily achieved despite moderate to high levels of expression of somatostatin receptor subtype-2 in tumor tissue. Postoperative use of adjuvant pegvisomant resulted in control of IGF1 in all five cases where it was employed. X-LAG is a new infant-onset gigantism syndrome that has a severe clinical phenotype leading to challenging disease management.

  20. Clinical aspects of X-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, A; Phillips, D I; Brown, R; Harper, P S

    1987-01-01

    Boys with X-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia and their families were studied. Many suffered severe illness in early childhood and nearly 30% died; many had feeding problems, severe fever, atopic disease, and recurrent respiratory infections. Some infants failed to thrive. We found no consistent common endocrine or immunological abnormality, although, most had abnormal immunoglobulin production. This may be related to the abnormal mucosa of the gastrointestinal and respiratory tracts which exacerbates the chronic obstructive airways disease found later in life in those who smoke. Mental handicap was not a feature, although convulsions sometimes occurred during fever. Early diagnosis is important to avoid attacks of severe fever and so that rational management may be planned for other problems that arise. Dental advice should be sought before school age and genetic counselling may also be required. Many female carriers may be recognised at clinical examination: their affected sons can then be diagnosed more readily. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:2445301

  1. X-linked dystonia parkinsonism: clinical phenotype, genetics and therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Rosales, Raymond L

    2010-10-01

    The clinical phenotype of X-Linked Dystonia Parkinsonism (XDP) is typically one that involves a Filipino adult male whose ancestry is mostly traced in the Philippine island of Panay. Dystonia usually starts focally in the lower limbs or oromandibular regions, then spreads to become generalized eventually. Parkinsonism sets in later into the disease and usually in combination with dystonia. /DYT3/ and /TAF1/ are the two genes associated with XDP. An SVA retrotransposon insertion in an intron of /TAF1/ may reduce neuron-specific expression of the /TAF1/ isoform in the caudate nucleus, and subsequently interfere with the transcription of many neuronal genes. Polypharmacy with oral benzodiazepines, anticholinergic agents and muscle relaxants leaves much to be desired in terms of efficacy. The medications to date that may appear beneficial, especially in disabling dystonias, are zolpidem, muscle afferent block with lidocaine-ethanol and botulinum toxin type A. Despite the few cases undergoing deep brain stimulation, this functional surgery has shown the greatest promise in XDP. An illustrative case of XDP in a family depicts the variable course of illness, including a bout of "status dystonicus," challenges in therapy, reckoning with the social impact of the disease, and eventual patient demise. Indeed, there remains some gaps in understanding some phenomenological, genetic and treatment aspects of XDP, the areas upon which future research directions may be worthwhile.

  2. Bullous X linked retinoschisis: clinical features and prognosis.

    PubMed

    Hinds, Anne-Marie; Fahim, Abigail; Moore, Anthony T; Wong, Sui Chien; Michaelides, Michel

    2017-08-28

    A subset of patients with X linked retinoschisis (XLRS) have bullous schisis cavities in the peripheral retina. This study describes the characteristics and prognosis of the bullous form of XLRS. A retrospective case series was performed of nine patients with molecularly proven bullous XLRS seen at a single tertiary centre. All cases of bullous peripheral schisis were bilateral, with one unilateral case at presentation which developed into bilateral bullous schisis over time. The mean age of onset was 1.9 years (range: 1 month-7 years, SD: 2.1 years) and at clinical diagnosis was 5.9 years (range: 1 month-27 years, SD: 9.0 years). Mean follow-up was 11 years (range: 6 months-36 years, SD: 10.8 years). Strabismus was the most common presentation (n=7). Other presenting complaints included decreased vision, floaters and an irregularly shaped pupil. The most frequently associated ocular features were strabismus (100%), vitreous haemorrhage (4/18 eyes, 22%), nystagmus (2/9, 22%) and persistent fetal vasculature (1/18, 6%). Localised tractional detachment was seen in 2/18 (11%) eyes, total detachment that underwent surgical repair in 1/18 (6%) and pigmented demarcation lines in a further 22% of the eyes. There was one eye with exudative retinal detachment. In XLRS, bullous schisis may be congenital or develop soon after birth and most commonly presents with strabismus. Cases may be complicated by some form of retinal detachment, which may be tractional or a Coats-like exudative detachment. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  3. [Families and psychiatry: models and evolving links].

    PubMed

    Frankhauser, Adeline

    2016-01-01

    The role of the families of persons with severe psychiatric disorders (schizophrenia in particular) in the care of their relatives has recently evolved: once seen as pathogenic to be kept at a distance, the family is now recognised by professionals as a partner in the care process. The links between families and psychiatric institutions remain complex and marked by ambivalence and paradoxes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Precision and negative predictive value of links between ClinicalTrials.gov and PubMed.

    PubMed

    Huser, Vojtech; Cimino, James J

    2012-01-01

    One of the goals of translational science is to shorten the time from discovery to clinical use. Clinical trial registries were established to increase transparency in completed and ongoing clinical trials, and they support linking trials with resulting publications. We set out to investigate precision and negative predictive value (NPV) of links between ClinicalTrials.gov (CT.gov) and PubMed. CT.gov has been established to increase transparency in clinical trials and the link to PubMed is crucial for supporting a number of important functions, including ascertaining publication bias. We drew a random sample of trials downloaded from CT.gov and performed manual review of retrieved publications. We characterize two types of links between trials and publications (NCT-link originating from MEDLINE and PMID-link originating from CT.gov).The link precision is different based on type (NCT-link: 100%; PMID-link: 63% to 96%). In trials with no linked publication, we were able to find publications 44% of the time (NPV=56%) by searching PubMed. This low NPV shows that there are potentially numerous publications that should have been formally linked with the trials. Our results indicate that existing trial registry and publisher policies may not be fully enforced. We suggest some automated methods for improving link quality.

  5. Precision and Negative Predictive Value of Links between ClinicalTrials.gov and PubMed

    PubMed Central

    Huser, Vojtech; Cimino, James J.

    2012-01-01

    One of the goals of translational science is to shorten the time from discovery to clinical use. Clinical trial registries were established to increase transparency in completed and ongoing clinical trials, and they support linking trials with resulting publications. We set out to investigate precision and negative predictive value (NPV) of links between ClinicalTrials.gov (CT.gov) and PubMed. CT.gov has been established to increase transparency in clinical trials and the link to PubMed is crucial for supporting a number of important functions, including ascertaining publication bias. We drew a random sample of trials downloaded from CT.gov and performed manual review of retrieved publications. We characterize two types of links between trials and publications (NCT-link originating from MEDLINE and PMID-link originating from CT.gov).The link precision is different based on type (NCT-link: 100%; PMID-link: 63% to 96%). In trials with no linked publication, we were able to find publications 44% of the time (NPV=56%) by searching PubMed. This low NPV shows that there are potentially numerous publications that should have been formally linked with the trials. Our results indicate that existing trial registry and publisher policies may not be fully enforced. We suggest some automated methods for improving link quality. PMID:23304310

  6. Cross-Link Guided Molecular Modeling with ROSETTA

    PubMed Central

    Leitner, Alexander; Rosenberger, George; Aebersold, Ruedi; Malmström, Lars

    2013-01-01

    Chemical cross-links identified by mass spectrometry generate distance restraints that reveal low-resolution structural information on proteins and protein complexes. The technology to reliably generate such data has become mature and robust enough to shift the focus to the question of how these distance restraints can be best integrated into molecular modeling calculations. Here, we introduce three workflows for incorporating distance restraints generated by chemical cross-linking and mass spectrometry into ROSETTA protocols for comparative and de novo modeling and protein-protein docking. We demonstrate that the cross-link validation and visualization software Xwalk facilitates successful cross-link data integration. Besides the protocols we introduce XLdb, a database of chemical cross-links from 14 different publications with 506 intra-protein and 62 inter-protein cross-links, where each cross-link can be mapped on an experimental structure from the Protein Data Bank. Finally, we demonstrate on a protein-protein docking reference data set the impact of virtual cross-links on protein docking calculations and show that an inter-protein cross-link can reduce on average the RMSD of a docking prediction by 5.0 Å. The methods and results presented here provide guidelines for the effective integration of chemical cross-link data in molecular modeling calculations and should advance the structural analysis of particularly large and transient protein complexes via hybrid structural biology methods. PMID:24069194

  7. Optogenetically inspired deep brain stimulation: linking basic with clinical research.

    PubMed

    Lüscher, Christian; Pollak, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    In the last decade, optogenetics has revolutionised the neurosciences. The technique, which allows for cell-type specific excitation and inhibition of neurons in the brain of freely moving rodents, has been used to tighten the links of causality between neural activity and behaviour. Optogenetics is also enabling an unprecedented characterisation of circuits and their dysfunction in a number of brain diseases, above all those conditions that are not caused by neurodegeneration. Notable progress has been made in addiction, depression and obsessive-compulsive disorders, as well as other anxiety disorders. By extension, the technique has also been used to propose blueprints for innovative rational treatment of these diseases. The goal is to design manipulations that disrupt pathological circuit function or restore normal activity. This can be achieved by targeting specific projections in order to apply specific stimulation protocols validated by ex-vivo analysis of the mechanisms underlying the dysfunction. In a number of cases, specific forms of pathological synaptic plasticity have been implicated. For example, addictive drugs via strong increase of dopamine trigger a myriad of alterations of glutamate and γ-aminobutyric acid transmission, also called drug-evoked synaptic plasticity. This opens the way to the design of optogenetic reversal protocols, which might restore normal transmission with the hope to abolish the pathological behaviour. Several proof of principle studies for this approach have recently been published. However, for many reasons, optogenetics will not be translatable to human applications in the near future. Here, we argue that an intermediate step is novel deep brain stimulation (DBS) protocols that emulate successful optogenetic approaches in animal models. We provide a roadmap for a translational path to rational, optogenetically inspired DBS protocols to refine existing approaches and expand to novel indications.

  8. Platform links clinical data with electronic health records

    Cancer.gov

    To make data gathered from patients in clinical trials available for use in standard care, NCI has created a new computer tool to support interoperability between clinical research and electronic health record systems. This new software represents an inno

  9. COMPARING AND LINKING PLUMES ACROSS MODELING APPROACHES

    EPA Science Inventory

    River plumes carry many pollutants, including microorganisms, into lakes and the coastal ocean. The physical scales of many stream and river plumes often lie between the scales for mixing zone plume models, such as the EPA Visual Plumes model, and larger-sized grid scales for re...

  10. COMPARING AND LINKING PLUMES ACROSS MODELING APPROACHES

    EPA Science Inventory

    River plumes carry many pollutants, including microorganisms, into lakes and the coastal ocean. The physical scales of many stream and river plumes often lie between the scales for mixing zone plume models, such as the EPA Visual Plumes model, and larger-sized grid scales for re...

  11. A VGI data integration framework based on linked data model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Lin; Ren, Rongrong

    2015-12-01

    This paper aims at the geographic data integration and sharing method for multiple online VGI data sets. We propose a semantic-enabled framework for online VGI sources cooperative application environment to solve a target class of geospatial problems. Based on linked data technologies - which is one of core components of semantic web, we can construct the relationship link among geographic features distributed in diverse VGI platform by using linked data modeling methods, then deploy these semantic-enabled entities on the web, and eventually form an interconnected geographic data network to support geospatial information cooperative application across multiple VGI data sources. The mapping and transformation from VGI sources to RDF linked data model is presented to guarantee the unique data represent model among different online social geographic data sources. We propose a mixed strategy which combined spatial distance similarity and feature name attribute similarity as the measure standard to compare and match different geographic features in various VGI data sets. And our work focuses on how to apply Markov logic networks to achieve interlinks of the same linked data in different VGI-based linked data sets. In our method, the automatic generating method of co-reference object identification model according to geographic linked data is discussed in more detail. It finally built a huge geographic linked data network across loosely-coupled VGI web sites. The results of the experiment built on our framework and the evaluation of our method shows the framework is reasonable and practicable.

  12. Design and modelling of a link monitoring mechanism for the Common Data Link (CDL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichelberger, John W., III

    1994-09-01

    The Common Data Link (CDL) is a full duplex, point-to-point microwave communications system used in imagery and signals intelligence collection systems. It provides a link between two remote Local Area Networks (LAN's) aboard collection and surface platforms. In a hostile environment, there is an overwhelming need to dynamically monitor the link and thus, limit the impact of jamming. This work describes steps taken to design, model, and evaluate a link monitoring system suitable for the CDL. The monitoring system is based on features and monitoring constructs of the Link Control Protocol (LCP) in the Point-to-Point Protocol (PPP) suite. The CDL model is based on a system of two remote Fiber Distributed Data Interface (FDDI) LAN's. In particular, the policies and mechanisms associated with monitoring are described in detail. An implementation of the required mechanisms using the OPNET network engineering tool is described. Performance data related to monitoring parameters is reported. Finally, integration of the FDDI-CDL model with the OPNET Internet model is described.

  13. Shuttle/TDRSS modelling and link simulation study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braun, W. R.; Mckenzie, T. M.; Biederman, L.; Lindsey, W. C.

    1979-01-01

    A Shuttle/TDRSS S-band and Ku-band link simulation package called LinCsim was developed for the evaluation of link performance for specific Shuttle signal designs. The link models were described in detail and the transmitter distortion parameters or user constraints were carefully defined. The overall link degradation (excluding hardware degradations) relative to an ideal BPSK channel were given for various sets of user constraint values. The performance sensitivity to each individual user constraint was then illustrated. The effect of excessive Spacelab clock jitter on the return link BER performance was also investigated as was the problem of subcarrier recovery for the K-band Shuttle return link signal.

  14. Detailed Clinical Models: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Goossen-Baremans, Anneke; van der Zel, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Objectives Due to the increasing use of electronic patient records and other health care information technology, we see an increase in requests to utilize these data. A highly level of standardization is required during the gathering of these data in the clinical context in order to use it for analyses. Detailed Clinical Models (DCM) have been created toward this purpose and several initiatives have been implemented in various parts of the world to create standardized models. This paper presents a review of DCM. Methods Two types of analyses are presented; one comparing DCM against health care information architectures and a second bottom up approach from concept analysis to representation. In addition core parts of the draft ISO standard 13972 on DCM are used such as clinician involvement, data element specification, modeling, meta information, and repository and governance. Results Six initiatives were selected: Intermountain Healthcare, 13606/OpenEHR Archetypes, Clinical Templates, Clinical Contents Models, Health Level 7 templates, and Dutch Detailed Clinical Models. Each model selected was reviewed for their overall development, involvement of clinicians, use of data types, code bindings, expressing semantics, modeling, meta information, use of repository and governance. Conclusions Using both a top down and bottom up approach to comparison reveals many commonalties and differences between initiatives. Important differences include the use of or lack of a reference model and expressiveness of models. Applying clinical data element standards facilitates the use of conceptual DCM models in different technical representations. PMID:21818440

  15. Multi-Scale Modeling of Cross-Linked Nanotube Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frankland, S. J. V.; Odegard, G. M.; Herzog, M. N.; Gates, T. S.; Fay, C. C.

    2005-01-01

    The effect of cross-linking single-walled carbon nanotubes on the Young's modulus of a nanotube-reinforced composite is modeled with a multi-scale method. The Young's modulus is predicted as a function of nanotube volume fraction and cross-link density. In this method, the constitutive properties of molecular representative volume elements are determined using molecular dynamics simulation and equivalent-continuum modeling. The Young's modulus is subsequently calculated for cross-linked nanotubes in a matrix which consists of the unreacted cross-linking agent. Two different cross-linking agents are used in this study, one that is short and rigid (Molecule A), and one that is long and flexible (Molecule B). Direct comparisons between the predicted elastic constants are made for the models in which the nanotubes are either covalently bonded or not chemically bonded to the cross-linking agent. At a nanotube volume fraction of 10%, the Young's modulus of Material A is not affected by nanotube crosslinking, while the Young's modulus of Material B is reduced by 64% when the nanotubes are cross-linked relative to the non-cross-linked material with the same matrix.

  16. Multi-Scale Modeling of Cross-Linked Nanotube Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frankland, S. J. V.; Odegard, G. M.; Herzog, M. N.; Gates, T. S.; Fay, C. C.

    2005-01-01

    The effect of cross-linking single-walled carbon nanotubes on the Young's modulus of a nanotube-reinforced composite is modeled with a multi-scale method. The Young's modulus is predicted as a function of nanotube volume fraction and cross-link density. In this method, the constitutive properties of molecular representative volume elements are determined using molecular dynamics simulation and equivalent-continuum modeling. The Young's modulus is subsequently calculated for cross-linked nanotubes in a matrix which consists of the unreacted cross-linking agent. Two different cross-linking agents are used in this study, one that is short and rigid (Molecule A), and one that is long and flexible (Molecule B). Direct comparisons between the predicted elastic constants are made for the models in which the nanotubes are either covalently bonded or not chemically bonded to the cross-linking agent. At a nanotube volume fraction of 10%, the Young's modulus of Material A is not affected by nanotube crosslinking, while the Young's modulus of Material B is reduced by 64% when the nanotubes are cross-linked relative to the non-cross-linked material with the same matrix.

  17. Extended model of restricted beam for FSO links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poliak, Juraj; Wilfert, Otakar

    2012-10-01

    Modern wireless optical communication systems in many aspects overcome wire or radio communications. Their advantages are license-free operation and broad bandwidth that they offer. The medium in free-space optical (FSO) links is the atmosphere. Operation of outdoor FSO links struggles with many atmospheric phenomena that deteriorate phase and amplitude of the transmitted optical beam. This beam originates in the transmitter and is affected by its individual parts, especially by the lens socket and the transmitter aperture, where attenuation and diffraction effects take place. Both of these phenomena unfavourable influence the beam and cause degradation of link availability, or its total malfunction. Therefore, both of these phenomena should be modelled and simulated, so that one can judge the link function prior to the realization of the system. Not only the link availability and reliability are concerned, but also economic aspects. In addition, the transmitted beam is not, generally speaking, circularly symmetrical, what makes the link simulation more difficult. In a comprehensive model, it is necessary to take into account the ellipticity of the beam that is restricted by circularly symmetrical aperture where then the attenuation and diffraction occur. General model is too computationally extensive; therefore simplification of the calculations by means of analytical and numerical approaches will be discussed. Presented model is not only simulated using computer, but also experimentally proven. One can then deduce the ability of the model to describe the reality and to estimate how far can one go with approximations, i.e. limitations of the model are discussed.

  18. Manipulators with flexible links: A simple model and experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shimoyama, Isao; Oppenheim, Irving J.

    1989-01-01

    A simple dynamic model proposed for flexible links is briefly reviewed and experimental control results are presented for different flexible systems. A simple dynamic model is useful for rapid prototyping of manipulators and their control systems, for possible application to manipulator design decisions, and for real time computation as might be applied in model based or feedforward control. Such a model is proposed, with the further advantage that clear physical arguments and explanations can be associated with its simplifying features and with its resulting analytical properties. The model is mathematically equivalent to Rayleigh's method. Taking the example of planar bending, the approach originates in its choice of two amplitude variables, typically chosen as the link end rotations referenced to the chord (or the tangent) motion of the link. This particular choice is key in establishing the advantageous features of the model, and it was used to support the series of experiments reported.

  19. Systematic review protocol assessing the processes for linking clinical trial registries and their published results

    PubMed Central

    Bashir, Rabia; Dunn, Adam G

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Clinical trial registries are an important source of information for tracking clinical trials from their inception through to their reporting, and have been used to measure publication bias and outcome reporting bias. Our aim is to survey and quantify the processes that have been used to identify links between clinical trial registries and published trial reports in studies that rely on these links to evaluate the completeness and accuracy of trial reporting. Methods and analysis We will identify studies that describe a process for identifying the links between a trial registry included in the WHO International Clinical Trial Registry Platform and published trial results, and use those links to evaluate the completeness and accuracy of trial reporting. Information extracted from the studies will include the purpose and application domain of the study, registries used or searched, processes by which the links were identified, the study period and proportions for which links were found. We will summarise what is known about the number and availability of links between clinical trial registries and published results, and examine how automatic linking, inference and inquiry processes have been used to identify links since the introduction of trial registries. Ethics and dissemination The systematic review is focused on the analysis of secondary data and does not require ethics approval. The results of the systematic review will be used to inform standard processes used to identify links to and from clinical trial registries in studies that evaluate the completeness and accuracy of clinical trial reports, as well as systematic reviews. Our findings will be disseminated by publishing the systematic review in a peer-reviewed journal, and by engaging with stakeholders from clinical trial registries and bibliographic databases. PMID:27697881

  20. Characterizing nanoparticle interactions: Linking models to experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Ramakrishnan, S.; Zukoski, C. F.

    2000-07-15

    Self-assembly of nanoparticles involves manipulating particle interactions such that attractions are on the order of the average thermal energy in the system. If the self-assembly is to result in an ordered packing, an understanding of their phase behavior is necessary. Here we test the ability of simple pair potentials to characterize the interactions and phase behavior of silico tungstic acid (STA), a 1.2 nm particle. The strength of interaction is controlled by dispersing STA in different background salt concentrations. The experimental variables used in characterizing the interactions are the osmotic compressibility (d{pi}/d{rho}), the second virial coefficient (B{sub 2}), relative solution viscosity ({eta}/{eta}{sub c}), and the solubility ({rho}{sigma}{sup 3}){sub sat}. Various techniques are then developed to extract the parameters of square well, the adhesive hard sphere (AHS), and the Yukawa pair potentials that best describe the experimental data. The AHS model describes the solution thermodynamic behavior only where the system is weakly attractive but, as would be expected, fails when long range repulsions or nonmonotonic pair potentials become important. Model free representations are presented which offer the opportunity to extract pair potential parameters. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  1. [Representation models and clinical psychology].

    PubMed

    Traube, P

    1993-01-01

    Clinical psychology often borrows vocabulary from medicine as well as its analysis schemes and explanation models. This survey will deal with all analysis schemes used by the clinical psychologist, explicitly or implicitly, to make it possible to understand the psychological functioning, and work on it as soon as a problem arises.

  2. Linking academic and clinical missions: UC Davis' integrated AHC.

    PubMed

    Pomeroy, Claire; Rice, Ann; McGowan, William; Osburn, Nathan

    2008-09-01

    Academic health centers (AHCs) rely on cross-subsidization of education and research programs by the clinical enterprise, but this is becoming more challenging as clinical reimbursements decline. These new realities provide an important opportunity to reevaluate the relationships between medical schools and academic medical centers. The authors examine the benefits of their ongoing commitment to create a fully integrated AHC at the University of California (UC) Davis, discussing strategies that serve as catalysts for continued growth. They explore how investments of proceeds from the clinical enterprise directly enhance educational and research initiatives, which, in turn, increase the success of patient-care programs. This has created a cycle of excellence that leads to an enhanced reputation for the entire health system. One strategy involves using clinical margins to "prime the pump" in anticipation of major research initiatives, resulting in rapid increases in external research funding and academic recognition. In turn, this facilitates recruitment of high-quality faculty and staff, improving the ability to deliver expert clinical care. The overall enhanced institutional reputation positions both the clinical and academic programs for further success. The authors posit that such approaches require executive-level commitment to a single strategic vision, unified leadership, and collaborative financial and operational decision making. Adopting such changes is not without challenges, which are discussed, but the authors suggest that an integrated AHC fosters optimized operations, enhanced reputation, and stronger performance across all mission areas. They also provide examples of how the UC Davis Health System has thus attracted philanthropists and investments from the private sector.

  3. Translational bioinformatics: linking the molecular world to the clinical world.

    PubMed

    Altman, R B

    2012-06-01

    Translational bioinformatics represents the union of translational medicine and bioinformatics. Translational medicine moves basic biological discoveries from the research bench into the patient-care setting and uses clinical observations to inform basic biology. It focuses on patient care, including the creation of new diagnostics, prognostics, prevention strategies, and therapies based on biological discoveries. Bioinformatics involves algorithms to represent, store, and analyze basic biological data, including DNA sequence, RNA expression, and protein and small-molecule abundance within cells. Translational bioinformatics spans these two fields; it involves the development of algorithms to analyze basic molecular and cellular data with an explicit goal of affecting clinical care.

  4. Precise numerical modeling of next generation multimode fiber based links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maksymiuk, L.; Stepniak, G.

    2015-12-01

    In order to numerically model modern multimode fiber based links we are required to take into account modal and chromatic dispersion, profile dispersion and spectral dependent coupling. In this paper we propose a complete numerical model which not only is precise but also versatile. Additionally to the detailed mathematical description of the model we provide also a bunch of numerical calculations performed with the use of the model.

  5. A Test Characteristic Curve Linking Method for the Testlet Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Yanmei; Bolt, Daniel M.; Fu, Jianbin

    2005-01-01

    When tests are made up of testlets, a testlet-based item response theory (IRT) model may be used to account for local dependence among items from a common testlet. This study presents a new test characteristic curve method to link calibrations based on the Bradlow, Wainer, and Wang (1999) testlet model. Procedures for calculating the test…

  6. PIPELINEs: Creating Comparable Clinical Knowledge Efficiently by Linking Trial Platforms.

    PubMed

    Trusheim, M R; Shrier, A A; Antonijevic, Z; Beckman, R A; Campbell, R K; Chen, C; Flaherty, K T; Loewy, J; Lacombe, D; Madhavan, S; Selker, H P; Esserman, L J

    2016-12-01

    Adaptive, seamless, multisponsor, multitherapy clinical trial designs executed as large scale platforms, could create superior evidence more efficiently than single-sponsor, single-drug trials. These trial PIPELINEs also could diminish barriers to trial participation, increase the representation of real-world populations, and create systematic evidence development for learning throughout a therapeutic life cycle, to continually refine its use. Comparable evidence could arise from multiarm design, shared comparator arms, and standardized endpoints-aiding sponsors in demonstrating the distinct value of their innovative medicines; facilitating providers and patients in selecting the most appropriate treatments; assisting regulators in efficacy and safety determinations; helping payers make coverage and reimbursement decisions; and spurring scientists with translational insights. Reduced trial times and costs could enable more indications, reduced development cycle times, and improved system financial sustainability. Challenges to overcome range from statistical to operational to collaborative governance and data exchange. © 2016 The Authors Clinical Pharmacology & Therapeutics published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

  7. A novel fibre-ensemble level constitutive model for exogenous cross-linked collagenous tissues.

    PubMed

    Sacks, Michael S; Zhang, Will; Wognum, Silvia

    2016-02-06

    Exogenous cross-linking of soft collagenous tissues is a common method for biomaterial development and medical therapies. To enable improved applications through computational methods, physically realistic constitutive models are required. Yet, despite decades of research, development and clinical use, no such model exists. In this study, we develop the first rigorous full structural model (i.e. explicitly incorporating various features of the collagen fibre architecture) for exogenously cross-linked soft tissues. This was made possible, in-part, with the use of native to cross-linked matched experimental datasets and an extension to the collagenous structural constitutive model so that the uncross-linked collagen fibre responses could be mapped to the cross-linked configuration. This allowed us to separate the effects of cross-linking from kinematic changes induced in the cross-linking process, which in turn allowed the non-fibrous tissue matrix component and the interaction effects to be identified. It was determined that the matrix could be modelled as an isotropic material using a modified Yeoh model. The most novel findings of this study were that: (i) the effective collagen fibre modulus was unaffected by cross-linking and (ii) fibre-ensemble interactions played a large role in stress development, often dominating the total tissue response (depending on the stress component and loading path considered). An important utility of the present model is its ability to separate the effects of exogenous cross-linking on the fibres from changes due to the matrix. Applications of this approach include the utilization in the design of novel chemical treatments to produce specific mechanical responses and the study of fatigue damage in bioprosthetic heart valve biomaterials.

  8. A novel fibre-ensemble level constitutive model for exogenous cross-linked collagenous tissues

    PubMed Central

    Sacks, Michael S.; Wognum, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Exogenous cross-linking of soft collagenous tissues is a common method for biomaterial development and medical therapies. To enable improved applications through computational methods, physically realistic constitutive models are required. Yet, despite decades of research, development and clinical use, no such model exists. In this study, we develop the first rigorous full structural model (i.e. explicitly incorporating various features of the collagen fibre architecture) for exogenously cross-linked soft tissues. This was made possible, in-part, with the use of native to cross-linked matched experimental datasets and an extension to the collagenous structural constitutive model so that the uncross-linked collagen fibre responses could be mapped to the cross-linked configuration. This allowed us to separate the effects of cross-linking from kinematic changes induced in the cross-linking process, which in turn allowed the non-fibrous tissue matrix component and the interaction effects to be identified. It was determined that the matrix could be modelled as an isotropic material using a modified Yeoh model. The most novel findings of this study were that: (i) the effective collagen fibre modulus was unaffected by cross-linking and (ii) fibre-ensemble interactions played a large role in stress development, often dominating the total tissue response (depending on the stress component and loading path considered). An important utility of the present model is its ability to separate the effects of exogenous cross-linking on the fibres from changes due to the matrix. Applications of this approach include the utilization in the design of novel chemical treatments to produce specific mechanical responses and the study of fatigue damage in bioprosthetic heart valve biomaterials. PMID:26855761

  9. Link Prediction in Weighted Networks: A Weighted Mutual Information Model

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Boyao; Xia, Yongxiang

    2016-01-01

    The link-prediction problem is an open issue in data mining and knowledge discovery, which attracts researchers from disparate scientific communities. A wealth of methods have been proposed to deal with this problem. Among these approaches, most are applied in unweighted networks, with only a few taking the weights of links into consideration. In this paper, we present a weighted model for undirected and weighted networks based on the mutual information of local network structures, where link weights are applied to further enhance the distinguishable extent of candidate links. Empirical experiments are conducted on four weighted networks, and results show that the proposed method can provide more accurate predictions than not only traditional unweighted indices but also typical weighted indices. Furthermore, some in-depth discussions on the effects of weak ties in link prediction as well as the potential to predict link weights are also given. This work may shed light on the design of algorithms for link prediction in weighted networks. PMID:26849659

  10. Link community detection using generative model and nonnegative matrix factorization.

    PubMed

    He, Dongxiao; Jin, Di; Baquero, Carlos; Liu, Dayou

    2014-01-01

    Discovery of communities in complex networks is a fundamental data analysis problem with applications in various domains. While most of the existing approaches have focused on discovering communities of nodes, recent studies have shown the advantages and uses of link community discovery in networks. Generative models provide a promising class of techniques for the identification of modular structures in networks, but most generative models mainly focus on the detection of node communities rather than link communities. In this work, we propose a generative model, which is based on the importance of each node when forming links in each community, to describe the structure of link communities. We proceed to fit the model parameters by taking it as an optimization problem, and solve it using nonnegative matrix factorization. Thereafter, in order to automatically determine the number of communities, we extend the above method by introducing a strategy of iterative bipartition. This extended method not only finds the number of communities all by itself, but also obtains high efficiency, and thus it is more suitable to deal with large and unexplored real networks. We test this approach on both synthetic benchmarks and real-world networks including an application on a large biological network, and compare it with two highly related methods. Results demonstrate the superior performance of our approach over competing methods for the detection of link communities.

  11. Link Community Detection Using Generative Model and Nonnegative Matrix Factorization

    PubMed Central

    He, Dongxiao; Jin, Di; Baquero, Carlos; Liu, Dayou

    2014-01-01

    Discovery of communities in complex networks is a fundamental data analysis problem with applications in various domains. While most of the existing approaches have focused on discovering communities of nodes, recent studies have shown the advantages and uses of link community discovery in networks. Generative models provide a promising class of techniques for the identification of modular structures in networks, but most generative models mainly focus on the detection of node communities rather than link communities. In this work, we propose a generative model, which is based on the importance of each node when forming links in each community, to describe the structure of link communities. We proceed to fit the model parameters by taking it as an optimization problem, and solve it using nonnegative matrix factorization. Thereafter, in order to automatically determine the number of communities, we extend the above method by introducing a strategy of iterative bipartition. This extended method not only finds the number of communities all by itself, but also obtains high efficiency, and thus it is more suitable to deal with large and unexplored real networks. We test this approach on both synthetic benchmarks and real-world networks including an application on a large biological network, and compare it with two highly related methods. Results demonstrate the superior performance of our approach over competing methods for the detection of link communities. PMID:24489803

  12. Linking knowledge and action through mental models of sustainable agriculture.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Matthew; Lubell, Mark; Hillis, Vicken

    2014-09-09

    Linking knowledge to action requires understanding how decision-makers conceptualize sustainability. This paper empirically analyzes farmer "mental models" of sustainability from three winegrape-growing regions of California where local extension programs have focused on sustainable agriculture. The mental models are represented as networks where sustainability concepts are nodes, and links are established when a farmer mentions two concepts in their stated definition of sustainability. The results suggest that winegrape grower mental models of sustainability are hierarchically structured, relatively similar across regions, and strongly linked to participation in extension programs and adoption of sustainable farm practices. We discuss the implications of our findings for the debate over the meaning of sustainability, and the role of local extension programs in managing knowledge systems.

  13. Linking Goal-Oriented Requirements and Model-Driven Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastor, Oscar; Giachetti, Giovanni

    In the context of Goal-Oriented Requirement Engineering (GORE) there are interesting modeling approaches for the analysis of complex scenarios that are oriented to obtain and represent the relevant requirements for the development of software products. However, the way to use these GORE models in an automated Model-Driven Development (MDD) process is not clear, and, in general terms, the translation of these models into the final software products is still manually performed. Therefore, in this chapter, we show an approach to automatically link GORE models and MDD processes, which has been elaborated by considering the experience obtained from linking the i * framework with an industrially applied MDD approach. The linking approach proposed is formulated by means of a generic process that is based on current modeling standards and technologies in order to facilitate its application for different MDD and GORE approaches. Special attention is paid to how this process generates appropriate model transformation mechanisms to automatically obtain MDD conceptual models from GORE models, and how it can be used to specify validation mechanisms to assure the correct model transformations.

  14. The Clinical Evidence Linking Helicobacter pylori to Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Moss, Steven F

    2017-03-01

    Gastric cancer has long been recognized to be accompanied and preceded by chronic gastritis, lasting decades. Arguably, the most important development in our understanding of gastric cancer pathogenesis over the past 50 years has been the realization that, for most cases of gastric cancer, Helicobacter pylori is the cause of the underlying gastritis. Gastritis can promote gastric carcinogenesis, typically via the Correa cascade of atrophic gastritis, intestinal metaplasia, and dysplasia. Nested case-control studies have shown that H pylori infection increases the risk of gastric cancer significantly, both of the intestinal and diffuse subtypes, and that H pylori is responsible for approximately 90% of the world's burden of noncardia gastric cancer. Based largely on randomized studies in high gastric cancer prevalence regions in East Asia, it appears that primary and tertiary intervention to eradicate H pylori can halve the risk of gastric cancer. Some public health authorities now are starting screening and treatment programs to reduce the burden of gastric cancer in these high-risk areas. However, there is currently much less enthusiasm for initiating similar attempts in the United States. This is partially because gastric cancer is a relatively less frequent cause of cancer in the United States, and in addition there are concerns about theoretical downsides of H pylori eradication, principally because of the consistent inverse relationship noted between H pylori and esophageal adenocarcinoma. Nevertheless, establishing a link between chronic H pylori infection and gastric cancer has led to novel insights into cancer biology, the gastrointestinal microbiome, and on individual and population-based gastric cancer prevention strategies.

  15. Targeting cancer epigenetics: Linking basic biology to clinical medicine.

    PubMed

    Shinjo, Keiko; Kondo, Yutaka

    2015-12-01

    Recent studies provide compelling evidence that epigenetic dysregulation is involved in almost every step of tumor development and progression. Differences in tumor behavior, which ultimately reflects clinical outcome, can be explained by variations in gene expression patterns generated by epigenetic mechanisms, such as DNA methylation. Therefore, epigenetic abnormalities are considered potential biomarkers and therapeutic targets. DNA methylation is stable at certain specific loci in cancer cells and predominantly reflects the characteristic clinicopathological features. Thus, it is an ideal biomarker for cancer screening, classification and prognostic purposes. Epigenetic treatment for cancers is based on the pharmacologic targeting of various core transcriptional programs that sustains cancer cell identity. Therefore, targeting aberrant epigenetic modifiers may be effective for multiple processes compared with using a selective inhibitor of aberrant single signaling pathway. This review provides an overview of the epigenetic alterations in human cancers and discusses about novel therapeutic strategies targeting epigenetic alterations.

  16. PIPELINEs: Creating Comparable Clinical Knowledge Efficiently by Linking Trial Platforms

    PubMed Central

    Shrier, AA; Antonijevic, Z; Beckman, RA; Campbell, RK; Chen, C; Flaherty, KT; Loewy, J; Lacombe, D; Madhavan, S; Selker, HP; Esserman, LJ

    2016-01-01

    Adaptive, seamless, multisponsor, multitherapy clinical trial designs executed as large scale platforms, could create superior evidence more efficiently than single‐sponsor, single‐drug trials. These trial PIPELINEs also could diminish barriers to trial participation, increase the representation of real‐world populations, and create systematic evidence development for learning throughout a therapeutic life cycle, to continually refine its use. Comparable evidence could arise from multiarm design, shared comparator arms, and standardized endpoints—aiding sponsors in demonstrating the distinct value of their innovative medicines; facilitating providers and patients in selecting the most appropriate treatments; assisting regulators in efficacy and safety determinations; helping payers make coverage and reimbursement decisions; and spurring scientists with translational insights. Reduced trial times and costs could enable more indications, reduced development cycle times, and improved system financial sustainability. Challenges to overcome range from statistical to operational to collaborative governance and data exchange. PMID:27643536

  17. Link performance model for filter bank based multicarrier systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, Dmitry; Oborina, Alexandra; Giupponi, Lorenza; Stitz, Tobias Hidalgo

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents a complete link level abstraction model for link quality estimation on the system level of filter bank multicarrier (FBMC)-based networks. The application of mean mutual information per coded bit (MMIB) approach is validated for the FBMC systems. The considered quality measure of the resource element for the FBMC transmission is the received signal-to-noise-plus-distortion ratio (SNDR). Simulation results of the proposed link abstraction model show that the proposed approach is capable of estimating the block error rate (BLER) accurately, even when the signal is propagated through the channels with deep and frequent fades, as it is the case for the 3GPP Hilly Terrain (3GPP-HT) and Enhanced Typical Urban (ETU) models. The FBMC-related results of link level simulations are compared with cyclic prefix orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (CP-OFDM) analogs. Simulation results are also validated through the comparison to reference publicly available results. Finally, the steps of link level abstraction algorithm for FBMC are formulated and its application for system level simulation of a professional mobile radio (PMR) network is discussed.

  18. Linking knowledge and action through mental models of sustainable agriculture

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Matthew; Lubell, Mark; Hillis, Vicken

    2014-01-01

    Linking knowledge to action requires understanding how decision-makers conceptualize sustainability. This paper empirically analyzes farmer “mental models” of sustainability from three winegrape-growing regions of California where local extension programs have focused on sustainable agriculture. The mental models are represented as networks where sustainability concepts are nodes, and links are established when a farmer mentions two concepts in their stated definition of sustainability. The results suggest that winegrape grower mental models of sustainability are hierarchically structured, relatively similar across regions, and strongly linked to participation in extension programs and adoption of sustainable farm practices. We discuss the implications of our findings for the debate over the meaning of sustainability, and the role of local extension programs in managing knowledge systems. PMID:25157158

  19. Linking Academic Entitlement and Student Incivility Using Latent Means Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kopp, Jason P.; Finney, Sara J.

    2013-01-01

    Academic entitlement has been theoretically linked with uncivil student behavior; however, this relationship has not been tested. To address this gap in the literature, the authors used latent means modeling to estimate the relationship between the Academic Entitlement Questionnaire and uncivil student behavior. The authors gathered scores on the…

  20. Model selection for athermal cross-linked fiber networks.

    PubMed

    Shahsavari, A; Picu, R C

    2012-07-01

    Athermal random fiber networks are usually modeled by representing each fiber as a truss, a Euler-Bernoulli or a Timoshenko beam, and, in the case of cross-linked networks, each cross-link as a pinned, rotating, or welded joint. In this work we study the effect of these various modeling options on the dependence of the overall network stiffness on system parameters. We conclude that Timoshenko beams can be used for the entire range of density and beam stiffness parameters, while the Euler-Bernoulli model can be used only at relatively low network densities. In the high density-high bending stiffness range, strain energy is stored predominantly in the axial and shear deformation modes, while in the other extreme range of parameters, the energy is stored in the bending mode. The effect of the model size on the network stiffness is also discussed.

  1. Single photon time transfer link model for GNSS satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vacek, Michael; Michalek, Vojtech; Peca, Marek; Prochazka, Ivan; Blazej, Josef

    2015-05-01

    The importance of optical time transfer serving as a complement to traditional microwave links, has been attested for GNSSes and for scientific missions. Single photon time transfer (SPTT) is a process, allowing to compare (subtract) time readings of two distant clocks. Such a comparison may be then used to synchronize less accurate clock to a better reference, to perform clock characterization and calibration, to calculate mean time out of ensemble of several clocks, displaced in space. The single-photon time transfer is well established in field of space geodesy, being supported by passive retro-reflectors within space segment of five known GNSSes. A truly two-way, active terminals work aboard of Jason-2 (T2L2) - multiphoton operation, GNSS Beidou (Compass) - SPTT, and are going to be launched within recent ACES project (ELT) - SPTT, and GNSS GLONASS - multiphoton operation. However, there is still missing comprehensive theoretical model of two-way (using satellite receiver and retroreflector) SPTT link incorporating all crucial parameters of receiver (both ground and space segment receivers), transmitter, atmosphere effects on uplink and downlink path, influence of retroreflector. The input to calculation of SPTT link performance will be among others: link budget (distance, power, apertures, beam divergence, attenuation, scattering), propagating medium (atmosphere scintillation, beam wander, etc.), mutual Tx/Rx velocity, wavelength. The SPTT model will be evaluated without the properties of real components. These will be added in the further development. The ground-to-space SPTT link performance of typical scenarios are modeled. This work is a part of the ESA study "Comparison of optical time-transfer links."

  2. A mathematical model of N-linked glycoform biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Umaña, P; Bailey, J E

    1997-09-20

    Metabolic engineering of N-linked oligosaccharide biosynthesis to produce novel glycoforms or glycoform distributions of a recombinant glycoprotein can potentially lead to an improved therapeutic performance of the glycoprotein product. Effective engineering of this pathway to maximize the fractions of beneficial glycoforms within the glycoform population of a target glycoprotein can be aided by a mathematical model of the N-linked glycosylation process. A mathematical model is presented here, whose main function is to calculate the expected qualitative trends in the N-linked oligosaccharide distribution resulting from changes in the levels of one or more enzymes involved in the network of enzyme-catalyzed reactions that accomplish N-linked oligosaccharide biosynthesis. It consists of mass balances for 33 different oligosaccharide species N-linked to a specified protein that is being transported through the different compartments of the Golgi complex. Values of the model parameters describing Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells were estimated from literature information. A basal set of kinetic parameters for the enzyme-catalyzed reactions acting on free oligosaccharide substrates was also obtained from the literature. The solution of the system for this basal set of parameters gave a glycoform distribution consisting mainly of complex-galactosylated oligosaccharides distributed in structures with different numbers of antennae in a fashion similar to that observed for various recombinant proteins produced in CHO cells. Other simulations indicate that changes in the oligosaccharide distribution could easily result from alteration in glycoprotein productivity within the range currently attainable in industry. The overexpression of N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase III in CHO cells was simulated under different conditions to test the main function of the model. These simulations allow a comparison of different strategies, such as simultaneous overexpression of several

  3. Model updating in flexible-link multibody systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belotti, R.; Caneva, G.; Palomba, I.; Richiedei, D.; Trevisani, A.

    2016-09-01

    The dynamic response of flexible-link multibody systems (FLMSs) can be predicted through nonlinear models based on finite elements, to describe the coupling between rigid- body and elastic behaviour. Their accuracy should be as high as possible to synthesize controllers and observers. Model updating based on experimental measurements is hence necessary. By taking advantage of the experimental modal analysis, this work proposes a model updating procedure for FLMSs and applies it experimentally to a planar robot. Indeed, several peculiarities of the model of FLMS should be carefully tackled. On the one hand, nonlinear models of a FLMS should be linearized about static equilibrium configurations. On the other, the experimental mode shapes should be corrected to be consistent with the elastic displacements represented in the model, which are defined with respect to a fictitious moving reference (the equivalent rigid link system). Then, since rotational degrees of freedom are also represented in the model, interpolation of the experimental data should be performed to match the model displacement vector. Model updating has been finally cast as an optimization problem in the presence of bounds on the feasible values, by also adopting methods to improve the numerical conditioning and to compute meaningful updated inertial and elastic parameters.

  4. UAS Modeling of the Communication Links Study Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birr, Richard B.; Girgis, Nancy; Murray, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is the authority that grants access into, and operations within, the National Airspace System (NAS) for all aircraft, including Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS). The safe operation of UAS in the NAS must be assured if the full potential of UAS is to be realized and supported by the public and Congress. This report analyzed the communication systems that are needed for the safe operations of UAS in the NAS. Safe operations can be defined as the availability of the required links to carry the information to control the UAS and the return links to allow controllers to know where the UAS is at any given moment as well as how it is performing. This report is the end result of work performed jointly between the FAA and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/Kennedy Space Center (NASA KSC). The work was done in support of the Radio Technical Commission for Aeronautics (RTCA) Special Committee 203 (SC-203) Control and Communications Working Group. The RTCA is a federal advisory committee to the FAA. Though the work was not under the direction of the working group, a large part of the specific values used in the simulations came from the working group. Specifically, all of the radio links were modeled based on the formulation completed by the working group. This report analyzed three scenarios from RTCA SC-203 that represent how a UAS would operate in the NAS. Each scenario was created using the Satellite Tool Kit (STK) modeling and simulation tool. The flight paths of the UAS were generated and the UAS dynamics were likewise modeled. Then each communication asset such as transmitters, receivers, and antennas were modeled and placed on the appropriate UAS, satellite, or Control Station (CS). After that, the radio links were analyzed for signal strength and antenna blockage, and the overall link performance was analyzed in detail. The goal was to obtain 99.9% availability on all of the radio communication links. In order

  5. Linking ClinicalTrials.gov and PubMed to Track Results of Interventional Human Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Huser, Vojtech; Cimino, James J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective In an effort to understand how results of human clinical trials are made public, we analyze a large set of clinical trials registered at ClinicalTrials.gov, the world’s largest clinical trial registry. Materials and Methods We considered two trial result artifacts: (1) existence of a trial result journal article that is formally linked to a registered trial or (2) the deposition of a trial’s basic summary results within the registry. Results The study sample consisted of 8907 completed, interventional, phase 2-or-higher clinical trials that were completed in 2006-2009. The majority of trials (72.2%) had no structured trial-article link present. Atotal of 2367 trials (26.6%) deposited basic summary results within the registry. Ofthose, 969 trials (10.9%) were classified as trials with extended results and 1398 trials (15.7%) were classified as trials with only required basic results. The majority of the trials (54.8%) had no evidence of results, based on either linked result articles or basic summary results (silent trials), while a minimal number (9.2%) report results through both registry deposition and publication. Discussion Our study analyzes the body of linked knowledge around clinical trials (which we refer to as the “trialome”). Our results show that most trials do not report results and, for those that do, there is minimal overlap in the types of reporting. We identify several mechanisms by which the linkages between trials and their published results can be increased. Conclusion Our study shows that even when combining publications and registry results, and despite availability of several information channels, trial sponsors do not sufficiently meet the mandate to inform the public either via a linked result publication or basic results submission. PMID:23874614

  6. Mutual information model for link prediction in heterogeneous complex networks

    PubMed Central

    Shakibian, Hadi; Moghadam Charkari, Nasrollah

    2017-01-01

    Recently, a number of meta-path based similarity indices like PathSim, HeteSim, and random walk have been proposed for link prediction in heterogeneous complex networks. However, these indices suffer from two major drawbacks. Firstly, they are primarily dependent on the connectivity degrees of node pairs without considering the further information provided by the given meta-path. Secondly, most of them are required to use a single and usually symmetric meta-path in advance. Hence, employing a set of different meta-paths is not straightforward. To tackle with these problems, we propose a mutual information model for link prediction in heterogeneous complex networks. The proposed model, called as Meta-path based Mutual Information Index (MMI), introduces meta-path based link entropy to estimate the link likelihood and could be carried on a set of available meta-paths. This estimation measures the amount of information through the paths instead of measuring the amount of connectivity between the node pairs. The experimental results on a Bibliography network show that the MMI obtains high prediction accuracy compared with other popular similarity indices. PMID:28344326

  7. Corneal collagen cross-linking. A review of its clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Balparda, K; Maldonado, M J

    2017-04-01

    To perform a literature review of the current clinical applications of corneal collagen cross-linking. An exhaustive literature search was made, including the main biomedical databases, and encompassing all years since the introduction of cross-linking in ophthalmology practice. Corneal collagen cross-linking using UVA irradiation and riboflavin is a surgical technique that is currently being optimised, and is supported by a good amount of pre-clinical and clinical studies. These papers found show the beneficial effect of the surgery on preventing the progression of corneal ectasia, especially keratoconus, but also on pellucid marginal degeneration and keratectasia after refractive surgery. The effect of cross-linking on avoiding the occurrence of iatrogenic keratectasia when combined with a photo-ablative procedure is less clear to date. Additionally, it appears that cross-linking may have a considerable beneficial effect on controlling corneal infection caused by fungi, bacteria and amoebae. However, its effect on viral keratitis can be detrimental. The benefit on bullous keratopathy seems to be rather transient. Corneal collagen cross-linking may be used with relative safety and efficacy in patients with progressive keratoconus. Its use could also be considered in patients with other corneal ectasias or with corneal infections of non-viral origin. Currently, there is still a need for more studies as regards its effect on preventing iatrogenic keratectasia. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Monogenic mouse models of autism spectrum disorders: Common mechanisms and missing links.

    PubMed

    Hulbert, S W; Jiang, Y-H

    2016-05-03

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) present unique challenges in the fields of genetics and neurobiology because of the clinical and molecular heterogeneity underlying these disorders. Genetic mutations found in ASD patients provide opportunities to dissect the molecular and circuit mechanisms underlying autistic behaviors using animal models. Ongoing studies of genetically modified models have offered critical insight into possible common mechanisms arising from different mutations, but links between molecular abnormalities and behavioral phenotypes remain elusive. The challenges encountered in modeling autism in mice demand a new analytic paradigm that integrates behavioral assessment with circuit-level analysis in genetically modified models with strong construct validity.

  9. Improving nonlinear modeling capabilities of functional link adaptive filters.

    PubMed

    Comminiello, Danilo; Scarpiniti, Michele; Scardapane, Simone; Parisi, Raffaele; Uncini, Aurelio

    2015-09-01

    The functional link adaptive filter (FLAF) represents an effective solution for online nonlinear modeling problems. In this paper, we take into account a FLAF-based architecture, which separates the adaptation of linear and nonlinear elements, and we focus on the nonlinear branch to improve the modeling performance. In particular, we propose a new model that involves an adaptive combination of filters downstream of the nonlinear expansion. Such combination leads to a cooperative behavior of the whole architecture, thus yielding a performance improvement, particularly in the presence of strong nonlinearities. An advanced architecture is also proposed involving the adaptive combination of multiple filters on the nonlinear branch. The proposed models are assessed in different nonlinear modeling problems, in which their effectiveness and capabilities are shown.

  10. Links among theory, research, and practice: cornerstones of clinical scientific progress.

    PubMed

    Jensen, P S

    1999-12-01

    Discusses how explicit links among clinical theory, research, and practice are necessary if a clinical discipline is to survive in the managed care marketplace of today. Robust links among theory, research, and practice enable the elaboration of a systematic body of clinical knowledge that is practical in its deployment, effective in its methods, and compelling in its rationale. Moreover, theoretical advances are increasingly necessary, in that they allow scientists to categorize and prioritize the growing amount of empirically derived information, determine how pieces of multilevel data fit together, identify knowledge gaps, and set priorities for future studies. As shown by some of the articles in this special section, evolving theories of behavior have several characteristics in common; namely that they are developmental, transactional, contextual, adaptational, multilevel, and multidetermined. Concerns may be raised, however, as to whether current research methods are fully adequate to test these newer, more complex, multilevel theories or the clinical phenomena they seek to characterize. To address these difficulties, as well as to increase the pace of scientific advances that may result from propitious links among theory, research, and practice, I offer several recommendations to clinical psychology in general and to clinical child psychological research in particular.

  11. A FAULT MODEL FOR ONTOLOGY MAPPING, ALIGNMENT, AND LINKING SYSTEMS

    PubMed Central

    JOHNSON, HELEN L.; COHEN, K. BRETONNEL; HUNTER, LAWRENCE

    2008-01-01

    There has been much work devoted to the mapping, alignment, and linking of ontologies (MALO), but little has been published about how to evaluate systems that do this. A fault model for conducting fine-grained evaluations of MALO systems is proposed, and its application to the system described in Johnson et al. [15] is illustrated. Two judges categorized errors according to the model, and inter-judge agreement was calculated by error category. Overall inter-judge agreement was 98% after dispute resolution, suggesting that the model is consistently applicable. The results of applying the model to the system described in [15] reveal the reason for a puzzling set of results in that paper, and also suggest a number of avenues and techniques for improving the state of the art in MALO, including the development of biomedical domain specific language processing tools, filtering of high frequency matching results, and word sense disambiguation. PMID:17990495

  12. Groundwater Pollution Source Identification using Linked ANN-Optimization Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayaz, Md; Srivastava, Rajesh; Jain, Ashu

    2014-05-01

    Groundwater is the principal source of drinking water in several parts of the world. Contamination of groundwater has become a serious health and environmental problem today. Human activities including industrial and agricultural activities are generally responsible for this contamination. Identification of groundwater pollution source is a major step in groundwater pollution remediation. Complete knowledge of pollution source in terms of its source characteristics is essential to adopt an effective remediation strategy. Groundwater pollution source is said to be identified completely when the source characteristics - location, strength and release period - are known. Identification of unknown groundwater pollution source is an ill-posed inverse problem. It becomes more difficult for real field conditions, when the lag time between the first reading at observation well and the time at which the source becomes active is not known. We developed a linked ANN-Optimization model for complete identification of an unknown groundwater pollution source. The model comprises two parts- an optimization model and an ANN model. Decision variables of linked ANN-Optimization model contain source location and release period of pollution source. An objective function is formulated using the spatial and temporal data of observed and simulated concentrations, and then minimized to identify the pollution source parameters. In the formulation of the objective function, we require the lag time which is not known. An ANN model with one hidden layer is trained using Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm to find the lag time. Different combinations of source locations and release periods are used as inputs and lag time is obtained as the output. Performance of the proposed model is evaluated for two and three dimensional case with error-free and erroneous data. Erroneous data was generated by adding uniformly distributed random error (error level 0-10%) to the analytically computed concentration

  13. VCT clinic HIV burden and its link with HIV care clinic at the University of Gondar hospital

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Voluntary Counselling and Testing (VCT) is an important component of any HIV/AIDS control and prevention activities. VCT makes people aware of their HIV serostatus and enables early identification of those who need care. It is an important link to HIV care and support. The main aim of this study is to describe the HIV burden at VCT and define the relationship between the VCT Center and the HIV Chronic Care Clinic of the University of Gondar (UoG) Hospital. Methods It is a record based descriptive study undertaken by using data collected by health professionals at the VCT center and the HIV chronic care clinic of the UoG Hospital. Patient data collected from 2005/06 to 2008/09 was investigated. Analysis was carried out using the SPSS version 16.0. Results A total of 19,168 people were tested for HIV and a prevalence of 25.4% was obtained. 4298 HIV positive people were referred to the HIV chronic care clinic but only 27% actually registered at the clinic. Chi-square analyses showed residence, age and time of VCT visit showed significant relations with hospital care attendance. Conclusion The overall HIV prevalence is high. The data obtained at the HIV care clinic regarding patients’ clinical conditions at acceptance were incomplete. Improvements are required on the link between VCT and HIV care and documentation of data. PMID:23171415

  14. Optimization model for UV-Riboflavin corneal cross-linking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumacher, S.; Wernli, J.; Scherrer, S.; Bueehler, M.; Seiler, T.; Mrochen, M.

    2011-03-01

    Nowadays UV-cross-linking is an established method for the treatment of keraectasia. Currently a standardized protocol is used for the cross-linking treatment. We will now present a theoretical model which predicts the number of induced crosslinks in the corneal tissue, in dependence of the Riboflavin concentration, the radiation intensity, the pre-treatment time and the treatment time. The model is developed by merging the difussion equation, the equation for the light distribution in dependence on the absorbers in the tissue and a rate equation for the polymerization process. A higher concentration of Riboflavin solution as well as a higher irradiation intensity will increase the number of induced crosslinks. However, performed stress-strain experiments which support the model showed that higher Riboflavin concentrations (> 0.125%) do not result in a further increase in stability of the corneal tissue. This is caused by the inhomogeneous distribution of induced crosslinks throughout the cornea due to the uneven absorption of the UV-light. The new model offers the possibility to optimize the treatment individually for every patient depending on their corneal thickness in terms of efficiency, saftey and treatment time.

  15. Modeling of Long-Range Atmospheric Lasercom Links Between Static and Mobile Platforms

    SciTech Connect

    Scharlemann, E T; Breitfeller, E F; Henderson, J R; Kallman, J S; Morris, J R; Ruggiero, A J

    2003-07-29

    We describe modeling and simulation of long-range terrestrial laser communications links between static and mobile platforms. Atmospheric turbulence modeling, along with pointing, tracking and acquisition models are combined to provide an overall capability to estimate communications link performance.

  16. Clinical genomics information management software linking cancer genome sequence and clinical decisions.

    PubMed

    Watt, Stuart; Jiao, Wei; Brown, Andrew M K; Petrocelli, Teresa; Tran, Ben; Zhang, Tong; McPherson, John D; Kamel-Reid, Suzanne; Bedard, Philippe L; Onetto, Nicole; Hudson, Thomas J; Dancey, Janet; Siu, Lillian L; Stein, Lincoln; Ferretti, Vincent

    2013-09-01

    Using sequencing information to guide clinical decision-making requires coordination of a diverse set of people and activities. In clinical genomics, the process typically includes sample acquisition, template preparation, genome data generation, analysis to identify and confirm variant alleles, interpretation of clinical significance, and reporting to clinicians. We describe a software application developed within a clinical genomics study, to support this entire process. The software application tracks patients, samples, genomic results, decisions and reports across the cohort, monitors progress and sends reminders, and works alongside an electronic data capture system for the trial's clinical and genomic data. It incorporates systems to read, store, analyze and consolidate sequencing results from multiple technologies, and provides a curated knowledge base of tumor mutation frequency (from the COSMIC database) annotated with clinical significance and drug sensitivity to generate reports for clinicians. By supporting the entire process, the application provides deep support for clinical decision making, enabling the generation of relevant guidance in reports for verification by an expert panel prior to forwarding to the treating physician. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. [Clinical and molecular study in a child with X-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia].

    PubMed

    Callea, Michele; Yavuz, Izzet; Clarich, Gabriella; Cammarata-Scalisi, Francisco

    2015-12-01

    Ectodermal dysplasia encompasses more than 200 clinically distinct entities, which affect at least two structures derived from the ectoderm, including the skin, hair, nails, teeth, sweat glands, and sebaceous glands. X-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia is the most common type and is caused by mutation of the EDA gene that encodes Ectodysplasin-A. It occurs in less than 1 in 100 000 individuals and is clinically characterized by hypodontia, hypohidrosis, hypotrichosis, and eye dis orders. We present a child evaluated in a multidisciplinary manner with clinical and molecular diagnosis of X-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia with type missense mutation c.1133C> T; p.T378M in EDA gene.

  18. Curing critical links in oscillator networks as power flow models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohden, Martin; Witthaut, Dirk; Timme, Marc; Meyer-Ortmanns, Hildegard

    2017-01-01

    Modern societies crucially depend on the robust supply with electric energy so that blackouts of power grids can have far reaching consequences. Typically, large scale blackouts take place after a cascade of failures: the failure of a single infrastructure component, such as a critical transmission line, results in several subsequent failures that spread across large parts of the network. Improving the robustness of a network to prevent such secondary failures is thus key for assuring a reliable power supply. In this article we analyze the nonlocal rerouting of power flows after transmission line failures for a simplified AC power grid model and compare different strategies to improve network robustness. We identify critical links in the grid and compute alternative pathways to quantify the grid’s redundant capacity and to find bottlenecks along the pathways. Different strategies are developed and tested to increase transmission capacities to restore stability with respect to transmission line failures. We show that local and nonlocal strategies typically perform alike: one can equally well cure critical links by providing backup capacities locally or by extending the capacities of bottleneck links at remote locations.

  19. Linking the Weather Generator with Regional Climate Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubrovsky, Martin; Farda, Ales; Skalak, Petr; Huth, Radan

    2013-04-01

    One of the downscaling approaches, which transform the raw outputs from the climate models (GCMs or RCMs) into data with more realistic structure, is based on linking the stochastic weather generator with the climate model output. The present contribution, in which the parametric daily surface weather generator (WG) M&Rfi is linked to the RCM output, follows two aims: (1) Validation of the new simulations of the present climate (1961-1990) made by the ALADIN-Climate Regional Climate Model at 25 km resolution. The WG parameters are derived from the RCM-simulated surface weather series and compared to those derived from weather series observed in 125 Czech meteorological stations. The set of WG parameters will include statistics of the surface temperature and precipitation series (including probability of wet day occurrence). (2) Presenting a methodology for linking the WG with RCM output. This methodology, which is based on merging information from observations and RCM, may be interpreted as a downscaling procedure, whose product is a gridded WG capable of producing realistic synthetic multivariate weather series for weather-ungauged locations. In this procedure, WG is calibrated with RCM-simulated multi-variate weather series in the first step, and the grid specific WG parameters are then de-biased by spatially interpolated correction factors based on comparison of WG parameters calibrated with gridded RCM weather series and spatially scarcer observations. The quality of the weather series produced by the resultant gridded WG will be assessed in terms of selected climatic characteristics (focusing on characteristics related to variability and extremes of surface temperature and precipitation). Acknowledgements: The present experiment is made within the frame of projects ALARO-Climate (project P209/11/2405 sponsored by the Czech Science Foundation), WG4VALUE (project LD12029 sponsored by the Ministry of Education, Youth and Sports of CR) and VALUE (COST ES 1102

  20. A mathematical model of N-linked glycosylation.

    PubMed

    Krambeck, Frederick J; Betenbaugh, Michael J

    2005-12-20

    Metabolic engineering of N-linked oligosaccharide biosynthesis to produce novel glycoforms or glycoform distributions of a recombinant glycoprotein can potentially lead to an improved therapeutic performance of the glycoprotein product. A mathematical model for the initial stages of this process, up to the first galactosylation of an oligosaccharide, was previously developed by Umana and Bailey (1997) (UB1997). Building on this work, an extended model is developed to include further galactosylation, fucosylation, extension of antennae by N-acetyllactosamine repeats, and sialylation. This allows many more structural features to be predicted. A number of simplifying assumptions are also relaxed to incorporate more variables for the control of glycoforms. The full model generates 7565 oligosaccharide structures in a network of 22,871 reactions. Methods for solving the model for the complete product distribution and adjusting the parameters to match experimental data are also developed. A basal set of kinetic parameters for the enzyme-catalyzed reactions acting on free oligosaccharide substrates is obtained from the previous model and existing literature. Enzyme activities are adjusted to match experimental glycoform distributions for Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO). The model is then used to predict the effect of increasing expression of a target glycoprotein on the product glycoform distribution and evaluate appropriate metabolic engineering strategies to return the glycoform profile to its original distribution pattern. This model may find significant utility in the future to predict glycosylation patterns and direct glycoengineering projects to optimize glycoform distributions.

  1. Clinical consequences of urea cycle enzyme deficiencies and potential links to arginine and nitric oxide metabolism.

    PubMed

    Scaglia, Fernando; Brunetti-Pierri, Nicola; Kleppe, Soledad; Marini, Juan; Carter, Susan; Garlick, Peter; Jahoor, Farook; O'Brien, William; Lee, Brendan

    2004-10-01

    Urea cycle disorders (UCD) are human conditions caused by the dysregulation of nitrogen transfer from ammonia nitrogen into urea. The biochemistry and the genetics of these disorders were well elucidated. Earlier diagnosis and improved treatments led to an emerging, longer-lived cohort of patients. The natural history of some of these disorders began to point to pathophysiological processes that may be unrelated to the primary cause of acute morbidity and mortality, i.e., hyperammonemia. Carbamyl phosphate synthetase I single nucleotide polymorphisms may be associated with altered vascular resistance that becomes clinically relevant when specific environmental stressors are present. Patients with argininosuccinic aciduria due to a deficiency of argininosuccinic acid lyase are uniquely prone to chronic hepatitis, potentially leading to cirrhosis. Moreover, our recent observations suggest that there may be an increased prevalence of essential hypertension. In contrast, hyperargininemia found in patients with arginase 1 deficiency is associated with pyramidal tract findings and spasticity, without significant hyperammonemia. An intriguing potential pathophysiological link is the dysregulation of intracellular arginine availability and its potential effect on nitric oxide (NO) metabolism. By combining detailed natural history studies with the development of tissue-specific null mouse models for urea cycle enzymes and measurement of nitrogen flux through the cycle to urea and NO in UCD patients, we may begin to dissect the contribution of different sources of arginine to NO production and the consequences on both rare genetic and common multifactorial diseases.

  2. Relative infertility: modeling clinical paradoxes.

    PubMed

    Jansen, R P

    1993-05-01

    To assume that a cause of relative infertility will decrease the monthly chance of conception (fecundability) in a dose-dependent manner and, by a mathematical model, to identify common clinical observations and paradoxes that are explainable within this hypothesis. An empirically based assumption of a population-mean fecundability of 0.2 and the accumulating probability of pregnancy equations and projections were used to examine over time the effects of diminishing such fecundability to one half, one fifth, and one twentieth of normal, and then reversing this effect with ideal treatment at points of 2 years and 5 years. [1] The duration of infertility is an important and powerful covariate in determining residual fecundability and the chance of pregnancy, with or without treatment. [2] The more substantial the pathology is, the greater should be the likelihood of pregnancy after its effective treatment. [3] Provided no harm is done by treatment, an increase in subsequent fecundability will result whatever the "dose" of the reproductive disturbance, but this will not always mean that pregnancy is probable. [4] The presence of a second infertility factor should compound dramatically the deleterious effects attributable to the first and make it more likely for either factor to be diagnosed. Duration of infertility is generally more important than the dose of an infertility factor as a covariate in clinical studies, and more emphasis should be placed on controlling for it. Discouraging clinical reports on the low success of treating certain conditions associated with infertility do not necessarily justify rejecting a hypothesis that such a condition decreases fertility in a dose-dependent manner.

  3. Clinical liaison nurse model in a community hospital: a unique academic-practice partnership that strengthens clinical nursing education.

    PubMed

    Lovecchio, Catherine P; DiMattio, Mary Jane K; Hudacek, Sharon

    2012-11-01

    The necessity to help baccalaureate nursing students transition to clinical practice in a health care environment governed by change has compelled nurse educators to investigate alternative clinical instruction models that nurture academic-practice partnerships and facilitate student clinical learning. This article describes an academic-practice partnership in a community hospital using the Clinical Liaison Nurse (CLN) model as a link between students and clinical faculty and reports results of a quasi-experimental study that compared perceptions of the clinical learning environment between students participating in the CLN model (experimental group) and those in a traditional, instructor-led clinical model (control group). Students assigned to the CLN model had statistically significantly higher individualization, satisfaction, and task orientation scores on the Clinical Learning Environment Inventory. The findings provide evidence that academic-practice partnerships can be successful in community hospital settings and enhance students' perceptions in the clinical learning environment.

  4. Model of Atmospheric Links on Optical Communications from High Altitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Subich, Christopher

    2004-01-01

    Optical communication links have the potential to solve many of the problems of current radio and microwave links to satellites and high-altitude aircraft. The higher frequency involved in optical systems allows for significantly greater signal bandwidth, and thus information transfer rate, in excess of 10 Gbps, and the highly directional nature of laser-based signals eliminates the need for frequency-division multiplexing seen in radio and microwave links today. The atmosphere, however, distorts an optical signal differently than a microwave signal. While the ionosphere is one of the most significant sources of noise and distortion in a microwave or radio signal, the lower atmosphere affects an optical signal more significantly. Refractive index fluctuations, primarily caused by changes in atmospheric temperature and density, distort the incoming signal in both deterministic and nondeterministic ways. Additionally, suspended particles, such as those in haze or rain, further corrupt the transmitted signal. To model many of the atmospheric effects on the propagating beam, we use simulations based on the beam-propagation method. This method, developed both for simulation of signals in waveguides and propagation in atmospheric turbulence, separates the propagation into a diffraction and refraction problem. The diffraction step is an exact solution, within the limits of numerical precision, to the problem of propagation in free space, and the refraction step models the refractive index variances over a segment of the propagation path. By applying refraction for a segment of the propagation path, then diffracting over that same segment, this method forms a good approximation to true propagation through the atmospheric medium. Iterating over small segments of the total propagation path gives a good approximation to the problem of propagation over the entire path. Parameters in this model, such as initial beam profile and atmospheric constants, are easily modified in a

  5. Model of Atmospheric Links on Optical Communications from High Altitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Subich, Christopher

    2004-01-01

    Optical communication links have the potential to solve many of the problems of current radio and microwave links to satellites and high-altitude aircraft. The higher frequency involved in optical systems allows for significantly greater signal bandwidth, and thus information transfer rate, in excess of 10 Gbps, and the highly directional nature of laser-based signals eliminates the need for frequency-division multiplexing seen in radio and microwave links today. The atmosphere, however, distorts an optical signal differently than a microwave signal. While the ionosphere is one of the most significant sources of noise and distortion in a microwave or radio signal, the lower atmosphere affects an optical signal more significantly. Refractive index fluctuations, primarily caused by changes in atmospheric temperature and density, distort the incoming signal in both deterministic and nondeterministic ways. Additionally, suspended particles, such as those in haze or rain, further corrupt the transmitted signal. To model many of the atmospheric effects on the propagating beam, we use simulations based on the beam-propagation method. This method, developed both for simulation of signals in waveguides and propagation in atmospheric turbulence, separates the propagation into a diffraction and refraction problem. The diffraction step is an exact solution, within the limits of numerical precision, to the problem of propagation in free space, and the refraction step models the refractive index variances over a segment of the propagation path. By applying refraction for a segment of the propagation path, then diffracting over that same segment, this method forms a good approximation to true propagation through the atmospheric medium. Iterating over small segments of the total propagation path gives a good approximation to the problem of propagation over the entire path. Parameters in this model, such as initial beam profile and atmospheric constants, are easily modified in a

  6. Integrative modelling reveals mechanisms linking productivity and plant species richness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grace, James B.; Anderson, T. Michael; Seabloom, Eric W.; Borer, Elizabeth T.; Adler, Peter B.; Harpole, W. Stanley; Hautier, Yann; Hillebrand, Helmut; Lind, Eric M.; Pärtel, Meelis; Bakker, Jonathan D.; Buckley, Yvonne M.; Crawley, Michael J.; Damschen, Ellen I.; Davies, Kendi F.; Fay, Philip A.; Firn, Jennifer; Gruner, Daniel S.; Hector, Andy; Knops, Johannes M. H.; MacDougall, Andrew S.; Melbourne, Brett A.; Morgan, John W.; Orrock, John L.; Prober, Suzanne M.; Smith, Melinda D.

    2016-01-01

    How ecosystem productivity and species richness are interrelated is one of the most debated subjects in the history of ecology. Decades of intensive study have yet to discern the actual mechanisms behind observed global patterns. Here, by integrating the predictions from multiple theories into a single model and using data from 1,126 grassland plots spanning five continents, we detect the clear signals of numerous underlying mechanisms linking productivity and richness. We find that an integrative model has substantially higher explanatory power than traditional bivariate analyses. In addition, the specific results unveil several surprising findings that conflict with classical models. These include the isolation of a strong and consistent enhancement of productivity by richness, an effect in striking contrast with superficial data patterns. Also revealed is a consistent importance of competition across the full range of productivity values, in direct conflict with some (but not all) proposed models. The promotion of local richness by macroecological gradients in climatic favourability, generally seen as a competing hypothesis, is also found to be important in our analysis. The results demonstrate that an integrative modelling approach leads to a major advance in our ability to discern the underlying processes operating in ecological systems.

  7. A Drosophila XPD model links cell cycle coordination with neuro-development and suggests links to cancer

    PubMed Central

    Stettler, Karin; Li, Xiaoming; Sandrock, Björn; Braga-Lagache, Sophie; Heller, Manfred; Dümbgen, Lutz; Suter, Beat

    2015-01-01

    XPD functions in transcription, DNA repair and in cell cycle control. Mutations in human XPD (also known as ERCC2) mainly cause three clinical phenotypes: xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), Cockayne syndrome (XP/CS) and trichothiodystrophy (TTD), and only XP patients have a high predisposition to developing cancer. Hence, we developed a fly model to obtain novel insights into the defects caused by individual hypomorphic alleles identified in human XP-D patients. This model revealed that the mutations that displayed the greatest in vivo UV sensitivity in Drosophila did not correlate with those that led to tumor formation in humans. Immunoprecipitations followed by targeted quantitative MS/MS analysis showed how different xpd mutations affected the formation or stability of different transcription factor IIH (TFIIH) subcomplexes. The XP mutants most clearly linked to high cancer risk, Xpd R683W and R601L, showed a reduced interaction with the core TFIIH and also an abnormal interaction with the Cdk-activating kinase (CAK) complex. Interestingly, these two XP alleles additionally displayed high levels of chromatin loss and free centrosomes during the rapid nuclear division phase of the Drosophila embryo. Finally, the xpd mutations showing defects in the coordination of cell cycle timing during the Drosophila embryonic divisions correlated with those human mutations that cause the neurodevelopmental abnormalities and developmental growth defects observed in XP/CS and TTD patients. PMID:25431422

  8. Linking Murine and Human Plasmodium falciparum Challenge Models in a Translational Path for Antimalarial Drug Development

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, James S.; Marquart, Louise; Sekuloski, Silvana; Trenholme, Katharine; Elliott, Suzanne; Griffin, Paul; Rockett, Rebecca; O'Rourke, Peter; Sloots, Theo; Angulo-Barturen, Iñigo; Ferrer, Santiago; Jiménez-Díaz, María Belén; Martínez, María-Santos; Duparc, Stephan; Leroy, Didier; Wells, Timothy N. C.; Baker, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Effective progression of candidate antimalarials is dependent on optimal dosing in clinical studies, which is determined by a sound understanding of pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics (PK/PD). Recently, two important translational models for antimalarials have been developed: the NOD/SCID/IL2Rγ−/− (NSG) model, whereby mice are engrafted with noninfected and Plasmodium falciparum-infected human erythrocytes, and the induced blood-stage malaria (IBSM) model in human volunteers. The antimalarial mefloquine was used to directly measure the PK/PD in both models, which were compared to previously published trial data for malaria patients. The clinical part was a single-center, controlled study using a blood-stage Plasmodium falciparum challenge inoculum in volunteers to characterize the effectiveness of mefloquine against early malaria. The study was conducted in three cohorts (n = 8 each) using different doses of mefloquine. The characteristic delay in onset of action of about 24 h was seen in both NSG and IBSM systems. In vivo 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50s) were estimated at 2.0 μg/ml and 1.8 μg/ml in the NSG and IBSM models, respectively, aligning with 1.8 μg/ml reported previously for patients. In the IBSM model, the parasite reduction ratios were 157 and 195 for the 10- and 15-mg/kg doses, within the range of previously reported clinical data for patients but significantly lower than observed in the mouse model. Linking mouse and human challenge models to clinical trial data can accelerate the accrual of critical data on antimalarial drug activity. Such data can guide large clinical trials required for development of urgently needed novel antimalarial combinations. (This trial was registered at the Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry [http://anzctr.org.au] under registration number ACTRN12612000323820.) PMID:27044554

  9. Linking geophysics and soil function modelling - biomass production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krüger, J.; Franko, U.; Werban, U.; Fank, J.

    2012-04-01

    The iSOIL project aims at reliable mapping of soil properties and soil functions with various methods including geophysical, spectroscopic and monitoring techniques. The general procedure contains three steps (i) geophysical monitoring, (ii) generation of soil property maps and (iii) process modelling. The objective of this work is to demonstrate the mentioned procedure with a focus on process modelling. It deals with the dynamics of soil water and the direct influence on crop biomass production. The new module PLUS extends CANDY to simulate crop biomass production based on environmental influences. A soil function modelling with an adapted model parameterisation based on data of ground penetration radar (GPR) and conductivity (EM38) was realized. This study shows an approach to handle heterogeneity of soil properties with geophysical data used for biomass production modelling. The Austrian field site Wagna is characterised by highly heterogenic soil with fluvioglacial gravel sediments. The variation of thickness of topsoil above a sandy subsoil with gravels strongly influences the soil water balance. EM38, mounted on a mobile platform, enables to rapidly scan large areas whereas GPR requires a greater logistical effort. However, GPR can detect exact soil horizon depth between topsoil and subsoil, the combination of both results in a detailed large scale soil map. The combined plot-specific GPR and field site EM38 measurements extends the soil input data and improves the model performance of CANDY PLUS for plant biomass production (Krüger et al. 2011). The example demonstrates how geophysics provides a surplus of data for agroecosystem modelling which identifies and contributes alternative options for agricultural management decisions. iSOIL - "Interactions between soil related sciences - Linking geophysics, soil science and digital soil mapping" is a Collaborative Project (Grant Agreement number 211386) co-funded by the Research DG of the European Commission

  10. The Linked Dual Representation model of vocal perception and production

    PubMed Central

    Hutchins, Sean; Moreno, Sylvain

    2013-01-01

    The voice is one of the most important media for communication, yet there is a wide range of abilities in both the perception and production of the voice. In this article, we review this range of abilities, focusing on pitch accuracy as a particularly informative case, and look at the factors underlying these abilities. Several classes of models have been posited describing the relationship between vocal perception and production, and we review the evidence for and against each class of model. We look at how the voice is different from other musical instruments and review evidence about both the association and the dissociation between vocal perception and production abilities. Finally, we introduce the Linked Dual Representation (LDR) model, a new approach which can account for the broad patterns in prior findings, including trends in the data which might seem to be countervailing. We discuss how this model interacts with higher-order cognition and examine its predictions about several aspects of vocal perception and production. PMID:24204360

  11. Linking an ecosystem model and a landscape model to study forest species response to climate warming

    Treesearch

    Hong S. He; David J. Mladenoff; Thomas R. Crow

    1999-01-01

    No single model can address forest change from single tree to regional scales. We discuss a framework linking an ecosystem process model {LINKAGES) with a spatial landscape model (LANDIS) to examine forest species responses to climate warming for a large, heterogeneous landscape in northern Wisconsin, USA. Individual species response at the ecosystem scale was...

  12. Linking Mind, Brain, and Education to Clinical Practice: A Proposal for Transdisciplinary Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ronstadt, Katie; Yellin, Paul B.

    2010-01-01

    It has been suggested that the field of Mind, Brain, and Education (MBE) requires a stable infrastructure for translating research into practice. Hinton and Fischer (2008) point to the academic medical center as a model for similar translational work and suggest a similar approach for linking scientists to research schools. We propose expanding…

  13. Link of dysfunctional attitudes with the negative self-model.

    PubMed

    Otani, Koichi; Suzuki, Akihito; Matsumoto, Yoshihiko; Enokido, Masanori

    2016-01-01

    Beck's cognitive theory postulates that dysfunctional attitudes predisposing to depression are formed by early negative experiences. Meanwhile, Bowlby's attachment theory contends that distorted working models built through insecure attachment relationships lead to various psychopathologies such as depression. The present study examined the correlations of dysfunctional attitudes about achievement, dependency, and self-control with working models of the self and other, and tried to promote understanding of those dysfunctional attitudes from an attachment perspective. The subjects were 591 Japanese healthy volunteers. Dysfunctional attitudes about achievement, dependency, and self-control were evaluated by the corresponding subscales of the 24-item Dysfunctional Attitude Scale, and working models of the self and other were assessed by the relationship scales questionnaire. The scores of the achievement (β = -0.26, P < 0.001), dependency (β = -0.41, P < 0.001), and self-control (β = -0.14, P < 0.01) subscales had negative correlations with the self-model score, suggesting the connections of all clusters of dysfunctional attitudes with the negative self-model. The score of the dependency subscale (β = 0.21, P < 0.001) had a positive correlation with the other-model score, suggesting the connection of this cluster of dysfunctional attitudes with the positive other-model. Meanwhile, the scores of the achievement (β = -0.17, P < 0.001) and self-control (β = -0.13, P < 0.01) subscales had negative correlations with the other-model score, suggesting the connections of these clusters of dysfunctional attitudes with the negative other-model. The present study suggests that dysfunctional attitudes as a whole are linked with the negative self-model built through negative attachment experiences, while the content specificity of each cluster is related to the differential correlations with the other-model.

  14. Effects of linking a soil-water-balance model with a groundwater-flow model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stanton, Jennifer S.; Ryter, Derek W.; Peterson, Steven M.

    2013-01-01

    A previously published regional groundwater-flow model in north-central Nebraska was sequentially linked with the recently developed soil-water-balance (SWB) model to analyze effects to groundwater-flow model parameters and calibration results. The linked models provided a more detailed spatial and temporal distribution of simulated recharge based on hydrologic processes, improvement of simulated groundwater-level changes and base flows at specific sites in agricultural areas, and a physically based assessment of the relative magnitude of recharge for grassland, nonirrigated cropland, and irrigated cropland areas. Root-mean-squared (RMS) differences between the simulated and estimated or measured target values for the previously published model and linked models were relatively similar and did not improve for all types of calibration targets. However, without any adjustment to the SWB-generated recharge, the RMS difference between simulated and estimated base-flow target values for the groundwater-flow model was slightly smaller than for the previously published model, possibly indicating that the volume of recharge simulated by the SWB code was closer to actual hydrogeologic conditions than the previously published model provided. Groundwater-level and base-flow hydrographs showed that temporal patterns of simulated groundwater levels and base flows were more accurate for the linked models than for the previously published model at several sites, particularly in agricultural areas.

  15. Binge eating in pre-clinical models.

    PubMed

    Rospond, Bartłomiej; Szpigiel, Joanna; Sadakierska-Chudy, Anna; Filip, Małgorzata

    2015-06-01

    Obesity is a globally widespread disease. Approximately 35% of world population has the problem of inappropriate body weight due to sedentary lifestyle, excessive food consumption and the lack of physical activity. In the course of many years, several pharmacological anti-obesity drugs have been discovered. Most of them, however, possess severe side effects. Recent findings suggest that disturbed functioning of the reward system can be involved in the development of obesity. The data coming from clinical and animal studies provide new evidence that links excessive food consumption with compulsive behavior that can lead to binge eating disease occurrence. In this review we discuss most commonly used animal models of binge eating such as restriction/refeeding, limited access and stress schedule model, and related to them neurobiological findings as well. We also present new, anti-obesity drugs, which are characterized by central mechanism of action. Copyright © 2014 Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  16. Linking GIS and storm water modeling for emergency risk assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Newkirk, R.T.

    1995-12-31

    Many emergencies involve the deposition of chemical contaminants on land either as a direct event or as a secondary byproduct. GIS can be useful in estimating the initial deposition area. Chemical product attribute data bases can be accessed to determine the degree that the contaminants might be transportable in a water medium. An important issue is to estimate the potential impact of the deposition on surface and subsurface water flows. This particularly important since millions of people rely on subsurface ground water as their main source of potable water. Thus, a modeling system is needed by planners and emergency managers to assess the potential for short and long term risks to communities due to storm water transport of deposited contaminants. GIS itself cannot provide the complete analysis. A prototype system to assist in estimating the flows of contaminants related to an emergency has been developed by linking an Arc/Info database, Digital Terrain Model, and SWMM the storm water management modeling system. This system also has important planning applications in assessing alternative land development plans for their impact on ground water recharge and management of storm water.

  17. Linking Geomechanical Models with Observations of Microseismicity during CCS Operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verdon, J.; Kendall, J.; White, D.

    2012-12-01

    During CO2 injection for the purposes of carbon capture and storage (CCS), injection-induced fracturing of the overburden represents a key risk to storage integrity. Fractures in a caprock provide a pathway along which buoyant CO2 can rise and escape the storage zone. Therefore the ability to link field-scale geomechanical models with field geophysical observations is of paramount importance to guarantee secure CO2 storage. Accurate location of microseismic events identifies where brittle failure has occurred on fracture planes. This is a manifestation of the deformation induced by CO2 injection. As the pore pressure is increased during injection, effective stress is decreased, leading to inflation of the reservoir and deformation of surrounding rocks, which creates microseismicity. The deformation induced by injection can be simulated using finite-element mechanical models. Such a model can be used to predict when and where microseismicity is expected to occur. However, typical elements in a field scale mechanical models have decameter scales, while the rupture size for microseismic events are typically of the order of 1 square meter. This means that mapping modeled stress changes to predictions of microseismic activity can be challenging. Where larger scale faults have been identified, they can be included explicitly in the geomechanical model. Where movement is simulated along these discrete features, it can be assumed that microseismicity will occur. However, microseismic events typically occur on fracture networks that are too small to be simulated explicitly in a field-scale model. Therefore, the likelihood of microseismicity occurring must be estimated within a finite element that does not contain explicitly modeled discontinuities. This can be done in a number of ways, including the utilization of measures such as closeness on the stress state to predetermined failure criteria, either for planes with a defined orientation (the Mohr-Coulomb criteria) for

  18. Linking geophysics and soil function modelling - two examples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krüger, J.; Franko, U.; Werban, U.; Dietrich, P.; Behrens, T.; Schmidt, K.; Fank, J.; Kroulik, M.

    2011-12-01

    iSOIL - "Interactions between soil related sciences - Linking geophysics, soil science and digital soil mapping" is a Collaborative Project (Grant Agreement number 211386) co-funded by the Research DG of the European Commission within the RTD activities of the FP7 Thematic Priority Environment. The iSOIL project aims at reliable mapping of soil properties and soil functions with various methods including geophysical, spectroscopic and monitoring techniques. The general procedure contains three steps (i) geophysical monitoring, (ii) generation of soil property maps and (iii) process modelling. The objective of this work is to demonstrate the methodological procedure on two different examples. Example A focuses on the turnover conditions for soil organic matter (SOM) since many soil functions in a direct or indirect way depend on SOM and SOM depletion is amongst the worst soil threats. Example B deals with the dynamics of soil water and the direct influence on crop biomass production. The applied CANDY model (Franko et al. 1995) was developed to describe dynamics of soil organic matter and mineral nitrogen as well as soil water and temperature. The new module PLUS extends CANDY to simulate crop biomass production based on environmental influences (Krüger et al. 2011). The methodological procedure of example A illustrates a model application for a field site in the Czech Republic using generated soil maps from combined geophysical data. Modelling requires a complete set of soil parameters. Combining measured soil properties and data of geophysical measurements (electrical conductivity and gamma spectrometry) is the basis for digital soil mapping which provided data about clay, silt and sand as well as SOC content. With these data pedotransfer functions produce detailed soil input data (e.g. bulk and particle density, field capacity, wilting point, saturated conductivity) for the rooted soil profile. CANDY calculated different indicators for SOM and gave hints about

  19. A framework to link international clinical research to the promotion of justice in global health.

    PubMed

    Pratt, Bridget; Loff, Bebe

    2014-10-01

    How international research might contribute to justice in global health has not been substantively addressed by bioethics. Theories of justice from political philosophy establish obligations for parties from high-income countries owed to parties from low and middle-income countries. We have developed a new framework that is based on Jennifer Ruger's health capability paradigm to strengthen the link between international clinical research and justice in global health. The 'research for health justice' framework provides direction on three aspects of international clinical research: the research target, research capacity strengthening, and post-trial benefits. It identifies the obligations of justice owed by national governments, research funders, research sponsors, and investigators to trial participants and host communities. These obligations vary from those currently articulated in international research ethics guidelines. Ethical requirements of a different kind are needed if international clinical research is to advance global health equity. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Clinical and mutational features of X-linked agammaglobulinemia in Mexico.

    PubMed

    García-García, E; Staines-Boone, A T; Vargas-Hernández, A; González-Serrano, M E; Carrillo-Tapia, E; Mogica-Martínez, D; Berrón-Ruíz, L; Segura-Mendez, N H; Espinosa-Rosales, F J; Yamazaki-Nakashimada, M A; Santos-Argumedo, L; López-Herrera, G

    2016-04-01

    X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) is caused by BTK mutations, patients typically show <2% of peripheral B cells and reduced levels of all immunoglobulins; they suffer from recurrent infections of bacterial origin; however, viral infections, autoimmune-like diseases, and an increased risk of developing gastric cancer are also reported. In this work, we report the BTK mutations and clinical features of 12 patients diagnosed with XLA. Furthermore, a clinical revision is also presented for an additional cohort of previously reported patients with XLA. Four novel mutations were identified, one of these located in the previously reported mutation refractory SH3 domain. Clinical data support previous reports accounting for frequent respiratory, gastrointestinal tract infections and other symptoms such as the occurrence of reactive arthritis in 19.2% of the patients. An equal proportion of patients developed septic arthritis; missense mutations and mutations in SH1, SH2 and PH domains predominated in patients who developed arthritis.

  1. Use of cross-linked carboxymethyl cellulose for soft-tissue augmentation: preliminary clinical studies

    PubMed Central

    Leonardis, Mauro; Palange, Andrea; Dornelles, Rodrigo FV; Hund, Felipe

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The continual search for new products for soft-tissue augmentation has in recent years led to the introduction of long lasting alternatives to hyaluronic acids and collagen that are composed of other polymers able to improve clinical persistence over time. This is the first report in which sodium carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) has been chemically treated by the cross-linking process and thus used as a hydrogel for soft-tissue augmentation through injection with thin needles. The study evaluates, from a clinical point of view, the behavior of cross-linked carboxymethyl cellulose hydrogel used in the aesthetic field and its side effects so as to check the safety and performance of the polymer following intradermal injections. Patients and methods: This work shows the preliminary results of an ongoing clinical study conducted between 2006 and 2009, performed on 84 healthy volunteers (62 females, 22 males) aged between 18 and 72 years, for the treatment of 168 nasolabial folds, 45 perioral wrinkles, and 39 lip volume. Results: Study results show an excellent correction of facial defects. Tolerance and aesthetic quality of the correction obtained indicate considerable safety features and absence of side effects. From a clinical point of view, hydrogel is gradually absorbed into the injection site without migration issues. Conclusion: Cross-linked CMC hydrogel proves to be an ideal agent for soft tissue augmentation with regard to safety and ease of application. It did not cause infection, extrusion, migration, or adverse reactions in the patients who have been followed for two years. Delayed aesthetic results on facial wrinkles were very satisfactory. PMID:21228896

  2. Clinical, biochemical, neuroimaging and molecular findings of X-linked Adrenoleukodystrophy patients in South China.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Min-yan; Cai, Yan-na; Liang, Cui-li; Peng, Min-zhi; Sheng, Hui-ying; Fan, Li-ping; Lin, Rui-zhu; Jiang, Hua; Huang, Yonglan; Liu, Li

    2015-12-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy is a common X-linked recessive peroxisomal disorder caused by the mutations in the ABCD1 gene. In this study, we analyzed 19 male patients and 9 female carriers with X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy in South China. By sequencing the ABCD1 gene, 13 different mutations were identified, including 7 novel mutations, and 6 known mutations, and 1 reported polymorphism. Mutation c.1180delG was demonstrated to be de novo mutation. 26.3 % (5/19) patients carried the deletion c.1415_16delAG, which may be the mutational hot spot in South China population. In addition, 73.7 % (14/19) patients were type of childhood cerebral adrenoleukodystrophy, 26.3 %(5/19) were in Addison only. Half of the childhood cerebral adrenoleukodystrophy patients had the adrenocortical insufficiency preceded the onset of neurological symptoms. Furthermore, 5 of 19 cases underwent hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Our data showed that hematopoietic stem cell transplantation performed at an advanced stage of the cerebral X- linked adrenoleukodystrophy would accelerate the progression of the disease. Good clinical outcome achieved when hematopoietic stem cell transplantation performed at the very early stage of the disease.

  3. The Clinical Model in Rehabilitation and Alternatives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woods, Diane E., Ed.; And Others

    This book is a compilation of responses and reactions to a position paper by Dr. Joseph Stubbins entitled "The Clinical Model in Rehabilitation and Alternatives." The text of the position paper is presented along with a brief summary of the main points he made in it pertaining to the clinical model and the systems model. Also included in the…

  4. Linking symbiont community structures in a model arbuscular mycorrhizal system.

    PubMed

    Meadow, James F; Zabinski, Catherine A

    2012-05-01

    • The influence of plant communities on symbiotic arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal (AMF) communities is difficult to study in situ as both symbionts are strongly influenced by some of the same soil and environmental conditions, and thus we have a poor understanding of the potential links in community composition and structure between host and fungal communities. • AMF were characterized in colonized roots of thermal soil Mimulus guttatus in both isolated plants supporting AMF for only a few months of the growing season and plants growing in mixed plant communities composed of annual and perennial hosts. Cluster and discriminant analysis were used to compare competing models based on either communities or soil conditions. • Mimulus guttatus in adjacent contrasting plant community situations harbored distinct AMF communities with few fungal taxa occurring in both community types. Isolated plants harbored communities of fewer fungal taxa with lower diversity than plants in mixed communities. Host community type was more indicative than pH of AMF community structure. • Our results support an inherent relationship between host plant and AMF community structures, although pH-based models were also statistically supported. © 2012 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2012 New Phytologist Trust.

  5. Implementation of a vibrationally linked chemical reaction model for DSMC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, A. B.; Bird, Graeme A.

    1994-01-01

    A new procedure closely linking dissociation and exchange reactions in air to the vibrational levels of the diatomic molecules has been implemented in both one- and two-dimensional versions of Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) programs. The previous modeling of chemical reactions with DSMC was based on the continuum reaction rates for the various possible reactions. The new method is more closely related to the actual physics of dissociation and is more appropriate to the particle nature of DSMC. Two cases are presented: the relaxation to equilibrium of undissociated air initially at 10,000 K, and the axisymmetric calculation of shuttle forebody heating during reentry at 92.35 km and 7500 m/s. Although reaction rates are not used in determining the dissociations or exchange reactions, the new method produces rates which agree astonishingly well with the published rates derived from experiment. The results for gas properties and surface properties also agree well with the results produced by earlier DSMC models, equilibrium air calculations, and experiment.

  6. Linking Geomagentic Data to Dynamo Models via Variational Data Assimilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitrova, L. L.; Egbert, G. D.; Kuang, W.; Jiang, W.; Tangborn, A.

    2011-12-01

    The increased resolution and accuracy of both the geomagnetic field models and observations in recent years has resulted in increased efforts to link theory to data via data assimilation (DA) techniques similar to those previously developed in the atmospheric and oceanic communities . If applied to the geomagnetic field, DA has potential to improve both models and observations: geodynamics models can be assessed and improved based on observational constraints to better understand the physics of the core dynamics; the improved models can then be used to (1)constrain "hidden" components of the state of the geodynamo that are not directly observable, (2)more accurately forecast the geomagnetic fields and (3) hindcast and improve past geomagnetic field models. DA methods can be broadly divided into two approaches: sequential and variational. In sequential DA, observations are combined with the current model state to produce a new state estimate, which is then used as the initial state for the next model forecast. As such, sequential DA leads to discontinuous model state, and observations can influence only the future model state. Variational DA differs from sequential DA in that the goal is a global adjustment of the model trajectory to fit simultaneously all the data. Thus in the variational approach, observations at a later time could influence the model solution at an earlier time. Both sequential and variational DA has been applied to simplified dynamic models (e.g.Sun et al. [2007], Fournier et al. [2007]), and sequential DA has been applied to full dynamo models (e.g. Liu et al. [2007], Kuang et al. [2008]). However, since the best data is from recent years, sequential schemes can't readily project this data backwards in time. We present an update to our ongoing efforts to implement modern variational DA methods (based on theory of representers, potentially allowing for weak constraint DA) for the Modular Scalable Self-consistent Three-dimensional (Mo

  7. Molecular genetic and clinical evaluation of three Chinese families with X-linked ocular albinism.

    PubMed

    Zou, Xuan; Li, Hui; Yang, Lizhu; Sun, Zixi; Yuan, Zhisheng; Li, Huajin; Sui, Ruifang

    2017-02-17

    X-linked ocular albinism (OA1) is an X-linked inherited disease characterized by hypopigmentation of the fundus and nystagmus. Our study performed mutation analysis of the G protein-coupled receptor 143 gene (GPR143) and assessed the clinical characteristics of OA1 in three Chinese families. Three novel mutations, c.333_360+14del42insCTT, c.276G>A (p.W92X), and c.793C>T (p.R265X), were identified in GPR143 by PCR followed by Sanger sequencing in these families. All affected individuals presented with nystagmus, photophobia, poor visual acuity, foveal hypoplasia and varying degrees of hypopigmentation of the fundus. The fundus of female carriers showed pigmented streaks alternating with hypopigmented streaks. These results allowed us to expand the spectrum of mutations in GPR143 and phenotypes associated with ocular albinism.

  8. Postmenopausal females and the link between oral bisphosphonates and osteonecrosis of the jaw: a clinical review.

    PubMed

    Haumschild, Mary S; Haumschild, Ryan J

    2010-10-01

    To increase awareness for nurse practitioners (NPs) of new information concerning the plausible link between the oral bisphosphonate drug classification and necrosis in the jaw. Selected research and clinical articles. In addition, several peer-reviewed, refereed medical and dental journals were consulted. Oral bisphosphonates are commonly prescribed by NPs for postmenopausal females with the diagnosis of osteoporosis to arrest bone loss and preserve bone density. Recent reports have shown a link between these medications and osteonecrosis of the jaw, which is a complication resulting in necrotic bone inside the mouth. NPs must be able to determine early warning signs of osteonecrosis to ensure prompt referral to a dental specialist in order to prevent irreversible sequelae. Because of the aging population, osteoporosis is predicted to increase; therefore, treatment with these drugs and the side effects that go along with them will most likely also increase. ©2010 The Author(s) Journal compilation ©2010 American Academy of Nurse Practitioners.

  9. Molecular genetic and clinical evaluation of three Chinese families with X-linked ocular albinism

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Xuan; Li, Hui; Yang, Lizhu; Sun, Zixi; Yuan, Zhisheng; Li, Huajin; Sui, Ruifang

    2017-01-01

    X-linked ocular albinism (OA1) is an X-linked inherited disease characterized by hypopigmentation of the fundus and nystagmus. Our study performed mutation analysis of the G protein-coupled receptor 143 gene (GPR143) and assessed the clinical characteristics of OA1 in three Chinese families. Three novel mutations, c.333_360+14del42insCTT, c.276G>A (p.W92X), and c.793C>T (p.R265X), were identified in GPR143 by PCR followed by Sanger sequencing in these families. All affected individuals presented with nystagmus, photophobia, poor visual acuity, foveal hypoplasia and varying degrees of hypopigmentation of the fundus. The fundus of female carriers showed pigmented streaks alternating with hypopigmented streaks. These results allowed us to expand the spectrum of mutations in GPR143 and phenotypes associated with ocular albinism. PMID:28211458

  10. How to Establish Clinical Prediction Models.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yong Ho; Bang, Heejung; Kim, Dae Jung

    2016-03-01

    A clinical prediction model can be applied to several challenging clinical scenarios: screening high-risk individuals for asymptomatic disease, predicting future events such as disease or death, and assisting medical decision-making and health education. Despite the impact of clinical prediction models on practice, prediction modeling is a complex process requiring careful statistical analyses and sound clinical judgement. Although there is no definite consensus on the best methodology for model development and validation, a few recommendations and checklists have been proposed. In this review, we summarize five steps for developing and validating a clinical prediction model: preparation for establishing clinical prediction models; dataset selection; handling variables; model generation; and model evaluation and validation. We also review several studies that detail methods for developing clinical prediction models with comparable examples from real practice. After model development and vigorous validation in relevant settings, possibly with evaluation of utility/usability and fine-tuning, good models can be ready for the use in practice. We anticipate that this framework will revitalize the use of predictive or prognostic research in endocrinology, leading to active applications in real clinical practice.

  11. An Optometric Clinical Practicum Examination Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eskridge, Jess B.

    1979-01-01

    A practical clinical examination model for use by state board examiners in optometry is described including purpose, format, examination design, procedures, evaluation examples and administration. (JMF)

  12. Vocational Education Models for Linking Agencies Serving the Handicapped. Model Development Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tindall, Lloyd W.; And Others

    Three states--Maryland, New Jersey, and Virginia--served as model states for a project on vocational education models for linking agencies serving the handicapped. Using a multi-agency team with members representing vocational education, special education, rehabilitation, guidance, and other agencies at the state level, each state developed a…

  13. Linking electronic medical records to large-scale simulation models: can we put rapid learning on turbo?

    PubMed

    Eddy, David M

    2007-01-01

    One method for rapid learning is to use data from electronic medical records (EMRs) to help build and validate large-scale, physiology-based simulation models. These models can than be used to help answer questions that cannot be addressed directly from the EMR data. Their potential uses include analyses of physiological pathways; simulation and design of clinical trials; and analyses of clinical management tools such as guidelines, performance measures, priority setting, and cost-effectiveness. Linking the models to EMR data also facilitates tailoring analyses to specific populations. The models' power and accuracy can be improved by linkage to comprehensive, person-specific, longitudinal data from EMRs.

  14. A communications model for an ISAS to NASA span link

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, James L.; Mcguire, Robert E.; Lopez-Swafford, Brian

    1987-01-01

    The authors propose that an initial computer-to-computer communication link use the public packet switched networks (PPSN) Venus-P in Japan and TELENET in the U.S. When the traffic warrants it, this link would then be upgraded to a dedicated leased line that directly connects into the Space Physics Analysis Network (SPAN). The proposed system of hardware and software will easily support migration to such a dedicated link. It therefore provides a cost effective approach to the network problem. Once a dedicated line becomes operation it is suggested that the public networks link and continue to coexist, providing a backup capability.

  15. FSO and radio link attenuation: meteorological models verified by experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brazda, Vladimir; Fiser, Ondrej; Svoboda, Jaroslav

    2011-09-01

    Institute of Atmospheric Physics of Czech Academy measures atmospheric attenuation on 60 m experimental FSO link on 830 and 1550 nm for more than three years. Visibility sensors and two 3D sonic anemometers on both transmitting and receiving site, rain gauge and many sensors enabling the refractivity index computation are spaced along the optical link. Meteorological visibility, wind turbulent energy, sonic temperature, structure index and rain rate are correlated with measured attenuation. FSO link attenuation dependence on the above mentioned parameters is analyzed. The paper shows also basic statistical behavior of the long-term FSO signal level and also the simulation of hybrid link techniques.

  16. Crustal recycling model: testing by linking petrology with isotope geochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobolev, A. V.; Hofmann, A. W.; Bruegmann, G.; Batanova, V. G.; Sigurdsson, I. A.; Kuzmin, D. V.

    2008-12-01

    Recycling of subducted oceanic crust is widely thought to explain much of the chemical and isotopic heterogeneity of Earth's present-day mantle (1). Recycled subducted ocean crust has been traced by elevated 187Os/188Os in some studies (2-4) and by high Ni and low Mn contents in others (5,6). Recently, we have linked these tracers for the first time (7). We combine data for averaged compositions of olivine phenocrysts for olivine rich lavas and bulk rock 187Os/188Os ratios from Iceland and Hawaii, and we apply the method (6,7) to obtain the proportion of pyroxenite derived melt by both Ni excess and Mn deficit in olivine. The observed strong correlation for quaternary lavas of Iceland significantly strengthens the recycling model (1,8). It allows us to estimate the Os isotopic composition of both the recycled crust and the mantle peridotite, thereby constraining the model ages of end-members. We show that Icelandic quaternary lavas require an ancient crustal component with model ages between 1.1 and 1.8 Ga and a peridotite end-member close to present-day oceanic mantle. The similar data for Hawaii suggest younger ages of recycled material: 0.5-1 Ga. References: 1. A.W. Hofmann, W. M. White, EPSL. 57, 421 (1982) 2. J. C. Lassiter, E. H. Hauri, EPSL 164, 483 (1998). 3. A.C. Skovgaard et al, EPSL 194, 259 (2001). 4. A. D. Brandon et al., GCA 71, 4570 (2007). 5. A.V. Sobolev et al., Nature 434, 590 (2005). 6. A.V. Sobolev et al., Science 316, 412 (2007). 7. A.V. Sobolev et al., Science 321, 536 (2008). 8. C. Hemond et al., JGR-Solid Earth 98, 15833 (1993).

  17. Characterizing cognitive aging in humans with links to animal models

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Gene E.; Ryan, Lee; Bowers, Dawn; Foster, Thomas C.; Bizon, Jennifer L.; Geldmacher, David S.; Glisky, Elizabeth L.

    2012-01-01

    With the population of older adults expected to grow rapidly over the next two decades, it has become increasingly important to advance research efforts to elucidate the mechanisms associated with cognitive aging, with the ultimate goal of developing effective interventions and prevention therapies. Although there has been a vast research literature on the use of cognitive tests to evaluate the effects of aging and age-related neurodegenerative disease, the need for a set of standardized measures to characterize the cognitive profiles specific to healthy aging has been widely recognized. Here we present a review of selected methods and approaches that have been applied in human research studies to evaluate the effects of aging on cognition, including executive function, memory, processing speed, language, and visuospatial function. The effects of healthy aging on each of these cognitive domains are discussed with examples from cognitive/experimental and clinical/neuropsychological approaches. Further, we consider those measures that have clear conceptual and methodological links to tasks currently in use for non-human animal studies of aging, as well as those that have the potential for translation to animal aging research. Having a complementary set of measures to assess the cognitive profiles of healthy aging across species provides a unique opportunity to enhance research efforts for cross-sectional, longitudinal, and intervention studies of cognitive aging. Taking a cross-species, translational approach will help to advance cognitive aging research, leading to a greater understanding of associated neurobiological mechanisms with the potential for developing effective interventions and prevention therapies for age-related cognitive decline. PMID:22988439

  18. Linked space physics models for operational ionospheric forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobiska, W.; Bouwer, D.; Forbes, J.; Frahm, R.; Fry, C.; Hagan, M.; Hajj, G.; Hsu, T.; Knipp, D.; Mannucci, A.; Papitashvili, V.; Pi, X.; Sharber, J.; Storz, M.; Wang, C.; Wilson, B.

    2003-12-01

    The shorter-term variable impact of the Sun's photons, solar wind particles, and interplanetary magnetic field upon the Earth's environment that can adversely affect technological systems is colloquially known as space weather. It includes, for example, the effects of solar coronal mass ejections, solar flares and irradiances, solar and galactic energetic particles, as well as the solar wind, all of which affect Earth's magnetospheric particles and fields, geomagnetic and electrodynamical conditions, radiation belts, aurorae, ionosphere, and the neutral thermosphere and mesosphere. These combined effects create risks to space and ground systems from electric field disturbances, irregularities, and scintillation, for example, where these ionospheric perturbations are a direct result of space weather. A major challenge exists to improve our understanding of ionospheric space weather processes and then translate that knowledge into operational systems. Ionospheric perturbed conditions can be recognized and specified in real-time or predicted through linkages of models and data streams. Linked systems must be based upon multi-spectral observations of the Sun, solar wind measurements by satellites between the Earth and Sun, as well as by measurements from radar and GPS/TEC networks. Models of the solar wind, solar irradiances, the neutral thermosphere, thermospheric winds, joule heating, particle precipitation, substorms, the electric field, and the ionosphere provide climatological best estimates of non-measured current and forecast parameters. We report on a team effort that is developing a prototype operational ionospheric forecast system to detect and predict the conditions leading to dynamic ionospheric changes. The system will provide global-to-local specifications of recent history, current epoch, and 72-hour forecast ionospheric and neutral density profiles, TEC, plasma drifts, neutral winds, and temperatures. Geophysical changes will be captured and

  19. A cell-based model system links chromothripsis with hyperploidy

    PubMed Central

    Mardin, Balca R; Drainas, Alexandros P; Waszak, Sebastian M; Weischenfeldt, Joachim; Isokane, Mayumi; Stütz, Adrian M; Raeder, Benjamin; Efthymiopoulos, Theocharis; Buccitelli, Christopher; Segura-Wang, Maia; Northcott, Paul; Pfister, Stefan M; Lichter, Peter; Ellenberg, Jan; Korbel, Jan O

    2015-01-01

    A remarkable observation emerging from recent cancer genome analyses is the identification of chromothripsis as a one-off genomic catastrophe, resulting in massive somatic DNA structural rearrangements (SRs). Largely due to lack of suitable model systems, the mechanistic basis of chromothripsis has remained elusive. We developed an integrative method termed “complex alterations after selection and transformation (CAST),” enabling efficient in vitro generation of complex DNA rearrangements including chromothripsis, using cell perturbations coupled with a strong selection barrier followed by massively parallel sequencing. We employed this methodology to characterize catastrophic SR formation processes, their temporal sequence, and their impact on gene expression and cell division. Our in vitro system uncovered a propensity of chromothripsis to occur in cells with damaged telomeres, and in particular in hyperploid cells. Analysis of primary medulloblastoma cancer genomes verified the link between hyperploidy and chromothripsis in vivo. CAST provides the foundation for mechanistic dissection of complex DNA rearrangement processes. PMID:26415501

  20. Clinical diversity and chromosomal localization of X-linked cone dystrophy (CODI)

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Hee-Kyung; Ferrell, R.E.; Gorin, M.B.

    1994-12-01

    X-linked progressive cone dystrophy (COD1) causes progressive deterioration of visual acuity, deepening of central scotomas, macular changes, and bull`s-eye lesions. The cone electroretinography (ERG) is variably abnormal in affected males, and the rod ERG may also be abnormal. The clinical picture of heterozygous females ranges from asymptomatic to a widespread spectrum of cone-mediated dysfunction. A prior linkage study demonstrated linkage between the COD1 locus and the marker locus DXS84, assigned to Xp21.1, with no recombination. In the present study, we have clinically characterized a large four-generation family with COD1 and have performed a linkage analysis using seven polymorphic markers on the short arm of the X chromosome. No recombination was observed between the disease and the marker loci DXS7 and MAOA, suggesting that the location of COD1 is in the region Xp11.3, distal to DXS84 and proximal to ARAF1.

  1. Pharmacogenomic and clinical data link non-pharmacokinetic metabolic dysregulation to drug side effect pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zielinski, Daniel C; Filipp, Fabian V; Bordbar, Aarash; Jensen, Kasper; Smith, Jeffrey W; Herrgard, Markus J; Mo, Monica L; Palsson, Bernhard O

    2015-06-09

    Drug side effects cause a significant clinical and economic burden. However, mechanisms of drug action underlying side effect pathogenesis remain largely unknown. Here, we integrate pharmacogenomic and clinical data with a human metabolic network and find that non-pharmacokinetic metabolic pathways dysregulated by drugs are linked to the development of side effects. We show such dysregulated metabolic pathways contain genes with sequence variants affecting side effect incidence, play established roles in pathophysiology, have significantly altered activity in corresponding diseases, are susceptible to metabolic inhibitors and are effective targets for therapeutic nutrient supplementation. Our results indicate that metabolic dysregulation represents a common mechanism underlying side effect pathogenesis that is distinct from the role of metabolism in drug clearance. We suggest that elucidating the relationships between the cellular response to drugs, genetic variation of patients and cell metabolism may help managing side effects by personalizing drug prescriptions and nutritional intervention strategies.

  2. Pharmacogenomic and clinical data link non-pharmacokinetic metabolic dysregulation to drug side effect pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Zielinski, Daniel C.; Filipp, Fabian V.; Bordbar, Aarash; Jensen, Kasper; Smith, Jeffrey W.; Herrgard, Markus J.; Mo, Monica L.; Palsson, Bernhard O.

    2015-01-01

    Drug side effects cause a significant clinical and economic burden. However, mechanisms of drug action underlying side effect pathogenesis remain largely unknown. Here, we integrate pharmacogenomic and clinical data with a human metabolic network and find that non-pharmacokinetic metabolic pathways dysregulated by drugs are linked to the development of side effects. We show such dysregulated metabolic pathways contain genes with sequence variants affecting side effect incidence, play established roles in pathophysiology, have significantly altered activity in corresponding diseases, are susceptible to metabolic inhibitors and are effective targets for therapeutic nutrient supplementation. Our results indicate that metabolic dysregulation represents a common mechanism underlying side effect pathogenesis that is distinct from the role of metabolism in drug clearance. We suggest that elucidating the relationships between the cellular response to drugs, genetic variation of patients and cell metabolism may help managing side effects by personalizing drug prescriptions and nutritional intervention strategies. PMID:26055627

  3. Comparison of some modeling and control issues for a flexible two link manipulator.

    PubMed

    Zhang, X; Xu, W; Nair, S S

    2004-10-01

    The nonlinear dynamics of a flexible two link manipulator presents a challenging modeling and control problem with its lumped actuator dynamics coupled with distributed link dynamics. Issues related to modeling uncertainty and control robustness as well as a good understanding of the experimental issues are essential for advanced modeling and control for such systems. This paper reports some of the advanced modeling, control, and experimental issues for a flexible two link manipulator, including some novel approaches developed by the authors.

  4. Linking the M&Rfi Weather Generator with Agrometeorological Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubrovsky, Martin; Trnka, Miroslav

    2015-04-01

    Realistic meteorological inputs (representing the present and/or future climates) for the agrometeorological model simulations are often produced by stochastic weather generators (WGs). This contribution presents some methodological issues and results obtained in our recent experiments. We also address selected questions raised in the synopsis of this session. The input meteorological time series for our experiments are produced by the parametric single site weather generator (WG) Marfi, which is calibrated from the available observational data (or interpolated from surrounding stations). To produce meteorological series representing the future climate, the WG parameters are modified by climate change scenarios, which are prepared by the pattern scaling method: the standardised scenarios derived from Global or Regional Climate Models are multiplied by the change in global mean temperature (ΔTG) determined by the simple climate model MAGICC. The presentation will address following questions: (i) The dependence of the quality of the synthetic weather series and impact results on the WG settings. An emphasis will be put on an effect of conditioning the daily WG on monthly WG (presently being one of our hot topics), which aims at improvement of the reproduction of the low-frequency weather variability. Comparison of results obtained with various WG settings is made in terms of climatic and agroclimatic indices (including extreme temperature and precipitation characteristics and drought indices). (ii) Our methodology accounts for the uncertainties coming from various sources. We will show how the climate change impact results are affected by 1. uncertainty in climate modelling, 2. uncertainty in ΔTG, and 3. uncertainty related to the complexity of the climate change scenario (focusing on an effect of inclusion of changes in variability into the climate change scenarios). Acknowledgements: This study was funded by project "Building up a multidisciplinary scientific

  5. Erb's explanation for the tendon reflexes. Links between science and the clinic.

    PubMed

    Louis, E D; Kaufmann, P

    1996-11-01

    To determine whether 19th-century experimental neurophysiological concepts directly influenced Erb's initial explanation for the deep tendon reflexes (DTRs). There is extensive literature on the discovery of the clinical utility of the DTRs on the one hand and on the development of 19th-century experimental neurophysiological concepts and early scientific concepts of reflexology on the other. While it seems logical to assume that Erb's 1875 discovery of the clinical utility of the DTRs and his initial interpretation of the physiological meaning of heightened DTRs were grounded in some of these scientific concepts, the important link between the clinical and scientific realm has not, to our knowledge, been the subject of previous analysis. Review of the 19th-century neurophysiological literature and translation of seminal manuscripts written by Erb in the years 1875 and 1876. The concepts of spinal inhibition and reflex action arose from 19th-century neurophysiological experimentation. Erb first described the term Patel-larsehnenreflex (patellar tendon reflex) in 1875, and his publications reveal clear insight into several fundamental scientific concepts, including spinal inhibition, the reflex arc, distinct motor and sensory neurons, and an excitomotor system in the spinal gray matter. While Erb's initial description and interpretation of the DTRs may be regarded as a fortuitous discovery by a keen clinical observer, on another level his observations were not made in isolation, but were based on his knowledge of the physiological work of the preceding decades.

  6. Improving Power System Modeling. A Tool to Link Capacity Expansion and Production Cost Models

    SciTech Connect

    Diakov, Victor; Cole, Wesley; Sullivan, Patrick; Brinkman, Gregory; Margolis, Robert

    2015-11-01

    Capacity expansion models (CEM) provide a high-level long-term view at the prospects of the evolving power system. In simulating the possibilities of long-term capacity expansion, it is important to maintain the viability of power system operation in the short-term (daily, hourly and sub-hourly) scales. Production-cost models (PCM) simulate routine power system operation on these shorter time scales using detailed load, transmission and generation fleet data by minimizing production costs and following reliability requirements. When based on CEM 'predictions' about generating unit retirements and buildup, PCM provide more detailed simulation for the short-term system operation and, consequently, may confirm the validity of capacity expansion predictions. Further, production cost model simulations of a system that is based on capacity expansion model solution are 'evolutionary' sound: the generator mix is the result of logical sequence of unit retirement and buildup resulting from policy and incentives. The above has motivated us to bridge CEM with PCM by building a capacity expansion - to - production cost model Linking Tool (CEPCoLT). The Linking Tool is built to onset capacity expansion model prescriptions onto production cost model inputs. NREL's ReEDS and Energy Examplar's PLEXOS are the capacity expansion and the production cost models, respectively. Via the Linking Tool, PLEXOS provides details of operation for the regionally-defined ReEDS scenarios.

  7. Clinical features of early onset, familial Alzheimer`s disease linked to chromosome 14

    SciTech Connect

    Mullan, M.; Bennett, C.; Figueredo, C.; Crawford, F.

    1995-02-27

    Early onset familial Alzheimer`s disease (AD) has an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance. Two genes are responsible for the majority of cases of this subtype of AD. Mutations in the {beta}-amyloid precursor protein ({beta}APP) gene on chromosome 21 have been shown to completely cosegregate with the disease. We and others have previously described the clinical features of families with {beta}APP mutations at the codon 717 locus in an attempt to define the phenotype associated with a valine to isoleucine (Val {r_arrow} Ile) or a valine to glycine (Val {r_arrow} Gly) change. More recently, a second locus for very early onset disease has been localized to chromosome 14. The results of linkage studies in some families suggesting linkage to both chromosomes have been explained by the suggestion of a second (centromeric) locus on chromosome 21. Here we report the clinical features and genetic analysis of a British pedigree (F74) with early onset AD in which neither the {beta}APP locus nor any other chromosome 21 locus segregates with the disease, but in which good evidence is seen for linkage on the long arm of chromosome 14. In particular we report marker data suggesting that the chromosome 14 disease locus is close to D14S43 and D14S77. Given the likelihood that F74 represents a chromosome 14 linked family, we describe the clinical features and make a limited clinical comparison with the {beta}APP717 Val {r_arrow} Ile and {beta}APP717 Val {r_arrow} Gly encoded families that have been previously described. We conclude that although several previously reported clinical features occur to excess in early onset familial AD, no single clinical feature demarcates either the chromosome 14 or {beta}APP codon 717 mutated families except mean age of onset. 52 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  8. Deviation-based cost modeling: a novel model to evaluate the clinical and economic impact of clinical pathways.

    PubMed

    Vanounou, Tsafrir; Pratt, Wande; Fischer, Josef E; Vollmer, Charles M; Callery, Mark P

    2007-04-01

    Although clinical pathways were developed to streamline patient care cost efficiently, few have been put to rigorous financial test. This is important today, because payors demand clear solutions to the cost-quality puzzle. We describe a novel, objective, and versatile model that can evaluate and link the clinical and economic impacts of clinical pathways. Outcomes for 209 consecutive patients undergoing high-acuity surgery (pancreaticoduodenectomy), before and after pathway implementation, were examined. Four grades of deviation (none to major) from the expected postoperative course were defined by merging length of stay with a validated classification scheme for complications. Deviation-based cost modeling (DBCM) links these deviations to actual total costs. Clinical outcomes compared favorably with benchmark standards for pancreaticoduodenectomy. Despite increasing patient acuity, this new pathway shortened length of stay, reduced resource use, and decreased hospital costs. DBCM indicated that fewer deviations from the expected course occurred after pathway implementation. The impacts of complications were less severe and translated to an overall cost savings of $5,542 per patient. DBCM also revealed that as more patients migrated to the expected course within our standardized care path, 50% of overall cost savings ($2,780) was attributable to the pathway alone, and improvements in care over time (secular trends) accounted for the remainder. DBCM accurately determined the incremental contribution of clinical pathway implementation to cost savings beyond that of secular trends alone. In addition, this versatile model can be customized to other systems' improvements to reveal their true clinical and economic impacts. This is valuable when choices linking quality with cost must be made.

  9. A proposed model of psychodynamic psychotherapy linked to Erik Erikson's eight stages of psychosocial development.

    PubMed

    Knight, Zelda Gillian

    2017-01-25

    Just as Freud used stages of psychosexual development to ground his model of psychoanalysis, it is possible to do the same with Erik Erikson's stages of development with regards to a model of psychodynamic psychotherapy. This paper proposes an eight-stage model of psychodynamic psychotherapy linked to Erik Erikson's eight stages of psychosocial development. Various suggestions are offered. One such suggestion is that as each of Erikson's developmental stages is triggered by a crisis, in therapy it is triggered by the client's search. The resolution of the search often leads to the development of another search, which implies that the therapy process comprises a series of searches. This idea of a series of searches and resolutions leads to the understanding that identity is developmental and therapy is a space in which a new sense of identity may emerge. The notion of hope is linked to Erikson's stage of Basic Trust and the proposed model of therapy views hope and trust as essential for the therapy process. Two clinical vignettes are offered to illustrate these ideas.

  10. X-linked intellectual disability type Nascimento is a clinically distinct, probably underdiagnosed entity

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    X-linked intellectual disability type Nascimento (MIM #300860), caused by mutations in UBE2A (MIM *312180), is characterized by craniofacial dysmorphism (synophrys, prominent supraorbital ridges, deep-set, almond-shaped eyes, depressed nasal bridge, prominent columella, hypoplastic alae nasi, and macrostomia), skin anomalies (hirsutism, myxedematous appearance, onychodystrophy), micropenis, moderate to severe intellectual disability (ID), motor delay, impaired/absent speech, and seizures. Hitherto only five familial point mutations and four different deletions including UBE2A have been reported in the literature. We present eight additional individuals from five families with UBE2A associated ID - three males from a consanguineous family, in whom we identified a small deletion of only 7.1 kb encompassing the first three exons of UBE2A, two related males with a UBE2A missense mutation in exon 4, a patient with a de novo nonsense mutation in exon 6, and two sporadic males with larger deletions including UBE2A. All affected male individuals share the typical clinical phenotype, all carrier females are unaffected and presented with a completely skewed X inactivation in blood. We conclude that 1.) X-linked intellectual disability type Nascimento is a clinically very distinct entity that might be underdiagnosed to date. 2.) So far, all females carrying a familial UBE2A aberration have a completely skewed X inactivation and are clinically unaffected. This should be taken in to account when counselling those families. 3.) The coverage of an array should be checked carefully prior to analysis since not all arrays have a sufficient resolution at specific loci, or alternative quantitative methods should be applied not to miss small deletions. PMID:24053514

  11. Linking Student Retention Model with Institutional Planning: The Benefits and Limitations of a Student Matrix Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schartman, Laura; Rhee, Byung-Shik

    This study explored the possibility of linking the Luna (1999) student flow matrix model with institutional planning at a comprehensive state institution, investigating how student flow environments were associated with student characteristics such as race, gender, citizenship, class level, entry type, and cumulative grade point average. The study…

  12. Anatomy meets dentistry! Linking anatomy and clinical practice in the preclinical dental curriculum.

    PubMed

    Rafai, Nicole; Lemos, Martin; Kennes, Lieven Nils; Hawari, Ayichah; Gerhardt-Szép, Susanne; Classen-Linke, Irmgard

    2016-11-25

    Establishing a strong link early on between preclinical coursework and the clinical context is necessary for students to be able to recognize the practical relevance of the curriculum during their preclinical anatomical courses and to transfer knowledge more easily. Our objective was to enhance the clinical relevance of a preclinical anatomy course for second-year medical students of dentistry by implementing an interdisciplinary skills training course on "Palpation of the Head and Neck Muscles" and to measure the learning outcomes. For the curricular development of the expanded course module, Kern's 6-step approach was applied including subjective evaluation. We used a peer-teaching format supported by an e-learning application. A randomized control study measured effects of the two components (skills training, e-module) on learning outcomes. Four learning methods were compared: (1) lecture, (2) lecture + e-module, (3) lecture + skills training, (4) lecture + skills training + e-module. An objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) was used to measure and compare learning outcomes. The two-way variance analysis demonstrated that participation in the skills training had a statistically significant effect on the OSCE results (p = 0.0007). Students who participated in the skills training did better (φ 107.4 ± 14.4 points) than students who only attended the lecture (φ 88.8 ± 26.2 points). Students who used the e-module but did not attend the skills training earned a slightly but not significantly higher average number of points (φ 91.8 ± 31.3 points) than those who only attended the lecture. The learning outcomes of the skills training were again significantly increased when the training was combined with the e-module (φ 121.8 ± 21.8 points), thus making it the ideal method for achieving the learning objectives defined in this study. The "Palpation of the Head and Neck Muscles" interdisciplinary skills training course

  13. UAS Modeling of the Communication Links Study Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birr, Richard; Murray, Jennifer; Girgis, nancy

    2011-01-01

    There were many links calculated for this and the other scenarios. The rain was analyzed for 99.9% availability with rain rated of none, 20 mm/hr and 90 mm/hr at a height of 5 km out to 25 NM. This was done for each scenario for LOS and for BLOS links for Scenario 5 and 6. Scenario 1 was a LOS-only scenario. Use of two 3 dB Antennas on both ends. The CS2 was unable to maintain a control RF Link during the flight. The largest access gap periods between object top and bottom UA antennae were caused by terrain (ridges and hills). The CS Antenna was changed to High Gain Directional Antenna, all three CS maintained lock on vehicle. There were RF dropouts between the top and bottom UA antennae caused by aircraft obstructions (fuselage, wings, wheel assembles, etc.). Note that for this study antenna locations were placed on top and bottom center of the UA body. Future study should include actual UA antenna locations on the aircraft providing manufactures are willing to provide information. The importance of CS location(s) was demonstrated for primary or backup CS. With a second backup CS placed in a suitable location the UA was able to maintain an overall RF link. The actual location of both backup CSs required the antenna location to be place 150 ft above ground in order to establish a RF link between the UA and CS.

  14. Clinical and molecular characteristics of Chinese patients with X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome type 1.

    PubMed

    An, Yun-Fei; Luo, Xiao-Bo; Yang, Xi; Wang, Jing; Li, Li; Zhao, Xiao-Dong

    2014-11-01

    X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome type 1 (XLP1) is a rare inherited, life-threatening immunodeficiency disorder caused by mutations in SH2D1A gene. It affect approximately two to three males per million. Fewer than 10 cases with definite gene mutations have been reported in Chinese mainland and no rapid diagnosis method has been established. We determined the clinical and molecular characteristics of five patients with XLP1. The SH2D1A gene were amplified by PCR and sequenced, the SAP expression was analyzed by flow cytometry. Two patients had novel SH2D1A mutations and three had mutations that have been previously reported. Three patients presented with fulminant infectious mononucleosis or hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis and one presented with lymphoma. Null or decreased SAP expression on PBMCs was noted. The remaining patient presented with unique, recurrent, nonfulminant infectious mononucleosis and bimodal intracellular SAP protein expression. The overall molecular characteristics and clinical phenotypes of Chinese patients with XLP1 matched previous reports. The unique bimodal intracellular SAP protein expression indicated the presence of some residual SAP-positive T cells that are able to respond to persistent Epstein-Barr virus infection and could explain the relatively mild clinical phenotype of this patient. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Linking susceptibility genes and pathogenesis mechanisms using mouse models of systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Crampton, Steve P.; Morawski, Peter A.; Bolland, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) represents a challenging autoimmune disease from a clinical perspective because of its varied forms of presentation. Although broad-spectrum steroids remain the standard treatment for SLE, they have many side effects and only provide temporary relief from the symptoms of the disease. Thus, gaining a deeper understanding of the genetic traits and biological pathways that confer susceptibility to SLE will help in the design of more targeted and effective therapeutics. Both human genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and investigations using a variety of mouse models of SLE have been valuable for the identification of the genes and pathways involved in pathogenesis. In this Review, we link human susceptibility genes for SLE with biological pathways characterized in mouse models of lupus, and discuss how the mechanistic insights gained could advance drug discovery for the disease. PMID:25147296

  16. Alternative Methodologies in Research Literature Review: Links between Clinical Work and MFT Effectiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Addison, Shelia M.; Sandberg, Jonathan G.; Corby, Joy; Robila, Mihaela; Platt, Jason J.

    2002-01-01

    Reviews 15 years of clinical research in three family therapy (FT) journals that provide evidence for the effectiveness of marriage and family therapy. Considers designs that are being utilized in reports on the effectiveness of various models of FT. Makes connections between research and the everyday work of clinicians to make the work more…

  17. Alternative Methodologies in Research Literature Review: Links between Clinical Work and MFT Effectiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Addison, Shelia M.; Sandberg, Jonathan G.; Corby, Joy; Robila, Mihaela; Platt, Jason J.

    2002-01-01

    Reviews 15 years of clinical research in three family therapy (FT) journals that provide evidence for the effectiveness of marriage and family therapy. Considers designs that are being utilized in reports on the effectiveness of various models of FT. Makes connections between research and the everyday work of clinicians to make the work more…

  18. Susceptibility of Austrian Clinical Klebsiella and Enterobacter Isolates Linked to Patient-Related Data

    PubMed Central

    Badura, Alexandra; Pregartner, Gudrun; Holzer, Judith C.; Feierl, Gebhard; Grisold, Andrea J.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to analyze the antimicrobial susceptibility of Austrian clinical Klebsiella sp. and Enterobacter sp. isolates linked to patient-related data over a time period from 1998 to 2014. The main findings of this study were (i) a marked difference of antibiotic susceptibility rates between different infection sites for both Klebsiella sp. and Enterobacter sp., (ii) significantly greater percentages of resistant isolates among both Klebsiella sp. and Enterobacter sp. in male patients compared to female patients and (iii) significantly greater percentages of resistant isolates among both Klebsiella sp. and Enterobacter sp. from hospital-derived samples compared to samples from the community. In conclusion, our statistical data analysis clearly indicated a strong association of patient-related data and Klebsiella sp. and Enterobacter sp. susceptibility profiles. PMID:26903953

  19. Clinical outcomes at one year following keratoconus treatment with accelerated transepithelial cross-linking

    PubMed Central

    Artola, Alberto; Piñero, David P.; Ruiz-Fortes, Pedro; Soto-Negro, Roberto; Pérez-Cambrodí, Rafael J

    2017-01-01

    This study evaluated the clinical outcomes in keratoconus corneas following accelerated transepithelial corneal collagen cross-linking (CXL) (Avedro KXL® system, Waltham, MA, USA) over one year of follow-up. The mean depth of the demarcation line measured by optical coherence tomography (OCT) was 205.19 µm. One month after surgery, a non-statistically significant change was noted in sphere (P=0.18) and in spherical equivalent (P=0.17), whereas a significant improvement was observed in corrected distance visual acuity (P=0.04). A significant change was observed in topographic astigmatism (P=0.03) and posterior corneal a sphericity (P=0.04). Accelerated transepithelial CXL may be a useful technique for the management of progressive keratoconus. PMID:28503442

  20. A model for reflection for good clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Balla, John I; Heneghan, Carl; Glasziou, Paul; Thompson, Matthew; Balla, Margaret E

    2009-12-01

    Rationale and aim The rapidly changing knowledge base of clinical practice highlights the need to keep abreast of knowledge changes that are most relevant for the practitioner. We aimed to develop a model for reflection on clinical practice that identified the key elements of medical knowledge needed for good medical practice. Method The dual theory of cognition, an integration of intuitive and analytic processes, provided the framework for the study. The design looked at the congruence between the clinical thinking process and the dual theory. A one-year study was conducted in general practice clinics in Oxfordshire, UK. Thirty-five general practitioners participated in 20-minute interviews to discuss how they worked through recently seen clinical cases. Over a one-year period 72 cases were recorded from 35 interviews. These were categorized according to emerging themes, which were manually coded and substantiated with verbatim quotations. Results There was a close fit between the dual theory and participants' clinical thinking processes. This included instant problem framing, consistent with automatic intuitive thinking, focusing on the risk and urgency of the case. Salient features accounting for these choices were recognizable. There was a second reflective phase, leading to the review of initial judgements. Conclusions The proposed model highlights the critical steps in decision making. This allows regular recalibration of knowledge that is most critical at each of these steps. In line with good practice, the model also links the crucial knowledge used in decision making, to value judgments made in relation to the patient.

  1. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic model linking plasma protein binding interactions with drug disposition.

    PubMed

    Buur, J L; Baynes, R E; Smith, G W; Riviere, J E

    2009-04-01

    Combination drug therapy increases the chance for an adverse drug reactions due to drug-drug interactions. Altered disposition for sulfamethazine (SMZ) when concurrently administered with flunixin meglumine (FLU) in swine could lead to increased tissue residues. There is a need for a pharmacokinetic modeling technique that can predict the consequences of possible drug interactions. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic model was developed that links plasma protein binding interactions to drug disposition for SMZ and FLU in swine. The model predicted a sustained decrease in total drug and a temporary increase in free drug concentration. An in vivo study confirmed the presence of a drug interaction. Neither the model nor the in vivo study revealed clinically significant changes that alter tissue disposition. This novel linkage approach has use in the prediction of the clinical impact of plasma protein binding interactions. Ultimately it could be used in the design of dosing regimens and in the protection of the food supply through prediction and minimization of tissue residues.

  2. A novel animal model linking adiposity to altered circadian rhythms

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Researchers have provided evidence for a link between obesity and altered circadian rhythms (e.g., shift work, disrupted sleep), but the mechanism for this association is still unknown. Adipocytes possess an intrinsic circadian clock, and circadian rhythms in adipocytokines and adipose tissue metab...

  3. Clinical presentations of X-linked retinoschisis in Taiwanese patients confirmed with genetic sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Laura; Chen, Ho-Min; Tsai, Shawn; Chang, Tsong-Chi; Tsai, Tzu-Hsun; Yang, Chung-May; Chao, An-Ning; Chen, Kuan-Jen; Kao, Ling-Yuh; Yeung, Ling; Yeh, Lung-Kun; Hwang, Yih-Shiou; Wu, Wei-Chi; Lai, Chi-Chun

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the clinical characteristics of X-linked retinoschisis (XLRS) and identify genetic mutations in Taiwanese patients with XLRS. Methods This study included 23 affected males from 16 families with XLRS. Fundus photography, spectral domain optical coherent tomography (SD-OCT), fundus autofluorescence (FAF), and full-field electroretinograms (ERGs) were performed. The coding regions of the RS1 gene that encodes retinoschisin were sequenced. Results The median age at diagnosis was 18 years (range 4–58 years). The best-corrected visual acuity ranged from no light perception to 20/25. The typical spoke-wheel pattern in the macula was present in 61% of the patients (14/23) while peripheral retinoschisis was present in 43% of the patients (10/23). Four eyes presented with vitreous hemorrhage, and two eyes presented with leukocoria that mimics Coats’ disease. Macular schisis was identified with SD-OCT in 82% of the eyes (31/38) while foveal atrophy was present in 18% of the eyes (7/38). Concentric area of high intensity was the most common FAF abnormality observed. Seven out of 12 patients (58%) showed electronegative ERG findings. Sequencing of the RS1 gene identified nine mutations, six of which were novel. The mutations are all located in exons 4–6, including six missense mutations, two nonsense mutations, and one deletion-caused frameshift mutation. Conclusions XLRS is a clinically heterogeneous disease with profound phenotypic inter- and intrafamiliar variability. Genetic sequencing is valuable as it allows a definite diagnosis of XLRS to be made without the classical clinical features and ERG findings. This study showed the variety of clinical features of XLRS and reported novel mutations. PMID:25999676

  4. Clinical and linkage study of a large family with simple ectopia lentis linked to FBN1

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, M.J.; Roberts, J.; Partington, M.W.; Colley, P.W.; Hollway, G.E.; Kozman, H.M.; Mulley, J.C.

    1994-10-15

    Simple ectopia lentis (EL) was studied in a large family, by clinical examination and analysis of linkage to markers in the region of FBN1, the gene for fibrillin which causes Marfan syndrome on chromosome 15. No patient had clinical or echocardiographic evidence of Marfan syndrome, although there was a trend towards relatively longer measurements of height; lower segment; arm span; middle finger, hand, and foot length in the affected members of the family, compared with unaffected sibs of the same sex. Analysis of linkage to intragenic FBN1 markers was inconclusive because they were relatively uninformative. Construction of a multipoint background map from the CEPH reference families identified microsatellite markers linked closely to FBN1 which could demonstrate linkage of EL in this family to the FBN1 region. LINKMAP analysis detected a multipoint lod score of 5.68 at D15S119, a marker approximately 6 cM distal to FBN1, and a multipoint lod score of 5.04 at FBN1. The EL gene in this family is likely to be allelic to Marfan syndrome, and molecular characterization of the FBN1 mutation should now be possible. 25 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. An architecture for linking medical decision-support applications to clinical databases and its evaluation.

    PubMed

    German, Efrat; Leibowitz, Akiva; Shahar, Yuval

    2009-04-01

    We describe and evaluate a framework, the Medical Database Adaptor (MEIDA), for linking knowledge-based medical decision-support systems (MDSSs) to multiple clinical databases, using standard medical schemata and vocabularies. Our solution involves a set of tools for embedding standard terms and units within knowledge bases (KBs) of MDSSs; a set of methods and tools for mapping the local database (DB) schema and the terms and units relevant to the KB of the MDSS into standardized schema, terms and units, using three heuristics (choice of a vocabulary, choice of a key term, and choice of a measurement unit); and a set of tools which, at runtime, automatically map standard term queries originating from the KB, to queries formulated using the local DB's schema, terms and units. The methodology was successfully evaluated by mapping three KBs to three DBs. Using a unit-domain matching heuristic reduced the number of term-mapping candidates by a mean of 71% even after other heuristics were used. Runtime access of 10,000 records required one second. We conclude that mapping MDSSs to different local clinical DBs, using the three-phase methodology and several term-mapping heuristics, is both feasible and efficient.

  6. [Electronic links between hospitals or clinics and pharmacies: structure and operation of WAKASHIO pharmacotherapeusis network].

    PubMed

    Negishi, Etsuko; Hirai, Aizan; Yoshizaki, Noboru; Yonezawa, Masaaki; Akiba, Tetsuo; Ueno, Koichi

    2003-03-01

    We developed the WAKASHIO Pharmacotherapeusis Network system. This system electronically links physicians' offices with pharmacies to share clinical records and offers the means for real time bi-directional information input. The system is equipped with individual signature (handwriting) recognition protocols to ensure strict enforcement of security and privacy. The network enables front-line pharmacists to access to pertinent clinical records. We performed a series of tests (a "shakedown cruise") of the system and examined the role of the pharmacist as a counselor for patient compliance with prescribed therapeutic regimens. The results indicated the following: 1) This system provides an unequivocal means of communication between physicians and pharmacists. 2) This system is useful for judicious resolution of potential problems arising from separation of the domains of prescriber and dispenser. 3) A noteworthy finding was that community pharmacists devote substantial time/effort to counseling patients concerning their pharmacotherapeutic regimens. 4) Over 80% of patients responded with statements such as "Now I understand my medicines better," and "I am free of anxiety over my medication now." Thus the system provides a powerful tool to promote patient compliance based on pharmacological knowledge. Our future plans for the system include: 1) implementation of an inquiry/response protocol to enhance risk management; 2) online prescription issuance; and 3) expansion of the database used for patient counseling and improvement of the counseling method. Finally, physician-pharmacist collaboration through the system will contribute to a clear redefinition of their respective roles in community medical care services.

  7. Genetic analysis and clinical features of X-linked retinoschisis in Chinese patients

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Qin-rui; Huang, Lv-zhen; Chen, Xiao-li; Xia, Hui-ka; Li, Tian-qi; Li, Xiao-xin

    2017-01-01

    Many mutations in the retinoschisis (RS1) gene have been identified, but there are limited clinical data relating to the different genotypes. This study investigated the genotype, clinical phenotype and therapies for X-linked juvenile retinoschisis (XLRS) patients in China to evaluate the effects of gene mutations and therapies on the prognosis of the disease. Thirty patients were recruited in the study. Genetic examination identified 8 novel RS1 gene mutations. Twenty-four patients were identified as missense mutation, which was the most common gene mutation in XLRS patients. Amino acids 102 and 209 were the most common mutation areas, accounting for a total 35.7% of all patients. Mutations affecting amino acid 102 were associated with poor results on the flash electroretinogram (ERG). Sixteen patients had various complications. Anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) drugs were given to four patients with hemorrhage or other complications, and serious adverse events did not occur. Our outcome demonstrates that missense mutation was the leading cause of XLRS and more than half of the patients with this missense had various complications. Anti-VEGF drugs may be an effective and safe way to prevent deterioration of XLRS with certain complications. There is wide genotypic and phenotypic variability in Chinese patients with XLRS. PMID:28272453

  8. Multilevel and Latent Variable Modeling with Composite Links and Exploded Likelihoods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rabe-Hesketh, Sophia; Skrondal, Anders

    2007-01-01

    Composite links and exploded likelihoods are powerful yet simple tools for specifying a wide range of latent variable models. Applications considered include survival or duration models, models for rankings, small area estimation with census information, models for ordinal responses, item response models with guessing, randomized response models,…

  9. A Linked Model for Simulating Stand Development and Growth Processes of Loblolly Pine

    Treesearch

    V. Clark Baldwin; Phillip M. Dougherty; Harold E. Burkhart

    1998-01-01

    Linking models of different scales (e.g., process, tree-stand-ecosystem) is essential for furthering our understanding of stand, climatic, and edaphic effects on tree growth and forest productivity. Moreover, linking existing models that differ in scale and levels of resolution quickly identifies knowledge gaps in information required to scale from one level to another...

  10. Modeling clinical context: rediscovering the social history and evaluating language from the clinic to the wards.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Colin; Elhadad, Noémie

    2014-01-01

    Social, behavioral, and cultural factors are clearly linked to health and disease outcomes. The medical social history is a critical evaluation of these factors performed by healthcare providers with patients in both inpatient and outpatient care settings. Physicians learn the topics covered in the social history through education and practice, but the topics discussed and documented in real-world clinical narrative have not been described at scale. This study applies large-scale automated topic modeling techniques to discover common topics discussed in social histories, to compare those topics to the medical textbook representation of those histories, and to compare topics between clinical settings to illustrate differences of clinical context on narrative content. Language modeling techniques are used to consider the extent to which inpatient and outpatient social histories share in their language use. Our findings highlight the fact that clinical context and setting are distinguishing factors for social history documentation, as the language of the hospital wards is not the same as that of the ambulatory clinic. Moreover, providers receive little feedback on the quality of their documentation beyond that needed for billing processes. The findings in this study demonstrate a number of topics described in textbooks - schooling, religion, alternative health practices, stressors, for example - do not appear in social histories in either clinical setting.

  11. A Typology for Modeling Processes in Clinical Guidelines and Protocols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Samson W.; Musen, Mark A.

    We analyzed the graphical representations that are used by various guideline-modeling methods to express process information embodied in clinical guidelines and protocols. From this analysis, we distilled four modeling formalisms and the processes they typically model: (1) flowcharts for capturing problem-solving processes, (2) disease-state maps that link decision points in managing patient problems over time, (3) plans that specify sequences of activities that contribute toward a goal, (4) workflow specifications that model care processes in an organization. We characterized the four approaches and showed that each captures some aspect of what a guideline may specify. We believe that a general guideline-modeling system must provide explicit representation for each type of process.

  12. Linking mechanistic models of tree physiology with models of forest dynamics: Problems of temporal scale

    SciTech Connect

    King, A.W.; Emanuel, W.R.; O'Neill, R.V.

    1988-01-01

    The individual-based forest gap models are a potential resource in the study of forest growth responses to environmental stress acting on physiological processes. This approach is currently limited by the lack of physiological detail in the gap models and by the temporal scales separating tree physiology and the annual tree growth simulated by the gap models. We describe a general procedure that integrates process-based models of tree physiology with forest gap models. The procedure involves (1) a link between a physiological model and a gap model provided by the simulation of annual wood production (AWP), (2) a factorial execution of a physiological model to generate AWP, (3) a response-surface model describing the relationship between AWP and driving variables appropriate to the annual time scale of a gap model, and (4) a revised gap model that includes a rescaled physiological model. The modified gap model can be used to simulate the impact of environmental stress on forest growth and succession. 18 refs., 2 figs.

  13. Mutations in the gene for X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy in patients with different clinical phenotypes.

    PubMed Central

    Braun, A; Ambach, H; Kammerer, S; Rolinski, B; Stöckler, S; Rabl, W; Gärtner, J; Zierz, S; Roscher, A A

    1995-01-01

    Recently, the gene for the most common peroxisomal disorder, X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD), has been described encoding a peroxisomal membrane transporter protein. We analyzed the entire protein-coding sequence of this gene by reverse-transcription PCR, SSCP, and DNA sequencing in five patients with different clinical expression of X-ALD and in their female relatives; these clinical expressions were cerebral childhood ALD, adrenomyeloneuropathy (AMN), and "Addison disease only" (ADO) phenotype. In the three patients exhibiting the classical picture of severe childhood ALD we identified in the 5' portion of the X-ALD gene a 38-bp deletion that causes a frameshift mutation, a 3-bp deletion leading to a deletion of an amino acid in the ATP-binding domain of the ALD protein, and a missense mutation. In the patient with the clinical phenotype of AMN, a nonsense mutation in codon 212, along with a second site mutation at codon 178, was observed. Analysis of the patient with the ADO phenotype revealed a further missense mutation at a highly conserved position in the ALDP/PMP70 comparison. The disruptive nature of two mutations (i.e., the frameshift and the nonsense mutation) in patients with biochemically proved childhood ALD and AMN further strongly supports the hypothesis that alterations in this gene play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of X-ALD. Since the current biochemical techniques for X-ALD carrier detection in affected families lack sufficient reliability, our procedure described for systematic mutation scanning is also capable of improving genetic counseling and prenatal diagnosis. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:7717396

  14. Investigating the productivity model for clinical nurses.

    PubMed

    Dehghan Nayeri, Nahid; Hooshmand Bahabadi, Abbas; Kazemnejad, Anoshirvan

    2014-01-01

    One of the main objectives of quantitative researches is assessment of models developed by qualitative studies. Models validation through their testing implies that the designed model is representative of the existed facts. Hence, this study was conducted to assess the clinical nurses' productivity model presented for Iranian nurses' productivity. The sample of the study consisted of 360 nurses of Tehran University of Medical Sciences. The research tool was a questionnaire for measuring the components of clinical nurses' productivity. After completing all steps of instrument psychometric and getting answers from the participants, the factors introduced in the questionnaire were named and then Lisrel Path Analysis tests were performed to analyze the components of the model. The results of the model test revealed there is an internal relationship among different components of the model. Regression Analysis showed that each increasing unit in components of the model was to be added to central variable of productivity model -human resource. Model components altogether explained 20 % of clinical nurses' productivity variance. This study found that the important component of productivity is human resources that are reciprocally related to other components of the model. Therefore, it can be stated that the managers can promote the productivity by using efficient strategies to correct human resource patterns.

  15. Clinical HBSE Concentration: A Transactional Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farmer, Rosemary L.

    1999-01-01

    Outlines a transactional model for addressing the underrepresentation of key areas in advanced clinical courses in human behavior in the social environment (HBSE), looking at social work's understanding of the biological and spiritual aspects of human beings. The transactional model is distinguished from other reductionist or interactionist models…

  16. Modeling the pathways linking childhood hyperactivity and substance use disorder in young adulthood.

    PubMed

    Tarter, Ralph E; Kirisci, Levent; Feske, Ulrike; Vanyukov, Michael

    2007-06-01

    This study modeled direct and mediated pathways linking childhood hyperactivity and substance use disorder (SUD). Boys (n = 112) were administered the revised Drug Use Screening Inventory at age 12-14 years and the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV at age 22 years. Six newly derived scales having established heritability were conceptually organized into internalizing and externalizing pathways to SUD emanating from childhood hyperactivity. Hyperactivity directly predicts SUD. Neuroticism, conduct problems, and their respective manifestations of social withdrawal and school problems mediated the association between hyperactivity and SUD. Hyperactivity also predicted neuroticism that, in turn, predicted low self-esteem leading to social withdrawal and SUD. These results indicate that hyperactivity is a diathesis for both internalizing and externalizing disturbances that, in turn, portend differential expression of psychosocial maladjustment presaging SUD.

  17. Global land-use allocation model linked to an integrated assessment model.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Tomoko; Fujimori, Shinichiro; Ito, Akihiko; Takahashi, Kiyoshi; Masui, Toshihiko

    2017-02-15

    We developed a global land-use allocation model that can be linked to integrated assessment models (IAMs) with a coarser spatial resolution. Using the model, we performed a downscaling of the IAMs' regional aggregated land-use projections to obtain a spatial land-use distribution, which could subsequently be used by Earth system models for global environmental assessments of ecosystem services, food security, and climate policies. Here we describe the land-use allocation model, discuss the verification of the downscaling technique, and explain the influences of the downscaling on estimates of land-use carbon emissions. A comparison of the emissions estimated with and without downscaling suggested that the land-use downscaling would help capture the spatial distribution of carbon stock density and regional heterogeneity of carbon emissions caused by cropland and pasture land expansion. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Lessons Learned from Dynamic Linking of a Hydrology Model with an Electricity Sector Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, S. M.; Newmark, R. L.; Miara, A.; Proussevitch, A. A.; Corsi, F.; Fekete, B. M.; Macknick, J.; Vorosmarty, C. J.

    2016-12-01

    Energy systems models and climate-driven hydrological models are designed and operate at different temporal and spatial scales due to the unique physical and infrastructure constraints of the systems that they represent. As the research community seeks to explicitly represent the complex interactions of the energy sector with climate conditions and hydrological resources, these scale inconsistencies present significant technical and conceptual challenges to traditional modeling approaches. To address these challenges, a multi-institution consortium of researchers has been exploring unique approaches to linking energy systems and climate-driven hydrological models to better understand how these different coupling approaches affect model outcomes and computation time. The present framework links the Water Balance Model (WBM) and the Thermoelectric Power and Thermal Pollution Model (TP2M), which evaluate hydrological conditions under a variety of climate and power plant configuration conditions, with the Regional Energy Deployment Systems (ReEDS) model, an electricity sector capacity expansion model. ReEDS is a more spatially and temporally aggregated model than WBM/TP2M, so model coupling requires disaggregating ReEDS deployment and dispatch results for use in site-specific hydrological calculations. WBM and TP2M are used to evaluate the feasibility of ReEDS output under highly resolved geophysical constraints and river network dynamics, and infeasible electricity dispatch can be fed back to constraints on the electric sector capacity expansion in ReEDS. An initial case study of modeling coupling was conducted in the Northeastern United States, and the work is being expanded to the contiguous United States to evaluate twenty climate scenarios under three different policy scenarios. This unique coupling approach across modeling platforms from different institutions is exploring mechanisms to automate model feedbacks at different time steps to demonstrate feasibility

  19. Clinical governance in Scotland: an educational model.

    PubMed Central

    Lough, Murray; Kelly, Diane; Taylor, Mike; Snadden, David; Patterson, Bill; McNamara, Iain; Murray, Stuart

    2002-01-01

    The concepts underpinning clinical governance are similar throughout the United Kingdom but models for its implementation will differ widely. This model aims to enable practices to identify areas for further learning and development against specific outcomes. Criteria sets and standards are suggested and a governance plan is used to allow practices to prioritise their objectives. Resourcing will always be a major issue and such a model should be fully evaluated. PMID:11942453

  20. Links between respiratory syncytial virus bronchiolitis and childhood asthma: clinical and research approaches.

    PubMed

    Openshaw, Peter J; Dean, Gillian S; Culley, Fiona J

    2003-02-01

    This review examines the relationship between severe pulmonary disease caused by respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection in infancy and later development of asthma or reactive airway disease (RAD). RSV infection accounts for 70% or greater of all cases of infantile bronchiolitis and has been linked to subsequent asthma or RAD, either directly or through a shared common predisposition. Several studies suggest that RSV bronchiolitis is an important factor in the development of asthma and possibly atopy, although the association is lost by the age of 13 years. The mechanism is as yet unclear, but murine models of RSV disease have identified many plausible causal explanations. Further study is necessary to determine the relative roles of RSV infection and genetic predisposition in explaining the association between RSV infection and asthma/RAD.

  1. Infertility etiologies are genetically and clinically linked with other diseases in single meta-diseases.

    PubMed

    Tarín, Juan J; García-Pérez, Miguel A; Hamatani, Toshio; Cano, Antonio

    2015-04-15

    linked with other diseases in single meta-diseases. This finding opens new insights for clinicians and reproductive biologists to treat infertility problems using a phenomic approach instead of considering infertility as an isolated and exclusive disease of the reproductive system/hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. In agreement with a previous validation analysis of the utility of DiseaseConnect web server, the present study does not show a univocal correspondence between common gene expression and clinical comorbid relationship. Further work is needed to untangle the potential genetic, epigenetic and phenotypic relationships that may be present among different infertility etiologies, morbid conditions and physical/cognitive traits.

  2. Public participation and marginalized groups: the community development model [Link

    PubMed Central

    O’Keefe, Eileen; Hogg, Christine

    2001-01-01

    Objectives To develop ways of reaching house‐bound people and enabling them to give their views in planning and monitoring health and social care. Strategy HealthLINK – a project based in a community health council – explored ways of involving older house‐bound people in the London Borough of Camden, in planning and monitoring health and social care using community development techniques. Results HealthLINK set up an infrastructure to enable house‐bound people to have access to information and to enable them to give their views. This resulted in access for health and local authorities to the views of house‐bound older people and increased the self esteem and quality of life of those who became involved. Conclusions Community development approaches that enable an infrastructure to be established may be an effective way of reaching marginalized communities. However, there are tensions in this approach between the different requirements for public involvement of statutory bodies and of users, and between representation of groups and listening to individual voices. PMID:11281901

  3. Conceptual Processes for Linking Eutrophication and Network Models

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-08-01

    modeling effort on Chesapeake Bay (Hagy 2002). The model is in use at the NOAA Chesapeake Bay Office, at the Virginia Institute of Marine Science , and at...Dorothy H. Tillman, Dr. Carl F. Cerco, and Mr. Mark R. Noel of the Water Quality and Contaminant Modeling Branch, Enviromental Laboratory (EL

  4. Quantitative Modeling of Entangled Polymer Rheology: Experiments, Tube Models and Slip-Link Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, Priyanka Subhash

    Rheology properties are sensitive indicators of molecular structure and dynamics. The relationship between rheology and polymer dynamics is captured in the constitutive model, which, if accurate and robust, would greatly aid molecular design and polymer processing. This dissertation is thus focused on building accurate and quantitative constitutive models that can help predict linear and non-linear viscoelasticity. In this work, we have used a multi-pronged approach based on the tube theory, coarse-grained slip-link simulations, and advanced polymeric synthetic and characterization techniques, to confront some of the outstanding problems in entangled polymer rheology. First, we modified simple tube based constitutive equations in extensional rheology and developed functional forms to test the effect of Kuhn segment alignment on a) tube diameter enlargement and b) monomeric friction reduction between subchains. We, then, used these functional forms to model extensional viscosity data for polystyrene (PS) melts and solutions. We demonstrated that the idea of reduction in segmental friction due to Kuhn alignment is successful in explaining the qualitative difference between melts and solutions in extension as revealed by recent experiments on PS. Second, we compiled literature data and used it to develop a universal tube model parameter set and prescribed their values and uncertainties for 1,4-PBd by comparing linear viscoelastic G' and G" mastercurves for 1,4-PBds of various branching architectures. The high frequency transition region of the mastercurves superposed very well for all the 1,4-PBds irrespective of their molecular weight and architecture, indicating universality in high frequency behavior. Therefore, all three parameters of the tube model were extracted from this high frequency transition region alone. Third, we compared predictions of two versions of the tube model, Hierarchical model and BoB model against linear viscoelastic data of blends of 1,4-PBd

  5. Prime Time: 18-Month Violence Outcomes of a Clinic-Linked Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Sieving, Renee E.; McMorris, Barbara J.; Secor-Turner, Molly; Garwick, Ann W.; Shlafer, Rebecca; Beckman, Kara J.; Pettingell, Sandra L.; Oliphant, Jennifer A.; Seppelt, Ann M.

    2013-01-01

    Prime Time, a youth development intervention, aims to reduce multiple risk behaviors among adolescent girls seeking clinic services who are at high risk for pregnancy. The purpose of the current study was to examine whether Prime Time involvement produced changes in relational aggression, physical violence and related psychosocial and behavioral outcomes. Qualitative case exemplars illustrated social contexts of intervention participants with differing longitudinal patterns of relational aggression and physical violence. Data were from a randomized efficacy trial with 13–17 year old girls (n=253) meeting specified risk criteria. Intervention participants were involved in Prime Time and usual clinic services for 18 months, control participants received usual clinic services. Participants in the current study completed self-report surveys at baseline and 18 months following enrollment. Outcomes analyses revealed significantly lower levels of relational aggression perpetration in the intervention group versus controls. In contrast, Prime Time involvement did not result in significant reductions in physical violence. Exploratory dose-response analyses indicated that reductions in relational aggression may have been most pronounced among girls actively involved in Prime Time case management and peer leadership activities. Qualitative findings suggested that the intervention’s emphasis on modeling and building supportive relationships contributed to reductions in relational aggression. This study contributes to a very limited evidence base regarding effective approaches to preventing violence among high-risk adolescent girls. Findings suggest that offering youth development interventions through clinic settings hold promise in reducing violence risk among vulnerable youth. PMID:23543359

  6. Prime time: 18-month violence outcomes of a clinic-linked intervention.

    PubMed

    Sieving, Renee E; McMorris, Barbara J; Secor-Turner, Molly; Garwick, Ann W; Shlafer, Rebecca; Beckman, Kara J; Pettingell, Sandra L; Oliphant, Jennifer A; Seppelt, Ann M

    2014-08-01

    Prime Time, a youth development intervention, aims to reduce multiple risk behaviors among adolescent girls seeking clinic services who are at high risk for pregnancy. The purpose of the current study was to examine whether Prime Time involvement produced changes in relational aggression, physical violence, and related psychosocial and behavioral outcomes. Qualitative case exemplars illustrated social contexts of intervention participants with differing longitudinal patterns of relational aggression and physical violence. Data were from a randomized efficacy trial with 13-17 year-old girls (n = 253) meeting specified risk criteria. Intervention participants were involved in Prime Time and usual clinic services for 18 months, control participants received usual clinic services. Participants in the current study completed self-report surveys at baseline and 18 months following enrollment. Outcomes analyses revealed significantly lower levels of relational aggression perpetration in the intervention group versus controls. In contrast, Prime Time involvement did not result in significant reductions in physical violence. Exploratory dose-response analyses indicated that reductions in relational aggression may have been most pronounced among girls actively involved in Prime Time case management and peer leadership activities. Qualitative findings suggested that the intervention's emphasis on modeling and building supportive relationships contributed to reductions in relational aggression. This study contributes to what has been a very limited evidence base regarding effective approaches to preventing violence among high-risk adolescent girls. Findings suggest that offering youth development interventions through clinic settings hold promise in reducing violence risk among vulnerable youth.

  7. Expression of integrin-linked kinase improves cardiac function in a swine model of myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Wen; Xie, Jun; Gu, Rong; Xu, Biao

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies have described the beneficial effects of overexpressing integrin-linked kinase (ILK) after myocardial infarction (MI) in small animal models. However, the effects of ILK in pre-clinical large animals are not known. To move closer to clinical translation, we examined the effects of ILK gene transfer in a swine model of ischemic heart disease. Swine received percutaneous intracoronary injections of adenoviral vector expressing ILK (n=10) or empty ad-null (n=10) in the left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD) following LAD occlusion. Four weeks after transfection, we confirmed that transgene expression was restricted to the infarcted area in the cardiac tissue. Imaging studies demonstrated preserved cardiac function in the ILK group. ILK treatment was associated with reduced infarcted scar size and preserved left ventricular (LV) geometry (LV diameter and LV wall thickness). Enhanced angiogenesis was preserved in the ILK animals, along with reduction of apoptosis. ILK gene therapy improves cardiac remodeling and function in swine following MI associated with increased angiogenesis, reduced apoptosis, and increased cardiomyocyte proliferation with no signs of toxicity. These results may deliver a new approach to treat post-infarct remodeling and subsequent heart failure. PMID:28565779

  8. Mutations in the gene for X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy in patients with different clinical phenotypes

    SciTech Connect

    Braun, A.; Ambach, H.; Kammerer, S.; Rolinski, B.; Roscher, A.; Rabl, W.; Stoeckler, S.; Gaertner, J.; Zierz, S.

    1995-04-01

    Recently, the gene for the most common peroxisomal disorder, X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD), has been described encoding a peroxisomal membrane transporter protein. We analyzed the entire protein-coding sequence of this gene by reverse-transcription PCR, SSCP, and DNA sequencing in five patients with different clinical expressions were cerebral childhood ALD, adrenomyecloneuropathy (AMN), and {open_quotes}Addison disease only{close_quotes} (AD) phenotype. In the three patients exhibiting the classical picture of severe childhood ALD we identified in the 5{prime} portion of the X-ALD gene a 38-bp deletion that causes a frameshift mutation, a 3-bp deletion leading to a deletion of an amino acid in the ATP-binding domain of the ALD protein, and a missense mutation. In the patient with the clinical phenotype of AMN, a nonsense mutation in codon 212, along with a second site mutation at codon 178, was observed. Analysis of the patient with the ADO phenotype revealed a further missense mutation at a highly conserved position in the ALDP/PMP70 comparison. The disruptive nature of two mutations (i.e., the frameshift and the nonsense mutation) in patients with biochemically proved childhood ALD and AMN further strongly supports the hypothesis that alterations in this gene play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of X-ALD. Since the current biochemical techniques for X-ALD carrier detection in affected families lack sufficient reliability, our procedure described for systematic mutation scanning is also capable of improving genetic counseling and prenatal diagnosis. 19 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Phenotypic characterization of X-linked retinoschisis: Clinical, electroretinography, and optical coherence tomography variables

    PubMed Central

    Neriyanuri, Srividya; Dhandayuthapani, Sudha; Arunachalam, Jayamuruga Pandian; Raman, Rajiv

    2016-01-01

    Aims: To study the phenotypic characteristics of X-linked retinoschisis (XLRS) and report the clinical, electroretinogram (ERG), and optical coherence tomography (OCT) variables in Indian eyes. Design: A retrospective study. Materials and Methods: Medical records of 21 patients with retinoschisis who were genetically confirmed to have RS1 mutation were reviewed. The phenotype characterization included the age of onset, best-corrected visual acuity, refractive error, fundus findings, OCT, and ERG. Statistical Analysis Used: Data from both the eyes were used for analysis. A P < 0.05 was set as statistical significance. Data were not normally distributed (P < 0.05, Shapiro wilk); hence, nonparametric tests were used for statistical analysis. Results: All were males whose mean age of presentation was 9 years. Visual acuity was moderately impaired (median 0.6 logMAR, interquartile range: 0.47, 1) in these eyes with a hyperopic refractive error of median +1.75 Ds (interquartile range: +0.50 Ds, +4.25 Ds). About 54.7% of the eyes had both foveal and peripheral schisis, isolated foveal schisis was seen in 28.5% of the eyes, and schisis with retinal detachment was seen in 16.6% of the eyes. The inner nuclear layer was found to be commonly involved in the schisis, followed by outer nuclear and plexiform layers as evident on OCT. On ERG, a- and b-wave amplitudes were significantly reduced in eyes with foveal and peripheral schisis when compared to the eyes with only foveal schisis (P < 0.05). Conclusions: XLRS has phenotypic heterogeneity as evident on OCT, ERG, and clinical findings. PMID:27609164

  10. RP2 and RPGR mutations and clinical correlations in patients with X-linked retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Sharon, Dror; Sandberg, Michael A; Rabe, Vivian W; Stillberger, Melissa; Dryja, Thaddeus P; Berson, Eliot L

    2003-11-01

    We determined the mutation spectrum of the RP2 and RPGR genes in patients with X-linked retinitis pigmentosa (XLRP) and searched for correlations between categories of mutation and severity of disease. We screened 187 unrelated male patients for mutations, including 135 with a prior clinical diagnosis of XLRP, 11 with probable XLRP, 30 isolate cases suspected of having XLRP, and 11 with cone-rod degeneration. Mutation screening was performed by single-strand conformation analysis and by sequencing of all RP2 exons and RPGR exons 1-14, ORF15, and 15a. The refractive error, visual acuity, final dark-adapted threshold, visual field area, and 30-Hz cone electroretinogram (ERG) amplitude were measured in each patient. Among the 187 patients, we found 10 mutations in RP2, 2 of which are novel, and 80 mutations in RPGR, 41 of which are novel; 66% of the RPGR mutations were within ORF15. Among the 135 with a prior clinical diagnosis of XLRP, mutations in the RP2 and RPGR genes were found in 9 of 135 (6.7%) and 98 of 135 (72.6%), respectively, for a total of 79% of patients. Patients with RP2 mutations had, on average, lower visual acuity but similar visual field area, final dark-adapted threshold, and 30-Hz ERG amplitude compared with those with RPGR mutations. Among patients with RPGR mutations, those with ORF15 mutations had, on average, a significantly larger visual field area and a borderline larger ERG amplitude than did patients with RPGR mutations in exons 1-14. Among patients with ORF15 mutations, regression analyses showed that the final dark-adapted threshold became lower (i.e., closer to normal) and that the 30-Hz ERG amplitude increased as the length of the wild-type ORF15 amino acid sequence increased. Furthermore, as the length of the abnormal amino acid sequence following ORF15 frameshift mutations increased, the severity of disease increased.

  11. X-linked Acrogigantism (X-LAG) Syndrome: Clinical Profile and Therapeutic Responses

    PubMed Central

    Beckers, Albert; Lodish, Maya Beth; Trivellin, Giampaolo; Rostomyan, Liliya; Lee, Misu; Faucz, Fabio R; Yuan, Bo; Choong, Catherine S; Caberg, Jean-Hubert; Verrua, Elisa; Naves, Luciana Ansaneli; Cheetham, Tim D; Young, Jacques; Lysy, Philippe A; Petrossians, Patrick; Cotterill, Andrew; Shah, Nalini Samir; Metzger, Daniel; Castermans, Emilie; Ambrosio, Maria Rosaria; Villa, Chiara; Strebkova, Natalia; Mazerkina, Nadia; Gaillard, Stéphan; Barra, Gustavo Barcelos; Casulari, Luis Augusto; Neggers, Sebastian J.; Salvatori, Roberto; Jaffrain-Rea, Marie-Lise; Zacharin, Margaret; Santamaria, Beatriz Lecumberri; Zacharieva, Sabina; Lim, Ee Mun; Mantovani, Giovanna; Zatelli, Maria Chaira; Collins, Michael T; Bonneville, Jean-François; Quezado, Martha; Chittiboina, Prashant; Oldfield, Edward H.; Bours, Vincent; Liu, Pengfei; De Herder, Wouter; Pellegata, Natalia; Lupski, James R.; Daly, Adrian F.; Stratakis, Constantine A.

    2015-01-01

    X-linked acro-gigantism (X-LAG) is a new syndrome of pituitary gigantism, caused by microduplications on chromosome Xq26.3, encompassing the gene GPR101, which is highly upregulated in pituitary tumors. We conducted this study to explore the clinical, radiological and hormonal phenotype and responses to therapy in patients with X-LAG syndrome. The study included 18 patients (13 sporadic) with X-LAG and a microduplication in chromosome Xq26.3. All sporadic cases had unique duplications and the inheritance pattern in 2 families was dominant with all Xq26.3 duplication carriers being affected. Patients began to grow rapidly as early as 2–3 months of age (median 12 months). At diagnosis (median delay 27 months), patients had a median height and weight SDS score of >+3.9 SDS. Apart from the increased overall body size, the children had acromegalic symptoms including acral enlargement and facial coarsening. More than a third of cases had increased appetite. Patients had marked hypersecretion of GH/IGF-1 and prolactin, usually due to a pituitary macroadenoma or hyperplasia. Primary neurosurgical control was achieved with extensive anterior pituitary resection but postoperative hypopituitarism was frequent. Control with somatostatin analogs was not readily achieved despite moderate to high somatostatin receptor subtype-2 expression in tumor tissue. Postoperative adjuvant pegvisomant achieved control of IGF-1 all 5 cases in which it was employed. X-LAG is a new infant-onset gigantism syndrome that has a severe clinical phenotype leading to challenging disease management. PMID:25712922

  12. Patient-Specific Computational Modeling of Keratoconus Progression and Differential Responses to Collagen Cross-linking

    PubMed Central

    Sinha Roy, Abhijit

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. To model keratoconus (KC) progression and investigate the differential responses of central and eccentric cones to standard and alternative collagen cross-linking (CXL) patterns. Methods. Three-dimensional finite element models (FEMs) were generated with clinical tomography and IOP measurements. Graded reductions in regional corneal hyperelastic properties and thickness were imposed separately in the less affected eye of a KC patient. Topographic results, including maximum curvature and first-surface, higher-order aberrations (HOAs), were compared to those of the more affected contralateral eye. In two eyes with central and eccentric cones, a standard broad-beam CXL protocol was simulated with 200- and 300-μm treatment depths and compared to spatially graded broad-beam and cone-centered CXL simulations. Results. In a model of KC progression, maximum curvature and HOA increased as regional corneal hyperelastic properties were decreased. A topographic cone could be generated without a reduction in corneal thickness. Simulation of standard 9-mm-diameter CXL produced decreases in corneal curvature comparable to clinical reports and affected cone location. A 100-μm increase in CXL depth enhanced flattening by 24% to 34% and decreased HOA by 22% to 31%. Topographic effects were greatest with cone-centered CXL simulations. Conclusions. Progressive hyperelastic weakening of a cornea with subclinical KC produced topographic features of manifest KC. The clinical phenomenon of topographic flattening after CXL was replicated. The magnitude and higher-order optics of this response depended on IOP and the spatial distribution of stiffening relative to the cone location. Smaller diameter simulated treatments centered on the cone provided greater reductions in curvature and HOA than a standard broad-beam CXL pattern. PMID:22039252

  13. Body circumferences: clinical implications emerging from a new geometric model

    PubMed Central

    Heymsfield, Steven B; Martin-Nguyen, Allison; Fong, Tung M; Gallagher, Dympna; Pietrobelli, Angelo

    2008-01-01

    Background Body volume expands with the positive energy balance associated with the development of adult human obesity and this "growth" is captured by two widely used clinical metrics, waist circumference and body mass index (BMI). Empirical correlations between circumferences, BMI, and related body compartments are frequently reported but fail to provide an important common conceptual foundation that can be related to key clinical observations. A two-phase program was designed to fill this important gap: a geometric model linking body volume with circumferences and BMI was developed and validated in cross-sectional cohorts; and the model was applied to the evaluation of longitudinally monitored subjects during periods of voluntary weight loss. Concepts emerging from the developed model were then used to examine the relations between the evaluated clinical measures and body composition. Methods Two groups of healthy adults (n = 494 and 1499) were included in the cross-sectional model development/testing phase and subjects in two previous weight loss studies were included in the longitudinal model evaluation phase. Five circumferences (arm, waist, hip, thigh, and calf; average of sum, C), height (H), BMI, body volume (V; underwater weighing), and the volumes of major body compartments (whole-body magnetic resonance imaging) were measured. Results The evaluation of a humanoid geometric model based a cylinder confirmed that V derived from C and H was highly correlated with measured V [R2 both males and females, 0.97; p < 0.001). Developed allometric models confirmed model predictions that C and BMI (represented as V/H) are directly linked as, C = (V/H)0.5. The scaling of individual circumferences to V/H varied, with waist the highest (V/H~0.6) and calf the lowest (V/H~0.3), indicating that the largest and smallest between-subject "growth" with greater body volume occurs in the abdominal area and lower extremities, respectively. A stepwise linear regression model

  14. BR 07-2 THE LINKING IN THE HUMAN (OBSERVATIONAL AND CLINICAL STUDY).

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Peter

    2016-09-01

    patterns in the household during childhood and adolescence due to cohabitation. It is hypothesized that microbiota profile as well as dietary intake patterns may cluster within families. Recently it was discovered that there is also a specific serum biomarker, the pro-atherosclerotic metabolite, trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO) that is able to reflect the gut microbiome and predict cardiovascular events [2]. TMAO can also predict prognosis in patients with congestive heart failure. Interventions to change the microbiota have provided promising results [3] and been described as a potential treatment target for cardio-metabolic disease. Such interventions should be based on the wider use of designed and tested functional food products as part of a healthy lifestyle in general. New findings hypertensive experimental animals and in human patients has revealed a special pattern of different microbiota patterns (dysbiosis) that differs from normotensive controls [4]. This could be linked to early life influences of other factors related to lifestyle in adult life. One idea is to test the influence of antibiotic treatment in these hypertensive individuals to see if vascular function can be improved and blood pressure lowered. We have to learn more about the gastrointestinal tract as potential initial organ of metabolic hypertension, as recently suggested [5].In summary, the family clustering of cardiometabolic disorders is a well-known clinical observation, but still not fully understood. Genetic factors, even put together in a risk score, can explain just a minor proportion of the increased family risk. New discoveries linking gut microbiota to obesity and cardiometabolic risk conditions, including hypertension, could explain some of this increased clustering. Gut microbiota could potentially be influenced by functional food products and healthy lifestyle, providing a link to cardiovascular and metabolic prevention.

  15. {open_quotes}Unspecific{close_quotes} X-linked mental retardation: Clinical, genetic and molecular studies

    SciTech Connect

    Ropers, H.H.; Maacel, S. van der; Knoers, N.

    1994-09-01

    Previous linkage studies have assigned a gene for non-syndromic X-linked mental retardation (XMR) to at least 8 different regions on the X-chromosome. The fragile X-syndrome (FRAXA) does not account for more than 40% of all cases; in most XMR families early diagnosis and prevention is not possible. As part of a systematic study into {open_quotes}unspecific{close_quotes} XMR involving more than 30 non-FRAXA families, linkage studies have enabled us to map the respective genes in 4 families to the Xp11.4-q12 interval with peak lod scores around the ALAS2 locus. In three other families, the gene defect could be assigned to the KAL-DMD, DXS424-FRAXAC2 and DSX52-Xqter intervals, respectively. In one of these families, small stature due to growth hormone deficiency was observed as a distinctive clinical feature. Molecular cloning of the breakpoint in a mentally retarded girl with a balanced t(Xq13;13q) translocation has enabled us to isolate an X-chromosomal gene which is disrupted in this patient and is highly expressed in brain. YAC cloning strategies are being employed to clone another XMR gene, which has been identified previously in the vicinity of the CHM locus and genes involved in mentally retarded patients with two different inversions, inv(X)(q21p11) and inv(X)(p21q24), respectively.

  16. Clinical and mutational features of Vietnamese children with X-linked agammaglobulinemia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) is a primary immune deficiency characterized by recurrent bacterial infections and profoundly depressed serum immunoglobulin levels and circulating mature B cells. It is caused by mutations of the Bruton tyrosine kinase (BTK) gene and is the most common form of inherited antibody deficiency. To our knowledge, this is the first report of XLA from Vietnam. Methods We investigated the BTK gene mutations and clinical features of four unrelated Vietnamese children. Results The mean ages at onset and at diagnosis were 2.5 and 8 years, respectively. All patients had a medical history of otitis media, pneumonia, and septicemia at the time of diagnosis. Other infections reported included sinusitis, bronchiectasis, arthritis, skin infections, meningitis, and recurrent diarrhea. We identified one previously reported mutation (c.441G >A) and three novel mutations: two frameshifts (c.1770delG and c.1742 delG), and one nonsense (c.1249A >T). Conclusions The delayed diagnosis may be attributable to insufficient awareness of this rare disease on the background of frequent infections even in the immunocompetent pediatric population in Vietnam. Our results further support the importance of molecular genetic testing in diagnosis of XLA. PMID:24885015

  17. From Molecules to the Clinic: Linking Schizophrenia and Metabolic Syndrome through Sphingolipids Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Castillo, Rolando I.; Rojo, Leonel E.; Henriquez-Henriquez, Marcela; Silva, Hernán; Maturana, Alejandro; Villar, María J.; Fuentes, Manuel; Gaspar, Pablo A.

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MS) is a prevalent and severe comorbidity observed in schizophrenia (SZ). The exact nature of this association is controversial and very often accredited to the effects of psychotropic medications and disease-induced life-style modifications, such as inactive lifestyle, poor dietary choices, and smoking. However, drug therapy and disease-induced lifestyle factors are likely not the only factors contributing to the observed converging nature of these conditions, since an increased prevalence of MS is also observed in first episode and drug-naïve psychosis populations. MS and SZ share common intrinsic susceptibility factors and etiopathogenic mechanisms, which may change the way we approach clinical management of SZ patients. Among the most relevant common pathogenic pathways of SZ and MS are alterations in the sphingolipids (SLs) metabolism and SLs homeostasis. SLs have important structural functions as they participate in the formation of membrane “lipid rafts.” SLs also play physiological roles in cell differentiation, proliferation, and inflammatory processes, which might be part of MS/SZ common pathophysiological processes. In this article we review a plausible mechanism to explain the link between MS and SZ through a disruption in SL homeostasis. Additionally, we provide insights on how this hypothesis can lead to the developing of new diagnostic/therapeutic technologies for SZ patients. PMID:27877101

  18. From Molecules to the Clinic: Linking Schizophrenia and Metabolic Syndrome through Sphingolipids Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Rolando I; Rojo, Leonel E; Henriquez-Henriquez, Marcela; Silva, Hernán; Maturana, Alejandro; Villar, María J; Fuentes, Manuel; Gaspar, Pablo A

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MS) is a prevalent and severe comorbidity observed in schizophrenia (SZ). The exact nature of this association is controversial and very often accredited to the effects of psychotropic medications and disease-induced life-style modifications, such as inactive lifestyle, poor dietary choices, and smoking. However, drug therapy and disease-induced lifestyle factors are likely not the only factors contributing to the observed converging nature of these conditions, since an increased prevalence of MS is also observed in first episode and drug-naïve psychosis populations. MS and SZ share common intrinsic susceptibility factors and etiopathogenic mechanisms, which may change the way we approach clinical management of SZ patients. Among the most relevant common pathogenic pathways of SZ and MS are alterations in the sphingolipids (SLs) metabolism and SLs homeostasis. SLs have important structural functions as they participate in the formation of membrane "lipid rafts." SLs also play physiological roles in cell differentiation, proliferation, and inflammatory processes, which might be part of MS/SZ common pathophysiological processes. In this article we review a plausible mechanism to explain the link between MS and SZ through a disruption in SL homeostasis. Additionally, we provide insights on how this hypothesis can lead to the developing of new diagnostic/therapeutic technologies for SZ patients.

  19. Gait Characteristics in a Canine Model of X-linked Myotubular Myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Goddard, Melissa A.; Burlingame, Emily; Beggs, Alan H.; Buj-Bello, Anna; Childers, Martin K.; Marsh, Anthony P.; Kelly, Valerie E.

    2014-01-01

    X-linked myotubular myopathy (XLMTM) is a fatal pediatric disease where affected boys display profound weakness of the skeletal muscles. Possible therapies are under development but robust outcome measures in animal models are required for effective translation to human patients. We established a naturally-occuring canine model, where XLMTM dogs display clinical symptoms similar to those observed in humans. The aim of this study was to determine potential endpoints for the assessment of future treatments in this model. Video-based gait analysis was selected, as it is a well-established method of assessing limb function in neuromuscular disease and measures have been correlated to patient quality of life. XLMTM dogs (N=3) and their true littermate wild type controls (N=3) were assessed at 4–5 time points, beginning at 10 weeks and continuing through 17 weeks. Motion capture and an instrumented carpet were used separately to evaluate spatiotemporal and kinematic changes over time. XLMTM dogs walk more slowly and with shorter stride lengths than wild type dogs, and these differences became greater over time. However, there was no clear difference in angular measures between affected and unaffected dogs. These data demonstrate that spatiotemporal parameters capture functional changes in gait in an XLMTM canine model and support their utility in future therapeutic trials. PMID:25281397

  20. Clinical safety and wear resistance of the phospholipid polymer-grafted highly cross-linked polyethylene liner.

    PubMed

    Moro, Toru; Takatori, Yoshio; Tanaka, Sakae; Ishihara, Kazuhiko; Oda, Hiromi; Kim, Yoon Taek; Umeyama, Takashige; Fukatani, Eisei; Ito, Hideya; Kyomoto, Masayuki; Oshima, Hirofumi; Tanaka, Takeyuki; Kawaguchi, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Kozo

    2016-11-03

    To reduce the production of wear particles and subsequent aseptic loosening, we created a human articular cartilage-mimicked surface for a highly cross-linked polyethylene liner, whose surface grafted layer consisted of a biocompatible phospholipid polymer, poly(2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine). Although our previous in vitro findings showed that poly(2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine)-grafted particles were biologically inert and caused no subsequent bone resorptive responses, and poly(2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine) grafting markedly decreased wear in hip joint simulator tests, the clinical safety, and in vivo wear resistance of poly(2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine)-grafted highly cross-linked polyethylene liners remained open to question. Therefore, in the present study, we evaluated clinical and radiographic outcomes of poly(2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine)-grafted highly cross-linked polyethylene liners 5 years subsequent to total hip replacement in 68 consecutive patients. No reoperation was required for any reason, and no adverse events were associated with the implanted liners. The average Harris Hip Score increased from 38.6 preoperatively to 96.5 5 years postoperatively, and health-related quality of life, as indicated by the Short Form 36 Health Survey, improved. Radiographic analyses showed no periprosthetic osteolysis or implant migration. Between 1 and 5 years postoperatively, the mean steady-state wear rate was 0.002 mm/year, which represented a marked reduction relative to other highly cross-linked polyethylene liners, and appeared to be unaffected by patient-related or surgical factors. Although longer follow up is required, poly(2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine)-grafted highly cross-linked polyethylene liners improved mid-term clinical outcomes. The clinical safety and wear-resistance results are encouraging with respect to the improvement of long-term clinical outcomes with poly(2

  1. Generalized Modelling of the Stabilizer Link and Static Simulation Using FEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cofaru, Nicolae Florin; Roman, Lucian Ion; Oleksik, Valentin; Pascu, Adrian

    2016-12-01

    This paper proposes an organological approach of one of the components of front suspension, namely anti-roll power link. There will be realized a CAD 3D modelling of this power link. 3D modelling is generalized and there were used the powers of Catia V5R20 software. Parameterized approach provides a high flexibility in the design, meaning that dimensional and shape changes of the semi-power link are very easy to perform just by changing some parameters. Several new versions are proposed for the anti-roll power link body. At the end of the work, it is made a static analysis of the semi-power link model used in the suspension of vehicles OPEL ASTRA G, ZAFIRA, MERIVA, and constructive optimization of its body.

  2. Clinical modeling--a critical analysis.

    PubMed

    Blobel, Bernd; Goossen, William; Brochhausen, Mathias

    2014-01-01

    Modeling clinical processes (and their informational representation) is a prerequisite for optimally enabling and supporting high quality and safe care through information and communication technology and meaningful use of gathered information. The paper investigates existing approaches to clinical modeling, thereby systematically analyzing the underlying principles, the consistency with and the integration opportunity to other existing or emerging projects, as well as the correctness of representing the reality of health and health services. The analysis is performed using an architectural framework for modeling real-world systems. In addition, fundamental work on the representation of facts, relations, and processes in the clinical domain by ontologies is applied, thereby including the integration of advanced methodologies such as translational and system medicine. The paper demonstrates fundamental weaknesses and different maturity as well as evolutionary potential in the approaches considered. It offers a development process starting with the business domain and its ontologies, continuing with the Reference Model-Open Distributed Processing (RM-ODP) related conceptual models in the ICT ontology space, the information and the computational view, and concluding with the implementation details represented as engineering and technology view, respectively. The existing approaches reflect at different levels the clinical domain, put the main focus on different phases of the development process instead of first establishing the real business process representation and therefore enable quite differently and partially limitedly the domain experts' involvement. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Theory and Practice: An Integrative Model Linking Class and Field

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lesser, Joan Granucci; Cooper, Marlene

    2006-01-01

    Social work has evolved over the years taking on the challenges of the times. The profession now espouses a breadth of theoretical approaches and treatment modalities. We have developed a model to help graduate social work students master the skill of integrating theory and social work practice. The Integrative Model has five components: (l) The…

  4. A Tiered Model for Linking Students to the Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Laura Landry; Gerard, Jean M.; Sturm, Michael R.; Wooldridge, Deborah G.

    2016-01-01

    A tiered practice model (introductory, pre-internship, and internship) embedded in the curriculum facilitates community engagement and creates relevance for students as they pursue a professional identity in Human Development and Family Studies. The tiered model integrates high-impact teaching practices (HIP) and student engagement pedagogies…

  5. A Tiered Model for Linking Students to the Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Laura Landry; Gerard, Jean M.; Sturm, Michael R.; Wooldridge, Deborah G.

    2016-01-01

    A tiered practice model (introductory, pre-internship, and internship) embedded in the curriculum facilitates community engagement and creates relevance for students as they pursue a professional identity in Human Development and Family Studies. The tiered model integrates high-impact teaching practices (HIP) and student engagement pedagogies…

  6. Design-oriented analytic model of phase and frequency modulated optical links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monsurrò, Pietro; Saitto, Antonio; Tommasino, Pasquale; Trifiletti, Alessandro; Vannucci, Antonello; Cimmino, Rosario F.

    2016-07-01

    An analytic design-oriented model of phase and frequency modulated microwave optical links has been developed. The models are suitable for design of broadband high dynamic range optical links for antenna remoting and optical beamforming, where noise and linearity of the subsystems are a concern Digital filter design techniques have been applied to the design of optical filters working as frequency discriminator, that are the bottleneck in terms of linearity for these systems. The models of frequency modulated, phase modulated, and coherent I/Q link have been used to compare performance of the different architectures in terms of linearity and SFDR.

  7. A Model for Linking Organizational Culture and Performance. Innovative Session 6. [AHRD Conference, 2001].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCullough, Cathy Bolton

    An innovative session was conducted to introduce session participants to a concept and researched model for linking organizational culture and performance. The session goals were as follows: (1) give participants a working knowledge of the link between business culture and key business performance indicators; (2) give participants a hands-on…

  8. Derivation of free energy expressions for tube models from coarse-grained slip-link models.

    PubMed

    Steenbakkers, Rudi J A; Schieber, Jay D

    2012-07-21

    We present the free energy of a single-chain mean-field model for polymer melt dynamics, which uses a continuous (tube-like) approximation to the discrete entanglements with surrounding chains, but, in contrast to previous tube models, includes fluctuations in the number density of Kuhn steps along the primitive path and in the degree of entanglement. The free energy is obtained from that of the slip-link model with fluctuating entanglement positions [J. D. Schieber and K. Horio, J. Chem. Phys. 132, 074905 (2010)] by taking the continuous limit of (functions of) the discrete Kuhn-step numbers and end-to-end vectors of the strands between entanglements. This coarse-graining from a more-detailed level of description has the advantage that no ad hoc arguments need to be introduced. Moreover, the thermodynamic consistency of the slip-link model [J. D. Schieber, J. Non-Equilib. Thermodyn. 28, 179 (2003)] can be preserved. Fluctuations in the positions of entanglements lead to a harmonic bending term in the free energy of the continuous chain, similar to that derived by Read et al. [Macromolecules 41, 6843 (2008)] starting from a modified GLaMM model [R. S. Graham, A. E. Likhtman, T. C. B. McLeish, and S. T. Milner, J. Rheol. 47, 1171 (2003)]. If these fluctuations are set to zero, the free energy becomes purely Gaussian and corresponds to the continuous limit of the original slip-link model, with affinely moving entanglements [J. D. Schieber, J. Chem. Phys. 118, 5162 (2003)]. The free energy reduces to that of Read et al. under their assumptions of a homogeneous Kuhn-step number density and a constant degree of entanglement. Finally, we show how a transformation of the primitive-path coordinate can be applied to make the degree of entanglement an outcome of the model instead of a variable. In summary, this paper constitutes a first step towards a unified mathematical formulation of tube models. The next step will be to formulate the dynamics of the primitive

  9. Derivation of free energy expressions for tube models from coarse-grained slip-link models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steenbakkers, Rudi J. A.; Schieber, Jay D.

    2012-07-01

    We present the free energy of a single-chain mean-field model for polymer melt dynamics, which uses a continuous (tube-like) approximation to the discrete entanglements with surrounding chains, but, in contrast to previous tube models, includes fluctuations in the number density of Kuhn steps along the primitive path and in the degree of entanglement. The free energy is obtained from that of the slip-link model with fluctuating entanglement positions [J. D. Schieber and K. Horio, J. Chem. Phys. 132, 074905 (2010)], 10.1063/1.3314727 by taking the continuous limit of (functions of) the discrete Kuhn-step numbers and end-to-end vectors of the strands between entanglements. This coarse-graining from a more-detailed level of description has the advantage that no ad hoc arguments need to be introduced. Moreover, the thermodynamic consistency of the slip-link model [J. D. Schieber, J. Non-Equilib. Thermodyn. 28, 179 (2003)], 10.1515/JNETDY.2003.010 can be preserved. Fluctuations in the positions of entanglements lead to a harmonic bending term in the free energy of the continuous chain, similar to that derived by Read et al. [Macromolecules 41, 6843 (2008)], 10.1021/ma8009855 starting from a modified GLaMM model [R. S. Graham, A. E. Likhtman, T. C. B. McLeish, and S. T. Milner, J. Rheol. 47, 1171 (2003)], 10.1122/1.1595099. If these fluctuations are set to zero, the free energy becomes purely Gaussian and corresponds to the continuous limit of the original slip-link model, with affinely moving entanglements [J. D. Schieber, J. Chem. Phys. 118, 5162 (2003)], 10.1063/1.1553764. The free energy reduces to that of Read et al. under their assumptions of a homogeneous Kuhn-step number density and a constant degree of entanglement. Finally, we show how a transformation of the primitive-path coordinate can be applied to make the degree of entanglement an outcome of the model instead of a variable. In summary, this paper constitutes a first step towards a unified mathematical

  10. Emotion regulation strategies in trauma-related disorders: pathways linking neurobiology and clinical manifestations.

    PubMed

    Del Río-Casanova, Lucía; González, Anabel; Páramo, Mario; Van Dijke, Annemiek; Brenlla, Julio

    2016-06-01

    Emotion regulation impairments with traumatic origins have mainly been studied from posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) models by studying cases of adult onset and single-incident trauma exposure. The effects of adverse traumatic experiences, however, go beyond the PTSD. Different authors have proposed that PTSD, borderline personality, dissociative, conversive and somatoform disorders constitute a full spectrum of trauma-related conditions. Therefore, a comprehensive review of the neurobiological findings covering this posttraumatic spectrum is needed in order to develop an all-encompassing model for trauma-related disorders with emotion regulation at its center. The present review has sought to link neurobiology findings concerning cortico-limbic function to the field of emotion regulation. In so doing, trauma-related disorders have been placed in a continuum between under- and over-regulation of affect strategies. Under-regulation of affect was predominant in borderline personality disorder, PTSD with re-experiencing symptoms and positive psychoform and somatoform dissociative symptoms. Over-regulation of affect was more prevalent in somatoform disorders and pathologies characterized by negative psychoform and somatoform symptoms. Throughout this continuum, different combinations between under- and over-regulation of affect strategies were also found.

  11. Strengthening the weak link: Built Environment modelling for loss analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millinship, I.

    2012-04-01

    Methods to analyse insured losses from a range of natural perils, including pricing by primary insurers and catastrophe modelling by reinsurers, typically lack sufficient exposure information. Understanding the hazard intensity in terms of spatial severity and frequency is only the first step towards quantifying the risk of a catastrophic event. For any given event we need to know: Are any structures affected? What type of buildings are they? How much damaged occurred? How much will the repairs cost? To achieve this, detailed exposure information is required to assess the likely damage and to effectively calculate the resultant loss. Modelling exposures in the Built Environment therefore plays as important a role in understanding re/insurance risk as characterising the physical hazard. Across both primary insurance books and aggregated reinsurance portfolios, the location of a property (a risk) and its monetary value is typically known. Exactly what that risk is in terms of detailed property descriptors including structure type and rebuild cost - and therefore its vulnerability to loss - is often omitted. This data deficiency is a primary source of variations between modelled losses and the actual claims value. Built Environment models are therefore required at a high resolution to describe building attributes that relate vulnerability to property damage. However, national-scale household-level datasets are often not computationally practical in catastrophe models and data must be aggregated. In order to provide more accurate risk analysis, we have developed and applied a methodology for Built Environment modelling for incorporation into a range of re/insurance applications, including operational models for different international regions and different perils and covering residential, commercial and industry exposures. Illustrated examples are presented, including exposure modelling suitable for aggregated reinsurance analysis for the UK and bespoke high resolution

  12. Modeling and control of a hydraulically actuated flexible-prismatic link robot

    SciTech Connect

    Love, L.; Kress, R.; Jansen, J.

    1996-12-01

    Most of the research related to flexible link manipulators to date has focused on single link, fixed length, single plane of vibration test beds. In addition, actuation has been predominantly based upon electromagnetic motors. Ironically, these elements are rarely found in the existing industrial long reach systems. This manuscript describes a new hydraulically actuated, long reach manipulator with a flexible prismatic link at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Focus is directed towards both modeling and control of hydraulic actuators as well as flexible links that have variable natural frequencies.

  13. Linking Time and Space Scales in Distributed Hydrological Modelling - a case study for the VIC model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melsen, Lieke; Teuling, Adriaan; Torfs, Paul; Zappa, Massimiliano; Mizukami, Naoki; Clark, Martyn; Uijlenhoet, Remko

    2015-04-01

    One of the famous paradoxes of the Greek philosopher Zeno of Elea (~450 BC) is the one with the arrow: If one shoots an arrow, and cuts its motion into such small time steps that at every step the arrow is standing still, the arrow is motionless, because a concatenation of non-moving parts does not create motion. Nowadays, this reasoning can be refuted easily, because we know that motion is a change in space over time, which thus by definition depends on both time and space. If one disregards time by cutting it into infinite small steps, motion is also excluded. This example shows that time and space are linked and therefore hard to evaluate separately. As hydrologists we want to understand and predict the motion of water, which means we have to look both in space and in time. In hydrological models we can account for space by using spatially explicit models. With increasing computational power and increased data availability from e.g. satellites, it has become easier to apply models at a higher spatial resolution. Increasing the resolution of hydrological models is also labelled as one of the 'Grand Challenges' in hydrology by Wood et al. (2011) and Bierkens et al. (2014), who call for global modelling at hyperresolution (~1 km and smaller). A literature survey on 242 peer-viewed articles in which the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) model was used, showed that the spatial resolution at which the model is applied has decreased over the past 17 years: From 0.5 to 2 degrees when the model was just developed, to 1/8 and even 1/32 degree nowadays. On the other hand the literature survey showed that the time step at which the model is calibrated and/or validated remained the same over the last 17 years; mainly daily or monthly. Klemeš (1983) stresses the fact that space and time scales are connected, and therefore downscaling the spatial scale would also imply downscaling of the temporal scale. Is it worth the effort of downscaling your model from 1 degree to 1

  14. Exploring Links between Genotypes, Phenotypes, and Clinical Predictors of Response to Early Intensive Behavioral Intervention in Autism Spectrum Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Eapen, Valsamma; Črnčec, Rudi; Walter, Amelia

    2013-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is amongst the most familial of psychiatric disorders. Twin and family studies have demonstrated a monozygotic concordance rate of 70–90%, dizygotic concordance of around 10%, and more than a 20-fold increase in risk for first-degree relatives. Despite major advances in the genetics of autism, the relationship between different aspects of the behavioral and cognitive phenotype and their underlying genetic liability is still unclear. This is complicated by the heterogeneity of autism, which exists at both genetic and phenotypic levels. Given this heterogeneity, one method to find homogeneous entities and link these with specific genotypes would be to pursue endophenotypes. Evidence from neuroimaging, eye tracking, and electrophysiology studies supports the hypothesis that, building on genetic vulnerability, ASD emerges from a developmental cascade in which a deficit in attention to social stimuli leads to impaired interactions with primary caregivers. This results in abnormal development of the neurocircuitry responsible for social cognition, which in turn adversely affects later behavioral and functional domains dependent on these early processes, such as language development. Such a model begets a heterogeneous clinical phenotype, and is also supported by studies demonstrating better clinical outcomes with earlier treatment. Treatment response following intensive early behavioral intervention in ASD is also distinctly variable; however, relatively little is known about specific elements of the clinical phenotype that may predict response to current behavioral treatments. This paper overviews the literature regarding genotypes, phenotypes, and predictors of response to behavioral intervention in ASD and presents suggestions for future research to explore linkages between these that would enable better identification of, and increased treatment efficacy for, ASD. PMID:24062668

  15. Microbiologic, Pharmacokinetic, and Clinical Effects of Corneal Collagen Cross-Linking on Experimentally Induced Pseudomonas Keratitis in Rabbits.

    PubMed

    Cosar, C Banu; Kucuk, Mutlu; Celik, Ekrem; Gonen, Tansu; Akyar, Isin; Serteser, Mustafa; Tokat, Fatma; Ince, Umit

    2015-10-01

    To determine the effects of corneal collagen cross-linking (CXL) on the penetration of topical 0.5% moxifloxacin, on the number of colony-forming units (CFUs) in the cornea, and on the clinical course in a rabbit eye model of experimentally induced Pseudomonas aeruginosa keratitis. In this prospective animal study, experimental Pseudomonas corneal ulcers were induced in 56 corneas of 28 albino New Zealand rabbits. The corneas were randomly divided into the following 4 groups: the control group (14 eyes), the MOX group (moxifloxacin) (14 eyes), the MOX + CXL group (14 eyes), and the CXL group (14 eyes). On day 4 of the experiment, the eyes in the control group were enucleated and CFU counting was performed. On day 10 of the experiment, all eyes were enucleated and CFU counting was performed. In the MOX and MOX + CXL groups, the moxifloxacin level in the cornea, aqueous humor, iris, plasma, and serum was measured by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. The difference in the corneal CFU count between the MOX group and the MOX + CXL group was not significant (P = 0.317). Clinical improvement was greatest in the MOX + CXL group (P < 0.001). The mean corneal moxifloxacin level was 0.391 ± 0.09 μg·mg in the MOX group versus 0.291 ± 0.09 μg·mg in the MOX + CXL group; as such, CXL did not have a significant effect on antibiotic penetrance (P = 0.386). Clinical improvement was greatest in the MOX + CXL group. The synergistic effect of CXL on corneal ulcer treatment is not through antibiotic penetrance.

  16. A model integration framework for linking SWAT and MODFLOW

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Hydrological response and transport phenomena are driven by atmospheric, surface and subsurface processes. These complex processes occur at different spatiotemporal scales requiring comprehensive modeling to assess the impact of anthropogenic activity on hydrology and fate and transport of chemical ...

  17. Brief Report: Examining the Link between Autistic Traits and Compulsive Internet Use in a Non-Clinical Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finkenauer, Catrin; Pollmann, Monique M. H.; Begeer, Sander; Kerkhof, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Individuals with autism spectrum disorders or autistic traits may profit from Internet and computer-mediated interactions, but there is concern about their Internet use becoming compulsive. This study investigated the link between autistic traits and Internet use in a 2-wave longitudinal study with a non-clinical community sample (n = 390). As…

  18. Brief Report: Examining the Link between Autistic Traits and Compulsive Internet Use in a Non-Clinical Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finkenauer, Catrin; Pollmann, Monique M. H.; Begeer, Sander; Kerkhof, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Individuals with autism spectrum disorders or autistic traits may profit from Internet and computer-mediated interactions, but there is concern about their Internet use becoming compulsive. This study investigated the link between autistic traits and Internet use in a 2-wave longitudinal study with a non-clinical community sample (n = 390). As…

  19. Multilayered temporal modeling for the clinical domain.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chen; Dligach, Dmitriy; Miller, Timothy A; Bethard, Steven; Savova, Guergana K

    2016-03-01

    To develop an open-source temporal relation discovery system for the clinical domain. The system is capable of automatically inferring temporal relations between events and time expressions using a multilayered modeling strategy. It can operate at different levels of granularity--from rough temporality expressed as event relations to the document creation time (DCT) to temporal containment to fine-grained classic Allen-style relations. We evaluated our systems on 2 clinical corpora. One is a subset of the Temporal Histories of Your Medical Events (THYME) corpus, which was used in SemEval 2015 Task 6: Clinical TempEval. The other is the 2012 Informatics for Integrating Biology and the Bedside (i2b2) challenge corpus. We designed multiple supervised machine learning models to compute the DCT relation and within-sentence temporal relations. For the i2b2 data, we also developed models and rule-based methods to recognize cross-sentence temporal relations. We used the official evaluation scripts of both challenges to make our results comparable with results of other participating systems. In addition, we conducted a feature ablation study to find out the contribution of various features to the system's performance. Our system achieved state-of-the-art performance on the Clinical TempEval corpus and was on par with the best systems on the i2b2 2012 corpus. Particularly, on the Clinical TempEval corpus, our system established a new F1 score benchmark, statistically significant as compared to the baseline and the best participating system. Presented here is the first open-source clinical temporal relation discovery system. It was built using a multilayered temporal modeling strategy and achieved top performance in 2 major shared tasks. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Multilayered temporal modeling for the clinical domain

    PubMed Central

    Dligach, Dmitriy; Miller, Timothy A; Bethard, Steven; Savova, Guergana K

    2016-01-01

    Objective To develop an open-source temporal relation discovery system for the clinical domain. The system is capable of automatically inferring temporal relations between events and time expressions using a multilayered modeling strategy. It can operate at different levels of granularity—from rough temporality expressed as event relations to the document creation time (DCT) to temporal containment to fine-grained classic Allen-style relations. Materials and Methods We evaluated our systems on 2 clinical corpora. One is a subset of the Temporal Histories of Your Medical Events (THYME) corpus, which was used in SemEval 2015 Task 6: Clinical TempEval. The other is the 2012 Informatics for Integrating Biology and the Bedside (i2b2) challenge corpus. We designed multiple supervised machine learning models to compute the DCT relation and within-sentence temporal relations. For the i2b2 data, we also developed models and rule-based methods to recognize cross-sentence temporal relations. We used the official evaluation scripts of both challenges to make our results comparable with results of other participating systems. In addition, we conducted a feature ablation study to find out the contribution of various features to the system’s performance. Results Our system achieved state-of-the-art performance on the Clinical TempEval corpus and was on par with the best systems on the i2b2 2012 corpus. Particularly, on the Clinical TempEval corpus, our system established a new F1 score benchmark, statistically significant as compared to the baseline and the best participating system. Conclusion Presented here is the first open-source clinical temporal relation discovery system. It was built using a multilayered temporal modeling strategy and achieved top performance in 2 major shared tasks. PMID:26521301

  1. A simple model linking galaxy and dark matter evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Birrer, Simon; Lilly, Simon; Amara, Adam; Paranjape, Aseem; Refregier, Alexandre E-mail: simon.lilly@phys.ethz.ch

    2014-09-20

    We construct a simple phenomenological model for the evolving galaxy population by incorporating predefined baryonic prescriptions into a dark matter hierarchical merger tree. The model is based on the simple gas-regulator model introduced by Lilly et al., coupled with the empirical quenching rules of Peng et al. The simplest model already does quite well in reproducing, without re-adjusting the input parameters, many observables, including the main sequence sSFR-mass relation, the faint end slope of the galaxy mass function, and the shape of the star forming and passive mass functions. Similar to observations and/or the recent phenomenological model of Behroozi et al., which was based on epoch-dependent abundance-matching, our model also qualitatively reproduces the evolution of the main sequence sSFR(z) and SFRD(z) star formation rate density relations, the M{sub s} – M{sub h} stellar-to-halo mass relation, and the SFR – M{sub h} relation. Quantitatively the evolution of sSFR(z) and SFRD(z) is not steep enough, the M{sub s} – M{sub h} relation is not quite peaked enough, and, surprisingly, the ratio of quenched to star forming galaxies around M* is not quite high enough. We show that these deficiencies can simultaneously be solved by ad hoc allowing galaxies to re-ingest some of the gas previously expelled in winds, provided that this is done in a mass-dependent and epoch-dependent way. These allow the model galaxies to reduce an inherent tendency to saturate their star formation efficiency, which emphasizes how efficient galaxies around M* are in converting baryons into stars and highlights the fact that quenching occurs at the point when galaxies are rapidly approaching the maximum possible efficiency of converting baryons into stars.

  2. Linking Essential Tremor to the Cerebellum-Animal Model Evidence.

    PubMed

    Handforth, Adrian

    2016-06-01

    In this review, we hope to stimulate interest in animal models as opportunities to understand tremor mechanisms within the cerebellar system. We begin by considering the harmaline model of essential tremor (ET), which has ET-like anatomy and pharmacology. Harmaline induces the inferior olive (IO) to burst fire rhythmically, recruiting rhythmic activity in Purkinje cells (PCs) and deep cerebellar nuclei (DCN). This model has fostered the IO hypothesis of ET, which postulates that factors that promote excess IO, and hence PC complex spike synchrony, also promote tremor. In contrast, the PC hypothesis postulates that partial PC cell loss underlies tremor of ET. We describe models in which chronic partial PC loss is associated with tremor, such as the Weaver mouse, and others with PC loss that do not show tremor, such as the Purkinje cell degeneration mouse. We postulate that partial PC loss with tremor is associated with terminal axonal sprouting. We then discuss tremor that occurs with large lesions of the cerebellum in primates. This tremor has variable frequency and is an ataxic tremor not related to ET. Another tremor type that is not likely related to ET is tremor in mice with mutations that cause prolonged synaptic GABA action. This tremor is probably due to mistiming within cerebellar circuitry. In the final section, we catalog tremor models involving neurotransmitter and ion channel perturbations. Some appear to be related to the IO hypothesis of ET, while in others tremor may be ataxic or due to mistiming. In summary, we offer a tentative framework for classifying animal action tremor, such that various models may be considered potentially relevant to ET, subscribing to IO or PC hypotheses, or not likely relevant, as with mistiming or ataxic tremor. Considerable further research is needed to elucidate the mechanisms of tremor in animal models.

  3. Modeling photosynthesis of discontinuous plant canopies by linking Geometric Optical Radiative Transfer model with biochemical processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Q.; Gong, P.; Li, W.

    2015-02-01

    Modeling vegetation photosynthesis is essential for understanding carbon exchanges between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere. The radiative transfer process within plant canopies is one of the key drivers that regulate canopy photosynthesis. Most vegetation cover consists of discrete plant crowns, of which the physical observation departs from the underlying assumption of a homogenous and uniform medium in classic radiative transfer theory. Here we advance the Geometric Optical Radiative Transfer (GORT) model to simulate photosynthesis activities for discontinuous plant canopies. We separate radiation absorption into two components that are absorbed by sunlit and shaded leaves, and derive analytical solutions by integrating over the canopy layer. To model leaf-level and canopy-level photosynthesis, leaf light absorption is then linked to the biochemical process of gas diffusion through leaf stomata. The canopy gap probability derived from GORT differs from classic radiative transfer theory, especially when the leaf area index is high, due to leaf clumping effects. Tree characteristics such as tree density, crown shape, and canopy length affect leaf clumping and regulate radiation interception. Modeled gross primary production (GPP) for two deciduous forest stands could explain more than 80% of the variance of flux tower measurements at both near hourly and daily time scales. We also demonstrate that the ambient CO2 concentration influences daytime vegetation photosynthesis, which needs to be considered in state-of-the-art biogeochemical models. The proposed model is complementary to classic radiative transfer theory and shows promise in modeling the radiative transfer process and photosynthetic activities over discontinuous forest canopies.

  4. A model linking uncertainty, post-traumatic stress, and health behaviors in childhood cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ya-Ling; Gau, Bih-Shya; Hsu, Wen-Ming; Chang, Hsiu-Hao

    2009-01-01

    To consolidate the literature and provide a model to explain the links among uncertainty, post-traumatic stress syndrome, and health behaviors in adolescent and young adult childhood cancer survivors. A systemic review of related literature and theory was used for the proposed model. The literature pertaining to the Uncertainty in Illness Theory, childhood cancer late effects, post-traumatic stress, and health behaviors was reviewed and critiqued from three data sets from 1979-2007: MEDLINE, PsycInfo, and CINAHL. Key words used for the search were uncertainty and post-traumatic stress as well as health behaviors, including smoking, alcohol use, unsafe sex, sunscreen use, and physical inactivity. Childhood cancer survivors living with chronic uncertainty may develop a new view of life and, as a result, adopt more health-promotion behaviors and engage in less health-risk behaviors. However, survivors living with chronic uncertainty may generate symptoms similar to post-traumatic stress disorder and, therefore, adopt fewer health-promotion behaviors and engage in more health-risk behaviors. The uncertainty that pervades the childhood cancer experience can lead to the development of symptoms that resemble those of post-traumatic stress. The symptoms can interfere with the adoption of healthy lifestyle behaviors and avoidance of health-risk behaviors. The theoretically derived model outlined in this article can be used to guide clinical interventions and additional research into the health behaviors of childhood cancer survivors.

  5. Linking Meteorology, Air Quality Models and Observations to ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Epidemiologic studies are critical in establishing the association between exposure to air pollutants and adverse health effects. Results of epidemiologic studies are used by U.S. EPA in developing air quality standards to protect the public from the health effects of air pollutants. A major challenge in environmental epidemiology is adequate exposure characterization. Numerous health studies have used measurements from a few central-site ambient monitors to characterize air pollution exposures. Relying solely on central-site ambient monitors does not account for the spatial-heterogeneity of ambient air pollution patterns, the temporal variability in ambient concentrations, nor the influence of infiltration and indoor sources. Central-site monitoring becomes even more problematic for certain air pollutants that exhibit significant spatial heterogeneity. Statistical interpolation techniques and passive monitoring methods can provide additional spatial resolution in ambient concentration estimates. In addition, spatio-temporal models, which integrate GIS data and other factors, such as meteorology, have also been developed to produce more resolved estimates of ambient concentrations. Models, such as the Community Multi-Scale Air Quality (CMAQ) model, estimate ambient concentrations by combining information on meteorology, source emissions, and chemical-fate and transport. Hybrid modeling approaches, which integrate regional scale models with local scale dispersion

  6. A Dimensional Bus model for integrating clinical and research data

    PubMed Central

    Hum, Richard C; Murphy, James R

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Many clinical research data integration platforms rely on the Entity–Attribute–Value model because of its flexibility, even though it presents problems in query formulation and execution time. The authors sought more balance in these traits. Materials and Methods Borrowing concepts from Entity–Attribute–Value and from enterprise data warehousing, the authors designed an alternative called the Dimensional Bus model and used it to integrate electronic medical record, sponsored study, and biorepository data. Each type of observational collection has its own table, and the structure of these tables varies to suit the source data. The observational tables are linked to the Bus, which holds provenance information and links to various classificatory dimensions that amplify the meaning of the data or facilitate its query and exposure management. Results The authors implemented a Bus-based clinical research data repository with a query system that flexibly manages data access and confidentiality, facilitates catalog search, and readily formulates and compiles complex queries. Conclusion The design provides a workable way to manage and query mixed schemas in a data warehouse. PMID:21856687

  7. Linking process and measurement models of recognition-based decisions.

    PubMed

    Heck, Daniel W; Erdfelder, Edgar

    2017-07-01

    When making inferences about pairs of objects, one of which is recognized and the other is not, the recognition heuristic states that participants choose the recognized object in a noncompensatory way without considering any further knowledge. In contrast, information-integration theories such as parallel constraint satisfaction (PCS) assume that recognition is merely one of many cues that is integrated with further knowledge in a compensatory way. To test both process models against each other without manipulating recognition or further knowledge, we include response times into the r-model, a popular multinomial processing tree model for memory-based decisions. Essentially, this response-time-extended r-model allows to test a crucial prediction of PCS, namely, that the integration of recognition-congruent knowledge leads to faster decisions compared to the consideration of recognition only-even though more information is processed. In contrast, decisions due to recognition-heuristic use are predicted to be faster than decisions affected by any further knowledge. Using the classical German-cities example, simulations show that the novel measurement model discriminates between both process models based on choices, decision times, and recognition judgments only. In a reanalysis of 29 data sets including more than 400,000 individual trials, noncompensatory choices of the recognized option were estimated to be slower than choices due to recognition-congruent knowledge. This corroborates the parallel information-integration account of memory-based decisions, according to which decisions become faster when the coherence of the available information increases. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  8. Mutations, Clinical Findings and Survival Estimates in South American Patients with X-Linked Adrenoleukodystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Fernanda dos Santos; Matte, Ursula; Habekost, Clarissa Troller; de Castilhos, Raphael Machado; El Husny, Antonette Souto; Lourenço, Charles Marques; Vianna-Morgante, Angela M.; Giuliani, Liane; Galera, Marcial Francis; Honjo, Rachel; Kim, Chong Ae; Politei, Juan; Vargas, Carmen Regla; Jardim, Laura Bannach

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we analyzed the ABCD1 gene in X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) patients and relatives from 38 unrelated families from South America, as well as phenotypic proportions, survival estimates, and the potential effect of geographical origin in clinical characteristics. Methods X- ALD patients from Brazil, Argentina and Uruguay were invited to participate in molecular studies to determine their genetic status, characterize the mutations and improve the genetic counseling of their families. All samples were screened by SSCP analysis of PCR fragments, followed by automated DNA sequencing to establish the specific mutation in each family. Age at onset and at death, male phenotypes, genetic status of women, and the effect of family and of latitude of origin were also studied. Results We identified thirty-six different mutations (twelve novel). This population had an important allelic heterogeneity, as only p.Arg518Gln was repeatedly found (three families). Four cases carried de novo mutations. Intra-familiar phenotype variability was observed in all families. Out of 87 affected males identified, 65% had the cerebral phenotype (CALD). The mean (95% CI) ages at onset and at death of the CALD were 10.9 (9.1–12.7) and 24.7 (19.8–29.6) years. No association was found between phenotypic manifestations and latitude of origin. One index-case was a girl with CALD who carried an ABCD1 mutation, and had completely skewed X inactivation. Conclusions This study extends the spectrum of mutations in X-ALD, confirms the high rates of de novo mutations and the absence of common mutations, and suggests a possible high frequency of cerebral forms in our population. PMID:22479560

  9. X-linked lethal infantile spinal muscular atrophy: From clinical description to molecular mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Baumbach, L.; Schiavi, A.

    1994-09-01

    The proximal spinal muscular atrophies (PSMA), one of the most common forms of lower motor neuron disease in children, are characterized by progressive muscle weakness due to loss of anterior horn cells. All three autosomal recessive forms have been mapped to chromosome 5q11.2-11.3, implying an allelic association between these disorders. Recent evidence from our laboratories, as well as others, suggests that a distinct form of lethal neonatal spinal muscular atrophy, associated with early onset contractures, is determined by a gene on the X chromosome. We report our efforts in mapping this disease locus. Our original studies have focused on two unrelated multigenerational families with similar clinical presentations of severe hypotonia, muscle weakness, and a disease course similar to Werdnig Hoffman except for the additional finding of congenital or early onset contractures. Muscle biopsy and/or autopsy were indicative of anterior horn cell loss in affected males. Disease occurrence in each of the families was consistent with an X-linked recessive mode of inheritance. Subsequently, two additional families have been identified, as well as several sporadic male cases. Linkage analysis has been completed in one of these families using highly polymorphic repeats dispersed 10 cM on the X chromosome. Interpretation of results was achieved using an automated data acquisition program. Analysis of over 300 haplotypes generated using PCR-based DNA markers have identified two 16 cM regions on Xp with complete concordance to the disease phenotype. Our currents efforts are focused on the region surrounding the Kallman gene, in attempts to better define a candidate region, as well as analyze possible candidate genes within this region.

  10. Linking international clinical research with stateless populations to justice in global health.

    PubMed

    Pratt, Bridget; Zion, Deborah; Lwin, Khin Maung; Cheah, Phaik Yeong; Nosten, Francois; Loff, Bebe

    2014-06-26

    factors included the research funding environment and staff turnover due to resettlement or migration. Our findings show that obligations for selecting research targets, research capacity strengthening, and post-trial benefits that link clinical trials to justice in global health can be upheld by external research actors from high-income countries when working with stateless populations in LMICs. However, meeting certain framework requirements for long-term collaborations may not be entirely feasible.

  11. Linking international clinical research with stateless populations to justice in global health

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    working with refugees and migrants. Obstructive factors included the research funding environment and staff turnover due to resettlement or migration. Conclusions Our findings show that obligations for selecting research targets, research capacity strengthening, and post-trial benefits that link clinical trials to justice in global health can be upheld by external research actors from high-income countries when working with stateless populations in LMICs. However, meeting certain framework requirements for long-term collaborations may not be entirely feasible. PMID:24969638

  12. Clinical and Genetic Features of Chinese X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth Type 1 Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yuan-Yuan; Lyu, He; Jin, Su-Qin; Zuo, Yue-Huan; Liu, Jing; Wang, Zhao-Xia; Zhang, Wei; Yuan, Yun

    2017-01-01

    Background: X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1 (CMT1X) disease is one of the most common forms of inherited neuropathy caused by mutations in the gap junction beta-1 protein (GJB1) gene (also known as connexin 32). This study presented the clinical and genetic features of a series of Chinese patients with GJB1 gene mutations. Methods: A total of 22 patients from unrelated families, who were referred to Department of Neurology, Peking University First Hospital from January 2005 to January 2016, were identified with GJB1 mutations. Their clinical records and laboratory findings were retrospectively collected and reviewed. Mutations in the GJB1 gene were analyzed by targeted next-generation sequencing (NGS). Nucleotide alternations were confirmed with Sanger sequencing. Results: The CMT1X patients predominantly showed distal muscle weakness of lower limbs with mild sensory disturbance. The mean age of onset was 15.6 ± 8.7 years (ranging from 1 year to 42 years). The sudden onset of cerebral symptoms appeared in four patients (18.2%); two were initial symptoms. One case had constant central nervous system (CNS) signs. There were 19 different heterozygous mutations, including 15 known mutations and four novel mutations (c.115G>T, c.380T>A, c.263C>A, and c.818_819insGGGCT). Among the 22 Chinese patients with CMT1X, the frequency of the GJB1 mutation was 4.5% in transmembrane domain 1 (TM1), 4.5% in TM2, 22.7% in TM3, 9.1% in TM4, 4.5% in extracellular 1 (EC1), 27.3% in EC2, 9.1% in intracellular loop, 13.6% in the N-terminal domain, and 4.5% in the C-terminal domain. CMT1X with CNS impairment appeared in five (22.7%) of these patients. Conclusions: This study indicated that CNS impairment was not rare in Chinese CMT1X patients. Mutations in the EC2 domain of the GJB1 gene were hotspot in Chinese CMT1X patients. PMID:28469099

  13. Linking Models: Reasoning from Patterns to Tables and Equations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Switzer, J. Matt

    2013-01-01

    Patterns are commonly used in middle years mathematics classrooms to teach students about functions and modelling with tables, graphs, and equations. Grade 6 students are expected to, "continue and create sequences involving whole numbers, fractions and decimals," and "describe the rule used to create the sequence." (Australian…

  14. Requirements for clinical information modelling tools.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Conde, Alberto; Jódar-Sánchez, Francisco; Kalra, Dipak

    2015-07-01

    This study proposes consensus requirements for clinical information modelling tools that can support modelling tasks in medium/large scale institutions. Rather than identify which functionalities are currently available in existing tools, the study has focused on functionalities that should be covered in order to provide guidance about how to evolve the existing tools. After identifying a set of 56 requirements for clinical information modelling tools based on a literature review and interviews with experts, a classical Delphi study methodology was applied to conduct a two round survey in order to classify them as essential or recommended. Essential requirements are those that must be met by any tool that claims to be suitable for clinical information modelling, and if we one day have a certified tools list, any tool that does not meet essential criteria would be excluded. Recommended requirements are those more advanced requirements that may be met by tools offering a superior product or only needed in certain modelling situations. According to the answers provided by 57 experts from 14 different countries, we found a high level of agreement to enable the study to identify 20 essential and 21 recommended requirements for these tools. It is expected that this list of identified requirements will guide developers on the inclusion of new basic and advanced functionalities that have strong support by end users. This list could also guide regulators in order to identify requirements that could be demanded of tools adopted within their institutions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Links between fluid mechanics and quantum mechanics: a model for information in economics?

    PubMed

    Haven, Emmanuel

    2016-05-28

    This paper tallies the links between fluid mechanics and quantum mechanics, and attempts to show whether those links can aid in beginning to build a formal template which is usable in economics models where time is (a)symmetric and memory is absent or present. An objective of this paper is to contemplate whether those formalisms can allow us to model information in economics in a novel way.

  16. Linking agent-based models and stochastic models of financial markets

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Ling; Li, Baowen; Podobnik, Boris; Preis, Tobias; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2012-01-01

    It is well-known that financial asset returns exhibit fat-tailed distributions and long-term memory. These empirical features are the main objectives of modeling efforts using (i) stochastic processes to quantitatively reproduce these features and (ii) agent-based simulations to understand the underlying microscopic interactions. After reviewing selected empirical and theoretical evidence documenting the behavior of traders, we construct an agent-based model to quantitatively demonstrate that “fat” tails in return distributions arise when traders share similar technical trading strategies and decisions. Extending our behavioral model to a stochastic model, we derive and explain a set of quantitative scaling relations of long-term memory from the empirical behavior of individual market participants. Our analysis provides a behavioral interpretation of the long-term memory of absolute and squared price returns: They are directly linked to the way investors evaluate their investments by applying technical strategies at different investment horizons, and this quantitative relationship is in agreement with empirical findings. Our approach provides a possible behavioral explanation for stochastic models for financial systems in general and provides a method to parameterize such models from market data rather than from statistical fitting. PMID:22586086

  17. Linking agent-based models and stochastic models of financial markets.

    PubMed

    Feng, Ling; Li, Baowen; Podobnik, Boris; Preis, Tobias; Stanley, H Eugene

    2012-05-29

    It is well-known that financial asset returns exhibit fat-tailed distributions and long-term memory. These empirical features are the main objectives of modeling efforts using (i) stochastic processes to quantitatively reproduce these features and (ii) agent-based simulations to understand the underlying microscopic interactions. After reviewing selected empirical and theoretical evidence documenting the behavior of traders, we construct an agent-based model to quantitatively demonstrate that "fat" tails in return distributions arise when traders share similar technical trading strategies and decisions. Extending our behavioral model to a stochastic model, we derive and explain a set of quantitative scaling relations of long-term memory from the empirical behavior of individual market participants. Our analysis provides a behavioral interpretation of the long-term memory of absolute and squared price returns: They are directly linked to the way investors evaluate their investments by applying technical strategies at different investment horizons, and this quantitative relationship is in agreement with empirical findings. Our approach provides a possible behavioral explanation for stochastic models for financial systems in general and provides a method to parameterize such models from market data rather than from statistical fitting.

  18. Shuttle Communications and Tracking Systems Modeling and TDRSS Link Simulations Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chie, C. M.; Dessouky, K.; Lindsey, W. C.; Tsang, C. S.; Su, Y. T.

    1985-01-01

    An analytical simulation package (LinCsim) which allows the analytical verification of data transmission performance through TDRSS satellites was modified. The work involved the modeling of the user transponder, TDRS, TDRS ground terminal, and link dynamics for forward and return links based on the TDRSS performance specifications (4) and the critical design reviews. The scope of this effort has recently been expanded to include the effects of radio frequency interference (RFI) on the bit error rate (BER) performance of the S-band return links. The RFI environment and the modified TDRSS satellite and ground station hardware are being modeled in accordance with their description in the applicable documents.

  19. Modeling water quality, temperature, and flow in Link River, south-central Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sullivan, Annett B.; Rounds, Stewart A.

    2016-09-09

    The 2.1-km (1.3-mi) Link River connects Upper Klamath Lake to the Klamath River in south-central Oregon. A CE-QUAL-W2 flow and water-quality model of Link River was developed to provide a connection between an existing model of the upper Klamath River and any existing or future models of Upper Klamath Lake. Water-quality sampling at six locations in Link River was done during 2013–15 to support model development and to provide a better understanding of instream biogeochemical processes. The short reach and high velocities in Link River resulted in fast travel times and limited water-quality transformations, except for dissolved oxygen. Reaeration through the reach, especially at the falls in Link River, was particularly important in moderating dissolved oxygen concentrations that at times entered the reach at Link River Dam with marked supersaturation or subsaturation. This reaeration resulted in concentrations closer to saturation downstream at the mouth of Link River.

  20. An integrative model linking feedback environment and organizational citizenship behavior.

    PubMed

    Peng, Jei-Chen; Chiu, Su-Fen

    2010-01-01

    Past empirical evidence has suggested that a positive supervisor feedback environment may enhance employees' organizational citizenship behavior (OCB). In this study, we aim to extend previous research by proposing and testing an integrative model that examines the mediating processes underlying the relationship between supervisor feedback environment and employee OCB. Data were collected from 259 subordinate-supervisor dyads across a variety of organizations in Taiwan. We used structural equation modeling to test our hypotheses. The results demonstrated that supervisor feedback environment influenced employees' OCB indirectly through (1) both positive affective-cognition and positive attitude (i.e., person-organization fit and organizational commitment), and (2) both negative affective-cognition and negative attitude (i.e., role stressors and job burnout). Theoretical and practical implications are discussed.

  1. Microbial Life in Soil - Linking Biophysical Models with Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Or, D.; Tecon, R.; Ebrahimi, A.; Kleyer, H.; Ilie, O.; Wang, G.

    2014-12-01

    Microbial life in soil occurs within fragmented aquatic habitats in complex pore spaces where motility is restricted to short hydration windows (e.g., following rainfall). The limited range of self-dispersion and physical confinement promote spatial association among trophically interdepended microbial species. Competition and preferences for different nutrient resources and byproducts and their diffusion require high level of spatial organization to sustain the functioning of multispecies communities. We report mechanistic modeling studies of competing multispecies microbial communities grown on hydrated surfaces and within artificial soil aggregates (represented by 3-D pore network). Results show how trophic dependencies and cell-level interactions within patchy diffusion fields promote spatial self-organization of motile microbial cells. The spontaneously forming patterns of segregated, yet coexisting species were robust to spatial heterogeneities and to temporal perturbations (hydration dynamics), and respond primarily to the type of trophic dependencies. Such spatially self-organized consortia may reflect ecological templates that optimize substrate utilization and could form the basic architecture for more permanent surface-attached microbial colonies. Hydration dynamics affect structure and spatial arrangement of aerobic and anaerobic microbial communities and their biogeochemical functions. Experiments with well-characterized artificial soil microbial assemblies grown on porous surfaces provide access to community dynamics during wetting and drying cycles detected through genetic fingerprinting. Experiments for visual observations of spatial associations of tagged bacterial species with known trophic dependencies on model porous surfaces are underway. Biophysical modeling provide a means for predicting hydration-mediated critical separation distances for activation of spatial self-organization. The study provides new modeling and observational tools that

  2. Cross Linking and Degradation Mechanisms in Model Sealant Candidates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paciorek, K. L.; Kaufman, J.; Ito, T. I.; Nakahara, J. H.; Kratzer, R. H.

    1977-01-01

    Model compounds were investigated as to which type of heterocyclic ring is the most advantageous for curing sealants based on perfluoroalkylether chains. The relative thermal, thermal oxidative, hydrolytic, and fuel stability of potential crosslinks were determined. Specifically substituted materials were synthesized and evaluation of their stabilities in air, inert atmosphere, water, and Jet-A fuel at 235 and 325 C was made. Three heterocyclic ring systems were considered, namely, triazine, 1,2,4- and 1,3,4-oxadiazoles.

  3. Microbial Life in Soil - Linking Biophysical Models with Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Or, Dani; Tecon, Robin; Ebrahimi, Ali; Kleyer, Hannah; Ilie, Olga; Wang, Gang

    2015-04-01

    Microbial life in soil occurs within fragmented aquatic habitats formed in complex pore spaces where motility is restricted to short hydration windows (e.g., following rainfall). The limited range of self-dispersion and physical confinement promote spatial association among trophically interdepended microbial species. Competition and preferences for different nutrient resources and byproducts and their diffusion require high level of spatial organization to sustain the functioning of multispecies communities. We report mechanistic modeling studies of competing multispecies microbial communities grown on hydrated surfaces and within artificial soil aggregates (represented by 3-D pore network). Results show how trophic dependencies and cell-level interactions within patchy diffusion fields promote spatial self-organization of motile microbial cells. The spontaneously forming patterns of segregated, yet coexisting species were robust to spatial heterogeneities and to temporal perturbations (hydration dynamics), and respond primarily to the type of trophic dependencies. Such spatially self-organized consortia may reflect ecological templates that optimize substrate utilization and could form the basic architecture for more permanent surface-attached microbial colonies. Hydration dynamics affect structure and spatial arrangement of aerobic and anaerobic microbial communities and their biogeochemical functions. Experiments with well-characterized artificial soil microbial assemblies grown on porous surfaces provide access to community dynamics during wetting and drying cycles detected through genetic fingerprinting. Experiments for visual observations of spatial associations of tagged bacterial species with known trophic dependencies on model porous surfaces are underway. Biophysical modeling provide a means for predicting hydration-mediated critical separation distances for activation of spatial self-organization. The study provides new modeling and observational tools

  4. Modeling Prairie Pothole Lakes: Linking Satellite Observation and Calibration (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, F. W.; Liu, G.; Zhang, B.; Yu, Z.

    2009-12-01

    This paper examines the response of a complex lake wetland system to variations in climate. The focus is on the lakes and wetlands of the Missouri Coteau, which is part of the larger Prairie Pothole Region of the Central Plains of North America. Information on lake size was enumerated from satellite images, and yielded power law relationships for different hydrological conditions. More traditional lake-stage data were made available to us from the USGS Cottonwood Lake Study Site in North Dakota. A Probabilistic Hydrologic Model (PHM) was developed to simulate lake complexes comprised of tens-of-thousands or more individual closed-basin lakes and wetlands. What is new about this model is a calibration scheme that utilizes remotely-sensed data on lake area as well as stage data for individual lakes. Some ¼ million individual data points are used within a Genetic Algorithm to calibrate the model by comparing the simulated results with observed lake area-frequency power law relationships derived from Landsat images and water depths from seven individual lakes and wetlands. The simulated lake behaviors show good agreement with the observations under average, dry, and wet climatic conditions. The calibrated model is used to examine the impact of climate variability on a large lake complex in ND, in particular, the “Dust Bowl Drought” 1930s. This most famous drought of the 20th Century devastated the agricultural economy of the Great Plains with health and social impacts lingering for years afterwards. Interestingly, the drought of 1930s is unremarkable in relation to others of greater intensity and frequency before AD 1200 in the Great Plains. Major droughts and deluges have the ability to create marked variability of the power law function (e.g. up to one and a half orders of magnitude variability from the extreme Dust Bowl Drought to the extreme 1993-2001 deluge). This new probabilistic modeling approach provides a novel tool to examine the response of the

  5. Plantar Fasciitis and the Windlass Mechanism: A Biomechanical Link to Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Malone, Terry R.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: Plantar fasciitis is a prevalent problem, with limited consensus among clinicians regarding the most effective treatment. The purpose of this literature review is to provide a systematic approach to the treatment of plantar fasciitis based on the windlass mechanism model. Data Sources: We searched MEDLINE, SPORT Discus, and CINAHL from 1966 to 2003 using the key words plantar fasciitis, windlass mechanism, pronation, heel pain, and heel spur. Data Synthesis: We offer a biomechanical application for the evaluation and treatment of plantar fasciitis based on a review of the literature for the windlass mechanism model. This model provides a means for describing plantar fasciitis conditions such that clinicians can formulate a potential causal relationship between the conditions and their treatments. Conclusions/Recommendations: Clinicians' understanding of the biomechanical causes of plantar fasciitis should guide the decision-making process concerning the evaluation and treatment of heel pain. Use of this approach may improve clinical outcomes because intervention does not merely treat physical symptoms but actively addresses the influences that resulted in the condition. Principles from this approach might also provide a basis for future research investigating the efficacy of plantar fascia treatment. PMID:16558682

  6. LINKING THE CMAQ AND HYSPLIT MODELING SYSTEM INTERFACE PROGRAM AND EXAMPLE APPLICATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A new software tool has been developed to link the Eulerian-based Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeling system with the Lagrangian-based HYSPLIT (HYbrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory) model. Both models require many of the same hourly meteorological...

  7. LINKING THE CMAQ AND HYSPLIT MODELING SYSTEM INTERFACE PROGRAM AND EXAMPLE APPLICATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A new software tool has been developed to link the Eulerian-based Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeling system with the Lagrangian-based HYSPLIT (HYbrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory) model. Both models require many of the same hourly meteorological...

  8. A Dual-Process Model of the Alcohol-Behavior Link for Social Drinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moss, Antony C.; Albery, Ian P.

    2009-01-01

    A dual-process model of the alcohol-behavior link is presented, synthesizing 2 of the major social-cognitive approaches: expectancy and myopia theories. Substantial evidence has accrued to support both of these models, and recent neurocognitive models of the effects of alcohol on thought and behavior have provided evidence to support both as well.…

  9. A Dual-Process Model of the Alcohol-Behavior Link for Social Drinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moss, Antony C.; Albery, Ian P.

    2009-01-01

    A dual-process model of the alcohol-behavior link is presented, synthesizing 2 of the major social-cognitive approaches: expectancy and myopia theories. Substantial evidence has accrued to support both of these models, and recent neurocognitive models of the effects of alcohol on thought and behavior have provided evidence to support both as well.…

  10. Linking seasonal climate forecasts with crop models in Iberian Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capa, Mirian; Ines, Amor; Baethgen, Walter; Rodriguez-Fonseca, Belen; Han, Eunjin; Ruiz-Ramos, Margarita

    2015-04-01

    Translating seasonal climate forecasts into agricultural production forecasts could help to establish early warning systems and to design crop management adaptation strategies that take advantage of favorable conditions or reduce the effect of adverse conditions. In this study, we use seasonal rainfall forecasts and crop models to improve predictability of wheat yield in the Iberian Peninsula (IP). Additionally, we estimate economic margins and production risks associated with extreme scenarios of seasonal rainfall forecast. This study evaluates two methods for disaggregating seasonal climate forecasts into daily weather data: 1) a stochastic weather generator (CondWG), and 2) a forecast tercile resampler (FResampler). Both methods were used to generate 100 (with FResampler) and 110 (with CondWG) weather series/sequences for three scenarios of seasonal rainfall forecasts. Simulated wheat yield is computed with the crop model CERES-wheat (Ritchie and Otter, 1985), which is included in Decision Support System for Agrotechnology Transfer (DSSAT v.4.5, Hoogenboom et al., 2010). Simulations were run at two locations in northeastern Spain where the crop model was calibrated and validated with independent field data. Once simulated yields were obtained, an assessment of farmer's gross margin for different seasonal climate forecasts was accomplished to estimate production risks under different climate scenarios. This methodology allows farmers to assess the benefits and risks of a seasonal weather forecast in IP prior to the crop growing season. The results of this study may have important implications on both, public (agricultural planning) and private (decision support to farmers, insurance companies) sectors. Acknowledgements Research by M. Capa-Morocho has been partly supported by a PICATA predoctoral fellowship of the Moncloa Campus of International Excellence (UCM-UPM) and MULCLIVAR project (CGL2012-38923-C02-02) References Hoogenboom, G. et al., 2010. The Decision

  11. Model analysis of the link between interest rates and crashes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broga, Kristijonas M.; Viegas, Eduardo; Jensen, Henrik Jeldtoft

    2016-09-01

    We analyse the effect of distinct levels of interest rates on the stability of the financial network under our modelling framework. We demonstrate that banking failures are likely to emerge early on under sustained high interest rates, and at much later stage-with higher probability-under a sustained low interest rate scenario. Moreover, we demonstrate that those bank failures are of a different nature: high interest rates tend to result in significantly more bankruptcies associated to credit losses whereas lack of liquidity tends to be the primary cause of failures under lower rates.

  12. Fungal-bacterial interactions and their relevance to oral health: linking the clinic and the bench.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Patricia I; Strausbaugh, Linda D; Dongari-Bagtzoglou, Anna

    2014-01-01

    High throughput sequencing has accelerated knowledge on the oral microbiome. While the bacterial component of oral communities has been extensively characterized, the role of the fungal microbiota in the oral cavity is largely unknown. Interactions among fungi and bacteria are likely to influence oral health as exemplified by the synergistic relationship between Candida albicans and oral streptococci. In this perspective, we discuss the current state of the field of fungal-bacterial interactions in the context of the oral cavity. We highlight the need to conduct longitudinal clinical studies to simultaneously characterize the bacterial and fungal components of the human oral microbiome in health and during disease progression. Such studies need to be coupled with investigations using disease-relevant models to mechanistically test the associations observed in humans and eventually identify fungal-bacterial interactions that could serve as preventive or therapeutic targets for oral diseases.

  13. Fungal-bacterial interactions and their relevance to oral health: linking the clinic and the bench

    PubMed Central

    Diaz, Patricia I.; Strausbaugh, Linda D.; Dongari-Bagtzoglou, Anna

    2014-01-01

    High throughput sequencing has accelerated knowledge on the oral microbiome. While the bacterial component of oral communities has been extensively characterized, the role of the fungal microbiota in the oral cavity is largely unknown. Interactions among fungi and bacteria are likely to influence oral health as exemplified by the synergistic relationship between Candida albicans and oral streptococci. In this perspective, we discuss the current state of the field of fungal-bacterial interactions in the context of the oral cavity. We highlight the need to conduct longitudinal clinical studies to simultaneously characterize the bacterial and fungal components of the human oral microbiome in health and during disease progression. Such studies need to be coupled with investigations using disease-relevant models to mechanistically test the associations observed in humans and eventually identify fungal-bacterial interactions that could serve as preventive or therapeutic targets for oral diseases. PMID:25120959

  14. Atempts to link Quanta & Atoms before the Bohr Atom model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkatesan, A.; Lieber, M.

    2005-03-01

    Attempts to quantize atomic phenomena before Bohr are hardly ever mentioned in elementary textbooks.This presentation will elucidate the contributions of A.Haas around 1910. Haas tried to quantize the Thomson atom model as an optical resonator made of positive and negative charges. The inherent ambiguity of charge distribution in the model made him choose a positive spherical distribution around which the electrons were distributed.He obtained expressions for the Rydberg constant and what is known today as the Bohr radius by balancing centrifugal energy with Coulomb energy and quantizing it with Planck's relation E=hν. We point out that Haas would have arrived at better estimates of these constants had he used the virial theorem apart from the fact that the fundamental constants were not well known. The crux of Haas's physical picture was to derive Planck's constant h from charge quantum e , mass of electron m and atomic radius. Haas faced severe criticism for applying thermodynamic concepts like Planck distribution to microscopic phenomena. We will try to give a flavor for how quantum phenomena were viewed at that time. It is of interest to note that the driving force behind Haas's work was to present a paper that would secure him a position as a Privatdozent in History of Physics. We end with comments by Bohr and Sommerfeld on Haas's work and with some brief biographical remarks.

  15. Horizontal gene transfer in eukaryotes: The weak-link model

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jinling

    2013-01-01

    The significance of horizontal gene transfer (HGT) in eukaryotic evolution remains controversial. Although many eukaryotic genes are of bacterial origin, they are often interpreted as being derived from mitochondria or plastids. Because of their fixed gene pool and gene loss, however, mitochondria and plastids alone cannot adequately explain the presence of all, or even the majority, of bacterial genes in eukaryotes. Available data indicate that no insurmountable barrier to HGT exists, even in complex multicellular eukaryotes. In addition, the discovery of both recent and ancient HGT events in all major eukaryotic groups suggests that HGT has been a regular occurrence throughout the history of eukaryotic evolution. A model of HGT is proposed that suggests both unicellular and early developmental stages as likely entry points for foreign genes into multicellular eukaryotes. PMID:24037739

  16. Horizontal gene transfer in eukaryotes: the weak-link model.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jinling

    2013-10-01

    The significance of horizontal gene transfer (HGT) in eukaryotic evolution remains controversial. Although many eukaryotic genes are of bacterial origin, they are often interpreted as being derived from mitochondria or plastids. Because of their fixed gene pool and gene loss, however, mitochondria and plastids alone cannot adequately explain the presence of all, or even the majority, of bacterial genes in eukaryotes. Available data indicate that no insurmountable barrier to HGT exists, even in complex multicellular eukaryotes. In addition, the discovery of both recent and ancient HGT events in all major eukaryotic groups suggests that HGT has been a regular occurrence throughout the history of eukaryotic evolution. A model of HGT is proposed that suggests both unicellular and early developmental stages as likely entry points for foreign genes into multicellular eukaryotes.

  17. Dynamic link between ECG and clinical data by a CORBA-based query engine and temporal mapping.

    PubMed

    Wang, C; Ohe, K; Kaihara, S

    1997-01-01

    It is important to create a dynamic link method to link distributed patient data across multiple hospitals on an "as needed" basis because the pre-defined links (an item of data has a character or group of characters that indicates the storage of another item of data) are difficult to be managed, or can only be established in part, or are not necessary to be pre-defined in many cases, especially in linking the descriptive data such as history data with the corresponding examination data across multiple hospitals. A method of linking electrocardiogram (ECG) with clinical data dynamically in a Common Object Request Broker Architecture (CORBA) environment has been achieved and verified in a real computing environment to approach to this goal. By this method, distributed patient data can be linked dynamically by a CORBA-based query engine and temporal mapping no matter where they are located on the Internet. The necessary temporal information is provided by either computing or human being. Since multiple time-axes for different databases are involved in, some temporal reasoning methods (such as mapping occurrences across temporal contexts and determining bounds for absolute occurrences, etc.) are applied to this study, and a series of temporal mappings including the first mapping, the secondary mapping, the contextual mapping, the extended mapping, the previous mapping and the next mapping are created. In comparison with the pre-defined link, the major strengths of this method are the dynamic link on an "as needed" basis, no limitation of institutional boundaries, easy creation, simplifying the data storage, and the high flexibility, etc.

  18. Linking Air Quality and Watershed Models for Environmental Assessments: Analysis of the Effects of Model-Specific Precipitation Estimates on Calculated Water Flux

    EPA Science Inventory

    Directly linking air quality and watershed models could provide an effective method for estimating spatially-explicit inputs of atmospheric contaminants to watershed biogeochemical models. However, to adequately link air and watershed models for wet deposition estimates, each mod...

  19. Linking Air Quality and Watershed Models for Environmental Assessments: Analysis of the Effects of Model-Specific Precipitation Estimates on Calculated Water Flux

    EPA Science Inventory

    Directly linking air quality and watershed models could provide an effective method for estimating spatially-explicit inputs of atmospheric contaminants to watershed biogeochemical models. However, to adequately link air and watershed models for wet deposition estimates, each mod...

  20. FG syndrome, an X-linked multiple congenital anomaly syndrome: the clinical phenotype and an algorithm for diagnostic testing.

    PubMed

    Clark, Robin Dawn; Graham, John M; Friez, Michael J; Hoo, Joe J; Jones, Kenneth Lyons; McKeown, Carole; Moeschler, John B; Raymond, F Lucy; Rogers, R Curtis; Schwartz, Charles E; Battaglia, Agatino; Lyons, Michael J; Stevenson, Roger E

    2009-11-01

    FG syndrome is a rare X-linked multiple congenital anomaly-cognitive impairment disorder caused by the p.R961W mutation in the MED12 gene. We identified all known patients with this mutation to delineate their clinical phenotype and devise a clinical algorithm to facilitate molecular diagnosis. We ascertained 23 males with the p.R961W mutation in MED12 from 9 previously reported FG syndrome families and 1 new family. Six patients are reviewed in detail. These 23 patients were compared with 48 MED12 mutation-negative patients, who had the clinical diagnosis of FG syndrome. Traits that best discriminated between these two groups were chosen to develop an algorithm with high sensitivity and specificity for the p.R961W MED12 mutation. FG syndrome has a recognizable dysmorphic phenotype with a high incidence of congenital anomalies. A family history of X-linked mental retardation, deceased male infants, and/or multiple fetal losses was documented in all families. The algorithm identifies the p.R961W MED12 mutation-positive group with 100% sensitivity and 90% specificity. The clinical phenotype of FG syndrome defines a recognizable pattern of X-linked multiple congenital anomalies and cognitive impairment. This algorithm can assist the clinician in selecting the patients for testing who are most likely to have the recurrent p.R961W MED12 mutation.

  1. Development of a clinical preceptor model.

    PubMed

    Blum, Cynthia Ann

    2009-01-01

    To reflect contemporary nursing care, the practicing nurse is in an ideal position to shape the clinical experience for student nurses. Although nurse preceptors are frequently used to assist in practice education of nursing students, their contribution to the creation of these programs has not been explored. The author discusses the results of a participatory action research study with the aim of creating a preceptor-guided practice education model for use throughout an undergraduate bachelor of science in nursing curriculum.

  2. Modelling soil nitrogen: the MAGIC model with nitrogen retention linked to carbon turnover using decomposer dynamics.

    PubMed

    Oulehle, F; Cosby, B J; Wright, R F; Hruška, J; Kopáček, J; Krám, P; Evans, C D; Moldan, F

    2012-06-01

    We present a new formulation of the acidification model MAGIC that uses decomposer dynamics to link nitrogen (N) cycling to carbon (C) turnover in soils. The new model is evaluated by application to 15-30 years of water chemistry data at three coniferous-forested sites in the Czech Republic where deposition of sulphur (S) and N have decreased by >80% and 40%, respectively. Sulphate concentrations in waters have declined commensurately with S deposition, but nitrate concentrations have shown much larger decreases relative to N deposition. This behaviour is inconsistent with most conceptual models of N saturation, and with earlier versions of MAGIC which assume N retention to be a first-order function of N deposition and/or controlled by the soil C/N ratio. In comparison with earlier versions, the new formulation more correctly simulates observed short-term changes in nitrate leaching, as well as long-term retention of N in soils. The model suggests that, despite recent deposition reductions and recovery, progressive N saturation will lead to increased future nitrate leaching, ecosystem eutrophication and re-acidification.

  3. Mumps in the Czech Republic in 2013: Clinical Characteristics, Mumps Virus Genotyping, and Epidemiological Links.

    PubMed

    Havlíčková, Martina; Limberková, Radomíra; Smíšková, Dita; Herrmannová, Kristýna; Jiřincová, Helena; Nováková, Ludmila; Lexová, Pavla; Kynčl, Jan; Arientová, Simona; Marešová, Vilma

    2016-03-01

    The aim of the study was to map the incidence of mumps in the Czech Republic in terms of clinical symptoms, epidemiological links, and characteristics of circulating genotypes. Patients with suspected mumps examined in the Infectious Diseases Clinic of the Na Bulovce Hospital in 2013 were enrolled in the study. Buccal swab specimens were tested by means of nucleic acid detection (RT-qPCR) and when positive, they were cultured in tissue culture. Sequencing was carried out using the BigDye Terminator v3.1 Cycle Sequencing Kit and Genetic Analyzer 3500. The SeqScape software was used for the analysis of sequencing data and filtering out low quality reads. The phylogenetic analysis and genotyping were performed using the Mega 6 software. To generate the phylogenetic tree, all sequences were aligned by the MAFFT tool and the alignment obtained was edited using the BioEdit software. In all patients, selected biochemical markers (C-reactive protein, white blood cell count and serum amylase) were measured. The EPIDAT system used for reporting infectious diseases, record keeping, and data analysis in the Czech Republic was the source of statistical data. Eighty-nine patients with suspected mumps were examined in the Na Bulovce Hospital and 65 of them were laboratory confirmed with mumps: 40 males (61.5%) and 25 females (38.5%). The mean age of the study cohort was 25.9 years (median age of 23 years, age range from 10 to 73 years) and 14 patients were under 18 years of age. Thirty-four (52.3%) patients were vaccinated in childhood, 28 (43.1%) were unvaccinated, and for three persons, vaccination data were not available. A severe course of the disease was reported in 15 (23.1%) patients. Fourteen of them needed hospitalization because of orchitis (9 males) and meningitis (5 patients). One patient with orchitis was treated on an outpatient basis. The need for hospitalization tended to be lower in the unvaccinated patients (14.7% vs. 35.7%, p=0.076). In 2013, 1,553 cases of

  4. 4D human body posture estimation based on a motion capture system and a multi-rigid link model.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Naoya; Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Ozaki, Wataru; Yamamoto, Tomohisa; Nomura, Taishin

    2012-01-01

    Human motion analysis in various fields such as neurophysiology, clinical medicine, and sports sciences utilizes a multi-rigid link model of a human body for considering kinetics by solving inverse dynamics of a motion, in which a motion capture system with reflective markers are often used to measure the motion, and then the obtained motion are mapped onto the multi-rigid link model. However, algorithms for such a mapping from spatio-temporal positions of the markers to the corresponding posture of the model are not always fully disclosed. Moreover, a common difficulty for such algorithms is an error caused by displacements of the markers attached on the body surface, referred to as the skin motion error. In this study, we developed a simple algorithm that maps positions of the markers to the corresponding posture of a rigid link model, and examined accuracy of the algorithm by evaluating quantitatively differences between the measured and the estimated posture. We also analyzed the skin motion error. It is shown that magnitude of the error was determined not only by the amplitude of the skin motion, but also by the direction of the marker displacement relative to the frame of reference attached to each segment of the body.

  5. Deregulation of the lysyl hydroxylase matrix cross-linking system in experimental and clinical bronchopulmonary dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Witsch, Thilo J.; Turowski, Paweł; Sakkas, Elpidoforos; Niess, Gero; Becker, Simone; Herold, Susanne; Mayer, Konstantin; Vadász, István; Roberts, Jesse D.; Seeger, Werner

    2013-01-01

    Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) is a common and serious complication of premature birth, characterized by a pronounced arrest of alveolar development. The underlying pathophysiological mechanisms are poorly understood although perturbations to the maturation and remodeling of the extracellular matrix (ECM) are emerging as candidate disease pathomechanisms. In this study, the expression and regulation of three members of the lysyl hydroxylase family of ECM remodeling enzymes (Plod1, Plod2, and Plod3) in clinical BPD, as well as in an experimental animal model of BPD, were addressed. All three enzymes were localized to the septal walls in developing mouse lungs, with Plod1 also expressed in the vessel walls of the developing lung and Plod3 expressed uniquely at the base of developing septa. The expression of plod1, plod2, and plod3 was upregulated in the lungs of mouse pups exposed to 85% O2, an experimental animal model of BPD. Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β increased plod2 mRNA levels and activated the plod2 promoter in vitro in lung epithelial cells and in lung fibroblasts. Using in vivo neutralization of TGF-β signaling in the experimental animal model of BPD, TGF-β was identified as the regulator of aberrant plod2 expression. PLOD2 mRNA expression was also elevated in human neonates who died with BPD or at risk for BPD, compared with neonates matched for gestational age at birth or chronological age at death. These data point to potential roles for lysyl hydroxylases in normal lung development, as well as in perturbed late lung development associated with BPD. PMID:24285264

  6. A methodology for linking 2D overland flow models with the sewer network model SWMM 5.1 based on dynamic link libraries.

    PubMed

    Leandro, Jorge; Martins, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    Pluvial flooding in urban areas is characterized by a gradually varying inundation process caused by surcharge of the sewer manholes. Therefore urban flood models need to simulate the interaction between the sewer network and the overland flow in order to accurately predict the flood inundation extents. In this work we present a methodology for linking 2D overland flow models with the storm sewer model SWMM 5. SWMM 5 is a well-known free open-source code originally developed in 1971. The latest major release saw its structure re-written in C ++ allowing it to be compiled as a command line executable or through a series of calls made to function inside a dynamic link library (DLL). The methodology developed herein is written inside the same DLL in C + +, and is able to simulate the bi-directional interaction between both models during simulation. Validation is done in a real case study with an existing urban flood coupled model. The novelty herein is that the new methodology can be added to SWMM without the need for editing SWMM's original code. Furthermore, it is directly applicable to other coupled overland flow models aiming to use SWMM 5 as the sewer network model.

  7. Coaching Model + Clinical Playbook = Transformative Learning.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Katherine A; Meyer, Mary

    2016-01-01

    Health care employers demand that workers be skilled in clinical reasoning, able to work within complex interprofessional teams to provide safe, quality patient-centered care in a complex evolving system. To this end, there have been calls for radical transformation of nursing education including the development of a baccalaureate generalist nurse. Based on recommendations from the American Association of Colleges of Nursing, faculty concluded that clinical education must change moving beyond direct patient care by applying the concepts associated with designer, manager, and coordinator of care and being a member of a profession. To accomplish this, the faculty utilized a system of focused learning assignments (FLAs) that present transformative learning opportunities that expose students to "disorienting dilemmas," alternative perspectives, and repeated opportunities to reflect and challenge their own beliefs. The FLAs collected in a "Playbook" were scaffolded to build the student's competencies over the course of the clinical experience. The FLAs were centered on the 6 Quality and Safety Education for Nurses competencies, with 2 additional concepts of professionalism and systems-based practice. The FLAs were competency-based exercises that students performed when not assigned to direct patient care or had free clinical time. Each FLA had a lesson plan that allowed the student and faculty member to see the competency addressed by the lesson, resources, time on task, student instructions, guide for reflection, grading rubric, and recommendations for clinical instructor. The major advantages of the model included (a) consistent implementation of structured learning experiences by a diverse teaching staff using a coaching model of instruction; (b) more systematic approach to present learning activities that build upon each other; (c) increased time for faculty to interact with students providing direct patient care; (d) guaranteed capture of selected transformative

  8. Linking clinical care to community resources for cardiovascular disease prevention: the North Carolina Enhanced WISEWOMAN project.

    PubMed

    Jilcott, Stephanie B; Keyserling, Thomas C; Samuel-Hodge, Carmen D; Rosamond, Wayne; Garcia, Beverly; Will, Julie C; Farris, Rosanne P; Ammerman, Alice S

    2006-06-01

    The Well-Integrated Screening and Evaluation for Women Across the Nation (WISEWOMAN) project addresses the need for effective cardiovascular disease (CVD) prevention among underserved, midlife women. We describe an Enhanced Intervention that addressed environmental and individual factors within the context of a clinic-based intervention. We also present the study design and baseline results of the randomized trial to evaluate the enhanced intervention. The multicomponent behavior change intervention addressed many elements of the Chronic Care Model (CCM), including the community resources and policy element, wherein Enhanced Intervention participants were encouraged to overcome environmental barriers to a healthy lifestyle by using community resources. Study participants were enrolled at one community health center; all were low-income, underinsured, midlife (40-64 years) women. A total of 236 participants were randomized to receive the Enhanced Intervention or the Minimum Intervention. At baseline, over three fourths of the participants were overweight or obese. Participants reported a variety of problematic neighborhood characteristics, including a paucity of restaurants with healthy food choices (41% reported as a problem); not enough farmer's markets or produce stands (50%), not enough affordable exercise places (52%), not enough physical activity programs that met women's needs (42%), heavy traffic (47%), and speeding drivers (53%). Overall, women knew little about affordable exercise venues and nutrition classes. In this clinic-based intervention, we addressed environmental factors related to a healthy lifestyle. Results indicate the need for effective and feasible intervention strategies to address the environments in which individuals are making behavior changes. The effectiveness of the WISEWOMAN Enhanced Intervention will be assessed in a randomized trial.

  9. Self-management support interventions that are clinically linked and technology enabled: can they successfully prevent and treat diabetes?

    PubMed

    Kaufman, Neal D; Woodley, Paula D Patnoe

    2011-05-01

    Patients with diabetes need a complex set of services and supports. The challenge of integrating these services into the diabetes regimen can be successfully overcome through self-management support interventions that are clinically linked and technology enabled: self-management support because patients need help mastering the knowledge, attitudes, skills, and behaviors so necessary for good outcomes; interventions because comprehensive theory-based, evidence-proven, long-term, longitudinal interventions work better than direct-to-consumer or nonplanned health promotion approaches; clinically linked because patients are more likely to adopt new behaviors when the approach is in the context of a trusted therapeutic relationship and within an effective medical care system; and technology enabled because capitalizing on the amazing power of information technology leads to the delivery of cost-effective, scalable, engaging solutions that prevent and manage diabetes.

  10. Self-Management Support Interventions That Are Clinically Linked and Technology Enabled: Can They Successfully Prevent and Treat Diabetes?

    PubMed Central

    Kaufman, Neal D; Woodley, Paula D. Patnoe

    2011-01-01

    Patients with diabetes need a complex set of services and supports. The challenge of integrating these services into the diabetes regimen can be successfully overcome through self-management support interventions that are clinically linked and technology enabled: self-management support because patients need help mastering the knowledge, attitudes, skills, and behaviors so necessary for good outcomes; interventions because comprehensive theory-based, evidence-proven, long-term, longitudinal interventions work better than direct-to-consumer or nonplanned health promotion approaches; clinically linked because patients are more likely to adopt new behaviors when the approach is in the context of a trusted therapeutic relationship and within an effective medical care system; and technology enabled because capitalizing on the amazing power of information technology leads to the delivery of cost-effective, scalable, engaging solutions that prevent and manage diabetes. PMID:21722596

  11. Linking big models to big data: efficient ecosystem model calibration through Bayesian model emulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fer, I.; Kelly, R.; Andrews, T.; Dietze, M.; Richardson, A. D.

    2016-12-01

    Our ability to forecast ecosystems is limited by how well we parameterize ecosystem models. Direct measurements for all model parameters are not always possible and inverse estimation of these parameters through Bayesian methods is computationally costly. A solution to computational challenges of Bayesian calibration is to approximate the posterior probability surface using a Gaussian Process that emulates the complex process-based model. Here we report the integration of this method within an ecoinformatics toolbox, Predictive Ecosystem Analyzer (PEcAn), and its application with two ecosystem models: SIPNET and ED2.1. SIPNET is a simple model, allowing application of MCMC methods both to the model itself and to its emulator. We used both approaches to assimilate flux (CO2 and latent heat), soil respiration, and soil carbon data from Bartlett Experimental Forest. This comparison showed that emulator is reliable in terms of convergence to the posterior distribution. A 10000-iteration MCMC analysis with SIPNET itself required more than two orders of magnitude greater computation time than an MCMC run of same length with its emulator. This difference would be greater for a more computationally demanding model. Validation of the emulator-calibrated SIPNET against both the assimilated data and out-of-sample data showed improved fit and reduced uncertainty around model predictions. We next applied the validated emulator method to the ED2, whose complexity precludes standard Bayesian data assimilation. We used the ED2 emulator to assimilate demographic data from a network of inventory plots. For validation of the calibrated ED2, we compared the model to results from Empirical Succession Mapping (ESM), a novel synthesis of successional patterns in Forest Inventory and Analysis data. Our results revealed that while the pre-assimilation ED2 formulation cannot capture the emergent demographic patterns from ESM analysis, constrained model parameters controlling demographic

  12. Computer modeling and analysis of thermal link performance for an optical refrigerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byram, Kevin; Mar, David; Parker, John; Von der Porten, Steven; Hankinson, John; Lee, Chris; Mayeda, Kai; Haskell, Richard C.; Yang, Qimin; Greenfield, Scott R.; Epstein, Richard I.

    2008-02-01

    We have used the thermal modeling tool in COMSOL Multiphysics to investigate factors that affect the thermal performance of the optical refrigerator. Assuming an ideal cooling element and a non-absorptive dielectric trapping mirror, the three dominant heating factors are blackbody radiation from the surrounding environment, conductive heat transfer through mechanical supports, and the absorption of fluoresced photons transmitted through the thermal link. Laboratory experimentation coupled with computer modeling using Code V optical software have resulted in link designs capable of reducing the transmission to 0.04% of the fluoresced photons emitted toward the thermal link. The ideal thermal link will have minimal surface area, provide complete optical isolation for the load, and possess high thermal conductivity. Modeling results imply that a 1cm 3 load can be chilled to 102 K with currently available cooling efficiencies using a 100 W pump laser on a YB:ZBLANP system, and using an ideal link that has minimal surface area and no optical transmission. We review the simulated steady-state cooling temperatures reached by the heat load for several link designs and system configurations as a comparative measure of how well particular configurations perform.

  13. Linking linear programming and spatial simulation models to predict landscape effects of forest management alternatives

    Treesearch

    Eric J. Gustafson; L. Jay Roberts; Larry A. Leefers

    2006-01-01

    Forest management planners require analytical tools to assess the effects of alternative strategies on the sometimes disparate benefits from forests such as timber production and wildlife habitat. We assessed the spatial patterns of alternative management strategies by linking two models that were developed for different purposes. We used a linear programming model (...

  14. An Extension of Least Squares Estimation of IRT Linking Coefficients for the Graded Response Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Seonghoon

    2010-01-01

    The three types (generalized, unweighted, and weighted) of least squares methods, proposed by Ogasawara, for estimating item response theory (IRT) linking coefficients under dichotomous models are extended to the graded response model. A simulation study was conducted to confirm the accuracy of the extended formulas, and a real data study was…

  15. A Simple Forecasting Model Linking Macroeconomic Policy to Industrial Employment Demand.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malley, James R.; Hady, Thomas F.

    A study detailed further a model linking monetary and fiscal policy to industrial employment in metropolitan and nonmetropolitan areas of four United States regions. The model was used to simulate the impacts on area and regional employment of three events in the economy: changing real gross national product (GNP) via monetary policy, holding the…

  16. A Bayesian model for estimating population means using a link-tracing sampling design.

    PubMed

    St Clair, Katherine; O'Connell, Daniel

    2012-03-01

    Link-tracing sampling designs can be used to study human populations that contain "hidden" groups who tend to be linked together by a common social trait. These links can be used to increase the sampling intensity of a hidden domain by tracing links from individuals selected in an initial wave of sampling to additional domain members. Chow and Thompson (2003, Survey Methodology 29, 197-205) derived a Bayesian model to estimate the size or proportion of individuals in the hidden population for certain link-tracing designs. We propose an addition to their model that will allow for the modeling of a quantitative response. We assess properties of our model using a constructed population and a real population of at-risk individuals, both of which contain two domains of hidden and nonhidden individuals. Our results show that our model can produce good point and interval estimates of the population mean and domain means when our population assumptions are satisfied. © 2011, The International Biometric Society.

  17. Neurophysiological Measures and Alcohol Use Disorder (AUD): Hypothesizing Links between Clinical Severity Index and Molecular Neurobiological Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Vitali, Mario; Napolitano, Carmen; Berman, Marlene Oscar; Minuto, Simona Flamminii; Battagliese, Gemma; Attilia, Maria Luisa; Braverman, Eric R; Romeo, Marina; Blum, Kenneth; Ceccanti, Mauro

    2016-01-01

    Background In 1987, Cloninger proposed a clinical description and classification of different personality traits genetically defined and independent from each other. Moreover, he elaborated a specific test the TCI to investigate these traits/states. The study of craving in Alcohol Use Disorder (AUD) assumed a greater significance, since ever more data seems to suggest a direct correlation between high levels of craving and a higher risk of relapse in alcoholics. Thus, our study aim is to explore the possible correlations among TCI linked molecular neurobiological pattern (s), craving and alcohol addiction severity measures in a sample of Italian alcoholics. Materials and Methods 191 alcoholics were recruited in a Day Hospital (DH) setting at the Alcohol Addiction Program Latium Region Referral Center, Sapienza University of Rome. After 7 days detoxification treatment a psychodiagnostic protocol was administered, including TCI, VAS-C, ASI and SADQ. All patients signed an Institutional Review Board (IRB) approved informed consent. Results Principally, we detected a significant positive correlation between HA-scale scores and the VAS scale: increasing in HA-scale corresponds to an increase in craving perception for both intensity (r=0.310; p ≤ 0.001) and frequency (r=0.246; p ≤ 0.001). Moreover, perception of dependence severity, measured with SADQ was also found to be significantly associated positively to both HA-scale (r=0.246; p ≤ 0.001) and NS-scale (r=0.224; p ≤ 0.01). While, for character scales, Persistence (r=−0.195; p=.008) and Self-directedness (r=−0.294; p ≤ 0.001) was negatively associated with ASI linked to alcohol problems. Self-directedness was also negatively correlated with ASI linked to family and social problems (r=−0.349; p ≤ 0.001), employment and support problems (r=−0.220; p=0.003) and psychiatric problems (r=−0.358; p ≤ 0.001). Cooperativeness was a negative correlate with Legal Problems (r=−0.173; p=0.019). and Self

  18. "Youth friendly" clinics: considerations for linking and engaging HIV-infected adolescents into care.

    PubMed

    Tanner, Amanda E; Philbin, Morgan M; Duval, Anna; Ellen, Jonathan; Kapogiannis, Bill; Fortenberry, J Dennis

    2014-02-01

    Linkage and engagement in care are critical corollaries to the health of HIV-infected adolescents. The adolescent HIV epidemic and adolescents' unique barriers to care necessitates innovation in the provision of care, including the consideration of the clinical experience. Little research has addressed how "youth friendly" clinics may influence care retention for HIV-infected youth. We conducted 124 interviews with providers, outreach workers, and case managers, at 15 Adolescent Medicine Trials Network clinics. Photographs of each clinic documented the characteristics of the physical space. Constant comparison and content and visual narrative methods were utilized for data analysis. Three elements of youth friendliness were identified for clinics serving HIV-infected youth, including: (1) role of target population (e.g., pediatric, adolescent, HIV); (2) clinics' physical environment; and (3) clinics' social environment. Working to create 'youth friendly' clinics through changes in physical (e.g., space, entertainment, and educational materials) and social (e.g., staff training related to development, gender, sexual orientation) environments may help reduce HIV-infected adolescents' unique barriers to care engagement. The integration of clinic design and staff training within the organization of a clinical program is helpful in meeting the specialized needs of HIV-infected youth.

  19. Humanized animal exercise model for clinical implication.

    PubMed

    Seo, Dae Yun; Lee, Sung Ryul; Kim, Nari; Ko, Kyung Soo; Rhee, Byoung Doo; Han, Jin

    2014-09-01

    Exercise and physical activity function as a patho-physiological process that can prevent, manage, and regulate numerous chronic conditions, including metabolic syndrome and age-related sarcopenia. Because of research ethics and technical difficulties in humans, exercise models using animals are requisite for the future development of exercise mimetics to treat such abnormalities. Moreover, the beneficial or adverse outcomes of a new regime or exercise intervention in the treatment of a specific condition should be tested prior to implementation in a clinical setting. In rodents, treadmill running (or swimming) and ladder climbing are widely used as aerobic and anaerobic exercise models, respectively. However, exercise models are not limited to these types. Indeed, there are no golden standard exercise modes or protocols for managing or improving health status since the types (aerobic vs. anaerobic), time (morning vs. evening), and duration (continuous vs. acute bouts) of exercise are the critical determinants for achieving expected beneficial effects. To provide insight into the understanding of exercise and exercise physiology, we have summarized current animal exercise models largely based on aerobic and anaerobic criteria. Additionally, specialized exercise models that have been developed for testing the effect of exercise on specific physiological conditions are presented. Finally, we provide suggestions and/or considerations for developing a new regime for an exercise model.

  20. Data Model Considerations for Clinical Effectiveness Researchers

    PubMed Central

    Kahn, Michael G.; Batson, Deborah; Schilling, Lisa M.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Growing adoption of electronic health records and increased emphasis on the reuse and integration of clinical care and administration data require a robust informatics infrastructure to inform health care effectiveness in real-world settings. The Scalable Architecture for Federated Translational Inquiries Network (SAFTI Net) was one of 3 projects receiving Agency for Healthcare Quality and Research funds to create a scalable, distributed network to support Comparative Effectiveness Research. SAFTINet’s method of extracting and compiling data from disparate entities requires the use of a shared common data model. Data Models Focusing on the needs of CER investigators, in addition to other project considerations, we examined the suitability of several data models. Data modeling is the process of determining which data elements will be stored and how they will be stored, including their relationships and constraints. Addressing compromises between complexity and usability is critical to modeling decisions. Case Study The SAFTINet project provides the case study for describing data model evaluation. A sample use case defines a cohort of asthma subjects that illustrates the need to identify patients by age, diagnoses, and medication use while excluding those with diagnoses that may often be misdiagnosed as asthma. Discussion The SAFTINet team explored several data models against a set of technical and investigator requirements to select a data model that best fit its needs and was conducive to expansion with new research requirements. Although SAFTINet ultimately chose the Observation Medical Outcomes Partnership common data model, other valid options exist and prioritization of requirements is dependent upon many factors. PMID:22692260

  1. First six months of clinical usage of an ATM network link between two Veterans Affairs Medical Centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duerinckx, Andre J.; Gentili, Amilcare; El-Saden, Suzie; Harmon, Craig; Kenagy, John J.; Grant, Edward G.

    1998-07-01

    Purpose/Background: Asynchronous transfer mode (ATM) network technology has recently been used for high speed transmission of radiological images between hospitals and inside hospitals. However, the number of clinical sites which routinely use this technology is limited. The purpose of this study was to analyze the very early impact of an ATM link between a large tertiary referral center and small peripheral clinic on cost and clinical practice. Methodology: An ATM link using 155 bps (OC3) technology was installed between the West Los Angeles VA Medical Center and the Sepulveda VA, a large outpatient facility which provides full service radiological services. The West Los Angeles VA Medical Center is a large tertiary referral center with sub-specialist radiologist. The clinical impact of this ATM link between a large full-scale DICOM-3 compliant PACS system at the West LA VA on a smaller PACS system at the Sepulveda VA was evaluated. Results: The ability to freely exchange complicated MRI and CT studies between a tertiary referral center and a clinic could have a direct impact on patient care. Over the last six months, all and CT studies from Sepulveda VA were readily available via the ATM connection to all radiologists at the West LA VA. On average the workload at the Sepulveda VA in CT and MRI was about one tenth of the same workload at West LA VA, thus creating interesting possibilities for sharing or radiologist resources. Conclusions: Although our preliminary data and work loads have been too limited to draw any final conclusions yet, we feel that future results will show that the ability to provide immediate and fast interactive consultation between general radiologists in a large outpatient facility and sub- specialists at a tertiary referral center can have an impact upon the quality of patient care.

  2. The Oral-Systemic Personalized Medicine Model at Marshfield Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Glurich, Ingrid; Acharya, Amit; Shukla, Sanjay K.; Nycz, Greg R; Brilliant, Murray H.

    2012-01-01

    Periodontal disease and diabetes, two diseases that have achieved epidemic status, share a bi-directional relationship driven by micro-inflammatory processes. The present review frames the current understanding of the pathological processes that appear to link these diseases and advances the hypothesis that reversal of the epidemic is possible through application of interdisciplinary intervention and advancement of oral-systemic personalized medicine. An overview of how Marshfield Clinic’s unique clinical, informatics and bio-repository resources and infrastructures are being aligned to advance oral-systemic personalized medicine is presented as an interventional model with the potential to reverse the epidemic trends seen for these two chronic diseases over the past several decades. The overall vision is to engineer a transformational shift in paradigm from ‘personalized medicine’ to ‘personalized health’. PMID:22458294

  3. Modeling of the ground-to-SSFMB link networking features using SPW

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, John C.

    1993-01-01

    This report describes the modeling and simulation of the networking features of the ground-to-Space Station Freedom manned base (SSFMB) link using COMDISCO signal processing work-system (SPW). The networking features modeled include the implementation of Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems (CCSDS) protocols in the multiplexing of digitized audio and core data into virtual channel data units (VCDU's) in the control center complex and the demultiplexing of VCDU's in the onboard baseband signal processor. The emphasis of this work has been placed on techniques for modeling the CCSDS networking features using SPW. The objectives for developing the SPW models are to test the suitability of SPW for modeling networking features and to develop SPW simulation models of the control center complex and space station baseband signal processor for use in end-to-end testing of the ground-to-SSFMB S-band single access forward (SSAF) link.

  4. Linking clinician interaction and coordination to clinical performance in Patient-Aligned Care Teams.

    PubMed

    Hysong, Sylvia J; Thomas, Candice L; Spitzmüller, Christiane; Amspoker, Amber B; Woodard, LeChauncy; Modi, Varsha; Naik, Aanand D

    2016-01-15

    Team coordination within clinical care settings is a critical component of effective patient care. Less is known about the extent, effectiveness, and impact of coordination activities among professionals within VA Patient-Aligned Care Teams (PACTs). This study will address these gaps by describing the specific, fundamental tasks and practices involved in PACT coordination, their impact on performance measures, and the role of coordination task complexity. First, we will use a web-based survey of coordination practices among 1600 PACTs in the national VHA. Survey findings will characterize PACT coordination practices and assess their association with clinical performance measures. Functional job analysis, using 6-8 subject matter experts who are 3rd and 4th year residents in VA Primary Care rotations, will be utilized to identify the tasks involved in completing clinical performance measures to standard. From this, expert ratings of coordination complexity will be used to determine the level of coordinative complexity required for each of the clinical performance measures drawn from the VA External Peer Review Program (EPRP). For objective 3, data collected from the first two methods will evaluate the effect of clinical complexity on the relationships between measures of PACT coordination and their ratings on the clinical performance measures. Results from this study will support successful implementation of coordinated team-based work in clinical settings by providing knowledge regarding which aspects of care require the most complex levels of coordination and how specific coordination practices impact clinical performance.

  5. “Youth friendly” clinics: Considerations for linking and engaging HIV-infected adolescents into care

    PubMed Central

    Tanner, Amanda E.; Philbin, Morgan M.; Duval, Anna; Ellen, Jonathan; Kapogiannis, Bill; Fortenberry, J. Dennis

    2014-01-01

    Linkage and engagement in care are critical corollaries to the health of HIV-infected adolescents. The adolescent HIV epidemic and adolescents’ unique barriers to care necessitates innovation in the provision of care, including the consideration of the clinical experience. Little research has addressed how “youth friendly” clinics may influence care retention for HIV-infected youth. We conducted 124 interviews with providers, outreach workers, and case managers, at 15 Adolescent Medicine Trials Network clinics. Photographs of each clinic documented the characteristics of the physical space. Constant comparison and content and visual narrative methods were utilized for data analysis. Three elements of youth friendliness were identified for clinics serving HIV-infected youth, including: (1) role of target population (e.g., pediatric, adolescent, HIV); (2) clinics’ physical environment; and (3) clinics’ social environment. Working to create ‘youth friendly’ clinics through changes in physical (e.g., space, entertainment, and educational materials) and social (e.g., staff training related to development, gender, sexual orientation) environments may help reduce HIV-infected adolescents’ unique barriers to care engagement. The integration of clinic design and staff training within the organization of a clinical program is helpful in meeting the specialized needs of HIV-infected youth. PMID:23782040

  6. Statistics of randomly cross-linked polymer models to interpret chromatin conformation capture data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukron, O.; Holcman, D.

    2017-07-01

    Polymer models are used to describe chromatin, which can be folded at different spatial scales by binding molecules. By folding, chromatin generates loops of various sizes. We present here a statistical analysis of the randomly cross-linked (RCL) polymer model, where monomer pairs are connected randomly, generating a heterogeneous ensemble of chromatin conformations. We obtain asymptotic formulas for the steady-state variance, encounter probability, the radius of gyration, instantaneous displacement, and the mean first encounter time between any two monomers. The analytical results are confirmed by Brownian simulations. Finally, the present results are used to extract the mean number of cross links in a chromatin region from conformation capture data.

  7. Clinical models of cardiovascular regulation after weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, D.; Jacob, G.; Ertl, A.; Shannon, J.; Mosqueda-Garcia, R.; Robertson, R. M.; Biaggioni, I.

    1996-01-01

    After several days in microgravity, return to earth is attended by alterations in cardiovascular function. The mechanisms underlying these effects are inadequately understood. Three clinical disorders of autonomic function represent possible models of this abnormal cardiovascular function after spaceflight. They are pure autonomic failure, baroreflex failure, and orthostatic intolerance. In pure autonomic failure, virtually complete loss of sympathetic and parasympathetic function occurs along with profound and immediate orthostatic hypotension. In baroreflex failure, various degrees of debuffering of blood pressure occur. In acute and complete baroreflex failure, there is usually severe hypertension and tachycardia, while with less complete and more chronic baroreflex impairment, orthostatic abnormalities may be more apparent. In orthostatic intolerance, blood pressure fall is minor, but orthostatic symptoms are prominent and tachycardia frequently occurs. Only careful autonomic studies of human subjects in the microgravity environment will permit us to determine which of these models most closely reflects the pathophysiology brought on by a period of time in the microgravity environment.

  8. A clinical application of the training model.

    PubMed

    Gianotti, Patricia

    2010-03-01

    This article offers a perspective and a summary of Jack Danielian's (2010) Horneyan training model, highlighting the benefits of a meta-psychological approach for analysts in training and seasoned practitioners alike. To help illustrate the complexity of Karen Horney's views of character structure and character pathology, this article presents a model that reflects the dynamic tensions at play within individuals with narcissistic issues. It suggests that therapeutic listening can be tracked and that thematic material unfolds in a somewhat predictable, sequential, yet altogether systemic manner. Listening is not just art or intuition, nor is it merely interpretation of content based on a theoretical framework. It represents a way of holding the dialectic tension between conscious and unconscious, syntonic and dystonic. If we can better track these dynamic tensions, we can better anticipate and hopefully avoid clinical ruptures through the acting out of negative transference.

  9. Clinical models of cardiovascular regulation after weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, D.; Jacob, G.; Ertl, A.; Shannon, J.; Mosqueda-Garcia, R.; Robertson, R. M.; Biaggioni, I.

    1996-01-01

    After several days in microgravity, return to earth is attended by alterations in cardiovascular function. The mechanisms underlying these effects are inadequately understood. Three clinical disorders of autonomic function represent possible models of this abnormal cardiovascular function after spaceflight. They are pure autonomic failure, baroreflex failure, and orthostatic intolerance. In pure autonomic failure, virtually complete loss of sympathetic and parasympathetic function occurs along with profound and immediate orthostatic hypotension. In baroreflex failure, various degrees of debuffering of blood pressure occur. In acute and complete baroreflex failure, there is usually severe hypertension and tachycardia, while with less complete and more chronic baroreflex impairment, orthostatic abnormalities may be more apparent. In orthostatic intolerance, blood pressure fall is minor, but orthostatic symptoms are prominent and tachycardia frequently occurs. Only careful autonomic studies of human subjects in the microgravity environment will permit us to determine which of these models most closely reflects the pathophysiology brought on by a period of time in the microgravity environment.

  10. Selection and mutation in X-linked recessive diseases epidemiological model.

    PubMed

    Verrilli, Francesca; Kebriaei, Hamed; Glielmo, Luigi; Corless, Martin; Del Vecchio, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    To describe the epidemiology of X-linked recessive diseases we developed a discrete time, structured, non linear mathematical model. The model allows for de novo mutations (i.e. affected sibling born to unaffected parents) and selection (i.e., distinct fitness rates depending on individual's health conditions). Applying Lyapunov direct method we found the domain of attraction of model's equilibrium point and studied the convergence properties of the degenerate equilibrium where only affected individuals survive.

  11. X-linked ichthyosis without STS deficiency: Clinical, genetical, and molecular studies

    SciTech Connect

    Robledo, R.; Melis, P.; Schillinger, E.; Siniscalco, M.

    1995-11-06

    We report on a Sardinian pedigree with congenital ichthyosis associated with normal levels of steroid sulfatase and a normal molecular pattern, as detectable with a cDNA probe for the steroid sulfatase (STS) gene. Though the pattern of transmission of the disease is consistent with X-linked recessive inheritance, this form of ichthyosis was found to segregate independently of genetic polymorphisms detected by probes of the region Xp22.3, where the STS locus has been mapped. The search for close genetic linkages with other polymorphic markers scattered along the entire X chromosome has so far been fruitless. For the time being, the main conclusion derived from these data is that STS deficiency is not a sine qua non for X-linked ichthyosis which may also result from a mutational event at an X-chromosomal site genetically unlinked to the STS locus. 16 refs., 4 figs.

  12. Discovering link communities in complex networks by an integer programming model and a genetic algorithm.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhenping; Zhang, Xiang-Sun; Wang, Rui-Sheng; Liu, Hongwei; Zhang, Shihua

    2013-01-01

    Identification of communities in complex networks is an important topic and issue in many fields such as sociology, biology, and computer science. Communities are often defined as groups of related nodes or links that correspond to functional subunits in the corresponding complex systems. While most conventional approaches have focused on discovering communities of nodes, some recent studies start partitioning links to find overlapping communities straightforwardly. In this paper, we propose a new quantity function for link community identification in complex networks. Based on this quantity function we formulate the link community partition problem into an integer programming model which allows us to partition a complex network into overlapping communities. We further propose a genetic algorithm for link community detection which can partition a network into overlapping communities without knowing the number of communities. We test our model and algorithm on both artificial networks and real-world networks. The results demonstrate that the model and algorithm are efficient in detecting overlapping community structure in complex networks.

  13. Correlation between connexin 32 gene mutations and clinical phenotype in X-linked dominant Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy

    SciTech Connect

    Ionasescu, V.; Ionasescu, R.; Searby, C.

    1996-06-14

    We studied the relationship between the genotype and clinical phenotype in 27 families with dominant X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMTX1) neuropathy. Twenty-two families showed mutations in the coding region of the connexin32 (cx32) gene. The mutations include four nonsense mutations, eight missense mutations, two medium size deletions, and one insertion. Most missense mutations showed a mild clinical phenotype (five out of eight), whereas all nonsense mutations, the larger of the two deletions, and the insertion that produced frameshifts showed severe phenotypes. Five CMTX1 families with mild clinical phenotype showed no point mutations of the cx32 gene coding region. Three of these families showed positive genetic linkage with the markers of the Xq13.1 region. The genetic linkage of the remaining two families could not be evaluated because of their small size. 25 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  14. Clinical and radiographic dental findings in X linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Crawford, P J; Aldred, M J; Clarke, A

    1991-01-01

    X linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia was studied in the dentition of both affected males and carrier females. Hypodontia was more severe in males than females and there were differences in the pattern of tooth absence between the sexes. Abnormal crown form, with the maximum diameter of the teeth being apically displaced, was noted particularly in the anterior teeth. Taurodontism was commonly seen radiographically. Images PMID:2051453

  15. Agreement between clinical and laboratory methods assessing tonic and cross-link components of accommodation and vergence.

    PubMed

    Neveu, Pascaline; Priot, Anne-Emmanuelle; Philippe, Matthieu; Fuchs, Philippe; Roumes, Corinne

    2015-09-01

    Several tests are available to optometrists for investigating accommodation and vergence. This study sought to investigate the agreement between clinical and laboratory methods and to clarify which components are actually measured when tonic and cross-link of accommodation and vergence are assessed. Tonic vergence, tonic accommodation, accommodative vergence (AC/A) and vergence accommodation (CA/C) were measured using several tests. Clinical tests were compared to the laboratory assessment, the latter being regarded as an absolute reference. The repeatability of each test and the degree of agreement between the tests were quantified using Bland-Altman analysis. The values obtained for each test were found to be stable across repetitions; however, in most cases, significant differences were observed between tests supposed to measure the same oculomotor component. Tonic and cross-link components cannot be easily assessed because proximal and instrumental responses interfere with the assessment. Other components interfere with oculomotor assessment. Specifically, accommodative divergence interferes with tonic vergence estimation and the type of accommodation considered in the AC/A ratio affects its magnitude. Results on clinical tonic accommodation and clinical CA/C show that further investigation is needed to clarify the limitations associated with the use of difference of Gaussian as visual targets to open the accommodative loop. Although different optometric tests of accommodation and vergence rely on the same basic principles, the results of this study indicate that clinical and laboratory methods actually involve distinct components. These differences, which are induced by methodological choices, must be taken into account, when comparing studies or when selecting a test to investigate a particular oculomotor component. © 2015 The Authors. Clinical and Experimental Optometry © 2015 Optometry Australia.

  16. [From clinical judgment to linear regression model.

    PubMed

    Palacios-Cruz, Lino; Pérez, Marcela; Rivas-Ruiz, Rodolfo; Talavera, Juan O

    2013-01-01

    When we think about mathematical models, such as linear regression model, we think that these terms are only used by those engaged in research, a notion that is far from the truth. Legendre described the first mathematical model in 1805, and Galton introduced the formal term in 1886. Linear regression is one of the most commonly used regression models in clinical practice. It is useful to predict or show the relationship between two or more variables as long as the dependent variable is quantitative and has normal distribution. Stated in another way, the regression is used to predict a measure based on the knowledge of at least one other variable. Linear regression has as it's first objective to determine the slope or inclination of the regression line: Y = a + bx, where "a" is the intercept or regression constant and it is equivalent to "Y" value when "X" equals 0 and "b" (also called slope) indicates the increase or decrease that occurs when the variable "x" increases or decreases in one unit. In the regression line, "b" is called regression coefficient. The coefficient of determination (R(2)) indicates the importance of independent variables in the outcome.

  17. Automatic generation of computable implementation guides from clinical information models.

    PubMed

    Boscá, Diego; Maldonado, José Alberto; Moner, David; Robles, Montserrat

    2015-06-01

    Clinical information models are increasingly used to describe the contents of Electronic Health Records. Implementation guides are a common specification mechanism used to define such models. They contain, among other reference materials, all the constraints and rules that clinical information must obey. However, these implementation guides typically are oriented to human-readability, and thus cannot be processed by computers. As a consequence, they must be reinterpreted and transformed manually into an executable language such as Schematron or Object Constraint Language (OCL). This task can be difficult and error prone due to the big gap between both representations. The challenge is to develop a methodology for the specification of implementation guides in such a way that humans can read and understand easily and at the same time can be processed by computers. In this paper, we propose and describe a novel methodology that uses archetypes as basis for generation of implementation guides. We use archetypes to generate formal rules expressed in Natural Rule Language (NRL) and other reference materials usually included in implementation guides such as sample XML instances. We also generate Schematron rules from NRL rules to be used for the validation of data instances. We have implemented these methods in LinkEHR, an archetype editing platform, and exemplify our approach by generating NRL rules and implementation guides from EN ISO 13606, openEHR, and HL7 CDA archetypes.

  18. Bayesian inference in an item response theory model with a generalized student t link function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azevedo, Caio L. N.; Migon, Helio S.

    2012-10-01

    In this paper we introduce a new item response theory (IRT) model with a generalized Student t-link function with unknown degrees of freedom (df), named generalized t-link (GtL) IRT model. In this model we consider only the difficulty parameter in the item response function. GtL is an alternative to the two parameter logit and probit models, since the degrees of freedom (df) play a similar role to the discrimination parameter. However, the behavior of the curves of the GtL is different from those of the two parameter models and the usual Student t link, since in GtL the curve obtained from different df's can cross the probit curves in more than one latent trait level. The GtL model has similar proprieties to the generalized linear mixed models, such as the existence of sufficient statistics and easy parameter interpretation. Also, many techniques of parameter estimation, model fit assessment and residual analysis developed for that models can be used for the GtL model. We develop fully Bayesian estimation and model fit assessment tools through a Metropolis-Hastings step within Gibbs sampling algorithm. We consider a prior sensitivity choice concerning the degrees of freedom. The simulation study indicates that the algorithm recovers all parameters properly. In addition, some Bayesian model fit assessment tools are considered. Finally, a real data set is analyzed using our approach and other usual models. The results indicate that our model fits the data better than the two parameter models.

  19. Clinical Trials Reference Materials and Related Links | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Agreements Clinical Trials Agreement Confidential Disclosure Agreements Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) - Research Plan Financial and Staffing Contribution of the Parties Exception or Modifications to the CRADA Human Subject Protection/Informed Consent |

  20. Pertussis Pseudo-outbreak linked to specimens contaminated by Bordetella pertussis DNA From clinic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Sema; Tatti, Kathleen M; Woods-Stout, Denise; Cassiday, Pamela K; Faulkner, Amanda E; Griffith, Matthew M; Jackson, Michael L; Pawloski, Lucia C; Wagner, Bari; Barnes, Meghan; Cohn, Amanda C; Gershman, Ken A; Messonnier, Nancy E; Clark, Thomas A; Tondella, Maria-Lucia C; Martin, Stacey W

    2012-02-01

    We investigated a pertussis outbreak characterized by atypical cases, confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) alone at a single laboratory, which persisted despite high vaccine coverage and routine control measures. We aimed to determine whether Bordetella pertussis was the causative agent and advise on control interventions. We conducted case ascertainment, confirmatory testing for pertussis and other pathogens, and an assessment for possible sources of specimen contamination, including a survey of clinic practices, sampling clinics for B pertussis DNA, and review of laboratory quality indicators. Between November 28, 2008, and September 4, 2009, 125 cases were reported, of which 92 (74%) were PCR positive. Cases occurring after April 2009 (n = 79; 63%) had fewer classic pertussis symptoms (63% vs 98%; P < .01), smaller amounts of B pertussis DNA (mean PCR cycle threshold value: 40.9 vs 33.1; P < .01), and a greater proportion of PCR-positive results (34% vs 6%; P < .01). Cultures and serology for B pertussis were negative. Other common respiratory pathogens were detected. We identified factors that likely resulted in specimen contamination at the point of collection: environmentally present B pertussis DNA in clinics from vaccine, clinic standard specimen collection practices, use of liquid transport medium, and lack of clinically relevant PCR cutoffs. A summer pertussis pseudo-outbreak, multifactorial in cause, likely occurred. Recommendations beyond standard practice were made to providers on specimen collection and environmental cleaning, and to laboratories on standardizing PCR protocols and reporting results, to minimize false-positive results from contaminated clinical specimens.

  1. Summary goodness-of-fit statistics for binary generalized linear models with noncanonical link functions.

    PubMed

    Canary, Jana D; Blizzard, Leigh; Barry, Ronald P; Hosmer, David W; Quinn, Stephen J

    2016-05-01

    Generalized linear models (GLM) with a canonical logit link function are the primary modeling technique used to relate a binary outcome to predictor variables. However, noncanonical links can offer more flexibility, producing convenient analytical quantities (e.g., probit GLMs in toxicology) and desired measures of effect (e.g., relative risk from log GLMs). Many summary goodness-of-fit (GOF) statistics exist for logistic GLM. Their properties make the development of GOF statistics relatively straightforward, but it can be more difficult under noncanonical links. Although GOF tests for logistic GLM with continuous covariates (GLMCC) have been applied to GLMCCs with log links, we know of no GOF tests in the literature specifically developed for GLMCCs that can be applied regardless of link function chosen. We generalize the Tsiatis GOF statistic originally developed for logistic GLMCCs, (TG), so that it can be applied under any link function. Further, we show that the algebraically related Hosmer-Lemeshow (HL) and Pigeon-Heyse (J(2) ) statistics can be applied directly. In a simulation study, TG, HL, and J(2) were used to evaluate the fit of probit, log-log, complementary log-log, and log models, all calculated with a common grouping method. The TG statistic consistently maintained Type I error rates, while those of HL and J(2) were often lower than expected if terms with little influence were included. Generally, the statistics had similar power to detect an incorrect model. An exception occurred when a log GLMCC was incorrectly fit to data generated from a logistic GLMCC. In this case, TG had more power than HL or J(2) .

  2. Clinical Scholar Model: providing excellence in clinical supervision of nursing students.

    PubMed

    Preheim, Gayle; Casey, Kathy; Krugman, Mary

    2006-01-01

    The Clinical Scholar Model (CSM) is a practice-education partnership focused on improving the outcomes of clinical nursing education by bridging the academic and service settings. An expert clinical nurse serves as a clinical scholar (CS) to coordinate, supervise, and evaluate the clinical education of nursing students in collaboration with school of nursing faculty. This article describes the model's evolution, how the model is differentiated from traditional clinical instruction roles and responsibilities, and the benefits to the collaborating clinical agency and school of nursing.

  3. The Indirect Link between Perceived Parenting and Adolescent Future Orientation: A Multiple-Step Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seginer, Rachel; Vermulst, Ad; Shoyer, Shirli

    2004-01-01

    The indirect links between perceived mothers' and fathers' autonomous-accepting parenting and future orientation were examined in a mediational model consisting of five steps: perceived mothers' and fathers' autonomous-accepting parenting, self-evaluation, and the motivational, cognitive representation, and behavioural components of future…

  4. Assessing crown fire potential by linking models of surface and crown fire behavior

    Treesearch

    Joe H. Scott; Elizabeth D. Reinhardt

    2001-01-01

    Fire managers are increasingly concerned about the threat of crown fires, yet only now are quantitative methods for assessing crown fire hazard being developed. Links among existing mathematical models of fire behavior are used to develop two indices of crown fire hazard-the Torching Index and Crowning Index. These indices can be used to ordinate different forest...

  5. What Works Clearinghouse Quick Review: "A Model for Success: CART's Linked Learning Program Increases College Enrollment"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The study, "A Model for Success: CART's Linked Learning Program Increases College Enrollment" examined whether students who enrolled in courses at a high school that combined academics and technical education had higher college enrollment rates than students who did not. The research described in this report does not meet What Works…

  6. The Chain-Link Fence Model: A Framework for Creating Security Procedures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houghton, Robert F.

    2013-01-01

    A long standing problem in information technology security is how to help reduce the security footprint. Many specific proposals exist to address specific problems in information technology security. Most information technology solutions need to be repeatable throughout the course of an information systems lifecycle. The Chain-Link Fence Model is…

  7. Multiscale Modeling for Linking Growth, Microstructure, and Properties of Inorganic Microporous Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vlachos, Dion G.

    2002-01-01

    The focus of this presentation is on multiscale modeling in order to link processing, microstructure, and properties of materials. Overview of problems we study includes: Growth mechanisms in chemical and physical vapor epitaxy; thin films of zeolites for separation and sensing; thin Pd films for hydrogen separation and pattern formation by self-regulation routes.

  8. The Gender-Linked Language Effect: An Empirical Test of a General Process Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulac, Anthony; Giles, Howard; Bradac, James J.; Palomares, Nicholas A.

    2013-01-01

    The gender-linked language effect (GLLE) is a phenomenon in which transcripts of female communicators are rated higher on Socio-Intellectual Status and Aesthetic Quality and male communicators are rated higher on Dynamism. This study proposed and tested a new general process model explanation for the GLLE, a central mediating element of which…

  9. Exploring Alternative Characteristic Curve Approaches to Linking Parameter Estimates from the Generalized Partial Credit Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, James S.; Bao, Han; Huang, Chun-Wei; Gagne, Phill

    Characteristic curve approaches for linking parameters from the generalized partial credit model were examined for cases in which common (anchor) items are calibrated separately in two groups. Three of these approaches are simple extensions of the test characteristic curve (TCC), item characteristic curve (ICC), and operating characteristic curve…

  10. A Comparison of Linking and Concurrent Calibration under the Graded Response Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Seock-Ho; Cohen, Allan S.

    2002-01-01

    Compared two methods for developing a common metric for the graded response model under item response theory: (1) linking separate calibration runs using equating coefficients from the characteristic curve method; and (2) concurrent calibration using the combined data of the base and target groups. Concurrent calibration yielded consistently,…

  11. The Chain-Link Fence Model: A Framework for Creating Security Procedures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houghton, Robert F.

    2013-01-01

    A long standing problem in information technology security is how to help reduce the security footprint. Many specific proposals exist to address specific problems in information technology security. Most information technology solutions need to be repeatable throughout the course of an information systems lifecycle. The Chain-Link Fence Model is…

  12. Multiscale Modeling for Linking Growth, Microstructure, and Properties of Inorganic Microporous Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vlachos, Dion G.

    2002-01-01

    The focus of this presentation is on multiscale modeling in order to link processing, microstructure, and properties of materials. Overview of problems we study includes: Growth mechanisms in chemical and physical vapor epitaxy; thin films of zeolites for separation and sensing; thin Pd films for hydrogen separation and pattern formation by self-regulation routes.

  13. The Gender-Linked Language Effect: An Empirical Test of a General Process Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulac, Anthony; Giles, Howard; Bradac, James J.; Palomares, Nicholas A.

    2013-01-01

    The gender-linked language effect (GLLE) is a phenomenon in which transcripts of female communicators are rated higher on Socio-Intellectual Status and Aesthetic Quality and male communicators are rated higher on Dynamism. This study proposed and tested a new general process model explanation for the GLLE, a central mediating element of which…

  14. Linking for the General Diagnostic Model. Research Report. ETS RR-08-08

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xu, Xueli; von Davier, Matthias

    2008-01-01

    Three strategies for linking two consecutive assessments are investigated and compared by analyzing reading data for the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) using the general diagnostic model. These strategies are compared in terms of marginal and joint expectations of skills, joint probabilities of skill patterns, and item…

  15. Vision-based stress estimation model for steel frame structures with rigid links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hyo Seon; Park, Jun Su; Oh, Byung Kwan

    2017-07-01

    This paper presents a stress estimation model for the safety evaluation of steel frame structures with rigid links using a vision-based monitoring system. In this model, the deformed shape of a structure under external loads is estimated via displacements measured by a motion capture system (MCS), which is a non-contact displacement measurement device. During the estimation of the deformed shape, the effective lengths of the rigid link ranges in the frame structure are identified. The radius of the curvature of the structural member to be monitored is calculated using the estimated deformed shape and is employed to estimate stress. Using MCS in the presented model, the safety of a structure can be assessed gauge-freely. In addition, because the stress is directly extracted from the radius of the curvature obtained from the measured deformed shape, information on the loadings and boundary conditions of the structure are not required. Furthermore, the model, which includes the identification of the effective lengths of the rigid links, can consider the influences of the stiffness of the connection and support on the deformation in the stress estimation. To verify the applicability of the presented model, static loading tests for a steel frame specimen were conducted. By comparing the stress estimated by the model with the measured stress, the validity of the model was confirmed.

  16. Model of Host-Pathogen Interaction Dynamics Links In Vivo Optical Imaging and Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Ale, Angelique; Crepin, Valerie F.; Collins, James W.; Constantinou, Nicholas; Habibzay, Maryam; Babtie, Ann C.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Tracking disease progression in vivo is essential for the development of treatments against bacterial infection. Optical imaging has become a central tool for in vivo tracking of bacterial population development and therapeutic response. For a precise understanding of in vivo imaging results in terms of disease mechanisms derived from detailed postmortem observations, however, a link between the two is needed. Here, we develop a model that provides that link for the investigation of Citrobacter rodentium infection, a mouse model for enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC). We connect in vivo disease progression of C57BL/6 mice infected with bioluminescent bacteria, imaged using optical tomography and X-ray computed tomography, to postmortem measurements of colonic immune cell infiltration. We use the model to explore changes to both the host immune response and the bacteria and to evaluate the response to antibiotic treatment. The developed model serves as a novel tool for the identification and development of new therapeutic interventions. PMID:27821583

  17. Humanized mouse models of clinical disease

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Nicole; Kenney, Laurie; Jangalwe, Sonal; Aryee, Ken-Edwin; Greiner, Dale L.; Brehm, Michael A.; Shultz, Leonard D.

    2017-01-01

    Immunodeficient mice engrafted with functional human cells and tissues, i.e., “humanized mice”, have become increasingly important as small pre-clinical animal models for the study of human diseases. Since the description of immunodeficient mice bearing mutations in the IL2 receptor common gamma chain (IL2rgnull) in the early 2000’s, investigators have been able to engraft murine recipients with human hematopoietic stem cells that develop into functional human immune systems. These mice can also be engrafted with human tissues such as islets, liver, skin, and most solid and hematologic cancers. Humanized mice are permitting significant progress in studies of human infectious disease, cancer, regenerative medicine, graft versus host disease, allergies, and immunity. Ultimately, use of humanized mice may lead to the implementation of truly “personalized” medicine in the clinic. This review discusses recent progress in the development and use of humanized mice, and highlights their utility for the study of human diseases. PMID:27959627

  18. Quality and safety of detailed clinical models.

    PubMed

    Ritz, Derek

    2013-01-01

    This chapter describes quality and safety risks related to the development and use of Detailed Clinical Models (DCM) and mechanisms which may be employed to mitigate such risks. The chapter begins with a brief discussion of DCMs and the role they can play in mitigating patient safety risk. There is then a brief description of the risks which DCMs themselves may introduce, followed by the introduction of a standards-based risk assessment method and the ways this assessment method may be applied to DCMs in particular. A general description is then made of the ISO 9000-based approach to quality management systems (QMS) and, specifically, how such an approach may be applied to DCM development, maintenance, deployment and use. The chapter concludes with a discussion of specific DCM quality and safety challenges and governance approaches which may be employed to help address these.

  19. Implicit and explicit stigma of mental illness: links to clinical care.

    PubMed

    Peris, Tara S; Teachman, Bethany A; Nosek, Brian A

    2008-10-01

    This study examined implicit and explicit measures of bias toward mental illness among people with different levels of mental health training, and investigated the influence of stigma on clinically-relevant decision-making. Participants (N = 1539) comprised of (1) mental health professionals and clinical graduate students, (2) other health care/social services specialists, (3) undergraduate students, and (4) the general public self-reported their attitudes toward people with mental illness, and completed implicit measures to assess mental illness evaluations that exist outside of awareness or control. In addition, participants predicted patient prognoses and assigned diagnoses after clinical vignettes. Compared with people without mental health training, individuals with mental health training demonstrated more positive implicit and explicit evaluations of people with mental illness. Further, explicit (but not implicit) biases predicted more negative patient prognoses, but implicit (and not explicit) biases predicted over-diagnosis, underscoring the value of using both implicit and explicit measures.

  20. Attrition in Models of Intergenerational Links Using the PSID with Extensions to Health and to Sibling Models*

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgerald, John M.

    2012-01-01

    Selective attrition potentially biases estimation of intergenerational links in health and economic status. This paper documents attrition in the PSID through 2007 for a cohort of children, and investigates attrition bias in intergenerational models predicting adult health, education and earnings, including models based on sibling differences. Although attrition affects unconditional means, the weighted PSID generally maintains its representativeness along key dimensions in comparison to the National Health Interview Survey. Using PSID, sibling correlations in outcomes and father-son correlations in earnings are not significantly affected by attrition. Models of intergenerational links with covariates yield more mixed results with females showing few robust impacts of attrition and males showing potential attrition bias for education and earnings outcomes. For adult health outcomes conditional on child background, neither gender shows significant impacts of attrition for the age ranges and models considered here. Sibling models do not produce robustly higher attrition impacts than individual models. PMID:22368743

  1. Dynamical modeling of serial manipulators with flexible links and joints using the method of kinematic influence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graves, Philip L.

    1989-01-01

    A method of formulating the dynamical equations of a flexible, serial manipulator is presented, using the Method of Kinematic Influence. The resulting equations account for rigid body motion, structural motion due to link and joint flexibilities, and the coupling between these two motions. Nonlinear inertial loads are included in the equations. A finite order mode summation method is used to model flexibilities. The structural data may be obtained from experimental, finite element, or analytical methods. Nonlinear flexibilities may be included in the model.

  2. Linking Parameters Estimated with the Generalized Graded Unfolding Model: A Comparison of the Accuracy of Characteristic Curve Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson Koenig, Judith; Roberts, James S.

    2007-01-01

    Methods for linking item response theory (IRT) parameters are developed for attitude questionnaire responses calibrated with the generalized graded unfolding model (GGUM). One class of IRT linking methods derives the linking coefficients by comparing characteristic curves, and three of these methods---test characteristic curve (TCC), item…

  3. Rainfall retrieval in urban areas using commercial microwave links from mobile networks: A modelling feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zohidov, Bahtiyor; Andrieu, Hervé; Servières, Myriam; Normand, Nicolas

    2014-05-01

    Rainfall is usually measured by networks of rain gauges and weather radars. Many cities worldwide are not supplied with these devices; however, they are generally equipped with mobile telecommunication networks. Mobile networks use atmospheric Hyper-Frequency (HF) links whose transmitted signal power is attenuated by rainfall. Measuring that signal attenuation along each link could allow the measurement of path-averaged rainfall [Leijnse et al 2007, Overeem et al 2013, Messer et al 2006, Guili et al 1991, Zinevich et al 2008, Cuccoli et al 2011]. As HF links are concentrated in cities, these networks could constitute a self-sufficient approach to monitoring rainfall in urban areas. We adopt a simulation approach in order to study the feasibility of mapping rainfall fields at the city scale by means of existing HF links. Our domain of study is the central part of the city of Nantes, France, where the density of cellular networks is greatest. As a basis, we use a data set consisting of hundreds of weather radar images recorded by the Météo-France C band weather radar at high spatial (250m x 250m) and temporal (5 minute) resolutions located about 10 km north of the center of Nantes. We convert these images into rainfall maps using the Z-R relation and consider them as reference rainfall fields. The simulation is performed as follows. First, we simulate the measurement of total attenuation along each HF link using a rain-attenuation model based on Mie theory and a known drop size distribution in a continental temperate climate. This procedure is applied for 256 real radio links operating at different frequencies (18, 23, 38 GHz) with lengths ranging from 0.4 to 16 km. This helps us to substitute the attenuation data for the signal power received from microwave links. Error sources affecting measurement accuracy are introduced as a zero-mean Gaussian distributed random variable with variance of 10% of total attenuation. The retrieval of the rainfield is performed by a

  4. Knowledge of risk factors and the periodontal disease-systemic link in dental students' clinical decisions.

    PubMed

    Friesen, Lynn Roosa; Walker, Mary P; Kisling, Rebecca E; Liu, Ying; Williams, Karen B

    2014-09-01

    This study evaluated second-, third-, and fourth-year dental students' ability to identify systemic conditions associated with periodontal disease, risk factors most important for referral, and medications with an effect on the periodontium and their ability to apply this knowledge to make clinical decisions regarding treatment and referral of periodontal patients. A twenty-one question survey was administered at one U.S. dental school in the spring semester of 2012 to elicit the students' knowledge and confidence regarding clinical reasoning. The response rate was 86 percent. Periodontal risk factors were accurately selected by at least 50 percent of students in all three classes; these were poorly controlled diabetes, ≥6 mm pockets posteriorly, and lack of response to previous non-surgical therapy. Confidence in knowledge, knowledge of risk factors, and knowledge of medications with an effect on the periodontium improved with training and were predictive of better referral decision making. The greatest impact of training was seen on the students' ability to make correct decisions about referral and treatment for seven clinical scenarios. Although the study found a large increase in the students' abilities from the second through fourth years, the mean of 4.6 (out of 7) for the fourth-year students shows that, on average, those students missed correct treatment or referral on more than two of seven clinical cases. These results suggest that dental curricula should emphasize more critical decision making with respect to referral and treatment criteria in managing the periodontal patient.

  5. Mutations in chromatin regulators functionally link Cornelia de Lange syndrome and clinically overlapping phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Parenti, Ilaria; Teresa-Rodrigo, María E; Pozojevic, Jelena; Ruiz Gil, Sara; Bader, Ingrid; Braunholz, Diana; Bramswig, Nuria C; Gervasini, Cristina; Larizza, Lidia; Pfeiffer, Lutz; Ozkinay, Ferda; Ramos, Feliciano; Reiz, Benedikt; Rittinger, Olaf; Strom, Tim M; Watrin, Erwan; Wendt, Kerstin; Wieczorek, Dagmar; Wollnik, Bernd; Baquero-Montoya, Carolina; Pié, Juan; Deardorff, Matthew A; Gillessen-Kaesbach, Gabriele; Kaiser, Frank J

    2017-03-01

    The coordinated tissue-specific regulation of gene expression is essential for the proper development of all organisms. Mutations in multiple transcriptional regulators cause a group of neurodevelopmental disorders termed "transcriptomopathies" that share core phenotypical features including growth retardation, developmental delay, intellectual disability and facial dysmorphism. Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) belongs to this class of disorders and is caused by mutations in different subunits or regulators of the cohesin complex. Herein, we report on the clinical and molecular characterization of seven patients with features overlapping with CdLS who were found to carry mutations in chromatin regulators previously associated to other neurodevelopmental disorders that are frequently considered in the differential diagnosis of CdLS. The identified mutations affect the methyltransferase-encoding genes KMT2A and SETD5 and different subunits of the SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling complex. Complementary to this, a patient with Coffin-Siris syndrome was found to carry a missense substitution in NIPBL. Our findings indicate that mutations in a variety of chromatin-associated factors result in overlapping clinical phenotypes, underscoring the genetic heterogeneity that should be considered when assessing the clinical and molecular diagnosis of neurodevelopmental syndromes. It is clear that emerging molecular mechanisms of chromatin dysregulation are central to understanding the pathogenesis of these clinically overlapping genetic disorders.

  6. The CAEP Standards and Research on Educator Preparation Programs: Linking Clinical Partnerships with Program Impact

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heafner, Tina; McIntyre, Ellen; Spooner, Melba

    2014-01-01

    Responding to the challenge of more rigorous and outcome-oriented program evaluation criteria of the Council for the Accreditation of Educator Preparation (CAEP), authors take a critical look at the intersection of two standards: Clinical Partnerships and Practice (Standard 2) and Program Impact (Standard 4). Illustrating one aspect of a secondary…

  7. Mediators of the Link between Autistic Traits and Relationship Satisfaction in a Non-Clinical Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pollmann, Monique M. H.; Finkenauer, Catrin; Begeer, Sander

    2010-01-01

    People with ASD have deficits in their social skills and may therefore experience lower relationship satisfaction. This study investigated possible mechanisms to explain whether and how autistic traits, measured with the AQ, influence relationship satisfaction in a non-clinical sample of 195 married couples. More autistic traits were associated…

  8. The CAEP Standards and Research on Educator Preparation Programs: Linking Clinical Partnerships with Program Impact

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heafner, Tina; McIntyre, Ellen; Spooner, Melba

    2014-01-01

    Responding to the challenge of more rigorous and outcome-oriented program evaluation criteria of the Council for the Accreditation of Educator Preparation (CAEP), authors take a critical look at the intersection of two standards: Clinical Partnerships and Practice (Standard 2) and Program Impact (Standard 4). Illustrating one aspect of a secondary…

  9. A prosthesis-specific multi-link segment model of lower-limb amputee sprinting.

    PubMed

    Rigney, Stacey M; Simmons, Anne; Kark, Lauren

    2016-10-03

    Lower-limb amputees commonly utilize non-articulating energy storage and return (ESAR) prostheses for high impact activities such as sprinting. Despite these prostheses lacking an articulating ankle joint, amputee gait analysis conventionally features a two-link segment model of the prosthetic foot. This paper investigated the effects of the selected link segment model׳s marker-set and geometry on a unilateral amputee sprinter׳s calculated lower-limb kinematics, kinetics and energetics. A total of five lower-limb models of the Ottobock(®) 1E90 Sprinter were developed, including two conventional shank-foot models that each used a different version of the Plug-in-Gait (PiG) marker-set to test the effect of prosthesis ankle marker location. Two Hybrid prosthesis-specific models were then developed, also using the PiG marker-sets, with the anatomical shank and foot replaced by prosthesis-specific geometry separated into two segments. Finally, a Multi-link segment (MLS) model was developed, consisting of six segments for the prosthesis as defined by a custom marker-set. All full-body musculoskeletal models were tested using four trials of experimental marker trajectories within OpenSim 3.2 (Stanford, California, USA) to find the affected and unaffected hip, knee and ankle kinematics, kinetics and energetics. The geometry of the selected lower-limb prosthesis model was found to significantly affect all variables on the affected leg (p < 0.05), and the marker-set also significantly affected all variables on the affected leg, and none of the unaffected leg variables. The results indicate that the omission of prosthesis-specific spatial, inertial and elastic properties from full-body models significantly affects the calculated amputee gait characteristics, and we therefore recommend the implementation of a MLS model.

  10. Familial X-linked mental retardation and isolated growth hormone deficiency: Clinical and molecular findings

    SciTech Connect

    Hamel, B.C.J.; Smits, A.P.T.; Helm, B. van den

    1996-07-12

    We report on several members of a family with varying degrees of X-linked mental retardation (XLMR), isolated growth hormone deficiency (IGHD), and infantile behavior but without other consistent phenotypic abnormalities. Male patients continued to grow until well into their twenties and reached a height ranging from 135 to 159 cm. Except one, all female carriers were mentally normal; their adult height ranged from 159 to 168 cm. By linkage studies we have assigned the underlying genetic defect to the Xq24-q27.3 region, with a maximum lod score of Z = 3.26 at {theta} = 0.0 for the DXS294 locus. The XLMR-IGHD phenotype in these patients may be due to pleiotropic effects of a single gene or it may represent a contiguous gene syndrome. 18 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detection of respiratory syncytial virus infection: application to clinical samples.

    PubMed Central

    McIntosh, K; Hendry, R M; Fahnestock, M L; Pierik, L T

    1982-01-01

    An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for respiratory syncytial virus antigens was applied to the rapid diagnosis of acute infections in children and was compared with viral culture and immunofluorescence tests. The ELISA test employed commercially available reagents and was run on a day-to-day basis as specimens were received in the laboratory. Sensitivity and specificity by ELISA were 82 and 95%, respectively, compared with culture. In the same specimens, the sensitivity and specificity by immunofluorescence were 86 and 96%, respectively. Nasopharyngeal aspirates were proven to be a better source of viral antigen than were nasopharyngeal swabs. ELISA-positive samples remained positive even when left unrefrigerated for a week or mailed to the laboratory in plastic containers. Respiratory syncytial virus ELISA, like culture, became negative as the disease progressed and showed no superiority over culture for diagnosis late in the illness. PMID:6749895

  12. Genetic analysis and clinical phenotype of two Indian families with X-linked choroideremia

    PubMed Central

    Battu, Rajani; Jeyabalan, Nallathambi; Murthy, Praveen; Reddy, Kavita S; Schouten, Jan SAG; Webers, Caroll A

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to describe the phenotype and genotype of two Indian families affected with X-linked choroideremia (CHM). Materials and Methods: In these two families, the affected individuals and unaffected family members underwent a comprehensive ophthalmic examination including an optical coherence tomography (OCT) and electroretinogram. Blood samples were collected from the families for genetic analysis. Next generation sequencing (NGS) was done using a panel of 184 genes, which covered previously associated genes with retinal dystrophies. Sequencing data were analyzed for the CHM, RPGR, and RP2 genes that have been implicated in CHM and X-linked retinitis pigmentosa (XLRP), respectively. The identified variants were confirmed by Sanger sequencing in available individuals and unrelated controls. Results: In two unrelated male patients, NGS analysis revealed a previously reported 3’-splice site change c.820-1G>C in the CHM gene in the first family and hemizygous mutation c.653G>C (p.Ser218X) in the second family. The asymptomatic family members were carriers for these mutations. Spectral domain-OCT showed loss of outer retina, preservation of the inner retina, and choroidal thinning in the affected males and retinal pigment epithelial changes in the asymptomatic carriers. The identified mutations were not present in 100 controls of Indian origin. There were no potential mutations found in XLRP-associated (RPGR and RP2) genes. Conclusion: This report describes the genotype and phenotype findings in patients with CHM from India. The identified genetic mutation leads to lack of Rab escort protein-1 (REP-1) or affects the production of a REP-1 protein that is likely to cause retinal abnormalities in patients. PMID:28112135

  13. Pex gene deletions in Gy and Hyp mice provide mouse models for X-linked hypophosphatemia.

    PubMed

    Strom, T M; Francis, F; Lorenz, B; Böddrich, A; Econs, M J; Lehrach, H; Meitinger, T

    1997-02-01

    X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets in humans is caused by mutations in the PEX gene which codes for a protein homologous to neutral endopeptidases. Hyp and Gy mice both have X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets, although genetic data and the different phenotypic spectra observed have previously suggested that two different genes are mutated. In addition to the metabolic disorder observed in Hyp mice, male Gy mice are sterile and show circling behavior and reduced viability. We now report the cloning of the mouse homolog of PEX which is highly conserved between man and mouse. The 3' end of this gene is deleted in Hyp mice. In Gy mice, the first three exons and the promotor region are deleted. Thus, Hyp and Gy are allelic mutations and both provide mouse models for X-linked hypophosphatemia.

  14. Pioglitazone halts axonal degeneration in a mouse model of X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Morató, Laia; Galino, Jorge; Ruiz, Montserrat; Calingasan, Noel Ylagan; Starkov, Anatoly A; Dumont, Magali; Naudí, Alba; Martínez, Juan José; Aubourg, Patrick; Portero-Otín, Manuel; Pamplona, Reinald; Galea, Elena; Beal, M Flint; Ferrer, Isidre; Fourcade, Stéphane; Pujol, Aurora

    2013-08-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy is a neurometabolic disorder caused by inactivation of the peroxisomal ABCD1 transporter of very long-chain fatty acids. In mice, ABCD1 loss causes late onset axonal degeneration in the spinal cord in association with locomotor disability resembling the most common phenotype in patients, adrenomyeloneuropathy. Increasing evidence indicates that oxidative stress and bioenergetic failure play major roles in the pathogenesis of X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy. In this study, we aimed to evaluate whether mitochondrial biogenesis is affected in X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy. We demonstrated that Abcd1 null mice show reduced mitochondrial DNA concomitant with downregulation of mitochondrial biogenesis pathway driven by PGC-1α/PPARγ and reduced expression of mitochondrial proteins cytochrome c, NDUFB8 and VDAC. Moreover, we show that the oral administration of pioglitazone, an agonist of PPARγ, restored mitochondrial content and expression of master regulators of biogenesis, neutralized oxidative damage to proteins and DNA, and reversed bioenergetic failure in terms of ATP levels, NAD+/NADH ratios, pyruvate kinase and glutathione reductase activities. Most importantly, the treatment halted locomotor disability and axonal damage in X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy mice. These results lend support to the use of pioglitazone in clinical trials with patients with adrenomyeloneuropathy and reveal novel molecular mechanisms of action of pioglitazone in neurodegeneration. Future studies should address the effects of this anti-diabetic drug on other axonopathies in which oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction are contributing factors.

  15. Pioglitazone halts axonal degeneration in a mouse model of X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Morató, Laia; Galino, Jorge; Ruiz, Montserrat; Calingasan, Noel Ylagan; Starkov, Anatoly A.; Dumont, Magali; Naudí, Alba; Martínez, Juan José; Aubourg, Patrick; Portero-Otín, Manuel; Pamplona, Reinald; Galea, Elena; Beal, M. Flint; Ferrer, Isidre; Fourcade, Stéphane

    2013-01-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy is a neurometabolic disorder caused by inactivation of the peroxisomal ABCD1 transporter of very long-chain fatty acids. In mice, ABCD1 loss causes late onset axonal degeneration in the spinal cord in association with locomotor disability resembling the most common phenotype in patients, adrenomyeloneuropathy. Increasing evidence indicates that oxidative stress and bioenergetic failure play major roles in the pathogenesis of X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy. In this study, we aimed to evaluate whether mitochondrial biogenesis is affected in X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy. We demonstrated that Abcd1 null mice show reduced mitochondrial DNA concomitant with downregulation of mitochondrial biogenesis pathway driven by PGC-1α/PPARγ and reduced expression of mitochondrial proteins cytochrome c, NDUFB8 and VDAC. Moreover, we show that the oral administration of pioglitazone, an agonist of PPARγ, restored mitochondrial content and expression of master regulators of biogenesis, neutralized oxidative damage to proteins and DNA, and reversed bioenergetic failure in terms of ATP levels, NAD+/NADH ratios, pyruvate kinase and glutathione reductase activities. Most importantly, the treatment halted locomotor disability and axonal damage in X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy mice. These results lend support to the use of pioglitazone in clinical trials with patients with adrenomyeloneuropathy and reveal novel molecular mechanisms of action of pioglitazone in neurodegeneration. Future studies should address the effects of this anti-diabetic drug on other axonopathies in which oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction are contributing factors. PMID:23794606

  16. X chromosome-linked Kallmann syndrome: clinical heterogeneity in three siblings carrying an intragenic deletion of the KAL-1 gene.

    PubMed

    Massin, Nathalie; Pêcheux, Christophe; Eloit, Corinne; Bensimon, Jean-Louis; Galey, Julie; Kuttenn, Frédérique; Hardelin, Jean-Pierre; Dodé, Catherine; Touraine, Philippe

    2003-05-01

    Kallmann syndrome (KS) is characterized by the association of hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and anosmia. The gene underlying the X chromosome-linked form of the disease, KAL-1, consists of 14 coding exons. It encodes a glycoprotein, anosmin-1, which is involved in the embryonic migration of GnRH-synthesizing neurons and the differentiation of the olfactory bulbs. We describe herein the clinical heterogeneity in three affected brothers who carry a large deletion (exons 3-13) in KAL-1. All three had a history of hypogonadotropic hypogonadism with delayed puberty. Although brain magnetic resonance imaging showed hypoplastic olfactory bulbs in the three siblings, variable degrees of anosmia/hyposmia were shown by olfactometry. In addition, these brothers had different phenotypic anomalies, i.e. unilateral renal aplasia (siblings B and C), high-arched palate (sibling A), brachymetacarpia (sibling A), mirror movements (siblings A and B), and abnormal eye movements (sibling C). Last but not least, sibling A suffered from a severe congenital hearing impairment, a feature that had been reported in KS but had not yet been ascribed unambiguously to the X-linked form of the disease. The variable phenotype, both qualitatively and quantitatively, in this family further emphasizes the role of putative modifier genes, and/or epigenetic factors, in the expressivity of the X-linked KS.

  17. Analytical model and figures of merit for filtered Microwave Photonic Links.

    PubMed

    Gasulla, Ivana; Capmany, José

    2011-09-26

    The concept of filtered Microwave Photonic Links is proposed in order to provide the most general and versatile description of complex analog photonic systems. We develop a field propagation model where a global optical filter, characterized by its optical transfer function, embraces all the intermediate optical components in a linear link. We assume a non-monochromatic light source characterized by an arbitrary spectral distribution which has a finite linewidth spectrum and consider both intensity modulation and phase modulation with balanced and single detection. Expressions leading to the computation of the main figures of merit concerning the link gain, noise and intermodulation distortion are provided which, to our knowledge, are not available in the literature. The usefulness of this derivation resides in the capability to directly provide performance criteria results for complex links just by substituting in the overall closed-form formulas the numerical or measured optical transfer function characterizing the link. This theory is presented thus as a potential tool for a wide range of relevant microwave photonic application cases which is extendable to multiport radio over fiber systems.

  18. Experimental scleral cross-linking increases glaucoma damage in a mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Kimball, Elizabeth C.; Nguyen, Cathy; Steinhart, Matthew R.; Nguyen, Thao D.; Pease, Mary E.; Oglesby, Ericka N.; Oveson, Brian C.; Quigley, Harry A.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of a scleral cross-linking agent on susceptibility to glaucoma damage in a mouse model. CD1 mice underwent 3 subconjunctival injections of 0.5 M glyceraldehyde (GA) in 1 week, then had elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) induced by bead injection. Degree of cross-linking was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), scleral permeability was measured by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP), and the mechanical effects of GA exposure were measured by inflation testing. Control mice had buffer injection or no injection in 2 separate glaucoma experiments. IOP was monitored by Tonolab and retinal ganglion cell (RGC) loss was measured by histological axon counting. To rule out undesirable effects of GA, we performed electroretinography and detailed histology of the retina. GA exposure had no detectable effects on RGC number, retinal structure or function either histologically or electrophysiologically. GA increased cross-linking of sclera by 37% in an ELISA assay, decreased scleral permeability (FRAP, p = 0.001), and produced a steeper pressure—strain behavior by in vitro inflation testing. In two experimental glaucoma experiments, GA-treated eyes had greater RGC axon loss from elevated IOP than either buffer-injected or control eyes, controlling for level of IOP exposure over time (p = 0.01, and 0.049, multivariable regression analyses). This is the first report that experimental alteration of the sclera, by cross-linking, increases susceptibility to RGC damage in mice. PMID:25285424

  19. Dynamic modelling and link mechanism design of four-legged mobile robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sung-Ho

    In order to apply the advanced biological phenomena to the leg design of mobile robots, the structural and locomotive characteristics of several selected animals and insects are studied, and the four-legged mobile robot which can cover all existing leg arrangements and locomotion patterns is modeled by a rigid multibody system consisting of links and joints. The model is simulated to prove that the given structure or locomotive conditions satisfy the requirement of minimum energy expenditure. According to the first simulation, there exist ideal forward and backward stroke distances for each pair leg. Therefore, the walking volume and link lengths of existing legged mobile robots should be modified. Also, for other structural and locomotive characteristics which have been used by living creatures, the model is simulated to determine whether or not the actual or possible biological phenomena can be applied to the leg mechanism design of mobile robot.

  20. Special conference of the American Association for Cancer Research on molecular imaging in cancer: linking biology, function, and clinical applications in vivo.

    PubMed

    Luker, Gary D

    2002-04-01

    The AACR Special Conference on Molecular Imaging in Cancer: Linking Biology, Function, and Clinical Applications In Vivo, was held January 23-27, 2002, at the Contemporary Hotel, Walt Disney World, Orlando, FL. Co-Chairs David Piwnica-Worms, Patricia Price and Thomas Meade brought together researchers with diverse expertise in molecular biology, gene therapy, chemistry, engineering, pharmacology, and imaging to accelerate progress in developing and applying technologies for imaging specific cellular and molecular signals in living animals and humans. The format of the conference was the presentation of research that focused on basic and translational biology of cancer and current state-of-the-art techniques for molecular imaging in animal models and humans. This report summarizes the special conference on molecular imaging, highlighting the interfaces of molecular biology with animal models, instrumentation, chemistry, and pharmacology that are essential to convert the dreams and promise of molecular imaging into improved understanding, diagnosis, and management of cancer.

  1. Clinical pharmacology of CAR-T cells: Linking cellular pharmacodynamics to pharmacokinetics and antitumor effects.

    PubMed

    Norelli, M; Casucci, M; Bonini, C; Bondanza, A

    2016-01-01

    Adoptive cell transfer of T cells genetically modified with tumor-reactive chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) is a rapidly emerging field in oncology, which in preliminary clinical trials has already shown striking antitumor efficacy. Despite these premises, there are still a number of open issues related to CAR-T cells, spanning from their exact mechanism of action (pharmacodynamics), to the factors associated with their in vivo persistence (pharmacokinetics), and, finally, to the relative contribution of each of the two in determining the antitumor effects and accompanying toxicities. In light of the unprecedented curative potential of CAR-T cells and of their predicted wide availability in the next few years, in this review we will summarize the current knowledge on the clinical pharmacology aspects of what is anticipated to be a brand new class of biopharmaceuticals to join the therapeutic armamentarium of cancer doctors. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Accessible, almost ab initio multi-scale modeling of entangled polymers via slip-links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreev, Marat

    It is widely accepted that dynamics of entangled polymers can be described by the tube model. Here we advocate for an alternative approach to entanglement modeling known as slip-links. Recently, slip-links were shown to possess important advantages over tube models, namely they have strong connections to atomistic, multichain levels of description, agree with non-equilibrium thermodynamics, are applicable to any chain architecture and can be used in linear or non-linear rheology. We present a hierarchy of slip-link models that are connected to each other through successive coarse graining. Models in the hierarchy are consistent in their overlapping domains of applicability in order to allow a straightforward mapping of parameters. In particular, the most--detailed level of description has four parameters, three of which can be determined directly from atomistic simulations. On the other hand, the least--detailed member of the hierarchy is numerically accessible, and allows for non-equilibrium flow predictions of complex chain architectures. Using GPU implementation these predictions can be obtained in minutes of computational time on a single desktop equipped with a mainstream gaming GPU. The GPU code is available online for free download.

  3. Assessment of sea ice-atmosphere links in CMIP5 models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boland, Emma J. D.; Bracegirdle, Thomas J.; Shuckburgh, Emily F.

    2016-09-01

    The Arctic is currently undergoing drastic changes in climate, largely thought to be due to so-called `Arctic amplification', whereby local feedbacks enhance global warming. Recently, a number of observational and modelling studies have questioned what the implications of this change in Arctic sea ice extent might be for weather in Northern Hemisphere midlatitudes, and in particular whether recent extremely cold winters such as 2009/10 might be consistent with an influence from observed Arctic sea ice decline. However, the proposed mechanisms for these links have not been consistently demonstrated. In a uniquely comprehensive cross-season and cross-model study, we show that the CMIP5 models provide no support for a relationship between declining Arctic sea ice and a negative NAM, or between declining Barents-Kara sea ice and cold European temperatures. The lack of evidence for the proposed links is consistent with studies that report a low signal-to-noise ratio in these relationships. These results imply that, whilst links may exist between declining sea ice and extreme cold weather events in the Northern Hemisphere, the CMIP5 model experiments do not show this to be a leading order effect in the long-term. We argue that this is likely due to a combination of the limitations of the CMIP5 models and an indication of other important long-term influences on Northern Hemisphere climate.

  4. Assessment of sea ice-atmosphere links in CMIP5 models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boland, Emma J. D.; Bracegirdle, Thomas J.; Shuckburgh, Emily F.

    2017-07-01

    The Arctic is currently undergoing drastic changes in climate, largely thought to be due to so-called `Arctic amplification', whereby local feedbacks enhance global warming. Recently, a number of observational and modelling studies have questioned what the implications of this change in Arctic sea ice extent might be for weather in Northern Hemisphere midlatitudes, and in particular whether recent extremely cold winters such as 2009/10 might be consistent with an influence from observed Arctic sea ice decline. However, the proposed mechanisms for these links have not been consistently demonstrated. In a uniquely comprehensive cross-season and cross-model study, we show that the CMIP5 models provide no support for a relationship between declining Arctic sea ice and a negative NAM, or between declining Barents-Kara sea ice and cold European temperatures. The lack of evidence for the proposed links is consistent with studies that report a low signal-to-noise ratio in these relationships. These results imply that, whilst links may exist between declining sea ice and extreme cold weather events in the Northern Hemisphere, the CMIP5 model experiments do not show this to be a leading order effect in the long-term. We argue that this is likely due to a combination of the limitations of the CMIP5 models and an indication of other important long-term influences on Northern Hemisphere climate.

  5. Deletion analysis and clinical correlations in patients with Xp21 linked muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Ulgenalp, Ayfer; Giray, Ozlem; Bora, Elçin; Hizli, Tülin; Kurul, Semra; Sağin-Saylam, Gül; Karasoy, Hatice; Uran, Nedret; Dizdarer, Gülşen; Tütüncüoğlu, Sarenur; Dirik, Eray; Ozkinay, Ferda; Erçal, Derya

    2004-01-01

    We carried out molecular deletion analysis on 142 patients with Duchenne/Becker muscular dystrophy which covered 25 exons of the dystrophin gene. We also evaluated the results by comparing with the clinical findings and examples in the literature. A deletion ratio of 63.7% was achieved. Exon 46 was the most frequently affected region. Interestingly we also observed four cases with muscle promoter (Mp) region deletions which have been rarely reported in the literature.

  6. Comorbidity and high viral load linked to clinical presentation of respiratory human bocavirus infection.

    PubMed

    Ghietto, Lucía María; Majul, Diego; Ferreyra Soaje, Patricia; Baumeister, Elsa; Avaro, Martín; Insfrán, Constanza; Mosca, Liliana; Cámara, Alicia; Moreno, Laura Beatriz; Adamo, Maria Pilar

    2015-01-01

    Human bocavirus (HBoV) is a new parvovirus associated with acute respiratory tract infection (ARTI). In order to evaluate HBoV significance as an agent of acute respiratory disease, we screened 1,135 respiratory samples from children and adults with and without symptoms during two complete calendar years. HBoV1 prevalence in patients with ARTI was 6.33 % in 2011 and 11.64 % in 2012, including neonatal and adult patients. HBoV1 was also detected in 3.77 % of asymptomatic individuals. The co-detection rate was 78.1 %. Among children, 87 % were clinically diagnosed with lower respiratory infection (no significant differences between patients with and without coinfection), and 31 % exhibited comorbidities. Pediatric patients with comorbidities were significantly older than patients without comorbidities. Patients with ARTI had either high or low viral load, while controls had only low viral load, but there were no clinical differences between patients with high or low viral load. In conclusion, we present evidence of the pathogenic potential of HBoV1 in young children with ARTI. Since patients with HBoV1-single infection are not significantly different from those with coinfection with respect to clinical features, the virus can be as pathogenic by itself as other respiratory agents are. Furthermore, an association between high HBoV1 load and disease could not be demonstrated in this study, but all asymptomatic individuals had low viral loads. Also, children with comorbidities are susceptible to HBoV1 infection at older ages than previously healthy children. Thus, the clinical presentation of infection may occur depending on both viral load and the particular interaction between the HBoV1 and the host.

  7. AIDS Clinical Trials Group Longitudinal Linked Randomized Trials (ALLRT): Rationale, Design, and Baseline Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Smurzynski, Marlene; Collier, Ann C.; Koletar, Susan L.; Bosch, Ronald J.; Wu, Kunling; Bastow, Barbara; Benson, Constance A.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose ALLRT is a longitudinal cohort study of HIV-infected subjects prospectively randomized into selected clinical trials for antiretroviral (ARV) treatment-naïve and ARV treatment-experienced individuals conducted by the AIDS Clinical Trials Group (ACTG). We describe the rationale, design, and baseline characteristics of the ALLRT cohort and its potential to address important research questions related to ARV therapy. Method Standardized visits occur every 16 weeks to evaluate long-term clinical, virologic, and immunologic outcomes associated with ARV treatment. Results A total of 4,371 subjects enrolled in ALLRT from January 2000 through June 2007. Of these, 3,146 (72%) were ARV naïve at parent study entry (18% female, 44% white, 32% black, 21% Hispanic; median age 37 years, CD4 count 218 cells/μL, follow-up 3.6 years; 343 [11%] followed ≥8 years) and 1,225 (28%) were treatment experienced (13% female, 59% white, 20% black, 17% Hispanic; median age 42 years, CD4 count 325 cells/μL, follow-up 5.7 years). Conclusions ALLRT provides the opportunity to understand long-term ramifications of therapeutic ARV choices and determine whether these vary by treatment regimen, timing of treatment initiation, or treatment changes over long-term follow-up. Investigations based on uniform data and specimen collection in the context of randomized ARV treatments will be critical to developing more successful long-term therapeutic strategies for HIV treatment. PMID:18753121

  8. Harmonising and linking biomedical and clinical data across disparate data archives to enable integrative cross-biobank research

    PubMed Central

    Spjuth, Ola; Krestyaninova, Maria; Hastings, Janna; Shen, Huei-Yi; Heikkinen, Jani; Waldenberger, Melanie; Langhammer, Arnulf; Ladenvall, Claes; Esko, Tõnu; Persson, Mats-Åke; Heggland, Jon; Dietrich, Joern; Ose, Sandra; Gieger, Christian; Ried, Janina S; Peters, Annette; Fortier, Isabel; de Geus, Eco JC; Klovins, Janis; Zaharenko, Linda; Willemsen, Gonneke; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Litton, Jan-Eric; Karvanen, Juha; Boomsma, Dorret I; Groop, Leif; Rung, Johan; Palmgren, Juni; Pedersen, Nancy L; McCarthy, Mark I; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Hveem, Kristian; Metspalu, Andres; Ripatti, Samuli; Prokopenko, Inga; Harris, Jennifer R

    2016-01-01

    A wealth of biospecimen samples are stored in modern globally distributed biobanks. Biomedical researchers worldwide need to be able to combine the available resources to improve the power of large-scale studies. A prerequisite for this effort is to be able to search and access phenotypic, clinical and other information about samples that are currently stored at biobanks in an integrated manner. However, privacy issues together with heterogeneous information systems and the lack of agreed-upon vocabularies have made specimen searching across multiple biobanks extremely challenging. We describe three case studies where we have linked samples and sample descriptions in order to facilitate global searching of available samples for research. The use cases include the ENGAGE (European Network for Genetic and Genomic Epidemiology) consortium comprising at least 39 cohorts, the SUMMIT (surrogate markers for micro- and macro-vascular hard endpoints for innovative diabetes tools) consortium and a pilot for data integration between a Swedish clinical health registry and a biobank. We used the Sample avAILability (SAIL) method for data linking: first, created harmonised variables and then annotated and made searchable information on the number of specimens available in individual biobanks for various phenotypic categories. By operating on this categorised availability data we sidestep many obstacles related to privacy that arise when handling real values and show that harmonised and annotated records about data availability across disparate biomedical archives provide a key methodological advance in pre-analysis exchange of information between biobanks, that is, during the project planning phase. PMID:26306643

  9. Harmonising and linking biomedical and clinical data across disparate data archives to enable integrative cross-biobank research.

    PubMed

    Spjuth, Ola; Krestyaninova, Maria; Hastings, Janna; Shen, Huei-Yi; Heikkinen, Jani; Waldenberger, Melanie; Langhammer, Arnulf; Ladenvall, Claes; Esko, Tõnu; Persson, Mats-Åke; Heggland, Jon; Dietrich, Joern; Ose, Sandra; Gieger, Christian; Ried, Janina S; Peters, Annette; Fortier, Isabel; de Geus, Eco J C; Klovins, Janis; Zaharenko, Linda; Willemsen, Gonneke; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Litton, Jan-Eric; Karvanen, Juha; Boomsma, Dorret I; Groop, Leif; Rung, Johan; Palmgren, Juni; Pedersen, Nancy L; McCarthy, Mark I; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Hveem, Kristian; Metspalu, Andres; Ripatti, Samuli; Prokopenko, Inga; Harris, Jennifer R

    2016-04-01

    A wealth of biospecimen samples are stored in modern globally distributed biobanks. Biomedical researchers worldwide need to be able to combine the available resources to improve the power of large-scale studies. A prerequisite for this effort is to be able to search and access phenotypic, clinical and other information about samples that are currently stored at biobanks in an integrated manner. However, privacy issues together with heterogeneous information systems and the lack of agreed-upon vocabularies have made specimen searching across multiple biobanks extremely challenging. We describe three case studies where we have linked samples and sample descriptions in order to facilitate global searching of available samples for research. The use cases include the ENGAGE (European Network for Genetic and Genomic Epidemiology) consortium comprising at least 39 cohorts, the SUMMIT (surrogate markers for micro- and macro-vascular hard endpoints for innovative diabetes tools) consortium and a pilot for data integration between a Swedish clinical health registry and a biobank. We used the Sample avAILability (SAIL) method for data linking: first, created harmonised variables and then annotated and made searchable information on the number of specimens available in individual biobanks for various phenotypic categories. By operating on this categorised availability data we sidestep many obstacles related to privacy that arise when handling real values and show that harmonised and annotated records about data availability across disparate biomedical archives provide a key methodological advance in pre-analysis exchange of information between biobanks, that is, during the project planning phase.

  10. Proficiency testing linked to the national reference system for the clinical laboratory: a proposal for achieving accuracy.

    PubMed

    Lasky, F D

    1992-07-01

    I propose using proficiency testing (PT) to achieve one of the important goals of CLIA: accurate and reliable clinical testing. Routine methods for the clinical laboratory are traceable to Definitive (DM) or Reference Methods (RM) or to Methodological Principles (MP) through a modification of the National Reference System for the Clinical Laboratory. PT is the link used to monitor consistent field performance. Although PT has been effective as a relative measure of laboratory performance, the technical limitations of PT fluids and of routine methods currently in use make it unlikely that PT alone can be used as a reliable measure of laboratory accuracy. Instead, I recommend calibration of routine systems through correlation to DM, RM, or MP with use of patients' specimens. The manufacturer is in the best position to assume this responsibility because of also being responsible for consistent, reliable product. Analysis of different manufactured batches of reagent would be compared with predetermined goals for precision and accuracy, as illustrated with data from product testing of Kodak Ektachem clinical chemistry slides. Adoption of this proposal would give manufacturers of PT materials, manufacturers of analytical systems, PT providers, and government agencies time to understand and resolve sources of error that limit the utility of PT for the job required by law.

  11. A spectral model of Linke's turbidity factor and its experimental implications

    SciTech Connect

    Grenier, J.C.; De La Casiniere, A.; Cabot, T. )

    1994-04-01

    A model of Linke's turbidity factor, T[sub L], is developed by means of updated spectral extraterrestrial irradiances and extinction coefficients of gaseous absorbers. It is shown that the new values of T[sub L] are clearly different from those obtained by Kasten's formula which parameterizes the optical thickness of the clean dry atmosphere. The model is used to investigate the dependence of T[sub L] on the relative optical air mass and to elucidate the relationships linking T[sub L] to Angstroem's turbidity coefficient and to the water vapor content. For any T[sub L], the corresponding value related to the air mass 2.0 can be determined. Such a standardized value is independent of solar elevation and is therefore strictly representative of the atmospheric turbidity. It can be linked to Angstroem's turbidity coefficient. Practical procedures and algorithms for computing the standard Linke's turbidity factor and determining Angstroem's turbidity coefficient are described. A relationship for converting the T[sub L] values obtained by Kasten's formula into the new values is proposed.

  12. [Factors linked to structural quality in the guidelines for clinical practice of physiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Medina Mirapeix, F; Saturno Hernández, P J; Meseguer Henarejos, A B; Montilla Herrador, J; Saura Llamas, J; Gascón Cánovas, J J

    2003-01-01

    To identify the characteristics associated with better structural quality of protocols.Design. Analytic and transversal.Setting. Health centres in Spain with physiotherapy protocols. Guidelines for physiotherapy practice or protocols worked out between 1990 and 1996, inclusive. The design quality of the documents was evaluated by using percentages of compliance with eight explicit validated criteria and the proportion of criteria complied with in each protocol out of the total possible. To identify the characteristics linked to structural quality, multiple and logistic regression multivariate analyses were performed. There was greater structural quality in documents worked out by teams of over five authors and after 1992. Variables that did not affect structural quality were the source of the protocol (Insalud or autonomous community with devolved powers) and the kind of professional (only physiotherapists or multi-disciplinary) who worked it out. The quality of the documents varies according to the date and the number of authors who work them out. There was significantly greater quality when this was after 1992 and there were over five authors. Therefore, under the opposite circumstances (few authors), there is greater risk of low-quality documents.

  13. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for antibodies against Campylobacter jejuni, and its clinical application.

    PubMed

    Walder, M; Forsgren, A

    1982-12-01

    Antibody response to Campylobacter jejuni/coli (CJC) was investigated, using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, ELISA. With a mixture of lipopolysaccharide from two CJC strains as antigen in ELISA, all 24 tested rabbit anti-CJC sera showed high antibody levels. However, only 70% of sera from patients with Campylobacter enteritis demonstrated an antibody response against the combined LPS antigen, using paired sera. In addition, the results obtained suggested non-specific binding of human immunoglobulin. When 24 formalinized whole CJC bacteria were used as antigen in ELISA, all corresponding rabbit antisera reacted with one strain (M 14). Essentially no unspecific binding of human immunoglobulin was obtained. Antibodies were detected in sera from healthy blood donors and at a lower level in sera from children, suggesting early immunization. In 67 enteritis patients with positive stool cultures for CJC, a significantly increased level of IgG antibodies could be detected in single or paired serum samples from 82% of the patients. An IgG titre increase occurred early in the course of infection, suggesting a boosting of an earlier immunization. IgM antibodies could be detected in the same sera in 77% of the patients. Considering both IgG and IgM analyses of the enteritis sera, 94% of the patients were positive in Campylobacter ELISA serology compared with only 5% of healthy controls.

  14. A linked hydrodynamic and water quality model for the Salton Sea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chung, E.G.; Schladow, S.G.; Perez-Losada, J.; Robertson, D.M.

    2008-01-01

    A linked hydrodynamic and water quality model was developed and applied to the Salton Sea. The hydrodynamic component is based on the one-dimensional numerical model, DLM. The water quality model is based on a new conceptual model for nutrient cycling in the Sea, and simulates temperature, total suspended sediment concentration, nutrient concentrations, including PO4-3, NO3-1 and NH4+1, DO concentration and chlorophyll a concentration as functions of depth and time. Existing water temperature data from 1997 were used to verify that the model could accurately represent the onset and breakup of thermal stratification. 1999 is the only year with a near-complete dataset for water quality variables for the Salton Sea. The linked hydrodynamic and water quality model was run for 1999, and by adjustment of rate coefficients and other water quality parameters, a good match with the data was obtained. In this article, the model is fully described and the model results for reductions in external phosphorus load on chlorophyll a distribution are presented. ?? 2008 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  15. Clinical perspective: Linking psychosocial care to the disease continuum in patients with multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Zabora, James; Buzaglo, Joanne; Kennedy, Vicki; Richards, Tiffany; Schapmire, Tara; Zebrack, Brad; Ghobrial, Irene M

    2015-08-01

    A model of psychosocial care specific for patients with multiple myeloma and their caregivers has not yet been proposed. We sought to develop a model of care that considers the specific profile of this disease. The authors, representing a multidisciplinary care team, met in December of 2012 to identify a model of psychosocial care for patients with multiple myeloma and their caregivers. This model was determined by consensus during the meeting and via total agreement following the meeting. The meeting was sponsored by Onyx Pharmaceuticals. The need for targeted psychosocial care for the multiple myeloma patient and caregiver throughout the disease process is essential to ensure quality of life and optimal treatment outcomes. We propose herein the first known model of care for the treatment of multiple myeloma that engages both the patient and their caregivers. Innovative partnerships between psychosocial providers and other entities such as pharmaceutical companies can maximize resources for comprehensive program development. This manuscript proposes a model of care that promotes active engagement in therapies for multiple myeloma while engaging the individual patient and their family caregivers. This treatment approach must be evidence based in terms of distress screening tools, comprehensive psychosocial assessments, and, most importantly, in the interventions and measurements of response that clinicians apply to this population.

  16. Link functions in multi-locus genetic models: implications for testing, prediction, and interpretation.

    PubMed

    Clayton, David

    2012-05-01

    "Complex" diseases are, by definition, influenced by multiple causes, both genetic and environmental, and statistical work on the joint action of multiple risk factors has, for more than 40 years, been dominated by the generalized linear model (GLM). In genetics, models for dichotomous traits have traditionally been approached via the model of an underlying, normally distributed, liability. This corresponds to the GLM with binomial errors and a probit link function. Elsewhere in epidemiology, however, the logistic regression model, a GLM with logit link function, has been the tool of choice, largely because of its convenient properties in case-control studies. The choice of link function has usually been dictated by mathematical convenience, but it has some important implications in (a) the choice of association test statistic in the presence of existing strong risk factors, (b) the ability to predict disease from genotype given its heritability, and (c) the definition, and interpretation of epistasis (or epistacy). These issues are reviewed, and a new association test proposed.

  17. Towards Controlling the Glycoform: A Model Framework Linking Extracellular Metabolites to Antibody Glycosylation

    PubMed Central

    Jedrzejewski, Philip M.; del Val, Ioscani Jimenez; Constantinou, Antony; Dell, Anne; Haslam, Stuart M.; Polizzi, Karen M.; Kontoravdi, Cleo

    2014-01-01

    Glycoproteins represent the largest group of the growing number of biologically-derived medicines. The associated glycan structures and their distribution are known to have a large impact on pharmacokinetics. A modelling framework was developed to provide a link from the extracellular environment and its effect on intracellular metabolites to the distribution of glycans on the constant region of an antibody product. The main focus of this work is the mechanistic in silico reconstruction of the nucleotide sugar donor (NSD) metabolic network by means of 34 species mass balances and the saturation kinetics rates of the 60 metabolic reactions involved. NSDs are the co-substrates of the glycosylation process in the Golgi apparatus and their simulated dynamic intracellular concentration profiles were linked to an existing model describing the distribution of N-linked glycan structures of the antibody constant region. The modelling framework also describes the growth dynamics of the cell population by means of modified Monod kinetics. Simulation results match well to experimental data from a murine hybridoma cell line. The result is a modelling platform which is able to describe the product glycoform based on extracellular conditions. It represents a first step towards the in silico prediction of the glycoform of a biotherapeutic and provides a platform for the optimisation of bioprocess conditions with respect to product quality. PMID:24637934

  18. Microbial functional diversity enhances predictive models linking environmental parameters to ecosystem properties.

    PubMed

    Powell, Jeff R; Welsh, Allana; Hallin, Sara

    2015-07-01

    Microorganisms drive biogeochemical processes, but linking these processes to real changes in microbial communities under field conditions is not trivial. Here, we present a model-based approach to estimate independent contributions of microbial community shifts to ecosystem properties. The approach was tested empirically, using denitrification potential as our model process, in a spatial survey of arable land encompassing a range of edaphic conditions and two agricultural production systems. Soil nitrate was the most important single predictor of denitrification potential (the change in Akaike's information criterion, corrected for sample size, ΔAIC(c) = 20.29); however, the inclusion of biotic variables (particularly the evenness and size of denitrifier communities [ΔAIC(c) = 12.02], and the abundance of one denitrifier genotype [ΔAIC(c) = 18.04]) had a substantial effect on model precision, comparable to the inclusion of abiotic variables (biotic R2 = 0.28, abiotic R2 = 0.50, biotic + abiotic R2 = 0.76). This approach provides a valuable tool for explicitly linking microbial communities to ecosystem functioning. By making this link, we have demonstrated that including aspects of microbial community structure and diversity in biogeochemical models can improve predictions of nutrient cycling in ecosystems and enhance our understanding of ecosystem functionality.

  19. Gene-based association studies report genetic links for clinical subtypes of frontotemporal dementia.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Aniket; Ferrari, Raffaele; Heutink, Peter; Hardy, John; Pijnenburg, Yolande; Posthuma, Danielle

    2017-04-05

    Genome-wide association studies in frontotemporal dementia showed limited success in identifying associated loci. This is possibly due to small sample size, allelic heterogeneity, small effect sizes of single genetic variants, and the necessity to statistically correct for testing millions of genetic variants. To overcome these issues, we performed gene-based association studies on 3348 clinically identified frontotemporal dementia cases and 9390 controls (discovery, replication and joint-cohort analyses). We report association of APOE and TOMM40 with behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia, and ARHGAP35 and SERPINA1 with progressive non-fluent aphasia. Further, we found the ɛ2 and ɛ4 alleles of APOE harbouring protective and risk increasing effects, respectively, in clinical subtypes of frontotemporal dementia against neurologically normal controls. The APOE-locus association with behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia indicates its potential risk-increasing role across different neurodegenerative diseases, whereas the novel genetic associations of ARHGAP35 and SERPINA1 with progressive non-fluent aphasia point towards a potential role of the stress-signalling pathway in its pathophysiology.

  20. Link of the mechanisms of action of glatiramer acetate to its long-term clinical data.

    PubMed

    Moreau, Thibault

    2009-02-01

    A consequence of the long-term nature of progression in multiple sclerosis is that treatment needs to be provided over the long term. Gathering evidence for long term clinical efficacy, safety and patient acceptance of immunomodulatory therapies is thus a critically important issue. However, pivotal trials, which generally last no more than two years, cannot address this issue. Glatiramer acetate is the only immunomodulatory treatment for which prospective data is available covering a treatment period of over a decade. In the long-term extension of the pivotal trial of glatiramer acetate, 108 patients have been followed for a mean treatment duration of 10.1 years. At the end of the treatment period, patients were experiencing a relapse only once every five years and 92% remained ambulatory throughout. Similar findings have been made in observational studies in the long-term follow-up of patients with relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis treated with glatiramer acetate under a compassionate use programme in France and in a patient registry in Argentina. Such data strongly suggest that a reduced risk of relapse represents a real long-term treatment effect. The cumulative evidence for the long-term clinical efficacy of glatiramer acetate is consistent with its dual mechanism of action, reassures the physician that glatiramer acetate can really help improve patient care over the long term, and may contribute to a more positive view of prognosis for patients with multiple sclerosis.

  1. Equilibrium and kinetic modeling of adsorption of reactive dye on cross-linked chitosan beads.

    PubMed

    Chiou, Ming Shen; Li, Hsing Ya

    2002-07-22

    The adsorption of reactive dye (Reactive Red 189) from aqueous solutions on cross-linked chitosan beads was studied in a batch system. The equilibrium isotherms at different particle sizes (2.3-2.5, 2.5-2.7 and 3.5-3.8mm) and the kinetics of adsorption with respect to the initial dye concentration (4320, 5760 and 7286 g/m(3)), temperature (30, 40 and 50 degrees C), pH (1.0, 3.0, 6.0 and 9.0), and cross-linking ratio (cross-linking agent/chitosan weight ratio: 0.2, 0.5, 0.7 and 1.0) were investigated. Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption models were applied to describe the experimental isotherms and isotherm constants. Equilibrium data fitted very well to the Langmuir model in the entire saturation concentration range (0-1800 g/m(3)). The maximum monolayer adsorption capacities obtained from the Langmuir model are very large, which are 1936, 1686 and 1642 g/kg for small, mediumand large particle sizes, respectively, at pH 3.0, 30 degrees C, and the cross-linking ratio of 0.2. The pseudo first- and second-order kinetic models were used to describe the kinetic data, and the rate constants were evaluated. The experimental data fitted well to the second-order kinetic model, which indicates that the chemical sorption is the rate-limiting step, instead of mass transfer. The initial dye concentration and the solution pH both significantly affect the adsorption capacity, but the temperature and the cross-linking ratio are relatively minor factors. An increase in initial dye concentration results in the increase of adsorption capacity, which also increases with decreasing pH. The activation energy is 43.0 kJ/mol for the adsorption of the dye on the cross-linked chitosan beads at pH 3.0 and initial dye concentration 3768 g/m(3).

  2. Predicting postoperative mortality after colorectal surgery: a novel clinical model.

    PubMed

    van der Sluis, F J; Espin, E; Vallribera, F; de Bock, G H; Hoekstra, H J; van Leeuwen, B L; Engel, A F

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to develop and externally validate a clinically, practical and discriminative prediction model designed to estimate in-hospital mortality of patients undergoing colorectal surgery. All consecutive patients who underwent elective or emergency colorectal surgery from 1990 to 2005, at the Zaandam Medical Centre, The Netherlands, were included in this study. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) linking the explanatory variables to the outcome variable in-hospital mortality, and a simplified Identification of Risk in Colorectal Surgery (IRCS) score was constructed. The model was validated in a population of patients who underwent colorectal surgery from 2005 to 2011 in Barcelona, Spain. Predictive performance was estimated by calculating the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve. The strongest predictors of in-hospital mortality were emergency surgery (OR = 6.7, 95% CI 4.7-9.5), tumour stage (OR = 3.2, 95% CI 2.8-4.6), age (OR = 13.1, 95% CI 6.6-26.0), pulmonary failure (OR = 4.9, 95% CI 3.3-7.1) and cardiac failure (OR = 3.7, 95% CI 2.6-5.3). These parameters were included in the prediction model and simplified scoring system. The IRCS model predicted in-hospital mortality and demonstrated a predictive performance of 0.83 (95% CI 0.79-0.87) in the validation population. In this population the predictive performance of the CR-POSSUM score was 0.76 (95% CI 0.71-0.81). The results of this study have shown that the IRCS score is a good predictor of in-hospital mortality after colorectal surgery despite the relatively low number of model parameters. Colorectal Disease © 2014 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  3. Bovine pericardium based non-cross linked collagen matrix for successful root coverage, a clinical study in human

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to clinically assess the capacity of a novel bovine pericardium based, non-cross linked collagen matrix in root coverage. Methods 62 gingival recessions of Miller class I or II were treated. The matrix was adapted underneath a coronal repositioned split thickness flap. Clinical values were assessed at baseline and after six months. Results The mean recession in each patient was 2.2 mm at baseline. 6 Months after surgery 86.7% of the exposed root surfaces were covered. On average 0,3 mm of recession remained. The clinical attachment level changed from 3.5 ± 1.3 mm to 1,8 ( ± 0,7) mm during the observational time period. No statistically significant difference was found in the difference of probing depth. An increase in the width of gingiva was significant. With a baseline value of 1.5 ± 0.9 mm an improvement of 2.4 ± 0.8 mm after six month could be observed. 40 out of 62 recessions were considered a thin biotype at baseline. After 6 months all 62 sites were assessed thick. Conclusions The results demonstrate the capacity of the bovine pericardium based non-cross linked collagen matrix for successful root coverage. This material was able to enhance gingival thickness and the width of keratinized gingiva. The percentage of root coverage achieved thereby is comparable to existing techniques. This method might contribute to an increase of patient's comfort and an enhanced aesthetical outcome. PMID:22390875

  4. Targeting Carcinoembryonic Antigen with DNA Vaccination: On-Target Adverse Events Link with Immunological and Clinical Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Chudley, Lindsey; Stasakova, Jana; Thirdborough, Stephen; King, Andrew; Lloyd-Evans, Paul; Buxton, Emily; Edwards, Ceri; Halford, Sarah; Bateman, Andrew; O’Callaghan, Ann; Clive, Sally; Anthoney, Alan; Jodrell, Duncan I.; Weinschenk, Toni; Simon, Petra; Sahin, Ugur; Thomas, Gareth J.; Stevenson, Freda K.; Ottensmeier, Christian H.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose We have clinically evaluated a DNA fusion vaccine to target the HLA-A*0201 binding peptide CAP-1 from carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA605–613) linked to an immunostimulatory domain (DOM) from fragment C of tetanus toxin. Experimental Design Twenty-seven patients with CEA-expressing carcinomas were recruited: 15 patients with measurable disease (Arm-I) and 12 patients without radiological evidence of disease (Arm-II). Six intramuscular vaccinations of naked DNA (1mg/dose) were administered up to week 12. Clinical and immunological follow-up was to week 64 or clinical/radiological disease. Results DOM-specific immune responses demonstrated successful vaccine delivery. All patients without measurable disease compared to 60% with advanced disease responded immunologically, while 58% and 20% expanded anti-CAP-1 CD8+ T-cells, respectively. CAP-1-specific T-cells were only detectable in the blood post-vaccination, but could also be identified in previously resected cancer tissue. The gastrointestinal adverse event diarrhea was reported by 48% of patients and linked to more frequent decreases in CEA (p<0.001) and improved global immunological responses (anti-DOM responses of greater magnitude (p<0.001), frequency (p=0.004) and duration) compared to patients without diarrhea. In advanced disease patients, decreases in CEA were associated with better overall survival (HR=0.14, p=0.017). CAP-1 peptide was detectable on MHC class I of normal bowel mucosa and primary colorectal cancer tissue by mass-spectrometry, offering a mechanistic explanation for diarrhea through CD8+ T-cell attack. Conclusions Our data suggest that DNA vaccination is able to overcome peripheral tolerance in normal and tumor tissue and warrants testing in combination studies, for example, by vaccinating in parallel to treatment with an anti-PD1 antibody. PMID:27091407

  5. A bi-ordering approach to linking gene expression with clinical annotations in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Shi, Fan; Leckie, Christopher; MacIntyre, Geoff; Haviv, Izhak; Boussioutas, Alex; Kowalczyk, Adam

    2010-09-23

    In the study of cancer genomics, gene expression microarrays, which measure thousands of genes in a single assay, provide abundant information for the investigation of interesting genes or biological pathways. However, in order to analyze the large number of noisy measurements in microarrays, effective and efficient bioinformatics techniques are needed to identify the associations between genes and relevant phenotypes. Moreover, systematic tests are needed to validate the statistical and biological significance of those discoveries. In this paper, we develop a robust and efficient method for exploratory analysis of microarray data, which produces a number of different orderings (rankings) of both genes and samples (reflecting correlation among those genes and samples). The core algorithm is closely related to biclustering, and so we first compare its performance with several existing biclustering algorithms on two real datasets - gastric cancer and lymphoma datasets. We then show on the gastric cancer data that the sample orderings generated by our method are highly statistically significant with respect to the histological classification of samples by using the Jonckheere trend test, while the gene modules are biologically significant with respect to biological processes (from the Gene Ontology). In particular, some of the gene modules associated with biclusters are closely linked to gastric cancer tumorigenesis reported in previous literature, while others are potentially novel discoveries. In conclusion, we have developed an effective and efficient method, Bi-Ordering Analysis, to detect informative patterns in gene expression microarrays by ranking genes and samples. In addition, a number of evaluation metrics were applied to assess both the statistical and biological significance of the resulting bi-orderings. The methodology was validated on gastric cancer and lymphoma datasets.

  6. A bi-ordering approach to linking gene expression with clinical annotations in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In the study of cancer genomics, gene expression microarrays, which measure thousands of genes in a single assay, provide abundant information for the investigation of interesting genes or biological pathways. However, in order to analyze the large number of noisy measurements in microarrays, effective and efficient bioinformatics techniques are needed to identify the associations between genes and relevant phenotypes. Moreover, systematic tests are needed to validate the statistical and biological significance of those discoveries. Results In this paper, we develop a robust and efficient method for exploratory analysis of microarray data, which produces a number of different orderings (rankings) of both genes and samples (reflecting correlation among those genes and samples). The core algorithm is closely related to biclustering, and so we first compare its performance with several existing biclustering algorithms on two real datasets - gastric cancer and lymphoma datasets. We then show on the gastric cancer data that the sample orderings generated by our method are highly statistically significant with respect to the histological classification of samples by using the Jonckheere trend test, while the gene modules are biologically significant with respect to biological processes (from the Gene Ontology). In particular, some of the gene modules associated with biclusters are closely linked to gastric cancer tumorigenesis reported in previous literature, while others are potentially novel discoveries. Conclusion In conclusion, we have developed an effective and efficient method, Bi-Ordering Analysis, to detect informative patterns in gene expression microarrays by ranking genes and samples. In addition, a number of evaluation metrics were applied to assess both the statistical and biological significance of the resulting bi-orderings. The methodology was validated on gastric cancer and lymphoma datasets. PMID:20860844

  7. Framework for Smart Electronic Health Record-Linked Predictive Models to Optimize Care for Complex Digestive Diseases

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-01

    Regueiro MD, Krasinskas AM, Saul M, Sapienza D, Binion DG, Hartman D. Mucosal IgG4 Cell Infiltration in Ulcerative Colitis (UC) is Linked to Disease ...Record-Linked Predictive Models to Optimize Care for Complex Digestive Diseases PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Michael A. Dunn, MD CONTRACTING...Framework for Smart Electronic Health Record-Linked Predictive Models to Optimize Care for Complex Digestive Diseases 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH11-2

  8. System Identification and Model Reduction for a Single-Link Flexible Manipulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LIU, K.; SUN, X.

    2001-05-01

    A new model reduction and updating technique is proposed and applied in modelling of a single-link flexible manipulator. The Observability Range Space Extraction algorithm is used to generate an initial overparameterized state-space model. The identified model is transformed into modal realization. The modal responses of individual modes are evaluated. A new measure is proposed to quantify the contribution of individual modes to the total responses. Using the proposed measure, a reduced order model is obtained by retaining the most significant modes. To improve model accuracy, either the reduced input or output matrix can be recalculated by a proposed method. Several critical issues related to the experimental identification are addressed. Experimental identification results are presented to illustrate the proposed technique.

  9. Role of weakest links and system-size scaling in multiscale modeling of stochastic plasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ispánovity, Péter Dusán; Tüzes, Dániel; Szabó, Péter; Zaiser, Michael; Groma, István

    2017-02-01

    Plastic deformation of crystalline and amorphous matter often involves intermittent local strain burst events. To understand the physical background of the phenomenon a minimal stochastic mesoscopic model was introduced, where details of the microstructure evolution are statistically represented in terms of a fluctuating local yield threshold. In the present paper we propose a method for determining the corresponding yield stress distribution for the case of crystal plasticity from lower scale discrete dislocation dynamics simulations which we combine with weakest link arguments. The success of scale linking is demonstrated by comparing stress-strain curves obtained from the resulting mesoscopic and the underlying discrete dislocation models in the microplastic regime. As shown by various scaling relations they are statistically equivalent and behave identically in the thermodynamic limit. The proposed technique is expected to be applicable to different microstructures and also to amorphous materials.

  10. Space Station communications and tracking systems modeling and RF link simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsang, Chit-Sang; Chie, Chak M.; Lindsey, William C.

    1986-01-01

    In this final report, the effort spent on Space Station Communications and Tracking System Modeling and RF Link Simulation is described in detail. The effort is mainly divided into three parts: frequency division multiple access (FDMA) system simulation modeling and software implementation; a study on design and evaluation of a functional computerized RF link simulation/analysis system for Space Station; and a study on design and evaluation of simulation system architecture. This report documents the results of these studies. In addition, a separate User's Manual on Space Communications Simulation System (SCSS) (Version 1) documents the software developed for the Space Station FDMA communications system simulation. The final report, SCSS user's manual, and the software located in the NASA JSC system analysis division's VAX 750 computer together serve as the deliverables from LinCom for this project effort.

  11. Simulink models for performance analysis of high speed DQPSK modulated optical link

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharan, Lucky; Rupanshi, Chaubey, V. K.

    2016-03-01

    This paper attempts to present the design approach for development of simulation models to study and analyze the transmission of 10 Gbps DQPSK signal over a single channel Peer to Peer link using Matlab Simulink. The simulation model considers the different optical components used in link design with their behavior represented initially by theoretical interpretation, including the transmitter topology, Mach Zehnder Modulator(MZM) module and, the propagation model for optical fibers etc. thus allowing scope for direct realization in experimental configurations. It provides the flexibility to incorporate the various photonic components as either user-defined or fixed and, can also be enhanced or removed from the model as per the design requirements. We describe the detailed operation and need of every component model and its representation in Simulink blocksets. Moreover the developed model can be extended in future to support Dense Wavelength Division Multiplexing (DWDM) system, thereby allowing high speed transmission with N × 40 Gbps systems. The various compensation techniques and their influence on system performance can be easily investigated by using such models.

  12. Simulink models for performance analysis of high speed DQPSK modulated optical link

    SciTech Connect

    Sharan, Lucky Rupanshi, Chaubey, V. K.

    2016-03-09

    This paper attempts to present the design approach for development of simulation models to study and analyze the transmission of 10 Gbps DQPSK signal over a single channel Peer to Peer link using Matlab Simulink. The simulation model considers the different optical components used in link design with their behavior represented initially by theoretical interpretation, including the transmitter topology, Mach Zehnder Modulator(MZM) module and, the propagation model for optical fibers etc. thus allowing scope for direct realization in experimental configurations. It provides the flexibility to incorporate the various photonic components as either user-defined or fixed and, can also be enhanced or removed from the model as per the design requirements. We describe the detailed operation and need of every component model and its representation in Simulink blocksets. Moreover the developed model can be extended in future to support Dense Wavelength Division Multiplexing (DWDM) system, thereby allowing high speed transmission with N × 40 Gbps systems. The various compensation techniques and their influence on system performance can be easily investigated by using such models.

  13. Effectiveness of the clinical teaching associate model to improve clinical learning outcomes: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Parchebafieh, Samaneh; Gholizadeh, Leila; Lakdizaji, Sima; Ghiasvandiyan, Shahrzad; Davoodi, Arefeh

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of the clinical teaching associate (CTA) model to improve clinical learning outcomes in nursing students. Students were randomly allocated to either the CTA (n = 28) or traditional training group (n = 32), and their clinical knowledge, skills, and satisfaction with the learning experience were assessed and compared. The results showed that the CTA model was equally effective in improving clinical knowledge, skills, and satisfaction of nursing students.

  14. Evaluation of clinical information modeling tools.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Conde, Alberto; Austin, Tony; Moreno-Conde, Jesús; Parra-Calderón, Carlos L; Kalra, Dipak

    2016-11-01

    Clinical information models are formal specifications for representing the structure and semantics of the clinical content within electronic health record systems. This research aims to define, test, and validate evaluation metrics for software tools designed to support the processes associated with the definition, management, and implementation of these models. The proposed framework builds on previous research that focused on obtaining agreement on the essential requirements in this area. A set of 50 conformance criteria were defined based on the 20 functional requirements agreed by that consensus and applied to evaluate the currently available tools. Of the 11 initiative developing tools for clinical information modeling identified, 9 were evaluated according to their performance on the evaluation metrics. Results show that functionalities related to management of data types, specifications, metadata, and terminology or ontology bindings have a good level of adoption. Improvements can be made in other areas focused on information modeling and associated processes. Other criteria related to displaying semantic relationships between concepts and communication with terminology servers had low levels of adoption. The proposed evaluation metrics were successfully tested and validated against a representative sample of existing tools. The results identify the need to improve tool support for information modeling and software development processes, especially in those areas related to governance, clinician involvement, and optimizing the technical validation of testing processes. This research confirmed the potential of these evaluation metrics to support decision makers in identifying the most appropriate tool for their organization. Los Modelos de Información Clínica son especificaciones para representar la estructura y características semánticas del contenido clínico en los sistemas de Historia Clínica Electrónica. Esta investigación define, prueba y valida

  15. Pain management in a medical walk-in clinic: link between recommended processes and pain relief.

    PubMed

    Perron, Noelle Junod; Bovier, Patrick

    2007-10-01

    While most recommended pain management practices have been developed for hospitalised patients, little is known about their relevance for ambulatory patients presenting with acute pain. In this study, we explored the relationship between patients' reported use of recommended pain management practices and pain relief in outpatients. 703 adult patients who presented with pain at the medical walk-in clinic of the University Hospitals of Geneva, Switzerland, were included in a mailed cross-sectional survey. They completed a self-administered questionnaire with specific items on self reports of pain and pain management processes. Patient's self reports on pain and pain management processes. Of the 703 patients presenting with pain, 40% reported complete pain relief after their visit at the medical walk-in clinic. After adjustment for age, sex, origin, general health and intensity of pain, patients' self-report of complete pain relief was associated with availability of medical doctors (OR = 5.6; 95% CI 2.1-14.7 for excellent vs. poor availability), availability of nurses (OR = 2.6; 95% CI 1.2-6.0 for excellent vs. poor availability), waiting < 10 min for pain medication (OR = 4.6; 95% CI 2.2-9.8), regular assessment of pain (OR = 1.7; 95% CI 1.02-2.7) and having received information about pain and its management (OR = 3.0; 95% CI 1.8-4.9). Self-reported pain relief was associated with more frequent use of recommended pain management processes. These recommendations initially developed for hospitalized patients should also be encouraged for ambulatory care patients.

  16. Explaining clinical behaviors using multiple theoretical models.

    PubMed

    Eccles, Martin P; Grimshaw, Jeremy M; MacLennan, Graeme; Bonetti, Debbie; Glidewell, Liz; Pitts, Nigel B; Steen, Nick; Thomas, Ruth; Walker, Anne; Johnston, Marie

    2012-10-17

    In the field of implementation research, there is an increased interest in use of theory when designing implementation research studies involving behavior change. In 2003, we initiated a series of five studies to establish a scientific rationale for interventions to translate research findings into clinical practice by exploring the performance of a number of different, commonly used, overlapping behavioral theories and models. We reflect on the strengths and weaknesses of the methods, the performance of the theories, and consider where these methods sit alongside the range of methods for studying healthcare professional behavior change. These were five studies of the theory-based cognitions and clinical behaviors (taking dental radiographs, performing dental restorations, placing fissure sealants, managing upper respiratory tract infections without prescribing antibiotics, managing low back pain without ordering lumbar spine x-rays) of random samples of primary care dentists and physicians. Measures were derived for the explanatory theoretical constructs in the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB), Social Cognitive Theory (SCT), and Illness Representations specified by the Common Sense Self Regulation Model (CSSRM). We constructed self-report measures of two constructs from Learning Theory (LT), a measure of Implementation Intentions (II), and the Precaution Adoption Process. We collected data on theory-based cognitions (explanatory measures) and two interim outcome measures (stated behavioral intention and simulated behavior) by postal questionnaire survey during the 12-month period to which objective measures of behavior (collected from routine administrative sources) were related. Planned analyses explored the predictive value of theories in explaining variance in intention, behavioral simulation and behavior. Response rates across the five surveys ranged from 21% to 48%; we achieved the target sample size for three of the five surveys. For the predictor variables

  17. Explaining clinical behaviors using multiple theoretical models

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In the field of implementation research, there is an increased interest in use of theory when designing implementation research studies involving behavior change. In 2003, we initiated a series of five studies to establish a scientific rationale for interventions to translate research findings into clinical practice by exploring the performance of a number of different, commonly used, overlapping behavioral theories and models. We reflect on the strengths and weaknesses of the methods, the performance of the theories, and consider where these methods sit alongside the range of methods for studying healthcare professional behavior change. Methods These were five studies of the theory-based cognitions and clinical behaviors (taking dental radiographs, performing dental restorations, placing fissure sealants, managing upper respiratory tract infections without prescribing antibiotics, managing low back pain without ordering lumbar spine x-rays) of random samples of primary care dentists and physicians. Measures were derived for the explanatory theoretical constructs in the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB), Social Cognitive Theory (SCT), and Illness Representations specified by the Common Sense Self Regulation Model (CSSRM). We constructed self-report measures of two constructs from Learning Theory (LT), a measure of Implementation Intentions (II), and the Precaution Adoption Process. We collected data on theory-based cognitions (explanatory measures) and two interim outcome measures (stated behavioral intention and simulated behavior) by postal questionnaire survey during the 12-month period to which objective measures of behavior (collected from routine administrative sources) were related. Planned analyses explored the predictive value of theories in explaining variance in intention, behavioral simulation and behavior. Results Response rates across the five surveys ranged from 21% to 48%; we achieved the target sample size for three of the five surveys

  18. Allostatic Load as a Complex Clinical Construct: A Case-Based Computational Modeling Approach.

    PubMed

    Buckwalter, J Galen; Castellani, Brian; McEwen, Bruce; Karlamangla, Arun S; Rizzo, Albert A; John, Bruce; O'Donnell, Kyle; Seeman, Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Allostatic load (AL) is a complex clinical construct, providing a unique window into the cumulative impact of stress. However, due to its inherent complexity, AL presents two major measurement challenges to conventional statistical modeling (the field's dominant methodology): it is comprised of a complex causal network of bioallostatic systems, represented by an even larger set of dynamic biomarkers; and, it is situated within a web of antecedent socioecological systems, linking AL to differences in health outcomes and disparities. To address these challenges, we employed case-based computational modeling (CBM), which allowed us to make four advances: (1) we developed a multisystem, 7-factor (20 biomarker) model of AL's network of allostatic systems; (2) used it to create a catalog of nine different clinical AL profiles (causal pathways); (3) linked each clinical profile to a typology of 23 health outcomes; and (4) explored our results (post hoc) as a function of gender, a key socioecological factor. In terms of highlights, (a) the Healthy clinical profile had few health risks; (b) the pro-inflammatory profile linked to high blood pressure and diabetes; (c) Low Stress Hormones linked to heart disease, TIA/Stroke, diabetes, and circulation problems; and (d) high stress hormones linked to heart disease and high blood pressure. Post hoc analyses also found that males were overrepresented on the High Blood Pressure (61.2%), Metabolic Syndrome (63.2%), High Stress Hormones (66.4%), and High Blood Sugar (57.1%); while females were overrepresented on the Healthy (81.9%), Low Stress Hormones (66.3%), and Low Stress Antagonists (stress buffers) (95.4%) profiles.

  19. Markers, Models, and Measurement Error: Exploring the Links Between Attention Deficits and Language Impairments

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The empirical record regarding the expected co-occurrence of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and specific language impairment is confusing and contradictory. A research plan is presented that has the potential to untangle links between these 2 common neurodevelopmental disorders. Method Data from completed and ongoing research projects examining the relative value of different clinical markers for separating cases of specific language impairment from ADHD are presented. Results The best option for measuring core language impairments in a manner that does not potentially penalize individuals with ADHD is to focus assessment on key grammatical and verbal memory skills. Likewise, assessment of ADHD symptoms through standardized informant rating scales is optimized when they are adjusted for overlapping language and academic symptoms. Conclusion As a collection, these clinical metrics set the stage for further examination of potential linkages between attention deficits and language impairments. PMID:26501406

  20. New Ghost-node method for linking different models with varied grid refinement.

    SciTech Connect

    Mehl, Steffen W.; Hill, Mary Catherine.; James, Scott Carlton; Leake, Stanley A.; Zyvoloski, George A.; Dickinson, Jesse E.; Eddebbarh, Al A.

    2006-01-01

    A flexible, robust method for linking grids of locally refined models constructed with different numerical methods is needed to address a variety of hydrologic problems. This work outlines and tests a new ghost-node model-linking method for a refined 'child' model that is contained within a larger and coarser 'parent' model that is based on the iterative method of Mehl and Hill (2002, 2004). The method is applicable to steady-state solutions for ground-water flow. Tests are presented for a homogeneous two-dimensional system that has either matching grids (parent cells border an integer number of child cells; Figure 2a) or non-matching grids (parent cells border a non-integer number of child cells; Figure 2b). The coupled grids are simulated using the finite-difference and finite-element models MODFLOW and FEHM, respectively. The simulations require no alteration of the MODFLOW or FEHM models and are executed using a batch file on Windows operating systems. Results indicate that when the grids are matched spatially so that nodes and child cell boundaries are aligned, the new coupling technique has error nearly equal to that when coupling two MODFLOW models (Mehl and Hill, 2002). When the grids are non-matching, model accuracy is slightly increased over matching-grid cases. Overall, results indicate that the ghost-node technique is a viable means to accurately couple distinct models because the overall error is less than if only the regional model was used to simulate flow in the child model's domain.

  1. NEW GHOST-NODE METHOD FOR LINKING DIFFERENT MODELS WITH VARIED GRID REFINEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    S.C. James; J.E. Dickinson; S.W. Mehl; M.C. Hill; S.A. Leake; G.A. zyvoloski; A. Eddebbarh

    2006-02-15

    A flexible, robust method for linking grids of locally refined models constructed with different numerical methods is needed to address a variety of hydrologic problems. This work outlines and tests a new ghost-node model-linking method for a refined ''child'' model that is contained within a larger and coarser ''parent'' model that is based on the iterative method of Mehl and Hill (2002, 2004). The method is applicable to steady-state solutions for ground-water flow. Tests are presented for a homogeneous two-dimensional system that has either matching grids (parent cells border an integer number of child cells; Figure 2a) or non-matching grids (parent cells border a non-integer number of child cells; Figure 2b). The coupled grids are simulated using the finite-difference and finite-element models MODFLOW and FEHM, respectively. The simulations require no alteration of the MODFLOW or FEHM models and are executed using a batch file on Windows operating systems. Results indicate that when the grids are matched spatially so that nodes and child cell boundaries are aligned, the new coupling technique has error nearly equal to that when coupling two MODFLOW models (Mehl and Hill, 2002). When the grids are non-matching, model accuracy is slightly increased over matching-grid cases. Overall, results indicate that the ghost-node technique is a viable means to accurately couple distinct models because the overall error is less than if only the regional model was used to simulate flow in the child model's domain.

  2. New ghost-node method for linking different models with varied grid refinement

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    James, S.C.; Dickinson, J.E.; Mehl, S.W.; Hill, M.C.; Leake, S.A.; Zyvoloski, G.A.; Eddebbarh, A.-A.

    2006-01-01

    A flexible, robust method for linking grids of locally refined ground-water flow models constructed with different numerical methods is needed to address a variety of hydrologic problems. This work outlines and tests a new ghost-node model-linking method for a refined "child" model that is contained within a larger and coarser "parent" model that is based on the iterative method of Steffen W. Mehl and Mary C. Hill (2002, Advances in Water Res., 25, p. 497-511; 2004, Advances in Water Res., 27, p. 899-912). The method is applicable to steady-state solutions for ground-water flow. Tests are presented for a homogeneous two-dimensional system that has matching grids (parent cells border an integer number of child cells) or nonmatching grids. The coupled grids are simulated by using the finite-difference and finite-element models MODFLOW and FEHM, respectively. The simulations require no alteration of the MODFLOW or FEHM models and are executed using a batch file on Windows operating systems. Results indicate that when the grids are matched spatially so that nodes and child-cell boundaries are aligned, the new coupling technique has error nearly equal to that when coupling two MODFLOW models. When the grids are nonmatching, model accuracy is slightly increased compared to that for matching-grid cases. Overall, results indicate that the ghost-node technique is a viable means to couple distinct models because the overall head and flow errors relative to the analytical solution are less than if only the regional coarse-grid model was used to simulate flow in the child model's domain.

  3. Energy dissipation and recovery in a simple model with reversible cross-links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabavi, S. Soran; Fratzl, Peter; Hartmann, Markus A.

    2015-03-01

    Reversible cross-linking is a method of enhancing the mechanical properties of polymeric materials. The inspiration for this kind of cross-linking comes from nature, which uses this strategy in a large variety of biological materials to dramatically increase their toughness. Recently, first attempts were made to transfer this principle to technological applications. In this study, Monte Carlo simulations are used to investigate the effect of the number and the topology of reversible cross-links on the mechanical performance of a simple model system. Computational cyclic loading tests are performed, and the work to fracture and the energy dissipation per cycle are determined, which both increase when the density of cross-links is increased. Furthermore, a different topology of the bonds may increase the work to fracture by a factor of more than 2 for the same density. This dependence of the mechanical properties on the topology of the bonds has important implications on the self-healing properties of such systems, because only a fast return of the system to its unloaded state after release of the load ensures that the optimal topology may form.

  4. ClinRefLink: Implementation of Infobutton-like Functionality in a Commercial Clinical Information System Incorporating Concepts From Textual Documents

    PubMed Central

    Oppenheim, Michael I.; Rand, Debra; Barone, Catherine; Hom, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Clinical information systems offer an opportunity to provide clinicians with medical reference materials during clinical encounters when the information is most beneficial. Implementation of this “Infobutton” concept has been described by a number of institutions with locally developed clinical information systems and electronic medical records. This article describes the development of an infobutton-like application called ClinRefLink embedded within a commercial clinical information system. ClinRefLink is somewhat unique in that it offers clinicians the option to perform reference searches based on clinical entities identified within narrative documents. In the first 30 days after implementation, 1018 reference searches were performed. The characteristics of the clinicians and the clinical context of the search terms are described. These data support the value of clinical term extraction from narrative documents as a component of an infobutton system. PMID:20351904

  5. A NEW GHOST-NODE METHOD FOR LINKING DIFFERENT MODELS WITH VARIED GRID REFINEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    J. dickinson; S.C. James; S. Mehl; M.C. Hill; S. Leake; G.A. Zyvoloski

    2005-10-18

    A flexible, robust method for linking grids of locally refined models that may be constructed using different types of numerical methods is needed to address a variety of hydrologic problems. This work outlines and tests a new ghost-node model-linking method based on the iterative method of Mehl and Hill (2002, 2004). It is applicable to steady-state solutions for ground-water flow. Tests are presented for a homogeneous two-dimensional system that facilitates clear analysis of typical problems. The coupled grids are simulated using the finite-difference and finite-element models MODFLOW and FEHM. Results indicate that when the grids are matched spatially so that nodes and control volume boundaries are aligned, the new coupling technique has approximately twice the error as coupling using two MODFLOW models. When the grids are non-matching; model accuracy is slightly increased over matching grid cases. Overall, results indicate that the ghost-node technique is a viable means to accurately couple distinct models.

  6. Modelling the multidimensional niche by linking functional traits to competitive performance

    PubMed Central

    Maynard, Daniel S.; Leonard, Kenneth E.; Drake, John M.; Hall, David W.; Crowther, Thomas W.; Bradford, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    Linking competitive outcomes to environmental conditions is necessary for understanding species' distributions and responses to environmental change. Despite this importance, generalizable approaches for predicting competitive outcomes across abiotic gradients are lacking, driven largely by the highly complex and context-dependent nature of biotic interactions. Here, we present and empirically test a novel niche model that uses functional traits to model the niche space of organisms and predict competitive outcomes of co-occurring populations across multiple resource gradients. The model makes no assumptions about the underlying mode of competition and instead applies to those settings where relative competitive ability across environments correlates with a quantifiable performance metric. To test the model, a series of controlled microcosm experiments were conducted using genetically related strains of a widespread microbe. The model identified trait microevolution and performance differences among strains, with the predicted competitive ability of each organism mapped across a two-dimensional carbon and nitrogen resource space. Areas of coexistence and competitive dominance between strains were identified, and the predicted competitive outcomes were validated in approximately 95% of the pairings. By linking trait variation to competitive ability, our work demonstrates a generalizable approach for predicting and modelling competitive outcomes across changing environmental contexts. PMID:26136444

  7. Modelling the multidimensional niche by linking functional traits to competitive performance.

    PubMed

    Maynard, Daniel S; Leonard, Kenneth E; Drake, John M; Hall, David W; Crowther, Thomas W; Bradford, Mark A

    2015-07-22

    Linking competitive outcomes to environmental conditions is necessary for understanding species' distributions and responses to environmental change. Despite this importance, generalizable approaches for predicting competitive outcomes across abiotic gradients are lacking, driven largely by the highly complex and context-dependent nature of biotic interactions. Here, we present and empirically test a novel niche model that uses functional traits to model the niche space of organisms and predict competitive outcomes of co-occurring populations across multiple resource gradients. The model makes no assumptions about the underlying mode of competition and instead applies to those settings where relative competitive ability across environments correlates with a quantifiable performance metric. To test the model, a series of controlled microcosm experiments were conducted using genetically related strains of a widespread microbe. The model identified trait microevolution and performance differences among strains, with the predicted competitive ability of each organism mapped across a two-dimensional carbon and nitrogen resource space. Areas of coexistence and competitive dominance between strains were identified,and the predicted competitive outcomes were validated in approximately 95% of the pairings. By linking trait variation to competitive ability, our work demonstrates a generalizable approach for predicting and modelling competitive outcomes across changing environmental contexts.

  8. Link between statistical equilibrium fidelity and forecasting skill for complex systems with model error.

    PubMed

    Majda, Andrew J; Gershgorin, Boris

    2011-08-02

    Understanding and improving the predictive skill of imperfect models for complex systems in their response to external forcing is a crucial issue in diverse applications such as for example climate change science. Equilibrium statistical fidelity of the imperfect model on suitable coarse-grained variables is a necessary but not sufficient condition for this predictive skill, and elementary examples are given here demonstrating this. Here, with equilibrium statistical fidelity of the imperfect model, a direct link is developed between the predictive fidelity of specific test problems in the training phase where the perfect natural system is observed and the predictive skill for the forced response of the imperfect model by combining appropriate concepts from information theory with other concepts based on the fluctuation dissipation theorem. Here a suite of mathematically tractable models with nontrivial eddy diffusivity, variance, and intermittent non-Gaussian statistics mimicking crucial features of atmospheric tracers together with stochastically forced standard eddy diffusivity approximation with model error are utilized to illustrate this link.

  9. Model Development for A University-Based Learning Disability Clinic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Larry L.; And Others

    The report presents a model for appraisal and individualized educational programing for learning disabled children at the School of Education, Auburn University, Alabama. Descriptions by clinic staff of visitations to exemplary models and a summary of a regional conference on learning disabilities introduce the report. The clinic model is…

  10. Is antipsychotic treatment linked to low bone mineral density and osteoporosis? A review of the evidence and the clinical implications

    PubMed Central

    Crews, Matthieu P K; Howes, Oliver D

    2013-01-01

    Objective Osteoporosis is increasingly common worldwide and there is growing concern that the long-term use of antipsychotic medications increases the risk of this disorder. In this review we consider whether antipsychotics may contribute to the development of osteoporosis through reductions in bone mineral density (BMD), discuss the possible mechanisms involved and consider the clinical implications of such a relationship. Methods We searched the literature for studies in this area published between 1966 and 2010 using the Medline and PubMed databases and the following search terms: (schizophrenia OR antipsychotic OR neuroleptic) AND (osteoporosis OR hyperprolactinaemia OR bone mineral density). Results The available data indicates that statistically significant reductions in bone mineral density are frequently seen in patients prescribed antipsychotic medications and suggests that there is a higher incidence of clinically significant reductions compared with the normal population. Conclusions Clinicians should be aware for the potential negative effects of antipsychotic medications on bone mineral density, particularly in patients with additional risk factors for osteoporosis. Recommendations regarding routine monitoring of bone mineral density for patients prescribed antipsychotic medications cannot be made on the basis of existing evidence and more research is required. Is antipsychotic treatment linked to low bone mineral density and osteoporosis? A review of the evidence and the clinical implications PMID:22228316

  11. The Link Between Mental Illness and Firearm Violence: Implications for Social Policy and Clinical Practice.

    PubMed

    Rozel, John S; Mulvey, Edward P

    2017-03-30

    The United States has substantially higher levels of firearm violence than most other developed countries. Firearm violence is a significant and preventable public health crisis. Mental illness is a weak risk factor for violence despite popular misconceptions reflected in the media and policy. That said, mental health professionals play a critical role in assessing their patients for violence risk, counseling about firearm safety, and guiding the creation of rational and evidence-based public policy that can be effective in mitigating violence risk without unnecessarily stigmatizing people with mental illness. This article summarizes existing evidence about the interplay among mental illness, violence, and firearms, with particular attention paid to the role of active symptoms, addiction, victimization, and psychosocial risk factors. The social and legal context of firearm ownership is discussed as a preface to exploring practical, evidence-driven, and behaviorally informed policy recommendations for mitigating firearm violence risk. Expected final online publication date for the Annual Review of Clinical Psychology Volume 13 is May 7, 2017. Please see http://www.annualreviews.org/page/journal/pubdates for revised estimates.

  12. Affective temperament profiles and clinical correlates in patients with epilepsy: a link from mood disorders.

    PubMed

    Erdoğan Taycan, Serap; Taycan, Okan

    2014-08-01

    The current study sought to investigate the affective temperaments of patients with epilepsy and possible relationships between disease characteristics and temperament profiles. A total of 70 adults with epilepsy and 70 healthy volunteers completed the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), the Beck Anxiety Inventory and the Temperament Evaluation of Memphis, Pisa, Paris and San Diego (TEMPS-A). Patients with epilepsy had higher scores on these three scales than healthy controls. With respect to temperaments, irritable temperament alone was significantly higher in patients than controls. Irritable temperament also had a significant positive correlation with psychiatric history, whereas depressive temperament had a significant positive correlation with illness and treatment duration. Patients who had suffered simple partial and complex partial seizures had higher anxious temperament scores than patients with generalized epilepsy. Because the study group was recruited through consecutive patients seen in a single neurology clinic, our findings may not be representative of PWE in general. Because irritability is one of the key symptoms of interictal dysphoric disorder and because TEMPS-A irritable temperament and BDI scores were found to be significantly related, the high rate of irritable temperament in our patient sample may be associated with depressive mood. We may suggest that at least some of the affective symptoms in patients with epilepsy and the historical concept of "epileptic personality" may be explained by affective temperaments. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Air pollution, vascular disease and thrombosis: linking clinical data and pathogenic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Franchini, M; Guida, A; Tufano, A; Coppola, A

    2012-12-01

    The public health burden of air pollution has been increasingly recognized over the last decades. Following the first assessed adverse effects on respiratory diseases and lung cancer, a large body of epidemiologic and clinical studies definitely documented an even stronger association of air pollution exposure with cardiovascular mortality and morbidity, particularly related to atherothrombotic (coronary and cerebrovascular) disease. Particulate matter (PM), mainly that with lower aerodynamic diameter (fine and ultrafine PM), is responsible for the most severe effects, due to its capacity to transport toxic substances deep into the lower airways. These effects have been shown to occur not only after short-term exposure to elevated concentrations of pollutants, but even after long-term relatively low levels of exposure. Vulnerable subjects (elderly persons and those with preexisting cardiopulmonary diseases) show the highest impact. Fewer and conflicting data also suggest an association with venous thromboembolism. Although not completely elucidated, a series of mechanisms have been hypothesized and tested in experimental settings. These phenomena, including vasomotor and cardiac autonomic dysfunction, hemostatic unbalance, oxidative stress and inflammatory response, have been shown to change over time and differently contribute to the short-term and long-term adverse effects of pollution exposure. Beyond environmental health policies, crucial for improving air quality and reducing the impact of such an elusive threat to public health, the recognition and assessment of the individual risk, together with specific advice, should be routinely implemented in the strategies of primary and secondary cardiovascular prevention.

  14. A simple pharmacokinetic model linking plasma progesterone concentrations with the hormone released from bovine intravaginal inserts.

    PubMed

    Mariano, R N; Turino, L N; Cabrera, M I; Scándolo, D E; Maciel, M G; Grau, R J A

    2010-10-01

    On the basis of pharmacokinetic modeling, this study provides some insights into predicting in vivo plasma progesterone concentrations when using bovine intravaginal inserts for systemic progesterone delivery. More significantly, this contribution is the first attempt to build a simple pharmacokinetic model that links plasma progesterone concentrations with the hormone released from bovine intravaginal inserts. After evaluating three rival pharmacokinetic models and considering some phenomena involved in the intravaginal administration of progesterone, a primary pharmacokinetic model having a good data fitting capability with only two adjustable parameters is proposed to the above mentioned task. Kinetic parameters are given for lactating Holstein dairy cows with two levels of daily milk yields; and non-pregnant, non-lactating Holstein-Friesian cattle. Model predictions indicate the occurrence of a preferential distribution of the intravaginally administered progesterone dose through a first uterine pass effect.

  15. Framework for Smart Electronic Health Record- Linked Predictive Models to Optimize Care for Complex Digestive Diseases

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-01

    was to search our world-wide military medical record for data sets to develop Bayesian Network ( BN ) models to predict defined outcomes in Crohn’s...on the AP and CD cohorts to develop our BN predictive models. More specifically, creating and testing Bayesian Network models for AP and setting...clinical EMR as an effective tool for future research, resource allocation and planning with regard to complex chronic illnesses. Application of BN

  16. Linking models of land use, resources, and economy to simulate the development of mountain regions (ALPSCAPE).

    PubMed

    Lundström, Corinne; Kytzia, Susanne; Walz, Ariane; Gret-Regamey, Adrienne; Bebi, Peter

    2007-09-01

    We present a framework of a scenario-based model that simulates the development of the municipality of Davos (Swiss Alps). We illustrate our method with the calculation of the scenario for 2050 "Decrease in subsidies for mountain agriculture and liberalization of markets." The main objective was to link submodels of land-use allocation (regression-based approach), material and energy flows submodels (Material and Energy Flux Analysis), and economic submodels (Input-Output Analysis). Letting qualitative and quantitative information flow from one submodel to the next, following the storyline describing a scenario, has proven to be suitable for linking submodels. The succession of the submodels is then strongly dependent on the scenario. Qualitative information flows are simulated with microsimulations of actor choices. Links between the submodels show different degrees of robustness: although the links involving microsimulations are the weakest, the uncertainty introduced by the land-use allocation model is actually advantageous because it allows one possible change in the landscape in the future to be simulated. The modeling results for the scenario here presented show that the disappearance of agriculture only marginally affects the region's factor income, but that the consequences for the self-sufficiency rate, for various landscape-related indicators and ecosystem services, and for the economy in the long term may be considerable. These benefits compensate for agriculture's modest direct economic value. The framework presented can potentially be applied to any region and scenario. This framework provides a basis for a learning package that allows potential detrimental consequences of regional development to be anticipated at an early stage.

  17. Conformational analysis of a covalently cross-linked Watson-Crick base pair model.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Erik A; Allen, Benjamin D; Kishi, Yoshito; O'Leary, Daniel J

    2008-11-15

    Low-temperature NMR experiments and molecular modeling have been used to characterize the conformational behavior of a covalently cross-linked DNA base pair model. The data suggest that Watson-Crick or reverse Watson-Crick hydrogen bonding geometries have similar energies and can interconvert at low temperatures. This low-temperature process involves rotation about the crosslink CH(2)C(5') (psi) carbon-carbon bond, which is energetically preferred over the alternate CH(2)N(3) (phi) carbon-nitrogen bond rotation.

  18. Viscoelastic Model of Cross-Linked Polyethylene Including Effects of Temperature and Crystallinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olasz, L.; Gudmundson, P.

    2005-12-01

    Characterization of the mechanical behavior of cross-linked polyethylene (XLPE) commonly used in high voltage cable insulation was performed by an extensive set of isothermal uniaxial tensile relaxation tests. Tensile relaxation experiments were complemented by pressure-volume-temperature experiments as well as density and crystallinity measurements. Based on the experimental results, a viscoelastic power law model with four parameters was formulated, incorporating temperature and crystallinity dependence. It was found that a master curve can be developed by both horizontal and vertical shifting of the relaxation curves. The model was evaluated by making comparisons of the predicted stress responses with the measured responses in relaxation tests with transient temperature histories.

  19. The (2 + 1)-d U(1) quantum link model masquerading as deconfined criticality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, D.; Jiang, F.-J.; Widmer, P.; Wiese, U.-J.

    2013-12-01

    The (2 + 1)-d U(1) quantum link model is a gauge theory, amenable to quantum simulation, with a spontaneously broken SO(2) symmetry emerging at a quantum phase transition. Its low-energy physics is described by a (2 + 1)-d RP(1) effective field theory, perturbed by an SO(2) breaking operator, which prevents the interpretation of the emergent pseudo-Goldstone boson as a dual photon. At the quantum phase transition, the model mimics some features of deconfined quantum criticality, but remains linearly confining. Deconfinement only sets in at high temperature. Dedicated to the memory of Bernard B Beard (1957-2012).

  20. A link-segment model of upright human posture for analysis of head-trunk coordination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicholas, S. C.; Doxey-Gasway, D. D.; Paloski, W. H.

    1998-01-01

    Sensory-motor control of upright human posture may be organized in a top-down fashion such that certain head-trunk coordination strategies are employed to optimize visual and/or vestibular sensory inputs. Previous quantitative models of the biomechanics of human posture control have examined the simple case of ankle sway strategy, in which an inverted pendulum model is used, and the somewhat more complicated case of hip sway strategy, in which multisegment, articulated models are used. While these models can be used to quantify the gross dynamics of posture control, they are not sufficiently detailed to analyze head-trunk coordination strategies that may be crucial to understanding its underlying mechanisms. In this paper, we present a biomechanical model of upright human posture that extends an existing four mass, sagittal plane, link-segment model to a five mass model including an independent head link. The new model was developed to analyze segmental body movements during dynamic posturography experiments in order to study head-trunk coordination strategies and their influence on sensory inputs to balance control. It was designed specifically to analyze data collected on the EquiTest (NeuroCom International, Clackamas, OR) computerized dynamic posturography system, where the task of maintaining postural equilibrium may be challenged under conditions in which the visual surround, support surface, or both are in motion. The performance of the model was tested by comparing its estimated ground reaction forces to those measured directly by support surface force transducers. We conclude that this model will be a valuable analytical tool in the search for mechanisms of balance control.

  1. A link-segment model of upright human posture for analysis of head-trunk coordination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicholas, S. C.; Doxey-Gasway, D. D.; Paloski, W. H.

    1998-01-01

    Sensory-motor control of upright human posture may be organized in a top-down fashion such that certain head-trunk coordination strategies are employed to optimize visual and/or vestibular sensory inputs. Previous quantitative models of the biomechanics of human posture control have examined the simple case of ankle sway strategy, in which an inverted pendulum model is used, and the somewhat more complicated case of hip sway strategy, in which multisegment, articulated models are used. While these models can be used to quantify the gross dynamics of posture control, they are not sufficiently detailed to analyze head-trunk coordination strategies that may be crucial to understanding its underlying mechanisms. In this paper, we present a biomechanical model of upright human posture that extends an existing four mass, sagittal plane, link-segment model to a five mass model including an independent head link. The new model was developed to analyze segmental body movements during dynamic posturography experiments in order to study head-trunk coordination strategies and their influence on sensory inputs to balance control. It was designed specifically to analyze data collected on the EquiTest (NeuroCom International, Clackamas, OR) computerized dynamic posturography system, where the task of maintaining postural equilibrium may be challenged under conditions in which the visual surround, support surface, or both are in motion. The performance of the model was tested by comparing its estimated ground reaction forces to those measured directly by support surface force transducers. We conclude that this model will be a valuable analytical tool in the search for mechanisms of balance control.

  2. Clinical and Electrophysiologic Characteristics of a Large Kindred with X-Linked Retinitis Pigmentosa Associated with the RPGR Locus.

    PubMed

    Tzu, Jonathan H; Arguello, Tania; Berrocal, Audina M; Berrocal, Maria; Weisman, Alejandra D; Liu, Mu; Hess, Ditte; Caputo, Michelle; Goldberg, Jeffrey L; Feuer, William J; Stone, Edwin M; Lam, Byron L

    2015-01-01

    To phenotypically and genotypically characterize a large Puerto Rican kindred with X-linked retinitis pigmentosa associated with a novel RP GTPase regulator (RPGR) genotype. A total of 100 family members of a single kindred with X-linked RP were evaluated with ophthalmic examinations and blood DNA analysis. Visual fields, OCT, and full-field ERG were obtained on all affected males and carriers. Of the 100 family members examined, 13 were affected males and 18 were carriers. A deletion of 2 base pair of the RPGR gene in the ORF15 region at position c.2267-2268 (Lys756del2aaAG hemi) was identified with the affected and carriers. Best eye visual acuity was correlated with age (Spearman coefficient = 0.95) with hand-motion acuity by age 35 and light perception to no light perception by age 50-60. Visual fields were minimally plottable by age 40, and ERG responses reached non-detectable levels by late teens. Carriers had no or mild visual symptoms. All carriers had visual acuity of at least 20/50 or better in one eye, and the amount of retinal degeneration was variable with ERG responses ranging from severely impaired to normal. Profound visual loss occurred by the second decade of life with progression to near no light perception by age 60 in this kindred of X-linked RP associated with the RPGR genotype. Female carriers maintained visual acuity with age and were identifiable by clinical and ERG examination. The information from this study is important to determine the optimal age for intervention, as new RP treatments are being developed and tested.

  3. Accelerated Corneal Collagen Cross-Linking Using Topography-Guided UV-A Energy Emission: Preliminary Clinical and Morphological Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Mazzotta, Cosimo; Traversi, Claudio; Baiocchi, Stefano; Fontana, Luigi

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To assess the clinical and morphological outcomes of topography-guided accelerated corneal cross-linking. Design. Retrospective case series. Methods. 21 eyes of 20 patients with progressive keratoconus were enrolled. All patients underwent accelerated cross-linking using an ultraviolet-A (UVA) exposure with an energy release varying from 7.2 J/cm2 up to 15 J/cm2, according to the topographic corneal curvature. Uncorrected (UDVA) and corrected (CDVA) distance visual acuity, topography, in vivo confocal microscopy (IVCM), and anterior segment optic coherence tomography (AS-OCT) were evaluated preoperatively and at the 1, 3, 6, and 12 months postoperatively. Results. 12 months after surgery UDVA and CDVA did not significantly vary from preoperative values. The average topographic astigmatism decreased from −4.61 ± 0.74 diopters (D) to −3.20 ± 0.81 D and coma aberration improved from 0.95 ± 0.03 μm to 0.88 ± 0.04 μm after surgery. AS-OCT and IVCM documented differential effects on the treated areas using different energies doses. The depths of demarcation line and keratocyte apoptosis were assessed. Conclusions. Preliminary results show correspondence between the energy dose applied and the microstructural stromal changes induced by the cross-linking at various depths in different areas of treated cornea. One year after surgery a significant reduction in the topographic astigmatism and comatic aberration was detected. None of the patients developed significant complications. PMID:28018671

  4. AR intragenic deletions linked to androgen receptor splice variant expression and activity in models of prostate cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Li, Y; Hwang, T H; Oseth, L A; Hauge, A; Vessella, R L; Schmechel, S C; Hirsch, B; Beckman, K B; Silverstein, K A; Dehm, S M

    2012-11-08

    Reactivation of the androgen receptor (AR) during androgen depletion therapy (ADT) underlies castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPCa). Alternative splicing of the AR gene and synthesis of constitutively active COOH-terminally truncated AR variants lacking the AR ligand-binding domain has emerged as an important mechanism of ADT resistance in CRPCa. In a previous study, we demonstrated that altered AR splicing in CRPCa 22Rv1 cells was linked to a 35-kb intragenic tandem duplication of AR exon 3 and flanking sequences. In this study, we demonstrate that complex patterns of AR gene copy number imbalances occur in PCa cell lines, xenografts and clinical specimens. To investigate whether these copy number imbalances reflect AR gene rearrangements that could be linked to splicing disruptions, we carried out a detailed analysis of AR gene structure in the LuCaP 86.2 and CWR-R1 models of CRPCa. By deletion-spanning PCR, we discovered a 8579-bp deletion of AR exons 5, 6 and 7 in the LuCaP 86.2 xenograft, which provides a rational explanation for synthesis of the truncated AR v567es AR variant in this model. Similarly, targeted resequencing of the AR gene in CWR-R1 cells led to the discovery of a 48-kb deletion in AR intron 1. This intragenic deletion marked a specific CWR-R1 cell population with enhanced expression of the truncated AR-V7/AR3 variant, a high level of androgen-independent AR transcriptional activity and rapid androgen independent growth. Together, these data demonstrate that structural alterations in the AR gene are linked to stable gain-of-function splicing alterations in CRPCa.

  5. AR intragenic deletions linked to androgen receptor splice variant expression and activity in models of prostate cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yingming; Hwang, Tae Hyun; Oseth, LeAnn; Hauge, Adam; Vessella, Robert L.; Schmechel, Stephen C.; Hirsch, Betsy; Beckman, Kenneth B.; Silverstein, Kevin A.; Dehm, Scott M.

    2011-01-01

    Reactivation of the androgen receptor (AR) during androgen depletion therapy (ADT) underlies castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPCa). Alternative splicing of the AR gene and synthesis of constitutively-active COOH-terminally truncated AR variants lacking the AR ligand binding domain has emerged as an important mechanism of ADT-resistance in CRPCa. In a previous study, we demonstrated that altered AR splicing in CRPCa 22Rv1 cells was linked to a 35 kb intragenic tandem duplication of AR exon 3 and flanking sequences. In this study, we demonstrate that complex patterns of AR gene copy number imbalances occur in PCa cell lines, xenografts, and clinical specimens. To investigate whether these copy number imbalances reflect AR gene rearrangements that could be linked to splicing disruptions, we carried out a detailed analysis of AR gene structure in the LuCaP 86.2 and CWR-R1 models of CRPCa. By deletion-spanning PCR, we discovered a 8,579 bp deletion of AR exons 5, 6, and 7 in the LuCaP 86.2 xenograft, which provides a rational explanation for synthesis of the truncated AR v567es AR variant in this model. Similarly, targeted re-sequencing of the AR gene in CWR-R1 cells led to the discovery of a 48 kb deletion in AR intron 1. This intragenic deletion marked a specific CWR-R1 cell population with enhanced expression of the truncated AR-V7/AR3 variant, a high level of androgen-independent AR transcriptional activity, and rapid androgen independent growth. Together, these data demonstrate that structural alterations in the AR gene are linked to stable gain-of-function splicing alterations in CRPCa. PMID:22266865

  6. Genomic analysis reveals that immune function genes are strongly linked to clinical outcome in the North Central Cancer Treatment Group n9831 Adjuvant Trastuzumab Trial.

    PubMed

    Perez, Edith A; Thompson, E Aubrey; Ballman, Karla V; Anderson, S Keith; Asmann, Yan W; Kalari, Krishna R; Eckel-Passow, Jeanette E; Dueck, Amylou C; Tenner, Kathleen S; Jen, Jin; Fan, Jian-Bing; Geiger, Xochiquetzal J; McCullough, Ann E; Chen, Beiyun; Jenkins, Robert B; Sledge, George W; Winer, Eric P; Gralow, Julie R; Reinholz, Monica M

    2015-03-01

    To develop a genomic signature that predicts benefit from trastuzumab in human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive breast cancer. DASL technology was used to quantify mRNA in samples from 1,282 patients enrolled onto the Combination Chemotherapy With or Without Trastuzumab in Treating Women With Breast Cancer (North Central Cancer Treatment Group N9831 [NCCTG-N9831]) adjuvant trastuzumab trial. Cox proportional hazard ratios (HRs), adjusted for significant clinicopathologic risk factors, were used to determine the association of each gene with relapse-free survival (RFS) for 433 patients who received chemotherapy alone (arm A) and 849 patients who received chemotherapy plus trastuzumab (arms B and C). Network and pathway analyses were used to identify key biologic processes linked to RFS. The signature was built by using a voting scheme. Network and functional ontology analyses suggested that increased RFS was linked to a subset of immune function genes. A voting scheme model was used to define immune gene enrichment based on the expression of any nine or more of 14 immune function genes at or above the 0.40 quantile for the population. This model was used to identify immune gene-enriched tumors in arm A and arms B and C. Immune gene enrichment was linked to increased RFS in arms B and C (HR, 0.35; 95% CI, 0.22 to 0.55; P < .001), whereas arm B and C patients who did not exhibit immune gene enrichment did not benefit from trastuzumab (HR, 0.89; 95% CI, 0.62 to 1.28; P = .53). Enriched immune function gene expression as defined by our predictive signature was not associated with increased RFS in arm A (HR, 0.90; 95% CI, 0.60 to 1.37; P = .64). Increased expression of a subset of immune function genes may provide a means of predicting benefit from adjuvant trastuzumab. © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  7. U-BIOPRED clinical adult asthma clusters linked to a subset of sputum omics.

    PubMed

    Lefaudeux, Diane; De Meulder, Bertrand; Loza, Matthew J; Peffer, Nancy; Rowe, Anthony; Baribaud, Frédéric; Bansal, Aruna T; Lutter, Rene; Sousa, Ana R; Corfield, Julie; Pandis, Ioannis; Bakke, Per S; Caruso, Massimo; Chanez, Pascal; Dahlén, Sven-Erik; Fleming, Louise J; Fowler, Stephen J; Horvath, Ildiko; Krug, Norbert; Montuschi, Paolo; Sanak, Marek; Sandstrom, Thomas; Shaw, Dominic E; Singer, Florian; Sterk, Peter J; Roberts, Graham; Adcock, Ian M; Djukanovic, Ratko; Auffray, Charles; Chung, Kian Fan

    2017-06-01

    Asthma is a heterogeneous disease in which there is a differential response to asthma treatments. This heterogeneity needs to be evaluated so that a personalized management approach can be provided. We stratified patients with moderate-to-severe asthma based on clinicophysiologic parameters and performed an omics analysis of sputum. Partition-around-medoids clustering was applied to a training set of 266 asthmatic participants from the European Unbiased Biomarkers for the Prediction of Respiratory Diseases Outcomes (U-BIOPRED) adult cohort using 8 prespecified clinic-physiologic variables. This was repeated in a separate validation set of 152 asthmatic patients. The clusters were compared based on sputum proteomics and transcriptomics data. Four reproducible and stable clusters of asthmatic patients were identified. The training set cluster T1 consists of patients with well-controlled moderate-to-severe asthma, whereas cluster T2 is a group of patients with late-onset severe asthma with a history of smoking and chronic airflow obstruction. Cluster T3 is similar to cluster T2 in terms of chronic airflow obstruction but is composed of nonsmokers. Cluster T4 is predominantly composed of obese female patients with uncontrolled severe asthma with increased exacerbations but with normal lung function. The validation set exhibited similar clusters, demonstrating reproducibility of the classification. There were significant differences in sputum proteomics and transcriptomics between the clusters. The severe asthma clusters (T2, T3, and T4) had higher sputum eosinophilia than cluster T1, with no differences in sputum neutrophil counts and exhaled nitric oxide and serum IgE levels. Clustering based on clinicophysiologic parameters yielded 4 stable and reproducible clusters that associate with different pathobiological pathways. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Large-scale adverse effects related to treatment evidence standardization (LAERTES): an open scalable system for linking pharmacovigilance evidence sources with clinical data.

    PubMed

    2017-03-07

    Integrating multiple sources of pharmacovigilance evidence has the potential to advance the science of safety signal detection and evaluation. In this regard, there is a need for more research on how to integrate multiple disparate evidence sources while making the evidence computable from a knowledge representation perspective (i.e., semantic enrichment). Existing frameworks suggest well-promising outcomes for such integration but employ a rather limited number of sources. In particular, none have been specifically designed to support both regulatory and clinical use cases, nor have any been designed to add new resources and use cases through an open architecture. This paper discusses the architecture and functionality of a system called Large-scale Adverse Effects Related to Treatment Evidence Standardization (LAERTES) that aims to address these shortcomings. LAERTES provides a standardized, open, and scalable architecture for linking evidence sources relevant to the association of drugs with health outcomes of interest (HOIs). Standard terminologies are used to represent different entities. For example, drugs and HOIs are represented in RxNorm and Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine -- Clinical Terms respectively. At the time of this writing, six evidence sources have been loaded into the LAERTES evidence base and are accessible through prototype evidence exploration user interface and a set of Web application programming interface services. This system operates within a larger software stack provided by the Observational Health Data Sciences and Informatics clinical research framework, including the relational Common Data Model for observational patient data created by the Observational Medical Outcomes Partnership. Elements of the Linked Data paradigm facilitate the systematic and scalable integration of relevant evidence sources. The prototype LAERTES system provides useful functionality while creating opportunities for further research. Future work will

  9. Clinical prediction models for aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Jaja, Blessing N R; Cusimano, Michael D; Etminan, Nima; Hanggi, Daniel; Hasan, David; Ilodigwe, Don; Lantigua, Hector; Le Roux, Peter; Lo, Benjamin; Louffat-Olivares, Ada; Mayer, Stephan; Molyneux, Andrew; Quinn, Audrey; Schweizer, Tom A; Schenk, Thomas; Spears, Julian; Todd, Michael; Torner, James; Vergouwen, Mervyn D I; Wong, George K C; Singh, Jeff; Macdonald, R Loch

    2013-02-01

    Clinical prediction models can enhance clinical decision-making and research. However, available prediction models in aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) are rarely used. We evaluated the methodological validity of SAH prediction models and the relevance of the main predictors to identify potentially reliable models and to guide future attempts at model development. We searched the EMBASE, MEDLINE, and Web of Science databases from January 1995 to June 2012 to identify studies that reported clinical prediction models for mortality and functional outcome in aSAH. Validated methods were used to minimize bias. Eleven studies were identified; 3 developed models from datasets of phase 3 clinical trials, the others from single hospital records. The median patient sample size was 340 (interquartile range 149-733). The main predictors used were age (n = 8), Fisher grade (n = 6), World Federation of Neurological Surgeons grade (n = 5), aneurysm size (n = 5), and Hunt and Hess grade (n = 3). Age was consistently dichotomized. Potential predictors were prescreened by univariate analysis in 36 % of studies. Only one study was penalized for model optimism. Details about model development were often insufficiently described and no published studies provided external validation. While clinical prediction models for aSAH use a few simple predictors, there are substantial methodological problems with the models and none have had external validation. This precludes the use of existing models for clinical or research purposes. We recommend further studies to develop and validate reliable clinical prediction models for aSAH.

  10. X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD): clinical presentation and guidelines for diagnosis, follow-up and management

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is the most common peroxisomal disorder. The disease is caused by mutations in the ABCD1 gene that encodes the peroxisomal membrane protein ALDP which is involved in the transmembrane transport of very long-chain fatty acids (VLCFA; ≥C22). A defect in ALDP results in elevated levels of VLCFA in plasma and tissues. The clinical spectrum in males with X-ALD ranges from isolated adrenocortical insufficiency and slowly progressive myelopathy to devastating cerebral demyelination. The majority of heterozygous females will develop symptoms by the age of 60 years. In individual patients the disease course remains unpredictable. This review focuses on the diagnosis and management of patients with X-ALD and provides a guideline for clinicians that encounter patients with this highly complex disorder. PMID:22889154

  11. X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD): clinical presentation and guidelines for diagnosis, follow-up and management.

    PubMed

    Engelen, Marc; Kemp, Stephan; de Visser, Marianne; van Geel, Björn M; Wanders, Ronald J A; Aubourg, Patrick; Poll-The, Bwee Tien

    2012-08-13

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is the most common peroxisomal disorder. The disease is caused by mutations in the ABCD1 gene that encodes the peroxisomal membrane protein ALDP which is involved in the transmembrane transport of very long-chain fatty acids (VLCFA; ≥ C22). A defect in ALDP results in elevated levels of VLCFA in plasma and tissues. The clinical spectrum in males with X-ALD ranges from isolated adrenocortical insufficiency and slowly progressive myelopathy to devastating cerebral demyelination. The majority of heterozygous females will develop symptoms by the age of 60 years. In individual patients the disease course remains unpredictable. This review focuses on the diagnosis and management of patients with X-ALD and provides a guideline for clinicians that encounter patients with this highly complex disorder.

  12. Blood Group O-Dependent Cellular Responses to Cholera Toxin: Parallel Clinical and Epidemiological Links to Severe Cholera.

    PubMed

    Kuhlmann, F Matthew; Santhanam, Srikanth; Kumar, Pardeep; Luo, Qingwei; Ciorba, Matthew A; Fleckenstein, James M

    2016-08-03

    Because O blood group has been associated with more severe cholera infections, it has been hypothesized that cholera toxin (CT) may bind non-O blood group antigens of the intestinal mucosae, thereby preventing efficient interaction with target GM1 gangliosides required for uptake of the toxin and activation of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) signaling in target epithelia. Herein, we show that after exposure to CT, human enteroids expressing O blood group exhibited marked increase in cAMP relative to cells derived from blood group A individuals. Likewise, using CRISPR/Cas9 engineering, a functional group O line (HT-29-A(-/-)) was generated from a parent group A HT-29 line. CT stimulated robust cAMP responses in HT-29-A(-/-) cells relative to HT-29 cells. These findings provide a direct molecular link between blood group O expression and differential cellular responses to CT, recapitulating clinical and epidemiologic observations.

  13. X-linked creatine transporter defect: a report on two unrelated boys with a severe clinical phenotype.

    PubMed

    Anselm, I A; Anselm, I M; Alkuraya, F S; Salomons, G S; Jakobs, C; Fulton, A B; Mazumdar, M; Rivkin, M; Frye, R; Poussaint, T Young; Marsden, D

    2006-02-01

    We report two unrelated boys with the X-linked creatine transporter defect (CRTR) and clinical features more severe than those previously described with this disorder. These two boys presented at ages 12 and 30 months with severe mental retardation, absent speech development, hypotonia, myopathy and extra-pyramidal movement disorder. One boy has seizures and some dysmorphic features; he also has evidence of an oxidative phosphorylation defect. They both had classical absence of creatine peak on brain magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). In one, however, this critical finding was overlooked in the initial interpretation and was discovered upon subsequent review of the MRS. Molecular studies showed large genomic deletions of a large part of the 3' end of the complete open reading frame of the SLC6A8 gene. This report emphasizes the importance of MRS in evaluating neurological symptoms, broadens the phenotypic spectrum of CRTR and adds knowledge about the pathogenesis of creatine depletion in the brain and retina.

  14. Evaluation of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using purified, deglycosylated histoplasmin for different clinical manifestations of histoplasmosis

    PubMed Central

    Guimarães, Allan Jefferson; Pizzini, Claudia Vera; De Abreu Almeida, Marcos; Peralta, José Mauro; Nosanchuk, Joshua Daniel; Zancopé-Oliveira, Rosely Maria

    2010-01-01

    Diagnosis of invasive fungal diseases remains problematic, especially in undeveloped countries. We have developed an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the detection of antibodies to Histoplasma capsulatum using metaperiodate treated purified histoplasmin (ptHMIN). Our ELISA was validated comparing sera from patients with histoplasmosis, related mycoses, and healthy individuals. The overall test specificity was 96%, with sensitivities of 100% (8/8) in acute disease, 90% (9/10) in chronic disease, 89% (8/9) in disseminated infection in individuals without HIV infection, 86% (12/14) in disseminated disease in the setting of HIV infection and 100% (3/3) in mediastinal histoplasmosis. These parameters are superior to the use of untreated histoplasmin in diagnostic ELISAs. The high specificities, sensitivities, and simplicity of our ELISA support further development of a deglycosylated HMIN ELISA for clinical use and for monitoring the humoral immune response during therapy in patients with chronic and disseminated histoplasmosis. PMID:21691458

  15. African American Women's Perceptions and Attitudes Regarding Participation in Medical Research: The Mayo Clinic/The Links, Incorporated Partnership

    PubMed Central

    Brewer, LaPrincess C.; Parker, Monica W.; Balls-Berry, Joyce E.; Halyard, Michele Y.; Pinn, Vivian W.; Radecki Breitkopf, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To examine perceptions and attitudes toward health-related research participation among professional African American women. Methods: Participants were members of an African American women's service organization, The Links, Incorporated. Data were collected via self-administered questionnaires at The Links, Incorporated 2012 National Assembly. Sociodemographics, prior research experience, intention to participate (ITP), willingness to participate (WTP) in a variety of research studies and attitudes about research participation were measured. Results: A total of 381 surveys were analyzed. A majority of respondents were married (66%), employed (69%), and college educated (96%). Median age was 59; 38% reported prior research participation. Overall, 78% agreed with the statement, “Participation in research will mean better care,” 24% agreed “Participation in research is risky” and 3% agreed “Scientists cannot be trusted.” Fifty-two percent agreed with the statement, “Research conducted in the U.S. is ethical.” Mean ITP in research was 4.9±1.7 on a rating scale of 1 (“definitely no”) to 7 (“definitely yes”). WTP was highest for an interview study and providing a blood sample, and lowest for clinical trial and medical record review. Conclusion: Attitudes toward research participation were generally favorable among professional African American women; many expressed WTP in a variety of research study types. PMID:25046058

  16. X-Linked Agammagobulinemia in a Large Series of North African Patients: Frequency, Clinical Features and Novel BTK Mutations.

    PubMed

    Aadam, Zahra; Kechout, Nadia; Barakat, Abdelhamid; Chan, Koon-Wing; Ben-Ali, Meriem; Ben-Mustapha, Imen; Zidi, Fethi; Ailal, Fatima; Attal, Nabila; Doudou, Fatouma; Abbadi, Mohamed-Cherif; Kaddache, Chawki; Smati, Leila; Touri, Nabila; Chemli, Jalel; Gargah, Tahar; Brini, Ines; Bakhchane, Amina; Charoute, Hicham; Jeddane, Leila; El Atiqi, Sara; El Hafidi, Naïma; Hida, Mustapha; Saile, Rachid; Alj, Hanane Salih; Boukari, Rachida; Bejaoui, Mohamed; Najib, Jilali; Barbouche, Mohamed-Ridha; Lau, Yu-Lung; Mellouli, Fethi; Bousfiha, Ahmed Aziz

    2016-04-01

    X-linked agammagobulinemia (XLA) is a primary immunodeficiency caused by Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) gene defect. XLA patients have absent or reduced number of peripheral B cells and a profound deficiency in all immunoglobulin isotypes. This multicenter study reports the clinical, immunological and molecular features of Bruton's disease in 40 North African male patients. Fifty male out of 63 (male and female) patients diagnosed with serum agammaglobulinemia and non detectable to less than 2% peripheral B cells were enrolled. The search for BTK gene mutations was performed for all of them by genomic DNA amplification and Sanger sequencing. We identified 33 different mutations in the BTK gene in 40 patients including 12 missense mutations, 6 nonsense mutations, 6 splice-site mutations, 5 frameshift, 2 large deletions, one complex mutation and one in-frame deletion. Seventeen of these mutations are novel. This large series shows a lower frequency of XLA among male patients from North Africa with agammaglobulinemia and absent to low B cells compared with other international studies (63.5% vs. 85%). No strong evidence for genotype-phenotype correlation was observed. This study adds to other reports from highly consanguineous North African populations, showing lower frequency of X-linked forms as compared to AR forms of the same primary immunodeficiency. Furthermore, a large number of novel BTK mutations were identified and could further help identify carriers for genetic counseling.

  17. Patent Ductus Arteriosus in Preterm Infants, Part 1: Understanding the Pathophysiologic Link Between the Patent Ductus Arteriosus and Clinical Complications.

    PubMed

    Elsayed, Yasser N; Fraser, Debbie

    2017-09-01

    The clinical guidelines for treating patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) have significantly evolved over the last decades from treating any ductal shunt to more conservative management where only the hemodynamically significant patent ductus arteriosus (HSPDA) is treated. This shift has resulted largely from a lack of evidence from randomized controlled trials supporting a relationship between treating a PDA and improving long-term neonatal outcomes. However, there are many unresolved issues. There is no consensus on the precise definition of HSPDA requiring treatment or a clear understanding of when to treat HSPDA. Moreover, the current evidence shows worsening of the long-term neurodevelopmental outcome for infants undergoing surgical PDA ligation.
    The presence of physiologic variability among preterm infants, and the presence of different compensatory mechanisms may make it difficult to establish a link between pathophysiology and long-term outcomes. That is, the physiologic variability cannot be simply assessed by randomly assigning infants into two arms of a study. Relying on research from animal and human studies, this article explains the link between the pathophysiology of a PDA and neonatal outcomes.

  18. Discovery of Novel DNA Gyrase Inhibiting Spiropyrimidinetriones: Benzisoxazole Fusion with N-Linked Oxazolidinone Substituents Leading to a Clinical Candidate (ETX0914).

    PubMed

    Basarab, Gregory S; Doig, Peter; Galullo, Vincent; Kern, Gunther; Kimzey, Amy; Kutschke, Amy; Newman, Joseph P; Morningstar, Marshall; Mueller, John; Otterson, Linda; Vishwanathan, Karthick; Zhou, Fei; Gowravaram, Madhusudhan

    2015-08-13

    A novel class of bacterial type-II topoisomerase inhibitor displaying a spiropyrimidinetrione architecture fused to a benzisoxazole scaffold shows potent activity against Gram-positive and fastidious Gram-negative bacteria. Here, we describe a series of N-linked oxazolidinone substituents on the benzisoxazole that improve upon the antibacterial activity of initially described compounds of the class, show favorable PK properties, and demonstrate efficacy in an in vivo Staphylococcus aureus infection model. Inhibition of the topoisomerases DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV from both Gram-positive and a Gram-negative organisms was demonstrated. Compounds showed a clean in vitro toxicity profile, including no genotoxicity and no bone marrow toxicity at the highest evaluated concentrations or other issues that have been problematic for some fluoroquinolones. Compound 1u was identified for advancement into human clinical trials for treatment of uncomplicated gonorrhea based on a variety of beneficial attributes including the potent activity and the favorable safety profile.

  19. Adaptive nonlinear model predictive control design of a flexible-link manipulator with uncertain parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnelle, Fabian; Eberhard, Peter

    2017-06-01

    This paper presents a novel adaptive nonlinear model predictive control design for trajectory tracking of flexible-link manipulators consisting of feedback linearization, linear model predictive control, and unscented Kalman filtering. Reducing the nonlinear system to a linear system by feedback linearization simplifies the optimization problem of the model predictive controller significantly, which, however, is no longer linear in the presence of parameter uncertainties and can potentially lead to an undesired dynamical behaviour. An unscented Kalman filter is used to approximate the dynamics of the prediction model by an online parameter estimation, which leads to an adaptation of the optimization problem in each time step and thus to a better prediction and an improved input action. Finally, a detailed fuzzy-arithmetic analysis is performed in order to quantify the effect of the uncertainties on the control structure and to derive robustness assessments. The control structure is applied to a serial manipulator with two flexible links containing uncertain model parameters and acting in three-dimensional space.

  20. Molecular weight and galloylation affect grape seed extract constituents’ ability to cross-link dentin collagen in clinically relevant time

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yi; Bai, Xinyan; Li, Shaohua; Liu, Ying; Keightley, Andrew; Wang, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the relationship between the structures of polyphenolic compounds found in grape seed extract (GSE) and their activity in cross-linking dentin collagen in clinically relevant settings. Methods Representative monomeric and dimeric GSE constituents including (+)-catechin (pCT), (−)-catechin (CT), (−)-epicatechin (EC), (−)-epigallocatechin (EGC), (−)-epicatechin gallate (ECG), (−)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), procyanidin B2 and a pCT-pCT dimer were purchased or synthesized. GSE was separated into low (PALM) and high molecular weight (PAHM) fractions. Human molars were processed into dentin films and beams. After demineralization, 11 groups of films (n=5) were treated for 1 min with the aforementioned reagents (1 wt% in 50/50 ethanol/water) and 1 group remained untreated. The films were studied by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) followed by a quantitative mass spectroscopy-based digestion assay. Tensile properties of demineralized dentin beams were evaluated (n=7) after treatments (2h and 24h) with selective GSE species that were found to protect dentin collagen from collagenase. Results Efficacy of GSE constituents in cross-linking dentin collagen was dependent on molecular size and galloylation. Non-galloylated species with degree of polymerization up to two, including pCT, CT, EC, EGC, procyanidin B2 and pCT-pCT dimer were not active. Galloylated species were active starting from monomeric form, including ECG, EGCG, PALM, GSE and PAHM. PALM induced the best overall improvement in tensile properties of dentin collagen. Significance Identification under clinically relevant settings of structural features that contribute to GSE constituents’ efficacy in stabilizing demineralized dentin matrix has immediate impact on optimizing GSE’s use in dentin bonding. PMID:25958268

  1. A Cybrid Cell Model for the Assessment of the Link Between Mitochondrial Deficits and Sporadic Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Arduíno, Daniela M.; Esteves, A. Raquel; Swerdlow, Russell H.; Cardoso, Sandra M.

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a multifactorial and clinically complex age-related movement disorder. The cause of its most common form (sporadic PD, sPD) is unknown, but one prominent causal factor is mitochondrial dysfunction. Although several genetic- and toxin-based models have been developed along the last decades to mimic the pathological cascade of PD, cellular models that reliably recapitulate the pathological features of the neurons that degenerate in PD are scarce. We describe here the generation of cytoplasmic hybrid cells (or cybrids) as a cellular model of sPD. This approach consists on the fusion of platelets harboring mtDNA from sPD patients with cells in which the endogenous mtDNA has been depleted (Rho0 cells). The sPD cybrid model has been successful in recapitulating most of the hallmarks of sPD, constituting now a validated model for addressing the link between mitochondrial dysfunction and sPD pathology. PMID:25634293

  2. A cybrid cell model for the assessment of the link between mitochondrial deficits and sporadic Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Arduíno, Daniela M; Esteves, A Raquel; Swerdlow, Russell H; Cardoso, Sandra M

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a multifactorial and clinically complex age-related movement disorder. The cause of its most common form (sporadic PD, sPD) is unknown, but one prominent causal factor is mitochondrial dysfunction. Although several genetic- and toxin-based models have been developed along the last decades to mimic the pathological cascade of PD, cellular models that reliably recapitulate the pathological features of the neurons that degenerate in PD are scarce.We describe here the generation of cytoplasmic hybrid cells (or cybrids) as a cellular model of sPD. This approach consists on the fusion of platelets harboring mtDNA from sPD patients with cells in which the endogenous mtDNA has been depleted (Rho0 cells).The sPD cybrid model has been successful in recapitulating most of the hallmarks of sPD, constituting now a validated model for addressing the link between mitochondrial dysfunction and sPD pathology.

  3. Determination of urban groundwater pollution in alluvial aquifer using linked process models considering urban water cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vizintin, Goran; Souvent, Petra; Veselič, Miran; Cencur Curk, Barbara

    2009-10-01

    SummaryThis paper presents the results of the 5th FP project AISUWRS (Assessing and Improving the Sustainability of Urban Water Resources and Systems) which aimed to assess the impact of the urban water infrastructure to underlying or nearby aquifers with the urban water balance modelling approach - a chain of different models that handle with contaminant fluxes and the movement of contaminants from the urban infrastructure into the underlying aquifer. An existing urban water management model UVQ was linked to a model for sewer infiltration and exfiltration (NEIMO), as well as unsaturated zone models (SLeakI/POSI, UL_FLOW) with existing numerical groundwater models. The linked process models offer the prospect of better quantification of urban water balance and contaminant loads, including improved estimates of total recharge and its components in urban areas. Once the model framework has been set up for a selected city, it can easily be updated in the future and it can be used for other purposes like planning of local remediation measures in the vicinity of individual contaminant spillages. This paper describes the application and results of the urban water model chain for the city of Ljubljana, which is the capital of Slovenia. The results from this study suggest that residential land-uses in urban areas with thick unsaturated zone may have significantly smaller impact on the groundwater than agriculture or industry. This can be seen as a speculative understanding of the groundwater pollutions problems. In this respect, use of sustainable urban development systems like on-site infiltration of roof runoff and improved sewer control and standards could result in better groundwater quality.

  4. Conceptual Models and Guidelines for Clinical Assessment of Financial Capacity.

    PubMed

    Marson, Daniel

    2016-09-01

    The ability to manage financial affairs is a life skill of critical importance, and neuropsychologists are increasingly asked to assess financial capacity across a variety of settings. Sound clinical assessment of financial capacity requires knowledge and appreciation of applicable clinical conceptual models and principles. However, the literature has presented relatively little conceptual guidance for clinicians concerning financial capacity and its assessment. This article seeks to address this gap. The article presents six clinical models of financial capacity : (1) the early gerontological IADL model of Lawton, (2) the clinical skills model and (3) related cognitive psychological model developed by Marson and colleagues, (4) a financial decision-making model adapting earlier decisional capacity work of Appelbaum and Grisso, (5) a person-centered model of financial decision-making developed by Lichtenberg and colleagues, and (6) a recent model of financial capacity in the real world developed through the Institute of Medicine. Accompanying presentation of the models is discussion of conceptual and practical perspectives they represent for clinician assessment. Based on the models, the article concludes by presenting a series of conceptually oriented guidelines for clinical assessment of financial capacity. In summary, sound assessment of financial capacity requires knowledge and appreciation of clinical conceptual models and principles. Awareness of such models, principles and guidelines will strengthen and advance clinical assessment of financial capacity.

  5. A review of statistical updating methods for clinical prediction models.

    PubMed

    Su, Ting-Li; Jaki, Thomas; Hickey, Graeme L; Buchan, Iain; Sperrin, Matthew

    2016-07-26

    A clinical prediction model is a tool for predicting healthcare outcomes, usually within a specific population and context. A common approach is to develop a new clinical prediction model for each population and context; however, this wastes potentially useful historical information. A better approach is to update or incorporate the existing clinical prediction models already developed for use in similar contexts or populations. In addition, clinical prediction models commonly become miscalibrated over time, and need replacing or updating. In this article, we review a range of approaches for re-using and updating clinical prediction models; these fall in into three main categories: simple coefficient updating, combining multiple previous clinical prediction models in a meta-model and dynamic updating of models. We evaluated the performance (discrimination and calibration) of the different strategies using data on mortality following cardiac surgery in the United Kingdom: We found that no single strategy performed sufficiently well to be used to the exclusion of the others. In conclusion, useful tools exist for updating existing clinical prediction models to a new population or context, and these should be implemented rather than developing a new clinical prediction model from scratch, using a breadth of complementary statistical methods. © The Author(s) 2016.

  6. Clinical teaching models for nursing practice: a review of literature.

    PubMed

    Vitale, Elsa

    2014-01-01

    Clinical placements provide opportunities for student nurses to learn experientially, thanks to clinical - practical teaching models. For this purpose this review wanted to better investigate the latest methods developed in nursing education to ameliorate the theory practice model in nursing education teaching model. The review of the literature was performed through a search of nursing specific data bases, including Cinahl, Capsur, Ovid, Cockrane Library, PubMed from January 2010 to September 2012. It included key words, such as: Clinical Model; Nursing Education Model; Nursing Practical Teaching Model; Theory-Practice Model. A total of 8 articles were found. Of these, only 4 articles were considered for this review because they better analyzed one clinical teaching model in nursing practice. Each article was structured analyzed, by considering the "PICOS" method, with reference to participants, interventions, comparisons, outcomes, and study design. Four innovative clinical teaching models for nursing practice were considered: the first one was the Problem-Based Leaning method in nursing education; the second one was the Self-Regulated Learning strategy; the third one was the developing nursing students' reflective skills associated as a key component in the perceived coherence between theory and practice; the fourth one was the computer-based clinical simulation. Each work performed an innovative clinical teaching model for nursing student. Some limitations were highlight, but all the literature revised emphasized the evaluation and feedback from students and the perceptions of their clinical activities is essential.

  7. Women and work in rural Taiwan: building a contextual model linking employment and health.

    PubMed

    Gallin, R S

    1989-12-01

    This paper is based on ethnographic research in a rural Taiwanese village in which married women with children are a major source of labor for local industry. Responsibility for job and home exposes these women to repeated stressors that can increase their susceptibility to illness. Existing explanatory models linking employment and women's health, however, do not explain adequately the women's response to their wage labor and the consequences of the social aspects of their work on their health. This paper describes women's work and its meaning, and discusses the way in which micro phenomena such as meanings and health states are linked to macro phenomena such as national political-economic processes and the world capitalist system.

  8. Parametric links among Monte Carlo, phase-field, and sharp-interface models of interfacial motion.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pu; Lusk, Mark T

    2002-12-01

    Parametric links are made among three mesoscale simulation paradigms: phase-field, sharp-interface, and Monte Carlo. A two-dimensional, square lattice, 1/2 Ising model is considered for the Monte Carlo method, where an exact solution for the interfacial free energy is known. The Monte Carlo mobility is calibrated as a function of temperature using Glauber kinetics. A standard asymptotic analysis relates the phase-field and sharp-interface parameters, and this allows the phase-field and Monte Carlo parameters to be linked. The result is derived without bulk effects but is then applied to a set of simulations with the bulk driving force included. An error analysis identifies the domain over which the parametric relationships are accurate.

  9. The Hillman Rotation: An External Clinic Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sears, Joan M.; Veith, Jack

    2000-01-01

    Describes the external optometric education program at the Sidney Hillman Health Centre (Chicago, Illinois). Discusses the history of the clinic, its administrative and educational philosophy, and its affiliation with two prominent hospitals and the Illinois College of Optometry. (DB)

  10. Global sensitivity analysis, probabilistic calibration, and predictive assessment for the data assimilation linked ecosystem carbon model

    SciTech Connect

    Safta, C.; Ricciuto, Daniel M.; Sargsyan, Khachik; Debusschere, B.; Najm, H. N.; Williams, M.; Thornton, Peter E.

    2015-07-01

    In this paper we propose a probabilistic framework for an uncertainty quantification (UQ) study of a carbon cycle model and focus on the comparison between steady-state and transient simulation setups. A global sensitivity analysis (GSA) study indicates the parameters and parameter couplings that are important at different times of the year for quantities of interest (QoIs) obtained with the data assimilation linked ecosystem carbon (DALEC) model. We then employ a Bayesian approach and a statistical model error term to calibrate the parameters of DALEC using net ecosystem exchange (NEE) observations at the Harvard Forest site. The calibration results are employed in the second part of the paper to assess the predictive skill of the model via posterior predictive checks.

  11. Global sensitivity analysis, probabilistic calibration, and predictive assessment for the data assimilation linked ecosystem carbon model

    DOE PAGES

    Safta, C.; Ricciuto, Daniel M.; Sargsyan, Khachik; ...

    2015-07-01

    In this paper we propose a probabilistic framework for an uncertainty quantification (UQ) study of a carbon cycle model and focus on the comparison between steady-state and transient simulation setups. A global sensitivity analysis (GSA) study indicates the parameters and parameter couplings that are important at different times of the year for quantities of interest (QoIs) obtained with the data assimilation linked ecosystem carbon (DALEC) model. We then employ a Bayesian approach and a statistical model error term to calibrate the parameters of DALEC using net ecosystem exchange (NEE) observations at the Harvard Forest site. The calibration results are employedmore » in the second part of the paper to assess the predictive skill of the model via posterior predictive checks.« less

  12. Venous Thrombosis and Cancer: from Mouse Models to Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Hisada, Y.; Geddings, J. E.; Ay, C.; Mackman, N.

    2015-01-01

    Cancer patients have a ~4 fold increased risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) compared with the general population and this is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. This review summarizes our current knowledge of VTE and cancer from mouse models to clinical studies. Notably, risk of VTE varies depending on the type and stage of cancer. For instance, pancreatic and brain cancer patients have a higher risk of VTE than breast and prostate cancer patients. Moreover, patients with metastatic disease have a higher risk than those with localized tumors. Tumor-derived procoagulant factors and growth factors may directly and indirectly enhance VTE. For example, increased levels of circulating tumor-derived, tissue factor-positive microvesicles may trigger VTE. In a mouse model of ovarian cancer, tumor-derived IL-6 and hepatic thrombopoietin has been linked to increased platelet production and thrombosis. In addition, mouse models of mammary and lung cancer showed that tumor-derived granulocyte colony-stimulating factor causes neutrophilia and activation of neutrophils. Activated neutrophils can release neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) that enhance thrombosis. Cell-free DNA in the blood derived from cancer cells, NETs and treatment with cytotoxic drugs can activate the clotting cascade. These studies suggest that there are multiple mechanisms for VTE in patients with different types of cancer. Preventing and treating VTE in cancer patients is challenging; the current recommendations are to use low molecular weight heparin. Understanding the underlying mechanisms may allow the development of new therapies to safely prevent VTE in cancer patients. PMID:25988873

  13. A review of clinical decision making: models and current research.

    PubMed

    Banning, Maggi

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to review the current literature clinical decision-making models and the educational application of models to clinical practice. This was achieved by exploring the function and related research of the three available models of clinical decision making: information-processing model, the intuitive-humanist model and the clinical decision-making model. Clinical decision making is a unique process that involves the interplay between knowledge of pre-existing pathological conditions, explicit patient information, nursing care and experiential learning. Historically, two models of clinical decision making are recognized from the literature; the information-processing model and the intuitive-humanist model. The usefulness and application of both models has been examined in relation the provision of nursing care and care related outcomes. More recently a third model of clinical decision making has been proposed. This new multidimensional model contains elements of the information-processing model but also examines patient specific elements that are necessary for cue and pattern recognition. Literature review. Evaluation of the literature generated from MEDLINE, CINAHL, OVID, PUBMED and EBESCO systems and the Internet from 1980 to November 2005. The characteristics of the three models of decision making were identified and the related research discussed. Three approaches to clinical decision making were identified, each having its own attributes and uses. The most recent addition to the clinical decision making is a theoretical, multidimensional model which was developed through an evaluation of current literature and the assessment of a limited number of research studies that focused on the clinical decision-making skills of inexperienced nurses in pseudoclinical settings. The components of this model and the relative merits to clinical practice are discussed. It is proposed that clinical decision making improves as the nurse gains experience of

  14. Full Scale Rotor Aeroacoustic Predictions and the Link to Model Scale Rotor Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, D. Douglas, Jr.; Burley, Casey L.; Conner, David A.

    2004-01-01

    The NASA Aeroacoustic Prediction System (NAPS) is used to establish a link between model-scale and full-scale rotor predictions and is partially validated against measured wind tunnel and flight aeroacoustic data. The prediction approach of NAPS couples a comprehensive rotorcraft analysis with acoustic source noise and propagation codes. The comprehensive analysis selected for this study is CAMRAD-II, which provides the performance/trim/wake solution for a given rotor or flight condition. The post-trim capabilities of CAMRAD-II are used to compute high-resolution sectional airloads for the acoustic tone noise analysis, WOPMOD. The tone noise is propagated to observers on the ground with the propagation code, RNM (Rotor Noise Model). Aeroacoustic predictions are made with NAPS for an isolated rotor and compared to results of the second Harmonic Aeroacoustic Rotor Test (HART-II) program, which tested a 40% dynamically and Mach-scaled BO-105 main rotor at the DNW. The NAPS is validated with comparisons for three rotor conditions: a baseline condition and two Higher Harmonic Control (HHC) conditions. To establish a link between model and full-scale rotor predictions, a full-scale BO-105 main rotor input deck for NAPS is created from the 40% scale rotor input deck. The full-scale isolated rotor predictions are then compared to the model predictions. The comparisons include aerodynamic loading, acoustic levels, and acoustic pressure time histories for each of the three conditions. With this link established, full-scale predictions are made for a range of descent flight conditions and compared with measured trends from the recent Rotorcraft Operational Noise Abatement Procedures (RONAP) flight test conducted by DLR and ONERA. Additionally, the effectiveness of two HHC conditions from the HART-II program is demonstrated for the full-scale rotor in flight.

  15. Linked Hydrologic-Hydrodynamic Model Framework to Forecast Impacts of Rivers on Beach Water Quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, E. J.; Fry, L. M.; Kramer, E.; Ritzenthaler, A.

    2014-12-01

    The goal of NOAA's beach quality forecasting program is to use a multi-faceted approach to aid in detection and prediction of bacteria in recreational waters. In particular, our focus has been on the connection between tributary loads and bacteria concentrations at nearby beaches. While there is a clear link between stormwater runoff and beach water quality, quantifying the contribution of river loadings to nearshore bacterial concentrations is complicated due to multiple processes that drive bacterial concentrations in rivers as well as those processes affecting the fate and transport of bacteria upon exiting the rivers. In order to forecast potential impacts of rivers on beach water quality, we developed a linked hydrologic-hydrodynamic water quality framework that simulates accumulation and washoff of bacteria from the landscape, and then predicts the fate and transport of washed off bacteria from the watershed to the coastal zone. The framework includes a watershed model (IHACRES) to predict fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) loadings to the coastal environment (accumulation, wash-off, die-off) as a function of effective rainfall. These loadings are input into a coastal hydrodynamic model (FVCOM), including a bacteria transport model (Lagrangian particle), to simulate 3D bacteria transport within the coastal environment. This modeling system provides predictive tools to assist local managers in decision-making to reduce human health threats.

  16. Application of a linked stress release model in Corinth Gulf and Central Ionian Islands (Greece)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangira, Ourania; Vasiliadis, Georgios; Papadimitriou, Eleftheria

    2017-06-01

    Spatio-temporal stress changes and interactions between adjacent fault segments consist of the most important component in seismic hazard assessment, as they can alter the occurrence probability of strong earthquake onto these segments. The investigation of the interactions between adjacent areas by means of the linked stress release model is attempted for moderate earthquakes ( M ≥ 5.2) in the Corinth Gulf and the Central Ionian Islands (Greece). The study areas were divided in two subareas, based on seismotectonic criteria. The seismicity of each subarea is investigated by means of a stochastic point process and its behavior is determined by the conditional intensity function, which usually gets an exponential form. A conditional intensity function of Weibull form is used for identifying the most appropriate among the models (simple, independent and linked stress release model) for the interpretation of the earthquake generation process. The appropriateness of the models was decided after evaluation via the Akaike information criterion. Despite the fact that the curves of the conditional intensity functions exhibit similar behavior, the use of the exponential-type conditional intensity function seems to fit better the data.

  17. A linked simulation-optimization model for solving the unknown groundwater pollution source identification problems.

    PubMed

    Ayvaz, M Tamer

    2010-09-20

    This study proposes a linked simulation-optimization model for solving the unknown groundwater pollution source identification problems. In the proposed model, MODFLOW and MT3DMS packages are used to simulate the flow and transport processes in the groundwater system. These models are then integrated with an optimization model which is based on the heuristic harmony search (HS) algorithm. In the proposed simulation-optimization model, the locations and release histories of the pollution sources are treated as the explicit decision variables and determined through the optimization model. Also, an implicit solution procedure is proposed to determine the optimum number of pollution sources which is an advantage of this model. The performance of the proposed model is evaluated on two hypothetical examples for simple and complex aquifer geometries, measurement error conditions, and different HS solution parameter sets. Identified results indicated that the proposed simulation-optimization model is an effective way and may be used to solve the inverse pollution source identification problems.

  18. X-linked thrombocytopenia (XLT) due to WAS mutations: clinical characteristics, long-term outcome, and treatment options.

    PubMed

    Albert, Michael H; Bittner, Tanja C; Nonoyama, Shigeaki; Notarangelo, Lucia Dora; Burns, Siobhan; Imai, Kohsuke; Espanol, Teresa; Fasth, Anders; Pellier, Isabelle; Strauss, Gabriele; Morio, Tomohiro; Gathmann, Benjamin; Noordzij, Jeroen G; Fillat, Cristina; Hoenig, Manfred; Nathrath, Michaela; Meindl, Alfons; Pagel, Philipp; Wintergerst, Uwe; Fischer, Alain; Thrasher, Adrian J; Belohradsky, Bernd H; Ochs, Hans D

    2010-04-22

    A large proportion of patients with mutations in the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS) protein gene exhibit the milder phenotype termed X-linked thrombocytopenia (XLT). Whereas stem cell transplantation at an early age is the treatment of choice for patients with WAS, therapeutic options for patients with XLT are controversial. In a retrospective multicenter study we defined the clinical phenotype of XLT and determined the probability of severe disease-related complications in patients older than 2 years with documented WAS gene mutations and mild-to-moderate eczema or mild, infrequent infections. Enrolled were 173 patients (median age, 11.5 years) from 12 countries spanning 2830 patient-years. Serious bleeding episodes occurred in 13.9%, life-threatening infections in 6.9%, autoimmunity in 12.1%, and malignancy in 5.2% of patients. Overall and event-free survival probabilities were not significantly influenced by the type of mutation or intravenous immunoglobulin or antibiotic prophylaxis. Splenectomy resulted in increased risk of severe infections. This analysis of the clinical outcome and molecular basis of patients with XLT shows excellent long-term survival but also a high probability of severe disease-related complications. These observations will allow better decision making when considering treatment options for individual patients with XLT.

  19. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for serological diagnosis of Nocardia brasiliensis and clinical correlation with mycetoma infections.

    PubMed

    Salinas-Carmona, M C; Welsh, O; Casillas, S M

    1993-11-01

    We previously identified three immunodominant antigens obtained from a Nocardia brasiliensis cell extract and recognized by sera from mycetoma patients (M. C. Salinas-Carmona, L. Vera, O. Welsh, and M. Rodríguez, Zentralbl. Bakteriol. 276:390-397, 1992). In the present work, we obtained a crude extract from a mass culture of N. brasiliensis HUJEG-1 and purified two immunodominant antigens, the 26- and 24-kDa proteins, by using simple physiochemical techniques. With these antigens, we developed a conventional solid-phase enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and tested 30 serum samples from mycetoma patients, 29 from tuberculosis patients, 24 from a leprosy group, and 31 from healthy individuals. Our results show for the first time statistically significant differences in serology among these groups. All mycetoma patients with a positive culture for N. brasiliensis had absorbance values higher than 0.3. On the other hand, the mycobacterium-infected patients as well as the healthy individuals all had absorbance values below that level. Moreover, we found a close correlation between the clinical condition of the mycetoma patients and the anti-26- and anti-24-kDa protein antibody concentrations. We therefore propose the use of this assay in routine clinical laboratories to confirm the diagnosis of N. brasiliensis infection in human mycetoma cases. In addition, the possible application of this assay in the serodiagnosis of Nocardia asteroides infection is also discussed.

  20. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for serological diagnosis of Nocardia brasiliensis and clinical correlation with mycetoma infections.

    PubMed Central

    Salinas-Carmona, M C; Welsh, O; Casillas, S M

    1993-01-01

    We previously identified three immunodominant antigens obtained from a Nocardia brasiliensis cell extract and recognized by sera from mycetoma patients (M. C. Salinas-Carmona, L. Vera, O. Welsh, and M. Rodríguez, Zentralbl. Bakteriol. 276:390-397, 1992). In the present work, we obtained a crude extract from a mass culture of N. brasiliensis HUJEG-1 and purified two immunodominant antigens, the 26- and 24-kDa proteins, by using simple physiochemical techniques. With these antigens, we developed a conventional solid-phase enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and tested 30 serum samples from mycetoma patients, 29 from tuberculosis patients, 24 from a leprosy group, and 31 from healthy individuals. Our results show for the first time statistically significant differences in serology among these groups. All mycetoma patients with a positive culture for N. brasiliensis had absorbance values higher than 0.3. On the other hand, the mycobacterium-infected patients as well as the healthy individuals all had absorbance values below that level. Moreover, we found a close correlation between the clinical condition of the mycetoma patients and the anti-26- and anti-24-kDa protein antibody concentrations. We therefore propose the use of this assay in routine clinical laboratories to confirm the diagnosis of N. brasiliensis infection in human mycetoma cases. In addition, the possible application of this assay in the serodiagnosis of Nocardia asteroides infection is also discussed. Images PMID:8263174

  1. The Repeated Insertion Model for Rankings: Missing Link between Two Subset Choice Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doignon, Jean-Paul; Pekec, Aleksandar; Regenwetter, Michel

    2004-01-01

    Several probabilistic models for subset choice have been proposed in the literature, for example, to explain approval voting data. We show that Marley et al.'s latent scale model is subsumed by Falmagne and Regenwetter's size-independent model, in the sense that every choice probability distribution generated by the former can also be explained by…

  2. The Repeated Insertion Model for Rankings: Missing Link between Two Subset Choice Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doignon, Jean-Paul; Pekec, Aleksandar; Regenwetter, Michel

    2004-01-01

    Several probabilistic models for subset choice have been proposed in the literature, for example, to explain approval voting data. We show that Marley et al.'s latent scale model is subsumed by Falmagne and Regenwetter's size-independent model, in the sense that every choice probability distribution generated by the former can also be explained by…

  3. LINKING ETA MODEL WITH THE COMMUNITY MULTISCALE AIR QUALITY (CMAQ) MODELING SYSTEM: OZONE BOUNDARY CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A prototype surface ozone concentration forecasting model system for the Eastern U.S. has been developed. The model system is consisting of a regional meteorological and a regional air quality model. It demonstrated a strong prediction dependence on its ozone boundary conditions....

  4. LINKING ETA MODEL WITH THE COMMUNITY MULTISCALE AIR QUALITY (CMAQ) MODELING SYSTEM: OZONE BOUNDARY CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A prototype surface ozone concentration forecasting model system for the Eastern U.S. has been developed. The model system is consisting of a regional meteorological and a regional air quality model. It demonstrated a strong prediction dependence on its ozone boundary conditions....

  5. Integration of Evidence into a Detailed Clinical Model-based Electronic Nursing Record System

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyeoun-Ae; Jeon, Eunjoo; Chung, Eunja

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to test the feasibility of an electronic nursing record system for perinatal care that is based on detailed clinical models and clinical practice guidelines in perinatal care. Methods This study was carried out in five phases: 1) generating nursing statements using detailed clinical models; 2) identifying the relevant evidence; 3) linking nursing statements with the evidence; 4) developing a prototype electronic nursing record system based on detailed clinical models and clinical practice guidelines; and 5) evaluating the prototype system. Results We first generated 799 nursing statements describing nursing assessments, diagnoses, interventions, and outcomes using entities, attributes, and value sets of detailed clinical models for perinatal care which we developed in a previous study. We then extracted 506 recommendations from nine clinical practice guidelines and created sets of nursing statements to be used for nursing documentation by grouping nursing statements according to these recommendations. Finally, we developed and evaluated a prototype electronic nursing record system that can provide nurses with recommendations for nursing practice and sets of nursing statements based on the recommendations for guiding nursing documentation. Conclusions The prototype system was found to be sufficiently complete, relevant, useful, and applicable in terms of content, and easy to use and useful in terms of system user interface. This study has revealed the feasibility of developing such an ENR system. PMID:22844649

  6. Integration of Evidence into a Detailed Clinical Model-based Electronic Nursing Record System.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyeoun-Ae; Min, Yul Ha; Jeon, Eunjoo; Chung, Eunja

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the feasibility of an electronic nursing record system for perinatal care that is based on detailed clinical models and clinical practice guidelines in perinatal care. THIS STUDY WAS CARRIED OUT IN FIVE PHASES: 1) generating nursing statements using detailed clinical models; 2) identifying the relevant evidence; 3) linking nursing statements with the evidence; 4) developing a prototype electronic nursing record system based on detailed clinical models and clinical practice guidelines; and 5) evaluating the prototype system. We first generated 799 nursing statements describing nursing assessments, diagnoses, interventions, and outcomes using entities, attributes, and value sets of detailed clinical models for perinatal care which we developed in a previous study. We then extracted 506 recommendations from nine clinical practice guidelines and created sets of nursing statements to be used for nursing documentation by grouping nursing statements according to these recommendations. Finally, we developed and evaluated a prototype electronic nursing record system that can provide nurses with recommendations for nursing practice and sets of nursing statements based on the recommendations for guiding nursing documentation. The prototype system was found to be sufficiently complete, relevant, useful, and applicable in terms of content, and easy to use and useful in terms of system user interface. This study has revealed the feasibility of developing such an ENR system.

  7. Juvenile retinoschisis: a model for molecular diagnostic testing of X-linked ophthalmic disease.

    PubMed Central

    Sieving, P A; Yashar, B M; Ayyagari, R

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: X-linked juvenile retinoschisis (RS) provides a starting point to define clinical paradigms and understand the limitations of diagnostic molecular testing. The RS phenotype is specific, but the broad severity range is clinically confusing. Molecular diagnostic testing obviates unnecessary examinations for boys at-risk and identifies carrier females who otherwise show no clinical signs. METHODS: The XLRS1 gene has 6 exons of 26-196 base-pair size. Each exon is amplified by a single polymerase chain reaction and then sequenced, starting with exons 4 through 6, which contain mutation "hot spots." RESULTS: The 6 XLRS1 exons are sequenced serially. If alterations are found, they are compared with mutations in our > 120 XLRS families and with the > 300 mutations reported worldwide. Point mutations, small deletions, or rearrangements are identified in nearly 90% of males with a clinical diagnosis of RS. XLRS1 has very few sequence polymorphisms. Carrier-state testing produces 1 of 3 results: (1) positive, in which the woman has the same mutation as an affected male relative or known in other RS families; (2) negative, in which she lacks the mutation of her affected male relative; and (3) uninformative, in which no known mutation is identified or no information exists about the familial mutation. CONCLUSIONS: Molecular RS screening is an effective diagnostic tool that complements the clinician's skills for early detection of at-risk males. Useful outcomes of carrier testing depend on several factors: (1) a male relative with a clear clinical diagnosis; (2) a well-defined inheritance pattern; (3) high disease penetrance; (4) size and organization of the gene; and (5) the types of disease-associated mutations. Ethical questions include molecular diagnostic testing of young at-risk females before the age of consent, the impact of this information on the emotional health of the patient and family, and issues of employability and insurance coverage

  8. Juvenile retinoschisis: a model for molecular diagnostic testing of X-linked ophthalmic disease.

    PubMed

    Sieving, P A; Yashar, B M; Ayyagari, R

    1999-01-01

    X-linked juvenile retinoschisis (RS) provides a starting point to define clinical paradigms and understand the limitations of diagnostic molecular testing. The RS phenotype is specific, but the broad severity range is clinically confusing. Molecular diagnostic testing obviates unnecessary examinations for boys at-risk and identifies carrier females who otherwise show no clinical signs. The XLRS1 gene has 6 exons of 26-196 base-pair size. Each exon is amplified by a single polymerase chain reaction and then sequenced, starting with exons 4 through 6, which contain mutation "hot spots." The 6 XLRS1 exons are sequenced serially. If alterations are found, they are compared with mutations in our > 120 XLRS families and with the > 300 mutations reported worldwide. Point mutations, small deletions, or rearrangements are identified in nearly 90% of males with a clinical diagnosis of RS. XLRS1 has very few sequence polymorphisms. Carrier-state testing produces 1 of 3 results: (1) positive, in which the woman has the same mutation as an affected male relative or known in other RS families; (2) negative, in which she lacks the mutation of her affected male relative; and (3) uninformative, in which no known mutation is identified or no information exists about the familial mutation. Molecular RS screening is an effective diagnostic tool that complements the clinician's skills for early detection of at-risk males. Useful outcomes of carrier testing depend on several factors: (1) a male relative with a clear clinical diagnosis; (2) a well-defined inheritance pattern; (3) high disease penetrance; (4) size and organization of the gene; and (5) the types of disease-associated mutations. Ethical questions include molecular diagnostic testing of young at-risk females before the age of consent, the impact of this information on the emotional health of the patient and family, and issues of employability and insurance coverage.

  9. The Intersection Between Clinical Excellence and Role Modeling in Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Kravet, Steven J.; Christmas, Colleen; Durso, Samuel; Parson, Gregory; Burkhart, Kathleen; Wright, Scott

    2011-01-01

    Background Role modeling is an integral component of medical education. The literature suggests that being a clinically excellent academic physician and serving as a role model for trainees are integrally related. Purpose To explore the relationship between being considered clinically excellent and being considered an effective role model. Methods Two independent surveys were administered to clinically active faculty (asked to name clinically excellent colleagues) and internal medicine residents (asked to name faculty role models). We compared frequency counts of clinically excellent faculty mentioned and frequency counts of role models mentioned by respondents. Spearman correlations and odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals were used to assess the relationship between the responses. Results A total of 39 of 66 faculty (59%) and 45 of 50 residents (90%) responded. There were 31 faculty members judged to be clinically excellent and 67 faculty identified as role models. Thirty faculty members appeared on both lists. There was a moderately high correlation between these groups (Spearman correlation coefficient  =  0.54, P < .001). Faculty members who were among those named as clinically excellent by their peers were more likely to be named 3 or more times as a role model by trainees (odds ratio, 24.6; confidence interval, 2.9–207). Conclusions This study tested and confirmed the correlation between clinical excellence and role modeling, illustrating the value of these faculty members at teaching hospitals. PMID:23205192

  10. An open source web interface for linking models to infrastructure system databases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knox, S.; Mohamed, K.; Harou, J. J.; Rheinheimer, D. E.; Medellin-Azuara, J.; Meier, P.; Tilmant, A.; Rosenberg, D. E.

    2016-12-01

    Models of networked engineered resource systems such as water or energy systems are often built collaboratively with developers from different domains working at different locations. These models can be linked to large scale real world databases, and they are constantly being improved and extended. As the development and application of these models becomes more sophisticated, and the computing power required for simulations and/or optimisations increases, so has the need for online services and tools which enable the efficient development and deployment of these models. Hydra Platform is an open source, web-based data management system, which allows modellers of network-based models to remotely store network topology and associated data in a generalised manner, allowing it to serve multiple disciplines. Hydra Platform uses a web API using JSON to allow external programs (referred to as `Apps') to interact with its stored networks and perform actions such as importing data, running models, or exporting the networks to different formats. Hydra Platform supports multiple users accessing the same network and has a suite of functions for managing users and data. We present ongoing development in Hydra Platform, the Hydra Web User Interface, through which users can collaboratively manage network data and models in a web browser. The web interface allows multiple users to graphically access, edit and share their networks, run apps and view results. Through apps, which are located on the server, the web interface can give users access to external data sources and models without the need to install or configure any software. This also ensures model results can be reproduced by removing platform or version dependence. Managing data and deploying models via the web interface provides a way for multiple modellers to collaboratively manage data, deploy and monitor model runs and analyse results.

  11. Investigation of the feasibility of linking a sediment transport model with a nearshore circulation model

    SciTech Connect

    Paddock, R.A.; Ditmars, J.D.

    1981-08-01

    A sediment transport model was integrated with the nearshore circulation model of Birkemeier and Dalrymple (University of Delaware) to identify those regions where sediment erosion and accretion are likely. A related report describes the application of the original circulation model to a stretch of Lake Michigan coastline and compares that model's predictions with field measurements of nearshore waves and currents made during storm conditions. The modified circulation model (with sediment transport) exhibited strong interaction among the wave field, the current field, and the bathymetry when applied to the Lake Michigan beach using the field data. As a result, large amounts of computer time were required to carry out the model calculations, and it was impractical to simulate more than a few minutes of real time. Therefore, the model in its present form does not appear suitable for the long-term prediction of sediment transport and resultant modifications to nearshore bathymetry. 7 refs., 11 figs.

  12. Application of cross-linked and hydrolyzed arabinoxylans in baking of model rye bread.

    PubMed

    Buksa, Krzysztof; Nowotna, Anna; Ziobro, Rafał

    2016-02-01

    The role of water extractable arabinoxylan with varying molar mass and structure (cross-linked vs. hydrolyzed) in the structure formation of rye bread was examined using a model bread. Instead of the normal flour, the dough contained starch, arabinoxylan and protein, which were isolated from rye wholemeal. It was observed that the applied mixes of these constituents result in a product closely resembling typical rye bread, even if arabinoxylan was modified (by cross-linking or hydrolysis). The levels of arabinoxylan required for bread preparation depended on its modification and mix composition. At 3% protein, the maximum applicable level of poorly soluble cross-linked arabinoxylan was 3%, as higher amounts of this preparation resulted in an extensively viscous dough and diminished bread volume. On the other hand highly soluble, hydrolyzed arabinoxylan could be used at a higher level (6%) together with larger amounts of rye protein (3% or 6%). Further addition of arabinoxylan leads to excessive water absorption, resulting in a decreased viscosity of the dough during baking and insufficient gas retention. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. An atomistic model for cross-linked HNBR elastomers used in seals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molinari, Nicola; Sutton, Adrian; Stevens, John; Mostofi, Arash

    2015-03-01

    Hydrogenated nitrile butadiene rubber (HNBR) is one of the most common elastomeric materials used for seals in the oil and gas industry. These seals sometimes suffer ``explosive decompression,'' a costly problem in which gases permeate a seal at the elevated temperatures and pressures pertaining in oil and gas wells, leading to rupture when the seal is brought back to the surface. The experimental evidence that HNBR and its unsaturated parent NBR have markedly different swelling properties suggests that cross-linking may occur during hydrogenation of NBR to produce HNBR. We have developed a code compatible with the LAMMPS molecular dynamics package to generate fully atomistic HNBR configurations by hydrogenating initial NBR structures. This can be done with any desired degree of cross-linking. The code uses a model of atomic interactions based on the OPLS-AA force-field. We present calculations of the dependence of a number of bulk properties on the degree of cross-linking. Using our atomistic representations of HNBR and NBR, we hope to develop a better molecular understanding of the mechanisms that result in explosive decompression.

  14. Synthesis, cholinesterase inhibition and molecular modelling studies of coumarin linked thiourea derivatives.

    PubMed

    Saeed, Aamer; Zaib, Sumera; Ashraf, Saba; Iftikhar, Javeria; Muddassar, Muhammad; Zhang, Kam Y J; Iqbal, Jamshed

    2015-12-01

    Alzheimer's disease is among the most widespread neurodegenerative disorder. Cholinesterases (ChEs) play an indispensable role in the control of cholinergic transmission and thus the acetylcholine level in the brain is enhanced by inhibition of ChEs. Coumarin linked thiourea derivatives were designed, synthesized and evaluated biologically in order to determine their inhibitory activity against acetylcholinesterases (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterases (BChE). The synthesized derivatives of coumarin linked thiourea compounds showed potential inhibitory activity against AChE and BChE. Among all the synthesized compounds, 1-(2-Oxo-2H-chromene-3-carbonyl)-3-(3-chlorophenyl)thiourea (2e) was the most potent inhibitor against AChE with an IC50 value of 0.04±0.01μM, while 1-(2-Oxo-2H-chromene-3-carbonyl)-3-(2-methoxyphenyl)thiourea (2b) showed the most potent inhibitory activity with an IC50 value of 0.06±0.02μM against BChE. Molecular docking simulations were performed using the homology models of both cholinesterases in order to explore the probable binding modes of inhibitors. Results showed that the novel synthesized coumarin linked thiourea derivatives are potential candidates to develop for potent and efficacious acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) inhibitors.

  15. Introduction to the Special Section: Linking the MMPI-2-RF to Contemporary Models of Psychopathology.

    PubMed

    Sellbom, Martin; Arbisi, Paul A

    2017-01-01

    This special section considers 9 independent articles that seek to link the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2-Restructured Form (MMPI-2-RF; Ben-Porath & Tellegen, 2008/ 2011 ) to contemporary models of psychopathology. Sellbom ( this issue ) maps the Specific Problems scales onto hierarchical psychopathology structures, whereas Romero, Toorabally, Burchett, Tarescavage, and Glassmire ( this issue ) and Shkalim, Almagor, and Ben-Porath ( this issue ) show evidence of linking the instruments' scales to diagnostic representations of common higher order psychopathology constructs. McCord, Achee, Cannon, Harrop, and Poynter ( this issue ) link the MMPI-2-RF scales to psychophysiological constructs inspired by the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) Research Domain Criteria. Sellbom and Smith ( this issue ) find support for MMPI-2-RF scale hypotheses in covering personality psychopathology in general, whereas Klein Haneveld, Kamphuis, Smid, and Forbey ( this issue ) and Kutchen et al. ( this issue ) demonstrate the utility of the MMPI-2-RF in capturing contemporary conceptualizations of the psychopathic personality. Finally, Franz, Harrop, and McCord ( this issue ) and Rogers et al. ( this issue ) mapped the MMPI-2-RF scales onto more specific transdiagnostic constructs reflecting interpersonal functioning and suicide behavior proneness, respectively.

  16. Neoproterozoic paleogeography of the Tarim Block: An extended or alternative "missing-link" model for Rodinia?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Bin; Evans, David A. D.; Li, Yong-Xiang

    2017-01-01

    Recent reconstructions of the Rodinia supercontinent and its breakup incorporate South China as a ;missing link; between Australia and Laurentia, and place the Tarim craton adjacent to northwestern Australia on the supercontinent's periphery. However, subsequent kinematic evolution toward Gondwana amalgamation requires complex geometric shuffling between South China and Tarim, which cannot be easily resolved with the stratigraphic records of those blocks. Here we present new paleomagnetic data from early Ediacaran strata of northwest Tarim, and document large-scale rotation at near-constant paleolatitudes during Cryogenian time. The rotation is coeval with Rodinia breakup, and Tarim's paleolatitudes are compatible with its placement between Australia and Laurentia, either by itself as an alternative ;missing link; or joined with South China in that role. At the same time, indications of subduction-related magmatism in Tarim's Neoproterozoic record suggest that Rodinia breakup was dynamically linked to subduction retreat along its northern margin. Such a model is akin to early stages of Jurassic fragmentation within southern Gondwana, and implies more complicated subduction-related dynamics of supercontinent breakup than superplume impingement alone.

  17. Effects of Linked Selective Sweeps on Demographic Inference and Model Selection.

    PubMed

    Schrider, Daniel R; Shanku, Alexander G; Kern, Andrew D

    2016-11-01

    The availability of large-scale population genomic sequence data has resulted in an explosion in efforts to infer the demographic histories of natural populations across a broad range of organisms. As demographic events alter coalescent genealogies, they leave detectable signatures in patterns of genetic variation within and between populations. Accordingly, a variety of approaches have been designed to leverage population genetic data to uncover the footprints of demographic change in the genome. The vast majority of these methods make the simplifying assumption that the measures of genetic variation used as their input are unaffected by natural selection. However, natural selection can dramatically skew patterns of variation not only at selected sites, but at linked, neutral loci as well. Here we assess the impact of recent positive selection on demographic inference by characterizing the performance of three popular methods through extensive simulation of data sets with varying numbers of linked selective sweeps. In particular, we examined three different demographic models relevant to a number of species, finding that positive selection can bias parameter estimates of each of these models-often severely. We find that selection can lead to incorrect inferences of population size changes when none have occurred. Moreover, we show that linked selection can lead to incorrect demographic model selection, when multiple demographic scenarios are compared. We argue that natural populations may experience the amount of recent positive selection required to skew inferences. These results suggest that demographic studies conducted in many species to date may have exaggerated the extent and frequency of population size changes. Copyright © 2016 by the Genetics Society of America.

  18. Identification of Multiple QTLs Linked to Neuropathology in the Engrailed-1 Heterozygous Mouse Model of Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kurowska, Zuzanna; Jewett, Michael; Brattås, Per Ludvik; Jimenez-Ferrer, Itzia; Kenéz, Xuyian; Björklund, Tomas; Nordström, Ulrika; Brundin, Patrik; Swanberg, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Motor symptoms in Parkinson’s disease are attributed to degeneration of midbrain dopaminergic neurons (DNs). Heterozygosity for Engrailed-1 (En1), one of the key factors for programming and maintenance of DNs, results in a parkinsonian phenotype featuring progressive degeneration of DNs in substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc), decreased striatal dopamine levels and swellings of nigro-striatal axons in the SwissOF1-En1+/− mouse strain. In contrast, C57Bl/6-En1+/− mice do not display this neurodegenerative phenotype, suggesting that susceptibility to En1 heterozygosity is genetically regulated. Our goal was to identify quantitative trait loci (QTLs) that regulate the susceptibility to PD-like neurodegenerative changes in response to loss of one En1 allele. We intercrossed SwissOF1-En1+/− and C57Bl/6 mice to obtain F2 mice with mixed genomes and analyzed number of DNs in SNpc and striatal axonal swellings in 120 F2-En1+/− 17 week-old male mice. Linkage analyses revealed 8 QTLs linked to number of DNs (p = 2.4e-09, variance explained = 74%), 7 QTLs linked to load of axonal swellings (p = 1.7e-12, variance explained = 80%) and 8 QTLs linked to size of axonal swellings (p = 7.0e-11, variance explained = 74%). These loci should be of prime interest for studies of susceptibility to Parkinson’s disease-like damage in rodent disease models and considered in clinical association studies in PD. PMID:27550741

  19. Identification of Multiple QTLs Linked to Neuropathology in the Engrailed-1 Heterozygous Mouse Model of Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Kurowska, Zuzanna; Jewett, Michael; Brattås, Per Ludvik; Jimenez-Ferrer, Itzia; Kenéz, Xuyian; Björklund, Tomas; Nordström, Ulrika; Brundin, Patrik; Swanberg, Maria

    2016-08-23

    Motor symptoms in Parkinson's disease are attributed to degeneration of midbrain dopaminergic neurons (DNs). Heterozygosity for Engrailed-1 (En1), one of the key factors for programming and maintenance of DNs, results in a parkinsonian phenotype featuring progressive degeneration of DNs in substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc), decreased striatal dopamine levels and swellings of nigro-striatal axons in the SwissOF1-En1+/- mouse strain. In contrast, C57Bl/6-En1+/- mice do not display this neurodegenerative phenotype, suggesting that susceptibility to En1 heterozygosity is genetically regulated. Our goal was to identify quantitative trait loci (QTLs) that regulate the susceptibility to PD-like neurodegenerative changes in response to loss of one En1 allele. We intercrossed SwissOF1-En1+/- and C57Bl/6 mice to obtain F2 mice with mixed genomes and analyzed number of DNs in SNpc and striatal axonal swellings in 120 F2-En1+/- 17 week-old male mice. Linkage analyses revealed 8 QTLs linked to number of DNs (p = 2.4e-09, variance explained = 74%), 7 QTLs linked to load of axonal swellings (p = 1.7e-12, variance explained = 80%) and 8 QTLs linked to size of axonal swellings (p = 7.0e-11, variance explained = 74%). These loci should be of prime interest for studies of susceptibility to Parkinson's disease-like damage in rodent disease models and considered in clinical association studies in PD.

  20. LERC-SLAM - THE NASA LEWIS RESEARCH CENTER SATELLITE LINK ATTENUATION MODEL PROGRAM (IBM PC VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manning, R. M.

    1994-01-01

    The frequency and intensity of rain attenuation affecting the communication between a satellite and an earth terminal is an important consideration in planning satellite links. The NASA Lewis Research Center Satellite Link Attenuation Model Program (LeRC-SLAM) provides a static and dynamic statistical assessment of the impact of rain attenuation on a communications link established between an earth terminal and a geosynchronous satellite. The program is designed for use in the specification, design and assessment of satellite links for any terminal location in the continental United States. The basis for LeRC-SLAM is the ACTS Rain Attenuation Prediction Model, which uses a log-normal cumulative probability distribution to describe the random process of rain attenuation on satellite links. The derivation of the statistics for the rainrate process at the specified terminal location relies on long term rainfall records compiled by the U.S. Weather Service during time periods of up to 55 years in length. The theory of extreme value statistics is also utilized. The user provides 1) the longitudinal position of the satellite in geosynchronous orbit, 2) the geographical position of the earth terminal in terms of latitude and longitude, 3) the height above sea level of the terminal site, 4) the yearly average rainfall at the terminal site, and 5) the operating frequency of the communications link (within 1 to 1000 GHz, inclusive). Based on the yearly average rainfall at the terminal location, LeRC-SLAM calculates the relevant rain statistics for the site using an internal data base. The program then generates rain attenuation data for the satellite link. This data includes a description of the static (i.e., yearly) attenuation process, an evaluation of the cumulative probability distribution for attenuation effects, and an evaluation of the probability of fades below selected fade depths. In addition, LeRC-SLAM calculates the elevation and azimuth angles of the terminal

  1. LERC-SLAM - THE NASA LEWIS RESEARCH CENTER SATELLITE LINK ATTENUATION MODEL PROGRAM (MACINTOSH VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manning, R. M.

    1994-01-01

    The frequency and intensity of rain attenuation affecting the communication between a satellite and an earth terminal is an important consideration in planning satellite links. The NASA Lewis Research Center Satellite Link Attenuation Model Program (LeRC-SLAM) provides a static and dynamic statistical assessment of the impact of rain attenuation on a communications link established between an earth terminal and a geosynchronous satellite. The program is designed for use in the specification, design and assessment of satellite links for any terminal location in the continental United States. The basis for LeRC-SLAM is the ACTS Rain Attenuation Prediction Model, which uses a log-normal cumulative probability distribution to describe the random process of rain attenuation on satellite links. The derivation of the statistics for the rainrate process at the specified terminal location relies on long term rainfall records compiled by the U.S. Weather Service during time periods of up to 55 years in length. The theory of extreme value statistics is also utilized. The user provides 1) the longitudinal position of the satellite in geosynchronous orbit, 2) the geographical position of the earth terminal in terms of latitude and longitude, 3) the height above sea level of the terminal site, 4) the yearly average rainfall at the terminal site, and 5) the operating frequency of the communications link (within 1 to 1000 GHz, inclusive). Based on the yearly average rainfall at the terminal location, LeRC-SLAM calculates the relevant rain statistics for the site using an internal data base. The program then generates rain attenuation data for the satellite link. This data includes a description of the static (i.e., yearly) attenuation process, an evaluation of the cumulative probability distribution for attenuation effects, and an evaluation of the probability of fades below selected fade depths. In addition, LeRC-SLAM calculates the elevation and azimuth angles of the terminal

  2. LERC-SLAM - THE NASA LEWIS RESEARCH CENTER SATELLITE LINK ATTENUATION MODEL PROGRAM (IBM PC VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manning, R. M.

    1994-01-01

    The frequency and intensity of rain attenuation affecting the communication between a satellite and an earth terminal is an important consideration in planning satellite links. The NASA Lewis Research Center Satellite Link Attenuation Model Program (LeRC-SLAM) provides a static and dynamic statistical assessment of the impact of rain attenuation on a communications link established between an earth terminal and a geosynchronous satellite. The program is designed for use in the specification, design and assessment of satellite links for any terminal location in the continental United States. The basis for LeRC-SLAM is the ACTS Rain Attenuation Prediction Model, which uses a log-normal cumulative probability distribution to describe the random process of rain attenuation on satellite links. The derivation of the statistics for the rainrate process at the specified terminal location relies on long term rainfall records compiled by the U.S. Weather Service during time periods of up to 55 years in length. The theory of extreme value statistics is also utilized. The user provides 1) the longitudinal position of the satellite in geosynchronous orbit, 2) the geographical position of the earth terminal in terms of latitude and longitude, 3) the height above sea level of the terminal site, 4) the yearly average rainfall at the terminal site, and 5) the operating frequency of the communications link (within 1 to 1000 GHz, inclusive). Based on the yearly average rainfall at the terminal location, LeRC-SLAM calculates the relevant rain statistics for the site using an internal data base. The program then generates rain attenuation data for the satellite link. This data includes a description of the static (i.e., yearly) attenuation process, an evaluation of the cumulative probability distribution for attenuation effects, and an evaluation of the probability of fades below selected fade depths. In addition, LeRC-SLAM calculates the elevation and azimuth angles of the terminal

  3. LERC-SLAM - THE NASA LEWIS RESEARCH CENTER SATELLITE LINK ATTENUATION MODEL PROGRAM (MACINTOSH VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manning, R. M.

    1994-01-01

    The frequency and intensity of rain attenuation affecting the communication between a satellite and an earth terminal is an important consideration in planning satellite links. The NASA Lewis Research Center Satellite Link Attenuation Model Program (LeRC-SLAM) provides a static and dynamic statistical assessment of the impact of rain attenuation on a communications link established between an earth terminal and a geosynchronous satellite. The program is designed for use in the specification, design and assessment of satellite links for any terminal location in the continental United States. The basis for LeRC-SLAM is the ACTS Rain Attenuation Prediction Model, which uses a log-normal cumulative probability distribution to describe the random process of rain attenuation on satellite links. The derivation of the statistics for the rainrate process at the specified terminal location relies on long term rainfall records compiled by the U.S. Weather Service during time periods of up to 55 years in length. The theory of extreme value statistics is also utilized. The user provides 1) the longitudinal position of the satellite in geosynchronous orbit, 2) the geographical position of the earth terminal in terms of latitude and longitude, 3) the height above sea level of the terminal site, 4) the yearly average rainfall at the terminal site, and 5) the operating frequency of the communications link (within 1 to 1000 GHz, inclusive). Based on the yearly average rainfall at the terminal location, LeRC-SLAM calculates the relevant rain statistics for the site using an internal data base. The program then generates rain attenuation data for the satellite link. This data includes a description of the static (i.e., yearly) attenuation process, an evaluation of the cumulative probability distribution for attenuation effects, and an evaluation of the probability of fades below selected fade depths. In addition, LeRC-SLAM calculates the elevation and azimuth angles of the terminal

  4. Link between hopping models and percolation scaling laws for charge transport in mixtures of small molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Ha, Dong -Gwang; Kim, Jang -Joo; Baldo, Marc A.

    2016-04-29

    Mixed host compositions that combine charge transport materials with luminescent dyes offer superior control over exciton formation and charge transport in organic light emitting devices (OLEDs). Two approaches are typically used to optimize the fraction of charge transport materials in a mixed host composition: either an empirical percolative model, or a hopping transport model. We show that these two commonly-employed models are linked by an analytic expression which relates the localization length to the percolation threshold and critical exponent. The relation is confirmed both numerically and experimentally through measurements of the relative conductivity of Tris(4-carbazoyl-9-ylphenyl) amine (TCTA) :1,3-bis(3,5-dipyrid-3-yl-phenyl) benzene (BmPyPb) mixtures with different concentrations, where the TCTA plays a role as hole conductor and the BmPyPb as hole insulator. Furthermore, the analytic relation may allow the rational design of mixed layers of small molecules for high-performance OLEDs.

  5. Exploring the link between emotional and behavioral dysregulation: a test of the emotional cascade model.

    PubMed

    Tuna, Ezgi; Bozo, Özlem

    2014-01-01

    The emotional cascade model (Selby, Anestis, & Joiner, 2008) posits that the link between emotional and behavioral dysregulation may be through emotional cascades, which are repetitive cycles of rumination and negative affect that result in an intensification of emotional distress. Dysregulated behaviors, such as non-suicidal self-injury, are used to reduce aversive emotions and distract the person from ruminative processes. The aim of the present study was to investigate the emotional cascade model in a non-Western sample of Turkish university students. Accordingly, a structural equation model was tested, and the results demonstrated that the emotional cascades were indeed associated to dysregulated behaviors, even when the effect of current symptoms of depression and anxiety on behavioral dysregulation was statistically controlled. Furthermore, thought suppression had a stronger relationship with all symptom patterns as compared to rumination, which may point to a cultural difference. Possible implications of the findings are discussed.

  6. Excitonic Coupling and Femtosecond Relaxation of Zinc Porphyrin Oligomers Linked with Triazole Bridge: Dynamics and Modeling.

    PubMed

    Bukreev, Alexey; Mikhailov, Konstantin; Shelaev, Ivan; Gostev, Fedor; Polevaya, Yuliya; Tyurin, Vladimir; Beletskaya, Irina; Umansky, Stanislav; Nadtochenko, Victor

    2016-03-31

    The synthesis of new zinc porphyrin oligomers linked by a triazole bridge was carried out via "click" reaction. A split in the porphyrin oligomer B-band was observed. It was considered as evidence of exciton-excitonic coupling. The relaxation of excited states in Q-band porphyrin oligomers was studied by the femtosecond laser spectroscopy technique with a 20 fs pump pulse. The transient oscillations of two B-band excitonic peaks have a π-radian shift. For explanation of the coherent oscillation, a theoretical model was developed. The model considered the combination of the exciton-excitonic coupling between porphyrin rings in dimer and weak exciton-vibronic coupling in one porphyrin ring. By varying the values of the structural parameters of porphyrins (the strength values of this couplings and measure of symmetry breaking), we obtained correspondence between the experimental data (phase shift and amplitudes of the spectrum oscillations) and the predictions of the model developed here.

  7. Random blebbing motion: A simple model linking cell structural properties to migration characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woolley, Thomas E.; Gaffney, Eamonn A.; Goriely, Alain

    2017-07-01

    If the plasma membrane of a cell is able to delaminate locally from its actin cortex, a cellular bleb can be produced. Blebs are pressure-driven protrusions, which are noteworthy for their ability to produce cellular motion. Starting from a general continuum mechanics description, we restrict ourselves to considering cell and bleb shapes that maintain approximately spherical forms. From this assumption, we obtain a tractable algebraic system for bleb formation. By including cell-substrate adhesions, we can model blebbing cell motility. Further, by considering mechanically isolated blebbing events, which are randomly distributed over the cell, we can derive equations linking the macroscopic migration characteristics to the microscopic structural parameters of the cell. This multiscale modeling framework is then used to provide parameter estimates, which are in agreement with current experimental data. In summary, the construction of the mathematical model provides testable relationships between the bleb size and cell motility.

  8. Link between hopping models and percolation scaling laws for charge transport in mixtures of small molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Ha, Dong-Gwang; Kim, Jang-Joo; Baldo, Marc A.

    2016-04-01

    Mixed host compositions that combine charge transport materials with luminescent dyes offer superior control over exciton formation and charge transport in organic light emitting devices (OLEDs). Two approaches are typically used to optimize the fraction of charge transport materials in a mixed host composition: either an empirical percolative model, or a hopping transport model. We show that these two commonly-employed models are linked by an analytic expression which relates the localization length to the percolation threshold and critical exponent. The relation is confirmed both numerically and experimentally through measurements of the relative conductivity of Tris(4-carbazoyl-9-ylphenyl)amine (TCTA) :1,3-bis(3,5-dipyrid-3-yl-phenyl)benzene (BmPyPb) mixtures with different concentrations, where the TCTA plays a role as hole conductor and the BmPyPb as hole insulator. The analytic relation may allow the rational design of mixed layers of small molecules for high-performance OLEDs.

  9. Bayesian analysis of an admixture model with mutations and arbitrarily linked markers.

    PubMed

    Excoffier, Laurent; Estoup, Arnaud; Cornuet, Jean-Marie

    2005-03-01

    We introduce here a Bayesian analysis of a classical admixture model in which all parameters are simultaneously estimated. Our approach follows the approximate Bayesian computation (ABC) framework, relying on massive simulations and a rejection-regression algorithm. Although computationally intensive, this approach can easily deal with complex mutation models and partially linked loci, and it can be thoroughly validated without much additional computation cost. Compared to a recent maximum-likelihood (ML) method, the ABC approach leads to similarly accurate estimates of admixture proportions in the case of recent admixture events, but it is found superior when the admixture is more ancient. All other parameters of the admixture model such as the divergence time between parental populations, the admixture time, and the population sizes are also well estimated, unlike the ML method. The use of partially linked markers does not introduce any particular bias in the estimation of admixture, but ML confidence intervals are found too narrow if linkage is not specifically accounted for. The application of our method to an artificially admixed domestic bee population from northwest Italy suggests that the admixture occurred in the last 10-40 generations and that the parental Apis mellifera and A. ligustica populations were completely separated since the last glacial maximum.

  10. Ensuring congruency in multiscale modeling: towards linking agent based and continuum biomechanical models of arterial adaptation.

    PubMed

    Hayenga, Heather N; Thorne, Bryan C; Peirce, Shayn M; Humphrey, Jay D

    2011-11-01

    There is a need to develop multiscale models of vascular adaptations to understand tissue-level manifestations of cellular level mechanisms. Continuum-based biomechanical models are well suited for relating blood pressures and flows to stress-mediated changes in geometry and properties, but less so for describing underlying mechanobiological processes. Discrete stochastic agent-based models are well suited for representing biological processes at a cellular level, but not for describing tissue-level mechanical changes. We present here a conceptually new approach to facilitate the coupling of continuum and agent-based models. Because of ubiquitous limitations in both the tissue- and cell-level data from which one derives constitutive relations for continuum models and rule-sets for agent-based models, we suggest that model verification should enforce congruency across scales. That is, multiscale model parameters initially determined from data sets representing different scales should be refined, when possible, to ensure that common outputs are consistent. Potential advantages of this approach are illustrated by comparing simulated aortic responses to a sustained increase in blood pressure predicted by continuum and agent-based models both before and after instituting a genetic algorithm to refine 16 objectively bounded model parameters. We show that congruency-based parameter refinement not only yielded increased consistency across scales, it also yielded predictions that are closer to in vivo observations.

  11. Clinical Utility of an Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay for Detecting Anti-Melanoma Differentiation-Associated Gene 5 Autoantibodies

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Shinji; Murakami, Akihiro; Kuwajima, Akiko; Takehara, Kazuhiko; Mimori, Tsuneyo; Kawakami, Atsushi; Mishima, Michiaki; Suda, Takafumi; Seishima, Mariko; Fujimoto, Manabu; Kuwana, Masataka

    2016-01-01

    Objective Autoantibodies to melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5 (MDA5) are specifically expressed in patients with dermatomyositis (DM) and are associated with a subset of DM patients with rapidly progressive interstitial lung disease (RP-ILD). Here, we examined the clinical utility of a newly developed enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) system for detecting these antibodies. Methods Here we developed an improved ELISA for detecting anti-MDA5 antibodies. We then performed a multicenter clinical study involving 8 medical centers and enrolled 242 adult patients with polymyositis (PM)/DM, 190 with non-PM/DM connective tissue disease (CTD), 154 with idiopathic interstitial pneumonia (IIP), and 123 healthy controls. Anti-MDA5 antibodies in the patients’ serum samples were quantified using our newly developed ELISA, and the results were compared to those obtained using the gold-standard immunoprecipitation (IP) assay. In addition, correlations between the ELISA-quantified anti-MDA5 antibodies and clinical characteristics were evaluated. Results In patients with PM/DM, the anti-MDA5 antibody measurements obtained from the ELISA and IP assay were highly concordant; the ELISA exhibited an analytical sensitivity of 98.2%, specificity of 100%, positive predictive value of 100%, and negative predictive value of 99.5% (compared to the IP assay). Anti-MDA5 antibodies were detected in 22.7% of the DM patients, but not in any of the patients with PM, non-PM/DM CTD, or IIP. Clinically amyopathic DM, RP-ILD, arthritis, and fever were more prevalent in DM patients who were anti-MDA5 antibody-positive than in those who were antibody-negative (P ≤ 0.0002 for all comparisons). In addition, anti-MDA5 antibody-positive patients with RP-ILD exhibited higher antibody levels than those without RP-ILD (P = 0.006). Conclusion Our newly developed ELISA can detect anti-MDA5 antibodies as efficiently as the gold standard IP assay and has the potential to facilitate the routine

  12. Modeling channel interference in an orbital angular momentum-multiplexed laser link

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anguita, Jaime A.; Neifeld, Mark A.; Vasic, Bane V.

    2009-08-01

    We study the effects of optical turbulence on the energy crosstalk among constituent orbital angular momentum (OAM) states in a vortex-based multi-channel laser communication link and determine channel interference in terms of turbulence strength and OAM state separation. We characterize the channel interference as a function of C2n and transmit OAM state, and propose probability models to predict the random fluctuations in the received signals for such architecture. Simulations indicate that turbulence-induced channel interference is mutually correlated across receive channels.

  13. Linking nutrient loading and oxygen in the coastal ocean: A new global scale model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Daniel C.; Harrison, John A.

    2016-03-01

    Recent decades have witnessed an exponential spread of low-oxygen regions in the coastal ocean due at least in-part to enhanced terrestrial nutrient inputs. As oxygen deprivation is a major stressor on marine ecosystems, there is a great need to quantitatively link shifts in nutrient loading with changes in oxygen concentrations. To this end, we have developed and here describe, evaluate, and apply the Coastal Ocean Oxygen Linked to Benthic Exchange And Nutrient Supply (COOLBEANS) model, a first-of-its-kind, spatially explicit (with 152 coastal segments) model, global model of coastal oxygen and nutrient dynamics. In COOLBEANS, benthic oxygen demand (BOD) is calculated using empirical models for aerobic respiration, iron reduction, and sulfate reduction, while oxygen supply is represented by a simple parameterization of exchange between surface and bottom waters. A nutrient cycling component translates shifts in riverine nutrient inputs into changes in organic matter delivery to sediments and, ultimately, oxygen uptake. Modeled BOD reproduces observations reasonably well (Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency = 0.71), and estimates of exchange between surface and bottom waters correlate with stratification. The model examines sensitivity of bottom water oxygen to changes in nutrient inputs and vertical exchange between surface and bottom waters, highlighting the importance of this vertical exchange in defining the susceptibility of a system to oxygen depletion. These sensitivities along with estimated maximum hypoxic areas that are supported by present day nutrient loads are consistent with existing hypoxic regions. Sensitivities are put into context by applying historic changes in nitrogen loading observed in the Gulf of Mexico to the global coastal ocean, demonstrating that such loads would drive many systems anoxic or even sulfidic.

  14. Middle School Mathematics Clinic: A Theoretical Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gore, Ethel V.

    This paper describes a middle school mathematics clinic in the District of Columbia Public Schools, which was designed to aid students in the transition from mathematics in the primary grades to high school mathematics courses. It is intended to provide the low achiever with effective diagnostic and corre