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Sample records for model linking viral

  1. Molecular modeling and conformational analysis of native and refolded viral genome-linked protein of cardamom mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Jebasingh, T; Jose, M; Yadunandam, A Kasin; Backiyarani, S; Srividhya, K V; Krishnaswamy, S; Usha, R

    2011-10-01

    The viral genome-linked protein (VPg) of Potyviruses is covalently attached to the 5' end of the genomic RNA. Towards biophysical characterization, the VPg coding region of Cardamom mosaic virus (CdMV) was amplified from the cDNA and expressed in E. coli. Most of the expressed VPg aggregated as inclusion bodies that were solubilized with urea and refolded with L-arginine hydrochloride. The various forms of CdMV VPg (native, denatured and refolded) were purified and the conformational variations between these forms were observed with fluorescence spectroscopy. Native and refolded CdMV VPg showed unordered secondary structure in the circular dichroism (CD) spectrum. The model of CdMV VPg was built based on the crystal structure of phosphotriesterase (from Pseudomonas diminuta), which had the maximum sequence homology with VPg to identify the arrangement of conserved amino acids in the protein to study the functional diversity of VPg. This is the first report on the VPg of CdMV, which is classified as a new member of the Macluravirus genus of the Potyviridae family.

  2. Molecular piracy: the viral link to carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Flaitz, C M; Hicks, M J

    1998-11-01

    The vast majority of the human experience with viral infections is associated with acute symptoms, such as malaise, fever, chills, rhinitis and diarrhea. With this acute or lytic phase, the immune system mounts a response and eliminates the viral agent while acquiring antibodies to that specific viral subtype. With latent or chronic infections, the viral agent becomes incorporated into the human genome. Viral agents capable of integration into the host's genetic material are particularly dangerous and may commandeer the host's ability to regulate normal cell growth and proliferation. The oncogenic viruses may immortalize the host cell, and facilitate malignant transformation. Cell growth and proliferation may be enhanced by viral interference with tumor suppressor gene function (p53 and pRb). Viruses may act as vectors for mutated proto-oncogenes (oncogenes). Overexpression of these oncogenes in viral-infected cells interferes with normal cell function and allows unregulated cell growth and proliferation, which may lead to malignant transformation and tumour formation. Development of oral neoplasms, both benign and malignant, has been linked to several viruses. Epstein-Barr virus is associated with oral hairy leukoplakia, lymphoproliferative disease, lymphoepithelial carcinoma, B-cell lymphomas, and nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Human herpesvirus-8 has been implicated in all forms of Kaposi's sarcoma, primary effusion lymphomas, multiple myeloma, angioimmunoblastic lymphadenopathy, and Castleman's disease. Human herpesvirus-6 has been detected in lymphoproliferative disease, lymphomas, Hodgkin's disease, and oral squamous cell carcinoma. The role of human papillomavirus in benign (squamous papilloma, focal epithelial hyperplasia, condyloma acuminatum, verruca vulgaris), premalignant (oral epithelial dysplasia), and malignant (squamous cell carcinoma) neoplasms within the oral cavity is well recognized. Herpes simplex virus may participate as a cofactor in oral squamous

  3. Modeling Viral Capsid Assembly

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    I present a review of the theoretical and computational methodologies that have been used to model the assembly of viral capsids. I discuss the capabilities and limitations of approaches ranging from equilibrium continuum theories to molecular dynamics simulations, and I give an overview of some of the important conclusions about virus assembly that have resulted from these modeling efforts. Topics include the assembly of empty viral shells, assembly around single-stranded nucleic acids to form viral particles, and assembly around synthetic polymers or charged nanoparticles for nanotechnology or biomedical applications. I present some examples in which modeling efforts have promoted experimental breakthroughs, as well as directions in which the connection between modeling and experiment can be strengthened. PMID:25663722

  4. Viral kinetic modeling: state of the art

    SciTech Connect

    Canini, Laetitia; Perelson, Alan S.

    2014-06-25

    Viral kinetic modeling has led to increased understanding of the within host dynamics of viral infections and the effects of therapy. Here we review recent developments in the modeling of viral infection kinetics with emphasis on two infectious diseases: hepatitis C and influenza. We review how viral kinetic modeling has evolved from simple models of viral infections treated with a drug or drug cocktail with an assumed constant effectiveness to models that incorporate drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, as well as phenomenological models that simply assume drugs have time varying-effectiveness. We also discuss multiscale models that include intracellular events in viral replication, models of drug-resistance, models that include innate and adaptive immune responses and models that incorporate cell-to-cell spread of infection. Overall, viral kinetic modeling has provided new insights into the understanding of the disease progression and the modes of action of several drugs. In conclusion, we expect that viral kinetic modeling will be increasingly used in the coming years to optimize drug regimens in order to improve therapeutic outcomes and treatment tolerability for infectious diseases.

  5. Viral kinetic modeling: state of the art

    DOE PAGES

    Canini, Laetitia; Perelson, Alan S.

    2014-06-25

    Viral kinetic modeling has led to increased understanding of the within host dynamics of viral infections and the effects of therapy. Here we review recent developments in the modeling of viral infection kinetics with emphasis on two infectious diseases: hepatitis C and influenza. We review how viral kinetic modeling has evolved from simple models of viral infections treated with a drug or drug cocktail with an assumed constant effectiveness to models that incorporate drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, as well as phenomenological models that simply assume drugs have time varying-effectiveness. We also discuss multiscale models that include intracellular events in viralmore » replication, models of drug-resistance, models that include innate and adaptive immune responses and models that incorporate cell-to-cell spread of infection. Overall, viral kinetic modeling has provided new insights into the understanding of the disease progression and the modes of action of several drugs. In conclusion, we expect that viral kinetic modeling will be increasingly used in the coming years to optimize drug regimens in order to improve therapeutic outcomes and treatment tolerability for infectious diseases.« less

  6. Viral kinetic modeling: state of the art.

    PubMed

    Canini, Laetitia; Perelson, Alan S

    2014-10-01

    Viral kinetic (VK) modeling has led to increased understanding of the within host dynamics of viral infections and the effects of therapy. Here we review recent developments in the modeling of viral infection kinetics with emphasis on two infectious diseases: hepatitis C and influenza. We review how VK modeling has evolved from simple models of viral infections treated with a drug or drug cocktail with an assumed constant effectiveness to models that incorporate drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, as well as phenomenological models that simply assume drugs have time varying-effectiveness. We also discuss multiscale models that include intracellular events in viral replication, models of drug-resistance, models that include innate and adaptive immune responses and models that incorporate cell-to-cell spread of infection. Overall, VK modeling has provided new insights into the understanding of the disease progression and the modes of action of several drugs. We expect that VK modeling will be increasingly used in the coming years to optimize drug regimens in order to improve therapeutic outcomes and treatment tolerability for infectious diseases.

  7. Gene Expression Profiles Link Respiratory Viral Infection, Platelet Response to Aspirin, and Acute Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Cyr, Derek D.; Lucas, Joseph E.; Zaas, Aimee K.; Woods, Christopher W.; Newby, L. Kristin; Kraus, William E.; Ginsburg, Geoffrey S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Influenza infection is associated with myocardial infarction (MI), suggesting that respiratory viral infection may induce biologic pathways that contribute to MI. We tested the hypotheses that 1) a validated blood gene expression signature of respiratory viral infection (viral GES) was associated with MI and 2) respiratory viral exposure changes levels of a validated platelet gene expression signature (platelet GES) of platelet function in response to aspirin that is associated with MI. Methods A previously defined viral GES was projected into blood RNA data from 594 patients undergoing elective cardiac catheterization and used to classify patients as having evidence of viral infection or not and tested for association with acute MI using logistic regression. A previously defined platelet GES was projected into blood RNA data from 81 healthy subjects before and after exposure to four respiratory viruses: Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) (n=20), Human Rhinovirus (HRV) (n=20), Influenza A virus subtype H1N1 (H1N1) (n=24), Influenza A Virus subtype H3N2 (H3N2) (n=17). We tested for the change in platelet GES with viral exposure using linear mixed-effects regression and by symptom status. Results In the catheterization cohort, 32 patients had evidence of viral infection based upon the viral GES, of which 25% (8/32) had MI versus 12.2% (69/567) among those without evidence of viral infection (OR 2.3; CI [1.03-5.5], p=0.04). In the infection cohorts, only H1N1 exposure increased platelet GES over time (time course p-value = 1e-04). Conclusions A viral GES of non-specific, respiratory viral infection was associated with acute MI; 18% of the top 49 genes in the viral GES are involved with hemostasis and/or platelet aggregation. Separately, H1N1 exposure, but not exposure to other respiratory viruses, increased a platelet GES previously shown to be associated with MI. Together, these results highlight specific genes and pathways that link viral infection

  8. Animal models of viral hemorrhagic fever.

    PubMed

    Smith, Darci R; Holbrook, Michael R; Gowen, Brian B

    2014-12-01

    The term "viral hemorrhagic fever" (VHF) designates a syndrome of acute febrile illness, increased vascular permeability and coagulation defects which often progresses to bleeding and shock and may be fatal in a significant percentage of cases. The causative agents are some 20 different RNA viruses in the families Arenaviridae, Bunyaviridae, Filoviridae and Flaviviridae, which are maintained in a variety of animal species and are transferred to humans through direct or indirect contact or by an arthropod vector. Except for dengue, which is transmitted among humans by mosquitoes, the geographic distribution of each type of VHF is determined by the range of its animal reservoir. Treatments are available for Argentine HF and Lassa fever, but no approved countermeasures have been developed against other types of VHF. The development of effective interventions is hindered by the sporadic nature of most infections and their occurrence in geographic regions with limited medical resources. Laboratory animal models that faithfully reproduce human disease are therefore essential for the evaluation of potential vaccines and therapeutics. The goal of this review is to highlight the current status of animal models that can be used to study the pathogenesis of VHF and test new countermeasures.

  9. Basic stochastic models for viral infection within a host.

    PubMed

    Vidurupola, Sukhitha W; Allen, Linda J S

    2012-10-01

    Stochastic differential equation (SDE) models are formulated for intra-host virus-cell dynamics during the early stages of viral infection, prior to activation of the immune system. The SDE models incorporate more realism into the mechanisms for viral entry and release than ordinary differential equation (ODE) models and show distinct differences from the ODE models. The variability in the SDE models depends on the concentration, with much greater variability for small concentrations than large concentrations. In addition, the SDE models show significant variability in the timing of the viral peak. The viral peak is earlier for viruses that are released from infected cells via bursting rather than via budding from the cell membrane.

  10. The oncogenic potential of BK-polyomavirus is linked to viral integration into the human genome.

    PubMed

    Kenan, Daniel J; Mieczkowski, Piotr A; Burger-Calderon, Raquel; Singh, Harsharan K; Nickeleit, Volker

    2015-11-01

    It has been suggested that BK-polyomavirus is linked to oncogenesis via high expression levels of large T-antigen in some urothelial neoplasms arising following kidney transplantation. However, a causal association between BK-polyomavirus, large T-antigen expression and oncogenesis has never been demonstrated in humans. Here we describe an investigation using high-throughput sequencing of tumour DNA obtained from an urothelial carcinoma arising in a renal allograft. We show that a novel BK-polyomavirus strain, named CH-1, is integrated into exon 26 of the myosin-binding protein C1 gene (MYBPC1) on chromosome 12 in tumour cells but not in normal renal cells. Integration of the BK-polyomavirus results in a number of discrete alterations in viral gene expression, including: (a) disruption of VP1 protein expression and robust expression of large T-antigen; (b) preclusion of viral replication; and (c) deletions in the non-coding control region (NCCR), with presumed alterations in promoter feedback loops. Viral integration disrupts one MYBPC1 gene copy and likely alters its expression. Circular episomal BK-polyomavirus gene sequences are not found, and the renal allograft shows no productive polyomavirus infection or polyomavirus nephropathy. These findings support the hypothesis that integration of polyomaviruses is essential to tumourigenesis. It is likely that dysregulation of large T-antigen, with persistent over-expression in non-lytic cells, promotes cell growth, genetic instability and neoplastic transformation.

  11. A neural model of valuation and information virality

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Elisa C.; O’Donnell, Matthew Brook; Kim, Hyun Suk; Cappella, Joseph N.

    2017-01-01

    Information sharing is an integral part of human interaction that serves to build social relationships and affects attitudes and behaviors in individuals and large groups. We present a unifying neurocognitive framework of mechanisms underlying information sharing at scale (virality). We argue that expectations regarding self-related and social consequences of sharing (e.g., in the form of potential for self-enhancement or social approval) are integrated into a domain-general value signal that encodes the value of sharing a piece of information. This value signal translates into population-level virality. In two studies (n = 41 and 39 participants), we tested these hypotheses using functional neuroimaging. Neural activity in response to 80 New York Times articles was observed in theory-driven regions of interest associated with value, self, and social cognitions. This activity then was linked to objectively logged population-level data encompassing n = 117,611 internet shares of the articles. In both studies, activity in neural regions associated with self-related and social cognition was indirectly related to population-level sharing through increased neural activation in the brain's value system. Neural activity further predicted population-level outcomes over and above the variance explained by article characteristics and commonly used self-report measures of sharing intentions. This parsimonious framework may help advance theory, improve predictive models, and inform new approaches to effective intervention. More broadly, these data shed light on the core functions of sharing—to express ourselves in positive ways and to strengthen our social bonds. PMID:28242678

  12. Construction of a mutagenesis cartridge for poliovirus genome-linked viral protein: isolation and characterization of viable and nonviable mutants

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhn, R.J.; Tada, H.; Ypma-Wong, M.F.; Dunn, J.J.; Semler, B.L.; Wimmer, E.

    1988-01-01

    By following a strategy of genetic analysis of poliovirus, the authors have constructed a synthetic mutagenesis cartridge spanning the genome-linked viral protein coding region and flanking cleavage sites in an infectious cDNA clone of the type I (Mahoney) genome. The insertion of new restriction sites within the infectious clone has allowed them to replace the wild-type sequences with short complementary pairs of synthetic oligonucleotides containing various mutations. A set of mutations have been made that create methionine codons within the genome-linked viral protein region. The resulting viruses have growth characteristics similar to wild type. Experiments that led to an alteration of the tyrosine residue responsible for the linkage to RNA have resulted in nonviable virus. In one mutant, proteolytic processing assayed in vitro appeared unimpaired by the mutation. They suggest that the position of the tyrosine residue is important for genome-linked viral protein function(s).

  13. Contribution of N-linked glycans on HSV-2 gB to cell–cell fusion and viral entry

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Sukun; Hu, Kai; He, Siyi; Wang, Ping; Zhang, Mudan; Huang, Xin; Du, Tao; Zheng, Chunfu; Liu, Yalan; Hu, Qinxue

    2015-09-15

    HSV-2 is the major cause of genital herpes and its infection increases the risk of HIV-1 acquisition and transmission. HSV-2 glycoprotein B together with glycoproteins D, H and L are indispensable for viral entry, of which gB, as a class III fusogen, plays an essential role. HSV-2 gB has seven potential N-linked glycosylation (N-CHO) sites, but their significance has yet to be determined. For the first time, we systematically analyzed the contributions of N-linked glycans on gB to cell–cell fusion and viral entry. Our results demonstrated that, of the seven potential N-CHO sites on gB, mutation at N390, N483 or N668 decreased cell–cell fusion and viral entry, while mutation at N133 mainly affected protein expression and the production of infectious virus particles by blocking the transport of gB from the endoplasmic reticulum to Golgi. Our findings highlight the significance of N-linked glycans on HSV-2 gB expression and function. - Highlights: • N-linked glycan at N133 is important for gB intracellular trafficking and maturation. • N-linked glycans at N390, N483 and N668 on gB are necessary for optimal cell–cell fusion. • N-linked glycans at N390, N483 and N668 on gB are necessary for optimal viral entry.

  14. Slice Culture Modeling of Central Nervous System (CNS) Viral Infection

    PubMed Central

    Dionne, Kalen R.; Tyler, Kenneth L.

    2016-01-01

    The complexity of the central nervous system (CNS) is not recapitulated in cell culture models. Thin slicing and subsequent culture of CNS tissue has become a valued means to study neuronal and glial biology within the context of the physiologically relevant tissue milieu. Modern membrane-interface slice culturing methodology allows straightforward access to both CNS tissue and feeding medium, enabling experimental manipulations and analyses that would otherwise be impossible in vivo. CNS slices can be successfully maintained in culture for up to several weeks for investigation of evolving pathology and long-term intervention in models of chronic neurologic disease. Herein, membrane-interface slice culture models for studying viral encephalitis and myelitis are detailed, with emphasis on the use of these models for investigation of pathogenesis and evaluation of novel treatment strategies. We describe techniques to (1) generate brain and spinal cord slices from rodent donors, (2) virally infect slices, (3) monitor viral replication, (4) assess virally induced injury/apoptosis, (5) characterize “CNS-specific” cytokine production, and (6) treat slices with cytokines/pharmaceuticals. Although our focus is on CNS viral infection, we anticipate that the described methods can be adapted to address a wide range of investigations within the fields of neuropathology, neuroimmunology, and neuropharmacology. PMID:23975824

  15. Viral Vector-Based Modeling of Neurodegenerative Disorders: Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Fischer, D Luke; Gombash, Sara E; Kemp, Christopher J; Manfredsson, Fredric P; Polinski, Nicole K; Duffy, Megan F; Sortwell, Caryl E

    2016-01-01

    Gene therapy methods are increasingly used to model Parkinson's disease (PD) in animals in an effort to test experimental therapeutics within a more relevant context to disease pathophysiology and neuropathology. We have detailed several criteria that are critical or advantageous to accurately modeling PD in a murine model or in a nonhuman primate. Using these criteria, we then evaluate approaches made to model PD using viral vectors to date, including both adeno-associated viruses and lentiviruses. Lastly, we comment on the consideration of aging as a critical factor for modeling PD.

  16. Differential equation modeling of HIV viral fitness experiments: model identification, model selection, and multimodel inference.

    PubMed

    Miao, Hongyu; Dykes, Carrie; Demeter, Lisa M; Wu, Hulin

    2009-03-01

    Many biological processes and systems can be described by a set of differential equation (DE) models. However, literature in statistical inference for DE models is very sparse. We propose statistical estimation, model selection, and multimodel averaging methods for HIV viral fitness experiments in vitro that can be described by a set of nonlinear ordinary differential equations (ODE). The parameter identifiability of the ODE models is also addressed. We apply the proposed methods and techniques to experimental data of viral fitness for HIV-1 mutant 103N. We expect that the proposed modeling and inference approaches for the DE models can be widely used for a variety of biomedical studies.

  17. Modelling HIV-RNA viral load in vertically infected children.

    PubMed

    Gray, Linsay; Cortina-Borja, Mario; Newell, Marie-Louise

    2004-03-15

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) ribo-nucleic acid (RNA) viral load is a measure of actively replicating virus and is used as a marker of disease progression. For a thorough understanding of the dynamics of the evolution of the virus in the early life of HIV-1 vertically infected children, it is important to elucidate the pattern of HIV-RNA viral load over age. An aspect of assay systems used in the quantification of RNA viral load is that they measure values above particular cut-off values for detection, below which the assays used are not sufficiently sensitive. In this way, measurements are potentially left-censored. Recent adult studies suggest that to adequately model RNA pattern over age, it is necessary to account for within-subject correlation, due to repeated measures, and censoring. The aim of this study, therefore, was to establish whether it is necessary to use complex methods to allow for repeated measures within individuals and censoring of the HIV-RNA viral load in children enrolled in a cohort study. The approach involved the identification of an appropriate model for the basic pattern of RNA viral load by age and subsequent assessment of various estimation procedures accounting for repeated measures and censoring in different ways. Methods developed by Hughes involving the expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm and the Gibbs sampler were taken as the benchmark for comparison of simpler alternatives. Other approaches considered involve linear mixed-effects and ordinary least squares in which censoring is dealt with informally by taking the cut-off value as absolute or taking the mid-point between cut-off and zero. Fractional polynomials provided a substantially superior approach for modelling the dynamics of viral load over age compared to conventional polynomials or change-point models. Allowing for repeated measures was necessary to improve the power of the likelihood ratio tests required to establish the final model, but methods beyond taking

  18. Structure-Function Studies Link Class II Viral Fusogens with the Ancestral Gamete Fusion Protein HAP2.

    PubMed

    Pinello, Jennifer Fricke; Lai, Alex L; Millet, Jean K; Cassidy-Hanley, Donna; Freed, Jack H; Clark, Theodore G

    2017-03-06

    The conserved transmembrane protein, HAP2/GCS1, has been linked to fertility in a wide range of taxa and is hypothesized to be an ancient gamete fusogen. Using template-based structural homology modeling, we now show that the ectodomain of HAP2 orthologs from Tetrahymena thermophila and other species adopt a protein fold remarkably similar to the dengue virus E glycoprotein and related class II viral fusogens. To test the functional significance of this predicted structure, we developed a flow-cytometry-based assay that measures cytosolic exchange across the conjugation junction to rapidly probe the effects of HAP2 mutations in the Tetrahymena system. Using this assay, alterations to a region in and around a predicted "fusion loop" in T. thermophila HAP2 were found to abrogate membrane pore formation in mating cells. Consistent with this, a synthetic peptide corresponding to the HAP2 fusion loop was found to interact directly with model membranes in a variety of biophysical assays. These results raise interesting questions regarding the evolutionary relationships of class II membrane fusogens and harken back to a long-held argument that eukaryotic sex arose as the byproduct of selection for the horizontal transfer of a "selfish" genetic element from cell to cell via membrane fusion.

  19. Thiouracil cross-linking mass spectrometry: a cell-based method to identify host factors involved in viral amplification.

    PubMed

    Lenarcic, Erik M; Landry, Dori M; Greco, Todd M; Cristea, Ileana M; Thompson, Sunnie R

    2013-08-01

    Eukaryotic RNA viruses are known to utilize host factors; however, the identity of these factors and their role in the virus life cycle remain largely undefined. Here, we report a method to identify proteins bound to the viral RNA during amplification in cell culture: thiouracil cross-linking mass spectrometry (TUX-MS). TUX-MS relies on incorporation of a zero-distance cross-linker into the viral RNA during infection. Proteins bound to viral RNA are cross-linked prior to cell lysis, purified, and identified using mass spectrometry. Using the TUX-MS method, an unbiased screen for poliovirus (PV) host factors was conducted. All host and viral proteins that are known to interact with the poliovirus RNA were identified. In addition, TUX-MS identified an additional 66 host proteins that have not been previously described in poliovirus amplification. From these candidates, eight were selected and validated. Furthermore, we demonstrate that small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown of two of these uncharacterized host factors results in either a decrease in copy number of positive-stranded RNA or a decrease in PV translation. These data demonstrate that TUX-MS is a robust, unbiased method to identify previously unknown host cell factors that influence virus growth. This method is broadly applicable to a range of RNA viruses, such as flaviviruses, alphaviruses, picornaviruses, bunyaviruses, and coronaviruses.

  20. Viral Genome-Linked Protein (VPg) Is Essential for Translation Initiation of Rabbit Hemorrhagic Disease Virus (RHDV).

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jie; Wang, Binbin; Miao, Qiuhong; Tan, Yonggui; Li, Chuanfeng; Chen, Zongyan; Guo, Huimin; Liu, Guangqing

    2015-01-01

    Rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV), the causative agent of rabbit hemorrhagic disease, is an important member of the caliciviridae family. Currently, no suitable tissue culture system is available for proliferating RHDV, limiting the study of the pathogenesis of RHDV. In addition, the mechanisms underlying RHDV translation and replication are largely unknown compared with other caliciviridae viruses. The RHDV replicon recently constructed in our laboratory provides an appropriate model to study the pathogenesis of RHDV without in vitro RHDV propagation and culture. Using this RHDV replicon, we demonstrated that the viral genome-linked protein (VPg) is essential for RHDV translation in RK-13 cells for the first time. In addition, we showed that VPg interacts with eukaryotic initiation factor 4E (eIF4E) in vivo and in vitro and that eIF4E silencing inhibits RHDV translation, suggesting the interaction between VPg and eIF4E is involved in RHDV translation. Our results support the hypothesis that VPg serves as a novel cap substitute during the initiation of RHDV translation.

  1. Stochastical modeling for Viral Disease: Statistical Mechanics and Network Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Hao; Deem, Michael

    2007-04-01

    Theoretical methods of statistical mechanics are developed and applied to study the immunological response against viral disease, such as dengue. We use this theory to show how the immune response to four different dengue serotypes may be sculpted. It is the ability of avian influenza, to change and to mix, that has given rise to the fear of a new human flu pandemic. Here we propose to utilize a scale free network based stochastic model to investigate the mitigation strategies and analyze the risk.

  2. Comorbidity and high viral load linked to clinical presentation of respiratory human bocavirus infection.

    PubMed

    Ghietto, Lucía María; Majul, Diego; Ferreyra Soaje, Patricia; Baumeister, Elsa; Avaro, Martín; Insfrán, Constanza; Mosca, Liliana; Cámara, Alicia; Moreno, Laura Beatriz; Adamo, Maria Pilar

    2015-01-01

    Human bocavirus (HBoV) is a new parvovirus associated with acute respiratory tract infection (ARTI). In order to evaluate HBoV significance as an agent of acute respiratory disease, we screened 1,135 respiratory samples from children and adults with and without symptoms during two complete calendar years. HBoV1 prevalence in patients with ARTI was 6.33 % in 2011 and 11.64 % in 2012, including neonatal and adult patients. HBoV1 was also detected in 3.77 % of asymptomatic individuals. The co-detection rate was 78.1 %. Among children, 87 % were clinically diagnosed with lower respiratory infection (no significant differences between patients with and without coinfection), and 31 % exhibited comorbidities. Pediatric patients with comorbidities were significantly older than patients without comorbidities. Patients with ARTI had either high or low viral load, while controls had only low viral load, but there were no clinical differences between patients with high or low viral load. In conclusion, we present evidence of the pathogenic potential of HBoV1 in young children with ARTI. Since patients with HBoV1-single infection are not significantly different from those with coinfection with respect to clinical features, the virus can be as pathogenic by itself as other respiratory agents are. Furthermore, an association between high HBoV1 load and disease could not be demonstrated in this study, but all asymptomatic individuals had low viral loads. Also, children with comorbidities are susceptible to HBoV1 infection at older ages than previously healthy children. Thus, the clinical presentation of infection may occur depending on both viral load and the particular interaction between the HBoV1 and the host.

  3. Outbreak of viral hepatitis B in a rural community in India linked to inadequately sterilized needles and syringes.

    PubMed Central

    Singh, J.; Bhatia, R.; Gandhi, J. C.; Kaswekar, A. P.; Khare, S.; Patel, S. B.; Oza, V. B.; Jain, D. C.; Sokhey, J.

    1998-01-01

    In India, virtually all outbreaks of viral hepatitis are considered to be due to faeco-orally transmitted hepatitis E virus. Recently, a cluster of 15 cases of viral hepatitis B was found in three villages in Gujarat State. The cases were epidemiologically linked to the use of inadequately sterilized needles and syringes by a local unqualified medical practitioner. The outbreak evolved slowly over a period of 3 months and was marked by a high case fatality rate (46.7%), probably because of concurrent infection with hepatitis D virus (HDV) or sexually transmitted infections. But for the many fatalities within 2-3 weeks of the onset of illness, the outbreak would have gone unnoticed. The findings emphasize the importance of inadequately sterilized needles and syringes in the transmission of viral hepatitis B in India, the need to strengthen the routine surveillance system, and to organize an education campaign targeting all health care workers including private practitioners, especially those working in rural areas, as well as the public at large, to take all possible measures to prevent this often fatal infection. PMID:9615501

  4. Bovine viral diarrhea virus antigen detection across whole cattle hides using two antigen-capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays.

    PubMed

    Vander Ley, Brian L; Ridpath, Julia F; Sweiger, Shaun H

    2012-05-01

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus is a costly disease of cattle that can be controlled by vaccination, biosecurity, and removal of persistently infected cattle. Development and proficiency testing of assays to identify persistently infected cattle requires substantial quantities of known positive- and negative-sample material. The objective of this study was to determine what sections of bovine skin contained Bovine viral diarrhea virus antigen. Two commercially available antigen-capture enzyme-linked immunoassays were used to test subsamples representing the entire skin of 3 persistently infected calves. Both assays detected Bovine viral diarrhea virus antigen in the samples indicated for use by assay protocol. However, one assay identified all subsamples as positive, while the second assay identified 64.4% of subsamples as positive. These results show that use of samples other than those specified by the assay protocol must be validated for each individual assay. In this study, alternative sample sites and use of the entire hide for proficiency testing would be acceptable for only one of the assays tested.

  5. On Modeling Viral Diffusion in Heterogeneous Wireless Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Hoai-Nam; Shinoda, Yoichi

    Smart phones and computers now are able to co-work in a wireless environment where malware can propagate. Although many investigations have modeled the spread of malware, little has been done to take into account different characteristics of items to see how they affect disease diffusion in an ad hoc network. We have therefore developed a novel framework, consisting of two models, which consider diversity of objects as well as interactions between their different classes. Our framework is able to produce a huge result space thus makes it appropriate to describe many viral proliferating scenarios. Additionally, we have developed a formula to calculate the possible average number of newly infected devices in the considered system. An important contribution of our work is the comprehension of item diversity, which states that a mixture of device types causes a bigger malware spread as the number of device types in the network increases.

  6. Analysis of Practical Identifiability of a Viral Infection Model

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Van Kinh; Klawonn, Frank; Mikolajczyk, Rafael; Hernandez-Vargas, Esteban A.

    2016-01-01

    Mathematical modelling approaches have granted a significant contribution to life sciences and beyond to understand experimental results. However, incomplete and inadequate assessments in parameter estimation practices hamper the parameter reliability, and consequently the insights that ultimately could arise from a mathematical model. To keep the diligent works in modelling biological systems from being mistrusted, potential sources of error must be acknowledged. Employing a popular mathematical model in viral infection research, existing means and practices in parameter estimation are exemplified. Numerical results show that poor experimental data is a main source that can lead to erroneous parameter estimates despite the use of innovative parameter estimation algorithms. Arbitrary choices of initial conditions as well as data asynchrony distort the parameter estimates but are often overlooked in modelling studies. This work stresses the existence of several sources of error buried in reports of modelling biological systems, voicing the need for assessing the sources of error, consolidating efforts in solving the immediate difficulties, and possibly reconsidering the use of mathematical modelling to quantify experimental data. PMID:28036339

  7. Linking host prokaryotic physiology to viral lifestyle dynamics in a temperate freshwater lake (Lake Pavin, France).

    PubMed

    Palesse, S; Colombet, J; Pradeep Ram, A S; Sime-Ngando, T

    2014-11-01

    In aquatic ecosystems, fluctuations in environmental conditions and prokaryotic host physiological states can strongly affect the dynamics of viral life strategies. The influence of prokaryote physiology and environmental factors on viral replication cycles (lytic and lysogeny) was investigated from April to September 2011 at three different strata (epi, meta, and hypolimnion) in the mixolimnion of deep volcanic temperate freshwater Lake Pavin (France). Overall, the euphotic region (epi and metalimnion) was more dynamic and showed significant variation in microbial standing stocks, prokaryotic physiological state, and viral life strategies compared to the aphotic hypolimnion which was stable within sampled months. The prokaryotic host physiology as inferred from the nucleic acid content of prokaryotic cells (high or low nucleic acid) was strongly regulated by the chlorophyll concentration. The predominance of the high nucleic acid (HNA) prokaryotes (cells) over low nucleic acid (LNA) prokaryotes (cells) in the spring (HNA/LNA = 1.2) and vice versa in the summer period (HNA/LNA = 0.4) suggest that the natural prokaryotic communities underwent major shifts in their physiological states during investigated time period. The increase in the percentage of inducible lysogenic prokaryotes in the summer period was associated with the switch in the dominance of LNA over HNA cells, which coincided with the periods of strong resource (nutrient) limitation. This supports the idea that lysogeny represents a maintenance strategy for viruses in unproductive or harsh nutrient/host conditions. A negative correlation of percentage of lysogenic prokaryotes with HNA cell abundance and chlorophyll suggest that lysogenic cycle is closely related to prokaryotic cells which are stressed or starved due to unavailability of resources for its growth and activity. Our results provide support to previous findings that changes in prokaryote physiology are critical for the promotion and

  8. Semantically linking in silico cancer models.

    PubMed

    Johnson, David; Connor, Anthony J; McKeever, Steve; Wang, Zhihui; Deisboeck, Thomas S; Quaiser, Tom; Shochat, Eliezer

    2014-01-01

    Multiscale models are commonplace in cancer modeling, where individual models acting on different biological scales are combined within a single, cohesive modeling framework. However, model composition gives rise to challenges in understanding interfaces and interactions between them. Based on specific domain expertise, typically these computational models are developed by separate research groups using different methodologies, programming languages, and parameters. This paper introduces a graph-based model for semantically linking computational cancer models via domain graphs that can help us better understand and explore combinations of models spanning multiple biological scales. We take the data model encoded by TumorML, an XML-based markup language for storing cancer models in online repositories, and transpose its model description elements into a graph-based representation. By taking such an approach, we can link domain models, such as controlled vocabularies, taxonomic schemes, and ontologies, with cancer model descriptions to better understand and explore relationships between models. The union of these graphs creates a connected property graph that links cancer models by categorizations, by computational compatibility, and by semantic interoperability, yielding a framework in which opportunities for exploration and discovery of combinations of models become possible.

  9. Optical Performance Models for FDDI Links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimball, Robert M.

    1990-01-01

    A loss budget model to predict optical performance of Fiber Distributed Data Interface (FDDI) type networks in the premises distribution environment has been developed. This model tailors existing statistical loss budget models to the FDDI standard. It is expected that as FDDI becomes popular, fiber based distribution systems will become common. When designing a fiber distribution system it is important to understand the constraints placed on link performance by the cable plant. To determine these constraints, the model is examined numerically using a large range of initial conditions. The total link length is used as the dependent variable. This set of initial conditions corresponds to an ensemble of possible link configurations. These link configurations are studied in the context of the premises distribution environment. The model is extended to include the use of optical bypass switches. Laboratory measurement data is presented to verify the accuracy of the bypass switch model. The extended model, including the bypass switch, is examined numerically for a similar set of initial conditions. These constraints are applied to the use of bypass switches in wiring closets, between floors, and at the work location. Distance limitations are determined for FDDI links utilizing optical bypass switches.

  10. Model Development for the Viral Kcv Potassium Channel

    PubMed Central

    Tayefeh, Sascha; Kloss, Thomas; Kreim, Michael; Gebhardt, Manuela; Baumeister, Dirk; Hertel, Brigitte; Richter, Christian; Schwalbe, Harald; Moroni, Anna; Thiel, Gerhard; Kast, Stefan M.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract A computational model for the open state of the short viral Kcv potassium channel was created and tested based on homology modeling and extensive molecular-dynamics simulation in a membrane environment. Particular attention was paid to the structure of the highly flexible N-terminal region and to the protonation state of membrane-exposed lysine residues. Data from various experimental sources, NMR spectroscopy, and electrophysiology, as well as results from three-dimensional reference interaction site model integral equation theory were taken into account to select the most reasonable model among possible variants. The final model exhibits spontaneous ion transitions across the complete pore, with and without application of an external field. The nonequilibrium transport events could be induced reproducibly without abnormally large driving potential and without the need to place ions artificially at certain key positions along the transition path. The transport mechanism through the filter region corresponds to the classic view of single-file motion, which in our case is coupled to frequent exchange of ions between the innermost filter position and the cavity. PMID:19167299

  11. Cell-Free versus Cell-to-Cell Infection by Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 and Human T-Lymphotropic Virus Type 1: Exploring the Link among Viral Source, Viral Trafficking, and Viral Replication.

    PubMed

    Dutartre, Hélène; Clavière, Mathieu; Journo, Chloé; Mahieux, Renaud

    2016-09-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) are complex retroviruses mainly infecting CD4(+) T lymphocytes. In addition, antigen-presenting cells such as dendritic cells (DCs) are targeted in vivo by both viruses, although to a lesser extent. Interaction of HIV-1 with DCs plays a key role in viral dissemination from the mucosa to CD4(+) T lymphocytes present in lymphoid organs. While similar mechanisms may occur for HTLV-1 as well, most HTLV-1 data were obtained from T-cell studies, and little is known regarding the trafficking of this virus in DCs. We first compared the efficiency of cell-free versus cell-associated viral sources of both retroviruses at infecting DCs. We showed that both HIV-1 and HTLV-1 cell-free particles are poorly efficient at productively infecting DCs, except when DC-SIGN has been engaged. Furthermore, while SAMHD-1 accounts for restriction of cell-free HIV-1 infection, it is not involved in HTLV-1 restriction. In addition, cell-free viruses lead mainly to a nonproductive DC infection, leading to trans-infection of T-cells, a process important for HIV-1 spread but not for that of HTLV-1. Finally, we show that T-DC cell-to-cell transfer implies viral trafficking in vesicles that may both increase productive infection of DCs ("cis-infection") and allow viral escape from immune surveillance. Altogether, these observations allowed us to draw a model of HTLV-1 and HIV-1 trafficking in DCs.

  12. Cell-Free versus Cell-to-Cell Infection by Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 and Human T-Lymphotropic Virus Type 1: Exploring the Link among Viral Source, Viral Trafficking, and Viral Replication

    PubMed Central

    Clavière, Mathieu; Journo, Chloé; Mahieux, Renaud

    2016-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) are complex retroviruses mainly infecting CD4+ T lymphocytes. In addition, antigen-presenting cells such as dendritic cells (DCs) are targeted in vivo by both viruses, although to a lesser extent. Interaction of HIV-1 with DCs plays a key role in viral dissemination from the mucosa to CD4+ T lymphocytes present in lymphoid organs. While similar mechanisms may occur for HTLV-1 as well, most HTLV-1 data were obtained from T-cell studies, and little is known regarding the trafficking of this virus in DCs. We first compared the efficiency of cell-free versus cell-associated viral sources of both retroviruses at infecting DCs. We showed that both HIV-1 and HTLV-1 cell-free particles are poorly efficient at productively infecting DCs, except when DC-SIGN has been engaged. Furthermore, while SAMHD-1 accounts for restriction of cell-free HIV-1 infection, it is not involved in HTLV-1 restriction. In addition, cell-free viruses lead mainly to a nonproductive DC infection, leading to trans-infection of T-cells, a process important for HIV-1 spread but not for that of HTLV-1. Finally, we show that T-DC cell-to-cell transfer implies viral trafficking in vesicles that may both increase productive infection of DCs (“cis-infection”) and allow viral escape from immune surveillance. Altogether, these observations allowed us to draw a model of HTLV-1 and HIV-1 trafficking in DCs. PMID:27334587

  13. Comparison of five bacteriophages as models for viral aerosol studies.

    PubMed

    Turgeon, Nathalie; Toulouse, Marie-Josée; Martel, Bruno; Moineau, Sylvain; Duchaine, Caroline

    2014-07-01

    Bacteriophages are perceived to be good models for the study of airborne viruses because they are safe to use, some of them display structural features similar to those of human and animal viruses, and they are relatively easy to produce in large quantities. Yet, only a few studies have investigated them as models. It has previously been demonstrated that aerosolization, environmental conditions, and sampling conditions affect viral infectivity, but viral infectivity is virus dependent. Thus, several virus models are likely needed to study their general behavior in aerosols. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of aerosolization and sampling on the infectivity of five tail-less bacteriophages and two pathogenic viruses: MS2 (a single-stranded RNA [ssRNA] phage of the Leviviridae family), Φ6 (a segmented double-stranded RNA [dsRNA] phage of the Cystoviridae family), ΦX174 (a single-stranded DNA [ssDNA] phage of the Microviridae family), PM2 (a double-stranded DNA [dsDNA] phage of the Corticoviridae family), PR772 (a dsDNA phage of the Tectiviridae family), human influenza A virus H1N1 (an ssRNA virus of the Orthomyxoviridae family), and the poultry virus Newcastle disease virus (NDV; an ssRNA virus of the Paramyxoviridae family). Three nebulizers and two nebulization salt buffers (with or without organic fluid) were tested, as were two aerosol sampling devices, a liquid cyclone (SKC BioSampler) and a dry cyclone (National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health two-stage cyclone bioaerosol sampler). The presence of viruses in collected air samples was detected by culture and quantitative PCR (qPCR). Our results showed that these selected five phages behave differently when aerosolized and sampled. RNA phage MS2 and ssDNA phage ΦX174 were the most resistant to aerosolization and sampling. The presence of organic fluid in the nebulization buffer protected phages PR772 and Φ6 throughout the aerosolization and sampling with dry cyclones. In this

  14. Maize Elongin C interacts with the viral genome-linked protein, VPg, of Sugarcane mosaic virus and facilitates virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Min; Chen, Yuting; Ding, Xin Shun; Webb, Stephen L; Zhou, Tao; Nelson, Richard S; Fan, Zaifeng

    2014-01-01

    The viral genome-linked protein, VPg, of potyviruses is involved in viral genome replication and translation. To determine host proteins that interact with Sugarcane mosaic virus (SCMV) VPg, a yeast two-hybrid screen was used and a maize (Zea mays) Elongin C (ZmElc) protein was identified. ZmELC transcript was observed in all maize organs, but most highly in leaves and pistil extracts, and ZmElc was present in the cytoplasm and nucleus of maize cells in the presence or absence of SCMV. ZmELC expression was increased in maize tissue at 4 and 6 d post SCMV inoculation. When ZmELC was transiently overexpressed in maize protoplasts the accumulation of SCMV RNA was approximately doubled compared with the amount of virus in control protoplasts. Silencing ZmELC expression using a Brome mosaic virus-based gene silencing vector (virus-induced gene silencing) did not influence maize plant growth and development, but did decrease RNA accumulation of two isolates of SCMV and host transcript encoding ZmeIF4E during SCMV infection. Interestingly, Maize chlorotic mottle virus, from outside the Potyviridae, was increased in accumulation after silencing ZmELC expression. Our results describe both the location of ZmElc expression in maize and a new activity associated with an Elc: support of potyvirus accumulation. PMID:24954157

  15. O-linked GlcNAcylation elevated by HPV E6 mediates viral oncogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Qinghua; Zhao, Rui-Xun; Chen, Jianfeng; Li, Yining; Li, Xiang-Dong; Liu, Xiao-Long; Zhang, Wei-Ming; Quan, Cheng-Shi; Wang, Yi-Shu; Zhai, Ying-Xian; Wang, Jian-Wei; Youssef, Mariam; Cui, Rutao; Liang, Jiyong; Genovese, Nicholas; Chow, Louise T; Li, Yu-Lin; Xu, Zhi-Xiang

    2016-08-16

    High-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are causative agents of anogenital cancers and a fraction of head and neck cancers. The mechanisms involved in the progression of HPV neoplasias to cancers remain largely unknown. Here, we report that O-linked GlcNAcylation (O-GlcNAc) and O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT) were markedly increased in HPV-caused cervical neoplasms relative to normal cervix, whereas O-GlcNAcase (OGA) levels were not altered. Transduction of HPV16 oncogene E6 or E6/E7 into mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) up-regulated OGT mRNA and protein, elevated the level of O-GlcNAc, and promoted cell proliferation while reducing cellular senescence. Conversely, in HPV-18-transformed HeLa cervical carcinoma cells, inhibition of O-GlcNAc with a low concentration of a chemical inhibitor impaired the transformed phenotypes in vitro. We showed that E6 elevated c-MYC via increased protein stability attributable to O-GlcNAcylation on Thr58. Reduction of HPV-mediated cell viability by a high concentration of O-GlcNAc inhibitor was partially rescued by elevated c-MYC. Finally, knockdown of OGT or O-GlcNAc inhibition in HeLa cells or in TC-1 cells, a mouse cell line transformed by HPV16 E6/E7 and activated K-RAS, reduced c-MYC and suppressed tumorigenesis and metastasis. Thus, we have uncovered a mechanism for HPV oncoprotein-mediated transformation. These findings may eventually aid in the development of effective therapeutics for HPV-associated malignancies by targeting aberrant O-GlcNAc.

  16. O-linked GlcNAcylation elevated by HPV E6 mediates viral oncogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Qinghua; Zhao, Rui-Xun; Chen, Jianfeng; Li, Yining; Li, Xiang-Dong; Liu, Xiao-Long; Zhang, Wei-Ming; Quan, Cheng-Shi; Wang, Yi-Shu; Zhai, Ying-Xian; Wang, Jian-Wei; Youssef, Mariam; Cui, Rutao; Liang, Jiyong; Genovese, Nicholas; Chow, Louise T.; Li, Yu-Lin; Xu, Zhi-Xiang

    2016-01-01

    High-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are causative agents of anogenital cancers and a fraction of head and neck cancers. The mechanisms involved in the progression of HPV neoplasias to cancers remain largely unknown. Here, we report that O-linked GlcNAcylation (O-GlcNAc) and O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT) were markedly increased in HPV-caused cervical neoplasms relative to normal cervix, whereas O-GlcNAcase (OGA) levels were not altered. Transduction of HPV16 oncogene E6 or E6/E7 into mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) up-regulated OGT mRNA and protein, elevated the level of O-GlcNAc, and promoted cell proliferation while reducing cellular senescence. Conversely, in HPV-18–transformed HeLa cervical carcinoma cells, inhibition of O-GlcNAc with a low concentration of a chemical inhibitor impaired the transformed phenotypes in vitro. We showed that E6 elevated c-MYC via increased protein stability attributable to O-GlcNAcylation on Thr58. Reduction of HPV-mediated cell viability by a high concentration of O-GlcNAc inhibitor was partially rescued by elevated c-MYC. Finally, knockdown of OGT or O-GlcNAc inhibition in HeLa cells or in TC-1 cells, a mouse cell line transformed by HPV16 E6/E7 and activated K-RAS, reduced c-MYC and suppressed tumorigenesis and metastasis. Thus, we have uncovered a mechanism for HPV oncoprotein-mediated transformation. These findings may eventually aid in the development of effective therapeutics for HPV-associated malignancies by targeting aberrant O-GlcNAc. PMID:27482104

  17. Mathematical models of immune effector responses to viral infections: Virus control versus the development of pathology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wodarz, Dominik

    2005-12-01

    This article reviews mathematical models which have investigated the importance of lytic and non-lytic immune responses for the control of viral infections. Lytic immune responses fight the virus by killing infected cells, while non-lytic immune responses fight the virus by inhibiting viral replication while leaving the infected cell alive. The models suggest which types or combinations of immune responses are required to resolve infections which vary in their characteristics, such as the rate of viral replication and the rate of virus-induced target cell death. This framework is then applied to persistent infections and viral evolution. It is investigated how viral evolution and antigenic escape can influence the relative balance of lytic and non-lytic responses over time, and how this might correlate with the transition from an asymptomatic infection to pathology. This is discussed in the specific context of hepatitis C virus infection.

  18. An HIV epidemic model based on viral load dynamics: value in assessing empirical trends in HIV virulence and community viral load.

    PubMed

    Herbeck, Joshua T; Mittler, John E; Gottlieb, Geoffrey S; Mullins, James I

    2014-06-01

    Trends in HIV virulence have been monitored since the start of the AIDS pandemic, as studying HIV virulence informs our understanding of HIV epidemiology and pathogenesis. Here, we model changes in HIV virulence as a strictly evolutionary process, using set point viral load (SPVL) as a proxy, to make inferences about empirical SPVL trends from longitudinal HIV cohorts. We develop an agent-based epidemic model based on HIV viral load dynamics. The model contains functions for viral load and transmission, SPVL and disease progression, viral load trajectories in multiple stages of infection, and the heritability of SPVL across transmissions. We find that HIV virulence evolves to an intermediate level that balances infectiousness with longer infected lifespans, resulting in an optimal SPVL∼4.75 log10 viral RNA copies/mL. Adaptive viral evolution may explain observed HIV virulence trends: our model produces SPVL trends with magnitudes that are broadly similar to empirical trends. With regard to variation among studies in empirical SPVL trends, results from our model suggest that variation may be explained by the specific epidemic context, e.g. the mean SPVL of the founding lineage or the age of the epidemic; or improvements in HIV screening and diagnosis that results in sampling biases. We also use our model to examine trends in community viral load, a population-level measure of HIV viral load that is thought to reflect a population's overall transmission potential. We find that community viral load evolves in association with SPVL, in the absence of prevention programs such as antiretroviral therapy, and that the mean community viral load is not necessarily a strong predictor of HIV incidence.

  19. Structural and metabolic studies of O-linked fucose-containing proteins of normal and virally-transformed rat fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Morton, P.A.

    1985-01-01

    Previous studies in this laboratory have demonstrated that cultured human and rodent cells contain a series of low molecular weight glycosylated amino acids of unusual structure, designated amino acid fucosides. The incorporation of radiolabelled-fucose into one of these components, designated FL4a (glucosylfucosylthreonine), is markedly-reduced in transformed epithelial and fibroblastic cells. The authors have examined fucose-labelled normal and virally-transformed rat fibroblast cell lines for glycoproteins which might be precursors to amino acid fucosides. Using milk alkaline/borohydride treatment (the beta-elimination reaction) to release O-linked oligosaccharides from proteins, they have isolated and partially characterized two low M/sub r/ reaction products (designated DS-ol and TS-ol) released from macromolecular cell material. The identity of one of these components (DS-ol, glucosylfucitol) suggested the existence in these cells of a direct protein precursor to FL4a. They examined fucose-labelled macromolecular cell material for proteins which release DS-ol (DS-proteins.). Using gel filtration chromatography and sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) with subsequent autoradiography, they have observed DS-proteins which appear to exhibit a broad molecular weight size range, and are also present in culture medium from normal and transformed cells. The findings suggest that mammalian cells contain DS-proteins and TS-proteins with a novel carbohydrate-peptide linkage wherein L-fucose is O-linked to a polypeptide backbone. Metabolic studies were undertaken to examine both the relationship between DS-protein and FL4a and the biochemical basis for the decreased level of FL4a and the biochemical basis for the decreased level of FL4a observed in transformed cells.

  20. Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea Virus 3C-Like Protease-Mediated Nucleocapsid Processing: Possible Link to Viral Cell Culture Adaptability.

    PubMed

    Jaru-Ampornpan, Peera; Jengarn, Juggragarn; Wanitchang, Asawin; Jongkaewwattana, Anan

    2017-01-15

    Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) causes severe diarrhea and high mortality rates in newborn piglets, leading to massive losses to the swine industry worldwide during recent epidemics. Intense research efforts are now focusing on defining viral characteristics that confer a growth advantage, pathogenicity, or cell adaptability in order to better understand the PEDV life cycle and identify suitable targets for antiviral or vaccine development. Here, we report a unique phenomenon of PEDV nucleocapsid (N) cleavage by the PEDV-encoded 3C-like protease (3Cpro) during infection. The identification of the 3Cpro cleavage site at the C terminus of N supported previous observations that PEDV 3Cpro showed a substrate requirement slightly different from that of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) 3Cpro and revealed a greater flexibility in its substrate recognition site. This cleavage motif is present in the majority of cell culture-adapted PEDV strains but is missing in emerging field isolates. Remarkably, reverse-genetics-derived cell culture-adapted PEDVAVCT12 harboring uncleavable N displayed growth retardation in Vero E6-APN cells compared to the wild-type virus. These observations altogether shed new light on the investigation and characterization of the PEDV nucleocapsid protein and its possible link to cell culture adaptation.

  1. Use of hydrophilic extra-viral domain of canine distemper virus H protein for enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay development.

    PubMed

    Cho, Ki-hyun; Kim, Jeongmi; Yoo, Hyun-ah; Kim, Dae-hee; Park, Seung-yong; Song, Chang-seon; Choi, In-soo; Lee, Joong-bok

    2014-12-01

    Simple methods for measuring the levels of serum antibody against canine distemper virus (CDV) would assist in the effective vaccination of dogs. To develop an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) specific for CDV, we expressed hydrophilic extra-viral domain (HEVD) protein of the A75/17-CDV H gene in a pET 28a plasmid-based Escherichia (E.) coli vector system. Expression was confirmed by dot and Western blotting. We proposed that detection of E. coli-expressed H protein might be conformation- dependent because intensities of the reactions observed with these two methods varied. The H gene HEVD protein was further purified and used as an antigen for an ELISA. Samples from dogs with undetectable to high anti-CDV antibody titers were analyzed using this HEVD-specific ELISA and a commercial CDV antibody detection kit (ImmunoComb). Levels of HEVD antigenicity measured with the assays and immunochromatography correlated. These data indicated that the HEDV protein may be used as antigen to develop techniques for detecting antibodies against CDV.

  2. Multi-scale model for hepatitis C viral load kinetics under treatment with direct acting antivirals.

    PubMed

    Clausznitzer, Diana; Harnisch, Julia; Kaderali, Lars

    2016-06-15

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections are a global health problem, and extensive research over the last decades has been targeted at understanding its molecular biology and developing effective antiviral treatments. Recently, a number of potent direct acting antiviral drugs have been developed targeting specific processes in the viral life cycle. Here, we developed a mathematical multi-scale model of the within-host dynamics of HCV infection by integrating a standard model for viral infection with a detailed model of the viral replication cycle inside infected cells. We use this model to study patient time courses of viral load under treatment with daclatasvir, an inhibitor of the viral non-structural protein NS5A. Model analysis predicts that treatment efficacy can be increased by combining daclatasvir with dedicated viral polymerase inhibitors, corresponding to promising current strategies in drug development. Hence, our model presents a predictive tool for in silico simulations, which can be used to study and optimize direct acting antiviral drug treatment.

  3. An accurate two-phase approximate solution to the acute viral infection model

    SciTech Connect

    Perelson, Alan S

    2009-01-01

    During an acute viral infection, virus levels rise, reach a peak and then decline. Data and numerical solutions suggest the growth and decay phases are linear on a log scale. While viral dynamic models are typically nonlinear with analytical solutions difficult to obtain, the exponential nature of the solutions suggests approximations can be found. We derive a two-phase approximate solution to the target cell limited influenza model and illustrate the accuracy using data and previously established parameter values of six patients infected with influenza A. For one patient, the subsequent fall in virus concentration was not consistent with our predictions during the decay phase and an alternate approximation is derived. We find expressions for the rate and length of initial viral growth in terms of the parameters, the extent each parameter is involved in viral peaks, and the single parameter responsible for virus decay. We discuss applications of this analysis in antiviral treatments and investigating host and virus heterogeneities.

  4. Spin models inferred from patient-derived viral sequence data faithfully describe HIV fitness landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shekhar, Karthik; Ruberman, Claire F.; Ferguson, Andrew L.; Barton, John P.; Kardar, Mehran; Chakraborty, Arup K.

    2013-12-01

    Mutational escape from vaccine-induced immune responses has thwarted the development of a successful vaccine against AIDS, whose causative agent is HIV, a highly mutable virus. Knowing the virus' fitness as a function of its proteomic sequence can enable rational design of potent vaccines, as this information can focus vaccine-induced immune responses to target mutational vulnerabilities of the virus. Spin models have been proposed as a means to infer intrinsic fitness landscapes of HIV proteins from patient-derived viral protein sequences. These sequences are the product of nonequilibrium viral evolution driven by patient-specific immune responses and are subject to phylogenetic constraints. How can such sequence data allow inference of intrinsic fitness landscapes? We combined computer simulations and variational theory á la Feynman to show that, in most circumstances, spin models inferred from patient-derived viral sequences reflect the correct rank order of the fitness of mutant viral strains. Our findings are relevant for diverse viruses.

  5. A phylogenetic analysis of Bovine Viral Diarrhoea Virus (BVDV) isolates from six different regions of the UK and links to animal movement data.

    PubMed

    Booth, Richard E; Thomas, Carole J; El-Attar, Laila M R; Gunn, George; Brownlie, Joe

    2013-06-19

    Bovine Viral Diarrhoea Virus (BVDV) is a pestivirus which infects cattle populations worldwide and is recognised as a significant source of economic loss through its impact on health and productivity. Studies investigating the molecular epidemiology of BVDV can give invaluable information about the diversity of viral strains present in a population and this, in turn, can inform control programs, drive vaccine development and determine likely infection sources. The current study investigated 104 viral isolates from forty farms across the UK. Through phylogenetic and nucleotide sequence analysis of the 5'UTR and Npro regions of the isolates investigated, it was determined that BVDV 1a was the predominant sub-genotype. However, BVDV 1b, 1e and 1i were also identified and, for the first time in the UK, BVDV 1d. Through analysis of animal movement data alongside the phylogenetic analysis of these BVD isolates, it was possible to link animal movements to the viral isolates present on several premises and, for the first time, begin to elucidate the routes of viral transmission. With further work, this type of analysis would enable accurate determination and quantification of the true biosecurity risk factors associated with BVDV transmission.

  6. [The SSPE model: suggestions for an explication of viral persistence].

    PubMed

    Cernescu, C

    1989-01-01

    The detection of a latent viral flora intrinsic to the central nervous system (CNS) raises the problem to know if some neuropathogenic strains have the property of initiating persistent infections or if the persistence is the result of the immune response particularities at the CNS level. A review is done of the pathogenic explanations of virus persistence in SSPE, followed by the discussion about two pathogenic alternatives issues from the author's studies: the antigenic "drift" hypothesis and the one of the defective interfering particles preferential synthesis.

  7. A study of the spreading scheme for viral marketing based on a complex network model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jianmei; Yao, Canzhong; Ma, Weicheng; Chen, Guanrong

    2010-02-01

    Buzzword-based viral marketing, known also as digital word-of-mouth marketing, is a marketing mode attached to some carriers on the Internet, which can rapidly copy marketing information at a low cost. Viral marketing actually uses a pre-existing social network where, however, the scale of the pre-existing network is believed to be so large and so random, so that its theoretical analysis is intractable and unmanageable. There are very few reports in the literature on how to design a spreading scheme for viral marketing on real social networks according to the traditional marketing theory or the relatively new network marketing theory. Complex network theory provides a new model for the study of large-scale complex systems, using the latest developments of graph theory and computing techniques. From this perspective, the present paper extends the complex network theory and modeling into the research of general viral marketing and develops a specific spreading scheme for viral marking and an approach to design the scheme based on a real complex network on the QQ instant messaging system. This approach is shown to be rather universal and can be further extended to the design of various spreading schemes for viral marketing based on different instant messaging systems.

  8. Common data link (CDL) interference model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerasoli, Caramen; Zhao, Wiley; Santapietro, John J.; McAlinden, R. E.; Smith, B. F.; Jacyk, P. A.

    2002-07-01

    The increasing use of airwaves for military communication and surveillance and commercial applications places burdens on spectrum use. This crowding of the spectrum presents two broad problem categories. The first is "co-site interference" where numerous transmitters and receivers are physically located in a small area and share a given portion of the spectrum. Under these conditions, a receiver can be "victim" to a co-located transmitter. The second category involves numerous transmitters (typically airborne) well separated from each other but communicating to receivers placed in a relatively small area. The Common Data Link (CDL) refers to a standard protocol for military data delivery and communication. Surveillance platforms such as Tactical Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (TUAV), JSTARS, U2's, Global Hawks will stream high rate surveillance data (radar, visual and/or infrared imagery, etc.) down to ground terminals. As such, bandwidths are wide (100's MHz) and the potential exists for ground receivers to be victim to signals from airborne transmitters other than its desired source. MITRE has developed a CDL Interference Model to assess potential problems in realistic tactical surveillance scenarios. This paper documents the physical basis of the CDL Interference Model as well as the visualization software architecture that integrates the model with ModSAF/OneSAF.

  9. ModeLang: A New Approach for Experts-Friendly Viral Infections Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Blazewicz, Jacek

    2013-01-01

    Computational modeling is an important element of systems biology. One of its important applications is modeling complex, dynamical, and biological systems, including viral infections. This type of modeling usually requires close cooperation between biologists and mathematicians. However, such cooperation often faces communication problems because biologists do not have sufficient knowledge to understand mathematical description of the models, and mathematicians do not have sufficient knowledge to define and verify these models. In many areas of systems biology, this problem has already been solved; however, in some of these areas there are still certain problematic aspects. The goal of the presented research was to facilitate this cooperation by designing seminatural formal language for describing viral infection models that will be easy to understand for biologists and easy to use by mathematicians and computer scientists. The ModeLang language was designed in cooperation with biologists and its computer implementation was prepared. Tests proved that it can be successfully used to describe commonly used viral infection models and then to simulate and verify them. As a result, it can make cooperation between biologists and mathematicians modeling viral infections much easier, speeding up computational verification of formulated hypotheses. PMID:24454531

  10. Manipulating 3D-Printed and Paper Models Enhances Student Understanding of Viral Replication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Couper, Lisa; Johannes, Kristen; Powers, Jackie; Silberglitt, Matt; Davenport, Jodi

    2016-01-01

    Understanding key concepts in molecular biology requires reasoning about molecular processes that are not directly observable and, as such, presents a challenge to students and teachers. We ask whether novel interactive physical models and activities can help students understand key processes in viral replication. Our 3D tangible models are…

  11. Dysplastic Hepatocytes Develop Nuclear Inclusions in a Mouse Model of Viral Hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Thakur, Priyanka; Lamoke, Folami; Chaffin, Joanna M.; Bartoli, Manuela; Lee, Jeffrey R.; Duncan, Michael B.

    2014-01-01

    Viral hepatitis resulting in chronic liver disease is an important clinical challenge and insight into the cellular processes that drive pathogenesis will be critical in order to develop new diagnostic and therapeutic options. Nuclear inclusions in viral and non-viral hepatitis are well documented and have diagnostic significance in some disease contexts. However, the origins and functional consequences of these nuclear inclusions remain elusive. To date the clinical observation of nuclear inclusions in viral and non-viral hepatitis has not been explored at depth in murine models of liver disease. Herein, we report that in a transgenic model of hepatitis B surface antigen mediated hepatitis, murine hepatocytes exhibit nuclear inclusions. Cells bearing nuclear inclusions were more likely to express markers of cell proliferation. We also established a correlation between these inclusions and oxidative stress. N-acetyl cysteine treatment effectively reduced oxidative stress levels, relieved endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, and the number of nuclear inclusions we observed in the transgenic mice. Our results suggest that the presence of nuclear inclusions in hepatocytes correlates with oxidative stress and cellular proliferation in a model of antigen mediated hepatitis. PMID:24932583

  12. Rainfall-runoff model for prediction of waterborne viral contamination in a small river catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelati, E.; Dommar, C.; Lowe, R.; Polcher, J.; Rodó, X.

    2013-12-01

    We present a lumped rainfall-runoff model aimed at providing useful information for the prediction of waterborne viral contamination in small rivers. Viral contamination of water bodies may occur because of the discharge of sewage effluents and of surface runoff over areas affected by animal waste loads. Surface runoff is caused by precipitation that cannot infiltrate due to its intensity and to antecedent soil water content. It may transport animal feces to adjacent water bodies and cause viral contamination. We model streamflow by separating it into two components: subsurface flow, which is produced by infiltrated precipitation; and surface runoff. The model estimates infiltrated and non-infiltrated precipitation and uses impulse-response functions to compute the corresponding fractions of streamflow. The developed methodologies are applied to the Glafkos river, whose catchment extends for 102 km2 and includes the city of Patra. Streamflow and precipitation observations are available at a daily time resolution. Waterborne virus concentration measurements were performed approximately every second week from the beginning of 2011 to mid 2012. Samples were taken at several locations: in river water upstream of Patras and in the urban area; in sea water at the river outlet and approximately 2 km south-west of Patras; in sewage effluents before and after treatment. The rainfall-runoff model was calibrated and validated using observed streamflow and precipitation data. The model contribution to waterborne viral contamination prediction was benchmarked by analyzing the virus concentration measurements together with the estimated surface runoff values. The presented methodology may be a first step towards the development of waterborne viral contamination alert systems. Predicting viral contamination of water bodies would benefit sectors such as water supply and tourism.

  13. Global Analysis of Viral Infection in an Archaeal Model System

    PubMed Central

    Maaty, Walid S.; Steffens, Joseph D.; Heinemann, Joshua; Ortmann, Alice C.; Reeves, Benjamin D.; Biswas, Swapan K.; Dratz, Edward A.; Grieco, Paul A.; Young, Mark J.; Bothner, Brian

    2012-01-01

    to viral infection, demonstrates the power of quantitative two-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis and ABPP using 2D gel compatible fluorescent dyes. PMID:23233852

  14. Design evaluation and optimization for models of hepatitis C viral dynamics.

    PubMed

    Guedj, Jeremie; Bazzoli, Caroline; Neumann, Avidan U; Mentré, France

    2011-05-10

    Mathematical modeling of hepatitis C viral (HCV) kinetics is widely used for understanding viral pathogenesis and predicting treatment outcome. The standard model is based on a system of five non-linear ordinary differential equations (ODE) that describe both viral kinetics and changes in drug concentration after treatment initiation. In such complex models parameter estimation is challenging and requires frequent sampling measurements on each individual. By borrowing information between study subjects, non-linear mixed effect models can deal with sparser sampling from each individual. However, the search for optimal designs in this context has been limited by the numerical difficulty of evaluating the Fisher information matrix (FIM). Using the software PFIM, we show that a linearization of the statistical model avoids most of the computational burden, while providing a good approximation to the FIM. We then compare the precision of the parameters that can be expected using five study designs from the literature. We illustrate the usefulness of rationalizing data sampling by showing that, for a given level of precision, optimal design could reduce the total number of measurements by up 50 per cent. Our approach can be used by a statistician or a clinician aiming at designing an HCV viral kinetics study.

  15. Using experimental human influenza infections to validate a viral dynamic model and the implications for prediction.

    PubMed

    Chen, S C; You, S H; Liu, C Y; Chio, C P; Liao, C M

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this work was to use experimental infection data of human influenza to assess a simple viral dynamics model in epithelial cells and better understand the underlying complex factors governing the infection process. The developed study model expands on previous reports of a target cell-limited model with delayed virus production. Data from 10 published experimental infection studies of human influenza was used to validate the model. Our results elucidate, mechanistically, the associations between epithelial cells, human immune responses, and viral titres and were supported by the experimental infection data. We report that the maximum total number of free virions following infection is 10(3)-fold higher than the initial introduced titre. Our results indicated that the infection rates of unprotected epithelial cells probably play an important role in affecting viral dynamics. By simulating an advanced model of viral dynamics and applying it to experimental infection data of human influenza, we obtained important estimates of the infection rate. This work provides epidemiologically meaningful results, meriting further efforts to understand the causes and consequences of influenza A infection.

  16. A pharmacokinetic/viral kinetic model to evaluate the treatment effectiveness of danoprevir against chronic HCV

    SciTech Connect

    Canini, Laetitia; Chatterjee, Anushree; Guedj, Jeremie; Lemenuel-Diot, Annabelle; Brennan, Barbara; Smith, Patrick F.; Perelson, Alan S.

    2014-10-16

    Background—Viral kinetic models have proven useful to characterize treatment effectiveness during HCV therapy with interferon (IFN) or with direct acting antivirals (DAAs). Methods—We use a pharmacokinetic/viral kinetic (PK/VK) model to describe HCV RNA kinetics during treatment with danoprevir, a protease inhibitor. In a phase 1 study, danoprevir monotherapy was administered for 14 days in ascending doses ranging from 200 to 600 mg per day to 40 patients of whom 32 were treatment-naïve and 8 were non-responders to prior PEG-IFN-α/ribavirin treatment. Results—In most patients, a biphasic decline of HCV RNA during therapy was observed. A two-compartment PK model and a VK model that considered treatment effectiveness to vary with the predicted danoprevir concentration inside the second compartment provided a good fit to the viral load data. A time-varying effectiveness model was also used to fit the viral load data. We found the antiviral effectiveness increased in a dose-dependent manner, with a 14-day time-averaged effectiveness of 0.95 at the lowest dose (100 mg bid) and 0.99 at the highest dose (200 mg tid). Prior IFN non-responders exhibited a 14-day time-averaged effectiveness of 0.98 (300 mg bid). Finally, the second phase decline showed two different behaviors, with 30% of patients exhibiting a rapid decline of HCV RNA, comparable to that seen with other protease inhibitors (>0.3 d-1), whereas the viral decline was slower in the other patients. Conclusions—Our results are consistent with the modest SVR rates from the INFORM-SVR study where patients were treated with a combination of mericitabine and ritonavir-boosted danoprevir.

  17. A pharmacokinetic/viral kinetic model to evaluate the treatment effectiveness of danoprevir against chronic HCV

    DOE PAGES

    Canini, Laetitia; Chatterjee, Anushree; Guedj, Jeremie; ...

    2014-10-16

    Background—Viral kinetic models have proven useful to characterize treatment effectiveness during HCV therapy with interferon (IFN) or with direct acting antivirals (DAAs). Methods—We use a pharmacokinetic/viral kinetic (PK/VK) model to describe HCV RNA kinetics during treatment with danoprevir, a protease inhibitor. In a phase 1 study, danoprevir monotherapy was administered for 14 days in ascending doses ranging from 200 to 600 mg per day to 40 patients of whom 32 were treatment-naïve and 8 were non-responders to prior PEG-IFN-α/ribavirin treatment. Results—In most patients, a biphasic decline of HCV RNA during therapy was observed. A two-compartment PK model and a VKmore » model that considered treatment effectiveness to vary with the predicted danoprevir concentration inside the second compartment provided a good fit to the viral load data. A time-varying effectiveness model was also used to fit the viral load data. We found the antiviral effectiveness increased in a dose-dependent manner, with a 14-day time-averaged effectiveness of 0.95 at the lowest dose (100 mg bid) and 0.99 at the highest dose (200 mg tid). Prior IFN non-responders exhibited a 14-day time-averaged effectiveness of 0.98 (300 mg bid). Finally, the second phase decline showed two different behaviors, with 30% of patients exhibiting a rapid decline of HCV RNA, comparable to that seen with other protease inhibitors (>0.3 d-1), whereas the viral decline was slower in the other patients. Conclusions—Our results are consistent with the modest SVR rates from the INFORM-SVR study where patients were treated with a combination of mericitabine and ritonavir-boosted danoprevir.« less

  18. A highly intensified ART regimen induces long-term viral suppression and restriction of the viral reservoir in a simian AIDS model.

    PubMed

    Shytaj, Iart Luca; Norelli, Sandro; Chirullo, Barbara; Della Corte, Alessandro; Collins, Matt; Yalley-Ogunro, Jake; Greenhouse, Jack; Iraci, Nunzio; Acosta, Edward P; Barreca, Maria Letizia; Lewis, Mark G; Savarino, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    Stably suppressed viremia during ART is essential for establishing reliable simian models for HIV/AIDS. We tested the efficacy of a multidrug ART (highly intensified ART) in a wide range of viremic conditions (10³-10⁷) viral RNA copies/mL) in SIVmac251-infected rhesus macaques, and its impact on the viral reservoir. Eleven macaques in the pre-AIDS stage of the disease were treated with a multidrug combination (highly intensified ART) consisting of two nucleosidic/nucleotidic reverse transcriptase inhibitors (emtricitabine and tenofovir), an integrase inhibitor (raltegravir), a protease inhibitor (ritonavir-boosted darunavir) and the CCR5 blocker maraviroc. All animals stably displayed viral loads below the limit of detection of the assay (i.e. <40 RNA copies/mL) after starting highly intensified ART. By increasing the sensitivity of the assay to 3 RNA copies/mL, viral load was still below the limit of detection in all subjects tested. Importantly, viral DNA resulted below the assay detection limit (<2 copies of DNA/5*10⁵ cells) in PBMCs and rectal biopsies of all animals at the end of the follow-up, and in lymph node biopsies from the majority of the study subjects. Moreover, highly intensified ART decreased central/transitional memory, effector memory and activated (HLA-DR⁺) effector memory CD4⁺ T-cells in vivo, in line with the role of these subsets as the main cell subpopulations harbouring the virus. Finally, treatment with highly intensified ART at viral load rebound following suspension of a previous anti-reservoir therapy eventually improved the spontaneous containment of viral load following suspension of the second therapeutic cycle, thus leading to a persistent suppression of viremia in the absence of ART. In conclusion, we show, for the first time, complete suppression of viral load by highly intensified ART and a likely associated restriction of the viral reservoir in the macaque AIDS model, making it a useful platform for testing potential

  19. Development of a mouse model mimicking key aspects of a viral asthma exacerbation.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Deborah L; Davis, Nicola H E; Majithiya, Jayesh B; Piper, Sian C; Lewis, Arthur; Sleeman, Matthew A; Corkill, Dominic J; May, Richard D

    2014-04-01

    Viral respiratory tract infections are known triggers of asthma exacerbations in both adults and children. The current standard of care, inhaled CS (corticosteroids) and LABAs (long-acting β2-adrenoceptor agonists), fails to prevent the loss of control that manifests as an exacerbation. In order to better understand the mechanisms underlying viral asthma exacerbations we established an in vivo model using the clinically relevant aeroallergen HDM (house dust mite) and the viral mimetic/TLR3 (Toll-like receptor 3) agonist poly(I:C). Poly(I:C) alone induced a similar neutrophilic inflammatory profile in the BAL (bronchoalveolar lavage) to that of HRV1b (human rhinovirus 1b) alone, accompanied by both elevated BAL KC (keratinocyte-derived chemokine) and IL-1β (interleukin-1β). When mice allergic to HDM were also challenged with poly(I:C) the neutrophilic inflammatory profile was exacerbated. Increased CD8(+) T-cell numbers, increased CD4(+) and CD8(+) cell activation and elevated KC and IL-1β were observed. No increases in Th2 cytokines or the eosinophil chemoattractant CCL11 [chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 11], above those induced by HDM alone, were observed. The poly(I:C)-exacerbated neutrophilia did not translate into changes in AHR (airways hyper-responsiveness), indicating that in this model inflammation and AHR are two mechanistically independent events. To test the clinical relevance of this model CS sensitivity was assessed using prednisone, a synthetic oral CS used to manage exacerbations in asthmatic patients already on maximal doses of inhaled CS. The increased neutrophils, and accompanying cytokines/chemokines KC and IL-1β induced by poly(I:C) challenge of HDM-sensitized and challenged mice were insensitive to oral prednisone therapy. In summary we have described a CS-resistant mouse model mimicking the key aspects of viral asthma exacerbation using the clinically relevant aeroallergen HDM and the viral mimic poly(I:C). This model may provide better

  20. Modeling the winter-to-summer transition of prokaryotic and viral abundance in the Arctic Ocean.

    PubMed

    Winter, Christian; Payet, Jérôme P; Suttle, Curtis A

    2012-01-01

    One of the challenges in oceanography is to understand the influence of environmental factors on the abundances of prokaryotes and viruses. Generally, conventional statistical methods resolve trends well, but more complex relationships are difficult to explore. In such cases, Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) offer an alternative way for data analysis. Here, we developed ANN-based models of prokaryotic and viral abundances in the Arctic Ocean. The models were used to identify the best predictors for prokaryotic and viral abundances including cytometrically-distinguishable populations of prokaryotes (high and low nucleic acid cells) and viruses (high- and low-fluorescent viruses) among salinity, temperature, depth, day length, and the concentration of Chlorophyll-a. The best performing ANNs to model the abundances of high and low nucleic acid cells used temperature and Chl-a as input parameters, while the abundances of high- and low-fluorescent viruses used depth, Chl-a, and day length as input parameters. Decreasing viral abundance with increasing depth and decreasing system productivity was captured well by the ANNs. Despite identifying the same predictors for the two populations of prokaryotes and viruses, respectively, the structure of the best performing ANNs differed between high and low nucleic acid cells and between high- and low-fluorescent viruses. Also, the two prokaryotic and viral groups responded differently to changes in the predictor parameters; hence, the cytometric distinction between these populations is ecologically relevant. The models imply that temperature is the main factor explaining most of the variation in the abundances of high nucleic acid cells and total prokaryotes and that the mechanisms governing the reaction to changes in the environment are distinctly different among the prokaryotic and viral populations.

  1. Modeling ecological drivers in marine viral communities using comparative metagenomics and network analyses

    PubMed Central

    Hurwitz, Bonnie L.; Westveld, Anton H.; Brum, Jennifer R.; Sullivan, Matthew B.

    2014-01-01

    Long-standing questions in marine viral ecology are centered on understanding how viral assemblages change along gradients in space and time. However, investigating these fundamental ecological questions has been challenging due to incomplete representation of naturally occurring viral diversity in single gene- or morphology-based studies and an inability to identify up to 90% of reads in viral metagenomes (viromes). Although protein clustering techniques provide a significant advance by helping organize this unknown metagenomic sequence space, they typically use only ∼75% of the data and rely on assembly methods not yet tuned for naturally occurring sequence variation. Here, we introduce an annotation- and assembly-free strategy for comparative metagenomics that combines shared k-mer and social network analyses (regression modeling). This robust statistical framework enables visualization of complex sample networks and determination of ecological factors driving community structure. Application to 32 viromes from the Pacific Ocean Virome dataset identified clusters of samples broadly delineated by photic zone and revealed that geographic region, depth, and proximity to shore were significant predictors of community structure. Within subsets of this dataset, depth, season, and oxygen concentration were significant drivers of viral community structure at a single open ocean station, whereas variability along onshore–offshore transects was driven by oxygen concentration in an area with an oxygen minimum zone and not depth or proximity to shore, as might be expected. Together these results demonstrate that this highly scalable approach using complete metagenomic network-based comparisons can both test and generate hypotheses for ecological investigation of viral and microbial communities in nature. PMID:25002514

  2. Modeling ecological drivers in marine viral communities using comparative metagenomics and network analyses.

    PubMed

    Hurwitz, Bonnie L; Westveld, Anton H; Brum, Jennifer R; Sullivan, Matthew B

    2014-07-22

    Long-standing questions in marine viral ecology are centered on understanding how viral assemblages change along gradients in space and time. However, investigating these fundamental ecological questions has been challenging due to incomplete representation of naturally occurring viral diversity in single gene- or morphology-based studies and an inability to identify up to 90% of reads in viral metagenomes (viromes). Although protein clustering techniques provide a significant advance by helping organize this unknown metagenomic sequence space, they typically use only ∼75% of the data and rely on assembly methods not yet tuned for naturally occurring sequence variation. Here, we introduce an annotation- and assembly-free strategy for comparative metagenomics that combines shared k-mer and social network analyses (regression modeling). This robust statistical framework enables visualization of complex sample networks and determination of ecological factors driving community structure. Application to 32 viromes from the Pacific Ocean Virome dataset identified clusters of samples broadly delineated by photic zone and revealed that geographic region, depth, and proximity to shore were significant predictors of community structure. Within subsets of this dataset, depth, season, and oxygen concentration were significant drivers of viral community structure at a single open ocean station, whereas variability along onshore-offshore transects was driven by oxygen concentration in an area with an oxygen minimum zone and not depth or proximity to shore, as might be expected. Together these results demonstrate that this highly scalable approach using complete metagenomic network-based comparisons can both test and generate hypotheses for ecological investigation of viral and microbial communities in nature.

  3. Spin models inferred from patient-derived viral sequence data faithfully describe HIV fitness landscapes

    PubMed Central

    Shekhar, Karthik; Ruberman, Claire F.; Ferguson, Andrew L.; Barton, John P.; Kardar, Mehran; Chakraborty, Arup K.

    2017-01-01

    Mutational escape from vaccine-induced immune responses has thwarted the development of a successful vaccine against AIDS, whose causative agent is HIV, a highly mutable virus. Knowing the virus’ fitness as a function of its proteomic sequence can enable rational design of potent vaccines, as this information can focus vaccine-induced immune responses to target mutational vulnerabilities of the virus. Spin models have been proposed as a means to infer intrinsic fitness landscapes of HIV proteins from patient-derived viral protein sequences. These sequences are the product of nonequilibrium viral evolution driven by patient-specific immune responses and are subject to phylogenetic constraints. How can such sequence data allow inference of intrinsic fitness landscapes? We combined computer simulations and variational theory á la Feynman to show that, in most circumstances, spin models inferred from patient-derived viral sequences reflect the correct rank order of the fitness of mutant viral strains. Our findings are relevant for diverse viruses. PMID:24483484

  4. Can information be spread as a virus? viral marketing as epidemiological model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Helena Sofia; Fonseca, Manuel José

    2016-11-01

    In epidemiology, an epidemic is defined as the spread of an infectious disease to a large number of people in a given population within a short period of time. In the marketing context, a message is viral when it is broadly sent and received by the target market through person-to-person transmission. This specific marketing communication strategy is commonly referred as viral marketing. Due to this similarity between an epidemic and the viral marketing process and because the understanding of the critical factors to this communications strategy effectiveness remain largely unknown, the mathematical models in epidemiology are presented in this marketing specific field. In this paper, an epidemiological model SIR (Susceptible- Infected-Recovered) to study the effects of a viral marketing strategy is presented. It is made a comparison between the disease parameters and the marketing application, and Matlab simulations are performed. Finally, some conclusions are carried out and their marketing implications are exposed: interactions across the parameters suggest some recommendations to marketers, as the profitability of the investment or the need to improve the targeting criteria of the communications campaigns.

  5. A nonstandard finite difference scheme for a basic model of cellular immune response to viral infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korpusik, Adam

    2017-02-01

    We present a nonstandard finite difference scheme for a basic model of cellular immune response to viral infection. The main advantage of this approach is that it preserves the essential qualitative features of the original continuous model (non-negativity and boundedness of the solution, equilibria and their stability conditions), while being easy to implement. All of the qualitative features are preserved independently of the chosen step-size. Numerical simulations of our approach and comparison with other conventional simulation methods are presented.

  6. Modeling the within-host dynamics of cholera: bacterial-viral interaction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xueying; Wang, Jin

    2016-12-22

    Novel deterministic and stochastic models are proposed in this paper for the within-host dynamics of cholera, with a focus on the bacterial-viral interaction. The deterministic model is a system of differential equations describing the interaction among the two types of vibrios and the viruses. The stochastic model is a system of Markov jump processes that is derived based on the dynamics of the deterministic model. The multitype branching process approximation is applied to estimate the extinction probability of bacteria and viruses within a human host during the early stage of the bacterial-viral infection. Accordingly, a closed-form expression is derived for the disease extinction probability, and analytic estimates are validated with numerical simulations. The local and global dynamics of the bacterial-viral interaction are analysed using the deterministic model, and the result indicates that there is a sharp disease threshold characterized by the basic reproduction number [Formula: see text]: if [Formula: see text], vibrios ingested from the environment into human body will not cause cholera infection; if [Formula: see text], vibrios will grow with increased toxicity and persist within the host, leading to human cholera. In contrast, the stochastic model indicates, more realistically, that there is always a positive probability of disease extinction within the human host.

  7. Specimen origin, type and testing laboratory are linked to longer turnaround times for HIV viral load testing in Malawi

    PubMed Central

    Chipungu, Geoffrey; Kim, Andrea A.; Sarr, Abdoulaye; Ali, Hammad; Mwenda, Reuben; Nkengasong, John N.; Singer, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Background Efforts to reach UNAIDS’ treatment and viral suppression targets have increased demand for viral load (VL) testing and strained existing laboratory networks, affecting turnaround time. Longer VL turnaround times delay both initiation of formal adherence counseling and switches to second-line therapy for persons failing treatment and contribute to poorer health outcomes. Methods We utilized descriptive statistics and logistic regression to analyze VL testing data collected in Malawi between January 2013 and March 2016. The primary outcomes assessed were greater-than-median pretest phase turnaround time (days elapsed from specimen collection to receipt at the laboratory) and greater-than-median test phase turnaround time (days from receipt to testing). Results The median number of days between specimen collection and testing increased 3-fold between 2013 (8 days, interquartile range (IQR) = 6–16) and 2015 (24, IQR = 13–39) (p<0.001). Multivariable analysis indicated that the odds of longer pretest phase turnaround time were significantly higher for specimen collection districts without laboratories capable of conducting viral load tests (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) = 5.16; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 5.04–5.27) as well as for Malawi’s Northern and Southern regions. Longer test phase turnaround time was significantly associated with use of dried blood spots instead of plasma (aOR = 2.30; 95% CI = 2.23–2.37) and for certain testing months and testing laboratories. Conclusion Increased turnaround time for VL testing appeared to be driven in part by categorical factors specific to the phase of turnaround time assessed. Given the implications of longer turnaround time and the global effort to scale up VL testing, addressing these factors via increasing efficiencies, improving quality management systems and generally strengthening the VL spectrum should be considered essential components of controlling the HIV epidemic. PMID:28235013

  8. Tupaia Belangeri as an Experimental Animal Model for Viral Infection

    PubMed Central

    Tsukiyama-Kohara, Kyoko; Kohara, Michinori

    2014-01-01

    Tupaias, or tree shrews, are small mammals that are similar in appearance to squirrels. The morphological and behavioral characteristics of the group have been extensively characterized, and despite previously being classified as primates, recent studies have placed the group in its own family, the Tupaiidae. Genomic analysis has revealed that the genus Tupaia is closer to humans than it is to rodents. In addition, tupaias are susceptible to hepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus. The only other experimental animal that has been demonstrated to be sensitive to both of these viruses is the chimpanzee, but restrictions on animal testing have meant that experiments using chimpanzees have become almost impossible. Consequently, the development of the tupaia for use as an animal infection model could become a powerful tool for hepatitis virus research and in preclinical studies on drug development. PMID:25048261

  9. Use of a three-dimensional humanized liver model for the study of viral gene vectors.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Anke; Röhrs, Viola; Materne, Eva-Maria; Hiller, Thomas; Kedzierski, Radoslaw; Fechner, Henry; Lauster, Roland; Kurreck, Jens

    2015-10-20

    Reconstituted three-dimensional (3D) liver models obtained by engrafting hepatic cells into an extracellular matrix (ECM) are valuable tools to study tissue regeneration, drug action and toxicology ex vivo. The aim of the present study was to establish a system for the functional investigation of a viral vector in a 3D liver model composed of human HepG2 cells on a rat ECM. An adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector expressing the Emerald green fluorescent protein (EmGFP) and a short hairpin RNA (shRNA) directed against human cyclophilin b (hCycB) was injected into the portal vein of 3D liver models. Application of the vector did not exert toxic effects, as shown by analysis of metabolic parameters. Six days after transduction, fluorescence microscopy analysis of EmGFP production revealed widespread distribution of the AAV vectors. After optimization of the recellularization and transduction conditions, averages of 55 and 90 internalized vector genomes per cell in two replicates of the liver model were achieved, as determined by quantitative PCR analysis. Functionality of the AAV vector was confirmed by efficient shRNA-mediated knockdown of hCycB by 70-90%. Our study provides a proof-of-concept that a recellularized biological ECM provides a valuable model to study viral vectors ex vivo.

  10. [Mathematical models in epidemiology: Study on viral hepatitis in Italy (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Jovine, R; Ghezzo, F; Orecchio, F

    1979-01-01

    In this paper a mathematical approach to the epidemics is proposed. The method is based upon a model able to describe any time-depending phenomena using the following elements: "class", "transition" and "related probability". The solution of the differential equations describing the model are obtained: first, by numerical techniques; second, by a Montecarlo simulation method. Deterministic and stochastic solutions which have been obtained, by applying the model to the study of viral hepatitis in Italy during 1960--1970, have been compared each other, to improve the model itself.

  11. Emergence of viral diseases: mathematical modeling as a tool for infection control, policy and decision making.

    PubMed

    Louz, Derrick; Bergmans, Hans E; Loos, Birgit P; Hoeben, Rob C

    2010-08-01

    Mathematical modeling can be used for the development and implementation of infection control policy to combat outbreaks and epidemics of communicable viral diseases. Here an outline is provided of basic concepts and approaches used in mathematical modeling and parameterization of disease transmission. The use of mathematical models is illustrated, using the 2001 UK foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) epidemic, the 2003 global severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) epidemic, and human influenza pandemics, as examples. This provides insights in the strengths, limitations, and weaknesses of the various models, and demonstrates their potential for supporting policy and decision making.

  12. Surveillance for Viral Hepatitis - United States, 2014

    MedlinePlus

    ... Historical reported cases and estimates Quick Links to Hepatitis … A | B | C | D | E Viral Hepatitis Home ... Programs Resource Center Viral Hepatitis Surveillance for Viral Hepatitis – United States, 2014 Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share ...

  13. The stability analysis of a general viral infection model with distributed delays and multi-staged infected progression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jinliang; Liu, Shengqiang

    2015-01-01

    We investigate an in-host model with general incidence and removal rate, as well as distributed delays in virus infections and in productions. By employing Lyapunov functionals and LaSalle's invariance principle, we define and prove the basic reproductive number R0 as a threshold quantity for stability of equilibria. It is shown that if R0 > 1 , then the infected equilibrium is globally asymptotically stable, while if R0 ⩽ 1 , then the infection free equilibrium is globally asymptotically stable under some reasonable assumptions. Moreover, n + 1 distributed delays describe (i) the time between viral entry and the transcription of viral RNA, (ii) the n - 1 -stage time needed for activated infected cells between viral RNA transcription and viral release, and (iii) the time necessary for the newly produced viruses to be infectious (maturation), respectively. The model can describe the viral infection dynamics of many viruses such as HIV-1, HCV and HBV.

  14. A VGI data integration framework based on linked data model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Lin; Ren, Rongrong

    2015-12-01

    This paper aims at the geographic data integration and sharing method for multiple online VGI data sets. We propose a semantic-enabled framework for online VGI sources cooperative application environment to solve a target class of geospatial problems. Based on linked data technologies - which is one of core components of semantic web, we can construct the relationship link among geographic features distributed in diverse VGI platform by using linked data modeling methods, then deploy these semantic-enabled entities on the web, and eventually form an interconnected geographic data network to support geospatial information cooperative application across multiple VGI data sources. The mapping and transformation from VGI sources to RDF linked data model is presented to guarantee the unique data represent model among different online social geographic data sources. We propose a mixed strategy which combined spatial distance similarity and feature name attribute similarity as the measure standard to compare and match different geographic features in various VGI data sets. And our work focuses on how to apply Markov logic networks to achieve interlinks of the same linked data in different VGI-based linked data sets. In our method, the automatic generating method of co-reference object identification model according to geographic linked data is discussed in more detail. It finally built a huge geographic linked data network across loosely-coupled VGI web sites. The results of the experiment built on our framework and the evaluation of our method shows the framework is reasonable and practicable.

  15. Viral quasispecies.

    PubMed

    Andino, Raul; Domingo, Esteban

    2015-05-01

    New generation sequencing is greatly expanding the capacity to examine the composition of mutant spectra of viral quasispecies in infected cells and host organisms. Here we review recent progress in the understanding of quasispecies dynamics, notably the occurrence of intra-mutant spectrum interactions, and implications of fitness landscapes for virus adaptation and de-adaptation. Complementation or interference can be established among components of the same mutant spectrum, dependent on the mutational status of the ensemble. Replicative fitness relates to an optimal mutant spectrum that provides the molecular basis for phenotypic flexibility, with implications for antiviral therapy. The biological impact of viral fitness renders particularly relevant the capacity of new generation sequencing to establish viral fitness landscapes. Progress with experimental model systems is becoming an important asset to understand virus behavior in the more complex environments faced during natural infections.

  16. Modeling viral coevolution: HIV multi-clonal persistence and competition dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagnoli, F.; Liò, P.; Sguanci, L.

    2006-07-01

    The coexistence of different viral strains (quasispecies) within the same host are nowadays observed for a growing number of viruses, most notably HIV, Marburg and Ebola, but the conditions for the formation and survival of new strains have not yet been understood. We present a model of HIV quasispecies competition, which describes the conditions of viral quasispecies coexistence under different immune system conditions. Our model incorporates both T and B cells responses, and we show that the role of B cells is important and additive to that of T cells. Simulations of coinfection (simultaneous infection) and superinfection (delayed secondary infection) scenarios in the early stages (days) and in the late stages of the infection (years) are in agreement with emerging molecular biology findings. The immune response induces a competition among similar phenotypes, leading to differentiation (quasispeciation), escape dynamics and complex oscillations of viral strain abundance. We found that the quasispecies dynamics after superinfection or coinfection has time scales of several months and becomes even slower when the immune system response is weak. Our model represents a general framework to study the speed and distribution of HIV quasispecies during disease progression, vaccination and therapy.

  17. COMPARING AND LINKING PLUMES ACROSS MODELING APPROACHES

    EPA Science Inventory

    River plumes carry many pollutants, including microorganisms, into lakes and the coastal ocean. The physical scales of many stream and river plumes often lie between the scales for mixing zone plume models, such as the EPA Visual Plumes model, and larger-sized grid scales for re...

  18. Design and modelling of a link monitoring mechanism for the Common Data Link (CDL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichelberger, John W., III

    1994-09-01

    The Common Data Link (CDL) is a full duplex, point-to-point microwave communications system used in imagery and signals intelligence collection systems. It provides a link between two remote Local Area Networks (LAN's) aboard collection and surface platforms. In a hostile environment, there is an overwhelming need to dynamically monitor the link and thus, limit the impact of jamming. This work describes steps taken to design, model, and evaluate a link monitoring system suitable for the CDL. The monitoring system is based on features and monitoring constructs of the Link Control Protocol (LCP) in the Point-to-Point Protocol (PPP) suite. The CDL model is based on a system of two remote Fiber Distributed Data Interface (FDDI) LAN's. In particular, the policies and mechanisms associated with monitoring are described in detail. An implementation of the required mechanisms using the OPNET network engineering tool is described. Performance data related to monitoring parameters is reported. Finally, integration of the FDDI-CDL model with the OPNET Internet model is described.

  19. Shuttle/TDRSS modelling and link simulation study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braun, W. R.; Mckenzie, T. M.; Biederman, L.; Lindsey, W. C.

    1979-01-01

    A Shuttle/TDRSS S-band and Ku-band link simulation package called LinCsim was developed for the evaluation of link performance for specific Shuttle signal designs. The link models were described in detail and the transmitter distortion parameters or user constraints were carefully defined. The overall link degradation (excluding hardware degradations) relative to an ideal BPSK channel were given for various sets of user constraint values. The performance sensitivity to each individual user constraint was then illustrated. The effect of excessive Spacelab clock jitter on the return link BER performance was also investigated as was the problem of subcarrier recovery for the K-band Shuttle return link signal.

  20. Norovirus translation requires an interaction between the C Terminus of the genome-linked viral protein VPg and eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4G.

    PubMed

    Chung, Liliane; Bailey, Dalan; Leen, Eoin N; Emmott, Edward P; Chaudhry, Yasmin; Roberts, Lisa O; Curry, Stephen; Locker, Nicolas; Goodfellow, Ian G

    2014-08-01

    Viruses have evolved a variety of mechanisms to usurp the host cell translation machinery to enable translation of the viral genome in the presence of high levels of cellular mRNAs. Noroviruses, a major cause of gastroenteritis in man, have evolved a mechanism that relies on the interaction of translation initiation factors with the virus-encoded VPg protein covalently linked to the 5' end of the viral RNA. To further characterize this novel mechanism of translation initiation, we have used proteomics to identify the components of the norovirus translation initiation factor complex. This approach revealed that VPg binds directly to the eIF4F complex, with a high affinity interaction occurring between VPg and eIF4G. Mutational analyses indicated that the C-terminal region of VPg is important for the VPg-eIF4G interaction; viruses with mutations that alter or disrupt this interaction are debilitated or non-viable. Our results shed new light on the unusual mechanisms of protein-directed translation initiation.

  1. Multi-Scale Modeling of Cross-Linked Nanotube Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frankland, S. J. V.; Odegard, G. M.; Herzog, M. N.; Gates, T. S.; Fay, C. C.

    2005-01-01

    The effect of cross-linking single-walled carbon nanotubes on the Young's modulus of a nanotube-reinforced composite is modeled with a multi-scale method. The Young's modulus is predicted as a function of nanotube volume fraction and cross-link density. In this method, the constitutive properties of molecular representative volume elements are determined using molecular dynamics simulation and equivalent-continuum modeling. The Young's modulus is subsequently calculated for cross-linked nanotubes in a matrix which consists of the unreacted cross-linking agent. Two different cross-linking agents are used in this study, one that is short and rigid (Molecule A), and one that is long and flexible (Molecule B). Direct comparisons between the predicted elastic constants are made for the models in which the nanotubes are either covalently bonded or not chemically bonded to the cross-linking agent. At a nanotube volume fraction of 10%, the Young's modulus of Material A is not affected by nanotube crosslinking, while the Young's modulus of Material B is reduced by 64% when the nanotubes are cross-linked relative to the non-cross-linked material with the same matrix.

  2. Evolution of 2009 H1N1 influenza viruses during the pandemic correlates with increased viral pathogenicity and transmissibility in the ferret model

    PubMed Central

    Otte, Anna; Marriott, Anthony C.; Dreier, Carola; Dove, Brian; Mooren, Kyra; Klingen, Thorsten R.; Sauter, Martina; Thompson, Katy-Anne; Bennett, Allan; Klingel, Karin; van Riel, Debby; McHardy, Alice C.; Carroll, Miles W.; Gabriel, Gülsah

    2016-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza viruses have evolved after pandemic onset giving rise to severe epidemics in subsequent waves. However, it still remains unclear which viral determinants might have contributed to disease severity after pandemic initiation. Here, we show that distinct mutations in the 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus genome have occurred with increased frequency after pandemic declaration. Among those, a mutation in the viral hemagglutinin was identified that increases 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus binding to human-like α2,6-linked sialic acids. Moreover, these mutations conferred increased viral replication in the respiratory tract and elevated respiratory droplet transmission between ferrets. Thus, our data show that 2009 H1N1 influenza viruses have evolved after pandemic onset giving rise to novel virus variants that enhance viral replicative fitness and respiratory droplet transmission in a mammalian animal model. These findings might help to improve surveillance efforts to assess the pandemic risk by emerging influenza viruses. PMID:27339001

  3. Multiscale model for the effects of adaptive immunity suppression on the viral therapy of cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paiva, Leticia R.; Silva, Hallan S.; Ferreira, Silvio C.; Martins, Marcelo L.

    2013-04-01

    Oncolytic virotherapy—the use of viruses that specifically kill tumor cells—is an innovative and highly promising route for treating cancer. However, its therapeutic outcomes are mainly impaired by the host immune response to the viral infection. In this paper, we propose a multiscale mathematical model to study how the immune response interferes with the viral oncolytic activity. The model assumes that cytotoxic T cells can induce apoptosis in infected cancer cells and that free viruses can be inactivated by neutralizing antibodies or cleared at a constant rate by the innate immune response. Our simulations suggest that reprogramming the immune microenvironment in tumors could substantially enhance the oncolytic virotherapy in immune-competent hosts. Viable routes to such reprogramming are either in situ virus-mediated impairing of CD8+ T cells motility or blockade of B and T lymphocytes recruitment. Our theoretical results can shed light on the design of viral vectors or new protocols with neat potential impacts on the clinical practice.

  4. Stochastic model-assisted development of efficient low-dose viral transduction in microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Luni, Camilla; Michielin, Federica; Barzon, Luisa; Calabrò, Vincenza; Elvassore, Nicola

    2013-02-19

    Adenoviruses are commonly used in vitro as gene transfer vectors in multiple applications. Nevertheless, issues such as low infection efficiency and toxicity effects on host cells have not been resolved yet. This work aims at developing a new versatile tool to enhance the expression of transduced genes while working at low viral doses in a sequential manner. We developed a microfluidic platform with automatically controlled sequential perfusion stages, which includes 10 independent channels. In addition, we built a stochastic mathematical model, accounting for the discrete nature of cells and viruses, to predict not only the percentage of infected cells, but also the associated infecting-virus distribution in the cell population. Microfluidic system and mathematical model were coupled to define an efficient experimental strategy. We used human foreskin fibroblasts, infected by replication-incompetent adenoviruses carrying EGFP gene, as the testing system. Cell characterization was performed through fluorescence microscopy, followed by image analysis. We explored the effect of different aspects: perfusion, multiplicity of infection, and temporal patterns of infection. We demonstrated feasibility of performing efficient viral transduction at low doses, by repeated pulses of cell-virus contact. This procedure also enhanced the exogenous gene expression in the sequential microfluidic infection system compared to a single infection at a higher, nontoxic, viral dose.

  5. Intestinal delivery of non-viral gene therapeutics: physiological barriers and preclinical models.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Martin J; Bourre, Ludovic; Melgar, Silvia; O'Driscoll, Caitriona M

    2011-03-01

    The future of nucleic acid-based therapeutics is dependent on achieving successful delivery. Recently, there has been an increasing interest in delivery via the gastrointestinal tract. Gene therapy via this route has many advantages, including non-invasive access and the versatility to treat local diseases, such as inflammatory bowel disease, as well as systemic diseases, such as haemophilia. However, the intestine presents several distinct barriers and, therefore, the design of robust non-viral delivery systems is key to future success. Several non-viral delivery strategies have provided evidence of activity in vivo. To facilitate the design of more efficient and safe gene medicines, more physiologically relevant models, at both the in vitro and in vivo levels, are essential.

  6. Development and evaluation of a blocking enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and virus neutralization assay to detect antibodies to viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, Anna; Goldberg, Tony; Marcquenski, Susan; Olson, Wendy; Goetz, Frederick; Hershberger, Paul; Hart, Lucas M.; Toohey-Kurth, Kathy

    2014-01-01

    Viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) is a target of surveillance by many state and federal agencies in the United States. Currently, the detection of VHSV relies on virus isolation, which is lethal to fish and indicates only the current infection status. A serological method is required to ascertain prior exposure. Here, we report two serologic tests for VHSV that are nonlethal, rapid, and species independent, a virus neutralization (VN) assay and a blocking enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The results show that the VN assay had a specificity of 100% and sensitivity of 42.9%; the anti-nucleocapsid-blocking ELISA detected nonneutralizing VHSV antibodies at a specificity of 88.2% and a sensitivity of 96.4%. The VN assay and ELISA are valuable tools for assessing exposure to VHSV.

  7. Evaluation of disease and viral biomarkers as triggers for therapeutic intervention in respiratory mousepox - an animal model of smallpox

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Scott; Chen, Nanhai G.; Foster, Scott; Hartzler, Hollyce; Hembrador, Ed; Hruby, Dennis; Jordan, Robert; Lanier, Randall; Painter, George; Painter, Wesley; Sagartz, John E.; Schriewer, Jill; Buller, R. Mark

    2013-01-01

    The human population is currently faced with the potential use of natural or recombinant variola and monkeypox viruses as biological weapons. Furthermore, the emergence of human monkeypox in Africa and its expanding environs poses a significant natural threat. Such occurrences would require therapeutic and prophylactic intervention with antivirals to minimize morbidity and mortality of exposed populations. Two orally-bioavailable antivirals are currently in clinical trials; namely CMX001, an ether-lipid analogue of cidofovir with activity at the DNA replication stage and ST-246, a novel viral egress inhibitor. Both of these drugs have previously been evaluated in the ectromelia/mousepox system; however, the trigger for intervention was not linked to a disease biomarker or a specific marker of virus replication. In this study we used lethal, intranasal, ectromelia virus infections of C57BL/6 and hairless SKH1 mice to model human disease and evaluate exanthematous rash (rash) as an indicator to initiate antiviral treatment. We show that significant protection can be provided to C57BL/6 mice by CMX001 or ST-246 when therapy is initiated on day 6 post infection or earlier. We also show that significant protection can be provided to SKH1 mice treated with CMX001 at day 3 post infection or earlier, but this is 4 or more days before detection of rash (ST-246 not tested). Although in this model rash could not be used as a treatment trigger, viral DNA was detected in blood by day 4 post infection and in the oropharyngeal secretions (saliva) by day 2-3 post infection – thus providing robust and specific markers of virus replication for therapy initiation. These findings are discussed in the context of current respiratory challenge animal models in use for the evaluation of poxvirus antivirals. PMID:22381921

  8. Evaluation of disease and viral biomarkers as triggers for therapeutic intervention in respiratory mousepox - an animal model of smallpox.

    PubMed

    Parker, Scott; Chen, Nanhai G; Foster, Scott; Hartzler, Hollyce; Hembrador, Ed; Hruby, Dennis; Jordan, Robert; Lanier, Randall; Painter, George; Painter, Wesley; Sagartz, John E; Schriewer, Jill; Mark Buller, R

    2012-04-01

    The human population is currently faced with the potential use of natural or recombinant variola and monkeypox viruses as biological weapons. Furthermore, the emergence of human monkeypox in Africa and its expanding environs poses a significant natural threat. Such occurrences would require therapeutic and prophylactic intervention with antivirals to minimize morbidity and mortality of exposed populations. Two orally-bioavailable antivirals are currently in clinical trials; namely CMX001, an ether-lipid analog of cidofovir with activity at the DNA replication stage and ST-246, a novel viral egress inhibitor. Both of these drugs have previously been evaluated in the ectromelia/mousepox system; however, the trigger for intervention was not linked to a disease biomarker or a specific marker of virus replication. In this study we used lethal, intranasal, ectromelia virus infections of C57BL/6 and hairless SKH1 mice to model human disease and evaluate exanthematous rash (rash) as an indicator to initiate antiviral treatment. We show that significant protection can be provided to C57BL/6 mice by CMX001 or ST-246 when therapy is initiated on day 6 post infection or earlier. We also show that significant protection can be provided to SKH1 mice treated with CMX001 at day 3 post infection or earlier, but this is four or more days before detection of rash (ST-246 not tested). Although in this model rash could not be used as a treatment trigger, viral DNA was detected in blood by day 4 post infection and in the oropharyngeal secretions (saliva) by day 2-3 post infection - thus providing robust and specific markers of virus replication for therapy initiation. These findings are discussed in the context of current respiratory challenge animal models in use for the evaluation of poxvirus antivirals.

  9. Duck hepatitis A virus serotype 1 minigenome: a model for studying the viral 3'UTR effect on viral translation.

    PubMed

    Liang, Ruiying; Li, Chuanfeng; Jin, Hongyan; Meng, Chunchun; Chen, Zongyan; Zhu, Jie; Miao, Qiuhong; Ding, Chan; Liu, Guangqing

    2015-12-01

    To date, the genetic replication and translation mechanisms as well as the pathogenesis of duck hepatitis A virus type 1 (DHAV-1) have not been adequately characterized due to the lack of a reliable and efficient cell culture system. Although the full-length infections clone system is the best platform to manipulate the virus, it is relatively difficult to assemble this system due to the lack of a suitable cell line. It has been proven that the minigenome system an efficient reverse genetics system for the study of RNA viruses. In some cases, it can be used to displace the infectious clone of RNA viruses. Here, we generated a minigenome for DHAV-1 with two luciferase reporter genes, firefly luciferase (Fluc) and Renilla luciferase (Rluc). The Rluc gene was used as a reference gene for the normalization of the Fluc gene expression in transfected cells, which provided a platform for studying the regulatory mechanisms of DHAV-1. Furthermore, to investigate the role of DHAV-3'UTR in the regulation of viral protein translation, deletions in the 3'UTR were introduced into the DHAV-1 minigenome. Luciferase activity, an indicator of virus translation, was then determined. These results showed that a minigenome system for DHAV-1 was successfully constructed for the first time and that the complete or partial deletion of the DHAV-3'UTR did not affect the expression level of the reporter gene, indicating that DHAV-1 translation may not be modulated by the viral genomic 3'UTR sequence.

  10. Extended model of restricted beam for FSO links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poliak, Juraj; Wilfert, Otakar

    2012-10-01

    Modern wireless optical communication systems in many aspects overcome wire or radio communications. Their advantages are license-free operation and broad bandwidth that they offer. The medium in free-space optical (FSO) links is the atmosphere. Operation of outdoor FSO links struggles with many atmospheric phenomena that deteriorate phase and amplitude of the transmitted optical beam. This beam originates in the transmitter and is affected by its individual parts, especially by the lens socket and the transmitter aperture, where attenuation and diffraction effects take place. Both of these phenomena unfavourable influence the beam and cause degradation of link availability, or its total malfunction. Therefore, both of these phenomena should be modelled and simulated, so that one can judge the link function prior to the realization of the system. Not only the link availability and reliability are concerned, but also economic aspects. In addition, the transmitted beam is not, generally speaking, circularly symmetrical, what makes the link simulation more difficult. In a comprehensive model, it is necessary to take into account the ellipticity of the beam that is restricted by circularly symmetrical aperture where then the attenuation and diffraction occur. General model is too computationally extensive; therefore simplification of the calculations by means of analytical and numerical approaches will be discussed. Presented model is not only simulated using computer, but also experimentally proven. One can then deduce the ability of the model to describe the reality and to estimate how far can one go with approximations, i.e. limitations of the model are discussed.

  11. Modelling, synthesis and biological evaluation of an ethidium-arginine conjugate linked to a ribonuclease mimic directed against TAR RNA of HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Patino, Nadia; Di Giorgio, Christophe; Dan-Covalciuc, Cristina; Peytou, Valérie; Terreux, Raphaël; Cabrol-Bass, Daniel; Bailly, Christian; Condom, Roger

    2002-07-01

    Using molecular modelling studies, an active anti-HIV ethidium-arginine conjugate targeted against the viral TAR RNA sequence has been linked to an artificial ribonuclease, with the aim to obtain an irreversible inhibitor. The ribonuclease moiety consists of an N-[N-(3-aminopropyl)-3-aminopropyl] glycine and has been constructed via two successive N-alkylations following the Fukuyama procedure.

  12. ON IDENTIFIABILITY OF NONLINEAR ODE MODELS AND APPLICATIONS IN VIRAL DYNAMICS

    PubMed Central

    MIAO, HONGYU; XIA, XIAOHUA; PERELSON, ALAN S.; WU, HULIN

    2011-01-01

    Ordinary differential equations (ODE) are a powerful tool for modeling dynamic processes with wide applications in a variety of scientific fields. Over the last 2 decades, ODEs have also emerged as a prevailing tool in various biomedical research fields, especially in infectious disease modeling. In practice, it is important and necessary to determine unknown parameters in ODE models based on experimental data. Identifiability analysis is the first step in determing unknown parameters in ODE models and such analysis techniques for nonlinear ODE models are still under development. In this article, we review identifiability analysis methodologies for nonlinear ODE models developed in the past one to two decades, including structural identifiability analysis, practical identifiability analysis and sensitivity-based identifiability analysis. Some advanced topics and ongoing research are also briefly reviewed. Finally, some examples from modeling viral dynamics of HIV, influenza and hepatitis viruses are given to illustrate how to apply these identifiability analysis methods in practice. PMID:21785515

  13. Manipulators with flexible links: A simple model and experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shimoyama, Isao; Oppenheim, Irving J.

    1989-01-01

    A simple dynamic model proposed for flexible links is briefly reviewed and experimental control results are presented for different flexible systems. A simple dynamic model is useful for rapid prototyping of manipulators and their control systems, for possible application to manipulator design decisions, and for real time computation as might be applied in model based or feedforward control. Such a model is proposed, with the further advantage that clear physical arguments and explanations can be associated with its simplifying features and with its resulting analytical properties. The model is mathematically equivalent to Rayleigh's method. Taking the example of planar bending, the approach originates in its choice of two amplitude variables, typically chosen as the link end rotations referenced to the chord (or the tangent) motion of the link. This particular choice is key in establishing the advantageous features of the model, and it was used to support the series of experiments reported.

  14. Characterizing nanoparticle interactions: Linking models to experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Ramakrishnan, S.; Zukoski, C. F.

    2000-07-15

    Self-assembly of nanoparticles involves manipulating particle interactions such that attractions are on the order of the average thermal energy in the system. If the self-assembly is to result in an ordered packing, an understanding of their phase behavior is necessary. Here we test the ability of simple pair potentials to characterize the interactions and phase behavior of silico tungstic acid (STA), a 1.2 nm particle. The strength of interaction is controlled by dispersing STA in different background salt concentrations. The experimental variables used in characterizing the interactions are the osmotic compressibility (d{pi}/d{rho}), the second virial coefficient (B{sub 2}), relative solution viscosity ({eta}/{eta}{sub c}), and the solubility ({rho}{sigma}{sup 3}){sub sat}. Various techniques are then developed to extract the parameters of square well, the adhesive hard sphere (AHS), and the Yukawa pair potentials that best describe the experimental data. The AHS model describes the solution thermodynamic behavior only where the system is weakly attractive but, as would be expected, fails when long range repulsions or nonmonotonic pair potentials become important. Model free representations are presented which offer the opportunity to extract pair potential parameters. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  15. Virally delivered channelrhodopsin-2 safely and effectively restores visual function in multiple mouse models of blindness.

    PubMed

    Doroudchi, M Mehdi; Greenberg, Kenneth P; Liu, Jianwen; Silka, Kimberly A; Boyden, Edward S; Lockridge, Jennifer A; Arman, A Cyrus; Janani, Ramesh; Boye, Shannon E; Boye, Sanford L; Gordon, Gabriel M; Matteo, Benjamin C; Sampath, Alapakkam P; Hauswirth, William W; Horsager, Alan

    2011-07-01

    Previous work established retinal expression of channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2), an algal cation channel gated by light, restored physiological and behavioral visual responses in otherwise blind rd1 mice. However, a viable ChR2-based human therapy must meet several key criteria: (i) ChR2 expression must be targeted, robust, and long-term, (ii) ChR2 must provide long-term and continuous therapeutic efficacy, and (iii) both viral vector delivery and ChR2 expression must be safe. Here, we demonstrate the development of a clinically relevant therapy for late stage retinal degeneration using ChR2. We achieved specific and stable expression of ChR2 in ON bipolar cells using a recombinant adeno-associated viral vector (rAAV) packaged in a tyrosine-mutated capsid. Targeted expression led to ChR2-driven electrophysiological ON responses in postsynaptic retinal ganglion cells and significant improvement in visually guided behavior for multiple models of blindness up to 10 months postinjection. Light levels to elicit visually guided behavioral responses were within the physiological range of cone photoreceptors. Finally, chronic ChR2 expression was nontoxic, with transgene biodistribution limited to the eye. No measurable immune or inflammatory response was observed following intraocular vector administration. Together, these data indicate that virally delivered ChR2 can provide a viable and efficacious clinical therapy for photoreceptor disease-related blindness.

  16. Protective and Detrimental Roles for Regulatory T Cells in a Viral Model for Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Nicholas E.; Karlsson, Fridrik; Sato, Fumitaka; Kawai, Eiichiro; Omura, Seiichi; Minagar, Alireza; Grisham, Matthew. B.; Tsunoda, Ikuo

    2014-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) has been proposed to be an immune-mediated disease in the central nervous system (CNS) that can be triggered by virus infections. In Theiler’s murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) infection, during the first week (acute stage), mice develop polioencephalomyelitis. After 3 weeks (chronic stage), mice develop immune-mediated demyelination with virus persistence, which has been used as a viral model for MS. Regulatory T cells (Tregs) can suppress inflammation, and have been suggested to be protective in immune-mediated diseases, including MS. However, in virus-induced inflammatory demyelination, although Tregs can suppress inflammation, preventing immune-mediated pathology, Tregs may also suppress anti-viral immune responses, leading to more active viral replication and/or persistence. To determine the role and potential translational usage of Tregs in MS, we treated TMEV-infected mice with ex vivo-generated induced Tregs (iTregs) on day 0 (early) or during the chronic stage (therapeutic). Early treatment worsened clinical signs during acute disease. The exacerbation of acute disease was associated with increased virus titers and decreased immune cell recruitment in the CNS. Therapeutic iTreg treatment reduced inflammatory demyelination during chronic disease. Immunologically, iTreg treatment increased interleukin-10 production from B cells, CD4+ T cells, and dendritic cells, which may contribute to the decreased CNS inflammation. PMID:24417588

  17. Transposon mouse models to elucidate the genetic mechanisms of hepatitis B viral induced hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Amy P; Tschida, Barbara R; Lo, Lilian H; Moriarity, Branden S; Rowlands, Dewi K; Largaespada, David A; Keng, Vincent W

    2015-01-01

    The major type of human liver cancer is hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), and there are currently many risk factors that contribute to this deadly disease. The majority of HCC occurrences are associated with chronic hepatitis viral infection, and hepatitis B viral (HBV) infection is currently a major health problem in Eastern Asia. Elucidating the genetic mechanisms associated with HBV-induced HCC has been difficult due to the heterogeneity and genetic complexity associated with this disease. A repertoire of animal models has been broadly used to study the pathophysiology and to develop potential treatment regimens for HBV-associated HCC. The use of these animal models has provided valuable genetic information and has been an important contributor to uncovering the factors involved in liver malignant transformation, invasion and metastasis. Recently, transposon-based mouse models are becoming more widely used in liver cancer research to interrogate the genome by forward genetics and also used to validate genes rapidly in a reverse genetic manner. Importantly, these transposon-based rapid reverse genetic mouse models could become crucial in testing potential therapeutic agents before proceeding to clinical trials in human. Therefore, this review will cover the use of transposon-based mouse models to address the problems of liver cancer, especially HBV-associated HCC occurrences in Asia. PMID:26576100

  18. Combination therapy including CpG oligodeoxynucleotides and entecavir induces early viral response and enhanced inhibition of viral replication in a woodchuck model of chronic hepadnaviral infection.

    PubMed

    Meng, Zhongji; Zhang, Xiaoyong; Pei, Rongjuan; Zhang, Ejuan; Kemper, Thekla; Vollmer, Jörg; Davis, Heather L; Glebe, Dieter; Gerlich, Wolfram; Roggendorf, Michael; Lu, Mengji

    2016-01-01

    CpG oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) stimulate immune cells via TLR9 and are potentially useful immunomodulators for the treatment of chronic viral infections. In the present study, different classes of CpGs were tested for their capacities for innate immune activation and antiviral activities in the woodchuck model. A class P CpG ODN was found to stimulate interferon (IFN) production in woodchuck peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in vitro, and following subcutaneous administration in vivo, it was observed to induce IFN and MxA expression in woodchuck PBMCs. Combination treatment with CpG ODN and entecavir (ETV) led to effective suppression of the woodchuck hepatitis virus (WHV) load in the woodchucks, with early viral responses and inhibition of replication. The woodchuck hepatitis surface antigen (WHsAg) serum concentrations were strongly decreased by CpG and ETV together but not by either agent alone, indicating synergistic effects. However, viral control post-treatment was still transient, similar to that observed with ETV alone. Significantly elevated levels of serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST) but not of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) in some of the woodchucks receiving CpG ODN were noted, but these increases were resolved before the completion of treatment and were not associated with an elevated serum bilirubin level or coagulation disorders, suggesting the absence of a significant safety concern.

  19. Viral Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Public Home » For Veterans and the Public Viral Hepatitis Menu Menu Viral Hepatitis Viral Hepatitis Home For ... the Public Veterans and Public Home How is Hepatitis C Treated? Find the facts about the newest ...

  20. Link Prediction in Weighted Networks: A Weighted Mutual Information Model

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Boyao; Xia, Yongxiang

    2016-01-01

    The link-prediction problem is an open issue in data mining and knowledge discovery, which attracts researchers from disparate scientific communities. A wealth of methods have been proposed to deal with this problem. Among these approaches, most are applied in unweighted networks, with only a few taking the weights of links into consideration. In this paper, we present a weighted model for undirected and weighted networks based on the mutual information of local network structures, where link weights are applied to further enhance the distinguishable extent of candidate links. Empirical experiments are conducted on four weighted networks, and results show that the proposed method can provide more accurate predictions than not only traditional unweighted indices but also typical weighted indices. Furthermore, some in-depth discussions on the effects of weak ties in link prediction as well as the potential to predict link weights are also given. This work may shed light on the design of algorithms for link prediction in weighted networks. PMID:26849659

  1. Linking knowledge and action through mental models of sustainable agriculture.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Matthew; Lubell, Mark; Hillis, Vicken

    2014-09-09

    Linking knowledge to action requires understanding how decision-makers conceptualize sustainability. This paper empirically analyzes farmer "mental models" of sustainability from three winegrape-growing regions of California where local extension programs have focused on sustainable agriculture. The mental models are represented as networks where sustainability concepts are nodes, and links are established when a farmer mentions two concepts in their stated definition of sustainability. The results suggest that winegrape grower mental models of sustainability are hierarchically structured, relatively similar across regions, and strongly linked to participation in extension programs and adoption of sustainable farm practices. We discuss the implications of our findings for the debate over the meaning of sustainability, and the role of local extension programs in managing knowledge systems.

  2. Mathematical model for viral depuration kinetics in shellfish: an useful tool to estimate the risk for the consumers.

    PubMed

    Polo, David; Feal, Xabier; Romalde, Jesús L

    2015-08-01

    Enteric virus depuration from shellfish is a complex biological process that may be influenced by biological properties of the mollusc and/or virus species. On the basis of previous experimental data, a mathematical model was developed to characterize the kinetics of viral elimination during the depuration process. The experimental data consisted on twenty depuration trials, each with 60 kg of Manila clams (Venerupis philippinarum) and mediterranean mussels (Mytilus galloprovincialis) previously subjected to bioaccumulation with HAV or MNV-1 (as a surrogate for human norovirus), that were performed in an experimental depuration system during 7 days. It was observed that although viral loads decay along depuration, a residual viral load remains at the end of the process suggesting a decomposition of viral load in a diluted load (susceptible of depuration) and a non-diluted load (unavailable to depurate). The model yielded a general equation, which can predict the viral load at any depuration time knowing the specific filtration rate, dependent on the bivalve species, and specific viral properties. The mathematical model can be combined with quantitative risk assessment calculations to determine the safety of the depurated shellfish, which can be very helpful not only for shellfish producers but also to public health authorities.

  3. Dynamics of the Cytotoxic T Cell Response to a Model of Acute Viral Infection

    PubMed Central

    DeWitt, William S.; Emerson, Ryan O.; Lindau, Paul; Vignali, Marissa; Snyder, Thomas M.; Desmarais, Cindy; Sanders, Catherine; Utsugi, Heidi; Warren, Edus H.; McElrath, Juliana; Makar, Karen W.; Wald, Anna

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT A detailed characterization of the dynamics and breadth of the immune response to an acute viral infection, as well as the determinants of recruitment to immunological memory, can greatly contribute to our basic understanding of the mechanics of the human immune system and can ultimately guide the design of effective vaccines. In addition to neutralizing antibodies, T cells have been shown to be critical for the effective resolution of acute viral infections. We report the first in-depth analysis of the dynamics of the CD8+ T cell repertoire at the level of individual T cell clonal lineages upon vaccination of human volunteers with a single dose of YF-17D. This live attenuated yellow fever virus vaccine yields sterile, long-term immunity and has been previously used as a model to understand the immune response to a controlled acute viral infection. We identified and enumerated unique CD8+ T cell clones specifically induced by this vaccine through a combined experimental and statistical approach that included high-throughput sequencing of the CDR3 variable region of the T cell receptor β-chain and an algorithm that detected significantly expanded T cell clones. This allowed us to establish that (i) on average, ∼2,000 CD8+ T cell clones were induced by YF-17D, (ii) 5 to 6% of the responding clones were recruited to long-term memory 3 months postvaccination, (iii) the most highly expanded effector clones were preferentially recruited to the memory compartment, and (iv) a fraction of the YF-17D-induced clones could be identified from peripheral blood lymphocytes solely by measuring clonal expansion. IMPORTANCE The exhaustive investigation of pathogen-induced effector T cells is essential to accurately quantify the dynamics of the human immune response. The yellow fever vaccine (YFV) has been broadly used as a model to understand how a controlled, self-resolving acute viral infection induces an effective and long-term protective immune response. Here, we

  4. Economic risk analysis model for bovine viral diarrhea virus biosecurity in cow-calf herds.

    PubMed

    Smith, Rebecca L; Sanderson, Michael W; Jones, Rodney; N'Guessan, Yapo; Renter, David; Larson, Robert; White, Brad J

    2014-03-01

    A stochastic model was designed to calculate the cost-effectiveness of biosecurity strategies for bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) in cow-calf herds. Possible sources of BVDV introduction considered were imported animals, including the calves of pregnant imports, and fenceline contact with infected herds, including stocker cattle raised in adjacent pastures. Spread of BVDV through the herd was modeled with a stochastic SIR model. Financial consequences of BVDV, including lost income, treatment costs, and the cost of biosecurity strategies, were calculated for 10 years, based on the risks of a herd with a user-defined import profile. Results indicate that importing pregnant animals and stockers increased the financial risk of BVDV. Strategic testing in combination with vaccination most decreased the risk of high-cost outbreaks in most herds. The choice of a biosecurity strategy was specific to the risks of a particular herd.

  5. Link performance model for filter bank based multicarrier systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, Dmitry; Oborina, Alexandra; Giupponi, Lorenza; Stitz, Tobias Hidalgo

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents a complete link level abstraction model for link quality estimation on the system level of filter bank multicarrier (FBMC)-based networks. The application of mean mutual information per coded bit (MMIB) approach is validated for the FBMC systems. The considered quality measure of the resource element for the FBMC transmission is the received signal-to-noise-plus-distortion ratio (SNDR). Simulation results of the proposed link abstraction model show that the proposed approach is capable of estimating the block error rate (BLER) accurately, even when the signal is propagated through the channels with deep and frequent fades, as it is the case for the 3GPP Hilly Terrain (3GPP-HT) and Enhanced Typical Urban (ETU) models. The FBMC-related results of link level simulations are compared with cyclic prefix orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (CP-OFDM) analogs. Simulation results are also validated through the comparison to reference publicly available results. Finally, the steps of link level abstraction algorithm for FBMC are formulated and its application for system level simulation of a professional mobile radio (PMR) network is discussed.

  6. Linking knowledge and action through mental models of sustainable agriculture

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Matthew; Lubell, Mark; Hillis, Vicken

    2014-01-01

    Linking knowledge to action requires understanding how decision-makers conceptualize sustainability. This paper empirically analyzes farmer “mental models” of sustainability from three winegrape-growing regions of California where local extension programs have focused on sustainable agriculture. The mental models are represented as networks where sustainability concepts are nodes, and links are established when a farmer mentions two concepts in their stated definition of sustainability. The results suggest that winegrape grower mental models of sustainability are hierarchically structured, relatively similar across regions, and strongly linked to participation in extension programs and adoption of sustainable farm practices. We discuss the implications of our findings for the debate over the meaning of sustainability, and the role of local extension programs in managing knowledge systems. PMID:25157158

  7. Viral Decay Dynamics and Mathematical Modeling of Treatment Response: Evidence of Lower in vivo Fitness of HIV-1 Subtype C

    PubMed Central

    Shet, Anita; Nagaraja, Pradeep

    2016-01-01

    Background: Despite the high prevalence of HIV-1 subtype C (HIV-1C) worldwide, information on HIV-1C viral dynamics and response to antiretroviral therapy (ART) is limited. We sought to measure viral load decay dynamics during treatment and estimate the within-host basic reproductive ratio, R0, and the critical efficacy, εc, for successful treatment of HIV-1C infection. Methods: Individuals initiated on first-line ART in India and monitored for 6 months of treatment were considered. Viral load, CD4+ count, and adherence data were collected at baseline, 4, 12, 16 and 24 weeks after ART initiation. Drug resistance genotyping was performed at baseline. R0 and εc were estimated using a mathematical model. Results: Among 257 patients with complete data, mean baseline viral load was 5.7 log10 copies per milliliter and median CD4+ count was 165 cells per cubic millimeter. Primary drug resistance was present in 3.1% at baseline. At 6 months, 87.5% had undetectable viral load, indicating excellent response to ART despite high baseline viremia. After excluding those with transmitted resistance, suboptimal adherence and viral rebound, data from 112 patients were analyzed using a mathematical model. We estimated the median R0 to be 5.3. The corresponding εc was ∼0.8. Conclusions: These estimates of R0 and εc are smaller than current estimates for HIV-1B, suggesting that HIV-1C exhibits lower in vivo fitness compared with HIV-1B, which allows successful treatment despite high baseline viral loads. The lower fitness, and potentially lower virulence, together with high viral loads may underlie the heightened transmission potential of HIV-1C and its growing global spread. PMID:27273158

  8. Linking Academic Entitlement and Student Incivility Using Latent Means Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kopp, Jason P.; Finney, Sara J.

    2013-01-01

    Academic entitlement has been theoretically linked with uncivil student behavior; however, this relationship has not been tested. To address this gap in the literature, the authors used latent means modeling to estimate the relationship between the Academic Entitlement Questionnaire and uncivil student behavior. The authors gathered scores on the…

  9. Viral-mediated temporally controlled dopamine production in a rat model of Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-Gang; Okada, Takashi; Kodera, Mika; Nara, Yuko; Takino, Naomi; Muramatsu, Chieko; Ikeguchi, Kunihiko; Urano, Fumi; Ichinose, Hiroshi; Metzger, Daniel; Chambon, Pierre; Nakano, Imaharu; Ozawa, Keiya; Muramatsu, Shin-Ichi

    2006-01-01

    Regulation of gene expression is necessary to avoid possible adverse effects of gene therapy due to excess synthesis of transgene products. To reduce transgene expression, we developed a viral vector-mediated somatic regulation system using inducible Cre recombinase. A recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector expressing Cre recombinase fused to a mutated ligand-binding domain of the estrogen receptor alpha (CreER(T2)) was delivered along with AAV vectors expressing dopamine-synthesizing enzymes to rats of a Parkinson disease model. Treatment with 4-hydroxytamoxifen, a synthetic estrogen receptor modulator, activated Cre recombinase within the transduced neurons and induced selective excision of the tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) coding sequence flanked by loxP sites, leading to a reduction in transgene-mediated dopamine synthesis. Using this strategy, aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase (AADC) activity was retained so that l-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-dopa), a substrate for AADC, could be converted to dopamine in the striatum and the therapeutic effects of L-dopa preserved, even after reduction of TH expression in the case of dopamine overproduction. Our data demonstrate that viral vector-mediated inducible Cre recombinase can serve as an in vivo molecular switch, allowing spatial and temporal control of transgene expression, thereby potentially increasing the safety of gene therapy.

  10. Model selection for athermal cross-linked fiber networks.

    PubMed

    Shahsavari, A; Picu, R C

    2012-07-01

    Athermal random fiber networks are usually modeled by representing each fiber as a truss, a Euler-Bernoulli or a Timoshenko beam, and, in the case of cross-linked networks, each cross-link as a pinned, rotating, or welded joint. In this work we study the effect of these various modeling options on the dependence of the overall network stiffness on system parameters. We conclude that Timoshenko beams can be used for the entire range of density and beam stiffness parameters, while the Euler-Bernoulli model can be used only at relatively low network densities. In the high density-high bending stiffness range, strain energy is stored predominantly in the axial and shear deformation modes, while in the other extreme range of parameters, the energy is stored in the bending mode. The effect of the model size on the network stiffness is also discussed.

  11. Single photon time transfer link model for GNSS satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vacek, Michael; Michalek, Vojtech; Peca, Marek; Prochazka, Ivan; Blazej, Josef

    2015-05-01

    The importance of optical time transfer serving as a complement to traditional microwave links, has been attested for GNSSes and for scientific missions. Single photon time transfer (SPTT) is a process, allowing to compare (subtract) time readings of two distant clocks. Such a comparison may be then used to synchronize less accurate clock to a better reference, to perform clock characterization and calibration, to calculate mean time out of ensemble of several clocks, displaced in space. The single-photon time transfer is well established in field of space geodesy, being supported by passive retro-reflectors within space segment of five known GNSSes. A truly two-way, active terminals work aboard of Jason-2 (T2L2) - multiphoton operation, GNSS Beidou (Compass) - SPTT, and are going to be launched within recent ACES project (ELT) - SPTT, and GNSS GLONASS - multiphoton operation. However, there is still missing comprehensive theoretical model of two-way (using satellite receiver and retroreflector) SPTT link incorporating all crucial parameters of receiver (both ground and space segment receivers), transmitter, atmosphere effects on uplink and downlink path, influence of retroreflector. The input to calculation of SPTT link performance will be among others: link budget (distance, power, apertures, beam divergence, attenuation, scattering), propagating medium (atmosphere scintillation, beam wander, etc.), mutual Tx/Rx velocity, wavelength. The SPTT model will be evaluated without the properties of real components. These will be added in the further development. The ground-to-space SPTT link performance of typical scenarios are modeled. This work is a part of the ESA study "Comparison of optical time-transfer links."

  12. An individual-based model of rabbit viral haemorrhagic disease on European wild rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fa, John E.; Sharples, Colin M.; Bell, Diana J.; DeAngelis, Donald L.

    2001-01-01

    We developed an individual-based model of Rabbit Viral Hemorrhagic Disease (RVHD) for European wild rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus L.), representing up to 1000 rabbits in four hectares. Model output for productivity and recruitment matched published values. The disease was density-dependent and virulence affected outcome. Strains that caused death after several days produced greater overall mortality than strains in which rabbits either died or recovered very quickly. Disease effect also depended on time of year. We also elaborated a larger scale model representing 25 km2 and 100,000+ rabbits, split into a number of grid-squares. This was a more traditional model that did not represent individual rabbits, but employed a system of dynamic equations for each grid-square. Disease spread depended on probability of transmission between neighboring grid-squares. Potential recovery from a major population crash caused by the disease relied on disease virulence and frequency of recurrence. The model's dependence on probability of disease transmission between grid-squares suggests the way that the model represents the spatial distribution of the population affects simulation. Although data on RVHD in Europe are lacking, our models provide a basis for describing the disease in realistic detail and for assessing influence of various social and spatial factors on spread.

  13. Modeling Viral Infectious Diseases and Development of Antiviral Therapies Using Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Systems

    PubMed Central

    Trevisan, Marta; Sinigaglia, Alessandro; Desole, Giovanna; Berto, Alessandro; Pacenti, Monia; Palù, Giorgio; Barzon, Luisa

    2015-01-01

    The recent biotechnology breakthrough of cell reprogramming and generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), which has revolutionized the approaches to study the mechanisms of human diseases and to test new drugs, can be exploited to generate patient-specific models for the investigation of host–pathogen interactions and to develop new antimicrobial and antiviral therapies. Applications of iPSC technology to the study of viral infections in humans have included in vitro modeling of viral infections of neural, liver, and cardiac cells; modeling of human genetic susceptibility to severe viral infectious diseases, such as encephalitis and severe influenza; genetic engineering and genome editing of patient-specific iPSC-derived cells to confer antiviral resistance. PMID:26184286

  14. A mathematical model of N-linked glycoform biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Umaña, P; Bailey, J E

    1997-09-20

    Metabolic engineering of N-linked oligosaccharide biosynthesis to produce novel glycoforms or glycoform distributions of a recombinant glycoprotein can potentially lead to an improved therapeutic performance of the glycoprotein product. Effective engineering of this pathway to maximize the fractions of beneficial glycoforms within the glycoform population of a target glycoprotein can be aided by a mathematical model of the N-linked glycosylation process. A mathematical model is presented here, whose main function is to calculate the expected qualitative trends in the N-linked oligosaccharide distribution resulting from changes in the levels of one or more enzymes involved in the network of enzyme-catalyzed reactions that accomplish N-linked oligosaccharide biosynthesis. It consists of mass balances for 33 different oligosaccharide species N-linked to a specified protein that is being transported through the different compartments of the Golgi complex. Values of the model parameters describing Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells were estimated from literature information. A basal set of kinetic parameters for the enzyme-catalyzed reactions acting on free oligosaccharide substrates was also obtained from the literature. The solution of the system for this basal set of parameters gave a glycoform distribution consisting mainly of complex-galactosylated oligosaccharides distributed in structures with different numbers of antennae in a fashion similar to that observed for various recombinant proteins produced in CHO cells. Other simulations indicate that changes in the oligosaccharide distribution could easily result from alteration in glycoprotein productivity within the range currently attainable in industry. The overexpression of N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase III in CHO cells was simulated under different conditions to test the main function of the model. These simulations allow a comparison of different strategies, such as simultaneous overexpression of several

  15. Model updating in flexible-link multibody systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belotti, R.; Caneva, G.; Palomba, I.; Richiedei, D.; Trevisani, A.

    2016-09-01

    The dynamic response of flexible-link multibody systems (FLMSs) can be predicted through nonlinear models based on finite elements, to describe the coupling between rigid- body and elastic behaviour. Their accuracy should be as high as possible to synthesize controllers and observers. Model updating based on experimental measurements is hence necessary. By taking advantage of the experimental modal analysis, this work proposes a model updating procedure for FLMSs and applies it experimentally to a planar robot. Indeed, several peculiarities of the model of FLMS should be carefully tackled. On the one hand, nonlinear models of a FLMS should be linearized about static equilibrium configurations. On the other, the experimental mode shapes should be corrected to be consistent with the elastic displacements represented in the model, which are defined with respect to a fictitious moving reference (the equivalent rigid link system). Then, since rotational degrees of freedom are also represented in the model, interpolation of the experimental data should be performed to match the model displacement vector. Model updating has been finally cast as an optimization problem in the presence of bounds on the feasible values, by also adopting methods to improve the numerical conditioning and to compute meaningful updated inertial and elastic parameters.

  16. Modeling Zika plasma viral dynamics in non-human primates: insights into viral pathogenesis and antiviral strategies

    SciTech Connect

    Best, Katharine; Guedj, Jeremie; Madelain, Vincent; de Lamballerie, Xavier; L, So-Yonim; Osuna, Christa E; Whitney, James; Perelson, Alan S.

    2016-10-24

    The recent outbreak of Zika virus (ZIKV) has been associated with fetal abnormalities and neurological complications, prompting global concern. Here we present the first mathematical analysis of the within-host dynamics of plasma ZiKV burden in a non-human primate model, allowing for characterization of the growth and clearance of ZIKV within an individual macaque.

  17. Viral Disease Networks?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulbahce, Natali; Yan, Han; Vidal, Marc; Barabasi, Albert-Laszlo

    2010-03-01

    Viral infections induce multiple perturbations that spread along the links of the biological networks of the host cells. Understanding the impact of these cascading perturbations requires an exhaustive knowledge of the cellular machinery as well as a systems biology approach that reveals how individual components of the cellular system function together. Here we describe an integrative method that provides a new approach to studying virus-human interactions and its correlations with diseases. Our method involves the combined utilization of protein - protein interactions, protein -- DNA interactions, metabolomics and gene - disease associations to build a ``viraldiseasome''. By solely using high-throughput data, we map well-known viral associated diseases and predict new candidate viral diseases. We use microarray data of virus-infected tissues and patient medical history data to further test the implications of the viral diseasome. We apply this method to Epstein-Barr virus and Human Papillomavirus and shed light into molecular development of viral diseases and disease pathways.

  18. UAS Modeling of the Communication Links Study Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birr, Richard B.; Girgis, Nancy; Murray, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is the authority that grants access into, and operations within, the National Airspace System (NAS) for all aircraft, including Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS). The safe operation of UAS in the NAS must be assured if the full potential of UAS is to be realized and supported by the public and Congress. This report analyzed the communication systems that are needed for the safe operations of UAS in the NAS. Safe operations can be defined as the availability of the required links to carry the information to control the UAS and the return links to allow controllers to know where the UAS is at any given moment as well as how it is performing. This report is the end result of work performed jointly between the FAA and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/Kennedy Space Center (NASA KSC). The work was done in support of the Radio Technical Commission for Aeronautics (RTCA) Special Committee 203 (SC-203) Control and Communications Working Group. The RTCA is a federal advisory committee to the FAA. Though the work was not under the direction of the working group, a large part of the specific values used in the simulations came from the working group. Specifically, all of the radio links were modeled based on the formulation completed by the working group. This report analyzed three scenarios from RTCA SC-203 that represent how a UAS would operate in the NAS. Each scenario was created using the Satellite Tool Kit (STK) modeling and simulation tool. The flight paths of the UAS were generated and the UAS dynamics were likewise modeled. Then each communication asset such as transmitters, receivers, and antennas were modeled and placed on the appropriate UAS, satellite, or Control Station (CS). After that, the radio links were analyzed for signal strength and antenna blockage, and the overall link performance was analyzed in detail. The goal was to obtain 99.9% availability on all of the radio communication links. In order

  19. Tailored delivery of analgesic ziconotide across a blood brain barrier model using viral nanocontainers.

    PubMed

    Anand, Prachi; O'Neil, Alison; Lin, Emily; Douglas, Trevor; Holford, Mandë

    2015-08-03

    The blood brain barrier (BBB) is often an insurmountable obstacle for a large number of candidate drugs, including peptides, antibiotics, and chemotherapeutic agents. Devising an adroit delivery method to cross the BBB is essential to unlocking widespread application of peptide therapeutics. Presented here is an engineered nanocontainer for delivering peptidic drugs across the BBB encapsulating the analgesic marine snail peptide ziconotide (Prialt®). We developed a bi-functional viral nanocontainer based on the Salmonella typhimurium bacteriophage P22 capsid, genetically incorporating ziconotide in the interior cavity, and chemically attaching cell penetrating HIV-Tat peptide on the exterior of the capsid. Virus like particles (VLPs) of P22 containing ziconotide were successfully transported in several BBB models of rat and human brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMVEC) using a recyclable noncytotoxic endocytic pathway. This work demonstrates proof in principle for developing a possible alternative to intrathecal injection of ziconotide using a tunable VLP drug delivery nanocontainer to cross the BBB.

  20. Tailored delivery of analgesic ziconotide across a blood brain barrier model using viral nanocontainers

    PubMed Central

    Anand, Prachi; O’Neil, Alison; Lin, Emily; Douglas, Trevor; Holford, Mandë

    2015-01-01

    The blood brain barrier (BBB) is often an insurmountable obstacle for a large number of candidate drugs, including peptides, antibiotics, and chemotherapeutic agents. Devising an adroit delivery method to cross the BBB is essential to unlocking widespread application of peptide therapeutics. Presented here is an engineered nanocontainer for delivering peptidic drugs across the BBB encapsulating the analgesic marine snail peptide ziconotide (Prialt®). We developed a bi-functional viral nanocontainer based on the Salmonella typhimurium bacteriophage P22 capsid, genetically incorporating ziconotide in the interior cavity, and chemically attaching cell penetrating HIV-Tat peptide on the exterior of the capsid. Virus like particles (VLPs) of P22 containing ziconotide were successfully transported in several BBB models of rat and human brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMVEC) using a recyclable noncytotoxic endocytic pathway. This work demonstrates proof in principle for developing a possible alternative to intrathecal injection of ziconotide using a tunable VLP drug delivery nanocontainer to cross the BBB. PMID:26234920

  1. Tailored delivery of analgesic ziconotide across a blood brain barrier model using viral nanocontainers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anand, Prachi; O'Neil, Alison; Lin, Emily; Douglas, Trevor; Holford, Mandë

    2015-08-01

    The blood brain barrier (BBB) is often an insurmountable obstacle for a large number of candidate drugs, including peptides, antibiotics, and chemotherapeutic agents. Devising an adroit delivery method to cross the BBB is essential to unlocking widespread application of peptide therapeutics. Presented here is an engineered nanocontainer for delivering peptidic drugs across the BBB encapsulating the analgesic marine snail peptide ziconotide (Prialt®). We developed a bi-functional viral nanocontainer based on the Salmonella typhimurium bacteriophage P22 capsid, genetically incorporating ziconotide in the interior cavity, and chemically attaching cell penetrating HIV-Tat peptide on the exterior of the capsid. Virus like particles (VLPs) of P22 containing ziconotide were successfully transported in several BBB models of rat and human brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMVEC) using a recyclable noncytotoxic endocytic pathway. This work demonstrates proof in principle for developing a possible alternative to intrathecal injection of ziconotide using a tunable VLP drug delivery nanocontainer to cross the BBB.

  2. Complex dynamic behavior in a viral model with delayed immune response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kaifa; Wang, Wendi; Pang, Haiyan; Liu, Xianning

    2007-02-01

    The rich dynamics of a viral infection model is studied under the assumption that the immune response is retarded. It is shown that if the basic reproductive ratio of the virus is less than one, the infection-free equilibrium is globally asymptotically stable. Analytical and numerical results show that if the basic reproductive ratio of the virus is greater than one, the combined effect of the strength of the lytic component, the time delay of the immune response and the birth rate of susceptible host cells is to create a rich dynamics, which includes the occurrence of stable periodic solutions and chaotic dynamical behavior. The route from periodic oscillations to chaos is investigated. These results can be used to explain irregular real time series data on the immune state of patients.

  3. Mutual information model for link prediction in heterogeneous complex networks

    PubMed Central

    Shakibian, Hadi; Moghadam Charkari, Nasrollah

    2017-01-01

    Recently, a number of meta-path based similarity indices like PathSim, HeteSim, and random walk have been proposed for link prediction in heterogeneous complex networks. However, these indices suffer from two major drawbacks. Firstly, they are primarily dependent on the connectivity degrees of node pairs without considering the further information provided by the given meta-path. Secondly, most of them are required to use a single and usually symmetric meta-path in advance. Hence, employing a set of different meta-paths is not straightforward. To tackle with these problems, we propose a mutual information model for link prediction in heterogeneous complex networks. The proposed model, called as Meta-path based Mutual Information Index (MMI), introduces meta-path based link entropy to estimate the link likelihood and could be carried on a set of available meta-paths. This estimation measures the amount of information through the paths instead of measuring the amount of connectivity between the node pairs. The experimental results on a Bibliography network show that the MMI obtains high prediction accuracy compared with other popular similarity indices. PMID:28344326

  4. Concepts in viral pathogenesis II

    SciTech Connect

    Notkins, A.L.; Oldstone, M.B.A.

    1986-01-01

    This paper contains papers divided among 10 sections. The section titles are: Viral Structure and Function; Viral Constructs; Oncogenes, Transfection, and Differentiation; Viral Tropism and Entry into Cells; Immune Recognition of Viruses; Evolving Concepts in Viral Pathogenesis Illustrated by Selected Plant and Animal Models; Evolving Concepts in Viral Pathogenesis Illustrated by Selected Diseases in Humans; New Trends in Diagnosis and Epidemiology; and Vaccines and Antiviral Therapy.

  5. Viral persistence, latent reservoir, and blips: a review on HIV-1 dynamics and modeling during HAART and related treatment implications

    SciTech Connect

    Rong, Libin; Perelson, Alan

    2008-01-01

    HIV-1 eradication from infected individuals has not been achieved with the use of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) for a prolonged period of time. The cellular reservoir for HIV-1 in resting memory CD4{sup +} T cells remains a major obstacle to viral elimination. The reservoir does not decay significantly over long periods of time as is able to release replication competent HIV-1 upon cell activation. Residual ongoing viral replication may likely occur in many patients because low levels of virus can be detected in plasma by sensitive assays and transient episodes of viremia, or HIV-1 blips, are often observed in patients even with successful viral suppression for many years. Here we review our current knowledge of the factors contributing to viral persistence, the latent reservoir, and blips, and mathematical models developed to explore them and their relationships. We show how mathematical modeling can help improve our understanding of HIV-1 dynamics in patients on HAART and the quantitative events underlying HIV-1 latency, reservoir stability, low-level viremic persistence, and emergence of intermittent viral blips. We also discuss treatment implications related to these studies.

  6. Bench-to-bedside review: Rare and common viral infections in the intensive care unit – linking pathophysiology to clinical presentation

    PubMed Central

    Stollenwerk, Nicholas; Harper, Richart W; Sandrock, Christian E

    2008-01-01

    Viral infections are common causes of respiratory tract disease in the outpatient setting but much less common in the intensive care unit. However, a finite number of viral agents cause respiratory tract disease in the intensive care unit. Some viruses, such as influenza, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), cytomegalovirus (CMV), and varicella-zoster virus (VZV), are relatively common. Others, such as adenovirus, severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS)-coronavirus, Hantavirus, and the viral hemorrhagic fevers (VHFs), are rare but have an immense public health impact. Recognizing these viral etiologies becomes paramount in treatment, infection control, and public health measures. Therefore, a basic understanding of the pathogenesis of viral entry, replication, and host response is important for clinical diagnosis and initiating therapeutic options. This review discusses the basic pathophysiology leading to clinical presentations in a few common and rare, but important, viruses found in the intensive care unit: influenza, RSV, SARS, VZV, adenovirus, CMV, VHF, and Hantavirus. PMID:18671826

  7. Viral Meningitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... have severe illness from viral meningitis. Causes Non-polio enteroviruses are the most common cause of viral ... following viruses spread by visiting CDC’s websites: Non-polio enteroviruses Mumps virus Herpesviruses, including Epstein-Barr virus , ...

  8. Viral Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... from medicines, which usually move through your bloodstream. Antibiotics do not work for viral infections. There are a few antiviral medicines available. Vaccines can help prevent you from getting many viral diseases. NIH: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

  9. A multi-scale mathematical modeling framework to investigate anti-viral therapeutic opportunities in targeting HIV-1 accessory proteins.

    PubMed

    Suryawanshi, Gajendra W; Hoffmann, Alexander

    2015-12-07

    Human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) employs accessory proteins to evade innate immune responses by neutralizing the anti-viral activity of host restriction factors. Apolipoprotein B mRNA-editing enzyme 3G (APOBEC3G, A3G) and bone marrow stromal cell antigen 2 (BST2) are host resistance factors that potentially inhibit HIV-1 infection. BST2 reduces viral production by tethering budding HIV-1 particles to virus producing cells, while A3G inhibits the reverse transcription (RT) process and induces viral genome hypermutation through cytidine deamination, generating fewer replication competent progeny virus. Two HIV-1 proteins counter these cellular restriction factors: Vpu, which reduces surface BST2, and Vif, which degrades cellular A3G. The contest between these host and viral proteins influences whether HIV-1 infection is established and progresses towards AIDS. In this work, we present an age-structured multi-scale viral dynamics model of in vivo HIV-1 infection. We integrated the intracellular dynamics of anti-viral activity of the host factors and their neutralization by HIV-1 accessory proteins into the virus/cell population dynamics model. We calculate the basic reproductive ratio (Ro) as a function of host-viral protein interaction coefficients, and numerically simulated the multi-scale model to understand HIV-1 dynamics following host factor-induced perturbations. We found that reducing the influence of Vpu triggers a drop in Ro, revealing the impact of BST2 on viral infection control. Reducing Vif׳s effect reveals the restrictive efficacy of A3G in blocking RT and in inducing lethal hypermutations, however, neither of these factors alone is sufficient to fully restrict HIV-1 infection. Interestingly, our model further predicts that BST2 and A3G function synergistically, and delineates their relative contribution in limiting HIV-1 infection and disease progression. We provide a robust modeling framework for devising novel combination therapies that target

  10. Improving nonlinear modeling capabilities of functional link adaptive filters.

    PubMed

    Comminiello, Danilo; Scarpiniti, Michele; Scardapane, Simone; Parisi, Raffaele; Uncini, Aurelio

    2015-09-01

    The functional link adaptive filter (FLAF) represents an effective solution for online nonlinear modeling problems. In this paper, we take into account a FLAF-based architecture, which separates the adaptation of linear and nonlinear elements, and we focus on the nonlinear branch to improve the modeling performance. In particular, we propose a new model that involves an adaptive combination of filters downstream of the nonlinear expansion. Such combination leads to a cooperative behavior of the whole architecture, thus yielding a performance improvement, particularly in the presence of strong nonlinearities. An advanced architecture is also proposed involving the adaptive combination of multiple filters on the nonlinear branch. The proposed models are assessed in different nonlinear modeling problems, in which their effectiveness and capabilities are shown.

  11. Viral pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Names Pneumonia - viral; Walking pneumonia - viral Images Lungs Respiratory system References Lee FE, Treanor JJ. Viral infections. In: Broaddus VC, Mason RJ, Ernst JD, et al, eds. Murray and Nadel's Textbook of Respiratory Medicine . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016: ...

  12. Next Generation Respiratory Viral Vaccine System: Advanced and Emerging Bioengineered Human Lung Epithelia Model (HLEM) Organoid Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, Thomas J.; Schneider, Sandra L.; MacIntosh, Victor; Gibbons, Thomas F.

    2010-01-01

    Acute respiratory infections, including pneumonia and influenza, are the S t" leading cause of United States and worldwide deaths. Newly emerging pathogens signaled the need for an advanced generation of vaccine technology.. Human bronchial-tracheal epithelial tissue was bioengineered to detect, identify, host and study the pathogenesis of acute respiratory viral disease. The 3-dimensional (3D) human lung epithelio-mesechymal tissue-like assemblies (HLEM TLAs) share characteristics with human respiratory epithelium: tight junctions, desmosomes, microvilli, functional markers villin, keratins and production of tissue mucin. Respiratory Syntial Virus (RSV) studies demonstrate viral growth kinetics and membrane bound glycoproteins up to day 20 post infection in the human lung-orgainoid infected cell system. Peak replication of RSV occurred on day 10 at 7 log10 particles forming units per ml/day. HLEM is an advanced virus vaccine model and biosentinel system for emergent viral infectious diseases to support DoD global surveillance and military readiness.

  13. Morphine increases hippocampal viral load and suppresses frontal lobe CCL5 expression in the LP-BM5 AIDS model.

    PubMed

    McLane, Virginia D; Cao, Ling; Willis, Colin L

    2014-04-15

    Chronic opiate abuse accelerates the development of cognitive deficits in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 patients. To investigate morphine's effects on viral infection of the central nervous system, we applied chronic morphine treatment to the LP-BM5 murine acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (MAIDS) model. LP-BM5 infection induces proinflammatory cytokine/chemokine production, correlating to increased blood-brain barrier permeability. Morphine treatment significantly increased LP-BM5 viral load in the hippocampus, but not in the frontal lobe. Morphine reduced the chemokine CCL5 to non-infected levels in the frontal lobe, but not in the hippocampus. These data indicate a region-specific mechanism for morphine's effects on virally-induced neurocognitive deficits.

  14. Modeling chronic hepatitis B or C virus infection during antiviral therapy using an analogy to enzyme kinetics: long-term viral dynamics without rebound and oscillation.

    PubMed

    Takayanagi, Toshiaki

    2013-12-01

    The basic model for chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) or hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection during therapy enables us to analyze short-term viral kinetics. However, the model is not useful for analyzing long-term viral kinetics. Here, I suggest a new model that was obtained by introducing Michaelis-Menten kinetics into the basic model. The new model can exhibit long-term viral kinetics without rebound and oscillation, unlike the basic model. The value of the parameter K in the new model is analogous to the Michaelis constant Km and is predicted to be approximately less than 10(10)/ml.

  15. A FAULT MODEL FOR ONTOLOGY MAPPING, ALIGNMENT, AND LINKING SYSTEMS

    PubMed Central

    JOHNSON, HELEN L.; COHEN, K. BRETONNEL; HUNTER, LAWRENCE

    2008-01-01

    There has been much work devoted to the mapping, alignment, and linking of ontologies (MALO), but little has been published about how to evaluate systems that do this. A fault model for conducting fine-grained evaluations of MALO systems is proposed, and its application to the system described in Johnson et al. [15] is illustrated. Two judges categorized errors according to the model, and inter-judge agreement was calculated by error category. Overall inter-judge agreement was 98% after dispute resolution, suggesting that the model is consistently applicable. The results of applying the model to the system described in [15] reveal the reason for a puzzling set of results in that paper, and also suggest a number of avenues and techniques for improving the state of the art in MALO, including the development of biomedical domain specific language processing tools, filtering of high frequency matching results, and word sense disambiguation. PMID:17990495

  16. Modeling of Long-Range Atmospheric Lasercom Links Between Static and Mobile Platforms

    SciTech Connect

    Scharlemann, E T; Breitfeller, E F; Henderson, J R; Kallman, J S; Morris, J R; Ruggiero, A J

    2003-07-29

    We describe modeling and simulation of long-range terrestrial laser communications links between static and mobile platforms. Atmospheric turbulence modeling, along with pointing, tracking and acquisition models are combined to provide an overall capability to estimate communications link performance.

  17. Evidence for differential viral oncolytic efficacy in an in vitro model of epithelial ovarian cancer metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Jessica G; Valdes, Yudith Ramos; Barrett, John W; Bell, John C; Stojdl, David; McFadden, Grant; McCart, J Andrea; DiMattia, Gabriel E; Shepherd, Trevor G

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer is unique among most carcinomas in that metastasis occurs by direct dissemination of malignant cells traversing throughout the intraperitoneal fluid. Accordingly, we test new therapeutic strategies using an in vitro three-dimensional spheroid suspension culture model that mimics key steps of this metastatic process. In the present study, we sought to uncover the differential oncolytic efficacy among three different viruses—Myxoma virus, double-deleted vaccinia virus, and Maraba virus—using three ovarian cancer cell lines in our metastasis model system. Herein, we demonstrate that Maraba virus effectively infects, replicates, and kills epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) cells in proliferating adherent cells and with slightly slower kinetics in tumor spheroids. Myxoma virus and vaccinia viruses infect and kill adherent cells to a much lesser extent than Maraba virus, and their oncolytic potential is almost completely attenuated in spheroids. Myxoma virus and vaccinia are able to infect and spread throughout spheroids, but are blocked in the final stages of the lytic cycle, and oncolytic-mediated cell killing is reactivated upon spheroid reattachment. Alternatively, Maraba virus has a remarkably reduced ability to initially enter spheroid cells, yet rapidly infects and spreads throughout spheroids generating significant cell killing effects. We show that low-density lipoprotein receptor expression in ovarian cancer spheroids is reduced and this controls efficient Maraba virus binding and entry into infected cells. Taken together, these results are the first to implicate the potential impact of differential viral oncolytic properties at key steps of ovarian cancer metastasis. PMID:27119108

  18. The Effects of Simulated Weightlessness on Susceptibility to Viral and Bacterial Infections Using a Murine Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gould, C. L.

    1985-01-01

    Certain immunological responses may be compromised as a result of changes in environmental conditions, such as the physiological adaptation to and from the weightlessness which occurs during space flight and recovery. A murine antiorthostatic model was developed to simulate weightlessness. Using this model, the proposed study will determine if differences in susceptibility to viral and bacterial infections exist among mice suspended in an antiorthostatic orientation to simulate weightlessness, mice suspended in an orthostatic orientation to provide a stressful situation without the condition of weightlessness simulation, and non-suspended control mice. Inbred mouse strains which are resistant to the diabetogenic effects of the D variant of encephalomyocarditis virus (EMC-D) and the lethal effects of Salmonella typhimurium will be evaluated. Glucose tolerance tests will be performed on all EMC-D-infected and non-infected control groups. The incidence of EMC-D-induced diabetes and the percentage survival of S. typhimurium-infected animals will be determined in each group. An additional study will determine the effects of simulated weightlessness on murine responses to exogenous interferon.

  19. Human Neural Precursor Cells Promote Neurologic Recovery in a Viral Model of Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lu; Coleman, Ronald; Leang, Ronika; Tran, Ha; Kopf, Alexandra; Walsh, Craig M.; Sears-Kraxberger, Ilse; Steward, Oswald; Macklin, Wendy B.; Loring, Jeanne F.; Lane, Thomas E.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Using a viral model of the demyelinating disease multiple sclerosis (MS), we show that intraspinal transplantation of human embryonic stem cell-derived neural precursor cells (hNPCs) results in sustained clinical recovery, although hNPCs were not detectable beyond day 8 posttransplantation. Improved motor skills were associated with a reduction in neuroinflammation, decreased demyelination, and enhanced remyelination. Evidence indicates that the reduced neuroinflammation is correlated with an increased number of CD4+CD25+FOXP3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) within the spinal cords. Coculture of hNPCs with activated T cells resulted in reduced T cell proliferation and increased Treg numbers. The hNPCs acted, in part, through secretion of TGF-β1 and TGF-β2. These findings indicate that the transient presence of hNPCs transplanted in an animal model of MS has powerful immunomodulatory effects and mediates recovery. Further investigation of the restorative effects of hNPC transplantation may aid in the development of clinically relevant MS treatments. PMID:24936469

  20. Using viral-mediated gene delivery to model Parkinson's disease: do nonhuman primate investigations expand our understanding?

    PubMed

    Fiandaca, Massimo S; Federoff, Howard J

    2014-06-01

    In this review, we consider the use of nonhuman primate (NHP) models of Parkinson's disease (PD) produced using viral-mediated gene delivery and information they provide in comparison to other model systems in rodents and NHPs. To date, rodent and NHP PD models have found it difficult to fully recapitulate the human disorder and, therefore, provide little actual insight into disease progression. The viral-mediated gene delivery method for α-synuclein has been shown to produce a parkinsonian rodent and NHP. This novel viral-mediated gene transfer model in the NHP appears to provide a significant advance beyond neurotoxicant models, by more closely mimicking the more chronic time course of developed behavioral deterioration and neuropathology. Although we agree that the use of these novel methods inducing parkinsonian NHPs may provide relevant treatment insights, beyond those of more standard PD models, we remain cautious as to the preclinical models' ability to predict outcomes in human trials. In specific cases of certain novel medical therapeutics, therefore, we also consider the phase 0 clinical trial as offering an alternative to the currently non-predictive preclinical models, including those in the NHP.

  1. Curing critical links in oscillator networks as power flow models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohden, Martin; Witthaut, Dirk; Timme, Marc; Meyer-Ortmanns, Hildegard

    2017-01-01

    Modern societies crucially depend on the robust supply with electric energy so that blackouts of power grids can have far reaching consequences. Typically, large scale blackouts take place after a cascade of failures: the failure of a single infrastructure component, such as a critical transmission line, results in several subsequent failures that spread across large parts of the network. Improving the robustness of a network to prevent such secondary failures is thus key for assuring a reliable power supply. In this article we analyze the nonlocal rerouting of power flows after transmission line failures for a simplified AC power grid model and compare different strategies to improve network robustness. We identify critical links in the grid and compute alternative pathways to quantify the grid’s redundant capacity and to find bottlenecks along the pathways. Different strategies are developed and tested to increase transmission capacities to restore stability with respect to transmission line failures. We show that local and nonlocal strategies typically perform alike: one can equally well cure critical links by providing backup capacities locally or by extending the capacities of bottleneck links at remote locations.

  2. Linking the Weather Generator with Regional Climate Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubrovsky, Martin; Farda, Ales; Skalak, Petr; Huth, Radan

    2013-04-01

    One of the downscaling approaches, which transform the raw outputs from the climate models (GCMs or RCMs) into data with more realistic structure, is based on linking the stochastic weather generator with the climate model output. The present contribution, in which the parametric daily surface weather generator (WG) M&Rfi is linked to the RCM output, follows two aims: (1) Validation of the new simulations of the present climate (1961-1990) made by the ALADIN-Climate Regional Climate Model at 25 km resolution. The WG parameters are derived from the RCM-simulated surface weather series and compared to those derived from weather series observed in 125 Czech meteorological stations. The set of WG parameters will include statistics of the surface temperature and precipitation series (including probability of wet day occurrence). (2) Presenting a methodology for linking the WG with RCM output. This methodology, which is based on merging information from observations and RCM, may be interpreted as a downscaling procedure, whose product is a gridded WG capable of producing realistic synthetic multivariate weather series for weather-ungauged locations. In this procedure, WG is calibrated with RCM-simulated multi-variate weather series in the first step, and the grid specific WG parameters are then de-biased by spatially interpolated correction factors based on comparison of WG parameters calibrated with gridded RCM weather series and spatially scarcer observations. The quality of the weather series produced by the resultant gridded WG will be assessed in terms of selected climatic characteristics (focusing on characteristics related to variability and extremes of surface temperature and precipitation). Acknowledgements: The present experiment is made within the frame of projects ALARO-Climate (project P209/11/2405 sponsored by the Czech Science Foundation), WG4VALUE (project LD12029 sponsored by the Ministry of Education, Youth and Sports of CR) and VALUE (COST ES 1102

  3. A mathematical model of N-linked glycosylation.

    PubMed

    Krambeck, Frederick J; Betenbaugh, Michael J

    2005-12-20

    Metabolic engineering of N-linked oligosaccharide biosynthesis to produce novel glycoforms or glycoform distributions of a recombinant glycoprotein can potentially lead to an improved therapeutic performance of the glycoprotein product. A mathematical model for the initial stages of this process, up to the first galactosylation of an oligosaccharide, was previously developed by Umana and Bailey (1997) (UB1997). Building on this work, an extended model is developed to include further galactosylation, fucosylation, extension of antennae by N-acetyllactosamine repeats, and sialylation. This allows many more structural features to be predicted. A number of simplifying assumptions are also relaxed to incorporate more variables for the control of glycoforms. The full model generates 7565 oligosaccharide structures in a network of 22,871 reactions. Methods for solving the model for the complete product distribution and adjusting the parameters to match experimental data are also developed. A basal set of kinetic parameters for the enzyme-catalyzed reactions acting on free oligosaccharide substrates is obtained from the previous model and existing literature. Enzyme activities are adjusted to match experimental glycoform distributions for Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO). The model is then used to predict the effect of increasing expression of a target glycoprotein on the product glycoform distribution and evaluate appropriate metabolic engineering strategies to return the glycoform profile to its original distribution pattern. This model may find significant utility in the future to predict glycosylation patterns and direct glycoengineering projects to optimize glycoform distributions.

  4. [Model for evaluating the risk of introducing rabbit viral hemorrhagic disease based on experience in Mexico].

    PubMed

    Heneidi Zeckua, A; Zepeda Sein, C; Mateos Poumián, A; Velázquez, G

    1997-04-01

    Viral haemorrhagic disease (VHD) of rabbits was introduced into Mexico from the United States of America in November 1988, following the importation of infected carcasses from China. In February 1989, the National System for Animal Health Emergencies was created, and an eradication programme was implemented at that time. The VHD virus was eradicated in 1992, by means of disease control procedures which included active epidemiological surveillance, publicity campaigns, slaughter, cleaning and disinfection of affected premises, the use of sentinel animals, serological monitoring and repopulation. The eradication programme involved the serological sampling of 39,727 rabbits (revealing an incidence of 1.4%) and the slaughter of 121,275 affected rabbits and rabbits at risk of exposure to infection. The final outbreak of the disease was recorded in April 1991. The country maintained strict epidemiological surveillance through serological testing, certification of premises free from the disease, and control of movement of animals and animal products. Mexico was declared free from the disease on 20 January 1993, becoming the first country to have eradicated VHD. The authors propose a model to evaluate the risk of introducing VHD through the importation of animals and animal products. A guide is provided to evaluate each branch of the relevant scenario tree and the principal criteria which indicate the event at each parameter.

  5. Viral arthritides.

    PubMed

    Outhred, Alexander C; Kok, Jen; Dwyer, Dominic E

    2011-05-01

    Viral infections may manifest as acute or chronic arthritis. Joint involvement arises from either direct infection of the joint, through an immunological response directed towards the virus or autoimmunity. Epidemiological clues to the diagnosis include geographic location and exposure to vector-borne, blood-borne or sexually transmitted viruses. Although not always possible, it is important to diagnose the pathogenic virus, usually by serology, nucleic acid tests or rarely, viral culture. In general, viral arthritides are self-limiting and treatment is targeted at symptomatic relief. This article focuses on the causes, clinical features, diagnosis and treatment of viral arthritides.

  6. Model of Atmospheric Links on Optical Communications from High Altitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Subich, Christopher

    2004-01-01

    Optical communication links have the potential to solve many of the problems of current radio and microwave links to satellites and high-altitude aircraft. The higher frequency involved in optical systems allows for significantly greater signal bandwidth, and thus information transfer rate, in excess of 10 Gbps, and the highly directional nature of laser-based signals eliminates the need for frequency-division multiplexing seen in radio and microwave links today. The atmosphere, however, distorts an optical signal differently than a microwave signal. While the ionosphere is one of the most significant sources of noise and distortion in a microwave or radio signal, the lower atmosphere affects an optical signal more significantly. Refractive index fluctuations, primarily caused by changes in atmospheric temperature and density, distort the incoming signal in both deterministic and nondeterministic ways. Additionally, suspended particles, such as those in haze or rain, further corrupt the transmitted signal. To model many of the atmospheric effects on the propagating beam, we use simulations based on the beam-propagation method. This method, developed both for simulation of signals in waveguides and propagation in atmospheric turbulence, separates the propagation into a diffraction and refraction problem. The diffraction step is an exact solution, within the limits of numerical precision, to the problem of propagation in free space, and the refraction step models the refractive index variances over a segment of the propagation path. By applying refraction for a segment of the propagation path, then diffracting over that same segment, this method forms a good approximation to true propagation through the atmospheric medium. Iterating over small segments of the total propagation path gives a good approximation to the problem of propagation over the entire path. Parameters in this model, such as initial beam profile and atmospheric constants, are easily modified in a

  7. The Viral Polymerase Inhibitor 7-Deaza-2’-C-Methyladenosine Is a Potent Inhibitor of In Vitro Zika Virus Replication and Delays Disease Progression in a Robust Mouse Infection Model

    PubMed Central

    Zmurko, Joanna; Marques, Rafael E.; Schols, Dominique; Verbeken, Erik; Kaptein, Suzanne J.F.; Neyts, Johan

    2016-01-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is an emerging flavivirus typically causing a dengue-like febrile illness, but neurological complications, such as microcephaly in newborns, have potentially been linked to this viral infection. We established a panel of in vitro assays to allow the identification of ZIKV inhibitors and demonstrate that the viral polymerase inhibitor 7-deaza-2’-C-methyladenosine (7DMA) efficiently inhibits replication. Infection of AG129 (IFN-α/β and IFN-γ receptor knock-out) mice with ZIKV resulted in acute neutrophilic encephalitis with viral antigens accumulating in neurons of the brain and spinal cord. Additionally, high levels of viral RNA were detected in the spleen, liver and kidney, and levels of IFN-γ and IL-18 were systematically increased in serum of ZIKV-infected mice. Interestingly, the virus was also detected in testicles of infected mice. In line with its in vitro anti-ZIKV activity, 7DMA reduced viremia and delayed virus-induced morbidity and mortality in infected mice, which also validates this small animal model to assess the in vivo efficacy of novel ZIKV inhibitors. Since AG129 mice can generate an antibody response, and have been used in dengue vaccine studies, the model can also be used to assess the efficacy of ZIKV vaccines.   PMID:27163257

  8. Global Stability of Delayed Viral Infection Models with Nonlinear Antibody and CTL Immune Responses and General Incidence Rate

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The dynamical behaviors for a five-dimensional viral infection model with three delays which describes the interactions of antibody, cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) immune responses, and nonlinear incidence rate are investigated. The threshold values for viral infection, antibody response, CTL immune response, CTL immune competition, and antibody competition, respectively, are established. Under certain assumptions, the threshold value conditions on the global stability of the infection-free, immune-free, antibody response, CTL immune response, and interior equilibria are proved by using the Lyapunov functionals method, respectively. Immune delay as a bifurcation parameter is further investigated. The numerical simulations are performed in order to illustrate the dynamical behavior of the model. PMID:28115980

  9. The Linked Dual Representation model of vocal perception and production

    PubMed Central

    Hutchins, Sean; Moreno, Sylvain

    2013-01-01

    The voice is one of the most important media for communication, yet there is a wide range of abilities in both the perception and production of the voice. In this article, we review this range of abilities, focusing on pitch accuracy as a particularly informative case, and look at the factors underlying these abilities. Several classes of models have been posited describing the relationship between vocal perception and production, and we review the evidence for and against each class of model. We look at how the voice is different from other musical instruments and review evidence about both the association and the dissociation between vocal perception and production abilities. Finally, we introduce the Linked Dual Representation (LDR) model, a new approach which can account for the broad patterns in prior findings, including trends in the data which might seem to be countervailing. We discuss how this model interacts with higher-order cognition and examine its predictions about several aspects of vocal perception and production. PMID:24204360

  10. Bioinformatics Multivariate Analysis Determined a Set of Phase-Specific Biomarker Candidates in a Novel Mouse Model for Viral Myocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Omura, Seiichi; Kawai, Eiichiro; Sato, Fumitaka; Martinez, Nicholas E.; Chaitanya, Ganta V.; Rollyson, Phoebe A.; Cvek, Urska; Trutschl, Marjan; Alexander, J. Steven; Tsunoda, Ikuo

    2015-01-01

    Background Myocarditis is an inflammatory disease of the cardiac muscle and is mainly caused by viral infections. Viral myocarditis has been proposed to be divided into 3 phases: the acute viral phase, the subacute immune phase, and the chronic cardiac remodeling phase. Although individualized therapy should be applied depending on the phase, no clinical or experimental studies have found biomarkers that distinguish between the 3 phases. Theiler’s murine encephalomyelitis virus belongs to the genus Cardiovirus and can cause myocarditis in susceptible mouse strains. Methods and Results Using this novel model for viral myocarditis induced with Theiler’s murine encephalomyelitis virus, we conducted multivariate analysis including echocardiography, serum troponin and viral RNA titration, and microarray to identify the biomarker candidates that can discriminate the 3 phases. Using C3H mice infected with Theiler’s murine encephalomyelitis virus on 4, 7, and 60 days post infection, we conducted bioinformatics analyses, including principal component analysis and k-means clustering of microarray data, because our traditional cardiac and serum assays, including 2-way comparison of microarray data, did not lead to the identification of a single biomarker. Principal component analysis separated heart samples clearly between the groups of 4, 7, and 60 days post infection. Representative genes contributing to the separation were as follows: 4 and 7 days post infection, innate immunity–related genes, such as Irf7 and Cxcl9; 7 and 60 days post infection, acquired immunity–related genes, such as Cd3g and H2-Aa; and cardiac remodeling–related genes, such as Mmp12 and Gpnmb. Conclusions Sets of molecules, not single molecules, identified by unsupervised principal component analysis, were found to be useful as phase-specific biomarkers. PMID:25031303

  11. Bovine viral diarrhea virus cyclically impairs long bone trabecular modeling in experimental persistently infected fetuses.

    PubMed

    Webb, B T; Norrdin, R W; Smirnova, N P; Van Campen, H; Weiner, C M; Antoniazzi, A Q; Bielefeldt-Ohmann, H; Hansen, T R

    2012-11-01

    Persistent infection (PI) with bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) has been associated with osteopetrosis and other long bone lesions, most commonly characterized as transverse zones of unmodeled metaphyseal trabeculae in fetuses and calves. This study was undertaken to characterize the morphogenesis of fetal long bone lesions. Forty-six BVDV-naïve pregnant Hereford heifers of approximately 18 months of age were inoculated with noncytopathic BVDV type 2 containing media or media alone on day 75 of gestation to produce PI and control fetuses, respectively, which were collected via cesarean section on days 82, 89, 97, 192, and 245 of gestation. Radiographic and histomorphometric abnormalities were first detected on day 192, at which age PI fetal long bone metaphyses contained focal densities (4 of 7 fetuses) and multiple alternating transverse radiodense bands (3 of 7 fetuses). Day 245 fetuses were similarly affected. Histomorphometric analysis of proximal tibial metaphyses from day 192 fetuses revealed transverse zones with increased calcified cartilage core (Cg.V/BV, %) and trabecular bone (BV/TV, %) volumes in regions corresponding to radiodense bands (P < .05). Numbers of tartrate resistant acid phosphatase positive osteoclasts (N.Oc/BS, #/mm(2)) and bone perimeter occupied (Oc.S/BS, %) were both decreased (P < .05). Mineralizing surface (MS/BS, %), a measure of tissue level bone formation activity, was reduced in PI fetuses (P < .05). It is concluded that PI with BVDV induces cyclic abnormal trabecular modeling, which is secondary to reduced numbers of osteoclasts. The factors responsible for these temporal changes are unknown but may be related to the time required for osteoclast differentiation from precursor cells.

  12. Effects of linking a soil-water-balance model with a groundwater-flow model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stanton, Jennifer S.; Ryter, Derek W.; Peterson, Steven M.

    2013-01-01

    A previously published regional groundwater-flow model in north-central Nebraska was sequentially linked with the recently developed soil-water-balance (SWB) model to analyze effects to groundwater-flow model parameters and calibration results. The linked models provided a more detailed spatial and temporal distribution of simulated recharge based on hydrologic processes, improvement of simulated groundwater-level changes and base flows at specific sites in agricultural areas, and a physically based assessment of the relative magnitude of recharge for grassland, nonirrigated cropland, and irrigated cropland areas. Root-mean-squared (RMS) differences between the simulated and estimated or measured target values for the previously published model and linked models were relatively similar and did not improve for all types of calibration targets. However, without any adjustment to the SWB-generated recharge, the RMS difference between simulated and estimated base-flow target values for the groundwater-flow model was slightly smaller than for the previously published model, possibly indicating that the volume of recharge simulated by the SWB code was closer to actual hydrogeologic conditions than the previously published model provided. Groundwater-level and base-flow hydrographs showed that temporal patterns of simulated groundwater levels and base flows were more accurate for the linked models than for the previously published model at several sites, particularly in agricultural areas.

  13. Viral Glycoprotein Complex Formation, Essential Function and Immunogenicity in the Guinea Pig Model for Cytomegalovirus

    PubMed Central

    Maddux, Sarah; Choi, K. Yeon; McGregor, Alistair

    2015-01-01

    Development of a cytomegalovirus (CMV) vaccine is a major public health priority due to the risk of congenital infection. A key component of a vaccine is thought to be an effective neutralizing antibody response against the viral glycoproteins necessary for cell entry. Species specificity of human CMV (HCMV) precludes direct studies in an animal model. The guinea pig is the only small animal model for congenital cytomegalovirus infection. Analysis of the guinea pig CMV (GPCMV) genome indicates that it potentially encodes homologs to the HCMV glycoproteins (including gB, gH, gL, gM, gN and gO) that form various cell entry complexes on the outside of the virus: gCI (gB); gCII (gH/gL/gO); gCIII (gM/gN). The gB homolog (GP55) has been investigated as a candidate subunit vaccine but little is known about the other homolog proteins. GPCMV glycoproteins were investigated by transient expression studies which indicated that homolog glycoproteins to gN and gM, or gH, gL and gO were able to co-localize in cells and generate respective homolog complexes which could be verified by immunoprecipitation assays. ELISA studies demonstrated that the individual complexes were highly immunogenic in guinea pigs. The gO (GP74) homolog protein has 13 conserved N-glycosylation sites found in HCMV gO. In transient expression studies, only the glycosylated protein is detected but in virus infected cells both N-glycosylated and non-glycosylated gO protein were detected. In protein interaction studies, a mutant gO that lacked N-glycosylation sites had no impact on the ability of the protein to interact with gH/gL which indicated a potential alternative function associated with these sites. Knockout GPCMV BAC mutagenesis of the respective glycoprotein genes (GP55 for gB, GP75 for gH, GP115 for gL, GP100 for gM, GP73 for gN and GP74 for gO) in separate reactions was lethal for virus regeneration on fibroblast cells which demonstrated the essential nature of the GPCMV glycoproteins. The gene

  14. Viral Glycoprotein Complex Formation, Essential Function and Immunogenicity in the Guinea Pig Model for Cytomegalovirus.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Stewart; Hornig, Julia; Maddux, Sarah; Choi, K Yeon; McGregor, Alistair

    2015-01-01

    Development of a cytomegalovirus (CMV) vaccine is a major public health priority due to the risk of congenital infection. A key component of a vaccine is thought to be an effective neutralizing antibody response against the viral glycoproteins necessary for cell entry. Species specificity of human CMV (HCMV) precludes direct studies in an animal model. The guinea pig is the only small animal model for congenital cytomegalovirus infection. Analysis of the guinea pig CMV (GPCMV) genome indicates that it potentially encodes homologs to the HCMV glycoproteins (including gB, gH, gL, gM, gN and gO) that form various cell entry complexes on the outside of the virus: gCI (gB); gCII (gH/gL/gO); gCIII (gM/gN). The gB homolog (GP55) has been investigated as a candidate subunit vaccine but little is known about the other homolog proteins. GPCMV glycoproteins were investigated by transient expression studies which indicated that homolog glycoproteins to gN and gM, or gH, gL and gO were able to co-localize in cells and generate respective homolog complexes which could be verified by immunoprecipitation assays. ELISA studies demonstrated that the individual complexes were highly immunogenic in guinea pigs. The gO (GP74) homolog protein has 13 conserved N-glycosylation sites found in HCMV gO. In transient expression studies, only the glycosylated protein is detected but in virus infected cells both N-glycosylated and non-glycosylated gO protein were detected. In protein interaction studies, a mutant gO that lacked N-glycosylation sites had no impact on the ability of the protein to interact with gH/gL which indicated a potential alternative function associated with these sites. Knockout GPCMV BAC mutagenesis of the respective glycoprotein genes (GP55 for gB, GP75 for gH, GP115 for gL, GP100 for gM, GP73 for gN and GP74 for gO) in separate reactions was lethal for virus regeneration on fibroblast cells which demonstrated the essential nature of the GPCMV glycoproteins. The gene

  15. Gene Therapy Studies in a Canine Model of X-Linked Severe Combined Immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    De Ravin, Suk See; Malech, Harry L.; Sorrentino, Brian P.; Burtner, Christopher; Kiem, Hans-Peter

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Since the occurrence of T cell leukemias in the original human γ-retroviral gene therapy trials for X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (XSCID), considerable effort has been devoted to developing safer vectors. This review summarizes gene therapy studies performed in a canine model of XSCID to evaluate the efficacy of γ-retroviral, lentiviral, and foamy viral vectors for treating XSCID and a novel method of vector delivery. These studies demonstrate that durable T cell reconstitution and thymopoiesis with no evidence of any serious adverse events and, in contrast to the human XSCID patients, sustained marking in myeloid cells and B cells with reconstitution of normal humoral immune function can be achieved for up to 5 years without any pretreatment conditioning. The presence of sustained levels of gene-marked T cells, B cells, and more importantly myeloid cells for almost 5 years is highly suggestive of transduction of either multipotent hematopoietic stem cells or very primitive committed progenitors. PMID:25603151

  16. Linking GIS and storm water modeling for emergency risk assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Newkirk, R.T.

    1995-12-31

    Many emergencies involve the deposition of chemical contaminants on land either as a direct event or as a secondary byproduct. GIS can be useful in estimating the initial deposition area. Chemical product attribute data bases can be accessed to determine the degree that the contaminants might be transportable in a water medium. An important issue is to estimate the potential impact of the deposition on surface and subsurface water flows. This particularly important since millions of people rely on subsurface ground water as their main source of potable water. Thus, a modeling system is needed by planners and emergency managers to assess the potential for short and long term risks to communities due to storm water transport of deposited contaminants. GIS itself cannot provide the complete analysis. A prototype system to assist in estimating the flows of contaminants related to an emergency has been developed by linking an Arc/Info database, Digital Terrain Model, and SWMM the storm water management modeling system. This system also has important planning applications in assessing alternative land development plans for their impact on ground water recharge and management of storm water.

  17. Linking Geomechanical Models with Observations of Microseismicity during CCS Operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verdon, J.; Kendall, J.; White, D.

    2012-12-01

    During CO2 injection for the purposes of carbon capture and storage (CCS), injection-induced fracturing of the overburden represents a key risk to storage integrity. Fractures in a caprock provide a pathway along which buoyant CO2 can rise and escape the storage zone. Therefore the ability to link field-scale geomechanical models with field geophysical observations is of paramount importance to guarantee secure CO2 storage. Accurate location of microseismic events identifies where brittle failure has occurred on fracture planes. This is a manifestation of the deformation induced by CO2 injection. As the pore pressure is increased during injection, effective stress is decreased, leading to inflation of the reservoir and deformation of surrounding rocks, which creates microseismicity. The deformation induced by injection can be simulated using finite-element mechanical models. Such a model can be used to predict when and where microseismicity is expected to occur. However, typical elements in a field scale mechanical models have decameter scales, while the rupture size for microseismic events are typically of the order of 1 square meter. This means that mapping modeled stress changes to predictions of microseismic activity can be challenging. Where larger scale faults have been identified, they can be included explicitly in the geomechanical model. Where movement is simulated along these discrete features, it can be assumed that microseismicity will occur. However, microseismic events typically occur on fracture networks that are too small to be simulated explicitly in a field-scale model. Therefore, the likelihood of microseismicity occurring must be estimated within a finite element that does not contain explicitly modeled discontinuities. This can be done in a number of ways, including the utilization of measures such as closeness on the stress state to predetermined failure criteria, either for planes with a defined orientation (the Mohr-Coulomb criteria) for

  18. Linking geophysics and soil function modelling - two examples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krüger, J.; Franko, U.; Werban, U.; Dietrich, P.; Behrens, T.; Schmidt, K.; Fank, J.; Kroulik, M.

    2011-12-01

    iSOIL - "Interactions between soil related sciences - Linking geophysics, soil science and digital soil mapping" is a Collaborative Project (Grant Agreement number 211386) co-funded by the Research DG of the European Commission within the RTD activities of the FP7 Thematic Priority Environment. The iSOIL project aims at reliable mapping of soil properties and soil functions with various methods including geophysical, spectroscopic and monitoring techniques. The general procedure contains three steps (i) geophysical monitoring, (ii) generation of soil property maps and (iii) process modelling. The objective of this work is to demonstrate the methodological procedure on two different examples. Example A focuses on the turnover conditions for soil organic matter (SOM) since many soil functions in a direct or indirect way depend on SOM and SOM depletion is amongst the worst soil threats. Example B deals with the dynamics of soil water and the direct influence on crop biomass production. The applied CANDY model (Franko et al. 1995) was developed to describe dynamics of soil organic matter and mineral nitrogen as well as soil water and temperature. The new module PLUS extends CANDY to simulate crop biomass production based on environmental influences (Krüger et al. 2011). The methodological procedure of example A illustrates a model application for a field site in the Czech Republic using generated soil maps from combined geophysical data. Modelling requires a complete set of soil parameters. Combining measured soil properties and data of geophysical measurements (electrical conductivity and gamma spectrometry) is the basis for digital soil mapping which provided data about clay, silt and sand as well as SOC content. With these data pedotransfer functions produce detailed soil input data (e.g. bulk and particle density, field capacity, wilting point, saturated conductivity) for the rooted soil profile. CANDY calculated different indicators for SOM and gave hints about

  19. Alterations in favipiravir (T-705) pharmacokinetics and biodistribution in a hamster model of viral hemorrhagic fever

    PubMed Central

    Gowen, Brian B.; Sefing, Eric J.; Westover, Jonna B.; Smee, Donald F.; Hagloch, Joseph; Furuta, Yousuke; Hall, Jeffery O.

    2015-01-01

    Favipiravir (T-705) is a new anti-influenza drug approved for human use in Japan and progressing through Phase 3 clinical trials in the U.S. In addition to its potent inhibitory effects against influenza virus infection, the compound has been shown to be broadly active against RNA viruses from 9 different families, including the Arenaviridae. Several members of the Arenaviridae family of viruses are significant human pathogens that cause viral hemorrhagic fever, a severe systemic syndrome where vascular leak is a cardinal feature. Because arenaviral infections are unlikely to be diagnosed and treated until the illness has progressed to a more advanced state, it is important to understand the effects of the disease state on favipiravir pharmacokinetics (PK) and biodistribution to help guide therapeutic strategy. During acute arenavirus infection in hamsters, we found reduced plasma favipiravir concentrations and altered kinetics of absorption, elimination and time to maximum drug concentration. In addition, the amounts of the favipiravir M1 primary metabolite were higher in the infected animals, suggesting that favipiravir metabolism may favor the formation of this inactive metabolite during viral infection. We also discovered differences in favipiravir and M1 PK parameters associated with arenavirus infection in a number of hamster tissues. Finally, analysis at the individual animal level demonstrated a correlation between reduced plasma favipiravir concentration with increased disease burden as reflected by weight loss and viral load. Our study is the first to show the impact of active viral infection and disease on favipiravir PK and biodistribution, highlighting the need to consider alterations in these parameters when treating individuals with viral hemorrhagic fever of arenavirus or other etiology. PMID:26186980

  20. Alterations in favipiravir (T-705) pharmacokinetics and biodistribution in a hamster model of viral hemorrhagic fever.

    PubMed

    Gowen, Brian B; Sefing, Eric J; Westover, Jonna B; Smee, Donald F; Hagloch, Joseph; Furuta, Yousuke; Hall, Jeffery O

    2015-09-01

    Favipiravir (T-705) is a new anti-influenza drug approved for human use in Japan and progressing through Phase 3 clinical trials in the U.S. In addition to its potent inhibitory effects against influenza virus infection, the compound has been shown to be broadly active against RNA viruses from 9 different families, including the Arenaviridae. Several members of the Arenaviridae family of viruses are significant human pathogens that cause viral hemorrhagic fever, a severe systemic syndrome where vascular leak is a cardinal feature. Because arenaviral infections are unlikely to be diagnosed and treated until the illness has progressed to a more advanced state, it is important to understand the effects of the disease state on favipiravir pharmacokinetics (PK) and biodistribution to help guide therapeutic strategy. During acute arenavirus infection in hamsters, we found reduced plasma favipiravir concentrations and altered kinetics of absorption, elimination and time to maximum drug concentration. In addition, the amounts of the favipiravir M1 primary metabolite were higher in the infected animals, suggesting that favipiravir metabolism may favor the formation of this inactive metabolite during viral infection. We also discovered differences in favipiravir and M1 PK parameters associated with arenavirus infection in a number of hamster tissues. Finally, analysis at the individual animal level demonstrated a correlation between reduced plasma favipiravir concentration with increased disease burden as reflected by weight loss and viral load. Our study is the first to show the impact of active viral infection and disease on favipiravir PK and biodistribution, highlighting the need to consider alterations in these parameters when treating individuals with viral hemorrhagic fever of arenavirus or other etiology.

  1. Viral cystatin evolution and three-dimensional structure modelling: A case of directional selection acting on a viral protein involved in a host-parasitoid interaction

    PubMed Central

    Serbielle, Céline; Chowdhury, Shafinaz; Pichon, Samuel; Dupas, Stéphane; Lesobre, Jérôme; Purisima, Enrico O; Drezen, Jean-Michel; Huguet, Elisabeth

    2008-01-01

    Background In pathogens, certain genes encoding proteins that directly interact with host defences coevolve with their host and are subject to positive selection. In the lepidopteran host-wasp parasitoid system, one of the most original strategies developed by the wasps to defeat host defences is the injection of a symbiotic polydnavirus at the same time as the wasp eggs. The virus is essential for wasp parasitism success since viral gene expression alters the immune system and development of the host. As a wasp mutualist symbiont, the virus is expected to exhibit a reduction in genome complexity and evolve under wasp phyletic constraints. However, as a lepidopteran host pathogenic symbiont, the virus is likely undergoing strong selective pressures for the acquisition of new functions by gene acquisition or duplication. To understand the constraints imposed by this particular system on virus evolution, we studied a polydnavirus gene family encoding cyteine protease inhibitors of the cystatin superfamily. Results We show that cystatins are the first bracovirus genes proven to be subject to strong positive selection within a host-parasitoid system. A generated three-dimensional model of Cotesia congregata bracovirus cystatin 1 provides a powerful framework to position positively selected residues and reveal that they are concentrated in the vicinity of actives sites which interact with cysteine proteases directly. In addition, phylogenetic analyses reveal two different cystatin forms which evolved under different selective constraints and are characterized by independent adaptive duplication events. Conclusion Positive selection acts to maintain cystatin gene duplications and induces directional divergence presumably to ensure the presence of efficient and adapted cystatin forms. Directional selection has acted on key cystatin active sites, suggesting that cystatins coevolve with their host target. We can strongly suggest that cystatins constitute major virulence

  2. Implementation of a vibrationally linked chemical reaction model for DSMC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, A. B.; Bird, Graeme A.

    1994-01-01

    A new procedure closely linking dissociation and exchange reactions in air to the vibrational levels of the diatomic molecules has been implemented in both one- and two-dimensional versions of Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) programs. The previous modeling of chemical reactions with DSMC was based on the continuum reaction rates for the various possible reactions. The new method is more closely related to the actual physics of dissociation and is more appropriate to the particle nature of DSMC. Two cases are presented: the relaxation to equilibrium of undissociated air initially at 10,000 K, and the axisymmetric calculation of shuttle forebody heating during reentry at 92.35 km and 7500 m/s. Although reaction rates are not used in determining the dissociations or exchange reactions, the new method produces rates which agree astonishingly well with the published rates derived from experiment. The results for gas properties and surface properties also agree well with the results produced by earlier DSMC models, equilibrium air calculations, and experiment.

  3. Linking Geomagentic Data to Dynamo Models via Variational Data Assimilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitrova, L. L.; Egbert, G. D.; Kuang, W.; Jiang, W.; Tangborn, A.

    2011-12-01

    The increased resolution and accuracy of both the geomagnetic field models and observations in recent years has resulted in increased efforts to link theory to data via data assimilation (DA) techniques similar to those previously developed in the atmospheric and oceanic communities . If applied to the geomagnetic field, DA has potential to improve both models and observations: geodynamics models can be assessed and improved based on observational constraints to better understand the physics of the core dynamics; the improved models can then be used to (1)constrain "hidden" components of the state of the geodynamo that are not directly observable, (2)more accurately forecast the geomagnetic fields and (3) hindcast and improve past geomagnetic field models. DA methods can be broadly divided into two approaches: sequential and variational. In sequential DA, observations are combined with the current model state to produce a new state estimate, which is then used as the initial state for the next model forecast. As such, sequential DA leads to discontinuous model state, and observations can influence only the future model state. Variational DA differs from sequential DA in that the goal is a global adjustment of the model trajectory to fit simultaneously all the data. Thus in the variational approach, observations at a later time could influence the model solution at an earlier time. Both sequential and variational DA has been applied to simplified dynamic models (e.g.Sun et al. [2007], Fournier et al. [2007]), and sequential DA has been applied to full dynamo models (e.g. Liu et al. [2007], Kuang et al. [2008]). However, since the best data is from recent years, sequential schemes can't readily project this data backwards in time. We present an update to our ongoing efforts to implement modern variational DA methods (based on theory of representers, potentially allowing for weak constraint DA) for the Modular Scalable Self-consistent Three-dimensional (Mo

  4. A communications model for an ISAS to NASA span link

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, James L.; Mcguire, Robert E.; Lopez-Swafford, Brian

    1987-01-01

    The authors propose that an initial computer-to-computer communication link use the public packet switched networks (PPSN) Venus-P in Japan and TELENET in the U.S. When the traffic warrants it, this link would then be upgraded to a dedicated leased line that directly connects into the Space Physics Analysis Network (SPAN). The proposed system of hardware and software will easily support migration to such a dedicated link. It therefore provides a cost effective approach to the network problem. Once a dedicated line becomes operation it is suggested that the public networks link and continue to coexist, providing a backup capability.

  5. FSO and radio link attenuation: meteorological models verified by experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brazda, Vladimir; Fiser, Ondrej; Svoboda, Jaroslav

    2011-09-01

    Institute of Atmospheric Physics of Czech Academy measures atmospheric attenuation on 60 m experimental FSO link on 830 and 1550 nm for more than three years. Visibility sensors and two 3D sonic anemometers on both transmitting and receiving site, rain gauge and many sensors enabling the refractivity index computation are spaced along the optical link. Meteorological visibility, wind turbulent energy, sonic temperature, structure index and rain rate are correlated with measured attenuation. FSO link attenuation dependence on the above mentioned parameters is analyzed. The paper shows also basic statistical behavior of the long-term FSO signal level and also the simulation of hybrid link techniques.

  6. Gene Expression Correlates with the Number of Herpes Viral Genomes Initiating Infection in Single Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Efrat M.

    2016-01-01

    Viral gene expression varies significantly among genetically identical cells. The sources of these variations are not well understood and have been suggested to involve both deterministic host differences and stochastic viral host interactions. For herpesviruses, only a limited number of incoming viral genomes initiate expression and replication in each infected cell. To elucidate the effect of this limited number of productively infecting genomes on viral gene expression in single cells, we constructed a set of fluorescence-expressing genetically tagged herpes recombinants. The number of different barcodes originating from a single cell is a good representative of the number of incoming viral genomes replicating (NOIVGR) in that cell. We identified a positive correlation between the NOIVGR and viral gene expression, as measured by the fluorescent protein expressed from the viral genome. This correlation was identified in three distinct cell-types, although the average NOIVGR per cell differed among these cell-types. Among clonal single cells, high housekeeping gene expression levels are not supportive of high viral gene expression, suggesting specific host determinants effecting viral infection. We developed a model to predict NOIVGR from cellular parameters, which supports the notion that viral gene expression is tightly linked to the NOIVGR in single-cells. Our results support the hypothesis that the stochastic nature of viral infection and host cell determinants contribute together to the variability observed among infected cells. PMID:27923068

  7. Viral infections and allergies.

    PubMed

    Xepapadaki, Paraskevi; Papadopoulos, Nikolaos G

    2007-01-01

    Respiratory viral infections have been implicated in the origin of, protection from and exacerbation of allergy-related symptoms in a variety of ways. Viral infections are closely linked to infantile wheezing. Severe bronchiolitis in early infancy may predispose to chronic childhood asthma as well as allergic sensitization; alternatively it could represent a marker of susceptible individuals. In contrast, repeated mild infections in early life may have a protective role in the development of asthma or atopy by driving the immune system towards Th1 responses. However, evidence on this hypothesis is not consistent as far as respiratory viruses are concerned. Several factors, including the presence of an atopic environment, timing of exposure and severity of the infection, interactively contribute to the allergy-infection relationship. In the present report, recent data on the role of viral infections in the development and progression of allergy and asthma are reviewed.

  8. Rate-equation modelling and ensemble approach to extraction of parameters for viral infection-induced cell apoptosis and necrosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domanskyi, Sergii; Schilling, Joshua E.; Gorshkov, Vyacheslav; Libert, Sergiy; Privman, Vladimir

    2016-09-01

    We develop a theoretical approach that uses physiochemical kinetics modelling to describe cell population dynamics upon progression of viral infection in cell culture, which results in cell apoptosis (programmed cell death) and necrosis (direct cell death). Several model parameters necessary for computer simulation were determined by reviewing and analyzing available published experimental data. By comparing experimental data to computer modelling results, we identify the parameters that are the most sensitive to the measured system properties and allow for the best data fitting. Our model allows extraction of parameters from experimental data and also has predictive power. Using the model we describe interesting time-dependent quantities that were not directly measured in the experiment and identify correlations among the fitted parameter values. Numerical simulation of viral infection progression is done by a rate-equation approach resulting in a system of "stiff" equations, which are solved by using a novel variant of the stochastic ensemble modelling approach. The latter was originally developed for coupled chemical reactions.

  9. Dose-dependent protective effect of nicotine in a murine model of viral myocarditis induced by coxsackievirus B3

    PubMed Central

    Li-Sha, Ge; Jing-Lin, Zhao; Guang-Yi, Chen; Li, Liu; De-Pu, Zhou; Yue-Chun, Li

    2015-01-01

    The alpha 7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (alpha7 nAChR) was recently described as an anti-inflammatory target in various inflammatory diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate the dose-related effects of nicotine, an alpha7 nAChR agonist, in murine model of viral myocarditis. BALB/C mice were infected by an intraperitoneally injection with coxsackievirus B3. Nicotine was administered at doses of 0.1, 0.2 or 0.4 mg/kg three times per day for 7 or 14 consecutive days. The effects of nicotine on survival, myocardial histopathological changes, cardiac function, and cytokine levels were studied. The survival rate on day 14 increased in a dose-dependent fashion and was markedly higher in the 0.2 and 0.4 mg/kg nicotine groups than in the infected untreated group. Treatment with high-dose nicotine reduced the myocardial inflammation and improved the impaired left ventricular function in infected mice. The mRNA expressions and protein levels of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-17A were significantly downregulated in dose-dependent manners in the nicotine treatment groups compared to the infected untreated group. Nicotine dose-dependently reduced the severity of viral myocarditis through inhibiting the production of proinflammatory cytokines. The findings suggest that alpha7 nAChR agonists may be a promising new strategy for patients with viral myocarditis. PMID:26507386

  10. Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee Considerations Regarding the Use of Virus-Induced Carcinogenesis and Oncolytic Viral Models.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Stephanie D; Hickman-Davis, Judy M; Bergdall, Valerie K

    2016-01-01

    The use of virus-induced carcinogenesis and oncologic experimental animal models is essential in understanding the mechanisms of cancer development to advance prevention, diagnosis, and treatment methods. The Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC) is responsible for both the complex philosophical and practical considerations associated with animal models of cancer. Animal models of cancer carry their own unique issues that require special consideration from the IACUC. Many of the considerations to be discussed apply to cancer models in general; specific issues related to viral carcinogenesis or oncolytic viruses will be specifically discussed as they arise. Responsible animal use integrates good science, humane care, and regulatory compliance. To meet those standards, the IACUC, in conjunction with the research investigator and attending veterinarian, must address a wide range of issues, including animal model selection, cancer model selection, humane end point considerations, experimental considerations, postapproval monitoring, reporting requirements, and animal management and personnel safety considerations.

  11. A cell-based model system links chromothripsis with hyperploidy

    PubMed Central

    Mardin, Balca R; Drainas, Alexandros P; Waszak, Sebastian M; Weischenfeldt, Joachim; Isokane, Mayumi; Stütz, Adrian M; Raeder, Benjamin; Efthymiopoulos, Theocharis; Buccitelli, Christopher; Segura-Wang, Maia; Northcott, Paul; Pfister, Stefan M; Lichter, Peter; Ellenberg, Jan; Korbel, Jan O

    2015-01-01

    A remarkable observation emerging from recent cancer genome analyses is the identification of chromothripsis as a one-off genomic catastrophe, resulting in massive somatic DNA structural rearrangements (SRs). Largely due to lack of suitable model systems, the mechanistic basis of chromothripsis has remained elusive. We developed an integrative method termed “complex alterations after selection and transformation (CAST),” enabling efficient in vitro generation of complex DNA rearrangements including chromothripsis, using cell perturbations coupled with a strong selection barrier followed by massively parallel sequencing. We employed this methodology to characterize catastrophic SR formation processes, their temporal sequence, and their impact on gene expression and cell division. Our in vitro system uncovered a propensity of chromothripsis to occur in cells with damaged telomeres, and in particular in hyperploid cells. Analysis of primary medulloblastoma cancer genomes verified the link between hyperploidy and chromothripsis in vivo. CAST provides the foundation for mechanistic dissection of complex DNA rearrangement processes. PMID:26415501

  12. Optimizing Viral Discovery in Bats

    PubMed Central

    Young, Cristin C. W.; Olival, Kevin J.

    2016-01-01

    Viral discovery studies in bats have increased dramatically over the past decade, yet a rigorous synthesis of the published data is lacking. We extract and analyze data from 93 studies published between 2007–2013 to examine factors that increase success of viral discovery in bats, and specific trends and patterns of infection across host taxa and viral families. Over the study period, 248 novel viruses from 24 viral families have been described. Using generalized linear models, at a study level we show the number of host species and viral families tested best explained number of viruses detected. We demonstrate that prevalence varies significantly across viral family, specimen type, and host taxonomy, and calculate mean PCR prevalence by viral family and specimen type across all studies. Using a logistic model, we additionally identify factors most likely to increase viral detection at an individual level for the entire dataset and by viral families with sufficient sample sizes. Our analysis highlights major taxonomic gaps in recent bat viral discovery efforts and identifies ways to improve future viral pathogen detection through the design of more efficient and targeted sample collection and screening approaches. PMID:26867024

  13. Linking the M&Rfi Weather Generator with Agrometeorological Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubrovsky, Martin; Trnka, Miroslav

    2015-04-01

    Realistic meteorological inputs (representing the present and/or future climates) for the agrometeorological model simulations are often produced by stochastic weather generators (WGs). This contribution presents some methodological issues and results obtained in our recent experiments. We also address selected questions raised in the synopsis of this session. The input meteorological time series for our experiments are produced by the parametric single site weather generator (WG) Marfi, which is calibrated from the available observational data (or interpolated from surrounding stations). To produce meteorological series representing the future climate, the WG parameters are modified by climate change scenarios, which are prepared by the pattern scaling method: the standardised scenarios derived from Global or Regional Climate Models are multiplied by the change in global mean temperature (ΔTG) determined by the simple climate model MAGICC. The presentation will address following questions: (i) The dependence of the quality of the synthetic weather series and impact results on the WG settings. An emphasis will be put on an effect of conditioning the daily WG on monthly WG (presently being one of our hot topics), which aims at improvement of the reproduction of the low-frequency weather variability. Comparison of results obtained with various WG settings is made in terms of climatic and agroclimatic indices (including extreme temperature and precipitation characteristics and drought indices). (ii) Our methodology accounts for the uncertainties coming from various sources. We will show how the climate change impact results are affected by 1. uncertainty in climate modelling, 2. uncertainty in ΔTG, and 3. uncertainty related to the complexity of the climate change scenario (focusing on an effect of inclusion of changes in variability into the climate change scenarios). Acknowledgements: This study was funded by project "Building up a multidisciplinary scientific

  14. An economic model to evaluate the mitigation programme for bovine viral diarrhoea in Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Häsler, B; Howe, K S; Presi, P; Stärk, K D C

    2012-09-15

    Economic analyses are indispensable as sources of information to help policy makers make decisions about mitigation resource use. The aim of this study was to conduct an economic evaluation of the Swiss national mitigation programme for bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV), which was implemented in 2008 and concludes in 2017. The eradication phase of the mitigation programme comprised testing and slaughtering of all persistently infected (PI) animals found. First, the whole population was antigen tested and all PI cattle removed. Since October 2008, all newborn calves have been subject to antigen testing to identify and slaughter PI calves. All mothers of PI calves were retested and slaughtered if the test was positive. Antigen testing in calves and elimination of virus-carriers was envisaged to be conducted until the end of 2011. Subsequently, a surveillance programme will document disease freedom or detect disease if it recurs. Four alternative surveillance strategies based on antibody testing in blood from newborn calves and/or milk from primiparous cows were proposed by Federal Veterinary Office servants in charge of the BVDV mitigation programme. A simple economic spreadsheet model was developed to estimate and compare the costs and benefits of the BVDV mitigation programme. In an independent project, the impact of the mitigation programme on the disease dynamics in the population was simulated using a stochastic compartment model. Mitigation costs accrued from materials, labour, and processes such as handling and testing samples, and recording results. Benefits were disease costs avoided by having the mitigation programme in place compared to a baseline of endemic disease equilibrium. Cumulative eradication costs and benefits were estimated to determine the break-even point for the eradication component of the programme. The margin over eradication cost therefore equalled the maximum expenditure potentially available for surveillance without the net benefit

  15. Viral arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Marks, Michael; Marks, Jonathan L

    2016-01-01

    Acute-onset arthritis is a common clinical problem facing both the general clinician and the rheumatologist. A viral aetiology is though to be responsible for approximately 1% of all cases of acute arthritis with a wide range of causal agents recognised. The epidemiology of acute viral arthritis continues to evolve, with some aetiologies, such as rubella, becoming less common due to vaccination, while some vector-borne viruses have become more widespread. A travel history therefore forms an important part of the assessment of patients presenting with an acute arthritis. Worldwide, parvovirus B19, hepatitis B and C, HIV and the alphaviruses are among the most important causes of virally mediated arthritis. Targeted serological testing may be of value in establishing a diagnosis, and clinicians must also be aware that low-titre autoantibodies, such as rheumatoid factor and antinuclear antibody, can occur in the context of acute viral arthritis. A careful consideration of epidemiological, clinical and serological features is therefore required to guide clinicians in making diagnostic and treatment decisions. While most virally mediated arthritides are self-limiting some warrant the initiation of specific antiviral therapy. PMID:27037381

  16. Is murine gammaherpesvirus-68 (MHV-68) a suitable immunotoxicological model for examining immunomodulatory drug-associated viral recrudescence?

    PubMed

    Aligo, Jason; Walker, Mindi; Bugelski, Peter; Weinstock, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Immunosuppressive agents are used for treatment of a variety of autoimmune diseases including rheumatoid arthritis (RA), systemic lupus erythematosis (SLE), and psoriasis, as well as for prevention of tissue rejection after organ transplantation. Recrudescence of herpesvirus infections, and increased risk of carcinogenesis from herpesvirus-associated tumors are related with immunosuppressive therapy in humans. Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD), a condition characterized by development of Epstein Barr Virus (EBV)-associated B-lymphocyte lymphoma, and Kaposi's Sarcoma (KS), a dermal tumor associated with Kaposi Sarcoma-associated virus (KSHV), may develop in solid organ transplant patients. KS also occurs in immunosuppressed Acquired Immunodeficiency (AIDS) patients. Kaposi Sarcoma-associated virus (KSHV) is a herpes virus genetically related to EBV. Murine gammaherpes-virus-68 (MHV-68) is proposed as a mouse model of gammaherpesvirus infection and recrudescence and may potentially have relevance for herpesvirus-associated neoplasia. The pathogenesis of MHV-68 infection in mice mimics EBV/KSHV infection in humans with acute lytic viral replication followed by dissemination and establishment of persistent latency. MHV-68-infected mice may develop lymphoproliferative disease that is accelerated by disruption of the immune system. This manuscript first presents an overview of gammaherpesvirus pathogenesis and immunology as well as factors involved in viral recrudescence. A description of different types of immunodeficiency then follows, with particular focus on viral association with lymphomagenesis after immunosuppression. Finally, this review discusses different gammaherpesvirus animal models and describes a proposed MHV-68 model to further examine the interplay of immunomodulatory agents and gammaherpesvirus-associated neoplasia.

  17. Improving Power System Modeling. A Tool to Link Capacity Expansion and Production Cost Models

    SciTech Connect

    Diakov, Victor; Cole, Wesley; Sullivan, Patrick; Brinkman, Gregory; Margolis, Robert

    2015-11-01

    Capacity expansion models (CEM) provide a high-level long-term view at the prospects of the evolving power system. In simulating the possibilities of long-term capacity expansion, it is important to maintain the viability of power system operation in the short-term (daily, hourly and sub-hourly) scales. Production-cost models (PCM) simulate routine power system operation on these shorter time scales using detailed load, transmission and generation fleet data by minimizing production costs and following reliability requirements. When based on CEM 'predictions' about generating unit retirements and buildup, PCM provide more detailed simulation for the short-term system operation and, consequently, may confirm the validity of capacity expansion predictions. Further, production cost model simulations of a system that is based on capacity expansion model solution are 'evolutionary' sound: the generator mix is the result of logical sequence of unit retirement and buildup resulting from policy and incentives. The above has motivated us to bridge CEM with PCM by building a capacity expansion - to - production cost model Linking Tool (CEPCoLT). The Linking Tool is built to onset capacity expansion model prescriptions onto production cost model inputs. NREL's ReEDS and Energy Examplar's PLEXOS are the capacity expansion and the production cost models, respectively. Via the Linking Tool, PLEXOS provides details of operation for the regionally-defined ReEDS scenarios.

  18. Link Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donoho, Steve

    Link analysis is a collection of techniques that operate on data that can be represented as nodes and links. This chapter surveys a variety of techniques including subgraph matching, finding cliques and K-plexes, maximizing spread of influence, visualization, finding hubs and authorities, and combining with traditional techniques (classification, clustering, etc). It also surveys applications including social network analysis, viral marketing, Internet search, fraud detection, and crime prevention.

  19. Enterovirus 71-induced autophagy increases viral replication and pathogenesis in a suckling mouse model

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background We previously reported that Enterovirus 71 (EV71) infection activates autophagy, which promotes viral replication both in vitro and in vivo. In the present study we further investigated whether EV71 infection of neuronal SK-N-SH cells induces an autophagic flux. Furthermore, the effects of autophagy on EV71-related pathogenesis and viral load were evaluated after intracranial inoculation of mouse-adapted EV71 (MP4 strain) into 6-day-old ICR suckling mice. Results We demonstrated that in EV71-infected SK-N-SH cells, EV71 structural protein VP1 and nonstructural protein 2C co-localized with LC3 and mannose-6-phosphate receptor (MPR, endosome marker) proteins by immunofluorescence staining, indicating amphisome formation. Together with amphisome formation, EV71 induced an autophagic flux, which could be blocked by NH4Cl (inhibitor of acidification) and vinblastine (inhibitor of fusion), as demonstrated by Western blotting. Suckling mice intracranially inoculated with EV71 showed EV71 VP1 protein expression (representing EV71 infection) in the cerebellum, medulla, and pons by immunohistochemical staining. Accompanied with these infected brain tissues, increased expression of LC3-II protein as well as formation of LC3 aggregates, autophagosomes and amphisomes were detected. Amphisome formation, which was confirmed by colocalization of EV71-VP1 protein or LC3 puncta and the endosome marker protein MPR. Thus, EV71-infected suckling mice (similar to EV71-infected SK-N-SH cells) also show an autophagic flux. The physiopathological parameters of EV71-MP4 infected mice, including body weight loss, disease symptoms, and mortality were increased compared to those of the uninfected mice. We further blocked EV71-induced autophagy with the inhibitor 3-methyladenine (3-MA), which attenuated the disease symptoms and decreased the viral load in the brain tissues of the infected mice. Conclusions In this study, we reveal that EV71 infection of suckling mice induces an

  20. Exposure to electronic cigarettes impairs pulmonary anti-bacterial and anti-viral defenses in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Sussan, Thomas E; Gajghate, Sachin; Thimmulappa, Rajesh K; Ma, Jinfang; Kim, Jung-Hyun; Sudini, Kuladeep; Consolini, Nicola; Cormier, Stephania A; Lomnicki, Slawo; Hasan, Farhana; Pekosz, Andrew; Biswal, Shyam

    2015-01-01

    Electronic cigarettes (E-cigs) have experienced sharp increases in popularity over the past five years due to many factors, including aggressive marketing, increased restrictions on conventional cigarettes, and a perception that E-cigs are healthy alternatives to cigarettes. Despite this perception, studies on health effects in humans are extremely limited and in vivo animal models have not been generated. Presently, we determined that E-cig vapor contains 7 x 10(11) free radicals per puff. To determine whether E-cig exposure impacts pulmonary responses in mice, we developed an inhalation chamber for E-cig exposure. Mice that were exposed to E-cig vapor contained serum cotinine concentrations that are comparable to human E-cig users. E-cig exposure for 2 weeks produced a significant increase in oxidative stress and moderate macrophage-mediated inflammation. Since, COPD patients are susceptible to bacterial and viral infections, we tested effects of E-cigs on immune response. Mice that were exposed to E-cig vapor showed significantly impaired pulmonary bacterial clearance, compared to air-exposed mice, following an intranasal infection with Streptococcus pneumonia. This defective bacterial clearance was partially due to reduced phagocytosis by alveolar macrophages from E-cig exposed mice. In response to Influenza A virus infection, E-cig exposed mice displayed increased lung viral titers and enhanced virus-induced illness and mortality. In summary, this study reports a murine model of E-cig exposure and demonstrates that E-cig exposure elicits impaired pulmonary anti-microbial defenses. Hence, E-cig exposure as an alternative to cigarette smoking must be rigorously tested in users for their effects on immune response and susceptibility to bacterial and viral infections.

  1. Activating receptor NKG2D targets RAE-1-expressing allogeneic neural precursor cells in a viral model of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Weinger, Jason G; Plaisted, Warren C; Maciejewski, Sonia M; Lanier, Lewis L; Walsh, Craig M; Lane, Thomas E

    2014-10-01

    Transplantation of major histocompatibility complex-mismatched mouse neural precursor cells (NPCs) into mice persistently infected with the neurotropic JHM strain of mouse hepatitis virus (JHMV) results in rapid rejection that is mediated, in part, by T cells. However, the contribution of the innate immune response to allograft rejection in a model of viral-induced neurological disease has not been well defined. Herein, we demonstrate that the natural killer (NK) cell-expressing-activating receptor NKG2D participates in transplanted allogeneic NPC rejection in mice persistently infected with JHMV. Cultured NPCs derived from C57BL/6 (H-2(b) ) mice express the NKG2D ligand retinoic acid early precursor transcript (RAE)-1 but expression was dramatically reduced upon differentiation into either glia or neurons. RAE-1(+) NPCs were susceptible to NK cell-mediated killing whereas RAE-1(-) cells were resistant to lysis. Transplantation of C57BL/6-derived NPCs into JHMV-infected BALB/c (H-2(d) ) mice resulted in infiltration of NKG2D(+) CD49b(+) NK cells and treatment with blocking antibody specific for NKG2D increased survival of allogeneic NPCs. Furthermore, transplantation of differentiated RAE-1(-) allogeneic NPCs into JHMV-infected BALB/c mice resulted in enhanced survival, highlighting a role for the NKG2D/RAE-1 signaling axis in allograft rejection. We also demonstrate that transplantation of allogeneic NPCs into JHMV-infected mice resulted in infection of the transplanted cells suggesting that these cells may be targets for infection. Viral infection of cultured cells increased RAE-1 expression, resulting in enhanced NK cell-mediated killing through NKG2D recognition. Collectively, these results show that in a viral-induced demyelination model, NK cells contribute to rejection of allogeneic NPCs through an NKG2D signaling pathway.

  2. Exposure to Electronic Cigarettes Impairs Pulmonary Anti-Bacterial and Anti-Viral Defenses in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Sussan, Thomas E.; Gajghate, Sachin; Thimmulappa, Rajesh K.; Ma, Jinfang; Kim, Jung-Hyun; Sudini, Kuladeep; Consolini, Nicola; Cormier, Stephania A.; Lomnicki, Slawo; Hasan, Farhana; Pekosz, Andrew; Biswal, Shyam

    2015-01-01

    Electronic cigarettes (E-cigs) have experienced sharp increases in popularity over the past five years due to many factors, including aggressive marketing, increased restrictions on conventional cigarettes, and a perception that E-cigs are healthy alternatives to cigarettes. Despite this perception, studies on health effects in humans are extremely limited and in vivo animal models have not been generated. Presently, we determined that E-cig vapor contains 7x1011 free radicals per puff. To determine whether E-cig exposure impacts pulmonary responses in mice, we developed an inhalation chamber for E-cig exposure. Mice that were exposed to E-cig vapor contained serum cotinine concentrations that are comparable to human E-cig users. E-cig exposure for 2 weeks produced a significant increase in oxidative stress and moderate macrophage-mediated inflammation. Since, COPD patients are susceptible to bacterial and viral infections, we tested effects of E-cigs on immune response. Mice that were exposed to E-cig vapor showed significantly impaired pulmonary bacterial clearance, compared to air-exposed mice, following an intranasal infection with Streptococcus pneumonia. This defective bacterial clearance was partially due to reduced phagocytosis by alveolar macrophages from E-cig exposed mice. In response to Influenza A virus infection, E-cig exposed mice displayed increased lung viral titers and enhanced virus-induced illness and mortality. In summary, this study reports a murine model of E-cig exposure and demonstrates that E-cig exposure elicits impaired pulmonary anti-microbial defenses. Hence, E-cig exposure as an alternative to cigarette smoking must be rigorously tested in users for their effects on immune response and susceptibility to bacterial and viral infections. PMID:25651083

  3. UAS Modeling of the Communication Links Study Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birr, Richard; Murray, Jennifer; Girgis, nancy

    2011-01-01

    There were many links calculated for this and the other scenarios. The rain was analyzed for 99.9% availability with rain rated of none, 20 mm/hr and 90 mm/hr at a height of 5 km out to 25 NM. This was done for each scenario for LOS and for BLOS links for Scenario 5 and 6. Scenario 1 was a LOS-only scenario. Use of two 3 dB Antennas on both ends. The CS2 was unable to maintain a control RF Link during the flight. The largest access gap periods between object top and bottom UA antennae were caused by terrain (ridges and hills). The CS Antenna was changed to High Gain Directional Antenna, all three CS maintained lock on vehicle. There were RF dropouts between the top and bottom UA antennae caused by aircraft obstructions (fuselage, wings, wheel assembles, etc.). Note that for this study antenna locations were placed on top and bottom center of the UA body. Future study should include actual UA antenna locations on the aircraft providing manufactures are willing to provide information. The importance of CS location(s) was demonstrated for primary or backup CS. With a second backup CS placed in a suitable location the UA was able to maintain an overall RF link. The actual location of both backup CSs required the antenna location to be place 150 ft above ground in order to establish a RF link between the UA and CS.

  4. NCBI viral genomes resource.

    PubMed

    Brister, J Rodney; Ako-Adjei, Danso; Bao, Yiming; Blinkova, Olga

    2015-01-01

    Recent technological innovations have ignited an explosion in virus genome sequencing that promises to fundamentally alter our understanding of viral biology and profoundly impact public health policy. Yet, any potential benefits from the billowing cloud of next generation sequence data hinge upon well implemented reference resources that facilitate the identification of sequences, aid in the assembly of sequence reads and provide reference annotation sources. The NCBI Viral Genomes Resource is a reference resource designed to bring order to this sequence shockwave and improve usability of viral sequence data. The resource can be accessed at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/genome/viruses/ and catalogs all publicly available virus genome sequences and curates reference genome sequences. As the number of genome sequences has grown, so too have the difficulties in annotating and maintaining reference sequences. The rapid expansion of the viral sequence universe has forced a recalibration of the data model to better provide extant sequence representation and enhanced reference sequence products to serve the needs of the various viral communities. This, in turn, has placed increased emphasis on leveraging the knowledge of individual scientific communities to identify important viral sequences and develop well annotated reference virus genome sets.

  5. Viral Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... with hepatitis? How does a pregnant woman pass hepatitis B virus to her baby? If I have hepatitis B, what does my baby need so that she ... Can I breastfeed my baby if I have hepatitis B? More information on viral hepatitis What is hepatitis? ...

  6. Zebrafish (Danio rerio) as a model for the study of vaccination against viral haemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV).

    PubMed

    Novoa, Beatriz; Romero, Alejandro; Mulero, Victoriano; Rodríguez, Iván; Fernández, Ignacio; Figueras, Antonio

    2006-07-26

    The rhabdovirus viral haemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) is the etiological agent of one of the most important salmonid viral diseases. In the present work, the ability of VHSV to infect and replicate in zebrafish at low temperature (15 degrees C) was demonstrated. Zebrafish was also used to determine the effectiveness of the recombinant virus rIHNV-Gvhsv GFP as a live attenuated vaccine against the virulent VHSV strain. Fish intraperitoneally injected with 3 x 10(6) to 3 x 10(5)TCID50/ml of the wild type VHSV showed a 100% of cumulative mortality, meanwhile only 57% of mortality was obtained in bath infections. Infected fish showed external clinical signs and histological observations revealed the appearance of small haemorrhages in the muscle, kidney, liver and dermis. Neither mortalities nor clinical signs were recorded in fish infected with a live attenuated recombinant virus. By RT-PCR technique, VHSV was detected in all the organs as early as 24h, but the recombinant virus was not detected in all the sampled days. VHSV was able to replicate "in vitro" in head kidney cells but the replication capacity of the attenuated viral strain was limited. The recombinant virus rIHNV-Gvhsv GFP was able to protect against VHSV with a survival rate ranging from 20% to 60% depending of the vaccine dose. The increase of TLR3, IFNalphabeta, Mx, IFNgamma and TNFalpha expression at 72h post-infection in the kidney of VHSV-infected fish contrasted with the results obtained with the avirulent virus, which did not induce an increment of this expression in infected fish. Zebrafish is a suitable animal model to study VHSV infection and immune (innate and adaptive) responses and, more importantly, we demonstrate for the first time the usefulness of the zebrafish as a vaccination model to viral diseases. In addition, the high protection obtained with the live attenuated virus demonstrates that the zebrafish is able to mount an efficient antiviral immune response at 15 degrees C.

  7. Reactivation of latently infected HIV-1 viral reservoirs and correction of aberrant alternative splicing in the LMNA gene via AMPK activation: Common mechanism of action linking HIV-1 latency and Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome.

    PubMed

    Finley, Jahahreeh

    2015-09-01

    AMPK, a master regulator of cellular metabolism which has been shown to activate PKC-theta (θ) and is essential for T cell activation, may modulate the splicing activities of SRp55 as well as enhance a p32-mediated inhibition of ASF/SF2-induced alternative splicing, potentially correcting aberrant alternative splicing in the LMNA gene and reactivating latent viral HIV-1 reservoirs. Moreover, similar epigenetic modifications and cell cycle regulators also characterize the analogous stages of premature senescence in progeroid cells and latency in HIV-1 infected T cells. AMPK-activating compounds including metformin and resveratrol may thus embody a novel treatment paradigm linking the pathophysiology of HGPS with that of HIV-1 latency.

  8. Molecular and virological evidence of viral activation from chromosomally integrated human herpesvirus 6A in a patient with X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Endo, Akifumi; Watanabe, Ken; Ohye, Tamae; Suzuki, Kyoko; Matsubara, Tomoyo; Shimizu, Norio; Kurahashi, Hiroki; Yoshikawa, Tetsushi; Katano, Harutaka; Inoue, Naoki; Imai, Kohsuke; Takagi, Masatoshi; Morio, Tomohiro; Mizutani, Shuki

    2014-08-15

    It has been unclear whether chromosomally integrated human herpesvirus 6 (ciHHV-6) can be activated with pathogenic effects on the human body. We present molecular and virological evidence of ciHHV-6A activation in a patient with X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency. These findings have significant implications for the management of patients with ciHHV-6.

  9. A novel animal model linking adiposity to altered circadian rhythms

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Researchers have provided evidence for a link between obesity and altered circadian rhythms (e.g., shift work, disrupted sleep), but the mechanism for this association is still unknown. Adipocytes possess an intrinsic circadian clock, and circadian rhythms in adipocytokines and adipose tissue metab...

  10. Infectious hematopoietic necrosis (IHN) and viral hemorrhagic septicemia (VHS): Detection of the trout antibodies to the causative viruses by means of plaque neutralization, immunofluorescence, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vestergard Jorgensen, P. E.; Olesen, N.J.; Lorenzen, N.; Winton, J.R.; Ristow, S.S.

    1991-01-01

    Sera collected from cultured rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss surviving outbreaks of infectious hematopoietic necrosis (IHN) or viral hemorrhagic septicemia (VHS) were examined for the presence of antibodies to both of the causative viruses, infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) and Egtved virus (viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus: VHSV). Sera were screened with three serological tests: 50% plaque neutralization test (PNT), immunofluorescence (IF), and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). In sera from 20 rainbow trout surviving IHN, antibodies to IHNV were detected in 9 fish by PNT, in 12 fish by IF, and in 9 fish by ELISA. In these sera, antibodies cross-reacting with VHSV were rare (detected in 0 fish by PNT, in 1 by IF, and in 1 by ELISA). In sera from 20 rainbow trout surviving VHS, antibodies to VHSV were detected in 9 fish by PNT, in 16 fish by IF, and in 18 fish by ELISA. A considerable percentage of the VHS-survivor sera contained antibodies that cross-reacted with IHNV, as detected by ELISA (16 fish) and 1F (7 fish) but not by PNT (0 fish). The three serological tests appear to be useful tools for IHNV and VHSV epidemiology; however, the presence of cross-reacting antibodies in some sera suggests caution when farms require specific pathogen-free certification for one of the viruses in the presence of the other.

  11. Multilevel and Latent Variable Modeling with Composite Links and Exploded Likelihoods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rabe-Hesketh, Sophia; Skrondal, Anders

    2007-01-01

    Composite links and exploded likelihoods are powerful yet simple tools for specifying a wide range of latent variable models. Applications considered include survival or duration models, models for rankings, small area estimation with census information, models for ordinal responses, item response models with guessing, randomized response models,…

  12. Model-based structural and functional characterization of the Rice stripe tenuivirus nucleocapsid protein interacting with viral genomic RNA.

    PubMed

    Lu, Gang; Li, Jia; Zhou, Yijun; Zhou, Xueping; Tao, Xiaorong

    2017-03-27

    Rice stripe tenuivirus (RSV) is a filamentous, negative-strand RNA virus causing severe diseases on rice in Asian countries. The viral particle is composed predominantly of a nucleocapsid protein (NP) and genomic RNA. However, the molecular details of how the RSV NP interacts with genomic RNA during particle assembly remain largely unknown. Here, we modeled the NP-RNA complex and show that polar amino acids within a predicted groove of NP are critical for RNA binding and protecting the RNA from RNase digestion. RSV NP formed pentamers, hexamers, heptamers, and octamers. By modeling the higher-order structures, we found that oligomer formation was driven by the N-terminal amino arm of the NP. Deletion of this arm abolished oligomerization; the N-terminally truncated NP was less able to interact with RNA and protect RNA than was the wild type. These findings afford valuable new insights into molecular mechanism of RSV NPs interacting with genomic RNA.

  13. Viral induced demyelination.

    PubMed

    Stohlman, S A; Hinton, D R

    2001-01-01

    Viral induced demyelination, in both humans and rodent models, has provided unique insights into the cell biology of oligodendroglia, their complex cell-cell interactions and mechanisms of myelin destruction. They illustrate mechanisms of viral persistence, including latent infections in which no infectious virus is readily evident, virus reactivation and viral-induced tissue damage. These studies have also provided excellent paradigms to study the interactions between the immune system and the central nervous system (CNS). Although of interest in their own right, an understanding of the diverse mechanisms used by viruses to induce demyelination may shed light into the etiology and pathogenesis of the common demyelinating disorder multiple sclerosis (MS). This notion is supported by the persistent view that a viral infection acquired during adolescence might initiate MS after a long period of quiescence. Demyelination in both humans and rodents can be initiated by infection with a diverse group of enveloped and non-enveloped RNA and DNA viruses (Table 1). The mechanisms that ultimately result in the loss of CNS myelin appear to be equally diverse as the etiological agents capable of causing diseases which result in demyelination. Although demyelination can be a secondary result of axonal loss, in many examples of viral induced demyelination, myelin loss is primary and associated with axonal sparing. This suggests that demyelination induced by viral infections can result from: 1) a direct viral infection of oligodendroglia resulting in cell death with degeneration of myelin and its subsequent removal; 2) a persistent viral infection, in the presence or absence of infectious virus, resulting in the loss of normal cellular homeostasis and subsequent oligodendroglial death; 3) a vigorous virus-specific inflammatory response wherein the virus replicates in a cell type other than oligodendroglia, but cytokines and other immune mediators directly damage the

  14. Mechanisms of protein modification during model anti-viral heat-treatment bioprocessing of beta-lactoglobulin variant A in the presence of sucrose.

    PubMed

    Smales, C M; Pepper, D S; James, D C

    2000-10-01

    To ensure the safety of plasma and recombinant therapeutic proteins, heat treatment is routinely applied to these biopharmaceuticals as a means of virus inactivation. However, to maintain protein integrity during heat treatment it is necessary to use high concentrations of thermostabilizing excipients, such as sucrose, in order to prevent protein damage. In this study we describe the covalent modifications inferred to a model protein, beta-lactoglobulin A, that occur during typical and extended anti-viral heat treatments. The chemical derivation and mechanisms by which these modifications arise are addressed. Heat treatment initiated hydrolysis of sucrose to glucose and fructose, which in turn were degraded to glyoxal. Glyoxal and the free reducing sugars reacted with free amino groups in beta-lactoglobulin A to yield Maillard glycation adducts and advanced glycation end products (AGEs). The major mechanism for AGE formation was via degradation of glucose-derived Schiff-base adducts. Heat treatment and glycation of beta-lactoglobulin A resulted in thiol-disulphide interchange reactions leading to protein oligomerization. A small population of beta-lactoglobulin A non-disulphide-linked dimers were also observed with increasingly harsh heat treatments. These findings have implications for (i) improvements in the safety and efficacy of heat-treated protein biopharmaceuticals and (ii) our understanding of the mechanisms of protein glycation and AGE adduct formation.

  15. Linking mechanistic models of tree physiology with models of forest dynamics: Problems of temporal scale

    SciTech Connect

    King, A.W.; Emanuel, W.R.; O'Neill, R.V.

    1988-01-01

    The individual-based forest gap models are a potential resource in the study of forest growth responses to environmental stress acting on physiological processes. This approach is currently limited by the lack of physiological detail in the gap models and by the temporal scales separating tree physiology and the annual tree growth simulated by the gap models. We describe a general procedure that integrates process-based models of tree physiology with forest gap models. The procedure involves (1) a link between a physiological model and a gap model provided by the simulation of annual wood production (AWP), (2) a factorial execution of a physiological model to generate AWP, (3) a response-surface model describing the relationship between AWP and driving variables appropriate to the annual time scale of a gap model, and (4) a revised gap model that includes a rescaled physiological model. The modified gap model can be used to simulate the impact of environmental stress on forest growth and succession. 18 refs., 2 figs.

  16. Viral diseases in zebrafish: what is known and unknown.

    PubMed

    Crim, Marcus J; Riley, Lela K

    2012-01-01

    Naturally occurring viral infections have the potential to introduce confounding variability that leads to invalid and misinterpreted data. Whereas the viral diseases of research rodents are well characterized and closely monitored, no naturally occurring viral infections have been characterized for the laboratory zebrafish (Danio rerio), an increasingly important biomedical research model. Despite the ignorance about naturally occurring zebrafish viruses, zebrafish models are rapidly expanding in areas of biomedical research where the confounding effects of unknown infectious agents present a serious concern. In addition, many zebrafish research colonies remain linked to the ornamental (pet) zebrafish trade, which can contribute to the introduction of new pathogens into research colonies, whereas mice used for research are purpose bred, with no introduction of new mice from the pet industry. Identification, characterization, and monitoring of naturally occurring viruses in zebrafish are crucial to the improvement of zebrafish health, the reduction of unwanted variability, and the continued development of the zebrafish as a model organism. This article addresses the importance of identifying and characterizing the viral diseases of zebrafish as the scope of zebrafish models expands into new research areas and also briefly addresses zebrafish susceptibility to experimental viral infection and the utility of the zebrafish as an infection and immunology model.

  17. Viral Diseases in Zebrafish: What Is Known and Unknown

    PubMed Central

    Crim, Marcus J.; Riley, Lela K.

    2013-01-01

    Naturally occurring viral infections have the potential to introduce confounding variability that leads to invalid and misinterpreted data. Whereas the viral diseases of research rodents are well characterized and closely monitored, no naturally occurring viral infections have been characterized for the laboratory zebrafish (Danio rerio), an increasingly important biomedical research model. Despite the ignorance about naturally occurring zebrafish viruses, zebrafish models are rapidly expanding in areas of biomedical research where the confounding effects of unknown infectious agents present a serious concern. In addition, many zebrafish research colonies remain linked to the ornamental (pet) zebrafish trade, which can contribute to the introduction of new pathogens into research colonies, whereas mice used for research are purpose bred, with no introduction of new mice from the pet industry. Identification, characterization, and monitoring of naturally occurring viruses in zebrafish are crucial to the improvement of zebrafish health, the reduction of unwanted variability, and the continued development of the zebrafish as a model organism. This article addresses the importance of identifying and characterizing the viral diseases of zebrafish as the scope of zebrafish models expands into new research areas and also briefly addresses zebrafish susceptibility to experimental viral infection and the utility of the zebrafish as an infection and immunology model. PMID:23382345

  18. Global land-use allocation model linked to an integrated assessment model.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Tomoko; Fujimori, Shinichiro; Ito, Akihiko; Takahashi, Kiyoshi; Masui, Toshihiko

    2017-02-15

    We developed a global land-use allocation model that can be linked to integrated assessment models (IAMs) with a coarser spatial resolution. Using the model, we performed a downscaling of the IAMs' regional aggregated land-use projections to obtain a spatial land-use distribution, which could subsequently be used by Earth system models for global environmental assessments of ecosystem services, food security, and climate policies. Here we describe the land-use allocation model, discuss the verification of the downscaling technique, and explain the influences of the downscaling on estimates of land-use carbon emissions. A comparison of the emissions estimated with and without downscaling suggested that the land-use downscaling would help capture the spatial distribution of carbon stock density and regional heterogeneity of carbon emissions caused by cropland and pasture land expansion.

  19. Global cost modeling analysis of HIV-1 and HCV viral load assays.

    PubMed

    Elbeik, Tarek; Chen, Yi-Ming Arthur; Soutchkov, Serguei V; Loftus, Richard A; Beringer, Scott

    2003-08-01

    This review addresses hidden costs associated with the Bayer VERSANT assay, Roche AMPLICOR MONITOR test and COBAS AMPLICOR MONITOR test and how these influence the final per reportable cost to a testing laboratory in resource-rich and -poor countries. An in-depth evaluation and recommendation of the most cost-effective approach for these tests is presented. The analyses demonstrate the need for manufacturers to consider labor and supply costs when marketing a kit in resource-poor countries, noting that marketing strategies need to change. In the absence of any proven monitoring alternative, emphasis is placed on increasing market share to promote significant reduction in kit prices to suit the demands of markets in resource-poor countries. Finally, recommendations are made to improve the overall cost structure of viral load testing. This review is intended as a tool to optimize assay usage in attaining the lowest performance costs by assay and is not to endorse any test, as will become apparent.

  20. Kallikrein 6 regulates early CNS demyelination in a viral model of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Scarisbrick, Isobel A; Yoon, Hyesook; Panos, Michael; Larson, Nadya; Blaber, Sachiko I; Blaber, Michael; Rodriguez, Moses

    2012-09-01

    Kallikrein 6 (Klk6) is a secreted serine protease that is elevated in active multiple sclerosis lesions and patient sera. To further evaluate the involvement of Klk6 in chronic progressive demyelinating disease, we determined its expression in the brain and spinal cord of SJL mice infected with Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) and assessed the effects of Klk6-neutralizing antibodies on disease progression. Klk6 RNA expression was elevated in the brain and spinal cord by 7 days postinfection (dpi). Thereafter, Klk6 expression persisted primarily in the spinal cord reaching a peak of fivefold over controls at mid-chronic stages (60 dpi-120 dpi). Significant elevations in Klk6 RNA were also induced in splenocytes stimulated with viral capsid proteins in vitro and in activated human acute monocytic leukemia cells. Klk6-neutralizing antibodies reduced TMEV-driven brain and spinal cord pathology and delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) responses when examined at early chronic time points (40 dpi). Reductions in spinal cord pathology included a decrease in activated monocytes/microglia and reductions in the loss of myelin basic protein (MBP). By 180 dpi, pathology scores no longer differed between groups. These findings point to regulatory activities for Klk6 in the development and progression of central nervous system (CNS) inflammation and demyelination that can be effectively targeted through the early chronic stages with neutralizing antibody.

  1. Quantitative Modeling of Entangled Polymer Rheology: Experiments, Tube Models and Slip-Link Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, Priyanka Subhash

    Rheology properties are sensitive indicators of molecular structure and dynamics. The relationship between rheology and polymer dynamics is captured in the constitutive model, which, if accurate and robust, would greatly aid molecular design and polymer processing. This dissertation is thus focused on building accurate and quantitative constitutive models that can help predict linear and non-linear viscoelasticity. In this work, we have used a multi-pronged approach based on the tube theory, coarse-grained slip-link simulations, and advanced polymeric synthetic and characterization techniques, to confront some of the outstanding problems in entangled polymer rheology. First, we modified simple tube based constitutive equations in extensional rheology and developed functional forms to test the effect of Kuhn segment alignment on a) tube diameter enlargement and b) monomeric friction reduction between subchains. We, then, used these functional forms to model extensional viscosity data for polystyrene (PS) melts and solutions. We demonstrated that the idea of reduction in segmental friction due to Kuhn alignment is successful in explaining the qualitative difference between melts and solutions in extension as revealed by recent experiments on PS. Second, we compiled literature data and used it to develop a universal tube model parameter set and prescribed their values and uncertainties for 1,4-PBd by comparing linear viscoelastic G' and G" mastercurves for 1,4-PBds of various branching architectures. The high frequency transition region of the mastercurves superposed very well for all the 1,4-PBds irrespective of their molecular weight and architecture, indicating universality in high frequency behavior. Therefore, all three parameters of the tube model were extracted from this high frequency transition region alone. Third, we compared predictions of two versions of the tube model, Hierarchical model and BoB model against linear viscoelastic data of blends of 1,4-PBd

  2. Viral epigenetics.

    PubMed

    Milavetz, Barry I; Balakrishnan, Lata

    2015-01-01

    DNA tumor viruses including members of the polyomavirus, adenovirus, papillomavirus, and herpes virus families are presently the subject of intense interest with respect to the role that epigenetics plays in control of the virus life cycle and the transformation of a normal cell to a cancer cell. To date, these studies have primarily focused on the role of histone modification, nucleosome location, and DNA methylation in regulating the biological consequences of infection. Using a wide variety of strategies and techniques ranging from simple ChIP to ChIP-chip and ChIP-seq to identify histone modifications, nuclease digestion to genome wide next generation sequencing to identify nucleosome location, and bisulfite treatment to MeDIP to identify DNA methylation sites, the epigenetic regulation of these viruses is slowly becoming better understood. While the viruses may differ in significant ways from each other and cellular chromatin, the role of epigenetics appears to be relatively similar. Within the viral genome nucleosomes are organized for the expression of appropriate genes with relevant histone modifications particularly histone acetylation. DNA methylation occurs as part of the typical gene silencing during latent infection by herpesviruses. In the simple tumor viruses like the polyomaviruses, adenoviruses, and papillomaviruses, transformation of the cell occurs via integration of the virus genome such that the virus's normal regulation is disrupted. This results in the unregulated expression of critical viral genes capable of redirecting cellular gene expression. The redirected cellular expression is a consequence of either indirect epigenetic regulation where cellular signaling or transcriptional dysregulation occurs or direct epigenetic regulation where epigenetic cofactors such as histone deacetylases are targeted. In the more complex herpersviruses transformation is a consequence of the expression of the viral latency proteins and RNAs which again can

  3. Generalized Modelling of the Stabilizer Link and Static Simulation Using FEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cofaru, Nicolae Florin; Roman, Lucian Ion; Oleksik, Valentin; Pascu, Adrian

    2016-12-01

    This paper proposes an organological approach of one of the components of front suspension, namely anti-roll power link. There will be realized a CAD 3D modelling of this power link. 3D modelling is generalized and there were used the powers of Catia V5R20 software. Parameterized approach provides a high flexibility in the design, meaning that dimensional and shape changes of the semi-power link are very easy to perform just by changing some parameters. Several new versions are proposed for the anti-roll power link body. At the end of the work, it is made a static analysis of the semi-power link model used in the suspension of vehicles OPEL ASTRA G, ZAFIRA, MERIVA, and constructive optimization of its body.

  4. Design-oriented analytic model of phase and frequency modulated optical links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monsurrò, Pietro; Saitto, Antonio; Tommasino, Pasquale; Trifiletti, Alessandro; Vannucci, Antonello; Cimmino, Rosario F.

    2016-07-01

    An analytic design-oriented model of phase and frequency modulated microwave optical links has been developed. The models are suitable for design of broadband high dynamic range optical links for antenna remoting and optical beamforming, where noise and linearity of the subsystems are a concern Digital filter design techniques have been applied to the design of optical filters working as frequency discriminator, that are the bottleneck in terms of linearity for these systems. The models of frequency modulated, phase modulated, and coherent I/Q link have been used to compare performance of the different architectures in terms of linearity and SFDR.

  5. Theory and Practice: An Integrative Model Linking Class and Field

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lesser, Joan Granucci; Cooper, Marlene

    2006-01-01

    Social work has evolved over the years taking on the challenges of the times. The profession now espouses a breadth of theoretical approaches and treatment modalities. We have developed a model to help graduate social work students master the skill of integrating theory and social work practice. The Integrative Model has five components: (l) The…

  6. A Tiered Model for Linking Students to the Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Laura Landry; Gerard, Jean M.; Sturm, Michael R.; Wooldridge, Deborah G.

    2016-01-01

    A tiered practice model (introductory, pre-internship, and internship) embedded in the curriculum facilitates community engagement and creates relevance for students as they pursue a professional identity in Human Development and Family Studies. The tiered model integrates high-impact teaching practices (HIP) and student engagement pedagogies…

  7. Modeling and control of a hydraulically actuated flexible-prismatic link robot

    SciTech Connect

    Love, L.; Kress, R.; Jansen, J.

    1996-12-01

    Most of the research related to flexible link manipulators to date has focused on single link, fixed length, single plane of vibration test beds. In addition, actuation has been predominantly based upon electromagnetic motors. Ironically, these elements are rarely found in the existing industrial long reach systems. This manuscript describes a new hydraulically actuated, long reach manipulator with a flexible prismatic link at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Focus is directed towards both modeling and control of hydraulic actuators as well as flexible links that have variable natural frequencies.

  8. Modelling the spread of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) in a beef cattle herd and its impact on herd productivity.

    PubMed

    Damman, Alix; Viet, Anne-France; Arnoux, Sandie; Guerrier-Chatellet, Marie-Claude; Petit, Etienne; Ezanno, Pauline

    2015-02-24

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) is a common pathogen of cattle herds that causes economic losses due to reproductive disorders in breeding cattle and increased morbidity and mortality amongst infected calves. Our objective was to evaluate the impact of BVDV spread on the productivity of a beef cow-calf herd using a stochastic model in discrete time that accounted for (1) the difference in transmission rates when animals are housed indoors versus grazing on pasture, (2) the external risk of disease introductions through fenceline contact with neighboring herds and the purchase of infected cattle, and (3) the risk of individual pregnant cattle generating persistently infected (PI) calves based on their stage in gestation. The model predicted the highest losses from BVDV during the first 3 years after disease was introduced into a naive herd. During the endemic phase, the impact of BVDV on the yearly herd productivity was much lower due to herd immunity. However, cumulative losses over 10 years in an endemic situation greatly surpassed the losses that occurred during the acute phase. A sensitivity analysis of key model parameters revealed that herd size, the duration of breeding, grazing, and selling periods, renewal rate of breeding females, and the level of numerical productivity expected by the farmer had a significant influence on the predicted losses. This model provides a valuable framework for evaluating the impact of BVDV and the efficacy of different control strategies in beef cow-calf herds.

  9. Visualization of the interaction between the precursors of VPg, the viral protein linked to the genome of turnip mosaic virus, and the translation eukaryotic initiation factor iso 4E in Planta.

    PubMed

    Beauchemin, Chantal; Boutet, Nathalie; Laliberté, Jean-François

    2007-01-01

    The RNA genome of Turnip mosaic virus is covalently linked at its 5' end to a viral protein known as VPg. This protein binds to the translation eukaryotic initiation factor iso 4E [eIF(iso)4E]. This interaction has been shown to be important for virus infection, although its exact biological function(s) has not been elucidated. In this study, we investigated the subcellular site of the VPg-eIF(iso)4E interaction using bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC). As a first step, eIF(iso)4E, 6K-VPg-Pro, and VPg-Pro were expressed as full-length green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusions in Nicotiana benthamiana, and their subcellular localizations were visualized by confocal microscopy. eIF(iso)4E was predominantly associated with the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), and VPg-Pro was observed in the nucleus and possibly the nucleolus, while 6K-VPg-Pro-GFP induced the formation of cytoplasmic vesicles budding from the ER. In BiFC experiments, reconstituted green fluorescence was observed throughout the nucleus, with a preferential accumulation in subnuclear structures when the GFP split fragments were fused to VPg-Pro and eIF(iso)4E. On the other hand, the interaction of 6K-VPg-Pro with eIF(iso)4E was observed in cytoplasmic vesicles embedded in the ER. These data suggest that the association of VPg with the translation factor might be needed for two different functions, depending of the VPg precursor involved in the interaction. VPg-Pro interaction with eIF(iso)4E may be involved in perturbing normal cellular functions, while 6K-VPg-Pro interaction with the translation factor may be needed for viral RNA translation and/or replication.

  10. Derivation of free energy expressions for tube models from coarse-grained slip-link models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steenbakkers, Rudi J. A.; Schieber, Jay D.

    2012-07-01

    We present the free energy of a single-chain mean-field model for polymer melt dynamics, which uses a continuous (tube-like) approximation to the discrete entanglements with surrounding chains, but, in contrast to previous tube models, includes fluctuations in the number density of Kuhn steps along the primitive path and in the degree of entanglement. The free energy is obtained from that of the slip-link model with fluctuating entanglement positions [J. D. Schieber and K. Horio, J. Chem. Phys. 132, 074905 (2010)], 10.1063/1.3314727 by taking the continuous limit of (functions of) the discrete Kuhn-step numbers and end-to-end vectors of the strands between entanglements. This coarse-graining from a more-detailed level of description has the advantage that no ad hoc arguments need to be introduced. Moreover, the thermodynamic consistency of the slip-link model [J. D. Schieber, J. Non-Equilib. Thermodyn. 28, 179 (2003)], 10.1515/JNETDY.2003.010 can be preserved. Fluctuations in the positions of entanglements lead to a harmonic bending term in the free energy of the continuous chain, similar to that derived by Read et al. [Macromolecules 41, 6843 (2008)], 10.1021/ma8009855 starting from a modified GLaMM model [R. S. Graham, A. E. Likhtman, T. C. B. McLeish, and S. T. Milner, J. Rheol. 47, 1171 (2003)], 10.1122/1.1595099. If these fluctuations are set to zero, the free energy becomes purely Gaussian and corresponds to the continuous limit of the original slip-link model, with affinely moving entanglements [J. D. Schieber, J. Chem. Phys. 118, 5162 (2003)], 10.1063/1.1553764. The free energy reduces to that of Read et al. under their assumptions of a homogeneous Kuhn-step number density and a constant degree of entanglement. Finally, we show how a transformation of the primitive-path coordinate can be applied to make the degree of entanglement an outcome of the model instead of a variable. In summary, this paper constitutes a first step towards a unified mathematical

  11. Strengthening the weak link: Built Environment modelling for loss analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millinship, I.

    2012-04-01

    Methods to analyse insured losses from a range of natural perils, including pricing by primary insurers and catastrophe modelling by reinsurers, typically lack sufficient exposure information. Understanding the hazard intensity in terms of spatial severity and frequency is only the first step towards quantifying the risk of a catastrophic event. For any given event we need to know: Are any structures affected? What type of buildings are they? How much damaged occurred? How much will the repairs cost? To achieve this, detailed exposure information is required to assess the likely damage and to effectively calculate the resultant loss. Modelling exposures in the Built Environment therefore plays as important a role in understanding re/insurance risk as characterising the physical hazard. Across both primary insurance books and aggregated reinsurance portfolios, the location of a property (a risk) and its monetary value is typically known. Exactly what that risk is in terms of detailed property descriptors including structure type and rebuild cost - and therefore its vulnerability to loss - is often omitted. This data deficiency is a primary source of variations between modelled losses and the actual claims value. Built Environment models are therefore required at a high resolution to describe building attributes that relate vulnerability to property damage. However, national-scale household-level datasets are often not computationally practical in catastrophe models and data must be aggregated. In order to provide more accurate risk analysis, we have developed and applied a methodology for Built Environment modelling for incorporation into a range of re/insurance applications, including operational models for different international regions and different perils and covering residential, commercial and industry exposures. Illustrated examples are presented, including exposure modelling suitable for aggregated reinsurance analysis for the UK and bespoke high resolution

  12. Recombination between poliovirus and coxsackie A viruses of species C: a model of viral genetic plasticity and emergence.

    PubMed

    Combelas, Nicolas; Holmblat, Barbara; Joffret, Marie-Line; Colbère-Garapin, Florence; Delpeyroux, Francis

    2011-08-01

    Genetic recombination in RNA viruses was discovered many years ago for poliovirus (PV), an enterovirus of the Picornaviridae family, and studied using PV or other picornaviruses as models. Recently, recombination was shown to be a general phenomenon between different types of enteroviruses of the same species. In particular, the interest for this mechanism of genetic plasticity was renewed with the emergence of pathogenic recombinant circulating vaccine-derived polioviruses (cVDPVs), which were implicated in poliomyelitis outbreaks in several regions of the world with insufficient vaccination coverage. Most of these cVDPVs had mosaic genomes constituted of mutated poliovaccine capsid sequences and part or all of the non-structural sequences from other human enteroviruses of species C (HEV-C), in particular coxsackie A viruses. A study in Madagascar showed that recombinant cVDPVs had been co-circulating in a small population of children with many different HEV-C types. This viral ecosystem showed a surprising and extensive biodiversity associated to several types and recombinant genotypes, indicating that intertypic genetic recombination was not only a mechanism of evolution for HEV-C, but an usual mode of genetic plasticity shaping viral diversity. Results suggested that recombination may be, in conjunction with mutations, implicated in the phenotypic diversity of enterovirus strains and in the emergence of new pathogenic strains. Nevertheless, little is known about the rules and mechanisms which govern genetic exchanges between HEV-C types, as well as about the importance of intertypic recombination in generating phenotypic variation. This review summarizes our current knowledge of the mechanisms of evolution of PV, in particular recombination events leading to the emergence of recombinant cVDPVs.

  13. A Positive Cooperativity Binding Model between Ly49 Natural Killer Cell Receptors and the Viral Immunoevasin m157

    PubMed Central

    Romasanta, Pablo N.; Curto, Lucrecia M.; Urtasun, Nicolas; Sarratea, María B.; Chiappini, Santiago; Miranda, María V.; Delfino, José M.; Mariuzza, Roy A.; Fernández, Marisa M.; Malchiodi, Emilio L.

    2014-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells discriminate between healthy and virally infected or transformed cells using diverse surface receptors that are both activating and inhibitory. Among them, the homodimeric Ly49 NK receptors, which can adopt two distinct conformations (backfolded and extended), are of particular importance for detecting cells infected with mouse cytomegalovirus (CMV) via recognition of the viral immunoevasin m157. The interaction of m157 with activating (Ly49H) and inhibitory (Ly49I) receptors governs the spread of mouse CMV. We carried out kinetic and thermodynamic experiments to elucidate the Ly49/m157 binding mechanism. Combining surface plasmon resonance, fluorescence anisotropy, and circular dichroism (CD), we determined that the best model to describe both the Ly49H/m157 and Ly49I/m157 interactions is a conformational selection mechanism where only the extended conformation of Ly49 (Ly49*) is able to bind the first m157 ligand followed by binding of the Ly49*/m157 complex to the second m157. The interaction is characterized by strong positive cooperativity such that the second m157 binds the Ly49 homodimer with a 1000-fold higher sequential constant than the first m157 (∼108 versus ∼105 m−1). Using far-UV CD, we obtained evidence for a conformational change in Ly49 upon binding m157 that could explain the positive cooperativity. The rate-limiting step of the overall mechanism is a conformational transition in Ly49 from its backfolded to extended form. The global thermodynamic parameters from the initial state (backfolded Ly49 and m157) to the final state (Ly49*/(m157)2) are characterized by an unfavorable enthalpy that is compensated by a favorable entropy, making the interaction spontaneous. PMID:24379405

  14. Linking Time and Space Scales in Distributed Hydrological Modelling - a case study for the VIC model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melsen, Lieke; Teuling, Adriaan; Torfs, Paul; Zappa, Massimiliano; Mizukami, Naoki; Clark, Martyn; Uijlenhoet, Remko

    2015-04-01

    One of the famous paradoxes of the Greek philosopher Zeno of Elea (~450 BC) is the one with the arrow: If one shoots an arrow, and cuts its motion into such small time steps that at every step the arrow is standing still, the arrow is motionless, because a concatenation of non-moving parts does not create motion. Nowadays, this reasoning can be refuted easily, because we know that motion is a change in space over time, which thus by definition depends on both time and space. If one disregards time by cutting it into infinite small steps, motion is also excluded. This example shows that time and space are linked and therefore hard to evaluate separately. As hydrologists we want to understand and predict the motion of water, which means we have to look both in space and in time. In hydrological models we can account for space by using spatially explicit models. With increasing computational power and increased data availability from e.g. satellites, it has become easier to apply models at a higher spatial resolution. Increasing the resolution of hydrological models is also labelled as one of the 'Grand Challenges' in hydrology by Wood et al. (2011) and Bierkens et al. (2014), who call for global modelling at hyperresolution (~1 km and smaller). A literature survey on 242 peer-viewed articles in which the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) model was used, showed that the spatial resolution at which the model is applied has decreased over the past 17 years: From 0.5 to 2 degrees when the model was just developed, to 1/8 and even 1/32 degree nowadays. On the other hand the literature survey showed that the time step at which the model is calibrated and/or validated remained the same over the last 17 years; mainly daily or monthly. Klemeš (1983) stresses the fact that space and time scales are connected, and therefore downscaling the spatial scale would also imply downscaling of the temporal scale. Is it worth the effort of downscaling your model from 1 degree to 1

  15. A novel fibre-ensemble level constitutive model for exogenous cross-linked collagenous tissues

    PubMed Central

    Sacks, Michael S.; Wognum, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Exogenous cross-linking of soft collagenous tissues is a common method for biomaterial development and medical therapies. To enable improved applications through computational methods, physically realistic constitutive models are required. Yet, despite decades of research, development and clinical use, no such model exists. In this study, we develop the first rigorous full structural model (i.e. explicitly incorporating various features of the collagen fibre architecture) for exogenously cross-linked soft tissues. This was made possible, in-part, with the use of native to cross-linked matched experimental datasets and an extension to the collagenous structural constitutive model so that the uncross-linked collagen fibre responses could be mapped to the cross-linked configuration. This allowed us to separate the effects of cross-linking from kinematic changes induced in the cross-linking process, which in turn allowed the non-fibrous tissue matrix component and the interaction effects to be identified. It was determined that the matrix could be modelled as an isotropic material using a modified Yeoh model. The most novel findings of this study were that: (i) the effective collagen fibre modulus was unaffected by cross-linking and (ii) fibre-ensemble interactions played a large role in stress development, often dominating the total tissue response (depending on the stress component and loading path considered). An important utility of the present model is its ability to separate the effects of exogenous cross-linking on the fibres from changes due to the matrix. Applications of this approach include the utilization in the design of novel chemical treatments to produce specific mechanical responses and the study of fatigue damage in bioprosthetic heart valve biomaterials. PMID:26855761

  16. A novel fibre-ensemble level constitutive model for exogenous cross-linked collagenous tissues.

    PubMed

    Sacks, Michael S; Zhang, Will; Wognum, Silvia

    2016-02-06

    Exogenous cross-linking of soft collagenous tissues is a common method for biomaterial development and medical therapies. To enable improved applications through computational methods, physically realistic constitutive models are required. Yet, despite decades of research, development and clinical use, no such model exists. In this study, we develop the first rigorous full structural model (i.e. explicitly incorporating various features of the collagen fibre architecture) for exogenously cross-linked soft tissues. This was made possible, in-part, with the use of native to cross-linked matched experimental datasets and an extension to the collagenous structural constitutive model so that the uncross-linked collagen fibre responses could be mapped to the cross-linked configuration. This allowed us to separate the effects of cross-linking from kinematic changes induced in the cross-linking process, which in turn allowed the non-fibrous tissue matrix component and the interaction effects to be identified. It was determined that the matrix could be modelled as an isotropic material using a modified Yeoh model. The most novel findings of this study were that: (i) the effective collagen fibre modulus was unaffected by cross-linking and (ii) fibre-ensemble interactions played a large role in stress development, often dominating the total tissue response (depending on the stress component and loading path considered). An important utility of the present model is its ability to separate the effects of exogenous cross-linking on the fibres from changes due to the matrix. Applications of this approach include the utilization in the design of novel chemical treatments to produce specific mechanical responses and the study of fatigue damage in bioprosthetic heart valve biomaterials.

  17. A model integration framework for linking SWAT and MODFLOW

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hydrological response and transport phenomena are driven by atmospheric, surface and subsurface processes. These complex processes occur at different spatiotemporal scales requiring comprehensive modeling to assess the impact of anthropogenic activity on hydrology and fate and transport of chemical ...

  18. Treating Viral Exacerbations of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: Insights from a Mouse Model of Cigarette Smoke and H1N1 Influenza Infection

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Carla M. T.; Zavitz, Caleb C. J.; Botelho, Fernando M.; Lambert, Kristen N.; Brown, Earl G.; Mossman, Karen L.; Taylor, John D.; Stämpfli, Martin R.

    2010-01-01

    Background Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is a progressive lung disease that is punctuated by periods of exacerbations (worsening of symptoms) that are attributable to viral infections. While rhinoviruses are most commonly isolated viruses during episodes of exacerbation, influenza viruses have the potential to become even more problematic with the increased likelihood of an epidemic. Methodology and Principal Findings This study examined the impact of current and potential pharmacological targets namely the systemic corticosteroid dexamethasone and the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor- gamma agonist pioglitazone on the outcome of infection in smoke-exposed mice. C57BL/6 mice were exposed to room air or cigarette smoke for 4 days and subsequently inoculated with an H1N1 influenza A virus. Interventions were delivered daily during the course of infection. We show that smoke-exposed mice have an exacerbated inflammatory response following infection. While smoke exposure did not compromise viral clearance, precision cut lung slices from smoke-exposed mice showed greater expression of CC (MCP-1, -3), and CXC (KC, MIP-2, GCP-2) chemokines compared to controls when stimulated with a viral mimic or influenza A virus. While dexamethasone treatment partially attenuated the inflammatory response in the broncho-alveolar lavage of smoke-exposed, virally-infected animals, viral-induced neutrophilia was steroid insensitive. In contrast to controls, dexamethasone-treated smoke-exposed influenza-infected mice had a worsened health status. Pioglitazone treatment of virally-infected smoke-exposed mice proved more efficacious than the steroid intervention. Further mechanistic evaluation revealed that a deficiency in CCR2 did not improve the inflammatory outcome in smoke-exposed, virally-infected animals. Conclusions and Significance This animal model of cigarette smoke and H1N1 influenza infection demonstrates that smoke-exposed animals are differentially primed to

  19. A simple model linking galaxy and dark matter evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Birrer, Simon; Lilly, Simon; Amara, Adam; Paranjape, Aseem; Refregier, Alexandre E-mail: simon.lilly@phys.ethz.ch

    2014-09-20

    We construct a simple phenomenological model for the evolving galaxy population by incorporating predefined baryonic prescriptions into a dark matter hierarchical merger tree. The model is based on the simple gas-regulator model introduced by Lilly et al., coupled with the empirical quenching rules of Peng et al. The simplest model already does quite well in reproducing, without re-adjusting the input parameters, many observables, including the main sequence sSFR-mass relation, the faint end slope of the galaxy mass function, and the shape of the star forming and passive mass functions. Similar to observations and/or the recent phenomenological model of Behroozi et al., which was based on epoch-dependent abundance-matching, our model also qualitatively reproduces the evolution of the main sequence sSFR(z) and SFRD(z) star formation rate density relations, the M{sub s} – M{sub h} stellar-to-halo mass relation, and the SFR – M{sub h} relation. Quantitatively the evolution of sSFR(z) and SFRD(z) is not steep enough, the M{sub s} – M{sub h} relation is not quite peaked enough, and, surprisingly, the ratio of quenched to star forming galaxies around M* is not quite high enough. We show that these deficiencies can simultaneously be solved by ad hoc allowing galaxies to re-ingest some of the gas previously expelled in winds, provided that this is done in a mass-dependent and epoch-dependent way. These allow the model galaxies to reduce an inherent tendency to saturate their star formation efficiency, which emphasizes how efficient galaxies around M* are in converting baryons into stars and highlights the fact that quenching occurs at the point when galaxies are rapidly approaching the maximum possible efficiency of converting baryons into stars.

  20. Linking Meteorology, Air Quality Models and Observations to ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Epidemiologic studies are critical in establishing the association between exposure to air pollutants and adverse health effects. Results of epidemiologic studies are used by U.S. EPA in developing air quality standards to protect the public from the health effects of air pollutants. A major challenge in environmental epidemiology is adequate exposure characterization. Numerous health studies have used measurements from a few central-site ambient monitors to characterize air pollution exposures. Relying solely on central-site ambient monitors does not account for the spatial-heterogeneity of ambient air pollution patterns, the temporal variability in ambient concentrations, nor the influence of infiltration and indoor sources. Central-site monitoring becomes even more problematic for certain air pollutants that exhibit significant spatial heterogeneity. Statistical interpolation techniques and passive monitoring methods can provide additional spatial resolution in ambient concentration estimates. In addition, spatio-temporal models, which integrate GIS data and other factors, such as meteorology, have also been developed to produce more resolved estimates of ambient concentrations. Models, such as the Community Multi-Scale Air Quality (CMAQ) model, estimate ambient concentrations by combining information on meteorology, source emissions, and chemical-fate and transport. Hybrid modeling approaches, which integrate regional scale models with local scale dispersion

  1. Modeling photosynthesis of discontinuous plant canopies by linking Geometric Optical Radiative Transfer model with biochemical processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Q.; Gong, P.; Li, W.

    2015-02-01

    Modeling vegetation photosynthesis is essential for understanding carbon exchanges between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere. The radiative transfer process within plant canopies is one of the key drivers that regulate canopy photosynthesis. Most vegetation cover consists of discrete plant crowns, of which the physical observation departs from the underlying assumption of a homogenous and uniform medium in classic radiative transfer theory. Here we advance the Geometric Optical Radiative Transfer (GORT) model to simulate photosynthesis activities for discontinuous plant canopies. We separate radiation absorption into two components that are absorbed by sunlit and shaded leaves, and derive analytical solutions by integrating over the canopy layer. To model leaf-level and canopy-level photosynthesis, leaf light absorption is then linked to the biochemical process of gas diffusion through leaf stomata. The canopy gap probability derived from GORT differs from classic radiative transfer theory, especially when the leaf area index is high, due to leaf clumping effects. Tree characteristics such as tree density, crown shape, and canopy length affect leaf clumping and regulate radiation interception. Modeled gross primary production (GPP) for two deciduous forest stands could explain more than 80% of the variance of flux tower measurements at both near hourly and daily time scales. We also demonstrate that the ambient CO2 concentration influences daytime vegetation photosynthesis, which needs to be considered in state-of-the-art biogeochemical models. The proposed model is complementary to classic radiative transfer theory and shows promise in modeling the radiative transfer process and photosynthetic activities over discontinuous forest canopies.

  2. Characterizing cognitive aging in humans with links to animal models

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Gene E.; Ryan, Lee; Bowers, Dawn; Foster, Thomas C.; Bizon, Jennifer L.; Geldmacher, David S.; Glisky, Elizabeth L.

    2012-01-01

    With the population of older adults expected to grow rapidly over the next two decades, it has become increasingly important to advance research efforts to elucidate the mechanisms associated with cognitive aging, with the ultimate goal of developing effective interventions and prevention therapies. Although there has been a vast research literature on the use of cognitive tests to evaluate the effects of aging and age-related neurodegenerative disease, the need for a set of standardized measures to characterize the cognitive profiles specific to healthy aging has been widely recognized. Here we present a review of selected methods and approaches that have been applied in human research studies to evaluate the effects of aging on cognition, including executive function, memory, processing speed, language, and visuospatial function. The effects of healthy aging on each of these cognitive domains are discussed with examples from cognitive/experimental and clinical/neuropsychological approaches. Further, we consider those measures that have clear conceptual and methodological links to tasks currently in use for non-human animal studies of aging, as well as those that have the potential for translation to animal aging research. Having a complementary set of measures to assess the cognitive profiles of healthy aging across species provides a unique opportunity to enhance research efforts for cross-sectional, longitudinal, and intervention studies of cognitive aging. Taking a cross-species, translational approach will help to advance cognitive aging research, leading to a greater understanding of associated neurobiological mechanisms with the potential for developing effective interventions and prevention therapies for age-related cognitive decline. PMID:22988439

  3. EVALUATION OF MURINE NOROVIRUS, FELINE CALICIVIRUS, POLIOVIRUS, AND MS2 AS SURROGATES FOR HUMAN NOROVIRUS IN a Model of Viral Persistence in SURFACE Water AND GROUNDWATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Human noroviruses (NoV) are a significant cause of non bacterial gastroenteritis worldwide with contaminated drinking water a potential transmission route. The absence of a cell culture infectivity model for NoV necessitates the use of molecular methods and/or viral surrogate mod...

  4. Links between fluid mechanics and quantum mechanics: a model for information in economics?

    PubMed

    Haven, Emmanuel

    2016-05-28

    This paper tallies the links between fluid mechanics and quantum mechanics, and attempts to show whether those links can aid in beginning to build a formal template which is usable in economics models where time is (a)symmetric and memory is absent or present. An objective of this paper is to contemplate whether those formalisms can allow us to model information in economics in a novel way.

  5. Viral Miniproteins

    PubMed Central

    DiMaio, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Many viruses encode short transmembrane proteins that play vital roles in virus replication or virulence. Because these proteins are often less than 50 amino acids long and not homologous to cellular proteins, their open reading frames were often overlooked during the initial annotation of viral genomes. Some of these proteins oligomerize in membranes and form ion channels. Other miniproteins bind to cellular transmembrane proteins and modulate their activity, whereas still others have an unknown mechanism of action. Based on the underlying principles of transmembrane miniprotein structure, it is possible to build artificial small transmembrane proteins that modulate a variety of biological processes. These findings suggest that short transmembrane proteins provide a versatile mechanism to regulate a wide range of cellular activities, and we speculate that cells also express many similar proteins that have not yet been discovered. PMID:24742054

  6. Conceptual Processes for Linking Eutrophication and Network Models

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-08-01

    for improvements. Submerged Aquatic Vegetation (SAV). SAV biomass values from ICM (identified as SAV in Table 3) are two to three times lower...Dorothy H. Tillman, Dr. Carl F. Cerco, and Mr. Mark R. Noel of the Water Quality and Contaminant Modeling Branch, Enviromental Laboratory (EL

  7. Linking Models: Reasoning from Patterns to Tables and Equations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Switzer, J. Matt

    2013-01-01

    Patterns are commonly used in middle years mathematics classrooms to teach students about functions and modelling with tables, graphs, and equations. Grade 6 students are expected to, "continue and create sequences involving whole numbers, fractions and decimals," and "describe the rule used to create the sequence." (Australian…

  8. Shuttle Communications and Tracking Systems Modeling and TDRSS Link Simulations Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chie, C. M.; Dessouky, K.; Lindsey, W. C.; Tsang, C. S.; Su, Y. T.

    1985-01-01

    An analytical simulation package (LinCsim) which allows the analytical verification of data transmission performance through TDRSS satellites was modified. The work involved the modeling of the user transponder, TDRS, TDRS ground terminal, and link dynamics for forward and return links based on the TDRSS performance specifications (4) and the critical design reviews. The scope of this effort has recently been expanded to include the effects of radio frequency interference (RFI) on the bit error rate (BER) performance of the S-band return links. The RFI environment and the modified TDRSS satellite and ground station hardware are being modeled in accordance with their description in the applicable documents.

  9. Modeling water quality, temperature, and flow in Link River, south-central Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sullivan, Annett B.; Rounds, Stewart A.

    2016-09-09

    The 2.1-km (1.3-mi) Link River connects Upper Klamath Lake to the Klamath River in south-central Oregon. A CE-QUAL-W2 flow and water-quality model of Link River was developed to provide a connection between an existing model of the upper Klamath River and any existing or future models of Upper Klamath Lake. Water-quality sampling at six locations in Link River was done during 2013–15 to support model development and to provide a better understanding of instream biogeochemical processes. The short reach and high velocities in Link River resulted in fast travel times and limited water-quality transformations, except for dissolved oxygen. Reaeration through the reach, especially at the falls in Link River, was particularly important in moderating dissolved oxygen concentrations that at times entered the reach at Link River Dam with marked supersaturation or subsaturation. This reaeration resulted in concentrations closer to saturation downstream at the mouth of Link River.

  10. Viral Carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Smith, A J; Smith, L A

    2016-01-01

    Cancer has been recognized for thousands of years. Egyptians believed that cancer occurred at the will of the gods. Hippocrates believed human disease resulted from an imbalance of the four humors: blood, phlegm, yellow bile, and black bile with cancer being caused by excess black bile. The lymph theory of cancer replaced the humoral theory and the blastema theory replaced the lymph theory. Rudolph Virchow was the first to recognize that cancer cells like all cells came from other cells and believed chronic irritation caused cancer. At the same time there was a belief that trauma caused cancer, though it never evolved after many experiments inducing trauma. The birth of virology occurred in 1892 when Dimitri Ivanofsky demonstrated that diseased tobacco plants remained infective after filtering their sap through a filter that trapped bacteria. Martinus Beijerinck would call the tiny infective agent a virus and both Dimitri Ivanofsky and Marinus Beijerinck would become the fathers of virology. Not to long thereafter, Payton Rous founded the field of tumor virology in 1911 with his discovery of a transmittable sarcoma of chickens by what would come to be called Rous sarcoma virus or RSV for short. The first identified human tumor virus was the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), named after Tony Epstein and Yvonne Barr who visualized the virus particles in Burkitt's lymphoma cells by electron microscopy in 1965. Since that time, many viruses have been associated with carcinogenesis including the most studied, human papilloma virus associated with cervical carcinoma, many other anogenital carcinomas, and oropharyngeal carcinoma. The World Health Organization currently estimates that approximately 22% of worldwide cancers are attributable to infectious etiologies, of which viral etiologies is estimated at 15-20%. The field of tumor virology/viral carcinogenesis has not only identified viruses as etiologic agents of human cancers, but has also given molecular insights to all human

  11. Linking agent-based models and stochastic models of financial markets.

    PubMed

    Feng, Ling; Li, Baowen; Podobnik, Boris; Preis, Tobias; Stanley, H Eugene

    2012-05-29

    It is well-known that financial asset returns exhibit fat-tailed distributions and long-term memory. These empirical features are the main objectives of modeling efforts using (i) stochastic processes to quantitatively reproduce these features and (ii) agent-based simulations to understand the underlying microscopic interactions. After reviewing selected empirical and theoretical evidence documenting the behavior of traders, we construct an agent-based model to quantitatively demonstrate that "fat" tails in return distributions arise when traders share similar technical trading strategies and decisions. Extending our behavioral model to a stochastic model, we derive and explain a set of quantitative scaling relations of long-term memory from the empirical behavior of individual market participants. Our analysis provides a behavioral interpretation of the long-term memory of absolute and squared price returns: They are directly linked to the way investors evaluate their investments by applying technical strategies at different investment horizons, and this quantitative relationship is in agreement with empirical findings. Our approach provides a possible behavioral explanation for stochastic models for financial systems in general and provides a method to parameterize such models from market data rather than from statistical fitting.

  12. Linking agent-based models and stochastic models of financial markets

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Ling; Li, Baowen; Podobnik, Boris; Preis, Tobias; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2012-01-01

    It is well-known that financial asset returns exhibit fat-tailed distributions and long-term memory. These empirical features are the main objectives of modeling efforts using (i) stochastic processes to quantitatively reproduce these features and (ii) agent-based simulations to understand the underlying microscopic interactions. After reviewing selected empirical and theoretical evidence documenting the behavior of traders, we construct an agent-based model to quantitatively demonstrate that “fat” tails in return distributions arise when traders share similar technical trading strategies and decisions. Extending our behavioral model to a stochastic model, we derive and explain a set of quantitative scaling relations of long-term memory from the empirical behavior of individual market participants. Our analysis provides a behavioral interpretation of the long-term memory of absolute and squared price returns: They are directly linked to the way investors evaluate their investments by applying technical strategies at different investment horizons, and this quantitative relationship is in agreement with empirical findings. Our approach provides a possible behavioral explanation for stochastic models for financial systems in general and provides a method to parameterize such models from market data rather than from statistical fitting. PMID:22586086

  13. Nonlinear Models for the Delayed Immune Response to a Viral Infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gleria, Iram; Neto, Adhemar Ranciaro; Canabarro, Askery

    2015-08-01

    We analyze ordinary differential equations modeling systems of biological interest. We focus on analytical properties of delayed equations that simulate the dynamics between cells of the immune system and a target population. We present the basic features of the linear stability analysis in delayed equations. New analytical results in a four-dimensional system are presented, as well as an analysis of a two-dimensional model.

  14. An integrative model linking feedback environment and organizational citizenship behavior.

    PubMed

    Peng, Jei-Chen; Chiu, Su-Fen

    2010-01-01

    Past empirical evidence has suggested that a positive supervisor feedback environment may enhance employees' organizational citizenship behavior (OCB). In this study, we aim to extend previous research by proposing and testing an integrative model that examines the mediating processes underlying the relationship between supervisor feedback environment and employee OCB. Data were collected from 259 subordinate-supervisor dyads across a variety of organizations in Taiwan. We used structural equation modeling to test our hypotheses. The results demonstrated that supervisor feedback environment influenced employees' OCB indirectly through (1) both positive affective-cognition and positive attitude (i.e., person-organization fit and organizational commitment), and (2) both negative affective-cognition and negative attitude (i.e., role stressors and job burnout). Theoretical and practical implications are discussed.

  15. Cross Linking and Degradation Mechanisms in Model Sealant Candidates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paciorek, K. L.; Kaufman, J.; Ito, T. I.; Nakahara, J. H.; Kratzer, R. H.

    1977-01-01

    Model compounds were investigated as to which type of heterocyclic ring is the most advantageous for curing sealants based on perfluoroalkylether chains. The relative thermal, thermal oxidative, hydrolytic, and fuel stability of potential crosslinks were determined. Specifically substituted materials were synthesized and evaluation of their stabilities in air, inert atmosphere, water, and Jet-A fuel at 235 and 325 C was made. Three heterocyclic ring systems were considered, namely, triazine, 1,2,4- and 1,3,4-oxadiazoles.

  16. Microbial Life in Soil - Linking Biophysical Models with Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Or, D.; Tecon, R.; Ebrahimi, A.; Kleyer, H.; Ilie, O.; Wang, G.

    2014-12-01

    Microbial life in soil occurs within fragmented aquatic habitats in complex pore spaces where motility is restricted to short hydration windows (e.g., following rainfall). The limited range of self-dispersion and physical confinement promote spatial association among trophically interdepended microbial species. Competition and preferences for different nutrient resources and byproducts and their diffusion require high level of spatial organization to sustain the functioning of multispecies communities. We report mechanistic modeling studies of competing multispecies microbial communities grown on hydrated surfaces and within artificial soil aggregates (represented by 3-D pore network). Results show how trophic dependencies and cell-level interactions within patchy diffusion fields promote spatial self-organization of motile microbial cells. The spontaneously forming patterns of segregated, yet coexisting species were robust to spatial heterogeneities and to temporal perturbations (hydration dynamics), and respond primarily to the type of trophic dependencies. Such spatially self-organized consortia may reflect ecological templates that optimize substrate utilization and could form the basic architecture for more permanent surface-attached microbial colonies. Hydration dynamics affect structure and spatial arrangement of aerobic and anaerobic microbial communities and their biogeochemical functions. Experiments with well-characterized artificial soil microbial assemblies grown on porous surfaces provide access to community dynamics during wetting and drying cycles detected through genetic fingerprinting. Experiments for visual observations of spatial associations of tagged bacterial species with known trophic dependencies on model porous surfaces are underway. Biophysical modeling provide a means for predicting hydration-mediated critical separation distances for activation of spatial self-organization. The study provides new modeling and observational tools that

  17. Microbial Life in Soil - Linking Biophysical Models with Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Or, Dani; Tecon, Robin; Ebrahimi, Ali; Kleyer, Hannah; Ilie, Olga; Wang, Gang

    2015-04-01

    Microbial life in soil occurs within fragmented aquatic habitats formed in complex pore spaces where motility is restricted to short hydration windows (e.g., following rainfall). The limited range of self-dispersion and physical confinement promote spatial association among trophically interdepended microbial species. Competition and preferences for different nutrient resources and byproducts and their diffusion require high level of spatial organization to sustain the functioning of multispecies communities. We report mechanistic modeling studies of competing multispecies microbial communities grown on hydrated surfaces and within artificial soil aggregates (represented by 3-D pore network). Results show how trophic dependencies and cell-level interactions within patchy diffusion fields promote spatial self-organization of motile microbial cells. The spontaneously forming patterns of segregated, yet coexisting species were robust to spatial heterogeneities and to temporal perturbations (hydration dynamics), and respond primarily to the type of trophic dependencies. Such spatially self-organized consortia may reflect ecological templates that optimize substrate utilization and could form the basic architecture for more permanent surface-attached microbial colonies. Hydration dynamics affect structure and spatial arrangement of aerobic and anaerobic microbial communities and their biogeochemical functions. Experiments with well-characterized artificial soil microbial assemblies grown on porous surfaces provide access to community dynamics during wetting and drying cycles detected through genetic fingerprinting. Experiments for visual observations of spatial associations of tagged bacterial species with known trophic dependencies on model porous surfaces are underway. Biophysical modeling provide a means for predicting hydration-mediated critical separation distances for activation of spatial self-organization. The study provides new modeling and observational tools

  18. Loss of HCN1 enhances disease progression in mouse models of CNG channel-linked retinitis pigmentosa and achromatopsia.

    PubMed

    Schön, Christian; Asteriti, Sabrina; Koch, Susanne; Sothilingam, Vithiyanjali; Garcia Garrido, Marina; Tanimoto, Naoyuki; Herms, Jochen; Seeliger, Mathias W; Cangiano, Lorenzo; Biel, Martin; Michalakis, Stylianos

    2016-03-15

    Most inherited blinding diseases are characterized by compromised retinal function and progressive degeneration of photoreceptors. However, the factors that affect the life span of photoreceptors in such degenerative retinal diseases are rather poorly understood. Here, we explore the role of hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated channel 1 (HCN1) in this context. HCN1 is known to adjust retinal function under mesopic conditions, and although it is expressed at high levels in rod and cone photoreceptor inner segments, no association with any retinal disorder has yet been found. We investigated the effects of an additional genetic deletion of HCN1 on the function and survival of photoreceptors in a mouse model of CNGB1-linked retinitis pigmentosa (RP). We found that the absence of HCN1 in Cngb1 knockout (KO) mice exacerbated photoreceptor degeneration. The deleterious effect was reduced by expression of HCN1 using a viral vector. Moreover, pharmacological inhibition of HCN1 also enhanced rod degeneration in Cngb1 KO mice. Patch-clamp recordings revealed that the membrane potentials of Cngb1 KO and Cngb1/Hcn1 double-KO rods were both significantly depolarized. We also found evidence for altered calcium homeostasis and increased activation of the protease calpain in Cngb1/Hcn1 double-KO mice. Finally, the deletion of HCN1 also exacerbated degeneration of cone photoreceptors in a mouse model of CNGA3-linked achromatopsia. Our results identify HCN1 as a major modifier of photoreceptor degeneration and suggest that pharmacological inhibition of HCN channels may enhance disease progression in RP and achromatopsia patients.

  19. Modeling Prairie Pothole Lakes: Linking Satellite Observation and Calibration (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, F. W.; Liu, G.; Zhang, B.; Yu, Z.

    2009-12-01

    This paper examines the response of a complex lake wetland system to variations in climate. The focus is on the lakes and wetlands of the Missouri Coteau, which is part of the larger Prairie Pothole Region of the Central Plains of North America. Information on lake size was enumerated from satellite images, and yielded power law relationships for different hydrological conditions. More traditional lake-stage data were made available to us from the USGS Cottonwood Lake Study Site in North Dakota. A Probabilistic Hydrologic Model (PHM) was developed to simulate lake complexes comprised of tens-of-thousands or more individual closed-basin lakes and wetlands. What is new about this model is a calibration scheme that utilizes remotely-sensed data on lake area as well as stage data for individual lakes. Some ¼ million individual data points are used within a Genetic Algorithm to calibrate the model by comparing the simulated results with observed lake area-frequency power law relationships derived from Landsat images and water depths from seven individual lakes and wetlands. The simulated lake behaviors show good agreement with the observations under average, dry, and wet climatic conditions. The calibrated model is used to examine the impact of climate variability on a large lake complex in ND, in particular, the “Dust Bowl Drought” 1930s. This most famous drought of the 20th Century devastated the agricultural economy of the Great Plains with health and social impacts lingering for years afterwards. Interestingly, the drought of 1930s is unremarkable in relation to others of greater intensity and frequency before AD 1200 in the Great Plains. Major droughts and deluges have the ability to create marked variability of the power law function (e.g. up to one and a half orders of magnitude variability from the extreme Dust Bowl Drought to the extreme 1993-2001 deluge). This new probabilistic modeling approach provides a novel tool to examine the response of the

  20. LINKING THE CMAQ AND HYSPLIT MODELING SYSTEM INTERFACE PROGRAM AND EXAMPLE APPLICATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A new software tool has been developed to link the Eulerian-based Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeling system with the Lagrangian-based HYSPLIT (HYbrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory) model. Both models require many of the same hourly meteorological...

  1. A Dual-Process Model of the Alcohol-Behavior Link for Social Drinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moss, Antony C.; Albery, Ian P.

    2009-01-01

    A dual-process model of the alcohol-behavior link is presented, synthesizing 2 of the major social-cognitive approaches: expectancy and myopia theories. Substantial evidence has accrued to support both of these models, and recent neurocognitive models of the effects of alcohol on thought and behavior have provided evidence to support both as well.…

  2. Linking seasonal climate forecasts with crop models in Iberian Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capa, Mirian; Ines, Amor; Baethgen, Walter; Rodriguez-Fonseca, Belen; Han, Eunjin; Ruiz-Ramos, Margarita

    2015-04-01

    Translating seasonal climate forecasts into agricultural production forecasts could help to establish early warning systems and to design crop management adaptation strategies that take advantage of favorable conditions or reduce the effect of adverse conditions. In this study, we use seasonal rainfall forecasts and crop models to improve predictability of wheat yield in the Iberian Peninsula (IP). Additionally, we estimate economic margins and production risks associated with extreme scenarios of seasonal rainfall forecast. This study evaluates two methods for disaggregating seasonal climate forecasts into daily weather data: 1) a stochastic weather generator (CondWG), and 2) a forecast tercile resampler (FResampler). Both methods were used to generate 100 (with FResampler) and 110 (with CondWG) weather series/sequences for three scenarios of seasonal rainfall forecasts. Simulated wheat yield is computed with the crop model CERES-wheat (Ritchie and Otter, 1985), which is included in Decision Support System for Agrotechnology Transfer (DSSAT v.4.5, Hoogenboom et al., 2010). Simulations were run at two locations in northeastern Spain where the crop model was calibrated and validated with independent field data. Once simulated yields were obtained, an assessment of farmer's gross margin for different seasonal climate forecasts was accomplished to estimate production risks under different climate scenarios. This methodology allows farmers to assess the benefits and risks of a seasonal weather forecast in IP prior to the crop growing season. The results of this study may have important implications on both, public (agricultural planning) and private (decision support to farmers, insurance companies) sectors. Acknowledgements Research by M. Capa-Morocho has been partly supported by a PICATA predoctoral fellowship of the Moncloa Campus of International Excellence (UCM-UPM) and MULCLIVAR project (CGL2012-38923-C02-02) References Hoogenboom, G. et al., 2010. The Decision

  3. Model analysis of the link between interest rates and crashes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broga, Kristijonas M.; Viegas, Eduardo; Jensen, Henrik Jeldtoft

    2016-09-01

    We analyse the effect of distinct levels of interest rates on the stability of the financial network under our modelling framework. We demonstrate that banking failures are likely to emerge early on under sustained high interest rates, and at much later stage-with higher probability-under a sustained low interest rate scenario. Moreover, we demonstrate that those bank failures are of a different nature: high interest rates tend to result in significantly more bankruptcies associated to credit losses whereas lack of liquidity tends to be the primary cause of failures under lower rates.

  4. Atempts to link Quanta & Atoms before the Bohr Atom model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkatesan, A.; Lieber, M.

    2005-03-01

    Attempts to quantize atomic phenomena before Bohr are hardly ever mentioned in elementary textbooks.This presentation will elucidate the contributions of A.Haas around 1910. Haas tried to quantize the Thomson atom model as an optical resonator made of positive and negative charges. The inherent ambiguity of charge distribution in the model made him choose a positive spherical distribution around which the electrons were distributed.He obtained expressions for the Rydberg constant and what is known today as the Bohr radius by balancing centrifugal energy with Coulomb energy and quantizing it with Planck's relation E=hν. We point out that Haas would have arrived at better estimates of these constants had he used the virial theorem apart from the fact that the fundamental constants were not well known. The crux of Haas's physical picture was to derive Planck's constant h from charge quantum e , mass of electron m and atomic radius. Haas faced severe criticism for applying thermodynamic concepts like Planck distribution to microscopic phenomena. We will try to give a flavor for how quantum phenomena were viewed at that time. It is of interest to note that the driving force behind Haas's work was to present a paper that would secure him a position as a Privatdozent in History of Physics. We end with comments by Bohr and Sommerfeld on Haas's work and with some brief biographical remarks.

  5. Study of Viral Vectors in a Three-dimensional Liver Model Repopulated with the Human Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cell Line HepG2

    PubMed Central

    Hiller, Thomas; Röhrs, Viola; Dehne, Eva-Maria; Wagner, Anke; Fechner, Henry; Lauster, Roland; Kurreck, Jens

    2016-01-01

    This protocol describes the generation of a three-dimensional (3D) ex vivo liver model and its application to the study and development of viral vector systems. The model is obtained by repopulating the extracellular matrix of a decellularized rat liver with a human hepatocyte cell line. The model permits studies in a vascularized 3D cell system, replacing potentially harmful experiments with living animals. Another advantage is the humanized nature of the model, which is closer to human physiology than animal models. In this study, we demonstrate the transduction of this liver model with a viral vector derived from adeno-associated viruses (AAV vector). The perfusion circuit that supplies the 3D liver model with media provides an easy means to apply the vector. The system permits monitoring of the major metabolic parameters of the liver. For final analysis, tissue samples can be taken to determine the extent of recellularization by histological techniques. Distribution of the virus vector and expression of the delivered transgene can be analyzed by quantitative PCR (qPCR), Western blotting and immunohistochemistry. Numerous applications of the vector model in basic research and in the development of gene therapeutic applications can be envisioned, including the development of novel antiviral therapeutics, cancer research, and the study of viral vectors and their potential side effects. PMID:27805597

  6. Functional regulation of PVBV Nuclear Inclusion protein-a protease activity upon interaction with Viral Protein genome-linked and phosphorylation

    SciTech Connect

    Mathur, C.; Jimsheena, V.K.; Banerjee, S.; Makinen, K.; Gowda, L.R.; Savithri, H.S.

    2012-01-20

    Regulation of NIa-Pro is crucial for polyprotein processing and hence, for successful infection of potyviruses. We have examined two novel mechanisms that could regulate NIa-Pro activity. Firstly, the influence of VPg domain on the proteolytic activity of NIa-Pro was investigated. It was shown that the turnover number of the protease increases when these two domains interact (cis: two-fold; trans: seven-fold) with each other. Secondly, the protease activity of NIa-Pro could also be modulated by phosphorylation at Ser129. A mutation of this residue either to aspartate (phosphorylation-mimic) or alanine (phosphorylation-deficient) drastically reduces the protease activity. Based on these observations and molecular modeling studies, we propose that interaction with VPg as well as phosphorylation of Ser129 could relay a signal through Trp143 present at the protein surface to the active site pocket by subtle conformational changes, thus modulating protease activity of NIa-Pro.

  7. Horizontal gene transfer in eukaryotes: The weak-link model

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jinling

    2013-01-01

    The significance of horizontal gene transfer (HGT) in eukaryotic evolution remains controversial. Although many eukaryotic genes are of bacterial origin, they are often interpreted as being derived from mitochondria or plastids. Because of their fixed gene pool and gene loss, however, mitochondria and plastids alone cannot adequately explain the presence of all, or even the majority, of bacterial genes in eukaryotes. Available data indicate that no insurmountable barrier to HGT exists, even in complex multicellular eukaryotes. In addition, the discovery of both recent and ancient HGT events in all major eukaryotic groups suggests that HGT has been a regular occurrence throughout the history of eukaryotic evolution. A model of HGT is proposed that suggests both unicellular and early developmental stages as likely entry points for foreign genes into multicellular eukaryotes. PMID:24037739

  8. Horizontal gene transfer in eukaryotes: the weak-link model.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jinling

    2013-10-01

    The significance of horizontal gene transfer (HGT) in eukaryotic evolution remains controversial. Although many eukaryotic genes are of bacterial origin, they are often interpreted as being derived from mitochondria or plastids. Because of their fixed gene pool and gene loss, however, mitochondria and plastids alone cannot adequately explain the presence of all, or even the majority, of bacterial genes in eukaryotes. Available data indicate that no insurmountable barrier to HGT exists, even in complex multicellular eukaryotes. In addition, the discovery of both recent and ancient HGT events in all major eukaryotic groups suggests that HGT has been a regular occurrence throughout the history of eukaryotic evolution. A model of HGT is proposed that suggests both unicellular and early developmental stages as likely entry points for foreign genes into multicellular eukaryotes.

  9. Resistance to oncolytic myxoma virus therapy in nf1(-/-)/trp53(-/-) syngeneic mouse glioma models is independent of anti-viral type-I interferon.

    PubMed

    Zemp, Franz J; McKenzie, Brienne A; Lun, Xueqing; Maxwell, Lori; Reilly, Karlyne M; McFadden, Grant; Yong, V Wee; Forsyth, Peter A

    2013-01-01

    Despite promising preclinical studies, oncolytic viral therapy for malignant gliomas has resulted in variable, but underwhelming results in clinical evaluations. Of concern are the low levels of tumour infection and viral replication within the tumour. This discrepancy between the laboratory and the clinic could result from the disparity of xenograft versus syngeneic models in determining in vivo viral infection, replication and treatment efficacy. Here we describe a panel of primary mouse glioma lines derived from Nf1 (+/-) Trp53 (+/-) mice in the C57Bl/6J background for use in the preclinical testing of the oncolytic virus Myxoma (MYXV). These lines show a range of susceptibility to MYXV replication in vitro, but all succumb to viral-mediated cell death. Two of these lines orthotopically grafted produced aggressive gliomas. Intracranial injection of MYXV failed to result in sustained viral replication or treatment efficacy, with minimal tumour infection that was completely resolved by 7 days post-infection. We hypothesized that the stromal production of Type-I interferons (IFNα/β) could explain the resistance seen in these models; however, we found that neither the cell lines in vitro nor the tumours in vivo produce any IFNα/β in response to MYXV infection. To confirm IFNα/β did not play a role in this resistance, we ablated the ability of tumours to respond to IFNα/β via IRF9 knockdown, and generated identical results. Our studies demonstrate that these syngeneic cell lines are relevant preclinical models for testing experimental glioma treatments, and show that IFNα/β is not responsible for the MYXV treatment resistance seen in syngeneic glioma models.

  10. Bicistronic Lentiviruses Containing a Viral 2A Cleavage Sequence Reliably Co-Express Two Proteins and Restore Vision to an Animal Model of LCA1

    PubMed Central

    Verrier, Jonathan D.; Madorsky, Irina; Coggin, William E.; Geesey, Mero; Hochman, Michael; Walling, Elleanor; Daroszewski, Daniel; Eccles, Kristofer S.; Ludlow, Rachel; Semple-Rowland, Susan L.

    2011-01-01

    The disease processes underlying inherited retinal disease are complex and are not completely understood. Many of the corrective gene therapies designed to treat diseases linked to mutations in genes specifically expressed in photoreceptor cells restore function to these cells but fail to stop progression of the disease. There is growing consensus that effective treatments for these diseases will require delivery of multiple therapeutic proteins that will be selected to treat specific aspects of the disease process. The purpose of this study was to design a lentiviral transgene that reliably expresses all of the proteins it encodes and does so in a consistent manner among infected cells. We show, using both in vitro and in vivo analyses, that bicistronic lentiviral transgenes encoding two fluorescent proteins fused to a viral 2A-like cleavage peptide meet these expression criteria. To determine if this transgene design is suitable for therapeutic applications, we replaced one of the fluorescent protein genes with the gene encoding guanylate cyclase -1 (GC1) and delivered lentivirus carrying this transgene to the retinas of the GUCY1*B avian model of Leber congenital amaurosis – 1 (LCA1). GUCY1*B chickens carry a null mutation in the GC1 gene that disrupts photoreceptor function and causes blindness at hatching, a phenotype that closely matches that observed in humans with LCA1. We found that treatment of these animals with the 2A lentivector encoding GC1 restored vision to these animals as evidenced by the presence of optokinetic reflexes. We conclude that 2A-like peptides, with proper optimization, can be successfully incorporated into therapeutic vectors designed to deliver multiple proteins to neural retinal. These results highlight the potential of this vector design to serve as a platform for the development of combination therapies designed to enhance or prolong the benefits of corrective gene therapies. PMID:21647387

  11. Linking Air Quality and Watershed Models for Environmental Assessments: Analysis of the Effects of Model-Specific Precipitation Estimates on Calculated Water Flux

    EPA Science Inventory

    Directly linking air quality and watershed models could provide an effective method for estimating spatially-explicit inputs of atmospheric contaminants to watershed biogeochemical models. However, to adequately link air and watershed models for wet deposition estimates, each mod...

  12. Modeling Shrimp Biomass and Viral Infection for Production of Biological Countermeasures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-12-09

    Mariculture Center in Bluffton, SC. We use regres- sion analysis to fit linear, cubic and exponential growth rate models to this data. In Section 3 we...out runs in a super-intensively stocked demonstration commercial scale raceway production system [7] at the Waddell Mariculture Center. Growth data is...fitting we have shown that data for normal growth of shrimp 28 obtained from the Waddell Mariculture center could be fairly approximated with linear

  13. Adeno-associated viral vector serotype 5 poorly transduces liver in rat models.

    PubMed

    Montenegro-Miranda, Paula S; Pañeda, Astrid; ten Bloemendaal, Lysbeth; Duijst, Suzanne; de Waart, Dirk R; Gonzalez- Aseguinolaza, Gloria; Aseguinolaza, Gloria Gonzalez; Bosma, Piter J

    2013-01-01

    Preclinical studies in mice and non-human primates showed that AAV serotype 5 provides efficient liver transduction and as such seems a promising vector for liver directed gene therapy. An advantage of AAV5 compared to serotype 8 already shown to provide efficient correction in a phase 1 trial in patients suffering from hemophilia B, is its lower seroprevalence in the general population. Our goal is liver directed gene therapy for Crigler-Najjar syndrome type I, inherited severe unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia caused by UGT1A1 deficiency. In a relevant animal model, the Gunn rat, we compared the efficacy of AAV 5 and 8 to that of AAV1 previously shown to be effective. Ferrying a construct driving hepatocyte specific expression of UGT1A1, both AAV8 and AAV1 provided an efficient correction of hyperbilirubinemia. In contrast to these two and to other animal models AAV5 failed to provide any correction. To clarify whether this unexpected finding was due to the rat model used or due to a problem with AAV5, the efficacy of this serotype was compared in a mouse and two additional rat strains. Administration of an AAV5 vector expressing luciferase under the control of a liver specific promoter confirmed that this serotype poorly performed in rat liver, rendering it not suitable for proof of concept studies in this species.

  14. Modelling soil nitrogen: the MAGIC model with nitrogen retention linked to carbon turnover using decomposer dynamics.

    PubMed

    Oulehle, F; Cosby, B J; Wright, R F; Hruška, J; Kopáček, J; Krám, P; Evans, C D; Moldan, F

    2012-06-01

    We present a new formulation of the acidification model MAGIC that uses decomposer dynamics to link nitrogen (N) cycling to carbon (C) turnover in soils. The new model is evaluated by application to 15-30 years of water chemistry data at three coniferous-forested sites in the Czech Republic where deposition of sulphur (S) and N have decreased by >80% and 40%, respectively. Sulphate concentrations in waters have declined commensurately with S deposition, but nitrate concentrations have shown much larger decreases relative to N deposition. This behaviour is inconsistent with most conceptual models of N saturation, and with earlier versions of MAGIC which assume N retention to be a first-order function of N deposition and/or controlled by the soil C/N ratio. In comparison with earlier versions, the new formulation more correctly simulates observed short-term changes in nitrate leaching, as well as long-term retention of N in soils. The model suggests that, despite recent deposition reductions and recovery, progressive N saturation will lead to increased future nitrate leaching, ecosystem eutrophication and re-acidification.

  15. New world primates as a model of viral-induced astrocytomas.

    PubMed

    Houff, S A; London, W T; Zu Rhein, G M; Padgett, B L; Walker, D L; Sever, J L

    1983-01-01

    Owl and squirrel monkeys are susceptible to the oncogenic effects of JCV. These species of New World monkeys can be safely inoculated intracerebrally. Care must be taken with owl monkeys since they have an inherited clotting abnormality. Incubation times for the development of tumors range from 14 to 30 months. Anorexia was the first clinical sign of tumor development. The clinical course is rapid with death within two to three days. This model provides a means for studying diagnostic, virological, immunological and therapeutic techniques which are applicable to human patients with astrocytomas.

  16. A methodology for linking 2D overland flow models with the sewer network model SWMM 5.1 based on dynamic link libraries.

    PubMed

    Leandro, Jorge; Martins, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    Pluvial flooding in urban areas is characterized by a gradually varying inundation process caused by surcharge of the sewer manholes. Therefore urban flood models need to simulate the interaction between the sewer network and the overland flow in order to accurately predict the flood inundation extents. In this work we present a methodology for linking 2D overland flow models with the storm sewer model SWMM 5. SWMM 5 is a well-known free open-source code originally developed in 1971. The latest major release saw its structure re-written in C ++ allowing it to be compiled as a command line executable or through a series of calls made to function inside a dynamic link library (DLL). The methodology developed herein is written inside the same DLL in C + +, and is able to simulate the bi-directional interaction between both models during simulation. Validation is done in a real case study with an existing urban flood coupled model. The novelty herein is that the new methodology can be added to SWMM without the need for editing SWMM's original code. Furthermore, it is directly applicable to other coupled overland flow models aiming to use SWMM 5 as the sewer network model.

  17. A mouse model to study infection against porcine circovirus type 2: viral distribution and lesions in mouse

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Little information is known about viral distribution and transmission of porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) in species other than swine. It is still a debated topic whether the PCV2 could be infected and caused clinical lesions. Our study is aimed to estimate the susceptibility of Kunming mouse to PCV2. Forty-eight, 6-week-old Kunming mice were randomly divided into four groups. Group A (C1-C12) was inoculated with PK-15 cell culture as a control group. Group B (sPCV1-12) was inoculated orally and intramuscularly with PCV2 (106.2TCID50/ml). Group C (mPCV1-12) was inoculated orally and intramuscularly with PCV2 (106.2TCID50/ml) and a booster inoculation at days 14 and 28 after the first inoculation. Group D (MixPCV1-12) was unvaccinated but released into Group C. Each group was sacrificed at 7, 14, 28, and 42 days post-inoculation, respectively. Necropsy was checked on every mouse. Sera samples were collected for the test of PCV2 specific antibody. Tissues were collected for histopathology study and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Results The results showed that viral replication, seroconversion, and microscopic lesions were found in inoculated mice. Continuous existence of PCV2 viruses in lymph nodes have been confirmed by PCR, which took at least seven days for the virus to be transferred into other organs from the primary interface, and the diffusion to thymus had been retarded for seven days. Special PCV2 antibody could be found in PCV2 inoculation mice and was significantly higher than that in the control. Further more, microscopic lesions and the main target of PCV2 focused in the lymph nodes with a characteristic depletion and occasional necrosis of lymphocytes in the cortex and paracortex were found in inoculated mice. Conclusions The Kunming mouse could be infected by PCV2 virus and used as a PCV2 infected experimental model. PMID:20630105

  18. The tree shrews: useful animal models for the viral hepatitis and hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yang, Er-Bin; Cao, Ji; Su, Jian-Jia; Chow, Pierce

    2005-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV)-induced hepatitis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) are major diseases worldwide. HBV infection and chemical carcinogens such as aflatoxin B1 are known to be two key factors in the development of HCC. Animal models for hepatitis and HCC are very useful in the in vivo studies of mechanism involved in the development and prevention of these diseases and the pre-clinical research of drugs for the treatment of these diseases. Now, several animals, such as woodchucks, ground squirrels, chimpanzees, ducks and tree shrews, have been used to establish hepatitis and HCC models. HCC occurs in some woodchucks and ground squirrels that are infected with their own hepatitis viruses and exposed to carcinogens. Chimpanzees and ducks can be infected with human and duck hepatitis B viruses, respectively, but HCC is rarely observed in these animals. The tree shrews are non-rodent, small animals and close to primates in evolution. This review focuses on the establishment of human HBV-induced hepatitis and human HBV-associated HCC in tree shrews and their applications in the study of HCC development.

  19. Simultaneous reconstruction of evolutionary history and epidemiological dynamics from viral sequences with the birth-death SIR model.

    PubMed

    Kühnert, Denise; Stadler, Tanja; Vaughan, Timothy G; Drummond, Alexei J

    2014-05-06

    The evolution of RNA viruses, such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis C virus and influenza virus, occurs so rapidly that the viruses' genomes contain information on past ecological dynamics. Hence, we develop a phylodynamic method that enables the joint estimation of epidemiological parameters and phylogenetic history. Based on a compartmental susceptible-infected-removed (SIR) model, this method provides separate information on incidence and prevalence of infections. Detailed information on the interaction of host population dynamics and evolutionary history can inform decisions on how to contain or entirely avoid disease outbreaks. We apply our birth-death SIR method to two viral datasets. First, five HIV type 1 clusters sampled in the UK between 1999 and 2003 are analysed. The estimated basic reproduction ratios range from 1.9 to 3.2 among the clusters. All clusters show a decline in the growth rate of the local epidemic in the middle or end of the 1990s. The analysis of a hepatitis C virus genotype 2c dataset shows that the local epidemic in the Córdoban city Cruz del Eje originated around 1906 (median), coinciding with an immigration wave from Europe to central Argentina that dates from 1880 to 1920. The estimated time of epidemic peak is around 1970.

  20. Porous Hyaluronic Acid Hydrogels for Localized Non-Viral DNA Delivery in a Diabetic Wound Healing Model

    PubMed Central

    Tokatlian, Talar; Cam, Cynthia; Segura, Tatiana

    2015-01-01

    The treatment of impaired wounds requires the use of biomaterials that can provide mechanical and biological queues to the surrounding environment to promote angiogenesis, granulation tissue formation, and wound closure. Porous hydrogels have previously been shown to promote angiogenesis even in the absence of pro-angiogenic factors. We hypothesized that the added delivery of non-viral DNA encoding for pro-angiogenic growth factors could further enhance this effect. Here, 100 and 60 μm porous and non-porous (n-pore) hyaluronic acid-MMP hydrogels with encapsulated reporter (pGFPluc) or pro-angiogenic (pVEGF) plasmids were used to investigate scaffold-mediated gene delivery for local gene therapy in a diabetic wound healing mouse model. Porous hydrogels allowed for significantly faster wound closure compared to n-pore hydrogels, which did not degrade and essentially provided a mechanical barrier to closure. Interestingly, the delivery of pDNA/PEI polyplexes positively promoted granulation tissue formation even when the DNA did not encode for an angiogenic protein. And although transfected cells were present throughout the granulation tissue surrounding all hydrogels at 2 weeks, pVEGF delivery did not further enhance the angiogenic response. Despite this, the presence of transfected cells shows promise for the use of polyplex-loaded porous hydrogels for local gene delivery in the treatment of diabetic wounds. PMID:25694196

  1. Viral Gastroenteritis (Stomach Flu)

    MedlinePlus

    Diseases and Conditions Viral gastroenteritis (stomach flu) By Mayo Clinic Staff Viral gastroenteritis is an intestinal infection marked by watery diarrhea, abdominal cramps, nausea or vomiting, and ...

  2. Frequent Zika Virus Sexual Transmission and Prolonged Viral RNA Shedding in an Immunodeficient Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Duggal, Nisha K; Ritter, Jana M; Pestorius, Samuel E; Zaki, Sherif R; Davis, Brent S; Chang, Gwong-Jen J; Bowen, Richard A; Brault, Aaron C

    2017-02-14

    Circulation of Zika virus (ZIKV) was first identified in the Western hemisphere in late 2014. Primarily transmitted through mosquito bite, ZIKV can also be transmitted through sex and from mother to fetus, and maternal ZIKV infection has been associated with fetal malformations. We assessed immunodeficient AG129 mice for their capacity to shed ZIKV in semen and to infect female mice via sexual transmission. Infectious virus was detected in semen between 7 and 21 days post-inoculation, and ZIKV RNA was detected in semen through 58 days post-inoculation. During mating, 73% of infected males transmitted ZIKV to uninfected females, and 50% of females became infected, with evidence of fetal infection in resulting pregnancies. Semen from vasectomized mice contained significantly lower levels of infectious virus, though sexual transmission still occurred. This model provides a platform for studying the kinetics of ZIKV sexual transmission and prolonged RNA shedding also observed in human semen.

  3. Maporal viral infection in the Syrian golden hamster: a model of hantavirus pulmonary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Milazzo, Mary Louise; Eyzaguirre, Eduardo J; Molina, Claudia P; Fulhorst, Charles F

    2002-11-15

    Hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS) is a severe and often fatal rodent-borne zoonosis. Maporal (MAP) virus is a newly discovered hantavirus that originally was isolated from an arboreal rice rat captured in central Venezuela. The results of this study indicate that MAP virus in the Syrian golden hamster (Mesocricetus auratus) can cause a disease that is clinically and pathologically remarkably similar to HPS. The similarities include the time course of clinical disease, presence of virus-specific IgG at the onset of clinical disease, subacute pneumonitis, rapid onset of diffuse alveolar edema in the absence of necrosis, hepatic-portal triaditis, mononuclear-cellular infiltrate in lung and liver, widespread distribution of hantaviral antigen in endothelial cells of the microvasculature of lung and other tissues, and variable lethality. These similarities suggest that the MAP virus-hamster system is a useful model for studies of the pathogenesis of HPS and for the evaluation of potential therapeutic agents.

  4. Breaking a virus: Identifying molecular level failure modes of a viral capsid by multiscale modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnamani, V.; Globisch, C.; Peter, C.; Deserno, M.

    2016-10-01

    We use coarse-grained (CG) simulations to study the deformation of empty Cowpea Chlorotic Mottle Virus (CCMV) capsids under uniaxial compression, from the initial elastic response up to capsid breakage. Our CG model is based on the MARTINI force field and has been amended by a stabilizing elastic network, acting only within individual proteins, that was tuned to capture the fluctuation spectrum of capsid protein dimers, obtained from all atom simulations. We have previously shown that this model predicts force-compression curves that match AFM indentation experiments on empty CCMV capsids. Here we investigate details of the actual breaking events when the CCMV capsid finally fails. We present a symmetry classification of all relevant protein contacts and show that they differ significantly in terms of stability. Specifically, we show that interfaces which break readily are precisely those which are believed to form last during assembly, even though some of them might share the same contacts as other non-breaking interfaces. In particular, the interfaces that form pentamers of dimers never break, while the virtually identical interfaces within hexamers of dimers readily do. Since these units differ in the large-scale geometry and, most noticeably, the cone-angle at the center of the 5- or 6-fold vertex, we propose that the hexameric unit fails because it is pre-stressed. This not only suggests that hexamers of dimers form less frequently during the early stages of assembly; it also offers a natural explanation for the well-known β-barrel motif at the hexameric center as a post-aggregation stabilization mechanism. Finally, we identify those amino acid contacts within all key protein interfaces that are most persistent during compressive deformation of the capsid, thereby providing potential targets for mutation studies aiming to elucidate the key contacts upon which overall stability rests.

  5. Mathematical model of viral kinetics in vitro estimates the number of E2-CD81 complexes necessary for hepatitis C virus entry.

    PubMed

    Padmanabhan, Pranesh; Dixit, Narendra M

    2011-12-01

    Interaction between the hepatitis C virus (HCV) envelope protein E2 and the host receptor CD81 is essential for HCV entry into target cells. The number of E2-CD81 complexes necessary for HCV entry has remained difficult to estimate experimentally. Using the recently developed cell culture systems that allow persistent HCV infection in vitro, the dependence of HCV entry and kinetics on CD81 expression has been measured. We reasoned that analysis of the latter experiments using a mathematical model of viral kinetics may yield estimates of the number of E2-CD81 complexes necessary for HCV entry. Here, we constructed a mathematical model of HCV viral kinetics in vitro, in which we accounted explicitly for the dependence of HCV entry on CD81 expression. Model predictions of viral kinetics are in quantitative agreement with experimental observations. Specifically, our model predicts triphasic viral kinetics in vitro, where the first phase is characterized by cell proliferation, the second by the infection of susceptible cells and the third by the growth of cells refractory to infection. By fitting model predictions to the above data, we were able to estimate the threshold number of E2-CD81 complexes necessary for HCV entry into human hepatoma-derived cells. We found that depending on the E2-CD81 binding affinity, between 1 and 13 E2-CD81 complexes are necessary for HCV entry. With this estimate, our model captured data from independent experiments that employed different HCV clones and cells with distinct CD81 expression levels, indicating that the estimate is robust. Our study thus quantifies the molecular requirements of HCV entry and suggests guidelines for intervention strategies that target the E2-CD81 interaction. Further, our model presents a framework for quantitative analyses of cell culture studies now extensively employed to investigate HCV infection.

  6. Computer modeling and analysis of thermal link performance for an optical refrigerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byram, Kevin; Mar, David; Parker, John; Von der Porten, Steven; Hankinson, John; Lee, Chris; Mayeda, Kai; Haskell, Richard C.; Yang, Qimin; Greenfield, Scott R.; Epstein, Richard I.

    2008-02-01

    We have used the thermal modeling tool in COMSOL Multiphysics to investigate factors that affect the thermal performance of the optical refrigerator. Assuming an ideal cooling element and a non-absorptive dielectric trapping mirror, the three dominant heating factors are blackbody radiation from the surrounding environment, conductive heat transfer through mechanical supports, and the absorption of fluoresced photons transmitted through the thermal link. Laboratory experimentation coupled with computer modeling using Code V optical software have resulted in link designs capable of reducing the transmission to 0.04% of the fluoresced photons emitted toward the thermal link. The ideal thermal link will have minimal surface area, provide complete optical isolation for the load, and possess high thermal conductivity. Modeling results imply that a 1cm 3 load can be chilled to 102 K with currently available cooling efficiencies using a 100 W pump laser on a YB:ZBLANP system, and using an ideal link that has minimal surface area and no optical transmission. We review the simulated steady-state cooling temperatures reached by the heat load for several link designs and system configurations as a comparative measure of how well particular configurations perform.

  7. A Simple Forecasting Model Linking Macroeconomic Policy to Industrial Employment Demand.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malley, James R.; Hady, Thomas F.

    A study detailed further a model linking monetary and fiscal policy to industrial employment in metropolitan and nonmetropolitan areas of four United States regions. The model was used to simulate the impacts on area and regional employment of three events in the economy: changing real gross national product (GNP) via monetary policy, holding the…

  8. An Extension of Least Squares Estimation of IRT Linking Coefficients for the Graded Response Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Seonghoon

    2010-01-01

    The three types (generalized, unweighted, and weighted) of least squares methods, proposed by Ogasawara, for estimating item response theory (IRT) linking coefficients under dichotomous models are extended to the graded response model. A simulation study was conducted to confirm the accuracy of the extended formulas, and a real data study was…

  9. Viral-mediated vision rescue of a novel AIPL1 cone-rod dystrophy model

    PubMed Central

    Ku, Cristy A.; Chiodo, Vince A.; Boye, Sanford L.; Hayes, Abigail; Goldberg, Andrew F.X.; Hauswirth, William W.; Ramamurthy, Visvanathan

    2015-01-01

    Defects in aryl hydrocarbon receptor interacting protein-like1 (AIPL1) are associated with blinding diseases with a wide range of severity in humans. We examined the mechanism behind autosomal dominant cone-rod dystrophy (adCORD) caused by 12 base pair (bp) deletion at proline 351 of hAIPL1 (P351Δ12) mutation in the primate-specific region of human AIPL1. Mutant P351Δ12 human isoform, aryl hydrocarbon receptor interacting protein-like 1 (hAIPL1) mice demonstrated a CORD phenotype with early defects in cone-mediated vision and subsequent photoreceptor degeneration. A dominant CORD phenotype was observed in double transgenic animals expressing both mutant P351Δ12 and normal hAIPL1, but not with co-expression of P351Δ12 hAIPL1 and the mouse isoform, aryl hydrocarbon receptor interacting protein-like 1 (mAipl1). Despite a dominant effect of the mutation, we successfully rescued cone-mediated vision in P351Δ12 hAIPL1 mice following high over-expression of WT hAIPL1 by adeno-associated virus-mediated gene delivery, which was stable up to 6 months after treatment. Our transgenic P351Δ12 hAIPL1 mouse offers a novel model of AIPL1-CORD, with distinct defects from both the Aipl1-null mouse mimicking LCA and the Aipl1-hypomorphic mice mimicking a slow progressing RP. PMID:25274777

  10. Viral gene transfer of APPsα rescues synaptic failure in an Alzheimer's disease mouse model.

    PubMed

    Fol, Romain; Braudeau, Jerome; Ludewig, Susann; Abel, Tobias; Weyer, Sascha W; Roederer, Jan-Peter; Brod, Florian; Audrain, Mickael; Bemelmans, Alexis-Pierre; Buchholz, Christian J; Korte, Martin; Cartier, Nathalie; Müller, Ulrike C

    2016-02-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by synaptic failure, dendritic and axonal atrophy, neuronal death and progressive loss of cognitive functions. It is commonly assumed that these deficits arise due to β-amyloid accumulation and plaque deposition. However, increasing evidence indicates that loss of physiological APP functions mediated predominantly by neurotrophic APPsα produced in the non-amyloidogenic α-secretase pathway may contribute to AD pathogenesis. Upregulation of APPsα production via induction of α-secretase might, however, be problematic as this may also affect substrates implicated in tumorigenesis. Here, we used a gene therapy approach to directly overexpress APPsα in the brain using AAV-mediated gene transfer and explored its potential to rescue structural, electrophysiological and behavioral deficits in APP/PS1∆E9 AD model mice. Sustained APPsα overexpression in aged mice with already preexisting pathology and amyloidosis restored synaptic plasticity and partially rescued spine density deficits. Importantly, AAV-APPsα treatment also resulted in a functional rescue of spatial reference memory in the Morris water maze. Moreover, we demonstrate a significant reduction of soluble Aβ species and plaque load. In addition, APPsα induced the recruitment of microglia with a ramified morphology into the vicinity of plaques and upregulated IDE and TREM2 expression suggesting enhanced plaque clearance. Collectively, these data indicate that APPsα can mitigate synaptic and cognitive deficits, despite established pathology. Increasing APPsα may therefore be of therapeutic relevance for AD.

  11. Conditions for Viral Influence Spreading through Multiplex Correlated Social Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yanqing; Havlin, Shlomo; Makse, Hernán A.

    2014-04-01

    A fundamental problem in network science is to predict how certain individuals are able to initiate new networks to spring up "new ideas." Frequently, these changes in trends are triggered by a few innovators who rapidly impose their ideas through "viral" influence spreading, producing cascades of followers and fragmenting an old network to create a new one. Typical examples include the rise of scientific ideas or abrupt changes in social media, like the rise of Facebook to the detriment of Myspace. How this process arises in practice has not been conclusively demonstrated. Here, we show that a condition for sustaining a viral spreading process is the existence of a multiplex-correlated graph with hidden "influence links." Analytical solutions predict percolation-phase transitions, either abrupt or continuous, where networks are disintegrated through viral cascades of followers, as in empirical data. Our modeling predicts the strict conditions to sustain a large viral spreading via a scaling form of the local correlation function between multilayers, which we also confirm empirically. Ultimately, the theory predicts the conditions for viral cascading in a large class of multiplex networks ranging from social to financial systems and markets.

  12. Protein modification during anti-viral heat-treatment bioprocessing of factor VIII concentrates, factor IX concentrates, and model proteins in the presence of sucrose.

    PubMed

    Smales, C Mark; Pepper, Duncan S; James, David C

    2002-01-05

    To ensure the optimal safety of plasma derived and new generation recombinant proteins, heat treatment is customarily applied in the manufacturing of such biopharmaceuticals as a means of viral inactivation. In subjecting proteins to anti-viral heat-treatment it is necessary to use high concentrations of thermostabilizing excipients to prevent protein damage, and it is therefore imperative that the correct balance between bioprocessing conditions, maintenance of protein integrity and virus kill is found. In this study we have utilized model proteins (lysozyme, fetuin, and human serum albumin) and plasma-derived therapeutic proteins (factor VIII and factor IX) to investigate the protein modifications that occur during anti-viral heat treatment. Specifically, we investigated the relationship between bioprocessing conditions and the type and extent of protein modification under a variety of industrially relevant wet and lyophilized heat treatments using sucrose as a thermostabilizing agent. Heat treatment led to the formation of disulfide crosslinks and aggregates in proteins containing free cysteine residues. Terminal oligosaccharide sialic acid residues were hydrolyzed from the glycan moieties of glycoproteins during anti-viral heat treatment. Heat treatment promoted sucrose hydrolysis to yield glucose and fructose, leading, in turn, to the glycation of lysine amino groups in those proteins containing di-lysine motifs. During extended hear treatments, 1,2-dicarbonyl type advanced glycation end-products were also formed. Glycation-type modifications were more prevalent in wet heat-treated protein formulations.

  13. Structural and functional neuroprotection in a rat model of Huntington's disease by viral gene transfer of GDNF.

    PubMed

    McBride, Jodi L; During, Matthew J; Wuu, Joanne; Chen, Er Yun; Leurgans, Sue E; Kordower, Jeffrey H

    2003-06-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an autosomal dominant disorder caused by an expanded polyglutamine (CAG) tract at the IT15 locus on chromosome 4. These excessive repeats lead to the degeneration of striatal and cortical neurons resulting in a devastating cognitive, psychiatric, and motor disorder for which no treatments are available. Neurotrophic factors support the viability of striatal neurons suggesting that they might prevent the inevitable neural degeneration and its accompanying functional decline associated with HD. The present study investigated whether glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) delivered by an adeno associated virus could provide structural and functional neuroprotection in a rat model of HD. Lewis rats received bilateral injections of either AAV-GDNF (n = 12) or AAV-green fluorescence protein (AAV-GFP, n = 12) into the striatum followed 2 weeks later by chronic subcutaneous infusions of the mitochondrial toxin, 3-nitropropionic acid (3-NP, 38 mg/kg). All rats underwent 4 weeks of behavioral testing and were then sacrificed. Following 3-NP, the performance by AAV-GFP-treated rats on a raised platform motor task deteriorated while the performance by AAV-GDNF-treated rats was near normal (P < 0.001). AAV-GDNF-treated rats also received better scores on a blinded semi-quantitative neurological scale compared to rats receiving AAV-GFP (P < 0.001). Histological analyses supported our behavioral findings. 3-NP-treated rats receiving AAV-GDNF displayed 70% more NeuN-immunoreactive neurons compared to 3-NP-treated rats receiving AAV-GFP (P = 0.002). Similar findings were seen with dopamine-and-adenosine-3'5'-monophosphate-regulated phosphoprotein (DARPP-32) staining. These data indicate that the viral-mediated gene transfer of GDNF into the striatum provides neuroanatomical and behavioral protection in a rodent model of HD.

  14. Pharmacophore modeling, resistant mutant isolation, docking, and MM-PBSA analysis: Combined experimental/computer-assisted approaches to identify new inhibitors of the bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV).

    PubMed

    Tonelli, Michele; Boido, Vito; La Colla, Paolo; Loddo, Roberta; Posocco, Paola; Paneni, Maria Silvia; Fermeglia, Maurizio; Pricl, Sabrina

    2010-03-15

    Starting from a series of our new 2-phenylbenzimidazole derivatives, shown to be selectively and potently active against the bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), we developed a hierarchical combined experimental/molecular modeling strategy to explore the drug leads for the BVDV RNA-dependent RNA-polymerase. Accordingly, a successful 3D pharmacophore model was developed, characterized by distinct chemical features that may be responsible for the activity of the inhibitors. BVDV mutants resistant to lead compounds in our series were then isolated, and the mutant residues on the viral molecular target, the RNA-dependent RNA-polymerase, were identified. Docking procedures upon pharmacophoric constraints and mutational data were carried out, and the binding affinity of all active compounds for the RdRp were estimated. Given the excellent agreement between in silico and in vitro data, this procedure is currently being employed in the design a new series of more selective and potent BVDV inhibitors.

  15. Selection and mutation in X-linked recessive diseases epidemiological model.

    PubMed

    Verrilli, Francesca; Kebriaei, Hamed; Glielmo, Luigi; Corless, Martin; Del Vecchio, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    To describe the epidemiology of X-linked recessive diseases we developed a discrete time, structured, non linear mathematical model. The model allows for de novo mutations (i.e. affected sibling born to unaffected parents) and selection (i.e., distinct fitness rates depending on individual's health conditions). Applying Lyapunov direct method we found the domain of attraction of model's equilibrium point and studied the convergence properties of the degenerate equilibrium where only affected individuals survive.

  16. Human viral cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Maisch, Bernhard; Ristic, Arsen D; Portig, Irene; Pankuweit, Sabine

    2003-01-01

    Viral infection of the heart is relatively common, usually asymptomatic and has a spontaneous and complete resolution. It can, however, in rare cases, lead to substantial cardiac damage, development of viral cardiomyopathy and congestive heart failure. Viral cardiomyopathy is defined as viral persistence in a dilated heart. It may be accompanied by myocardial inflammation and then termed inflammatory viral cardiomyopathy (or viral myocarditis with cardiomegaly). If no inflammation is observed in the biopsy of a dilated heart (<14 lymphocytes and macrophages/mm ) the term viral cardiomyopathy or viral persistence in dilated cardiomyopathy should be applied. The diagnosis of myocarditis and viral cardiomyopathy can be made only by endomyocardial biopsy, implementing the WHO/WHF criteria, and PCR techniques for identification of viral genome. The most frequent cardiotropic viruses detected by endomyocardial biopsy are Parvo B19, enteroviruses, adenoviruses, cytomegalovirus, and less frequently Epstein-Barr virus, and influenza virus.

  17. Discovering link communities in complex networks by an integer programming model and a genetic algorithm.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhenping; Zhang, Xiang-Sun; Wang, Rui-Sheng; Liu, Hongwei; Zhang, Shihua

    2013-01-01

    Identification of communities in complex networks is an important topic and issue in many fields such as sociology, biology, and computer science. Communities are often defined as groups of related nodes or links that correspond to functional subunits in the corresponding complex systems. While most conventional approaches have focused on discovering communities of nodes, some recent studies start partitioning links to find overlapping communities straightforwardly. In this paper, we propose a new quantity function for link community identification in complex networks. Based on this quantity function we formulate the link community partition problem into an integer programming model which allows us to partition a complex network into overlapping communities. We further propose a genetic algorithm for link community detection which can partition a network into overlapping communities without knowing the number of communities. We test our model and algorithm on both artificial networks and real-world networks. The results demonstrate that the model and algorithm are efficient in detecting overlapping community structure in complex networks.

  18. In vivo T2* weighted MRI visualizes cardiac lesions in murine models of acute and chronic viral myocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Helluy, Xavier; Sauter, Martina; Ye, Yu-Xiang; Lykowsky, Gunthard; Kreutner, Jakob; Yilmaz, Ali; Jahns, Roland; Boivin, Valerie; Kandolf, Reinhard; Jakob, Peter M.; Hiller, Karl-Heinz; Klingel, Karin

    2017-01-01

    Objective Acute and chronic forms of myocarditis are mainly induced by virus infections. As a consequence of myocardial damage and inflammation dilated cardiomyopathy and chronic heart failure may develop. The gold standard for the diagnosis of myocarditis is endomyocardial biopsies which are required to determine the etiopathogenesis of cardiac inflammatory processes. However, new non-invasive MRI techniques hold great potential in visualizing cardiac non-ischemic inflammatory lesions at high spatial resolution, which could improve the investigation of the pathophysiology of viral myocarditis. Results Here we present the discovery of a novel endogenous T2* MRI contrast of myocardial lesions in murine models of acute and chronic CVB3 myocarditis. The evaluation of infected hearts ex vivo and in vivo by 3D T2w and T2*w MRI allowed direct localization of virus-induced myocardial lesions without any MRI tracer or contrast agent. T2*w weighted MRI is able to detect both small cardiac lesions of acute myocarditis and larger necrotic areas at later stages of chronic myocarditis, which was confirmed by spatial correlation of MRI hypointensity in myocardium with myocardial lesions histologically. Additional in vivo and ex vivo MRI analysis proved that the contrast mechanism was due to a strong paramagnetic tissue alteration in the vicinity of myocardial lesions, effectively pointing towards iron deposits as the primary contributor of contrast. The evaluation of the biological origin of the MR contrast by specific histological staining and transmission electron microscopy revealed that impaired iron metabolism primarily in mitochondria caused iron deposits within necrotic myocytes, which induces strong magnetic susceptibility in myocardial lesions and results in strong T2* contrast. Conclusion This T2*w MRI technique provides a fast and sensitive diagnostic tool to determine the patterns and the severity of acute and chronic enteroviral myocarditis and the precise

  19. Solid Lipid Nanoparticles as Non-Viral Vectors for Gene Transfection in a Cell Model of Fabry Disease.

    PubMed

    Ruiz de Garibay, A P; Solinís, M A; del Pozo-Rodríguez, A; Apaolaza, P S; Shen, J S; Rodríguez-Gascón, A

    2015-03-01

    Here, we demonstrate the ability of solid lipid nanoparticle-based non-viral vectors to increase the α-galactosidase A levels of the IMFE1 cell line, an in vitro model for target cells in Fabry disease. For this purpose, vectors containing the pR-M10-αGal A plasmid, which encodes the α-galactosidase A enzyme, were prepared; the in vitro transfection efficacy was studied in IMFE1 cells, and the results were confirmed by RT-PCR. The cellular uptake of the vectors, intracellular disposition of the plasmid, and probable endocytosis pathways of the nanoparticles were also analyzed. The vectors used for the studies carried protamine (P-DNA-SLN), dextran and protamine (D-P-DNA-SLN), or hyaluronic acid of two different molecular weights and protamine (HA150-P-DNA-SLN or HA500-P-DNA-SLN). The new formulations, which presented a particle size in the range of nanometers (from 218 nm to 348 nm) and a positive superficial charge, were able to increase α-galactosidase A activity up to 4-fold in comparison to non treated IMFE1 cells. The most efficient vectors were those that included HA, and no differences due to changes in the molecular weight of HA were detected. The observed lack of colocalization with each of the four different Nile Red-labeled vectors and transferrin or cholera toxin appears to indicate that clathrin- and caveolae-independent pathways may be involved in their cellular uptake. Additionally, colocalization with LysoTracker indicated that the formulations were exposed to lysosomal activity, which may be responsible for the release of the plasmid from the vector. In conclusion, we reveal the potential of SLN-based vectors to efficiently transfect an immortalized Fabry patient cell line.

  20. Beyond Viral Neutralization.

    PubMed

    Lewis, George K; Pazgier, Marzena; Evans, David; Ferrari, Guido; Bournazos, Stylianos; Parsons, Matthew S; Bernard, Nicole F; Finzi, Andrés

    2017-01-13

    It has been known for more than 30 years that Human Immunodeficiency Virus 1 (HIV-1) infection drives a very potent B cell response resulting in the production of anti-HIV-1 antibodies targeting several viral proteins, particularly its envelope glycoproteins (Env). Env epitopes are exposed on the surfaces of viral particles and infected cells where they are targets of potentially protective antibodies. These antibodies can interdict infection by neutralization and there is strong evidence suggesting that Fc-mediated effector function can also contribute to protection. Current evidence suggests that Fc-mediated effector function plays a role in protection against infection by broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) and it might be important for protection by non-neutralizing antibodies. Fc-mediated effector function includes diverse mechanisms that include antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), antibody-mediated complement activation (ADC), antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP), antibody-dependent cell-mediated virus inhibition (ADCVI), antibody-mediated trancytosis inhibition, and antibody-mediated virus opsonization. All these functions could be beneficial in fighting viral infections including HIV-1. In this perspective, we discuss the latest developments for ADCC responses discussed at the HIVR4P satellite session on non-neutralizing antibodies, with emphasis on the mechanisms of ADCC resistance employed by HIV-1, the structural basis of epitopes recognized by antibodies that mediate ADCC, NK-cell education and ADCC, and murine models to study ADCC against HIV-1.

  1. Summary goodness-of-fit statistics for binary generalized linear models with noncanonical link functions.

    PubMed

    Canary, Jana D; Blizzard, Leigh; Barry, Ronald P; Hosmer, David W; Quinn, Stephen J

    2016-05-01

    Generalized linear models (GLM) with a canonical logit link function are the primary modeling technique used to relate a binary outcome to predictor variables. However, noncanonical links can offer more flexibility, producing convenient analytical quantities (e.g., probit GLMs in toxicology) and desired measures of effect (e.g., relative risk from log GLMs). Many summary goodness-of-fit (GOF) statistics exist for logistic GLM. Their properties make the development of GOF statistics relatively straightforward, but it can be more difficult under noncanonical links. Although GOF tests for logistic GLM with continuous covariates (GLMCC) have been applied to GLMCCs with log links, we know of no GOF tests in the literature specifically developed for GLMCCs that can be applied regardless of link function chosen. We generalize the Tsiatis GOF statistic originally developed for logistic GLMCCs, (TG), so that it can be applied under any link function. Further, we show that the algebraically related Hosmer-Lemeshow (HL) and Pigeon-Heyse (J(2) ) statistics can be applied directly. In a simulation study, TG, HL, and J(2) were used to evaluate the fit of probit, log-log, complementary log-log, and log models, all calculated with a common grouping method. The TG statistic consistently maintained Type I error rates, while those of HL and J(2) were often lower than expected if terms with little influence were included. Generally, the statistics had similar power to detect an incorrect model. An exception occurred when a log GLMCC was incorrectly fit to data generated from a logistic GLMCC. In this case, TG had more power than HL or J(2) .

  2. Synthesizing within-host and population-level selective pressures on viral populations: the impact of adaptive immunity on viral immune escape

    PubMed Central

    Volkov, Igor; Pepin, Kim M.; Lloyd-Smith, James O.; Banavar, Jayanth R.; Grenfell, Bryan T.

    2010-01-01

    The evolution of viruses to escape prevailing host immunity involves selection at multiple integrative scales, from within-host viral and immune kinetics to the host population level. In order to understand how viral immune escape occurs, we develop an analytical framework that links the dynamical nature of immunity and viral variation across these scales. Our epidemiological model incorporates within-host viral evolutionary dynamics for a virus that causes acute infections (e.g. influenza and norovirus) with changes in host immunity in response to genetic changes in the virus population. We use a deterministic description of the within-host replication dynamics of the virus, the pool of susceptible host cells and the host adaptive immune response. We find that viral immune escape is most effective at intermediate values of immune strength. At very low levels of immunity, selection is too weak to drive immune escape in recovered hosts, while very high levels of immunity impose such strong selection that viral subpopulations go extinct before acquiring enough genetic diversity to escape host immunity. This result echoes the predictions of simpler models, but our formulation allows us to dissect the combination of within-host and transmission-level processes that drive immune escape. PMID:20335194

  3. Exploring Alternative Characteristic Curve Approaches to Linking Parameter Estimates from the Generalized Partial Credit Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, James S.; Bao, Han; Huang, Chun-Wei; Gagne, Phill

    Characteristic curve approaches for linking parameters from the generalized partial credit model were examined for cases in which common (anchor) items are calibrated separately in two groups. Three of these approaches are simple extensions of the test characteristic curve (TCC), item characteristic curve (ICC), and operating characteristic curve…

  4. What Works Clearinghouse Quick Review: "A Model for Success: CART's Linked Learning Program Increases College Enrollment"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The study, "A Model for Success: CART's Linked Learning Program Increases College Enrollment" examined whether students who enrolled in courses at a high school that combined academics and technical education had higher college enrollment rates than students who did not. The research described in this report does not meet What Works…

  5. The Chain-Link Fence Model: A Framework for Creating Security Procedures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houghton, Robert F.

    2013-01-01

    A long standing problem in information technology security is how to help reduce the security footprint. Many specific proposals exist to address specific problems in information technology security. Most information technology solutions need to be repeatable throughout the course of an information systems lifecycle. The Chain-Link Fence Model is…

  6. Multiscale Modeling for Linking Growth, Microstructure, and Properties of Inorganic Microporous Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vlachos, Dion G.

    2002-01-01

    The focus of this presentation is on multiscale modeling in order to link processing, microstructure, and properties of materials. Overview of problems we study includes: Growth mechanisms in chemical and physical vapor epitaxy; thin films of zeolites for separation and sensing; thin Pd films for hydrogen separation and pattern formation by self-regulation routes.

  7. The Gender-Linked Language Effect: An Empirical Test of a General Process Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulac, Anthony; Giles, Howard; Bradac, James J.; Palomares, Nicholas A.

    2013-01-01

    The gender-linked language effect (GLLE) is a phenomenon in which transcripts of female communicators are rated higher on Socio-Intellectual Status and Aesthetic Quality and male communicators are rated higher on Dynamism. This study proposed and tested a new general process model explanation for the GLLE, a central mediating element of which…

  8. Bovine respiratory disease model based on dual infections with infection with bovine viral diarrhea virus and bovine corona virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bovine respiratory disease complex (BRDC) is the leading cause of economic loss in the U.S. cattle industry. BRDC likely results from simultaneous or sequential infections with multiple pathogens including both viruses and bacteria. Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) and bovine corona virus (BoCV...

  9. Cannabidiol provides long-lasting protection against the deleterious effects of inflammation in a viral model of multiple sclerosis: a role for A2A receptors.

    PubMed

    Mecha, M; Feliú, A; Iñigo, P M; Mestre, L; Carrillo-Salinas, F J; Guaza, C

    2013-11-01

    Inflammation in the central nervous system (CNS) is a complex process that involves a multitude of molecules and effectors, and it requires the transmigration of blood leukocytes across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and the activation of resident immune cells. Cannabidiol (CBD), a non-psychotropic cannabinoid constituent of Cannabis sativa, has potent anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive properties. Yet, how this compound modifies the deleterious effects of inflammation in TMEV-induced demyelinating disease (TMEV-IDD) remains unknown. Using this viral model of multiple sclerosis (MS), we demonstrate that CBD decreases the transmigration of blood leukocytes by downregulating the expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), chemokines (CCL2 and CCL5) and the proinflammatory cytokine IL-1β, as well as by attenuating the activation of microglia. Moreover, CBD administration at the time of viral infection exerts long-lasting effects, ameliorating motor deficits in the chronic phase of the disease in conjunction with reduced microglial activation and pro-inflammatory cytokine production. Adenosine A2A receptors participate in some of the anti-inflammatory effects of CBD, as the A2A antagonist ZM241385 partially blocks the protective effects of CBD in the initial stages of inflammation. Together, our findings highlight the anti-inflammatory effects of CBD in this viral model of MS and demonstrate the significant therapeutic potential of this compound for the treatment of pathologies with an inflammatory component.

  10. Model of Host-Pathogen Interaction Dynamics Links In Vivo Optical Imaging and Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Ale, Angelique; Crepin, Valerie F.; Collins, James W.; Constantinou, Nicholas; Habibzay, Maryam; Babtie, Ann C.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Tracking disease progression in vivo is essential for the development of treatments against bacterial infection. Optical imaging has become a central tool for in vivo tracking of bacterial population development and therapeutic response. For a precise understanding of in vivo imaging results in terms of disease mechanisms derived from detailed postmortem observations, however, a link between the two is needed. Here, we develop a model that provides that link for the investigation of Citrobacter rodentium infection, a mouse model for enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC). We connect in vivo disease progression of C57BL/6 mice infected with bioluminescent bacteria, imaged using optical tomography and X-ray computed tomography, to postmortem measurements of colonic immune cell infiltration. We use the model to explore changes to both the host immune response and the bacteria and to evaluate the response to antibiotic treatment. The developed model serves as a novel tool for the identification and development of new therapeutic interventions. PMID:27821583

  11. A Multi-Variant, Viral Dynamic Model of Genotype 1 HCV to Assess the in vivo Evolution of Protease-Inhibitor Resistant Variants

    PubMed Central

    Adiwijaya, Bambang S.; Herrmann, Eva; Hare, Brian; Kieffer, Tara; Lin, Chao; Kwong, Ann D.; Garg, Varun; Randle, John C. R.; Sarrazin, Christoph; Zeuzem, Stefan; Caron, Paul R.

    2010-01-01

    Variants resistant to compounds specifically targeting HCV are observed in clinical trials. A multi-variant viral dynamic model was developed to quantify the evolution and in vivo fitness of variants in subjects dosed with monotherapy of an HCV protease inhibitor, telaprevir. Variant fitness was estimated using a model in which variants were selected by competition for shared limited replication space. Fitness was represented in the absence of telaprevir by different variant production rate constants and in the presence of telaprevir by additional antiviral blockage by telaprevir. Model parameters, including rate constants for viral production, clearance, and effective telaprevir concentration, were estimated from 1) plasma HCV RNA levels of subjects before, during, and after dosing, 2) post-dosing prevalence of plasma variants from subjects, and 3) sensitivity of variants to telaprevir in the HCV replicon. The model provided a good fit to plasma HCV RNA levels observed both during and after telaprevir dosing, as well as to variant prevalence observed after telaprevir dosing. After an initial sharp decline in HCV RNA levels during dosing with telaprevir, HCV RNA levels increased in some subjects. The model predicted this increase to be caused by pre-existing variants with sufficient fitness to expand once available replication space increased due to rapid clearance of wild-type (WT) virus. The average replicative fitness estimates in the absence of telaprevir ranged from 1% to 68% of WT fitness. Compared to the relative fitness method, the in vivo estimates from the viral dynamic model corresponded more closely to in vitro replicon data, as well as to qualitative behaviors observed in both on-dosing and long-term post-dosing clinical data. The modeling fitness estimates were robust in sensitivity analyses in which the restoration dynamics of replication space and assumptions of HCV mutation rates were varied. PMID:20419154

  12. Linking Parameters Estimated with the Generalized Graded Unfolding Model: A Comparison of the Accuracy of Characteristic Curve Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson Koenig, Judith; Roberts, James S.

    2007-01-01

    Methods for linking item response theory (IRT) parameters are developed for attitude questionnaire responses calibrated with the generalized graded unfolding model (GGUM). One class of IRT linking methods derives the linking coefficients by comparing characteristic curves, and three of these methods---test characteristic curve (TCC), item…

  13. Dynamical modeling of serial manipulators with flexible links and joints using the method of kinematic influence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graves, Philip L.

    1989-01-01

    A method of formulating the dynamical equations of a flexible, serial manipulator is presented, using the Method of Kinematic Influence. The resulting equations account for rigid body motion, structural motion due to link and joint flexibilities, and the coupling between these two motions. Nonlinear inertial loads are included in the equations. A finite order mode summation method is used to model flexibilities. The structural data may be obtained from experimental, finite element, or analytical methods. Nonlinear flexibilities may be included in the model.

  14. High Bandwidth Communications Links Between Heterogeneous Autonomous Vehicles Using Sensor Network Modeling and Extremum Control Approaches

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-12-01

    two- fold. First, a communication propagation model was developed to predict the signal-to-noise ( SNR ) ratio of the communication link, which is used...as a reference SNR signal for the UAVs. Second, the communication model was then integrated into a feedback control loop to formulate a new real-time...loitering path using SNR as the cost function. 15. NUMBER OF PAGES 75 14. SUBJECT TERMS Unmanned Aerial Vehicle, UAV, Extremum Seeking

  15. Monogenic mouse models of autism spectrum disorders: Common mechanisms and missing links.

    PubMed

    Hulbert, S W; Jiang, Y-H

    2016-05-03

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) present unique challenges in the fields of genetics and neurobiology because of the clinical and molecular heterogeneity underlying these disorders. Genetic mutations found in ASD patients provide opportunities to dissect the molecular and circuit mechanisms underlying autistic behaviors using animal models. Ongoing studies of genetically modified models have offered critical insight into possible common mechanisms arising from different mutations, but links between molecular abnormalities and behavioral phenotypes remain elusive. The challenges encountered in modeling autism in mice demand a new analytic paradigm that integrates behavioral assessment with circuit-level analysis in genetically modified models with strong construct validity.

  16. A prosthesis-specific multi-link segment model of lower-limb amputee sprinting.

    PubMed

    Rigney, Stacey M; Simmons, Anne; Kark, Lauren

    2016-10-03

    Lower-limb amputees commonly utilize non-articulating energy storage and return (ESAR) prostheses for high impact activities such as sprinting. Despite these prostheses lacking an articulating ankle joint, amputee gait analysis conventionally features a two-link segment model of the prosthetic foot. This paper investigated the effects of the selected link segment model׳s marker-set and geometry on a unilateral amputee sprinter׳s calculated lower-limb kinematics, kinetics and energetics. A total of five lower-limb models of the Ottobock(®) 1E90 Sprinter were developed, including two conventional shank-foot models that each used a different version of the Plug-in-Gait (PiG) marker-set to test the effect of prosthesis ankle marker location. Two Hybrid prosthesis-specific models were then developed, also using the PiG marker-sets, with the anatomical shank and foot replaced by prosthesis-specific geometry separated into two segments. Finally, a Multi-link segment (MLS) model was developed, consisting of six segments for the prosthesis as defined by a custom marker-set. All full-body musculoskeletal models were tested using four trials of experimental marker trajectories within OpenSim 3.2 (Stanford, California, USA) to find the affected and unaffected hip, knee and ankle kinematics, kinetics and energetics. The geometry of the selected lower-limb prosthesis model was found to significantly affect all variables on the affected leg (p < 0.05), and the marker-set also significantly affected all variables on the affected leg, and none of the unaffected leg variables. The results indicate that the omission of prosthesis-specific spatial, inertial and elastic properties from full-body models significantly affects the calculated amputee gait characteristics, and we therefore recommend the implementation of a MLS model.

  17. Pex gene deletions in Gy and Hyp mice provide mouse models for X-linked hypophosphatemia.

    PubMed

    Strom, T M; Francis, F; Lorenz, B; Böddrich, A; Econs, M J; Lehrach, H; Meitinger, T

    1997-02-01

    X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets in humans is caused by mutations in the PEX gene which codes for a protein homologous to neutral endopeptidases. Hyp and Gy mice both have X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets, although genetic data and the different phenotypic spectra observed have previously suggested that two different genes are mutated. In addition to the metabolic disorder observed in Hyp mice, male Gy mice are sterile and show circling behavior and reduced viability. We now report the cloning of the mouse homolog of PEX which is highly conserved between man and mouse. The 3' end of this gene is deleted in Hyp mice. In Gy mice, the first three exons and the promotor region are deleted. Thus, Hyp and Gy are allelic mutations and both provide mouse models for X-linked hypophosphatemia.

  18. Analytical model and figures of merit for filtered Microwave Photonic Links.

    PubMed

    Gasulla, Ivana; Capmany, José

    2011-09-26

    The concept of filtered Microwave Photonic Links is proposed in order to provide the most general and versatile description of complex analog photonic systems. We develop a field propagation model where a global optical filter, characterized by its optical transfer function, embraces all the intermediate optical components in a linear link. We assume a non-monochromatic light source characterized by an arbitrary spectral distribution which has a finite linewidth spectrum and consider both intensity modulation and phase modulation with balanced and single detection. Expressions leading to the computation of the main figures of merit concerning the link gain, noise and intermodulation distortion are provided which, to our knowledge, are not available in the literature. The usefulness of this derivation resides in the capability to directly provide performance criteria results for complex links just by substituting in the overall closed-form formulas the numerical or measured optical transfer function characterizing the link. This theory is presented thus as a potential tool for a wide range of relevant microwave photonic application cases which is extendable to multiport radio over fiber systems.

  19. Dynamic modelling and link mechanism design of four-legged mobile robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sung-Ho

    In order to apply the advanced biological phenomena to the leg design of mobile robots, the structural and locomotive characteristics of several selected animals and insects are studied, and the four-legged mobile robot which can cover all existing leg arrangements and locomotion patterns is modeled by a rigid multibody system consisting of links and joints. The model is simulated to prove that the given structure or locomotive conditions satisfy the requirement of minimum energy expenditure. According to the first simulation, there exist ideal forward and backward stroke distances for each pair leg. Therefore, the walking volume and link lengths of existing legged mobile robots should be modified. Also, for other structural and locomotive characteristics which have been used by living creatures, the model is simulated to determine whether or not the actual or possible biological phenomena can be applied to the leg mechanism design of mobile robot.

  20. Assessment of sea ice-atmosphere links in CMIP5 models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boland, Emma J. D.; Bracegirdle, Thomas J.; Shuckburgh, Emily F.

    2016-09-01

    The Arctic is currently undergoing drastic changes in climate, largely thought to be due to so-called `Arctic amplification', whereby local feedbacks enhance global warming. Recently, a number of observational and modelling studies have questioned what the implications of this change in Arctic sea ice extent might be for weather in Northern Hemisphere midlatitudes, and in particular whether recent extremely cold winters such as 2009/10 might be consistent with an influence from observed Arctic sea ice decline. However, the proposed mechanisms for these links have not been consistently demonstrated. In a uniquely comprehensive cross-season and cross-model study, we show that the CMIP5 models provide no support for a relationship between declining Arctic sea ice and a negative NAM, or between declining Barents-Kara sea ice and cold European temperatures. The lack of evidence for the proposed links is consistent with studies that report a low signal-to-noise ratio in these relationships. These results imply that, whilst links may exist between declining sea ice and extreme cold weather events in the Northern Hemisphere, the CMIP5 model experiments do not show this to be a leading order effect in the long-term. We argue that this is likely due to a combination of the limitations of the CMIP5 models and an indication of other important long-term influences on Northern Hemisphere climate.

  1. Viral delivery of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor improves behavior and protects striatal neurons in a mouse model of Huntington’s disease

    PubMed Central

    McBride, Jodi L.; Ramaswamy, Shilpa; Gasmi, Mehdi; Bartus, Raymond T.; Herzog, Christopher D.; Brandon, Eugene P.; Zhou, Lili; Pitzer, Mark R.; Berry-Kravis, Elizabeth M.; Kordower, Jeffrey H.

    2006-01-01

    Huntington’s disease (HD) is a fatal, genetic, neurological disorder resulting from a trinucleotide repeat expansion in the gene that encodes for the protein huntingtin. These excessive repeats confer a toxic gain of function on huntingtin, which leads to the degeneration of striatal and cortical neurons and a devastating motor, cognitive, and psychological disorder. Trophic factor administration has emerged as a compelling potential therapy for a variety of neurodegenerative disorders, including HD. We previously demonstrated that viral delivery of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) provides structural and functional neuroprotection in a rat neurotoxin model of HD. In this report we demonstrate that viral delivery of GDNF into the striatum of presymptomatic mice ameliorates behavioral deficits on the accelerating rotorod and hind limb clasping tests in transgenic HD mice. Behavioral neuroprotection was associated with anatomical preservation of the number and size of striatal neurons from cell death and cell atrophy. Additionally, GDNF-treated mice had a lower percentage of neurons containing mutant huntingtin-stained inclusion bodies, a hallmark of HD pathology. These data further support the concept that viral vector delivery of GDNF may be a viable treatment for patients suffering from HD. PMID:16751280

  2. Expression and In Silico Analysis of the Recombinant Bovine Papillomavirus E6 Protein as a Model for Viral Oncoproteins Studies

    PubMed Central

    Mazzuchelli-de-Souza, J.; Carvalho, R. F.; Ruiz, R. M.; Melo, T. C.; Araldi, R. P.; Carvalho, E.; Thompson, C. E.; Sircili, M. P.; Beçak, W.; Stocco, R. C.

    2013-01-01

    Bovine papillomaviruses (BPVs) are recognized as the causal agents of economical relevant diseases in cattle, associated with the development of tumors in skin and mucosa. The oncogenesis process is mainly associated with different viral oncoprotein expressions, which are involved in cell transformation. The expression and characterization of recombinant viral oncoproteins represent an attractive strategy to obtain biotechnological products as antibodies and potential vaccines, Thus, the aim of this work was to clone and express the BPV-1 and BPV-2 E6 recombinant proteins and perform in silico analysis in order to develop a strategy for the systematic study of other papillomaviruses oncoproteins. The results demonstrated that BPV-1 and BPV-2 E6 recombinant proteins were expressed and purified from bacterial system as well as its in silico analysis was performed in order to explore and predict biological characteristics of these proteins. PMID:23878806

  3. Expression and in Silico analysis of the recombinant bovine papillomavirus E6 protein as a model for viral oncoproteins studies.

    PubMed

    Mazzuchelli-de-Souza, J; Carvalho, R F; Ruiz, R M; Melo, T C; Araldi, R P; Carvalho, E; Thompson, C E; Sircili, M P; Beçak, W; Stocco, R C

    2013-01-01

    Bovine papillomaviruses (BPVs) are recognized as the causal agents of economical relevant diseases in cattle, associated with the development of tumors in skin and mucosa. The oncogenesis process is mainly associated with different viral oncoprotein expressions, which are involved in cell transformation. The expression and characterization of recombinant viral oncoproteins represent an attractive strategy to obtain biotechnological products as antibodies and potential vaccines, Thus, the aim of this work was to clone and express the BPV-1 and BPV-2 E6 recombinant proteins and perform in silico analysis in order to develop a strategy for the systematic study of other papillomaviruses oncoproteins. The results demonstrated that BPV-1 and BPV-2 E6 recombinant proteins were expressed and purified from bacterial system as well as its in silico analysis was performed in order to explore and predict biological characteristics of these proteins.

  4. Viral Hemorrhagic Fevers

    MedlinePlus

    ... The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Viral Hemorrhagic Fevers (VHFs) Note: Javascript is disabled or is not ... please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Viral Hemorrhagic Fevers (VHFs) Virus Families Arenaviruses Old World/New World ...

  5. Bacterial, viral and turbidity removal by intermittent slow sand filtration for household use in developing countries: experimental investigation and modeling.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Marion W; Tiwari, Sangam K; Darby, Jeannie

    2011-11-15

    A two-factor three-block experimental design was developed to permit rigorous evaluation and modeling of the main effects and interactions of sand size (d(10) of 0.17 and 0.52 mm) and hydraulic head (10, 20, and 30 cm) on removal of fecal coliform (FC) bacteria, MS2 bacteriophage virus, and turbidity, under two batch operating modes ('long' and 'short') in intermittent slow sand filters (ISSFs). Long operation involved an overnight pause time between feeding of two successive 20 L batches (16 h average batch residence time (RT)). Short operation involved no pause between two 20 L batch feeds (5h average batch RT). Conditions tested were representative of those encountered in developing country field settings. Over a ten week period, the 18 experimental filters were fed river water augmented with wastewater (influent turbidity of 5.4-58.6 NTU) and maintained with the wet harrowing method. Linear mixed modeling allowed systematic estimates of the independent marginal effects of each independent variable on each performance outcome of interest while controlling for the effects of variations in a batch's actual residence time, days since maintenance, and influent turbidity. This is the first study in which simultaneous measurement of bacteria, viruses and turbidity removal at the batch level over an extended duration has been undertaken with a large number of replicate units to permit rigorous modeling of ISSF performance variability within and across a range of likely filter design configurations and operating conditions. On average, the experimental filters removed 1.40 log fecal coliform CFU (SD 0.40 log, N=249), 0.54 log MS2 PFU (SD 0.42 log, N=245) and 89.0 percent turbidity (SD 6.9 percent, N=263). Effluent turbidity averaged 1.24 NTU (SD 0.53 NTU, N=263) and always remained below 3 NTU. Under the best performing design configuration and operating mode (fine sand, 10 cm head, long operation, initial HLR of 0.01-0.03 m/h), mean 1.82 log removal of bacteria (98

  6. A linked hydrodynamic and water quality model for the Salton Sea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chung, E.G.; Schladow, S.G.; Perez-Losada, J.; Robertson, D.M.

    2008-01-01

    A linked hydrodynamic and water quality model was developed and applied to the Salton Sea. The hydrodynamic component is based on the one-dimensional numerical model, DLM. The water quality model is based on a new conceptual model for nutrient cycling in the Sea, and simulates temperature, total suspended sediment concentration, nutrient concentrations, including PO4-3, NO3-1 and NH4+1, DO concentration and chlorophyll a concentration as functions of depth and time. Existing water temperature data from 1997 were used to verify that the model could accurately represent the onset and breakup of thermal stratification. 1999 is the only year with a near-complete dataset for water quality variables for the Salton Sea. The linked hydrodynamic and water quality model was run for 1999, and by adjustment of rate coefficients and other water quality parameters, a good match with the data was obtained. In this article, the model is fully described and the model results for reductions in external phosphorus load on chlorophyll a distribution are presented. ?? 2008 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  7. Link functions in multi-locus genetic models: implications for testing, prediction, and interpretation.

    PubMed

    Clayton, David

    2012-05-01

    "Complex" diseases are, by definition, influenced by multiple causes, both genetic and environmental, and statistical work on the joint action of multiple risk factors has, for more than 40 years, been dominated by the generalized linear model (GLM). In genetics, models for dichotomous traits have traditionally been approached via the model of an underlying, normally distributed, liability. This corresponds to the GLM with binomial errors and a probit link function. Elsewhere in epidemiology, however, the logistic regression model, a GLM with logit link function, has been the tool of choice, largely because of its convenient properties in case-control studies. The choice of link function has usually been dictated by mathematical convenience, but it has some important implications in (a) the choice of association test statistic in the presence of existing strong risk factors, (b) the ability to predict disease from genotype given its heritability, and (c) the definition, and interpretation of epistasis (or epistacy). These issues are reviewed, and a new association test proposed.

  8. Equilibrium and kinetic modeling of adsorption of reactive dye on cross-linked chitosan beads.

    PubMed

    Chiou, Ming Shen; Li, Hsing Ya

    2002-07-22

    The adsorption of reactive dye (Reactive Red 189) from aqueous solutions on cross-linked chitosan beads was studied in a batch system. The equilibrium isotherms at different particle sizes (2.3-2.5, 2.5-2.7 and 3.5-3.8mm) and the kinetics of adsorption with respect to the initial dye concentration (4320, 5760 and 7286 g/m(3)), temperature (30, 40 and 50 degrees C), pH (1.0, 3.0, 6.0 and 9.0), and cross-linking ratio (cross-linking agent/chitosan weight ratio: 0.2, 0.5, 0.7 and 1.0) were investigated. Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption models were applied to describe the experimental isotherms and isotherm constants. Equilibrium data fitted very well to the Langmuir model in the entire saturation concentration range (0-1800 g/m(3)). The maximum monolayer adsorption capacities obtained from the Langmuir model are very large, which are 1936, 1686 and 1642 g/kg for small, mediumand large particle sizes, respectively, at pH 3.0, 30 degrees C, and the cross-linking ratio of 0.2. The pseudo first- and second-order kinetic models were used to describe the kinetic data, and the rate constants were evaluated. The experimental data fitted well to the second-order kinetic model, which indicates that the chemical sorption is the rate-limiting step, instead of mass transfer. The initial dye concentration and the solution pH both significantly affect the adsorption capacity, but the temperature and the cross-linking ratio are relatively minor factors. An increase in initial dye concentration results in the increase of adsorption capacity, which also increases with decreasing pH. The activation energy is 43.0 kJ/mol for the adsorption of the dye on the cross-linked chitosan beads at pH 3.0 and initial dye concentration 3768 g/m(3).

  9. Framework for Smart Electronic Health Record-Linked Predictive Models to Optimize Care for Complex Digestive Diseases

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-01

    Regueiro MD, Krasinskas AM, Saul M, Sapienza D, Binion DG, Hartman D. Mucosal IgG4 Cell Infiltration in Ulcerative Colitis (UC) is Linked to Disease ...Record-Linked Predictive Models to Optimize Care for Complex Digestive Diseases PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Michael A. Dunn, MD CONTRACTING...Framework for Smart Electronic Health Record-Linked Predictive Models to Optimize Care for Complex Digestive Diseases 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH11-2

  10. Role of weakest links and system-size scaling in multiscale modeling of stochastic plasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ispánovity, Péter Dusán; Tüzes, Dániel; Szabó, Péter; Zaiser, Michael; Groma, István

    2017-02-01

    Plastic deformation of crystalline and amorphous matter often involves intermittent local strain burst events. To understand the physical background of the phenomenon a minimal stochastic mesoscopic model was introduced, where details of the microstructure evolution are statistically represented in terms of a fluctuating local yield threshold. In the present paper we propose a method for determining the corresponding yield stress distribution for the case of crystal plasticity from lower scale discrete dislocation dynamics simulations which we combine with weakest link arguments. The success of scale linking is demonstrated by comparing stress-strain curves obtained from the resulting mesoscopic and the underlying discrete dislocation models in the microplastic regime. As shown by various scaling relations they are statistically equivalent and behave identically in the thermodynamic limit. The proposed technique is expected to be applicable to different microstructures and also to amorphous materials.

  11. Space Station communications and tracking systems modeling and RF link simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsang, Chit-Sang; Chie, Chak M.; Lindsey, William C.

    1986-01-01

    In this final report, the effort spent on Space Station Communications and Tracking System Modeling and RF Link Simulation is described in detail. The effort is mainly divided into three parts: frequency division multiple access (FDMA) system simulation modeling and software implementation; a study on design and evaluation of a functional computerized RF link simulation/analysis system for Space Station; and a study on design and evaluation of simulation system architecture. This report documents the results of these studies. In addition, a separate User's Manual on Space Communications Simulation System (SCSS) (Version 1) documents the software developed for the Space Station FDMA communications system simulation. The final report, SCSS user's manual, and the software located in the NASA JSC system analysis division's VAX 750 computer together serve as the deliverables from LinCom for this project effort.

  12. Simulink models for performance analysis of high speed DQPSK modulated optical link

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharan, Lucky; Rupanshi, Chaubey, V. K.

    2016-03-01

    This paper attempts to present the design approach for development of simulation models to study and analyze the transmission of 10 Gbps DQPSK signal over a single channel Peer to Peer link using Matlab Simulink. The simulation model considers the different optical components used in link design with their behavior represented initially by theoretical interpretation, including the transmitter topology, Mach Zehnder Modulator(MZM) module and, the propagation model for optical fibers etc. thus allowing scope for direct realization in experimental configurations. It provides the flexibility to incorporate the various photonic components as either user-defined or fixed and, can also be enhanced or removed from the model as per the design requirements. We describe the detailed operation and need of every component model and its representation in Simulink blocksets. Moreover the developed model can be extended in future to support Dense Wavelength Division Multiplexing (DWDM) system, thereby allowing high speed transmission with N × 40 Gbps systems. The various compensation techniques and their influence on system performance can be easily investigated by using such models.

  13. Constructing a Conceptual Model Linking Drivers and Ecosystem Services in Piedmont Streams

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-01

    CONSTRUCTING A CONCEPTUAL MODEL LINKING DRIVERS AND ECOSYSTEM SERVICES IN PIEDMONT STREAMS S . Kyle McKay1, Bruce A. Pruitt1, Christopher J...5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR( S ) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7...PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME( S ) AND ADDRESS(ES) U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center,Athens,GA,30606 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER

  14. Iron withholding: a defense against viral infections.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, E D

    1996-10-01

    A variety of laboratory and clinical investigations during the past 15 years have observed that one of the dangers of excessive iron is its ability to favor animal viral infections. The metal is essential for host cell synthesis of virions and can also impair defense cell function and increase oxidative stress. In both animal models and humans, viral infections cause upregulation of the iron withholding defense system. Factors that suppress the system enhance viral progression; factors that strengthen the system augment host defense. Procedures designed to reinforce the system are being developed and tested; some of these may become useful adjuncts in prevention and management of viral diseases.

  15. NEW GHOST-NODE METHOD FOR LINKING DIFFERENT MODELS WITH VARIED GRID REFINEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    S.C. James; J.E. Dickinson; S.W. Mehl; M.C. Hill; S.A. Leake; G.A. zyvoloski; A. Eddebbarh

    2006-02-15

    A flexible, robust method for linking grids of locally refined models constructed with different numerical methods is needed to address a variety of hydrologic problems. This work outlines and tests a new ghost-node model-linking method for a refined ''child'' model that is contained within a larger and coarser ''parent'' model that is based on the iterative method of Mehl and Hill (2002, 2004). The method is applicable to steady-state solutions for ground-water flow. Tests are presented for a homogeneous two-dimensional system that has either matching grids (parent cells border an integer number of child cells; Figure 2a) or non-matching grids (parent cells border a non-integer number of child cells; Figure 2b). The coupled grids are simulated using the finite-difference and finite-element models MODFLOW and FEHM, respectively. The simulations require no alteration of the MODFLOW or FEHM models and are executed using a batch file on Windows operating systems. Results indicate that when the grids are matched spatially so that nodes and child cell boundaries are aligned, the new coupling technique has error nearly equal to that when coupling two MODFLOW models (Mehl and Hill, 2002). When the grids are non-matching, model accuracy is slightly increased over matching-grid cases. Overall, results indicate that the ghost-node technique is a viable means to accurately couple distinct models because the overall error is less than if only the regional model was used to simulate flow in the child model's domain.

  16. New Ghost-node method for linking different models with varied grid refinement.

    SciTech Connect

    Mehl, Steffen W.; Hill, Mary Catherine.; James, Scott Carlton; Leake, Stanley A.; Zyvoloski, George A.; Dickinson, Jesse E.; Eddebbarh, Al A.

    2006-01-01

    A flexible, robust method for linking grids of locally refined models constructed with different numerical methods is needed to address a variety of hydrologic problems. This work outlines and tests a new ghost-node model-linking method for a refined 'child' model that is contained within a larger and coarser 'parent' model that is based on the iterative method of Mehl and Hill (2002, 2004). The method is applicable to steady-state solutions for ground-water flow. Tests are presented for a homogeneous two-dimensional system that has either matching grids (parent cells border an integer number of child cells; Figure 2a) or non-matching grids (parent cells border a non-integer number of child cells; Figure 2b). The coupled grids are simulated using the finite-difference and finite-element models MODFLOW and FEHM, respectively. The simulations require no alteration of the MODFLOW or FEHM models and are executed using a batch file on Windows operating systems. Results indicate that when the grids are matched spatially so that nodes and child cell boundaries are aligned, the new coupling technique has error nearly equal to that when coupling two MODFLOW models (Mehl and Hill, 2002). When the grids are non-matching, model accuracy is slightly increased over matching-grid cases. Overall, results indicate that the ghost-node technique is a viable means to accurately couple distinct models because the overall error is less than if only the regional model was used to simulate flow in the child model's domain.

  17. New ghost-node method for linking different models with varied grid refinement

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    James, S.C.; Dickinson, J.E.; Mehl, S.W.; Hill, M.C.; Leake, S.A.; Zyvoloski, G.A.; Eddebbarh, A.-A.

    2006-01-01

    A flexible, robust method for linking grids of locally refined ground-water flow models constructed with different numerical methods is needed to address a variety of hydrologic problems. This work outlines and tests a new ghost-node model-linking method for a refined "child" model that is contained within a larger and coarser "parent" model that is based on the iterative method of Steffen W. Mehl and Mary C. Hill (2002, Advances in Water Res., 25, p. 497-511; 2004, Advances in Water Res., 27, p. 899-912). The method is applicable to steady-state solutions for ground-water flow. Tests are presented for a homogeneous two-dimensional system that has matching grids (parent cells border an integer number of child cells) or nonmatching grids. The coupled grids are simulated by using the finite-difference and finite-element models MODFLOW and FEHM, respectively. The simulations require no alteration of the MODFLOW or FEHM models and are executed using a batch file on Windows operating systems. Results indicate that when the grids are matched spatially so that nodes and child-cell boundaries are aligned, the new coupling technique has error nearly equal to that when coupling two MODFLOW models. When the grids are nonmatching, model accuracy is slightly increased compared to that for matching-grid cases. Overall, results indicate that the ghost-node technique is a viable means to couple distinct models because the overall head and flow errors relative to the analytical solution are less than if only the regional coarse-grid model was used to simulate flow in the child model's domain.

  18. Modelling the multidimensional niche by linking functional traits to competitive performance

    PubMed Central

    Maynard, Daniel S.; Leonard, Kenneth E.; Drake, John M.; Hall, David W.; Crowther, Thomas W.; Bradford, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    Linking competitive outcomes to environmental conditions is necessary for understanding species' distributions and responses to environmental change. Despite this importance, generalizable approaches for predicting competitive outcomes across abiotic gradients are lacking, driven largely by the highly complex and context-dependent nature of biotic interactions. Here, we present and empirically test a novel niche model that uses functional traits to model the niche space of organisms and predict competitive outcomes of co-occurring populations across multiple resource gradients. The model makes no assumptions about the underlying mode of competition and instead applies to those settings where relative competitive ability across environments correlates with a quantifiable performance metric. To test the model, a series of controlled microcosm experiments were conducted using genetically related strains of a widespread microbe. The model identified trait microevolution and performance differences among strains, with the predicted competitive ability of each organism mapped across a two-dimensional carbon and nitrogen resource space. Areas of coexistence and competitive dominance between strains were identified, and the predicted competitive outcomes were validated in approximately 95% of the pairings. By linking trait variation to competitive ability, our work demonstrates a generalizable approach for predicting and modelling competitive outcomes across changing environmental contexts. PMID:26136444

  19. Link between statistical equilibrium fidelity and forecasting skill for complex systems with model error.

    PubMed

    Majda, Andrew J; Gershgorin, Boris

    2011-08-02

    Understanding and improving the predictive skill of imperfect models for complex systems in their response to external forcing is a crucial issue in diverse applications such as for example climate change science. Equilibrium statistical fidelity of the imperfect model on suitable coarse-grained variables is a necessary but not sufficient condition for this predictive skill, and elementary examples are given here demonstrating this. Here, with equilibrium statistical fidelity of the imperfect model, a direct link is developed between the predictive fidelity of specific test problems in the training phase where the perfect natural system is observed and the predictive skill for the forced response of the imperfect model by combining appropriate concepts from information theory with other concepts based on the fluctuation dissipation theorem. Here a suite of mathematically tractable models with nontrivial eddy diffusivity, variance, and intermittent non-Gaussian statistics mimicking crucial features of atmospheric tracers together with stochastically forced standard eddy diffusivity approximation with model error are utilized to illustrate this link.

  20. A NEW GHOST-NODE METHOD FOR LINKING DIFFERENT MODELS WITH VARIED GRID REFINEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    J. dickinson; S.C. James; S. Mehl; M.C. Hill; S. Leake; G.A. Zyvoloski

    2005-10-18

    A flexible, robust method for linking grids of locally refined models that may be constructed using different types of numerical methods is needed to address a variety of hydrologic problems. This work outlines and tests a new ghost-node model-linking method based on the iterative method of Mehl and Hill (2002, 2004). It is applicable to steady-state solutions for ground-water flow. Tests are presented for a homogeneous two-dimensional system that facilitates clear analysis of typical problems. The coupled grids are simulated using the finite-difference and finite-element models MODFLOW and FEHM. Results indicate that when the grids are matched spatially so that nodes and control volume boundaries are aligned, the new coupling technique has approximately twice the error as coupling using two MODFLOW models. When the grids are non-matching; model accuracy is slightly increased over matching grid cases. Overall, results indicate that the ghost-node technique is a viable means to accurately couple distinct models.

  1. Neuroinvasion and Inflammation in Viral Central Nervous System Infections

    PubMed Central

    Schroten, Horst

    2016-01-01

    Neurotropic viruses can cause devastating central nervous system (CNS) infections, especially in young children and the elderly. The blood-brain barrier (BBB) and the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier (BCSFB) have been described as relevant sites of entry for specific viruses as well as for leukocytes, which are recruited during the proinflammatory response in the course of CNS infection. In this review, we illustrate examples of established brain barrier models, in which the specific reaction patterns of different viral families can be analyzed. Furthermore, we highlight the pathogen specific array of cytokines and chemokines involved in immunological responses in viral CNS infections. We discuss in detail the link between specific cytokines and chemokines and leukocyte migration profiles. The thorough understanding of the complex and interrelated inflammatory mechanisms as well as identifying universal mediators promoting CNS inflammation is essential for the development of new diagnostic and treatment strategies. PMID:27313404

  2. Equine herpesvirus type 1 tegument protein VP22 is not essential for pathogenicity in a hamster model, but is required for efficient viral growth in cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Okada, Ayaka; Izume, Satoko; Ohya, Kenji; Fukushi, Hideto

    2015-10-01

    VP22 is a major tegument protein of Equine herpesvirus type 1 (EHV-1) that is a conserved protein among alphaherpesviruses. However, the roles of VP22 differ among each virus, and the roles of EHV-1 VP22 are still unclear. Here, we constructed an EHV-1 VP22 deletion mutant and a revertant virus to clarify the role of VP22. We found that EHV-1 VP22 was required for efficient viral growth in cultured cells, but not for virulence in a hamster model.

  3. A simple pharmacokinetic model linking plasma progesterone concentrations with the hormone released from bovine intravaginal inserts.

    PubMed

    Mariano, R N; Turino, L N; Cabrera, M I; Scándolo, D E; Maciel, M G; Grau, R J A

    2010-10-01

    On the basis of pharmacokinetic modeling, this study provides some insights into predicting in vivo plasma progesterone concentrations when using bovine intravaginal inserts for systemic progesterone delivery. More significantly, this contribution is the first attempt to build a simple pharmacokinetic model that links plasma progesterone concentrations with the hormone released from bovine intravaginal inserts. After evaluating three rival pharmacokinetic models and considering some phenomena involved in the intravaginal administration of progesterone, a primary pharmacokinetic model having a good data fitting capability with only two adjustable parameters is proposed to the above mentioned task. Kinetic parameters are given for lactating Holstein dairy cows with two levels of daily milk yields; and non-pregnant, non-lactating Holstein-Friesian cattle. Model predictions indicate the occurrence of a preferential distribution of the intravaginally administered progesterone dose through a first uterine pass effect.

  4. Linking models of land use, resources, and economy to simulate the development of mountain regions (ALPSCAPE).

    PubMed

    Lundström, Corinne; Kytzia, Susanne; Walz, Ariane; Gret-Regamey, Adrienne; Bebi, Peter

    2007-09-01

    We present a framework of a scenario-based model that simulates the development of the municipality of Davos (Swiss Alps). We illustrate our method with the calculation of the scenario for 2050 "Decrease in subsidies for mountain agriculture and liberalization of markets." The main objective was to link submodels of land-use allocation (regression-based approach), material and energy flows submodels (Material and Energy Flux Analysis), and economic submodels (Input-Output Analysis). Letting qualitative and quantitative information flow from one submodel to the next, following the storyline describing a scenario, has proven to be suitable for linking submodels. The succession of the submodels is then strongly dependent on the scenario. Qualitative information flows are simulated with microsimulations of actor choices. Links between the submodels show different degrees of robustness: although the links involving microsimulations are the weakest, the uncertainty introduced by the land-use allocation model is actually advantageous because it allows one possible change in the landscape in the future to be simulated. The modeling results for the scenario here presented show that the disappearance of agriculture only marginally affects the region's factor income, but that the consequences for the self-sufficiency rate, for various landscape-related indicators and ecosystem services, and for the economy in the long term may be considerable. These benefits compensate for agriculture's modest direct economic value. The framework presented can potentially be applied to any region and scenario. This framework provides a basis for a learning package that allows potential detrimental consequences of regional development to be anticipated at an early stage.

  5. Conformational analysis of a covalently cross-linked Watson-Crick base pair model.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Erik A; Allen, Benjamin D; Kishi, Yoshito; O'Leary, Daniel J

    2008-11-15

    Low-temperature NMR experiments and molecular modeling have been used to characterize the conformational behavior of a covalently cross-linked DNA base pair model. The data suggest that Watson-Crick or reverse Watson-Crick hydrogen bonding geometries have similar energies and can interconvert at low temperatures. This low-temperature process involves rotation about the crosslink CH(2)C(5') (psi) carbon-carbon bond, which is energetically preferred over the alternate CH(2)N(3) (phi) carbon-nitrogen bond rotation.

  6. Viscoelastic Model of Cross-Linked Polyethylene Including Effects of Temperature and Crystallinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olasz, L.; Gudmundson, P.

    2005-12-01

    Characterization of the mechanical behavior of cross-linked polyethylene (XLPE) commonly used in high voltage cable insulation was performed by an extensive set of isothermal uniaxial tensile relaxation tests. Tensile relaxation experiments were complemented by pressure-volume-temperature experiments as well as density and crystallinity measurements. Based on the experimental results, a viscoelastic power law model with four parameters was formulated, incorporating temperature and crystallinity dependence. It was found that a master curve can be developed by both horizontal and vertical shifting of the relaxation curves. The model was evaluated by making comparisons of the predicted stress responses with the measured responses in relaxation tests with transient temperature histories.

  7. A link-segment model of upright human posture for analysis of head-trunk coordination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicholas, S. C.; Doxey-Gasway, D. D.; Paloski, W. H.

    1998-01-01

    Sensory-motor control of upright human posture may be organized in a top-down fashion such that certain head-trunk coordination strategies are employed to optimize visual and/or vestibular sensory inputs. Previous quantitative models of the biomechanics of human posture control have examined the simple case of ankle sway strategy, in which an inverted pendulum model is used, and the somewhat more complicated case of hip sway strategy, in which multisegment, articulated models are used. While these models can be used to quantify the gross dynamics of posture control, they are not sufficiently detailed to analyze head-trunk coordination strategies that may be crucial to understanding its underlying mechanisms. In this paper, we present a biomechanical model of upright human posture that extends an existing four mass, sagittal plane, link-segment model to a five mass model including an independent head link. The new model was developed to analyze segmental body movements during dynamic posturography experiments in order to study head-trunk coordination strategies and their influence on sensory inputs to balance control. It was designed specifically to analyze data collected on the EquiTest (NeuroCom International, Clackamas, OR) computerized dynamic posturography system, where the task of maintaining postural equilibrium may be challenged under conditions in which the visual surround, support surface, or both are in motion. The performance of the model was tested by comparing its estimated ground reaction forces to those measured directly by support surface force transducers. We conclude that this model will be a valuable analytical tool in the search for mechanisms of balance control.

  8. [Viral safety of biologicals].

    PubMed

    Barin, F

    2008-06-01

    The viral safety of biologicals, either human blood derivatives or animal products or recombinant proteins issued from biotechnology, relies on the quality of the starting material, the manufacturing process and, if necessary, the control of the final product. The quality of the starting material is highly guaranteed for blood derivatives due to the individual screening for specific markers (antigens, genome, antibodies) for major blood borne viruses such as hepatitis B and C viruses (HBV, HCV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). It can be reinforced by the detection through amplification procedures (polymerase chain reaction) in the plasma pool of genomes from viruses that have been implicated in contaminations of blood derivatives in the past (parvovirus B19, hepatitis A virus). The association in the manufacturing process of different steps dedicated to purification of plasma proteins (partitioning), virus inactivation (solvent/detergent treatment, heat inactivation) or specific procedures allowing virus removal (nanofiltration) allows to reduce the viral risk very efficiently. The validation studies using scaled down systems and model viruses allow to evaluate the virus safety of any product quantitatively. The aim of these procedures is to guarantee the lack of infectivity due to any virus, either known or unknown.

  9. Determination of urban groundwater pollution in alluvial aquifer using linked process models considering urban water cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vizintin, Goran; Souvent, Petra; Veselič, Miran; Cencur Curk, Barbara

    2009-10-01

    SummaryThis paper presents the results of the 5th FP project AISUWRS (Assessing and Improving the Sustainability of Urban Water Resources and Systems) which aimed to assess the impact of the urban water infrastructure to underlying or nearby aquifers with the urban water balance modelling approach - a chain of different models that handle with contaminant fluxes and the movement of contaminants from the urban infrastructure into the underlying aquifer. An existing urban water management model UVQ was linked to a model for sewer infiltration and exfiltration (NEIMO), as well as unsaturated zone models (SLeakI/POSI, UL_FLOW) with existing numerical groundwater models. The linked process models offer the prospect of better quantification of urban water balance and contaminant loads, including improved estimates of total recharge and its components in urban areas. Once the model framework has been set up for a selected city, it can easily be updated in the future and it can be used for other purposes like planning of local remediation measures in the vicinity of individual contaminant spillages. This paper describes the application and results of the urban water model chain for the city of Ljubljana, which is the capital of Slovenia. The results from this study suggest that residential land-uses in urban areas with thick unsaturated zone may have significantly smaller impact on the groundwater than agriculture or industry. This can be seen as a speculative understanding of the groundwater pollutions problems. In this respect, use of sustainable urban development systems like on-site infiltration of roof runoff and improved sewer control and standards could result in better groundwater quality.

  10. Display of the Viral Epitopes on Lactococcus lactis: A Model for Food Grade Vaccine against EV71.

    PubMed

    Varma, Nadimpalli Ravi S; Toosa, Haryanti; Foo, Hooi Ling; Alitheen, Noorjahan Banu Mohamed; Nor Shamsudin, Mariana; Arbab, Ali S; Yusoff, Khatijah; Abdul Rahim, Raha

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we have developed a system for display of antigens of Enterovirus type 71 (EV71) on the cell surface of L. lactis. The viral capsid protein (VP1) gene from a local viral isolate was utilized as the candidate vaccine for the development of oral live vaccines against EV71 using L. lactis as a carrier. We expressed fusion proteins in E. coli and purified fusion proteins were incubated with L. lactis. We confirmed that mice orally fed with L. lactis displaying these fusion proteins on its surface were able to mount an immune response against the epitopes of EV71. This is the first example of an EV71 antigen displayed on the surface of a food grade organism and opens a new perspective for alternative vaccine strategies against the EV71. We believe that the method of protein docking utilized in this study will allow for more flexible presentations of short peptides and proteins on the surface of L. lactis to be useful as a delivery vehicle.

  11. Display of the Viral Epitopes on Lactococcus lactis: A Model for Food Grade Vaccine against EV71

    PubMed Central

    Varma, Nadimpalli Ravi S.; Toosa, Haryanti; Foo, Hooi Ling; Alitheen, Noorjahan Banu Mohamed; Nor Shamsudin, Mariana; Arbab, Ali S.; Yusoff, Khatijah; Abdul Rahim, Raha

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we have developed a system for display of antigens of Enterovirus type 71 (EV71) on the cell surface of L. lactis. The viral capsid protein (VP1) gene from a local viral isolate was utilized as the candidate vaccine for the development of oral live vaccines against EV71 using L. lactis as a carrier. We expressed fusion proteins in E. coli and purified fusion proteins were incubated with L. lactis. We confirmed that mice orally fed with L. lactis displaying these fusion proteins on its surface were able to mount an immune response against the epitopes of EV71. This is the first example of an EV71 antigen displayed on the surface of a food grade organism and opens a new perspective for alternative vaccine strategies against the EV71. We believe that the method of protein docking utilized in this study will allow for more flexible presentations of short peptides and proteins on the surface of L. lactis to be useful as a delivery vehicle. PMID:23476790

  12. Women and work in rural Taiwan: building a contextual model linking employment and health.

    PubMed

    Gallin, R S

    1989-12-01

    This paper is based on ethnographic research in a rural Taiwanese village in which married women with children are a major source of labor for local industry. Responsibility for job and home exposes these women to repeated stressors that can increase their susceptibility to illness. Existing explanatory models linking employment and women's health, however, do not explain adequately the women's response to their wage labor and the consequences of the social aspects of their work on their health. This paper describes women's work and its meaning, and discusses the way in which micro phenomena such as meanings and health states are linked to macro phenomena such as national political-economic processes and the world capitalist system.

  13. Global sensitivity analysis, probabilistic calibration, and predictive assessment for the data assimilation linked ecosystem carbon model

    DOE PAGES

    Safta, C.; Ricciuto, Daniel M.; Sargsyan, Khachik; ...

    2015-07-01

    In this paper we propose a probabilistic framework for an uncertainty quantification (UQ) study of a carbon cycle model and focus on the comparison between steady-state and transient simulation setups. A global sensitivity analysis (GSA) study indicates the parameters and parameter couplings that are important at different times of the year for quantities of interest (QoIs) obtained with the data assimilation linked ecosystem carbon (DALEC) model. We then employ a Bayesian approach and a statistical model error term to calibrate the parameters of DALEC using net ecosystem exchange (NEE) observations at the Harvard Forest site. The calibration results are employedmore » in the second part of the paper to assess the predictive skill of the model via posterior predictive checks.« less

  14. Global sensitivity analysis, probabilistic calibration, and predictive assessment for the data assimilation linked ecosystem carbon model

    SciTech Connect

    Safta, C.; Ricciuto, Daniel M.; Sargsyan, Khachik; Debusschere, B.; Najm, H. N.; Williams, M.; Thornton, Peter E.

    2015-07-01

    In this paper we propose a probabilistic framework for an uncertainty quantification (UQ) study of a carbon cycle model and focus on the comparison between steady-state and transient simulation setups. A global sensitivity analysis (GSA) study indicates the parameters and parameter couplings that are important at different times of the year for quantities of interest (QoIs) obtained with the data assimilation linked ecosystem carbon (DALEC) model. We then employ a Bayesian approach and a statistical model error term to calibrate the parameters of DALEC using net ecosystem exchange (NEE) observations at the Harvard Forest site. The calibration results are employed in the second part of the paper to assess the predictive skill of the model via posterior predictive checks.

  15. Full Scale Rotor Aeroacoustic Predictions and the Link to Model Scale Rotor Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, D. Douglas, Jr.; Burley, Casey L.; Conner, David A.

    2004-01-01

    The NASA Aeroacoustic Prediction System (NAPS) is used to establish a link between model-scale and full-scale rotor predictions and is partially validated against measured wind tunnel and flight aeroacoustic data. The prediction approach of NAPS couples a comprehensive rotorcraft analysis with acoustic source noise and propagation codes. The comprehensive analysis selected for this study is CAMRAD-II, which provides the performance/trim/wake solution for a given rotor or flight condition. The post-trim capabilities of CAMRAD-II are used to compute high-resolution sectional airloads for the acoustic tone noise analysis, WOPMOD. The tone noise is propagated to observers on the ground with the propagation code, RNM (Rotor Noise Model). Aeroacoustic predictions are made with NAPS for an isolated rotor and compared to results of the second Harmonic Aeroacoustic Rotor Test (HART-II) program, which tested a 40% dynamically and Mach-scaled BO-105 main rotor at the DNW. The NAPS is validated with comparisons for three rotor conditions: a baseline condition and two Higher Harmonic Control (HHC) conditions. To establish a link between model and full-scale rotor predictions, a full-scale BO-105 main rotor input deck for NAPS is created from the 40% scale rotor input deck. The full-scale isolated rotor predictions are then compared to the model predictions. The comparisons include aerodynamic loading, acoustic levels, and acoustic pressure time histories for each of the three conditions. With this link established, full-scale predictions are made for a range of descent flight conditions and compared with measured trends from the recent Rotorcraft Operational Noise Abatement Procedures (RONAP) flight test conducted by DLR and ONERA. Additionally, the effectiveness of two HHC conditions from the HART-II program is demonstrated for the full-scale rotor in flight.

  16. A proposed model of psychodynamic psychotherapy linked to Erik Erikson's eight stages of psychosocial development.

    PubMed

    Knight, Zelda Gillian

    2017-01-25

    Just as Freud used stages of psychosexual development to ground his model of psychoanalysis, it is possible to do the same with Erik Erikson's stages of development with regards to a model of psychodynamic psychotherapy. This paper proposes an eight-stage model of psychodynamic psychotherapy linked to Erik Erikson's eight stages of psychosocial development. Various suggestions are offered. One such suggestion is that as each of Erikson's developmental stages is triggered by a crisis, in therapy it is triggered by the client's search. The resolution of the search often leads to the development of another search, which implies that the therapy process comprises a series of searches. This idea of a series of searches and resolutions leads to the understanding that identity is developmental and therapy is a space in which a new sense of identity may emerge. The notion of hope is linked to Erikson's stage of Basic Trust and the proposed model of therapy views hope and trust as essential for the therapy process. Two clinical vignettes are offered to illustrate these ideas.

  17. Linked Hydrologic-Hydrodynamic Model Framework to Forecast Impacts of Rivers on Beach Water Quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, E. J.; Fry, L. M.; Kramer, E.; Ritzenthaler, A.

    2014-12-01

    The goal of NOAA's beach quality forecasting program is to use a multi-faceted approach to aid in detection and prediction of bacteria in recreational waters. In particular, our focus has been on the connection between tributary loads and bacteria concentrations at nearby beaches. While there is a clear link between stormwater runoff and beach water quality, quantifying the contribution of river loadings to nearshore bacterial concentrations is complicated due to multiple processes that drive bacterial concentrations in rivers as well as those processes affecting the fate and transport of bacteria upon exiting the rivers. In order to forecast potential impacts of rivers on beach water quality, we developed a linked hydrologic-hydrodynamic water quality framework that simulates accumulation and washoff of bacteria from the landscape, and then predicts the fate and transport of washed off bacteria from the watershed to the coastal zone. The framework includes a watershed model (IHACRES) to predict fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) loadings to the coastal environment (accumulation, wash-off, die-off) as a function of effective rainfall. These loadings are input into a coastal hydrodynamic model (FVCOM), including a bacteria transport model (Lagrangian particle), to simulate 3D bacteria transport within the coastal environment. This modeling system provides predictive tools to assist local managers in decision-making to reduce human health threats.

  18. Effect of preexisting anti-herpes immunity on the efficacy of herpes simplex viral therapy in a murine intraperitoneal tumor model.

    PubMed

    Lambright, E S; Kang, E H; Force, S; Lanuti, M; Caparrelli, D; Kaiser, L R; Albelda, S M; Molnar-Kimber, K L

    2000-10-01

    HSV-1716, a replicating nonneurovirulent herpes simplex virus type 1, has shown efficacy in treating multiple types of human tumors in immunodeficient mice. Since the majority of the human population has been previously exposed to herpes simplex virus, the efficacy of HSV-based oncolytic therapy was investigated in an immunocompetent animal tumor model. EJ-6-2-Bam-6a, a tumor cell line derived from h-ras-transformed murine fibroblast, exhibit a diffuse growth pattern in the peritoneal cavity of BALB/c mice and replicate HSV-1716 to titers observed in human tumors. An established intraperitoneal (ip) tumor model of EJ-6-2-Bam-6a in naive and HSV-immunized mice was used to evaluate the efficacy of single or multiple ip administrations of HSV-1716 (4 x 10(6) pfu/treatment) or of carrier cells, which are irradiated, ex vivo virally infected EJ-6-2-Bam-6a cells that can amplify the viral load in situ. All treated groups significantly prolonged survival versus media control with an approximately 40% long-term survival rate (cure) in the multiply treated, HSV-naive animals. Prior immunization of the mice with HSV did not significantly decrease the median survival of the single or multiply treated HSV-1716 or the carrier cell-treated groups. These studies support the development of replication-selective herpes virus mutants for use in localized intraperitoneal malignancies.

  19. A linked simulation-optimization model for solving the unknown groundwater pollution source identification problems.

    PubMed

    Ayvaz, M Tamer

    2010-09-20

    This study proposes a linked simulation-optimization model for solving the unknown groundwater pollution source identification problems. In the proposed model, MODFLOW and MT3DMS packages are used to simulate the flow and transport processes in the groundwater system. These models are then integrated with an optimization model which is based on the heuristic harmony search (HS) algorithm. In the proposed simulation-optimization model, the locations and release histories of the pollution sources are treated as the explicit decision variables and determined through the optimization model. Also, an implicit solution procedure is proposed to determine the optimum number of pollution sources which is an advantage of this model. The performance of the proposed model is evaluated on two hypothetical examples for simple and complex aquifer geometries, measurement error conditions, and different HS solution parameter sets. Identified results indicated that the proposed simulation-optimization model is an effective way and may be used to solve the inverse pollution source identification problems.

  20. Synthesis, cholinesterase inhibition and molecular modelling studies of coumarin linked thiourea derivatives.

    PubMed

    Saeed, Aamer; Zaib, Sumera; Ashraf, Saba; Iftikhar, Javeria; Muddassar, Muhammad; Zhang, Kam Y J; Iqbal, Jamshed

    2015-12-01

    Alzheimer's disease is among the most widespread neurodegenerative disorder. Cholinesterases (ChEs) play an indispensable role in the control of cholinergic transmission and thus the acetylcholine level in the brain is enhanced by inhibition of ChEs. Coumarin linked thiourea derivatives were designed, synthesized and evaluated biologically in order to determine their inhibitory activity against acetylcholinesterases (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterases (BChE). The synthesized derivatives of coumarin linked thiourea compounds showed potential inhibitory activity against AChE and BChE. Among all the synthesized compounds, 1-(2-Oxo-2H-chromene-3-carbonyl)-3-(3-chlorophenyl)thiourea (2e) was the most potent inhibitor against AChE with an IC50 value of 0.04±0.01μM, while 1-(2-Oxo-2H-chromene-3-carbonyl)-3-(2-methoxyphenyl)thiourea (2b) showed the most potent inhibitory activity with an IC50 value of 0.06±0.02μM against BChE. Molecular docking simulations were performed using the homology models of both cholinesterases in order to explore the probable binding modes of inhibitors. Results showed that the novel synthesized coumarin linked thiourea derivatives are potential candidates to develop for potent and efficacious acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) inhibitors.

  1. Application of cross-linked and hydrolyzed arabinoxylans in baking of model rye bread.

    PubMed

    Buksa, Krzysztof; Nowotna, Anna; Ziobro, Rafał

    2016-02-01

    The role of water extractable arabinoxylan with varying molar mass and structure (cross-linked vs. hydrolyzed) in the structure formation of rye bread was examined using a model bread. Instead of the normal flour, the dough contained starch, arabinoxylan and protein, which were isolated from rye wholemeal. It was observed that the applied mixes of these constituents result in a product closely resembling typical rye bread, even if arabinoxylan was modified (by cross-linking or hydrolysis). The levels of arabinoxylan required for bread preparation depended on its modification and mix composition. At 3% protein, the maximum applicable level of poorly soluble cross-linked arabinoxylan was 3%, as higher amounts of this preparation resulted in an extensively viscous dough and diminished bread volume. On the other hand highly soluble, hydrolyzed arabinoxylan could be used at a higher level (6%) together with larger amounts of rye protein (3% or 6%). Further addition of arabinoxylan leads to excessive water absorption, resulting in a decreased viscosity of the dough during baking and insufficient gas retention.

  2. An atomistic model for cross-linked HNBR elastomers used in seals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molinari, Nicola; Sutton, Adrian; Stevens, John; Mostofi, Arash

    2015-03-01

    Hydrogenated nitrile butadiene rubber (HNBR) is one of the most common elastomeric materials used for seals in the oil and gas industry. These seals sometimes suffer ``explosive decompression,'' a costly problem in which gases permeate a seal at the elevated temperatures and pressures pertaining in oil and gas wells, leading to rupture when the seal is brought back to the surface. The experimental evidence that HNBR and its unsaturated parent NBR have markedly different swelling properties suggests that cross-linking may occur during hydrogenation of NBR to produce HNBR. We have developed a code compatible with the LAMMPS molecular dynamics package to generate fully atomistic HNBR configurations by hydrogenating initial NBR structures. This can be done with any desired degree of cross-linking. The code uses a model of atomic interactions based on the OPLS-AA force-field. We present calculations of the dependence of a number of bulk properties on the degree of cross-linking. Using our atomistic representations of HNBR and NBR, we hope to develop a better molecular understanding of the mechanisms that result in explosive decompression.

  3. Neoproterozoic paleogeography of the Tarim Block: An extended or alternative "missing-link" model for Rodinia?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Bin; Evans, David A. D.; Li, Yong-Xiang

    2017-01-01

    Recent reconstructions of the Rodinia supercontinent and its breakup incorporate South China as a ;missing link; between Australia and Laurentia, and place the Tarim craton adjacent to northwestern Australia on the supercontinent's periphery. However, subsequent kinematic evolution toward Gondwana amalgamation requires complex geometric shuffling between South China and Tarim, which cannot be easily resolved with the stratigraphic records of those blocks. Here we present new paleomagnetic data from early Ediacaran strata of northwest Tarim, and document large-scale rotation at near-constant paleolatitudes during Cryogenian time. The rotation is coeval with Rodinia breakup, and Tarim's paleolatitudes are compatible with its placement between Australia and Laurentia, either by itself as an alternative ;missing link; or joined with South China in that role. At the same time, indications of subduction-related magmatism in Tarim's Neoproterozoic record suggest that Rodinia breakup was dynamically linked to subduction retreat along its northern margin. Such a model is akin to early stages of Jurassic fragmentation within southern Gondwana, and implies more complicated subduction-related dynamics of supercontinent breakup than superplume impingement alone.

  4. LINKING ETA MODEL WITH THE COMMUNITY MULTISCALE AIR QUALITY (CMAQ) MODELING SYSTEM: OZONE BOUNDARY CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A prototype surface ozone concentration forecasting model system for the Eastern U.S. has been developed. The model system is consisting of a regional meteorological and a regional air quality model. It demonstrated a strong prediction dependence on its ozone boundary conditions....

  5. The Repeated Insertion Model for Rankings: Missing Link between Two Subset Choice Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doignon, Jean-Paul; Pekec, Aleksandar; Regenwetter, Michel

    2004-01-01

    Several probabilistic models for subset choice have been proposed in the literature, for example, to explain approval voting data. We show that Marley et al.'s latent scale model is subsumed by Falmagne and Regenwetter's size-independent model, in the sense that every choice probability distribution generated by the former can also be explained by…

  6. LERC-SLAM - THE NASA LEWIS RESEARCH CENTER SATELLITE LINK ATTENUATION MODEL PROGRAM (MACINTOSH VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manning, R. M.

    1994-01-01

    The frequency and intensity of rain attenuation affecting the communication between a satellite and an earth terminal is an important consideration in planning satellite links. The NASA Lewis Research Center Satellite Link Attenuation Model Program (LeRC-SLAM) provides a static and dynamic statistical assessment of the impact of rain attenuation on a communications link established between an earth terminal and a geosynchronous satellite. The program is designed for use in the specification, design and assessment of satellite links for any terminal location in the continental United States. The basis for LeRC-SLAM is the ACTS Rain Attenuation Prediction Model, which uses a log-normal cumulative probability distribution to describe the random process of rain attenuation on satellite links. The derivation of the statistics for the rainrate process at the specified terminal location relies on long term rainfall records compiled by the U.S. Weather Service during time periods of up to 55 years in length. The theory of extreme value statistics is also utilized. The user provides 1) the longitudinal position of the satellite in geosynchronous orbit, 2) the geographical position of the earth terminal in terms of latitude and longitude, 3) the height above sea level of the terminal site, 4) the yearly average rainfall at the terminal site, and 5) the operating frequency of the communications link (within 1 to 1000 GHz, inclusive). Based on the yearly average rainfall at the terminal location, LeRC-SLAM calculates the relevant rain statistics for the site using an internal data base. The program then generates rain attenuation data for the satellite link. This data includes a description of the static (i.e., yearly) attenuation process, an evaluation of the cumulative probability distribution for attenuation effects, and an evaluation of the probability of fades below selected fade depths. In addition, LeRC-SLAM calculates the elevation and azimuth angles of the terminal

  7. LERC-SLAM - THE NASA LEWIS RESEARCH CENTER SATELLITE LINK ATTENUATION MODEL PROGRAM (IBM PC VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manning, R. M.

    1994-01-01

    The frequency and intensity of rain attenuation affecting the communication between a satellite and an earth terminal is an important consideration in planning satellite links. The NASA Lewis Research Center Satellite Link Attenuation Model Program (LeRC-SLAM) provides a static and dynamic statistical assessment of the impact of rain attenuation on a communications link established between an earth terminal and a geosynchronous satellite. The program is designed for use in the specification, design and assessment of satellite links for any terminal location in the continental United States. The basis for LeRC-SLAM is the ACTS Rain Attenuation Prediction Model, which uses a log-normal cumulative probability distribution to describe the random process of rain attenuation on satellite links. The derivation of the statistics for the rainrate process at the specified terminal location relies on long term rainfall records compiled by the U.S. Weather Service during time periods of up to 55 years in length. The theory of extreme value statistics is also utilized. The user provides 1) the longitudinal position of the satellite in geosynchronous orbit, 2) the geographical position of the earth terminal in terms of latitude and longitude, 3) the height above sea level of the terminal site, 4) the yearly average rainfall at the terminal site, and 5) the operating frequency of the communications link (within 1 to 1000 GHz, inclusive). Based on the yearly average rainfall at the terminal location, LeRC-SLAM calculates the relevant rain statistics for the site using an internal data base. The program then generates rain attenuation data for the satellite link. This data includes a description of the static (i.e., yearly) attenuation process, an evaluation of the cumulative probability distribution for attenuation effects, and an evaluation of the probability of fades below selected fade depths. In addition, LeRC-SLAM calculates the elevation and azimuth angles of the terminal

  8. Link between hopping models and percolation scaling laws for charge transport in mixtures of small molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Ha, Dong -Gwang; Kim, Jang -Joo; Baldo, Marc A.

    2016-04-29

    Mixed host compositions that combine charge transport materials with luminescent dyes offer superior control over exciton formation and charge transport in organic light emitting devices (OLEDs). Two approaches are typically used to optimize the fraction of charge transport materials in a mixed host composition: either an empirical percolative model, or a hopping transport model. We show that these two commonly-employed models are linked by an analytic expression which relates the localization length to the percolation threshold and critical exponent. The relation is confirmed both numerically and experimentally through measurements of the relative conductivity of Tris(4-carbazoyl-9-ylphenyl) amine (TCTA) :1,3-bis(3,5-dipyrid-3-yl-phenyl) benzene (BmPyPb) mixtures with different concentrations, where the TCTA plays a role as hole conductor and the BmPyPb as hole insulator. Furthermore, the analytic relation may allow the rational design of mixed layers of small molecules for high-performance OLEDs.

  9. Excitonic Coupling and Femtosecond Relaxation of Zinc Porphyrin Oligomers Linked with Triazole Bridge: Dynamics and Modeling.

    PubMed

    Bukreev, Alexey; Mikhailov, Konstantin; Shelaev, Ivan; Gostev, Fedor; Polevaya, Yuliya; Tyurin, Vladimir; Beletskaya, Irina; Umansky, Stanislav; Nadtochenko, Victor

    2016-03-31

    The synthesis of new zinc porphyrin oligomers linked by a triazole bridge was carried out via "click" reaction. A split in the porphyrin oligomer B-band was observed. It was considered as evidence of exciton-excitonic coupling. The relaxation of excited states in Q-band porphyrin oligomers was studied by the femtosecond laser spectroscopy technique with a 20 fs pump pulse. The transient oscillations of two B-band excitonic peaks have a π-radian shift. For explanation of the coherent oscillation, a theoretical model was developed. The model considered the combination of the exciton-excitonic coupling between porphyrin rings in dimer and weak exciton-vibronic coupling in one porphyrin ring. By varying the values of the structural parameters of porphyrins (the strength values of this couplings and measure of symmetry breaking), we obtained correspondence between the experimental data (phase shift and amplitudes of the spectrum oscillations) and the predictions of the model developed here.

  10. Exploring the link between emotional and behavioral dysregulation: a test of the emotional cascade model.

    PubMed

    Tuna, Ezgi; Bozo, Özlem

    2014-01-01

    The emotional cascade model (Selby, Anestis, & Joiner, 2008) posits that the link between emotional and behavioral dysregulation may be through emotional cascades, which are repetitive cycles of rumination and negative affect that result in an intensification of emotional distress. Dysregulated behaviors, such as non-suicidal self-injury, are used to reduce aversive emotions and distract the person from ruminative processes. The aim of the present study was to investigate the emotional cascade model in a non-Western sample of Turkish university students. Accordingly, a structural equation model was tested, and the results demonstrated that the emotional cascades were indeed associated to dysregulated behaviors, even when the effect of current symptoms of depression and anxiety on behavioral dysregulation was statistically controlled. Furthermore, thought suppression had a stronger relationship with all symptom patterns as compared to rumination, which may point to a cultural difference. Possible implications of the findings are discussed.

  11. Bayesian analysis of an admixture model with mutations and arbitrarily linked markers.

    PubMed

    Excoffier, Laurent; Estoup, Arnaud; Cornuet, Jean-Marie

    2005-03-01

    We introduce here a Bayesian analysis of a classical admixture model in which all parameters are simultaneously estimated. Our approach follows the approximate Bayesian computation (ABC) framework, relying on massive simulations and a rejection-regression algorithm. Although computationally intensive, this approach can easily deal with complex mutation models and partially linked loci, and it can be thoroughly validated without much additional computation cost. Compared to a recent maximum-likelihood (ML) method, the ABC approach leads to similarly accurate estimates of admixture proportions in the case of recent admixture events, but it is found superior when the admixture is more ancient. All other parameters of the admixture model such as the divergence time between parental populations, the admixture time, and the population sizes are also well estimated, unlike the ML method. The use of partially linked markers does not introduce any particular bias in the estimation of admixture, but ML confidence intervals are found too narrow if linkage is not specifically accounted for. The application of our method to an artificially admixed domestic bee population from northwest Italy suggests that the admixture occurred in the last 10-40 generations and that the parental Apis mellifera and A. ligustica populations were completely separated since the last glacial maximum.

  12. Modeling channel interference in an orbital angular momentum-multiplexed laser link

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anguita, Jaime A.; Neifeld, Mark A.; Vasic, Bane V.

    2009-08-01

    We study the effects of optical turbulence on the energy crosstalk among constituent orbital angular momentum (OAM) states in a vortex-based multi-channel laser communication link and determine channel interference in terms of turbulence strength and OAM state separation. We characterize the channel interference as a function of C2n and transmit OAM state, and propose probability models to predict the random fluctuations in the received signals for such architecture. Simulations indicate that turbulence-induced channel interference is mutually correlated across receive channels.

  13. Linking nutrient loading and oxygen in the coastal ocean: A new global scale model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Daniel C.; Harrison, John A.

    2016-03-01

    Recent decades have witnessed an exponential spread of low-oxygen regions in the coastal ocean due at least in-part to enhanced terrestrial nutrient inputs. As oxygen deprivation is a major stressor on marine ecosystems, there is a great need to quantitatively link shifts in nutrient loading with changes in oxygen concentrations. To this end, we have developed and here describe, evaluate, and apply the Coastal Ocean Oxygen Linked to Benthic Exchange And Nutrient Supply (COOLBEANS) model, a first-of-its-kind, spatially explicit (with 152 coastal segments) model, global model of coastal oxygen and nutrient dynamics. In COOLBEANS, benthic oxygen demand (BOD) is calculated using empirical models for aerobic respiration, iron reduction, and sulfate reduction, while oxygen supply is represented by a simple parameterization of exchange between surface and bottom waters. A nutrient cycling component translates shifts in riverine nutrient inputs into changes in organic matter delivery to sediments and, ultimately, oxygen uptake. Modeled BOD reproduces observations reasonably well (Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency = 0.71), and estimates of exchange between surface and bottom waters correlate with stratification. The model examines sensitivity of bottom water oxygen to changes in nutrient inputs and vertical exchange between surface and bottom waters, highlighting the importance of this vertical exchange in defining the susceptibility of a system to oxygen depletion. These sensitivities along with estimated maximum hypoxic areas that are supported by present day nutrient loads are consistent with existing hypoxic regions. Sensitivities are put into context by applying historic changes in nitrogen loading observed in the Gulf of Mexico to the global coastal ocean, demonstrating that such loads would drive many systems anoxic or even sulfidic.

  14. Contrasting life strategies of viruses that infect photo- and heterotrophic bacteria, as revealed by viral tagging.

    PubMed

    Deng, Li; Gregory, Ann; Yilmaz, Suzan; Poulos, Bonnie T; Hugenholtz, Philip; Sullivan, Matthew B

    2012-10-30

    Ocean viruses are ubiquitous and abundant and play important roles in global biogeochemical cycles by means of their mortality, horizontal gene transfer, and manipulation of host metabolism. However, the obstacles involved in linking viruses to their hosts in a high-throughput manner bottlenecks our ability to understand virus-host interactions in complex communities. We have developed a method called viral tagging (VT), which combines mixtures of host cells and fluorescent viruses with flow cytometry. We investigated multiple viruses which infect each of two model marine bacteria that represent the slow-growing, photoautotrophic genus Synechococcus (Cyanobacteria) and the fast-growing, heterotrophic genus Pseudoalteromonas (Gammaproteobacteria). Overall, viral tagging results for viral infection were consistent with plaque and liquid infection assays for cyanobacterial myo-, podo- and siphoviruses and some (myo- and podoviruses) but not all (four siphoviruses) heterotrophic bacterial viruses. Virus-tagged Pseudoalteromonas organisms were proportional to the added viruses under varied infection conditions (virus-bacterium ratios), while no more than 50% of the Synechococcus organisms were virus tagged even at viral abundances that exceeded (5 to 10×) that of their hosts. Further, we found that host growth phase minimally impacts the fraction of virus-tagged Synechococcus organisms while greatly affecting phage adsorption to Pseudoalteromonas. Together these findings suggest that at least two contrasting viral life strategies exist in the oceans and that they likely reflect adaptation to their host microbes. Looking forward to the point at which the virus-tagging signature is well understood (e.g., for Synechococcus), application to natural communities should begin to provide population genomic data at the proper scale for predictively modeling two of the most abundant biological entities on Earth. Viral study suffers from an inability to link viruses to hosts en

  15. Ensuring congruency in multiscale modeling: towards linking agent based and continuum biomechanical models of arterial adaptation.

    PubMed

    Hayenga, Heather N; Thorne, Bryan C; Peirce, Shayn M; Humphrey, Jay D

    2011-11-01

    There is a need to develop multiscale models of vascular adaptations to understand tissue-level manifestations of cellular level mechanisms. Continuum-based biomechanical models are well suited for relating blood pressures and flows to stress-mediated changes in geometry and properties, but less so for describing underlying mechanobiological processes. Discrete stochastic agent-based models are well suited for representing biological processes at a cellular level, but not for describing tissue-level mechanical changes. We present here a conceptually new approach to facilitate the coupling of continuum and agent-based models. Because of ubiquitous limitations in both the tissue- and cell-level data from which one derives constitutive relations for continuum models and rule-sets for agent-based models, we suggest that model verification should enforce congruency across scales. That is, multiscale model parameters initially determined from data sets representing different scales should be refined, when possible, to ensure that common outputs are consistent. Potential advantages of this approach are illustrated by comparing simulated aortic responses to a sustained increase in blood pressure predicted by continuum and agent-based models both before and after instituting a genetic algorithm to refine 16 objectively bounded model parameters. We show that congruency-based parameter refinement not only yielded increased consistency across scales, it also yielded predictions that are closer to in vivo observations.

  16. Predictive statistical models linking antecedent meteorological conditions and waterway bacterial contamination in urban waterways.

    PubMed

    Farnham, David J; Lall, Upmanu

    2015-06-01

    Although the relationships between meteorological conditions and waterway bacterial contamination are being better understood, statistical models capable of fully leveraging these links have not been developed for highly urbanized settings. We present a hierarchical Bayesian regression model for predicting transient fecal indicator bacteria contamination episodes in urban waterways. Canals, creeks, and rivers of the New York City harbor system are used to examine the model. The model configuration facilitates the hierarchical structure of the underlying system with weekly observations nested within sampling sites, which in turn were nested inside of the harbor network. Models are compared using cross-validation and a variety of Bayesian and classical model fit statistics. The uncertainty of predicted enterococci concentration values is reflected by sampling from the posterior predictive distribution. Issuing predictions with the uncertainty reasonably reflected allows a water manager or a monitoring agency to issue warnings that better reflect the underlying risk of exposure. A model using only antecedent meteorological conditions is shown to correctly classify safe and unsafe levels of enterococci with good accuracy. The hierarchical Bayesian regression approach is most valuable where transient fecal indicator bacteria contamination is problematic and drainage network data are scarce.

  17. Linking market interaction intensity of 3D Ising type financial model with market volatility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Wen; Ke, Jinchuan; Wang, Jun; Feng, Ling

    2016-11-01

    Microscopic interaction models in physics have been used to investigate the complex phenomena of economic systems. The simple interactions involved can lead to complex behaviors and help the understanding of mechanisms in the financial market at a systemic level. This article aims to develop a financial time series model through 3D (three-dimensional) Ising dynamic system which is widely used as an interacting spins model to explain the ferromagnetism in physics. Through Monte Carlo simulations of the financial model and numerical analysis for both the simulation return time series and historical return data of Hushen 300 (HS300) index in Chinese stock market, we show that despite its simplicity, this model displays stylized facts similar to that seen in real financial market. We demonstrate a possible underlying link between volatility fluctuations of real stock market and the change in interaction strengths of market participants in the financial model. In particular, our stochastic interaction strength in our model demonstrates that the real market may be consistently operating near the critical point of the system.

  18. Autistic disorder and viral infections.

    PubMed

    Libbey, Jane E; Sweeten, Thayne L; McMahon, William M; Fujinami, Robert S

    2005-02-01

    Autistic disorder (autism) is a behaviorally defined developmental disorder with a wide range of behaviors. Although the etiology of autism is unknown, data suggest that autism results from multiple etiologies with both genetic and environmental contributions, which may explain the spectrum of behaviors seen in this disorder. One proposed etiology for autism is viral infection very early in development. The mechanism, by which viral infection may lead to autism, be it through direct infection of the central nervous system (CNS), through infection elsewhere in the body acting as a trigger for disease in the CNS, through alteration of the immune response of the mother or offspring, or through a combination of these, is not yet known. Animal models in which early viral infection results in behavioral changes later in life include the influenza virus model in pregnant mice and the Borna disease virus model in newborn Lewis rats. Many studies over the years have presented evidence both for and against the association of autism with various viral infections. The best association to date has been made between congenital rubella and autism; however, members of the herpes virus family may also have a role in autism. Recently, controversy has arisen as to the involvement of measles virus and/or the measles, mumps, rubella (MMR) vaccine in the development of autism. Biological assays lend support to the association between measles virus or MMR and autism whereas epidemiologic studies show no association between MMR and autism. Further research is needed to clarify both the mechanisms whereby viral infection early in development may lead to autism and the possible involvement of the MMR vaccine in the development of autism.

  19. Combination fluconazole/paroxetine treatment is neuroprotective despite ongoing neuroinflammation and viral replication in an SIV model of HIV neurological disease.

    PubMed

    Meulendyke, Kelly A; Queen, Suzanne E; Engle, Elizabeth L; Shirk, Erin N; Liu, Jiayang; Steiner, Joseph P; Nath, Avindra; Tarwater, Patrick M; Graham, David R; Mankowski, Joseph L; Zink, M Christine

    2014-12-01

    Effective combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) in HIV-infected patients has made HIV a treatable infection; however, debilitating HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) can still affect approximately 50% of HIV-infected individuals even under cART. While cART has greatly reduced the prevalence of the most severe form of HAND, milder forms have increased in prevalence, leaving the total proportion of HIV-infected individuals suffering from HAND relatively unchanged. In this study, an in vitro drug screen identified fluconazole and paroxetine as protective compounds against HIV gp120 and Tat neurotoxicity. Using an accelerated, consistent SIV/macaque model of HIV-associated CNS disease, we tested the in vivo neuroprotective capabilities of combination fluconazole/paroxetine (FluPar) treatment. FluPar treatment protected macaques from SIV-induced neurodegeneration, as measured by neurofilament light chain in the CSF, APP accumulation in axons, and CaMKIIα in the frontal cortex, but did not significantly reduce markers of neuroinflammation or plasma or CNS viral loads. Since HIV and SIV neurodegeneration is often attributed to accompanying neuroinflammation, this study provides proof of concept that neuroprotection can be achieved even in the face of ongoing neuroinflammation and viral replication.

  20. New links between SOD1 and metabolic dysfunction from a yeast model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Bastow, Emma L.; Peswani, Amber R.; Tarrant, Daniel S. J.; Pentland, Daniel R.; Chen, Xi; Staniforth, Gemma L.; Rowe, Michelle L.; Howard, Mark J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT A number of genes have been linked to familial forms of the fatal motor neuron disease amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Over 150 mutations within the gene encoding superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) have been implicated in ALS, but why such mutations lead to ALS-associated cellular dysfunction is unclear. In this study, we identify how ALS-linked SOD1 mutations lead to changes in the cellular health of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We find that it is not the accumulation of aggregates but the loss of Sod1 protein stability that drives cellular dysfunction. The toxic effect of Sod1 instability does not correlate with a loss of mitochondrial function or increased production of reactive oxygen species, but instead prevents acidification of the vacuole, perturbs metabolic regulation and promotes senescence. Central to the toxic gain-of-function seen with the SOD1 mutants examined was an inability to regulate amino acid biosynthesis. We also report that leucine supplementation results in an improvement in motor function in a Caenorhabditis elegans model of ALS. Our data suggest that metabolic dysfunction plays an important role in Sod1-mediated toxicity in both the yeast and worm models of ALS. PMID:27656112

  1. Links between deterministic and stochastic approaches for invasion in growth-fragmentation-death models.

    PubMed

    Campillo, Fabien; Champagnat, Nicolas; Fritsch, Coralie

    2016-12-01

    We present two approaches to study invasion in growth-fragmentation-death models. The first one is based on a stochastic individual based model, which is a piecewise deterministic branching process with a continuum of types, and the second one is based on an integro-differential model. The invasion of the population is described by the survival probability for the former model and by an eigenproblem for the latter one. We study these two notions of invasion fitness, giving different characterizations of the growth of the population, and we make links between these two complementary points of view. In particular we prove that the two approaches lead to the same criterion of possible invasion. Based on Krein-Rutman theory, we also give a proof of the existence of a solution to the eigenproblem, which satisfies the conditions needed for our study of the stochastic model, hence providing a set of assumptions under which both approaches can be carried out. Finally, we motivate our work in the context of adaptive dynamics in a chemostat model.

  2. Dynamically linking economic models to ecological condition for coastal zone management: Application to sustainable tourism planning.

    PubMed

    Dvarskas, Anthony

    2017-03-01

    While the development of the tourism industry can bring economic benefits to an area, it is important to consider the long-run impact of the industry on a given location. Particularly when the tourism industry relies upon a certain ecological state, those weighing different development options need to consider the long-run impacts of increased tourist numbers upon measures of ecological condition. This paper presents one approach for linking a model of recreational visitor behavior with an ecological model that estimates the impact of the increased visitors upon the environment. Two simulations were run for the model using initial parameters available from survey data and water quality data for beach locations in Croatia. Results suggest that the resilience of a given tourist location to the changes brought by increasing tourism numbers is important in determining its long-run sustainability. Further work should investigate additional model components, including the tourism industry, refinement of the relationships assumed by the model, and application of the proposed model in additional areas.

  3. Dynamic hysteresis modelling of entangled cross-linked fibres in shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piollet, Elsa; Poquillon, Dominique; Michon, Guilhem

    2016-11-01

    The objective of this paper is to characterize and model the vibration behaviour of entangled carbon fibres cross-linked with epoxy resin. The material is tested in shear, in a double lap configuration. Experimental testing is carried out for frequencies varying from 1 Hz to 80 Hz and for shear strain amplitudes ranging from 5 ·10-4 to 1 ·10-2. Measured shear stress-strain hysteresis loops show a nonlinear behaviour with a low frequency dependency. The hysteresis loops are decomposed in a linear part and three nonlinear parts: a dry friction hysteresis, a stiffening term and a stiction-like overshoot term. The Generalized Dahl Model is used in conjunction with other hysteresis models to develop an appropriate description of the measured hysteresis loops, based on the three nonlinear parts. In particular, a new one-state formulation of the Bliman-Sorine model is developed. A new identification procedure is also introduced for the Dahl model, based on the so-called backbone curve. The model is shown to capture well the complex shapes of the measured hysteresis loops at all amplitudes.

  4. Non-random patterns in viral diversity.

    PubMed

    Anthony, Simon J; Islam, Ariful; Johnson, Christine; Navarrete-Macias, Isamara; Liang, Eliza; Jain, Komal; Hitchens, Peta L; Che, Xiaoyu; Soloyvov, Alexander; Hicks, Allison L; Ojeda-Flores, Rafael; Zambrana-Torrelio, Carlos; Ulrich, Werner; Rostal, Melinda K; Petrosov, Alexandra; Garcia, Joel; Haider, Najmul; Wolfe, Nathan; Goldstein, Tracey; Morse, Stephen S; Rahman, Mahmudur; Epstein, Jonathan H; Mazet, Jonna K; Daszak, Peter; Lipkin, W Ian

    2015-09-22

    It is currently unclear whether changes in viral communities will ever be predictable. Here we investigate whether viral communities in wildlife are inherently structured (inferring predictability) by looking at whether communities are assembled through deterministic (often predictable) or stochastic (not predictable) processes. We sample macaque faeces across nine sites in Bangladesh and use consensus PCR and sequencing to discover 184 viruses from 14 viral families. We then use network modelling and statistical null-hypothesis testing to show the presence of non-random deterministic patterns at different scales, between sites and within individuals. We show that the effects of determinism are not absolute however, as stochastic patterns are also observed. In showing that determinism is an important process in viral community assembly we conclude that it should be possible to forecast changes to some portion of a viral community, however there will always be some portion for which prediction will be unlikely.

  5. Non-random patterns in viral diversity

    PubMed Central

    Anthony, Simon J.; Islam, Ariful; Johnson, Christine; Navarrete-Macias, Isamara; Liang, Eliza; Jain, Komal; Hitchens, Peta L.; Che, Xiaoyu; Soloyvov, Alexander; Hicks, Allison L.; Ojeda-Flores, Rafael; Zambrana-Torrelio, Carlos; Ulrich, Werner; Rostal, Melinda K.; Petrosov, Alexandra; Garcia, Joel; Haider, Najmul; Wolfe, Nathan; Goldstein, Tracey; Morse, Stephen S.; Rahman, Mahmudur; Epstein, Jonathan H.; Mazet, Jonna K.; Daszak, Peter; Lipkin, W. Ian

    2015-01-01

    It is currently unclear whether changes in viral communities will ever be predictable. Here we investigate whether viral communities in wildlife are inherently structured (inferring predictability) by looking at whether communities are assembled through deterministic (often predictable) or stochastic (not predictable) processes. We sample macaque faeces across nine sites in Bangladesh and use consensus PCR and sequencing to discover 184 viruses from 14 viral families. We then use network modelling and statistical null-hypothesis testing to show the presence of non-random deterministic patterns at different scales, between sites and within individuals. We show that the effects of determinism are not absolute however, as stochastic patterns are also observed. In showing that determinism is an important process in viral community assembly we conclude that it should be possible to forecast changes to some portion of a viral community, however there will always be some portion for which prediction will be unlikely. PMID:26391192

  6. Individual-based modeling of fish: Linking to physical models and water quality.

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, K.A.

    1997-08-01

    The individual-based modeling approach for the simulating fish population and community dynamics is gaining popularity. Individual-based modeling has been used in many other fields, such as forest succession and astronomy. The popularity of the individual-based approach is partly a result of the lack of success of the more aggregate modeling approaches traditionally used for simulating fish population and community dynamics. Also, recent recognition that it is often the atypical individual that survives has fostered interest in the individual-based approach. Two general types of individual-based models are distribution and configuration. Distribution models follow the probability distributions of individual characteristics, such as length and age. Configuration models explicitly simulate each individual; the sum over individuals being the population. DeAngelis et al (1992) showed that, when distribution and configuration models were formulated from the same common pool of information, both approaches generated similar predictions. The distribution approach was more compact and general, while the configuration approach was more flexible. Simple biological changes, such as making growth rate dependent on previous days growth rates, were easy to implement in the configuration version but prevented simple analytical solution of the distribution version.

  7. Developing and testing a theoretical model linking work-family conflict to employee safety.

    PubMed

    Cullen, Jennifer C; Hammer, Leslie B

    2007-07-01

    Despite work-family conflict being recognized as a source of stress, no published research to our knowledge has considered how it negatively affects workplace safety. A theoretical model linking strain-based work-family conflict and employee safety was tested with 243 health care workers. Within this model, work-family conflict is conceptualized as a workplace hazard. As expected, strong work performance norms and high work overload were associated with higher work-family conflict; increased family-to-work conflict was associated with decreased compliance with safety rules and less willingness to participate in discretionary safety meetings. Work-to-family conflict, however, was not associated with safety. These findings underscore the importance of work redesign strategies that consider work performance norms and work-family conflict for expecting a return on investment in terms of a safer workplace.

  8. Linking susceptibility genes and pathogenesis mechanisms using mouse models of systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Crampton, Steve P.; Morawski, Peter A.; Bolland, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) represents a challenging autoimmune disease from a clinical perspective because of its varied forms of presentation. Although broad-spectrum steroids remain the standard treatment for SLE, they have many side effects and only provide temporary relief from the symptoms of the disease. Thus, gaining a deeper understanding of the genetic traits and biological pathways that confer susceptibility to SLE will help in the design of more targeted and effective therapeutics. Both human genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and investigations using a variety of mouse models of SLE have been valuable for the identification of the genes and pathways involved in pathogenesis. In this Review, we link human susceptibility genes for SLE with biological pathways characterized in mouse models of lupus, and discuss how the mechanistic insights gained could advance drug discovery for the disease. PMID:25147296

  9. Disease dynamics in a coupled cholera model linking within-host and between-host interactions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xueying; Wang, Jin

    2016-09-19

    A new modelling framework is proposed to study the within-host and between-host dynamics of cholera, a severe intestinal infection caused by the bacterium Vibrio cholerae. The within-host dynamics are characterized by the growth of highly infectious vibrios inside the human body. These vibrios shed from humans contribute to the environmental bacterial growth and the transmission of the disease among humans, providing a link from the within-host dynamics at the individual level to the between-host dynamics at the population and environmental level. A fast-slow analysis is conducted based on the two different time scales in our model. In particular, a bifurcation study is performed, and sufficient and necessary conditions are derived that lead to a backward bifurcation in cholera epidemics. Our result regarding the backward bifurcation highlights the challenges in the prevention and control of cholera.

  10. Atmospheric turbulence-induced fading channel model for space-to-ground laser communications links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyoshima, Morio; Takenaka, Hideki; Takayama, Yoshihisa

    2011-08-01

    The fading channel model for generating a random time-varying signal based on the atmospheric turbulence spectrum for space-to-ground laser links is discussed. The temporal frequency characteristics of the downlink are theoretically derived based on the von Karman spectrum. The rms wind speed based on the Bufton wind model is used as the transverse wind velocity, which makes the simulation simple. The time-varying signal is generated as functions of the receiver aperture diameter and the rms wind speed. The simulated result of the time-varying signal is presented and compared with the gamma-gamma distribution based on the scintillation theory in a moderate-to-strong-turbulence regime.

  11. Linking sediment fingerprinting and modeling outputs for a Spanish Pyrenean river catchment.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palazón, Leticia; Latorre, Borja; Gaspar, Leticia; Blake, Williams H.; Smith, Hugh G.; Navas, Ana

    2015-04-01

    Indirect techniques to study fine sediment redistribution in river catchments could provide unique and diverse information, which, when combined become a powerful tool to address catchment management problems. Such combinations could solve limitations of individual techniques and provide different lines of information to address a particular problem. The Barasona reservoir has suffered from siltation since its construction, with the loss of over one third of its storage volume in around 30 study years (period 1972-1996). Information on sediment production from tributary catchments for the reservoir is required to develop management plans for maintaining reservoir sustainability. Large spatial variability in sediment delivery was found in previous studies in the Barasona catchment and the major sediment sources identified included badlands developed in the middle part of the catchment and the agricultural fields in its lower part. From the diverse range of indirect techniques, fingerprinting sediment sources and computer models could be linked to obtain a more holistic view of the processes related to sediment redistribution in the Barasona river catchment (1509 km2, Central Spanish Pyrenees), which comprises agricultural and forest land uses. In the present study, the results from a fingerprinting procedure and the SWAT model were compared and combined to improve the knowledge of land use sediment source contributions to the reservoir. Samples from the study catchment were used to define soil parameters for the model and for fingerprinting the land use sources. The fingerprinting approach provided information about relative contributions from land use sources to the superficial sediment samples taken from the reservoir infill. The calibration and validation of the model provided valuable information, for example on the timescale of sediment production from the different land uses within the catchment. Linking results from both techniques enabled us to achieve a

  12. Channel modelling for free-space optical inter-HAP links using adaptive ARQ transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parthasarathy, S.; Giggenbach, D.; Kirstädter, A.

    2014-10-01

    Free-space optical (FSO) communication systems have seen significant developments in recent years due to growing need for very high data rates and tap-proof communication. The operation of an FSO link is suited to diverse variety of applications such as satellites, High Altitude Platforms (HAPs), Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs), aircrafts, ground stations and other areas involving both civil and military situations. FSO communication systems face challenges due to different effects of the atmospheric channel. FSO channel primarily suffers from scintillation effects due to Index of Refraction Turbulence (IRT). In addition, acquisition and pointing becomes more difficult because of the high directivity of the transmitted beam: Miss-pointing of the transmitted beam and tracking errors at the receiver generate additional fading of the optical signal. High Altitude Platforms (HAPs) are quasi-stationary vehicles operating in the stratosphere. The slowly varying but precisely determined time-of-flight of the Inter-HAP channel adds to its characteristics. To propose a suitable ARQ scheme, proper theoretical understanding of the optical atmospheric propagation and modeling of a specific scenario FSO channel is required. In this paper, a bi-directional symmetrical Inter-HAP link has been selected and modeled. The Inter-HAP channel model is then investigated via simulations in terms of optical scintillation induced by IRT and in presence of pointing error. The performance characteristic of the model is then quantified in terms of fading statistics from which the Packet Error Probability (PEP) is calculated. Based on the PEP characteristics, we propose suitable ARQ schemes.

  13. Actinobacteria from Termite Mounds Show Antiviral Activity against Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus, a Surrogate Model for Hepatitis C Virus

    PubMed Central

    Padilla, Marina Aiello; Rodrigues, Rodney Alexandre Ferreira; Bastos, Juliana Cristina Santiago; Martini, Matheus Cavalheiro; Barnabé, Ana Caroline de Souza; Kohn, Luciana Konecny; Uetanabaro, Ana Paula Trovatti; Bomfim, Getúlio Freitas; Afonso, Rafael Sanches; Fantinatti-Garboggini, Fabiana; Arns, Clarice Weis

    2015-01-01

    Extracts from termite-associated bacteria were evaluated for in vitro antiviral activity against bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV). Two bacterial strains were identified as active, with percentages of inhibition (IP) equal to 98%. Both strains were subjected to functional analysis via the addition of virus and extract at different time points in cell culture; the results showed that they were effective as posttreatments. Moreover, we performed MTT colorimetric assays to identify the CC50, IC50, and SI values of these strains, and strain CDPA27 was considered the most promising. In parallel, the isolates were identified as Streptomyces through 16S rRNA gene sequencing analysis. Specifically, CDPA27 was identified as S. chartreusis. The CDPA27 extract was fractionated on a C18-E SPE cartridge, and the fractions were reevaluated. A 100% methanol fraction was identified to contain the compound(s) responsible for antiviral activity, which had an SI of 262.41. GC-MS analysis showed that this activity was likely associated with the compound(s) that had a peak retention time of 5 min. Taken together, the results of the present study provide new information for antiviral research using natural sources, demonstrate the antiviral potential of Streptomyces chartreusis compounds isolated from termite mounds against BVDV, and lay the foundation for further studies on the treatment of HCV infection. PMID:26579205

  14. Actinobacteria from Termite Mounds Show Antiviral Activity against Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus, a Surrogate Model for Hepatitis C Virus.

    PubMed

    Padilla, Marina Aiello; Rodrigues, Rodney Alexandre Ferreira; Bastos, Juliana Cristina Santiago; Martini, Matheus Cavalheiro; Barnabé, Ana Caroline de Souza; Kohn, Luciana Konecny; Uetanabaro, Ana Paula Trovatti; Bomfim, Getúlio Freitas; Afonso, Rafael Sanches; Fantinatti-Garboggini, Fabiana; Arns, Clarice Weis

    2015-01-01

    Extracts from termite-associated bacteria were evaluated for in vitro antiviral activity against bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV). Two bacterial strains were identified as active, with percentages of inhibition (IP) equal to 98%. Both strains were subjected to functional analysis via the addition of virus and extract at different time points in cell culture; the results showed that they were effective as posttreatments. Moreover, we performed MTT colorimetric assays to identify the CC50, IC50, and SI values of these strains, and strain CDPA27 was considered the most promising. In parallel, the isolates were identified as Streptomyces through 16S rRNA gene sequencing analysis. Specifically, CDPA27 was identified as S. chartreusis. The CDPA27 extract was fractionated on a C18-E SPE cartridge, and the fractions were reevaluated. A 100% methanol fraction was identified to contain the compound(s) responsible for antiviral activity, which had an SI of 262.41. GC-MS analysis showed that this activity was likely associated with the compound(s) that had a peak retention time of 5 min. Taken together, the results of the present study provide new information for antiviral research using natural sources, demonstrate the antiviral potential of Streptomyces chartreusis compounds isolated from termite mounds against BVDV, and lay the foundation for further studies on the treatment of HCV infection.

  15. Response of diatom-associated bacteria to host growth state, nutrient concentrations, and viral host infection in a model system.

    PubMed

    Baker, Lydia J; Alegado, Rosanna A; Kemp, Paul F

    2016-08-25

    Diatoms are photosynthetic unicellular eukaryotes found ubiquitously in aquatic systems. Frequent physical associations with other microorganisms such as bacteria may influence diatom fitness. The predictability of bacterial-diatom interactions is hypothesized to depend on availability of nutrients as well as the physiological state of the host. Biotic and abiotic factors such as nutrient levels, host growth stage and host viral infection were manipulated to determine their effect on the ecological succession of bacterial communities associated with a single cell line of Chaetoceros sp. KBDT20; this was assessed using the relative abundance of bacterial phylotypes based on 16S rDNA sequences. A single bacterial family, Alteromonadaceae, dominated the attached-bacterial community (84.0%), with the most prevalent phylotypes belonging to the Alteromonas and Marinobacter genera. The taxa comprising the other 16% of the attached bacterial assemblage include Alphaproteobacteria, Betaproteobacteria, Bacilli, Deltaproteobacteria, other Gammaproteobacteria and Flavobacteria. Nutrient concentration and host growth stage had a statistically significant effect on the phylogenetic composition of the attached bacteria. It was inferred that interactions between attached bacteria, as well as the inherent stochasticity mediating contact may also contribute to diatom-bacterial associations.

  16. The model of response to viral haemorrhagic fevers of the National Institute for Infectious Diseases "Lazzaro Spallanzani".

    PubMed

    Armignacco, O; Lauria, F N; Puro, V; Macrì, G; Petrecchia, A; Ippolito, G

    2001-01-01

    Viral haemorrhagic fevers (VHF) are severe and life-threatening diseases caused by a range of viruses. However, only four agents of VHF are known to be readily capable of person-to-person spread: Lassa virus, Crimean/Congo haemorrhagic fever virus, Ebola and Marburg viruses. Diseases caused by these viruses are endemic only in few areas in the world, most notably Africa and some rural parts of the Middle East and Eastern Europe. Nonetheless, the increasing volume of international travel presents a greater likelihood for the importation of these infections or of suspected cases in non endemic countries. Four conditions can lead to the importation and to the subsequent recognition of VHF within Europe: 1) patients arriving as a result of a planned medical evacuation; 2) persons who became sick on route to their destination; 3) persons discovered ill when entering a country, for example during routine clinical examination at the airport; 4) persons becoming sick after their arrival. Public health implications and the risk of secondary spread of pathogens in the above reported circumstances are very different. Similarly, preparedness and response should vary. This paper summarizes the present knowledge on the four VHF capable of person-to-person spread, describes the high isolation area constructed at the Italian National Institute for Infectious Diseases Lazzaro Spallanzani in Rome to respond to the occurrence of VHF. A brief overview of procedures and equipment adopted is provided.

  17. Bats as Viral Reservoirs.

    PubMed

    Hayman, David T S

    2016-09-29

    Bats are hosts of a range of viruses, including ebolaviruses, and many important human viral infections, such as measles and mumps, may have their ancestry traced back to bats. Here, I review viruses of all viral families detected in global bat populations. The viral diversity in bats is substantial, and viruses with all known types of genomic structures and replication strategies have been discovered in bats. However, the discovery of viruses is not geographically even, with some apparently undersampled regions, such as South America. Furthermore, some bat families, including those with global or wide distributions such as Emballonuridae and Miniopteridae, are underrepresented on viral databases. Future studies, including those that address these sampling gaps along with those that develop our understanding of viral-host relationships, are highlighted.

  18. Assessing intervention efficacy on high-risk drinkers using generalized linear mixed models with a new class of link functions.

    PubMed

    Prates, Marcos O; Aseltine, Robert H; Dey, Dipak K; Yan, Jun

    2013-11-01

    Unhealthy alcohol use is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in the United States. Brief interventions with high-risk drinkers during an emergency department (ED) visit are of great interest due to their possible efficacy and low cost. In a collaborative study with patients recruited at 14 academic ED across the United States, we examined the self-reported number of drinks per week by each patient following the exposure to a brief intervention. Count data with overdispersion have been mostly analyzed with generalized linear mixed models (GLMMs), of which only a limited number of link functions are available. Different choices of link function provide different fit and predictive power for a particular dataset. We propose a class of link functions from an alternative way to incorporate random effects in a GLMM, which encompasses many existing link functions as special cases. The methodology is naturally implemented in a Bayesian framework, with competing links selected with Bayesian model selection criteria such as the conditional predictive ordinate (CPO). In application to the ED intervention study, all models suggest that the intervention was effective in reducing the number of drinks, but some new models are found to significantly outperform the traditional model as measured by CPO. The validity of CPO in link selection is confirmed in a simulation study that shared the same characteristics as the count data from high-risk drinkers. The dataset and the source code for the best fitting model are available in Supporting Information.

  19. A dynamical systems analysis of the data assimilation linked ecosystem carbon (DALEC) models.

    PubMed

    Chuter, Anna M; Aston, Philip J; Skeldon, Anne C; Roulstone, Ian

    2015-03-01

    Changes in our climate and environment make it ever more important to understand the processes involved in Earth systems, such as the carbon cycle. There are many models that attempt to describe and predict the behaviour of carbon stocks and stores but, despite their complexity, significant uncertainties remain. We consider the qualitative behaviour of one of the simplest carbon cycle models, the Data Assimilation Linked Ecosystem Carbon (DALEC) model, which is a simple vegetation model of processes involved in the carbon cycle of forests, and consider in detail the dynamical structure of the model. Our analysis shows that the dynamics of both evergreen and deciduous forests in DALEC are dependent on a few key parameters and it is possible to find a limit point where there is stable sustainable behaviour on one side but unsustainable conditions on the other side. The fact that typical parameter values reside close to this limit point highlights the difficulty of predicting even the correct trend without sufficient data and has implications for the use of data assimilation methods.

  20. A dynamical systems analysis of the data assimilation linked ecosystem carbon (DALEC) models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuter, Anna M.; Aston, Philip J.; Skeldon, Anne C.; Roulstone, Ian

    2015-03-01

    Changes in our climate and environment make it ever more important to understand the processes involved in Earth systems, such as the carbon cycle. There are many models that attempt to describe and predict the behaviour of carbon stocks and stores but, despite their complexity, significant uncertainties remain. We consider the qualitative behaviour of one of the simplest carbon cycle models, the Data Assimilation Linked Ecosystem Carbon (DALEC) model, which is a simple vegetation model of processes involved in the carbon cycle of forests, and consider in detail the dynamical structure of the model. Our analysis shows that the dynamics of both evergreen and deciduous forests in DALEC are dependent on a few key parameters and it is possible to find a limit point where there is stable sustainable behaviour on one side but unsustainable conditions on the other side. The fact that typical parameter values reside close to this limit point highlights the difficulty of predicting even the correct trend without sufficient data and has implications for the use of data assimilation methods.

  1. Development of conceptual ecological models linking management of the Missouri River to pallid sturgeon population dynamics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jacobson, Robert B.; Parsley, Michael J.; Annis, Mandy L.; Colvin, Michael E.; Welker, Timothy L.; James, Daniel A.

    2015-01-01

    This report documents the process of developing and refining conceptual ecological models (CEMs) for linking river management to pallid sturgeon (Scaphirhynchus albus) population dynamics in the Missouri River. The refined CEMs are being used in the Missouri River Pallid Sturgeon Effects Analysis to organize, document, and formalize an understanding of pallid sturgeon population responses to past and future management alternatives. The general form of the CEMs, represented by a population-level model and component life-stage models, was determined in workshops held in the summer of 2013. Subsequently, the Missouri River Pallid Sturgeon Effects Analysis team designed a general hierarchical structure for the component models, refined the graphical structure, and reconciled variation among the components and between models developed for the upper river (Upper Missouri & Yellowstone Rivers) and the lower river (Missouri River downstream from Gavins Point Dam). Importance scores attributed to the relations between primary biotic characteristics and survival were used to define a candidate set of working dominant hypotheses about pallid sturgeon population dynamics. These CEMs are intended to guide research and adaptive-management actions to benefit pallid sturgeon populations in the Missouri River.

  2. Stabilizing PID controllers for a single-link biomechanical model with position, velocity, and force feedback.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Kamran; Roy, Anindo

    2004-12-01

    In this paper we address the problem of PID stabilization of a single-link inverted pendulum-based biomechanical model with force feedback, two levels of position and velocity feedback, and with delays in all the feedback loops. The novelty of the proposed model lies in its physiological relevance, whereby both small and medium latency sensory feedbacks from muscle spindle (MS), and force feedback from Golgi tendon organ (GTO) are included in the formulation. The biomechanical model also includes active and passive viscoelastic feedback from Hill-type muscle model and a second-order low-pass function for muscle activation. The central nervous system (CNS) regulation of postural movement is represented by a proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controller. Padé approximation of delay terms is employed to arrive at an overall rational transfer function of the biomechanical model. The Hermite-Biehler theorem is then used to derive stability results, leading to the existence of stabilizing PID controllers. An algorithm for selection of stabilizing feedback gains is developed using the linear matrix inequality (LMI) approach.

  3. Evaluating a model linking assessed parent factors to four domains of youth risky driving.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Sarah; Morrongiello, Barbara A; Colwell, Scott R

    2014-08-01

    Motor vehicle collisions are the leading cause of death in youth aged 15-19. Research has consistently shown that driver education programs do not result in safer youth driving. Indeed, the biggest predictor of collisions involving youth is parental history of collisions. The current study examined how parental modeling of and teaching about risky driving behaviors related to youth practices within four domains of risky driving (aggressive, substance use, distracted, moving violations), and evaluated whether the Prototype-Willingness Model explains links from parent to teen driving practices. Participants (N=432) were undergraduate students (mean age 18 years, age range 17-22 years) who had obtained their G2 driver's license within the past year; the G2 driver's license allows youth to drive alone on all municipal roads, with some restrictions on their blood alcohol level and the number of passengers they can carry. Results revealed that parental modeling was more predictive than parental teaching for all domains of risky driving examined. Youth whose parents modeled risky driving behaviors were found to be more likely to have engaged in those risky driving behaviors in the past, as well as to be more willing to engage in the behaviors in the future. The Prototype-Willingness Model was not a good fit to explain these relations. Findings from this study highlight the role parents play in the development of youth risky driving practices.

  4. High-dimensional immunomonitoring models of HIV-1–specific CD8 T-cell responses accurately identify subjects achieving spontaneous viral control

    PubMed Central

    Ndhlovu, Zaza M.; Chibnik, Lori B.; Proudfoot, Jacqueline; Vine, Seanna; McMullen, Ashley; Cesa, Kevin; Porichis, Filippos; Jones, R. Brad; Alvino, Donna Marie; Hart, Meghan G.; Stampouloglou, Eleni; Piechocka-Trocha, Alicja; Kadie, Carl; Pereyra, Florencia; Heckerman, David; De Jager, Philip L.; Walker, Bruce D.

    2013-01-01

    The development of immunomonitoring models to determine HIV-1 vaccine efficacy is a major challenge. Studies suggest that HIV-1–specific CD8 T cells play a critical role in subjects achieving spontaneous viral control (HIV-1 controllers) and that they will be important in immune interventions. However, no single CD8 T-cell function is uniquely associated with controller status and the heterogeneity of responses targeting different epitopes further complicates the discovery of determinants of protective immunity. In the present study, we describe immunomonitoring models integrating multiple functions of epitope-specific CD8 T cells that distinguish controllers from subjects with treated or untreated progressive infection. Models integrating higher numbers of variables and trained with the least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO) variant of logistic regression and 10-fold cross-validation produce “diagnostic tests” that display an excellent capacity to delineate subject categories. The test accuracy reaches 75% area under the receiving operating characteristic curve in cohorts matched for prevalence of protective alleles. Linear mixed-effects model analyses show that the proliferative capacity, cytokine production, and kinetics of cytokine secretion are associated with HIV-1 control. Although proliferative capacity is the strongest single discriminant, integrated modeling of different dimensions of data leverages individual associations. This strategy may have important applications in predictive model development and immune monitoring of HIV-1 vaccine trials. PMID:23233659

  5. Linking Formal and Informal Science Education: A Successful Model using Libraries, Volunteers and NASA Resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Race, M. S.; Lafayette Library; Learning Center Foundation (Lllcf)

    2011-12-01

    In these times of budget cuts, tight school schedules, and limited opportunities for student field trips and teacher professional development, it is especially difficult to expose elementary and middle school students to the latest STEM information-particularly in the space sciences. Using our library as a facilitator and catalyst, we built a volunteer-based, multi-faceted, curriculum-linked program for students and teachers in local middle schools (Grade 8) and showcased new astronomical and planetary science information using mainly NASA resources and volunteer effort. The project began with the idea of bringing free NASA photo exhibits (FETTU) to the Lafayette and Antioch Libraries for public display. Subsequently, the effort expanded by adding layers of activities that brought space and science information to teachers, students and the pubic at 5 libraries and schools in the 2 cities, one of which serves a diverse, underserved community. Overall, the effort (supported by a pilot grant from the Bechtel Foundation) included school and library based teacher workshops with resource materials; travelling space museum visits with hands-on activities (Chabot-to-Go); separate powerpoint presentations for students and adults at the library; and concurrent ancillary space-related themes for young children's programs at the library. This pilot project, based largely on the use of free government resources and online materials, demonstrated that volunteer-based, standards-linked STEM efforts can enhance curriculum at the middle school, with libraries serving a special role. Using this model, we subsequently also obtained a small NASA-Space Grant award to bring star parties and hand-on science activities to three libraries this Fall, linking with numerous Grade 5 teachers and students in two additional underserved areas of our county. It's not necessary to reinvent the wheel, you just collect the pieces and build on what you already have.

  6. Linking leaf and tree water use with an individual-tree model.

    PubMed

    Medlyn, Belinda E; Pepper, David A; O'Grady, Anthony P; Keith, Heather

    2007-12-01

    We tested the ability of a model to scale gas exchange from leaf level to whole-tree level by: (1) measuring leaf gas exchange in the canopy of 10 trees in a tall Eucalyptus delegatensis RT Baker forest in NSW, Australia; (2) monitoring sap flow of the same 10 trees during the measurement week; and (3) using an individual-tree-based model (MAESTRA) to link the two sets of measurements. Photosynthesis and stomatal conductance components of the model were parameterized with the leaf gas exchange data, and canopy structure was parameterized with crown heights, dimensions and leaf areas of each of the measurement trees and up to 45 neighboring trees. Transpiration of the measurement trees was predicted by the model and compared with sap flow data. Leaf gas exchange parameters were similar for all 10 trees, with the exception of two smaller trees that had relatively low stomatal conductances. We hypothesize that these trees may have experienced water stress as a result of competition from large neighboring trees. The model performed well, and in most cases, was able to replicate the time course of tree transpiration. Maximum rates of transpiration were higher than measured rates for some trees and lower than measured rates for others, which may have been a result of inaccuracy in estimating tree leaf area. There was a small lag (about 15-30 minutes) between sap flow and modeled transpiration for some trees in the morning, likely associated with use of water stored in stems. The model also captured patterns of variation in sap flow among trees. Overall, the study confirms the ability of models to estimate forest canopy transpiration from leaf-level measurements.

  7. Linking Murine and Human Plasmodium falciparum Challenge Models in a Translational Path for Antimalarial Drug Development

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, James S.; Marquart, Louise; Sekuloski, Silvana; Trenholme, Katharine; Elliott, Suzanne; Griffin, Paul; Rockett, Rebecca; O'Rourke, Peter; Sloots, Theo; Angulo-Barturen, Iñigo; Ferrer, Santiago; Jiménez-Díaz, María Belén; Martínez, María-Santos; Duparc, Stephan; Leroy, Didier; Wells, Timothy N. C.; Baker, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Effective progression of candidate antimalarials is dependent on optimal dosing in clinical studies, which is determined by a sound understanding of pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics (PK/PD). Recently, two important translational models for antimalarials have been developed: the NOD/SCID/IL2Rγ−/− (NSG) model, whereby mice are engrafted with noninfected and Plasmodium falciparum-infected human erythrocytes, and the induced blood-stage malaria (IBSM) model in human volunteers. The antimalarial mefloquine was used to directly measure the PK/PD in both models, which were compared to previously published trial data for malaria patients. The clinical part was a single-center, controlled study using a blood-stage Plasmodium falciparum challenge inoculum in volunteers to characterize the effectiveness of mefloquine against early malaria. The study was conducted in three cohorts (n = 8 each) using different doses of mefloquine. The characteristic delay in onset of action of about 24 h was seen in both NSG and IBSM systems. In vivo 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50s) were estimated at 2.0 μg/ml and 1.8 μg/ml in the NSG and IBSM models, respectively, aligning with 1.8 μg/ml reported previously for patients. In the IBSM model, the parasite reduction ratios were 157 and 195 for the 10- and 15-mg/kg doses, within the range of previously reported clinical data for patients but significantly lower than observed in the mouse model. Linking mouse and human challenge models to clinical trial data can accelerate the accrual of critical data on antimalarial drug activity. Such data can guide large clinical trials required for development of urgently needed novel antimalarial combinations. (This trial was registered at the Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry [http://anzctr.org.au] under registration number ACTRN12612000323820.) PMID:27044554

  8. Underestimation of boreal soil carbon stocks by mathematical soil carbon models linked to soil nutrient status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ťupek, Boris; Ortiz, Carina A.; Hashimoto, Shoji; Stendahl, Johan; Dahlgren, Jonas; Karltun, Erik; Lehtonen, Aleksi

    2016-08-01

    Inaccurate estimate of the largest terrestrial carbon pool, soil organic carbon (SOC) stock, is the major source of uncertainty in simulating feedback of climate warming on ecosystem-atmosphere carbon dioxide exchange by process-based ecosystem and soil carbon models. Although the models need to simplify complex environmental processes of soil carbon sequestration, in a large mosaic of environments a missing key driver could lead to a modeling bias in predictions of SOC stock change.We aimed to evaluate SOC stock estimates of process-based models (Yasso07, Q, and CENTURY soil sub-model v4) against a massive Swedish forest soil inventory data set (3230 samples) organized by a recursive partitioning method into distinct soil groups with underlying SOC stock development linked to physicochemical conditions.For two-thirds of measurements all models predicted accurate SOC stock levels regardless of the detail of input data, e.g., whether they ignored or included soil properties. However, in fertile sites with high N deposition, high cation exchange capacity, or moderately increased soil water content, Yasso07 and Q models underestimated SOC stocks. In comparison to Yasso07 and Q, accounting for the site-specific soil characteristics (e. g. clay content and topsoil mineral N) by CENTURY improved SOC stock estimates for sites with high clay content, but not for sites with high N deposition.Our analysis suggested that the soils with poorly predicted SOC stocks, as characterized by the high nutrient status and well-sorted parent material, indeed have had other predominant drivers of SOC stabilization lacking in the models, presumably the mycorrhizal organic uptake and organo-mineral stabilization processes. Our results imply that the role of soil nutrient status as regulator of organic matter mineralization has to be re-evaluated, since correct SOC stocks are decisive for predicting future SOC change and soil CO2 efflux.

  9. LINKING AIR TOXIC CONCENTRATIONS FROM CMAQ TO THE HAPEM5 EXPOSURE MODEL AT NEIGHORHOOD SCALES FOR THE PHILADELPHIA AREA

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper provides a preliminary demonstration of the EPA neighborhood scale modeling paradigm for air toxics by linking concentration from the Community Multi-scale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeling system to the fifth version of the Hazardous Pollutant Exposure Model (HAPEM5). For ...

  10. Connecting the Dots: Linking Environmental Justice Indicators to Daily Dose Model Estimates

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hongtai; Barzyk, Timothy M.

    2016-01-01

    Many different quantitative techniques have been developed to either assess Environmental Justice (EJ) issues or estimate exposure and dose for risk assessment. However, very few approaches have been applied to link EJ factors to exposure dose estimate and identify potential impacts of EJ factors on dose-related variables. The purpose of this study is to identify quantitative approaches that incorporate conventional risk assessment (RA) dose modeling and cumulative risk assessment (CRA) considerations of disproportionate environmental exposure. We apply the Average Daily Dose (ADD) model, which has been commonly used in RA, to better understand impacts of EJ indicators upon exposure dose estimates and dose-related variables, termed the Environmental-Justice-Average-Daily-Dose (EJ-ADD) approach. On the U.S. nationwide census tract-level, we defined and quantified two EJ indicators (poverty and race/ethnicity) using an EJ scoring method to examine their relation to census tract-level multi-chemical exposure dose estimates. Pollutant doses for each tract were calculated using the ADD model, and EJ scores were assigned to each tract based on poverty- or race-related population percentages. Single- and multiple-chemical ADD values were matched to the tract-level EJ scores to analyze disproportionate dose relationships and contributing EJ factors. We found that when both EJ indicators were examined simultaneously, ADD for all pollutants generally increased with larger EJ scores. To demonstrate the utility of using EJ-ADD on the local scale, we approximated ADD levels of lead via soil/dust ingestion for simulated communities with different EJ-related scenarios. The local-level simulation indicates a substantial difference in exposure-dose levels between wealthy and EJ communities. The application of the EJ-ADD approach can link EJ factors to exposure dose estimate and identify potential EJ impacts on dose-related variables. PMID:28036053

  11. A neural network model of semantic memory linking feature-based object representation and words.

    PubMed

    Cuppini, C; Magosso, E; Ursino, M

    2009-06-01

    Recent theories in cognitive neuroscience suggest that semantic memory is a distributed process, which involves many cortical areas and is based on a multimodal representation of objects. The aim of this work is to extend a previous model of object representation to realize a semantic memory, in which sensory-motor representations of objects are linked with words. The model assumes that each object is described as a collection of features, coded in different cortical areas via a topological organization. Features in different objects are segmented via gamma-band synchronization of neural oscillators. The feature areas are further connected with a lexical area, devoted to the representation of words. Synapses among the feature areas, and among the lexical area and the feature areas are trained via a time-dependent Hebbian rule, during a period in which individual objects are presented together with the corresponding words. Simulation results demonstrate that, during the retrieval phase, the network can deal with the simultaneous presence of objects (from sensory-motor inputs) and words (from acoustic inputs), can correctly associate objects with words and segment objects even in the presence of incomplete information. Moreover, the network can realize some semantic links among words representing objects with shared features. These results support the idea that semantic memory can be described as an integrated process, whose content is retrieved by the co-activation of different multimodal regions. In perspective, extended versions of this model may be used to test conceptual theories, and to provide a quantitative assessment of existing data (for instance concerning patients with neural deficits).

  12. Pattern formation in a model for mountain pine beetle dispersal: linking model predictions to data.

    PubMed

    Strohm, S; Tyson, R C; Powell, J A

    2013-10-01

    Pattern formation occurs in a wide range of biological systems. This pattern formation can occur in mathematical models because of diffusion-driven instability or due to the interaction between reaction, diffusion, and chemotaxis. In this paper, we investigate the spatial pattern formation of attack clusters in a system for Mountain Pine Beetle. The pattern formation (aggregation) of the Mountain Pine Beetle in order to attack susceptible trees is crucial for their survival and reproduction. We use a reaction-diffusion equation with chemotaxis to model the interaction between Mountain Pine Beetle, Mountain Pine Beetle pheromones, and susceptible trees. Mathematical analysis is utilized to discover the spacing in-between beetle attacks on the susceptible landscape. The model predictions are verified by analysing aerial detection survey data of Mountain Pine Beetle Attack from the Sawtooth National Recreation Area. We find that the distance between Mountain Pine Beetle attack clusters predicted by our model closely corresponds to the observed attack data in the Sawtooth National Recreation Area. These results clarify the spatial mechanisms controlling the transition from incipient to epidemic populations and may lead to control measures which protect forests from Mountain Pine Beetle outbreak.

  13. Particle Tracking Model (PTM) in the SMS 10: IV. Link to Coastal Modeling System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-07-01

    CMS- M2D : Version 3.0; Report 2: Sediment transport and morphology change. ERDC/CHL TR-06-7. Vicksburg, MS: U.S. Army Engineer Research and...W. Reed, A. K. Zundel, and N. C. Kraus. 2004. Two-dimensional depth-averaged circulation model CMS- M2D : Version 2.0; Report 1: Technical

  14. Phosphorylation events during viral infections provide potential therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Keating, Julie A.; Striker, Rob

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY For many medically relevant viruses, there is now considerable evidence that both viral and cellular kinases play important roles in viral infection. Ultimately, these kinases, and the cellular signaling pathways that they exploit, may serve as therapeutic targets for treating patients. Currently, small molecule inhibitors of kinases are under investigation as therapy for herpes viral infections. Additionally, a number of cellular or host-directed tyrosine kinase inhibitors that have been previously FDA-approved for cancer treatment are under study in animal models and clinical trials, as they have shown promise for the treatment of various viral infections as well. This review will highlight the wide range of viral proteins phosphorylated by viral and cellular kinases, and the potential for variability of kinase recognition sites within viral substrates to impact phosphorylation and kinase prediction. Research studying kinase-targeting prophylactic and therapeutic treatments for a number of viral infections will also be discussed. PMID:22113983

  15. Remyelination Is Correlated with Regulatory T Cell Induction Following Human Embryoid Body-Derived Neural Precursor Cell Transplantation in a Viral Model of Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Plaisted, Warren C.; Zavala, Angel; Hingco, Edna; Tran, Ha; Coleman, Ronald; Lane, Thomas E.; Loring, Jeanne F.; Walsh, Craig M.

    2016-01-01

    We have recently described sustained clinical recovery associated with dampened neuroinflammation and remyelination following transplantation of neural precursor cells (NPCs) derived from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) in a viral model of the human demyelinating disease multiple sclerosis. The hNPCs used in that study were derived by a novel direct differentiation method (direct differentiation, DD-NPCs) that resulted in a unique gene expression pattern when compared to hNPCs derived by conventional methods. Since the therapeutic potential of human NPCs may differ greatly depending on the method of derivation and culture, we wanted to determine whether NPCs differentiated using conventional methods would be similarly effective in improving clinical outcome under neuroinflammatory demyelinating conditions. For the current study, we utilized hNPCs differentiated from a human induced pluripotent cell line via an embryoid body intermediate stage (EB-NPCs). Intraspinal transplantation of EB-NPCs into mice infected with the neurotropic JHM strain of mouse hepatitis virus (JHMV) resulted in decreased accumulation of CD4+ T cells in the central nervous system that was concomitant with reduced demyelination at the site of injection. Dampened neuroinflammation and remyelination was correlated with a transient increase in CD4+FOXP3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) concentrated within the peripheral lymphatics. However, compared to our earlier study, pathological improvements were modest and did not result in significant clinical recovery. We conclude that the genetic signature of NPCs is critical to their effectiveness in this model of viral-induced neurologic disease. These comparisons will be useful for understanding what factors are critical for the sustained clinical improvement. PMID:27310015

  16. Putting the five-factor model into context: evidence linking big five traits to narrative identity.

    PubMed

    Raggatt, Peter

    2006-10-01

    The study examined relationships between the Big Five personality traits and thematic content extracted from self-reports of life history data. One hundred and five "mature age" university students (M=30.1 years) completed the NEO PI-R trait measure, and the Personality Web Protocol. The protocol examines constituents of identity by asking participants to describe 24 key "attachments" from their life histories (significant events, people, places, objects, and possessions). Participants sorted these attachments into clusters and provided a self-descriptive label for each cluster (e.g., "adventurous self"). It was predicted that the thematic content of these cluster labels would be systematically related to Big Five trait scores (e.g., that labels referring to strength or positive emotions would be linked to Extraversion). The hypothesized links were obtained for each of the Big Five trait domains except Conscientiousness. Results are discussed with a view to broadening our understanding of the Five-Factor Model in relation to units of personality other than traits.

  17. Gait Characteristics in a Canine Model of X-linked Myotubular Myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Goddard, Melissa A.; Burlingame, Emily; Beggs, Alan H.; Buj-Bello, Anna; Childers, Martin K.; Marsh, Anthony P.; Kelly, Valerie E.

    2014-01-01

    X-linked myotubular myopathy (XLMTM) is a fatal pediatric disease where affected boys display profound weakness of the skeletal muscles. Possible therapies are under development but robust outcome measures in animal models are required for effective translation to human patients. We established a naturally-occuring canine model, where XLMTM dogs display clinical symptoms similar to those observed in humans. The aim of this study was to determine potential endpoints for the assessment of future treatments in this model. Video-based gait analysis was selected, as it is a well-established method of assessing limb function in neuromuscular disease and measures have been correlated to patient quality of life. XLMTM dogs (N=3) and their true littermate wild type controls (N=3) were assessed at 4–5 time points, beginning at 10 weeks and continuing through 17 weeks. Motion capture and an instrumented carpet were used separately to evaluate spatiotemporal and kinematic changes over time. XLMTM dogs walk more slowly and with shorter stride lengths than wild type dogs, and these differences became greater over time. However, there was no clear difference in angular measures between affected and unaffected dogs. These data demonstrate that spatiotemporal parameters capture functional changes in gait in an XLMTM canine model and support their utility in future therapeutic trials. PMID:25281397

  18. A review of the evidence linking adult attachment theory and chronic pain: presenting a conceptual model.

    PubMed

    Meredith, Pamela; Ownsworth, Tamara; Strong, Jenny

    2008-03-01

    It is now well established that pain is a multidimensional phenomenon, affected by a gamut of psychosocial and biological variables. According to diathesis-stress models of chronic pain, some individuals are more vulnerable to developing disability following acute pain because they possess particular psychosocial vulnerabilities which interact with physical pathology to impact negatively upon outcome. Attachment theory, a theory of social and personality development, has been proposed as a comprehensive developmental model of pain, implicating individual adult attachment pattern in the ontogenesis and maintenance of chronic pain. The present paper reviews and critically appraises studies which link adult attachment theory with chronic pain. Together, these papers offer support for the role of insecure attachment as a diathesis (or vulnerability) for problematic adjustment to pain. The Attachment-Diathesis Model of Chronic Pain developed from this body of literature, combines adult attachment theory with the diathesis-stress approach to chronic pain. The evidence presented in this review, and the associated model, advances our understanding of the developmental origins of chronic pain conditions, with potential application in guiding early pain intervention and prevention efforts, as well as tailoring interventions to suit specific patient needs.

  19. A Linked Simulation-Optimization (LSO) Model for Conjunctive Irrigation Management using Clonal Selection Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Sirajul; Talukdar, Bipul

    2016-09-01

    A Linked Simulation-Optimization (LSO) model based on a Clonal Selection Algorithm (CSA) was formulated for application in conjunctive irrigation management. A series of measures were considered for reducing the computational burden associated with the LSO approach. Certain modifications were incurred to the formulated CSA, so as to decrease the number of function evaluations. In addition, a simple problem specific code for a two dimensional groundwater flow simulation model was developed. The flow model was further simplified by a novel approach of area reduction, in order to save computational time in simulation. The LSO model was applied in the irrigation command of the Pagladiya Dam Project in Assam, India. With a view to evaluate the performance of the CSA, a Genetic Algorithm (GA) was used as a comparison base. The results from the CSA compared well with those from the GA. In fact, the CSA was found to consume less computational time than the GA while converging to the optimal solution, due to the modifications incurred in it.

  20. MARKAL-MACRO: A linked model for energy-economy analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Manne, A.S. ); Wene, C.O. Chalmers Univ. of Tech., Goeteborg )

    1992-02-01

    MARKAL-MACRO is an experiment in model linkage for energy and economy analysis. This new tool is intended as an improvement over existing methods for energy strategy assessment. It is designed specifically for estimating the costs and analyzing the technologies proposed for reducing environmental risks such as global climate change or regional air pollution. The greenhouse gas debate illustrates the usefulness of linked energy-economy models. A central issue is the coupling between economic growth, the level of energy demands, and the development of an energy system to supply these demands. The debate is often connected with alternative modeling approaches. The competing philosophies may be labeled top-down macroeconomic'' and bottom-up engineering'' perspectives. MARKAL is a systems engineering (physical process) analysis built on the concept of a Reference Energy System (RES). MARKAL is solved by means of dynamic linear programming. In most applications, the end use demands are fixed, and an economically efficient solution is obtained by minimizing the present value of energy system's costs throughout the planning horizon. MACRO is a macroeconomic model with an aggregated view of long-term economic growth. The basis input factors of production are capital, labor and individual forms of energy. MACRO is solved by nonlinear optimization.

  1. MARKAL-MACRO: A linked model for energy-economy analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Manne, A.S.; Wene, C.O. |

    1992-02-01

    MARKAL-MACRO is an experiment in model linkage for energy and economy analysis. This new tool is intended as an improvement over existing methods for energy strategy assessment. It is designed specifically for estimating the costs and analyzing the technologies proposed for reducing environmental risks such as global climate change or regional air pollution. The greenhouse gas debate illustrates the usefulness of linked energy-economy models. A central issue is the coupling between economic growth, the level of energy demands, and the development of an energy system to supply these demands. The debate is often connected with alternative modeling approaches. The competing philosophies may be labeled ``top-down macroeconomic`` and ``bottom-up engineering`` perspectives. MARKAL is a systems engineering (physical process) analysis built on the concept of a Reference Energy System (RES). MARKAL is solved by means of dynamic linear programming. In most applications, the end use demands are fixed, and an economically efficient solution is obtained by minimizing the present value of energy system`s costs throughout the planning horizon. MACRO is a macroeconomic model with an aggregated view of long-term economic growth. The basis input factors of production are capital, labor and individual forms of energy. MACRO is solved by nonlinear optimization.

  2. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic model linking plasma protein binding interactions with drug disposition.

    PubMed

    Buur, J L; Baynes, R E; Smith, G W; Riviere, J E

    2009-04-01

    Combination drug therapy increases the chance for an adverse drug reactions due to drug-drug interactions. Altered disposition for sulfamethazine (SMZ) when concurrently administered with flunixin meglumine (FLU) in swine could lead to increased tissue residues. There is a need for a pharmacokinetic modeling technique that can predict the consequences of possible drug interactions. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic model was developed that links plasma protein binding interactions to drug disposition for SMZ and FLU in swine. The model predicted a sustained decrease in total drug and a temporary increase in free drug concentration. An in vivo study confirmed the presence of a drug interaction. Neither the model nor the in vivo study revealed clinically significant changes that alter tissue disposition. This novel linkage approach has use in the prediction of the clinical impact of plasma protein binding interactions. Ultimately it could be used in the design of dosing regimens and in the protection of the food supply through prediction and minimization of tissue residues.

  3. Linking linear programming and spatial simulation models to predict landscape effects of forest management alternatives.

    PubMed

    Gustafson, Eric J; Roberts, L Jay; Leefers, Larry A

    2006-12-01

    Forest management planners require analytical tools to assess the effects of alternative strategies on the sometimes disparate benefits from forests such as timber production and wildlife habitat. We assessed the spatial patterns of alternative management strategies by linking two models that were developed for different purposes. We used a linear programming model (Spectrum) to optimize timber harvest schedules, then a simulation model (HARVEST) to project those schedules in a spatially explicit way and produce maps from which the spatial pattern of habitat could be calculated. We demonstrated the power of this approach by evaluating alternative plans developed for a national forest plan revision in Wisconsin, USA. The amount of forest interior habitat was inversely related to the amount of timber cut, and increased under the alternatives compared to the current plan. The amount of edge habitat was positively related to the amount of timber cut, and increased under all alternatives. The amount of mature northern hardwood interior and edge habitat increased for all alternatives, but mature pine habitat area varied. Mature age classes of all forest types increased, and young classes decreased under all alternatives. The average size of patches (defined by age class) generally decreased. These results are consistent with the design goals of each of the alternatives, but reveal that the spatial differences among the alternatives are modest. These complementary models are valuable for quantifying and comparing the spatial effects of alternative management strategies.

  4. Modeling photosynthesis of discontinuous plant canopies by linking the Geometric Optical Radiative Transfer model with biochemical processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Q.; Gong, P.; Li, W.

    2015-06-01

    Modeling vegetation photosynthesis is essential for understanding carbon exchanges between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere. The radiative transfer process within plant canopies is one of the key drivers that regulate canopy photosynthesis. Most vegetation cover consists of discrete plant crowns, of which the physical observation departs from the underlying assumption of a homogenous and uniform medium in classic radiative transfer theory. Here we advance the Geometric Optical Radiative Transfer (GORT) model to simulate photosynthesis activities for discontinuous plant canopies. We separate radiation absorption into two components that are absorbed by sunlit and shaded leaves, and derive analytical solutions by integrating over the canopy layer. To model leaf-level and canopy-level photosynthesis, leaf light absorption is then linked to the biochemical process of gas diffusion through leaf stomata. The canopy gap probability derived from GORT differs from classic radiative transfer theory, especially when the leaf area index is high, due to leaf clumping effects. Tree characteristics such as tree density, crown shape, and canopy length affect leaf clumping and regulate radiation interception. Modeled gross primary production (GPP) for two deciduous forest stands could explain more than 80% of the variance of flux tower measurements at both near hourly and daily timescales. We demonstrate that ambient CO2 concentrations influence daytime vegetation photosynthesis, which needs to be considered in biogeochemical models. The proposed model is complementary to classic radiative transfer theory and shows promise in modeling the radiative transfer process and photosynthetic activities over discontinuous forest canopies.

  5. Link or sink: a modelling interpretation of the open Baltic biogeochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vichi, M.; Ruardij, P.; Baretta, J. W.

    2004-08-01

    A 1-D model system, consisting of the 1-D version of the Princeton Ocean Model (POM) coupled with the European Regional Seas Ecosystem Model (ERSEM) has been applied to a sub-basin of the Baltic Proper, the Bornholm basin. The model has been forced with 3h meteorological data for the period 1979-1990, producing a 12-year hindcast validated with datasets from the Baltic Environmental Database for the same period. The model results demonstrate the model to hindcast the time-evolution of the physical structure very well, confirming the view of the open Baltic water column as a three layer system of surface, intermediate and bottom waters. Comparative analyses of modelled hydrochemical components with respect to the independent data have shown that the long-term system behaviour of the model is within the observed ranges. Also primary production processes, deduced from oxygen (over)saturation are hindcast correctly over the entire period and the annual net primary production is within the observed range. The largest mismatch with observations is found in simulating the biogeochemistry of the Baltic intermediate waters. Modifications in the structure of the model (addition of fast-sinking detritus and polysaccharide dynamics) have shown that the nutrient dynamics is linked to the quality and dimensions of the organic matter produced in the euphotic zone, highlighting the importance of the residence time of the organic matter within the microbial foodweb in the intermediate waters. Experiments with different scenarios of riverine nutrient loads, assessed in the limits of a 1-D setup, have shown that the external input of organic matter makes the open Baltic model more heterotrophic. The characteristics of the inputs also drive the dynamics of nitrogen in the bottom layers leading either to nitrate accumulation (when the external sources are inorganic), or to coupled nitrification-denitrification (under strong organic inputs). The model indicates the permanent

  6. Link or sink: a modelling interpretation of the open Baltic biogeochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vichi, M.; Ruardij, P.; Baretta, J. W.

    A 1-D model system, consisting of the 1-D version of the Princeton Ocean Model (POM) coupled with the European Regional Seas Ecosystem Model (ERSEM) has been applied to a sub-basin of the Baltic Proper, the Bornholm basin. The model has been forced with 3h meteorological data for the period 1979-1990, producing a 12-year hindcast validated with datasets from the Baltic Environmental Database for the same period. The model results demonstrate the model to hindcast the time-evolution of the physical structure very well, confirming the view of the open Baltic water column as a three layer system of surface, intermediate and bottom waters. Comparative analyses of modelled hydrochemical components with respect to the independent data have shown that the long-term system behaviour of the model is within the observed ranges. Also primary production processes, deduced from oxygen (over)saturation are hindcast correctly over the entire period and the annual net primary production is within the observed range. The largest mismatch with observations is found in simulating the biogeochemistry of the Baltic intermediate waters. Modifications in the structure of the model (addition of fast-sinking detritus and polysaccharide dynamics) have shown that the nutrient dynamics are linked to the quality and dimensions of the organic matter produced in the euphotic zone, highlighting the importance of the residence time of the organic matter within the microbial foodweb in the intermediate waters. Experiments with different scenarios of riverine nutrient loads, assessed in the limits of a 1-D setup, have shown that the external input of organic matter makes the open Baltic model more heterotrophic. The characteristics of the inputs also drive the dynamics of nitrogen in the bottom layers leading either to nitrate accumulation (when the external sources are inorganic), or to coupled nitrification-denitrification (under strong organic inputs). The model indicates the permanent

  7. Bone fracture toughness and strength correlate with collagen cross-link maturity in a dose-controlled lathyrism mouse model

    PubMed Central

    McNerny, Erin M. B.; Gong, Bo; Morris, Michael D.; Kohn, David H.

    2014-01-01

    Collagen cross-linking is altered in many diseases of bone, and enzymatic collagen cross-links are important to bone quality as evidenced by losses of strength following lysyl oxidase inhibition (lathyrism). We hypothesized that cross-links also contribute directly to bone fracture toughness. A mouse model of lathyrism using subcutaneous injection of up to 500mg/kg β-aminopropionitrile (BAPN) was developed and characterized (60 animals across 4 dosage groups). Three weeks of 150 or 350 mg/kg BAPN treatment in young growing mice significantly reduced cortical bone fracture toughness, strength, and pyridinoline cross-link content. Ratios reflecting relative cross-link maturity were positive regressors of fracture toughness (HP/[DHLNL+HLNL] r2=0.208, p<0.05; [HP+LP]/[DHNL+HLNL] r2=0.196, p<0.1), whereas quantities of mature pyridinoline cross-links were significant positive regressors of tissue strength (lysyl pyridinoline r2=0.159, p=0.014; hydroxylysyl pyridinoline r2=0.112, p<0.05). Immature and pyrrole cross-links, which were not significantly reduced by BAPN, did not correlate with mechanical properties. The effect of BAPN treatment on mechanical properties was dose specific, with the greatest impact found at the intermediate (350mg/kg) dose. Calcein labeling was used to define locations of new bone formation, allowing for the identification of regions of normally cross-linked (preexisting) and BAPN treated (newly formed, cross-link-deficient) bone. Raman spectroscopy revealed spatial differences due to relative tissue age and effects of cross-link inhibition. Newly deposited tissues had lower mineral/matrix, carbonate/phosphate and Amide I cross-link (matrix maturity) ratios compared to preexisting tissues. BAPN treatment did not affect mineral measures, but significantly increased the cross-link (matrix maturity) ratio compared to newly formed control tissue. Our study reveals that spatially localized effects of short term BAPN cross-link inhibition can alter

  8. Norovirus Polymerase Fidelity Contributes to Viral Transmission In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Thorne, Lucy; Ghurburrun, Elsa

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Intrahost genetic diversity and replication error rates are intricately linked to RNA virus pathogenesis, with alterations in viral polymerase fidelity typically leading to attenuation during infections in vivo. We have previously shown that norovirus intrahost genetic diversity also influences viral pathogenesis using the murine norovirus model, as increasing viral mutation frequency using a mutagenic nucleoside resulted in clearance of a persistent infection in mice. Given the role of replication fidelity and genetic diversity in pathogenesis, we have now investigated whether polymerase fidelity can also impact virus transmission between susceptible hosts. We have identified a high-fidelity norovirus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase mutant (I391L) which displays delayed replication kinetics in vivo but not in cell culture. The I391L polymerase mutant also exhibited lower transmission rates between susceptible hosts than the wild-type virus and, most notably, another replication defective mutant that has wild-type levels of polymerase fidelity. These results provide the first experimental evidence that norovirus polymerase fidelity contributes to virus transmission between hosts and that maintaining diversity is important for the establishment of infection. This work supports the hypothesis that the reduced polymerase fidelity of the pandemic GII.4 human norovirus isolates may contribute to their global dominance. IMPORTANCE Virus replication fidelity and hence the intrahost genetic diversity of viral populations are known to be intricately linked to viral pathogenesis and tropism as well as to immune and antiviral escape during infection. In this study, we investigated whether changes in replication fidelity can impact the ability of a virus to transmit between susceptible hosts by the use of a mouse model for norovirus. We show that a variant encoding a high-fidelity polymerase is transmitted less efficiently between mice than the wild-type strain. This

  9. Norovirus Polymerase Fidelity Contributes to Viral Transmission In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Arias, Armando; Thorne, Lucy; Ghurburrun, Elsa; Bailey, Dalan; Goodfellow, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Intrahost genetic diversity and replication error rates are intricately linked to RNA virus pathogenesis, with alterations in viral polymerase fidelity typically leading to attenuation during infections in vivo. We have previously shown that norovirus intrahost genetic diversity also influences viral pathogenesis using the murine norovirus model, as increasing viral mutation frequency using a mutagenic nucleoside resulted in clearance of a persistent infection in mice. Given the role of replication fidelity and genetic diversity in pathogenesis, we have now investigated whether polymerase fidelity can also impact virus transmission between susceptible hosts. We have identified a high-fidelity norovirus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase mutant (I391L) which displays delayed replication kinetics in vivo but not in cell culture. The I391L polymerase mutant also exhibited lower transmission rates between susceptible hosts than the wild-type virus and, most notably, another replication defective mutant that has wild-type levels of polymerase fidelity. These results provide the first experimental evidence that norovirus polymerase fidelity contributes to virus transmission between hosts and that maintaining diversity is important for the establishment of infection. This work supports the hypothesis that the reduced polymerase fidelity of the pandemic GII.4 human norovirus isolates may contribute to their global dominance. IMPORTANCE Virus replication fidelity and hence the intrahost genetic diversity of viral populations are known to be intricately linked to viral pathogenesis and tropism as well as to immune and antiviral escape during infection. In this study, we investigated whether changes in replication fidelity can impact the ability of a virus to transmit between susceptible hosts by the use of a mouse model for norovirus. We show that a variant encoding a high-fidelity polymerase is transmitted less efficiently between mice than the wild-type strain. This constitutes

  10. a Six-Link Kinematic Chain Model of Human Body Using Kane's Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rambely, A. S.; Fazrolrozi

    A biomechanics model of six-link kinematic chain of human body is developed by using Kane's method. The kinematic data comprise of six segments; foot, calf, thigh, trunk, upper arm and forearm, are obtained through data collection of walking, running and jumping using the Vicon Nexus system. The motion capture system uses 12 Vicon MX-3+ cameras and 12 Vicon MX-F40 cameras, two DV (50 Hz) cameras and a force plate (100 Hz). Inverse dynamics approach is used to obtain the unknown value of torques produced by joint segments during walking, running and jumping activities. The results show that the largest value of torques produced occurs at the foot segment.

  11. Assessing the potential of using telecommunication microwave links in urban drainage modelling.

    PubMed

    Fencl, M; Rieckermann, J; Schleiss, M; Stránský, D; Bareš, V

    2013-01-01

    The ability to predict the runoff response of an urban catchment to rainfall is crucial for managing drainage systems effectively and controlling discharges from urban areas. In this paper we assess the potential of commercial microwave links (MWL) to capture the spatio-temporal rainfall dynamics and thus improve urban rainfall-runoff modelling. Specifically, we perform numerical experiments with virtual rainfall fields and compare the results of MWL rainfall reconstructions to those of rain gauge (RG) observations. In a case study, we are able to show that MWL networks in urban areas are sufficiently dense to provide good information on spatio-temporal rainfall variability and can thus considerably improve pipe flow prediction, even in small subcatchments. In addition, the better spatial coverage also improves the control of discharges from urban areas. This is especially beneficial for heavy rainfall, which usually has a high spatial variability that cannot be accurately captured by RG point measurements.

  12. Pathophysiology of white-nose syndrome in bats: a mechanistic model linking wing damage to mortality

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Warnecke, Lisa; Turner, James M.; Bollinger, Trent K.; Misra, Vikram; Cryan, Paul M.; Blehert, David S.; Wibbelt, Gudrun; Willis, Craig K.R.

    2013-01-01

    White-nose syndrome is devastating North American bat populations but we lack basic information on disease mechanisms. Altered blood physiology owing to epidermal invasion by the fungal pathogen Geomyces destructans (Gd) has been hypothesized as a cause of disrupted torpor patterns of affected hibernating bats, leading to mortality. Here, we present data on blood electrolyte concentration, haematology and acid–base balance of hibernating little brown bats, Myotis lucifugus, following experimental inoculation with Gd. Compared with controls, infected bats showed electrolyte depletion (i.e. lower plasma sodium), changes in haematology (i.e. increased haematocrit and decreased glucose) and disrupted acid–base balance (i.e. lower CO2 partial pressure and bicarbonate). These findings indicate hypotonic dehydration, hypovolaemia and metabolic acidosis. We propose a mechanistic model linking tissue damage to altered homeostasis and morbidity/mortality.

  13. Three Papers in International Health Policy: Modeling the Links between Economics and Epidemiology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-04-01

    The base infectivity of  influenza A  viruses  depends  12 on the rate at which the average  infected person  ‘sheds’  the  virus ,  the  timing of  the...under  several  scenarios  of  infectiousness  and  virulence  of  a  pandemic  influenza  virus  (11, 12). These studies do not conduct  epidemiological ...International Health Policy. Modeling the Links Between Economics and Epidemiology 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER

  14. Viruses and viral proteins.

    PubMed

    Verdaguer, Nuria; Ferrero, Diego; Murthy, Mathur R N

    2014-11-01

    For more than 30 years X-ray crystallography has been by far the most powerful approach for determining the structures of viruses and viral proteins at atomic resolution. The information provided by these structures, which covers many important aspects of the viral life cycle such as cell-receptor recognition, viral entry, nucleic acid transfer and genome replication, has extensively enriched our vision of the virus world. Many of the structures available correspond to potential targets for antiviral drugs against important human pathogens. This article provides an overview of the current knowledge of different structural aspects of the above-mentioned processes.

  15. Viruses and viral proteins

    PubMed Central

    Verdaguer, Nuria; Ferrero, Diego; Murthy, Mathur R. N.

    2014-01-01

    For more than 30 years X-ray crystallography has been by far the most powerful approach for determining the structures of viruses and viral proteins at atomic resolution. The information provided by these structures, which covers many important aspects of the viral life cycle such as cell-receptor recognition, viral entry, nucleic acid transfer and genome replication, has extensively enriched our vision of the virus world. Many of the structures available correspond to potential targets for antiviral drugs against important human pathogens. This article provides an overview of the current knowledge of different structural aspects of the above-mentioned processes. PMID:25485129

  16. Coupled dynamics of node and link states in complex networks: a model for language competition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carro, Adrián; Toral, Raúl; San Miguel, Maxi

    2016-11-01

    Inspired by language competition processes, we present a model of coupled evolution of node and link states. In particular, we focus on the interplay between the use of a language and the preference or attitude of the speakers towards it, which we model, respectively, as a property of the interactions between speakers (a link state) and as a property of the speakers themselves (a node state). Furthermore, we restrict our attention to the case of two socially equivalent languages and to socially inspired network topologies based on a mechanism of triadic closure. As opposed to most of the previous literature, where language extinction is an inevitable outcome of the dynamics, we find a broad range of possible asymptotic configurations, which we classify as: frozen extinction states, frozen coexistence states, and dynamically trapped coexistence states. Moreover, metastable coexistence states with very long survival times and displaying a non-trivial dynamics are found to be abundant. Interestingly, a system size scaling analysis shows, on the one hand, that the probability of language extinction vanishes exponentially for increasing system sizes and, on the other hand, that the time scale of survival of the non-trivial dynamical metastable states increases linearly with the size of the system. Thus, non-trivial dynamical coexistence is the only possible outcome for large enough systems. Finally, we show how this coexistence is characterized by one of the languages becoming clearly predominant while the other one becomes increasingly confined to ‘ghetto-like’ structures: small groups of bilingual speakers arranged in triangles, with a strong preference for the minority language, and using it for their intra-group interactions while they switch to the predominant language for communications with the rest of the population.

  17. Dependence of Invadopodia Function on Collagen Fiber Spacing and Cross-Linking: Computational Modeling and Experimental Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Enderling, Heiko; Alexander, Nelson R.; Clark, Emily S.; Branch, Kevin M.; Estrada, Lourdes; Crooke, Cornelia; Jourquin, Jérôme; Lobdell, Nichole; Zaman, Muhammad H.; Guelcher, Scott A.; Anderson, Alexander R. A.; Weaver, Alissa M.

    2008-01-01

    Invadopodia are subcellular organelles thought to be critical for extracellular matrix (ECM) degradation and the movement of cells through tissues. Here we examine invadopodia generation, turnover, and function in relation to two structural aspects of the ECM substrates they degrade: cross-linking and fiber density. We set up a cellular automaton computational model that simulates ECM penetration and degradation by invadopodia. Experiments with denatured collagen (gelatin) were used to calibrate the model and demonstrate the inhibitory effect of ECM cross-linking on invadopodia degradation and penetration. Incorporation of dynamic invadopodia behavior into the model amplified the effect of cross-linking on ECM degradation, and was used to model feedback from the ECM. When the model was parameterized with spatial fibrillar dimensions that closely matched the organization, in real life, of native ECM collagen into triple-helical monomers, microfibrils, and macrofibrils, little or no inhibition of invadopodia penetration was observed in simulations of sparse collagen gels, no matter how high the degree of cross-linking. Experimental validation, using live-cell imaging of invadopodia in cells plated on cross-linked gelatin, was consistent with simulations in which ECM cross-linking led to higher rates of both invadopodia retraction and formation. Analyses of invadopodia function from cells plated on cross-linked gelatin and collagen gels under standard concentrations were consistent with simulation results in which sparse collagen gels provided a weak barrier to invadopodia. These results suggest that the organization of collagen, as it may occur in stroma or in vitro collagen gels, forms gaps large enough so as to have little impact on invadopodia penetration/degradation. By contrast, dense ECM, such as gelatin or possibly basement membranes, is an effective obstacle to invadopodia penetration and degradation, particularly when cross-linked. These results provide a

  18. Linking landscape characteristics to local grizzly bear abundance using multiple detection methods in a hierarchical model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Graves, T.A.; Kendall, K.C.; Royle, J. Andrew; Stetz, J.B.; Macleod, A.C.

    2011-01-01

    Few studies link habitat to grizzly bear Ursus arctos abundance and these have not accounted for the variation in detection or spatial autocorrelation. We collected and genotyped bear hair in and around Glacier National Park in northwestern Montana during the summer of 2000. We developed a hierarchical Markov chain Monte Carlo model that extends the existing occupancy and count models by accounting for (1) spatially explicit variables that we hypothesized might influence abundance; (2) separate sub-models of detection probability for two distinct sampling methods (hair traps and rub trees) targeting different segments of the population; (3) covariates to explain variation in each sub-model of detection; (4) a conditional autoregressive term to account for spatial autocorrelation; (5) weights to identify most important variables. Road density and per cent mesic habitat best explained variation in female grizzly bear abundance; spatial autocorrelation was not supported. More female bears were predicted in places with lower road density and with more mesic habitat. Detection rates of females increased with rub tree sampling effort. Road density best explained variation in male grizzly bear abundance and spatial autocorrelation was supported. More male bears were predicted in areas of low road density. Detection rates of males increased with rub tree and hair trap sampling effort and decreased over the sampling period. We provide a new method to (1) incorporate multiple detection methods into hierarchical models of abundance; (2) determine whether spatial autocorrelation should be included in final models. Our results suggest that the influence of landscape variables is consistent between habitat selection and abundance in this system. ?? 2011 The Authors. Animal Conservation ?? 2011 The Zoological Society of London.

  19. An X-linked three allele model of hand preference and hand posture for writing.

    PubMed

    McKeever, Walter F

    2004-04-01

    This paper describes a genetic model of hand preferences for writing and for handwriting posture (HWP). The challenge of devising an X-linked model for these aspects of human handedness was posed by the results of a large family handedness study (McKeever, 2000) that showed evidence of such linkage. Because X-linkage for handedness has been widely regarded as untenable, the prospects for developing such a model were not initially encouraging, but ultimately a viable model did suggest itself. Family studies of handedness and leading theories of handedness are briefly described, as is some of the research on HWP motivated by the theory of Levy and Nagylaki (1972). It is argued that there is evidence that HWP reflects a biological dictate and not just individual "choices" or "adaptations" to writing in a left-to-right direction with the left hand. The model proposes that inverted handwriting posture is not necessarily highly related to speech and language lateralities of sinistrals, but that it reveals an interhemispheric mediation of writing. It is hypothesised that it reflects a specialisation of the left angular gyrus (with some possible extension into the supramarginal gyrus) for the storage of movement and timing sequences of cursive writing, and right hemisphere motor programming of the motor output of writing. It is also argued that no family handedness study conducted to date is adequate for testing the predictions of extant handedness theories, and the often wide variations between the results of family handedness studies are noted. It is suggested that fMRI studies could definitively test the HWP hypotheses of the model and that the hypothesis of X-linkage could be tested definitively should studies of the human genome identify a gene for handedness.

  20. Linking state-and-transition simulation and timber supply models for forest biomass production scenarios

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Costanza, Jennifer; Abt, Robert C.; McKerrow, Alexa; Collazo, Jaime

    2015-01-01

    We linked state-and-transition simulation models (STSMs) with an economics-based timber supply model to examine landscape dynamics in North Carolina through 2050 for three scenarios of forest biomass production. Forest biomass could be an important source of renewable energy in the future, but there is currently much uncertainty about how biomass production would impact landscapes. In the southeastern US, if forests become important sources of biomass for bioenergy, we expect increased land-use change and forest management. STSMs are ideal for simulating these landscape changes, but the amounts of change will depend on drivers such as timber prices and demand for forest land, which are best captured with forest economic models. We first developed state-and-transition model pathways in the ST-Sim software platform for 49 vegetation and land-use types that incorporated each expected type of landscape change. Next, for the three biomass production scenarios, the SubRegional Timber Supply Model (SRTS) was used to determine the annual areas of thinning and harvest in five broad forest types, as well as annual areas converted among those forest types, agricultural, and urban lands. The SRTS output was used to define area targets for STSMs in ST-Sim under two scenarios of biomass production and one baseline, business-as-usual scenario. We show that ST-Sim output matched SRTS targets in most cases. Landscape dynamics results indicate that, compared with the baseline scenario, forest biomass production leads to more forest and, specifically, more intensively managed forest on the landscape by 2050. Thus, the STSMs, informed by forest economics models, provide important information about potential landscape effects of bioenergy production.

  1. Interactions between airway epithelial cells and dendritic cells during viral infections using an in vitro co-culture model

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rationale: Historically, single cell culture models have been limited in pathological and physiological relevance. A co-culture model of dendritic cells (DCs) and differentiated human airway epithelial cells was developed to examine potential interactions between these two cell t...

  2. Longitudinal follow-up and characterization of a robust rat model for Parkinson's disease based on overexpression of alpha-synuclein with adeno-associated viral vectors.

    PubMed

    Van der Perren, Anke; Toelen, Jaan; Casteels, Cindy; Macchi, Francesca; Van Rompuy, Anne-Sophie; Sarre, Sophie; Casadei, Nicolas; Nuber, Silke; Himmelreich, Uwe; Osorio Garcia, Maria Isabel; Michotte, Yvette; D'Hooge, Rudi; Bormans, Guy; Van Laere, Koen; Gijsbers, Rik; Van den Haute, Chris; Debyser, Zeger; Baekelandt, Veerle

    2015-03-01

    Testing of new therapeutic strategies for Parkinson's disease (PD) is currently hampered by the lack of relevant and reproducible animal models. Here, we developed a robust rat model for PD by injection of adeno-associated viral vectors (rAAV2/7) encoding α-synuclein into the substantia nigra, resulting in reproducible nigrostriatal pathology and behavioral deficits in a 4-week time period. Progressive dopaminergic dysfunction was corroborated by histopathologic and biochemical analysis, motor behavior testing and in vivo microdialysis. L-DOPA treatment was found to reverse the behavioral phenotype. Non-invasive positron emission tomography imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy allowed longitudinal monitoring of neurodegeneration. In addition, insoluble α-synuclein aggregates were formed in this model. This α-synuclein rat model shows improved face and predictive validity, and therefore offers the possibility to reliably test novel therapeutics. Furthermore, it will be of great value for further research into the molecular pathogenesis of PD and the importance of α-synuclein aggregation in the disease process.

  3. Linking riparian dynamics and groundwater: an ecohydrologic approach to modeling groundwater and riparian vegetation.

    PubMed

    Baird, Kathryn J; Stromberg, Juliet C; Maddock, Thomas

    2005-10-01

    The growing use of global freshwater supplies is increasing the need for improved modeling of the linkage between groundwater and riparian vegetation. Traditional groundwater models such as MODFLOW have been used to predict changes in regional groundwater levels, and thus riparian vegetation potential attributable to anthropogenic water use. This article describes an approach that improves on these modeling techniques through several innovations. First, evapotranspiration from riparian/wetland systems is modeled in a manner that more realistically reflects plant ecophysiology and vegetation complexity. In the authors' model programs (RIP-ET and PRE-RIP-ET), the single, monotonically increasing evapotranspiration flux curve in traditional groundwater models is replaced with a set of ecophysiologically based curves, one for each plant functional group present. For each group, the curve simulates transpiration declines that occur both as water levels decline below rooting depths and as waters rise to levels that produce anoxic soil conditions. Accuracy is further improved by more effective spatial handling of vegetation distribution, which allows modeling of surface elevation and depth to water for multiple vegetation types within each large model cell. The use of RIP-ET in groundwater models can improve the accuracy of basin scale estimates of riparian evapotranspiration rates, riparian vegetation water requirements, and water budgets. Two case studies are used to demonstrate that RIP-ET produces significantly different evapotranspiration estimates than the traditional method. When combined with vegetation mapping and a supporting program (RIP-GIS), RIP-ET also enables predictions of riparian vegetation response to water use and development scenarios. The RIP-GIS program links the head distribution from MODFLOW with surface digital elevation models, producing moderate- to high-resolution depth-to-groundwater maps. Together with information on plant rooting depths

  4. Linking environmental variability to village-scale malaria transmission using a simple immunity model

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    constituting a mechanistic link between spatial and temporal environmental variability and village-scale malaria transmission. Incorporating acquired immunity into the model has allowed simulation of prevalence in the two villages, and isolation of the effects of acquired immunity in dampening the difference in prevalence between the two villages. Without these effects, the difference in prevalence between the two villages would have been significantly larger in response to the large differences in mosquito populations and the associated biting rates. PMID:23919581

  5. Link between hopping models and percolation scaling laws for charge transport in mixtures of small molecules

    DOE PAGES

    Ha, Dong -Gwang; Kim, Jang -Joo; Baldo, Marc A.

    2016-04-29

    Mixed host compositions that combine charge transport materials with luminescent dyes offer superior control over exciton formation and charge transport in organic light emitting devices (OLEDs). Two approaches are typically used to optimize the fraction of charge transport materials in a mixed host composition: either an empirical percolative model, or a hopping transport model. We show that these two commonly-employed models are linked by an analytic expression which relates the localization length to the percolation threshold and critical exponent. The relation is confirmed both numerically and experimentally through measurements of the relative conductivity of Tris(4-carbazoyl-9-ylphenyl) amine (TCTA) :1,3-bis(3,5-dipyrid-3-yl-phenyl) benzene (BmPyPb)more » mixtures with different concentrations, where the TCTA plays a role as hole conductor and the BmPyPb as hole insulator. Furthermore, the analytic relation may allow the rational design of mixed layers of small molecules for high-performance OLEDs.« less

  6. Linking genes to communities and ecosystems: Daphnia as an ecogenomic model.

    PubMed

    Miner, Brooks E; De Meester, Luc; Pfrender, Michael E; Lampert, Winfried; Hairston, Nelson G

    2012-05-22

    How do genetic variation and evolutionary change in critical species affect the composition and functioning of populations, communities and ecosystems? Illuminating the links in the causal chain from genes up to ecosystems is a particularly exciting prospect now that the feedbacks between ecological and evolutionary changes are known to be bidirectional. Yet to fully explore phenomena that span multiple levels of the biological hierarchy requires model organisms and systems that feature a comprehensive triad of strong ecological interactions in nature, experimental tractability in diverse contexts and accessibility to modern genomic tools. The water flea Daphnia satisfies these criteria, and genomic approaches capitalizing on the pivotal role Daphnia plays in the functioning of pelagic freshwater food webs will enable investigations of eco-evolutionary dynamics in unprecedented detail. Because its ecology is profoundly influenced by both genetic polymorphism and phenotypic plasticity, Daphnia represents a model system with tremendous potential for developing a mechanistic understanding of the relationship between traits at the genetic, organismal and population levels, and consequences for community and ecosystem dynamics. Here, we highlight the combination of traits and ecological interactions that make Daphnia a definitive model system, focusing on the additional power and capabilities enabled by recent molecular and genomic advances.

  7. Linking river management to species conservation using dynamic landscape scale models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Freeman, Mary C.; Buell, Gary R.; Hay, Lauren E.; Hughes, W. Brian; Jacobson, Robert B.; Jones, John W.; Jones, S.A.; LaFontaine, Jacob H.; Odom, Kenneth R.; Peterson, James T.; Riley, Jeffrey W.; Schindler, J. Stephen; Shea, C.; Weaver, J.D.

    2013-01-01

    Efforts to conserve stream and river biota could benefit from tools that allow managers to evaluate landscape-scale changes in species distributions in response to water management decisions. We present a framework and methods for integrating hydrology, geographic context and metapopulation processes to simulate effects of changes in streamflow on fish occupancy dynamics across a landscape of interconnected stream segments. We illustrate this approach using a 482 km2 catchment in the southeastern US supporting 50 or more stream fish species. A spatially distributed, deterministic and physically based hydrologic model is used to simulate daily streamflow for sub-basins composing the catchment. We use geographic data to characterize stream segments with respect to channel size, confinement, position and connectedness within the stream network. Simulated streamflow dynamics are then applied to model fish metapopulation dynamics in stream segments, using hypothesized effects of streamflow magnitude and variability on population processes, conditioned by channel characteristics. The resulting time series simulate spatially explicit, annual changes in species occurrences or assemblage metrics (e.g. species richness) across the catchment as outcomes of management scenarios. Sensitivity analyses using alternative, plausible links between streamflow components and metapopulation processes, or allowing for alternative modes of fish dispersal, demonstrate large effects of ecological uncertainty on model outcomes and highlight needed research and monitoring. Nonetheless, with uncertainties explicitly acknowledged, dynamic, landscape-scale simulations may prove useful for quantitatively comparing river management alternatives with respect to species conservation.

  8. The use of statistical channel models, full-field propagation codes, and field data to predict link availability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michael, Steven; Parenti, Ronald R.; Moores, John D.; Wilcox, William, Jr.; Yarnall, Timothy M.; Volpicelli, Alicia M.; Taylor, John A.

    2009-08-01

    The free-space communications community has only recently recognized the complexity of atmospheric channel interactions, which are highly dependent on the turbulence profile, beam propagation geometry, and transceiver design. The search for models that accurately describe link performance and overall availability is currently an active field of research. This paper describes a method for defining link availability based on statistical channel models, which can be derived from measured signal fluctuations during periods of stable atmospheric conditions. Measurements made during an extended communication link experiment conducted during the summer of 2008 indicate that the intervals of channel stability, which impact the length of link outages, can vary in duration from a few minutes to several hours. This work was sponsored by the Department of Defense, RRCO DDR&E, under Air Force Contract FA8721-05-C-0002. Opinions, interpretations, conclusions and recommendations are those of the authors and are not necessarily endorsed by the United States Government.

  9. Mechanisms of influenza viral membrane fusion.

    PubMed

    Blijleven, Jelle S; Boonstra, Sander; Onck, Patrick R; van der Giessen, Erik; van Oijen, Antoine M

    2016-12-01

    Influenza viral particles are enveloped by a lipid bilayer. A major step in infection is fusion of the viral and host cellular membranes, a process with large kinetic barriers. Influenza membrane fusion is catalyzed by hemagglutinin (HA), a class I viral fusion protein activated by low pH. The exact nature of the HA conformational changes that deliver the energy required for fusion remains poorly understood. This review summarizes our current knowledge of HA structure and dynamics, describes recent single-particle experiments and modeling studies, and discusses their role in understanding how multiple HAs mediate fusion. These approaches provide a mechanistic picture in which HAs independently and stochastically insert into the target membrane, forming a cluster of HAs that is collectively able to overcome the barrier to membrane fusion. The new experimental and modeling approaches described in this review hold promise for a more complete understanding of other viral fusion systems and the protein systems responsible for cellular fusion.

  10. Small synthetic ligands for the enrichment of viral particles pseudotyped with amphotropic murine leukemia virus envelope.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Cláudia S M; Castro, Rute; Coroadinha, Ana Sofia; Roque, A Cecília A

    2016-03-18

    Retroviral vectors gained popularity toward other viral vectors as they integrate their genome into hosts' genome, a characteristic required for the modification of stem cells. However, the production of viable particles for gene therapy is hampered by the low ratio of infectious to non-infectious viral particles after purification, low titers and limited number of competent viral receptors. We have developed de novo two fully synthetic triazine-based ligands that can selectively bind retroviral particles pseudotyped with amphotropic murine leukemia virus envelope (AMPHO4070A). A 78-membered library of triazine-based ligands was designed in silico and was virtually screened against the modeled structure of the AMPHO4070A protein. Ligands displaying the highest energy of binding were synthesized on cross-linked agarose and experimentally tested. Adsorbents containing ligands A5A10 and A10A11 showed selectivity toward viral particles containing the target protein (VLP-AMPHO), binding 19 ± 5 μg/g support and 47 ± 13 μg/g support, respectively. The elution conditions for both ligands were mild and with high recovery yields (80-100%), in comparison with common purification practices. These results were based on a lab-scale experimental setting with VLP integrity being confirmed through TEM. In particular, the elution buffer containing 12 mM imidazole allowed the recovery of intact amphotropic viral particles.

  11. Dynamic root growth and architecture responses to limiting nutrient availability: linking physiological models and experimentation.

    PubMed

    Postma, Johannes A; Schurr, Ulrich; Fiorani, Fabio

    2014-01-01

    In recent years the study of root phenotypic plasticity in response to sub-optimal environmental factors and the genetic control of these responses have received renewed attention. As a path to increased productivity, in particular for low fertility soils, several applied research projects worldwide target the improvement of crop root traits both in plant breeding and biotechnology contexts. To assist these tasks and address the challenge of optimizing root growth and architecture for enhanced mineral resource use, the development of realistic simulation models is of great importance. We review this research field from a modeling perspective focusing particularly on nutrient acquisition strategies for crop production on low nitrogen and low phosphorous soils. Soil heterogeneity and the dynamics of nutrient availability in the soil pose a challenging environment in which plants have to forage efficiently for nutrients in order to maintain their internal nutrient homeostasis throughout their life cycle. Mathematical models assist in understanding plant growth strategies and associated root phenes that have potential to be tested and introduced in physiological breeding programs. At the same time, we stress that it is necessary to carefully consider model assumptions and development from a whole plant-resource allocation perspective and to introduce or refine modules simulating explicitly root growth and architecture dynamics through ontogeny with reference to key factors that constrain root growth. In this view it is important to understand negative feedbacks such as plant-plant competition. We conclude by briefly touching on available and developing technologies for quantitative root phenotyping from lab to field, from quantification of partial root profiles in the field to 3D reconstruction of whole root systems. Finally, we discuss how these approaches can and should be tightly linked to modeling to explore the root phenome.

  12. Viral hemorrhagic septicemia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Batts, William N.; Winton, James R.

    2012-01-01

    Viral hemorrhagic septicemia (VHS) is one of the most important viral diseases of finfish worldwide. In the past, VHS was thought to affect mainly rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss reared at freshwater facilities in Western Europe where it was known by various names including Egtved disease and infectious kidney swelling and liver degeneration (Wolf 1988). Today, VHS is known as an important source of mortality for cultured and wild fish in freshwater and marine environments in several regions of the northern hemisphere (Dixon 1999; Gagné et al. 2007; Kim and Faisal 2011; Lumsden et al. 2007; Marty et al. 1998, 2003; Meyers and Winton 1995; Skall et al. 2005b; Smail 1999; Takano et al. 2001). Viral hemorrhagic septicemia is caused by the fish rhabdovirus, viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV), a member of the genus Novirhabdovirus of the family Rhabdoviridae

  13. Viral quasispecies complexity measures.

    PubMed

    Gregori, Josep; Perales, Celia; Rodriguez-Frias, Francisco; Esteban, Juan I; Quer, Josep; Domingo, Esteban

    2016-06-01

    Mutant spectrum dynamics (changes in the related mutants that compose viral populations) has a decisive impact on virus behavior. The several platforms of next generation sequencing (NGS) to study viral quasispecies offer a magnifying glass to study viral quasispecies complexity. Several parameters are available to quantify the complexity of mutant spectra, but they have limitations. Here we critically evaluate the information provided by several population diversity indices, and we propose the introduction of some new ones used in ecology. In particular we make a distinction between incidence, abundance and function measures of viral quasispecies composition. We suggest a multidimensional approach (complementary information contributed by adequately chosen indices), propose some guidelines, and illustrate the use of indices with a simple example. We apply the indices to three clinical samples of hepatitis C virus that display different population heterogeneity. Areas of virus biology in which population complexity plays a role are discussed.

  14. Papillomaviruses: Viral evolution, cancer and evolutionary medicine.

    PubMed

    Bravo, Ignacio G; Félez-Sánchez, Marta

    2015-01-28

    Papillomaviruses (PVs) are a numerous family of small dsDNA viruses infecting virtually all mammals. PVs cause infections without triggering a strong immune response, and natural infection provides only limited protection against reinfection. Most PVs are part and parcel of the skin microbiota. In some cases, infections by certain PVs take diverse clinical presentations from highly productive self-limited warts to invasive cancers. We propose PVs as an excellent model system to study the evolutionary interactions between the immune system and pathogens causing chronic infections: genotypically, PVs are very diverse, with hundreds of different genotypes infecting skin and mucosa; phenotypically, they display extremely broad gradients and trade-offs between key phenotypic traits, namely productivity, immunogenicity, prevalence, oncogenicity and clinical presentation. Public health interventions have been launched to decrease the burden of PV-associated cancers, including massive vaccination against the most oncogenic human PVs, as well as systematic screening for PV chronic anogenital infections. Anti-PVs vaccines elicit protection against infection, induce cross-protection against closely related viruses and result in herd immunity. However, our knowledge on the ecological and intrapatient dynamics of PV infections remains fragmentary. We still need to understand how the novel anthropogenic selection pressures posed by vaccination and screening will affect viral circulation and epidemiology. We present here an overview of PV evolution and the connection between PV genotypes and the phenotypic, clinical manifestations of the diseases they cause. This differential link between viral evolution and the gradient cancer-warts-asymptomatic infections makes PVs a privileged playground for evolutionary medicine research.

  15. Use of the Syrian hamster as a new model of ebola virus disease and other viral hemorrhagic fevers.

    PubMed

    Wahl-Jensen, Victoria; Bollinger, Laura; Safronetz, David; de Kok-Mercado, Fabian; Scott, Dana P; Ebihara, Hideki

    2012-12-14

    Historically, mice and guinea pigs have been the rodent models of choice for therapeutic and prophylactic countermeasure testing against Ebola virus disease (EVD). Recently, hamsters have emerged as a novel animal model for the in vivo study of EVD. In this review, we discuss the history of the hamster as a research laboratory animal, as well as current benefits and challenges of this model. Availability of immunological reagents is addressed. Salient features of EVD in hamsters, including relevant pathology and coagulation parameters, are compared directly with the mouse, guinea pig and nonhuman primate models.

  16. Immigration and viral hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Suraj; Carballo, Manuel; Feld, Jordan J; Janssen, Harry L A

    2015-08-01

    WHO estimates reveal that the global prevalence of viral hepatitis may be as high as 500 million, with an annual mortality rate of up to 1.3 million individuals. The majority of this global burden of disease is borne by nations of the developing world with high rates of vertical and iatrogenic transmission of HBV and HCV, as well as poor access to healthcare. In 2013, 3.2% of the global population (231 million individuals) migrated into a new host nation. Migrants predominantly originate from the developing countries of the south, into the developed economies of North America and Western Europe. This mass migration of individuals from areas of high-prevalence of viral hepatitis poses a unique challenge to the healthcare systems of the host nations. Due to a lack of universal standards for screening, vaccination and treatment of viral hepatitis, the burden of chronic liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma continues to increase among migrant populations globally. Efforts to increase case identification and treatment among migrants have largely been limited to small outreach programs in urban centers, such that the majority of migrants with viral hepatitis continue to remain unaware of their infection. This review summarizes the data on prevalence of viral hepatitis and burden of chronic liver disease among migrants, current standards for screening and treatment of immigrants and refugees, and efforts to improve the identification and treatment of viral hepatitis among migrants.

  17. Tectonic plates, difficulties for pupils to link models and scientific data.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David-Ameline, Jacques

    2014-05-01

    In a secondary school in the west of France, I teach Biology and Geology to young pupils from 12 to 15 years old. This poster deals with the difficulties that pupils have to link the scientific data concerning the plate tectonics and the models. I choose to reproduce for pupils some situations that faced some first scientific people as they discovered arguments for the plate tectonics. For example, they have to discover the thickness of the plates by studying the speed of the seismic waves regarding the deepness. That means that they have to construct a curve starting with a table and then to analyze it. The first step is linked to math lessons and is quite easy for them. But the second one needs to mix the curve with its signification. This point is particularly hard and as we correct it, it appears like one moment of « pure science » because they seem to discover something none did before, with the power of their brain ! The second work on this subject is to study the representations of the subduction at an oceanic trench and of the mid-ocean ridge. They first look for drawing explaining what happens for the plates in those places and then they look for proofs that permitted to create those drawings. They really need help to make the difference between scientific data (pictures, curves...) and other drawings similar to the one they choose. For this subject working with documents is not easy because pupils have to ask themselves « what kind of document is it ?» before going further into their thinking. Nevertheless, they often succeed in those works because the teacher helps them a little. Those subjects open their eyes on what science is for a geological theme. It's also a good method to make them having fun doing science and to make them being seduced by making science.

  18. Cross-linked xenogenic collagen implantation in the sheep model for vaginal surgery.

    PubMed

    Endo, Masayuki; Urbankova, Iva; Vlacil, Jaromir; Sengupta, Siddarth; Deprest, Thomas; Klosterhalfen, Bernd; Feola, Andrew; Deprest, Jan

    The properties of meshes used in reconstructive surgery affect the host response and biomechanical characteristics of the grafted tissue. Whereas durable synthetics induce a chronic inflammation, biological grafts are usually considered as more biocompatible. The location of implantation is another determinant of the host response: the vagina is a different environment with specific function and anatomy. Herein, we evaluated a cross-linked acellular collagen matrix (ACM), pretreated by the anti-calcification procedure ADAPT® in a sheep model for vaginal surgery. Ten sheep were implanted with a cross-linked ACM, and six controls were implanted with a polypropylene (PP; 56 g/m(2)) control. One implant was inserted in the lower rectovaginal septum, and one was used for abdominal wall defect reconstruction. Grafts were removed after 180 days; all graft-related complications were recorded, and explants underwent bi-axial tensiometry and contractility testing. Half of ACM-implanted animals had palpable induration in the vaginal implantation area, two of these also on the abdominal implant. One animal had a vaginal exposure. Vaginal ACMs were 63 % less stiff compared to abdominal ACM explants (p = 0.01) but comparable to vaginal PP explants. Seven anterior vaginal ACM explants showed areas of graft degradation on histology. There was no overall difference in vaginal contractility. Considering histologic degradation in the anterior vaginal implant as representative for the host, posterior ACM explants of animals with degradation had a 60 % reduced contractility as compared to PP (p = 0.048). Three abdominal implants showed histologic degradation; those were more compliant than non-degraded implants. Vaginal implantation with ACM was associated with graft-related complications (GRCs) and biomechanical properties comparable to PP. Partially degraded ACM had a decreased vaginal contractility.

  19. Ecological-network models link diversity, structure and function in the plankton food-web

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D’Alelio, Domenico; Libralato, Simone; Wyatt, Timothy; Ribera D’Alcalà, Maurizio

    2016-02-01

    A planktonic food-web model including sixty-three functional nodes (representing auto- mixo- and heterotrophs) was developed to integrate most trophic diversity present in the plankton. The model was implemented in two variants - which we named ‘green’ and ‘blue’ - characterized by opposite amounts of phytoplankton biomass and representing, respectively, bloom and non-bloom states of the system. Taxonomically disaggregated food-webs described herein allowed to shed light on how components of the plankton community changed their trophic behavior in the two different conditions, and modified the overall functioning of the plankton food web. The green and blue food-webs showed distinct organizations in terms of trophic roles of the nodes and carbon fluxes between them. Such re-organization stemmed from switches in selective grazing by both metazoan and protozoan consumers. Switches in food-web structure resulted in relatively small differences in the efficiency of material transfer towards higher trophic levels. For instance, from green to blue states, a seven-fold decrease in phytoplankton biomass translated into only a two-fold decrease in potential planktivorous fish biomass. By linking diversity, structure and function in the plankton food-web, we discuss the role of internal mechanisms, relying on species-specific functionalities, in driving the ‘adaptive’ responses of plankton communities to perturbations.

  20. Ecological-network models link diversity, structure and function in the plankton food-web

    PubMed Central

    D’Alelio, Domenico; Libralato, Simone; Wyatt, Timothy; Ribera d’Alcalà, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    A planktonic food-web model including sixty-three functional nodes (representing auto- mixo- and heterotrophs) was developed to integrate most trophic diversity present in the plankton. The model was implemented in two variants - which we named ‘green’ and ‘blue’ - characterized by opposite amounts of phytoplankton biomass and representing, respectively, bloom and non-bloom states of the system. Taxonomically disaggregated food-webs described herein allowed to shed light on how components of the plankton community changed their trophic behavior in the two different conditions, and modified the overall functioning of the plankton food web. The green and blue food-webs showed distinct organizations in terms of trophic roles of the nodes and carbon fluxes between them. Such re-organization stemmed from switches in selective grazing by both metazoan and protozoan consumers. Switches in food-web structure resulted in relatively small differences in the efficiency of material transfer towards higher trophic levels. For instance, from green to blue states, a seven-fold decrease in phytoplankton biomass translated into only a two-fold decrease in potential planktivorous fish biomass. By linking diversity, structure and function in the plankton food-web, we discuss the role of internal mechanisms, relying on species-specific functionalities, in driving the ‘adaptive’ responses of plankton communities to perturbations. PMID:26883643

  1. Novel approximation of misalignment fading modeled by Beckmann distribution on free-space optical links.

    PubMed

    Boluda-Ruiz, Rubén; García-Zambrana, Antonio; Castillo-Vázquez, Carmen; Castillo-Vázquez, Beatriz

    2016-10-03

    A novel accurate and useful approximation of the well-known Beckmann distribution is presented here, which is used to model generalized pointing errors in the context of free-space optical (FSO) communication systems. We derive an approximate closed-form probability density function (PDF) for the composite gamma-gamma (GG) atmospheric turbulence with the pointing error model using the proposed approximation of the Beckmann distribution, which is valid for most practical terrestrial FSO links. This approximation takes into account the effect of the beam width, different jitters for the elevation and the horizontal displacement and the simultaneous effect of nonzero boresight errors for each axis at the receiver plane. Additionally, the proposed approximation allows us to delimit two different FSO scenarios. The first of them is when atmospheric turbulence is the dominant effect in relation to generalized pointing errors, and the second one when generalized pointing error is the dominant effect in relation to atmospheric turbulence. The second FSO scenario has not been studied in-depth by the research community. Moreover, the accuracy of the method is measured both visually and quantitatively using curve-fitting metrics. Simulation results are further included to confirm the analytical results.

  2. Ecological-network models link diversity, structure and function in the plankton food-web.

    PubMed

    D'Alelio, Domenico; Libralato, Simone; Wyatt, Timothy; Ribera d'Alcalà, Maurizio

    2016-02-17

    A planktonic food-web model including sixty-three functional nodes (representing auto- mixo- and heterotrophs) was developed to integrate most trophic diversity present in the plankton. The model was implemented in two variants - which we named 'green' and 'blue' - characterized by opposite amounts of phytoplankton biomass and representing, respectively, bloom and non-bloom states of the system. Taxonomically disaggregated food-webs described herein allowed to shed light on how components of the plankton community changed their trophic behavior in the two different conditions, and modified the overall functioning of the plankton food web. The green and blue food-webs showed distinct organizations in terms of trophic roles of the nodes and carbon fluxes between them. Such re-organization stemmed from switches in selective grazing by both metazoan and protozoan consumers. Switches in food-web structure resulted in relatively small differences in the efficiency of material transfer towards higher trophic levels. For instance, from green to blue states, a seven-fold decrease in phytoplankton biomass translated into only a two-fold decrease in potential planktivorous fish biomass. By linking diversity, structure and function in the plankton food-web, we discuss the role of internal mechanisms, relying on species-specific functionalities, in driving the 'adaptive' responses of plankton communities to perturbations.

  3. Linking Fine-Scale Observations and Model Output with Imagery at Multiple Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadler, J.; Walthall, C. L.

    2014-12-01

    The development and implementation of a system for seasonal worldwide agricultural yield estimates is underway with the international Group on Earth Observations GeoGLAM project. GeoGLAM includes a research component to continually improve and validate its algorithms. There is a history of field measurement campaigns going back decades to draw upon for ways of linking surface measurements and model results with satellite observations. Ground-based, in-situ measurements collected by interdisciplinary teams include yields, model inputs and factors affecting scene radiation. Data that is comparable across space and time with careful attention to calibration is essential for the development and validation of agricultural applications of remote sensing. Data management to ensure stewardship, availability and accessibility of the data are best accomplished when considered an integral part of the research. The expense and logistical challenges of field measurement campaigns can be cost-prohibitive and because of short funding cycles for research, access to consistent, stable study sites can be lost. The use of a dedicated staff for baseline data needed by multiple investigators, and conducting measurement campaigns using existing measurement networks such as the USDA Long Term Agroecosystem Research network can fulfill these needs and ensure long-term access to study sites.

  4. ON THE TRANSITIONAL DISK CLASS: LINKING OBSERVATIONS OF T TAURI STARS AND PHYSICAL DISK MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Espaillat, C.; Andrews, S.; Qi, C.; Wilner, D.; Ingleby, L.; Calvet, N.; Hernandez, J.; Furlan, E.; D'Alessio, P.; Muzerolle, J. E-mail: sandrews@cfa.harvard.edu E-mail: dwilner@cfa.harvard.edu E-mail: ncalvet@umich.edu E-mail: Elise.Furlan@jpl.nasa.gov E-mail: muzerol@stsci.edu

    2012-03-10

    Two decades ago 'transitional disks' (TDs) described spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of T Tauri stars with small near-IR excesses, but significant mid- and far-IR excesses. Many inferred this indicated dust-free holes in disks possibly cleared by planets. Recently, this term has been applied disparately to objects whose Spitzer SEDs diverge from the expectations for a typical full disk (FD). Here, we use irradiated accretion disk models to fit the SEDs of 15 such disks in NGC 2068 and IC 348. One group has a 'dip' in infrared emission while the others' continuum emission decreases steadily at all wavelengths. We find that the former have an inner disk hole or gap at intermediate radii in the disk and we call these objects 'transitional disks' and 'pre-transitional disks' (PTDs), respectively. For the latter group, we can fit these SEDs with FD models and find that millimeter data are necessary to break the degeneracy between dust settling and disk mass. We suggest that the term 'transitional' only be applied to objects that display evidence for a radical change in the disk's radial structure. Using this definition, we find that TDs and PTDs tend to have lower mass accretion rates than FDs and that TDs have lower accretion rates than PTDs. These reduced accretion rates onto the star could be linked to forming planets. Future observations of TDs and PTDs will allow us to better quantify the signatures of planet formation in young disks.

  5. Playing the role of weak clique property in link prediction: A friend recommendation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Chuang; Zhou, Tao; Zhang, Hai-Feng

    2016-07-01

    An important fact in studying link prediction is that the structural properties of networks have significant impacts on the performance of algorithms. Therefore, how to improve the performance of link prediction with the aid of structural properties of networks is an essential problem. By analyzing many real networks, we find a typical structural property: nodes are preferentially linked to the nodes with the weak clique structure (abbreviated as PWCS to simplify descriptions). Based on this PWCS phenomenon, we propose a local friend recommendation (FR) index to facilitate link prediction. Our experiments show that the performance of FR index is better than some famous local similarity indices, such as Common Neighbor (CN) index, Adamic-Adar (AA) index and Resource Allocation (RA) index. We then explain why PWCS can give rise to the better performance of FR index in link prediction. Finally, a mixed friend recommendation index (labelled MFR) is proposed by utilizing the PWCS phenomenon, which further improves the accuracy of link prediction.

  6. Playing the role of weak clique property in link prediction: A friend recommendation model.

    PubMed

    Ma, Chuang; Zhou, Tao; Zhang, Hai-Feng

    2016-07-21

    An important fact in studying link prediction is that the structural properties of networks have significant impacts on the performance of algorithms. Therefore, how to improve the performance of link prediction with the aid of structural properties of networks is an essential problem. By analyzing many real networks, we find a typical structural property: nodes are preferentially linked to the nodes with the weak clique structure (abbreviated as PWCS to simplify descriptions). Based on this PWCS phenomenon, we propose a local friend recommendation (FR) index to facilitate link prediction. Our experiments show that the performance of FR index is better than some famous local similarity indices, such as Common Neighbor (CN) index, Adamic-Adar (AA) index and Resource Allocation (RA) index. We then explain why PWCS can give rise to the better performance of FR index in link prediction. Finally, a mixed friend recommendation index (labelled MFR) is proposed by utilizing the PWCS phenomenon, which further improves the accuracy of link prediction.

  7. Structural organization of poliovirus RNA replication is mediated by viral proteins of the P2 genomic region

    SciTech Connect

    Bienz, K.; Egger, D.; Troxler, M.; Pasamontes, L. )

    1990-03-01

    Transcriptionally active replication complexes bound to smooth membrane vesicles were isolated from poliovirus-infected cells. In electron microscopic, negatively stained preparations, the replication complex appeared as an irregularly shaped, oblong structure attached to several virus-induced vesicles of a rosettelike arrangement. Electron microscopic immunocytochemistry of such preparations demonstrated that the poliovirus replication complex contains the proteins coded by the P2 genomic region (P2 proteins) in a membrane-associated form. In addition, the P2 proteins are also associated with viral RNA, and they can be cross-linked to viral RNA by UV irradiation. Guanidine hydrochloride prevented the P2 proteins from becoming membrane bound but did not change their association with viral RNA. The findings allow the conclusion that the protein 2C or 2C-containing precursor(s) is responsible for the attachment of the viral RNA to the vesicular membrane and for the spatial organization of the replication complex necessary for its proper functioning in viral transcription. A model for the structure of the viral replication complex and for the function of the 2C-containing P2 protein(s) and the vesicular membranes is proposed.

  8. Recombination-dependent concatemeric viral DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Lo Piano, Ambra; Martínez-Jiménez, María I; Zecchi, Lisa; Ayora, Silvia

    2011-09-01

    The initiation of viral double stranded (ds) DNA replication involves proteins that recruit and load the replisome at the replication origin (ori). Any block in replication fork progression or a programmed barrier may act as a factor for ori-independent remodelling and assembly of a new replisome at the stalled fork. Then replication initiation becomes dependent on recombination proteins, a process called recombination-dependent replication (RDR). RDR, which is recognized as being important for replication restart and stability in all living organisms, plays an essential role in the replication cycle of many dsDNA viruses. The SPP1 virus, which infects Bacillus subtilis cells, serves as a paradigm to understand the links between replication and recombination in circular dsDNA viruses. SPP1-encoded initiator and replisome assembly proteins control the onset of viral replication and direct the recruitment of host-encoded replisomal components at viral oriL. SPP1 uses replication fork reactivation to switch from ori-dependent θ-type (circle-to-circle) replication to σ-type RDR. Replication fork arrest leads to a double strand break that is processed by viral-encoded factors to generate a D-loop into which a new replisome is assembled, leading to σ-type viral replication. SPP1 RDR proteins are compared with similar proteins encoded by other viruses and their possible in vivo roles are discussed.

  9. Studying the immune response to human viral infections using zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Goody, Michelle F; Sullivan, Con; Kim, Carol H

    2014-09-01

    Humans and viruses have a long co-evolutionary history. Viral illnesses have and will continue to shape human history: from smallpox, to influenza, to HIV, and beyond. Animal models of human viral illnesses are needed in order to generate safe and effective antiviral medicines, adjuvant therapies, and vaccines. These animal models must support the replication of human viruses, recapitulate aspects of human viral illnesses, and respond with conserved immune signaling cascades. The zebrafish is perhaps the simplest, most commonly used laboratory model organism in which innate and/or adaptive immunity can be studied. Herein, we will discuss the current zebrafish models of human viral illnesses and the insights they have provided. We will highlight advantages of early life stage zebrafish and the importance of innate immunity in human viral illnesses. We will also discuss viral characteristics to consider before infecting zebrafish with human viruses as well as predict other human viruses that may be able to infect zebrafish.

  10. Linking land use change to recreational fishery valuation with a spatially explicit behavior model: A case study from Tampa Bay, FL USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Drawing a link between habitat change and production and delivery of ecosystem services is a priority in coastal estuarine ecosystems. This link is needed to fully understand how human communities can influence ecosystem sustainability. Mechanistic modeling tools are highly fun...

  11. Linking GIS-based models to value ecosystem services in an Alpine region.

    PubMed

    Grêt-Regamey, Adrienne; Bebi, Peter; Bishop, Ian D; Schmid, Willy A

    2008-11-01

    Planning frequently fails to include the valuation of public goods and services. This can have long-term negative economic consequences for a region. This is especially the case in mountainous regions such as the Alps, which depend on tourism and where land-use changes can negatively impact key ecosystem services and hence the economy. In this study, we develop a semi-automatic procedure to value ecosystem goods and services. Several existing process-based models linked to economic valuation methods are integrated into a geographic information system (GIS) platform. The model requires the input of a digital elevation model, a land-cover map, and a spatially explicit temperature dataset. These datasets are available for most regions in Europe. We illustrate the approach by valuing four ecosystem services: avalanche protection, timber production, scenic beauty, and habitat, which are supplied by the "Landschaft Davos", an administrative district in the Swiss Alps. We compare the impacts of a human development scenario and a climate scenario on the value of these ecosystem services. Urban expansion and tourist infrastructure developments have a negative impact on scenic beauty and habitats. These impacts outweigh the benefits of the developments in the long-term. Forest expansion, predictable under a climate change scenario, favours natural avalanche protection and habitats. In general, such non-marketed benefits provided by the case-study region more than compensate for the costs of forest maintenance. Finally, we discuss the advantages and disadvantages of the approach. Despite its limitations, we show how this approach could well help decision-makers balance the impacts of different planning options on the economic accounting of a region, and guide them in selecting sustainable and economically feasible development strategies.

  12. Linking an economic model for European agriculture with a mechanistic model to estimate nitrogen losses from cropland soil in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leip, A.; Marchi, G.; Koeble, R.; Kempen, M.; Britz, W.; Li, C.

    2007-07-01

    For the comprehensive assessment of the policy impact on greenhouse gas emissions from agricultural soils both socio-economic aspects and the environmental heterogeneity of the landscape are important factors that must be considered. We developed a modelling framework that links the large-scale economic model for agriculture CAPRI with the bio-geochemistry model DNDC to simulate greenhouse gas fluxes, carbon stock changes and the nitrogen budget of agricultural soils in Europe. The framework allows the ex-ante simulation of agricultural or agri-environmental policy impacts on wide range of environmental problems such as climate change (greenhouse gas emissions), air pollution and groundwater pollution. Those environmental impacts can be analysed in the context of economic and social indicators as calculated by the economic model. The methodology consists in four steps (i) the definition of appropriate calculation units that can be considered as homogeneous in terms of economic behaviour and environmental response; (ii) downscaling of regional agricultural statistics and farm management information from a CAPRI simulation run into the spatial calculation units; (iii) setting up of environmental model scenarios and model runs; and finally (iv) aggregating results for interpretation. We show first results of the nitrogen budget in cropland for the area of fourteen countries of the European Union. These results, in terms of estimated nitrogen fluxes, must still be considered as illustrative as needs for improvements in input data (e.g. the soil map) and management data (yield estimates) have been identified and will be the focus of future work. Nevertheless, we highlight inter-dependencies between farmer's choices of land uses and the environmental impact of different cultivation systems.

  13. Accelerating Influenza Research: Vaccines, Antivirals, Immunomodulators and Monoclonal Antibodies. The Manufacture of a New Wild-Type H3N2 Virus for the Human Viral Challenge Model

    PubMed Central

    Fullen, Daniel J.; Noulin, Nicolas; Catchpole, Andrew; Fathi, Hosnieh; Murray, Edward J.; Mann, Alex; Eze, Kingsley; Balaratnam, Ganesh; Borley, Daryl W.; Gilbert, Anthony; Lambkin-Williams, Rob

    2016-01-01

    Background Influenza and its associated diseases are a major cause of morbidity and mortality. The United States Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices recommends influenza vaccination for everyone over 6 months of age. The failure of the flu vaccine in 2014–2015 demonstrates the need for a model that allows the rapid development of novel antivirals, universal/intra-seasonal vaccines, immunomodulators, monoclonal antibodies and other novel treatments. To this end we manufactured a new H3N2 influenza virus in compliance with Good Manufacturing Practice for use in the Human Viral Challenge Model. Methods and Strain Selection We chose an H3N2 influenza subtype, rather than H1N1, given that this strain has the most substantial impact in terms of morbidity or mortality annually as described by the Centre for Disease Control. We first subjected the virus batch to rigorous adventitious agent testing, confirmed the virus to be wild-type by Sanger sequencing and determined the virus titres appropriate for human use via the established ferret model. We built on our previous experience with other H3N2 and H1N1 viruses to develop this unique model. Human Challenge and Conclusions We conducted an initial safety and characterisation study in healthy adult volunteers, utilising our unique clinical quarantine facility in London, UK. In this study we demonstrated this new influenza (H3N2) challenge virus to be both safe and pathogenic with an appropriate level of disease in volunteers. Furthermore, by inoculating volunteers with a range of different inoculum titres, we established the minimum infectious titre required to achieve reproducible disease whilst ensuring a sensitive model that can be translated to design of subsequent field based studies. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02525055 PMID:26761707

  14. Treatment of hepatitis C virus infection with interferon and small molecule direct antivirals: viral kinetics and modeling

    PubMed Central

    Rong, Libin; Perelson, Alan S.

    2010-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection remains a threat to global public health. Treatment with pegylated interferon (IFN) plus ribavirin leads to a sustained virologic response in about 50% of patients. New therapies using direct antiviral agents have the potential to cure patients unresponsive to IFN-based therapies. Mathematical modeling has played an important role in studying HCV kinetics. Using models one can evaluate the effectiveness of new treatment agents, estimate important parameters that govern virus-host interactions, explore possible mechanisms of drug action against HCV, investigate the development of drug resistance and study quasispecies dynamics during therapy. Here we review our current knowledge of HCV kinetics under IFN-based therapy and newly developed antiviral agents specifically targeted to attack HCV, and show how mathematical models have helped improve our understanding of HCV infection and treatment. PMID:20370626

  15. Favorable effects of VEGF gene transfer on a rat model of Parkinson disease using adeno-associated viral vectors.

    PubMed

    Tian, You-yong; Tang, Cui-Ju; Wang, Jia-ning; Feng, Yuan; Chen, Xiao-wu; Wang, Lan; Qiao, Xian; Sun, Sheng-gang

    2007-06-29

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a specific angiogenic peptide, which has been identified to play a critical role in neurodegeneration, and has beneficial effects on neurons. In this study, we investigated whether neurodegeneration in a rat model of Parkinson disease could be prevented by VEGF gene transfer mediated by adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors. Our results demonstrated that a single injection of a VEGF-expressing AAV vector into striatum improved the rotational behavior of rat Parkinson disease models, and promoted the survival of dopaminergic neurons and fibers. Meanwhile, AAV-VEGF injection significantly increased the reactive astrocytes and the levels of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor in striatum, but did not induce extra angiogenesis and remarkable disorder of blood-brain barrier. We thus conclude that intrastriatal delivery of VEGF gene mediated by AAV has favorable effects on the dopaminergic neurons in a rat Parkinson disease model.

  16. Myeloid Leukemias and Virally Induced Lymphomas in Miniature Inbred Swine: Development of a Large Animal Tumor Model.

    PubMed

    Duran-Struuck, Raimon; Matar, Abraham J; Huang, Christene A

    2015-01-01

    The lack of a large animal transplantable tumor model has limited the study of novel therapeutic strategies for the treatment of liquid cancers. Swine as a species provide a natural option based on their similarities with humans and their already extensive use in biomedical research. Specifically, the Massachusetts General Hospital miniature swine herd retains unique genetic characteristics that facilitate the study of hematopoietic cell and solid organ transplantation. Spontaneously arising liquid cancers in these swine, specifically myeloid leukemias and B cell lymphomas, closely resemble human malignancies. The ability to establish aggressive tumor cell lines in vitro from these naturally occurring malignancies makes a transplantable tumor model a close reality. Here, we discuss our experience with myeloid and lymphoid tumors in major histocompatibility characterized miniature swine and future approaches regarding the development of a large animal transplantable tumor model.

  17. Viral fitness: definitions, measurement, and current insights

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wargo, Andrew R.; Kurath, Gael

    2012-01-01

    Viral fitness is an active area of research, with recent work involving an expanded number of human, non-human vertebrate, invertebrate, plant, and bacterial viruses. Many publications deal with RNA viruses associated with major disease emergence events, such as HIV-1, influenza virus, and Dengue virus. Study topics include drug resistance, immune escape, viral emergence, host jumps, mutation effects, quasispecies diversity, and mathematical models of viral fitness. Important recent trends include increasing use of in vivo systems to assess vertebrate virus fitness, and a broadening of research beyond replicative fitness to also investigate transmission fitness and epidemiologic fitness. This is essential for a more integrated understanding of overall viral fitness, with implications for disease management in the future.

  18. Viral fitness: definitions, measurement, and current insights.

    PubMed

    Wargo, Andrew R; Kurath, Gael

    2012-10-01

    Viral fitness is an active area of research, with recent work involving an expanded number of human, non-human vertebrate, invertebrate, plant, and bacterial viruses. Many publications deal with RNA viruses associated with major disease emergence events, such as HIV-1, influenza virus, and Dengue virus. Study topics include drug resistance, immune escape, viral emergence, host jumps, mutation effects, quasispecies diversity, and mathematical models of viral fitness. Important recent trends include increasing use of in vivo systems to assess vertebrate virus fitness, and a broadening of research beyond replicative fitness to also investigate transmission fitness and epidemiologic fitness. This is essential for a more integrated understanding of overall viral fitness, with implications for disease management in the future.

  19. The Role of VP1 Amino Acid Residue 145 of Enterovirus 71 in Viral Fitness and Pathogenesis in a Cynomolgus Monkey Model.

    PubMed

    Kataoka, Chikako; Suzuki, Tadaki; Kotani, Osamu; Iwata-Yoshikawa, Naoko; Nagata, Noriyo; Ami, Yasushi; Wakita, Takaji; Nishimura, Yorihiro; Shimizu, Hiroyuki

    2015-07-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71), a major causative agent of hand, foot, and mouth disease, occasionally causes severe neurological symptoms. We identified P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1) as an EV71 receptor and found that an amino acid residue 145 in the capsid protein VP1 (VP1-145) defined PSGL-1-binding (PB) and PSGL-1-nonbinding (non-PB) phenotypes of EV71. However, the role of PSGL-1-dependent EV71 replication in neuropathogenesis remains poorly understood. In this study, we investigated viral replication, genetic stability, and the pathogenicity of PB and non-PB strains of EV71 in a cynomolgus monkey model. Monkeys were intravenously inoculated with cDNA-derived PB and non-PB strains of EV71, EV71-02363-EG and EV71-02363-KE strains, respectively, with two amino acid differences at VP1-98 and VP1-145. Mild neurological symptoms, transient lymphocytopenia, and inflammatory cytokine responses, were found predominantly in the 02363-KE-inoculated monkeys. During the early stage of infection, viruses were frequently detected in clinical samples from 02363-KE-inoculated monkeys but rarely in samples from 02363-EG-inoculated monkeys. Histopathological analysis of central nervous system (CNS) tissues at 10 days postinfection revealed that 02363-KE induced neuropathogenesis more efficiently than that induced by 02363-EG. After inoculation with 02363-EG, almost all EV71 variants detected in clinical samples, CNS, and non-CNS tissues, possessed a G to E amino acid substitution at VP1-145, suggesting a strong in vivo selection of VP1-145E variants and CNS spread presumably in a PSGL-1-independent manner. EV71 variants with VP1-145G were identified only in peripheral blood mononuclear cells in two out of four 02363-EG-inoculated monkeys. Thus, VP1-145E variants are mainly responsible for the development of viremia and neuropathogenesis in a non-human primate model, further suggesting the in vivo involvement of amino acid polymorphism at VP1-145 in cell-specific viral

  20. Linking optimization and ecological models in a decision support tool for oyster restoration and management.

    PubMed

    North, E W; King, D M; Xu, J; Hood, R R; Newell, R I E; Paynter, K; Kellogg, M L; Liddel, M K; Boesch, D F

    2010-04-01

    Restoration of ecologically important marine species and habitats is restricted by funding constraints and hindered by lack of information about trade-offs among restoration goals and the effectiveness of alternative restoration strategies. Because ecosystems provide diverse human and ecological benefits, achieving one restoration benefit may take place at the expense of other benefits. This poses challenges when attempting to allocate limited resources to optimally achieve multiple benefits, and when defining measures of restoration success. We present a restoration decision-support tool that links ecosystem prediction and human use in a flexible "optimization" framework that clarifies important restoration trade-offs, makes location-specific recommendations, predicts benefits, and quantifies the associated costs (in the form of lost opportunities). The tool is illustrated by examining restoration options related to the eastern oyster, Crassostrea virginica, which supported an historically important fishery in Chesapeake Bay and provides a range of ecosystem services such as removing seston, enhancing water clarity, and creating benthic habitat. We use an optimization approach to identify the locations where oyster restoration efforts are most likely to maximize one or more benefits such as reduction in seston, increase in light penetration, spawning stock enhancement, and harvest, subject to funding constraints and other limitations. This proof-of-concept Oyster Restoration Optimization model (ORO) incorporates predictions from three-dimensional water quality (nutrients-phytoplankton zooplankton-detritus [NPZD] with oyster filtration) and larval transport models; calculates size- and salinity-dependent growth, mortality, and fecundity of oysters; and includes economic costs of restoration efforts. Model results indicate that restoration of oysters in different regions of the Chesapeake Bay would maximize different suites of benefits due to interactions between

  1. Vibro-acoustic modelling of aircraft double-walls with structural links using Statistical Energy Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campolina, Bruno L.

    The prediction of aircraft interior noise involves the vibroacoustic modelling of the fuselage with noise control treatments. This structure is composed of a stiffened metallic or composite panel, lined with a thermal and acoustic insulation layer (glass wool), and structurally connected via vibration isolators to a commercial lining panel (trim). The goal of this work aims at tailoring the noise control treatments taking design constraints such as weight and space optimization into account. For this purpose, a representative aircraft double-wall is modelled using the Statistical Energy Analysis (SEA) method. Laboratory excitations such as diffuse acoustic field and point force are addressed and trends are derived for applications under in-flight conditions, considering turbulent boundary layer excitation. The effect of the porous layer compression is firstly addressed. In aeronautical applications, compression can result from the installation of equipment and cables. It is studied analytically and experimentally, using a single panel and a fibrous uniformly compressed over 100% of its surface. When compression increases, a degradation of the transmission loss up to 5 dB for a 50% compression of the porous thickness is observed mainly in the mid-frequency range (around 800 Hz). However, for realistic cases, the effect should be reduced since the compression rate is lower and compression occurs locally. Then the transmission through structural connections between panels is addressed using a four-pole approach that links the force-velocity pair at each side of the connection. The modelling integrates experimental dynamic stiffness of isolators, derived using an adapted test rig. The structural transmission is then experimentally validated and included in the double-wall SEA model as an equivalent coupling loss factor (CLF) between panels. The tested structures being flat, only axial transmission is addressed. Finally, the dominant sound transmission paths are

  2. Assessing the viral fitness of oseltamivir-resistant influenza viruses in ferrets, using a competitive-mixtures model.

    PubMed

    Hurt, Aeron C; Nor'e, Siti Sarah; McCaw, James M; Fryer, Helen R; Mosse, Jennifer; McLean, Angela R; Barr, Ian G

    2010-09-01

    To determine the relative fitness of oseltamivir-resistant strains compared to susceptible wild-type viruses, we combined mathematical modeling and statistical techniques with a novel in vivo "competitive-mixtures" experimental model. Ferrets were coinfected with either pure populations (100% susceptible wild-type or 100% oseltamivir-resistant mutant virus) or mixed populations of wild-type and oseltamivir-resistant influenza viruses (80%:20%, 50%:50%, and 20%:80%) at equivalent infectivity titers, and the changes in the relative proportions of those two viruses were monitored over the course of the infection during within-host and over host-to-host transmission events in a ferret contact model. Coinfection of ferrets with mixtures of an oseltamivir-resistant R292K mutant A(H3N2) virus and a R292 oseltamivir-susceptible wild-type virus demonstrated that the R292K mutant virus was rapidly outgrown by the R292 wild-type virus in artificially infected donor ferrets and did not transmit to any of the recipient ferrets. The competitive-mixtures model was also used to investigate the fitness of the seasonal A(H1N1) oseltamivir-resistant H274Y mutant and showed that within infected ferrets the H274Y mutant virus was marginally outgrown by the wild-type strain but demonstrated equivalent transmissibility between ferrets. This novel in vivo experimental method and accompanying mathematical analysis provide greater insight into the relative fitness, both within the host and between hosts, of two different influenza virus strains compared to more traditional methods that infect ferrets with only pure populations of viruses. Our statistical inferences are essential for the development of the next generation of mathematical models of the emergence and spread of oseltamivir-resistant influenza in human populations.

  3. Resistance to Oncolytic Myxoma Virus Therapy in Nf1−/−/Trp53−/− Syngeneic Mouse Glioma Models Is Independent of Anti-Viral Type-I Interferon

    PubMed Central

    Zemp, Franz J.; McKenzie, Brienne A.; Lun, Xueqing; Maxwell, Lori; Reilly, Karlyne M.; McFadden, Grant; Yong, V. Wee; Forsyth, Peter A.

    2013-01-01

    Despite promising preclinical studies, oncolytic viral therapy for malignant gliomas has resulted in variable, but underwhelming results in clinical evaluations. Of concern are the low levels of tumour infection and viral replication within the tumour. This discrepancy between the laboratory and the clinic could result from the disparity of xenograft versus syngeneic models in determining in vivo viral infection, replication and treatment efficacy. Here we describe a panel of primary mouse glioma lines derived from Nf1+/−Trp53+/− mice in the C57Bl/6J background for use in the preclinical testing of the oncolytic virus Myxoma (MYXV). These lines show a range of susceptibility to MYXV replication in vitro, but all succumb to viral-mediated cell death. Two of these lines orthotopically grafted produced aggressive gliomas. Intracranial injection of MYXV failed to result in sustained viral replication or treatment efficacy, with minimal tumour infection that was completely resolved by 7 days post-infection. We hypothesized that the stromal production of Type-I interferons (IFNα/β) could explain the resistance seen in these models; however, we found that neither the cell lines in vitro nor the tumours in vivo produce any IFNα/β in response to MYXV infection. To confirm IFNα/β did not play a role in this resistance, we ablated the ability of tumours to respond to IFNα/β via IRF9 knockdown, and generated identical results. Our studies demonstrate that these syngeneic cell lines are relevant preclinical models for testing experimental glioma treatments, and show that IFNα/β is not responsible for the MYXV treatment resistance seen in syngeneic glioma models. PMID:23762429

  4. Linking rates of folding in lattice models of proteins with underlying thermodynamic characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimov, D. K.; Thirumalai, D.

    1998-09-01

    We investigate the sequence-dependent properties of proteins that determine the dual requirements of stability of the native state and its kinetic accessibility using simple cubic lattice models. Three interaction schemes are used to describe the potentials between nearest neighbor nonbonded beads. We show that, under the simulation conditions when the native basin of attraction (NBA) is the most stable, there is an excellent correlation between folding times τF and the dimensionless parameter σT=(Tθ-TF)/Tθ, where Tθ is the collapse temperature and TF is the folding transition temperature. There is also a significant correlation between τF and another dimensionless quantity Z=(EN-Ems)/δ, where EN is the energy of the native state, Ems is the average energy of the ensemble of misfolded structures, and δ is the dispersion in the contact energies. In contrast, there is no significant correlation between τF and the Z-score gap ΔZ=EN-Ems. An approximate relationship between σT and the Z-score is derived, which explains the superior correlation seen between τF and σT. For two state folders τF is linked to the free energy difference (not simply energy gap, however it is defined) between the unfolded states and the NBA.

  5. Gene Therapy Model of X-linked Severe Combined Immunodeficiency Using a Modified Foamy Virus Vector

    PubMed Central

    Horino, Satoshi; Uchiyama, Toru; So, Takanori; Nagashima, Hiroyuki; Sun, Shu-lan; Sato, Miki; Asao, Atsuko; Haji, Yoichi; Sasahara, Yoji; Candotti, Fabio; Tsuchiya, Shigeru; Kure, Shigeo; Sugamura, Kazuo; Ishii, Naoto

    2013-01-01

    X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID-X1) is an inherited genetic immunodeficiency associated with mutations in the common cytokine receptor γ chain (γc) gene, and characterized by a complete defect of T and natural killer (NK) cells. Gene therapy for SCID-X1 using conventional retroviral (RV) vectors carrying the γc gene results in the successful reconstitution of T cell immunity. However, the high incidence of vector-mediated T cell leukemia, caused by vector insertion near or within cancer-related genes has been a serious problem. In this study, we established a gene therapy model of mouse SCID-X1 using a modified foamy virus (FV) vector expressing human γc. Analysis of vector integration in a human T cell line demonstrated that the FV vector integration sites were significantly less likely to be located within or near transcriptional start sites than RV vector integration sites. To evaluate the therapeutic efficacy, bone marrow cells from γc-knockout (γc-KO) mice were infected with the FV vector and transplanted into γc-KO mice. Transplantation of the FV-treated cells resulted in the successful reconstitution of functionally active T and B cells. These data suggest that FV vectors can be effective and may be safer than conventional RV vectors for gene therapy for SCID-X1. PMID:23990961

  6. Three-Dimensional Characterization and Modeling of Microstructural Weak Links for Spall Damage in FCC Metals

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnan, Kapil; Brown, Andrew; Wayne, Leda; Vo, Johnathan; Opie, Saul; Lim, Harn; Peralta, Pedro; Luo, Sheng-Nian; Byler, Darrin; McClellan, Kenneth J.; Koskelo, Aaron; Dickerson, Robert

    2014-11-25

    Local microstructural weak links for spall damage were investigated using three-dimensional (3-D) characterization in multicrystalline copper samples (grain size ≈ 450 µm) shocked with laser-driven plates at low pressures (2 to 4 GPa). The thickness of samples and flyer plates, approximately 1000 and 500 µm respectively, led to short pressure pulses that allowed isolating microstructure effects on local damage characteristics. Electron Backscattering Diffraction and optical microscopy were used to relate the presence, size, and shape of porosity to local microstructure. The experiments were complemented with 3-D finite element simulations of individual grain boundaries (GBs) that resulted in large damage volumes using crystal plasticity coupled with a void nucleation and growth model. Results from analysis of these damage sites show that the presence of a GB-affected zone, where strain concentration occurs next to a GB, correlates strongly with damage localization at these sites, most likely due to the inability of maintaining strain compatibility across these interfaces, with additional effects due to the inclination of the GB with respect to the shock. Results indicate that strain compatibility plays an important role on intergranular spall damage in metallic materials.

  7. Gene therapy model of X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency using a modified foamy virus vector.

    PubMed

    Horino, Satoshi; Uchiyama, Toru; So, Takanori; Nagashima, Hiroyuki; Sun, Shu-Lan; Sato, Miki; Asao, Atsuko; Haji, Yoichi; Sasahara, Yoji; Candotti, Fabio; Tsuchiya, Shigeru; Kure, Shigeo; Sugamura, Kazuo; Ishii, Naoto

    2013-01-01

    X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID-X1) is an inherited genetic immunodeficiency associated with mutations in the common cytokine receptor γ chain (γc) gene, and characterized by a complete defect of T and natural killer (NK) cells. Gene therapy for SCID-X1 using conventional retroviral (RV) vectors carrying the γc gene results in the successful reconstitution of T cell immunity. However, the high incidence of vector-mediated T cell leukemia, caused by vector insertion near or within cancer-related genes has been a serious problem. In this study, we established a gene therapy model of mouse SCID-X1 using a modified foamy virus (FV) vector expressing human γc. Analysis of vector integration in a human T cell line demonstrated that the FV vector integration sites were significantly less likely to be located within or near transcriptional start sites than RV vector integration sites. To evaluate the therapeutic efficacy, bone marrow cells from γc-knockout (γc-KO) mice were infected with the FV vector and transplanted into γc-KO mice. Transplantation of the FV-treated cells resulted in the successful reconstitution of functionally active T and B cells. These data suggest that FV vectors can be effective and may be safer than conventional RV vectors for gene therapy for SCID-X1.

  8. Genetic and Environmental Models of Circadian Disruption Link SRC-2 Function to Hepatic Pathology.

    PubMed

    Fleet, Tiffany; Stashi, Erin; Zhu, Bokai; Rajapakshe, Kimal; Marcelo, Kathrina L; Kettner, Nicole M; Gorman, Blythe K; Coarfa, Cristian; Fu, Loning; O'Malley, Bert W; York, Brian

    2016-10-01

    Circadian rhythmicity is a fundamental process that synchronizes behavioral cues with metabolic homeostasis. Disruption of daily cycles due to jet lag or shift work results in severe physiological consequences including advanced aging, metabolic syndrome, and even cancer. Our understanding of the molecular clock, which is regulated by intricate positive feedforward and negative feedback loops, has expanded to include an important metabolic transcriptional coregulator, Steroid Receptor Coactivator-2 (SRC-2), that regulates both the central clock of the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) and peripheral clocks including the liver. We hypothesized that an environmental uncoupling of the light-dark phases, termed chronic circadian disruption (CCD), would lead to pathology similar to the genetic circadian disruption observed with loss of SRC-2 We found that CCD and ablation of SRC-2 in mice led to a common comorbidity of metabolic syndrome also found in humans with circadian disruption, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). The combination of SRC-2(-/-) and CCD results in a more robust phenotype that correlates with human non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) gene signatures. Either CCD or SRC-2 ablation produces an advanced aging phenotype leading to increased mortality consistent with other circadian mutant mouse models. Collectively, our studies demonstrate that SRC-2 provides an essential link between the behavioral activities influenced by light cues and the metabolic homeostasis maintained by the liver.

  9. Three-Dimensional Characterization and Modeling of Microstructural Weak Links for Spall Damage in FCC Metals

    DOE PAGES

    Krishnan, Kapil; Brown, Andrew; Wayne, Leda; ...

    2014-11-25

    Local microstructural weak links for spall damage were investigated using three-dimensional (3-D) characterization in multicrystalline copper samples (grain size ≈ 450 µm) shocked with laser-driven plates at low pressures (2 to 4 GPa). The thickness of samples and flyer plates, approximately 1000 and 500 µm respectively, led to short pressure pulses that allowed isolating microstructure effects on local damage characteristics. Electron Backscattering Diffraction and optical microscopy were used to relate the presence, size, and shape of porosity to local microstructure. The experiments were complemented with 3-D finite element simulations of individual grain boundaries (GBs) that resulted in large damage volumesmore » using crystal plasticity coupled with a void nucleation and growth model. Results from analysis of these damage sites show that the presence of a GB-affected zone, where strain concentration occurs next to a GB, correlates strongly with damage localization at these sites, most likely due to the inability of maintaining strain compatibility across these interfaces, with additional effects due to the inclination of the GB with respect to the shock. Results indicate that strain compatibility plays an important role on intergranular spall damage in metallic materials.« less

  10. Linked-cluster expansion for the Green's function of the infinite-U Hubbard model.

    PubMed

    Khatami, Ehsan; Perepelitsky, Edward; Rigol, Marcos; Shastry, B Sriram

    2014-06-01

    We implement a highly efficient strong-coupling expansion for the Green's function of the Hubbard model. In the limit of extreme correlations, where the onsite interaction is infinite, the evaluation of diagrams simplifies dramatically enabling us to carry out the expansion to the eighth order in powers of the hopping amplitude. We compute the finite-temperature Green's function analytically in the momentum and Matsubara frequency space as a function of the electron density. Employing Padé approximations, we study the equation of state, Kelvin thermopower, momentum distribution function, quasiparticle fraction, and quasiparticle lifetime of the system at temperatures lower than, or of the order of, the hopping amplitude. We also discuss several different approaches for obtaining the spectral functions through analytic continuation of the imaginary frequency Green's function, and show results for the system near half filling. We benchmark our results for the equation of state against those obtained from a numerical linked-cluster expansion carried out to the eleventh order.

  11. The nuclear export protein of H5N1 influenza A viruses recruits Matrix 1 (M1) protein to the viral ribonucleoprotein to mediate nuclear export.

    PubMed

    Brunotte, Linda; Flies, Joe; Bolte, Hardin; Reuther, Peter; Vreede, Frank; Schwemmle, Martin

    2014-07-18

    In influenza A virus-infected cells, replication and transcription of the viral genome occurs in the nucleus. To be packaged into viral particles at the plasma membrane, encapsidated viral genomes must be exported from the nucleus. Intriguingly, the nuclear export protein (NEP) is involved in both processes. Although NEP stimulates viral RNA synthesis by binding to the viral polymerase, its function during nuclear export implicates interaction with viral ribonucleoprotein (vRNP)-associated M1. The observation that both interactions are mediated by the C-terminal moiety of NEP raised the question whether these two features of NEP are linked functionally. Here we provide evidence that the interaction between M1 and the vRNP depends on the NEP C terminus and its polymerase activity-enhancing property for the nuclear export of vRNPs. This suggests that these features of NEP are linked functionally. Furthermore, our data suggest that the N-terminal domain of NEP interferes with the stability of the vRNP-M1-NEP nuclear export complex, probably mediated by its highly flexible intramolecular interaction with the NEP C terminus. On the basis of our data, we propose a new model for the assembly of the nuclear export complex of Influenza A vRNPs.

  12. What Is Engagement? Proactivity as the Missing Link in the HEXACO Model of Personality.

    PubMed

    de Vries, Reinout E; Wawoe, Kilian W; Holtrop, Djurre

    2016-04-01

    We tested the hypothesis that proactivity represents the engagement vector in the HEXACO model of personality. Questionnaire data were obtained in five studies, three of which consisted (mostly) of students: Study 1 (N = 188, Mage  = 20.0, 89.4% women), Study 3 (N = 315, Mage  = 20.4, 80.6% women), and Study 4 (N = 309 self-ratings, Mage  = 20.0, 78.3% women; N = 307 other-ratings, Mage  = 24.5, 62.2% women). Participants in the other two studies came from an ISO-certified representative community panel: Study 2 (N = 525, Mage  = 51.2, 52.0% women) and Study 5 (N = 736, Mage  = 42.2, 48.0% women). Proactive Personality and Proactivity were positively related to Extraversion, Conscientiousness, and Openness to Experience, but only weakly related or unrelated to Honesty-Humility, Emotionality, and Agreeableness, supporting the alignment of Proactive Personality/Proactivity with the hypothesized HEXACO engagement vector. Additionally, Proactivity explained incremental variance in self-rated job performance on top of the HEXACO facets that were most closely associated with Proactive Personality/Proactivity, that is, Social Boldness (an Extraversion facet), Diligence (a Conscientiousness facet), and Creativity (an Openness to Experience facet), but not in entrepreneurship and intrapreneurship. Proactivity is the missing engagement link in the HEXACO model of personality. The results are discussed in light of higher-order factors (e.g., general factor of personality and Alpha and Beta) of personality and bandwidth-fidelity controversies.

  13. Acute viral myocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Dennert, Robert; Crijns, Harry J.; Heymans, Stephane

    2008-01-01

    Acute myocarditis is one of the most challenging diagnosis in cardiology. At present, no diagnostic gold standard is generally accepted, due to the insensitivity of traditional diagnostic tests. This leads to the need for new diagnostic approaches, which resulted in the emergence of new molecular tests and a more detailed immunohistochemical analysis of endomyocardial biopsies. Recent findings using these new diagnostic tests resulted in increased interest in inflammatory cardiomyopathies and a better understanding of its pathophysiology, the recognition in overlap of virus-mediated damage, inflammation, and autoimmune dysregulation. Novel results also pointed towards a broader spectrum of viral genomes responsible for acute myocarditis, indicating a shift of enterovirus and adenovirus to parvovirus B19 and human herpes virus 6. The present review proposes a general diagnostic approach, focuses on the viral aetiology and associated autoimmune processes, and reviews treatment options for patients with acute viral myocarditis. PMID:18617482

  14. [Vasculitis and viral infection].

    PubMed

    Martínez Aguilar, N E; Guido Bayardo, R; Vargas Camaño, M E; Compañ González, D; Miranda Feria, A J

    1997-01-01

    Viruses have been implicated in vasculitis. To determine activity of viral infection associated with vasculitis. 17 patients with vasculitis had been in immunological and antiviral antibodies evaluation. Twenty five healthy controls sex and age matched with hematic biometry (BH) and AA. All subjects were negative to HIV and HBV. Viral activity was demonstrated in eight patients; vascular purpura (5), Takayasu disease (1), polyarteritis nodosa (1), erythema nodosum (1). None subject of control group had IgM activity. Antibodies response of IgG in patients were of lesser intensity than in control group. 14 abnormalities in BH were found in patients and 4 in control group. Immune response in patients, measured by lymphocyte subpopulations and circulating immune complexes was abnormal. In conclusion 47% showed viral activity, but the dominant feature was abnormal immune response in 82%.

  15. Model Linking Plasma and Intracellular Tenofovir/Emtricitabine with Deoxynucleoside Triphosphates

    PubMed Central

    Castillo-Mancilla, Jose R.; Bushman, Lane R.; Zheng, Jia-Hua; Kiser, Jennifer J.; MaWhinney, Samantha; Anderson, Peter L.

    2016-01-01

    The coformulation of the nucleos(t)ide analogs (NA) tenofovir (TFV) disoproxil fumarate (TDF) and emtricitabine (FTC) is approved for HIV-infection treatment and prevention. Plasma TFV and FTC undergo complicated hybrid processes to form, accumulate, and retain as their active intracellular anabolites: TFV-diphosphate (TFV-DP) and FTC-triphosphate (FTC-TP). Such complexities manifest in nonlinear intracellular pharmacokinetics (PK). In target cells, TFV-DP/FTC-TP compete with endogenous deoxynucleoside triphosphates (dNTP) at the active site of HIV reverse transcriptase, underscoring the importance of analog:dNTP ratios for antiviral efficacy. However, NA such as TFV and FTC have the potential to disturb the dNTP pool, which could augment or reduce their efficacies. We conducted a pharmacokinetics-pharmacodynamics (PKPD) study among forty subjects receiving daily TDF/FTC (300 mg/200 mg) from the first-dose to pharmacological intracellular steady-state (30 days). TFV/FTC in plasma, TFV-DP/FTC-TP and dNTPs in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were quantified using validated LC/MS/MS methodologies. Concentration-time data were analyzed using nonlinear mixed effects modeling (NONMEM). Formations and the accumulation of intracellular TFV-DP/FTC-TP was driven by plasma TFV/FTC, which was described by a hybrid of first-order formation and saturation. An indirect response link model described the interplay between TFV-DP/FTC-TP and the dNTP pool change. The EC50 (interindividual variability, (%CV)) of TFV-DP and FTC-TP on the inhibition of deoxyadenosine triphosphate (dATP) and deoxycytidine triphosphate (dCTP) production were 1020 fmol/106 cells (130%) and 44.4 pmol/106 cells (82.5%), resulting in (90% prediction interval) 11% (0.45%, 53%) and 14% (2.6%, 35%) reductions. Model simulations of analog:dNTP molar ratios using IPERGAY dosing suggested that FTC significantly contributes to the protective effect of preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP). Simulation

  16. Enhancement of viral pathogenesis in mice maintained in an antiorthostatic suspension model - Coordination with effects on interferon production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gould, C. L.; Sonnenfeld, G.

    1987-01-01

    Both rodents and men returning from spaceflight have exhibited alterations in immune responses and, in particular, interferon production. This work utilizes a model for antiorthostatic (20-deg head-down tilt), hypokinetic, hypodynamic suspension of mice that simulates some aspects of weightlessness. Female Swiss/Webster mice that are normally resistant to infection with the D variant of encephalomyocarditis virus showed a marked increase in susceptibility to infection when suspended. This correlated with a drop in interferom production. Control, orthostatically suspended mice (no tilt) showed no increase in susceptibility to the virus.

  17. Viral apoptotic mimicry.

    PubMed

    Amara, Ali; Mercer, Jason

    2015-08-01

    As opportunistic pathogens, viruses have evolved many elegant strategies to manipulate host cells for infectious entry and replication. Viral apoptotic mimicry, defined by the exposure of phosphatidylserine - a marker for apoptosis - on the pathogen surface, is emerging as a common theme used by enveloped viruses to promote infection. Focusing on the four best described examples (vaccinia virus, dengue virus, Ebola virus and pseudotyped lentivirus), we summarize our current understanding of apoptotic mimicry as a mechanism for virus entry, binding and immune evasion. We also describe recent examples of non-enveloped viruses that use this mimicry strategy, and discuss future directions and how viral apoptotic mimicry could be targeted therapeutically.

  18. Advances in viral oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, G.

    1987-01-01

    Volume 6 of Advances in Viral Oncology presents experimental approaches to multifactorial interactions in tumor development. Included are in-depth analyses of malignant phenotypes by oncogene complementation, as well as studies of complementary interactions among DNA viral oncogenes; multiple cell-derived sequences in single retroviral genomes; and sequences that influence the transforming activity and expression of the mos oncogene. The genetic regulation of tumorigenic expression in somatic cell hybrids, the inhibition of oncogenes by cellular genes, and the interaction of genes that favor and genes that suppress tumorigenesis are examined in detail. The book concludes with a study of the relationship of oncogenes to the evolution of the metastatic phenotype.

  19. Solvent/Detergent Virally Inactivated Serum Eye Drops Restore Healthy Ocular Epithelium in a Rabbit Model of Dry-Eye Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Ching-Li; Chen, Zhi-Yu; Renn, Ting-Yi; Hsiao, Shun-Hung; Burnouf, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    Application of autologous serum eye drops (SEDs) is a recognized means to treat severe dry-eye syndrome (DES). Due to the inconvenience and difficulty of preparing SEDs from some patients, producing SEDs from allogeneic blood donations is gaining popularity. A major safety concern associated with allogeneic blood is virus transmission. We therefore herein evaluated the possibility of applying a solvent/detergent (S/D) treatment to inactivate viruses and studied the impacts of such treatment of SEDs to resolve DES in a rabbit model. Sera prepared from the blood of five rabbits were pooled and divided into two sub-pools. One was untreated (SEDs), while the other was virally-inactivated with 1% Tri-n-butyl phosphate/1% Triton X-45 at 31°C for 1 h (S/D-SEDs). DES was induced in rabbits using 0.1% benzalkonium chloride (BAC). Rabbits were divided into five groups of two rabbits each. One group was untreated (control), three were treated twice daily for 3 weeks using PBS, SEDs, or S/D-SEDs, and the last received an additional 0.1% BAC (as the negative control). The DES condition was determined by measuring aqueous tear secretion (Schirmer’s test), corneal fluorescein staining, a corneal histologic examination, TUNEL stain apoptosis, and corneal inflammatory marker (tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-8, and IL-6) expressions. We first confirmed that SEDs and S/D-SEDs had similar protein profiles and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β contents. Animal experiments showed that tear secretion did not significantly differ between the SED and S/D-SED groups but was significantly higher than in the PBS group. Eye fluorescein staining revealed dramatic improvements in epithelial defects in groups treated with SEDs or S/D-SEDs, and hematoxylin/eosin staining revealed microscopic epithelial layers similar to those of the untreated controls. Inflammatory markers and TUNEL studies showed that healthy epithelium had been restored in groups treated with SEDs or S

  20. A novel homologous model for gene therapy of dwarfism by non-viral transfer of the mouse growth hormone gene into immunocompetent dwarf mice.

    PubMed

    Cecchi, Claudia R; Higuti, Eliza; Oliveira, Nelio A J; Lima, Eliana R; Jakobsen, Maria; Dagnaes-Hansen, Frederick; Gissel, Hanne; Aagaard, Lars; Jensen, Thomas G; Jorge, Alexander A L; Bartolini, Paolo; Peroni, Cibele N

    2014-02-01

    The possibilities for non-viral GH gene therapy are studied in immunocompetent dwarf mice (lit/lit). As expression vector we used a plasmid previously employed in immunodeficient dwarf mice (pUBI-hGH-gDNA) by replacing the human GH gene with the genomic sequence of mouse-GH DNA (pUBI-mGH-gDNA). HEK-293 human cells transfected with pUBI-mGH-gDNA produced 3.0 µg mGH/10(6) cells/day compared to 3.7 µg hGH/10(6) cells/day for pUBIhGH- gDNA transfected cells. The weight of lit/lit mice treated with the same two plasmids (50 µg DNA/mouse) by electrotransfer into the quadriceps muscle was followed for 3 months. The weight increase up to 15 days for mGH, hGH and saline treated mice were 0.130, 0.112 and 0.027 g/mouse/day. Most sera from hGH-treated mice contained anti-hGH antibodies already on day 15, with the highest titers on day 45, while no significant anti-mGH antibodies were observed in mGH-treated mice. At the end of 3 months, the weight increase for mGH-treated mice was 34.3%, while the nose-to-tail and femur lengths increased 9.5% and 24.3%. Mouse-GH and hGH circulating levels were 4-5 ng/mL 15 days after treatment, versus control levels of ~0.7 ng GH/mL (P<0.001). In mGH-treated mice, mIGF-I determined on days 15, 45 and 94 were 1.5- to 3-fold higher than the control and 1.2- to 1.6-fold higher than hGH-treated mice. The described homologous model represents an important progress forming the basis for preclinical testing of non-viral gene therapy for GH deficiency.

  1. Solvent/Detergent Virally Inactivated Serum Eye Drops Restore Healthy Ocular Epithelium in a Rabbit Model of Dry-Eye Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Ching-Li; Chen, Zhi-Yu; Renn, Ting-Yi; Hsiao, Shun-Hung; Burnouf, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    Application of autologous serum eye drops (SEDs) is a recognized means to treat severe dry-eye syndrome (DES). Due to the inconvenience and difficulty of preparing SEDs from some patients, producing SEDs from allogeneic blood donations is gaining popularity. A major safety concern associated with allogeneic blood is virus transmission. We therefore herein evaluated the possibility of applying a solvent/detergent (S/D) treatment to inactivate viruses and studied the impacts of such treatment of SEDs to resolve DES in a rabbit model. Sera prepared from the blood of five rabbits were pooled and divided into two sub-pools. One was untreated (SEDs), while the other was virally-inactivated with 1% Tri-n-butyl phosphate/1% Triton X-45 at 31°C for 1 h (S/D-SEDs). DES was induced in rabbits using 0.1% benzalkonium chloride (BAC). Rabbits were divided into five groups of two rabbits each. One group was untreated (control), three were treated twice daily for 3 weeks using PBS, SEDs, or S/D-SEDs, and the last received an additional 0.1% BAC (as the negative control). The DES condition was determined by measuring aqueous tear secretion (Schirmer's test), corneal fluorescein staining, a corneal histologic examination, TUNEL stain apoptosis, and corneal inflammatory marker (tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-8, and IL-6) expressions. We first confirmed that SEDs and S/D-SEDs had similar protein profiles and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β contents. Animal experiments showed that tear secretion did not significantly differ between the SED and S/D-SED groups but was significantly higher than in the PBS group. Eye fluorescein staining revealed dramatic improvements in epithelial defects in groups treated with SEDs or S/D-SEDs, and hematoxylin/eosin staining revealed microscopic epithelial layers similar to those of the untreated controls. Inflammatory markers and TUNEL studies showed that healthy epithelium had been restored in groups treated with SEDs or S

  2. Pancreatic cancer modeling using retrograde viral vector delivery and in vivo CRISPR/Cas9-mediated somatic genome editing

    PubMed Central

    Chiou, Shin-Heng; Winters, Ian P.; Wang, Jing; Naranjo, Santiago; Dudgeon, Crissy; Tamburini, Fiona B.; Brady, Jennifer J.; Yang, Dian; Grüner, Barbara M.; Chuang, Chen-Hua; Caswell, Deborah R.; Zeng, Hong; Chu, Pauline; Kim, Grace E.; Carpizo, Darren R.; Kim, Seung K.; Winslow, Monte M.

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a genomically diverse, prevalent, and almost invariably fatal malignancy. Although conventional genetically engineered mouse models of human PDAC have been instrumental in understanding pancreatic cancer development, these models are much too labor-intensive, expensive, and slow to perform the extensive molecular analyses needed to adequately understand this disease. Here we demonstrate that retrograde pancreatic ductal injection of either adenoviral-Cre or lentiviral-Cre vectors allows titratable initiation of pancreatic neoplasias that progress into invasive and metastatic PDAC. To enable in vivo CRISPR/Cas9-mediated gene inactivation in the pancreas, we generated a Cre-regulated Cas9 allele and lentiviral vectors that express Cre and a single-guide RNA. CRISPR-mediated targeting of Lkb1 in combination with oncogenic Kras expression led to selection for inactivating genomic alterations, absence of Lkb1 protein, and rapid tumor growth that phenocopied Cre-mediated genetic deletion of Lkb1. This method will transform our ability to rapidly interrogate gene function during the development of this recalcitrant cancer. PMID:26178787

  3. Pancreatic cancer modeling using retrograde viral vector delivery and in vivo CRISPR/Cas9-mediated somatic genome editing.

    PubMed

    Chiou, Shin-Heng; Winters, Ian P; Wang, Jing; Naranjo, Santiago; Dudgeon, Crissy; Tamburini, Fiona B; Brady, Jennifer J; Yang, Dian; Grüner, Barbara M; Chuang, Chen-Hua; Caswell, Deborah R; Zeng, Hong; Chu, Pauline; Kim, Grace E; Carpizo, Darren R; Kim, Seung K; Winslow, Monte M

    2015-07-15

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a genomically diverse, prevalent, and almost invariably fatal malignancy. Although conventional genetically engineered mouse models of human PDAC have been instrumental in understanding pancreatic cancer development, these models are much too labor-intensive, expensive, and slow to perform the extensive molecular analyses needed to adequately understand this disease. Here we demonstrate that retrograde pancreatic ductal injection of either adenoviral-Cre or lentiviral-Cre vectors allows titratable initiation of pancreatic neoplasias that progress into invasive and metastatic PDAC. To enable in vivo CRISPR/Cas9-mediated gene inactivation in the pancreas, we generated a Cre-regulated Cas9 allele and lentiviral vectors that express Cre and a single-guide RNA. CRISPR-mediated targeting of Lkb1 in combination with oncogenic Kras expression led to selection for inactivating genomic alterations, absence of Lkb1 protein, and rapid tumor growth that phenocopied Cre-mediated genetic deletion of Lkb1. This method will transform our ability to rapidly interrogate gene function during the development of this recalcitrant cancer.

  4. Modelling the effects of previous infection and re-infection on the costs of bovine viral diarrhoea outbreaks in beef herds.

    PubMed

    Stott, A W; Humphry, R W; Gunn, G J

    2010-08-01

    A previously published model was re-employed to examine the potential impact of different epidemiological circumstances on output losses due to bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV) infection in typical British hill cow-calf enterprises. The average annuity equivalent of unchecked losses from 100 simulated 10-year disease scenarios ranged from almost pound0/cow to approximately pound40/cow. Significant differences were found under certain circumstances, depending on the initial disease status of the herd, the initial source of virus, the probability and source of further infection, the probability of virus transmission within the herd and herd size. For naïve herds, losses depended only on the risk of incursion. In most other circumstances, the losses could be mitigated if the annual risk of incursion was <0.3 and risk of within herd transmission was extremely low. Greater understanding of the interaction between these risk factors and management actions are required so that total costs of BVDV infection can be minimised under different circumstances.

  5. Virally mediated Kcnq1 gene replacement therapy in the immature scala media restores hearing in a mouse model of human Jervell and Lange-Nielsen deafness syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chang, Qing; Wang, Jianjun; Li, Qi; Kim, Yeunjung; Zhou, Binfei; Wang, Yunfeng; Li, Huawei; Lin, Xi

    2015-08-01

    Mutations in the potassium channel subunit KCNQ1 cause the human severe congenital deafness Jervell and Lange-Nielsen (JLN) syndrome. We applied a gene therapy approach in a mouse model of JLN syndrome (Kcnq1(-/-) mice) to prevent the development of deafness in the adult stage. A modified adeno-associated virus construct carrying a Kcnq1 expression cassette was injected postnatally (P0-P2) into the endolymph, which resulted in Kcnq1 expression in most cochlear marginal cells where native Kcnq1 is exclusively expressed. We also found that extensive ectopic virally mediated Kcnq1 transgene expression did not affect normal cochlear functions. Examination of cochlear morphology showed that the collapse of the Reissner's membrane and degeneration of hair cells (HCs) and cells in the spiral ganglia were corrected in Kcnq1(-/-) mice. Electrophysiological tests showed normal endocochlear potential in treated ears. In addition, auditory brainstem responses showed significant hearing preservation in the injected ears, ranging from 20 dB improvement to complete correction of the deafness phenotype. Our results demonstrate the first successful gene therapy treatment for gene defects specifically affecting the function of the stria vascularis, which is a major site affected by genetic mutations in inherited hearing loss.

  6. A comparison of low back kinetic estimates obtained through posture matching, rigid link modeling and an EMG-assisted model.

    PubMed

    Parkinson, R J; Bezaire, M; Callaghan, J P

    2011-07-01

    This study examined errors introduced by a posture matching approach (3DMatch) relative to dynamic three-dimensional rigid link and EMG-assisted models. Eighty-eight lifting trials of various combinations of heights (floor, 0.67, 1.2 m), asymmetry (left, right and center) and mass (7.6 and 9.7 kg) were videotaped while spine postures, ground reaction forces, segment orientations and muscle activations were documented and used to estimate joint moments and forces (L5/S1). Posture matching over predicted peak and cumulative extension moment (p < 0.0001 for all variables). There was no difference between peak compression estimates obtained with posture matching or EMG-assisted approaches (p = 0.7987). Posture matching over predicted cumulative (p < 0.0001) compressive loading due to a bias in standing, however, individualized bias correction eliminated the differences. Therefore, posture matching provides a method to analyze industrial lifting exposures that will predict kinetic values similar to those of more sophisticated models, provided necessary corrections are applied.

  7. Modeling the impact of hepatitis C viral clearance on end-stage liver disease in an HIV co-infected cohort with Targeted Maximum Likelihood Estimation

    PubMed Central

    Schnitzer, Mireille E; Moodie, Erica EM; van der Laan, Mark J; Platt, Robert W; Klein, Marina B

    2013-01-01

    Summary Despite modern effective HIV treatment, hepatitis C virus (HCV) co-infection is associated with a high risk of progression to end-stage liver disease (ESLD) which has emerged as the primary cause of death in this population. Clinical interest lies in determining the impact of clearance of HCV on risk for ESLD. In this case study, we examine whether HCV clearance affects risk of ESLD using data from the multicenter Canadian Co-infection Cohort Study. Complications in this survival analysis arise from the time-dependent nature of the data, the presence of baseline confounders, loss to follow-up, and confounders that change over time, all of which can obscure the causal effect of interest. Additional challenges included non-censoring variable missingness and event sparsity. In order to efficiently estimate the ESLD-free survival probabilities under a specific history of HCV clearance, we demonstrate the doubly-robust and semiparametric efficient method of Targeted Maximum Likelihood Estimation (TMLE). Marginal structural models (MSM) can be used to model the effect of viral clearance (expressed as a hazard ratio) on ESLD-free survival and we demonstrate a way to estimate the parameters of a logistic model for the hazard function with TMLE. We show the theoretical derivation of the efficient influence curves for the parameters of two different MSMs and how they can be used to produce variance approximations for parameter estimates. Finally, the data analysis evaluating the impact of HCV on ESLD was undertaken using multiple imputations to account for the non-monotone missing data. PMID:24571372

  8. Combination of Biological Screening in a Cellular Model of Viral Latency and Virtual Screening Identifies Novel Compounds That Reactivate HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Gallastegui, Edurne; Marshall, Brett; Vidal, David; Sanchez-Duffhues, Gonzalo; Collado, Juan A.; Alvarez-Fernández, Carmen; Luque, Neus; Terme, Jean-Michel; Gatell, Josep M.; Sánchez-Palomino, Sonsoles; Muñoz, Eduardo; Mestres, Jordi; Verdin, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Although highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has converted HIV into a chronic disease, a reservoir of HIV latently infected resting T cells prevents the eradication of the virus from patients. To achieve eradication, HAART must be combined with drugs that reactivate the dormant viruses. We examined this problem in an established model of HIV postintegration latency by screening a library of small molecules. Initially, we identified eight molecules that reactivated latent HIV. Using them as templates, additional hits were identified by means of similarity-based virtual screening. One of those hits, 8-methoxy-6-methylquinolin-4-ol (MMQO), proved to be useful to reactivate HIV-1 in different cellular models, especially in combination with other known reactivating agents, without causing T-cell activation and with lower toxicity than that of the initial hits. Interestingly, we have established that MMQO produces Jun N-terminal protein kinase (JNK) activation and enhances the T-cell receptor (TCR)/CD3 stimulation of HIV-1 reactivation from latency but inhibits CD3-induced interleukin-2 (IL-2) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) gene transcription. Moreover, MMQO prevents TCR-induced cell cycle progression and proliferation in primary T cells. The present study documents that the combination of biological screening in a cellular model of viral latency with virtual screening is useful for the identification of novel agents able to reactivate HIV-1. Moreover, we set the bases for a hypothetical therapy to reactivate latent HIV by combining MMQO with physiological or pharmacological TCR/CD3 stimulation. PMID:22258251

  9. Experimental verification of a model of a two-link flexible, lightweight manipulator. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huggins, James David

    1988-01-01

    Experimental verification is presented for an assumed modes model of a large, two link, flexible manipulator design and constructed in the School of Mechanical Engineering at Georgia Institute of Technology. The structure was designed to have typical characteristics of a lightweight manipulator.

  10. Framework for Smart Electronic Health Record-Linked Predictive Models to Optimize Care for C