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Sample records for model particle interactions

  1. Particle-Surface Interaction Model and Method of Determining Particle-Surface Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, David W. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A method and model of predicting particle-surface interactions with a surface, such as the surface of a spacecraft. The method includes the steps of: determining a trajectory path of a plurality of moving particles; predicting whether any of the moving particles will intersect a surface; predicting whether any of the particles will be captured by the surface and/or; predicting a reflected trajectory and velocity of particles reflected from the surface.

  2. Utilitarian supersymmetric gauge model of particle interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Ernest

    2010-05-01

    A remarkabale U(1) gauge extension of the supersymmetric standard model was proposed 8 years ago. It is anomaly free, has no μ term, and conserves baryon and lepton numbers automatically. The phenomenology of a specific version of this model is discussed. In particular, leptoquarks are predicted, with couplings to the heavy singlet neutrinos, the scalar partners of which may be components of dark matter. The Majorana neutrino mass matrix itself may have two zero subdeterminants.

  3. Lifshitz tail in a model of interacting particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forgacs, G.; Kotov, V.

    1995-05-01

    The density of states of noninteracting disordered particle systems shows a characteristic behavior deep in the band, known as the Lifshitz tail. In the present work the Lifshitz problem is reconsidered in a model one-dimensional disordered system with ``minimal'' interactions. The interaction has a form which allows the calculations to be performed asymptotically exactly in the tail, using nonperturbative techniques. Correlation between the particles leads to a considerable decrease of the density of states. These findings indicate that interactions may favor delocalization, a result obtained earlier, using phenomenological approaches, perturbative analysis, and the renormalization-group method.

  4. Continuum modeling of hydrodynamic particle-particle interactions in microfluidic high-concentration suspensions.

    PubMed

    Ley, Mikkel W H; Bruus, Henrik

    2016-04-01

    A continuum model is established for numerical studies of hydrodynamic particle-particle interactions in microfluidic high-concentration suspensions. A suspension of microparticles placed in a microfluidic channel and influenced by an external force, is described by a continuous particle-concentration field coupled to the continuity and Navier-Stokes equation for the solution. The hydrodynamic interactions are accounted for through the concentration dependence of the suspension viscosity, of the single-particle mobility, and of the momentum transfer from the particles to the suspension. The model is applied on a magnetophoretic and an acoustophoretic system, respectively, and based on the results, we illustrate three main points: (1) for relative particle-to-fluid volume fractions greater than 0.01, the hydrodynamic interaction effects become important through a decreased particle mobility and an increased suspension viscosity. (2) At these high particle concentrations, particle-induced flow rolls occur, which can lead to significant deviations of the advective particle transport relative to that of dilute suspensions. (3) Which interaction mechanism that dominates, depends on the specific flow geometry and the specific external force acting on the particles. PMID:26948344

  5. Continuum modeling of hydrodynamic particle-particle interactions in microfluidic high-concentration suspensions.

    PubMed

    Ley, Mikkel W H; Bruus, Henrik

    2016-04-01

    A continuum model is established for numerical studies of hydrodynamic particle-particle interactions in microfluidic high-concentration suspensions. A suspension of microparticles placed in a microfluidic channel and influenced by an external force, is described by a continuous particle-concentration field coupled to the continuity and Navier-Stokes equation for the solution. The hydrodynamic interactions are accounted for through the concentration dependence of the suspension viscosity, of the single-particle mobility, and of the momentum transfer from the particles to the suspension. The model is applied on a magnetophoretic and an acoustophoretic system, respectively, and based on the results, we illustrate three main points: (1) for relative particle-to-fluid volume fractions greater than 0.01, the hydrodynamic interaction effects become important through a decreased particle mobility and an increased suspension viscosity. (2) At these high particle concentrations, particle-induced flow rolls occur, which can lead to significant deviations of the advective particle transport relative to that of dilute suspensions. (3) Which interaction mechanism that dominates, depends on the specific flow geometry and the specific external force acting on the particles.

  6. Theory and modeling of particles with DNA-mediated interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Licata, Nicholas A.

    2008-05-01

    In recent years significant attention has been attracted to proposals which utilize DNA for nanotechnological applications. Potential applications of these ideas range from the programmable self-assembly of colloidal crystals, to biosensors and nanoparticle based drug delivery platforms. In Chapter I we introduce the system, which generically consists of colloidal particles functionalized with specially designed DNA markers. The sequence of bases on the DNA markers determines the particle type. Due to the hybridization between complementary single-stranded DNA, specific, type-dependent interactions can be introduced between particles by choosing the appropriate DNA marker sequences. In Chapter II we develop a statistical mechanical description of the aggregation and melting behavior of particles with DNA-mediated interactions. In Chapter III a model is proposed to describe the dynamical departure and diffusion of particles which form reversible key-lock connections. In Chapter IV we propose a method to self-assemble nanoparticle clusters using DNA scaffolds. A natural extension is discussed in Chapter V, the programmable self-assembly of nanoparticle clusters where the desired cluster geometry is encoded using DNA-mediated interactions. In Chapter VI we consider a nanoparticle based drug delivery platform for targeted, cell specific chemotherapy. In Chapter VII we present prospects for future research: the connection between DNA-mediated colloidal crystallization and jamming, and the inverse problem in self-assembly.

  7. How to model the interaction of charged Janus particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hieronimus, Reint; Raschke, Simon; Heuer, Andreas

    2016-08-01

    We analyze the interaction of charged Janus particles including screening effects. The explicit interaction is mapped via a least square method on a variable number n of systematically generated tensors that reflect the angular dependence of the potential. For n = 2 we show that the interaction is equivalent to a model previously described by Erdmann, Kröger, and Hess (EKH). Interestingly, this mapping is for n = 2 not able to capture the subtleties of the interaction for small screening lengths. Rather, a larger number of tensors has to be used. We find that the characteristics of the Janus type interaction plays an important role for the aggregation behavior. We obtained cluster structures up to the size of 13 particles for n = 2 and 36 and screening lengths κ-1 = 0.1 and 1.0 via Monte Carlo simulations. The influence of the screening length is analyzed and the structures are compared to results for an electrostatic-type potential and for the multipole-expanded Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory. We find that a dipole-like potential (EKH or dipole DLVO approximation) is not able to sufficiently reproduce the anisotropy effects of the potential. Instead, a higher order expansion has to be used to obtain cluster structures that are compatible with experimental observations. The resulting minimum-energy clusters are compared to those of sticky hard sphere systems. Janus particles with a short-range screened interaction resemble sticky hard sphere clusters for all considered particle numbers, whereas for long-range screening even very small clusters are structurally different.

  8. Model-independent analyses of dark-matter particle interactions

    DOE PAGES

    Anand, Nikhil; Fitzpatrick, A. Liam; Haxton, W. C.

    2015-03-24

    A model-independent treatment of dark-matter particle elastic scattering has been developed, yielding the most general interaction for WIMP-nucleon low-energy scattering, and the resulting amplitude has been embedded into the nucleus, taking into account the selection rules imposed by parity and time-reversal. One finds that, in contrast to the usual spin-independent/spin-dependent (SI/SD) formulation, the resulting cross section contains six independent nuclear response functions, three of which are associated with possible velocity-dependent interactions. We find that current experiments are four orders of magnitude more sensitive to derivative couplings than is apparent in the standard SI/SD treatment, which necessarily associated such interactions withmore » cross sections proportional to v2T ~ 10⁻⁶, where vT is the WIMP velocity relative to the center of mass of the nuclear target.« less

  9. Model-independent analyses of dark-matter particle interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Anand, Nikhil; Fitzpatrick, A. Liam; Haxton, W. C.

    2015-03-24

    A model-independent treatment of dark-matter particle elastic scattering has been developed, yielding the most general interaction for WIMP-nucleon low-energy scattering, and the resulting amplitude has been embedded into the nucleus, taking into account the selection rules imposed by parity and time-reversal. One finds that, in contrast to the usual spin-independent/spin-dependent (SI/SD) formulation, the resulting cross section contains six independent nuclear response functions, three of which are associated with possible velocity-dependent interactions. We find that current experiments are four orders of magnitude more sensitive to derivative couplings than is apparent in the standard SI/SD treatment, which necessarily associated such interactions with cross sections proportional to v2T ~ 10⁻⁶, where vT is the WIMP velocity relative to the center of mass of the nuclear target.

  10. Theory and modeling of particles with DNA-mediated interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Licata, Nicholas A.

    In recent years significant attention has been attracted to proposals which utilize DNA for nanotechnological applications. Potential applications of these ideas range from the programmable self-assembly of colloidal crystals, to biosensors and nanoparticle based drug delivery platforms. In Chapter I we introduce the system, which generically consists of colloidal particles functionalized with specially designed DNA markers. The sequence of bases on the DNA markers determines the particle type. Due to the hybridization between complementary single-stranded DNA, specific, type-dependent interactions can be introduced between particles by choosing the appropriate DNA marker sequences. In Chapter II we develop a statistical mechanical description of the aggregation and melting behavior of particles with DNA-mediated interactions. A quantitative comparison between the theory and experiments is made by calculating the experimentally observed melting profile. In Chapter III a model is proposed to describe the dynamical departure and diffusion of particles which form reversible key-lock connections. The model predicts a crossover from localized to diffusive behavior. The random walk statistics for the particles' in plane diffusion is discussed. The lateral motion is analogous to dispersive transport in disordered semiconductors, ranging from standard diffusion with a renormalized diffusion coefficient to anomalous, subdiffusive behavior. In Chapter IV we propose a method to self-assemble nanoparticle clusters using DNA scaffolds. An optimal concentration ratio is determined for the experimental implementation of our self-assembly proposal. A natural extension is discussed in Chapter V, the programmable self-assembly of nanoparticle clusters where the desired cluster geometry is encoded using DNA-mediated interactions. We determine the probability that the system self-assembles the desired cluster geometry, and discuss the connections to jamming in granular and colloidal

  11. Modeling and simulation of dielectrophoretic particle-particle interactions and assembly.

    PubMed

    Hossan, Mohammad Robiul; Dillon, Robert; Roy, Ajit K; Dutta, Prashanta

    2013-03-15

    Electric field induced particle-particle interactions and assembly are of great interest due to their useful applications in micro devices. The behavior of particles becomes more complex if multiple particles interact with each other at the same time. In this paper, we present a numerical study of two dimensional DC dielectrophoresis based particle-particle interactions and assembly for multiple particles using a hybrid immersed interface-immersed boundary method. The immersed interface method is employed to capture the physics of electrostatics in a fluid media with suspended particles. Particle interaction based dielectrophoretic forces are obtained using Maxwell's stress tensor without any boundary or volume integration. This electrostatic force distribution mimics the actual physics of the immersed particles in a fluid media. The corresponding particle response and hydrodynamic interactions are captured through the immersed boundary method by solving the transient Navier-Stokes equations. The interaction and assembly of multiple electrically similar and dissimilar particles are studied for various initial positions and orientations. Numerical results show that in a fluid media, similar particles form a chain parallel to the applied electric field, whereas dissimilar particles form a chain perpendicular to the applied electric field. Irrespective of initial position and orientation, particles first align themselves parallel or perpendicular to the electric field depending on the similarity or dissimilarity of particles. The acceleration and deceleration of particles are also observed and analyzed at different phases of the assembly process. This comprehensive study can be used to explain the multiple particle interaction and assembly phenomena observed in experiments.

  12. Towards a Revised Monte Carlo Neutral Particle Surface Interaction Model

    SciTech Connect

    D.P. Stotler

    2005-06-09

    The components of the neutral- and plasma-surface interaction model used in the Monte Carlo neutral transport code DEGAS 2 are reviewed. The idealized surfaces and processes handled by that model are inadequate for accurately simulating neutral transport behavior in present day and future fusion devices. We identify some of the physical processes missing from the model, such as mixed materials and implanted hydrogen, and make some suggestions for improving the model.

  13. Noise, Bifurcations, and Modeling of Interacting Particle Systems

    PubMed Central

    Mier-y-Teran-Romero, Luis; Forgoston, Eric; Schwartz, Ira B.

    2011-01-01

    We consider the stochastic patterns of a system of communicating, or coupled, self-propelled particles in the presence of noise and communication time delay. For sufficiently large environmental noise, there exists a transition between a translating state and a rotating state with stationary center of mass. Time delayed communication creates a bifurcation pattern dependent on the coupling amplitude between particles. Using a mean field model in the large number limit, we show how the complete bifurcation unfolds in the presence of communication delay and coupling amplitude. Relative to the center of mass, the patterns can then be described as transitions between translation, rotation about a stationary point, or a rotating swarm, where the center of mass undergoes a Hopf bifurcation from steady state to a limit cycle. Examples of some of the stochastic patterns will be given for large numbers of particles. PMID:22124204

  14. Lieb-Thirring inequality for a model of particles with point interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, Rupert L.; Seiringer, Robert

    2012-09-15

    We consider a model of quantum-mechanical particles interacting via point interactions of infinite scattering length. In the case of fermions we prove a Lieb-Thirring inequality for the energy, i.e., we show that the energy is bounded from below by a constant times the integral of the particle density to the power (5/3).

  15. Chaotic delocalization of two interacting particles in the classical Harper model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepelyansky, Dima L.

    2016-06-01

    We study the problem of two interacting particles in the classical Harper model in the regime when one-particle motion is absolutely bounded inside one cell of periodic potential. The interaction between particles breaks integrability of classical motion leading to emergence of Hamiltonian dynamical chaos. At moderate interactions and certain energies above the mobility edge this chaos leads to a chaotic propulsion of two particles with their diffusive spreading over the whole space both in one and two dimensions. At the same time the distance between particles remains bounded by one or two periodic cells demonstrating appearance of new composite quasi-particles called chaons. The effect of chaotic delocalization of chaons is shown to be rather general being present for Coulomb and short range interactions. It is argued that such delocalized chaons can be observed in experiments with cold atoms and ions in optical lattices.

  16. Micromechanics-based elastic model for functionally graded materials with particle interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, H.M.; Sun, L.Z.; Paulino, G.H

    2004-07-12

    A micromechanics-based elastic model is developed for two-phase functionally graded materials with locally pair-wise interactions between particles. While the effective material properties change gradually along the gradation direction, there exist two microstructurally distinct zones: particle-matrix zone and transition zone. In the particle-matrix zone, pair-wise interactions between particles are employed using a modified Green's function method. By integrating the interactions from all other particles over the representative volume element, the homogenized elastic fields are obtained. The effective stiffness distribution over the gradation direction is further derived. In the transition zone, a transition function is constructed to make the homogenized elastic fields continuous and differentiable in the gradation direction. The model prediction is compared with other models and experimental data to demonstrate the capability of the proposed method.

  17. Microbial interactions lead to rapid micro-scale successions on model marine particles

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Manoshi S.; Sliwerska, Elzbieta; Gore, Jeff; Polz, Martin F.; Cordero, Otto X.

    2016-01-01

    In the ocean, organic particles harbour diverse bacterial communities, which collectively digest and recycle essential nutrients. Traits like motility and exo-enzyme production allow individual taxa to colonize and exploit particle resources, but it remains unclear how community dynamics emerge from these individual traits. Here we track the taxon and trait dynamics of bacteria attached to model marine particles and demonstrate that particle-attached communities undergo rapid, reproducible successions driven by ecological interactions. Motile, particle-degrading taxa are selected for during early successional stages. However, this selective pressure is later relaxed when secondary consumers invade, which are unable to use the particle resource but, instead, rely on carbon from primary degraders. This creates a trophic chain that shifts community metabolism away from the particle substrate. These results suggest that primary successions may shape particle-attached bacterial communities in the ocean and that rapid community-wide metabolic shifts could limit rates of marine particle degradation. PMID:27311813

  18. Delocalization of two interacting particles in the 2D Harper model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frahm, Klaus M.; Shepelyansky, Dima L.

    2016-01-01

    We study the problem of two interacting particles in a two-dimensional quasiperiodic potential of the Harper model. We consider an amplitude of the quasiperiodic potential such that in absence of interactions all eigenstates are exponentially localized while the two interacting particles are delocalized showing anomalous subdiffusive spreading over the lattice with the spreading exponent b ≈ 0.5 instead of a usual diffusion with b = 1. This spreading is stronger than in the case of a correlated disorder potential with a one particle localization length as for the quasiperiodic potential. At the same time we do not find signatures of ballistic pairs existing for two interacting particles in the localized phase of the one-dimensional Harper model.

  19. Effect of dipolar nanoparticle interaction on transverse magnetic susceptibility: particle pair model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plowman, Elizabeth; Hovorka, Ondrej; Friedman, Gennady

    2014-03-01

    Determining nanoparticle dipolar interactions from experimental measurement of magnetic moments is a classical inverse problem in magnetism. It is important in a variety of applications including magnetic information storage and Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI). Historically, magnetic moment relaxation has been used to characterize system parameters including dipolar interactions. However, the results are sensitive to particle size distribution. We demonstrate that dipolar coupling strength in a nanoparticle-pair can be determined from transverse magnetic susceptibility, a readily measured parameter. Moreover, we demonstrate that this method is insensitive to particle size, rendering it more robust for real-world experiments. We present both analytical and numerical models for transient and steady-state transverse magnetic susceptibility and resulting interaction strength of our two-particle system. In the analytical model master equation is employed. The particles are assumed to be immobile and the set of possible states is discrete. In the numerical models both master equation and Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert dynamics are employed. In these models random particle anisotropy directions are taken into account. The results of each model are compared. National Science Foundation GRFP.

  20. Mathematical modeling of the interaction between an insoluble solid particle and a solidifying interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catalina, Adrian Vasile

    When a moving solidification front intercepts an insoluble particle, three distinct interaction phenomena can occur: instantaneous engulfment, continuous pushing of the particle, or particle pushing followed by engulfment. Various mathematical models, aiming to predict the critical solidification velocity for the pushing/engulfment transition, have been published in the literature. However, their predictions were not confirmed by the recent experimental measurements performed in microgravity conditions. The aim of this dissertation is to further continue the study of the interaction particle/solidifying interface through mathematical modeling. In this respect, two new analytical models were developed. In addition, a finite difference numerical approach is proposed. The first analytical model, the Equilibrium Breakdown Model, reveals the fact that the particle/solidifying interface interaction is not a steady state process, as assumed in the previously published models. Its simple formulation makes it attractive for practical purposes such as manufacturing of composite materials. The second model, i.e., the Dynamic Model, is more complex and, for the first time, it is able to capture and explain interesting phenomena that escaped the steady state analyses of previously published models. It shows that steady state interaction is only a particular case that can occur only at sub-critical solidification velocity. In this work, both analytical models were successfully validated against experimental data produced under microgravity conditions. The numerical approach, based on an interface tracking procedure, consists in the development of two distinct models, i.e., a solidification model and a fluid flow model. These two models together can give a more comprehensive picture of the particle/interface interaction. The solidification model has the capability to accommodate changes of the solid/liquid interface temperature because of capillarity and solute redistribution. It

  1. Smoothed particle hydrodynamics and element bending group modeling of flexible fibers interacting with viscous fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiufeng; Liu, Moubin; Peng, Shiliu

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents a smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) and element bending group (EBG) coupling method for modeling the interaction of flexible fibers with moving viscous fluids. SPH is a well-developed mesh-free particle method for simulating viscous fluid flows. EBG is also a particle method for modeling flexible bodies. The interaction of flexible fibers with moving viscous fluids is rendered through the interaction of EBG particles for flexible fiber and SPH particles for fluid. In numerical simulation, flexible fibers of different lengths are immersed in a moving viscous fluid driven by a body force. The drag force on the fiber obtained from SPH-EBG simulation agrees well with experimental observations. It is shown that the flexible fiber demonstrates three typical bending modes, including the U-shaped mode, the flapping mode, and the closed mode, and that the flexible fiber experiences a drag reduction due to its reconfiguration by bending. It is also found that the U 4/3 drag scaling law for a flexible fiber is only valid for the U-shaped mode, but not valid for the flapping and closed modes. The results indicate that the reconfiguration of a flexible fiber is caused by the fluid force acting on it, while vortex shedding is of importance in the translations of bending modes.

  2. Interaction of Burning Metal Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dreizin, Edward L.

    1997-01-01

    Multiple particle/droplet flames are ubiquitous in practical combustion systems, and thus the flame interaction processes are of great practical importance. This explains the strong current interest in interactive combustion phenomena. This research is aimed at the investigation of combustion parameters of microgravity model aerosols: relatively large uniform metal particles aerosolized in microgravity environment. An experiment consisting of creation and ignition of a metal multiparticle system in microgravity and high-speed video-recording of the combustion events will produce visual records of the development of individual particle flames, their interactions and the particle motion they induce simultaneously with the observation of the entire aerosol combustion process. Frame by frame analysis of the video-images taken using a high-speed movie camera will allow one to determine particle brightness temperatures and the decrease in particle diameter during combustion. Analysis of the experimental results and comparison with the results of single metal particle combustion experiments, conducted under similar microgravity conditions in the framework of a parallel program, will establish the relationship between single and multiple particle burning rates and combustion temperatures, concentrations at which the flame substructure forms rather than individual particle flames, efficiency of radiative heat transfer in metal aerosol combustion, what is the role of electrostatic forces in structuring the flame and the effect of that structure on the flame propagation rate. Although some details of fine particle aerosol clouds, such as the kinetics limited burning rate, radiative heat transfer in a system with a high specific surface, particle induced turbulence, etc., will probably not be very well simulated in the planned experiments, they are relatively well understood and can be accounted for using an adequate individual particle combustion model. On the other hand, the

  3. Numerical Simulation of Interacting Stellar Winds Model Using Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thronson, H. A., Jr.; Li, P. S.; Kwok, S.

    1997-12-01

    In the past decade, the Interacting Stellar Winds (ISW) model has been shown to be successful in explaining the formation of planetary nebulae, Wolf-Rayet nebulae, slow novae, and supernovae. Since analytical methods applied to the ISW model have been limited to the spherical symmetric (1D) geometry, numerical methods are necessary for axisymmetric (2D) or arbitrary (3D) geometries, such as the study of formation and evolution of planetary nebulae, and for symbiotic nova outbursts. The Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) algorithm has been developed to study hydrodynamics using the particle method. This algorithm has been applied in many different fields successfully. In this paper, we apply the SPH algorithm using the TREE code to the problem of interacting winds dynamics. We present three simulations: (1) the interaction of two winds in spherical symmetry to demonstrate the validity of the algorithm in dealing with ISW modeling, (2) the formation and evolution of an axisymmetric nebula in the first 500 years, and (3) the interacting-colliding winds caused by a slow nova outburst in a symbiotic system. It is the first time that the SPH algorithm has been applied to an ISW simulation. The SPH algorithm is proved to be an accurate and powerful tool in studying ISW model. This work is supported by NASA's US ISO program and the University of Calgary.

  4. Elementary particle interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Bugg, W.M.; Condo, G.T.; Handler, T.; Hart, E.L.; Ward, B.F.L.; Close, F.E.; Christophorou, L.G.

    1990-10-01

    This report discusses freon bubble chamber experiments exposed to {mu}{sup +} and neutrinos, photon-proton interactions; shower counter simulations; SLD detectors at the Stanford Linear Collider, and the detectors at the Superconducting Super Collider; elementary particle interactions; physical properties of dielectric materials used in High Energy Physics detectors; and Nuclear Physics. (LSP)

  5. Rubber particle proteins, HbREF and HbSRPP, show different interactions with model membranes.

    PubMed

    Berthelot, Karine; Lecomte, Sophie; Estevez, Yannick; Zhendre, Vanessa; Henry, Sarah; Thévenot, Julie; Dufourc, Erick J; Alves, Isabel D; Peruch, Frédéric

    2014-01-01

    The biomembrane surrounding rubber particles from the hevea latex is well known for its content of numerous allergen proteins. HbREF (Hevb1) and HbSRPP (Hevb3) are major components, linked on rubber particles, and they have been shown to be involved in rubber synthesis or quality (mass regulation), but their exact function is still to be determined. In this study we highlighted the different modes of interactions of both recombinant proteins with various membrane models (lipid monolayers, liposomes or supported bilayers, and multilamellar vesicles) to mimic the latex particle membrane. We combined various biophysical methods (polarization-modulation-infrared reflection-adsorption spectroscopy (PM-IRRAS)/ellipsometry, attenuated-total reflectance Fourier-transform infrared (ATR-FTIR), solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), plasmon waveguide resonance (PWR), fluorescence spectroscopy) to elucidate their interactions. Small rubber particle protein (SRPP) shows less affinity than rubber elongation factor (REF) for the membranes but displays a kind of "covering" effect on the lipid headgroups without disturbing the membrane integrity. Its structure is conserved in the presence of lipids. Contrarily, REF demonstrates higher membrane affinity with changes in its aggregation properties, the amyloid nature of REF, which we previously reported, is not favored in the presence of lipids. REF binds and inserts into membranes. The membrane integrity is highly perturbed, and we suspect that REF is even able to remove lipids from the membrane leading to the formation of mixed micelles. These two homologous proteins show affinity to all membrane models tested but neatly differ in their interacting features. This could imply differential roles on the surface of rubber particles.

  6. Interactive Terascale Particle Visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellsworth, David; Green, Bryan; Moran, Patrick

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the methods used to produce an interactive visualization of a 2 TB computational fluid dynamics (CFD) data set using particle tracing (streaklines). We use the method introduced by Bruckschen et al. [2001] that pre-computes a large number of particles, stores them on disk using a space-filling curve ordering that minimizes seeks, and then retrieves and displays the particles according to the user's command. We describe how the particle computation can be performed using a PC cluster, how the algorithm can be adapted to work with a multi-block curvilinear mesh, and how the out-of-core visualization can be scaled to 296 billion particles while still achieving interactive performance on PG hardware. Compared to the earlier work, our data set size and total number of particles are an order of magnitude larger. We also describe a new compression technique that allows the lossless compression of the particles by 41% and speeds the particle retrieval by about 30%.

  7. Modelling pathogen fate in stormwaters by a particle-pathogen interaction model using population balances.

    PubMed

    Vergeynst, L; Vallet, B; Vanrolleghem, P A

    2012-01-01

    Stormwater is polluted by various contaminants affecting the quality of receiving water bodies. Pathogens are one of these contaminants, which have a critical effect on water use in rivers. Increasing the retention time of water in stormwater basins can lead to reduced loads of pathogens released to the rivers. In this paper a model describing the behaviour of pathogens in stormwater basins is presented including different fate processes such as decay, adsorption/desorption, settling and solar disinfection. By considering the settling velocity distribution of particles and a layered approach, this model is able to create a light intensity, and particle and pathogen concentration profile along the water depth in the basin. A strong effect of solar disinfection is discerned. The model has been used to evaluate pathogen removal efficiencies in stormwater basins. It includes a population of particle classes characterized by a distribution of settling velocities in order to be able to reproduce stormwater quality and treatment in a realistic way.

  8. Final Report: Model interacting particle systems for simulation and macroscopic description of particulate suspensions

    SciTech Connect

    Peter J. Mucha

    2007-08-30

    Suspensions of solid particles in liquids appear in numerous applications, from environmental settings like river silt, to industrial systems of solids transport and water treatment, and biological flows such as blood flow. Despite their importance, much remains unexplained about these complicated systems. Mucha's research aims to improve understanding of basic properties of suspensions through a program of simulating model interacting particle systems with critical evaluation of proposed continuum equations, in close collaboration with experimentalists. Natural to this approach, the original proposal centered around collaboration with studies already conducted in various experimental groups. However, as was detailed in the 2004 progress report, following the first year of this award, a number of the questions from the original proposal were necessarily redirected towards other specific goals because of changes in the research programs of the proposed experimental collaborators. Nevertheless, the modified project goals and the results that followed from those goals maintain close alignment with the main themes of the original proposal, improving efficient simulation and macroscopic modeling of sedimenting and colloidal suspensions. In particular, the main investigations covered under this award have included: (1) Sedimentation instabilities, including the sedimentation analogue of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability (for heavy, particle-laden fluid over lighter, clear fluid). (2) Ageing dynamics of colloidal suspensions at concentrations above the glass transition, using simplified interactions. (3) Stochastic reconstruction of velocity-field dependence for particle image velocimetry (PIV). (4) Stochastic modeling of the near-wall bias in 'nano-PIV'. (5) Distributed Lagrange multiplier simulation of the 'internal splash' of a particle falling through a stable stratified interface. (6) Fundamental study of velocity fluctuations in sedimentation. (7) Parallelization of

  9. ELEMENTARY PARTICLE INTERACTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    EFREMENKO, YURI; HANDLER, THOMAS; KAMYSHKOV, YURI; SIOPSIS, GEORGE; SPANIER, STEFAN

    2013-07-30

    The High-Energy Elementary Particle Interactions group at UT during the last three years worked on the following directions and projects: Collider-based Particle Physics; Neutrino Physics, particularly participation in “NOνA”, “Double Chooz”, and “KamLAND” neutrino experiments; and Theory, including Scattering amplitudes, Quark-gluon plasma; Holographic cosmology; Holographic superconductors; Charge density waves; Striped superconductors; and Holographic FFLO states.

  10. A model study on a pair of trapped particles interacting with an arbitrary effective range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, Partha; Deb, Bimalendu

    2016-08-01

    We study the effects of the effective range of interaction on the eigenvalues and eigenstates of two particles confined in a three-dimensional (3D) isotropic as well as one- or quasi-one dimensional harmonic (1D) traps. For this we employ model potentials which mimic finite-range s-wave interactions over a wide range of s-wave scattering length a s including the unitarity limits {a}s\\to +/- ∞ . Our results show that when the range is larger than the 3D or 1D harmonic oscillator length scale, the eigenvalues and eigenstates are nearly similar to those of noninteracting two particles in the 3D or 1D trap, respectively. In case of 3D, we find that when the range goes to zero, the results of contact potential as derived by Busch et al (1998 Foundations of Physics 28 549) are reproduced. However, in the case of 1D, such reproducibility does not occur as the range goes to zero. We have calculated the eigenvalues and eigenstates in a 1D harmonic trap taking one dimensional finite-range model potential. We have also calculated the bound state properties of two particles confined in a highly anisotropic quasi-1D trap taking three-dimensional finite-range model potential, and examined whether these quasi-1D results approach towards 1D ones as the aspect ratio η of the radial to axial frequency of the trap increases. We find that if the range is very small compared to the axial size of the trap, then one can reach 1D regime for η ≥slant 10000. However, for a large range, one can almost get 1D results for smaller values of η. This study will be important for the exploration of two-body or many body physics of trapped ultracold atoms interacting with narrow Feshbach resonance for which the effective range can be large.

  11. Modeling of Interaction Layer Growth Between U-Mo Particles and an Al Matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Yeon Soo Kim; G. L. Hofman; Ho Jin Ryu; Jong Man Park; A. B. Robinson; D. M. Wachs

    2013-12-01

    Interaction layer growth between U-Mo alloy fuel particles and Al in a dispersion fuel is a concern due to the volume expansion and other unfavorable irradiation behavior of the interaction product. To reduce interaction layer (IL) growth, a small amount of Si is added to the Al. As a result, IL growth is affected by the Si content in the Al matrix. In order to predict IL growth during fabrication and irradiation, empirical models were developed. For IL growth prediction during fabrication and any follow-on heating process before irradiation, out-of-pile heating test data were used to develop kinetic correlations. Two out-of-pile correlations, one for the pure Al matrix and the other for the Al matrix with Si addition, respectively, were developed, which are Arrhenius equations that include temperature and time. For IL growth predictions during irradiation, the out-of-pile correlations were modified to include a fission-rate term to consider fission enhanced diffusion, and multiplication factors to incorporate the Si addition effect and the effect of the Mo content. The in-pile correlation is applicable for a pure Al matrix and an Al matrix with the Si content up to 8 wt%, for fuel temperatures up to 200 degrees C, and for Mo content in the range of 6 – 10wt%. In order to cover these ranges, in-pile data were included in modeling from various tests, such as the US RERTR-4, -5, -6, -7 and -9 tests and Korea’s KOMO-4 test, that were designed to systematically examine the effects of the fission rate, temperature, Si content in Al matrix, and Mo content in U-Mo particles. A model converting the IL thickness to the IL volume fraction in the meat was also developed.

  12. Mixing model with multi-particle interactions for Lagrangian simulations of turbulent mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, T.; Nagata, K.

    2016-08-01

    We report on the numerical study of the mixing volume model (MVM) for molecular diffusion in Lagrangian simulations of turbulent mixing problems. The MVM is based on the multi-particle interaction in a finite volume (mixing volume). A priori test of the MVM, based on the direct numerical simulations of planar jets, is conducted in the turbulent region and the interfacial layer between the turbulent and non-turbulent fluids. The results show that the MVM predicts well the mean effects of the molecular diffusion under various numerical and flow parameters. The number of the mixing particles should be large for predicting a value of the molecular diffusion term positively correlated to the exact value. The size of the mixing volume relative to the Kolmogorov scale η is important in the performance of the MVM. The scalar transfer across the turbulent/non-turbulent interface is well captured by the MVM especially with the small mixing volume. Furthermore, the MVM with multiple mixing particles is tested in the hybrid implicit large-eddy-simulation/Lagrangian-particle-simulation (LES-LPS) of the planar jet with the characteristic length of the mixing volume of O(100η). Despite the large mixing volume, the MVM works well and decays the scalar variance in a rate close to the reference LES. The statistics in the LPS are very robust to the number of the particles used in the simulations and the computational grid size of the LES. Both in the turbulent core region and the intermittent region, the LPS predicts a scalar field well correlated to the LES.

  13. A Penalty Method to Model Particle Interactions in DNA-laden Flows

    SciTech Connect

    Trebotich, D; Miller, G H; Bybee, M D

    2006-10-06

    We present a hybrid fluid-particle algorithm to simulate flow and transport of DNA-laden fluids in microdevices. Relevant length scales in microfluidic systems range from characteristic channel sizes of millimeters to micron scale geometric variation (e.g., post arrays) to 10 nanometers for the length of a single rod in a bead-rod polymer representation of a biological material such as DNA. The method is based on a previous fluid-particle algorithm in which long molecules are represented as a chain of connected rods, but in which the physically unrealistic behavior of rod crossing occurred. We have extended this algorithm to include screened Coulombic forces between particles by implementing a Debye-Hueckel potential acting between rods. In the method an unsteady incompressible Newtonian fluid is discretized with a second-order finite difference method in the interior of the Cartesian grid domain; an embedded boundary volume-of-fluid formulation is used near boundaries. The bead-rod polymer model is fully coupled to the solvent through body forces representing hydrodynamic drag and stochastic thermal fluctuations. While intrapolymer interactions are modeled by a soft potential, polymer-structure interactions are treated as perfectly elastic collisions. We demonstrate this method on flow and transport of a polymer through a post array microchannel in 2D where the polymer incorporates more realistic physical parameters of DNA, and compare to previous simulations where rods are allowed to cross. We also show that the method is capable of simulating 3D flow in a packed bed micro-column.

  14. New particles and interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Gilman, F.J.; Grannis, P.D.

    1984-04-01

    The Working Group on New Particles and Interactions met as a whole at the beginning and at the end of the Workshop. However, much of what was accomplished was done in five subgroups. These were devoted to: (1) new quarks and leptons; (2) technicolor; (3) supersymmetry; (4) rare decays and CP; and (5) substructure of quarks and leptons. Other aspects of new particles, e.g., Higgs, W', Z', fell to the Electroweak Working Group to consider. The central question of this Workshop of comparing anti pp (with L = 10/sup 32//cm/sup 2/-sec) with pp (with L = 10/sup 33//cm/sup 2/-sec) colliders carried through to all these subgroups. In addition there were several other aspects of hadron colliders which were considered: what does an increase in ..sqrt..s gain in cross section and resultant sensitivity to new physics versus an increase in luminosity; will polarized beams or the use of asymmetries be essential in finding new interactions; where and at what level do rate limitations due to triggering or detection systems play a role; and how and where will the detection of particles with short, but detectable, lifetimes be important. 25 references.

  15. Charged patchy particle models in explicit salt: Ion distributions, electrostatic potentials, and effective interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Yigit, Cemil; Dzubiella, Joachim; Heyda, Jan

    2015-08-14

    We introduce a set of charged patchy particle models (CPPMs) in order to systematically study the influence of electrostatic charge patchiness and multipolarity on macromolecular interactions by means of implicit-solvent, explicit-ion Langevin dynamics simulations employing the Gromacs software. We consider well-defined zero-, one-, and two-patched spherical globules each of the same net charge and (nanometer) size which are composed of discrete atoms. The studied mono- and multipole moments of the CPPMs are comparable to those of globular proteins with similar size. We first characterize ion distributions and electrostatic potentials around a single CPPM. Although angle-resolved radial distribution functions reveal the expected local accumulation and depletion of counter- and co-ions around the patches, respectively, the orientation-averaged electrostatic potential shows only a small variation among the various CPPMs due to space charge cancellations. Furthermore, we study the orientation-averaged potential of mean force (PMF), the number of accumulated ions on the patches, as well as the CPPM orientations along the center-to-center distance of a pair of CPPMs. We compare the PMFs to the classical Derjaguin-Verwey-Landau-Overbeek theory and previously introduced orientation-averaged Debye-Hückel pair potentials including dipolar interactions. Our simulations confirm the adequacy of the theories in their respective regimes of validity, while low salt concentrations and large multipolar interactions remain a challenge for tractable theoretical descriptions.

  16. Charged patchy particle models in explicit salt: Ion distributions, electrostatic potentials, and effective interactions.

    PubMed

    Yigit, Cemil; Heyda, Jan; Dzubiella, Joachim

    2015-08-14

    We introduce a set of charged patchy particle models (CPPMs) in order to systematically study the influence of electrostatic charge patchiness and multipolarity on macromolecular interactions by means of implicit-solvent, explicit-ion Langevin dynamics simulations employing the Gromacs software. We consider well-defined zero-, one-, and two-patched spherical globules each of the same net charge and (nanometer) size which are composed of discrete atoms. The studied mono- and multipole moments of the CPPMs are comparable to those of globular proteins with similar size. We first characterize ion distributions and electrostatic potentials around a single CPPM. Although angle-resolved radial distribution functions reveal the expected local accumulation and depletion of counter- and co-ions around the patches, respectively, the orientation-averaged electrostatic potential shows only a small variation among the various CPPMs due to space charge cancellations. Furthermore, we study the orientation-averaged potential of mean force (PMF), the number of accumulated ions on the patches, as well as the CPPM orientations along the center-to-center distance of a pair of CPPMs. We compare the PMFs to the classical Derjaguin-Verwey-Landau-Overbeek theory and previously introduced orientation-averaged Debye-Hückel pair potentials including dipolar interactions. Our simulations confirm the adequacy of the theories in their respective regimes of validity, while low salt concentrations and large multipolar interactions remain a challenge for tractable theoretical descriptions. PMID:26277163

  17. Modeling of conductive particle motion in viscous medium affected by an electric field considering particle-electrode interactions and microdischarge phenomenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eslami, Ghiyam; Esmaeilzadeh, Esmaeil; Pérez, Alberto T.

    2016-10-01

    Up and down motion of a spherical conductive particle in dielectric viscous fluid driven by a DC electric field between two parallel electrodes was investigated. A nonlinear differential equation, governing the particle dynamics, was derived, based on Newton's second law of mechanics, and solved numerically. All the pertaining dimensionless groups were extracted. In contrast to similar previous works, hydrodynamic interaction between the particle and the electrodes, as well as image electric forces, has been taken into account. Furthermore, the influence of the microdischarge produced between the electrodes and the approaching particle on the particle dynamics has been included in the model. The model results were compared with experimental data available in the literature, as well as with some additional experimental data obtained through the present study showing very good agreement. The results indicate that the wall hydrodynamic effect and the dielectric liquid ionic conductivity are very dominant factors determining the particle trajectory. A lower bound is derived for the charge transferred to the particle while rebounding from an electrode. It is found that the time and length scales of the post-microdischarge motion of the particle can be as small as microsecond and micrometer, respectively. The model is able to predict the so called settling/dwelling time phenomenon for the first time.

  18. Numerical modeling of the early interaction of a planar shock with a dense particle field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regele, Jonathan; Blanquart, Guillaume

    2011-11-01

    Dense compressible multiphase flows are of interest for multiphase turbomachinary and energetic material detonations. Still, there is little understanding of the detailed interaction mechanisms between shock waves and dense (particle volume fraction αd > 0 . 001) particle fields. A recent experimental study [Wagner et al, AIAA Aero. Sci., Orlando, 2011-188] has focused on the impingement of a planar shock wave on a dense particle curtain. In the present work, numerical solutions of the Euler equations in one and two dimensions are performed for a planar shock wave impinging on a fixed particle curtain and are compared to the experimental data for early times. Comparison of the one- and two-dimensional results demonstrate that the one-dimensional description captures the large scale flow behavior, but is inadequate to capture all the details observed in the experiments. The two-dimensional solutions are shown to reproduce the experimentally observed flow structures and provide insight into how these details originate.

  19. Modeling transport of energetic particles in corotating interaction regions: A case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Lulu; Li, Gang; Ebert, R. W.; Dayeh, M. A.; Desai, M. I.; Mason, G. M.; Wu, Z.; Chen, Y.

    2016-01-01

    We investigate energetic particle transport in corotating interaction regions (CIRs) through a case study. The CIR event we study occurred on 8 February 2008 and was observed by both the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) and the twin Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory (STEREO) B spacecraft. An in situ reverse shock was observed by STEREO B (1.0 AU) but not ACE (0.98 AU). Using STEREO B observations and assuming the CIR structure does not vary significantly in the corotating frame, we estimate the shock location at later times for both the STEREO B and ACE observations. Further assuming the accelerated particle spectral shape at the shock does not vary with shock location, we calculate the particle differential intensities as observed by ACE and STEREO B at two different times by solving the focused transport equation using a Monte Carlo simulation. We assume that particles move along Parker's field and experience no cross-field diffusion. We find that the modulation of sub-MeV/nucleon particles is significant. To obtain reasonable comparisons between the simulations and the observations by both ACE and STEREO B, one has to assume that the CIR shock can accelerate more particles at a larger heliocentric distance than at a smaller heliocentric distance.

  20. An Interactive Computer Model for Improved Student Understanding of Random Particle Motion and Osmosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kottonau, Johannes

    2011-01-01

    Effectively teaching the concepts of osmosis to college-level students is a major obstacle in biological education. Therefore, a novel computer model is presented that allows students to observe the random nature of particle motion simultaneously with the seemingly directed net flow of water across a semipermeable membrane during osmotic…

  1. Soft particles with anisotropic interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schurtenberger, Peter

    Responsive colloids such as thermo- or pH-sensitive microgels are ideal model systems to investigate the relationship between the nature of interparticle interactions and the plethora of self-assembled structures that can form in colloidal suspensions. They allow for a variation of the form, strength and range of the interaction potential almost at will. While microgels have extensively been used as model systems to investigate various condensed matter problems such as glass formation, jamming or crystallization, they can also be used to study systems with anisotropic interactions. Here we show results from a systematic investigation of the influence of softness and anisotropy on the structural and dynamic properties of strongly interacting suspensions. We focus first on ionic microgels. Due to their large number of internal counterions they possess very large polarisabilities, and we can thus use external electrical ac fields to generate large dipolar contributions to the interparticle interaction potential. This leads to a number of new crystal phases, and we can trigger crystal-crystal phase transitions through the appropriate choice of the field strength. We then show that this approach can be extended to more complex particle shapes in an attempt to copy nature's well documented success in fabricating complex nanostructures such as virus shells via self assembly. European Research Council (ERC-339678-COMPASS).

  2. Optimized sparse-particle aerosol representations for modeling cloud-aerosol interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fierce, Laura; McGraw, Robert

    2016-04-01

    Sparse representations of atmospheric aerosols are needed for efficient regional- and global-scale chemical transport models. Here we introduce a new framework for representing aerosol distributions, based on the method of moments. Given a set of moment constraints, we show how linear programming can be used to identify collections of sparse particles that approximately maximize distributional entropy. The collections of sparse particles derived from this approach reproduce CCN activity of the exact model aerosol distributions with high accuracy. Additionally, the linear programming techniques described in this study can be used to bound key aerosol properties, such as the number concentration of CCN. Unlike the commonly used sparse representations, such as modal and sectional schemes, the maximum-entropy moment-based approach is not constrained to pre-determined size bins or assumed distribution shapes. This study is a first step toward a new aerosol simulation scheme that will track multivariate aerosol distributions with sufficient computational efficiency for large-scale simulations.

  3. Interaction of Burning Metal Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dreizin, Edward L.; Berman, Charles H.; Hoffmann, Vern K.

    1999-01-01

    Physical characteristics of the combustion of metal particle groups have been addressed in this research. The combustion behavior and interaction effects of multiple metal particles has been studied using a microgravity environment, which presents a unique opportunity to create an "aerosol" consisting of relatively large particles, i.e., 50-300 micrometer diameter. Combustion behavior of such an aerosol could be examined using methods adopted from well-developed single particle combustion research. The experiment included fluidizing relatively large (order of 100 micrometer diameter) uniform metal particles under microgravity and igniting such an "aerosol" using a hot wire igniter. The flame propagation and details of individual particle combustion and particle interaction have been studied using a high speed movie and video-imaging with cameras coupled with microscope lenses to resolve individual particles. Interference filters were used to separate characteristic metal and metal oxide radiation bands form the thermal black body radiation. Recorded flame images were digitized and employed to understand the processes occurring in the burning aerosol. The development of individual particle flames, merging or separation, and extinguishing as well as induced particle motion have been analyzed to identify the mechanisms governing these processes. Size distribution, morphology, and elemental compositions of combustion products were characterized and used to link the observed in this project aerosol combustion phenomena with the recently expanded mechanism of single metal particle combustion.

  4. Interaction of Burning Metal Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dreizin, Edward L.; Berman, Charles H.; Hoffmann, Vern K.

    1999-01-01

    Physical characteristics of the combustion of metal particle groups have been addressed in this research. The combustion behavior and interaction effects of multiple metal particles has been studied using a microgravity environment, which presents a unique opportunity to create an "aerosol" consisting of relatively large particles, i.e., 50-300 m diameter. Combustion behavior of such an aerosol could be examined using methods adopted from well-developed single particle combustion research. The experiment included fluidizing relatively large (order of 100 m diameter) uniform metal particles under microgravity and igniting such an "aerosol" using a hot wire igniter. The flame propagation and details of individual particle combustion and particle interaction have been studied using a high speed movie and video-imaging with cameras coupled with microscope lenses to resolve individual particles. Interference filters were used to separate characteristic metal and metal oxide radiation bands from the thermal black body radiation. Recorded flame images were digitized and various image processing techniques including flame position tracking, color separation, and pixel by pixel image comparison were employed to understand the processes occurring in the burning aerosol. The development of individual particle flames, merging or separation, and extinguishment as well as induced particle motion have been analyzed to identify the mechanisms governing these processes. Size distribution, morphology, and elemental compositions of combustion products were characterized and used to link the observed in this project aerosol combustion phenomena with the recently expanded mechanism of single metal particle combustion.

  5. Model for Thermal Relic Dark Matter of Strongly Interacting Massive Particles.

    PubMed

    Hochberg, Yonit; Kuflik, Eric; Murayama, Hitoshi; Volansky, Tomer; Wacker, Jay G

    2015-07-10

    A recent proposal is that dark matter could be a thermal relic of 3→2 scatterings in a strongly coupled hidden sector. We present explicit classes of strongly coupled gauge theories that admit this behavior. These are QCD-like theories of dynamical chiral symmetry breaking, where the pions play the role of dark matter. The number-changing 3→2 process, which sets the dark matter relic abundance, arises from the Wess-Zumino-Witten term. The theories give an explicit relationship between the 3→2 annihilation rate and the 2→2 self-scattering rate, which alters predictions for structure formation. This is a simple calculable realization of the strongly interacting massive-particle mechanism.

  6. A relativistically interacting exactly solvable multi-time model for two massless Dirac particles in 1 + 1 dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Lienert, Matthias

    2015-04-15

    The question how to Lorentz transform an N-particle wave function naturally leads to the concept of a so-called multi-time wave function, i.e., a map from (space-time){sup N} to a spin space. This concept was originally proposed by Dirac as the basis of relativistic quantum mechanics. In such a view, interaction potentials are mathematically inconsistent. This fact motivates the search for new mechanisms for relativistic interactions. In this paper, we explore the idea that relativistic interaction can be described by boundary conditions on the set of coincidence points of two particles in space-time. This extends ideas from zero-range physics to a relativistic setting. We illustrate the idea at the simplest model which still possesses essential physical properties like Lorentz invariance and a positive definite density: two-time equations for massless Dirac particles in 1 + 1 dimensions. In order to deal with a spatio-temporally non-trivial domain, a necessity in the multi-time picture, we develop a new method to prove existence and uniqueness of classical solutions: a generalized version of the method of characteristics. Both mathematical and physical considerations are combined to precisely formulate and answer the questions of probability conservation, Lorentz invariance, interaction, and antisymmetry.

  7. A new particle interaction mixing model for turbulent dispersion and turbulent reactive flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Daniel W.

    2010-03-01

    Probability density function (PDF) methods are an established tool applied for the simulation of turbulent mixing and turbulent reactive flows. Mixing models are required to close the molecular diffusion term in the PDF transport equation. From the nature of molecular diffusion, several requirements or design criteria can be derived for mixing models. All current models have certain shortcomings with respect to these requirements. A new mixing model is presented which fully satisfies almost all requirements. It conserves the mean of an inert scalar, reduces its scalar variance, and relaxes closely to a Gaussian scalar PDF. Multiple inert scalars without differential diffusion effects evolve independently and are kept bounded within their allowable region. Mixing is conditional on the velocity and particle scalar trajectories are continuous in time leading to a model that is local in a weak sense. Validation tests show that the model can reproduce differential diffusion effects and mixing rate dependencies due to variable initial scalar length scales or Reynolds and Schmidt number variations.

  8. Particle interactions in microemulsion systems

    SciTech Connect

    Brouwer, W.M.; Nieuwenhuis, E.A.; Kops-Werkhoven, M.M.

    1983-03-01

    This study obtains information about the type of interactions between microemulsion particles as a function of their composition using time averaged and dynamic light scattering and sedimentation measurements and checks the consistency of the experimental data with respect to the generalized Einstein relation. Interactions between microemulsion particles are affected by the flexibility of the soap chains. The more flexible the soap chains, the lesser the attraction forces between the particles. The lack of consistency in the interaction behavior as obtained from different experimental techniques is an important observation, which leads to the conclusion that care should be taken in the determination of the interaction behavior in microemulsion systems from one or 2 experimental techniques. 24 referernces.

  9. Noroviral P-Particles as an In Vitro Model to Assess the Interactions of Noroviruses with Probiotics

    PubMed Central

    Rubio-del-Campo, Antonio; Coll-Marqués, José M.; Yebra, María J.; Buesa, Javier; Pérez-Martínez, Gaspar; Monedero, Vicente; Rodríguez-Díaz, Jesús

    2014-01-01

    Noroviruses (NoVs) are the main etiologic agents of acute epidemic gastroenteritis and probiotic bacteria have been reported to exert a positive effect on viral diarrhea. The protruding (P) domain from NoVs VP1 capsid protein has the ability to assemble into the so-called P-particles, which retain the binding ability to host receptors. We purified the P-domains from NoVs genotypes GI.1 and GII.4 as 6X(His)-tagged proteins and determined that, similar to native domains, they were structured into P-particles that were functional in the recognition of the specific glycoconjugated receptors, as established by surface plasmon resonance experiments. We showed that several lactic acid bacteria (probiotic and non-probiotic) and a Gram-negative probiotic strain have the ability to bind P-particles on their surfaces irrespective of their probiotic status. The binding of P-particles (GI.1) to HT-29 cells in the presence of selected strains showed that bacteria can inhibit P-particle attachment in competitive exclusion experiments. However, pre-treatment of cells with bacteria or adding bacteria to cells with already attached P-particles enhanced the retention of the particles. Although direct viral binding and blocking of viral receptors have been postulated as mechanisms of protection against viral infection by probiotic bacteria, these results highlight the need for a careful evaluation of this hypothesis. The work presented here investigates for the first time the probiotic-NoVs-host interactions and points up the NoVs P-particles as useful tools to overcome the absence of in vitro cellular models to propagate these viruses. PMID:24586892

  10. 1.5D Quasilinear Model for Alpha Particle-TAE Interaction in ARIES ACT-I

    SciTech Connect

    K. Ghantous, N.N. Gorelenkov, C. Kessel, F. Poli

    2013-01-30

    We study the TAE interaction with alpha particle fusion products in ARIES ACT-I using the 1.5D quasilinear model. 1.5D uses linear analytic expressions for growth and damping rates of TAE modes evaluated using TRANSP pro les to calculates the relaxation of pressure pro les. NOVA- K simulations are conducted to validate the analytic dependancies of the rates, and to normalize their absolute value. The low dimensionality of the model permits calculating loss diagrams in large parameter spaces.

  11. Numerical Approach of Interactions of Proton Beams and Dense Plasmas with Quantum-Hydrodynamic/Particle-in-Cell Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ya; Li, Lian; Jiang, Wei; Yi, Lin

    2016-07-01

    A one dimensional quantum-hydrodynamic/particle-in-cell (QHD/PIC) model is used to study the interaction process of an intense proton beam (injection density of 1017 cm‑3) with a dense plasma (initial density of ~ 1021 cm‑3), with the PIC method for simulating the beam particle dynamics and the QHD model for considering the quantum effects including the quantum statistical and quantum diffraction effects. By means of the QHD theory, the wake electron density and wakefields are calculated, while the proton beam density is calculated by the PIC method and compared to hydrodynamic results to justify that the PIC method is a more suitable way to simulate the beam particle dynamics. The calculation results show that the incident continuous proton beam when propagating in the plasma generates electron perturbations as well as wakefields oscillations with negative valleys and positive peaks where the proton beams are repelled by the positive wakefields and accelerated by the negative wakefields. Moreover, the quantum correction obviously hinders the electron perturbations as well as the wakefields. Therefore, it is necessary to consider the quantum effects in the interaction of a proton beam with cold dense plasmas, such as in the metal films. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 11405067, 11105057, 11275007)

  12. Elementary Particles and Weak Interactions

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Lee, T. D.; Yang, C. N.

    1957-01-01

    Some general patterns of interactions between various elementary particles are reviewed and some general questions concerning the symmetry properties of these particles are studied. Topics are included on the theta-tau puzzle, experimental limits on the validity of parity conservation, some general discussions on the consequences due to possible non-invariance under P, C, and T, various possible experimental tests on invariance under P, C, and T, a two-component theory of the neutrino, a possible law of conservation of leptons and the universal Fermi interactions, and time reversal invariance and Mach's principle. (M.H.R.)

  13. Wave-turbulence description of interacting particles: Klein-Gordon model with a Mexican-hat potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallet, Basile; Nazarenko, Sergey; Dubrulle, Bérengère

    2015-07-01

    In field theory, particles are waves or excitations that propagate on the fundamental state. In experiments or cosmological models, one typically wants to compute the out-of-equilibrium evolution of a given initial distribution of such waves. Wave turbulence deals with out-of-equilibrium ensembles of weakly nonlinear waves, and is therefore well suited to address this problem. As an example, we consider the complex Klein-Gordon equation with a Mexican-hat potential. This simple equation displays two kinds of excitations around the fundamental state: massive particles and massless Goldstone bosons. The former are waves with a nonzero frequency for vanishing wave number, whereas the latter obey an acoustic dispersion relation. Using wave-turbulence theory, we derive wave kinetic equations that govern the coupled evolution of the spectra of massive and massless waves. We first consider the thermodynamic solutions to these equations and study the wave condensation transition, which is the classical equivalent of Bose-Einstein condensation. We then focus on nonlocal interactions in wave-number space: we study the decay of an ensemble of massive particles into massless ones. Under rather general conditions, these massless particles accumulate at low wave number. We study the dynamics of waves coexisting with such a strong condensate, and we compute rigorously a nonlocal Kolmogorov-Zakharov solution, where particles are transferred nonlocally to the condensate, while energy cascades towards large wave numbers through local interactions. This nonlocal cascading state constitutes the intermediate asymptotics between the initial distribution of waves and the thermodynamic state reached in the long-time limit.

  14. Wave-turbulence description of interacting particles: Klein-Gordon model with a Mexican-hat potential.

    PubMed

    Gallet, Basile; Nazarenko, Sergey; Dubrulle, Bérengère

    2015-07-01

    In field theory, particles are waves or excitations that propagate on the fundamental state. In experiments or cosmological models, one typically wants to compute the out-of-equilibrium evolution of a given initial distribution of such waves. Wave turbulence deals with out-of-equilibrium ensembles of weakly nonlinear waves, and is therefore well suited to address this problem. As an example, we consider the complex Klein-Gordon equation with a Mexican-hat potential. This simple equation displays two kinds of excitations around the fundamental state: massive particles and massless Goldstone bosons. The former are waves with a nonzero frequency for vanishing wave number, whereas the latter obey an acoustic dispersion relation. Using wave-turbulence theory, we derive wave kinetic equations that govern the coupled evolution of the spectra of massive and massless waves. We first consider the thermodynamic solutions to these equations and study the wave condensation transition, which is the classical equivalent of Bose-Einstein condensation. We then focus on nonlocal interactions in wave-number space: we study the decay of an ensemble of massive particles into massless ones. Under rather general conditions, these massless particles accumulate at low wave number. We study the dynamics of waves coexisting with such a strong condensate, and we compute rigorously a nonlocal Kolmogorov-Zakharov solution, where particles are transferred nonlocally to the condensate, while energy cascades towards large wave numbers through local interactions. This nonlocal cascading state constitutes the intermediate asymptotics between the initial distribution of waves and the thermodynamic state reached in the long-time limit.

  15. On multi-scale percolation behaviour of the effective conductivity for the lattice model with interacting particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiśniowski, R.; Olchawa, W.; Frączek, D.; Piasecki, R.

    2016-02-01

    Recently, the effective medium approach (EMA) using 2×2 basic cluster of model lattice sites to predict the conductivity of interacting microemulsion droplets has been presented by Hattori et al. To make a step aside from pure applications, we studied earlier a multi-scale percolation, employing any k× k basic cluster for non-interacting particles. Here, with interactions included, we examine in what way they alter the percolation threshold for any cluster case. We found that at a fixed length scale k, the interaction reduces the range of shifts of the percolation threshold. To determine the critical concentrations, the simplified EMA-model is used. It diminishes the number of local conductivities into two main ones. In the presence of a dominance of the repulsive interaction over the thermal energy, the exact percolation thresholds at two small scales can be revealed from analytical formulas. Furthermore, at large scales, the highest possible value of the estimated threshold can be obtained.

  16. Percolation of interaction diffusing particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Selinger, Robin Blumberg; Stanley, H. Eugene

    1990-01-01

    The connectivity properties of systems of diffusing interacting particles with the blind and myopic diffusion rules are studied. It is found that the blind rule case is equivalent to the lattice gas with J = 0 in all dimensions. The connectivity properties of blind rule diffusion are described by random site percolation due to the fact that the density on neighboring sites is uncorrelated.

  17. Electroweak interactions and dark baryons in the sextet BSM model with a composite Higgs particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fodor, Zoltan; Holland, Kieran; Kuti, Julius; Mondal, Santanu; Nogradi, Daniel; Wong, Chik Him

    2016-07-01

    The electroweak interactions of a strongly coupled gauge theory are discussed with an outlook beyond the Standard Model (BSM) under global and gauge anomaly constraints. The theory is built on a minimal massless fermion doublet of the SU(2) BSM flavor group (bsm-flavor) with a confining gauge force at the TeV scale in the two-index symmetric (sextet) representation of the BSM SU(3) color gauge group (bsm-color). The intriguing possibility of near-conformal sextet gauge dynamics could lead to the minimal realization of the composite Higgs mechanism with a light 0++ scalar, far separated from strongly coupled resonances of the confining gauge force in the 2-3 TeV range, distinct from Higgsless technicolor. In previous publications we have presented results for the meson spectrum of the theory, including the light composite scalar, which is perhaps the emergent Higgs impostor. Here we discuss the critically important role of the baryon spectrum in the sextet model investigating its compatibility with what we know about thermal evolution of the early Universe including its galactic and terrestrial relics. For an important application, we report the first numerical results on the baryon spectrum of this theory from nonperturbative lattice simulations with baryon correlators in the staggered fermion implementation of the strongly coupled gauge sector. The quantum numbers of composite baryons and their spectroscopy from lattice simulations are required inputs for exploring dark matter contributions of the sextet BSM model, as outlined for future work.

  18. Interaction of rotavirus particles with liposomes.

    PubMed

    Nandi, P; Charpilienne, A; Cohen, J

    1992-06-01

    We have studied the interactions of purified viral particles with liposomes as a model to understand the mechanism of entry of rotavirus into the cell. Liposomes, made from pure as well as mixed lipids, that contained encapsulated self-quenching concentrations of the fluorophore carboxyfluorescein (CF) were used. Rotavirus-liposome interactions were studied from the fluorescence dequenching of CF resulting from its release to the bulk solution. Purified infectious double-shelled virus particles induced a concentration- and temperature-dependent release of CF. The rate and extent of CF release was maximum between pH 7.3 and 7.6. The removal of outer structural proteins VP4 and VP7 from virus, which results in the formation of single-shelled particles, prevented virus interaction with liposomes. Rotavirus particles with uncleaved VP4 did not interact with liposomes, but treatment in situ of these particles with trypsin restored the interaction with the liposomes and resulted in CF dequenching. Our data support the view that rotavirus enters the cell through direct penetration of the plasma membrane. In contrast, adenovirus, the only other nonenveloped virus studied by this method, shows the optimum rate of marker release from liposomes at around pH 6 (R. Blumenthal, P. S. Seth, M. C. Willingham, and I. Pastan, Biochemistry 25:2231-2237, 1986). The interaction between rotavirus and liposomes is sensitive to specific divalent metal ions, unlike the adenovirus-liposome interaction, which is independent of them. PMID:1316453

  19. Constraints on Dark Matter Interactions with Standard Model Particles from Cosmic Microwave Background Spectral Distortions.

    PubMed

    Ali-Haïmoud, Yacine; Chluba, Jens; Kamionkowski, Marc

    2015-08-14

    We propose a new method to constrain elastic scattering between dark matter (DM) and standard model particles in the early Universe. Direct or indirect thermal coupling of nonrelativistic DM with photons leads to a heat sink for the latter. This results in spectral distortions of the cosmic microwave background (CMB), the amplitude of which can be as large as a few times the DM-to-photon-number ratio. We compute CMB spectral distortions due to DM-proton, DM-electron, and DM-photon scattering for generic energy-dependent cross sections and DM mass m_{χ}≳1 keV. Using Far-Infrared Absolute Spectrophotometer measurements, we set constraints on the cross sections for m_{χ}≲0.1 MeV. In particular, for energy-independent scattering we obtain σ_{DM-proton}≲10^{-24} cm^{2} (keV/m_{χ})^{1/2}, σ_{DM-electron}≲10^{-27} cm^{2} (keV/m_{χ})^{1/2}, and σ_{DM-photon}≲10^{-39} cm^{2} (m_{χ}/keV). An experiment with the characteristics of the Primordial Inflation Explorer would extend the regime of sensitivity up to masses m_{χ}~1 GeV.

  20. Dielectrophoretic particle-particle interaction under AC electrohydrodynamic flow conditions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Doh-Hyoung; Yu, Chengjie; Papazoglou, Elisabeth; Farouk, Bakhtier; Noh, Hongseok M

    2011-09-01

    We used the Maxwell stress tensor method to understand dielectrophoretic particle-particle interactions and applied the results to the interpretation of particle behaviors under alternating current (AC) electrohydrodynamic conditions such as AC electroosmosis (ACEO) and electrothermal flow (ETF). Distinct particle behaviors were observed under ACEO and ETF. Diverse particle-particle interactions observed in experiments such as particle clustering, particles keeping a certain distance from each other, chain and disc formation and their rotation, are explained based on the numerical simulation data. The improved understanding of particle behaviors in AC electrohydrodynamic flows presented here will enable researchers to design better particle manipulation strategies for lab-on-a-chip applications. PMID:21823132

  1. The Particle Beam Optics Interactive Computer Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Gillespie, George H.; Hill, Barrey W.; Brown, Nathan A.; Babcock, R. Chris; Martono, Hendy; Carey, David C.

    1997-02-01

    The Particle Beam Optics Interactive Computer Laboratory (PBO Lab) is an educational software concept to aid students and professionals in learning about charged particle beams and particle beam optical systems. The PBO Lab is being developed as a cross-platform application and includes four key elements. The first is a graphic user interface shell that provides for a highly interactive learning session. The second is a knowledge database containing information on electric and magnetic optics transport elements. The knowledge database provides interactive tutorials on the fundamental physics of charged particle optics and on the technology used in particle optics hardware. The third element is a graphical construction kit that provides tools for students to interactively and visually construct optical beamlines. The final element is a set of charged particle optics computational engines that compute trajectories, transport beam envelopes, fit parameters to optical constraints and carry out similar calculations for the student designed beamlines. The primary computational engine is provided by the third-order TRANSPORT code. Augmenting TRANSPORT is the multiple ray tracing program TURTLE and a first-order matrix program that includes a space charge model and support for calculating single particle trajectories in the presence of the beam space charge. This paper describes progress on the development of the PBO Lab.

  2. The Particle Beam Optics Interactive Computer Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Gillespie, G.H.; Hill, B.W.; Brown, N.A.; Babcock, R.C.; Martono, H.; Carey, D.C. |

    1997-02-01

    The Particle Beam Optics Interactive Computer Laboratory (PBO Lab) is an educational software concept to aid students and professionals in learning about charged particle beams and particle beam optical systems. The PBO Lab is being developed as a cross-platform application and includes four key elements. The first is a graphic user interface shell that provides for a highly interactive learning session. The second is a knowledge database containing information on electric and magnetic optics transport elements. The knowledge database provides interactive tutorials on the fundamental physics of charged particle optics and on the technology used in particle optics hardware. The third element is a graphical construction kit that provides tools for students to interactively and visually construct optical beamlines. The final element is a set of charged particle optics computational engines that compute trajectories, transport beam envelopes, fit parameters to optical constraints and carry out similar calculations for the student designed beamlines. The primary computational engine is provided by the third-order TRANSPORT code. Augmenting TRANSPORT is the multiple ray tracing program TURTLE and a first-order matrix program that includes a space charge model and support for calculating single particle trajectories in the presence of the beam space charge. This paper describes progress on the development of the PBO Lab. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  3. A New Model of A Magnetoreceptor In Homing Pigeons Based On Interacting Clusters of Superparamagnetic Magnetite Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davila, A. F.; Winklhofer, M.; Petersen, N.

    We present a new model of a magnetoreceptor based on the mutual interactions of adjacent clusters of superparamagnetic (SP) particles. The model takes into account previous microscopic results on tissue samples of homing pigeons: In the putative magnetoreceptor tissue, clusters of SP magnetite are found in close neighbourhood to each other, often even in alignment, like a string of perls. Depending on the direction of the magnetic field, the clusters attract or repel each other, which results in mechanical strain in the tissue associated with the clusters. It will be shown that the magnetic- field dependent strain is sufficiently large to be detected by cellular strain receptors. Our new theory is supported by model experiments on ferrofluid droplets to simulate the behaviour of the clusters in a variable magnetic fields.

  4. Particle dynamics and particle-cell interaction in microfluidic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stamm, Matthew T.

    Particle-laden flow in a microchannel resulting in aggregation of microparticles was investigated to determine the dependence of the cluster growth rate on the following parameters: suspension void fraction, shear strain rate, and channel-height to particle-diameter ratio. The growth rate of an average cluster was found to increase linearly with suspension void fraction, and to obey a power-law relationships with shear strain rate as S 0.9 and channel-height to particle-diameter ratio as (h/d )--3.5. Ceramic liposomal nanoparticles and silica microparticles were functionalized with antibodies that act as targeting ligands. The bio-functionality and physical integrity of the cerasomes were characterized. Surface functionalization allows cerasomes to deliver drugs with selectivity and specificity that is not possible using standard liposomes. The functionalized particle-target cell binding process was characterized using BT-20 breast cancer cells. Two microfluidic systems were used; one with both species in suspension, the other with cells immobilized inside a microchannel and particle suspension as the mobile phase. Effects of incubation time, particle concentration, and shear strain rate on particle-cell binding were investigated. With both species in suspension, the particle-cell binding process was found to be reasonably well-described by a first-order model. Particle desorption and cellular loss of binding affinity in time were found to be negligible; cell-particle-cell interaction was identified as the limiting mechanism in particle-cell binding. Findings suggest that separation of a bound particle from a cell may be detrimental to cellular binding affinity. Cell-particle-cell interactions were prevented by immobilizing cells inside a microchannel. The initial stage of particle-cell binding was investigated and was again found to be reasonably well-described by a first-order model. For both systems, the time constant was found to be inversely proportional to

  5. Detecting weakly interacting massive particles.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drukier, A. K.; Gelmini, G. B.

    The growing synergy between astrophysics, particle physics, and low background experiments strengthens the possibility of detecting astrophysical non-baryonic matter. The idea of direct detection is that an incident, massive weakly interacting particle could collide with a nucleus and transfer an energy that could be measured. The present low levels of background achieved by the PNL/USC Ge detector represent a new technology which yields interesting bounds on Galactic cold dark matter and on light bosons emitted from the Sun. Further improvements require the development of cryogenic detectors. The authors analyse the practicality of such detectors, their optimalization and background suppression using the "annual modulation effect".

  6. Weakly-interacting massive particles in non-supersymmetric SO(10) grand unified models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagata, Natsumi; Olive, Keith A.; Zheng, Jiaming

    2015-10-01

    Non-supersymmetric SO(10) grand unified theories provide a framework in which the stability of dark matter is explained while gauge coupling unification is realized. In this work, we systematically study this possibility by classifying weakly interacting dark matter candidates in terms of their quantum numbers of SU(2) L ⊗ U(1) Y , B - L, and SU(2) R . We consider both scalar and fermion candidates. We show that the requirement of a sufficiently high unification scale to ensure a proton lifetime compatible with experimental constraints plays a strong role in selecting viable candidates. Among the scalar candidates originating from either a 16 or 144 of SO(10), only SU(2) L singlets with zero hypercharge or doublets with Y = 1 /2 satisfy all constraints for SU(4) C ⊗ SU(2) L ⊗ SU(2) R and SU(3) C ⊗ SU(2) L ⊗ SU(2) R ⊗ U(1) B- L intermediate scale gauge groups. Among fermion triplets with zero hypercharge, only a triplet in the 45 with intermediate group SU(4) C ⊗ SU(2) L ⊗ SU(2) R leads to solutions with M GUT > M int and a long proton lifetime. We find three models with weak doublets and Y = 1 /2 as dark matter candidates for the SU(4) C ⊗ SU(2) L ⊗ SU(2) R and SU(4) C ⊗ SU(2) L ⊗ U(1) R intermediate scale gauge groups assuming a minimal Higgs content. We also discuss how these models may be tested at accelerators and in dark matter detection experiments.

  7. Matter and Interactions: A Particle Physics Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Organtini, Giovanni

    2011-01-01

    In classical mechanics, matter and fields are completely separated; matter interacts with fields. For particle physicists this is not the case; both matter and fields are represented by particles. Fundamental interactions are mediated by particles exchanged between matter particles. In this article we explain why particle physicists believe in…

  8. Dissipative particle dynamics with attractive and repulsive particle-particle interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Meakin; Moubin Liu; Hai Huang

    2006-01-01

    In molecular dynamics simulations, a combination of short-range repulsive and long-range attractive interactions allows the behavior of gases, liquids, solids, and multiphase systems to be simulated. We demonstrate that dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulations with similar pairwise particle-particle interactions can also be used to simulate the dynamics of multiphase fluids. In these simulations, the positive, short-range, repulsive part of the interaction potentials were represented by polynomial spline functions such as those used as smoothing functions in smoothed particle hydrodynamics, and the negative long-range part of the interaction has the same form but a different range and amplitude. If a single spline function corresponding to a purely repulsive interaction is used, the DPD fluid is a gas, and we show that the Poiseuille flow of this gas can be described accurately by the Navier-Stokes equation at low Reynolds numbers. In a two-component system in which the purely repulsive interactions between different components are substantially larger than the purely repulsive intracomponent interactions, separation into two gas phases occurs, in agreement with results obtained using DPD simulations with standard repulsive particle-particle interactions. Finally, we show that a combination of short-range repulsive interactions and long-range attractive interactions can be used to simulate the behavior of liquid drops surrounded by a gas. Similar models can be used to simulate a wide range of processes such as multiphase fluid flow through fractures and porous media with complex geometries and wetting behaviors.

  9. High energy interactions of cosmic ray particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, L. W.

    1986-01-01

    The highlights of seven sessions of the Conference dealing with high energy interactions of cosmic rays are discussed. High energy cross section measurements; particle production-models of experiments; nuclei and nuclear matter; nucleus-nucleus collision; searches for magnetic monopoles; and studies of nucleon decay are covered.

  10. Testing model energy spectra of charged particles produced in hadron interactions on the basis of atmospheric muons

    SciTech Connect

    Dedenko, L. G.; Roganova, T. M.; Fedorova, G. F.

    2015-10-15

    An original method for calculating the spectrum of atmospheric muons with the aid of the CORSIKA 7.4 code package and numerical integration is proposed. The first step consists in calculating the energy distribution of muons for various fixed energies of primary-cosmic-ray particles and within several chosen hadron-interaction models included in the CORSIKA 7.4 code package. After that, the spectrum of atmospheric muons is calculated via integrating the resulting distribution densities with the chosen spectrum of primary-cosmic-ray particles. The atmospheric-muon fluxes that were calculated on the basis of the SIBYLL 2.1, QGSJET01, and QGSJET II-04 models exceed the predictions of the wellknown Gaisser approximation of this spectrum by a factor of 1.5 to 1.8 in the range of muon energies between about 10{sup 3} and 10{sup 4} GeV.Under the assumption that, in the region of extremely highmuon energies, a dominant contribution to the muon flux comes from one to two generations of charged π{sup ±} and K{sup ±} mesons, the production rate calculated for these mesons is overestimated by a factor of 1.3 to 1.5. This conclusion is confirmed by the results of the LHCf and TOTEM experiments.

  11. Bacterial Colonization of Particles: Growth and Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Grossart, Hans-Peter; Kiørboe, Thomas; Tang, Kam; Ploug, Helle

    2003-01-01

    Marine particles in the ocean are exposed to diverse bacterial communities, and colonization and growth of attached bacteria are important processes in the degradation and transformation of the particles. In an earlier study, we showed that the initial colonization of model particles by individual bacterial strains isolated from marine aggregates was a function of attachment and detachment. In the present study, we have investigated how this colonization process was further affected by growth and interspecific interactions among the bacteria. Long-term incubation experiments showed that growth dominated over attachment and detachment after a few hours in controlling the bacterial population density on agar particles. In the absence of grazing mortality, this growth led to an equilibrium population density consistent with the theoretical limit due to oxygen diffusion. Interspecific interaction experiments showed that the presence of some bacterial strains (“residents”) on the agar particles either increased or decreased the colonization rate of other strains (“newcomers”). Comparison between an antibiotic-producing strain and its antibiotic-free mutant showed no inhibitory effect on the newcomers due to antibiotic production. On the contrary, hydrolytic activity of the antibiotic-producing strain appeared to benefit the newcomers and enhance their colonization rate. These results show that growth- and species-specific interactions have to be taken into account to adequately describe bacterial colonization of marine particles. Changes in colonization pattern due to such small-scale processes may have profound effects on the transformation and fluxes of particulate matter in the ocean. PMID:12788756

  12. Bacterial colonization of particles: growth and interactions.

    PubMed

    Grossart, Hans-Peter; Kiørboe, Thomas; Tang, Kam; Ploug, Helle

    2003-06-01

    Marine particles in the ocean are exposed to diverse bacterial communities, and colonization and growth of attached bacteria are important processes in the degradation and transformation of the particles. In an earlier study, we showed that the initial colonization of model particles by individual bacterial strains isolated from marine aggregates was a function of attachment and detachment. In the present study, we have investigated how this colonization process was further affected by growth and interspecific interactions among the bacteria. Long-term incubation experiments showed that growth dominated over attachment and detachment after a few hours in controlling the bacterial population density on agar particles. In the absence of grazing mortality, this growth led to an equilibrium population density consistent with the theoretical limit due to oxygen diffusion. Interspecific interaction experiments showed that the presence of some bacterial strains ("residents") on the agar particles either increased or decreased the colonization rate of other strains ("newcomers"). Comparison between an antibiotic-producing strain and its antibiotic-free mutant showed no inhibitory effect on the newcomers due to antibiotic production. On the contrary, hydrolytic activity of the antibiotic-producing strain appeared to benefit the newcomers and enhance their colonization rate. These results show that growth- and species-specific interactions have to be taken into account to adequately describe bacterial colonization of marine particles. Changes in colonization pattern due to such small-scale processes may have profound effects on the transformation and fluxes of particulate matter in the ocean.

  13. Material and interaction properties of selected grains and oilseeds for modeling discrete particles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Experimental investigations of grain flow can be expensive and time-consuming, but computer simulations can reduce the large effort required to evaluate the flow of grain in handling operations. Published data on material and interaction properties of selected grains and oilseeds relevant to Discret...

  14. Numerical calculations of cosmic ray cascade in the Earth's atmosphere using different particle interaction models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesterenok, A. V.; Naidenov, V. O.

    2015-12-01

    The interaction of primary cosmic rays with the Earth's atmosphere is investigated using the simulation toolkit GEANT4. Two reference lists of physical processes - QGSP_BIC_HP and FTFP_BERT_HP - are used in the simulations of cosmic ray cascade in the atmosphere. The cosmic ray neutron fluxes are calculated for mean level of solar activity, high geomagnetic latitudes and sea level. The calculated fluxes are compared with the published results of other analogous simulations and with experimental data.

  15. Computer modeling reveals that modifications of the histone tail charges define salt-dependent interaction of the nucleosome core particles.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ye; Lyubartsev, Alexander P; Korolev, Nikolay; Nordenskiöld, Lars

    2009-03-18

    Coarse-grained Langevin molecular dynamics computer simulations were conducted for systems that mimic solutions of nucleosome core particles (NCPs). The NCP was modeled as a negatively charged spherical particle representing the complex of DNA and the globular part of the histones combined with attached strings of connected charged beads modeling the histone tails. The size, charge, and distribution of the tails relative to the core were built to match real NCPs. Three models of NCPs were constructed to represent different extents of covalent modification on the histone tails: (nonmodified) recombinant (rNCP), acetylated (aNCP), and acetylated and phosphorylated (paNCP). The simulation cell contained 10 NCPs in a dielectric continuum with explicit mobile counterions and added salt. The NCP-NCP interaction is decisively dependent on the modification state of the histone tails and on salt conditions. Increasing the monovalent salt concentration (KCl) from salt-free to physiological concentration leads to NCP aggregation in solution for rNCP, whereas NCP associates are observed only occasionally in the system of aNCPs. In the presence of divalent salt (Mg(2+)), rNCPs form dense stable aggregates, whereas aNCPs form aggregates less frequently. Aggregates are formed via histone-tail bridging and accumulation of counterions in the regions of NCP-NCP contacts. The paNCPs do not show NCP-NCP interaction upon addition of KCl or in the presence of Mg(2+). Simulations for systems with a gradual substitution of K(+) for Mg(2+), to mimic the Mg(2+) titration of an NCP solution, were performed. The rNCP system showed stronger aggregation that occurred at lower concentrations of added Mg(2+), compared to the aNCP system. Additional molecular dynamics simulations performed with a single NCP in the simulation cell showed that detachment of the tails from the NCP core was modest under a wide range of salt concentrations. This implies that salt-induced tail dissociation of the

  16. Interaction vertex for classical spinning particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rempel, Trevor; Freidel, Laurent

    2016-08-01

    We consider a model of the classical spinning particle in which the coadjoint orbits of the Poincaré group are parametrized by two pairs of canonically conjugate four-vectors, one representing the standard position and momentum variables, and the other encoding the spinning degrees of freedom. This "dual phase space model" is shown to be a consistent theory of both massive and massless particles and allows for coupling to background fields such as electromagnetism. The on-shell action is derived and shown to be a sum of two terms, one associated with motion in spacetime, and the other with motion in "spin space." Interactions between spinning particles are studied, and a necessary and sufficient condition for consistency of a three-point vertex is established.

  17. Occupation probabilities of single particle levels using the microscopic interacting boson model: Application to some nuclei of interest in neutrinoless double-β decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotila, J.; Barea, J.

    2016-09-01

    We have developed a new method to calculate the occupancies of single particle levels in atomic nuclei. This method has been developed in the context of the microscopic interacting boson model, in which neutron and proton degrees of freedom are treated explicitly. The energies of the single particle levels constitute a very important input for the calculation of the occupancies in this method. In principle these energies can be considered as input parameters that can be fitted to reproduce the experimental occupancies. Instead of fitting, in this study we have extracted the single particle energies from experimental data on nuclei with a particle more or one particle less than a shell closure. We provide the sets of these single particle energies suitable for several major shells and apply our method to calculate the occupancies of several nuclei of interest in neutrinoless double-β decay using these sets. Our results are compared with other theoretical calculations and experimental occupancies, when available.

  18. DEM Particle Fracture Model

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Boning; Herbold, Eric B.; Homel, Michael A.; Regueiro, Richard A.

    2015-12-01

    An adaptive particle fracture model in poly-ellipsoidal Discrete Element Method is developed. The poly-ellipsoidal particle will break into several sub-poly-ellipsoids by Hoek-Brown fracture criterion based on continuum stress and the maximum tensile stress in contacts. Also Weibull theory is introduced to consider the statistics and size effects on particle strength. Finally, high strain-rate split Hopkinson pressure bar experiment of silica sand is simulated using this newly developed model. Comparisons with experiments show that our particle fracture model can capture the mechanical behavior of this experiment very well, both in stress-strain response and particle size redistribution. The effects of density and packings o the samples are also studied in numerical examples.

  19. Gup-Based and Snyder Noncommutative Algebras, Relativistic Particle Models, Deformed Symmetries and Interaction: a Unified Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pramanik, Souvik; Ghosh, Subir

    2013-08-01

    We have developed a unified scheme for studying noncommutative algebras based on generalized uncertainty principle (GUP) and Snyder form in a relativistically covariant point particle Lagrangian (or symplectic) framework. Even though the GUP-based algebra and Snyder algebra are very distinct, the more involved latter algebra emerges from an approximation of the Lagrangian model of the former algebra. Deformed Poincaré generators for the systems that keep space-time symmetries of the relativistic particle models have been studied thoroughly. From a purely constrained dynamical analysis perspective the models studied here are very rich and provide insights on how to consistently construct approximate models from the exact ones when nonlinear constraints are present in the system. We also study dynamics of the GUP particle in presence of external electromagnetic field.

  20. Gup-Based and Snyder Noncommutative Algebras, Relativistic Particle Models, Deformed Symmetries and Interaction: a Unified Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pramanik, Souvik; Ghosh, Subir

    2013-10-01

    We have developed a unified scheme for studying noncommutative algebras based on generalized uncertainty principle (GUP) and Snyder form in a relativistically covariant point particle Lagrangian (or symplectic) framework. Even though the GUP-based algebra and Snyder algebra are very distinct, the more involved latter algebra emerges from an approximation of the Lagrangian model of the former algebra. Deformed Poincaré generators for the systems that keep space-time symmetries of the relativistic particle models have been studied thoroughly. From a purely constrained dynamical analysis perspective the models studied here are very rich and provide insights on how to consistently construct approximate models from the exact ones when nonlinear constraints are present in the system. We also study dynamics of the GUP particle in presence of external electromagnetic field.

  1. A model for the distribution of particle flux in the mid-water column controlled by subsurface biotic interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, George A.; Burd, Adrian B.

    The sub-euphotic zone water column is important in controlling the downward transport of material falling from the surface waters. Descriptions of the carbon flux as a function of depth have focused on empirical relationships that neglect biological processes that might control them. We develop here a series of simple models of the region that describe changes in flux in terms of the population dynamics of a particle feeder and its predator. One model predicts that the flux and predator concentration at steady state decrease exponentially with depth while the concentration of the particle feeders is constant; a second predicts that flux, particle feeder, and predator concentrations are proportional and decrease at rates that are approximately inversely proportional to depth. Away from steady state, variations in particle flux leaving the surface can induce oscillations in the near-surface animal populations but not the deeper populations. As a result of the animal oscillations associated with the surface flux variations, there can be large swings in the deep vertical particle flux that are not synchronized to the surface variations for one model formulation; a second formulation predicts that fluctuations in surface flux are damped out near the bottom. The differences in predictions for the various models make it possible to verify the utility of one or the other formulation.

  2. Three-dimensional particle-in-cell modeling of terahertz gyrotrons with cylindrical and planar configurations of the interaction space

    SciTech Connect

    Zaslavsky, V. Yu.; Ginzburg, N. S.; Glyavin, M. Yu.; Zheleznov, I. V.; Zotova, I. V.

    2013-04-15

    We perform 3D particle-in-cell simulations of terahertz gyrotrons with two different configurations of the interaction space. For a gyrotron with conventional cylindrical configuration of the interaction cavity, we demonstrate reasonable agreement between simulations and experimental results, including output frequency, structure of the higher-order operating mode (TE{sub 17,4}), output power, and ohmic losses. For a novel planar gyrotron scheme with transverse energy extraction, a possibility of further increasing the oversized factor with the single-mode operation regime retained is shown. Frequency detuning by mechanical variation of the gap between waveguide plates is also demonstrated.

  3. Energy exchange in systems of particles with nonreciprocal interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Vaulina, O. S.; Lisina, I. I. Lisin, E. A.

    2015-10-15

    A model is proposed to describe the sources of additional kinetic energy and its redistribution in systems of particles with a nonreciprocal interaction. The proposed model is shown to explain the qualitative specific features of the dust particle dynamics in the sheath region of an RF discharge. Prominence is given to the systems of particles with a quasi-dipole–dipole interaction, which is similar to the interaction induced by the ion focusing effects that occur in experiments on a laboratory dusty plasma, and with the shadow interaction caused by thermophoretic forces and Le Sage’s forces.

  4. Planckian Interacting Massive Particles as Dark Matter.

    PubMed

    Garny, Mathias; Sandora, McCullen; Sloth, Martin S

    2016-03-11

    The standard model could be self-consistent up to the Planck scale according to the present measurements of the Higgs boson mass and top quark Yukawa coupling. It is therefore possible that new physics is only coupled to the standard model through Planck suppressed higher dimensional operators. In this case the weakly interacting massive particle miracle is a mirage, and instead minimality as dictated by Occam's razor would indicate that dark matter is related to the Planck scale, where quantum gravity is anyway expected to manifest itself. Assuming within this framework that dark matter is a Planckian interacting massive particle, we show that the most natural mass larger than 0.01M_{p} is already ruled out by the absence of tensor modes in the cosmic microwave background (CMB). This also indicates that we expect tensor modes in the CMB to be observed soon for this type of minimal dark matter model. Finally, we touch upon the Kaluza-Klein graviton mode as a possible realization of this scenario within UV complete models, as well as further potential signatures and peculiar properties of this type of dark matter candidate. This paradigm therefore leads to a subtle connection between quantum gravity, the physics of primordial inflation, and the nature of dark matter.

  5. Planckian Interacting Massive Particles as Dark Matter.

    PubMed

    Garny, Mathias; Sandora, McCullen; Sloth, Martin S

    2016-03-11

    The standard model could be self-consistent up to the Planck scale according to the present measurements of the Higgs boson mass and top quark Yukawa coupling. It is therefore possible that new physics is only coupled to the standard model through Planck suppressed higher dimensional operators. In this case the weakly interacting massive particle miracle is a mirage, and instead minimality as dictated by Occam's razor would indicate that dark matter is related to the Planck scale, where quantum gravity is anyway expected to manifest itself. Assuming within this framework that dark matter is a Planckian interacting massive particle, we show that the most natural mass larger than 0.01M_{p} is already ruled out by the absence of tensor modes in the cosmic microwave background (CMB). This also indicates that we expect tensor modes in the CMB to be observed soon for this type of minimal dark matter model. Finally, we touch upon the Kaluza-Klein graviton mode as a possible realization of this scenario within UV complete models, as well as further potential signatures and peculiar properties of this type of dark matter candidate. This paradigm therefore leads to a subtle connection between quantum gravity, the physics of primordial inflation, and the nature of dark matter. PMID:27015472

  6. Planckian Interacting Massive Particles as Dark Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garny, Mathias; Sandora, McCullen; Sloth, Martin S.

    2016-03-01

    The standard model could be self-consistent up to the Planck scale according to the present measurements of the Higgs boson mass and top quark Yukawa coupling. It is therefore possible that new physics is only coupled to the standard model through Planck suppressed higher dimensional operators. In this case the weakly interacting massive particle miracle is a mirage, and instead minimality as dictated by Occam's razor would indicate that dark matter is related to the Planck scale, where quantum gravity is anyway expected to manifest itself. Assuming within this framework that dark matter is a Planckian interacting massive particle, we show that the most natural mass larger than 0.01 Mp is already ruled out by the absence of tensor modes in the cosmic microwave background (CMB). This also indicates that we expect tensor modes in the CMB to be observed soon for this type of minimal dark matter model. Finally, we touch upon the Kaluza-Klein graviton mode as a possible realization of this scenario within UV complete models, as well as further potential signatures and peculiar properties of this type of dark matter candidate. This paradigm therefore leads to a subtle connection between quantum gravity, the physics of primordial inflation, and the nature of dark matter.

  7. Interactions between Janus particles and membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Hong-Ming; Ma, Yu-Qiang

    2012-02-01

    Understanding how nanoparticles interact with cell membranes is of great importance in drug/gene delivery. In this paper, we investigate the interactions between Janus particles and membranes by using dissipative particle dynamics, and find that there exist two different modes (i.e., insertion and engulfment) in the Janus particle-membrane interactions. The initial orientation and properties of Janus particles have an important impact on the interactions. When the hydrophilic part of the particle is close to the membrane or the particle has a larger section area and higher hydrophilic coverage, the particle is more likely to be engulfed by the membrane. We also provide insights into the interactions between Janus particles and membranes containing lipid rafts, and find that a Janus particle could easily detach from a membrane after it is engulfed by the raft. The present study suggests a potential way to translocate Janus particles through membranes, which may give some significant suggestions on future nanoparticle design for drug delivery.

  8. Free-Propagator Reweighting Integrator for Single-Particle Dynamics in Reaction-Diffusion Models of Heterogeneous Protein-Protein Interaction Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Margaret E.; Hummer, Gerhard

    2014-07-01

    We present a new algorithm for simulating reaction-diffusion equations at single-particle resolution. Our algorithm is designed to be both accurate and simple to implement, and to be applicable to large and heterogeneous systems, including those arising in systems biology applications. We combine the use of the exact Green's function for a pair of reacting particles with the approximate free-diffusion propagator for position updates to particles. Trajectory reweighting in our free-propagator reweighting (FPR) method recovers the exact association rates for a pair of interacting particles at all times. FPR simulations of many-body systems accurately reproduce the theoretically known dynamic behavior for a variety of different reaction types. FPR does not suffer from the loss of efficiency common to other path-reweighting schemes, first, because corrections apply only in the immediate vicinity of reacting particles and, second, because by construction the average weight factor equals one upon leaving this reaction zone. FPR applications include the modeling of pathways and networks of protein-driven processes where reaction rates can vary widely and thousands of proteins may participate in the formation of large assemblies. With a limited amount of bookkeeping necessary to ensure proper association rates for each reactant pair, FPR can account for changes to reaction rates or diffusion constants as a result of reaction events. Importantly, FPR can also be extended to physical descriptions of protein interactions with long-range forces, as we demonstrate here for Coulombic interactions.

  9. Interactions between protein coated particles and polymer surfaces studied with the rotating particles probe.

    PubMed

    Kemper, M; Spridon, D; van IJzendoorn, L J; Prins, M W J

    2012-05-29

    Nonspecific interactions between proteins and polymer surfaces have to be minimized in order to control the performance of biosensors based on immunoassays with particle labels. In this paper we investigate these nonspecific interactions by analyzing the response of protein coated magnetic particles to a rotating magnetic field while the particles are in nanometer vicinity to a polymer surface. We use the fraction of nonrotating (bound) particles as a probe for the interaction between the particles and the surface. As a model system, we study the interaction of myoglobin coated particles with oxidized polystyrene surfaces. We measure the interaction as a function of the ionic strength of the solution, varying the oxidation time of the polystyrene and the pH of the solution. To describe the data we propose a model in which particles bind to the polymer by crossing an energy barrier. The height of this barrier depends on the ionic strength of the solution and two interaction parameters. The fraction of nonrotating particles as a function of ionic strength shows a characteristic shape that can be explained with a normal distribution of energy barrier heights. This method to determine interaction parameters paves the way for further studies to quantify the roles of protein coated particles and polymers in their mutual nonspecific interactions in different matrixes.

  10. Particle bed reactor modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sapyta, Joe; Reid, Hank; Walton, Lew

    1993-01-01

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: particle bed reactor (PBR) core cross section; PBR bleed cycle; fuel and moderator flow paths; PBR modeling requirements; characteristics of PBR and nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) modeling; challenges for PBR and NTP modeling; thermal hydraulic computer codes; capabilities for PBR/reactor application; thermal/hydralic codes; limitations; physical correlations; comparison of predicted friction factor and experimental data; frit pressure drop testing; cold frit mask factor; decay heat flow rate; startup transient simulation; and philosophy of systems modeling.

  11. Computational Fluid Dynamics Study of Molten Steel Flow Patterns and Particle-Wall Interactions Inside a Slide-Gate Nozzle by a Hybrid Turbulent Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadi-Ghaleni, Mahdi; Asle Zaeem, Mohsen; Smith, Jeffrey D.; O'Malley, Ronald

    2016-10-01

    Melt flow patterns and turbulence inside a slide-gate throttled submerged entry nozzle (SEN) were studied using Detached-Eddy Simulation (DES) model, which is a combination of Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) and Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) models. The DES switching criterion between RANS and LES was investigated to closely reproduce the flow structures of low and high turbulence regions similar to RANS and LES simulations, respectively. The melt flow patterns inside the nozzle were determined by k- ɛ (a RANS model), LES, and DES turbulent models, and convergence studies were performed to ensure reliability of the results. Results showed that the DES model has significant advantages over the standard k- ɛ model in transient simulations and in regions containing flow separation from the nozzle surface. Moreover, due to applying a hybrid approach, DES uses a RANS model at wall boundaries which resolves the extremely fine mesh requirement of LES simulations, and therefore it is computationally more efficient. Investigation of particle distribution inside the nozzle and particle adhesion to the nozzle wall also reveals that the DES model simulations predict more particle-wall interactions compared to LES model.

  12. Computational Fluid Dynamics Study of Molten Steel Flow Patterns and Particle-Wall Interactions Inside a Slide-Gate Nozzle by a Hybrid Turbulent Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadi-Ghaleni, Mahdi; Asle Zaeem, Mohsen; Smith, Jeffrey D.; O'Malley, Ronald

    2016-06-01

    Melt flow patterns and turbulence inside a slide-gate throttled submerged entry nozzle (SEN) were studied using Detached-Eddy Simulation (DES) model, which is a combination of Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) and Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) models. The DES switching criterion between RANS and LES was investigated to closely reproduce the flow structures of low and high turbulence regions similar to RANS and LES simulations, respectively. The melt flow patterns inside the nozzle were determined by k-ɛ (a RANS model), LES, and DES turbulent models, and convergence studies were performed to ensure reliability of the results. Results showed that the DES model has significant advantages over the standard k-ɛ model in transient simulations and in regions containing flow separation from the nozzle surface. Moreover, due to applying a hybrid approach, DES uses a RANS model at wall boundaries which resolves the extremely fine mesh requirement of LES simulations, and therefore it is computationally more efficient. Investigation of particle distribution inside the nozzle and particle adhesion to the nozzle wall also reveals that the DES model simulations predict more particle-wall interactions compared to LES model.

  13. Origin of particle accumulation structures in liquid bridges: Particle-boundary-interactions versus inertia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muldoon, Frank H.; Kuhlmann, Hendrik C.

    2016-07-01

    The formation of particle-accumulation structures in the flow in a cylindrical liquid bridge driven by the thermocapillary effect is studied with the aim of determining the physical mechanism which forms the structures. The flow is modeled using the incompressible Navier-Stokes and energy equations with the assumption of constant fluid properties except for surface tension, which is assumed to depend linearly on temperature. Different models for the motion of small non-interacting spherical particles at low concentration are employed, taking into account particle inertia due to density differences between fluid and particles and the restricted particle motion near the boundaries of the flow domain. Attention is focused on differences in formation time between particle-accumulation structures arising as a result of inertial effects only, particle-boundary-interaction effects only, and a combination of the two.

  14. Algorithm for Computing Particle/Surface Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, David W.

    2009-01-01

    An algorithm has been devised for predicting the behaviors of sparsely spatially distributed particles impinging on a solid surface in a rarefied atmosphere. Under the stated conditions, prior particle-transport models in which (1) dense distributions of particles are treated as continuum fluids; or (2) sparse distributions of particles are considered to be suspended in and to diffuse through fluid streams are not valid.

  15. Charged particle therapy: the physics of interaction.

    PubMed

    Lomax, Antony J

    2009-01-01

    Particle therapy has a long and distinguished history with more than 50,000 patients having been treated, mainly with high-energy proton therapy. Particularly, for proton therapy, there is an increasing interest in exploiting the physical characteristics of charged particles for further improving the potential of radiation therapy. In this article, we review the most important interactions of charged particles with matter and describe the basic physical principles that underlie why particle beams behave the way they do and why such a behavior could bring many benefits in radiation therapy.

  16. Collective Cell Motion in an Epithelial Sheet Can Be Quantitatively Described by a Stochastic Interacting Particle Model

    PubMed Central

    Cochet, Olivier; Grasland-Mongrain, Erwan; Silberzan, Pascal; Hakim, Vincent

    2013-01-01

    Modelling the displacement of thousands of cells that move in a collective way is required for the simulation and the theoretical analysis of various biological processes. Here, we tackle this question in the controlled setting where the motion of Madin-Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK) cells in a confluent epithelium is triggered by the unmasking of free surface. We develop a simple model in which cells are described as point particles with a dynamic based on the two premises that, first, cells move in a stochastic manner and, second, tend to adapt their motion to that of their neighbors. Detailed comparison to experimental data show that the model provides a quantitatively accurate description of cell motion in the epithelium bulk at early times. In addition, inclusion of model “leader” cells with modified characteristics, accounts for the digitated shape of the interface which develops over the subsequent hours, providing that leader cells invade free surface more easily than other cells and coordinate their motion with their followers. The previously-described progression of the epithelium border is reproduced by the model and quantitatively explained. PMID:23505356

  17. Gyrokinetic particle simulation model

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, W.W.

    1986-07-01

    A new type of particle simulation model based on the gyrophase-averaged Vlasov and Poisson equations is presented. The reduced system, in which particle gyrations are removed from the equations of motion while the finite Larmor radius effects are still preserved, is most suitable for studying low frequency microinstabilities in magnetized plasmas. It is feasible to simulate an elongated system (L/sub parallel/ >> L/sub perpendicular/) with a three-dimensional grid using the present model without resorting to the usual mode expansion technique, since there is essentially no restriction on the size of ..delta..x/sub parallel/ in a gyrokinetic plasma. The new approach also enables us to further separate the time and spatial scales of the simulation from those associated with global transport through the use of multiple spatial scale expansion. Thus, the model can be a very efficient tool for studying anomalous transport problems related to steady-state drift-wave turbulence in magnetic confinement devices. It can also be applied to other areas of plasma physics.

  18. Semiquantal approach to finite systems of interacting particles.

    PubMed

    Borgonovi, F; Celardo, G; Izrailev, F M; Casati, G

    2002-02-01

    A novel approach is suggested for the statistical description of quantum systems of interacting particles. We show that the occupation numbers for single-particle states can be represented as a convolution of a classical analog of the eigenstate, with the quantum occupation number for noninteracting particles. The latter takes into account the wave function symmetry and depends on the unperturbed energy spectrum only. As a result, the distribution of occupation numbers n(s) can be found even for a large number of interacting particles. Using the model of interacting spins, we demonstrate that this approach gives a correct description of n(s) even in deep quantum regions with few single-particle orbitals.

  19. Kinetic model framework for aerosol and cloud surface chemistry and gas-particle interactions: Part 1 - general equations, parameters, and terminology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pöschl, U.; Rudich, Y.; Ammann, M.

    2005-04-01

    Aerosols and clouds play central roles in atmospheric chemistry and physics, climate, air pollution, and public health. The mechanistic understanding and predictability of aerosol and cloud properties, interactions, transformations, and effects are, however, still very limited. This is due not only to the limited availability of measurement data, but also to the limited applicability and compatibility of model formalisms used for the analysis, interpretation, and description of heterogeneous and multiphase processes. To support the investigation and elucidation of atmospheric aerosol and cloud surface chemistry and gas-particle interactions, we present a comprehensive kinetic model framework with consistent and unambiguous terminology and universally applicable rate equations and parameters. It allows to describe mass transport and chemical reactions at the gas-particle interface and to link aerosol and cloud surface processes with gas phase and particle bulk processes in systems with multiple chemical components and competing physicochemical processes. The key elements and essential aspects of the presented framework are: a simple and descriptive double-layer surface model (sorption layer and quasi-static layer); straightforward flux-based mass balance and rate equations; clear separation of mass transport and chemical reactions; well-defined rate parameters (uptake and accommodation coefficients, reaction and transport rate coefficients); clear distinction between gas phase, gas-surface, and surface-bulk transport (gas phase diffusion correction, surface and bulk accommodation); clear distinction between gas-surface, surface layer, and surface-bulk reactions (Langmuir-Hinshelwood and Eley-Rideal mechanisms); mechanistic description of concentration and time dependencies; flexible inclusion/omission of chemical species and physicochemical processes; flexible convolution/deconvolution of species and processes; and full compatibility with traditional resistor model

  20. Molecular modeling in structural nano-toxicology: Interactions of nano-particles with nano-machinery of cells

    PubMed Central

    Yanamala, Naveena; Kagan, Valerian E.; Shvedova, Anna A.

    2013-01-01

    Over the past two decades, nanotechnology has emerged as a key player in various disciplines of science and technology. Some of the most exciting applications are in the field of biomedicine – for theranostics (for combined diagnostic and therapeutic purposes) as well as for exploration of biological systems. A detailed understanding of the molecular details of interactions between nanoparticles and biological nano-machinery – macromolecules, membranes, and intracellular organelles - is crucial for obtaining adequate information on mechanisms of action of nanomaterials as well as a perspective on the long term effects of these materials and their possible toxicological outcomes. This review focuses on the use of structure-based computational molecular modeling as a tool to understand and to predict the interactions between nanomaterials and nano-biosystems. We review major approaches and provide examples of computational analysis of the structural principles behind such interactions. A rationale on how nanoparticles of different sizes, shape, structure and chemical properties can affect the organization and functions of nano-machinery of cells is also presented. PMID:23726945

  1. Interactive methods for exploring particle simulation data

    SciTech Connect

    Co, Christopher S.; Friedman, Alex; Grote, David P.; Vay, Jean-Luc; Bethel, E. Wes; Joy, Kenneth I.

    2004-05-01

    In this work, we visualize high-dimensional particle simulation data using a suite of scatter plot-based visualizations coupled with interactive selection tools. We use traditional 2D and 3D projection scatter plots as well as a novel oriented disk rendering style to convey various information about the data. Interactive selection tools allow physicists to manually classify ''interesting'' sets of particles that are highlighted across multiple, linked views of the data. The power of our application is the ability to correspond new visual representations of the simulation data with traditional, well understood visualizations. This approach supports the interactive exploration of the high-dimensional space while promoting discovery of new particle behavior.

  2. An advanced coarse-grained nucleosome core particle model for computer simulations of nucleosome-nucleosome interactions under varying ionic conditions.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yanping; Korolev, Nikolay; Lyubartsev, Alexander P; Nordenskiöld, Lars

    2013-01-01

    In the eukaryotic cell nucleus, DNA exists as chromatin, a compact but dynamic complex with histone proteins. The first level of DNA organization is the linear array of nucleosome core particles (NCPs). The NCP is a well-defined complex of 147 bp DNA with an octamer of histones. Interactions between NCPs are of paramount importance for higher levels of chromatin compaction. The polyelectrolyte nature of the NCP implies that nucleosome-nucleosome interactions must exhibit a great influence from both the ionic environment as well as the positively charged and highly flexible N-terminal histone tails, protruding out from the NCP. The large size of the system precludes a modelling analysis of chromatin at an all-atom level and calls for coarse-grained approximations. Here, a model of the NCP that include the globular histone core and the flexible histone tails described by one particle per each amino acid and taking into account their net charge is proposed. DNA wrapped around the histone core was approximated at the level of two base pairs represented by one bead (bases and sugar) plus four beads of charged phosphate groups. Computer simulations, using a Langevin thermostat, in a dielectric continuum with explicit monovalent (K(+)), divalent (Mg(2+)) or trivalent (Co(NH(3))(6) (3+)) cations were performed for systems with one or ten NCPs. Increase of the counterion charge results in a switch from repulsive NCP-NCP interaction in the presence of K(+), to partial aggregation with Mg(2+) and to strong mutual attraction of all 10 NCPs in the presence of CoHex(3+). The new model reproduced experimental results and the structure of the NCP-NCP contacts is in agreement with available data. Cation screening, ion-ion correlations and tail bridging contribute to the NCP-NCP attraction and the new NCP model accounts for these interactions. PMID:23418426

  3. An advanced coarse-grained nucleosome core particle model for computer simulations of nucleosome-nucleosome interactions under varying ionic conditions.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yanping; Korolev, Nikolay; Lyubartsev, Alexander P; Nordenskiöld, Lars

    2013-01-01

    In the eukaryotic cell nucleus, DNA exists as chromatin, a compact but dynamic complex with histone proteins. The first level of DNA organization is the linear array of nucleosome core particles (NCPs). The NCP is a well-defined complex of 147 bp DNA with an octamer of histones. Interactions between NCPs are of paramount importance for higher levels of chromatin compaction. The polyelectrolyte nature of the NCP implies that nucleosome-nucleosome interactions must exhibit a great influence from both the ionic environment as well as the positively charged and highly flexible N-terminal histone tails, protruding out from the NCP. The large size of the system precludes a modelling analysis of chromatin at an all-atom level and calls for coarse-grained approximations. Here, a model of the NCP that include the globular histone core and the flexible histone tails described by one particle per each amino acid and taking into account their net charge is proposed. DNA wrapped around the histone core was approximated at the level of two base pairs represented by one bead (bases and sugar) plus four beads of charged phosphate groups. Computer simulations, using a Langevin thermostat, in a dielectric continuum with explicit monovalent (K(+)), divalent (Mg(2+)) or trivalent (Co(NH(3))(6) (3+)) cations were performed for systems with one or ten NCPs. Increase of the counterion charge results in a switch from repulsive NCP-NCP interaction in the presence of K(+), to partial aggregation with Mg(2+) and to strong mutual attraction of all 10 NCPs in the presence of CoHex(3+). The new model reproduced experimental results and the structure of the NCP-NCP contacts is in agreement with available data. Cation screening, ion-ion correlations and tail bridging contribute to the NCP-NCP attraction and the new NCP model accounts for these interactions.

  4. The Interaction of Debye-Shielded Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Buss, Richard J.; Riley, Merle E.

    1999-04-01

    Macroscopic particles or solid surfaces in contact with a typical low-temperature plasma immediately charge negatively and surround themselves with an electron-depleted region of positive charge. This Debye shielding effect is involved in the Debye-Huckel theory in liquids and plasma sheath formation in the gas phase. In this report, the interaction between such screened particles is found by using the same basic approximation that is used in constructing the Debye shielding potential itself. The results demonstrate that a significant attraction exists between the particles, and, if conditions are right, this attractive force can contribute to the generation of particulate plasma crystals.

  5. Thermoelectricity of interacting particles: a numerical approach.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shunda; Wang, Jiao; Casati, Giulio; Benenti, Giuliano

    2015-09-01

    A method for computing the thermopower in interacting systems is proposed. This approach, which relies on Monte Carlo simulations, is illustrated first for a diatomic chain of hard-point elastically colliding particles and then in the case of a one-dimensional gas with (screened) Coulomb interparticle interaction. Numerical simulations up to N>10^{4} particles confirm the general theoretical arguments for momentum-conserving systems and show that the thermoelectric figure of merit increases linearly with the system size. PMID:26465458

  6. Modeling and simulation of bubbles and particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorgan, Andrew James

    The interaction of particles, drops, and bubbles with a fluid (gas or liquid) is important in a number of engineering problems. The present works seeks to extend the understanding of these interactions through numerical simulation. To model many of these relevant flows, it is often important to consider finite Reynolds number effects on drag, lift, torque and history force. Thus, the present work develops an equation of motion for spherical particles with a no-slip surface based on theoretical analysis, experimental data and surface-resolved simulations which is appropriate for dispersed multiphase flows. The equation of motion is then extended to account for finite particle size. This extension is critical for particles which will have a size significantly larger than the grid cell size, particularly important for bubbles and low-density particles. The extension to finite particle size is accomplished through spatial-averaging (both volume-based and surface-based) of the continuous flow properties. This averaging is consistent with the Faxen limit for solid spheres at small Reynolds numbers and added mass and fluid stress forces at inviscid limits. Further work is needed for more quantitative assessment of the truncation terms in complex flows. The new equation of motion is then used to assess the relative importance of each force in the context of two low-density particles (an air bubble and a sand particle) in a boundary layer of water. This relative importance is measured by considering effects on particle concentration, visualization of particle-fluid interactions, diffusion rates, and Lagrangian statistics collected along the particle trajectory. Strong added mass and stress gradient effects are observed for the bubble but these were found to have little effect on a sand particle of equal diameter. Lift was shown to be important for both conditions provided the terminal velocity was aligned with the flow direction. The influence of lift was found to be

  7. Discrete Element Modeling of Triboelectrically Charged Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hogue, Michael D.; Calle, Carlos I.; Weitzman, Peter S.; Curry, David R.

    2008-01-01

    Tribocharging of particles is common in many processes including fine powder handling and mixing, printer toner transport and dust extraction. In a lunar environment with its high vacuum and lack of water, electrostatic forces are an important factor to consider when designing and operating equipment. Dust mitigation and management is critical to safe and predictable performance of people and equipment. The extreme nature of lunar conditions makes it difficult and costly to carry out experiments on earth which are necessary to better understand how particles gather and transfer charge between each other and with equipment surfaces. DEM (Discrete Element Modeling) provides an excellent virtual laboratory for studying tribocharging of particles as well as for design of devices for dust mitigation and for other purposes related to handling and processing of lunar regolith. Theoretical and experimental work has been performed pursuant to incorporating screened Coulombic electrostatic forces into EDEM, a commercial DEM software package. The DEM software is used to model the trajectories of large numbers of particles for industrial particulate handling and processing applications and can be coupled with other solvers and numerical models to calculate particle interaction with surrounding media and force fields. While simple Coulombic force between two particles is well understood, its operation in an ensemble of particles is more complex. When the tribocharging of particles and surfaces due to frictional contact is also considered, it is necessary to consider longer range of interaction of particles in response to electrostatic charging. The standard DEM algorithm accounts for particle mechanical properties and inertia as a function of particle shape and mass. If fluid drag is neglected, then particle dynamics are governed by contact between particles, between particles and equipment surfaces and gravity forces. Consideration of particle charge and any tribocharging and

  8. Internal waves interacting with particles in suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micard, Diane

    2016-04-01

    Internal waves are produced as a consequence of the dynamic balance between buoy- ancy and gravity forces when a particle of fluid is vertically displaced in a stable stratified environment. Geophysical systems such as ocean and atmosphere are naturally stratified and therefore suitable for internal waves to propagate. Furthermore, these two environ- ments stock a vast amount of particles in suspension, which present a large spectrum of physical properties (size, density, shape), and can be organic, mineral or pollutant agents. Therefore, it is reasonable to expect that internal waves will have an active effect over the dynamics of these particles. In order to study the interaction of internal waves and suspended particles, an ide- alized experimental setup has been implemented. A linear stratification is produced in a 80×40×17 cm3 tank, in which two dimensional plane waves are created thanks to the inno- vative wave generator GOAL. In addition, a particle injector has been developed to produce a vertical column of particles within the fluid, displaying the same two-dimensional sym- metry as the waves. The particle injector allows to control the volumic fraction of particles and the size of the column. The presence of internal waves passing through the column of particles allowed to observe two main effects: The column oscillates around an equilibrium position (which is observed in both, the contours an the interior of the column), and the column is displaced as a whole. The column is displaced depending on the characteristics of the column, the gradient of the density, and the intensity and frequency of the wave. When displaced, the particles within the column are sucked towards the source of waves. The direction of the displacement of the column is explained by computing the effect of the Lagrangian drift generated by the wave over the time the particles stay in the wave beam before settling.

  9. Dissipative Particle Dynamics interaction parameters from ab initio calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sepehr, Fatemeh; Paddison, Stephen J.

    2016-02-01

    Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) is a commonly employed coarse-grained method to model complex systems. Presented here is a pragmatic approach to connect atomic-scale information to the meso-scale interactions defined between the DPD particles or beads. Specifically, electronic structure calculations were utilized for the calculation of the DPD pair-wise interaction parameters. An implicit treatment of the electrostatic interactions for charged beads is introduced. The method is successfully applied to derive the parameters for a hydrated perfluorosulfonic acid ionomer with absorbed vanadium cations.

  10. Wave-particle Interactions In Rotating Mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Abraham J. Fetterman and Nathaniel J. Fisch

    2011-01-11

    Wave-particle interactions in E×B rotating plasmas feature an unusual effect: particles are diffused by waves in both potential energy and kinetic energy. This wave-particle interaction generalizes the alpha channeling effect, in which radio frequency waves are used to remove alpha particles collisionlessly at low energy. In rotating plasmas, the alpha particles may be removed at low energy through the loss cone, and the energy lost may be transferred to the radial electric field. This eliminates the need for electrodes in the mirror throat, which have presented serious technical issues in past rotating plasma devices. A particularly simple way to achieve this effect is to use a high azimuthal mode number perturbation on the magnetic field. Rotation can also be sustained by waves in plasmas without a kinetic energy source. This type of wave has been considered for plasma centrifuges used for isotope separation. Energy may also be transferred from the electric field to particles or waves, which may be useful for ion heating and energy generation.

  11. Conformal invariance in noncommutative geometry and mutually interacting Snyder particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pramanik, Souvik; Ghosh, Subir; Pal, Probir

    2014-11-01

    A system of relativistic Snyder particles with mutual two-body interaction that lives in a noncommutative Snyder geometry is studied. The underlying novel symplectic structure is a coupled and extended version of (single-particle) Snyder algebra. In a recent work by Casalbuoni and Gomis [Phys. Rev. D 90, 026001 (2014)], a system of interacting conventional particles (in commutative spacetime) was studied with special emphasis on its conformal invariance. Proceeding along the same lines, we have shown that our interacting Snyder particle model is also conformally invariant. Moreover, the conformal Killing vectors have been constructed. Our main emphasis is on the Hamiltonian analysis of the conformal symmetry generators. We demonstrate that the Lorentz algebra remains undeformed, but validity of the full conformal algebra requires further restrictions.

  12. Granular Segregation Driven by Particle Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozano, C.; Zuriguel, I.; Garcimartín, A.; Mullin, T.

    2015-05-01

    We report the results of an experimental study of particle-particle interactions in a horizontally shaken granular layer that undergoes a second order phase transition from a binary gas to a segregation liquid as the packing fraction C is increased. By focusing on the behavior of individual particles, the effect of C is studied on (1) the process of cluster formation, (2) cluster dynamics, and (3) cluster destruction. The outcomes indicate that the segregation is driven by two mechanisms: attraction between particles with the same properties and random motion with a characteristic length that is inversely proportional to C . All clusters investigated are found to be transient and the probability distribution functions of the separation times display a power law tail, indicating that the splitting probability decreases with time.

  13. Granular segregation driven by particle interactions.

    PubMed

    Lozano, C; Zuriguel, I; Garcimartín, A; Mullin, T

    2015-05-01

    We report the results of an experimental study of particle-particle interactions in a horizontally shaken granular layer that undergoes a second order phase transition from a binary gas to a segregation liquid as the packing fraction C is increased. By focusing on the behavior of individual particles, the effect of C is studied on (1) the process of cluster formation, (2) cluster dynamics, and (3) cluster destruction. The outcomes indicate that the segregation is driven by two mechanisms: attraction between particles with the same properties and random motion with a characteristic length that is inversely proportional to C. All clusters investigated are found to be transient and the probability distribution functions of the separation times display a power law tail, indicating that the splitting probability decreases with time.

  14. Polarizable water model for Dissipative Particle Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pivkin, Igor; Peter, Emanuel

    2015-11-01

    Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) is an efficient particle-based method for modeling mesoscopic behavior of fluid systems. DPD forces conserve the momentum resulting in a correct description of hydrodynamic interactions. Polarizability has been introduced into some coarse-grained particle-based simulation methods; however it has not been done with DPD before. We developed a new polarizable coarse-grained water model for DPD, which employs long-range electrostatics and Drude oscillators. In this talk, we will present the model and its applications in simulations of membrane systems, where polarization effects play an essential role.

  15. Particle-bubble interaction inside a Hele-Shaw cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Peng; Mines, John M.; Lee, Sungyon; Jung, Sunghwan

    2016-08-01

    Hydrodynamic interactions between air bubbles and particles have wide applications in multiphase separation and reaction processes. In the present work, we explore the fundamental mechanism of such complex processes by studying the collision of a single bubble with a fixed solid particle inside a Hele-Shaw cell. Physical experiments show that an air bubble either splits or slides around the particle depending on the initial transverse distance between the bubble and particle centroids. An air bubble splits into two daughter bubbles at small transverse distances, and slides around the particle at large distances. In order to predict the critical transverse distance that separates these two behaviors, we also develop a theoretical model by estimating the rate of the bubble volume transfer from one side of the particle to the other based on Darcy's law, which is in good agreement with experiments.

  16. Particle-bubble interaction inside a Hele-Shaw cell.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Mines, John M; Lee, Sungyon; Jung, Sunghwan

    2016-08-01

    Hydrodynamic interactions between air bubbles and particles have wide applications in multiphase separation and reaction processes. In the present work, we explore the fundamental mechanism of such complex processes by studying the collision of a single bubble with a fixed solid particle inside a Hele-Shaw cell. Physical experiments show that an air bubble either splits or slides around the particle depending on the initial transverse distance between the bubble and particle centroids. An air bubble splits into two daughter bubbles at small transverse distances, and slides around the particle at large distances. In order to predict the critical transverse distance that separates these two behaviors, we also develop a theoretical model by estimating the rate of the bubble volume transfer from one side of the particle to the other based on Darcy's law, which is in good agreement with experiments. PMID:27627397

  17. Hydrodynamic interaction between particles near elastic interfaces.

    PubMed

    Daddi-Moussa-Ider, Abdallah; Gekle, Stephan

    2016-07-01

    We present an analytical calculation of the hydrodynamic interaction between two spherical particles near an elastic interface such as a cell membrane. The theory predicts the frequency dependent self- and pair-mobilities accounting for the finite particle size up to the 5th order in the ratio between particle diameter and wall distance as well as between diameter and interparticle distance. We find that particle motion towards a membrane with pure bending resistance always leads to mutual repulsion similar as in the well-known case of a hard-wall. In the vicinity of a membrane with shearing resistance, however, we observe an attractive interaction in a certain parameter range which is in contrast to the behavior near a hard wall. This attraction might facilitate surface chemical reactions. Furthermore, we show that there exists a frequency range in which the pair-mobility for perpendicular motion exceeds its bulk value, leading to short-lived superdiffusive behavior. Using the analytical particle mobilities we compute collective and relative diffusion coefficients. The appropriateness of the approximations in our analytical results is demonstrated by corresponding boundary integral simulations which are in excellent agreement with the theoretical predictions. PMID:27394123

  18. Hydrodynamic interaction between particles near elastic interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daddi-Moussa-Ider, Abdallah; Gekle, Stephan

    2016-07-01

    We present an analytical calculation of the hydrodynamic interaction between two spherical particles near an elastic interface such as a cell membrane. The theory predicts the frequency dependent self- and pair-mobilities accounting for the finite particle size up to the 5th order in the ratio between particle diameter and wall distance as well as between diameter and interparticle distance. We find that particle motion towards a membrane with pure bending resistance always leads to mutual repulsion similar as in the well-known case of a hard-wall. In the vicinity of a membrane with shearing resistance, however, we observe an attractive interaction in a certain parameter range which is in contrast to the behavior near a hard wall. This attraction might facilitate surface chemical reactions. Furthermore, we show that there exists a frequency range in which the pair-mobility for perpendicular motion exceeds its bulk value, leading to short-lived superdiffusive behavior. Using the analytical particle mobilities we compute collective and relative diffusion coefficients. The appropriateness of the approximations in our analytical results is demonstrated by corresponding boundary integral simulations which are in excellent agreement with the theoretical predictions.

  19. Simulation of hydrodynamically interacting particles confined by a spherical cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aponte-Rivera, Christian; Zia, Roseanna N.

    2016-06-01

    We present a theoretical framework to model the behavior of a concentrated colloidal dispersion confined inside a spherical cavity. Prior attempts to model such behavior were limited to a single enclosed particle and attempts to enlarge such models to two or more particles have seen limited success owing to the challenges of accurately modeling many-body and singular hydrodynamic interactions. To overcome these difficulties, we have developed a set of hydrodynamic mobility functions that couple particle motion with hydrodynamic traction moments that, when inverted and combined with near-field resistance functions, form a complete coupling tensor that accurately captures both the far-field and near-field physics and is valid for an arbitrary number of spherical particles enclosed by a spherical cavity of arbitrary relative size a /R , where a and R are the particle and cavity size, respectively. This framework is then utilized to study the effect of spherical confinement on the self- and entrained motion of the colloids, for a range of particle-to-cavity size ratios. The self-motion of a finite-size enclosed particle is studied first, recovering prior results published in the literature: The hydrodynamic mobility of the particle is greatest at the center of the cavity and decays as (a /R ) /(1 -y2) , where y is the particle distance to the cavity center. Near the cavity wall, the no-slip surfaces couple strongly and mobility along the cavity radius vanishes as ξ ≡R -(a +y ) , where y is center-to-center distance from particle to cavity. Corresponding motion transverse to the cavity radius vanishes as [ln(1/ξ ) ] -1. The effect of confinement on entrainment of a particle in the flow created by the motion of others is also studied, where we find that confinement exerts a qualitative effect on the strength and anisotropy of entrainment of a passive particle dragged by the flow of a forced particle. As expected, entrainment strength decays with increased distance

  20. Kinetic model framework for aerosol and cloud surface chemistry and gas-particle interactions - Part 1: General equations, parameters, and terminology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pöschl, U.; Rudich, Y.; Ammann, M.

    2007-12-01

    Aerosols and clouds play central roles in atmospheric chemistry and physics, climate, air pollution, and public health. The mechanistic understanding and predictability of aerosol and cloud properties, interactions, transformations, and effects are, however, still very limited. This is due not only to the limited availability of measurement data, but also to the limited applicability and compatibility of model formalisms used for the analysis, interpretation, and description of heterogeneous and multiphase processes. To support the investigation and elucidation of atmospheric aerosol and cloud surface chemistry and gas-particle interactions, we present a comprehensive kinetic model framework with consistent and unambiguous terminology and universally applicable rate equations and parameters. It enables a detailed description of mass transport and chemical reactions at the gas-particle interface, and it allows linking aerosol and cloud surface processes with gas phase and particle bulk processes in systems with multiple chemical components and competing physicochemical processes. The key elements and essential aspects of the presented framework are: a simple and descriptive double-layer surface model (sorption layer and quasi-static layer); straightforward flux-based mass balance and rate equations; clear separation of mass transport and chemical reactions; well-defined and consistent rate parameters (uptake and accommodation coefficients, reaction and transport rate coefficients); clear distinction between gas phase, gas-surface, and surface-bulk transport (gas phase diffusion, surface and bulk accommodation); clear distinction between gas-surface, surface layer, and surface-bulk reactions (Langmuir-Hinshelwood and Eley-Rideal mechanisms); mechanistic description of concentration and time dependences (transient and steady-state conditions); flexible addition of unlimited numbers of chemical species and physicochemical processes; optional aggregation or resolution

  1. Effect of particle-particle interactions on the acoustic radiation force in an ultrasonic standing wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipkens, Bart; Ilinskii, Yurii A.; Zabolotskaya, Evgenia A.

    2015-10-01

    Ultrasonic standing waves are widely used for separation applications. In MEMS applications, a half wavelength standing wave field is generated perpendicular to a laminar flow. The acoustic radiation force exerted on the particle drives the particle to the center of the MEMS channel, where concentrated particles are harvested. In macro-scale applications, the ultrasonic standing wave spans multiple wavelengths. Examples of such applications are oil/water emulsion splitting [1], and blood/lipid separation [2]. In macro-scale applications, particles are typically trapped in the standing wave, resulting in clumping or coalescence of particles/droplets. Subsequent gravitational settling results in separation of the secondary phase. An often used expression for the radiation force on a particle is that derived by Gorkov [3]. The assumptions are that the particle size is small relative to the wavelength, and therefore, only monopole and dipole scattering contributions are used to calculate the radiation force. This framework seems satisfactory for MEMS scale applications where each particle is treated separately by the standing wave, and concentrations are typically low. In macro-scale applications, particle concentration is high, and particle clumping or droplet coalescence results in particle sizes not necessarily small relative to the wavelength. Ilinskii et al. developed a framework for calculation of the acoustic radiation force valid for any size particle [4]. However, this model does not take into account particle to particle effects, which can become important as particle concentration increases. It is known that an acoustic radiation force on a particle or a droplet is determined by the local field. An acoustic radiation force expression is developed that includes the effect of particle to particle interaction. The case of two neighboring particles is considered. The approach is based on sound scattering by the particles. The acoustic field at the location of

  2. Effect of particle-particle interactions on the acoustic radiation force in an ultrasonic standing wave

    SciTech Connect

    Lipkens, Bart; Ilinskii, Yurii A. Zabolotskaya, Evgenia A.

    2015-10-28

    Ultrasonic standing waves are widely used for separation applications. In MEMS applications, a half wavelength standing wave field is generated perpendicular to a laminar flow. The acoustic radiation force exerted on the particle drives the particle to the center of the MEMS channel, where concentrated particles are harvested. In macro-scale applications, the ultrasonic standing wave spans multiple wavelengths. Examples of such applications are oil/water emulsion splitting [1], and blood/lipid separation [2]. In macro-scale applications, particles are typically trapped in the standing wave, resulting in clumping or coalescence of particles/droplets. Subsequent gravitational settling results in separation of the secondary phase. An often used expression for the radiation force on a particle is that derived by Gorkov [3]. The assumptions are that the particle size is small relative to the wavelength, and therefore, only monopole and dipole scattering contributions are used to calculate the radiation force. This framework seems satisfactory for MEMS scale applications where each particle is treated separately by the standing wave, and concentrations are typically low. In macro-scale applications, particle concentration is high, and particle clumping or droplet coalescence results in particle sizes not necessarily small relative to the wavelength. Ilinskii et al. developed a framework for calculation of the acoustic radiation force valid for any size particle [4]. However, this model does not take into account particle to particle effects, which can become important as particle concentration increases. It is known that an acoustic radiation force on a particle or a droplet is determined by the local field. An acoustic radiation force expression is developed that includes the effect of particle to particle interaction. The case of two neighboring particles is considered. The approach is based on sound scattering by the particles. The acoustic field at the location of

  3. (Research in elementary particles and interactions). [1992

    SciTech Connect

    Adair, R.; Sandweiss, J.; Schmidt, M.

    1992-05-01

    Research of the Yale University groups in the areas of elementary particles and their interactions are outlined. Work on the following topics is reported: development of CDF trigger system; SSC detector development; study of heavy flavors at TPL; search for composite objects produced in relativistic heavy-ion collisions; high-energy polarized lepton-nucleon scattering; rare K{sup +} decays; unpolarized high-energy muon scattering; muon anomalous magnetic moment; theoretical high-energy physics including gauge theories, symmetry breaking, string theory, and gravitation theory; study of e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} interactions with the SLD detector at SLAC; and the production and decay of particles containing charm and beauty quarks.

  4. Interaction measurement of particles bound to a lipid membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarfati, Raphael; Dufresne, Eric

    2015-03-01

    The local shape and dynamics of the plasma membrane play important roles in many cellular processes. Local membrane deformations are often mediated by the adsorption of proteins (notably from the BAR family), and their subsequent self-assembly. The emerging hypothesis is that self-assembly arises from long-range interactions of individual proteins through the membrane's deformation field. We study these interactions in a model system of micron-sized colloidal particles adsorbed onto a lipid bilayer. We use fluorescent microscopy, optical tweezers and particle tracking to measure dissipative and conservative forces as a function of the separation between the particles. We find that particles are driven together with forces of order 100 fN and remain bound in a potential well with a stiffness of order 100 fN/micron.

  5. JSPAM: Interacting galaxies modeller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallin, John F.; Holincheck, Anthony; Harvey, Allen

    2015-11-01

    JSPAM models galaxy collisions using a restricted n-body approach to speed up computation. Instead of using a softened point-mass potential, the software supports a modified version of the three component potential created by Hernquist (1994, ApJS 86, 389). Although spherically symmetric gravitationally potentials and a Gaussian model for the bulge are used to increase computational efficiency, the potential mimics that of a fully consistent n-body model of a galaxy. Dynamical friction has been implemented in the code to improve the accuracy of close approaches between galaxies. Simulations using this code using thousands of particles over the typical interaction times of a galaxy interaction take a few seconds on modern desktop workstations, making it ideal for rapidly prototyping the dynamics of colliding galaxies. Extensive testing of the code has shown that it produces nearly identical tidal features to those from hierarchical tree codes such as Gadget but using a fraction of the computational resources. This code was used in the Galaxy Zoo: Mergers project and is very well suited for automated fitting of galaxy mergers with automated pattern fitting approaches such as genetic algorithms. Java and Fortran versions of the code are available.

  6. Effect of particle interactions on thermoremanent magnetization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newell, A. J.; Niemerg, M.; Bates, D.

    2013-12-01

    Paleomagnetism has a dizzying array of protocols for determining the strength of the Earth's magnetic field in the past from measurements of the magnetic memory in rocks. Some, such as variants of the Thellier-Thellier method, try to isolate the signal from an "ideal" fraction of magnetic minerals, discarding the contribution of "non-ideal" minerals; others, like the multi-specimen method, try to glean useful information from all of the minerals. The "ideal" remanence carriers behave like single-domain (SD) magnets with uniaxial anisotropy, and their behavior is predicted by Louis Néel's theory of thermoremanent magnetization (TRM). Non-ideal carriers are not at all well understood, but every paleointensity method relies on assumptions about their nature to either remove their signal or make use of it. One way to explore the boundary between ideal and non-ideal is to look at the behavior of SD magnets as they are brought increasingly close together, thus increasing the strength of the magnetostatic coupling between them. Magnetostatic coupling greatly increases the complexity of such a system. Instead of just two stable states, many must be found. Instead of one energy barrier, there is a network of connections between stable states over energy barriers. Instead of one rate for the relaxation of a system towards equilibrium, there are several. It is particularly difficult to find the transition states at the top of the energy barriers. We have developed software that does all of the above. A method from algebraic geometry called homotopy continuation is used to find all stable states and transition states. The software can track changes in these states with magnetic field, temperature, or other external variables. We use it to model TRM acquisition in small systems of interacting particles, and examine its behavior under various paleointensity tests.

  7. The impact of surface properties on particle-interface interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Anna; Kaz, David; McGorty, Ryan; Manoharan, Vinothan N.

    2013-03-01

    The propensity for particles to bind to oil-water interfaces was first noted by Ramsden and Pickering over a century ago, and has been attributed to the huge reduction in surface energy when a particle breaches an oil-water interface and straddles it at its equilibrium height. Since then materials on a variety of length scales have been fabricated using particles at interfaces, from Pickering emulsions to Janus particles. In these applications, it is simply assumed that the particle sits at its hugely energetically favourable equilibrium position. However, it was recently shown that the relaxation of particles towards their equilibrium position is logarithmic in time and could take months, much longer than typical experiments. Here we investigate how surface charge and particle 'hairiness' impact the interaction between micron-sized particles and oil-water interfaces, and explore a molecular kinetic theory model to help understand these results. We use digital holographic microscopy to track micron-sized particles as they approach an oil-water interface with a resolution of 2 nm in all three dimensions at up to thousands of frames per second.

  8. Numerical investigation of fluid-particle interactions for embolic stroke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Debanjan; Padilla, Jose; Shadden, Shawn C.

    2016-04-01

    Roughly one-third of all strokes are caused by an embolus traveling to a cerebral artery and blocking blood flow in the brain. The objective of this study is to gain a detailed understanding of the dynamics of embolic particles within arteries. Patient computed tomography image is used to construct a three-dimensional model of the carotid bifurcation. An idealized carotid bifurcation model of same vessel diameters was also constructed for comparison. Blood flow velocities and embolic particle trajectories are resolved using a coupled Euler-Lagrange approach. Blood is modeled as a Newtonian fluid, discretized using the finite volume method, with physiologically appropriate inflow and outflow boundary conditions. The embolus trajectory is modeled using Lagrangian particle equations accounting for embolus interaction with blood as well as vessel wall. Both one- and two-way fluid-particle coupling are considered, the latter being implemented using momentum sources augmented to the discretized flow equations. It was observed that for small-to-moderate particle sizes (relative to vessel diameters), the estimated particle distribution ratio—with and without the inclusion of two-way fluid-particle momentum exchange—were found to be similar. The maximum observed differences in distribution ratio with and without the coupling were found to be higher for the idealized bifurcation model. Additionally, the distribution was found to be reasonably matching the volumetric flow distribution for the idealized model, while a notable deviation from volumetric flow was observed in the anatomical model. It was also observed from an analysis of particle path lines that particle interaction with helical flow, characteristic of anatomical vasculature models, could play a prominent role in transport of embolic particle. The results indicate therefore that flow helicity could be an important hemodynamic indicator for analysis of embolus particle transport. Additionally, in the presence

  9. Simultaneous Eye Tracking and Blink Detection with Interactive Particle Filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Junwen; Trivedi, Mohan M.

    2007-12-01

    We present a system that simultaneously tracks eyes and detects eye blinks. Two interactive particle filters are used for this purpose, one for the closed eyes and the other one for the open eyes. Each particle filter is used to track the eye locations as well as the scales of the eye subjects. The set of particles that gives higher confidence is defined as the primary set and the other one is defined as the secondary set. The eye location is estimated by the primary particle filter, and whether the eye status is open or closed is also decided by the label of the primary particle filter. When a new frame comes, the secondary particle filter is reinitialized according to the estimates from the primary particle filter. We use autoregression models for describing the state transition and a classification-based model for measuring the observation. Tensor subspace analysis is used for feature extraction which is followed by a logistic regression model to give the posterior estimation. The performance is carefully evaluated from two aspects: the blink detection rate and the tracking accuracy. The blink detection rate is evaluated using videos from varying scenarios, and the tracking accuracy is given by comparing with the benchmark data obtained using the Vicon motion capturing system. The setup for obtaining benchmark data for tracking accuracy evaluation is presented and experimental results are shown. Extensive experimental evaluations validate the capability of the algorithm.

  10. Ultraminimal technicolor and its dark matter technicolor interacting massive particles

    SciTech Connect

    Ryttov, Thomas A.; Sannino, Francesco

    2008-12-01

    We introduce an explicit model with technifermion matter transforming according to multiple representations of the underlying technicolor gauge group. The model features simultaneously the smallest possible value of the naive S parameter and the smallest possible number of technifermions. The chiral dynamics is extremely rich. We construct the low-energy effective Lagrangian. We provide both the linearly and nonlinearly realized ones. We then embed, in a natural way, the standard model (SM) interactions within the global symmetries of the underlying gauge theory. Several low-energy composite particles are SM singlets. One of these technicolor interacting massive particles (TIMP)s is a natural cold dark matter (DM) candidate. We estimate the fraction of the mass in the universe constituted by our DM candidate over the baryon one. We show that the new TIMP, differently from earlier models, can be sufficiently light to be directly produced and studied at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC)

  11. Solvable Models of Correlated Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Zachary Nyong-Chol

    The Heisenberg spin chain with inverse-square exchange (ISE) has recently been introduced and has elevated general interest in the models with ISE. It has been known for a long time that the model is directly related to the random matrix theory. Recently, the matrix model in two -dimensional quantum gravity has also been shown to be related to the ISE model. In this thesis we show that the Bethe -ansatz-solvable, nearest-neighbor-exchange (NNE) models and the ISE model share a striking structure called the "string". Chapter 1 is a review of the Bethe ansatz, the "strings", and the ISE models. In Chapter 2 the "string" structure of one-dimensional Hubbard model eigenstates is studied numerically and is used to show the validity of thermodynamic Bethe ansatz equations (TBAE). We, furthermore, solve TBAE in a strong coupling expansion series form and obtain the thermodynamic potential which agrees with the known high temperature expansion series. We also calculate various thermodynamic quantities using our solution and provide some new features of the strongly correlated one -dimensional Hubbard model. In Chapter 3 a one-dimensional quantum N-body system of either fermions or bosons with SU(n) "spins" (or colors in particle physics language) interacting via inverse-square exchange is presented. A class of eigenstates of both the continuum and lattice version of the model Hamiltonians is constructed in terms of the Jastrow-product wave function. The class of states we construct corresponds to the ground state and the low-energy excitations of the model that can be described by the effective harmonic fluid Hamiltonian. By expanding the energy about the ground state, we find the harmonic fluid parameters (i.e., the charge, spin velocities, etc.) explicitly. The correlation exponent and the compressibility are also found. As expected, the general harmonic relation (i.e., v_ {S} = (v_{N}v_{J })^{1/2) is satisfied among the charge and the spin velocities. In Chapter 4, an

  12. Simulation of Bounce Resonance ULF Wave-Particle Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rankin, Robert; Wang, Chengrui; Sydorenko, Dmytro; Wang, Yongfu; Zong, Quigang

    2016-04-01

    Poloidal mode ultra-low-frequency (ULF) waves with high azimuthal mode number (high-m) are common throughout Earth's magnetosphere. It is speculated that substantial electric fields in these waves, on the order of tens of millivolts per metre, can energize ions and electrons efficiently via drift- and drift-bounce-resonance wave-particle interactions. We present test-particle simulations of drift-bounce resonance using a new numerical model of ULF waves. The model can use an arbitrary magnetic field and includes a realistic ionosphere with height-resolved Pedersen and Hall conductivity. An interesting finding is that fundamental mode poloidal waves in the ULF model rapidly transform into toroidal mode waves. Second harmonic high-m waves do not exhibit this behaviour. It is demonstrated that second-harmonic poloidal mode waves are very efficient at energizing ions. The test-particle simulations of bounce-resonance 2nd-harmonic wave-particle interactions are shown to produce particle signatures that reproduce ion flux oscillations observed by satellites from the Cluster mission. The expected significance of the results in the context current satellite missions such as the Van Allen Probes and up-coming ERG satellite mission will be briefly discussed.

  13. Evolution of one-particle and double-occupied Green functions for the Hubbard model, with interaction, at half-filling with lifetime effects within the moment approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schafroth, S.; Rodríguez-Núñez, J. J.

    1999-08-01

    We evaluate the one-particle and double-occupied Green functions for the Hubbard model at half-filling using the moment approach of Nolting [Z. Phys. 255, 25 (1972); Grund Kurs: Theoretische Physik. 7 Viel-Teilchen-Theorie (Verlag Zimmermann-Neufang, Ulmen, 1992)]. Our starting point is a self-energy, Σ(k-->,ω), which has a single pole, Ω(k-->), with spectral weight, α(k-->), and quasiparticle lifetime, γ(k-->) [J. J. Rodríguez-Núñez and S. Schafroth, J. Phys. Condens. Matter 10, L391 (1998); J. J. Rodríguez-Núñez, S. Schafroth, and H. Beck, Physica B (to be published); (unpublished)]. In our approach, Σ(k-->,ω) becomes the central feature of the many-body problem and due to three unknown k--> parameters we have to satisfy only the first three sum rules instead of four as in the canonical formulation of Nolting [Z. Phys. 255, 25 (1972); Grund Kurs: Theoretische Physik. 7 Viel-Teilchen-Theorie (Verlag Zimmermann-Neufang, Ulmen, 1992)]. This self-energy choice forces our system to be a non-Fermi liquid for any value of the interaction, since it does not vanish at zero frequency. The one-particle Green function, G(k-->,ω), shows the fingerprint of a strongly correlated system, i.e., a double peak structure in the one-particle spectral density, A(k-->,ω), vs ω for intermediate values of the interaction. Close to the Mott insulator-transition, A(k-->,ω) becomes a wide single peak, signaling the absence of quasiparticles. Similar behavior is observed for the real and imaginary parts of the self-energy, Σ(k-->,ω). The double-occupied Green function, G2(q-->,ω), has been obtained from G(k-->,ω) by means of the equation of motion. The relation between G2(q-->,ω) and the self-energy, Σ(k-->,ω), is formally established and numerical results for the spectral function of G2(k-->,ω), χ(2)(k-->,ω)≡-(1/π)δ-->0+Im[G2(k-->,ω)], are given. Our approach represents the simplest way to include (1) lifetime effects in the moment approach of Nolting, as

  14. Critical Casimir interactions between Janus particles.

    PubMed

    Labbé-Laurent, M; Dietrich, S

    2016-08-21

    Recently there has been strong experimental and theoretical interest in studying the self-assembly and the phase behavior of patchy and Janus particles, which form colloidal suspensions. Although in this quest a variety of effective interactions have been proposed and used in order to achieve a directed assembly, the critical Casimir effect stands out as being particularly suitable in this respect because it provides both attractive and repulsive interactions as well as the potential of a sensitive temperature control of their strength. Specifically, we have calculated the critical Casimir force between a single Janus particle and a laterally homogeneous substrate as well as a substrate with a chemical step. We have used the Derjaguin approximation and compared it with results from full mean field theory. A modification of the Derjaguin approximation turns out to be generally reliable. Based on this approach we have derived the effective force and the effective potential between two Janus cylinders as well as between two Janus spheres. PMID:27444691

  15. Entropic Ratchet transport of interacting active Brownian particles

    SciTech Connect

    Ai, Bao-Quan; He, Ya-Feng; Zhong, Wei-Rong

    2014-11-21

    Directed transport of interacting active (self-propelled) Brownian particles is numerically investigated in confined geometries (entropic barriers). The self-propelled velocity can break thermodynamical equilibrium and induce the directed transport. It is found that the interaction between active particles can greatly affect the ratchet transport. For attractive particles, on increasing the interaction strength, the average velocity first decreases to its minima, then increases, and finally decreases to zero. For repulsive particles, when the interaction is very weak, there exists a critical interaction at which the average velocity is minimal, nearly tends to zero, however, for the strong interaction, the average velocity is independent of the interaction.

  16. Modeling of particle agglomeration in nanofluids

    SciTech Connect

    Krishna, K. Hari; Neti, S.; Oztekin, A.; Mohapatra, S.

    2015-03-07

    Agglomeration strongly influences the stability or shelf life of nanofluid. The present computational and experimental study investigates the rate of agglomeration quantitatively. Agglomeration in nanofluids is attributed to the net effect of various inter-particle interaction forces. For the nanofluid considered here, a net inter-particle force depends on the particle size, volume fraction, pH, and electrolyte concentration. A solution of the discretized and coupled population balance equations can yield particle sizes as a function of time. Nanofluid prepared here consists of alumina nanoparticles with the average particle size of 150 nm dispersed in de-ionized water. As the pH of the colloid was moved towards the isoelectric point of alumina nanofluids, the rate of increase of average particle size increased with time due to lower net positive charge on particles. The rate at which the average particle size is increased is predicted and measured for different electrolyte concentration and volume fraction. The higher rate of agglomeration is attributed to the decrease in the electrostatic double layer repulsion forces. The rate of agglomeration decreases due to increase in the size of nano-particle clusters thus approaching zero rate of agglomeration when all the clusters are nearly uniform in size. Predicted rates of agglomeration agree adequate enough with the measured values; validating the mathematical model and numerical approach is employed.

  17. Waves, particles, and interactions in reduced dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yiming

    This thesis presents a set of experiments that study the interplay between the wave-particle duality of electrons and the interaction effects in systems of reduced dimensions. Both dc transport and measurements of current noise have been employed in the studies; in particular, techniques for efficiently measuring current noise have been developed specifically for these experiments. The first four experiments study current noise auto- and cross correlations in various mesoscopic devices, including quantum point contacts, single and double quantum dots, and graphene devices. In quantum point contacts, shot noise at zero magnetic field exhibits an asymmetry related to the 0.7 structure in conductance. The asymmetry in noise evolves smoothly into the symmetric signature of spin-resolved electron transmission at high field. Comparison to a phenomenological model with density-dependent level splitting yields good quantitative agreement. Additionally, a device-specific contribution to the finite-bias noise, particularly visible on conductance plateaus where shot noise vanishes, agrees with a model of bias-dependent electron heating. In a three-lead single quantum dot and a capacitively coupled double quantum dot, sign reversal of noise cross correlations have been observed in the Coulomb blockade regime, and found to be tunable by gate voltages and source-drain bias. In the limit of weak output tunneling, cross correlations in the three-lead dot are found to be proportional to the two-lead noise in excess of the Poissonian value. These results can be reproduced with master equation calculations that include multi-level transport in the single dot, and inter-dot charging energy in the double dot. Shot noise measurements in single-layer graphene devices reveal a Fano factor independent of carrier type and density, device geometry, and the presence of a p-n junction. This result contrasts with theory for ballistic graphene sheets and junctions, suggesting that the transport

  18. Turbulence-particle interactions under surface gravity waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paskyabi, Mostafa Bakhoday

    2016-11-01

    The dispersion and transport of single inertial particles through an oscillatory turbulent aquatic environment are examined numerically by a Lagrangian particle tracking model using a series of idealised test cases. The turbulent mixing is incorporated into the Lagrangian model by the means of a stochastic scheme in which the inhomogeneous turbulent quantities are governed by a one-dimensional k- ɛ turbulence closure scheme. This vertical mixing model is further modified to include the effects of surface gravity waves including Coriolis-Stokes forcing, wave breaking, and Langmuir circulations. To simplify the complex interactions between the deterministic and the stochastic phases of flow, we assume a time-invariant turbulent flow field and exclude the hydrodynamic biases due to the effects of ambient mean current. The numerical results show that the inertial particles acquire perturbed oscillations traced out as time-varying sinking/rising orbits in the vicinity of the sea surface under linear and cnoidal waves and acquire a non-looping single arc superimposed with the high-frequency fluctuations beneath the nonlinear solitary waves. Furthermore, we briefly summarise some recipes through the course of this paper on the implementation of the stochastic particle tracking models to realistically describe the drift and suspension of inertial particles throughout the water column.

  19. Particle Acceleration in Shock-Shock Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakanotani, Masaru; Matsukiyo, Shuichi; Hada, Tohru

    2015-04-01

    Collisionless shock waves play a crucial role in producing high energy particles. One of the most plausible acceleration mechanisms is the first order Fermi acceleration in which non-thermal particles statistically gain energy while scattered by MHD turbulence both upstream and downstream of a shock. Indeed, X-ray emission from energetic particles accelerated at supernova remnant shocks is often observed [e.g., Uchiyama et al., 2007]. Most of the previous studies on shock acceleration assume the presence of a single shock. In space, however, two shocks frequently come close to or even collide with each other. For instance, it is observed that a CME (coronal mass ejection) driven shock collides with the earth's bow shock [Hietala et al., 2011], or interplanetary shocks pass through the heliospheric termination shock [Lu et al., 1999]. Colliding shocks are observed also in high power laser experiments [Morita et al., 2013]. It is expected that shock-shock interactions efficiently produce high energy particles. A previous work using hybrid simulation [Cargill et al., 1986] reports efficient ion acceleration when supercritical two shocks collide. In the hybrid simulation, however, the electron dynamics cannot be resolved so that electron acceleration cannot be discussed in principle. Here, we perform one-dimensional full Particle-in-Cell (PIC) simulations to examine colliding two symmetric oblique shocks and the associated electron acceleration. In particular, the following three points are discussed in detail. 1. Energetic electrons are observed upstream of the two shocks before their collision. These energetic electrons are efficiently accelerated through multiple reflections at the two shocks (Fermi acceleration). 2. The reflected electrons excite large amplitude upstream waves. Electron beam cyclotron instability [Hasegawa, 1975] and electron fire hose instability [Li et al., 2000] appear to occur. 3. The large amplitude waves can scatters energetic electrons in

  20. MODELING DEPOSITION OF INHALED PARTICLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Modeling Deposition of Inhaled Particles: ABSTRACT

    The mathematical modeling of the deposition and distribution of inhaled aerosols within human lungs is an invaluable tool in predicting both the health risks associated with inhaled environmental aerosols and the therapeut...

  1. CORSAIR Solar Energetic Particle Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandroos, A.

    2013-05-01

    Acceleration of particles in coronal mass ejection (CME) driven shock waves is the most commonly accepted and best developed theory of the genesis of gradual solar energetic particle (SEP) events. The underlying acceleration mechanism is the diffusive shock acceleration (DSA). According to DSA, particles scatter from fluctuations present in the ambient magnetic field, which causes some particles to encounter the shock front repeatedly and to gain energy during each crossing. Currently STEREO and near-Earth spacecraft are providing valuable multi-point information on how SEP properties, such as composition and energy spectra, vary in longitude. Initial results have shown that longitude distributions of large CME-associated SEP events are much wider than reported in earlier studies. These findings have important consequences on SEP modeling. It is important to extend the present models into two or three spatial coordinates to properly take into account the effects of coronal and interplanetary (IP) magnetic geometry, and evolution of the CME and the associated shock, on the acceleration and transport of SEPs. We give a status update on CORSAIR project, which is an effort to develop a new self-consistent (total energy conserving) DSA acceleration model that is capable of modeling energetic particle acceleration and transport in IP space in two or three spatial dimensions. In the new model particles are propagated using guiding center approximation. Waves are modeled as (Lagrangian) wave packets propagating (anti)parallel to ambient magnetic field. Diffusion coefficients related to scattering from the waves are calculated using quasilinear theory. State of ambient plasma is obtained from an MHD simulation or by using idealized analytic models. CORSAIR is an extension to our earlier efforts to model the effects of magnetic geometry on SEP acceleration (Sandroos & Vainio, 2007,2009).

  2. Electrokinetic particle-electrode interactions at high frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yariv, Ehud; Schnitzer, Ory

    2013-01-01

    We provide a macroscale description of electrokinetic particle-electrode interactions at high frequencies, where chemical reactions at the electrodes are negligible. Using a thin-double-layer approximation, our starting point is the set of macroscale equations governing the “bounded” configuration comprising of a particle suspended between two electrodes, wherein the electrodes are governed by a capacitive charging condition and the imposed voltage is expressed as an integral constraint. In the large-cell limit the bounded model is transformed into an effectively equivalent “unbounded” model describing the interaction between the particle and a single electrode, where the imposed-voltage condition is manifested in a uniform field at infinity together with a Robin-type condition applying at the electrode. This condition, together with the standard no-flux condition applying at the particle surface, leads to a linear problem governing the electric potential in the fluid domain in which the dimensionless frequency ω of the applied voltage appears as a governing parameter. In the high-frequency limit ω≫1 the flow is dominated by electro-osmotic slip at the particle surface, the contribution of electrode electro-osmosis being O(ω-2) small. That simplification allows for a convenient analytical investigation of the prevailing case where the clearance between the particle and the adjacent electrode is small. Use of tangent-sphere coordinates allows to calculate the electric and flows fields as integral Hankel transforms. At large distances from the particle, along the electrode, both fields decay with the fourth power of distance.

  3. Electrokinetic particle-electrode interactions at high frequencies.

    PubMed

    Yariv, Ehud; Schnitzer, Ory

    2013-01-01

    We provide a macroscale description of electrokinetic particle-electrode interactions at high frequencies, where chemical reactions at the electrodes are negligible. Using a thin-double-layer approximation, our starting point is the set of macroscale equations governing the "bounded" configuration comprising of a particle suspended between two electrodes, wherein the electrodes are governed by a capacitive charging condition and the imposed voltage is expressed as an integral constraint. In the large-cell limit the bounded model is transformed into an effectively equivalent "unbounded" model describing the interaction between the particle and a single electrode, where the imposed-voltage condition is manifested in a uniform field at infinity together with a Robin-type condition applying at the electrode. This condition, together with the standard no-flux condition applying at the particle surface, leads to a linear problem governing the electric potential in the fluid domain in which the dimensionless frequency ω of the applied voltage appears as a governing parameter. In the high-frequency limit ω>1 the flow is dominated by electro-osmotic slip at the particle surface, the contribution of electrode electro-osmosis being O(ω(-2)) small. That simplification allows for a convenient analytical investigation of the prevailing case where the clearance between the particle and the adjacent electrode is small. Use of tangent-sphere coordinates allows to calculate the electric and flows fields as integral Hankel transforms. At large distances from the particle, along the electrode, both fields decay with the fourth power of distance.

  4. Aerosols-cloud-climate -interactions in the Norwegian Earth System Model (NorESM). Importance of biogenic particles for cloud properties and anthropogenic indirect effect.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seland, Ø.; Iversen, T.; Kirkevâg, A.

    2012-04-01

    According to the 4th assessment report of IPCC, major sources of uncertainty in anthropogenic climate change projections are inaccurate model description and weak knowledge of aerosols and their interactions with radiation and clouds, as well as the cloud feedback to radiative forcing. One important aspect of the associated uncertainty is the natural atmosphere. Anthropogenic climate change is an increment caused by anthropogenic emissions relative to the properties of the climate system untouched by man. This is crucial for the direct and indirect effects of aerosols, since the amount, size and physical properties of natural background particles strongly influence the same properties of the anthropogenic aerosol components. In many climate models where CDNC is calculated explicitly, CDNC is constrained by prescribing a lower bound below which calculated values are not allowed. This is done in order to keep the aerosol in-direct effect within estimated values. The rationale for using such a lower bound is to keep the aerosol radiative forcing constrained by the forcing of green-house gases and 20th century climate.We hypothesize this lower bound can be removed or made less strict by including aerosols of biogenic origin. We will present results and sensitivity studies from simulations with the NorESM where we have added contributions from organic carbon of natural origin both from vegetation and oceanic sources. By including aerosols of biogenic origin we obtain close to the median indirect radiative forcing reported by IPCC AR4, as well as reproducing the temperature increase in the 20th century. NorESM is based on the Earth system model CCSM4.0 from NCAR, but is using CAM4-Oslo instead of CAM4 as atmosphere model and an updated version of MICOM from the Bergen Climate Model (BCM) instead of the ocean model POP2. The aerosol module includes sea-salt, dust, sulphate, black carbon (BC) and particulate organic matter (OM). Primary aerosol size-distributions are

  5. Patchy Particle Model for Vitrimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smallenburg, Frank; Leibler, Ludwik; Sciortino, Francesco

    2013-11-01

    Vitrimers—a recently invented new class of polymers—consist of covalent networks that can rearrange their topology via a bond shuffling mechanism, preserving the total number of network links. We introduce a patchy particle model whose dynamics directly mimic the bond exchange mechanism and reproduce the observed glass-forming ability. We calculate the free energy of this model in the limit of strong (chemical) bonds between the particles, both via the Wertheim thermodynamic perturbation theory and using computer simulations. The system exhibits an entropy-driven phase separation between a network phase and a dilute cluster gas, bringing new insight into the swelling behavior of vitrimers in solvents.

  6. Lubrication analysis of interacting rigid cylindrical particles in confined shear flow

    SciTech Connect

    Cardinaels, R.; Stone, H. A.

    2015-07-15

    Lubrication analysis is used to determine analytical expressions for the elements of the resistance matrix describing the interaction of two rigid cylindrical particles in two-dimensional shear flow in a symmetrically confined channel geometry. The developed model is valid for non-Brownian particles in a low-Reynolds-number flow between two sliding plates with thin gaps between the two particles and also between the particles and the walls. Using this analytical model, a comprehensive overview of the dynamics of interacting cylindrical particles in shear flow is presented. With only hydrodynamic interactions, rigid particles undergo a reversible interaction with no cross-streamline migration, irrespective of the confinement value. However, the interaction time of the particle pair substantially increases with confinement, and at the same time, the minimum distance between the particle surfaces during the interaction substantially decreases with confinement. By combining our purely hydrodynamic model with a simple on/off non-hydrodynamic attractive particle interaction force, the effects of confinement on particle aggregation are qualitatively mapped out in an aggregation diagram. The latter shows that the range of initial relative particle positions for which aggregation occurs is increased substantially due to geometrical confinement. The interacting particle pair exhibits tangential and normal lubrication forces on the sliding plates, which will contribute to the rheology of confined suspensions in shear flow. Due to the combined effects of the confining walls and the particle interaction, the particle velocities and resulting forces both tangential and perpendicular to the walls exhibit a non-monotonic evolution as a function of the orientation angle of the particle pair. However, by incorporating appropriate scalings of the forces, velocities, and doublet orientation angle with the minimum free fraction of the gap height and the plate speed, master curves for

  7. Space Earthquake Perturbation Simulation (SEPS) an application based on Geant4 tools to model and simulate the interaction between the Earthquake and the particle trapped on the Van Allen belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambroglini, Filippo; Jerome Burger, William; Battiston, Roberto; Vitale, Vincenzo; Zhang, Yu

    2014-05-01

    During last decades, few space experiments revealed anomalous bursts of charged particles, mainly electrons with energy larger than few MeV. A possible source of these bursts are the low-frequency seismo-electromagnetic emissions, which can cause the precipitation of the electrons from the lower boundary of their inner belt. Studies of these bursts reported also a short-term pre-seismic excess. Starting from simulation tools traditionally used on high energy physics we developed a dedicated application SEPS (Space Perturbation Earthquake Simulation), based on the Geant4 tool and PLANETOCOSMICS program, able to model and simulate the electromagnetic interaction between the earthquake and the particles trapped in the inner Van Allen belt. With SEPS one can study the transport of particles trapped in the Van Allen belts through the Earth's magnetic field also taking into account possible interactions with the Earth's atmosphere. SEPS provides the possibility of: testing different models of interaction between electromagnetic waves and trapped particles, defining the mechanism of interaction as also shaping the area in which this takes place,assessing the effects of perturbations in the magnetic field on the particles path, performing back-tracking analysis and also modelling the interaction with electric fields. SEPS is in advanced development stage, so that it could be already exploited to test in details the results of correlation analysis between particle bursts and earthquakes based on NOAA and SAMPEX data. The test was performed both with a full simulation analysis, (tracing from the position of the earthquake and going to see if there were paths compatible with the burst revealed) and with a back-tracking analysis (tracing from the burst detection point and checking the compatibility with the position of associated earthquake).

  8. Particle Interactions in DNA-laden Flows

    SciTech Connect

    Bybee, M D; Miller, G H; Trebotich, D

    2005-12-20

    Microfluidic devices are becoming state-of-the-art in many significant applications including pathogen detection, continuous monitoring, and drug delivery. Numerical algorithms which can simulate flows of complex fluids within these devices are needed for their development and optimization. A method is being developed at LLNL by Trebotich et. al. [30] for simulations of DNA-laden flows in complex microscale geometries such as packed bed reactors and pillar chips. In this method an incompressible Newtonian fluid is discretized with Cartesian grid embedded boundary methods, and the DNA is represented by a bead-rod polymer model. The fluid and polymer are coupled through a body force. In its current state, polymer-surface interactions are treated as elastic collisions between beads and surface, and polymer-polymer interactions are neglected. Implementation of polymer-polymer interactions is the main objective of this work. It is achieved by two methods: (1) a rigid constraint whereby rods elastically bounce off one another, and (2) a smooth potential acting between rods. In addition, a smooth potential is also implemented for the polymer-surface interactions. Background information will also be presented as well as related work by other researchers.

  9. Localization in a random XY model with long-range interactions: Intermediate case between single-particle and many-body problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burin, Alexander L.

    2015-09-01

    Many-body localization in an XY model with a long-range interaction is investigated. We show that in the regime of a high strength of disordering compared to the interaction an off-resonant flip-flop spin-spin interaction (hopping) generates the effective Ising interactions of spins in the third order of perturbation theory in a hopping. The combination of hopping and induced Ising interactions for the power-law distance dependent hopping V (R ) ∝R-α always leads to the localization breakdown in a thermodynamic limit of an infinite system at α <3 d /2 where d is a system dimension. The delocalization takes place due to the induced Ising interactions U (R ) ∝R-2 α of "extended" resonant pairs. This prediction is consistent with the numerical finite size scaling in one-dimensional systems. Many-body localization in an XY model is more stable with respect to the long-range interaction compared to a many-body problem with similar Ising and Heisenberg interactions requiring α ≥2 d which makes the practical implementations of this model more attractive for quantum information applications. The full summary of dimension constraints and localization threshold size dependencies for many-body localization in the case of combined Ising and hopping interactions is obtained using this and previous work and it is the subject for the future experimental verification using cold atomic systems.

  10. On the Relation of Wave-Particle Interactions, Particle Dynamics, and Suprathermal Particle Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kucharek, Harald; Galvin, Antoinette; Farrugia, Charles; Klecker, Berndt; Pogorelov, Nikolai

    2016-04-01

    Wave-particle interactions, ion acceleration, and magnetic turbulence are closely interlinked and the physical processes may occur on different scales. These scales range from the kinetic scale to the macro-scale (MHD-scale). These processes are likely universal and the same basic processes occur at the Earth's environment, at the Earth's bow shock, the solar wind, and around the heliosphere. Undoubtedly, the Earth's environment as well as the close interplanetary space are the best plasma environments to study these processes using satellite measurements. Recently, ACE, STEREO, IBEX and Voyager observations clearly showed that turbulence and wave-particle interactions and turbulence are extremely important in interplanetary space and in the heliosphere. Using data from STEREO, Wind, we have investigated the spectral properties of suprathermal ion distributions. The results show that spectral slopes are very variable and depend on the plasma properties. We have also performed 3D hybrid simulations and studied particle dynamics. These simulations show that the particle dynamics in the turbulent magnetic wave field is Levy-Flight like which leads to a kappa distribution, which is often found in various space environments. This result is very significant of future mission such as THOR and IMAP and current operating missions such as STEREO, IBEX, and MMS.

  11. Dynamics of a suspension of interacting yolk-shell particles

    SciTech Connect

    Sánchez Díaz, L. E.; Cortes-Morales, E. C.; Li, X.; Chen, Wei-Ren; Medina-Noyola, M.

    2014-12-01

    In this work we study the self-diusion properties of a liquid of hollow spherical particles (shells) bearing a smaller solid sphere in their interior (yolks). We model this system using purely repulsive hard-body interactions between all (shell and yolk) particles, but assume the presence of a background ideal solvent such that all the particles execute free Brownian motion between collisions, characterized by short-time self-diusion coecients D0 s for the shells and D0 y for the yolks. Using a softened version of these interparticle potentials we perform Brownian dynamics simulations to determine the mean squared displacement and intermediate scattering function of the yolk-shell complex. These results can be understood in terms of a set of eective Langevin equations for the N interacting shell particles, pre-averaged over the yolks' degrees of freedom, from which an approximate self-consistent description of the simulated self-diusion properties can be derived. Here we compare the theoretical and simulated results between them, and with the results for the same system in the absence of yolks. We nd that the yolks, which have no eect on the shell-shell static structure, in uence the dynamic properties in a predictable manner, fully captured by the theory.

  12. Dynamics of a suspension of interacting yolk-shell particles

    DOE PAGES

    Sánchez Díaz, L. E.; Cortes-Morales, E. C.; Li, X.; Chen, Wei-Ren; Medina-Noyola, M.

    2014-12-01

    In this work we study the self-diusion properties of a liquid of hollow spherical particles (shells) bearing a smaller solid sphere in their interior (yolks). We model this system using purely repulsive hard-body interactions between all (shell and yolk) particles, but assume the presence of a background ideal solvent such that all the particles execute free Brownian motion between collisions, characterized by short-time self-diusion coecients D0 s for the shells and D0 y for the yolks. Using a softened version of these interparticle potentials we perform Brownian dynamics simulations to determine the mean squared displacement and intermediate scattering function ofmore » the yolk-shell complex. These results can be understood in terms of a set of eective Langevin equations for the N interacting shell particles, pre-averaged over the yolks' degrees of freedom, from which an approximate self-consistent description of the simulated self-diusion properties can be derived. Here we compare the theoretical and simulated results between them, and with the results for the same system in the absence of yolks. We nd that the yolks, which have no eect on the shell-shell static structure, in uence the dynamic properties in a predictable manner, fully captured by the theory.« less

  13. Lagrangian Trajectory Modeling of Lunar Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lane, John E.; Metzger, Philip T.; Immer, Christopher D.

    2008-01-01

    Apollo landing videos shot from inside the right LEM window, provide a quantitative measure of the characteristics and dynamics of the ejecta spray of lunar regolith particles beneath the Lander during the final 10 [m] or so of descent. Photogrammetry analysis gives an estimate of the thickness of the dust layer and angle of trajectory. In addition, Apollo landing video analysis divulges valuable information on the regolith ejecta interactions with lunar surface topography. For example, dense dust streaks are seen to originate at the outer rims of craters within a critical radius of the Lander during descent. The primary intent of this work was to develop a mathematical model and software implementation for the trajectory simulation of lunar dust particles acted on by gas jets originating from the nozzle of a lunar Lander, where the particle sizes typically range from 10 micron to 500 micron. The high temperature, supersonic jet of gas that is exhausted from a rocket engine can propel dust, soil, gravel, as well as small rocks to high velocities. The lunar vacuum allows ejected particles to travel great distances unimpeded, and in the case of smaller particles, escape velocities may be reached. The particle size distributions and kinetic energies of ejected particles can lead to damage to the landing spacecraft or to other hardware that has previously been deployed in the vicinity. Thus the primary motivation behind this work is to seek a better understanding for the purpose of modeling and predicting the behavior of regolith dust particle trajectories during powered rocket descent and ascent.

  14. Modelling the motion of particles around choanoflagellates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orme, Belinda; Pettitt, Michala; Otto, Steve; Blake, John

    2001-11-01

    The three-dimensional particle paths due to a helical beat pattern of the flagellum of a sessile choanoflagellate, Salpingoeca Amphoridium (SA), are modelled and compared against experimental observations. The organism's main components are a flagellum and cell body which are situated above a substrate such that the interaction between these entities is crucial in determining the fluid flow around the choanoflagellate. The flow of fluid in the organism's environment can be characterised as Stokes flow and a flow field analogous to one created by the flagellum is generated by a distribution of stokeslets and dipoles along a helical curve. The model describing the flow considers interactions between a slender flagellum, an infinite flat plane (modelling the substrate) and a sphere (modelling the cell body). The use of image systems appropriate to Green's functions for a sphere and plane boundary are described. The computations depict particle paths representing passive tracers from experiments and their motion illustrates overall flow patterns. Figures are presented comparing recorded experimental data with numerically generated results for a number of particle paths. The principal results show good agreement between the experiments and theory.

  15. White dwarfs constraints on dark sector models with light particles

    SciTech Connect

    Ubaldi, Lorenzo

    2014-06-24

    The white dwarf luminosity function is well understood in terms of standard model physics and leaves little room for exotic cooling mechanisms related to the possible existence of new weakly interacting light particles. This puts significant constraints on the parameter space of models that contain a massive dark photon and light dark sector particles.

  16. Surface electrical properties of coal particles on interaction with polyelectrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Evmenova, G.L.

    2006-07-15

    The paper presents experimental data obtained in determining an electrokinetic potential of coal particles during their interaction with coagulation and flocculation agents. It is established that flocculation agents allow decreasing electrokinetic potential of mineral particles up to the values that promote aggregation of the particles thereby enabling the control over the stability of coal dispersions.

  17. Quantum dynamics and topological excitations in interacting dipolar particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rey, Ana

    2016-05-01

    Dipole-dipole interactions, long-range and anisotropic interactions that arise due to the virtual exchange of photons, are of fundamental importance in optical physics, and are enabling a range of new quantum technologies including quantum networks and optical lattice atomic clocks. In this talk I will first discuss how arrays of dipolar particles with a simple J = 0- J = 1 internal level structure can naturally host topological and chiral excitations including Weyl quasi-particles. Weyl fermions were first predicted to exist in the context of high energy physics but only recently have been observed in solid state systems. I will discuss a proposal of using Mott insulators of Sr atoms to observe and probe the Weyl excitation spectrum and its non-trivial chirality. Finally I will report on a recent experiment done at JILA which validates the underlying microscopic model that predicts the existence of these excitations. The experiment measured the collective emission from a coherently driven gas of ultracold 88 Sr atoms and observed a highly directional and anisotropic emission intensity and a substantial broadening of the atomic spectral lines. All of the measurements are well reproduced by the theoretical model. These investigations open the door for the exploration of novel quantum many-body systems involving strongly interacting atoms and photons, and are useful guides for further developments of optical atomic clocks and other applications involving dense atomic ensembles. AFOSR, MURI-AFOSR, ARO,NSF-PHY-1521080, JILA-NSF-PFC-1125844.

  18. Kinetic equation for nonlinear resonant wave-particle interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artemyev, A. V.; Neishtadt, A. I.; Vasiliev, A. A.; Mourenas, D.

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the nonlinear resonant wave-particle interactions including the effects of particle (phase) trapping, detrapping, and scattering by high-amplitude coherent waves. After deriving the relationship between probability of trapping and velocity of particle drift induced by nonlinear scattering (phase bunching), we substitute this relation and other characteristic equations of wave-particle interaction into a kinetic equation for the particle distribution function. The final equation has the form of a Fokker-Planck equation with peculiar advection and collision terms. This equation fully describes the evolution of particle momentum distribution due to particle diffusion, nonlinear drift, and fast transport in phase-space via trapping. Solutions of the obtained kinetic equation are compared with results of test particle simulations.

  19. Particles inside electrolytes with ion-specific interactions, their effective charge distributions, and effective interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Mingnan; Liang, Yihao; Xing, Xiangjun

    2016-10-01

    In this work, we explore the statistical physics of colloidal particles that interact with electrolytes via ion-specific interactions. Firstly we study particles interacting weakly with electrolyte using linear response theory. We find that the mean potential around a particle is linearly determined by the effective charge distribution of the particle, which depends both on the bare charge distribution and on ion-specific interactions. We also discuss the effective interaction between two such particles and show that, in the far field regime, it is bilinear in the effective charge distributions of two particles. We subsequently generalize the above results to the more complicated case where particles interact strongly with the electrolyte. Our results indicate that in order to understand the statistical physics of non-dilute electrolytes, both ion-specific interactions and ionic correlations have to be addressed in a single unified and consistent framework. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11174196 and 91130012).

  20. Solar energetic particle interactions with the Venusian atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plainaki, Christina; Paschalis, Pavlos; Grassi, Davide; Mavromichalaki, Helen; Andriopoulou, Maria

    2016-07-01

    In the context of planetary space weather, we estimate the ion production rates in the Venusian atmosphere due to the interactions of solar energetic particles (SEPs) with gas. The assumed concept for our estimations is based on two cases of SEP events, previously observed in near-Earth space: the event in October 1989 and the event in May 2012. For both cases, we assume that the directional properties of the flux and the interplanetary magnetic field configuration would have allowed the SEPs' arrival at Venus and their penetration to the planet's atmosphere. For the event in May 2012, we consider the solar particle properties (integrated flux and rigidity spectrum) obtained by the Neutron Monitor Based Anisotropic GLE Pure Power Law (NMBANGLE PPOLA) model (Plainaki et al., 2010, 2014) applied previously for the Earth case and scaled to the distance of Venus from the Sun. For the simulation of the actual cascade in the Venusian atmosphere initiated by the incoming particle fluxes, we apply the DYASTIMA code, a Monte Carlo (MC) application based on the Geant4 software (Paschalis et al., 2014). Our predictions are afterwards compared to other estimations derived from previous studies and discussed. Finally, we discuss the differences between the nominal ionization profile due to galactic cosmic-ray-atmosphere interactions and the profile during periods of intense solar activity, and we show the importance of understanding space weather conditions on Venus in the context of future mission preparation and data interpretation.

  1. Latent Variable Interaction Modeling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schumacker, Randall E.

    2002-01-01

    Used simulation to study two different approaches to latent variable interaction modeling with continuous observed variables: (1) a LISREL 8.30 program and (2) data analysis through PRELIS2 and SIMPLIS programs. Results show that parameter estimation was similar but standard errors were different. Discusses differences in ease of implementation.…

  2. Saturn's rings - Particle size distributions for thin layer model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zebker, H. A.; Marouf, E. A.; Tyler, G. L.

    1985-01-01

    A model incorporating limited interaction between the incident energy and particles in the ring is considered which appears to be consistent with the multiple scattering process in Saturn's rings. The model allows for the small physical thickness of the rings and can be used to relate Voyager 1 observations of 3.6- and 13-cm wavelength microwave scatter from the rings to the ring particle size distribution function for particles with radii ranging from 0.001 to 20 m. This limited-scatter model yields solutions for particle size distribution functions for eight regions in the rings, which exhibit approximately inverse-cubic power-law behavior.

  3. Interaction of light particles with capillaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tőkési, K.; DuBois, R. D.

    2013-04-01

    The possible similarities and differences between the transmission of slow highly charged ions and light particles, like positrons and electrons, through a single cylindrical, tapered glass capillary with large aspect ratio are studied. We address the question whether the guiding-effect is observable for low intensity positron beams.

  4. Particle dynamics in fluids with random interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shagolsem, Lenin S.; Rabin, Yitzhak

    2016-05-01

    We study the dynamics of particles in a multi-component 2d Lennard-Jones (LJ) fluid in the limiting case where all the particles are different (APD). The equilibrium properties of this APD system were studied in our earlier work [L. S. Shagolsem et al., J. Chem. Phys. 142, 051104 (2015).]. We use molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the statistical properties of particle trajectories in a temperature range covering both the fluid and the solid-fluid coexistence region. We calculate the mean-square displacement as well as displacement, angle, and waiting time distributions, and compare the results with those for one-component LJ fluid. As temperature is lowered, the dynamics of the APD system becomes increasingly complex, as the intrinsic difference between the particles is amplified by neighborhood identity ordering and by the inhomogeneous character of the solid-fluid coexistence region. The ramifications of our results for the analysis of protein tracking experiments in living cells are discussed.

  5. Nuclear gamma rays from energetic particle interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramaty, R.; Kozlovsky, B.; Lingenfelter, R. E.

    1978-01-01

    Gamma ray line emission from nuclear deexcitation following energetic particle reactions is evaluated. The compiled nuclear data and the calculated gamma ray spectra and intensities can be used for the study of astrophysical sites which contain large fluxes of energetic protons and nuclei. A detailed evaluation of gamma ray line production in the interstellar medium is made.

  6. Modelling the motion of particles around choanoflagellates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orme, B. A. A.; Blake, J. R.; Otto, S. R.

    2003-01-01

    The three-dimensional particle paths due to a helical beat pattern of the flagellum of a sessile choanoflagellate, Salpingoeca Amphoridium (SA), are modelled and compared to the experimental observations of Pettitt (2001). The organism’s main components are a flagellum and a cell body which are situated above a substrate such that the interaction between these entities is crucial in determining the fluid flow around the choanoflagellate. This flow of fluid can be characterized as Stokes flow and a flow field analogous to one created by the flagellum is generated by a distribution of stokeslets and dipoles along a helical curve.

  7. Acoustic interaction forces between small particles in an ideal fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Glauber T.; Bruus, Henrik

    2014-12-01

    We present a theoretical expression for the acoustic interaction force between small spherical particles suspended in an ideal fluid exposed to an external acoustic wave. The acoustic interaction force is the part of the acoustic radiation force on one given particle involving the scattered waves from the other particles. The particles, either compressible liquid droplets or elastic microspheres, are considered to be much smaller than the acoustic wavelength. In this so-called Rayleigh limit, the acoustic interaction forces between the particles are well approximated by gradients of pair-interaction potentials with no restriction on the interparticle distance. The theory is applied to studies of the acoustic interaction force on a particle suspension in either standing or traveling plane waves. The results show aggregation regions along the wave propagation direction, while particles may attract or repel each other in the transverse direction. In addition, a mean-field approximation is developed to describe the acoustic interaction force in an emulsion of oil droplets in water.

  8. Impact of Radiatively Interactive Dust Aerosols in the NASA GEOS-5 Climate Model: Sensitivity to Dust Particle Shape and Refractive Index

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colarco, Peter R.; Nowottnick, Edward Paul; Randles, Cynthia A.; Yi, Bingqi; Yang, Ping; Kim, Kyu-Myong; Smith, Jamison A.; Bardeen, Charles D.

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the radiative effects of dust aerosols in the NASA GEOS-5 atmospheric general circulation model. GEOS-5 is improved with the inclusion of a sectional aerosol and cloud microphysics module, the Community Aerosol and Radiation Model for Atmospheres (CARMA). Into CARMA we introduce treatment of the dust and sea salt aerosol lifecycle, including sources, transport evolution, and sinks. The aerosols are radiatively coupled to GEOS-5, and we perform a series of multi-decade AMIP-style simulations in which dust optical properties (spectral refractive index and particle shape distribution) are varied. Optical properties assuming spherical dust particles are from Mie theory, while those for non-spherical shape distributions are drawn from a recently available database for tri-axial ellipsoids. The climatologies of the various simulations generally compare well to data from the MODIS, MISR, and CALIOP space-based sensors, the ground-based AERONET, and surface measurements of dust deposition and concentration. Focusing on the summertime Saharan dust cycle we show significant variability in our simulations resulting from different choices of dust optical properties. Atmospheric heating due to dust enhances surface winds over important Saharan dust sources, and we find a positive feedback where increased dust absorption leads to increased dust emissions. We further find that increased dust absorption leads to a strengthening of the summertime Hadley cell circulation, increasing dust lofting to higher altitudes and strengthening the African Easterly Jet. This leads to a longer atmospheric residence time, higher altitude, and generally more northward transport of dust in simulations with the most absorbing dust optical properties. We find that particle shape, although important for radiance simulations, is a minor effect compared to choices of refractive index, although total atmospheric forcing is enhanced by greater than 10 percent for simulations incorporating a

  9. Effects of field interactions upon particle creation in Robertson-Walker universes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birrell, N. D.; Davies, P. C. W.; Ford, L. H.

    1980-01-01

    Particle creation due to field interactions in an expanding Robertson-Walker universe is investigated. A model in which pseudoscalar mesons and photons are created as a result of their mutual interaction is considered, and the energy density of created particles is calculated in model universes which undergo a bounce at some maximum curvature. The free-field creation of non-conformally coupled scalar particles and of gravitons is calculated in the same space-times. It is found that if the bounce occurs at a sufficiently early time the interacting particle creation will dominate. This result may be traced to the fact that the model interaction chosen introduces a length scale which is much larger than the Planck length.

  10. Controlling chaos in wave-particle interactions.

    PubMed

    de Sousa, M C; Caldas, I L; Rizzato, F B; Pakter, R; Steffens, F M

    2012-07-01

    We analyze the behavior of a relativistic particle moving under the influence of a uniform magnetic field and a stationary electrostatic wave. We work with a set of pulsed waves that allows us to obtain an exact map for the system. We also use a method of control for near-integrable Hamiltonians that consists of the addition of a small and simple control term to the system. This control term creates invariant tori in phase space that prevent chaos from spreading to large regions, making the controlled dynamics more regular. We show numerically that the control term just slightly modifies the system but is able to drastically reduce chaos with a low additional cost of energy. Moreover, we discuss how the control of chaos and the consequent recovery of regular trajectories in phase space are useful to improve regular particle acceleration. PMID:23005517

  11. Cosmological constraints on the properties of weakly interacting massive particles

    SciTech Connect

    Steigman, G.; Turner, M.S.

    1984-10-01

    Considerations of the age and density of, as well as the evolution of structure in, the Universe lead to constraints on the masses and lifetimes of weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs). 26 references.

  12. Relationship between the cohesion of guest particles on the flow behaviour of interactive mixtures.

    PubMed

    Mangal, Sharad; Gengenbach, Thomas; Millington-Smith, Doug; Armstrong, Brian; Morton, David A V; Larson, Ian

    2016-05-01

    In this study, we aimed to investigate the effects cohesion of small surface-engineered guest binder particles on the flow behaviour of interactive mixtures. Polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) - a model pharmaceutical binder - was spray-dried with varying l-leucine feed concentrations to create small surface-engineered binder particles with varying cohesion. These spray-dried formulations were characterised by their particle size distribution, morphology and cohesion. Interactive mixtures were produced by blending these spray-dried formulations with paracetamol. The resultant blends were visualised under scanning electron microscope to confirm formation of interactive mixtures. Surface coverage of paracetamol by guest particles as well as the flow behaviour of these mixtures were examined. The flow performance of interactive mixtures was evaluated using measurements of conditioned bulk density, basic flowability energy, aeration energy and compressibility. With higher feed l-leucine concentrations, the surface roughness of small binder particles increased, while their cohesion decreased. Visual inspection of the SEM images of the blends indicated that the guest particles adhered to the surface of paracetamol resulting in effective formation of interactive mixtures. These images also showed that the low-cohesion guest particles were better de-agglomerated that consequently formed a more homogeneous interactive mixture with paracetamol compared with high-cohesion formulations. The flow performance of interactive mixtures changed as a function of the cohesion of the guest particles. Interactive mixtures with low-cohesion guest binder particles showed notably improved bulk flow performance compared with those containing high-cohesion guest binder particles. Thus, our study suggests that the cohesion of guest particles dictates the flow performance of interactive mixtures.

  13. Review of Physics Results from the Tevatron: Searches for New Particles and Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Toback, David; ŽIvković, Lidija

    2015-02-17

    We present a summary of results for searches for new particles and interactions at the Fermilab Tevatron collider by the CDF and the D0 experiments. These include results from Run I as well as Run II for the time period up to July 2014. We focus on searches for supersymmetry, as well as other models of new physics such as new fermions and bosons, various models of excited fermions, leptoquarks, technicolor, hidden-valley model particles, long-lived particles, extra dimensions, dark matter particles, and signature-based searches.

  14. Strong interactive massive particles from a strong coupled theory

    SciTech Connect

    Khlopov, Maxim Yu.; Kouvaris, Chris

    2008-03-15

    Minimal walking technicolor models can provide a nontrivial solution for cosmological dark matter, if the lightest technibaryon is doubly charged. Technibaryon asymmetry generated in the early Universe is related to baryon asymmetry, and it is possible to create an excess of techniparticles with charge (-2). These excessive techniparticles are all captured by {sup 4}He, creating techni-O-helium tOHe atoms, as soon as {sup 4}He is formed in big bang nucleosynthesis. The interaction of techni-O-helium with nuclei opens new paths to the creation of heavy nuclei in big bang nucleosynthesis. Because of the large mass of technibaryons, the tOHe ''atomic'' gas decouples from the baryonic matter and plays the role of dark matter in large scale structure formation, while structures in small scales are suppressed. Nuclear interactions with matter slow down cosmic techni-O-helium in the Earth below the threshold of underground dark matter detectors, thus escaping severe cryogenic dark matter search constraints. On the other hand, these nuclear interactions are not sufficiently strong to exclude this form of strongly interactive massive particles by constraints from the XQC experiment. Experimental tests of this hypothesis are possible in the search for tOHe in balloon-borne experiments (or on the ground) and for its charged techniparticle constituents in cosmic rays and accelerators. The tOHe atoms can cause cold nuclear transformations in matter and might form anomalous isotopes, offering possible ways to exclude (or prove?) their existence.

  15. Quantum chaos and thermalization in isolated systems of interacting particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borgonovi, F.; Izrailev, F. M.; Santos, L. F.; Zelevinsky, V. G.

    2016-04-01

    This review is devoted to the problem of thermalization in a small isolated conglomerate of interacting constituents. A variety of physically important systems of intensive current interest belong to this category: complex atoms, molecules (including biological molecules), nuclei, small devices of condensed matter and quantum optics on nano- and micro-scale, cold atoms in optical lattices, ion traps. Physical implementations of quantum computers, where there are many interacting qubits, also fall into this group. Statistical regularities come into play through inter-particle interactions, which have two fundamental components: mean field, that along with external conditions, forms the regular component of the dynamics, and residual interactions responsible for the complex structure of the actual stationary states. At sufficiently high level density, the stationary states become exceedingly complicated superpositions of simple quasiparticle excitations. At this stage, regularities typical of quantum chaos emerge and bring in signatures of thermalization. We describe all the stages and the results of the processes leading to thermalization, using analytical and massive numerical examples for realistic atomic, nuclear, and spin systems, as well as for models with random parameters. The structure of stationary states, strength functions of simple configurations, and concepts of entropy and temperature in application to isolated mesoscopic systems are discussed in detail. We conclude with a schematic discussion of the time evolution of such systems to equilibrium.

  16. Theoretical study of interactions between striated cylindrical particles and membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jing-Jing; Jia-Wei, Feng; Ren, Chun-Lai

    2015-08-01

    The interaction of nanoparticles with cell membranes is of great importance because of their potential biomedical applications. In this paper, we investigate the adhesion of stripe-patterned cylinders to a fluid membrane with a full consideration of the Helfrich free energy. Three situations are considered: one striated cylindrical particle, two pure cylindrical particles, and two Janus cylindrical particles. It is found that, with the adhesion of a single sparse striated cylinder, there are a variety of steady-states with energy barriers and the stable state is determined by the pattern of the cylinder. However, when the particle is densely striped, it has no effect on the stable state. By comparing the wrapping degree of two cylindrical particles with that of a single cylindrical particle, we find that two pure cylindrical particles can promote or suppress their interaction with the membrane under different situations. However, two Janus cylindrical particles can only inhibit their interaction with the membrane. Besides, this interaction is related to a first-order transition which is a shallow-to-deep wrapping transition for two pure cylinders while it is a shallow-to-half wrapping transition for two Janus cylinders. Furthermore, the position where the transition happens as a function of adhesion energy is given for fixed membrane tension and the precondition of the transition is presented. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 91027040 and 21274062).

  17. Effective field theory of thermal Casimir interactions between anisotropic particles.

    PubMed

    Haussman, Robert C; Deserno, Markus

    2014-06-01

    We employ an effective field theory (EFT) approach to study thermal Casimir interactions between objects bound to a fluctuating fluid surface or interface dominated by surface tension, with a focus on the effects of particle anisotropy. The EFT prescription disentangles the constraints imposed by the particles' boundaries from the calculation of the interaction free energy by constructing an equivalent point particle description. The finite-size information is captured in a derivative expansion that encodes the particles' response to external fields. The coefficients of the expansion terms correspond to generalized tensorial polarizabilities and are found by matching the results of a linear response boundary value problem computed in both the full and effective theories. We demonstrate the versatility of the EFT approach by constructing the general effective Hamiltonian for a collection of particles of arbitrary shapes. Taking advantage of the conformal symmetry of the Hamiltonian, we discuss a straightforward conformal mapping procedure to systematically determine the polarizabilities and derive a complete description for elliptical particles. We compute the pairwise interaction energies to several orders for nonidentical ellipses as well as their leading-order triplet interactions and discuss the resulting preferred pair and multibody configurations. Furthermore, we elaborate on the complications that arise with pinned particle boundary conditions and show that the powerlike corrections expected from dimensional analysis are exponentially suppressed by the leading-order interaction energies. PMID:25019720

  18. A numerical simulation of atmospheric photochemical processes including interactions with aerosol particles

    SciTech Connect

    Hackler, M.A.

    1989-01-01

    We propose a comprehensive model of atmospheric photochemical processes that can be used to investigate the interactions between gas species and aerosol particles. We considered both gas and particle phase reactions, transport of material between these phases, convection, turbulent diffusion, particle growth, coagulation, nucleation, and sources. The aerosol particle phase is not forced to follow the gas phase in equilibrium; transport to the particles is described by diffusion to the particle surface. The resulting model treats 33 gas phase species and 39 particles phase species; 16 of these are transported between the phases. The particle size distribution is approximated by 9 sections between 0.01 and 10 {mu}m diameter. Strong interactions between the gas and particles are seen. Higher relative humidity results in more particle volume and surface area, allowing the interphase transport to become competitive with the reaction terms. In particular, at high relative humidities the increased scavenging of HO{sub 2} radicals by particles reduces the O{sub 3} maximum concentration. This effect is seen only on days when the maximum relative humidity exceeds 90%. This conclusion has implications for the applicability of models developed for the Los Angeles Basin, where the maximum relative humidity rarely exceeds 75%, to more humid climates like Houston.

  19. A phase-field point-particle model for particle-laden interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Chuan; Botto, Lorenzo

    2014-11-01

    The irreversible attachment of solid particles to fluid interfaces is exploited in a variety of applications, such as froth flotation and Pickering emulsions. Critical in these applications is to predict particle transport in and near the interface, and the two-way coupling between the particles and the interface. While it is now possible to carry out particle-resolved simulations of these systems, simulating relatively large systems with many particles remains challenging. We present validation studies and preliminary results for a hybrid Eulerian-Lagrangian simulation method, in which the dynamics of the interface is fully-resolved by a phase-field approach, while the particles are treated in the ``point-particle'' approximation. With this method, which represents a compromise between the competing needs of resolving particle and interface scale phenomena, we are able to simulate the adsorption of a large number of particles in the interface of drops, and particle-interface interactions during the spinodal coarsening of a multiphase system. While this method models the adsorption phenomenon efficiently and with reasonable accuracy, it still requires understanding subtle issues related to the modelling of hydrodynamic and capillary forces for particles in contact with interface.

  20. Feebly interacting dark matter particle as the inflaton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenkanen, Tommi

    2016-09-01

    We present a scenario where a Z 2-symmetric scalar field ϕ first drives cosmic inflation, then reheats the Universe but remains out-of-equilibrium itself, and finally comprises the observed dark matter abundance, produced by particle decays à la freeze-in mechanism. We work model-independently without specifying the interactions of the scalar field besides its self-interaction coupling, λϕ 4, non-minimal coupling to gravity, ξϕ 2 R, and coupling to another scalar field, gϕ 2 σ 2. We find the scalar field ϕ serves both as the inflaton and a dark matter candidate if 10-9 ≲ λ ≲ g ≲ 10-7 and 3 keV ≲ m ϕ ≲ 85 MeV for ξ ={O}(1) . Such a small value of the non-minimal coupling is also found to be of the right magnitude to produce the observed curvature perturbation amplitude within the scenario. We also discuss how the model may be distinguished from other inflationary models of the same type by the next generation CMB satellites.

  1. Distribution function approach to irreversible adsorption of interacting colloidal particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faraudo, Jordi; Bafaluy, Javier

    2000-01-01

    A statistical-mechanical description of the irreversible adsorption of interacting colloidal particles is developed. Our approach describes in a consistent way the interaction of particles from the bulk with adsorbed particles during the transport process towards the adsorbing surface. The macroscopic physical quantities corresponding to the actual process are expressed as averages over simpler auxiliary processes which proceed in the presence of a fixed number n of adsorbed particles. The adsorption rate verifies a generalized Langmuir equation, in which the kinetic resistance (the inverse of the kinetic coefficient) is expressed as the sum of a diffusional resistance and a resistance due to interaction with adsorbed particles during the transport process (blocking effect). Contrary to previous approaches, the blocking effect is not due to geometrical exclusion, instead it measures how the transport from the bulk is affected by the adsorbed particles. From the general expressions obtained, we have derived coverage expansions for the adsorption rate and the surface correlation function. The theory is applied to the case of colloidal particles interacting through DLVO potentials. This form of the kinetic coefficient is shown to be in agreement with recent experimental results, in which RSA fails.

  2. Cell and Particle Interactions and Aggregation During Electrophoretic Motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Hua; Zeng, Shulin; Loewenberg, Michael; Todd, Paul; Davis, Robert H.

    1996-01-01

    The stability and pairwise aggregation rates of small spherical particles under the collective effects of buoyancy-driven motion and electrophoretic migration are analyzed. The particles are assumed to be non-Brownian, with thin double-layers and different zeta potentials. The particle aggregation rates may be enhanced or reduced, respectively, by parallel and antiparallel alignments of the buoyancy-driven and electrophoretic velocities. For antiparallel alignments, with the buoyancy-driven relative velocity exceeding the electrophoretic relative velocity between two widely-separated particles, there is a 'collision-forbidden region' in parameter space due to hydrodynamic interactions; thus, the suspension becomes stable against aggregation.

  3. Multidimensional stationary probability distribution for interacting active particles

    PubMed Central

    Maggi, Claudio; Marconi, Umberto Marini Bettolo; Gnan, Nicoletta; Di Leonardo, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    We derive the stationary probability distribution for a non-equilibrium system composed by an arbitrary number of degrees of freedom that are subject to Gaussian colored noise and a conservative potential. This is based on a multidimensional version of the Unified Colored Noise Approximation. By comparing theory with numerical simulations we demonstrate that the theoretical probability density quantitatively describes the accumulation of active particles around repulsive obstacles. In particular, for two particles with repulsive interactions, the probability of close contact decreases when one of the two particle is pinned. Moreover, in the case of isotropic confining potentials, the radial density profile shows a non trivial scaling with radius. Finally we show that the theory well approximates the “pressure” generated by the active particles allowing to derive an equation of state for a system of non-interacting colored noise-driven particles. PMID:26021260

  4. Abnormal behaviors detection using particle motion model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yutao; Zhang, Hong; Cheng, Feiyang; Yuan, Ding; You, Yuhu

    2015-03-01

    Human abnormal behaviors detection is one of the most challenging tasks in the video surveillance for the public security control. Interaction Energy Potential model is an effective and competitive method published recently to detect abnormal behaviors, but their model of abnormal behaviors is not accurate enough, so it has some limitations. In order to solve this problem, we propose a novel Particle Motion model. Firstly, we extract the foreground to improve the accuracy of interest points detection since the complex background usually degrade the effectiveness of interest points detection largely. Secondly, we detect the interest points using the graphics features. Here, the movement of each human target can be represented by the movements of detected interest points of the target. Then, we track these interest points in videos to record their positions and velocities. In this way, the velocity angles, position angles and distance between each two points can be calculated. Finally, we proposed a Particle Motion model to calculate the eigenvalue of each frame. An adaptive threshold method is proposed to detect abnormal behaviors. Experimental results on the BEHAVE dataset and online videos show that our method could detect fight and robbery events effectively and has a promising performance.

  5. Single particle density of trapped interacting quantum gases

    SciTech Connect

    Bala, Renu; Bosse, J.; Pathak, K. N.

    2015-05-15

    An expression for single particle density for trapped interacting gases has been obtained in first order of interaction using Green’s function method. Results are easily simplified for homogeneous quantum gases and are found to agree with famous results obtained by Huang-Yang-Luttinger and Lee-Yang.

  6. Wave "Coherency" and Implications for Wave-Particle Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsurutani, Bruce; Lakhina, Gurbax; Remya, Banhu; Lee, Lou

    2016-04-01

    Wave "coherency" was introduced in 2009 by Tsurutani et al. (JGR, doi:10.1029/2008JA013353, 2009) to describe the waves detected in the ~10 to 100 ms duration subelements which are the fundamental components of ~0.1 to 0.5 s chorus "elements". In this talk we will show examples of what we mean by coherency and quasicoherency for: electromagnetic whistler mode chorus, electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves and plasmaspheric hiss waves. We will show how to measure coherency/quasicoherency quantitatively. This will be important for modeling purposes. Perhaps even more important is how coherent waves affect wave-particle interactions. Specific wave examples will be used to show that the pitch angle scattering rate for energetic electrons is roughly 3 orders of magnitude faster than Kennel-Petschek diffusion (which assumes incoherent waves).

  7. Strongly interacting particles on an anisotropic kagome lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hotta, Chisa; Pollmann, Frank

    2009-01-01

    We study a model of strongly interacting spinless fermions and hard-core bosons on an anisotropic kagome lattice near 2/3-filling. Our main focus lies on the strongly anisotropic case in which the nearest-neighbor repulsions V and V' are large compared to the hopping amplitudes |t| and |t'|. When t = t' = 0, the system has a charge ordered insulating ground state where the charges align in striped configurations. Doping one electron or hole into the ground state yields an anisotropic metal at V' > V, where the particle fractionalizes along the V'-bonds while propagates along the V-bonds in a one-body like manner. The sixth order ring exchange processes around the hexagonal unit of the lattice play a crucial role in forming a bound state of fractional charges.

  8. Foamy Virus Protein—Nucleic Acid Interactions during Particle Morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hamann, Martin V.; Lindemann, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Compared with orthoretroviruses, our understanding of the molecular and cellular replication mechanism of foamy viruses (FVs), a subfamily of retroviruses, is less advanced. The FV replication cycle differs in several key aspects from orthoretroviruses, which leaves established retroviral models debatable for FVs. Here, we review the general aspect of the FV protein-nucleic acid interactions during virus morphogenesis. We provide a summary of the current knowledge of the FV genome structure and essential sequence motifs required for RNA encapsidation as well as Gag and Pol binding in combination with details about the Gag and Pol biosynthesis. This leads us to address open questions in FV RNA engagement, binding and packaging. Based on recent findings, we propose to shift the point of view from individual glycine-arginine-rich motifs having functions in RNA interactions towards envisioning the FV Gag C-terminus as a general RNA binding protein module. We encourage further investigating a potential new retroviral RNA packaging mechanism, which seems more complex in terms of the components that need to be gathered to form an infectious particle. Additional molecular insights into retroviral protein-nucleic acid interactions help us to develop safer, more specific and more efficient vectors in an era of booming genome engineering and gene therapy approaches. PMID:27589786

  9. Foamy Virus Protein-Nucleic Acid Interactions during Particle Morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hamann, Martin V; Lindemann, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Compared with orthoretroviruses, our understanding of the molecular and cellular replication mechanism of foamy viruses (FVs), a subfamily of retroviruses, is less advanced. The FV replication cycle differs in several key aspects from orthoretroviruses, which leaves established retroviral models debatable for FVs. Here, we review the general aspect of the FV protein-nucleic acid interactions during virus morphogenesis. We provide a summary of the current knowledge of the FV genome structure and essential sequence motifs required for RNA encapsidation as well as Gag and Pol binding in combination with details about the Gag and Pol biosynthesis. This leads us to address open questions in FV RNA engagement, binding and packaging. Based on recent findings, we propose to shift the point of view from individual glycine-arginine-rich motifs having functions in RNA interactions towards envisioning the FV Gag C-terminus as a general RNA binding protein module. We encourage further investigating a potential new retroviral RNA packaging mechanism, which seems more complex in terms of the components that need to be gathered to form an infectious particle. Additional molecular insights into retroviral protein-nucleic acid interactions help us to develop safer, more specific and more efficient vectors in an era of booming genome engineering and gene therapy approaches. PMID:27589786

  10. Simulation of wave packet tunneling of interacting identical particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozovik, Yu. E.; Filinov, A. V.; Arkhipov, A. S.

    2003-02-01

    We demonstrate a different method of simulation of nonstationary quantum processes, considering the tunneling of two interacting identical particles, represented by wave packets. The used method of quantum molecular dynamics (WMD) is based on the Wigner representation of quantum mechanics. In the context of this method ensembles of classical trajectories are used to solve quantum Wigner-Liouville equation. These classical trajectories obey Hamiltonian-like equations, where the effective potential consists of the usual classical term and the quantum term, which depends on the Wigner function and its derivatives. The quantum term is calculated using local distribution of trajectories in phase space, therefore, classical trajectories are not independent, contrary to classical molecular dynamics. The developed WMD method takes into account the influence of exchange and interaction between particles. The role of direct and exchange interactions in tunneling is analyzed. The tunneling times for interacting particles are calculated.

  11. Electrophoretic interactions and aggregation of colloidal biological particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Robert H.; Nichols, Scott C.; Loewenberg, Michael; Todd, Paul

    1994-01-01

    The separation of cells or particles from solution has traditionally been accomplished with centrifuges or by sedimentation; however, many particles have specific densities close to unity, making buoyancy-driven motion slow or negligible, but most cells and particles carry surface charges, making them ideal for electrophoretic separation. Both buoyancy-driven and electrophoretic separation may be influenced by hydrodynamic interactions and aggregation of neighboring particles. Aggregation by electrophoresis was analyzed for two non-Brownian particles with different zeta potentials and thin double layers migrating through a viscous fluid. The results indicate that the initial rate of electrophoretically-driven aggregation may exceed that of buoyancy-driven aggregation, even under conditions in which buoyancy-driven relative motion of noninteracting particles is dominant.

  12. Model independence of constraints on particle dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Griest, K.; Sadoulet, B.

    1989-03-01

    The connection between the annihilation, elastic, and production cross sections is reviewed, showing how a general lower limit on the interaction rate in a detector is obtained from the requirement that a particle be the dark matter. High energy production experiments further constrain models, making very light dark matter particles unlikely. Special attention is paid to the uncertainties, loopholes and model dependencies that go into the arguments and several examples are given. 12 refs., 6 figs.

  13. Neutral strange particle production in high energy neutrino interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Wolin, E.J.

    1984-01-01

    In a high energy neutrino and anti-neutrino scattering experiment in the Fermilab 15-foot bubble chamber filled with a Neon-Hydrogen mixture, production of the neutral strange particles K, Lambda, and anti-Lambda is observed. Global rates of neutral strange particle production, rates versus event kinematical variables, and strange particle kinematical distributions are presented. Absorption, rescattering, etc. of Lambda particles by the Ne nucleus is shown to be negligible within the statistical significance of the data. Production of both charged states the strange resonance Sigma(1385) is observed. These results are extensively compared to the predictions of the Lund model. The Lund model is found to reproduce the data well in most instances. The transverse momentum distribution for neutral K particles has a tail at high transverse momentum, in disagreement with the exponential decrease predicted by the model. Lambda particles are produced with higher average momentum and anti-Lambda's with lower average momentum than is predicted.

  14. Pseudoanomalies in the interactions of massless particles

    SciTech Connect

    Contopanagos, H.F. ); Einhorn, M.B. Randall Laboratory of Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-1120 )

    1992-02-15

    We discuss evanescent'' processes involving effects which are in principle absent for a field theory involving strictly massless particles but which {ital appear} to survive if such a theory is defined as the massless limit of the corresponding massive theory. Two such effects are discussed for QED: (1) survival of helicity-flip bremsstrahlung in the limit that the electron mass {ital m}{sub {ital e}}{r arrow}0, and (2) for a massive photon but massless electron, nondecoupling of its longitudinal helicity as the photon mass {ital m}{sub {gamma}}{r arrow}0. Based on the general theory, we argue that all such anomalous effects are unobservable in principle and demonstrate this by explicit calculation for these two illustrative examples. This resolves a long-standing paradox of Lee and Nauenberg. However, we show that, given the physical electron mass, the helicity-flip process remains of {ital O}({alpha}) rather than {ital O}({alpha}{ital m}{sub {ital e}}{sup 2}/{ital E}{sup 2}) in the high-energy limit of QED for experimentally realizable electron beams, providing an important background for certain experiments. Our results are quite general and are expected to hold for non-Abelian theories as well.

  15. Energetic particle acceleration at corotating interaction regions: Ulysses results

    SciTech Connect

    Desai, M.I.; Marsden, R.G.; Sanderson, T.R.; Gosling, J.T.

    1997-07-01

    We present here statistical properties of energetic ions (tilde 1 MeV) accelerated by corotating interaction regions observed at the Ulysses spacecraft. We have correlated the tilde 1 MeV proton intensity measured near the trailing edges of the interaction regions with their compression ratio. We interpret our results in terms of the plasma conditions experienced at Ulysses and identify a likely source of the low energy seed particles accelerated at the interaction regions.

  16. Studying bubble-particle interactions by zeta potential distribution analysis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chendi; Wang, Louxiang; Harbottle, David; Masliyah, Jacob; Xu, Zhenghe

    2015-07-01

    Over a decade ago, Xu and Masliyah pioneered an approach to characterize the interactions between particles in dynamic environments of multicomponent systems by measuring zeta potential distributions of individual components and their mixtures. Using a Zetaphoremeter, the measured zeta potential distributions of individual components and their mixtures were used to determine the conditions of preferential attachment in multicomponent particle suspensions. The technique has been applied to study the attachment of nano-sized silica and alumina particles to sub-micron size bubbles in solutions with and without the addition of surface active agents (SDS, DAH and DF250). The degree of attachment between gas bubbles and particles is shown to be a function of the interaction energy governed by the dispersion, electrostatic double layer and hydrophobic forces. Under certain chemical conditions, the attachment of nano-particles to sub-micron size bubbles is shown to be enhanced by in-situ gas nucleation induced by hydrodynamic cavitation for the weakly interacting systems, where mixing of the two individual components results in negligible attachment. Preferential interaction in complex tertiary particle systems demonstrated strong attachment between micron-sized alumina and gas bubbles, with little attachment between micron-sized alumina and silica, possibly due to instability of the aggregates in the shear flow environment.

  17. Asymmetries between strange and antistrange particle production inpion-proton interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Gutierrez, T.D.; Vogt, R.

    2002-01-29

    Recent measurements of the asymmetries between Feynman x-distributions of strange and antistrange hadrons in {pi}{sup -}A interactions show a strong effect as a function of x{sub F}. We calculate strange hadron production in the context of the intrinsic model and make predictions for particle/antiparticle asymmetries in these interactions.

  18. Interaction of Particles with Recirculating Flow Regions inside Cavities of Inertial Microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haddadi, Hamed; di Carlo, Dino

    2015-11-01

    Confined inertial flow over cavities of a microfluidic device leads to formation of recirculating flow regions, i.e flow cells, inside cavities which can entrap particles from the free stream. Besides its significance as a fundamental problem in fluid mechanics of mixtures, understanding particle interaction with recirculating flow regions inside cavities is important in biomedical applications, such as Circulating Tumor Cell (CTC) separation and platelet deposition in arterial stenosis. In the present work, a lattice-Boltzmann model with resolved particle-corner interaction combined with microfluidic experiments enabled improved understanding of the particle exchange within flow cells in confined inertial flow. Formation of a limit cycle trajectory, observed in experiments and numerical simulations, is a key feature in particle accumulation. By varying the dimensions of the cavity and channel Reynolds number, The length and location of the limit cycle trajectory also varies, altering of the rate of particle exchange and level of accumulation with recirculating zones inside cavities.

  19. Ridge Regression for Interactive Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tate, Richard L.

    1988-01-01

    An exploratory study of the value of ridge regression for interactive models is reported. Assuming that the linear terms in a simple interactive model are centered to eliminate non-essential multicollinearity, a variety of common models, representing both ordinal and disordinal interactions, are shown to have "orientations" that are favorable to…

  20. Particle-fluid interactions in rotor-generated vortex flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauleder, Jürgen; Leishman, J. Gordon

    2014-03-01

    An investigation was made into the particle-laden turbulent flow produced by a rotor hovering in ground effect over a mobile sediment bed. Measurements of the two-phase flow were made using time-resolved particle image velocimetry and particle tracking velocimetry as the rotor wake and its embedded vorticity approached and interacted with the sediment bed. Mobilized particles of 45-63 μm diameter (estimated to have a particle Reynolds number of <30 and a Stokes number of about 60) were individually identified and tracked in the resulting flow, with the objective of relating any changes in the vortical flow and turbulence characteristics of the carrier flow phase to the action of the dispersed particle phase. It was observed that, in general, a two-way coupling between the flow phases was produced near the ground, and in some cases, the coupling was very significant. Specifically, it was shown that the uplifted particles altered the carrier flow near the sediment bed, leading to an earlier distortion of the external flow induced by the blade tip vortices and to the accelerated diffusion of the vorticity they contained. The uplifted particles were also seen to modify the overall turbulence field, and when sufficient particle concentrations built up, the particles began to attenuate the turbulence levels. Even in regions with lower particle concentrations, turbulence was found to be attenuated by the indirect action of the particles because of the distortions made to the tip vortices, which were otherwise a significant source of turbulence production. After the tip vortices had diffused further downstream, the uplifted particles were also found to increase the anisotropy of turbulence in the flow.

  1. Multiscale modelling of nucleosome core particle aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyubartsev, Alexander P.; Korolev, Nikolay; Fan, Yanping; Nordenskiöld, Lars

    2015-02-01

    The nucleosome core particle (NCP) is the basic building block of chromatin. Under the influence of multivalent cations, isolated mononucleosomes exhibit a rich phase behaviour forming various columnar phases with characteristic NCP-NCP stacking. NCP stacking is also a regular element of chromatin structure in vivo. Understanding the mechanism of nucleosome stacking and the conditions leading to self-assembly of NCPs is still incomplete. Due to the complexity of the system and the need to describe electrostatics properly by including the explicit mobile ions, novel modelling approaches based on coarse-grained (CG) methods at the multiscale level becomes a necessity. In this work we present a multiscale CG computer simulation approach to modelling interactions and self-assembly of solutions of NCPs induced by the presence of multivalent cations. Starting from continuum simulations including explicit three-valent cobalt(III)hexammine (CoHex3+) counterions and 20 NCPs, based on a previously developed advanced CG NCP model with one bead per amino acid and five beads per two DNA base pair unit (Fan et al 2013 PLoS One 8 e54228), we use the inverse Monte Carlo method to calculate effective interaction potentials for a ‘super-CG’ NCP model consisting of seven beads for each NCP. These interaction potentials are used in large-scale simulations of up to 5000 NCPs, modelling self-assembly induced by CoHex3+. The systems of ‘super-CG’ NCPs form a single large cluster of stacked NCPs without long-range order in agreement with experimental data for NCPs precipitated by the three-valent polyamine, spermidine3+.

  2. Multiscale modelling of nucleosome core particle aggregation.

    PubMed

    Lyubartsev, Alexander P; Korolev, Nikolay; Fan, Yanping; Nordenskiöld, Lars

    2015-02-18

    The nucleosome core particle (NCP) is the basic building block of chromatin. Under the influence of multivalent cations, isolated mononucleosomes exhibit a rich phase behaviour forming various columnar phases with characteristic NCP-NCP stacking. NCP stacking is also a regular element of chromatin structure in vivo. Understanding the mechanism of nucleosome stacking and the conditions leading to self-assembly of NCPs is still incomplete. Due to the complexity of the system and the need to describe electrostatics properly by including the explicit mobile ions, novel modelling approaches based on coarse-grained (CG) methods at the multiscale level becomes a necessity. In this work we present a multiscale CG computer simulation approach to modelling interactions and self-assembly of solutions of NCPs induced by the presence of multivalent cations. Starting from continuum simulations including explicit three-valent cobalt(III)hexammine (CoHex(3+)) counterions and 20 NCPs, based on a previously developed advanced CG NCP model with one bead per amino acid and five beads per two DNA base pair unit (Fan et al 2013 PLoS One 8 e54228), we use the inverse Monte Carlo method to calculate effective interaction potentials for a 'super-CG' NCP model consisting of seven beads for each NCP. These interaction potentials are used in large-scale simulations of up to 5000 NCPs, modelling self-assembly induced by CoHex(3+). The systems of 'super-CG' NCPs form a single large cluster of stacked NCPs without long-range order in agreement with experimental data for NCPs precipitated by the three-valent polyamine, spermidine(3+).

  3. Gas-Particle Interactions in a Microgravity Flow Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Louge, Michel; Jenkins, James

    1999-01-01

    We are developing a microgravity flow cell in which to study the interaction of a flowing gas with relatively massive particles that collide with each other and with the moving boundaries of the cell. The absence of gravity makes possible the independent control of the relative motion of the boundaries and the flow of the gas. The cell will permit gas-particle interactions to be studied over the entire range of flow conditions over which the mixture is not turbulent. Within this range, we shall characterize the viscous dissipation of the energy of the particle fluctuations, measure the influence of particle-phase viscosity on the pressure drop along the cell, and observe the development of localized inhomogeneities that are likely to be associated with the onset of clusters. These measurements and observations should contribute to an understanding of the essential physics of pneumatic transport.

  4. Local wave particle resonant interaction causing energetic particle prompt loss in DIII-D plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, R. B.; Fu, G. Y.; White, R. B.; Wang, X. G.

    2015-11-01

    A new wave particle resonance mechanism is found explaining the first-orbit prompt neutral beam-ion losses induced by shear Alfvén Eigenmodes (AEs) in the DIII-D tokamak. Because of the large banana width, a typical trapped beam ion can only interact locally with a core localised Alfvén Eigenmode for a fraction of its orbit, i.e. part of its inner leg of the banana orbit. These trapped beam ions can experience substantial radial kick within one bounce as long as the phases of the wave seen by the particles are nearly constant during this local interaction. A wave particle resonant condition is found based on the locally averaged particle orbit frequencies over the interaction part of the particle orbit. It is further found that the frequency width of the local resonance is quite large because the interaction time is short. This implies that particles over a considerable region of phase space can interact effectively with the localised AEs and experience large radial kicks within one bounce orbit. The radial kick size is found numerically and analytically to scale linearly in AE amplitude and is about 5 cm for typical experimental parameters. These results are consistent with experimental measurement.

  5. Particle Acceleration at Corotating Interaction Regions in the Heliosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsubouchi, K.

    2014-11-01

    Hybrid simulations are performed to investigate the dynamics of both solar wind protons and interplanetary pickup ions (PUIs) around the corotating interaction region (CIR). The one-dimensional system is applied in order to focus on processes in the direction of CIR propagation. The CIR is bounded by forward and reverse shocks, which are responsible for particle acceleration. The effective acceleration of solar wind protons takes place when the reverse shock (fast wind side) favors a quasi-parallel regime. The diffusive process accounts for this acceleration, and particles can gain energy in a suprathermal range (on the order of 10 keV). In contrast, the PUI acceleration around the shock differs from the conventional model in which the motional electric field along the shock surface accelerates particles. Owing to their large gyroradius, PUIs can gyrate between the upstream and downstream, several proton inertial lengths away from the shock. This "cross-shock" gyration results in a net velocity increase in the field-aligned component, indicating that the magnetic mirror force is responsible for acceleration. The PUIs that remain in the vicinity of the shock for a long duration (tens of gyroperiods) gain much energy and are reflected back toward the upstream. These reflected energetic PUIs move back and forth along the magnetic field between a pair of CIRs that are magnetically connected. The PUIs are repeatedly accelerated in each reflection, leading to a maximum energy gain close to 100 keV. This mechanism can be evaluated in terms of "preacceleration" for the generation of anomalous cosmic rays.

  6. Particle acceleration at corotating interaction regions in the heliosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Tsubouchi, K.

    2014-11-01

    Hybrid simulations are performed to investigate the dynamics of both solar wind protons and interplanetary pickup ions (PUIs) around the corotating interaction region (CIR). The one-dimensional system is applied in order to focus on processes in the direction of CIR propagation. The CIR is bounded by forward and reverse shocks, which are responsible for particle acceleration. The effective acceleration of solar wind protons takes place when the reverse shock (fast wind side) favors a quasi-parallel regime. The diffusive process accounts for this acceleration, and particles can gain energy in a suprathermal range (on the order of 10 keV). In contrast, the PUI acceleration around the shock differs from the conventional model in which the motional electric field along the shock surface accelerates particles. Owing to their large gyroradius, PUIs can gyrate between the upstream and downstream, several proton inertial lengths away from the shock. This 'cross-shock' gyration results in a net velocity increase in the field-aligned component, indicating that the magnetic mirror force is responsible for acceleration. The PUIs that remain in the vicinity of the shock for a long duration (tens of gyroperiods) gain much energy and are reflected back toward the upstream. These reflected energetic PUIs move back and forth along the magnetic field between a pair of CIRs that are magnetically connected. The PUIs are repeatedly accelerated in each reflection, leading to a maximum energy gain close to 100 keV. This mechanism can be evaluated in terms of 'preacceleration' for the generation of anomalous cosmic rays.

  7. Transient bimodality in interacting particle systems

    SciTech Connect

    Calderoni, P.; Pellegrinotti, A.; Presutti, E.; Vares, M.E. )

    1989-05-01

    The authors consider a system of spins which have values {plus minus} 1 and evolve according to a jump Markov process whose generator is the sum of two generators, one describing a spin-flip Glauber process, the other a Kawasaki (stirring) evolution. It was proven elsewhere that if the Kawasaki dynamics is speeded up by a factor {var epsilon}{sup {minus}2}, then, in the limit {var epsilon} {yields} 0 (continuum limit), propagation of chaos holds and the local magnetization solves a reaction-diffusion equation. They choose the parameters of the Glauber interaction so that the potential of the reaction term in the reaction-diffusion equation is a double-well potential with quartic maximum at the origin. They assume further that for each {var epsilon} the system is in a finite interval of Z with {var epsilon}{sup {minus}1} sites and periodic boundary conditions. They specify the initial measure as the product measure with 0 spin average, thus obtaining, in the continuum limit, a constant magnetic profile equal to 0, which is a stationary unstable solution to the reaction-diffusion equation. They prove that at times of the order {var epsilon}{sup {minus}1/2} propagation of chaos does not hold any more and, in the limit as {var epsilon} {yields} 0, the state becomes a nontrivial superposition of Bernoulli measures with parameters corresponding to the minima of the reaction potential. The coefficients of such a superposition depend on time (on the scale {var epsilon}{sup {minus}1/2}) and at large times (on this scale) the coefficient of the term corresponding to the initial magnetization vanishes (transient bimodality). This differs from what was observed by De Masi, Presutti, and Vares, who considered a reaction potential with quadratic maximum and no bimodal effect was seen, as predicted by Broggi, Lugiato, and Colombo.

  8. Computer simulations of particle-bubble interactions and particle sliding using Discrete Element Method.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, R; Ata, S; Wanless, E J; Moreno-Atanasio, R

    2012-09-01

    Three dimensional Discrete Element Method (DEM) computer simulations have been carried out to analyse the kinetics of collision of multiple particles against a stationary bubble and the sliding of the particles over the bubble surface. This is the first time that a computational analysis of the sliding time and particle packing arrangements of multiple particles on the surface of a bubble has been carried out. The collision kinetics of monodisperse (33 μm in radius) and polydisperse (12-33 μm in radius) particle systems have been analysed in terms of the time taken by 10%, 50% and 100% of the particles to collide against the bubble. The dependencies of these collision times on the strength of hydrophobic interactions follow relationships close to power laws. However, minimal sensitivity of the collision times to particle size was found when linear and square relationships of the hydrophobic force with particles radius were considered. The sliding time for single particles has corroborated published theoretical expressions. Finally, a good qualitative comparison with experiments has been observed with respect to the particle packing at the bottom of the bubble after sliding demonstrating the usefulness of computer simulations in the studies of particle-bubble systems.

  9. Dynamic single-domain particle model for magnetite particles with combined crystalline and shape anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graeser, M.; Bente, K.; Buzug, T. M.

    2015-06-01

    The dynamical behaviour of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) is not yet fully understood. In magnetic particle imaging (MPI) SPIONs are used to determine quantitative real-time medical images of a tracer material distribution. For reaching spatial resolution in the sub-millimetre range, MPI requires a well engineered instrumentation providing a magnetic field gradient exceeding 2 T m{}-{1} . However, as the particle performance strongly affects the sensitivity of the imaging process, optimization of the particle parameters is a crucial factor, which is not easy to address. Today most simulations of MPI use the Langevin model to describe the particle behaviour. In equilibrium, the model matches the measured data. If alternating fields in the mid kHz frequency range are applied, the dynamic behaviour of the particles differs from the Langevin theory due to anisotropy effects, particle-particle-interactions and/or exchange interaction in case of multi-core particles. In this paper a model based on previous work is introduced, which was adopted to include crystal and shape anisotropy of immobilised mono-domain single-core particles. The model is applied to typical MPI frequencies and field strengths with different possible superposition of the anisotropy effects, leading to differences in the particle response. It is shown that, despite comparatively high anisotropy constants, the magnetocrystalline anisotropy energy does not quench the signal response for MPI. The constructive superposition of shape and crystal anisotropy leads to the best performance in terms of sensitivity and resolution of the associated imaging modality and slightly reduces the energy barriers compared to a sole-shape anisotropy.

  10. An incompressible two-dimensional multiphase particle-in-cell model for dense particle flows

    SciTech Connect

    Snider, D.M.; O`Rourke, P.J.; Andrews, M.J.

    1997-06-01

    A two-dimensional, incompressible, multiphase particle-in-cell (MP-PIC) method is presented for dense particle flows. The numerical technique solves the governing equations of the fluid phase using a continuum model and those of the particle phase using a Lagrangian model. Difficulties associated with calculating interparticle interactions for dense particle flows with volume fractions above 5% have been eliminated by mapping particle properties to a Eulerian grid and then mapping back computed stress tensors to particle positions. This approach utilizes the best of Eulerian/Eulerian continuum models and Eulerian/Lagrangian discrete models. The solution scheme allows for distributions of types, sizes, and density of particles, with no numerical diffusion from the Lagrangian particle calculations. The computational method is implicit with respect to pressure, velocity, and volume fraction in the continuum solution thus avoiding courant limits on computational time advancement. MP-PIC simulations are compared with one-dimensional problems that have analytical solutions and with two-dimensional problems for which there are experimental data.

  11. Charging of multiple interacting particles by contact electrification.

    PubMed

    Soh, Siowling; Liu, Helena; Cademartiri, Rebecca; Yoon, Hyo Jae; Whitesides, George M

    2014-09-24

    Many processes involve the movement of a disordered collection of small particles (e.g., powders, grain, dust, and granular foods). These particles move chaotically, interact randomly among themselves, and gain electrical charge by contact electrification. Understanding the mechanisms of contact electrification of multiple interacting particles has been challenging, in part due to the complex movement and interactions of the particles. To examine the processes contributing to contact electrification at the level of single particles, a system was constructed in which an array of millimeter-sized polymeric beads of different materials were agitated on a dish. The dish was filled almost completely with beads, such that beads did not exchange positions. At the same time, during agitation, there was sufficient space for collisions with neighboring beads. The charge of the beads was measured individually after agitation. Results of systematic variations in the organization and composition of the interacting beads showed that three mechanisms determined the steady-state charge of the beads: (i) contact electrification (charging of beads of different materials), (ii) contact de-electrification (discharging of beads of the same charge polarity to the atmosphere), and (iii) a long-range influence across beads not in contact with one another (occurring, plausibly, by diffusion of charge from a bead with a higher charge to a bead with a lower charge of the same polarity).

  12. Light scattering and dynamics of interacting Brownian particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsang, T.; Tang, H. T.

    1982-01-01

    The relative motions of interacting Brownian particles in liquids may be described as radial diffusion in an effective potential of the mean force. By using a harmonic approximation for the effective potential, the intermediate scattering function may also be evaluated. For polystyrene spheres of 250 A mean radius in aqueous environment at 0.00125 g/cu cm concentration, the results for the calculated mean square displacement are in qualitative agreement with experimental data from photon correlation spectroscopy. Because of the interactions, the functions deviate considerably from the exponential forms for the free particles.

  13. Experimental Studies of Elementary Particle Interactions at High Energies

    SciTech Connect

    Goulianos, Konstantin

    2013-07-31

    This is the final report of a program of research on ``Experimental Studies of Elementary Particle Interactions at High Energies'' of the High Energy Physics (HEP) group of The Rockefeller University. The research was carried out using the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) and the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. Three faculty members, two research associates, and two postdoctoral associates participated in this project. At CDF, we studied proton-antiproton collisions at an energy of 1.96 TeV. We focused on diffractive interactions, in which the colliding antiproton loses a small fraction of its momentum, typically less than 1%, while the proton is excited into a high mass state retaining its quantum numbers. The study of such collisions provides insight into the nature of the diffractive exchange, conventionally referred to as Pomeron exchange. In studies of W and Z production, we found results that point to a QCD-based interpretation of the diffractive exchange, as predicted in a data-driven phenomenology developed within the Rockefeller HEP group. At CMS, we worked on diffraction, supersymmetry (SUSY), dark matter, large extra dimensions, and statistical applications to data analysis projects. In diffraction, we extended our CDF studies to higher energies working on two fronts: measurement of the single/double diffraction and of the rapidity gap cross sections at 7 TeV, and development of a simulation of diffractive processes along the lines of our successful model used at CDF. Working with the PYTHIA8 Monte Carlo simulation authors, we implemented our model as a PYTHIA8-MBR option in PYTHIA8 and used it in our data analysis. Preliminary results indicate good agreement. We searched for SUSY by measuring parameters in the Constrained Minimal Supersymmetric extension of the Standard Model (CMSSM) and found results which, combined with other experimental constraints and theoretical considerations, indicate that the

  14. Modeling particle loss in ventilation ducts

    SciTech Connect

    Sippola, Mark R.; Nazaroff, William W.

    2003-04-01

    Empirical equations were developed and applied to predict losses of 0.01-100 {micro}m airborne particles making a single pass through 120 different ventilation duct runs typical of those found in mid-sized office buildings. For all duct runs, losses were negligible for submicron particles and nearly complete for particles larger than 50 {micro}m. The 50th percentile cut-point diameters were 15 {micro}m in supply runs and 25 {micro}m in return runs. Losses in supply duct runs were higher than in return duct runs, mostly because internal insulation was present in portions of supply duct runs, but absent from return duct runs. Single-pass equations for particle loss in duct runs were combined with models for predicting ventilation system filtration efficiency and particle deposition to indoor surfaces to evaluate the fates of particles of indoor and outdoor origin in an archetypal mechanically ventilated building. Results suggest that duct losses are a minor influence for determining indoor concentrations for most particle sizes. Losses in ducts were of a comparable magnitude to indoor surface losses for most particle sizes. For outdoor air drawn into an unfiltered ventilation system, most particles smaller than 1 {micro}m are exhausted from the building. Large particles deposit within the building, mostly in supply ducts or on indoor surfaces. When filters are present, most particles are either filtered or exhausted. The fates of particles generated indoors follow similar trends as outdoor particles drawn into the building.

  15. Nonperturbative overproduction of axionlike particles via derivative interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazumdar, Anupam; Qutub, Saleh

    2016-02-01

    Axionlike particles (ALPs) are quite generic in many scenarios for physics beyond the Standard Model. They are pseudoscalar Nambu-Goldstone bosons that appear once any global U (1 ) symmetry is broken spontaneously. The ALPs can gain mass from various nonperturbative quantum effects, such as anomalies or instantons. ALPs can couple to the matter sector including a scalar condensate such as inflaton or moduli field via derivative interactions, which are suppressed by the axion decay constant, fχ . Although weakly interacting, the ALPs can be produced abundantly from the coherent oscillations of a homogeneous condensate. In this paper we will study such a scenario where the ALPs can be produced abundantly, and in some cases can even overclose the Universe via odd- and even-dimensional operators, as long as fχ/ΦI≪1 , where ΦI denotes the initial amplitude of the coherent oscillations of the scalar condensate, ϕ . We will briefly mention how such dangerous overproduction would affect dark matter and dark radiation abundances in the Universe.

  16. Calculating the annihilation rate of weakly interacting massive particles.

    PubMed

    Baumgart, Matthew; Rothstein, Ira Z; Vaidya, Varun

    2015-05-29

    We develop a formalism that allows one to systematically calculate the weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP) annihilation rate into gamma rays whose energy far exceeds the weak scale. A factorization theorem is presented which separates the radiative corrections stemming from initial-state potential interactions from loops involving the final state. This separation allows us to go beyond the fixed order calculation, which is polluted by large infrared logarithms. For the case of Majorana WIMPs transforming in the adjoint representation of SU(2), we present the result for the resummed rate at leading double-log accuracy in terms of two initial-state partial-wave matrix elements and one hard matching coefficient. For a given model, one may calculate the cross section by finding the tree level matching coefficient and determining the value of a local four-fermion operator. The effects of resummation can be as large as 100% for a 20 TeV WIMP. However, for lighter WIMP masses relevant for the thermal relic scenario, leading-log resummation modifies the Sudakov factors only at the 10% level. Furthermore, given comparably sized Sommerfeld factors, the total effect of radiative corrections on the semi-inclusive photon annihilation rate is found to be percent level. The generalization of the formalism to other types of WIMPs is discussed.

  17. Exploring the Standard Model of Particles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johansson, K. E.; Watkins, P. M.

    2013-01-01

    With the recent discovery of a new particle at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) the Higgs boson could be about to be discovered. This paper provides a brief summary of the standard model of particle physics and the importance of the Higgs boson and field in that model for non-specialists. The role of Feynman diagrams in making predictions for…

  18. Interaction between two spherical particles in a nematic liquid crystal.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Jun-ichi; Stark, Holger; Yoneya, Makoto; Yokoyama, Hiroshi

    2004-04-01

    We numerically investigate the interaction between two spherical particles in a nematic liquid crystal mediated by elastic distortions in the orientational order. We pay attention to the cases where two particles with equal radii R0 impose rigid normal anchoring on their surfaces and carry a pointlike topological defect referred to as a hyperbolic hedgehog. To describe the geometry of our system, we use bispherical coordinates, which prove useful in the implementation of boundary conditions at the particle surfaces and at infinity. We adopt the Landau-de Gennes continuum theory in terms of a second-rank tensor order parameter Q(ij) for the description of the orientational order of a nematic liquid crystal. We also utilize an adaptive mesh refinement scheme that has proven to be an efficient way of dealing with topological defects whose core size is much smaller than the particle size. When the two "dipoles," composed of a particle and a hyperbolic hedgehog, are in parallel directions, the two-particle interaction potential is attractive for large interparticle distances D and proportional to D-3 as expected from the form of the dipole-dipole interaction, until the well-defined potential minimum at D approximately 2.46 R0 is reached. For the antiparallel configuration with no hedgehogs between the two particles, the interaction potential is repulsive and behaves as D-2 for D less than or approximately equal 10R0, which is stronger than the dipole-dipole repulsion (approximately D-3 ) expected theoretically as an asymptotic behavior for large D.

  19. Modelling Positron Interactions with Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, G.; Petrovic, Z.; White, R.; Buckman, S.

    2011-05-01

    In this work we link fundamental measurements of positron interactions with biomolecules, with the development of computer codes for positron transport and track structure calculations. We model positron transport in a medium from a knowledge of the fundamental scattering cross section for the atoms and molecules comprising the medium, combined with a transport analysis based on statistical mechanics and Monte-Carlo techniques. The accurate knowledge of the scattering is most important at low energies, a few tens of electron volts or less. The ultimate goal of this work is to do this in soft condensed matter, with a view to ultimately developing a dosimetry model for Positron Emission Tomography (PET). The high-energy positrons first emitted by a radionuclide in PET may well be described by standard formulas for energy loss of charged particles in matter, but it is incorrect to extrapolate these formulas to low energies. Likewise, using electron cross-sections to model positron transport at these low energies has been shown to be in serious error due to the effects of positronium formation. Work was supported by the Australian Research Council, the Serbian Government, and the Ministerio de Ciencia e Innovación, Spain.

  20. Hydrodynamics of interaction of particles (including cells) with surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duszyk, Marek; Doroszewski, Jan

    particle velocity perpendicular to the streamline direction. This phenomenon is the cause of the lateral migration of particles. Neutrally buoyant rigid particles migrate to a certain concentrical region situated between the tube axis and the wall (tubular pinch region). Deformable neutrally buoyant particles migrate towards the tube axis, and deformable non-neutrally buoyant particles may move either toward the tube axis or toward the wall. In the research on the influence of the flow delimiting surface on the motion of particles in suspension a considerable progress has recently been made. However, the phenomena in this field are extremely complex. At present, two main types of approach may be distinguished. On a microscopic level direct interactions between particles and surfaces are analyzed. A macroscopic approach consists in treating particle suspension as fluid, and overall influence of the surface on its properties are studied. A comprehensive theory linking these two levels has not yet emerged.

  1. Acoustofluidics 15: streaming with sound waves interacting with solid particles.

    PubMed

    Sadhal, S S

    2012-08-01

    In Part 15 of the tutorial series "Acoustofluidics-exploiting ultrasonic standing waves forces and acoustic streaming in microfluidic systems for cell and particle manipulation," we examine the interaction of acoustic fields with solid particles. The main focus here is the interaction of standing waves with spherical particles leading to streaming, together with some discussion on one non-spherical case. We begin with the classical problem of a particle at the velocity antinode of a standing wave, and then treat the problem of a sphere at the velocity node, followed by the intermediate situation of a particle between nodes. Finally, we discuss the effect of deviation from sphericity which brings about interesting fluid mechanics. The entire Focus article is devoted to the analysis of the nonlinear fluid mechanics by singular perturbation methods, and the study of the streaming phenomenon that ensues from the nonlinear interaction. With the intention of being instructive material, this tutorial cannot by any means be considered 'complete and comprehensive' owing to the complexity of the class of problems being covered herein.

  2. Acoustofluidics 15: streaming with sound waves interacting with solid particles.

    PubMed

    Sadhal, S S

    2012-08-01

    In Part 15 of the tutorial series "Acoustofluidics-exploiting ultrasonic standing waves forces and acoustic streaming in microfluidic systems for cell and particle manipulation," we examine the interaction of acoustic fields with solid particles. The main focus here is the interaction of standing waves with spherical particles leading to streaming, together with some discussion on one non-spherical case. We begin with the classical problem of a particle at the velocity antinode of a standing wave, and then treat the problem of a sphere at the velocity node, followed by the intermediate situation of a particle between nodes. Finally, we discuss the effect of deviation from sphericity which brings about interesting fluid mechanics. The entire Focus article is devoted to the analysis of the nonlinear fluid mechanics by singular perturbation methods, and the study of the streaming phenomenon that ensues from the nonlinear interaction. With the intention of being instructive material, this tutorial cannot by any means be considered 'complete and comprehensive' owing to the complexity of the class of problems being covered herein. PMID:22744212

  3. A FDR-Preserving Field Theory for Interacting Brownian Particles: One-Loop Theory and MCT

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Bongsoo; Kawasaki, Kyozi

    2008-02-21

    We develop a field theoretical treatment of a model of interacting Brownian particles. We pay particlular attention to the requirement of the time reversal (TR) invariance and the flucutation-dissipation relationship (FDR). Previous field theoretical formulations were found to be inconsistent with this requirement. The method used in the present formulation is a modified version of the auxilliary field method due originally to Andreanov, Biroli and Lefevre (ABL). We recover the correct diffusion law when the interaction is dropped as well as the standard mode coupling equation in the one-loop order calculation for interacting Brownian particle systems.

  4. BDO-RFQ Program Complex of Modelling and Optimization of Charged Particle Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovsyannikov, D. A.; Ovsyannikov, A. D.; Antropov, I. V.; Kozynchenko, V. A.

    2016-09-01

    The article is dedicated to BDO Code program complex used for modelling and optimization of charged particle dynamics with consideration of interaction in RFQ accelerating structures. The structure of the program complex and its functionality are described; mathematical models of charged particle dynamics, interaction models and methods of optimization are given.

  5. Higgs particles interacting via a scalar Dark Matter field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Yajnavalkya; Darewych, Jurij

    2016-07-01

    We study a system of two Higgs particles, interacting via a scalar Dark Matter mediating field. The variational method in the Hamiltonian formalism of QFT is used to derive relativistic wave equations for the two-Higgs system, using a truncated Fock-space trial state. Approximate solutions of the two-body equations are used to examine the existence of Higgs bound states.

  6. The Energetic Particles in Shock-ICME Interaction Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, C.

    2015-12-01

    Previous results show that the energetic particles intensity will decreased in the ICMEs. But, in the year of 2008, Shen et al. reported a definite case that the intensity of solar energetic particles (SEP) in the shock-MC interaction structure increase greatly. They further found that such enhancement is the main cause of the largest SEP event in solar cycle 23. The questions remained are: Did all the shock-ICME(MC) structure cause the enhancement of the SEP intensity? If not, why it only happened in some events? Is there any other mechanism which can make the energetic particle intensity in ICME enhanced? To answer these questions, the SEP signatures in all ICMEs including the shock-ICME interaction structures from 1996 to 2014 are studied detail. It is found that the SEP intensities enhanced in about half of the shock-ICME interaction events. Meanwhile, large fraction of energetic particles intensity enhanced ICMEs are interacted with shocks. To find the possible condition and physical mechanismof such enhancement, the parameters of the shock, ICME(MC) and etc. are detailed analyzed.

  7. Bounds on halo-particle interactions from interstellar calorimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chivukula, Sekhar R.; Cohen, Andrew G.; Dimopoulos, Savas; Walker, Terry P.

    1990-01-01

    It is shown that the existence of neutral interstellar clouds constrains the interaction of any particulate dark-matter candidate with atomic hydrogen to be quite small. Even for a halo particle of mass 1 PeV (10 to the 6 GeV), it is shown that the cross section with hydrogen must be smaller than the typical atomic cross section that is expected for a positively charged particle bound to an electron. The argument presented is that if the clouds are in equilibrium, then the rate at which energy is deposited by collisions with dark-matter particles must be smaller than the rate at which the cloud can cool. This argument is used to constrain the interaction cross section of dark matter with hydrogen. Remarks are made on the general viability of charged dark matter. Comments are also made on a bound which derives from the dynamical stability of the halo.

  8. Nuclear gamma-rays from energetic particle interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramaty, R.; Kozlovsky, B.; Lingenfelter, R. E.

    1979-01-01

    Gamma-ray line emission due to nuclear deexcitation following energetic particle interactions with abundant constituents of cosmic matter is studied. Reactions induced by energetic protons and alpha particles in ambient nuclei (He, C, N, O, Ne, Mg, Al, Si, S, Ca, and Fe) are considered, along with inverse reactions in which energetic nuclei interact with ambient H and He. Line-production cross sections are evaluated by analyzing a large body of laboratory nuclear data. Both prompt gamma rays, produced by direct excitation of nuclear levels and by spallation reactions that leave the secondary nucleus in an excited state, and delayed emission from long-lived radioactive nuclei also produced in the energetic particle reactions are investigated. A line list is provided, and the shapes of the gamma-ray lines are determined. Gamma-ray line production in the interstellar medium is evaluated in detail.

  9. Interaction Terms in Nonlinear Models

    PubMed Central

    Karaca-Mandic, Pinar; Norton, Edward C; Dowd, Bryan

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To explain the use of interaction terms in nonlinear models. Study Design We discuss the motivation for including interaction terms in multivariate analyses. We then explain how the straightforward interpretation of interaction terms in linear models changes in nonlinear models, using graphs and equations. We extend the basic results from logit and probit to difference-in-differences models, models with higher powers of explanatory variables, other nonlinear models (including log transformation and ordered models), and panel data models. Empirical Application We show how to calculate and interpret interaction effects using a publicly available Stata data set with a binary outcome. Stata 11 has added several features which make those calculations easier. LIMDEP code also is provided. Conclusions It is important to understand why interaction terms are included in nonlinear models in order to be clear about their substantive interpretation. PMID:22091735

  10. Interaction of nanosilver particles with human lymphocyte cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhornik, Alena; Baranova, Ludmila; Volotovski, Igor; Chizhik, Sergey; Drozd, Elizaveta; Sudas, Margarita; Buu Ngo, Quoc; Chau Nguyen, Hoai; Huynh, Thi Ha; Hien Dao, Trong

    2015-01-01

    The damaging effects of nanoparticles were hypothesized to be the oxidative stress caused by the formation of reactive oxygen species and initiation of inflammatory reactions. In this context a study on the effects of nanosilver particles on the formation of reactive oxygen species in human lymphocyte culture was carried out. The obtained results showed that fluorescence intensity considerably increased after cells had interacted with nanosilver particles of varying concentrations, indicating the formation of reactive oxygen species and their accumulation in lymphocyte cells. Morphological study of the lymphocyte cells under the effects of nanosilver particles showed that the change in morphology depends on the concentration and size of nanosilver particles: for a size ≤20 nm the lymphocyte cell significantly shrank with pronounced differences in the morphological structure of the cell membrane, but for a size ≥200 nm no change was observed.

  11. A New Analytical Model for Trans-Relativistic Particle Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Peter A.

    2011-01-01

    Most existing analytical models describing the second-order Fermi acceleration of relativistic particles due to collisions with MHD waves assume that the injected seed particles are already highly relativistic, despite the fact that the most prevalent source of particles is usually the local thermal background, which is typically a non-relativistic gas. This presents a problem because the momentum dependence of the momentum diffusion coefficient describing the interaction between the particles and the MHD waves is qualitatively different in the non-relativistic and highly relativistic limits. Since the existing analytical models are not able to address this situation, workers have had to rely on numerical simulations to obtain particle spectra describing the trans-relativistic case. In this work we present the first analytical solution to the global, trans-relativistic problem, obtained by using a hybrid form for the momentum diffusion coefficient, given by the sum of the two asymptotic forms. The model also incorporates the appropriate momentum dependence for the particle escape timescale, and the effect of synchrotron and inverse-Compton losses, which are critical for establishing the location of the high-energy cutoff in the particle spectrum. The results can be used to model the acceleration of particles in AGN and solar environments, and can also be used to compute the spectra of the associated synchrotron and inverse-Compton emission. Applications of both types are discussed.

  12. Observations and Modeling of Geospace Energetic Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xinlin

    2016-07-01

    Comprehensive measurements of energetic particles and electric and magnetic fields from state-of-art instruments onboard Van Allen Probes, in a geo-transfer-like orbit, revealed new features of the energetic particles and the fields in the inner magnetosphere and impose new challenges to any quantitative modeling of the physical processes responsible for these observations. Concurrent measurements of energetic particles by satellites in highly inclined low Earth orbits and plasma and fields by satellites in farther distances in the magnetospheres and in the up stream solar wind are the critically needed information for quantitative modeling and for leading to eventual accurate forecast of the variations of the energetic particles in the magnetosphere. In this presentation, emphasis will be on the most recent advance in our understanding of the energetic particles in the magnetosphere and the missing links for significantly advance in our modeling and forecasting capabilities.

  13. Diffusion and Subdiffusion of Interacting Particles on Comblike Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bénichou, O.; Illien, P.; Oshanin, G.; Sarracino, A.; Voituriez, R.

    2015-11-01

    We study the dynamics of a tracer particle (TP) on a comb lattice populated by randomly moving hard-core particles in the dense limit. We first consider the case where the TP is constrained to move on the backbone of the comb only. In the limit of high density of the particles, we present exact analytical results for the cumulants of the TP position, showing a subdiffusive behavior ˜t3 /4. At longer times, a second regime is observed where standard diffusion is recovered, with a surprising nonanalytical dependence of the diffusion coefficient on the particle density. When the TP is allowed to visit the teeth of the comb, based on a mean-field-like continuous time random walk description, we unveil a rich and complex scenario with several successive subdiffusive regimes, resulting from the coupling between the geometrical constraints of the comb lattice and particle interactions. In this case, remarkably, the presence of hard-core interactions asymptotically speeds up the TP motion along the backbone of the structure.

  14. Magnetic microswimmers: Controlling particle approach through magnetic and hydrodynamic interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meshkati, Farshad; Cheang, U. Kei; Kim, Minjun; Fu, Henry

    2015-11-01

    We investigate magnetic microswimmers actuated by a rotating magnetic field that may be useful for drug delivery, micro-surgery, or diagnostics in human body. For modular swimmers, assembly and disassembly requires understanding the interactions between the swimmer and other modules in the fluid. Here, we discuss possible mechanisms for a frequency-dependent attraction/repulsion between a three-bead, achiral swimmer and other magnetic particles, which represent modular assembly elements. We first investigate the hydrodynamic interaction between a swimmer and nearby particle by studying the Lagrangian trajectories in the vicinity of the swimmer. Then we show that the magnetic forces can be attractive or repulsive depending on the spatial arrangement of the swimmer and particle, with a magnitude that decreases with increasing frequency. Combining magnetic and hydrodynamic effects allows us to understand the overall behavior of magnetic particles near the swimmer. Interestingly, we find that the frequency of rotation can be used to control when the particle can closely approach the swimmer, with potential application to assembly.

  15. Chromatic patchy particles: Effects of specific interactions on liquid structure

    SciTech Connect

    Vasilyev, Oleg A.; Tkachenko, Alexei V.; Klumov, Boris A.

    2015-07-13

    We study the structural and thermodynamic properties of patchy particle liquids, with a special focus on the role of “color,” i.e., specific interactions between individual patches. A possible experimental realization of such “chromatic” interactions is by decorating the particle patches with single-stranded DNA linkers. The complementarity of the linkers can promote selective bond formation between predetermined pairs of patches. By using MD simulations, we compare the local connectivity, the bond orientation order, and other structural properties of the aggregates formed by the “colored” and “colorless” systems. The analysis is done for spherical particles with two different patch arrangements (tetrahedral and cubic). It is found that the aggregated (liquid) phase of the “colorless” patchy particles is better connected, denser and typically has stronger local order than the corresponding “colored” one. This, in turn, makes the colored liquid less stable thermodynamically. Specifically, we predict that in a typical case the chromatic interactions should increase the relative stability of the crystalline phase with respect to the disordered liquid, thus expanding its region in the phase diagram.

  16. Interaction potentials from arbitrary multi-particle trajectory data.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Ian C; Crocker, John C; Sinno, Talid

    2015-09-21

    Understanding the complex physics of particle-based systems at the nanoscale and mesoscale increasingly relies on simulation methods, empowered by exponential advances in computing speed. A major impediment to progress lies in reliably obtaining the interaction potential functions that control system behavior - which are key inputs for any simulation approach - and which are often difficult or impossible to obtain directly using traditional experimental methods. Here, we present a straightforward methodology for generating pair potential functions from large multi-particle trajectory datasets, with no operational constraints regarding their state of equilibration, degree of damping or presence of hydrodynamic interactions. Using simulated datasets, we demonstrate that the method is highly robust against trajectory perturbations from Brownian motion and common errors introduced by particle tracking algorithms. Given the recent rapid pace of advancement in high-speed and three-dimensional microscopy and associated particle tracking algorithms, we anticipate a near future experimental regime where easily collected high-dimensional trajectory sets can be rapidly converted to the detailed interaction and hydrodynamic force fields required to replicate the system's physics in simulation.

  17. Chromatic patchy particles: Effects of specific interactions on liquid structure

    DOE PAGES

    Vasilyev, Oleg A.; Tkachenko, Alexei V.; Klumov, Boris A.

    2015-07-13

    We study the structural and thermodynamic properties of patchy particle liquids, with a special focus on the role of “color,” i.e., specific interactions between individual patches. A possible experimental realization of such “chromatic” interactions is by decorating the particle patches with single-stranded DNA linkers. The complementarity of the linkers can promote selective bond formation between predetermined pairs of patches. By using MD simulations, we compare the local connectivity, the bond orientation order, and other structural properties of the aggregates formed by the “colored” and “colorless” systems. The analysis is done for spherical particles with two different patch arrangements (tetrahedral andmore » cubic). It is found that the aggregated (liquid) phase of the “colorless” patchy particles is better connected, denser and typically has stronger local order than the corresponding “colored” one. This, in turn, makes the colored liquid less stable thermodynamically. Specifically, we predict that in a typical case the chromatic interactions should increase the relative stability of the crystalline phase with respect to the disordered liquid, thus expanding its region in the phase diagram.« less

  18. Electrostatic interactions between charged dielectric particles in an electrolyte solution.

    PubMed

    Derbenev, Ivan N; Filippov, Anatoly V; Stace, Anthony J; Besley, Elena

    2016-08-28

    Theory is developed to address a significant problem of how two charged dielectric particles interact in the presence of a polarizable medium that is a dilute solution of a strong electrolyte. The electrostatic force is defined by characteristic parameters for the interacting particles (charge, radius, and dielectric constant) and for the medium (permittivity and Debye length), and is expressed in the form of a converging infinite series. The limiting case of weak screening and large inter-particle separation is considered, which corresponds to small (macro)ions that carry constant charge. The theory yields a solution in the limit of monopole and dipole terms that agrees exactly with existing analytical expressions, which are generally used to describe ion-ion and ion-molecular interactions in a medium. Results from the theory are compared with DLVO theory and with experimental measurements for the electrostatic force between two PMMA particles contained in a nonpolar solvent (hexadecane) with an added charge control agent. PMID:27586900

  19. Nonlinear interactions in electrophoresis of ideally polarizable particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saintillan, David

    2008-06-01

    In the classical analysis of electrophoresis, particle motion is a consequence of the interfacial fluid slip that arises inside the ionic charge cloud (or Debye screening layer) surrounding the particle surface when an external field is applied. Under the assumptions of thin Debye layers, weak applied fields, and zero polarizability, it can be shown that the electrophoretic velocity of a collection of particles with identical zeta potential is the same as that of an isolated particle, unchanged by interactions [L. D. Reed and F. A. Morrison, "Hydrodynamic interaction in electrophoresis," J. Colloid Interface Sci. 54, 117 (1976)]. When some of these assumptions are relaxed, nonlinear effects may also arise and result in relative motions. First, the perturbation of the external field around the particles creates field gradients, which may result in nonzero dielectrophoretic forces due to Maxwell stresses in the fluid. In addition, if the particles are able to polarize, they can acquire a nonuniform surface charge, and the action of the field on the dipolar charge clouds surrounding them drives disturbance flows in the fluid, causing relative motions by induced-charge electrophoresis. These two nonlinear effects are analyzed in detail in the prototypical case of two equal-sized ideally polarizable spheres carrying no net charge, using accurate boundary-element simulations, along with asymptotic calculations by the method of twin multipole expansions and the method of reflections. It is found that both types of interactions result in significant relative motions and can be either attractive or repulsive depending on the configuration of the spheres.

  20. Tuning the particle-surface interactions in aqueous solutions by soft microgel particles.

    PubMed

    Gong, Xiangjun; Hua, Li; Wei, Jingjing; Ngai, To

    2014-11-11

    Due to the softness and deformability, interaction between colloidal surfaces induced by soft particles varies in a more complex way than for solid particles and thus has attracted much attention in recent years. In the present study, we use total internal reflection microscopy (TIRM) to directly measure the interaction between polystyrene (PS) microparticles and a flat glass surface in a poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) microgel dispersion with concentration varying from dilute (0.1 wt %) to highly concentrated regime (7.5 wt %). Our result shows that the PS particle-surface interactions mediated by the soft microgels are greatly affected by the particle concentration, the configuration of those microgels adsorbed on the surfaces, and the structure and packing of microgels in bulk solution. With increasing the microgel concentration (Cmicrogel), the interaction between the PS particle and surface turned from bridging attraction to steric repulsion, and then depletion attraction, which were mainly governed by the adsorption amount and configuration of microgels on the two surfaces. By further increasing Cmicrogel to condensed situation, structural force with oscillated energy wells was detected. The variation of interactions induced by the soft microgels was further confirmed by optical imaging. Crystallization of the PS microparticles appeared at moderate Cmicrogel; however, crystallization was hindered at higher Cmicrogel where the microgels are highly packed in the bulk solution. Furthermore, using TIRM, microgel packing with local energy well (0.1-1.0 kBT) at the highly condensed state (7.5 wt %) was resolved from the interaction profiles. Therefore, the shear force and modulus generated by such microgel packing can be determined as ∼0.2 pN and tens of mPa, respectively, which are much weaker than data given by conventional active methods.

  1. One-dimensional particle models for heat transfer analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bufferand, H.; Ciraolo, G.; Ghendrih, Ph; Tamain, P.; Bagnoli, F.; Lepri, S.; Livi, R.

    2010-11-01

    For a better understanding of Spitzer-Härm closure restrictions and for estimating the relevancy of this expression when collisionnality decreases, an effort is done in developing simple models that aim at catching the physics of the transition from conductive to free-streaming heat flux. In that perspective, one-dimensional particle models are developed to study heat transfer properties in the direction parallel to the magnetic field in tokamaks. These models are based on particles that carry energy at a specific velocity and that can interact with each other or with heat sources. By adjusting the particle dynamics and particle interaction properties, it is possible to generate a broad range of models of growing complexity. The simplest models can be solved analytically and are used to link particle behavior to general macroscopic heat transfer properties. In particular, some configurations recover Fourier's law and make possible to investigate the dependance of thermal conductivity on temperature. Besides, some configurations where local balance is lost require defining non local expression for heat flux. These different classes of models could then be linked to different plasma configurations and used to study transition from collisional to non-collisional plasma.

  2. The PHOCUS Project: Particle Interactions in the Polar Summer Mesosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gumbel, J.; Hedin, J.; Khaplanov, M.

    2012-12-01

    On the morning of July 21, 2011, the PHOCUS sounding rocket was launched from Esrange, Sweden, into strong noctilucent clouds (NLC) and polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSE) observed by the Esrange lidar and the ESRAD MST radar. The aim of the PHOCUS project (Particles, Hydrogen and Oxygen Chemistry in the Upper Summer mesosphere) is to study mesospheric particles (ice and meteoric smoke) and their interaction with their neutral and charged environment. Starting out from first ideas in 2005, PHOCUS has developed into a comprehensive venture that connects to a number of new and renewed scientific questions. Interactions of interest comprise the charging and nucleation of particles, the relationship between meteoric smoke and ice, and the influence of these particles on gas-phase chemistry. This presentation gives an overview of the campaign and scientific results. The backbone of the campaign was a sounding rocket with 18 instruments from 8 scientific groups in Sweden, Norway, Germany, Austria and the USA. Atmospheric composition and ice particle properties were probed by a set of optical instruments from Stockholm University, in collaboration with the University in Trondheim. Exciting new instrument developments concerned microwave radiometers for in situ measurements of water vapour at 183 and 558 GHz by Chalmers University of Technology. Charged particles were probed by impact detectors from the University of Colorado, the University of Tromsø and the Leibniz Institute of Atmospheric Physics (IAP), complemented by direct particle sampling from Stockholm University. The neutral and charged background state of the atmosphere was quantified by the Technical University Graz, IAP, and the Norwegian Defence Research Establishment. Important ground-based instrumentation included the Esrange lidar, the ESRAD MST radar, the SkiYMET meteor radar and EISCAT.

  3. Small oscillations of two interacting particles in a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    del Pino, L. A.; Curilef, S.

    2016-11-01

    The classical behavior of two interacting particles in the presence of a uniform magnetic field is studied in the small oscillations approximation. Using the Lagrangian formalism, the equations of motion are derived, as are their solutions and constants of motion. Normal modes of oscillations and their corresponding normal coordinates are obtained that strongly depend on the initial condition; therefore, we observe that the oscillation along the line that joins the particles is non-isochronous. In addition, particular attention has been paid to the planar motion, without the pseudomomentum component parallel to the magnetic field, where one longitudinal mode and two transversal modes are obtained.

  4. Enhanced Luminescent Stability through Particle Interactions in Silicon Nanocrystal Aggregates.

    PubMed

    Miller, Joseph B; Dandu, Naveen; Velizhanin, Kirill A; Anthony, Rebecca J; Kortshagen, Uwe R; Kroll, Daniel M; Kilina, Svetlana; Hobbie, Erik K

    2015-10-27

    Close-packed assemblies of ligand-passivated colloidal nanocrystals can exhibit enhanced photoluminescent stability, but the origin of this effect is unclear. Here, we use experiment, simulation, and ab initio computation to examine the influence of interparticle interactions on the photoluminescent stability of silicon nanocrystal aggregates. The time-dependent photoluminescence emitted by structures ranging in size from a single quantum dot to agglomerates of more than a thousand is compared with Monte Carlo simulations of noninteracting ensembles using measured single-particle blinking data as input. In contrast to the behavior typically exhibited by the metal chalcogenides, the measured photoluminescent stability shows an enhancement with respect to the noninteracting scenario with increasing aggregate size. We model this behavior using time-dependent density functional theory calculations of energy transfer between neighboring nanocrystals as a function of nanocrystal size, separation, and the presence of charge and/or surface-passivation defects. Our results suggest that rapid exciton transfer from "bright" nanocrystals to surface trap states in nearest-neighbors can efficiently fill such traps and enhance the stability of emission by promoting the radiative recombination of slowly diffusing excited electrons.

  5. Simulations of Energetic Particles Interacting with Dynamical Magnetic Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussein, M.; Shalchi, A.

    2016-02-01

    We explore the transport of energetic particles in interplanetary space by using test-particle simulations. In previous work such simulations have been performed by using either magnetostatic turbulence or undamped propagating plasma waves. In the current paper we simulate for the first time particle transport in dynamical turbulence. To do so we employ two models, namely the damping model of dynamical turbulence and the random sweeping model. We compute parallel and perpendicular diffusion coefficients and compare our numerical findings with solar wind observations. We show that good agreement can be found between simulations and the Palmer consensus range for both dynamical turbulence models if the ratio of turbulent magnetic field and mean field is δB/B0 = 0.5.

  6. Quantum constraint dynamics for two spinless particles under vector interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crater, Horace W.; van Alstine, Peter

    1984-12-01

    Using Dirac's constraint mechanics we derive two-body Klein-Gordon equations for two spinless particles under mutual vector interaction. We construct generalized mass-shell constraints which incorporate the gauge structure of this interaction for the constituent particles. The resultant direct-interaction formalism does more than just dress static potentials with relativistic two-body kinematics. It includes dynamical recoil effects in the potential characteristic of those that appear in field theories. We demonstrate this classically by showing its canonical equivalence in the slow-motion, weak-potential domain (the semirelativistic approximation) to the Darwin Hamiltonian. We also show this quantum mechanically by demonstrating its equivalence (for weak potentials) to Todorov's homogeneous quasipotential equation (which in turn leads to the standard Breit results for perturbative QED). Not only is our one-body Schrödinger-type equation local and covariant, but also it leads to forms of interaction that make nonperturbative quantum-mechanical sense at short distances. Thus this constraint approach is ideally suited for use in phenomenological applications where a perturbative treatment may be inadequate (with no need for extra smoothing parameters or finite particle size).

  7. Gas interaction effects on lunar bonded particles and their implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukherjee, N. R.

    1976-01-01

    Results are reported for an experimental investigation of gas-interaction effects on different Apollo 11 and Apollo 12 lunar-soil samples containing bonded particles. In the experiments, lunar fines were exposed to pure O2, pure water vapor, HCl, NH3, N2, HCOOH, and CH3NH2, in order to observe whether bonded particles would separate. In addition, repeated gas adsorption/desorption measurements were performed to determine the nature and reactive properties of the particle surfaces, and surface areas were measured for comparison with analogous terrestrial samples to determine whether the surface areas of highly radiation-damaged particles were larger or smaller. It is found that N2 is apparently ineffective in separating bonded particles and that the ratio of Apollo 11 to Apollo 12 bonded particles separated by a particular gas exposure ranges from 2.5 to 3.0. Possible reasons for differences in material surface properties at the two Apollo sites are considered, and it is concluded that material from a certain depth at some other site was transported to the Apollo 12 site and mixed with the original material in recent years (considerably less than 2000 years ago).

  8. Experimental studies of wave-particle interactions in space using particle correlators: Results and future developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gough, M. P.; Buckley, A. M.; Carozzi, T.; Beloff, N.

    The technique of particle correlation measures directly electron modulations that result from naturally occurring and actively stimulated wave-particle interactions in space plasmas. In the past this technique has been used for studies of beam-plasma interactions, caused by both natural auroral electron beams via sounding rockets and by artificially generated electron beams on Space Shuttle missions (STS-46, STS-75). It has also been applied to studies of how electrons become energised by waves injected from in-situ transmitters (e.g OEDIPUS-C sounding rocket). All four ESA Cluster-II spacecraft launched in 2000 to study the outer magnetosphere, cusp, and bow shock were implemented with electron correlators. Here the prevalent weaker wave-particle interactions have been more difficult to extract, however, the application of new statistical algorithms has permitted these correlators to provide a novel insight into the plasma turbulence that occurs. Present work involves technical improvements to both sensor design and correlator implementation that enable many electron energy-angle combinations to be simultaneously monitored for wave-particle interactions. A broad energy-angle range spectrograph connected to a multi-channel, multi-frequency range FPGA implemented array of correlators is scheduled to fly early 2004. Neural network techniques previously flown on STS-46 and STS-75, and statistical tests developed for Cluster-II will be used on-board to select data to be transmitted.

  9. Effects of hydrodynamic retardation and interparticle interactions on the self-assembly in a drying droplet containing suspended solid particles.

    PubMed

    Lebovka, N I; Khrapatiy, S; Melnyk, R; Vygornitskii, M

    2014-05-01

    Self-assembly of particles, suspended in a drying droplet, were studied by the Monte Carlo method. The Brownian diffusion of particles was simulated accounting for the effect of hydrodynamic retardation and interparticle interactions. The model allowed for explaining formation of the "coffee ring" patterns even without accounting for the radial flows towards the three-phase contact line. Morphologies of the drying patterns and their dependence on interparticle interactions and concentration of particles are discussed. PMID:25353800

  10. Characterization of the interactions within fine particle mixtures in highly concentrated suspensions for advanced particle processing.

    PubMed

    Otsuki, Akira; Bryant, Gary

    2015-12-01

    This paper aims to summarize recent investigations into the dispersion of fine particles, and the characterization of their interactions, in concentrated suspensions. This summary will provide a better understanding of the current status of this research, and will provide useful feedback for advanced particle processing. Such processes include the fabrication of functional nanostructures and the sustainable beneficiation of complex ores. For example, there has been increasing demand for complex ore utilization due to the noticeable decrease in the accessibility of high grade and easily extractable ores. In order to maintain the sustainable use of mineral resources, the effective beneficiation of complex ores is urgently required. It can be successfully achieved only with selective particle/mineral dispersion/liberation and the assistance of mineralogical and particle characterization. PMID:26298173

  11. Characterization of the interactions within fine particle mixtures in highly concentrated suspensions for advanced particle processing.

    PubMed

    Otsuki, Akira; Bryant, Gary

    2015-12-01

    This paper aims to summarize recent investigations into the dispersion of fine particles, and the characterization of their interactions, in concentrated suspensions. This summary will provide a better understanding of the current status of this research, and will provide useful feedback for advanced particle processing. Such processes include the fabrication of functional nanostructures and the sustainable beneficiation of complex ores. For example, there has been increasing demand for complex ore utilization due to the noticeable decrease in the accessibility of high grade and easily extractable ores. In order to maintain the sustainable use of mineral resources, the effective beneficiation of complex ores is urgently required. It can be successfully achieved only with selective particle/mineral dispersion/liberation and the assistance of mineralogical and particle characterization.

  12. Modeling of Fine-Particle Formation in Turbulent Flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raman, Venkat; Fox, Rodney O.

    2016-01-01

    The generation of nanostructured particles in high-temperature flames is important both for the control of emissions from combustion devices and for the synthesis of high-value chemicals for a variety of applications. The physiochemical processes that lead to the production of fine particles in turbulent flames are highly sensitive to the flow physics and, in particular, the history of thermochemical compositions and turbulent features they encounter. Consequently, it is possible to change the characteristic size, structure, composition, and yield of the fine particles by altering the flow configuration. This review describes the complex multiscale interactions among turbulent fluid flow, gas-phase chemical reactions, and solid-phase particle evolution. The focus is on modeling the generation of soot particles, an unwanted pollutant from automobile and aircraft engines, as well as metal oxides, a class of high-value chemicals sought for specialized applications, including emissions control. Issues arising due to the numerical methods used to approximate the particle number density function, the modeling of turbulence-chemistry interactions, and model validation are also discussed.

  13. Contribution from the interaction Hamiltonian to the expectation value of particle number with the non-equilibrium quantum field theory

    SciTech Connect

    Hotta, Ryuuichi; Morozumi, Takuya; Takata, Hiroyuki

    2012-07-27

    We develop the method analyzing particle number non-conserving phenomena with non-equilibrium quantum field-theory. In this study, we consider a CP violating model with interaction Hamiltonian that breaks particle number conservation. To derive the quantum Boltzmann equation for the particle number, we solve Schwinger-Dyson equation, which are obtained from two particle irreducible closed-time-path (2PI CTP) effective action. In this calculation, we show the contribution from interaction Hamiltonian to the time evolution of expectation value of particle number.

  14. Optical properties of soot particles: measurement - model comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forestieri, S.; Lambe, A. T.; Lack, D.; Massoli, P.; Cross, E. S.; Dubey, M.; Mazzoleni, C.; Olfert, J.; Freedman, A.; Davidovits, P.; Onasch, T. B.; Cappa, C. D.

    2013-12-01

    Soot, a product of incomplete combustion, plays an important role in the earth's climate system through the absorption and scattering of solar radiation. In order to accurately model the direct radiative impact of black carbon (BC), the refractive index and shape dependent scattering and absorption characteristics must be known. At present, the assumed shape remains highly uncertain because BC particles are fractal-like, being agglomerates of smaller (20-40 nm) spherules, yet traditional optical models such as Mie theory typically assume a spherical particle morphology. To investigate the ability of various optical models to reproduce observed BC optical properties, we measured light absorption and extinction coefficients of methane and ethylene flame soot particles. Optical properties were measured by multiple instruments: absorption by a dual cavity ringdown photoacoustic spectrometer (CRD-PAS), absorption and scattering by a 3-wavelength photoacoustic/nephelometer spectrometer (PASS-3) and extinction and scattering by a cavity attenuated phase shift spectrometer (CAPS). Soot particle mass was quantified using a centrifugal particle mass analyzer (CPMA) and mobility size was measured with a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS). Measurements were made for nascent soot particles and for collapsed soot particles following coating with dioctyl sebacate or sulfuric acid and thermal denuding to remove the coating. Wavelength-dependent refractive indices for the sampled particles were derived by fitting the observed absorption and extinction cross-sections to spherical particle Mie theory and Rayleigh-Debye-Gans theory. The Rayleigh-Debye-Gans approximation assumes that the absorption properties of soot are dictated by the individual spherules and neglects interaction between them. In general, Mie theory reproduces the observed absorption and extinction cross-sections for particles with volume equivalent diameters (VED) < ~160 nm, but systematically predicts lower

  15. Tunneling dynamics of two interacting one-dimensional particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gharashi, Seyed Ebrahim; Blume, D.

    2015-09-01

    We present one-dimensional simulation results for the cold-atom tunneling experiments by the Heidelberg group [Zürn et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 075303 (2012), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.108.075303; Zürn et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 175302 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.111.175302] on one or two 6Li atoms confined by a potential that consists of an approximately harmonic optical trap plus a linear magnetic-field gradient. At the noninteracting particle level, we find that the Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin approximation may not be used as a reliable tool to extract the trapping potential parameters from the experimentally measured tunneling data. We use our numerical calculations along with the experimental tunneling rates for the noninteracting system to reparametrize the trapping potential. The reparametrized trapping potentials serve as input for our simulations of two interacting particles. For two interacting (distinguishable) atoms on the upper branch, we reproduce the experimentally measured tunneling rates, which vary over several orders of magnitude, fairly well. For infinitely strong interaction strength, we compare the time dynamics with that of two identical fermions and discuss the implications of fermionization on the dynamics. For two attractively interacting atoms on the molecular branch, we find that single-particle tunneling dominates for weakly attractive interactions, while pair tunneling dominates for strongly attractive interactions. Our first set of calculations yields qualitative but not quantitative agreement with the experimentally measured tunneling rates. We obtain quantitative agreement with the experimentally measured tunneling rates if we allow for a weakened radial confinement.

  16. A mechanistic interpretation of the resonant wave-particle interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chim, Chi Yung; O'Neil, Thomas M.

    2016-05-01

    This paper provides a simple mechanistic interpretation of the resonant wave-particle interaction of Landau. For the simple case of a Langmuir wave in a Vlasov plasma, the non-resonant electrons satisfy an oscillator equation that is driven resonantly by the bare electric field from the resonant electrons, and in the case of wave damping, this complex driver field is of a phase to reduce the oscillation amplitude. The wave-particle resonant interaction also occurs in waves governed by 2D E × B drift dynamics, such as a diocotron wave. In this case, the bare electric field from the resonant electrons causes E × B drift motion back in the core plasma, reducing the amplitude of the wave.

  17. [Research in elementary particles and interactions]. Technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Adair, R.; Sandweiss, J.; Schmidt, M.

    1992-05-01

    Research of the Yale University groups in the areas of elementary particles and their interactions are outlined. Work on the following topics is reported: development of CDF trigger system; SSC detector development; study of heavy flavors at TPL; search for composite objects produced in relativistic heavy-ion collisions; high-energy polarized lepton-nucleon scattering; rare K{sup +} decays; unpolarized high-energy muon scattering; muon anomalous magnetic moment; theoretical high-energy physics including gauge theories, symmetry breaking, string theory, and gravitation theory; study of e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} interactions with the SLD detector at SLAC; and the production and decay of particles containing charm and beauty quarks.

  18. Modeling selective local interactions with memory

    PubMed Central

    Galante, Amanda; Levy, Doron

    2012-01-01

    Recently we developed a stochastic particle system describing local interactions between cyanobacteria. We focused on the common freshwater cyanobacteria Synechocystis sp., which are coccoidal bacteria that utilize group dynamics to move toward a light source, a motion referred to as phototaxis. We were particularly interested in the local interactions between cells that were located in low to medium density areas away from the front. The simulations of our stochastic particle system in 2D replicated many experimentally observed phenomena, such as the formation of aggregations and the quasi-random motion of cells. In this paper, we seek to develop a better understanding of group dynamics produced by this model. To facilitate this study, we replace the stochastic model with a system of ordinary differential equations describing the evolution of particles in 1D. Unlike many other models, our emphasis is on particles that selectively choose one of their neighbors as the preferred direction of motion. Furthermore, we incorporate memory by allowing persistence in the motion. We conduct numerical simulations which allow us to efficiently explore the space of parameters, in order to study the stability, size, and merging of aggregations. PMID:24244060

  19. Strange particle production in neutrino-neon charged current interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Plano, R.; Baker, N.J.; Connolly, P.L.; Kahn, S.A.; Murtagh, M.J.; Palmer, R.B.; Samios, N.P.; Tanaka, M.; Baltay, C.; Bregman, M.

    1986-01-01

    Neutral strange particle production in charged-current muon-neutrino interactions have been studied in the Fermilab 15-foot neon bubble chamber. Associated production is expected to be the major source of strange particles in charged-current neutrino interactions. sigma-neutral and xi-minus production by neutrinos was observed. The dependence on various leptonic and hadronic variables is investigated. A fit to single and associated production of s, s/anti-s, and c quarks is described based on the number of single and double strange particle production events. Inclusive neutral strange particle decays (V/sup 0/) production rates as a fraction of all charged-current events are measured and are tabulated. The lambda/K ratio is found to be 0.39 +- 0.04 and the fraction of lambda coming from sigma-neutral is (16 +- 5)%. The single- and double V/sup 0/ production was used to determine the associated s anti-s production rate and single s-quark production rate. 13 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs. (LEW)

  20. Interfacial interactions between plastic particles in plastics flotation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chong-qing; Wang, Hui; Gu, Guo-hua; Fu, Jian-gang; Lin, Qing-quan; Liu, You-nian

    2015-12-01

    Plastics flotation used for recycling of plastic wastes receives increasing attention for its industrial application. In order to study the mechanism of plastics flotation, the interfacial interactions between plastic particles in flotation system were investigated through calculation of Lifshitz-van der Waals (LW) function, Lewis acid-base (AB) Gibbs function, and the extended Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek potential energy profiles. The results showed that van der Waals force between plastic particles is attraction force in flotation system. The large hydrophobic attraction, caused by the AB Gibbs function, is the dominant interparticle force. Wetting agents present significant effects on the interfacial interactions between plastic particles. It is found that adsorption of wetting agents promotes dispersion of plastic particles and decreases the floatability. Pneumatic flotation may improve the recovery and purity of separated plastics through selective adsorption of wetting agents on plastic surface. The relationships between hydrophobic attraction and surface properties were also examined. It is revealed that there exists a three-order polynomial relationship between the AB Gibbs function and Lewis base component. Our finding provides some insights into mechanism of plastics flotation.

  1. Interfacial interactions between plastic particles in plastics flotation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chong-qing; Wang, Hui; Gu, Guo-hua; Fu, Jian-gang; Lin, Qing-quan; Liu, You-nian

    2015-12-01

    Plastics flotation used for recycling of plastic wastes receives increasing attention for its industrial application. In order to study the mechanism of plastics flotation, the interfacial interactions between plastic particles in flotation system were investigated through calculation of Lifshitz-van der Waals (LW) function, Lewis acid-base (AB) Gibbs function, and the extended Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek potential energy profiles. The results showed that van der Waals force between plastic particles is attraction force in flotation system. The large hydrophobic attraction, caused by the AB Gibbs function, is the dominant interparticle force. Wetting agents present significant effects on the interfacial interactions between plastic particles. It is found that adsorption of wetting agents promotes dispersion of plastic particles and decreases the floatability. Pneumatic flotation may improve the recovery and purity of separated plastics through selective adsorption of wetting agents on plastic surface. The relationships between hydrophobic attraction and surface properties were also examined. It is revealed that there exists a three-order polynomial relationship between the AB Gibbs function and Lewis base component. Our finding provides some insights into mechanism of plastics flotation. PMID:26337962

  2. The Classical Theory of Light Colors: a Paradigm for Description of Particle Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazilu, Nicolae; Agop, Maricel; Gatu, Irina; Iacob, Dan Dezideriu; Butuc, Irina; Ghizdovat, Vlad

    2016-06-01

    The color is an interaction property: of the interaction of light with matter. Classically speaking it is therefore akin to the forces. But while forces engendered the mechanical view of the world, the colors generated the optical view. One of the modern concepts of interaction between the fundamental particles of matter - the quantum chromodynamics - aims to fill the gap between mechanics and optics, in a specific description of strong interactions. We show here that this modern description of the particle interactions has ties with both the classical and quantum theories of light, regardless of the connection between forces and colors. In a word, the light is a universal model in the description of matter. The description involves classical Yang-Mills fields related to color.

  3. Role of Polymer Segment-Particle Surface Interactions in Controlling Nanoparticle Dispersions in Concentrated Polymer Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, So Youn; Zukoski, Charles F.

    2014-09-24

    The microstructure of particles suspended in concentrated polymer solutions is examined with small-angle X-ray scattering and small-angle neutron scattering. Of interest are changes to long wavelength particle density fluctuations in ternary mixtures of silica nanoparticles suspended in concentrated solutions of poly(ethylene glycol). The results are understood in terms of application of the pseudo-two-component polymer reference interaction site model (PRISM) theory modified to account for solvent addition via effective contact strength of interfacial attraction, εpc, in an implicit manner. The combined experimental-theoretical study emphasizes the complex interactions between solvent, polymer, and particle surface that control particle miscibility but also demonstrate that these factors can all be understood in terms of variations of εpc.

  4. The Particle Beam Optics Interactive Computer Laboratory for Personal Computers and Workstations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillespie, G. H.; Hill, B.; Brown, N.; Martono, H.; Moore, J.; Babcock, C.

    1997-05-01

    The Particle Beam Optics Interactive Computer Laboratory (PBO Lab) is a new software concept to aid both students and professionals in modeling charged particle beams and particle beam optical systems. The PBO Lab has been designed to run on several computer platforms and includes four key elements: a graphic user interface shell; (2) a knowledge database on electric and magnetic optics elements, including interactive tutorials on the physics of charged particle optics and on the technology used in particle optics hardware; (3) a graphic construction kit for users to interactively and visually construct optical beam lines; and (4) a set of charged particle optics computational engines that compute transport matrices, beam envelopes and trajectories, fit parameters to optical constraints, and carry out similar calculations for the graphically-defined beam lines. The primary computational engines in the first generation PBO Lab are the third-order TRANSPORT code, the multiple ray tracing program TURTLE, and a new first-order matrix code that includes an envelope space charge model with support for calculating single trajectories in the presence of the beam space charge. Progress on the PBO Lab development is described and a demonstration will be given.

  5. Modeling Deposition of Inhaled Particles

    EPA Science Inventory

    The mathematical modeling of the deposition and distribution of inhaled aerosols within human lungs is an invaluable tool in predicting both the health risks associated with inhaled environmental aerosols and the therapeutic dose delivered by inhaled pharmacological drugs. Howeve...

  6. Surface charge features of kaolinite particles and their interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Vishal

    Kaolinite is both a blessing and a curse. As an important industrial mineral commodity, kaolinite clays are extensively used in the paper, ceramic, paint, plastic and rubber industries. In all these applications the wettability, aggregation, dispersion, flotation and thickening of kaolinite particles are affected by its crystal structure and surface properties. It is therefore the objective of this research to investigate selected physical and surface chemical properties of kaolinite, specifically the surface charge of kaolinite particles. A pool of advanced analytical techniques such as XRD, XRF, SEM, AFM, FTIR and ISS were utilized to investigate the morphological and surface chemistry features of kaolinite. Surface force measurements revealed that the silica tetrahedral face of kaolinite is negatively charged at pH>4, whereas the alumina octahedral face of kaolinite is positively charged at pH<6, and negatively charged at pH>8. Based on electrophoresis measurements, the apparent iso-electric point for kaolinite particles was determined to be less than pH 3. In contrast, the point of zero charge was determined to be pH 4.5 by titration techniques, which corresponds to the iso-electric point of between pH 4 and 5 as determined by surface force measurements. Results from kaolinite particle interactions indicate that the silica face--alumina face interaction is dominant for kaolinite particle aggregation at low and intermediate pH values, which explains the maximum shear yield stress at pH 5-5.5. Lattice resolution images reveal the hexagonal lattice structure of these two face surfaces of kaolinite. Analysis of the silica face of kaolinite showed that the center of the hexagonal ring of oxygen atoms is vacant, whereas the alumina face showed that the hexagonal surface lattice ring of hydroxyls surround another hydroxyl in the center of the ring. High resolution transmission electron microscopy investigation of kaolinite has indicated that kaolinite is indeed

  7. Secondary Cosmic Ray Particles Due to GCR Interactions in the Earth's Atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Battistoni, G.; Cerutti, F.; Fasso, A.; Ferrari, A.; Garzelli, M.V.; Lantz, M.; Muraro, S. Pinsky, L.S.; Ranft, J.; Roesler, S.; Sala, P.R.; /Milan U. /INFN, Milan

    2009-06-16

    Primary GCR interact with the Earth's atmosphere originating atmospheric showers, thus giving rise to fluxes of secondary particles in the atmosphere. Electromagnetic and hadronic interactions interplay in the production of these particles, whose detection is performed by means of complementary techniques in different energy ranges and at different depths in the atmosphere, down to the Earth's surface. Monte Carlo codes are essential calculation tools which can describe the complexity of the physics of these phenomena, thus allowing the analysis of experimental data. However, these codes are affected by important uncertainties, concerning, in particular, hadronic physics at high energy. In this paper we shall report some results concerning inclusive particle fluxes and atmospheric shower properties as obtained using the FLUKA transport and interaction code. Some emphasis will also be given to the validation of the physics models of FLUKA involved in these calculations.

  8. Probabilistic Solar Energetic Particle Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, James H., Jr.; Dietrich, William F.; Xapsos, Michael A.

    2011-01-01

    To plan and design safe and reliable space missions, it is necessary to take into account the effects of the space radiation environment. This is done by setting the goal of achieving safety and reliability with some desired level of confidence. To achieve this goal, a worst-case space radiation environment at the required confidence level must be obtained. Planning and designing then proceeds, taking into account the effects of this worst-case environment. The result will be a mission that is reliable against the effects of the space radiation environment at the desired confidence level. In this paper we will describe progress toward developing a model that provides worst-case space radiation environments at user-specified confidence levels. We will present a model for worst-case event-integrated solar proton environments that provide the worst-case differential proton spectrum. This model is based on data from IMP-8 and GOES spacecraft that provide a data base extending from 1974 to the present. We will discuss extending this work to create worst-case models for peak flux and mission-integrated fluence for protons. We will also describe plans for similar models for helium and heavier ions.

  9. Interactive geologic modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Glaeser, J.D.; Krajewski, S.A.

    1984-04-01

    Improved success in finding hydrocarbons and minerals depends on developing geologic models from seismic, gravity, and magnetic data that most closely approximate real-world settings. Although data processing remains the chore of mainframe and minicomputers, interpretations and modeling of geologic and geophysical information now are best accomplished on personal computers because these computers afford the explorationist maximum freedom to shape and fine tune geophysical evaluations. Three case histories use the GEOSIM geophysical modeling systems to delineate exploration targets. The first example is Silurian Niagaran reef trends in the Michigan basin. Here, differences in seismic reef anomalies result from variations in carbonate-evaporite stratigraphy encasing the reefs, reef geometry, and reef reservoir parameters. These variations which influence real seismic-response differences can be successfully matched using appropriate geologic models in generating synthetic seismic reef anomalies. The second example applies gravity and magnetic data to seismic modeling of a Wyoming coal field. Detailed seismic stratigraphy helps locate those portions of the field having multiple seams, although it does not resolve individual economic zones. Gravity data do identify pinchout margins of multiseam zones and pinchouts between principal coals. Magnetic data are then used to delineate the burn (clinker) margin. Seismic modeling of subtle stratigraphic traps is the broader area of exploration interest contained in the first 2 examples. In the third, successfully modeled and tested examples of lateral changes in deltaic facies and of faulted, unconformity-bounded continent-margin sequences are shown to be successful guides to reinterpretation of seismic data.

  10. Cosmological and Particle Physics Constraints on a New Non-Abelian SU(3) Gauge Model for Ordinary/Dark Matter Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, O.; Bertulani, C. A.; Hussein, M. S.; Paula, W. de; Frederico, T.

    2016-08-01

    We propose a mirror model for ordinary and dark matter that assumes a new SU(3) gauge group of transformations, as a natural extension of the Standard Model (SM). A close study of big bang nucleosynthesis, baryon asymmetries, cosmic microwave background bounds, galaxy dynamics, together with the Standard Model assumptions, help us to set a limit on the mass and width of the new gauge boson. The cross section for the elastic scattering of a dark proton by an ordinary proton is estimated and compare to the WIMP-nucleon experimental upper bounds. It is observed that all experimental bounds for the various cross sections can be accommodated consistently within the gauge model. We also suggest a way for direct detection of the new gauge boson via one example of a SM forbidden process: e+ + p → μ + + X, where X=Λ or Λ c .

  11. Polarizable protein model for Dissipative Particle Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peter, Emanuel; Lykov, Kirill; Pivkin, Igor

    2015-11-01

    In this talk, we present a novel polarizable protein model for the Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) simulation technique, a coarse-grained particle-based method widely used in modeling of fluid systems at the mesoscale. We employ long-range electrostatics and Drude oscillators in combination with a newly developed polarizable water model. The protein in our model is resembled by a polarizable backbone and a simplified representation of the sidechains. We define the model parameters using the experimental structures of 2 proteins: TrpZip2 and TrpCage. We validate the model on folding of five other proteins and demonstrate that it successfully predicts folding of these proteins into their native conformations. As a perspective of this model, we will give a short outlook on simulations of protein aggregation in the bulk and near a model membrane, a relevant process in several Amyloid diseases, e.g. Alzheimer's and Diabetes II.

  12. Multiscale Modeling of Particles Embedded in High Speed Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Sean; Sen, Oishik; Jacobs, Gustaaf; Udaykumar, H. S.

    2015-06-01

    Problems involving propagation of shock waves through a cloud of particles are inherently multiscale. The system scale is governed by macro-scale conservation equations, which average over solid and fluid phases. The averaging process results in source terms that represent the unresolved momentum exchange between the solid phase and the fluid phase. Typically, such source terms are modeled using empirical correlations derived from physical experiments conducted in a limited parameter space. The focus of the current research is to advance the multiscale modeling of shocked particle-laden gas flows; particle- (i.e. meso-)scale computations are performed to resolve the dynamics of ensembles of particles and closure laws are obtained from the meso-scale for use in the macro-scale equations. Closure models are constructed from meso-scale simulations using the Dynamic Kriging method. The presentation will demonstrate the multiscale approach by connecting meso-scale simulations to an Eulerian-Lagrangian macro-scale model of particle laden flows. The technique is applied to study shock interactions with particle curtains in shock tubes and the results are compared with experimental data in such systems. We gratefully acknowledge the financial support by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research under Grant Number FA9550-12-1-0115 and the National Science Foundation under grant number DMS-115631.

  13. Colloids exposed to random potential energy landscapes: From particle number density to particle-potential and particle-particle interactions.

    PubMed

    Bewerunge, Jörg; Sengupta, Ankush; Capellmann, Ronja F; Platten, Florian; Sengupta, Surajit; Egelhaaf, Stefan U

    2016-07-28

    Colloidal particles were exposed to a random potential energy landscape that has been created optically via a speckle pattern. The mean particle density as well as the potential roughness, i.e., the disorder strength, were varied. The local probability density of the particles as well as its main characteristics were determined. For the first time, the disorder-averaged pair density correlation function g((1))(r) and an analogue of the Edwards-Anderson order parameter g((2))(r), which quantifies the correlation of the mean local density among disorder realisations, were measured experimentally and shown to be consistent with replica liquid state theory results.

  14. Model of resonance scattering of composite particles

    SciTech Connect

    Kuperin, Yu.A.; Makarov, K.A.; Pavlov, B.S.

    1987-04-01

    A model of binary reactions in a system of particles having a nontrivial internal structure is constructed by the theory of extensions of a nonrelativistic Hamiltonian with the addition of a space of internal degrees of freedom. The model is used to describe hadron-hadron scattering at low and intermediate energies.

  15. Particle tracks and the mechanism of decoherence in a model bubble chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blasi, Raffaella; Pascazio, Saverio; Takagi, Shin

    1998-12-01

    We put forward a toy model for a “bubble chamber” and study its interaction with an incoming object particle. We discuss the notion of particle “tracks” inside the bubble chamber and analyze the mechanisms that provoke a loss of quantum mechanical coherence (decoherence). The model is solvable and provides interesting insights into some of the most salient features of the interaction between a microscopic particle and a macroscopic device.

  16. Dispersive approaches for three-particle final state interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Peng; Danilkin, Igor V.; Szczepaniak, Adam P.

    2015-10-30

    In this work, we presented different representations of Khuri-Treiman equation, the advantage and disadvantage of each representations are discussed. With a scattering amplitude toy model, we also studied the sensitivity of solution of KT equation to left-hand cut of toy model and to the different approximate methods. At last, we give a brief discussion of Watson's theorem when three particles in final states are involved.

  17. Modeling nanoscale hydrodynamics by smoothed dissipative particle dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Huan; Mundy, Christopher J.; Schenter, Gregory K.; Voulgarakis, Nikolaos K.

    2015-05-01

    Thermal fluctuation and hydrophobicity are two hallmarks of fluid hydrodynamics on the nano-scale. It is a challenge to consistently couple the small length and time scale phenomena associated with molecular interaction with larger scale phenomena. The development of this consistency is the essence of mesoscale science. In this study, we use a nanoscale fluid model based on smoothed dissipative particle dynamics that accounts for the phenomena associated with density fluctuations and hydrophobicity. We show consistency in the fluctuation spectrum across scales. In doing so, it is necessary to account for finite fluid particle size. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the present model can capture the void probability and solvation free energy of nonpolar hard particles of different sizes. The present fluid model is well suited for an understanding of emergent phenomena in nano-scale fluid systems.

  18. Cache Allocation in CDN: An Evolutionary Game Generalized Particle Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Xiang; Lau, Francis C. M.; Gao, Daqi

    Content distribution networks (CDNs) increasingly have been used to reduce the response times experienced by Internet users through placing surrogates close to the clients. This paper presents an object replacement approach based on an evolutionary game generalized particle model (G-GPM). We first propose a problem model for CDNs. The CDN model is then fit into a gravitational field. The origin servers and surrogates are regarded as two kinds of particles which are located in two force-fields. The cache allocation problem is thus transformed into the kinematics and dynamics of the particles in the annular and the round force-fields. The G-GPM approach is unique in four aspects: 1) direct viewing of individual and overall optimization; 2) parallel computing (lower time complexity); 3) multi-objective solution; and 4) being able to deal with some social interactions behaviors.

  19. Modeling nanoscale hydrodynamics by smoothed dissipative particle dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Lei, Huan; Mundy, Christopher J.; Schenter, Gregory K.; Voulgarakis, Nikolaos

    2015-05-21

    Thermal fluctuation and hydrophobicity are two hallmarks of fluid hydrodynamics on the nano-scale. It is a challenge to consistently couple the small length and time scale phenomena associated with molecular interaction with larger scale phenomena. The development of this consistency is the essence of mesoscale science. In this study, we develop a nanoscale fluid model based on smoothed dissipative particle dynamics that accounts for the phenomena of associated with density fluctuations and hydrophobicity. We show consistency in the fluctuation spectrum across scales. In doing so, it is necessary to account for finite fluid particle size. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the present model can capture of the void probability and solvation free energy of apolar particles of different sizes. The present fluid model is well suited for a understanding emergent phenomena in nano-scale fluid systems.

  20. Understanding particle size and distance driven competition of interparticle interactions and effective single-particle anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacakova, B.; Mantlikova, A.; Niznansky, D.; Kubickova, S.; Vejpravova, J.

    2016-05-01

    Magnetic response of single-domain nanoparticles (NPs) in concentrated systems is strongly affected by mutual interparticle interactions. However, particle proximity significantly influences single-particle effective anisotropy. To solve which of these two phenomena plays a dominant role in the magnetic response of real NP systems, systematic study on samples with well-defined parameters is required. In our work, we prepared a series of nanocomposites constituted of highly-crystalline and well-isolated CoFe2O4 NPs embedded in an amorphous SiO2 matrix using a single-molecule precursor method. This preparation method enabled us to reach a wide interval of particle size and concentration. We observed that the characteristic parameters of the single-domain state (coercivity, blocking temperature) and dipole-dipole interaction energy ({{E}\\text{d-\\text{d}}} ) scaled with each other and increased with increasing {{≤ft({{d}\\text{XRD}}/r\\right)}3} , where d XRD was the NP diameter and r was the interparticle distance. Our results are in excellent agreement with Monte-Carlo simulations of the particle growth. Moreover, we demonstrated that the contribution of {{E}\\text{d-\\text{d}}} acting as an additional energetic barrier to the superspin reversal or as an average static field did not sufficiently explain how the concentrated NP systems responded to an external magnetic field. Alternations in the blocking temperature and coercivity of our NP systems accounted for reformed relaxations of the NP superspins and modified effective anisotropy energy of the interacting NPs. Therefore, the concept of modified NP effective anisotropy explains the magnetic response of our concentrated NP systems better than the concept of the energy barrier influenced by interparticle interactions.

  1. Quantum corrections to the gravitational interaction of massless particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackburn, Thomas J., Jr.

    Donoghue's effective field theory of quantum gravity is extended to include the interaction of massless particles. The collinear divergences which accompany massless particles are examined first in the context of QED and then in quantum gravity. A result of Weinberg is extended to show how these divergences vanish in the case of gravity. The scattering cross section for hypothetical massless scalar particles is computed first, because it is simpler, and the results are then extended to photons. Some terms in the cross section are shown to correspond to the Aichelburg-Sexl metric surrounding a massless particle and to quantum corrections to that metric. The scattering cross section is also applied to calculate quantum corrections to the bending of starlight, and though small, the result obtained is qualitatively different than in the classical case. Since effective field theory includes the low-energy degrees of freedom which generate collinear divergences, the results presented here will remain relevant in any future quantum theory of gravity.

  2. Interspecies modeling of inhaled particle deposition patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Martonen, T.B.; Zhang, Z.; Yang, Y.

    1992-01-01

    To evaluate the potential toxic effects of ambient contaminants or therapeutic effects of airborne drugs, inhalation exposure experiments can be performed with surrogate laboratory animals. Herein, an interspecies particle deposition theory is presented for physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling. It is derived to improve animal testing protocols. The computer code describes the behavior and fate of particles in the lungs of human subjects and a selected surrogate, the laboratory rat. In the simulations CO2 is integrated with exposure chamber atmospheres, and its concentrations regulated to produce rat breathing profiles corresponding to selected levels of human physical activity. The dosimetric model is used to calculate total, compartmental (i.e., tracheobronchial and pulmonary), and localized distribution patterns of inhaled particles in rats and humans for comparable ventilatory conditions. It is demonstrated that the model can be used to predetermine the exposure conditions necessary to produce deposition patterns in rats that are equivalent to those in humans at prescribed physical activities.

  3. Modeling pollutant transport using a meshless-lagrangian particle model

    SciTech Connect

    Carrington, D. B.; Pepper, D. W.

    2002-01-01

    A combined meshless-Lagrangian particle transport model is used to predict pollutant transport over irregular terrain. The numerical model for initializing the velocity field is based on a meshless approach utilizing multiquadrics established by Kansa. The Lagrangian particle transport technique uses a random walk procedure to depict the advection and dispersion of pollutants over any type of surface, including street and city canyons

  4. Monte Carlo modeling of radiative heat transfer in particle-laden flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farbar, Erin; Boyd, Iain D.; Esmaily-Moghadam, Mahdi

    2016-11-01

    Three-dimensional numerical simulations are applied to model radiative heat transfer in a dispersed particle phase exhibiting preferential concentration typical of a turbulent, particle-laden flow environment. The dispersed phase is composed of micron-sized nickel particles, and the carrier phase is non-participating. The simulations are performed for a snapshot of the particle field using the Monte Carlo Ray Tracing method, and the spectral dependence of the optical properties is considered. Interaction between the particles and radiation is modeled by projecting the particle locations onto an Eulerian mesh. Results show that the optically thin approximation results in errors in predicted particle heat transfer of up to 35% at some locations in the particle field. Oxidation is shown to change the absorption efficiency of the particles significantly, while consideration of non-spherical particle shapes results in relatively small changes in the predicted optical properties of the particles.

  5. Erosion processes due to energetic particle-surface interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Schmid, K.; Roth, J.

    2010-05-20

    The interaction of the fast particles from the hot plasma of a magnetic confinement fusion experiment with the first wall is one of the most challenging problems toward the realization of a fusion power plant. The erosion of the first wall by the fast particles leads to life time limitations and the radiative cooling of the plasma by the eroded impurity species lowers the energy confinement. Apart from these obvious consequences also the trapping of large quantities of the fuelling species (deuterium and tritium) in re-deposited layers of the eroded species poses a problem due to accumulation of large radiative inventories and plasma fuelling inefficiency. The source of all these challenges is the erosion of first wall components due to physical sputtering, chemical erosion and radiation enhanced sublimation. This paper will give an overview about the physical principles behind these erosion channels.

  6. Interaction between solar energetic particles and interplanetary grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strazzulla, G.; Calcagno, L.; Foti, G.; Sheng, K. L.

    Some laboratory-studied effects induced by the fluence of fast ions on frosts of astrophysical interest are summarized. The results are applied to the interaction between energetic solar ions and interplanetary dust grains assumed to be cometary debris which spends about one-million yr before being collected in the earth's atmosphere or colliding on the moon's surface. The importance of erosion by particles to the stability of ice grains is confirmed. The build up of carbonaceous material by ion fluence on hydrocarbon containing grains is discussed. It is suggested that these new materials could be the glue which cements submicron silicate particles to form a complex agglomeration whose density increases with increasing proton fluence (packing effect). The IR spectra of laboratory synthesized carbonaceous material are compared with those observed in some carbonaceous meteoritic extracts.

  7. Resonant wave-particle interactions modified by intrinsic Alfvenic turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, C. S.; Lee, K. H.; Wang, C. B.; Wu, D. J.

    2012-08-15

    The concept of wave-particle interactions via resonance is well discussed in plasma physics. This paper shows that intrinsic Alfven waves can qualitatively modify the physics discussed in conventional linear plasma kinetic theories. It turns out that preexisting Alfven waves can affect particle motion along the ambient magnetic field and, moreover, the ensuing force field is periodic in time. As a result, the meaning of the usual Landau and cyclotron resonance conditions becomes questionable. It turns out that this effect leads us to find a new electromagnetic instability. In such a process intrinsic Alfven waves not only modify the unperturbed distribution function but also result in a different type of cyclotron resonance which is affected by the level of turbulence. This instability might enable us to better our understanding of the observed radio emission processes in the solar atmosphere.

  8. Wave-particle interactions in the magnetosphere of Uranus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurth, W. S.; Gurnett, D. A.; Scarf, F. L.; Coroniti, F. V.

    1988-01-01

    The Voyager 2 encounter of Uranus has provided observations of plasma waves in and near the magnetosphere. These data, while the first from Uranus, will also be the only direct information on wave-particle interactions at this planet for many years to come. The observations include electrostatic waves upstream of the bow shock, turbulence in the shock, Bernstein emissions and whistler mode waves in the magnetosphere, broadband electrostatic noise in the magnetotail, and a number of the other types of plasma waves which have yet to be clearly identified. Each of these types of waves exist in a plasma environment which both supports the growth of the waves and is modified by interactions with the waves. Wave-particle interactions provide the channels through which the waves can accelerate, scatter, or thermalize the plasmas. The most spectacular example in the case of Uranus is the extremely intense whistler mode activity in the inner magnetosphere which is the source of strong pitch angle diffusion. The resulting electron precipitation is sufficient to produce the auroral emissions observed by Voyager. The strong diffusion, however, presents the problem of supplying electrons in the range of 5 to 40 keV in order to support the losses to the atmosphere.

  9. Wave-particle interactions in the magnetosphere of Uranus

    SciTech Connect

    Kurth, W.S.; Gurnett, D.A.; Scarf, F.L.; Coroniti, F.V.

    1988-07-01

    The Voyager 2 encounter of Uranus has provided observations of plasma waves in and near the magnetosphere. These data, while the first from Uranus, will also be the only direct information on wave-particle interactions at this planet for many years to come. The observations include electrostatic waves upstream of the bow shock, turbulence in the shock, Bernstein emissions and whistler mode waves in the magnetosphere, broadband electrostatic noise in the magnetotail, and a number of the other types of plasma waves which have yet to be clearly identified. Each of these types of waves exist in a plasma environment which both supports the growth of the waves and is modified by interactions with the waves. Wave-particle interactions provide the channels through which the waves can accelerate, scatter, or thermalize the plasmas. The most spectacular example in the case of Uranus is the extremely intense whistler mode activity in the inner magnetosphere which is the source of strong pitch angle diffusion. The resulting electron precipitation is sufficient to produce the auroral emissions observed by Voyager. The strong diffusion, however, presents the problem of supplying electrons in the range of 5 to 40 keV in order to support the losses to the atmosphere.

  10. Wave-particle interactions in the magnetosphere of Uranus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurth, W. S.; Gurnett, D. A.; Coroniti, F. V.; Scarf, F. L.

    1991-01-01

    The Voyager 2 encounter of Uranus has provided observations of plasma waves in and near the magnetosphere. These data, while the first from Uranus, will also be the only direct information on wave-particle interactions at this planet for many years to come. The observations include electrostatic waves upstream of the bow shock, turbulence in the shock Bernstein emissions and whistler mode waves in the magnetosphere, broadband electrostatic noise in the magnetotail, and a number of the other types of plasma waves which have yet to be clearly identified. Each of these types of waves exist in a plasma environment which both supports the growth of the waves and is modified by interactions with the waves. Wave-particle interactions provide the channels through which the waves can accelerate, scatter, or thermalize the plasmas. The most spectacular example in the case of Uranus is the extremely intense whistler mode activity in the inner magnetosphere which is the source of strong pitch angle diffusion. The resulting electron precipitation is sufficient to produce the auroral emissions observed by Voyager. The strong diffusion, however, presents the problem of supplying electrons in the range of 5 to 40 keV in order to support the losses to the atmosphere.

  11. Lower Bound on the Mean Square Displacement of Particles in the Hard Disk Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richthammer, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    The hard disk model is a 2D Gibbsian process of particles interacting via pure hard core repulsion. At high particle density the model is believed to show orientational order, however, it is known not to exhibit positional order. Here we investigate to what extent particle positions may fluctuate. We consider a finite volume version of the model in a box of dimensions 2 n × 2 n with arbitrary boundary configuration, and we show that the mean square displacement of particles near the center of the box is bounded from below by c log n. The result generalizes to a large class of models with fairly arbitrary interaction.

  12. Role of particle masses in the magnetic field generation driven by the parity violating interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvornikov, Maxim

    2016-09-01

    Recently the new model for the generation of strong large scale magnetic fields in neutron stars, driven by the parity violating interaction, was proposed. In this model, the magnetic field instability results from the modification of the chiral magnetic effect in presence of the electroweak interaction between ultrarelativistic electrons and nucleons. In the present work we study how a nonzero mass of charged particles, which are degenerate relativistic electrons and nonrelativistic protons, influences the generation of the magnetic field in frames of this approach. For this purpose we calculate the induced electric current of these charged particles, electroweakly interacting with background neutrons and an external magnetic field, exactly accounting for the particle mass. This current is calculated by two methods: using the exact solution of the Dirac equation for a charged particle in external fields and computing the polarization operator of a photon in matter composed of background neutrons. We show that the induced current is vanishing in both approaches leading to the zero contribution of massive particles to the generated magnetic field. We discuss the implication of our results for the problem of the magnetic field generation in compact stars.

  13. Model of Image Artifacts from Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willson, Reg

    2008-01-01

    A mathematical model of image artifacts produced by dust particles on lenses has been derived. Machine-vision systems often have to work with camera lenses that become dusty during use. Dust particles on the front surface of a lens produce image artifacts that can potentially affect the performance of a machine-vision algorithm. The present model satisfies a need for a means of synthesizing dust image artifacts for testing machine-vision algorithms for robustness (or the lack thereof) in the presence of dust on lenses. A dust particle can absorb light or scatter light out of some pixels, thereby giving rise to a dark dust artifact. It can also scatter light into other pixels, thereby giving rise to a bright dust artifact. For the sake of simplicity, this model deals only with dark dust artifacts. The model effectively represents dark dust artifacts as an attenuation image consisting of an array of diffuse darkened spots centered at image locations corresponding to the locations of dust particles. The dust artifacts are computationally incorporated into a given test image by simply multiplying the brightness value of each pixel by a transmission factor that incorporates the factor of attenuation, by dust particles, of the light incident on that pixel. With respect to computation of the attenuation and transmission factors, the model is based on a first-order geometric (ray)-optics treatment of the shadows cast by dust particles on the image detector. In this model, the light collected by a pixel is deemed to be confined to a pair of cones defined by the location of the pixel s image in object space, the entrance pupil of the lens, and the location of the pixel in the image plane (see Figure 1). For simplicity, it is assumed that the size of a dust particle is somewhat less than the diameter, at the front surface of the lens, of any collection cone containing all or part of that dust particle. Under this assumption, the shape of any individual dust particle artifact

  14. Indirect probe of electroweak-interacting particles at future lepton colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harigaya, Keisuke; Ichikawa, Koji; Kundu, Anirban; Matsumoto, Shigeki; Shirai, Satoshi

    2015-09-01

    Various types of electroweak-interacting particles, which have non-trivial charges under the SU(2) L × U(1) Y gauge symmetry, appear in various extensions of the Standard Model. These particles are good targets of future lepton colliders, such as the International Linear Collider (ILC), the Compact LInear Collider (CLIC) and the Future Circular Collider of electrons and positrons (FCC-ee). An advantage of the experiments is that, even if their beam energies are below the threshold of the production of the new particles, quantum effects of the particles can be detected through high precision measurements. We estimate the capability of future lepton colliders to probe electroweak-interacting particles through the quantum effects, with particular focus on the wino, the Higgsino and the so-called minimal dark matters, and found that a particle whose mass is greater than the beam energy by 100-1000 GeV is detectable by measuring di-fermion production cross sections with O(0.1)% accuracy. In addition, with the use of the same analysis, we also discuss the sensitivity of the future colliders to model independent higher dimensional operators, and found that the cutoff scales corresponding to the operators can be probed up to a few ten TeV.

  15. Computer Models Simulate Fine Particle Dispersion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    Through a NASA Seed Fund partnership with DEM Solutions Inc., of Lebanon, New Hampshire, scientists at Kennedy Space Center refined existing software to study the electrostatic phenomena of granular and bulk materials as they apply to planetary surfaces. The software, EDEM, allows users to import particles and obtain accurate representations of their shapes for modeling purposes, such as simulating bulk solids behavior, and was enhanced to be able to more accurately model fine, abrasive, cohesive particles. These new EDEM capabilities can be applied in many industries unrelated to space exploration and have been adopted by several prominent U.S. companies, including John Deere, Pfizer, and Procter & Gamble.

  16. Particle production beyond the thermal model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolschin, Georg

    2016-07-01

    The sources of particle production in relativistic heavy-ion collisions are investigated from RHIC to LHC energies. Whereas charged-hadron production in the fragmentation sources follows a ln(sNN/s0) law, particle production in the mid-rapidity low-x gluon-gluon source exhibits a much stronger dependence ∝ ln3(sNN/s0), and becomes dominant between RHIC and LHC energies. The equilibration of the three sources is investigated in a relativistic diffusion model (RDM). It agrees with the thermal model only for t → ∞.

  17. Quark interchange model of baryon interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Maslow, J.N.

    1983-01-01

    The strong interactions at low energy are traditionally described by meson field theories treating hadrons as point-like particles. Here a mesonic quark interchange model (QIM) is presented which takes into account the finite size of the baryons and the internal quark structure of hadrons. The model incorporates the basic quark-gluon coupling of quantum chromodynamics (QCD) and the MIT bag model for color confinement. Because the quark-gluon coupling constant is large and it is assumed that confinement excludes overlap of hadronic quark bags except at high momenta, a non-perturbative method of nuclear interactions is presented. The QIM allows for exchange of quark quantum numbers at the bag boundary between colliding hadrons mediated at short distances by a gluon exchange between two quarks within the hadronic interior. This generates, via a Fierz transformation, an effective space-like t channel exchange of color singlet (q anti-q) states that can be identified with the low lying meson multiplets. Thus, a one boson exchange (OBE) model is obtained that allows for comparison with traditional phenomenological models of nuclear scattering. Inclusion of strange quarks enables calculation of YN scattering. The NN and YN coupling constants and the nucleon form factors show good agreement with experimental values as do the deuteron low energy data and the NN low energy phase shifts. Thus, the QIM provides a simple model of strong interactions that is chirally invariant, includes confinement and allows for an OBE form of hadronic interaction at low energies and momentum transfers.

  18. Hamiltonian description of a self-consistent interaction between charged particles and electromagnetic waves.

    PubMed

    Bachelard, R; Chandre, C; Vittot, M

    2008-09-01

    The Hamiltonian description of the self-consistent interaction between an electromagnetic plane wave and a copropagating beam of charged particles is considered. We show how the motion can be reduced to a one-dimensional Hamiltonian model (in a canonical setting) from the Vlasov-Maxwell Poisson brackets. The reduction to this paradigmatic Hamiltonian model is performed using a Lie algebraic formalism which allows us to preserve the Hamiltonian character at each step of the derivation.

  19. Nano to micro particle size distribution measurement in the fluid by interactive force apparatus for fine particle processing.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Toyohisa; Dodbiba, Gjergj; Okaya, Katsunori; Matsuo, Seiji; Wang, Li Pang; Onda, Kana; Otsuki, Akira

    2013-12-01

    The direct measurement of fine particles size distribution of dispersions or coagulations in liquid is important for water purification, fine particles separation for recycling and mineral processing, as well as the new material production. The nano to micro particle size is usually measured by light scattering method; however, it is difficult to measure at high concentration of suspension. Here, a novel dynamical method by using the interactive force measurement between particles in liquid under electric field is used for measuring distribution of fine particle. Three types of nano to submicron particles, that is well-dispersed nano particles, coagulated nano particles and settled submicron particles, have been measured by interactive force measurement method. The particle size distributions are compered with the size distributions of dried particles measured by TEM or SEM. The well-dispersed nano particle size distribution by interactive force measurement is influenced by the nano size surfactant micelles. The size distribution of coagulated nano particles in water is larger than the result by TEM. On the other hand, the submicron nickel particle size distribution is similar with the one analyzed by SEM.

  20. Nano to micro particle size distribution measurement in the fluid by interactive force apparatus for fine particle processing.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Toyohisa; Dodbiba, Gjergj; Okaya, Katsunori; Matsuo, Seiji; Wang, Li Pang; Onda, Kana; Otsuki, Akira

    2013-12-01

    The direct measurement of fine particles size distribution of dispersions or coagulations in liquid is important for water purification, fine particles separation for recycling and mineral processing, as well as the new material production. The nano to micro particle size is usually measured by light scattering method; however, it is difficult to measure at high concentration of suspension. Here, a novel dynamical method by using the interactive force measurement between particles in liquid under electric field is used for measuring distribution of fine particle. Three types of nano to submicron particles, that is well-dispersed nano particles, coagulated nano particles and settled submicron particles, have been measured by interactive force measurement method. The particle size distributions are compered with the size distributions of dried particles measured by TEM or SEM. The well-dispersed nano particle size distribution by interactive force measurement is influenced by the nano size surfactant micelles. The size distribution of coagulated nano particles in water is larger than the result by TEM. On the other hand, the submicron nickel particle size distribution is similar with the one analyzed by SEM. PMID:24266212

  1. Nonlinear wave particle interaction in the Earth's foreshock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazelle, C.; LeQueau, D.; Meziane, K.; Lin, R. P.; Parks, G.; Reme, H.; Sanderson, T.; Lepping, R. P.

    1997-01-01

    The possibility that ion beams could provide a free energy source for driving an ion/ion instability responsible for the ULF wave occurrence is investigated. For this, the wave dispersion relation with the observed parameters is solved. Secondly, it is shown that the ring-like distributions could then be produced by a coherent nonlinear wave-particle interaction. It tends to trap the ions into narrow cells in velocity space centered around a well-defined pitch-angle, directly related to the saturation wave amplitude in the analytical theory. The theoretical predictions with the observations are compared.

  2. Study of the Interaction of Fluxes of Annihilating Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazarov, A. A.; Feropontova, N. M.

    2015-12-01

    A study of interacting particle fluxes in the form of an infinite linear queueing system with positive and negative requests is presented for different types of such systems. For the first class of systems with exponential service a stationary probability distribution of the number of positive requests in the system has been found. For the second class of systems, for the case of arbitrary service, the study is performed by the method of asymptotic analysis. Asymptotic equivalence of the systems under consideration is demonstrated.

  3. Interaction for solitary waves in coasting charged particle beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shi-Wei; Qi, Xin; Han, Jiu-Ning; Hong, Xue-Ren; Shi, Yu-Ren; Duan, Wen-shan; Yang, Lei

    2014-03-01

    By using the extended Poincare-Lighthill-Kuo perturbation method, the collision of solitary waves in a coasting charged particle beams is studied. The results show that the system admits a solution with two solitary waves, which move in opposite directions and can be described by two Korteweg-deVries equation in small-amplitude limit. The collision of two solitary waves is elastic, and after the interaction they preserve their original properties. Then the weak phase shift in traveling direction of collision between two solitary waves is derived explicitly.

  4. Interaction for solitary waves in coasting charged particle beams

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Shi-Wei; Hong, Xue-Ren; Shi, Yu-Ren; Duan, Wen-shan; Qi, Xin; Yang, Lei; Han, Jiu-Ning

    2014-03-15

    By using the extended Poincare-Lighthill-Kuo perturbation method, the collision of solitary waves in a coasting charged particle beams is studied. The results show that the system admits a solution with two solitary waves, which move in opposite directions and can be described by two Korteweg-deVries equation in small-amplitude limit. The collision of two solitary waves is elastic, and after the interaction they preserve their original properties. Then the weak phase shift in traveling direction of collision between two solitary waves is derived explicitly.

  5. Modeling light scattering from diesel soot particles

    SciTech Connect

    Hull, Patricia; Shepherd, Ian; Hunt, Arlon

    2002-07-16

    The Mie model is widely used to analyze light scattering from particulate aerosols. The Diesel Particle Scatterometer (DPS), for example, determines the size and optical properties of diesel exhaust particles that are characterized by measuring three angle-dependent elements of the Mueller scattering matrix. These elements are then fitted using Mie calculations with a Levenburg-Marquardt optimization program. This approach has achieved good fits for most experimental data. However, in many cases, the predicted real and imaginary parts of the index of refraction were less than that for solid carbon. To understand this result and explain the experimental data, we present an assessment of the Mie model by use of a light scattering model based on the coupled dipole approximation. The results indicate that the Mie calculation can be used to determine the largest dimension of irregularly shaped particles at sizes characteristic of Diesel soot and, for particles of known refractive index, tables can be constructed to determine the average porosity of the particles from the predicted index of refraction.

  6. Generalized slave-particle method for extended Hubbard models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgescu, Alexandru B.; Ismail-Beigi, Sohrab

    2015-12-01

    We introduce a set of generalized slave-particle models for extended Hubbard models that treat localized electronic correlations using slave-boson decompositions. Our models automatically include two slave-particle methods of recent interest, the slave-rotor and slave-spin methods, as well as a ladder of new intermediate models where one can choose which of the electronic degrees of freedom (e.g., spin or orbital labels) are treated as correlated degrees of freedom by the slave bosons. In addition, our method removes the aberrant behavior of the slave-rotor model, where it systematically overestimates the importance of electronic correlation effects for weak interaction strength, by removing the contribution of unphysical states from the bosonic Hilbert space. The flexibility of our formalism permits one to separate and isolate the effect of correlations on the key degrees of freedom.

  7. Parallelization of the Lagrangian Particle Dispersion Model

    SciTech Connect

    Buckley, R.L.; O`Steen, B.L.

    1997-08-01

    An advanced stochastic Lagrangian Particle Dispersion Model (LPDM) is used by the Atmospheric Technologies Group (ATG) to simulate contaminant transport. The model uses time-dependent three-dimensional fields of wind and turbulence to determine the location of individual particles released into the atmosphere. This report describes modifications to LPDM using the Message Passing Interface (MPI) which allows for execution in a parallel configuration on the Cray Supercomputer facility at the SRS. Use of a parallel version allows for many more particles to be released in a given simulation, with little or no increase in computational time. This significantly lowers (greater than an order of magnitude) the minimum resolvable concentration levels without ad hoc averaging schemes and/or without reducing spatial resolution. The general changes made to LPDM are discussed and a series of tests are performed comparing the serial (single processor) and parallel versions of the code.

  8. Particle size and particle-particle interactions on tensile properties and reinforcement of corn flour particles in natural rubber

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Renewable corn flour has a significant reinforcement effect in natural rubber. The corn flour was hydrolyzed and microfluidized to reduce its particle size. Greater than 90% of the hydrolyzed corn flour had an average size of ~300 nm, a reduction of 33 times compared to unhydrolyzed corn flour. Comp...

  9. Shock acceleration of energetic particles in corotating interaction regions in the solar wind

    SciTech Connect

    Fisk, L.A.; Lee, M.A.

    1980-04-15

    A simple shock model for the acceleration of energetic particles in corotating interaction regions (CIRs) in the solar wind is presented. Particles are accelerated at the forward and reverse shocks which bound the CIR by being compressed between the shock fronts and magnetic irregularities upstream from the shocks, or by being compressed between upstream irregularities and those downstream from the shocks. Particles also suffer adiabatic deceleration in the expanding solar wind, an effect not included in previous shock models for acceleration in CIRs. The model is able to account for the observed exponential spectra at Earth, the observed behavior of the spectra with radial distance, the observed radial gradients in the intensity, and the observed differences in the intensity and spectra at the forward and reverse shocks.

  10. An Introduction to the Standard Model of Particle Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cottingham, W. Noel; Greenwood, Derek A.

    1999-01-01

    This graduate textbook provides a concise, accessible introduction to the Standard Model of particle physics. Theoretical concepts are developed clearly and carefully throughout the book--from the electromagnetic and weak interactions of leptons and quarks to the strong interactions of quarks. Chapters developing the theory are interspersed with chapters describing some of the wealth of experimental data supporting the model. The book assumes only the standard mathematics taught in an undergraduate physics course; more sophisticated mathematical ideas are developed in the text and in appendices. For graduate students in particle physics and physicists working in other fields who are interested in the current understanding of the ultimate constituents of matter, this textbook provides a lucid and up-to-date introduction.

  11. E-Mentoring Interaction Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lenear, Phoebe E.

    2007-01-01

    Little research has been conducted on electronic mentoring. Several traditional mentoring models exist; however, due to the novelty of the research area, no theoretical e-mentoring models appear in the literature. Using Moore's Theory of Transactional Distance as the theoretical framework, this research compared mentor-protege interaction,…

  12. Analytical theory of polymer-network-mediated interaction between colloidal particles.

    PubMed

    Di Michele, Lorenzo; Zaccone, Alessio; Eiser, Erika

    2012-06-26

    Nanostructured materials based on colloidal particles embedded in a polymer network are used in a variety of applications ranging from nanocomposite rubbers to organic-inorganic hybrid solar cells. Further, polymer-network-mediated colloidal interactions are highly relevant to biological studies whereby polymer hydrogels are commonly employed to probe the mechanical response of living cells, which can determine their biological function in physiological environments. The performance of nanomaterials crucially relies upon the spatial organization of the colloidal particles within the polymer network that depends, in turn, on the effective interactions between the particles in the medium. Existing models based on nonlocal equilibrium thermodynamics fail to clarify the nature of these interactions, precluding the way toward the rational design of polymer-composite materials. In this article, we present a predictive analytical theory of these interactions based on a coarse-grained model for polymer networks. We apply the theory to the case of colloids partially embedded in cross-linked polymer substrates and clarify the origin of attractive interactions recently observed experimentally. Monte Carlo simulation results that quantitatively confirm the theoretical predictions are also presented. PMID:22679289

  13. Solar wind-magnetosphere interaction as simulated by a 3D, EM particle code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buneman, O.; Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi; Neubert, T.

    1993-01-01

    The results of simulating the solar wind-magnetosphere interaction with a three dimensional, electromagnetic (EM) particle code are presented. Hitherto such global simulations were done with magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) codes while lower dimensional particle or hybrid codes served to account for microscopic processes and such transport parameters as have to be introduced ad hoc in MHD. The kinetic model combines macroscopic and microscopic tasks. It relies only on the Maxwell curl equations and the Lorentz equation for particles. The preliminary results are for an unmagnetized solar wind plasma streaming past a dipolar magnetic field. The results show the formation of a bow shock and a magnetotail, the penetration of energetic particles into cusp and radiation belt regions, and dawn to dusk asymmetries.

  14. Solar wind-magnetosphere interaction as simulated by a 3-D EM particle code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buneman, Oscar; Neubert, Torsten; Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi

    1992-01-01

    We present here our first results of simulating the solar wind-magnetosphere interaction with a new three-dimensional electromagnetic particle code. Hitherto such global simulations were done with MHD codes while lower-dimensional particle or hybrid codes served to account for microscopic processes and such transport parameters as have to be introduced ad hoc in MHD. Our kinetic model attempts to combine the macroscopic and microscopic tasks. It relies only on the Maxwell curl equation and the Lorentz equation for particles, which are ideally suited for computers. The preliminary results shown here are for an unmagnetized solar wind plasma streaming past a dipolar magnetic field. The results show the formation of a bow shock and a magnetotail, the penetration of energetic particles into cusp and radiation belt regions, and dawn-dusk asymmetries.

  15. Non-linear interactions of plasma waves in the context of solar particle acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallegos-Cruz, A.; Perez-Peraza, J.

    2001-08-01

    Stochastic particle acceleration in plasmas by means of MHD turbulence in-volves a wide range of alternatives according to, the specific wave mode, the frequency regime of the turbulence, the kind of particles to be accelerated, the assumed plasma model and so on. At present most of the alternatives have been studied with relatively deepness, though some features are not yet com-pletely understood. One of them is the delimitation of the real importance of non-lineal effects of turbulence waves in the process of particle acceleration. In this work we analyse such effects taking into account the temporal evolution of the turbulence. For illustration we exemplify our analysis with the fast MHD mode. Our results show that in some specific stages of the turbulence evolu-tion, non-linear interactions have important effects in the process of particle acceleration.

  16. Modelling new particle formation events in the South African savannah

    SciTech Connect

    Gierens, Rosa; Laakso, Lauri; Mogensen, Ditte; Vakkari, Ville; Buekes, Johan P.; Van Zyl, Pieter; Hakola, H.; Guenther, Alex B.; Pienaar, J. J.; Boy, Michael

    2014-05-28

    Africa is one of the less studied continents with respect to atmospheric aerosols. Savannahs are complex dynamic systems sensitive to climate and land-use changes, but the interaction of these systems with the atmosphere is not well understood. Atmospheric particles, called aerosols, affect the climate on regional and global scales, and are an important factor in air quality. In this study, measurements from a relatively clean savannah environment in South Africa were used to model new particle formation and growth. There already are some combined long-term measurements of trace gas concentrations together with aerosol and meteorological variables available, but to our knowledge this is the first detailed simulation that includes all the main processes relevant to particle formation. The results show that both of the particle formation mechanisms investigated overestimated the dependency of the formation rates on sulphuric acid. From the two particle formation mechanisms tested in this work, the approach that included low volatile organic compounds to the particle formation process was more accurate in describing the nucleation events than the approach that did not. To obtain a reliable estimate of aerosol concentration in simulations for larger scales, nucleation mechanisms would need to include organic compounds, at least in southern Africa. This work is the first step in developing a more comprehensive new particle formation model applicable to the unique environment in southern Africa. Such a model will assist in better understanding and predicting new particle formation – knowledge which could ultimately be used to mitigate impacts of climate change and air quality.

  17. Beauty is more attractive: particle production andmoduli trapping with higher dimensional interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enomoto, Seishi; Iida, Satoshi; Maekawa, Nobuhiro; Matsuda, Tomohiro

    2014-01-01

    We study quantum effects on moduli dynamics arising from particle production near the enhanced symmetry point (ESP). We focus on non-renormalizable couplings between the moduli field and the field that becomes light at the ESP. Considering higher dimensional interaction, we find that particle production is significant in a large area, which is even larger than the area that is expected from a renormalizable interaction. It is possible to find this possibility from a trivial adiabatic condition; however the quantitative estimation of particle production and trapping of the field in motion are far from trivial. In this paper we study particle production and trapping in detail, using both the analytical and numerical calculations, to find a clear and intuitive result that supports trapping in a vast variety of theories. Our study shows that trapping driven by a non-renormalizable interaction is possible. This possibility has not been considered in previous works. Some phenomenological models of particle physics will be mentioned to complement discussion.

  18. The joy of interactive modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donchyts, Gennadii; Baart, Fedor; van Dam, Arthur; Jagers, Bert

    2013-04-01

    The conventional way of working with hydrodynamical models usually consists of the following steps: 1) define a schematization (e.g., in a graphical user interface, or by editing input files) 2) run model from start to end 3) visualize results 4) repeat any of the previous steps. This cycle commonly takes up from hours to several days. What if we can make this happen instantly? As most of the research done using numerical models is in fact qualitative and exploratory (Oreskes et al., 1994), why not use these models as such? How can we adapt models so that we can edit model input, run and visualize results at the same time? More and more, interactive models become available as online apps, mainly for demonstration and educational purposes. These models often simplify the physics behind flows and run on simplified model geometries, particularly when compared with state-of-the-art scientific simulation packages. Here we show how the aforementioned conventional standalone models ("static, run once") can be transformed into interactive models. The basic concepts behind turning existing (conventional) model engines into interactive engines are the following. The engine does not run the model from start to end, but is always available in memory, and can be fed by new boundary conditions, or state changes at any time. The model can be run continuously, per step, or up to a specified time. The Hollywood principle dictates how the model engine is instructed from 'outside', instead of the model engine taking all necessary actions on its own initiative. The underlying techniques that facilitate these concepts are introspection of the computation engine, which exposes its state variables, and control functions, e.g. for time stepping, via a standardized interface, such as BMI (Peckam et. al., 2012). In this work we have used a shallow water flow model engine D-Flow Flexible Mesh. The model was converted from executable to a library, and coupled to the graphical modelling

  19. Impact modeling with Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Stellingwerf, R.F.; Wingate, C.A.

    1993-07-01

    Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) can be used to model hypervelocity impact phenomena via the addition of a strength of materials treatment. SPH is the only technique that can model such problems efficiently due to the combination of 3-dimensional geometry, large translations of material, large deformations, and large void fractions for most problems of interest. This makes SPH an ideal candidate for modeling of asteroid impact, spacecraft shield modeling, and planetary accretion. In this paper we describe the derivation of the strength equations in SPH, show several basic code tests, and present several impact test cases with experimental comparisons.

  20. Wave-particle interactions with parallel whistler waves: Nonlinear and time-dependent effects revealed by particle-in-cell simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Camporeale, Enrico; Zimbardo, Gaetano

    2015-09-15

    We present a self-consistent Particle-in-Cell simulation of the resonant interactions between anisotropic energetic electrons and a population of whistler waves, with parameters relevant to the Earth's radiation belt. By tracking PIC particles and comparing with test-particle simulations, we emphasize the importance of including nonlinear effects and time evolution in the modeling of wave-particle interactions, which are excluded in the resonant limit of quasi-linear theory routinely used in radiation belt studies. In particular, we show that pitch angle diffusion is enhanced during the linear growth phase, and it rapidly saturates well before a single bounce period. This calls into question the widely used bounce average performed in most radiation belt diffusion calculations. Furthermore, we discuss how the saturation is related to the fact that the domain in which the particles pitch angle diffuses is bounded, and to the well-known problem of 90° diffusion barrier.

  1. Force interactions of nonagglomerating polylactide particles obtained through covalent surface grafting with hydrophilic polymers.

    PubMed

    Nugroho, Robertus Wahyu N; Pettersson, Torbjörn; Odelius, Karin; Höglund, Anders; Albertsson, Ann-Christine

    2013-07-16

    Nonagglomerating polylactide (PLA) particles with various interaction forces were designed by covalent photografting. PLA particles were surface grafted with hydrophilic poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) or poly(acrylamide) (PAAm), and force interactions were determined using colloidal probe atomic force microscopy. Long-range repulsive interactions were detected in the hydrophilic/hydrophilic systems and in the hydrophobic/hydrophilic PLA/PLA-g-PAAm system. In contrast, attractive interactions were observed in the hydrophobic PLA/PLA and in the hydrophobic/hydrophilic PLA/PLA-g-PAA systems. AFM was also used in the tapping mode to determine the surface roughness of both neat and surface-grafted PLA film substrates. The imaging was performed in the dry state as well as in salt solutions of different concentrations. Differences in surface roughness were identified as conformational changes induced by the altered Debye screening length. To understand the origin of the repulsive force, the AFM force profiles were compared to the Derjaguin, Landau, Verwey, and Overbeek (DLVO) theory and the Alexander de Gennes (AdG) model. The steric repulsion provided by the different grafted hydrophilic polymers is a useful tool to inhibit agglomeration of polymeric particles. This is a key aspect in many applications of polymer particles, for example in drug delivery.

  2. Capillary interactions between particles bound to interfaces, liquid films and biomembranes.

    PubMed

    Kralchevsky, P A; Nagayama, K

    2000-03-31

    the meniscus area, gravitational energy and/or energy of wetting. The second approach is based on calculating the net force exerted on the particle, which can originate from the hydrostatic pressure, interfacial tension and bending moment. In the case of small perturbations, the superposition approximation can be used to derive an asymptotic formula for the capillary forces, which has been found to agree well with the experiment. Capillary interactions between particles bound to spherical interfaces are also considered taking into account the special geometry and restricted area of such phase boundaries. A similar approach can be applied to quantify the forces between inclusions (transmembrane proteins) in lipid membranes. The deformations in a lipid membrane, due to the inclusions, can be described theoretically in the framework of a mechanical model of the lipid bilayer, which accounts for its 'hybrid' rheology (neither elastic body nor fluid). In all considered cases the lateral capillary interaction originates from the overlap of interfacial deformations and is subject to a unified theoretical treatment, despite the fact that the characteristic particle size can vary from 1 cm down to 1 nm.

  3. Excitation energies of particle-hole states in {sup 208}Pb and the surface delta interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Heusler, A.; Jolos, R. V.; Brentano, P. von

    2013-07-15

    The schematic shell model without residual interaction (SSM) assumes the same excitation energy for all spins in each particle-hole configuration multiplet. In {sup 208}Pb, more than forty states are known to contain almost the full strength of a single particle-hole configuration. The experimental excitation energy for a state with a certain spin differs from the energy predicted by the SSM by -0.2 to +0.6 MeV. The multiplet splitting is calculated with the surface delta interaction; it corresponds to the diagonal matrix element of the residual interaction in the SSM. For states containing more than 90% strength of a certain configuration and for the centroid of several completely observed configurations, the calculated multiplet splitting often approximates the experimental excitation energy within 30 keV. The strong mixing within some pairs of states containing the full strengths of two configurations is explained.

  4. Process maps for plasma spray: Part 1: Plasma-particle interactions

    SciTech Connect

    GILMORE,DELWYN L.; NEISER JR.,RICHARD A.; WAN,YUEPENG; SAMPATH,SANJAY

    2000-01-26

    This is the first paper of a two part series based on an integrated study carried out at Sandia National Laboratories and the State University of New York at Stony Brook. The aim of the study is to develop a more fundamental understanding of plasma-particle interactions, droplet-substrate interactions, deposit formation dynamics and microstructural development as well as final deposit properties. The purpose is to create models that can be used to link processing to performance. Process maps have been developed for air plasma spray of molybdenum. Experimental work was done to investigate the importance of such spray parameters as gun current, auxiliary gas flow, and powder carrier gas flow. In-flight particle diameters, temperatures, and velocities were measured in various areas of the spray plume. Samples were produced for analysis of microstructures and properties. An empirical model was developed, relating the input parameters to the in-flight particle characteristics. Multi-dimensional numerical simulations of the plasma gas flow field and in-flight particles under different operating conditions were also performed. In addition to the parameters which were experimentally investigated, the effect of particle injection velocity was also considered. The simulation results were found to be in good general agreement with the experimental data.

  5. A vector model for electroweak interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reifler, Frank

    1985-03-01

    In this paper we present a vector model for the electroweak interactions. The Cartan map gives an isomorphism between Dirac bispinors and an isotropic class of Yang-Mills vector fields. The isotropic Yang-Mills vector fields Fk =Ek +iHk with k=1,2,3, satisfy the condition that the matrix of scalar invariants (Fj ṡFk) equals a scalar multiple of the identity matrix. We show that all the bispinor observables commute with the Cartan isomorphism, including all gauge transformations, as well as Lorentz transformations. We derive the Yang-Mills equivalent Dirac equation. As a consequence of the vector model, we obtain a new Lagrangian for electroweak interactions, which is an alternative to the Weinberg-Salam Lagrangian. Moreover, we show that the vector model predicts that the Weinberg angle θw satisfies sin2 θw =0.25, which is close to the measured value of sin2 θw =0.23. The vector model accommodates all the lepton and quark flavors. Furthermore, it predicts the conservation of baryon number and lepton number, as well as electric charge in electroweak interactions. The vector model also gives a new interpretation to antiparticles. In the vector model, an antiparticle is characterized by its opposite baryon number, lepton number, and electric charge; yet both particles and antiparticles propagate forward in time with positive energies.

  6. Beyond the standard model of particle physics.

    PubMed

    Virdee, T S

    2016-08-28

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN and its experiments were conceived to tackle open questions in particle physics. The mechanism of the generation of mass of fundamental particles has been elucidated with the discovery of the Higgs boson. It is clear that the standard model is not the final theory. The open questions still awaiting clues or answers, from the LHC and other experiments, include: What is the composition of dark matter and of dark energy? Why is there more matter than anti-matter? Are there more space dimensions than the familiar three? What is the path to the unification of all the fundamental forces? This talk will discuss the status of, and prospects for, the search for new particles, symmetries and forces in order to address the open questions.This article is part of the themed issue 'Unifying physics and technology in light of Maxwell's equations'. PMID:27458261

  7. Beyond the standard model of particle physics.

    PubMed

    Virdee, T S

    2016-08-28

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN and its experiments were conceived to tackle open questions in particle physics. The mechanism of the generation of mass of fundamental particles has been elucidated with the discovery of the Higgs boson. It is clear that the standard model is not the final theory. The open questions still awaiting clues or answers, from the LHC and other experiments, include: What is the composition of dark matter and of dark energy? Why is there more matter than anti-matter? Are there more space dimensions than the familiar three? What is the path to the unification of all the fundamental forces? This talk will discuss the status of, and prospects for, the search for new particles, symmetries and forces in order to address the open questions.This article is part of the themed issue 'Unifying physics and technology in light of Maxwell's equations'.

  8. Raman scattering investigation of VOCs in interaction with ice particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Facq, Sébastien; Oancea, Adriana; Focsa, Cristian; Chazallon, Bertrand

    2010-05-01

    Cirrus clouds that form in the Earth's upper troposphere (UT) are known to play a significant role in the radiation budget and climate [1]. These clouds that cover about 35% of the Earth's surface [2] are mainly composed of small ice particles that can provide surfaces for trace gas interactions [3]. Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) are present in relative high abundance in the UT [4][5]. They promote substantial sources of free OH radicals that are responsible for driving photochemical cycles in the atmosphere. Their presence can both influence the oxidizing capacity and the ozone budget of the atmosphere. VOCs can interact with ice particles via different trapping processes (adsorption, diffusion, freezing, and co-deposition, i.e., incorporation of trace gases during growing ice conditions) which can result in the perturbation of the chemistry and photochemistry of the UT. Knowledge of the incorporation processes of VOCs in ice particles is important in order to understand and predict their impact on the ice particles structure and reactivity and more generally on the cirrus cloud formation. This proceeds via the in-situ characterization of the ice condensed phase in a pressure and temperature range of the UT. An important mechanism of UT cirrus cloud formation is the heterogeneous ice freezing process. In this study, we examine and characterize the interaction of a VOC, i.e., ethanol (EtOH) with ice particles during freezing. Vibrational spectra of water O-H and EtOH C-H spectral regions are analysed using confocal micro-Raman spectroscopy. Information at the molecular level on the surface structure can be derived from accompanying changes observed in band shapes and vibrational mode frequencies. Depending of the EtOH content, different crystalline phases have been identified and compared to hydrates previously reported for the EtOH-water system. Particular attention is paid on the effect of EtOH aqueous solutions cooling rate and droplet sizes on the phases

  9. Dissipative-particle-dynamics model of biofilm growth

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Zhijie; Meakin, Paul; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Scheibe, Timothy D.

    2011-06-13

    A dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) model for the quantitative simulation of biofilm growth controlled by substrate (nutrient) consumption, advective and diffusive substrate transport, and hydrodynamic interactions with fluid flow (including fragmentation and reattachment) is described. The model was used to simulate biomass growth, decay, and spreading. It predicts how the biofilm morphology depends on flow conditions, biofilm growth kinetics, the rheomechanical properties of the biofilm and adhesion to solid surfaces. The morphology of the model biofilm depends strongly on its rigidity and the magnitude of the body force that drives the fluid over the biofilm.

  10. Final Report - Interaction of radiation and charged particles in miniature plasma structures

    SciTech Connect

    Antonsen, Thomas M.

    2014-07-16

    The extension of our program to the development of theories and models capable of describing the interactions of intense laser pulses and charged particles in miniature plasma channels is reported. These channels, which have recently been created in the laboratory, have unique dispersion properties that make them interesting for a variety of applications including particle acceleration, high harmonic generation, and THz generation. Our program systematically explored the properties of these channels, including dispersion, losses, and coupling. A particular application that was pursued is the generation of intense pulses of THz radiation by short laser pulses propagating these channels. We also explored the nonlinear dynamics of laser pulses propagating in these channels.

  11. Threshold separation distance for attractive interaction between dust particles

    SciTech Connect

    Jabdaraghi, R. Najafi; Sobhanian, S.

    2008-09-07

    Interaction between dust grains in a dusty plasma could be both repulsive and attractive. The Coulomb interaction between two negatively charged dust particulates and the electrostatic force between them are repulsive, while the shadowing force affecting them is attractive. We show in this paper that in some experimental conditions, there is some grain separation zone for which the attractive shadowing force is larger than the repulsive forces between them. In experimental conditions, for the grains separation distance r = 0.4 cm the shadowing force is almost equal to the electrostatic force between them and for r>0.4 cm the shadowing force exceeds the electrostatic force. So the resultant interaction force will be attractive. The possibility of dust crystal formation in this zone and also the motion of dust particles in the resultant potential of the form V = -(a/r)+(b/r{sup 2}) will be discussed. This form of potential comes from the combination electrostatic (F{sub es} (c/r{sup 3})) and shadowing (F{sub shadow} = -(d/r{sup 2})) forces.

  12. Particle dispersion in homogeneous turbulence using the one-dimensional turbulence model

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Guangyuan Lignell, David O.; Hewson, John C.; Gin, Craig R.

    2014-10-15

    Lagrangian particle dispersion is studied using the one-dimensional turbulence (ODT) model in homogeneous decaying turbulence configurations. The ODT model has been widely and successfully applied to a number of reacting and nonreacting flow configurations, but only limited application has been made to multiphase flows. Here, we present a version of the particle implementation and interaction with the stochastic and instantaneous ODT eddy events. The model is characterized by comparison to experimental data of particle dispersion for a range of intrinsic particle time scales and body forces. Particle dispersion, velocity, and integral time scale results are presented. The particle implementation introduces a single model parameter β{sub p}, and sensitivity to this parameter and behavior of the model are discussed. Good agreement is found with experimental data and the ODT model is able to capture the particle inertial and trajectory crossing effects. These results serve as a validation case of the multiphase implementations of ODT for extensions to other flow configurations.

  13. Particle dispersion in homogeneous turbulence using the one-dimensional turbulence model

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Guangyuan; Lignell, David O.; Hewson, John C.; Gin, Craig R.

    2014-10-09

    Lagrangian particle dispersion is studied using the one-dimensional turbulence (ODT) model in homogeneous decaying turbulence configurations. The ODT model has been widely and successfully applied to a number of reacting and nonreacting flow configurations, but only limited application has been made to multiphase flows. We present a version of the particle implementation and interaction with the stochastic and instantaneous ODT eddy events. The model is characterized by comparison to experimental data of particle dispersion for a range of intrinsic particle time scales and body forces. Particle dispersion, velocity, and integral time scale results are presented. Moreover, the particle implementation introduces a single model parameter β p , and sensitivity to this parameter and behavior of the model are discussed. Good agreement is found with experimental data and the ODT model is able to capture the particle inertial and trajectory crossing effects. Our results serve as a validation case of the multiphase implementations of ODT for extensions to other flow configurations.

  14. Effect of long-range repulsive Coulomb interactions on packing structure of adhesive particles.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sheng; Li, Shuiqing; Liu, Wenwei; Makse, Hernán A

    2016-02-14

    The packing of charged micron-sized particles is investigated using discrete element simulations based on adhesive contact dynamic model. The formation process and the final obtained structures of ballistic packings are studied to show the effect of interparticle Coulomb force. It is found that increasing the charge on particles causes a remarkable decrease of the packing volume fraction ϕ and the average coordination number 〈Z〉, indicating a looser and chainlike structure. Force-scaling analysis shows that the long-range Coulomb interaction changes packing structures through its influence on particle inertia before they are bonded into the force networks. Once contact networks are formed, the expansion effect caused by repulsive Coulomb forces are dominated by short-range adhesion. Based on abundant results from simulations, a dimensionless adhesion parameter Ad*, which combines the effects of the particle inertia, the short-range adhesion and the long-range Coulomb interaction, is proposed and successfully scales the packing results for micron-sized particles within the latest derived adhesive loose packing (ALP) regime. The structural properties of our packings follow well the recent theoretical prediction which is described by an ensemble approach based on a coarse-grained volume function, indicating some kind of universality in the low packing density regime of the phase diagram regardless of adhesion or particle charge. Based on the comprehensive consideration of the complicated inter-particle interactions, our findings provide insight into the roles of short-range adhesion and repulsive Coulomb force during packing formation and should be useful for further design of packings.

  15. Giant Polymersome Protocells Dock with Virus Particle Mimics via Multivalent Glycan-Lectin Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubilis, Artur; Abdulkarim, Ali; Eissa, Ahmed M.; Cameron, Neil R.

    2016-08-01

    Despite the low complexity of their components, several simple physical systems, including microspheres, coacervate droplets and phospholipid membrane structures (liposomes), have been suggested as protocell models. These, however, lack key cellular characteristics, such as the ability to replicate or to dock with extracellular species. Here, we report a simple method for the de novo creation of synthetic cell mimics in the form of giant polymeric vesicles (polymersomes), which are capable of behavior approaching that of living cells. These polymersomes form by self-assembly, under electroformation conditions, of amphiphilic, glycosylated block copolymers in aqueous solution. The glycosylated exterior of the resulting polymeric giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) allows their selective interaction with carbohydrate-binding receptor-functionalized particles, in a manner reminiscent of the cell-surface docking of virus particles. We believe that this is the first example of a simple protocell model displaying cell-like behavior through a native receptor-ligand interaction.

  16. Giant Polymersome Protocells Dock with Virus Particle Mimics via Multivalent Glycan-Lectin Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Kubilis, Artur; Abdulkarim, Ali; Eissa, Ahmed M.; Cameron, Neil R.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the low complexity of their components, several simple physical systems, including microspheres, coacervate droplets and phospholipid membrane structures (liposomes), have been suggested as protocell models. These, however, lack key cellular characteristics, such as the ability to replicate or to dock with extracellular species. Here, we report a simple method for the de novo creation of synthetic cell mimics in the form of giant polymeric vesicles (polymersomes), which are capable of behavior approaching that of living cells. These polymersomes form by self-assembly, under electroformation conditions, of amphiphilic, glycosylated block copolymers in aqueous solution. The glycosylated exterior of the resulting polymeric giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) allows their selective interaction with carbohydrate-binding receptor-functionalized particles, in a manner reminiscent of the cell-surface docking of virus particles. We believe that this is the first example of a simple protocell model displaying cell-like behavior through a native receptor-ligand interaction. PMID:27576579

  17. Giant Polymersome Protocells Dock with Virus Particle Mimics via Multivalent Glycan-Lectin Interactions.

    PubMed

    Kubilis, Artur; Abdulkarim, Ali; Eissa, Ahmed M; Cameron, Neil R

    2016-01-01

    Despite the low complexity of their components, several simple physical systems, including microspheres, coacervate droplets and phospholipid membrane structures (liposomes), have been suggested as protocell models. These, however, lack key cellular characteristics, such as the ability to replicate or to dock with extracellular species. Here, we report a simple method for the de novo creation of synthetic cell mimics in the form of giant polymeric vesicles (polymersomes), which are capable of behavior approaching that of living cells. These polymersomes form by self-assembly, under electroformation conditions, of amphiphilic, glycosylated block copolymers in aqueous solution. The glycosylated exterior of the resulting polymeric giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) allows their selective interaction with carbohydrate-binding receptor-functionalized particles, in a manner reminiscent of the cell-surface docking of virus particles. We believe that this is the first example of a simple protocell model displaying cell-like behavior through a native receptor-ligand interaction. PMID:27576579

  18. Probabilistic Models for Solar Particle Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, James H., Jr.; Dietrich, W. F.; Xapsos, M. A.; Welton, A. M.

    2009-01-01

    Probabilistic Models of Solar Particle Events (SPEs) are used in space mission design studies to provide a description of the worst-case radiation environment that the mission must be designed to tolerate.The models determine the worst-case environment using a description of the mission and a user-specified confidence level that the provided environment will not be exceeded. This poster will focus on completing the existing suite of models by developing models for peak flux and event-integrated fluence elemental spectra for the Z>2 elements. It will also discuss methods to take into account uncertainties in the data base and the uncertainties resulting from the limited number of solar particle events in the database. These new probabilistic models are based on an extensive survey of SPE measurements of peak and event-integrated elemental differential energy spectra. Attempts are made to fit the measured spectra with eight different published models. The model giving the best fit to each spectrum is chosen and used to represent that spectrum for any energy in the energy range covered by the measurements. The set of all such spectral representations for each element is then used to determine the worst case spectrum as a function of confidence level. The spectral representation that best fits these worst case spectra is found and its dependence on confidence level is parameterized. This procedure creates probabilistic models for the peak and event-integrated spectra.

  19. Simulation of Cell Adhesion using a Particle Transport Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chesnutt, Jennifer

    2005-11-01

    An efficient computational method for simulation of cell adhesion through protein binding forces is discussed. In this method, the cells are represented by deformable elastic particles, and the protein binding is represented by a rate equation. The method is first developed for collision and adhesion of two similar cells impacting on each other from opposite directions. The computational method is then applied in a particle-transport model for a cloud of interacting and colliding cells, each of which are represented by particles of finite size. One application might include red blood cells adhering together to form rouleaux, which are chains of red blood cells that are found in different parts of the circulatory system. Other potential applications include adhesion of platelets to a blood vessel wall or mechanical heart valve, which is a precursor of thrombosis formation, or adhesion of cancer cells to organ walls in the lymphatic, circulatory, digestive or pulmonary systems.

  20. Determining Trajectory of Triboelectrically Charged Particles, Using Discrete Element Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    The Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Electrostatics and Surface Physics Laboratory is participating in an Innovative Partnership Program (IPP) project with an industry partner to modify a commercial off-the-shelf simulation software product to treat the electrodynamics of particulate systems. Discrete element modeling (DEM) is a numerical technique that can track the dynamics of particle systems. This technique, which was introduced in 1979 for analysis of rock mechanics, was recently refined to include the contact force interaction of particles with arbitrary surfaces and moving machinery. In our work, we endeavor to incorporate electrostatic forces into the DEM calculations to enhance the fidelity of the software and its applicability to (1) particle processes, such as electrophotography, that are greatly affected by electrostatic forces, (2) grain and dust transport, and (3) the study of lunar and Martian regoliths.

  1. Magnetic interaction of Janus magnetic particles suspended in a viscous fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seong, Yujin; Kang, Tae Gon; Hulsen, Martien A.; den Toonder, Jaap M. J.; Anderson, Patrick D.

    2016-02-01

    We studied the magnetic interaction between circular Janus magnetic particles suspended in a Newtonian fluid under the influence of an externally applied uniform magnetic field. The particles are equally compartmentalized into paramagnetic and nonmagnetic sides. A direct numerical scheme is employed to solve the magnetic particulate flow in the Stokes flow regime. Upon applying the magnetic field, contrary to isotropic paramagnetic particles, a single Janus particle can rotate due to the magnetic torque created by the magnetic anisotropy of the particle. In a two-particle problem, the orientation of each particle is found to be an additional factor that affects the critical angle separating the nature of magnetic interaction. Using multiparticle problems, we show that the orientation of the particles has a significant influence on the dynamics of the particles, the fluid flow induced by the actuated particles, and the final conformation of the particles. Straight and staggered chain structures observed experimentally can be reproduced numerically in a multiple particle problem.

  2. Magnetic interaction of Janus magnetic particles suspended in a viscous fluid.

    PubMed

    Seong, Yujin; Kang, Tae Gon; Hulsen, Martien A; den Toonder, Jaap M J; Anderson, Patrick D

    2016-02-01

    We studied the magnetic interaction between circular Janus magnetic particles suspended in a Newtonian fluid under the influence of an externally applied uniform magnetic field. The particles are equally compartmentalized into paramagnetic and nonmagnetic sides. A direct numerical scheme is employed to solve the magnetic particulate flow in the Stokes flow regime. Upon applying the magnetic field, contrary to isotropic paramagnetic particles, a single Janus particle can rotate due to the magnetic torque created by the magnetic anisotropy of the particle. In a two-particle problem, the orientation of each particle is found to be an additional factor that affects the critical angle separating the nature of magnetic interaction. Using multiparticle problems, we show that the orientation of the particles has a significant influence on the dynamics of the particles, the fluid flow induced by the actuated particles, and the final conformation of the particles. Straight and staggered chain structures observed experimentally can be reproduced numerically in a multiple particle problem.

  3. The effect of particle-particle interaction forces on the flow properties of silica slurries

    SciTech Connect

    Harbottle, David; Fairweather, Michael; Biggs, Simon; Rhodes, Dominic

    2007-07-01

    Preliminary work has been completed to investigate the effect of particle-particle interaction forces on the flow properties of silica slurries. Classically hydro-transport studies have focused on the flow of coarse granular material in Newtonian fluids. However, with current economical and environmental pressures, the need to increase solid loadings in pipe flow has lead to studies that examine non-Newtonian fluid dynamics. The flow characteristics of non-Newtonian slurries can be greatly influenced through controlling the solution chemistry. Here we present data on an 'ideal' slurry where the particle size and shape is controlled together with the solution chemistry. We have investigated the effect of adsorbed cations on the stability of a suspension, the packing nature of a sediment and the frictional forces to be overcome during re-slurrying. A significant change in the criteria assessed was observed as the electrolyte concentration was increased from 0.1 mM to 1 M. In relation to industrial processes, such delicate control of the slurry chemistry can greatly influence the optimum operating conditions of non-Newtonian pipe flows. (authors)

  4. Interactive graphics for geometry modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wozny, M. J.

    1984-01-01

    An interactive vector capability to create geometry and a raster color shaded rendering capability to sample and verify interim geometric design steps through color snapshots is described. The development is outlined of the underlying methodology which facilitates computer aided engineering and design. At present, raster systems cannot match the interactivity and line-drawing capability of refresh vector systems. Consequently, an intermediate step in mechanical design is used to create objects interactively on the vector display and then scan convert the wireframe model to render it as a color shaded object on a raster display. Several algorithms are presented for rendering such objects. Superquadric solid primitive extend the class of primitives normally used in solid modelers.

  5. Simulations of energetic particles interacting with nonlinear anisotropic dynamical turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heusen, M.; Shalchi, A.

    2016-09-01

    We investigate test-particle diffusion in dynamical turbulence based on a numerical approach presented before. For the turbulence we employ the nonlinear anisotropic dynamical turbulence model which takes into account wave propagation effects as well as damping effects. We compute numerically diffusion coefficients of energetic particles along and across the mean magnetic field. We focus on turbulence and particle parameters which should be relevant for the solar system and compare our findings with different interplanetary observations. We vary different parameters such as the dissipation range spectral index, the ratio of the turbulence bendover scales, and the magnetic field strength in order to explore the relevance of the different parameters. We show that the bendover scales as well as the magnetic field ratio have a strong influence on diffusion coefficients whereas the influence of the dissipation range spectral index is weak. The best agreement with solar wind observations can be found for equal bendover scales and a magnetic field ratio of δ B / B0 = 0.75.

  6. Wave "Coherency" and Implications for Wave-Particle Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsurutani, Bruce; Singh Lakhina, Gurbax; Bhanu, Remya; Lee, Lou-Chuang

    2016-07-01

    Wave "coherency" was introduced in 2009 by Tsurutani et al. (JGR, doi:10.1029/2008JA013353, 2009) to describe the waves detected in the ~10 to 100 ms duration subelements which are the fundamental components of ~0.1 to 0.5 s chorus "elements". In this talk we will show examples of what we mean by coherency, quasi-coherency and incoherency for a variety of magnetospheric plasma waves. We will show how to measure coherency/quasicoherency quantitatively for electromagnetic whistler mode chorus, electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves, plasmaspheric hiss and linearly polarized magnetosonic waves. If plasma waves are coherent, their interactions with resonant particles will be substantially different. Specific examples will be used to show that the pitch angle scattering rates for energetic charged particles is roughly 3 orders of magnitude faster than the Kennel-Petschek diffusion (which assumes incoherent waves) rate. We feel that this mechanism is the only one that can explain ~ 0.1- 0.5 s bremsstrahlung x-ray microbursts.

  7. Modeling Interactions in Small Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heise, David R.

    2013-01-01

    A new theory of interaction within small groups posits that group members initiate actions when tension mounts between the affective meanings of their situational identities and impressions produced by recent events. Actors choose partners and behaviors so as to reduce the tensions. A computer model based on this theory, incorporating reciprocal…

  8. Particle model for nonlocal heat transport in fusion plasmas.

    PubMed

    Bufferand, H; Ciraolo, G; Ghendrih, Ph; Lepri, S; Livi, R

    2013-02-01

    We present a simple stochastic, one-dimensional model for heat transfer in weakly collisional media as fusion plasmas. Energies of plasma particles are treated as lattice random variables interacting with a rate inversely proportional to their energy schematizing a screened Coulomb interaction. We consider both the equilibrium (microcanonical) and nonequilibrium case in which the system is in contact with heat baths at different temperatures. The model exhibits a characteristic length of thermalization that can be associated with an interaction mean free path and one observes a transition from ballistic to diffusive regime depending on the average energy of the system. A mean-field expression for heat flux is deduced from system heat transport properties. Finally, it is shown that the nonequilibrium steady state is characterized by long-range correlations.

  9. Coupled electrostatic and material surface stresses yield anomalous particle interactions and deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemp, B. A.; Nikolayev, I.; Sheppard, C. J.

    2016-04-01

    Like-charges repel, and opposite charges attract. This fundamental tenet is a result of Coulomb's law. However, the electrostatic interactions between dielectric particles remain topical due to observations of like-charged particle attraction and the self-assembly of colloidal systems. Here, we show, using both an approximate description and an exact solution of Maxwell's equations, that nonlinear charged particle forces result even for linear material systems and can be responsible for anomalous electrostatic interactions such as like-charged particle attraction and oppositely charged particle repulsion. Furthermore, these electrostatic interactions and the deformation of such particles have fundamental implications for our understanding of macroscopic electrodynamics.

  10. Transport equations for subdiffusion with nonlinear particle interaction.

    PubMed

    Straka, P; Fedotov, S

    2015-02-01

    We show how the nonlinear interaction effects 'volume filling' and 'adhesion' can be incorporated into the fractional subdiffusive transport of cells and individual organisms. To this end, we use microscopic random walk models with anomalous trapping and systematically derive generic non-Markovian and nonlinear governing equations for the mean concentrations of the subdiffusive cells or organisms. We uncover an interesting interaction between the nonlinearities and the non-Markovian nature of the transport. In the subdiffusive case, this interaction manifests itself in a nontrivial combination of nonlinear terms with fractional derivatives. In the long time limit, however, these equations simplify to a form without fractional operators. This provides an easy method for the study of aggregation phenomena. In particular, this enables us to show that volume filling can prevent "anomalous aggregation," which occurs in subdiffusive systems with a spatially varying anomalous exponent.

  11. A fluid-particle interaction method for blood flow with special emphasis on red blood cell aggregation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tong; Xing, Zhongwen

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a fluid-particle interaction algorithm using the distributed Lagrange multiplier based fictitious domain method. The application of this method to the numerical investigation of motion and aggregation of red blood cells in two-dimensional microvessels is discussed. The cells are modelled as rigid biconcave-shaped neutrally buoyant particles. The aggregating force between two cells is derived from a Morse type potential function. The cell-cell interaction is coupled with the fluid-cell interaction through a time splitting scheme. Simulation results of multiple red blood cells in Poiseuille flow are presented. Because of its modular nature, this algorithm is applicable to a large class of problems involving the processes of particle aggregation and fluid-particle interaction.

  12. Topological invariants for interacting topological insulators. II. Breakdown of single-particle Green's function formalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yuan-Yao; Wu, Han-Qing; Meng, Zi Yang; Lu, Zhong-Yi

    2016-05-01

    Topological phase transitions in free fermion systems can be characterized by the closing of single-particle gap and the change in topological invariants. However, in the presence of electronic interactions, topological phase transitions can be more complicated. In paper I of this series [Phys. Rev. B 93, 195163 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevB.93.195163], we have proposed an efficient scheme to evaluate the topological invariants based on the single-particle Green's function formalism. Here, in paper II, we demonstrate several interaction-driven topological phase transitions (TPTs) in two-dimensional (2D) interacting topological insulators (TIs) via large-scale quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) simulations, based on the scheme of evaluating topological invariants presented in paper I. Across these transitions, the defining symmetries of the TIs have been neither explicitly nor spontaneously broken. In the first two models, the topological invariants calculated from the Green's function formalism succeed in characterizing the topologically distinct phases and identifying interaction-driven TPTs. However, in the other two models, we find that the single-particle gap does not close and the topological invariants constructed from the single-particle Green's function acquire no change across the TPTs. Unexpected breakdown of the Green's function formalism in constructing the topological invariants is thus discovered. We thence classify the topological phase transitions in interacting TIs into two categories in practical computation: Those that have noninteracting correspondence can be characterized successfully by the topological invariants constructed from the Green's functions, while for the others that do not have noninteracting correspondence, the Green's function formalism experiences a breakdown, but more interesting and exciting phenomena, such as emergent collective critical modes at the transition, arise. Discussion on the success and breakdown of topological invariants

  13. Modeling intercellular interactions during carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Sachs, Rainer K; Chan, Michael; Hlatky, Lynn; Hahnfeldt, Philip

    2005-09-01

    By modulating the microenvironment of malignant or premalignant cells, inhibitory or stimulatory signals from nearby cells can play a key role in carcinogenesis. However, current commonly used quantitative models for induction of cancers by ionizing radiation focus on single cells and their progeny. Intercellular interactions are neglected or assumed to be confined to unidirectional radiation bystander effect signals from cells of the same tissue type. We here formulate a parsimoniously parameterized two-stage logistic (TSL) carcinogenesis model that incorporates some effects of intercellular interactions during the growth of premalignant cells. We show that for baseline tumor rates, involving no radiation apart from background radiation, this TSL model gives acceptable fits to a number of data sets. Specifically, it gives the same baseline hazard function, using the same number of adjustable parameters, as does the commonly used two-stage clonal expansion (TSCE) model, so it is automatically applicable to the many data sets on baseline cancer that have been analyzed using the TSCE model. For perturbations of baseline rates due to radiation, the models differ. We argue from epidemiological and laboratory evidence, especially results for the atomic bomb survivors, that for radiation carcinogenesis the TSL model gives results at least as realistic as the TSCE or similar models, despite involving fewer adjustable parameters in many cases. PMID:16137206

  14. Self-Propelled Particles with Soft-Core Interactions: Patterns, Stability, and Collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Orsogna, M. R.; Chuang, Y. L.; Bertozzi, A. L.; Chayes, L. S.

    2006-03-01

    Understanding collective properties of driven particle systems is significant for naturally occurring aggregates and because the knowledge gained can be used as building blocks for the design of artificial ones. We model self-propelling biological or artificial individuals interacting through pairwise attractive and repulsive forces. For the first time, we are able to predict stability and morphology of organization starting from the shape of the two-body interaction. We present a coherent theory, based on fundamental statistical mechanics, for all possible phases of collective motion.

  15. Self-propelled particles with soft-core interactions: patterns, stability, and collapse.

    PubMed

    D' Orsogna, M R; Chuang, Y L; Bertozzi, A L; Chayes, L S

    2006-03-17

    Understanding collective properties of driven particle systems is significant for naturally occurring aggregates and because the knowledge gained can be used as building blocks for the design of artificial ones. We model self-propelling biological or artificial individuals interacting through pairwise attractive and repulsive forces. For the first time, we are able to predict stability and morphology of organization starting from the shape of the two-body interaction. We present a coherent theory, based on fundamental statistical mechanics, for all possible phases of collective motion. PMID:16605738

  16. Particle Swarm Optimization with Scale-Free Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chen; Du, Wen-Bo; Wang, Wen-Xu

    2014-01-01

    The particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm, in which individuals collaborate with their interacted neighbors like bird flocking to search for the optima, has been successfully applied in a wide range of fields pertaining to searching and convergence. Here we employ the scale-free network to represent the inter-individual interactions in the population, named SF-PSO. In contrast to the traditional PSO with fully-connected topology or regular topology, the scale-free topology used in SF-PSO incorporates the diversity of individuals in searching and information dissemination ability, leading to a quite different optimization process. Systematic results with respect to several standard test functions demonstrate that SF-PSO gives rise to a better balance between the convergence speed and the optimum quality, accounting for its much better performance than that of the traditional PSO algorithms. We further explore the dynamical searching process microscopically, finding that the cooperation of hub nodes and non-hub nodes play a crucial role in optimizing the convergence process. Our work may have implications in computational intelligence and complex networks. PMID:24859007

  17. Models of dyadic social interaction.

    PubMed Central

    Griffin, Dale; Gonzalez, Richard

    2003-01-01

    We discuss the logic of research designs for dyadic interaction and present statistical models with parameters that are tied to psychologically relevant constructs. Building on Karl Pearson's classic nineteenth-century statistical analysis of within-organism similarity, we describe several approaches to indexing dyadic interdependence and provide graphical methods for visualizing dyadic data. We also describe several statistical and conceptual solutions to the 'levels of analytic' problem in analysing dyadic data. These analytic strategies allow the researcher to examine and measure psychological questions of interdependence and social influence. We provide illustrative data from casually interacting and romantic dyads. PMID:12689382

  18. Neural Networks for Modeling and Control of Particle Accelerators

    DOE PAGES

    Edelen, A. L.; Biedron, S. G.; Chase, B. E.; Edstrom, D.; Milton, S. V.; Stabile, P.

    2016-04-01

    Myriad nonlinear and complex physical phenomena are host to particle accelerators. They often involve a multitude of interacting systems, are subject to tight performance demands, and should be able to run for extended periods of time with minimal interruptions. Often times, traditional control techniques cannot fully meet these requirements. One promising avenue is to introduce machine learning and sophisticated control techniques inspired by artificial intelligence, particularly in light of recent theoretical and practical advances in these fields. Within machine learning and artificial intelligence, neural networks are particularly well-suited to modeling, control, and diagnostic analysis of complex, nonlinear, and time-varying systems,more » as well as systems with large parameter spaces. Consequently, the use of neural network-based modeling and control techniques could be of significant benefit to particle accelerators. For the same reasons, particle accelerators are also ideal test-beds for these techniques. Moreover, many early attempts to apply neural networks to particle accelerators yielded mixed results due to the relative immaturity of the technology for such tasks. For the purpose of this paper is to re-introduce neural networks to the particle accelerator community and report on some work in neural network control that is being conducted as part of a dedicated collaboration between Fermilab and Colorado State University (CSU). We also describe some of the challenges of particle accelerator control, highlight recent advances in neural network techniques, discuss some promising avenues for incorporating neural networks into particle accelerator control systems, and describe a neural network-based control system that is being developed for resonance control of an RF electron gun at the Fermilab Accelerator Science and Technology (FAST) facility, including initial experimental results from a benchmark controller.« less

  19. Modeling of Endothelial Glyccalyx via Dissipative Particle Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Mingge; Liang, Haojun; Karniadakis, George

    2011-03-01

    We employ Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) to simulate flow in small vessels with the endothelial glycocalyx attached to the wall. Of particular interest is the quantification of the slip velocity at the edge of glycocalyx and of the increased pressure drop at different crafting densities, stiffness and height of the glycocalyx. Results will be presented for capillaries and small arterioles, and interactions with discrete red blood cells will be included in the modeling. In addition to the physical insight gain for this important but relatively unexplored bioflow, simple models for the slip velocity will be proposed that can be used in continuum simulations of blood flow in micro-vessels.

  20. A Simple Mathematical Model for Standard Model of Elementary Particles and Extension Thereof

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Ashok

    2016-03-01

    An algebraically (and geometrically) simple model representing the masses of the elementary particles in terms of the interaction (strong, weak, electromagnetic) constants is developed, including the Higgs bosons. The predicted Higgs boson mass is identical to that discovered by LHC experimental programs; while possibility of additional Higgs bosons (and their masses) is indicated. The model can be analyzed to explain and resolve many puzzles of particle physics and cosmology including the neutrino masses and mixing; origin of the proton mass and the mass-difference between the proton and the neutron; the big bang and cosmological Inflation; the Hubble expansion; etc. A novel interpretation of the model in terms of quaternion and rotation in the six-dimensional space of the elementary particle interaction-space - or, equivalently, in six-dimensional spacetime - is presented. Interrelations among particle masses are derived theoretically. A new approach for defining the interaction parameters leading to an elegant and symmetrical diagram is delineated. Generalization of the model to include supersymmetry is illustrated without recourse to complex mathematical formulation and free from any ambiguity. This Abstract represents some results of the Author's Independent Theoretical Research in Particle Physics, with possible connection to the Superstring Theory. However, only very elementary mathematics and physics is used in my presentation.

  1. Theoretical and experimental examination of particle-particle interaction effects on induced dipole moments and dielectrophoretic responses of multiple particle chains.

    PubMed

    Moncada-Hernandez, Hector; Nagler, Eliot; Minerick, Adrienne R

    2014-07-01

    Dielectrophoresis (DEP), an electrokinetic phenomenon based on particle polarizations in nonuniform electric fields, is increasingly employed for particle and cell characterizations and manipulations in microdevices. However, particle number densities are rarely varied and particle-particle interactions are largely overlooked, but both affect particle's effective polarizations by changing the local electric field, which directly impacts particle assembly into chains. This work examines theoretical and experimental particle-particle interactions and dielectrophoretic responses in nonuniform electric fields, then presents individual and chain velocities of spherical polystyrene microparticles and red blood cells (RBCs) under DEP forces in a modified quadruple electrode microdevice. Velocities are independently compared between 1, 2, 3, and 4 polystyrene beads and RBCs assembled into chains aligned with the electric field. Simulations compared induced dipole moments for particles experiencing the same (single point) and changing (multiple points) electric fields. Experiments and simulations are compared by plotting DEP velocities versus applied signal frequency from 1 kHz to 80 MHz. Simulations indicate differences in the DEP force exerted on each particle according to chain position. Simulations and experiments show excellent qualitative agreement; chains with more particles experienced a decrease in the DEP response for both polystyrene beads and RBCs. These results advance understanding of the extent that induced dipole polarizations with multiple particle chains affect observed behaviors in electrokinetic cellular diagnostic systems.

  2. Kinetic theory for systems of self-propelled particles with metric-free interactions.

    PubMed

    Chou, Yen-Liang; Wolfe, Rylan; Ihle, Thomas

    2012-08-01

    A model of self-driven particles similar to the Vicsek model [Phys. Rev. Lett. 75, 1226 (1995)] but with metric-free interactions is studied by means of a novel Enskog-type kinetic theory. In this model, N particles of constant speed v(0) try to align their travel directions with the average direction of a fixed number of closest neighbors. At strong alignment a global flocking state forms. The alignment is defined by a stochastic rule, not by a Hamiltonian. The corresponding interactions are of genuine multibody nature. The theory is based on a Master equation in 3N-dimensional phase space, which is made tractable by means of the molecular chaos approximation. The phase diagram for the transition to collective motion is calculated and compared to direct numerical simulations. A linear stability analysis of a homogeneous ordered state is performed using the kinetic but not the hydrodynamic equations in order to achieve high accuracy. In contrast to the regular metric Vicsek-model no instabilities occur. This confirms previous direct simulations that, for Vicsek-like models with metric-free interactions, there is no formation of density bands and that the flocking transition is continuous.

  3. Discrete mathematical physics and particle modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenspan, D.

    The theory and application of the arithmetic approach to the foundations of both Newtonian and special relativistic mechanics are explored. Using only arithmetic, a reformulation of the Newtonian approach is given for: gravity; particle modeling of solids, liquids, and gases; conservative modeling of laminar and turbulent fluid flow, heat conduction, and elastic vibration; and nonconservative modeling of heat convection, shock-wave generation, the liquid drop problem, porous flow, the interface motion of a melting solid, soap films, string vibrations, and solitons. An arithmetic reformulation of special relativistic mechanics is given for theory in one space dimension, relativistic harmonic oscillation, and theory in three space dimensions. A speculative quantum mechanical model of vibrations in the water molecule is also discussed.

  4. Concentration polarization of interacting solute particles in cross-flow membrane filtration

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharjee, S.; Kim, A.S.; Elimelech, M.

    1999-04-01

    A theoretical approach for predicting the influence of interparticle interactions on concentration polarization and the ensuing permeate flux decline during cross-flow membrane filtration of charged solute particles is presented. The Ornstein-Zernike integral equation is solved using appropriate closures corresponding to hard-spherical and long-range solute-solute interactions to predict the radial distribution function of the solute particles in a concentrated solution (dispersion). Two properties of the solution, namely the osmotic pressure and the diffusion coefficient, are determined on the basis of the radial distribution function at different solute concentrations. Incorporation of the concentration dependence of these two properties in the concentration polarization model comprising the convective-diffusion equation and the osmotic-pressure governed permeate flux equation leads to the coupled prediction of the solute concentration profile and the local permeate flux. The approach leads to a direct quantitative incorporation of solute-solute interactions in the framework of a standard theory of concentration polarization. The developed model is used to study the effects of ionic strength and electrostatic potential on the variations of solute diffusivity and osmotic pressure. Finally, the combined influence of these two properties on the permeate flux decline behavior during cross-flow membrane filtration of charged solute particles is predicted.

  5. The Roles of Transport and Wave-Particle Interactions on Radiation Belt Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fok, Mei-Ching; Glocer, Alex; Zheng, Qiuhua

    2011-01-01

    Particle fluxes in the radiation belts can vary dramatically during geomagnetic active periods. Transport and wave-particle interactions are believed to be the two main types of mechanisms that control the radiation belt dynamics. Major transport processes include substorm dipolarization and injection, radial diffusion, convection, adiabatic acceleration and deceleration, and magnetopause shadowing. Energetic electrons and ions are also subjected to pitch-angle and energy diffusion when interact with plasma waves in the radiation belts. Important wave modes include whistler mode chorus waves, plasmaspheric hiss, electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves, and magnetosonic waves. We investigate the relative roles of transport and wave associated processes in radiation belt variations. Energetic electron fluxes during several storms are simulated using our Radiation Belt Environment (RBE) model. The model includes important transport and wave processes such as substorm dipolarization in global MHD fields, chorus waves, and plasmaspheric hiss. We discuss the effects of these competing processes at different phases of the storms and validate the results by comparison with satellite and ground-based observations. Keywords: Radiation Belts, Space Weather, Wave-Particle Interaction, Storm and Substorm

  6. Traffic Flow of Interacting Self-Driven Particles: Rails and Trails, Vehicles and Vesicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, Debashish

    One common feature of a vehicle, an ant and a kinesin motor is that they all convert chemical energy, derived from fuel or food, into mechanical energy required for their forward movement; such objects have been modelled in recent years as self-driven particles. Cytoskeletal filaments, e.g., microtubules, form a rail network for intra-cellular transport of vesicular cargo by molecular motors like, for example, kinesins. Similarly, ants move along trails while vehicles move along lanes. Therefore, the traffic of vehicles and organisms as well as that of molecular motors can be modelled as systems of interacting self-driven particles; these are of current interest in non-equilibrium statistical mechanics. In this paper we point out the common features of these model systems and emphasize the crucial differences in their physical properties.

  7. Modelling New Particle Formation Events in the South African Savannah

    SciTech Connect

    Gierens, Rosa; Laakso, Lauri; Mogensen, Ditte; Vakkari, Ville; Beukes, J. P.; Van Zyl, Pieter; Hakola, H.; Guenther, Alex B.; Pienaar, J. J.; Boy, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Africa is one of the less studied continents with respect to atmospheric aerosols. Savannahs are complex dynamic systems sensitive to climate and land-use changes, but the interaction with the atmosphere is not well understood. Atmospheric particles, aka aerosols, affect the climate on regional and global scale, and are an important factor in air quality. In this study measurements from a relatively clean savannah environment in South Africa were used to model new particle formation and growth. There are already some combined long-term measurements of trace gas concentrations together with aerosol and meteorological variables available, but to our knowledge this is the first time detailed simulations, that include all the main processes relevant to particle formation, were done. The results show that both investigated particle formation mechanisms overestimated the formation rates dependency on sulphuric acid. The approach including low volatile organic compounds to the particle formation process was more accurate in describing the nucleation events. To get reliable estimation of aerosol concentration in simulations for larger scales, nucleation mechanisms would need to include organic compounds, at least in southern Africa.

  8. Particle-hole duality, integrability, and Russian doll BCS model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bork, L. V.; Pogosov, W. V.

    2015-08-01

    We address a generalized Richardson model (Russian doll BCS model), which is characterized by the breaking of time-reversal symmetry. This model is known to be exactly solvable and integrable. We point out that the Russian doll BCS model, on the level of Hamiltonian, is also particle-hole symmetric. This implies that the same state can be expressed both in the particle and hole representations with two different sets of Bethe roots. We then derive exact relations between Bethe roots in the two representations, which can hardly be obtained staying on the level of Bethe equations. In a quasi-classical limit, similar identities for usual Richardson model, known from literature, are recovered from our results. We also show that these relations for Richardson roots take a remarkably simple form at half-filling and for a symmetric with respect to the middle of the interaction band distribution of one-body energy levels, since, in this special case, the rapidities in the particle and hole representations up to the translation satisfy the same system of equations.

  9. Many particle magnetic dipole-dipole and hydrodynamic interactions in magnetizable stent assisted magnetic drug targeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cregg, P. J.; Murphy, Kieran; Mardinoglu, Adil; Prina-Mello, Adriele

    2010-08-01

    The implant assisted magnetic targeted drug delivery system of Avilés, Ebner and Ritter is considered both experimentally ( in vitro) and theoretically. The results of a 2D mathematical model are compared with 3D experimental results for a magnetizable wire stent. In this experiment a ferromagnetic, coiled wire stent is implanted to aid collection of particles which consist of single domain magnetic nanoparticles (radius ≈10 nm). In order to model the agglomeration of particles known to occur in this system, the magnetic dipole-dipole and hydrodynamic interactions for multiple particles are included. Simulations based on this mathematical model were performed using open source C++ code. Different initial positions are considered and the system performance is assessed in terms of collection efficiency. The results of this model show closer agreement with the measured in vitro experimental results and with the literature. The implications in nanotechnology and nanomedicine are based on the prediction of the particle efficiency, in conjunction with the magnetizable stent, for targeted drug delivery.

  10. Particle-based model for skiing traffic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holleczek, Thomas; Tröster, Gerhard

    2012-05-01

    We develop and investigate a particle-based model for ski slope traffic. Skiers are modeled as particles with a mass that are exposed to social and physical forces, which define the riding behavior of skiers during their descents on ski slopes. We also report position and speed data of 21 skiers recorded with GPS-equipped cell phones on two ski slopes. A comparison of these data with the trajectories resulting from computer simulations of our model shows a good correspondence. A study of the relationship among the density, speed, and flow of skiers reveals that congestion does not occur even with arrival rates of skiers exceeding the maximum ski lift capacity. In a sensitivity analysis, we identify the kinetic friction coefficient of skis on snow, the skier mass, the range of repelling social forces, and the arrival rate of skiers as the crucial parameters influencing the simulation results. Our model allows for the prediction of speed zones and skier densities on ski slopes, which is important in the prevention of skiing accidents.

  11. Studies of HZE particle interactions and transport for space radiation protection purposes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, Lawrence W.; Wilson, John W.; Schimmerling, Walter; Wong, Mervyn

    1987-01-01

    The main emphasis is on developing general methods for accurately predicting high-energy heavy ion (HZE) particle interactions and transport for use by researchers in mission planning studies, in evaluating astronaut self-shielding factors, and in spacecraft shield design and optimization studies. The two research tasks are: (1) to develop computationally fast and accurate solutions to the Boltzmann (transport) equation; and (2) to develop accurate HZE interaction models, from fundamental physical considerations, for use as inputs into these transport codes. Accurate solutions to the HZE transport problem have been formulated through a combination of analytical and numerical techniques. In addition, theoretical models for the input interaction parameters are under development: stopping powers, nuclear absorption cross sections, and fragmentation parameters.

  12. Smoothed particle hydrodynamics modelling for failure in metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strand, Russell K.

    It is generally regarded to be a difficult task to model multiple fractures leading to fragmentation in metals subjected to high strain rates using numerical methods. Meshless methods such as Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) are well suited to the application of fracture mechanics, since they are not prone to the problems associated with mesh tangling. This research demonstrates and validates a numerical inter-particle fracture model for the initiation, growth and subsequent failure in metals at high strain rate, applicable within a Total Lagrangian SPH scheme. Total Lagrangian SPH performs calculations in the reference state of a material and therefore the neighbourhoods remain fixed throughout the computation; this allows the inter-particle bonds to be stored and tracked as material history parameters. Swegle (2000) showed that the SPH momentum equation can be rearranged in terms of a particle-particle interaction area. By reducing this area to zero via an inter-particle damage parameter, the principles of continuum damage mechanics can be observed without the need for an effective stress term, held at the individual particles.. This research makes use of the Cochran-Banner damage growth model which has been updated for 3D damage and makes the appropriate modifications for inter-particle damage growth. The fracture model was tested on simulations of a 1D flyer plate impact test and the results were compared to experimental data. Some limited modelling was also conducted in 2 and 3 dimensions and promising results were observed. Research was also performed into the mesh sensitivity of the explosively driven Mock- Holt experiment. 3D simulations using the Eulerian SPH formulation were conducted and the best results were observed with a radial packing arrangement. An in-depth assessment of the Monaghan repulsive force correction was also conducted in attempt to eliminate the presence of the SPH tensile instability and stabilise the available Eulerian SPH code

  13. Electromagnetic field interactions with micro channels, particles and cells: Application to advanced cytometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkatapathi, Murugesan

    This thesis involves a study of the interaction of laser beams with micro channels and micro particles/cells using the electromagnetic field approach. This problem is relevant to the next generation cytometry, in particular to model based design of flow cytometers. The field approach is applied to study light scatter from particles/cells and also internal and scattered fields of cylindrical micro channels that are important for optical interrogation of particles and cells flowing through. Though current flow cytometers use qualitative fluorescence measurements for biological analysis, other viable optical interrogation techniques like light scatter, quantitative fluorescence and Coherent anti-stokes Raman scatter (CARS) are being studied for application to flow cytometry. The light scatter from particles and cells in a flow cytometer has been studied with the objective of extracting useful information about the particles using scatter measurements. First, the correlation between the size of particles and the current forward scatter measurements was both analytically modeled and experimentally determined. These results indicated that integrated scatter measurements currently used in flow cytometry (forward and side scatter) cannot be used to unambiguously estimate size, shape or refractive index of particles for classification. It is shown that multi-angle scatter measurements can be used to classify micro spheres of different sizes/refractive indices and different bacteria species, provided the scatter measurements are designed based on numerical scatter models. The numerical scatter models were then also used to do a preliminary study of correlation of scatter with internal structure of simple cells like stem cells. A few multivariate statistical methods have been applied for the classification of such particles in flow cytometry using scatter and multi-spectral fluorescence measurements. Typically the micro channels used in flow cytometry have square or circular

  14. Standard model bosons as composite particles

    SciTech Connect

    Kahana, D.E. . Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility); Kahana, S.H. )

    1990-01-01

    The Standard model of electro-weak interactions is derived from a Nambu, Jona-Lasinio type four-fermion interaction, which is assumed to result from a more basic theory valid above a very high scale {Lambda}. The masses of the gauge bosons and the Higgs are then produced by dynamical symmetry breaking of the Nambu model at an intermediate scale {mu}, and are evolved back to experimental energies via the renormalisation group equations of the Standard model. The weak angle sin{sup 2} ({theta}{sub W}) is predicted to be 3/8 at the scale {mu}, as in grand unified theories, and is evolved back to the experimental value at scale M{sub W}, thus determining {mu} {approximately}10{sup 13}GeV. Predictions for the ratios of the masses of the gauge and the Higgs bosons to the top quark mass, at experimental energies, are also obtained.

  15. Correlation Inequalities for Interacting Particle Systems with Duality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giardinà, C.; Redig, F.; Vafayi, K.

    2010-10-01

    We prove a comparison inequality between a system of independent random walkers and a system of random walkers which either interact by attracting each other—a process which we call here the symmetric inclusion process (SIP)—or repel each other—a generalized version of the well-known symmetric exclusion process. As an application, new correlation inequalities are obtained for the SIP, as well as for some interacting diffusions which are used as models of heat conduction,—the so-called Brownian momentum process, and the Brownian energy process. These inequalities are counterparts of the inequalities (in the opposite direction) for the symmetric exclusion process, showing that the SIP is a natural bosonic analogue of the symmetric exclusion process, which is fermionic. Finally, we consider a boundary driven version of the SIP for which we prove duality and then obtain correlation inequalities.

  16. Turbulence and wave particle interactions in solar-terrestrial plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dulk, G. A.; Goldman, M. V.; Toomre, J.

    1985-01-01

    Activities in the following study areas are reported: (1) particle and wave processes in solar flares; (2) solar convection zone turbulence; and (3) solar radiation emission. To investigate the amplification of cyclotron maser radiation in solar flares, a radio frequency. (RF) heating model was developed for the corona surrounding the energy release site. Then nonlinear simulations of compressible convection display prominent penetration by plumes into regions of stable stratification at the base of the solar convection zone, leading to the excitation of internal gravity waves there. Lastly, linear saturation of electron-beam-driven Langmuir waves by ambient density fluctuations, nonlinear saturation by strong turbulence processes, and radiation emission mechanisms are examined. An additional section discusses solar magnetic fields and hydromagnetic waves in inhomogeneous media, and the effect of magnetic fields on stellar oscillation.

  17. Thermodynamics of Distinguishable Particles: A Key to High-Energy Strong Interactions?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagedorn, Rolf

    A new kind of thermodynamical model for strong interactions at high energies is proposed. We start from the fact that strong interactions produce so many possible particle states (from \\uppi over its resonances to nucleons, strange particles and their resonances, up to highly excited `fireballs') that in an actual process each of these states practically never occurs more than once. We use this in order to treat the very first instant of a high-energy collision by statistical thermodynamics of a system of an illimited number of distinguishable particles. The model shows surprising properties: there exists a universal highest possible temperature T 0 of the order of 150-200 MeV (corresponding to ≈ 1012 K) which governs all high-energy processes of strongly interacting particles, independently of the actual energy and independently of the particle number, from cosmic ray jets down to elastic scattering. If a Lorentz contracted volume is introduced, the transverse momentum distribution in jets as well as in elastic scattering is described in agreement with experimental results. Paradoxically, this distribution is independent of whether or not `thermal equilibrium' is reached. If it is not reached—in the majority of cases it is not reached—then the jet structure for production processes is the consequence. If the model turns out to be as good as present experiments indicated, then the existence of a highest temperature is very likely; it implies that, from higher and higher energy experiments, not much new can be learnt about the structure of strong interactions, since the mode of excitation (which depends on the dynamical details we would like to know) has no influence on what is finally observed. The situation would then be similar to that in ordinary thermodynamics, where no experiment could possibly reveal how a certain system was brought into its thermodynamical state. In astrophysics, the method of thermodynamics of distinguishable particles may have

  18. Wave/current interaction model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, A. K.

    1988-01-01

    The wave-current interaction for the application to remote sensing data via numerical simulations and data comparison is modelled. Using the field data of surface current shear, wind condition and ambient wave spectrum, the numerical simulations of directional wave spectrum evolution were used to interpret and to compare with the aircraft data from Radar Ocean Wave Spectrometer (ROWS) and Surface Contour Radar (SCR) across the front during Frontal Air Sea Interaction Experiment (FASINEX). The wave-ice interaction was inspired by the observation of large amplitude waves hundreds of kms inside the ice pack in the Weddell Sea, resulting in breakup of the ice pack. The developed analysis of processes includes the refraction of waves at the pack edge, the effects of pack compression on wave propagation, wave train stability and buckling stability in the ice pack. Sources of pack compression and interaction between wave momentum and pack compression are investigated. Viscous camping of propagating waves in the marginal ice zone are also studied. The analysis suggests an explanation for the change in wave dispersion observed from the ship and the sequence of processes that cause ice pack breakup, pressure ridge formation and the formation of open bands of water.

  19. Low energy charged particles interacting with amorphous solid water layers.

    PubMed

    Horowitz, Yonatan; Asscher, Micha

    2012-04-01

    The interaction of charged particles with condensed water films has been studied extensively in recent years due to its importance in biological systems, ecology as well as interstellar processes. We have studied low energy electrons (3-25 eV) and positive argon ions (55 eV) charging effects on amorphous solid water (ASW) and ice films, 120-1080 ML thick, deposited on ruthenium single crystal under ultrahigh vacuum conditions. Charging the ASW films by both electrons and positive argon ions has been measured using a Kelvin probe for contact potential difference (CPD) detection and found to obey plate capacitor physics. The incoming electrons kinetic energy has defined the maximum measurable CPD values by retarding further impinging electrons. L-defects (shallow traps) are suggested to be populated by the penetrating electrons and stabilize them. Low energy electron transmission measurements (currents of 0.4-1.5 μA) have shown that the maximal and stable CPD values were obtained only after a relatively slow change has been completed within the ASW structure. Once the film has been stabilized, the spontaneous discharge was measured over a period of several hours at 103 ± 2 K. Finally, UV laser photo-emission study of the charged films has suggested that the negative charges tend to reside primarily at the ASW-vacuum interface, in good agreement with the known behavior of charged water clusters.

  20. Low energy charged particles interacting with amorphous solid water layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horowitz, Yonatan; Asscher, Micha

    2012-04-01

    The interaction of charged particles with condensed water films has been studied extensively in recent years due to its importance in biological systems, ecology as well as interstellar processes. We have studied low energy electrons (3-25 eV) and positive argon ions (55 eV) charging effects on amorphous solid water (ASW) and ice films, 120-1080 ML thick, deposited on ruthenium single crystal under ultrahigh vacuum conditions. Charging the ASW films by both electrons and positive argon ions has been measured using a Kelvin probe for contact potential difference (CPD) detection and found to obey plate capacitor physics. The incoming electrons kinetic energy has defined the maximum measurable CPD values by retarding further impinging electrons. L-defects (shallow traps) are suggested to be populated by the penetrating electrons and stabilize them. Low energy electron transmission measurements (currents of 0.4-1.5 μA) have shown that the maximal and stable CPD values were obtained only after a relatively slow change has been completed within the ASW structure. Once the film has been stabilized, the spontaneous discharge was measured over a period of several hours at 103 ± 2 K. Finally, UV laser photo-emission study of the charged films has suggested that the negative charges tend to reside primarily at the ASW-vacuum interface, in good agreement with the known behavior of charged water clusters.

  1. Consistent thermodynamic framework for interacting particles by neglecting thermal noise.

    PubMed

    Nobre, Fernando D; Curado, Evaldo M F; Souza, Andre M C; Andrade, Roberto F S

    2015-02-01

    An effective temperature θ, conjugated to a generalized entropy s(q), was introduced recently for a system of interacting particles. Since θ presents values much higher than those of typical room temperatures T≪θ, the thermal noise can be neglected (T/θ≃0) in these systems. Moreover, the consistency of this definition, as well as of a form analogous to the first law of thermodynamics, du=θds(q)+δW, were verified lately by means of a Carnot cycle, whose efficiency was shown to present the usual form, η=1-(θ(2)/θ(1)). Herein we explore further the heat contribution δQ=θds(q) by proposing a way for a heat exchange between two such systems, as well as its associated thermal equilibrium. As a consequence, the zeroth principle is also established. Moreover, we consolidate the first-law proposal by following the usual procedure for obtaining different potentials, i.e., applying Legendre transformations for distinct pairs of independent variables. From these potentials we derive the equation of state, Maxwell relations, and define response functions. All results presented are shown to be consistent with those of standard thermodynamics for T>0. PMID:25768486

  2. Observation of Hamiltonian chaos in wave particle interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doveil, Fabrice; Macor, Alessandro; Aïssi, Anass

    2008-09-01

    The motion of charged particle in longitudinal waves is a paradigm for the transition to large scale chaos in Hamiltonian systems. Recently a test cold electron beam has been used to observe its non-self-consistent interaction with externally excited wave(s) in a specially designed Traveling Wave Tube (TWT). The velocity distribution function of the electron beam is recorded with a trochoidal energy analyzer at the output of the TWT. An arbitrary waveform generator is used to launch a prescribed spectrum of waves along the slow wave structure (a 4 m long helix) of the TWT. The resonant velocity domain associated to a single wave is observed, as well as the transition to large scale chaos when the resonant domains of two waves and their secondary resonances overlap. This transition exhibits a “devil’s staircase” behavior when increasing the excitation amplitude in agreement with numerical simulation. A new strategy for control of chaos by building barriers of transport which prevent electrons to escape from a given velocity region as well as its robustness are also successfully tested. Thus generic features of Hamiltonian chaos have been experimentally observed.

  3. Interactions of energetic particles and clusters with solids

    SciTech Connect

    Averback, R.S.; Hsieh, Horngming . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering); Diaz de la Rubia, T. ); Benedek, R. )

    1990-12-01

    Ion beams are being applied for surface modifications of materials in a variety of different ways: ion implantation, ion beam mixing, sputtering, and particle or cluster beam-assisted deposition. Fundamental to all of these processes is the deposition of a large amount of energy, generally some keV's, in a localized area. This can lead to the production of defects, atomic mixing, disordering and in some cases, amorphization. Recent results of molecular dynamics computer simulations of energetic displacement cascades in Cu and Ni with energies up to 5 keV suggest that thermal spikes play an important role in these processes. Specifically, it will be shown that many aspects of defect production, atomic mixing and cascade collapse'' can be understood as a consequence of local melting of the cascade core. Included in this discussion will be the possible role of electron-phonon coupling in thermal spike dynamics. The interaction of energetic clusters of atoms with solid surfaces has also been studied by molecular dynamics simulations. this process is of interest because a large amount of energy can be deposited in a small region and possibly without creating point defects in the substrate or implanting cluster atoms. The simulations reveal that the dynamics of the collision process are strongly dependent on cluster size and energy. Different regimes where defect production, local melting and plastic flow dominate will be discussed. 43 refs., 7 figs.

  4. Effects of corotating interaction regions on Ulysses high energy particles

    SciTech Connect

    Droege, W.; Kunow, H.; Heber, B.; Mueller-Mellin, R.; Sierks, H.; Wibberenz, G.; Raviart, A.; Ducros, R.; Ferrando, P.; Rastoin, C.; Paizis, C.; Gosling, J. T.

    1996-07-20

    We investigate the intensity variation of low energy ({approx}6-23 MeV/N) heliospheric ions and of galactic protons (250-2200 MeV) observed by the Kiel Electron Telescope onboard the Ulysses spacecraft associated with Corotating Interaction Regions (CIR) from mid-1992 to end of June 1995. This period covers Ulysses' transit to high southern latitudes, the south polar pass, return to the solar equator and ascent to the north pole up to 70 deg. We find that the flux of high energy protons exhibits a periodicity of about 26 days with a relative intensity variation of 10%. At latitudes below {approx}50 deg. the recurrent variations of galactic protons are in coincidence with the passage of CIRs and enhancements of low energies protons and alpha particles which are accelerated at the shocks of the CIRs. The modulation of galactic protons is observed up to high southern latitudes, where the signatures of a CIR are no longer visible in plasma or magnetic field data. The periodicity does not depend on latitude and its phase apparently remains constant during Ulysses' pass over the south pole as well as through the solar equator.

  5. Effects of corotating interaction regions on Ulysses high energy particles

    SciTech Connect

    Droege, W.; Kunow, H.; Heber, B.; Mueller-Mellin, R.; Sierks, H.; Wibberenz, G.; Raviart, A.; Ducros, R.; Ferrando, P.; Rastoin, C.; Gosling, J.T.

    1996-07-01

    We investigate the intensity variation of low energy ({approximately}6{endash}23MeV/N) heliospheric ions and of galactic protons (250{endash}2200 MeV) observed by the Kiel Electron Telescope onboard the Ulysses spacecraft associated with Corotating Interaction Regions (CIR) from mid-1992 to end of June 1995. This period covers Ulysses{close_quote} transit to high southern latitudes, the south polar pass, return to the solar equator and ascent to the north pole up to 70{degree}. We find that the flux of high energy protons exhibits a periodicity of about 26 days with a relative intensity variation of 10{percent}. At latitudes below {approximately}50{degree} the recurrent variations of galactic protons are in coincidence with the passage of CIRs and enhancements of low energies protons and alpha particles which are accelerated at the shocks of the CIRs. The modulation of galactic protons is observed up to high southern latitudes, where the signatures of a CIR are no longer visible in plasma or magnetic field data. The periodicity does not depend on latitude and its phase apparently remains constant during Ulysses{close_quote} pass over the south pole as well as through the solar equator. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  6. Low energy charged particles interacting with amorphous solid water layers

    SciTech Connect

    Horowitz, Yonatan; Asscher, Micha

    2012-04-07

    The interaction of charged particles with condensed water films has been studied extensively in recent years due to its importance in biological systems, ecology as well as interstellar processes. We have studied low energy electrons (3-25 eV) and positive argon ions (55 eV) charging effects on amorphous solid water (ASW) and ice films, 120-1080 ML thick, deposited on ruthenium single crystal under ultrahigh vacuum conditions. Charging the ASW films by both electrons and positive argon ions has been measured using a Kelvin probe for contact potential difference (CPD) detection and found to obey plate capacitor physics. The incoming electrons kinetic energy has defined the maximum measurable CPD values by retarding further impinging electrons. L-defects (shallow traps) are suggested to be populated by the penetrating electrons and stabilize them. Low energy electron transmission measurements (currents of 0.4-1.5 {mu}A) have shown that the maximal and stable CPD values were obtained only after a relatively slow change has been completed within the ASW structure. Once the film has been stabilized, the spontaneous discharge was measured over a period of several hours at 103 {+-} 2 K. Finally, UV laser photo-emission study of the charged films has suggested that the negative charges tend to reside primarily at the ASW-vacuum interface, in good agreement with the known behavior of charged water clusters.

  7. The Isolation of DNA by Polycharged Magnetic Particles: An Analysis of the Interaction by Zeta Potential and Particle Size.

    PubMed

    Haddad, Yazan; Xhaxhiu, Kledi; Kopel, Pavel; Hynek, David; Zitka, Ondrej; Adam, Vojtech

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic isolation of biological targets is in major demand in the biotechnology industry today. This study considers the interaction of four surface-modified magnetic micro- and nanoparticles with selected DNA fragments. Different surface modifications of nanomaghemite precursors were investigated: MAN37 (silica-coated), MAN127 (polyvinylpyrrolidone-coated), MAN158 (phosphate-coated), and MAN164 (tripolyphosphate-coated). All particles were positive polycharged agglomerated monodispersed systems. Mean particle sizes were 0.48, 2.97, 2.93, and 3.67 μm for MAN37, MAN127, MAN164, and MAN158, respectively. DNA fragments exhibited negative zeta potential of -0.22 mV under binding conditions (high ionic strength, low pH, and dehydration). A decrease in zeta potential of particles upon exposure to DNA was observed with exception of MAN158 particles. The measured particle size of MAN164 particles increased by nearly twofold upon exposure to DNA. Quantitative PCR isolation of DNA with a high retrieval rate was observed by magnetic particles MAN127 and MAN164. Interaction between polycharged magnetic particles and DNA is mediated by various binding mechanisms such as hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions. Future development of DNA isolation technology requires an understanding of the physical and biochemical conditions of this process. PMID:27104527

  8. The Isolation of DNA by Polycharged Magnetic Particles: An Analysis of the Interaction by Zeta Potential and Particle Size

    PubMed Central

    Haddad, Yazan; Xhaxhiu, Kledi; Kopel, Pavel; Hynek, David; Zitka, Ondrej; Adam, Vojtech

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic isolation of biological targets is in major demand in the biotechnology industry today. This study considers the interaction of four surface-modified magnetic micro- and nanoparticles with selected DNA fragments. Different surface modifications of nanomaghemite precursors were investigated: MAN37 (silica-coated), MAN127 (polyvinylpyrrolidone-coated), MAN158 (phosphate-coated), and MAN164 (tripolyphosphate-coated). All particles were positive polycharged agglomerated monodispersed systems. Mean particle sizes were 0.48, 2.97, 2.93, and 3.67 μm for MAN37, MAN127, MAN164, and MAN158, respectively. DNA fragments exhibited negative zeta potential of −0.22 mV under binding conditions (high ionic strength, low pH, and dehydration). A decrease in zeta potential of particles upon exposure to DNA was observed with exception of MAN158 particles. The measured particle size of MAN164 particles increased by nearly twofold upon exposure to DNA. Quantitative PCR isolation of DNA with a high retrieval rate was observed by magnetic particles MAN127 and MAN164. Interaction between polycharged magnetic particles and DNA is mediated by various binding mechanisms such as hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions. Future development of DNA isolation technology requires an understanding of the physical and biochemical conditions of this process. PMID:27104527

  9. The Isolation of DNA by Polycharged Magnetic Particles: An Analysis of the Interaction by Zeta Potential and Particle Size.

    PubMed

    Haddad, Yazan; Xhaxhiu, Kledi; Kopel, Pavel; Hynek, David; Zitka, Ondrej; Adam, Vojtech

    2016-04-20

    Magnetic isolation of biological targets is in major demand in the biotechnology industry today. This study considers the interaction of four surface-modified magnetic micro- and nanoparticles with selected DNA fragments. Different surface modifications of nanomaghemite precursors were investigated: MAN37 (silica-coated), MAN127 (polyvinylpyrrolidone-coated), MAN158 (phosphate-coated), and MAN164 (tripolyphosphate-coated). All particles were positive polycharged agglomerated monodispersed systems. Mean particle sizes were 0.48, 2.97, 2.93, and 3.67 μm for MAN37, MAN127, MAN164, and MAN158, respectively. DNA fragments exhibited negative zeta potential of -0.22 mV under binding conditions (high ionic strength, low pH, and dehydration). A decrease in zeta potential of particles upon exposure to DNA was observed with exception of MAN158 particles. The measured particle size of MAN164 particles increased by nearly twofold upon exposure to DNA. Quantitative PCR isolation of DNA with a high retrieval rate was observed by magnetic particles MAN127 and MAN164. Interaction between polycharged magnetic particles and DNA is mediated by various binding mechanisms such as hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions. Future development of DNA isolation technology requires an understanding of the physical and biochemical conditions of this process.

  10. Diffuse interface field approach to modeling arbitrarily-shaped particles at fluid-fluid interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Paul C. Millett; Yu. U. Wang

    2011-01-01

    We present a novel mesoscale simulation approach to modeling the evolution of solid particles segregated at fluid-fluid interfaces. The approach involves a diffuse- interface field description of each fluid phase in addition to the set of solid particles. The unique strength of the model is its generality to include particles of arbitrary shapes and orientations, as well as the ability to incorporate electrostatic particle interactions and external forces via a previous work [Millett PC, Wang YU, Acta Mater 2009;57:3101]. In this work, we verify that the model produces the correct capillary forces and contact angles by comparing with a well-defined analytical solution. In addition, simulation results of rotations of various-shaped particles at fluid-fluid interfaces, external force- induced capillary attraction/repulsion between particles, and spinodal decomposition arrest due to colloidal particle jamming at the interfaces are presented.

  11. Cloud-chemistry interactions modeling and validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kristjansson, J.; Storelvmo, T.; Iversen, T.

    2006-12-01

    Clouds play a crucial role in several processes related to atmospheric chemistry, many of which include aerosols: On the one hand, aerosols are needed for the formation of clouds, and any change in the amount or composition of aerosols will influence cloud properties. For instance, the addition of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) by human activity changes the cloud microphysical properties such that cloud albedo is enhanced and precipitation is suppressed (aerosol indirect effect). Furthermore, adding anthropogenic ice nuclei enhances the ability of supercooled water droplets to freeze. On the other hand, clouds serve as sites for wet-phase oxidation processes, by which gases (e.g., SO2) are transformed to aerosols (e.g., sulfate). Through cloud processing, both the aerosol size distribution and the chemical composition of the air are modified. In addition, clouds influence the atmospheric chemical composition through wet deposition, which is the removal of material from the atmosphere by cloud particles or precipitation. In this talk we will focus on the modeling of aerosol-cloud interactions in global climate models (GCMs). We will start by reviewing some recent literature on this topic. We will then describe in detail a modeling approach developed at the University of Oslo and implemented in the NCAR Community Atmosphere Model. A life-cycle model dealing with the chemistry transformations of 5 aerosol species (sulfate, black carbon, organic matter, sea salt and mineral dust) and their precursors is involved. The aerosol size distributions are then determined, assuming log-normal modes. Cloud droplet nucleation is computed, assuming different hygroscopicities based on chemical composition, and taking into account the competition effect, i.e., the lowering of the supersaturation by the competition between the CCN for the available vapor. Some of the aerosol particles (e.g., soot and dust particles) are assumed to have ice nucleating capabilities, enabling an

  12. Laser-plasma interactions with a Fourier-Bessel particle-in-cell method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andriyash, Igor A.; Lehe, Remi; Lifschitz, Agustin

    2016-03-01

    A new spectral particle-in-cell (PIC) method for plasma modeling is presented and discussed. In the proposed scheme, the Fourier-Bessel transform is used to translate the Maxwell equations to the quasi-cylindrical spectral domain. In this domain, the equations are solved analytically in time, and the spatial derivatives are approximated with high accuracy. In contrast to the finite-difference time domain (FDTD) methods, that are used commonly in PIC, the developed method does not produce numerical dispersion and does not involve grid staggering for the electric and magnetic fields. These features are especially valuable in modeling the wakefield acceleration of particles in plasmas. The proposed algorithm is implemented in the code PLARES-PIC, and the test simulations of laser plasma interactions are compared to the ones done with the quasi-cylindrical FDTD PIC code CALDER-CIRC.

  13. Interaction between Two Coronal Mass Ejections in the 2013 May 22 Large Solar Energetic Particle Event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Liu-Guan; Li, Gang; Jiang, Yong; Le, Gui-Ming; Shen, Cheng-Long; Wang, Yu-Ming; Chen, Yao; Xu, Fei; Gu, Bin; Zhang, Ya-Nan

    2014-10-01

    We investigate the eruption and interaction of two coronal mass ejections (CMEs) during the large 2013 May 22 solar energetic particle event using multiple spacecraft observations. Two CMEs, having similar propagation directions, were found to erupt from two nearby active regions (ARs), AR11748 and AR11745, at ~08:48 UT and ~13:25 UT, respectively. The second CME was faster than the first CME. Using the graduated cylindrical shell model, we reconstructed the propagation of these two CMEs and found that the leading edge of the second CME caught up with the trailing edge of the first CME at a height of ~6 solar radii. After about two hours, the leading edges of the two CMEs merged at a height of ~20 solar radii. Type II solar radio bursts showed strong enhancement during this two hour period. Using the velocity dispersion method, we obtained the solar particle release (SPR) time and the path length for energetic electrons. Further assuming that energetic protons propagated along the same interplanetary magnetic field, we also obtained the SPR time for energetic protons, which were close to that of electrons. These release times agreed with the time when the second CME caught up with the trailing edge of the first CME, indicating that the CME-CME interaction (and shock-CME interaction) plays an important role in the process of particle acceleration in this event.

  14. INTERACTION BETWEEN TWO CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS IN THE 2013 MAY 22 LARGE SOLAR ENERGETIC PARTICLE EVENT

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Liu-Guan; Xu, Fei; Gu, Bin; Zhang, Ya-Nan; Li, Gang; Jiang, Yong; Le, Gui-Ming; Shen, Cheng-Long; Wang, Yu-Ming; Chen, Yao

    2014-10-01

    We investigate the eruption and interaction of two coronal mass ejections (CMEs) during the large 2013 May 22 solar energetic particle event using multiple spacecraft observations. Two CMEs, having similar propagation directions, were found to erupt from two nearby active regions (ARs), AR11748 and AR11745, at ∼08:48 UT and ∼13:25 UT, respectively. The second CME was faster than the first CME. Using the graduated cylindrical shell model, we reconstructed the propagation of these two CMEs and found that the leading edge of the second CME caught up with the trailing edge of the first CME at a height of ∼6 solar radii. After about two hours, the leading edges of the two CMEs merged at a height of ∼20 solar radii. Type II solar radio bursts showed strong enhancement during this two hour period. Using the velocity dispersion method, we obtained the solar particle release (SPR) time and the path length for energetic electrons. Further assuming that energetic protons propagated along the same interplanetary magnetic field, we also obtained the SPR time for energetic protons, which were close to that of electrons. These release times agreed with the time when the second CME caught up with the trailing edge of the first CME, indicating that the CME-CME interaction (and shock-CME interaction) plays an important role in the process of particle acceleration in this event.

  15. Model-independent particle accelerator tuning

    SciTech Connect

    Scheinker, Alexander; Pang, Xiaoying; Rybarcyk, Larry

    2013-10-21

    We present a new model-independent dynamic feedback technique, rotation rate tuning, for automatically and simultaneously tuning coupled components of uncertain, complex systems. The main advantages of the method are: 1) It has the ability to handle unknown, time-varying systems, 2) It gives known bounds on parameter update rates, 3) We give an analytic proof of its convergence and its stability, and 4) It has a simple digital implementation through a control system such as the Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS). Because this technique is model independent it may be useful as a real-time, in-hardware, feedback-based optimization scheme for uncertain and time-varying systems. In particular, it is robust enough to handle uncertainty due to coupling, thermal cycling, misalignments, and manufacturing imperfections. As a result, it may be used as a fine-tuning supplement for existing accelerator tuning/control schemes. We present multi-particle simulation results demonstrating the scheme’s ability to simultaneously adaptively adjust the set points of twenty two quadrupole magnets and two RF buncher cavities in the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center Linear Accelerator’s transport region, while the beam properties and RF phase shift are continuously varying. The tuning is based only on beam current readings, without knowledge of particle dynamics. We also present an outline of how to implement this general scheme in software for optimization, and in hardware for feedback-based control/tuning, for a wide range of systems.

  16. Toward a descriptive model of solar particles in the heliosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shea, M. A.; Smart, D. F.; Adams, James H., Jr.; Chenette, D.; Feynman, Joan; Hamilton, Douglas C.; Heckman, G. R.; Konradi, A.; Lee, Martin A.; Nachtwey, D. S.

    1988-01-01

    During a workshop on the interplanetary charged particle environment held in 1987, a descriptive model of solar particles in the heliosphere was assembled. This model includes the fluence, composition, energy spectra, and spatial and temporal variations of solar particles both within and beyong 1 AU. The ability to predict solar particle fluences was also discussed. Suggestions for specific studies designed to improve the basic model were also made.

  17. Many-body dissipative particle dynamics simulation of liquid/vapor and liquid/solid interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Arienti, Marco; Pan, Wenxiao; Li, Xiaoyi; Karniadakis, George E.

    2011-05-27

    The combination of short-range repulsive and long-range attractive forces in Many-body Dissipative Particle Dynamics (MDPD) is examined at a vapor/liquid and liquid/solid interface. Based on the radial distribution of the virial pressure in a drop at equilibrium, a systematic study is carried out to characterize the sensitivity of the surface tension coefficient with respect to the inter-particle interaction parameters. For the first time, this study highlights the approximately cubic dependence of the surface tension coefficient on the bulk density of the fluid. In capillary flow, MDPD solutions are shown to satisfy the condition on the wavelength of an axial disturbance leading to the pinch-off of a cylindrical liquid thread. Correctly, no pinch-off occurs below the cutoff wavelength. MDPD is augmented by a set of bell-shaped weight functions to model interaction with a solid wall. There, hydrophilic and hydrophobic behaviors, including the occurrence of slip in the latter, are reproduced using a modification in the weight function that avoids particle clustering. Finally, the dynamics of droplets entering an inverted Y-shaped fracture junction is correctly captured in simulations parameterized by the Bond number, proving the flexibility of MDPD in modeling interface-dominated flows.

  18. Many-body dissipative particle dynamics simulation of liquid/vapor and liquid/solid interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arienti, Marco; Pan, Wenxiao; Li, Xiaoyi; Karniadakis, George

    2011-05-01

    The combination of short-range repulsive and long-range attractive forces in many-body dissipative particle dynamics (MDPD) is examined at a vapor/liquid and liquid/solid interface. Based on the radial distribution of the virial pressure in a drop at equilibrium, a systematic study is carried out to characterize the sensitivity of the surface tension coefficient with respect to the inter-particle interaction parameters. For the first time, the approximately cubic dependence of the surface tension coefficient on the bulk density of the fluid is evidenced. In capillary flow, MDPD solutions are shown to satisfy the condition on the wavelength of an axial disturbance leading to the pinch-off of a cylindrical liquid thread; correctly, no pinch-off occurs below the cutoff wavelength. Moreover, in an example that illustrates the cascade of fluid dynamics behaviors from potential to inertial-viscous to stochastic flow, the dynamics of the jet radius is consistent with the power law predictions of asymptotic analysis. To model interaction with a solid wall, MDPD is augmented by a set of bell-shaped weight functions; hydrophilic and hydrophobic behaviors, including the occurrence of slip in the latter, are reproduced using a modification in the weight function that avoids particle clustering. The dynamics of droplets entering an inverted Y-shaped fracture junction is shown to be correctly captured in simulations parametrized by the Bond number, confirming the flexibility of MDPD in modeling interface-dominated flows.

  19. Multiscale modeling of interfacial physics in particle-solidification front dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garvin, Justin Wayne

    Depending on thermosolutal conditions, the interaction of solidification fronts with embedded particles can result in pushing or engulfment of the particles by the front. Such interactions are important in several applications, including metal matrix composite manufacture, frost heaving, and cryobiology. The development of the solidified microstructure in such systems depends on interactions between non-planar solidification fronts and multiple particles. The interaction between an advancing solidification front and a micron-size particle is an inherently multiscale heat and mass transport problem. Transport at the micro-scale (i.e. the scale of the particle dimension) couples with intermolecular interactions and lubrication forces in a thin layer of melt between the particle and the front to determine the overall dynamics of the interaction. A multiscale model is developed to simulate such front-particle interactions. Lubrication equations are employed to quantify the fluid flow (pressure field) and thermal transport (temperature field) in the thin gap region ("inner region") between the particle and front. The lubrication equations include disjoining pressure effects due to intermolecular forces that are important at the nano-meter length scale. The solution to the lubrication equations in the melt layer ("inner region") is coupled to the solution of the Navier-Stokes equations for the overall particle-front system ("outer region''). Techniques are developed for coupling the dynamics at the two disparate scales ("inner" and "outer") at a common "matching region". All interfaces are represented and tracked using the level-set approach. A sharp-interface technique is employed for solution of the governing equations in the resulting moving boundary problem. Validation of the coupling strategy and results for the particle-front interaction phenomenon with the multiscale approach are presented. Results show that particle pushing can only occur when the thermal

  20. On the classical description of the recombination of dark matter particles with a Coulomb-like interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belotsky, K. M.; Esipova, E. A.; Kirillov, A. A.

    2016-10-01

    Cold dark matter (DM) scenario may be cured of several problems by involving self-interaction of dark matter. Viability of the models of long-range interacting DM crucially depends on the effectiveness of recombination of the DM particles, making thereby their interaction short-range. Usually in numeric calculations, recombination is described by cross section obtained on a feasible quantum level. However in a wide range of parameter values, a classical treatment, where the particles are bound due to dipole radiation, is applicable. The cross sections, obtained in both approaches, are very different and lead to diverse consequences. Classical cross section has a steeper dependence on relative velocity, what leads to the fact that, after decoupling of DM particles from thermal background of "dark photons" (carriers of DM long-range interaction), recombination process does not "freeze out", diminishing gradually density of unbound DM particles. Our simplified estimates show, that at the taken parameter values (the mass of DM particle is 100 GeV, interaction constant is 100-1, and quite natural assumptions on initial conditions, from which the result is very weakly dependent) the difference in residual density reaches about 5 orders of magnitude on pre-galactic stage. This estimate takes into account thermal effects induced by dipole radiation and recombination, which resulted in the increase of both temperature and density of DM particles by a half order of magnitude.

  1. Computer and laboratory simulation of interactions between spacecraft surfaces and charged-particle environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, N. J.

    1979-01-01

    There are two categories of interactions considered in this report. The first, spacecraft passive, refers to cases where the charged-particle environment acts on the spacecraft (e.g., spacecraft charging phenomena). The second, spacecraft active, refers to cases where a system on the spacecraft causes the interaction (e.g., high voltage space power systems). Both categories are studied in ground simulation facilities to understand the processes involved and to measure the pertinent parameters. Computer simulations are based on the NASA Charging Analyzer Program (NASCAP) code. Analytical models are developed in this code and verified against the experimental data. Extrapolation from the small test samples to space conditions are made with this code. Typical results from laboratory and computer simulations are presented for both types of interactions. Extrapolations from these simulations to performance in space environments are discussed.

  2. Modeling of the optical properties of a two-dimensional system of small conductive particles.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondikov, A. A.; Tonkaev, P. A.; Chaldyshev, V. V.; Vartanyan, T. A.

    2016-08-01

    Software was developed for quick numerical calculations and graphic display of the absorption, reflection and transmittance spectra of two-dimensional systems of small conductive particles. It allowed us to make instant comparison of calculation results and experimental data. A lattice model was used to simulate nearly distributed particles, and the coherent-potential approximation was applied to obtain a solution to the problem of interacting particles. The Delphi programming environment was used.

  3. Systematic Uncertainties in High-Energy Hadronic Interaction Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zha, M.; Knapp, J.; Ostapchenko, S.

    2003-07-01

    Hadronic interaction models for cosmic ray energies are uncertain since our knowledge of hadronic interactions is extrap olated from accelerator experiments at much lower energies. At present most high-energy models are based on Grib ov-Regge theory of multi-Pomeron exchange, which provides a theoretical framework to evaluate cross-sections and particle production. While experimental data constrain some of the model parameters, others are not well determined and are therefore a source of systematic uncertainties. In this paper we evaluate the variation of results obtained with the QGSJET model, when modifying parameters relating to three ma jor sources of uncertainty: the form of the parton structure function, the role of diffractive interactions, and the string hadronisation. Results on inelastic cross sections, on secondary particle production and on the air shower development are discussed.

  4. A-DROP: A predictive model for the formation of oil particle aggregates (OPAs)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhao, Lin; Boufadel, Michel C.; Geng, Xiaolong; Lee, Kenneth; King, Thomas; Robinson, Brian; Fitzpatrick, Faith A.

    2016-01-01

    Oil–particle interactions play a major role in removal of free oil from the water column. We present a new conceptual–numerical model, A-DROP, to predict oil amount trapped in oil–particle aggregates. A new conceptual formulation of oil–particle coagulation efficiency is introduced to account for the effects of oil stabilization by particles, particle hydrophobicity, and oil–particle size ratio on OPA formation. A-DROP was able to closely reproduce the oil trapping efficiency reported in experimental studies. The model was then used to simulate the OPA formation in a typical nearshore environment. Modeling results indicate that the increase of particle concentration in the swash zone would speed up the oil–particle interaction process; but the oil amount trapped in OPAs did not correspond to the increase of particle concentration. The developed A-DROP model could become an important tool in understanding the natural removal of oil and developing oil spill countermeasures by means of oil–particle aggregation.

  5. A-DROP: A predictive model for the formation of oil particle aggregates (OPAs).

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lin; Boufadel, Michel C; Geng, Xiaolong; Lee, Kenneth; King, Thomas; Robinson, Brian; Fitzpatrick, Faith

    2016-05-15

    Oil-particle interactions play a major role in removal of free oil from the water column. We present a new conceptual-numerical model, A-DROP, to predict oil amount trapped in oil-particle aggregates. A new conceptual formulation of oil-particle coagulation efficiency is introduced to account for the effects of oil stabilization by particles, particle hydrophobicity, and oil-particle size ratio on OPA formation. A-DROP was able to closely reproduce the oil trapping efficiency reported in experimental studies. The model was then used to simulate the OPA formation in a typical nearshore environment. Modeling results indicate that the increase of particle concentration in the swash zone would speed up the oil-particle interaction process; but the oil amount trapped in OPAs did not correspond to the increase of particle concentration. The developed A-DROP model could become an important tool in understanding the natural removal of oil and developing oil spill countermeasures by means of oil-particle aggregation.

  6. A-DROP: A predictive model for the formation of oil particle aggregates (OPAs).

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lin; Boufadel, Michel C; Geng, Xiaolong; Lee, Kenneth; King, Thomas; Robinson, Brian; Fitzpatrick, Faith

    2016-05-15

    Oil-particle interactions play a major role in removal of free oil from the water column. We present a new conceptual-numerical model, A-DROP, to predict oil amount trapped in oil-particle aggregates. A new conceptual formulation of oil-particle coagulation efficiency is introduced to account for the effects of oil stabilization by particles, particle hydrophobicity, and oil-particle size ratio on OPA formation. A-DROP was able to closely reproduce the oil trapping efficiency reported in experimental studies. The model was then used to simulate the OPA formation in a typical nearshore environment. Modeling results indicate that the increase of particle concentration in the swash zone would speed up the oil-particle interaction process; but the oil amount trapped in OPAs did not correspond to the increase of particle concentration. The developed A-DROP model could become an important tool in understanding the natural removal of oil and developing oil spill countermeasures by means of oil-particle aggregation. PMID:26992749

  7. Spectral Theory for Interacting Particle Systems Solvable by Coordinate Bethe Ansatz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borodin, Alexei; Corwin, Ivan; Petrov, Leonid; Sasamoto, Tomohiro

    2015-11-01

    We develop spectral theory for the q-Hahn stochastic particle system introduced recently by Povolotsky. That is, we establish a Plancherel type isomorphism result that implies completeness and biorthogonality statements for the Bethe ansatz eigenfunctions of the system. Owing to a Markov duality with the q-Hahn TASEP (a discrete-time generalization of TASEP with particles' jump distribution being the orthogonality weight for the classical q-Hahn orthogonal polynomials), we write down moment formulas that characterize the fixed time distribution of the q-Hahn TASEP with general initial data. The Bethe ansatz eigenfunctions of the q-Hahn system degenerate into eigenfunctions of other (not necessarily stochastic) interacting particle systems solvable by the coordinate Bethe ansatz. This includes the ASEP, the (asymmetric) six-vertex model, and the Heisenberg XXZ spin chain (all models are on the infinite lattice). In this way, each of the latter systems possesses a spectral theory, too. In particular, biorthogonality of the ASEP eigenfunctions, which follows from the corresponding q-Hahn statement, implies symmetrization identities of Tracy and Widom (for ASEP with either step or step Bernoulli initial configuration) as corollaries. Another degeneration takes the q-Hahn system to the q-Boson particle system (dual to q-TASEP) studied in detail in our previous paper (2013). Thus, at the spectral theory level we unify two discrete-space regularizations of the Kardar-Parisi-Zhang equation/stochastic heat equation, namely, q-TASEP and ASEP.

  8. Wave-particle interaction during a dipolarization front event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, M. L.; Hwang, K.; Klimas, A. J.; Schriver, D.; Ashour-Abdalla, M.; Vinas, A. F.

    2013-12-01

    We present Cluster observations of wave-particle interactions during an earthward-propagating dipolarization front (DF) and associated fast plasma bulk flows detected at the central current sheet in Earth's magnetotail. During this period, flux tubes behind a DF frequently contain more energetic or hotter ions than did the pre-existing flux tubes ahead of the DF. On the other hand, electrons within the DF flux tubes heat less, or are even colder, than were the pre-existing populations, and are often accompanied by superposed isolated beams. At the same time, electrostatic emissions are strongly enhanced over a wide range of frequencies (up to several times the electron cyclotron frequency). The lower-frequency (below about several tenths of the electron cyclotron frequency) electrostatic wave power is well correlated with ion energization. From linear theory, we find two wave modes: a high-frequency beam mode and a low-frequency whistler mode that are associated with the electron beam component. We attribute the generation of whistlers to electron beams that persist for a while before undergoing rapid thermalization. The existence of isolated beam components behind DFs detected during the 4-sec Cluster spin period indicates that DFs either provide a continuous source of electron beams or facilitate a physical process that maintains the beams against rapid thermalization. Our analysis suggests that the earthward motion of the DF flux tube, via Fermi acceleration related to a shortening of the magnetic field lines, leads to the generation or sustenance of the electron beams that can generate whistler mode waves, which can in turn heat ions. This scenario, by which free energy in electron beams generates waves that then heat ions, accounts for Cluster observations of the different energization behaviors between electrons and ions behind DFs. Our PIC simulations qualitatively reproduce the Cluster observations.

  9. Spin-Curvature Interaction for Particles of Rest Mass Zero

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordwell, William Robert

    Using a W.K.B. approximation, equations of motion are derived for integral spin particles of zero rest mass. The equations are similar to Papapetrou's equations. A modified, extended W.K.B. approximation is used to derive the equations for half-integral spin particles. The equations are applied to particles travelling down the axis of a spinning black hole, and to particles in a stationary, weak field spacetime. The results agree with frequency cut-offs and linear polarization rotation results found by various other methods. Some previously known polarization results for electromagnetic waves are extended to other spins.

  10. Particle interactions in three-dimensional electrical field simulated by iterative dipole moment method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Le; Xie, Chuanchuan; Chen, Bo; Wu, Jiankang

    2016-06-01

    The dielectrophoresis (DEP) interactions of a few particles in a uniform two-dimensional (2D) electrical field have well been studied by Maxwell stress tensor (MST) method. Multiple particle interactions in three-dimensional (3D) electrical field are investigated in this work using iterative dipole moment (IDM) method which is an analytic algorithm without complicated numerical computations to solve for electrical field. The interactive DEP forces of particles calculated by IDM are found to be well agreed with those of MST method and much simple to implement. Using IDM method, a series of examples of multiple particles interactions and particle chains in a 3D uniform DC electrical field is presented. Randomly distributed similar dense particles (either all positive DEP (pDEP) or all negative DEP (nDEP) particles) in 3D uniform electrical field can generally form chains in lines parallel to the electrical field, except the case that all similar particles are in a plane perpendicular to the electrical field where the particles repel each other and move away in the plane. Randomly distributed dissimilar dense particles (mixture of pDEP and nDEP particles) can form (1) chains in lines, (2) clusters in a plane or (3) 3D groups. The chains, clusters and groups are of staggered arrangements of pDEP and nDEP particles, which are perpendicular to the electrical field.

  11. Size effects in aerosol particle interactions: the van der Waals potential and collision rates

    SciTech Connect

    Marlow, W H

    1980-01-01

    Three effects which are explicitly dependent on aerosol particle size are identified and discussed. They are focussed about the particle collision rate and how it relates to the properties of the gas, the particle, and the particle's interaction potential energy which play roles in particle-particle collision rates. By incorporating the conduction electronic free path effect for conductors into the frequency-dependent dielectric constants of silver and graphite, particle size effects in the Lifshitz-van der Waals potentials for identical pairs of 1 nm and 100 nm particles are evaluated. Water and tetradecane particle interaction potentials for the same size particles are also calculated to illustrate size effects due to the retardation of the interaction. These potentials are then used to calculate the enhancement of the particle collision rates above their values in the absence of any potential at various gas pressures. The roles of the interaction potential in collision among identical pairs of particles of differing compositions is also briefly discussed.

  12. Accurate predictions of dielectrophoretic force and torque on particles with strong mutual field, particle, and wall interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qianlong; Reifsnider, Kenneth

    2012-11-01

    The basis of dielectrophoresis (DEP) is the prediction of the force and torque on particles. The classical approach to the prediction is based on the effective moment method, which, however, is an approximate approach, assumes infinitesimal particles. Therefore, it is well-known that for finite-sized particles, the DEP approximation is inaccurate as the mutual field, particle, wall interactions become strong, a situation presently attracting extensive research for practical significant applications. In the present talk, we provide accurate calculations of the force and torque on the particles from first principles, by directly resolving the local geometry and properties and accurately accounting for the mutual interactions for finite-sized particles with both dielectric polarization and conduction in a sinusoidally steady-state electric field. Since the approach has a significant advantage, compared to other numerical methods, to efficiently simulate many closely packed particles, it provides an important, unique, and accurate technique to investigate complex DEP phenomena, for example heterogeneous mixtures containing particle chains, nanoparticle assembly, biological cells, non-spherical effects, etc. This study was supported by the Department of Energy under funding for an EFRC (the HeteroFoaM Center), grant no. DE-SC0001061.

  13. Beyond Standard Model Physics: At the Frontiers of Cosmology and Particle Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez-Suarez, Alejandro O.

    I begin to write this thesis at a time of great excitement in the field of cosmology and particle physics. The aim of this thesis is to study and search for beyond the standard model (BSM) physics in the cosmological and high energy particle fields. There are two main questions, which this thesis aims to address: 1) what can we learn about the inflationary epoch utilizing the pioneer gravitational wave detector Adv. LIGO?, and 2) what are the dark matter particle properties and interactions with the standard model particles?. This thesis will focus on advances in answering both questions.

  14. Preliminary discrete element modeling of a falling particle curtain for CSP central tower receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanino, R.; Ho, C. K.; Romano, D.; Savoldi, L.

    2016-05-01

    Current methods used to simulate the curtain thickness in a falling particle receiver lead to a poor agreement with the experiments. Here the Discrete Element Method (DEM) is proposed to address the problem, including both the top hopper and the interactions between particles in the model. Some first promising results are presented, showing an acceptable agreement between simulation and experiment for an ad-hoc set of input parameters. A sensitivity study provides a first assessment of the effects of the main input parameters of the model (boundary conditions at the release, particle Young's modulus, restitution coefficients and effective particle diameter) on the predicted curtain thickness.

  15. Particle acceleration in a complex solar active region modelled by a Cellular automata model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dauphin, C.; Vilmer, N.; Anastasiadis, A.

    2004-12-01

    The models of cellular automat allowed to reproduce successfully several statistical properties of the solar flares. We use a cellular automat model based on the concept of self-organised critical system to model the evolution of the magnetic energy released in an eruptive active area. Each burst of magnetic energy released is assimilated to a process of magnetic reconnection. We will thus generate several current layers (RCS) where the particles are accelerated by a direct electric field. We calculate the energy gain of the particles (ions and electrons) for various types of magnetic configuration. We calculate the distribution function of the kinetic energy of the particles after their interactions with a given number of RCS for each type of configurations. We show that the relative efficiency of the acceleration of the electrons and the ions depends on the selected configuration.

  16. Wave-Particle Interactions As a Driving Mechanism for the Solar Wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, William J.

    2004-01-01

    Our research has been focusing on a highly experimentally relevant issue: intermittency of the fluctuating fields in outflowing plasmas. We have contributed to both the theoretical and experimental research of the topic. In particular, we have developed a theoretical model and data analyzing programs to examine the issue of intermittency in space plasma outflows, including the solar wind. As fluctuating electric fields in the solar wind are likely to provide a heating and acceleration mechanism for the ions, our studies of the intermittency in turbulence in space plasma outflows help us toward achieving the goal of comparing major physical mechanisms that contribute to the driving of the fast solar wind. Our new theoretical model extends the utilities of our global hybrid model, which has allowed us to follow the kinetic evolution of the particle distributions along an inhomogeneous field line while the particles are subjected to various physical mechanisms. The physical effects that were considered in the global hybrid model included wave-particle interactions, an ambipolar electric field that was consistent with the particle distributions themselves, and Coulomb collisions. With an earlier version of the global hybrid model, we examined the overall impact on the solar wind flow due to the combination of these physical effects. In particular, we studied the combined effects of two major mechanisms that had been proposed as the drivers of the fast solar wind: (1) velocity filtration effect due to suprathermal electrons; (2) ion cyclotron resonance. Since the approval of this research grant, we have updated the model such that the effects due to these two driving mechanisms can be examined separately, thereby allowing us to compare their contributions to the acceleration of the solar wind. In the next section, we shall demonstrate that the velocity filtration effect is rather insignificant in comparison with that due to ion cyclotron resonance.

  17. The interaction of colloidal particles with weak homeotropic anchoring energy in homogeneous nematic liquid crystal cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Jo; Kim, Jong-Hyun

    2014-04-21

    We have investigated interactions of colloidal particles with weak homeotropic anchoring energy in homogeneous nematic liquid crystal cells. Particle-wall and inter-particle interactions were observed experimentally and analyzed using typical dipole-dipole and quadrupole-quadrupole interactions, including substrate effects as the image charges. Both experimental results matched well with the calculated results for the effective particle radius reflecting the weak anchoring. The effective radius is reduced by the amount of extrapolation length than the actual particle radius. The effective radii of polyethylene micro-particles were reduced to a coefficient ζ (0.78 ≥ ζ ≥ 0.52) times the actual radius with anchoring coefficients in the range of 3.8 × 10(-6) to 1.4 × 10(-6) J m(-2). The anchoring energy of the particles is, therefore, a key component for explaining liquid crystal colloidal systems.

  18. Some Basic Concepts of Wave-Particle Interactions in Collisionless Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lakhina, Gurbax S.; Tsurutani, Bruce T.

    1997-01-01

    The physical concepts of wave-particle interactions in a collisionless plasma are developed from first principles. Using the Lorentz force, starting with the concepts of gyromotion, particle mirroring and the loss-cone, normal and anomalous cyclotron resonant interactions, pitch-angle scattering, and cross-field diffusion are developed.

  19. Mechanism for thermal relic dark matter of strongly interacting massive particles.

    PubMed

    Hochberg, Yonit; Kuflik, Eric; Volansky, Tomer; Wacker, Jay G

    2014-10-24

    We present a new paradigm for achieving thermal relic dark matter. The mechanism arises when a nearly secluded dark sector is thermalized with the standard model after reheating. The freeze-out process is a number-changing 3→2 annihilation of strongly interacting massive particles (SIMPs) in the dark sector, and points to sub-GeV dark matter. The couplings to the visible sector, necessary for maintaining thermal equilibrium with the standard model, imply measurable signals that will allow coverage of a significant part of the parameter space with future indirect- and direct-detection experiments and via direct production of dark matter at colliders. Moreover, 3→2 annihilations typically predict sizable 2→2 self-interactions which naturally address the "core versus cusp" and "too-big-to-fail" small-scale structure formation problems.

  20. Dynamic cross correlation studies of wave particle interactions in ULF phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcpherron, R. L.

    1979-01-01

    Magnetic field observations made by satellites in the earth's magnetic field reveal a wide variety of ULF waves. These waves interact with the ambient particle populations in complex ways, causing modulation of the observed particle fluxes. This modulation is found to be a function of species, pitch angle, energy and time. The characteristics of this modulation provide information concerning the wave mode and interaction process. One important characteristic of wave-particle interactions is the phase of the particle flux modulation relative to the magnetic field variations. To display this phase as a function of time a dynamic cross spectrum program has been developed. The program produces contour maps in the frequency time plane of the cross correlation coefficient between any particle flux time series and the magnetic field vector. This program has been utilized in several studies of ULF wave-particle interactions at synchronous orbit.

  1. Cell and Particle Interactions and Aggregation During Electrophoretic Motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Robert H.

    2000-01-01

    The objectives of this research were (i) to perform experiments for observing and quantifying electrophoretic aggregation, (ii) to develop a theoretical description to appropriately analyze and compare with the experimental results, (iii) to study the combined effects of electrophoretic and gravitational aggregation of large particles, and the combined effects of electrophoretic and Brownian aggregation of small particles, and (iv) to perform a preliminary design of a potential future flight experiment involving electrophoretic aggregation. Electrophoresis refers to the motion of charged particles, droplets or molecules in response to an applied electric field. Electrophoresis is commonly used for analysis and separation of biological particles or molecules. When particles have different surface charge densities or potentials, they will migrate at different velocities in an electric field. This differential migration leads to the possibility that they will collide and aggregate, thereby preventing separation.

  2. Modeling crowd turbulence by many-particle simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Wenjian; Johansson, Anders

    2007-10-01

    A recent study [D. Helbing, A. Johansson, and H. Z. Al-Abideen, Phys. Rev. E 75, 046109 (2007)] has revealed a “turbulent” state of pedestrian flows, which is characterized by sudden displacements and causes the falling and trampling of people. However, turbulent crowd motion is not reproduced well by current many-particle models due to their insufficient representation of the local interactions in areas of extreme densities. In this contribution, we extend the repulsive force term of the social force model to reproduce crowd turbulence. We perform numerical simulations of pedestrians moving through a bottleneck area with this model. The transitions from laminar to stop-and-go and turbulent flows are observed. The empirical features characterizing crowd turbulence, such as the structure function and the probability density function of velocity increments, are reproduced well; i.e., they are well compatible with an analysis of video data during the annual Muslim pilgrimage.

  3. Emergent smectic order in simple active particle models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanczuk, Pawel; Chaté, Hugues; Chen, Leiming; Ngo, Sandrine; Toner, John

    2016-06-01

    Novel ‘smectic-P’ behavior, in which self-propelled particles form rows and move on average along them, occurs generically within the orientationally ordered phase of simple models that we simulate. Both apolar (head-tail symmetric) and polar (head-tail asymmetric) models with aligning and repulsive interactions exhibit slow algebraic decay of smectic order with system size up to some finite length scale, after which faster decay occurs. In the apolar case, this scale is that of an undulation instability of the rows. In the polar case, this instability is absent, but traveling fluctuations disrupt the rows in large systems and motion and smectic order may spontaneously globally rotate. These observations agree with a new hydrodynamic theory which we present here. Variants of our models also exhibit active smectic ‘A’ and ‘C’ order, with motion orthogonal and oblique to the layers respectively.

  4. Modeling crowd turbulence by many-particle simulations.

    PubMed

    Yu, Wenjian; Johansson, Anders

    2007-10-01

    A recent study [D. Helbing, A. Johansson, and H. Z. Al-Abideen, Phys. Rev. E 75, 046109 (2007)] has revealed a "turbulent" state of pedestrian flows, which is characterized by sudden displacements and causes the falling and trampling of people. However, turbulent crowd motion is not reproduced well by current many-particle models due to their insufficient representation of the local interactions in areas of extreme densities. In this contribution, we extend the repulsive force term of the social force model to reproduce crowd turbulence. We perform numerical simulations of pedestrians moving through a bottleneck area with this model. The transitions from laminar to stop-and-go and turbulent flows are observed. The empirical features characterizing crowd turbulence, such as the structure function and the probability density function of velocity increments, are reproduced well; i.e., they are well compatible with an analysis of video data during the annual Muslim pilgrimage.

  5. Model-independent particle accelerator tuning

    DOE PAGES

    Scheinker, Alexander; Pang, Xiaoying; Rybarcyk, Larry

    2013-10-21

    We present a new model-independent dynamic feedback technique, rotation rate tuning, for automatically and simultaneously tuning coupled components of uncertain, complex systems. The main advantages of the method are: 1) It has the ability to handle unknown, time-varying systems, 2) It gives known bounds on parameter update rates, 3) We give an analytic proof of its convergence and its stability, and 4) It has a simple digital implementation through a control system such as the Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS). Because this technique is model independent it may be useful as a real-time, in-hardware, feedback-based optimization scheme formore » uncertain and time-varying systems. In particular, it is robust enough to handle uncertainty due to coupling, thermal cycling, misalignments, and manufacturing imperfections. As a result, it may be used as a fine-tuning supplement for existing accelerator tuning/control schemes. We present multi-particle simulation results demonstrating the scheme’s ability to simultaneously adaptively adjust the set points of twenty two quadrupole magnets and two RF buncher cavities in the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center Linear Accelerator’s transport region, while the beam properties and RF phase shift are continuously varying. The tuning is based only on beam current readings, without knowledge of particle dynamics. We also present an outline of how to implement this general scheme in software for optimization, and in hardware for feedback-based control/tuning, for a wide range of systems.« less

  6. SHOCK ACCELERATION OF PARTICLES IN THE NONSTATIONARY EVOLUTION OF COROTATING INTERACTION REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Tsubouchi, K.

    2011-10-20

    One-dimensional hybrid simulations are used to investigate the particle energization process during the nonstationary evolution of corotating interaction regions (CIRs) in the heliosphere. The simulation model, where fast and slow solar wind streams interact with each other, allows the formation of a pair (forward/reverse) of shocks at the CIR boundaries and the stream interface interior, which prevents the interchange of both streams. While both shocks are quasi-perpendicular and are not capable of accelerating thermal particles (hundreds of eV) up to a suprathermal energy (tens to hundreds of keV) in the early phase of their development, the reverse shock in the fast wind experiences a transition to a quasi-parallel regime in the later phase. The quasi-parallel reverse shock can efficiently accelerate particles to the suprathermal range. The different timescale of the adiabatic expansion between the fast and slow wind leads to a transition of the shock geometry that can take place more easily in the reverse shock than in the forward shock, where the magnetic field in the fast wind remains more radial to the propagation direction than in the slow wind. The difference in the acceleration efficiency between these shocks follows a well-known observed asymmetry in the profile of the energetic particle fluxes, where the larger intensity increases more in the reverse shock than in the forward shock. The present results suggest that the solar wind thermal plasma, as well as interstellar pickup ions, can contribute to the composition of energetic particles associated with the CIRs.

  7. Evaluation of Drying Rates of Lignite Particles in Superheated Steam Using Single-Particle Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiriyama, Tsuyoshi; Sasaki, Hideaki; Hashimoto, Akira; Kaneko, Shozo; Maeda, Masafumi

    2016-08-01

    Drying rates of lignite particle groups in superheated steam are evaluated using a single-particle model developed for Australian lignite. Size distributions of the particles are assumed to obey the Rosin-Rammler equation with the maximum particle diameters defined as 100, 50, and 6 mm. The results show the drying rate of a lignite group depends strongly on the maximum particle size, and removal of large particles prior to drying is shown to be effective to reduce the drying time. The calculation model is available for simulations of drying behaviors of lignite in various dryers when an appropriate heat transfer coefficient is given. This study simulates the drying of particles smaller than 6 mm using a heat transfer coefficient in a fluidized bed dryer reported elsewhere. The required drying time estimated from the calculation is comparable to the processing time reported in an actual fluidized bed dryer, supporting the validity of the calculation model.

  8. Interactions of Model Cell Membranes with Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Angelo, S. M.; Camesano, T. A.; Nagarajan, R.

    2011-12-01

    The same properties that give nanoparticles their enhanced function, such as high surface area, small size, and better conductivity, can also alter the cytotoxicity of nanomaterials. Ultimately, many of these nanomaterials will be released into the environment, and can cause cytotoxic effects to environmental bacteria, aquatic organisms, and humans. Previous results from our laboratory suggest that nanoparticles can have a detrimental effect on cells, depending on nanoparticle size. It is our goal to characterize the properties of nanomaterials that can result in membrane destabilization. We tested the effects of nanoparticle size and chemical functionalization on nanoparticle-membrane interactions. Gold nanoparticles at 2, 5,10, and 80 nm were investigated, with a concentration of 1.1x1010 particles/mL. Model cell membranes were constructed of of L-α-phosphatidylcholine (egg PC), which has negatively charged lipid headgroups. A quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) was used to measure frequency changes at different overtones, which were related to mass changes corresponding to nanoparticle interaction with the model membrane. In QCM-D, a lipid bilayer is constructed on a silicon dioxide crystal. The crystals, oscillate at different harmonic frequencies depending upon changes in mass or energy dissipation. When mass is added to the crystal surface, such as through addition of a lipid vesicle solution, the frequency change decreases. By monitoring the frequency and dissipation, we could verify that a supported lipid bilayer (SLB) formed on the silica surface. After formation of the SLB, the nanoparticles can be added to the system, and the changes in frequency and dissipation are monitored in order to build a mechanistic understanding of nanoparticle-cell membrane interactions. For all of the smaller nanoparticles (2, 5, and 10 nm), nanoparticle addition caused a loss of mass from the lipid bilayer, which appears to be due to the formation of holes

  9. Properties of the Higgs particle in a model involving a single unified fermion generation

    SciTech Connect

    Libanov, M. V. Nugaev, E. Ya.

    2007-05-15

    The properties of the Higgs boson are studied within a model where three generations of Standard Model fermions emerge from one generation in a theory featuring two extra spatial dimensions. It is shown that, despite a nontrivial external field forming a brane, the interactions of the Higgs particle in the effective four-dimensional theory are virtually identical to the interactions of this particle in the Standard Model. Arguments in favor of the statement that the Higgs boson must be rather light in the model being considered are also presented.

  10. Interaction of dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine monolayers with a particle-laden subphase.

    PubMed

    Farnoud, Amir M; Fiegel, Jennifer

    2013-10-10

    Recent interest in using submicrometer particles for industrial and therapeutic purposes has led to concerns about their interactions with biological membranes. The mechanisms of particle-membrane interactions are not well understood resulting in contradictory reports on the effects of particles on membrane interfacial properties. In this study, the interactions between negatively charged polystyrene particles (200 nm) and monolayers of dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) were investigated. Surface pressure, surface potential, and surfactant microstructure studies were conducted to monitor the interfacial properties of DPPC monolayers spread on a subphase in which particles were dispersed. At a concentration of 0.1 g/L, particles caused a partial collapse of the monolayer. DPPC monolayers spread on a particle-laden subphase also exhibited higher surface potential and increased ratio of ordered domains supporting the presence of a more compact monolayer. These results suggest that particles penetrated the air-water interface thereby altering monolayer packing at the interface. These findings are contrary to our previous work where particles injected into the subphase beneath a DPPC monolayer did not penetrate the interface confirming that the sequence of particle and monolayer addition can alter particle-monolayer interactions. These studies may partially explain the varying results reported in previous studies.

  11. Effect of particle momentum transfer on an oblique-shock-wave/laminar-boundary-layer interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teh, E.-J.; Johansen, C. T.

    2016-11-01

    Numerical simulations of solid particles seeded into a supersonic flow containing an oblique shock wave reflection were performed. The momentum transfer mechanism between solid and gas phases in the shock-wave/boundary-layer interaction was studied by varying the particle size and mass loading. It was discovered that solid particles were capable of significant modulation of the flow field, including suppression of flow separation. The particle size controlled the rate of momentum transfer while the particle mass loading controlled the magnitude of momentum transfer. The seeding of micro- and nano-sized particles upstream of a supersonic/hypersonic air-breathing propulsion system is proposed as a flow control concept.

  12. Single fiber model of particle retention in an acoustically driven porous mesh.

    PubMed

    Grossner, Michael T; Penrod, Alan E; Belovich, Joanne M; Feke, Donald L

    2003-03-01

    A method for the capture of small particles (tens of microns in diameter) from a continuously flowing suspension has recently been reported. This technique relies on a standing acoustic wave resonating in a rectangular chamber filled with a high-porosity mesh. Particles are retained in this chamber via a complex interaction between the acoustic field and the porous mesh. Although the mesh has a pore size two orders of magnitude larger than the particle diameter, collection efficiencies of 90% have been measured. A mathematical model has been developed to understand the experimentally observed phenomena and to be able to predict filtration performance. By examining a small region (a single fiber) of the porous mesh, the model has duplicated several experimental events such as the focusing of particles near an element of the mesh and the levitation of particles within pores. The single-fiber analysis forms the basis of modeling the overall performance of the particle filtration system. PMID:12565069

  13. Effective Semi-empirical Interaction Potential for Dusty Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Ramazanov, T. S.; Dzhumagulova, K. N.; Omarbakiyeva, Y. A.; Dosbolayev, M. K.; Jumabekov, A. N.

    2008-09-07

    The Poisson equation was numerically solved on the basis of the experimental correlation functions of dusty particles. Calculations were performed with real parameters of dusty plasma. Reconstructed potential has oscillated character; the minimums coincide to maximums of correlation functions.

  14. Approach to the unification of elementary particle interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Gaillard, M.K.

    1981-09-01

    The assumption that the grand unified theory (GUT) emerges as an effective theory describing bound states of N = 8 supergravity preons should determine the GUT particle spectrum and constrain their couplings. Analysis of the spectrum has led to some possibly encouraging indications. At the least, the particle content in scalars, vectors and fermions needed to reproduce SU(5) phenomenology can be found among the states of the EGMZ multiplet.

  15. Molecular simulation study of role of polymer–particle interactions in the strain-dependent viscoelasticity of elastomers (Payne effect)

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Yulong; Li, Ziwei; Wen, Shipeng; Zhang, Liqun; Yang, Qingyuan E-mail: LiuL@mail.buct.edu.cn; Zhong, Chongli; Liu, Li E-mail: LiuL@mail.buct.edu.cn

    2014-09-14

    The strain-amplitude dependence of viscoelastic behavior of model crosslinked elastomers containing various concentrations of spherical nanoparticles (NPs) was studied by non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation. All the filler NPs were in monodispersed state and the interactions between these particles were purely repulsive. The polymer–particle interactions were attractive and their interaction energies were tuned in a broad range. Through the computational study, many important features of the behavior of particle-reinforced elastomers observed in experiments, including the Payne effect, were successfully reproduced. It was shown that the magnitude of the Payne effect was found to depend on the polymer–particle interaction and the filler loading. By examining the microstructures of the simulation systems and their evolution during oscillatory shear, four different mechanisms for the role of the polymer–particle interactions in the Payne effect were revealed that consist of the debonding of polymer chains from NP surfaces, the breakage of polymer-shell-bridged NP network, the rearrangement of the NPs in the network into different layers and the shear-induced yielding of the rigid polymer shell in-between neighboring NPs.

  16. Wave-particle interaction in the Faraday waves.

    PubMed

    Francois, N; Xia, H; Punzmann, H; Shats, M

    2015-10-01

    Wave motion in disordered Faraday waves is analysed in terms of oscillons or quasi-particles. The motion of these oscillons is measured using particle tracking tools and it is compared with the motion of fluid particles on the water surface. Both the real floating particles and the oscillons, representing the collective fluid motion, show Brownian-type dispersion exhibiting ballistic and diffusive mean squared displacement at short and long times, respectively. While the floating particles motion has been previously explained in the context of two-dimensional turbulence driven by Faraday waves, no theoretical description exists for the random walk type motion of oscillons. It is found that the r.m.s velocity ⟨μ̃(osc)⟩(rms) of oscillons is directly related to the turbulent r.m.s. velocity ⟨μ̃⟩(rms) of the fluid particles in a broad range of vertical accelerations. The measured ⟨μ̃(osc)⟩(rms) accurately explains the broadening of the frequency spectra of the surface elevation observed in disordered Faraday waves. These results suggest that 2D turbulence is the driving force behind both the randomization of the oscillons motion and the resulting broadening of the wave frequency spectra. The coupling between wave motion and hydrodynamic turbulence demonstrated here offers new perspectives for predicting complex fluid transport from the knowledge of wave field spectra and vice versa. PMID:26420468

  17. Wave-particle interaction in the Faraday waves.

    PubMed

    Francois, N; Xia, H; Punzmann, H; Shats, M

    2015-10-01

    Wave motion in disordered Faraday waves is analysed in terms of oscillons or quasi-particles. The motion of these oscillons is measured using particle tracking tools and it is compared with the motion of fluid particles on the water surface. Both the real floating particles and the oscillons, representing the collective fluid motion, show Brownian-type dispersion exhibiting ballistic and diffusive mean squared displacement at short and long times, respectively. While the floating particles motion has been previously explained in the context of two-dimensional turbulence driven by Faraday waves, no theoretical description exists for the random walk type motion of oscillons. It is found that the r.m.s velocity ⟨μ̃(osc)⟩(rms) of oscillons is directly related to the turbulent r.m.s. velocity ⟨μ̃⟩(rms) of the fluid particles in a broad range of vertical accelerations. The measured ⟨μ̃(osc)⟩(rms) accurately explains the broadening of the frequency spectra of the surface elevation observed in disordered Faraday waves. These results suggest that 2D turbulence is the driving force behind both the randomization of the oscillons motion and the resulting broadening of the wave frequency spectra. The coupling between wave motion and hydrodynamic turbulence demonstrated here offers new perspectives for predicting complex fluid transport from the knowledge of wave field spectra and vice versa.

  18. A new interaction potential for swarming models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrillo, J. A.; Martin, S.; Panferov, V.

    2013-10-01

    We consider a self-propelled particle system which has been used to describe certain types of collective motion of animals, such as fish schools and bird flocks. Interactions between particles are specified by means of a pairwise potential, repulsive at short ranges and attractive at longer ranges. The exponentially decaying Morse potential is a typical choice, and is known to reproduce certain types of collective motion observed in nature, particularly aligned flocks and rotating mills. We introduce a class of interaction potentials, that we call Quasi-Morse, for which flock and rotating mills states are also observed numerically, however in that case the corresponding macroscopic equations allow for explicit solutions in terms of special functions, with coefficients that can be obtained numerically without solving the particle evolution. We compare the obtained solutions with long-time dynamics of the particle systems and find a close agreement for several types of flock and mill solutions.

  19. Fidelity decay and entropy production in many-particle systems after random interaction quench

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haldar, Sudip Kumar; Chavda, N. D.; Vyas, Manan; Kota, V. K. B.

    2016-04-01

    We analyze the effect of spin degree of freedom on fidelity decay and entropy production of a many-particle fermionic (bosonic) system in a mean-field, quenched by a random two-body interaction preserving many-particle spin S. The system Hamiltonian is represented by embedded Gaussian orthogonal ensemble (EGOE) of random matrices (for time-reversal and rotationally invariant systems) with one plus two-body interactions preserving S for fermions/bosons. EGOE are paradigmatic models to study the dynamical transition from integrability to chaos in interacting many-body quantum systems. A simple general picture, in which the variances of the eigenvalue density play a central role, is obtained for describing the short-time dynamics of fidelity decay and entropy production. Using some approximations, an EGOE formula for the time (t sat) for the onset of saturation of entropy, is also derived. These analytical EGOE results are in good agreement with numerical calculations. Moreover, both fermion and boson systems show significant spin dependence on the relaxation dynamics of the fidelity and entropy.

  20. Charged particles interacting with a mixed supported lipid bilayer as a biomimetic pulmonary surfactant.

    PubMed

    Munteanu, B; Harb, F; Rieu, J P; Berthier, Y; Tinland, B; Trunfio-Sfarghiu, A-M

    2014-08-01

    This study shows the interactions of charged particles with mixed supported lipid bilayers (SLB) as biomimetic pulmonary surfactants. We tested two types of charged particles: positively charged and negatively charged particles. Two parameters were measured: adsorption density of particles on the SLB and the diffusion coefficient of lipids by FRAPP techniques as a measure of interaction strength between particles and lipids. We found that positively charged particles do not adsorb on the bilayer, probably due to the electrostatic repulsion between positively charged parts of the lipid head and the positive groups on the particle surface, therefore no variation in diffusion coefficient of lipid molecules was observed. On the contrary, the negatively charged particles, driven by electrostatic interactions are adsorbed onto the supported bilayer. The adsorption of negatively charged particles increases with the zeta-potential of the particle. Consecutively, the diffusion coefficient of lipids is reduced probably due to binding onto the lipid heads which slows down their Brownian motion. The results are directly relevant for understanding the interactions of particulate matter with pulmonary structures which could lead to pulmonary surfactant inhibition or deficiency causing severe respiratory distress or pathologies.

  1. Shock interaction with three-dimensional face centered cubic array of particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, Y.; Neal, C.; Jackson, T. L.; Balachandar, S.; Thakur, S.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper we present three-dimensional fully resolved numerical simulations of shock propagation in air over a face centered cubic (fcc) array of particles. It is well know that shock interaction with a single particle results in nonmonotonic drag on the particle and that the peak force is an order of magnitude greater than the steady-state force. However, there is currently a substantial lack of numerical results for shock propagation over multiple particles. We therefore compute the unsteady inviscid drag coefficient as a function of time for the fcc array of particles and investigate the effect of varying the shock Mach number and the volume fraction. We compare the unsteady drag for the fcc array against the unsteady drag for a single spherical particle and against the unsteady drag for a structured one-dimensional array of spherical particles and make relevant observations. We also plot the local Mach number contours to explain the various observed complex physical mechanisms occurring during shock-particle interaction. Finally, since shock interaction with particles lead to transmitted and reflected waves, we compute the average pressure in the computational domain to characterize the strength of the transmitted shock wave to study pressure attenuation behind the particle barrier. By analyzing the pressure field we can determine the effect of particles on the flow.

  2. Modeling Particle Exposure in US Trucking Terminals

    PubMed Central

    Davis, ME; Smith, TJ; Laden, F; Hart, JE; Ryan, LM; Garshick, E

    2007-01-01

    Multi-tiered sampling approaches are common in environmental and occupational exposure assessment, where exposures for a given individual are often modeled based on simultaneous measurements taken at multiple indoor and outdoor sites. The monitoring data from such studies is hierarchical by design, imposing a complex covariance structure that must be accounted for in order to obtain unbiased estimates of exposure. Statistical methods such as structural equation modeling (SEM) represent a useful alternative to simple linear regression in these cases, providing simultaneous and unbiased predictions of each level of exposure based on a set of covariates specific to the exposure setting. We test the SEM approach using data from a large exposure assessment of diesel and combustion particles in the US trucking industry. The exposure assessment includes data from 36 different trucking terminals across the United States sampled between 2001 and 2005, measuring PM2.5 and its elemental carbon (EC), organic carbon (OC) components, by personal monitoring, and sampling at two indoor work locations and an outdoor “background” location. Using the SEM method, we predict: 1) personal exposures as a function of work related exposure and smoking status; 2) work related exposure as a function of terminal characteristics, indoor ventilation, job location, and background exposure conditions; and 3) background exposure conditions as a function of weather, nearby source pollution, and other regional differences across terminal sites. The primary advantage of SEMs in this setting is the ability to simultaneously predict exposures at each of the sampling locations, while accounting for the complex covariance structure among the measurements and descriptive variables. The statistically significant results and high R2 values observed from the trucking industry application supports the broader use of this approach in exposure assessment modeling. PMID:16856739

  3. Interactive Modelling of Molecular Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rustad, J. R.; Kreylos, O.; Hamann, B.

    2004-12-01

    The "Nanotech Construction Kit" (NCK) [1] is a new project aimed at improving the understanding of molecular structures at a nanometer-scale level by visualization and interactive manipulation. Our very first prototype is a virtual-reality program allowing the construction of silica and carbon structures from scratch by assembling them one atom at a time. In silica crystals or glasses, the basic building block is an SiO4 unit, with the four oxygen atoms arranged around the central silicon atom in the shape of a regular tetrahedron. Two silicate units can connect to each other by their silicon atoms covalently bonding to one shared oxygen atom. Geometrically, this means that two tetrahedra can link at their vertices. Our program is based on geometric representations and uses simple force fields to simulate the interaction of building blocks, such as forming/breaking of bonds and repulsion. Together with stereoscopic visualization and direct manipulation of building blocks using wands or data gloves, this enables users to create realistic and complex molecular models in short amounts of time. The NCK can either be used as a standalone tool, to analyze or experiment with molecular structures, or it can be used in combination with "traditional" molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. In a first step, the NCK can create initial configurations for subsequent MD simulation. In a more evolved setup, the NCK can serve as a visual front-end for an ongoing MD simulation, visualizing changes in simulation state in real time. Additionally, the NCK can be used to change simulation state on-the-fly, to experiment with different simulation conditions, or force certain events, e.g., the forming of a bond, and observe the simulation's reaction. [1] http://graphics.cs.ucdavis.edu/~okreylos/ResDev/NanoTech

  4. Current noise of the interacting resonant level model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, T. J.; Kennes, D. M.; Meden, V.

    2016-02-01

    We study the zero-frequency current noise of the interacting resonant level model for arbitrary bias voltages using a functional renormalization group approach. For this we extend the existing nonequilibrium scheme by deriving and solving flow equations for the current-vertex functions. On-resonance artificial divergences of the latter found in lowest-order perturbation theory in the two-particle interaction are consistently removed. Away from resonance they are shifted to higher orders. This allows us to gain a comprehensive picture of the current noise in the scaling limit. At high bias voltages, the current noise exhibits a universal power-law decay, whose exponent is, to leading order in the interaction, identical to that of the current. The effective charge on resonance is analyzed in detail, employing properties of the vertex correction. We find that it is only modified to second or higher order in the two-particle interaction.

  5. Computer and laboratory simulation of interactions between spacecraft surfaces and charged-particle environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, N. J.

    1979-01-01

    Cases where the charged-particle environment acts on the spacecraft (e.g., spacecraft charging phenomena) and cases where a system on the spacecraft causes the interaction (e.g., high voltage space power systems) are considered. Both categories were studied in ground simulation facilities to understand the processes involved and to measure the pertinent parameters. Computer simulations are based on the NASA Charging Analyzer Program (NASCAP) code. Analytical models are developed in this code and verified against the experimental data. Extrapolation from the small test samples to space conditions are made with this code. Typical results from laboratory and computer simulations are presented for both types of interactions. Extrapolations from these simulations to performance in space environments are discussed.

  6. Acquiring Interactional Competence in a Study Abroad Context: Japanese Language Learners' Use of the Interactional Particle "ne"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masuda, Kyoko

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the development of interactional competence (Hall, 1993, 1995) by English-speaking learners of Japanese as a foreign language (JFL) in a study abroad setting, as indexed by their use of the interactionally significant particle "ne." The analysis is based on a comparison of (a) 6 sets of conversations between JFL learners and…

  7. Possibilities of the particle finite element method for fluid-soil-structure interaction problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oñate, Eugenio; Celigueta, Miguel Angel; Idelsohn, Sergio R.; Salazar, Fernando; Suárez, Benjamín

    2011-09-01

    We present some developments in the particle finite element method (PFEM) for analysis of complex coupled problems in mechanics involving fluid-soil-structure interaction (FSSI). The PFEM uses an updated Lagrangian description to model the motion of nodes (particles) in both the fluid and the solid domains (the later including soil/rock and structures). A mesh connects the particles (nodes) defining the discretized domain where the governing equations for each of the constituent materials are solved as in the standard FEM. The stabilization for dealing with an incompressibility continuum is introduced via the finite calculus method. An incremental iterative scheme for the solution of the non linear transient coupled FSSI problem is described. The procedure to model frictional contact conditions and material erosion at fluid-solid and solid-solid interfaces is described. We present several examples of application of the PFEM to solve FSSI problems such as the motion of rocks by water streams, the erosion of a river bed adjacent to a bridge foundation, the stability of breakwaters and constructions sea waves and the study of landslides.

  8. The interaction Lagrangian for two spin 1/2 elementary Dirac particles

    SciTech Connect

    Rivas, Martin

    2007-06-13

    It has been recently shown that the spacetime symmetry group of a Dirac particle is larger than the Poincare group. It also contains spacetime dilations and local rotations. In the quantum representation it becomes WxSU(2), where W is the Weyl group (Poincare group including spacetime dilations) and SU(2) is the unitary representation of the local rotation group. In this work we obtain the interaction Lagrangian for two Dirac particles, which is invariant under this enlarged spacetime group. We analyze the interaction between two Dirac particles, and show that it is possible the existence of metastable bound states for particles of the same charge, provided some initial conditions are fulfilled.

  9. Multiscale Modeling of Metallic Materials Containing Embedded Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Dawn R.; Iesulauro, Erin; Glaessgen, Edward H.

    2004-01-01

    Multiscale modeling at small length scales (10(exp -9) to 10(exp -3) m) is discussed for aluminum matrices with embedded particles. A configuration containing one particle surrounded by about 50 grains and subjected to uniform tension and lateral constraint is considered. The analyses are performed to better understand the effects of material configuration on the initiation and progression of debonding of the particles from the surrounding aluminum matrix. Configurational parameters considered include particle aspect ratio and orientation within the surrounding matrix. Both configurational parameters are shown to have a significant effect on the behavior of the materials as a whole. For elliptical particles with the major axis perpendicular to the direction of loading, a particle with a 1:1 aspect ratio completely debonds from the surrounding matrix at higher loads than particles with higher aspect ratios. As the particle major axis is aligned with the direction of the applied load, increasing amounts of load are required to completely debond the particles.

  10. Disc galaxy modelling with a particle-by-particle made-to-measure method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, Jason A. S.; Kawata, Daisuke

    2013-04-01

    We have developed the initial version of a new particle-by-particle adaptation of the made-to-measure (M2M) method, aiming to model the Galactic disc from upcoming Galactic stellar survey data. In our new particle-by-particle M2M, the observables of the target system are compared with those of the model galaxy at the position of the target stars (i.e. particles). The weights of the model particles are changed to reproduce the observables of the target system, and the gravitational potential is automatically adjusted by the changing weights of the particles. This paper demonstrates, as the initial work, that the particle-by-particle M2M can recreate a target disc system created by an N-body simulation in a known dark matter potential, with no error in the observables. The radial profiles of the surface density, velocity dispersion in the radial and perpendicular directions, and the rotational velocity of the target disc are all well reproduced from the initial disc model, whose scalelength is different from that of the target disc. We also demonstrate that our M2M can be applied to an incomplete data set and recreate the target disc reasonably well when the observables are restricted to a part of the disc. We discuss our calibration of the model parameters and the importance of regularization.

  11. Analytical considerations and dimensionless analysis for a description of particle interactions in high pressure processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauh, Cornelia; Delgado, Antonio

    2010-12-01

    High pressures of up to several hundreds of MPa are utilized in a wide range of applications in chemical, bio-, and food engineering, aiming at selective control of (bio-)chemical reactions. Non-uniformity of process conditions may threaten the safety and quality of the resulting products because processing conditions such as pressure, temperature, and treatment history are crucial for the course of (bio-)chemical reactions. Therefore, thermofluid-dynamical phenomena during the high pressure process have to be examined, and numerical tools to predict process uniformity and to optimize the processes have to be developed. Recently applied mathematical models and numerical simulations of laboratory and industrial scale high pressure processes investigating the mentioned crucial phenomena are based on continuum balancing models of thermofluid dynamics. Nevertheless, biological systems are complex fluids containing the relevant (bio-)chemical compounds (enzymes and microorganisms). These compounds are particles that interact with the surrounding medium and between each other. This contribution deals with thermofluid-dynamical interactions of the relevant particulate (bio-)chemical compounds (enzymes and microorganisms) with the surrounding fluid. By consideration of characteristic time and length scales and particle forces, the motion of the (bio-)chemical compounds is characterized.

  12. Exchange fluctuation theorems for a chain of interacting particles in presence of two heat baths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahiri, Sourabh; Jayannavar, Arun M.

    2014-06-01

    The exchange fluctuation theorem for heat exchanged between two systems at different temperatures, when kept in direct contact, has been investigated by Jarzynski and Wójcik [Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 230602 (2004)]. We extend this result to the case where two Langevin reservoirs at different temperatures are connected via a conductor made of interacting particles, and are subjected to an external drive or work source. The Langevin reservoirs are characterized by Gaussian white noise fluctuations and concomitant friction coefficients. We first derive the Crooks theorem for the ratio between forward and reverse paths, and discuss the first law in this model. Then we derive the modified detailed fluctuation theorems (MDFT) for the heat exchanged at each end. These theorems differ from the usual form of the detailed fluctuation theorems (DFT) in literature, due the presence of an extra multiplicative factor. This factor quantifies the deviation of our MFDT from the DFT. Finally, we numerically study our model, with only two interacting particles for simplicity.

  13. Modelling Iron-Bentonite Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, C.; Savage, D.; Benbow, S.; Wilson, J.

    2009-04-01

    The presence of both iron canisters and bentonitic clay in some engineered barrier system (EBS) designs for the geological disposal of high-level radioactive wastes creates the potential for chemical interactions which may impact upon the long-term performance of the clay as a barrier to radionuclide migration. Flooding of potential radionuclide sorption sites on the clay by ferrous ions and conversion of clay to non-swelling sheet silicates (e.g. berthierine) are two possible outcomes deleterious to long-term performance. Laboratory experimental studies of the corrosion of iron in clay show that corrosion product layers are generally thin (< 1 µm) with magnetite, siderite, or ‘green rust' occurring depending upon temperature and ambient partial pressure of carbon dioxide. In theory, incorporation of iron into clay alteration products could act as a ‘pump' to accelerate corrosion. However, the results of laboratory experiments to characterise the products of iron-bentonite interaction are less than unequivocal. The type and amounts of solid products appear to be strong functions of time, temperature, water/clay ratio, and clay and pore fluid compositions. For example, the products of high temperature experiments (> 250 °C) are dominated by chlorite, whereas lower temperatures produce berthierine, odinite, cronstedtite, or Fe-rich smectite. Unfortunately, the inevitable short-term nature of laboratory experimental studies introduces issues of metastability and kinetics. The sequential formation in time of minerals in natural systems often produces the formation of phases not predicted by equilibrium thermodynamics. Evidence from analogous natural systems suggests that the sequence of alteration of clay by Fe-rich fluids will proceed via an Ostwald step sequence. The computer code, QPAC, has been modified to incorporate processes of nucleation, growth, precursor cannibalisation, and Ostwald ripening to address the issues of the slow growth of bentonite

  14. Quench field sensitivity of two-particle correlation in a Hubbard model

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, X. Z.; Lin, S.; Song, Z.

    2016-01-01

    Short-range interaction can give rise to particle pairing with a short-range correlation, which may be destroyed in the presence of an external field. We study the transition between correlated and uncorrelated particle states in the framework of one- dimensional Hubbard model driven by a field. We show that the long time-scale transfer rate from an initial correlated state to final uncorrelated particle states is sensitive to the quench field strength and exhibits a periodic behavior. This process involves an irreversible energy transfer from the field to particles, leading to a quantum electrothermal effect. PMID:27250080

  15. Particle acceleration at corotating interaction regions in the three-dimensional heliosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Desai, M.I.; Marsden, R.G.; Sanderson, T.R.; Balogh, A.; Forsyth, R.J.; Gosling, J.T.

    1998-02-01

    We have investigated the relationship between the energetic ({approximately}1MeV) proton intensity (J) and the magnetic compression ratio (C) measured at the trailing edges of corotating interaction regions observed at Ulysses. In general, our results show that the proton intensity was well correlated with the compression ratio, provided that the seed intensity remained constant, consistent with predictions of the Fermi model. Specifically, our results indicate that particles were accelerated to above {approximately}1MeV in energy at or near the trailing edges of the compression regions observed in the midlatitude southern heliosphere, irrespective of whether the bounding reverse shocks were present or not. On the basis of this, we conclude that shock acceleration is probably not the only mechanism by which particles are accelerated to above {approximately}1MeV in energy at compression or interaction regions (CIRs). On the basis of magnetic field measurements obtained near the trailing edges of several midlatitude CIRs, we propose that particles could have been accelerated via the Fermi mechanism by being scattered back and forth across the trailing edges of the compression regions by large-amplitude Alfv{acute e}n waves. Our results also show that the proton intensity was well correlated with the compression ratio during low solar activity periods but was essentially independent of C during periods of high solar activity. We suggest that the correlation between J and C was not observed during solar active periods because of significant variations in the seed intensity that result from sporadic contributions from transient solar events. In contrast, the correlation was observable during quiescent periods probably because contributions from transients had decreased dramatically, which allowed the CIRs to accelerate particles out of a seed population whose intensity remained relatively unperturbed. {copyright} 1998 American Geophysical Union

  16. Cluster kinetics model of particle separation in vibrated granular media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCoy, Benjamin J.; Madras, Giridhar

    2006-01-01

    We model the Brazil-nut effect (BNE) by hypothesizing that granules form clusters that fragment and aggregate. This provides a heterogeneous medium in which the immersed intruder particle rises (BNE) or sinks (reverse BNE) according to relative convection currents and buoyant and drag forces. A simple relationship proposed for viscous drag in terms of the vibrational intensity and the particle to grain density ratio allows simulation of published experimental data for rise and sink times as functions of particle radius, initial depth of the particle, and particle-grain density ratio. The proposed model correctly describes the experimentally observed maximum in risetime.

  17. Magnetic interaction of Janus magnetic particles suspended in a viscous fluid.

    PubMed

    Seong, Yujin; Kang, Tae Gon; Hulsen, Martien A; den Toonder, Jaap M J; Anderson, Patrick D

    2016-02-01

    We studied the magnetic interaction between circular Janus magnetic particles suspended in a Newtonian fluid under the influence of an externally applied uniform magnetic field. The particles are equally compartmentalized into paramagnetic and nonmagnetic sides. A direct numerical scheme is employed to solve the magnetic particulate flow in the Stokes flow regime. Upon applying the magnetic field, contrary to isotropic paramagnetic particles, a single Janus particle can rotate due to the magnetic torque created by the magnetic anisotropy of the particle. In a two-particle problem, the orientation of each particle is found to be an additional factor that affects the critical angle separating the nature of magnetic interaction. Using multiparticle problems, we show that the orientation of the particles has a significant influence on the dynamics of the particles, the fluid flow induced by the actuated particles, and the final conformation of the particles. Straight and staggered chain structures observed experimentally can be reproduced numerically in a multiple particle problem. PMID:26986377

  18. Interaction of SiC particles with moving solid-liquid interface during directional solidification of silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedrich, J.; Reimann, C.; Jauss, T.; Cröll, A.; Sorgenfrei, T.

    2016-08-01

    In this work, the interaction of SiC particles, having sizes of 7 μm to 300 μm, with the moving solid-liquid interface during directional solidification of silicon was experimentally and theoretically investigated. This included both convective and nearly diffusive conditions. In the nearly diffusive regime under microgravity, the particles were incorporated at a lower growth velocity than in the convective regime under 1g conditions. The experimental data were compared to simple theoretical models allowing the calculation of the critical growth velocity for the incorporation of spherical particles in dependence of the particle size. It was found that the theoretical results could qualitatively explain the experimental observations when a proper set of equations for the forces acting on the particle and of the material constants are chosen. It can be concluded that sedimentation of the particles due to gravity seems to play a role only for large particles. On the other hand, melt flow might cause a lift force which would push the particles away from the solid-liquid interface, and thus would result in higher critical growth velocities under convective conditions, e.g. due to buoyancy convection. Therefore, a contribution of the missing lift force under μg conditions could lead to the smaller critical growth velocity for particle incorporation that is observed under microgravity.

  19. On the high fidelity simulation of chemical explosions and their interaction with solid particle clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balakrishnan, Kaushik

    The flow field behind chemical explosions in multiphase environments is investigated using a robust, state-of-the-art simulation strategy that accounts for the thermodynamics, gas dynamics and fluid mechanics of relevance to the problem. Focus is laid on the investigation of blast wave propagation, growth of hydrodynamic instabilities behind explosive blasts, the mixing aspects behind explosions, the effects of afterburn and its quantification, and the role played by solid particles in these phenomena. In particular, the confluence and interplay of these different physical phenomena are explored from a fundamental perspective, and applied to the problem of chemical explosions. A solid phase solver suited for the study of high-speed, two-phase flows has been developed and validated. This solver accounts for the inter-phase mass, momentum and energy transfer through empirical laws, and ensures two-way coupling between the two phases, viz. solid particles and gas. For dense flow fields, i.e., when the solid volume fraction becomes non-negligible (˜60%), the finite volume method with a Godunov type shock-capturing scheme requires modifications to account for volume fraction gradients during the computation of cell interface gas fluxes. To this end, the simulation methodology is extended with the formulation of an Eulerian gas, Lagrangian solid approach, thereby ensuring that the so developed two-phase simulation strategy can be applied for both flow conditions, dilute and dense alike. Moreover, under dense loading conditions the solid particles inevitably collide, which is accounted for in the current research effort with the use of an empirical collision/contact model from literature. Furthermore, the post-detonation flow field consists of gases under extreme temperature and pressure conditions, necessitating the use of real gas equations of state in the multiphase model. This overall simulation strategy is then extended to the investigation of chemical explosions in

  20. Single-molecule detection of proteins with antigen-antibody interaction using resistive-pulse sensing of submicron latex particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takakura, T.; Yanagi, I.; Goto, Y.; Ishige, Y.; Kohara, Y.

    2016-03-01

    We developed a resistive-pulse sensor with a solid-state pore and measured the latex agglutination of submicron particles induced by antigen-antibody interaction for single-molecule detection of proteins. We fabricated the pore based on numerical simulation to clearly distinguish between monomer and dimer latex particles. By measuring single dimers agglutinated in the single-molecule regime, we detected single human alpha-fetoprotein molecules. Adjusting the initial particle concentration improves the limit of detection (LOD) to 95 fmol/l. We established a theoretical model of the LOD by combining the reaction kinetics and the counting statistics to explain the effect of initial particle concentration on the LOD. The theoretical model shows how to improve the LOD quantitatively. The single-molecule detection studied here indicates the feasibility of implementing a highly sensitive immunoassay by a simple measurement method using resistive-pulse sensing.

  1. Modelling of aircrew radiation exposure during solar particle events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al Anid, Hani Khaled

    In 1990, the International Commission on Radiological Protection recognized the occupational exposure of aircrew to cosmic radiation. In Canada, a Commercial and Business Aviation Advisory Circular was issued by Transport Canada suggesting that action should be taken to manage such exposure. In anticipation of possible regulations on exposure of Canadian-based aircrew in the near future, an extensive study was carried out at the Royal Military College of Canada to measure the radiation exposure during commercial flights. The radiation exposure to aircrew is a result of a complex mixed-radiation field resulting from Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCRs) and Solar Energetic Particles (SEPs). Supernova explosions and active galactic nuclei are responsible for GCRs which consist of 90% protons, 9% alpha particles, and 1% heavy nuclei. While they have a fairly constant fluence rate, their interaction with the magnetic field of the Earth varies throughout the solar cycles, which has a period of approximately 11 years. SEPs are highly sporadic events that are associated with solar flares and coronal mass ejections. This type of exposure may be of concern to certain aircrew members, such as pregnant flight crew, for which the annual effective dose is limited to 1 mSv over the remainder of the pregnancy. The composition of SEPs is very similar to GCRs, in that they consist of mostly protons, some alpha particles and a few heavy nuclei, but with a softer energy spectrum. An additional factor when analysing SEPs is the effect of flare anisotropy. This refers to the way charged particles are transported through the Earth's magnetosphere in an anisotropic fashion. Solar flares that are fairly isotropic produce a uniform radiation exposure for areas that have similar geomagnetic shielding, while highly anisotropic events produce variable exposures at different locations on the Earth. Studies of neutron monitor count rates from detectors sharing similar geomagnetic shielding properties

  2. Nonlinear Wave-particle Interaction and Particle Trapping in Large Amplitude Dust Acoustic Waves

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Mei-Chu; Teng, Lee-Wen; Lin, I.

    2011-11-29

    Large amplitude dust acoustic wave can be self-excited by the strong downward ion flow in a dusty plasma liquid formed by negatively charged dusts suspended in a weakly ionized low pressure discharge. In this work, we investigate experimentally the wave-particle phase space dynamics of the large amplitude dust acoustic wave by connecting the Lagrangian and Eulerian views, through directly tracking particle motion and measuring local dust density fluctuations. The microscopic pictures of wave steepening and breaking, resonant particle-wave crest trapping, and the absence of trough trapping observed in our experiment are constructed.

  3. Charmed-Particle Lifetimes from Neutrino Interactions Experiment #531

    SciTech Connect

    Reay, W. N.

    1980-01-01

    Detection of charm in several Fermilab experiments, among them E-531, was discussed by L. Hand, L. Voyvodic, and the author in Fermilab Report in March 1979. Since that time, there have been significant new results from E-531 on charmed particles and their lifetimes and a discussion of these results is useful at this time.

  4. The Interaction Between an Insoluble Particle and an Advancing Solid/Liquid Interface: Micro-Gravity Experiments and Theoretical Developments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Catalina, Adrian V.; Ssen, Subhayu; Stefanescu, Doru M.

    2003-01-01

    The interaction of an insoluble particle with an advancing solid/liquid interface (SLI) has been a subject of investigation for the past four decades. While the original interest stemmed from geology applications (e.g., frost heaving in soil), researchers soon realized that the complex science associated with such an interaction is relevant to many other scientific fields encompassing metal matrix composites (MMCs), high temperature superconductors, inclusion management in steel, growth of monotectics, and preservation of biological cells. During solidification of a liquid containing an insoluble particle, three distinct interaction phenomena have been experimentally observed: instantaneous engulfment of the particle, continuous pushing, and particle pushing followed by engulfment. It was also observed that for given experimental conditions and particle size there is a critical solidification velocity, V(sub cr), above which a particle is engulfed. During solidification of MMCs pushing leads to particle agglomeration at the grain boundaries and this has detrimental effects on mechanical properties of the casting. Consequently, the process must be designed for instantaneous engulfment to occur. This implies the development of accurate theoretical models to predict V(sub cr), and perform benchmark experiments to test the validity of such models. Although considerable progress has been made in understanding the pushing/engulfment phenomenon (PEP), its quantification in terms of the material and processing parameters remains a focus of research. Since natural convection currents occurring during terrestrial solidification experiments complicate the study of PEP, execution of experiments on the International Space Station (ISS) has been approved and funded by NASA. Extensive terrestrial (1g) experiments and preliminary micro-gravity (mu g) experiments on two space shuttle missions have been conducted in preparation for future experiments on the ISS. The investigated

  5. Hydrodynamic interactions of spherical particles in Poiseuille flow between two parallel walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, S.; Bławzdziewicz, J.; Wajnryb, E.

    2006-05-01

    We study hydrodynamic interactions of spherical particles in incident Poiseuille flow in a channel with infinite planar walls. The particles are suspended in a Newtonian fluid, and creeping-flow conditions are assumed. Numerical results, obtained using our highly accurate Cartesian-representation algorithm [Physica A 356, 294 (2005)] are presented for a single sphere, two spheres, and arrays of many spheres. We consider the motion of freely suspended particles as well as the forces and torques acting on particles adsorbed at a wall. We find that the pair hydrodynamic interactions in this wall-bounded system have a complex dependence on the lateral interparticle distance due to the combined effects of the dissipation in the gap between the particle surfaces and the backflow associated with the presence of the walls. For immobile particle pairs we have examined the crossover between several far-field asymptotic regimes corresponding to different relations between the particle separation and the distances of the particles from the walls. We have also shown that the cumulative effect of the far-field flow substantially influences the force distribution in arrays of immobile spheres, and it affects trajectories of suspended particles. Therefore, the far-field contributions should be included in any reliable algorithm for evaluating many-particle hydrodynamic interactions in the parallel-wall geometry.

  6. Relaxation rates for inverse power law particle interactions and their variable hard sphere surrogates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubinstein, Robert

    2015-11-01

    It is well known that collision models based on an assumed intermolecular potential (IPL, LJ, ...) can be successfully replaced by simplified surrogates (VHS, VSS, VS, ...) in DSMC calculations. But these surrogates only reproduce certain gross properties of the molecular model, for example, the temperature dependence of the viscosity; they do not approximate, and even mis-state, the details of the particle interactions. The success of the simplified models in problems at finite Knudsen number, where the Navier-Stokes approximation is not valid, may therefore seem surprising. To understand this success in a very special case, we showed that the first seven relaxation rates of the linearized Boltzmann equation for Maxwellian molecules are well approximated by the corresponding relaxation rates of its VHS surrogate. We will show that this analysis can be extended in somewhat less generality to IPL interactions, and to some extent to more realistic models including LJ. We believe that this analysis can help address the more general problem of identifying the properties of the collision model that dominate the predictions of the Boltzmann equation.

  7. Multiscale Particle-Based Modeling of Flowing Platelets in Blood Plasma Using Dissipative Particle Dynamics and Coarse Grained Molecular Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Peng; Gao, Chao; Zhang, Na; Slepian, Marvin J.; Deng, Yuefan; Bluestein, Danny

    2014-01-01

    We developed a multiscale particle-based model of platelets, to study the transport dynamics of shear stresses between the surrounding fluid and the platelet membrane. This model facilitates a more accurate prediction of the activation potential of platelets by viscous shear stresses - one of the major mechanisms leading to thrombus formation in cardiovascular diseases and in prosthetic cardiovascular devices. The interface of the model couples coarse-grained molecular dynamics (CGMD) with dissipative particle dynamics (DPD). The CGMD handles individual platelets while the DPD models the macroscopic transport of blood plasma in vessels. A hybrid force field is formulated for establishing a functional interface between the platelet membrane and the surrounding fluid, in which the microstructural changes of platelets may respond to the extracellular viscous shear stresses transferred to them. The interaction between the two systems preserves dynamic properties of the flowing platelets, such as the flipping motion. Using this multiscale particle-based approach, we have further studied the effects of the platelet elastic modulus by comparing the action of the flow-induced shear stresses on rigid and deformable platelet models. The results indicate that neglecting the platelet deformability may overestimate the stress on the platelet membrane, which in turn may lead to erroneous predictions of the platelet activation under viscous shear flow conditions. This particle-based fluid-structure interaction multiscale model offers for the first time a computationally feasible approach for simulating deformable platelets interacting with viscous blood flow, aimed at predicting flow induced platelet activation by using a highly resolved mapping of the stress distribution on the platelet membrane under dynamic flow conditions. PMID:25530818

  8. Emergent Ultra-Long-Range Interactions Between Active Particles in Hybrid Active-Inactive Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steimel, Joshua; Aragones, Juan; Hu, Helen; Qureshi, Naser; Alexander-Katz, Alfredo

    Particle-particle interactions determine the state of a system. Control over the range and magnitude of such interactions has been an active area of research for decades due to the fundamental challenges it poses in science and technology. Effective interactions between active particles have gathered much attention as they can lead to out-of-equilibrium cooperative states such as flocking. Inspired by nature, where active living cells coexist with lifeless, immobile objects and structures, here we study the effective interactions that appear in systems composed of active and passive mixtures of colloids. Our system is a two dimensional colloidal monolayer composed primarily of passive (inactive) colloids and a very small fraction of active (sinning) ferromagnetic colloids. We find an emergent ultra-long-range attractive interaction between active particles induced by the activity of the spinning particles and mediated by the elasticity of the passive medium. Interestingly, the appearance of such interaction depends on the spinning protocol and has a minimum actuation time scale below which no attraction is observed. Overall, these results clearly show that in the presence of elastic components, active particles can interact across very long distances without any chemical modification of the environment. Such a mechanism might potentially be important for some biological systems and can be harnessed for newer developments in synthetic active soft materials.

  9. Interaction of superparamagnetic and non-superparamagnetic particles in magnetic fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeyadevan, B.; Nakatsuka, K.

    1995-08-01

    Magnetic fluids are known to contain superparamagnetic and non-superparamagnetic particles. In this paper, an attempt has been made to show the interaction between superparamagnetic and non-superparamagnetic particles experimentally by measuring the initial susceptibility, over a wide temperature range, of manganese-zinc ferrite and cobalt ferrite magnetic fluids both separate and as mixtures. Likewise experiments were done with manganese-zinc ferrite and magnetite magnetic fluids. The results showed that when the percentage of non-superparamagnetic particles is high, the interaction is high when the particle rotations are restricted. The interaction was less for the system where the non-superparamagnetic particle fraction is small, as in the case of manganese-zinc ferrite and magnetite mixture. The above was true for both zero field cooled and field cooled cases.

  10. 3D Plasma Clusters: Analysis of dynamical evolution and individual particle interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Antonova, T.; Thomas, H. M.; Morfill, G. E.; Annaratone, B. M.

    2008-09-07

    3D plasma clusters (up to 100 particles) have been built inside small (32 mm{sup 3}) plasma volume in gravity. It has been estimated that the external confinement has a negligible influence on the processes inside the clusters. At such conditions the analysis of dynamical evolution and individual particle interactions have shown that the binary interaction among particles in addition to the repelling Coulomb force exhibits also an attractive part. The tendency of the systems to approach the state with minimum energy by rearranging particles inside has been detected. The measured 63 particles' cluster vibrations are in close agreement with vibrations of a drop with surface tension. This indicates that even a 63 particle cluster already exhibits properties normally associated with the cooperative regime.

  11. 3D Plasma Clusters: Analysis of dynamical evolution and individual particle interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonova, T.; Annaratone, B. M.; Thomas, H. M.; Morfill, G. E.

    2008-09-01

    3D plasma clusters (up to 100 particles) have been built inside small (32 mm3) plasma volume in gravity. It has been estimated that the external confinement has a negligible influence on the processes inside the clusters. At such conditions the analysis of dynamical evolution and individual particle interactions have shown that the binary interaction among particles in addition to the repelling Coulomb force exhibits also an attractive part. The tendency of the systems to approach the state with minimum energy by rearranging particles inside has been detected. The measured 63 particles' cluster vibrations are in close agreement with vibrations of a drop with surface tension. This indicates that even a 63 particle cluster already exhibits properties normally associated with the cooperative regime.

  12. Current sheet interaction and particle acceleration in the Jovian magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, A. F.

    1990-04-01

    The thin, rapidly rotating current sheet in Jupiter's magnetodisk can energize heavy ions by hundreds of keV. If the magnetic field lines are azimuthally swept back, energetic ions undergoing nonadiabatic current sheet interactions will step radially outward and be centrifugally energized. Estimated energization times can be comparable to the Jovian rotation period. Nonadiabatic interactions with the rotating Jovian current sheet may be an important energization mechanism for heavy ions, but are not effective for energizing electrons or light ions like protons.

  13. Method and apparatus for modeling interactions

    DOEpatents

    Xavier, Patrick G.

    2002-01-01

    The present invention provides a method and apparatus for modeling interactions that overcomes drawbacks. The method of the present invention comprises representing two bodies undergoing translations by two swept volume representations. Interactions such as nearest approach and collision can be modeled based on the swept body representations. The present invention is more robust and allows faster modeling than previous methods.

  14. Particle hopping vs. fluid-dynamical models for traffic flow

    SciTech Connect

    Nagel, K.

    1995-12-31

    Although particle hopping models have been introduced into traffic science in the 19509, their systematic use has only started recently. Two reasons for this are, that they are advantageous on modem computers, and that recent theoretical developments allow analytical understanding of their properties and therefore more confidence for their use. In principle, particle hopping models fit between microscopic models for driving and fluiddynamical models for traffic flow. In this sense, they also help closing the conceptual gap between these two. This paper shows connections between particle hopping models and traffic flow theory. It shows that the hydrodynamical limits of certain particle hopping models correspond to the Lighthill-Whitham theory for traffic flow, and that only slightly more complex particle hopping models produce already the correct traffic jam dynamics, consistent with recent fluid-dynamical models for traffic flow. By doing so, this paper establishes that, on the macroscopic level, particle hopping models are at least as good as fluid-dynamical models. Yet, particle hopping models have at least two advantages over fluid-dynamical models: they straightforwardly allow microscopic simulations, and they include stochasticity.

  15. Symmetry breaking and interaction of colloidal particles in nematic liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Lev, B I; Chernyshuk, S B; Tomchuk, P M; Yokoyama, H

    2002-02-01

    We propose a general approach to the description of the long-ranged elastic interaction in the nematic colloids, based on the symmetry breaking of the director field. The type of the far-field interaction between particles immersed in a nematic host is determined by the way the symmetry is broken in the near-field region around the colloidal particle. This is caused both by the particle's shape and the anchoring at the surface. If the director field near the particle has a set of three symmetry planes, the far-field interaction falls off as d(-5) with d being the distance between particles. If one symmetry plane is absent, a dipolar moment perpendicular to it is allowed and yields dipole-dipole interactions, which decays as d(-3). If both the horizontal and vertical mirror symmetries are broken (it is equivalent to the case when the nonzero torque moment is applied to the particle by the nematic liquid crystal), the particles are shown to attract each other following the Coulomb law. We propose a simple method for the experimental observation of this Coulomb attraction. The behavior of colloid particles in curved director fields is analyzed. Quadrupolar particles with planar anchoring are shown to be attracted toward the regions with high splay deformations, while quadrupoles with homeotropic anchoring are depleted from such regions. When there are many colloidal particles in the nematic solvent, the distortions of the director from all of them are overlapped and lead to the exponential screening in the elastic pair interaction potential. This is a many-body interaction effect. This screening is essential in the real dense colloid systems, such as ferronematics--suspensions of magnetic cylindrical grains in the nematic liquid crystal. External magnetic field induces an elastic Yukawa attraction between them. We apply this attraction to the explanation of the cellular texture in magnetically doped liquid crystals.

  16. Nuclear Deexcitation Gamma Ray Lines from Accelerated Particle Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, R. J.; Kozlovsky, B.; Ramaty, R.

    2001-12-01

    Since the comprehensive treatment of nuclear deexcitation gamma-ray line emission by Ramaty, Kozlovsky and Lingenfelter in 1979, many new laboratory measurements of the cross sections have become available. Such new measurements allow improved theoretical evaluations of cross sections and the addition of more lines in the analyses of gamma-ray data. For example, the inclusion of lines produced by energetic 3He will provide unique information about its abundance. We present these improved cross sections as a function of the projectile energy for proton, alpha and 3He reactions with He, C, N, O, Ne, Mg, Al, Si, S, Ca and Fe. We also present calculations of gamma-ray line yields based on these cross sections and show how line ratios depend on the assumed ambient and accelerated-particle abundances and on the accelerated-particle energy spectrum. Such calculations are essential for interpretation of gamma-ray line observations of astrophysical sites that contain significant fluxes of energetic particles such as solar flares, the Earth's atmosphere, planetary atmospheres and surfaces, the interstellar medium and galactic nebulae. Part of the research reported here was supported by NASA DPR S92680F and W19977.

  17. Elementary particle interactions. [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Bugg, W.M.; Condo, G.T.; Handler, T.; Hart, E.L.; Read, K.; Ward, B.F.L.

    1992-10-01

    Work continues on strange particle production in weak interactions using data from a high-energy neutrino exposure in a freon bubble chamber. Meson photoproduction has also consumed considerable effort. Detector research and development activities have been carried out.

  18. Elementary particle interactions. Progress report, October 1, 1991--September 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Bugg, W.M.; Condo, G.T.; Handler, T.; Hart, E.L.; Read, K.; Ward, B.F.L.

    1992-10-01

    Work continues on strange particle production in weak interactions using data from a high-energy neutrino exposure in a freon bubble chamber. Meson photoproduction has also consumed considerable effort. Detector research and development activities have been carried out.

  19. UHV studies of the interaction of CO with small supported metal particles, Ni/mica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doering, D. L.; Poppa, H.; Dickinson, J. T.

    1982-01-01

    The interaction of carbon monoxide with small nickel (Ni) particles supported on UHV-cleaved mica was studied using flash thermal desorption, Auger electron spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Molecular desorption was accompanied by decomposition of CO at a rate strongly dependent on particle size. Recombination of surface-precipitated carbon with adsorbed oxygen was observed, and gas-induced morphological particle changes because of exposure to CO and O2 are analyzed in some detail.

  20. Proton-Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) from the Galilean Satellites: Modeling charged-particle interactions on the satellite surfaces and the prospect for direct measurement of the elemental compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraft, R.; Nulsen, S.; Germain, G.; Kenter, A.

    2015-12-01

    Energetic particles in the Jovian magnetosphere impact the surface of the Galilean moons andgenerate characteristic X-ray lines from the elemental constituents due to the proton-inducedX-ray emission (PIXE) process. The X-ray spectra of these satellites provide direct measurementsof their elemental surface compositions. Chandra X-ray Observatory (CXO) observationsof Jupiter detected oxygen emission from Io and Europa (Elsner et al. 2005). We presentcalculations of the expected PIXE from each of the Galilean satellites for various models oftheir surface constituents. We discuss the viability of detecting emission lines fromelements other than oxygen with deep observations from the current generation of Earth-orbiting X-ray observatories,and describe the implications to our understanding of the surface processes from suchdetections. Finally, we outline the potential discovery space for a dedicated X-ray imagingspectrometer flown on a mission to the Jovian system.

  1. Ferrimagnetism and single-particle excitations in a periodic Anderson model on the honeycomb lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seki, Kazuhiro; Shirakawa, Tomonori; Zhang, Qinfang; Li, Tao; Yunoki, Seiji

    2015-04-01

    By using the variationalcluster approximation and cluster perturbation theory, we investigate the magnetism and single-particle excitations of a periodic Anderson model on the honeycomb lattice as an effective model for the single-side hydrogenated graphene, namely, graphone. We calculate the magnetic moment as a function of U (Coulomb interaction on impurity sites) with showing that the ground state is ferrimagneticfor any U > 0. We then calculate the single-particle excitations and show that the single-particle excitations are gapless and exhibit quadratic dispersion relation near the Fermi energy.

  2. Constraining interactions mediated by axion-like particles with ultracold neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afach, S.; Ban, G.; Bison, G.; Bodek, K.; Burghoff, M.; Daum, M.; Fertl, M.; Franke, B.; Grujić, Z. D.; Hélaine, V.; Kasprzak, M.; Kermaïdic, Y.; Kirch, K.; Knowles, P.; Koch, H.-C.; Komposch, S.; Kozela, A.; Krempel, J.; Lauss, B.; Lefort, T.; Lemière, Y.; Mtchedlishvili, A.; Naviliat-Cuncic, O.; Piegsa, F. M.; Pignol, G.; Prashanth, P. N.; Quéméner, G.; Rebreyend, D.; Ries, D.; Roccia, S.; Schmidt-Wellenburg, P.; Schnabel, A.; Severijns, N.; Voigt, J.; Weis, A.; Wyszynski, G.; Zejma, J.; Zenner, J.; Zsigmond, G.

    2015-05-01

    We report a new limit on a possible short range spin-dependent interaction from the precise measurement of the ratio of Larmor precession frequencies of stored ultracold neutrons and 199Hg atoms confined in the same volume. The measurement was performed in a ∼ 1μT vertical magnetic holding field with the apparatus searching for a permanent electric dipole moment of the neutron at the Paul Scherrer Institute. A possible coupling between freely precessing polarized neutron spins and unpolarized nucleons of the wall material can be investigated by searching for a tiny change of the precession frequencies of neutron and mercury spins. Such a frequency change can be interpreted as a consequence of a short range spin-dependent interaction that could possibly be mediated by axions or axion-like particles. The interaction strength is proportional to the CP violating product of scalar and pseudoscalar coupling constants gSgP. Our result confirms limits from complementary experiments with spin-polarized nuclei in a model-independent way. Limits from other neutron experiments are improved by up to two orders of magnitude in the interaction range of 10-6 < λ <10-4m.

  3. Fractional exclusion statistics: the method for describing interacting particle systems as ideal gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anghel, Dragoş-Victor

    2012-11-01

    I show that if the total energy of a system of interacting particles may be written as a sum of quasiparticle energies, then the system of quasiparticles can be viewed, in general, as an ideal gas with fractional exclusion statistics (FES). The general method for calculating the FES parameters is also provided. The interacting particle system cannot be described as an ideal gas of Bose and Fermi quasiparticles except in trivial situations.

  4. Modeling photoacoustic spectral features of micron-sized particles.

    PubMed

    Strohm, Eric M; Gorelikov, Ivan; Matsuura, Naomi; Kolios, Michael C

    2014-10-01

    The photoacoustic signal generated from particles when irradiated by light is determined by attributes of the particle such as the size, speed of sound, morphology and the optical absorption coefficient. Unique features such as periodically varying minima and maxima are observed throughout the photoacoustic signal power spectrum, where the periodicity depends on these physical attributes. The frequency content of the photoacoustic signals can be used to obtain the physical attributes of unknown particles by comparison to analytical solutions of homogeneous symmetric geometric structures, such as spheres. However, analytical solutions do not exist for irregularly shaped particles, inhomogeneous particles or particles near structures. A finite element model (FEM) was used to simulate photoacoustic wave propagation from four different particle configurations: a homogeneous particle suspended in water, a homogeneous particle on a reflecting boundary, an inhomogeneous particle with an absorbing shell and non-absorbing core, and an irregularly shaped particle such as a red blood cell. Biocompatible perfluorocarbon droplets, 3-5 μm in diameter containing optically absorbing nanoparticles were used as the representative ideal particles, as they are spherical, homogeneous, optically translucent, and have known physical properties. The photoacoustic spectrum of micron-sized single droplets in suspension and on a reflecting boundary were measured over the frequency range of 100-500 MHz and compared directly to analytical models and the FEM. Good agreement between the analytical model, FEM and measured values were observed for a droplet in suspension, where the spectral minima agreed to within a 3.3 MHz standard deviation. For a droplet on a reflecting boundary, spectral features were correctly reproduced using the FEM but not the analytical model. The photoacoustic spectra from other common particle configurations such as particle with an absorbing shell and a

  5. Low Reynolds Number Interactions between Colloidal Particles near the Entrance to a Cylindrical Pore.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran; Venkatesan; Tryggvason; Scott Fogler H

    2000-09-15

    The interaction between stable colloidal particles arriving at a pore entrance was studied using a numerical method for the case where the particle size is smaller than but of the same order as the pore size. The numerical method was adapted from a front-tracking technique developed for studying incompressible, multifluid flow by S. O. Unverdi and G. Tryggvason (J. Comp. Phys. 100, 25, 1992). The method is based on the finite difference solution of Navier-Stokes equation on a stationary, structured, Cartesian grid and the explicit representation of the particle-liquid interface using an unstructured grid that moves through the stationary grid. The simulations are in two dimensions, considering both deformable and nondeformable particles, and include interparticle colloidal interactions. The interparticle and particle-pore hydrodynamic interactions, which are very difficult to determine using existing analytical and semi-numerical, semi-analytical techniques in microhydrodynamics, are naturally accounted for in our numerical method and need not be explicity determined. Two- and three-particle motion toward a pore has been considered in our simulations. The simulations demonstrate how the competition between hydrodynamic forces and colloidal forces acting on particles dictate their flow behavior near the pore entrance. The predicted dependence of the particle flow behavior on the flow velocity and the ratio of pore size to particle size are qualitatively consistent with the experimental observations of V. Ramachandran and H. S. Fogler (J. Fluid Mech. 385, 129, 1999). Copyright 2000 Academic Press. PMID:10985810

  6. Communication: The origin of many-particle signals in nonlinear optical spectroscopy of non-interacting particles.

    PubMed

    Mukamel, Shaul

    2016-07-28

    Nonlinear spectroscopy signals detected by fluorescence from dilute samples of N non-interacting molecules are usually adequately described by simply multiplying the single molecule response by N. We show that signals that scale with higher powers of N are generated by the joint detection of several particles. This can be accomplished by phase sensitive detection such as phase cycling, photo-acoustic modulation, or by Hanbury-Brown Twiss photon coincidence. Such measurements can dissect the ensemble according to the number of excited particles.

  7. Communication: The origin of many-particle signals in nonlinear optical spectroscopy of non-interacting particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukamel, Shaul

    2016-07-01

    Nonlinear spectroscopy signals detected by fluorescence from dilute samples of N non-interacting molecules are usually adequately described by simply multiplying the single molecule response by N. We show that signals that scale with higher powers of N are generated by the joint detection of several particles. This can be accomplished by phase sensitive detection such as phase cycling, photo-acoustic modulation, or by Hanbury-Brown Twiss photon coincidence. Such measurements can dissect the ensemble according to the number of excited particles.

  8. Modeling the interaction between two dimensional strongly coupled confined dust clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Djebli, M.; Issaad, M.; Rouaiguia, L.

    2010-03-15

    Numerical simulations based on the Monte Carlo method are conducted to investigate ground-state configurations and phase transitions of strongly coupled dust particles. The interaction between negatively charged dust particles is modeled by three different potentials, namely, Coulomb, Yukawa, and logarithmic. The effect of random charge fluctuation is taken into account for a dominant charging process by particles collection and in the presence of two dimensional parabolic confinement potential. Structural arrangement and phase transition are found to be dependent on the potential interaction and the charge fluctuation. The changes in the melting temperature, when the charge fluctuation is taken into account, are particularly noticeable for systems with particles interacting through logarithmic potential.

  9. Investigation of particles size effects in Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) modelling of colloidal suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mai-Duy, N.; Phan-Thien, N.; Khoo, B. C.

    2015-04-01

    In the Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) simulation of suspension, the fluid (solvent) and colloidal particles are replaced by a set of DPD particles and therefore their relative sizes (as measured by their exclusion zones) can affect the maximal packing fraction of the colloidal particles. In this study, we investigate roles of the conservative, dissipative and random forces in this relative size ratio (colloidal/solvent). We propose a mechanism of adjusting the DPD parameters to properly model the solvent phase (the solvent here is supposed to have the same isothermal compressibility to that of water).

  10. Interactive Group Modeling: Part 2. An Interactive Monitor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vian, Kathleen Spangler; And Others

    This is the second of four reports of the Interactive Group Modeling project--an undertaking designed to extend group communication through computers to support the more task-focused communication required by those building computer models. The report focuses on the HUB system--a system that facilitates communication in four modes: computer…

  11. Particle Physics Primer: Explaining the Standard Model of Matter.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vondracek, Mark

    2002-01-01

    Describes the Standard Model, a basic model of the universe that describes electromagnetic force, weak nuclear force radioactivity, and the strong nuclear force responsible for holding particles within the nucleus together. (YDS)

  12. Predictive modeling of particle-laden turbulent flows. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Shaffer, F.; Bolio, E.J.; Hrenya, C.M.

    1993-12-31

    Earlier work of Sinclair and Jackson which treats the laminar flow of gas-solid suspensions is extended to model dilute turbulent flow. The random particle motion, often exceeding the turbulent fluctuations in the gas, is obtained using a model based on kinetic theory of granular materials. A two-equation low Reynolds number turbulence model is, modified to account for the presence of the dilute particle phase. Comparisons of the model predictions with available experimental data for the mean and fluctuating velocity profiles for both phases indicate that the resulting theory captures many of the flow features observed in the pneumatic transport of large particles. The model predictions did not manifest an extreme sensitivity to the degree of inelasticity in the particle-particle collisions for the range of solid loading ratios investigated.

  13. Electron Climbing a 'Devil's Staircase' in Wave-Particle Interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Macor, Alessandro; Doveil, Fabrice; Elskens, Yves

    2005-12-31

    Numerous nonlinear driven systems display spectacular responses to forcing, including chaos and complex phase-locking plateaus characterized by 'devil's staircase', Arnold tongues, and Farey trees. In the universality class of Hamiltonian systems, a paradigm is the motion of a charged particle in two waves, which inspired a renormalization group method for its description. Here we report the observation of the underlying 'devil's staircase' by recording the beam velocity distribution function at the outlet of a traveling wave tube versus the amplitude of two externally induced waves.

  14. Stochastic modeling of fine particle deposition, resuspension, and hyporheic exchange in rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Packman, Aaron; Drummond, Jennifer; Aubeneau, Antoine

    2013-04-01

    Fine suspended particles are responsible for substantial flux of organic matter and contaminants in rivers. Further, microorganisms delivered from the terrestrial system or resuspended from benthic and hyporheic biofilms also propagate downstream in rivers, providing connectivity in the river microbial community. Because fine particle concentrations are often similar along the length of rivers, there has been a tendency to think that their dynamics are simple. Historically, fine suspended particles have been considered to show little interaction with streambed sediments. This is a fallacy. Recent observations have demonstrated that fine particles show complex dynamics in rivers, including ongoing deposition and resuspension. This provides substantial opportunity for interaction with benthic and hyporheic sediments and biofilms, which can lead to enhanced processing of fine particulate organic carbon, accumulation of pathogens in riverbeds, and mixing of particle-bound contaminants into bed sediments. Here I will briefly review current understanding of fine particle deposition, resuspension, and hyporheic exchange processes, develop a conceptual model for fine particle dynamics in rivers, and present a stochastic modeling framework that can represent most of these processes. I will close by discussing the limits of current modeling capability and prospects for future development of more general models.

  15. Modeling Local Interactions during the Motion of Cyanobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Galante, Amanda; Wisen, Susanne; Bhaya, Devaki; Levy, Doron

    2012-01-01

    Synechocystis sp., a common unicellular freshwater cyanobacterium, has been used as a model organism to study phototaxis, an ability to move in the direction of a light source. This microorganism displays a number of additional characteristics such as delayed motion, surface dependence, and a quasi-random motion, where cells move in a seemingly disordered fashion instead of in the direction of the light source, a global force on the system. These unexplained motions are thought to be modulated by local interactions between cells such as intercellular communication. In this paper, we consider only local interactions of these phototactic cells in order to mathematically model this quasi-random motion. We analyze an experimental data set to illustrate the presence of quasi-random motion and then derive a stochastic dynamic particle system modeling interacting phototactic cells. The simulations of our model are consistent with experimentally observed phototactic motion. PMID:22713858

  16. Numerical investigation of gas-particle interaction in polydisperse volcanic jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carcano, Susanna; Esposti Ongaro, Tomaso; Bonaventura, Luca; Neri, Augusto

    2014-05-01

    We investigate the problem of underexpanded jet decompression when the injected fluid is a mixture of a gaseous phase and different classes of solid particles. The underexpanded multiphase jet problem is representative of phenomena that can be observed in the first stages of explosive volcanic eruptions. Whereas the case of homogeneous jets has been studied deeply in the literature, both experimentally, theoretically and numerically, the case of multiphase gas--particle jets still presents some open issues. It has been proven theoretically and experimentally that vents with supersonic or sonic velocity and gas pressure greater than the atmospheric one result in a rapid expansion and acceleration of the fluid to high Mach number. A series of expansion waves form and are reflected as compression waves at the flow boundary. The compression waves coealesce to form a standing normal shock wave (Mach disk), across which the fluid is rapidly compressed and decelerated to subsonic speeds. When solid particles are added to the gas flow, new phenomena associated to kinetic and thermal non-equilibrium between gas and particulate phases arise. Such effects are controlled by drag and heat exchange terms in the momentum and energy equations. In the present work we carry out two- and three-dimensional numerical simulations with the multiphase flow model PDAC (Neri et al., J. Geophys. Res, 2003; Carcano et al., Geosci. Mod. Dev., 2013), to identify and quantify non-equilibrium effects related to the interaction between the jet decompression structure and solid particles. We quantify, on a theoretical basis, the expected non-equilibrium effects between the gas and the solid phase in terms of the particle Stokes numer (St), i.e. the ratio between the particle relaxation time and a characteristic time scale of the jet (taken as the formation time of the Mach disk shock), for two sample grain-size distributions of natural events (Mount St. Helens, 1980; Vesuvius, aD 79). The Stokes

  17. Predictive modeling of multicellular structure formation by using Cellular Particle Dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCune, Matthew; Shafiee, Ashkan; Forgacs, Gabor; Kosztin, Ioan

    2014-03-01

    Cellular Particle Dynamics (CPD) is an effective computational method for describing and predicting the time evolution of biomechanical relaxation processes of multicellular systems. A typical example is the fusion of spheroidal bioink particles during post bioprinting structure formation. In CPD cells are modeled as an ensemble of cellular particles (CPs) that interact via short-range contact interactions, characterized by an attractive (adhesive interaction) and a repulsive (excluded volume interaction) component. The time evolution of the spatial conformation of the multicellular system is determined by following the trajectories of all CPs through integration of their equations of motion. CPD was successfully applied to describe and predict the fusion of 3D tissue construct involving identical spherical aggregates. Here, we demonstrate that CPD can also predict tissue formation involving uneven spherical aggregates whose volumes decrease during the fusion process. Work supported by NSF [PHY-0957914]. Computer time provided by the University of Missouri Bioinformatics Consortium.

  18. NONRESONANT INTERACTION OF CHARGED ENERGETIC PARTICLES WITH LOW-FREQUENCY NONCOMPRESSIVE TURBULENCE: NUMERICAL SIMULATION

    SciTech Connect

    Ragot, B. R.

    2012-10-20

    A new method for simulating the three-dimensional dynamics of charged energetic particles in very broadband noncompressive magnetic turbulence is introduced. All scales within the primary inertial range of the turbulence observed in the solar wind near 1 AU are now included for the independent computations of both the particle dynamics and the turbulent magnetic field lines (MFLs). While previous theories of resonant particle pitch-angle (PA) scattering and transport in interplanetary magnetic fields had favored interpreting the observed depletions in the electron PA distributions (PADs) around 90 Degree-Sign PA as evidence of poor scattering at low PA cosines, the computed particle dynamics reveal a very different reality. The MFL directions now vary on many scales, and the PADs are depleted around 90 Degree-Sign PA due to nonresonant filtering of the particles that propagate at too large an angle to the local magnetic field. Rather than being too weak, the scattering through 90 Degree-Sign PA is actually so strong that the particles (electrons and protons/ions) are reflected and trapped in the turbulent magnetic fields. While the low-frequency nonresonant turbulence produces ubiquitous magnetic traps that only let through particles with the most field-aligned velocities, higher-frequency near-gyroscale turbulence, when present, enhances particle transport by allowing the particles to navigate between magnetic traps. Finally, visualizing both particle trajectories and MFLs in the very same turbulence reveals a powerful tool for understanding the effects of the turbulent fields on the particle dynamics and cross-field transport. Some cross-field-line scattering, strongly amplified by MFL dispersal, results in a strong cross-field scattering of the particles. From this visualization, it also appears that near-gyroscale turbulence, previously known as gyroresonant turbulence, does not resonantly interact with the particles. The interaction between particles and

  19. Toward a Unified Picture of Elementary Particle Interactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaillard, Mary K.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses progress made over the last two decades concerning the synthesis and possible unification of the three interactions (strong, electromagnetic, gravitational) relevant to high energy experiments. Areas addressed include quantum field theories, a unified quantum field theory, connection with cosmology, and possibilities for further…

  20. Confined turbulent fluid-particle flow modeling using multiple-realization particle trajectory schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adeniji-Fashola, A. A.

    1988-01-01

    A multiple-realization particle trajectory scheme has been developed and applied to the numerical prediction of confined turbulent fluid-particle flows. The example flows investigated include the vertical pipe upflow experimental data of Tsuji et al. and the experimental data of Leavitt for a coaxial jet flow, comprising a particle-laden central jet and a clean annular jet, into a large recirculation chamber. The results obtained from the numerical scheme agree well with the experimental data, lending confidence to the modeling approach. The multiple-realization particle trajectory turbulent flow modeling scheme is believed to be a more elegant and accurate approach to the extension of single-particle hydrodynamics to dilute multi-particle systems than the more commonly employed two-fluid modeling approach. It is also better able to incorporate additional force items such as lift, virtual mass and Bassett history terms directly into the particle equation of motion as appropriate. This makes it a suitable candidate for particle migration studies and an extension to situations involving liquid particulate phases with possible propulsion applications, such as in spray combustion, follows naturally.