Science.gov

Sample records for model sorptive phases

  1. Effect of Model Sorptive Phases on Phenanthrene Biodegradation: Molecular Analysis of Enrichments and Isolates Suggests Selection Based on Bioavailability

    PubMed Central

    Friedrich, M.; Grosser, R. J.; Kern, E. A.; Inskeep, W. P.; Ward, D. M.

    2000-01-01

    Reduced bioavailability of nonpolar contaminants due to sorption to natural organic matter is an important factor controlling biodegradation of pollutants in the environment. We established enrichment cultures in which solid organic phases were used to reduce phenanthrene bioavailability to different degrees (R. J. Grosser, M. Friedrich, D. M. Ward, and W. P. Inskeep, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 66:2695–2702, 2000). Bacteria enriched and isolated from contaminated soils under these conditions were analyzed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and sequencing of PCR-amplified 16S ribosomal DNA segments. Compared to DGGE patterns obtained with enrichment cultures containing sand or no sorptive solid phase, different DGGE patterns were obtained with enrichment cultures containing phenanthrene sorbed to beads of Amberlite IRC-50 (AMB), a weak cation-exchange resin, and especially Biobead SM7 (SM7), a polyacrylic resin that sorbed phenanthrene more strongly. SM7 enrichments selected for mycobacterial phenanthrene mineralizers, whereas AMB enrichments selected for a Burkholderia sp. that degrades phenanthrene. Identical mycobacterial and Burkholderia 16S rRNA sequence segments were found in SM7 and AMB enrichment cultures inoculated with contaminated soil from two geographically distant sites. Other closely related Burkholderia sp. populations, some of which utilized phenanthrene, were detected in sand and control enrichment cultures. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that different phenanthrene-utilizing bacteria inhabiting the same soils may be adapted to different phenanthrene bioavailabilities. PMID:10877758

  2. Fabric phase sorptive extraction: Two practical sample pretreatment techniques for brominated flame retardants in water.

    PubMed

    Huang, Guiqi; Dong, Sheying; Zhang, Mengfei; Zhang, Haihan; Huang, Tinglin

    2016-09-15

    Sample pretreatment is the critical section for residue monitoring of hazardous pollutants. In this paper, using the cellulose fabric as host matrix, three extraction sorbents such as poly (tetrahydrofuran) (PTHF), poly (ethylene glycol) (PEG) and poly (dimethyldiphenylsiloxane) (PDMDPS), were prepared on the surface of the cellulose fabric. Two practical extraction techniques including stir bar fabric phase sorptive extraction (stir bar-FPSE) and magnetic stir fabric phase sorptive extraction (magnetic stir-FPSE) have been designed, which allow stirring of fabric phase sorbent during the whole extraction process. In the meantime, three brominated flame retardants (BFRs) [tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA), tetrabromobisphenol A bisallylether (TBBPA-BAE), tetrabromobisphenol A bis(2,3-dibromopropyl)ether (TBBPA-BDBPE)] in the water sample were selected as model analytes for the practical evaluation of the proposed two techniques using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Moreover, various experimental conditions affecting extraction process such as the type of fabric phase, extraction time, the amount of salt and elution conditions were also investigated. Due to the large sorbent loading capacity and unique stirring performance, both techniques possessed high extraction capability and fast extraction equilibrium. Under the optimized conditions, high recoveries (90-99%) and low limits of detection (LODs) (0.01-0.05 μg L(-1)) were achieved. In addition, the reproducibility was obtained by evaluating the intraday and interday precisions with relative standard deviations (RSDs) less than 5.1% and 6.8%, respectively. The results indicated that two pretreatment techniques were promising and practical for monitoring of hazardous pollutants in the water sample. Due to low solvent consumption and high repeated use performance, proposed techniques also could meet green analytical criteria.

  3. Fabric phase sorptive extraction: Two practical sample pretreatment techniques for brominated flame retardants in water.

    PubMed

    Huang, Guiqi; Dong, Sheying; Zhang, Mengfei; Zhang, Haihan; Huang, Tinglin

    2016-09-15

    Sample pretreatment is the critical section for residue monitoring of hazardous pollutants. In this paper, using the cellulose fabric as host matrix, three extraction sorbents such as poly (tetrahydrofuran) (PTHF), poly (ethylene glycol) (PEG) and poly (dimethyldiphenylsiloxane) (PDMDPS), were prepared on the surface of the cellulose fabric. Two practical extraction techniques including stir bar fabric phase sorptive extraction (stir bar-FPSE) and magnetic stir fabric phase sorptive extraction (magnetic stir-FPSE) have been designed, which allow stirring of fabric phase sorbent during the whole extraction process. In the meantime, three brominated flame retardants (BFRs) [tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA), tetrabromobisphenol A bisallylether (TBBPA-BAE), tetrabromobisphenol A bis(2,3-dibromopropyl)ether (TBBPA-BDBPE)] in the water sample were selected as model analytes for the practical evaluation of the proposed two techniques using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Moreover, various experimental conditions affecting extraction process such as the type of fabric phase, extraction time, the amount of salt and elution conditions were also investigated. Due to the large sorbent loading capacity and unique stirring performance, both techniques possessed high extraction capability and fast extraction equilibrium. Under the optimized conditions, high recoveries (90-99%) and low limits of detection (LODs) (0.01-0.05 μg L(-1)) were achieved. In addition, the reproducibility was obtained by evaluating the intraday and interday precisions with relative standard deviations (RSDs) less than 5.1% and 6.8%, respectively. The results indicated that two pretreatment techniques were promising and practical for monitoring of hazardous pollutants in the water sample. Due to low solvent consumption and high repeated use performance, proposed techniques also could meet green analytical criteria. PMID:27300591

  4. Modeling the effect of initial soil moisture on sorptivity and infiltration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Ryan; Abou Najm, Majdi; Rupp, David; Selker, John

    2016-04-01

    Soil capillarity, often associated with the parameter sorptivity, is a primary control on infiltration during short-duration rainfall and irrigation events. However, most mathematical models used to quantify capillarity are only valid for dry antecedent conditions. In this study, we examine how the capillary component of sorptivity (i.e., wetting front potential) varies with initial soil water content, and use this finding to provide a simple modification to the classic Green-Ampt sorptivity model. The modified model has many practical applications, including 1) describing the relative sorptivity of a soil at various water contents; 2) quantifying saturated hydraulic conductivity from sorptivity measurements; and 3) interpreting transient time behavior of single ring infiltration (i.e., beerkan) measurements. The model is especially useful in low permeability soils, where steady-state conditions may not be attained for hours or even days, and in shrink-swell soils, where rapid infiltration measurements are often desired so as not to induce substantial material swelling.

  5. Analysis of volatiles of malt whisky by solid-phase microextraction and stir bar sorptive extraction.

    PubMed

    Demyttenaere, Jan C R; Martínez, Jorge I Sánchez; Verhé, Roland; Sandra, Pat; De Kimpe, Norbert

    2003-01-24

    Blended Scotch whisky was analysed by solid-phase microextraction (SPME) and stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE) to study the composition of the volatiles. For SPME analysis, three different fibres were compared, poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) (100 microm). poly(acrylate) (PA) (85 microm) and divinylbenzene-Carboxen on poly(dimethylsiloxane) (DVB-CAR-(PDMS) (50/30 microm). It was found that the PDMS and DVB-CAR-PDMS fibres showed a higher enrichment capacity than PA as well as a better reproducibility. The influence of sampling time, temperature and salt addition on the enrichment of volatiles as well as the difference between liquid and headspace SPME were studied. An optimum SPME method was developed. Finally a more recent sample preparation technique, namely SBSE was evaluated to extract whisky volatiles.

  6. Fabric phase sorptive extraction: a new sorptive microextraction technique for the determination of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs from environmental water samples.

    PubMed

    Racamonde, Inés; Rodil, Rosario; Quintana, José Benito; Sieira, Benigno José; Kabir, Abuzar; Furton, Kenneth G; Cela, Rafael

    2015-03-20

    Fabric phase sorptive extraction (FPSE) is a new, yet very promising member of the sorbent-based sorptive microextraction family. It has simultaneously improved both the extraction sensitivity and the speed of the extraction by incorporating high volume of sol-gel hybrid inorganic-organic sorbents into permeable fabric substrates. The advantages of FPSE have been investigated for the determination of four non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, ibuprofen, naproxen, ketoprofen and diclofenac, in environmental water samples in combination with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Initially, the significance of several parameters affecting FPSE: sorbent chemistry, matrix pH and ionic strength were investigated using a mixed level factorial design (3(1)×2(2)). Then, other important parameters e.g., sample volume, extraction kinetics, desorption time and volume were also carefully studied and optimized. Due to the high sorbent loading on the FPSE substrate in the form of ultra-thin coating and the open geometry of the microextraction device, higher mass transfer of the target analytes occurs at a faster rate, leading to high enrichment factors in a relatively short period of time (equilibrium times: 45-100 min). Under optimal operational conditions, the limits of detection (S/N=3) were found to be in the range of 0.8 ng L(-1) to 5 ng L(-1). The enrichment factors ranged from 162 to 418 with absolute extraction efficiencies varied from 27 to 70%, and a good trueness (82-116% relative recoveries) indicating that the proposed method can be readily deployed to routine environmental pollution monitoring. The proposed method was successfully applied to the analysis of target analytes in two influent and effluent samples from a wastewater treatment plant and two river water samples in Spain. PMID:25732581

  7. Determination of crystal violet in water by direct solid phase spectrophotometry after rotating disk sorptive extraction.

    PubMed

    Manzo, Valentina; Navarro, Orielle; Honda, Luis; Sánchez, Karen; Inés Toral, M; Richter, Pablo

    2013-03-15

    The microextraction of crystal violet (CV) from water samples into polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) using the rotating disk sorptive extraction (RDSE) technique was performed. The extracting device was a small Teflon disk that had an embedded miniature magnetic stirring bar and a PDMS (560 μL) film attached to one side of the disk using double-sided tape. The extraction involves a preconcentration of CV into the PDMS, where the analyte is then directly quantified using solid phase spectrophotometry at 600 nm. Different chemical and extraction device-related variables were studied to achieve the best sensitivity for the determination. The optimum extraction was performed at pH 14 because under this condition, CV is transformed to the neutral and colorless species carbinol, which can be quantitatively transferred to the PDMS phase. Although the colorless species is the chemical form extracted in the PDMS, an intense violet coloration appeared in the phase because the -OH bond in the carbinol molecule is weakened through the formation of hydrogen bonds with the oxygen atoms of the PDMS, allowing the resonance between the three benzene rings to compensate for the charge deficit on the central carbon atom of the molecule. The accuracy and precision of the method were evaluated in river water samples spiked with 10 and 30 μg L(-1) of CV, yielding a relative standard deviation of 6.2% and 8.4% and a recovery of 98.4% and 99.4%, respectively. The method detection limit was 1.8 μg L(-1) and the limit of quantification was 5.4 μg L(-1), which can be decreased if the sample volume is increased.

  8. Fabric phase sorptive extraction followed by UHPLC-MS/MS for the analysis of benzotriazole UV stabilizers in sewage samples.

    PubMed

    Montesdeoca-Esponda, Sarah; Sosa-Ferrera, Zoraida; Kabir, Abuzar; Furton, Kenneth G; Santana-Rodríguez, José Juan

    2015-10-01

    A fast and sensitive sample preparation strategy using fabric phase sorptive extraction followed by ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry detection has been developed to analyse benzotriazole UV stabilizer compounds in aqueous samples. Benzotriazole UV stabilizer compounds are a group of compounds added to sunscreens and other personal care products which may present detrimental effects to aquatic ecosystems. Fabric phase sorptive extraction is a novel solvent minimized sample preparation approach that integrates the advantages of sol-gel derived hybrid inorganic-organic nanocomposite sorbents and the flexible, permeable and hydrophobic surface chemistry of polyester fabric. It is a highly sensitive, fast, efficient and inexpensive device that can be reused and does not suffer from coating damage, unlike SPME fibres or stir bars. In this paper, we optimized the extraction of seven benzotriazole UV filters evaluating the majority of the parameters involved in the extraction process, such as sorbent chemistry selection, extraction time, back-extraction solvent, back-extraction time and the impact of ionic strength. Under the optimized conditions, fabric phase sorptive extraction allows enrichment factors of 10 times with detection limits ranging from 6.01 to 60.7 ng L(-1) and intra- and inter-day % RSDs lower than 11 and 30 % for all compounds, respectively. The optimized sample preparation technique followed by ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry detection was applied to determine the target analytes in sewage samples from wastewater treatment plants with different purification processes of Gran Canaria Island (Spain). Two UV stabilizer compounds were measured in ranges 17.0-60.5 ng mL(-1) (UV 328) and 69.3-99.2 ng mL(-1) (UV 360) in the three sewage water samples analysed. PMID:26345441

  9. Dynamic fabric phase sorptive extraction for a group of pharmaceuticals and personal care products from environmental waters.

    PubMed

    Lakade, Sameer S; Borrull, Francesc; Furton, Kenneth G; Kabir, Abuzar; Marcé, Rosa Maria; Fontanals, Núria

    2016-07-22

    This paper describes for the first time the use of a new extraction technique, based on fabric phase sorptive extraction (FPSE). This new mode proposes the extraction of the analytes in dynamic mode in order to reduce the extraction time. Dynamic fabric phase sorptive extraction (DFPSE) followed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry was evaluated for the extraction of a group of pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) from environmental water samples. Different parameters affecting the extraction were optimized and best conditions were achieved when 50mL of sample at pH 3 was passed through 3 disks and analytes retained were eluted with 10mL of ethyl acetate. The recoveries were higher than 60% for most of compounds with the exception of the most polar ones (between 8% and 38%). The analytical method was validated with environmental samples such as river water and effluent and influent wastewater, and good performance was obtained. The analysis of samples revealed the presence of some PPCPs at low ngL(-1) concentrations. PMID:27295962

  10. A permeability model for coal and other fractured, sorptive-elastic media

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, E.P.; Christiansen, R.L.

    2008-09-15

    This paper describes the derivation of a new equation that can be used to model the permeability behavior of a fractured, sorptive-elastic medium, such as coal, under variable stress conditions. The equation is applicable to confinement pressure schemes commonly used during the collection of permeability data in the laboratory. The model is derived for cubic geometry under biaxial or hydrostatic confining pressures. The model is designed to handle changes in permeability caused by adsorption and desorption of gases onto and from the matrix blocks in fractured media. The model equations can be used to calculate permeability changes caused by the production of methane (CH{sub 4}) from coal as well as the injection of gases, such as carbon dioxide, for sequestration in coal. Sensitivity analysis of the model found that each of the input variables can have a significant impact on the outcome of the permeability forecast as a function of changing pore pressure, thus, accurate input data are essential. The permeability model also can be used as a tool to determine input parameters for field simulations by curve fitting laboratory-generated permeability data. The new model is compared to two other widely used coal-permeability models using a hypothetical coal with average properties.

  11. A Permeability Model for Coal and Other Fractured, Sorptive-Elastic Media

    SciTech Connect

    Eric P. Robertson; Richard L. Christiansen

    2006-10-01

    This paper describes the derivation of a new equation that can be used to model the permeability behavior of a fractured, sorptive-elastic media, such as coal, under variable stress conditions commonly used during measurement of permeability data in the laboratory. The model is derived for cubic geometry under biaxial or hydrostatic confining pressures. The model is also designed to handle changes in permeability caused by adsorption and desorption of gases from the matrix blocks. The model equations can be used to calculate permeability changes caused by the production of methane from coal as well as the injection of gases, such as carbon dioxide, for sequestration in coal. Sensitivity analysis of the model found that each of the input variables can have a significant impact on the outcome of the permeability forecast as a function of changing pore pressure; thus, accurate input data are essential. The permeability model can also be used as a tool to determine input parameters for field simulations by curve-fitting laboratory-generated permeability data. The new model is compared to two other widely used coal permeability models using a hypothetical coal with average properties.

  12. Fabric phase sorptive extraction: An innovative sample preparation approach applied to the analysis of specific migration from food packaging.

    PubMed

    Aznar, M; Alfaro, P; Nerin, C; Kabir, A; Furton, K G

    2016-09-14

    Additives added to food packaging materials can migrate to food in contact with them during storage and shelf life. A novel simple, fast and sensitive analyte extraction method based on fabric phase sorptive extraction (FPSE), followed by analysis using ultra-high performance liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry detection (UPLC-MS) was applied to the analysis of 18 common non-volatile plastic additives. Three FPSE media coated with different sol-gel sorbents characterized with different polarities including sol-gel poly(dimethylsiloxane), sol-gel poly(ethylene glycol) and sol-gel poly(tetrahydrofuran) were studied. All three FPSE media showed very satisfactory results. In general, compounds with low logP values seemed to have higher enrichment factors (EFs), especially with poly(tetrahydrofuran) and poly(ethylene glycol) media. For compounds with high logP values, the use of sol-gel poly(dimethylsiloxane) improved the enrichment capacity. Sample preparation time was optimized at 20 min for sample extraction and 10 min for solvent desorption. Acetonitrile was selected as desorption solvent since recoveries were over 70% for 13 out of 18 selected compounds in all FPSE media. The best extraction recovery values were obtained when compounds were dissolved in aqueous acetic acid solution (3%), where 17 out of 18 compounds showed improvement in their signal intensity after FPSE extraction and 10 obtained enrichment factors above 3 for all the tested FPSE media. When FPSE extracts were concentrated under nitrogen, 11 out of 18 compounds reached EFs values above 100. PMID:27566344

  13. Fabric phase sorptive extraction: An innovative sample preparation approach applied to the analysis of specific migration from food packaging.

    PubMed

    Aznar, M; Alfaro, P; Nerin, C; Kabir, A; Furton, K G

    2016-09-14

    Additives added to food packaging materials can migrate to food in contact with them during storage and shelf life. A novel simple, fast and sensitive analyte extraction method based on fabric phase sorptive extraction (FPSE), followed by analysis using ultra-high performance liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry detection (UPLC-MS) was applied to the analysis of 18 common non-volatile plastic additives. Three FPSE media coated with different sol-gel sorbents characterized with different polarities including sol-gel poly(dimethylsiloxane), sol-gel poly(ethylene glycol) and sol-gel poly(tetrahydrofuran) were studied. All three FPSE media showed very satisfactory results. In general, compounds with low logP values seemed to have higher enrichment factors (EFs), especially with poly(tetrahydrofuran) and poly(ethylene glycol) media. For compounds with high logP values, the use of sol-gel poly(dimethylsiloxane) improved the enrichment capacity. Sample preparation time was optimized at 20 min for sample extraction and 10 min for solvent desorption. Acetonitrile was selected as desorption solvent since recoveries were over 70% for 13 out of 18 selected compounds in all FPSE media. The best extraction recovery values were obtained when compounds were dissolved in aqueous acetic acid solution (3%), where 17 out of 18 compounds showed improvement in their signal intensity after FPSE extraction and 10 obtained enrichment factors above 3 for all the tested FPSE media. When FPSE extracts were concentrated under nitrogen, 11 out of 18 compounds reached EFs values above 100.

  14. Determination of androgens and progestogens in environmental and biological samples using fabric phase sorptive extraction coupled to ultra-high performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Guedes-Alonso, Rayco; Ciofi, Lorenzo; Sosa-Ferrera, Zoraida; Santana-Rodríguez, José Juan; Bubba, Massimo Del; Kabir, Abuzar; Furton, Kenneth G

    2016-03-11

    Androgens and progestogens are two important groups of endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) which are implicated to produce severe detrimental impact over aquatic biota, even at very low concentrations of ngL(-1). For this reason, one of the major challenges to analytical chemists is the development of sensitive and selective extraction processes which allow the rapid and green determination of these emerging pollutants at low concentrations in environmental samples. Fabric phase sorptive extraction is a new, highly sensitive, efficient and solvent minimized technique which combine the advantages of sol-gel derived microextraction sorbents and the rich surface chemistry of cellulose fabric substrate. This process has several advantages such as minimum usage of organic solvents, short extraction times, small sample volumes and high analyte preconcentration factors. In this study, an extraction method based on sorptive fabric phase coupled to ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry detection (FPSE-UHPLC-MS/MS) has been developed for the determination of four progestogens and six androgens in environmental and biological samples. All the parameters involved in the extraction, such as sample volume, extraction and desorption times, desorption solvent volume and sample pH values have been optimized. The developed method provides satisfactory limits of detection (between 1.7 and 264ngL(-1)), good recoveries and low relative standard deviations (below 10% in tap and osmosis water and below 20% in wastewater and urine). Subsequently, the method was used to analyse tap water, wastewater treated with different processing technologies and urine samples. The concentrations of the detected hormones ranged from 28.3 to 227.3 ngL(-1) in water samples and from 1.1 to 3.7μgL(-1) in urine samples.

  15. Determination of androgens and progestogens in environmental and biological samples using fabric phase sorptive extraction coupled to ultra-high performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Guedes-Alonso, Rayco; Ciofi, Lorenzo; Sosa-Ferrera, Zoraida; Santana-Rodríguez, José Juan; Bubba, Massimo Del; Kabir, Abuzar; Furton, Kenneth G

    2016-03-11

    Androgens and progestogens are two important groups of endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) which are implicated to produce severe detrimental impact over aquatic biota, even at very low concentrations of ngL(-1). For this reason, one of the major challenges to analytical chemists is the development of sensitive and selective extraction processes which allow the rapid and green determination of these emerging pollutants at low concentrations in environmental samples. Fabric phase sorptive extraction is a new, highly sensitive, efficient and solvent minimized technique which combine the advantages of sol-gel derived microextraction sorbents and the rich surface chemistry of cellulose fabric substrate. This process has several advantages such as minimum usage of organic solvents, short extraction times, small sample volumes and high analyte preconcentration factors. In this study, an extraction method based on sorptive fabric phase coupled to ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry detection (FPSE-UHPLC-MS/MS) has been developed for the determination of four progestogens and six androgens in environmental and biological samples. All the parameters involved in the extraction, such as sample volume, extraction and desorption times, desorption solvent volume and sample pH values have been optimized. The developed method provides satisfactory limits of detection (between 1.7 and 264ngL(-1)), good recoveries and low relative standard deviations (below 10% in tap and osmosis water and below 20% in wastewater and urine). Subsequently, the method was used to analyse tap water, wastewater treated with different processing technologies and urine samples. The concentrations of the detected hormones ranged from 28.3 to 227.3 ngL(-1) in water samples and from 1.1 to 3.7μgL(-1) in urine samples. PMID:26858117

  16. Identification of thymol phase I metabolites in human urine by headspace sorptive extraction combined with thermal desorption and gas chromatography mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Thalhamer, Bernhard; Buchberger, Wolfgang; Waser, Mario

    2011-08-25

    Development of a novel highly sensitive headspace sorptive extraction (HSSE) method in combination with thermal desorption gas chromatography coupled to a mass spectrometer (TD-GC/MS) allowed the identification of thymol and several phase I metabolites in human urine. Combined with an enzymatic hydrolysis of glucuronated or sulphated phase II metabolites of thymol and of the respective phase I metabolites prior to analysis, even trace quantities of hitherto not detected thymol phase I metabolites could be identified in urine samples of test persons after oral administration of 50mg thymol. It was proven, that human metabolism leads to a hydroxylation of the aromatic ring as well as of the iso-propyl side chain. Hydroxylation of the iso-propyl group results in the formation of the rather unstable p-cymene-3,8-diol and the corresponding dehydration product p-cymene-3-ol-8-ene which could be clearly detected in human urine samples. Furthermore, the aromatic hydroxylation products p-cymene-2,5-diol, its oxidation product p-cymene-2,5-dione and p-cymene-2,3-diol were also unambiguously identified by comparison with synthesized reference compounds. PMID:21620603

  17. Application of a membrane model to the sorptive interactions of humic substances.

    PubMed Central

    Wershaw, R L

    1989-01-01

    Humic substances, the dark-colored, natural organic polyelectrolytes that are found in practically all soils, sediments, and natural water, strongly interact with both inorganic and organic pollutants. Inorganic cationic species generally undergo complexation reactions with humic substances. The binding of cations, such as cupric ions, by humic substances often markedly reduces their toxicity to aquatic organisms. Some inorganic anionic species, in the presence of metal ions, are sorbed by humic substances. In these instances the metal ions appear to form bridges between the humic substances and the anions. Several different types of interactions take place between organic compounds and humic materials. Hydrophobic organic species partition into either insoluble or soluble humic substances. The insoluble humic substances will remove hydrophobic organic compounds from the aqueous phase, thereby rendering them less mobile. However, soluble humic substances will solubilize hydrophobic organics, increasing their mobility. Other types of interactions between humic substances and organic compounds, such as adsorption and ion exchange, also have been observed. These various interactions between humic substances and pollutants are important in governing their fate and movement in natural water systems, and, for this reason, a detailed understanding of the mechanisms of the interaction is important. A recently developed membrane model of the structure of humic substances is described; this model enables one to better understand the physical-chemical properties of these materials. Images FIGURE 2. FIGURE 3. PMID:2533555

  18. Analysis of preservatives with different polarities in beverage samples by dual-phase dual stir bar sorptive extraction combined with high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jin; Chen, Beibei; He, Man; Hu, Bin

    2013-02-22

    A new concept of "dual-phase dual stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE)" was proposed to simultaneously extract six preservatives with different polarities (logKo/w values of 1.27-3.41), namely, benzoic acid (BA), sorbic acid (SA), methyl p-hydroxybenzoate (MP), ethyl p-hydroxybenzoate (EP), propyl p-hydroxybenzoate (PP), and butyl p-hydroxybenzoate (BP). The dual-phase dual SBSE apparatus was consisted of two differently coated stir bars, a 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES)-hydroxy-terminated silicone oil (OH-TSO)-coated stir bar that was prepared by sol-gel technique and a C(18) silica (C(18))-polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)-coated stir bar that was prepared by adhesion. In dual-phase dual SBSE, the two stir bars with different coatings were placed in the same sample solution for the simultaneous extraction of the target analytes with different polarities, and then the bars were desorbed in the same desorption solvent. The extraction performance of the dual-phase dual SBSE for the six preservatives was evaluated by comparing with the conventional SBSE (individual stir bar) with different coatings, including commercial PDMS, homemade PDMS, C(18)-APTES-OH-TSO, APTES-OH-TSO, and C(18)-PDMS. The experimental results showed that the dual-phase dual SBSE had the highest extraction efficiency for the six target preservatives. Based on this fact, a novel method by combining the dual-phase dual SBSE which was consisted of the APTES-OH-TSO-coated and C(18)-PDMS-coated stir bars with high-performance liquid chromatography-ultraviolet detection (HPLC-UV) was developed for the simultaneous analysis of six target beverage preservatives in beverages. Under optimal conditions, the limits of detection (LODs) for six target preservatives ranged from 0.6 to 2.7 μgL(-1) with the relative standard deviations (RSDs) of 4.6-9.2% (C(BA,SA)=5 μgL(-1),C(MP)=20 μgL(-1),C(EP,PP,BP)=10 μgL(-1), n=7). The enrichment factors (EFs) were approximately 16-42-fold (theoretical EF was 50-fold

  19. Headspace stir bar sorptive extraction-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry characterization of the diluted vapor phase of cigarette smoke delivered to an in vitro cell exposure chamber.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Navneet; Cabral, Jean-Louis; Morin, André; Waldron, Karen C

    2011-01-14

    Advanced smoke generation systems, such as the Borgwaldt RM20S(®) smoking machine used in combination with the BAT exposure chamber, allow for the generation, dilution and delivery of fresh cigarette smoke to cell or tissue cultures for in vitro cell culture analyses. Recently, our group confirmed that the Borgwaldt RM20S(®) is a reliable tool to generate and deliver repeatable and reproducible exposure concentrations of whole smoke to in vitro cultures. However, the relationship between dose and diluted smoke components found within the exposure chamber has not been characterized. The current study focused on the development of a headspace stir bar sorptive extraction (HSSE) method to chemically characterize some of the vapor phase components of cigarette smoke generated by the Borgwaldt RM20S(®) and collected within a cell culture exposure chamber. The method was based on passive sampling within the chamber by HSSE using a Twister™ stir bar. Following exposure, sorbed analytes were recovered using a thermal desorption unit and a cooled injection system coupled to gas chromatograph/mass spectrometry for identification and quantification. Using the HSSE method, sixteen compounds were identified. The desorption parameters were assessed using ten reference compounds and the following conditions led to the maximal response: desorption temperature of 200°C for 2 min with cryofocussing temperature of -75°C. During transfer of the stir bars to the thermal desorption system, significant losses of analytes were observed as a function of time; therefore, the exposure-to-desorption time interval was kept at the minimum of 10±0.5 min. Repeatability of the HSSE method was assessed by monitoring five reference compounds present in the vapor phase (10.1-12.9% RSD) and n-butyl acetate, the internal standard (18.5% RSD). The smoke dilution precision was found to be 17.2, 6.2 and 11.7% RSD for exposure concentrations of 1, 2 and 5% (v/v) cigarette vapor phase in air

  20. Sorptivity of fly ash concretes

    SciTech Connect

    Gopalan, M.K.

    1996-08-01

    A factorial experiment was designed to measure the sorptivity of cement and fly ash concretes in order to compare the durability of fly ash concrete against the cement concrete. Sorptivity measurements based on the capillary movement of water was made on three grades of cement concrete and six grades of fly ash mixes. The effect of curing was also studied by treating the samples in two curving conditions. A functional relationship of sorptivity against the strength, curing condition and fly ash content has been presented. The results were useful to analyze the factors influencing the durability of cement and fly ash concretes and to explain why some of the previously reported findings were contradictory. Curing conditions have been found to be the most important factor that affected the durability properties of fly ash concrete. When proper curing was provided, a mix with 40% fly ash was found to reduce the sorptivity by 37%. Under inadequate curing the sorptivity was found to increase by 60%. The influence of curing on cement concrete was found to be of much less importance.

  1. Modeling changes in mineral assemblages and sorptive capacity within the altered zone: analytical data for flow-through experiment

    SciTech Connect

    DeLoach, L., LLNL

    1997-10-01

    Mineral changes that may occur within the altered zone (AZ) will develop in response to complex interactions among condensate, pore waters, fracture mineralogy, and the mineralogy of the in situ rocks. At the Yucca Mountain site, the mineralogy of the in situ rock varies from one lithologic unit to another, reflecting different initial bulk rock chemistries and different degrees of devitrification and welding. To account for these variations when describing the possible changes the potential repository block will experience during heating and fluid movement, a credible database of experimental results describing the chemical and mineralogical consequences of rock-water interaction must be available; against this, modeling capabilities are compared. Once the capability is established to accurately simulate the time-dependent evolution of rock-water systems at elevated temperatures, confidence can be placed in models of the mineral changes expected within the AZ. This report describes experiments and modeling that consider the effects of different starting materials on mineral evolution and on the rates of mineral formation. Bounds are placed on the kinetics of the controlling dissolution-rate constants, which are the fundamental parameters that influence secondary mineral development. The sensitivity of the results to different secondary minerals is considered in the simulations. The most significant parameters affecting the results are shown to be the effective surface areas of the phases involved, the rate constants for the phases, and, for the case of vitric material, the model used for glass dissolution.

  2. Sorptive interactions between VOCs and indoor materials.

    PubMed

    Won, D; Corsi, R L; Rynes, M

    2001-12-01

    This study was carried out using various materials (carpet, gypsum board, upholstery, vinyl and wood flooring, acoustic tiles, and fruit) that were exposed to eight gaseous volatile organic compounds (VOCs) (isopropanol, MTBE, cyclohexane, toluene, ethylbenzene, tetrachloroethene, 1,2-dichlorobenzene, and 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene) in electro-polished stainless-steel chambers. Dynamic responses in VOC concentrations were used to determine linear adsorption and desorption rate coefficients and equilibrium partition coefficients. A linear adsorption/desorption model was used to effectively describe the interactions between VOCs and indoor surface materials for short-term source events (10 h). Relationships between sorption parameters and chemical vapor pressure and the octanol-air partition coefficient were observed. Carpet was identified as the most significant sorptive sink for non-polar VOCs. Virgin gypsum board was observed to be a significant sink for highly polar VOCs. Sorptive interactions between non-polar VOCs and indoor materials were not affected by variations in relative humidity. However, increases in relative humidity were observed to increase the degree of sorption of isopropanol to carpet. PMID:11761600

  3. An extension of Miller scaling to scale sorptivity by contact angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallach, Rony; Wang, Qiuling

    2013-10-01

    This study sheds light on the limitations of using [(cos θ)½] to scale sorptivity by contact angle while reaffirming its scaling by geometrical Miller scaling factor (λ½). The sorptivity for uniform and nonuniform (wavy) capillary tubes was determined by a mathematical model that includes the effect of inertia and dynamic contact angle. Given that real porous media are preferably represented by a bundle of nonuniform rather than uniform capillary tubes, the relationship between sorptivity and contact angle was examined for different combinations of contact angles and capillary tube degrees of waviness. A general relationship of S = f [cos θ)β] (with β ≤ ½) was found. The deviation of β from ½ (associated with uniform capillary tubes) increased with contact angle and capillary waviness increase. Zero sorptivity was obtained even for wettable capillaries, θ < 90°, a phenomenon that has been generally associated with hydrophobic capillaries (θ ≥ 90°). Contact angle and nonuniform pore structure had a synergistic effect on sorptivity. Capillary nonuniformity per se diminished sorptivity but its synergy with contact angle markedly magnified this reduction. Thus, following the sorptivity impact on finger width, it is rational to assume that larger-than-zero contact angles are involved in the formation of narrow fingers with an abrupt change between the inner wet and surrounding dry areas.

  4. Headspace sorptive solid phase microextraction (HS-SPME) combined with a spectrophotometry system: A simple glass devise for extraction and simultaneous determination of cyanide and thiocyanate in environmental and biological samples.

    PubMed

    Al-Saidi, H M; Al-Harbi, Sami A; Aljuhani, E H; El-Shahawi, M S

    2016-10-01

    A simple, low cost and efficient headspace sorptive solid phase microextraction (HS-SPME) method for determination of cyanide has been developed. The system comprises of a glass tube with two valves and a moveable glass slide fixed at its centre. It includes an acceptor phase polyurethane foam treated mercury (II) dithizonate [Hg(HDz)2-PUF] complex fixed inside by a septum cap in a cylindrical configuration (5.0cm length and 1.0cm diameter). The extraction is based upon the contact of the acceptor phase to the headspace and subsequently measuring the absorbance of the recovered mercury (II) dithizonate from PUFs sorbent. Unlike other HSSE, extraction and back - extractions was carried out in a closed system, thereby improving the analytical performance by preventing the analyte loss. Under the optimized conditions, a linear calibration plot in the range of 1.0-50.0µmolL(-1) was achieved with limits of detection (LOD) and quantification (LOQ) of 0.34, 1.2µmolL(-1) CN(-), respectively. Simultaneous analysis of cyanide and thiocyanate in saliva was also performed with satisfactory recoveries.

  5. Headspace sorptive solid phase microextraction (HS-SPME) combined with a spectrophotometry system: A simple glass devise for extraction and simultaneous determination of cyanide and thiocyanate in environmental and biological samples.

    PubMed

    Al-Saidi, H M; Al-Harbi, Sami A; Aljuhani, E H; El-Shahawi, M S

    2016-10-01

    A simple, low cost and efficient headspace sorptive solid phase microextraction (HS-SPME) method for determination of cyanide has been developed. The system comprises of a glass tube with two valves and a moveable glass slide fixed at its centre. It includes an acceptor phase polyurethane foam treated mercury (II) dithizonate [Hg(HDz)2-PUF] complex fixed inside by a septum cap in a cylindrical configuration (5.0cm length and 1.0cm diameter). The extraction is based upon the contact of the acceptor phase to the headspace and subsequently measuring the absorbance of the recovered mercury (II) dithizonate from PUFs sorbent. Unlike other HSSE, extraction and back - extractions was carried out in a closed system, thereby improving the analytical performance by preventing the analyte loss. Under the optimized conditions, a linear calibration plot in the range of 1.0-50.0µmolL(-1) was achieved with limits of detection (LOD) and quantification (LOQ) of 0.34, 1.2µmolL(-1) CN(-), respectively. Simultaneous analysis of cyanide and thiocyanate in saliva was also performed with satisfactory recoveries. PMID:27474290

  6. Relationship between liquid sorptivity and capillarity in concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Hanzic, L.; Ilic, R

    2003-09-01

    Neutron radiography (NR) was applied to study liquid transport processes in concrete. With this method, it is possible to monitor the liquid distribution inside specimens and to measure the height of the liquid front for liquids of high hydrogen content inside concrete. The experiment was performed with water and fuel oil for three different types of concrete. The results are compared with the sorptivity measured by the gravimetric method. It is shown that the ratio between the capillarity coefficient and sorptivity depends upon the combination of liquid and solid phases. For water, this value was found to be 5.5{+-}0.6, 5.8{+-}0.6 and 7.1{+-}0.7 in concrete without additives, concrete with an air-entraining agent and concrete with a plasticizer, respectively. For fuel oil, the value is about 50% higher than that for water.

  7. Recent developments in stir bar sorptive extraction.

    PubMed

    He, Man; Chen, Beibei; Hu, Bin

    2014-03-01

    As a crucial step in qualitative and quantitative analysis, sample pretreatment is commonly used to isolate the target analytes, concentrate them, or convert them into the forms tailored to the instrumental analysis. In recent years, there has been a trend for sample pretreatment techniques to become more miniaturized and more environmentally friendly. Stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE), which was developed in 1999, is such an environmentally friendly microextraction technique. Compared with other microextraction techniques, including solid phase microextraction and liquid phase microextraction, SBSE provides a higher extraction efficiency and better reproducibility owing to the much greater amount of the extraction phase, and no special skills are required. However, there are some problems associated with SBSE, such as the limited applicable coatings, coating abrasion of the laboratory-made stir bar, and the difficulty in automation, which restrict the further improvement and application of SBSE. This review focuses on the development of SBSE in the past decade, in terms of coating preparation, automated systems, novel extraction modes, its use with various instruments, and applications in food, environmental, and biological samples.

  8. The sorptive behavior of organic compounds on retorted oil shale

    SciTech Connect

    Godrej, A.N.

    1989-01-01

    Single- and multisolute batch sorption isotherm experiments performed on Antrim spent shale from Michigan indicated a consistent behavior by the shale with respect to the four sorbates used-Phenol, 2-Hydroxynaphthalen (HN), 2,3,5-Trimethylphenol (TP) and 1,2,3,4-Tetrahydroquinoline (THQ). The sorptive capacity of the shale was least for Phenol and greatest for THQ, with order being Phenol < TP < HN < THQ. Single-solute continuous-flow column experiments on shale could not be better analyzed because of a lack of kinetic data. The order in which the compounds would reach a 50% breakthrough, and the sorptive amount order in batch multicomponent experiments, could be predicted from the single-solute batch data. The order at 10% breakthrough in the column experiments could not be predicted clearly. Averages of the ratios of the amount sorbed of any one component to the total sorbed amount of all components in multisolute systems were calculated and indicated the partitioning of the components as 11% Phenol, 32% HN, 37% THQ, and 20% TP in a tetrasolute system. Average ratios for bi- and trisolute systems computed from the tetrasolute system agreed to <11% for those compounds that srobed to larger extents (HN, THQ) and to <19% for those that sorbed to a smaller degree (Phenol, TP). A comparison with single-component batch isotherm experiments performed on Filtrasorb 300 granular activated carbon (GAC) showed that the shale had a sorptive capacity of about two orders of magnitude less than that of the GAC. The multicomponent shale data could not be adequately modelled with any one of three models - multicomponent Freundlich type and Langmuir models, and the simplified ideal adsorbed solution theory model.

  9. Estimation of hydraulic conductivities of Yucca Mountain tuffs from sorptivity and water retention measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, R.W.; Bodvarsson, G.S.

    1995-06-01

    The hydraulic conductivity functions of the matrix rocks at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, are among the most important data needed as input for the site-scale hydrological model of the unsaturated zone. The difficult and time-consuming nature of hydraulic conductivity measurements renders it infeasible to directly measure this property on large numbers of cores. Water retention and sorptivity measurements, however, can be made relatively rapidly. The sorptivity is, in principle, a unique functional of the conductivity and water retention functions. It therefore should be possible to invert sorptivity and water retention measurements in order to estimate the conductivity; the porosity is the only other parameter that is required for this inversion. In this report two methods of carrying out this inversion are presented, and are tested against a limited data set that has been collected by Flint et al. at the USGS on a set of Yucca Mountain tuffs. The absolute permeability is usually predicted by both methods to within an average error of about 0.5 - 1.0 orders of magnitude. The discrepancy appears to be due to the fact that the water retention curves have only been measured during drainage, whereas the imbibition water retention curve is the one that is relevant to sorptivity measurements. Although the inversion methods also yield predictions of the relative permeability function, there are yet no unsaturated hydraulic conductivity data against which to test these predictions.

  10. Rotating-disk sorptive extraction of nonylphenol from water samples.

    PubMed

    Richter, Pablo; Leiva, Claudio; Choque, Carlos; Giordano, Ady; Sepúlveda, Betsabet

    2009-12-01

    In this study the sorption of nonylphenol was implemented on a rotating Teflon disk coated with a PDMS film on one of its surfaces. In this way, the disk, which has a high surface area, contacts only the liquid sample, which can be stirred at higher velocity than with the stir bar used in stir-bar sorptive extraction (SBSE), without damaging the phase while at the same time facilitating analyte mass transfer to the PDMS surface. We refer to the procedure as rotating-disk sorptive extraction (RDSE). Extraction variables such as disk rotational velocity, extraction time, and surface area of PDMS film were studied to establish the best conditions for extraction. With increasing rotational velocity, the amount of extracted analyte significantly increases because the stagnant layer concomitantly decreases. On the other hand, the extracted amount concomitantly increases with extraction time, reaching equilibrium at approximately 20 min, which can be reduced to 10 min when the surface area of PDMS increases from 1.74 to 6.97 cm(2). Precision of the method was determined by using the same disk (n=6) and different disks (n=3), showing relative standard deviations for the analyte of 3.7% and 10%, respectively. The detection limit of the method was 0.09 microg/L NP, defined at a signal to noise ratio of 3. The method was applied to a real sample, achieving quantitative recovery. The PDMS phase on the disk could be used for at least 50 experiments. In any case, replacement of the PDMS film on the disk is very easy and inexpensive, as compared to the commercial alternative SBSE.

  11. Sorptive thin film microextraction followed by direct solid state spectrofluorimetry: A simple, rapid and sensitive method for determination of carvedilol in human plasma.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Shima; Talebpour, Zahra; Adib, Noushin

    2016-06-14

    A poly acrylate-ethylene glycol (PA-EG) thin film is introduced for the first time as a novel polar sorbent for sorptive extraction method coupled directly to solid-state spectrofluorimetry without the necessity of a desorption step. The structure, polarity, fluorescence property and extraction performance of the developed thin film were investigated systematically. Carvedilol was used as the model analyte to evaluate the proposed method. The entire procedure involved one-step extraction of carvedilol from plasma using PA-EG thin film sorptive phase without protein precipitation. Extraction variables were studied in order to establish the best experimental conditions. Optimum extraction conditions were the followings: stirring speed of 1000 rpm, pH of 6.8, extraction temperature of 60 °C, and extraction time of 60 min. Under optimal conditions, extraction of carvedilol was carried out in spiked human plasma; and the linear range of calibration curve was 15-300 ng mL(-1) with regression coefficient of 0.998. Limit of detection (LOD) for the method was 4.5 ng mL(-1). The intra- and inter-day accuracy and precision of the proposed method were evaluated in plasma sample spiked with three concentration levels of carvedilol; yielding a recovery of 91-112% and relative standard deviation of less than 8%, respectively. The established procedure was successfully applied for quantification of carvedilol in plasma sample of a volunteer patient. The developed PA-EG thin film sorptive phase followed by solid-state spectrofluorimetric method provides a simple, rapid and sensitive approach for the analysis of carvedilol in human plasma.

  12. Fission Product Sorptivity in Graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Tompson, Jr., Robert V.; Loyalka, Sudarshan; Ghosh, Tushar; Viswanath, Dabir; Walton, Kyle; Haffner, Robert

    2015-04-01

    graduate student meant that data acquisition with the packed bed systems ended up competing for the graduate student’s available time with the electrodynamic balance redesign and assembly portions of the project. This competition for available time was eventually mitigated to some extent by the later recruitment of an undergraduate student to help with data collection using the packed bed system. It was only the recruitment of the second student that allowed the single particle balance design and construction efforts to proceed as far as they did during the project period. It should be added that some significant time was also spent by the graduate student cataloging previous work involving graphite. This eventually resulted in a review paper being submitted and accepted (“Adsorption of Iodine on Graphite in High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Systems: A Review,” Kyle L. Walton, Tushar K. Ghosh, Dabir S. Viswanath, Sudarshan K. Loyalka, Robert V. Tompson). Our specific revised objectives in this project were as follows: Experimentally obtain isotherms of Iodine for reactor grade IG-110 samples of graphite particles over a range of temperatures and pressures using an EDB and a temperature controlled EDB; Experimentally obtain isotherms of Iodine for reactor grade IG-110 samples of graphite particles over a range of temperatures and pressures using a packed column bed apparatus; Explore the effect that charge has on the adsorption isotherms of iodine by varying the charges on and the voltages used to suspend the microscopic particles in the EDB; and To interpret these results in terms of the existing models (Langmuir, BET, Freundlich, and others) which we will modify as necessary to include charge related effects.

  13. VRA Modeling, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kindt, Louis M.; Mullins, Michael E.; Hand, David W.; Kline, Andrew A.

    1995-01-01

    The destruction of organic contaminants in waste water for closed systems, such as that of Space Station, is crucial due to the need for recycling the waste water. A co-current upflow bubble column using oxygen as the gas phase oxidant and packed with catalyst particles consisting of a noble metal on an alumina substrate is being developed for this process. The objective of this study is to develop a plug-flow model that will predict the performance of this three phase reactor system in destroying a multicomponent mixture of organic contaminants in water. Mass balances on a series of contaminants and oxygen in both the liquid and gas phases are used to develop this model. These mass balances incorporate the gas-to-liquid and liquid-to-particle mass transfer coefficients, the catalyst effectiveness factor, and intrinsic reaction rate. To validate this model, a bench scale reactor has been tested at Michigan Technological University at elevated pressures (50-83 psig,) and a temperature range of 200 to 290 F. Feeds consisting of five dilute solutions of ethanol (approx. 10 ppm), chlorobenzene (approx. 20 ppb), formaldehyde (approx. 100 ppb), dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO approx. 300 ppb), and urea (approx. 20 ppm) in water were tested individually with an oxygen mass flow rate of 0.009 lb/h. The results from these individual tests were used to develop the kinetic parameter inputs necessary for the computer model. The computer simulated results are compared to the experimental data obtained for all 5 components run in a mixture on the differential test column for a range of reactor contact times.

  14. HEURISTIC OPTIMIZATION AND ALGORITHM TUNING APPLIED TO SORPTIVE BARRIER DESIGN

    EPA Science Inventory

    While heuristic optimization is applied in environmental applications, ad-hoc algorithm configuration is typical. We use a multi-layer sorptive barrier design problem as a benchmark for an algorithm-tuning procedure, as applied to three heuristics (genetic algorithms, simulated ...

  15. [Analysis of part of flavor compounds in wheat by headspace sorptive extraction-gas chromatography].

    PubMed

    Wang, Tongbo; Yan, Xiao; Lan, Xiaozheng

    2013-05-01

    A method has been established for the analysis of flavor compounds in wheat by headspace sorptive extraction (HSSE). The sorptive extraction bar was composed of a silicon rubber coating and a capillary glass with an inner iron rod. The silicon rubber coating was condensed inside a stainless steel mold from the silicon precursors with a sol-hot air vulcanization method. The coating of the extraction bar has a volume of about 87 microL and is thermally stable until 390 degrees C. The flavor compounds extracted by the bar were desorbed in a homemade thermal desorption unit (TDU) and introduced directly into a pre-column in a gas chromatograph for analysis. Experimental parameters for the extraction efficiency were optimized including extraction temperature and time, phase ratio and thermal desorption conditions. The standard wheat flour samples spiked with seven flavor compounds were analyzed under the optimized conditions, and showed good linear relationships (r > 0.9979), limits of detection (LOD) of 0.09 - 1.00 microg/kg, good recoveries (95% - 121%) and repeatabilities (relative standard deviations, RSD, 2.2% - 7.8%). By external calibration method, the absolute contents of the seven flavor compounds in a real wheat sample were determined. The method is rapid, simple with low limits of detection, and is applicable for the rapid quantitative analysis of the flavor compounds in wheat. PMID:24010348

  16. Modeling of phased array transducers.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Rais; Kundu, Tribikram; Placko, Dominique

    2005-04-01

    Phased array transducers are multi-element transducers, where different elements are activated with different time delays. The advantage of these transducers is that no mechanical movement of the transducer is needed to scan an object. Focusing and beam steering is obtained simply by adjusting the time delay. In this paper the DPSM (distributed point source method) is used to model the ultrasonic field generated by a phased array transducer and to study the interaction effect when two phased array transducers are placed in a homogeneous fluid. Earlier investigations modeled the acoustic field for conventional transducers where all transducer points are excited simultaneously. In this research, combining the concepts of delayed firing and the DPSM, the phased array transducers are modeled semi-analytically. In addition to the single transducer modeling the ultrasonic fields from two phased array transducers placed face to face in a fluid medium is also modeled to study the interaction effect. The importance of considering the interaction effect in multiple transducer modeling is discussed, pointing out that neighboring transducers not only act as ultrasonic wave generators but also as scatterers.

  17. A KINETIC MODEL FOR CELL DENSITY DEPENDENT BACTERIAL TRANSPORT IN POROUS MEDIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    A kinetic transport model with the ability to account for variations in cell density of the aqueous and solid phases was developed for bacteria in porous media. Sorption kinetics in the advective-dispersive-sorptive equation was described by assuming that adsorption was proportio...

  18. Stir bar sorptive-dispersive microextraction mediated by magnetic nanoparticles-nylon 6 composite for the extraction of hydrophilic organic compounds in aqueous media.

    PubMed

    Benedé, Juan L; Chisvert, Alberto; Giokas, Dimosthenis L; Salvador, Amparo

    2016-07-01

    A new and sensitive analytical method based on the recently developed approach termed stir bar-sorptive dispersive microextraction (SBSDME) using a magnetic CoFe2O4@SiO2-nylon 6 composite as sorbent material is presented for the extraction of hydrophilic organic compounds. The simultaneous determination of four hydrophilic UV filters in environmental water samples has been chosen as a model analytical application due to the increasing awareness regarding the occurrence of sunscreen residuals in natural waters. The developed SBSDME approach combines the principles and benefits of stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE) and dispersive solid phase extraction (DSPE) but allows for lower extraction time and easier post-extraction treatment. Moreover, most importantly, it enables the use of new magnetic materials that affords higher versatility and can be tailored to the needs of the analysis. The main experimental parameters involved in the SBSDME process (i.e. composite amount, extraction time, pH, ionic strength, desorption solvent and desorption time) were evaluated to provide the best enrichment factors. Under the optimized conditions, the method was successfully validated showing good linearity, enrichment factors between 105 and 145 depending on the analyte, limits of detection and quantification in the low ng mL(-1) range (1.6-2.9 ng mL(-1) and 5.4-9.6 ng mL(-1), respectively) and good intra- and inter-day repeatability (RSD < 13%). The developed method was applied to the analysis of water samples of different origin (sea, river and swimming pool). Relative recovery values ranged between 90 and 115%, thus showing that the matrices under consideration do not affect the extraction process.

  19. Stir bar sorptive-dispersive microextraction mediated by magnetic nanoparticles-nylon 6 composite for the extraction of hydrophilic organic compounds in aqueous media.

    PubMed

    Benedé, Juan L; Chisvert, Alberto; Giokas, Dimosthenis L; Salvador, Amparo

    2016-07-01

    A new and sensitive analytical method based on the recently developed approach termed stir bar-sorptive dispersive microextraction (SBSDME) using a magnetic CoFe2O4@SiO2-nylon 6 composite as sorbent material is presented for the extraction of hydrophilic organic compounds. The simultaneous determination of four hydrophilic UV filters in environmental water samples has been chosen as a model analytical application due to the increasing awareness regarding the occurrence of sunscreen residuals in natural waters. The developed SBSDME approach combines the principles and benefits of stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE) and dispersive solid phase extraction (DSPE) but allows for lower extraction time and easier post-extraction treatment. Moreover, most importantly, it enables the use of new magnetic materials that affords higher versatility and can be tailored to the needs of the analysis. The main experimental parameters involved in the SBSDME process (i.e. composite amount, extraction time, pH, ionic strength, desorption solvent and desorption time) were evaluated to provide the best enrichment factors. Under the optimized conditions, the method was successfully validated showing good linearity, enrichment factors between 105 and 145 depending on the analyte, limits of detection and quantification in the low ng mL(-1) range (1.6-2.9 ng mL(-1) and 5.4-9.6 ng mL(-1), respectively) and good intra- and inter-day repeatability (RSD < 13%). The developed method was applied to the analysis of water samples of different origin (sea, river and swimming pool). Relative recovery values ranged between 90 and 115%, thus showing that the matrices under consideration do not affect the extraction process. PMID:27216394

  20. Quantum Dimer Model: Phase Diagrams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, Garry; Chamon, Claudio; Castelnovo, Claudio

    We present new theoretical analysis of the Quantum Dimer Model. We study dimer models on square, cubic and triangular lattices and we reproduce their phase diagrams (which were previously known only numerically). We show that there are several types of dimer liquids and solids. We present preliminary analysis of several other models including doped dimers and planar spin ice, and some results on the Kagome and hexagonal lattices.

  1. Evaluation of sorptive partitioning of nonionic pollutants in closed systems by headspace analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Garbarini, D.R.; Lion, L.W.

    1985-11-01

    An equilibrium headspace technique is shown to be applicable to the determination of sorption equilibria for the nonionic volatile organic compounds toluene and trichloroethylene (TCE). This procedure avoids the problems inherent in other experimental techniques that directly analyze aqueous phase concentration. Such problems include incomplete solid phase separation and subsequent measurements of solute bound to dissolved or colloidal sorbent as free solute. Sorptive partitioning coefficients may be determined by the headspace procedure in the absence of carrier solvents or knowledge of the aqueous concentration of the volatile compounds of concern. Experiments examining the sorption of toluene and TCE onto humic acids, alumina coated with humic acids, and two soil core samples demonstrated the applicability of the headspace technique to sorption studies.

  2. Effect of α-stable sorptive waiting times on microbial transport in microflow cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonilla, F. Alejandro; Cushman, John H.

    2002-09-01

    The interaction of bacteria in the fluid phase with pore walls of a porous material involves a wide range of effective reaction times which obey a diversity of substrate-bacteria adhesion conditions, and adhesive mechanisms. For a transported species, this heterogeneity in sorption conditions occurs both in time and space. Modern experimental methods allow one to measure adhesive reaction times of individual bacteria. This detailed information may be incorporated into nonequilibrium transport-sorption models that capture the heterogeneity in reaction times caused by varying chemical conditions. We have carried out particle (Brownian dynamic) simulations of adhesive, self-motile bacteria convected between two infinite plates as a model for a microflow cell. The adhesive heterogeneity is included by introducing adhesive reaction time (understood as time spent at a solid boundary once the particle collides against it) as a random variable that can be infinite (irreversible sorption) or vary over a wide range of values. This is made possible by treating this reaction time random variable as having an α-stable probability distribution whose properties (e.g., infinite moments and long tails) are distinctive from the standard exponential distribution commonly used to model reversible sorption. In addition, the α-stable distribution is renormalizable and hence upscalable to complex porous media. Simulations are performed in a pressure-driven microflow cell. Bacteria motility (driven by an effective Brownian force) acts as a dispersive component in the convective field. Upon collision with the pore wall, bacteria attachment or detachment occurs. The time bacteria spend at the wall varies over a wide range of time scales. This model has the advantage of being parsimonious, that is, involving very few parameters to model complex irreversible or reversible adhesion in heterogeneous environments. It is shown that, as in Taylor dispersion, the ratio of the channel half width b

  3. Phase-field modeling of multi-phase solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nestler, Britta; Wheeler, Adam A.

    2002-08-01

    A phase-field model for a general class of multi-phase metallic alloys is now proposed which describes both multi-phase solidification phenomena as well as polycrystalline grain structures. The model serves as a computational method to simulate the motion and kinetics of multiple phase boundaries and enables the visualization of the diffusion processes and of the phase transitions in multi-phase systems. Numerical simulations are presented which illustrate the capability of the phase-field model to recover a variety of complex experimental growth structures. In particular, the phase-field model can be used to simulate microstructure evolutions in eutectic, peritectic and monotectic alloys. In addition, polycrystalline grain structures with effects such as wetting, grain growth, symmetry properties of adjacent triple junctions in thin film samples and stability criteria at multiple junctions are described by phase-field simulations.

  4. On the role of organic adlayers in the anomalous water sorptivity of Lépine limestone.

    PubMed

    Ioannou, Ioannis; Hoff, William D; Hall, Christopher

    2004-11-01

    Sorptivity data are reported for the capillary absorption of water, ethanol, propan-2-ol, and n-heptane by the calcitic limestone Lépine (Lavoux à grain). The data confirm that the water sorptivity is anomalously low, an indication of partial wetting by water. Results are expressed in terms of a wetting index. The water sorptivity increases after heat treatment and chemical oxidation by hydrogen peroxide bleaching, while the sorptivity with organic liquids is unchanged. These treatments, therefore, increase the water wetting index. The results provide strong evidence that the presence of a natural organic adlayer is responsible for the anomalously low water sorptivity of this particular limestone. This natural water repellency effect may be exploited in developing chemical treatments to modify the water transport properties of stone. PMID:15380433

  5. Modeling of intermediate phase growth

    SciTech Connect

    Umantsev, A.

    2007-01-15

    We introduced a continuum method for modeling of intermediate phase growth and numerically simulated three common experimental situations relevant to the physical metallurgy of soldering: growth of intermetallic compound layer from an unlimited amount of liquid and solid solders and growth of the compound from limited amounts of liquid solder. We found qualitative agreements with the experimental regimes of growth in all cases. For instance, the layer expands in both directions with respect to the base line when it grows from solid solder, and grows into the copper phase when the solder is molten. The quantitative agreement with the sharp-interface approximation was also achieved in these cases. In the cases of limited amounts of liquid solder we found the point of turnaround when the compound/solder boundary changed the direction of its motion. Although such behavior had been previously observed experimentally, the simulations revealed important information: the turnaround occurs approximately at the time of complete saturation of solder with copper. This result allows us to conclude that coarsening of the intermetallic compound structure starts only after the solder is practically saturated with copper.

  6. Preparation of sol-gel polyethylene glycol-polydimethylsiloxane-poly(vinyl alcohol)-coated sorptive bar for the determination of organic sulfur compounds in water.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chunhe; Li, Xuan; Hu, Bin

    2008-08-15

    A novel headspace sorptive extraction (HSSE) using a glass bar coated with carbowax (polyethylene glycol)-polydimethylsiloxane-poly(vinyl alcohol) (CW/PDMS/PVA) prepared by sol-gel technology method was proposed for the determination of volatile organic sulfur compounds (VOSs) in water. After the extraction, the sorptive bar was desorbed with 60 microL of ethanol and 30 microL of the extract was analysed by large volume injection (LVI) into a gas chromatography-flame photometric detector (GC-FPD). The parameters affecting the headspace sorptive extraction of VOSs such as extraction and desorption time, extraction temperature, stirring speed, desorption solvent, headspace phase ratio, salt and pH were carefully investigated and the optimized experimental conditions were established. The limits of detection (LODs) for the studied VOSs ranged from 0.04 to 4.8 microg/L with the relative standard deviations (RSDs) ranging from 4.5 to 10.2% (n=6). The reproducibility for the preparation of CW/PDMS/PVA-coated sorptive bar ranged from 3.2 to 9.2% in one batch, and from 2.8 to 18.5% in batch-to-batch, and more than 50 extractions can be achieved without apparent loss. The proposed method was compared with polydimethylsiloxane-HSSE and carboxen/PDMS-headspace-solid phase microextraction (CAR/PDMS-HS-SPME) under their optimum conditions, CW/PDMS/PVA-HSSE shows the highest adsorption capacity (larger surface area and more active sites), the highest sensitivity (about 10 times) and the best polarity matching for VOSs. PMID:18603256

  7. Characterisation, quantity and sorptive properties of microplastics extracted from cosmetics.

    PubMed

    Napper, Imogen E; Bakir, Adil; Rowland, Steven J; Thompson, Richard C

    2015-10-15

    Cosmetic products, such as facial scrubs, have been identified as potentially important primary sources of microplastics to the marine environment. This study characterises, quantifies and then investigates the sorptive properties of plastic microbeads that are used as exfoliants in cosmetics. Polyethylene microbeads were extracted from several products, and shown to have a wide size range (mean diameters between 164 and 327 μm). We estimated that between 4594 and 94,500 microbeads could be released in a single use. To examine the potential for microbeads to accumulate and transport chemicals they were exposed to a binary mixture of (3)H-phenanthrene and (14)C-DDT in seawater. The potential for transport of sorbed chemicals by microbeads was broadly similar to that of polythene (PE) particles used in previous sorption studies. In conclusion, cosmetic exfoliants are a potentially important, yet preventable source of microplastic contamination in the marine environment.

  8. Characterisation, quantity and sorptive properties of microplastics extracted from cosmetics.

    PubMed

    Napper, Imogen E; Bakir, Adil; Rowland, Steven J; Thompson, Richard C

    2015-10-15

    Cosmetic products, such as facial scrubs, have been identified as potentially important primary sources of microplastics to the marine environment. This study characterises, quantifies and then investigates the sorptive properties of plastic microbeads that are used as exfoliants in cosmetics. Polyethylene microbeads were extracted from several products, and shown to have a wide size range (mean diameters between 164 and 327 μm). We estimated that between 4594 and 94,500 microbeads could be released in a single use. To examine the potential for microbeads to accumulate and transport chemicals they were exposed to a binary mixture of (3)H-phenanthrene and (14)C-DDT in seawater. The potential for transport of sorbed chemicals by microbeads was broadly similar to that of polythene (PE) particles used in previous sorption studies. In conclusion, cosmetic exfoliants are a potentially important, yet preventable source of microplastic contamination in the marine environment. PMID:26234612

  9. Interplay between sniffing and odorant sorptive properties in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Rojas-Líbano, Daniel; Kay, Leslie M.

    2012-01-01

    For decades it has been known that the olfactory sensory epithelium can act like a chromatograph, separating odorants based on their air-mucus sorptive properties (Mozell and Jagodowicz, 1973). It has been hypothesized that animals could take advantage of this property, modulating sniffing behavior to manipulate airflow and thereby direct odorant molecules to the portions of the olfactory epithelium where they are best detected (Schoenfeld and Cleland, 2005). We report here a test of this hypothesis in behaving rats, monitoring respiratory activity through diaphragm EMG, which allowed us to estimate nasal airflow. In our test rats had to detect either low-sorption (LS) or high-sorption (HS) monomolecular odorant targets from the same stimulus set of six binary odor mixtures. We found that it is more difficult for rats to detect LS than HS targets. Even though sniffing bouts are the same duration for each group (approximately 500 ms), sniffing longer and using more inhalations results in better performance for rats assigned to detect LS targets. LS-detecting rats also increase the duration of individual inhalations (81 msec for LS- vs. 69 msec for HS-detecting rats) and sniff at lower frequencies (7.8 Hz for LS- vs. 8.6 Hz for HS-detecting rats) when learning to sense the target. When LS-detecting rats do discriminate well, they do so with lower airflow, more sniffs and lower frequency sniffing than HS-detecting counterparts. These data show that rats adjust sniff strategies as a function of odorant sorptiveness and provide support for the chromatographic and zonation hypotheses. PMID:23115193

  10. Surface chemistry and relative Ni sorptive capacities of synthetic hydrous Mn oxyhydroxides under variable wetting and drying regimes 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, Corrie; Smith, D. Scott; Warren, Lesley A.

    2004-02-01

    The surface binding site characteristics and Ni sorptive capacities of synthesized hydrous Mn oxyhydroxides experimentally conditioned to represent three hydrological conditions—MnO XW, freshly precipitated; MnO XD, dried at 37°C for 8 d; and MnO XC, cyclically hydrated and dehydrated (at 37°C) over a 24-h cycle for 7 d—were examined through particle size analysis, surface acid-base titrations and subsequent modelling of the p Ka spectrum, and batch Ni sorption experiments at two pH values (2 and 5). Mineralogical bulk analyses by XRD indicate that all three treatments resulted in amorphous Mn oxyhydroxides; i.e., no substantial bulk crystalline phases were produced through drying. However, drying and repeated wetting and drying resulted in a non-reversible decrease in particle size. In contrast, total proton binding capacities determined by acid-base titrations were reversibly altered with drying and cyclically re-wetting and drying from 82 ± 5 μmol/m 2 for the MnO XW to 21 ± 1 μmol/m 2 for the MnO XD and 37 ± 5 μmol/m 2 for the MnO XC. Total proton binding sites measured decreased by ≈75% with drying from the MnO XW and then increased to ≈50% of the MnO XW value in the MnO XC. Thus, despite a trend of higher surface area for the MnO XD, a lower total number of sites was observed, suggesting a coordinational change in the hydroxyl sites. Surface site characterization identified that changes also occurred in the types and densities of surface sites for each hydrologically conditioned Mn oxyhydroxide treatment (pH titration range of 2-10). Drying decreased the total number of sites as well as shifted the remaining sites to more acidic p Ka values. Experimentally determined apparent pH zpc values decreased with drying, from 6.82 ± 0.06 for the MnO XW to 3.2 ± 0.3 for the MnO XD and increased again with rewetting to 5.05 ± 0.05 for the MnO XC. Higher Ni sorption was observed at pH 5 for all three Mn oxyhydroxide treatments compared to pH 2. However

  11. Quantitative analysis of perfumes in talcum powder by using headspace sorptive extraction.

    PubMed

    Ng, Khim Hui; Heng, Audrey; Osborne, Murray

    2012-03-01

    Quantitative analysis of perfume dosage in talcum powder has been a challenge due to interference of the matrix and has so far not been widely reported. In this study, headspace sorptive extraction (HSSE) was validated as a solventless sample preparation method for the extraction and enrichment of perfume raw materials from talcum powder. Sample enrichment is performed on a thick film of poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) coated onto a magnetic stir bar incorporated in a glass jacket. Sampling is done by placing the PDMS stir bar in the headspace vial by using a holder. The stir bar is then thermally desorbed online with capillary gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The HSSE method is based on the same principles as headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME). Nevertheless, a relatively larger amount of extracting phase is coated on the stir bar as compared to SPME. Sample amount and extraction time were optimized in this study. The method has shown good repeatability (with relative standard deviation no higher than 12.5%) and excellent linearity with correlation coefficients above 0.99 for all analytes. The method was also successfully applied in the quantitative analysis of talcum powder spiked with perfume at different dosages.

  12. Phase computations and phase models for discrete molecular oscillators

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Biochemical oscillators perform crucial functions in cells, e.g., they set up circadian clocks. The dynamical behavior of oscillators is best described and analyzed in terms of the scalar quantity, phase. A rigorous and useful definition for phase is based on the so-called isochrons of oscillators. Phase computation techniques for continuous oscillators that are based on isochrons have been used for characterizing the behavior of various types of oscillators under the influence of perturbations such as noise. Results In this article, we extend the applicability of these phase computation methods to biochemical oscillators as discrete molecular systems, upon the information obtained from a continuous-state approximation of such oscillators. In particular, we describe techniques for computing the instantaneous phase of discrete, molecular oscillators for stochastic simulation algorithm generated sample paths. We comment on the accuracies and derive certain measures for assessing the feasibilities of the proposed phase computation methods. Phase computation experiments on the sample paths of well-known biological oscillators validate our analyses. Conclusions The impact of noise that arises from the discrete and random nature of the mechanisms that make up molecular oscillators can be characterized based on the phase computation techniques proposed in this article. The concept of isochrons is the natural choice upon which the phase notion of oscillators can be founded. The isochron-theoretic phase computation methods that we propose can be applied to discrete molecular oscillators of any dimension, provided that the oscillatory behavior observed in discrete-state does not vanish in a continuous-state approximation. Analysis of the full versatility of phase noise phenomena in molecular oscillators will be possible if a proper phase model theory is developed, without resorting to such approximations. PMID:22687330

  13. Development of a carbon-nanoparticle-coated stirrer for stir bar sorptive extraction by a simple carbon deposition in flame.

    PubMed

    Feng, Juanjuan; Sun, Min; Bu, Yanan; Luo, Chuannan

    2016-03-01

    Stir bar sorptive extraction is an environmentally friendly microextraction technique based on a stir bar with various sorbents. A commercial stirrer is a good support, but it has not been used in stir bar sorptive extraction due to difficult modification. A stirrer was modified with carbon nanoparticles by a simple carbon deposition process in flame and characterized by scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry. A three-dimensional porous coating was formed with carbon nanoparticles. In combination with high-performance liquid chromatography, the stir bar was evaluated using five polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons as model analytes. Conditions including extraction time and temperature, ionic strength, and desorption solvent were investigated by a factor-by-factor optimization method. The established method exhibited good linearity (0.01-10 μg/L) and low limits of quantification (0.01 μg/L). It was applied to detect model analytes in environmental water samples. No analyte was detected in river water, and five analytes were quantified in rain water. The recoveries of five analytes in two samples with spiked at 2 μg/L were in the range of 92.2-106% and 93.4-108%, respectively. The results indicated that the carbon nanoparticle-coated stirrer was an efficient stir bar for extraction analysis of some polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. PMID:26663510

  14. Phase contrast radiography: Image modeling and optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arhatari, Benedicta D.; Mancuso, Adrian P.; Peele, Andrew G.; Nugent, Keith A.

    2004-12-01

    We consider image formation for the phase-contrast radiography technique where the radiation source is extended and spatially incoherent. A model is developed for this imaging process which allows us to define an objective filtering criterion that can be applied to the recovery of quantitative phase images from data obtained at different propagation distances. We test our image model with experimental x-ray data. We then apply our filter to experimental neutron phase radiography data and demonstrate improved image quality.

  15. Phase transitions for the Brusselator model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Tian; Wang, Shouhong

    2011-03-01

    Dynamic phase transitions of the Brusselator model is carefully analyzed, leading to a rigorous characterization of the types and structure of the phase transitions of the model from basic homogeneous states. The study is based on the dynamic transition theory developed recently by the authors.

  16. A Model for Ferroelectric Phase Shifters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romanofsky, Robert R.; Qureshi, A. Haq

    2000-01-01

    Novel microwave phase shifters consisting of coupled microstrip lines on thin ferroelectric films have been demonstrated recently. A theoretical model useful for predicting the propagation characteristics (insertion phase shift, dielectric loss, impedance, and bandwidth) is presented here. The model is based on a variational solution for line capacitance and coupled strip transmission line theory.

  17. Characterization of volatile organic gunshot residues in fired handgun cartridges by headspace sorptive extraction.

    PubMed

    Gallidabino, Matteo; Romolo, Francesco S; Weyermann, Celine

    2015-09-01

    In forensic investigation of firearm-related cases, determination of the residual amount of volatile compounds remaining inside a cartridge could be useful in estimating the time since its discharge. Published approaches are based on following the decrease of selected target compounds as a function of time by using solid phase micro-extraction (SPME). Naphthalene as well as an unidentified decomposition product of nitrocellulose (referred to as "TEA2") are usually employed for this purpose. However, reliability can be brought into question given their high volatility and low reproducibility of the extracted procedure. In order to identify alternatives and therefore develop improved dating methods, an extensive study on the composition and variability of volatile residues in nine different types of cartridges was carried out. Analysis was performed using headspace sorptive extraction (HSSE), which is a more exhaustive technique compared to SPME. One hundred sixty six compounds were identified (several of which for the first time), and it was observed that the final compositional characteristics of each residue were strongly dependent on its source. Variability of single identified compounds within and between different types of cartridge as well as their evolution over time were also studied. Many explosion products containing up to four aromatic rings were found to be globally present in high proportions. Twenty-seven of them (excluding naphthalene) also presented detectable decreases during the first 24 h. Therefore, they could be used as complementary target analytes in future dating methods. PMID:26168966

  18. Characterization of volatile organic gunshot residues in fired handgun cartridges by headspace sorptive extraction.

    PubMed

    Gallidabino, Matteo; Romolo, Francesco S; Weyermann, Celine

    2015-09-01

    In forensic investigation of firearm-related cases, determination of the residual amount of volatile compounds remaining inside a cartridge could be useful in estimating the time since its discharge. Published approaches are based on following the decrease of selected target compounds as a function of time by using solid phase micro-extraction (SPME). Naphthalene as well as an unidentified decomposition product of nitrocellulose (referred to as "TEA2") are usually employed for this purpose. However, reliability can be brought into question given their high volatility and low reproducibility of the extracted procedure. In order to identify alternatives and therefore develop improved dating methods, an extensive study on the composition and variability of volatile residues in nine different types of cartridges was carried out. Analysis was performed using headspace sorptive extraction (HSSE), which is a more exhaustive technique compared to SPME. One hundred sixty six compounds were identified (several of which for the first time), and it was observed that the final compositional characteristics of each residue were strongly dependent on its source. Variability of single identified compounds within and between different types of cartridge as well as their evolution over time were also studied. Many explosion products containing up to four aromatic rings were found to be globally present in high proportions. Twenty-seven of them (excluding naphthalene) also presented detectable decreases during the first 24 h. Therefore, they could be used as complementary target analytes in future dating methods.

  19. Aerothermal modeling program, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sturgess, G. J.

    1983-01-01

    The physical modeling embodied in the computational fluid dynamics codes is discussed. The objectives were to identify shortcomings in the models and to provide a program plan to improve the quantitative accuracy. The physical models studied were for: turbulent mass and momentum transport, heat release, liquid fuel spray, and gaseous radiation. The approach adopted was to test the models against appropriate benchmark-quality test cases from experiments in the literature for the constituent flows that together make up the combustor real flow.

  20. Plastic crystal phases of simple water models.

    PubMed

    Aragones, J L; Vega, C

    2009-06-28

    We report the appearance of two plastic crystal phases of water at high pressure and temperature using computer simulations. In one of them the oxygen atoms form a body centered cubic structure (bcc) and in the other they form a face centered cubic structure (fcc). In both cases the water molecules were able to rotate almost freely. We have found that the bcc plastic crystal transformed into a fcc plastic crystal via a Martensitic phase transition when heated at constant pressure. We have performed the characterization and localization in the phase diagram of these plastic crystal phases for the SPC/E, TIP4P, and TIP4P/2005 water potential models. For TIP4P/2005 model free energy calculations were carried out for the bcc plastic crystal and fcc plastic crystal using a new method (which is a slight variation of the Einstein crystal method) proposed for these types of solid. The initial coexistence points for the SPC/E and TIP4P models were obtained using Hamiltonian Gibbs-Duhem integration. For all of these models these two plastic crystal phases appear in the high pressure and temperature region of the phase diagram. It would be of interest to study if such plastic crystal phases do indeed exist for real water. This would shed some light on the question of whether these models can describe satisfactorily the high pressure part of the phase diagram of water, and if not, where and why they fail. PMID:19566163

  1. Aerothermal modeling program, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, R.; Reynolds, R.; Ball, I.; Berry, R.; Johnson, K.; Mongia, H.

    1983-01-01

    Aerothermal submodels used in analytical combustor models are analyzed. The models described include turbulence and scalar transport, gaseous full combustion, spray evaporation/combustion, soot formation and oxidation, and radiation. The computational scheme is discussed in relation to boundary conditions and convergence criteria. Also presented is the data base for benchmark quality test cases and an analysis of simple flows.

  2. Langley's CSI evolutionary model: Phase O

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belvin, W. Keith; Elliott, Kenny B.; Horta, Lucas G.; Bailey, Jim P.; Bruner, Anne M.; Sulla, Jeffrey L.; Won, John; Ugoletti, Roberto M.

    1991-01-01

    A testbed for the development of Controls Structures Interaction (CSI) technology to improve space science platform pointing is described. The evolutionary nature of the testbed will permit the study of global line-of-sight pointing in phases 0 and 1, whereas, multipayload pointing systems will be studied beginning with phase 2. The design, capabilities, and typical dynamic behavior of the phase 0 version of the CSI evolutionary model (CEM) is documented for investigator both internal and external to NASA. The model description includes line-of-sight pointing measurement, testbed structure, actuators, sensors, and real time computers, as well as finite element and state space models of major components.

  3. Phase diagram of a truncated tetrahedral model.

    PubMed

    Krcmar, Roman; Gendiar, Andrej; Nishino, Tomotoshi

    2016-08-01

    Phase diagram of a discrete counterpart of the classical Heisenberg model, the truncated tetrahedral model, is analyzed on the square lattice, when the interaction is ferromagnetic. Each spin is represented by a unit vector that can point to one of the 12 vertices of the truncated tetrahedron, which is a continuous interpolation between the tetrahedron and the octahedron. Phase diagram of the model is determined by means of the statistical analog of the entanglement entropy, which is numerically calculated by the corner transfer matrix renormalization group method. The obtained phase diagram consists of four different phases, which are separated by five transition lines. In the parameter region, where the octahedral anisotropy is dominant, a weak first-order phase transition is observed. PMID:27627273

  4. Phase diagram of a truncated tetrahedral model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krcmar, Roman; Gendiar, Andrej; Nishino, Tomotoshi

    2016-08-01

    Phase diagram of a discrete counterpart of the classical Heisenberg model, the truncated tetrahedral model, is analyzed on the square lattice, when the interaction is ferromagnetic. Each spin is represented by a unit vector that can point to one of the 12 vertices of the truncated tetrahedron, which is a continuous interpolation between the tetrahedron and the octahedron. Phase diagram of the model is determined by means of the statistical analog of the entanglement entropy, which is numerically calculated by the corner transfer matrix renormalization group method. The obtained phase diagram consists of four different phases, which are separated by five transition lines. In the parameter region, where the octahedral anisotropy is dominant, a weak first-order phase transition is observed.

  5. The Pliocene Model Intercomparison Project - Phase 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haywood, Alan; Dowsett, Harry; Dolan, Aisling; Rowley, David; Abe-Ouchi, Ayako; Otto-Bliesner, Bette; Chandler, Mark; Hunter, Stephen; Lunt, Daniel; Pound, Matthew; Salzmann, Ulrich

    2016-04-01

    The Pliocene Model Intercomparison Project (PlioMIP) is a co-ordinated international climate modelling initiative to study and understand climate and environments of the Late Pliocene, and their potential relevance in the context of future climate change. PlioMIP examines the consistency of model predictions in simulating Pliocene climate, and their ability to reproduce climate signals preserved by geological climate archives. Here we provide a description of the aim and objectives of the next phase of the model intercomparison project (PlioMIP Phase 2), and we present the experimental design and boundary conditions that will be utilised for climate model experiments in Phase 2. Following on from PlioMIP Phase 1, Phase 2 will continue to be a mechanism for sampling structural uncertainty within climate models. However, Phase 1 demonstrated the requirement to better understand boundary condition uncertainties as well as uncertainty in the methodologies used for data-model comparison. Therefore, our strategy for Phase 2 is to utilise state-of-the-art boundary conditions that have emerged over the last 5 years. These include a new palaeogeographic reconstruction, detailing ocean bathymetry and land/ice surface topography. The ice surface topography is built upon the lessons learned from offline ice sheet modelling studies. Land surface cover has been enhanced by recent additions of Pliocene soils and lakes. Atmospheric reconstructions of palaeo-CO2 are emerging on orbital timescales and these are also incorporated into PlioMIP Phase 2. New records of surface and sea surface temperature change are being produced that will be more temporally consistent with the boundary conditions and forcings used within models. Finally we have designed a suite of prioritized experiments that tackle issues surrounding the basic understanding of the Pliocene and its relevance in the context of future climate change in a discrete way.

  6. Modeling phase noise in multifunction subassemblies.

    PubMed

    Driscoll, Michael

    2012-03-01

    Obtaining requisite phase noise performance in hardware containing multifunction circuitry requires accurate modeling of the phase noise characteristics of each signal path component, including both absolute (oscillator) and residual (non-oscillator) circuit contributors. This includes prediction of both static and vibration-induced phase noise. The model (usually in spreadsheet form) is refined as critical components are received and evaluated. Additive (KTBF) phase noise data can be reasonably estimated, based on device drive level and noise figure. However, accurate determination of component near-carrier (multiplicative) and vibration-induced noise usually must be determined via measurement. The model should also include the effects of noise introduced by IC voltage regulators and properly discriminate between common versus independent signal path residual noise contributors. The modeling can be easily implemented using a spreadsheet.

  7. Automated multisyringe stir bar sorptive extraction using robust montmorillonite/epoxy-coated stir bars.

    PubMed

    Ghani, Milad; Saraji, Mohammad; Maya, Fernando; Cerdà, Víctor

    2016-05-01

    Herein we present a simple, rapid and low cost strategy for the preparation of robust stir bar coatings based on the combination of montmorillonite with epoxy resin. The composite stir bar was implemented in a novel automated multisyringe stir bar sorptive extraction system (MS-SBSE), and applied to the extraction of four chlorophenols (4-chlorophenol, 2,4-dichlorophenol, 2,4,6-trichlorophenol and pentachlorophenol) as model compounds, followed by high performance liquid chromatography-diode array detection. The different experimental parameters of the MS-SBSE, such as sample volume, selection of the desorption solvent, desorption volume, desorption time, sample solution pH, salt effect and extraction time were studied. Under the optimum conditions, the detection limits were between 0.02 and 0.34μgL(-1). Relative standard deviations (RSD) of the method for the analytes at 10μgL(-1) concentration level ranged from 3.5% to 4.1% (as intra-day RSD) and from 3.9% to 4.3% (as inter-day RSD at 50μgL(-1) concentration level). Batch-to-batch reproducibility for three different stir bars was 4.6-5.1%. The enrichment factors were between 30 and 49. In order to investigate the capability of the developed technique for real sample analysis, well water, wastewater and leachates from a solid waste treatment plant were satisfactorily analyzed.

  8. Diffusion of water-soluble sorptive drugs in HEMA/MAA hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Liu, D E; Dursch, T J; Taylor, N O; Chan, S Y; Bregante, D T; Radke, C J

    2016-10-10

    We measure and, for the first time, theoretically predict four prototypical aqueous-drug diffusion coefficients in five soft-contact-lens material hydrogels where solute-specific adsorption is pronounced. Two-photon fluorescence confocal microscopy and UV/Vis-absorption spectrophotometry assess transient solute concentration profiles and concentration histories, respectively. Diffusion coefficients are obtained for acetazolamide, riboflavin, sodium fluorescein, and theophylline in 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate/methacrylic acid (HEMA/MAA) copolymer hydrogels as functions of composition, equilibrium water content (30-90%), and aqueous pH (2 and 7.4). At pH2, MAA chains are nonionic, whereas at pH7.4, MAA chains are anionic (pKa≈5.2). All studied prototypical drugs specifically interact with HEMA and nonionic MAA (at pH2) moieties. Conversely, none of the prototypical drugs adsorb specifically to anionic MAA (at pH7.4) chains. As expected, diffusivities of adsorbing solutes are significantly diminished by specific interactions with hydrogel strands. Despite similar solute size, relative diffusion coefficients in the hydrogels span several orders of magnitude because of varying degrees of solute interactions with hydrogel-polymer chains. To provide a theoretical framework for the new diffusion data, we apply an effective-medium model extended for solute-specific interactions with hydrogel copolymer strands. Sorptive-diffusion kinetics is successfully described by local equilibrium and Henry's law. All necessary parameters are determined independently. Predicted diffusivities are in good agreement with experiment. PMID:27565214

  9. Optimum Installation of Sorptive Building Materials Using Contribution Ratio of Pollution Source for Improvement of Indoor Air Quality.

    PubMed

    Park, Seonghyun; Seo, Janghoo

    2016-04-01

    Reinforcing the insulation and airtightness of buildings and the use of building materials containing new chemical substances have caused indoor air quality problems. Use of sorptive building materials along with removal of pollutants, constant ventilation, bake-out, etc. are gaining attention in Korea and Japan as methods for improving such indoor air quality problems. On the other hand, sorptive building materials are considered a passive method of reducing the concentration of pollutants, and their application should be reviewed in the early stages. Thus, in this research, activated carbon was prepared as a sorptive building material. Then, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) was conducted, and a method for optimal installation of sorptive building materials was derived according to the indoor environment using the contribution ratio of pollution source (CRP) index. The results show that a method for optimal installation of sorptive building materials can be derived by predicting the contribution ratio of pollutant sources according to the CRP index. PMID:27043605

  10. Optimum Installation of Sorptive Building Materials Using Contribution Ratio of Pollution Source for Improvement of Indoor Air Quality

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seonghyun; Seo, Janghoo

    2016-01-01

    Reinforcing the insulation and airtightness of buildings and the use of building materials containing new chemical substances have caused indoor air quality problems. Use of sorptive building materials along with removal of pollutants, constant ventilation, bake-out, etc. are gaining attention in Korea and Japan as methods for improving such indoor air quality problems. On the other hand, sorptive building materials are considered a passive method of reducing the concentration of pollutants, and their application should be reviewed in the early stages. Thus, in this research, activated carbon was prepared as a sorptive building material. Then, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) was conducted, and a method for optimal installation of sorptive building materials was derived according to the indoor environment using the contribution ratio of pollution source (CRP) index. The results show that a method for optimal installation of sorptive building materials can be derived by predicting the contribution ratio of pollutant sources according to the CRP index. PMID:27043605

  11. Dynamic phase transition in diluted Ising model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chattopadhyay, Sourav; Gorai, Gopal; Santra, S. B.

    2015-06-01

    Dynamic phase transition in disordered Ising model in two dimensions has been studied in presence of external time dependent oscillating magnetic field applying Glauber Monte Carlo techniques. Dynamic phase transitions are identified estimating dynamic order parameter against temperature for different concentrations of disorder. For a given field strength and frequency for which there was no hysteresis, it is observed that disorder is able induce hysteresis in the system. Effect of increasing concentration of disorder on hysteresis loop area has also been studied.

  12. Preliminary Phase Field Computational Model Development

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yulan; Hu, Shenyang Y.; Xu, Ke; Suter, Jonathan D.; McCloy, John S.; Johnson, Bradley R.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep

    2014-12-15

    This interim report presents progress towards the development of meso-scale models of magnetic behavior that incorporate microstructural information. Modeling magnetic signatures in irradiated materials with complex microstructures (such as structural steels) is a significant challenge. The complexity is addressed incrementally, using the monocrystalline Fe (i.e., ferrite) film as model systems to develop and validate initial models, followed by polycrystalline Fe films, and by more complicated and representative alloys. In addition, the modeling incrementally addresses inclusion of other major phases (e.g., martensite, austenite), minor magnetic phases (e.g., carbides, FeCr precipitates), and minor nonmagnetic phases (e.g., Cu precipitates, voids). The focus of the magnetic modeling is on phase-field models. The models are based on the numerical solution to the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation. From the computational standpoint, phase-field modeling allows the simulation of large enough systems that relevant defect structures and their effects on functional properties like magnetism can be simulated. To date, two phase-field models have been generated in support of this work. First, a bulk iron model with periodic boundary conditions was generated as a proof-of-concept to investigate major loop effects of single versus polycrystalline bulk iron and effects of single non-magnetic defects. More recently, to support the experimental program herein using iron thin films, a new model was generated that uses finite boundary conditions representing surfaces and edges. This model has provided key insights into the domain structures observed in magnetic force microscopy (MFM) measurements. Simulation results for single crystal thin-film iron indicate the feasibility of the model for determining magnetic domain wall thickness and mobility in an externally applied field. Because the phase-field model dimensions are limited relative to the size of most specimens used in

  13. Phase Transitions in Model Active Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redner, Gabriel S.

    The amazing collective behaviors of active systems such as bird flocks, schools of fish, and colonies of microorganisms have long amazed scientists and laypeople alike. Understanding the physics of such systems is challenging due to their far-from-equilibrium dynamics, as well as the extreme diversity in their ingredients, relevant time- and length-scales, and emergent phenomenology. To make progress, one can categorize active systems by the symmetries of their constituent particles, as well as how activity is expressed. In this work, we examine two categories of active systems, and explore their phase behavior in detail. First, we study systems of self-propelled spherical particles moving in two dimensions. Despite the absence of an aligning interaction, this system displays complex emergent dynamics, including phase separation into a dense active solid and dilute gas. Using simulations and analytic modeling, we quantify the phase diagram and separation kinetics. We show that this nonequilibrium phase transition is analogous to an equilibrium vapor-liquid system, with binodal and spinodal curves and a critical point. We also characterize the dense active solid phase, a unique material which exhibits the structural signatures of a crystalline solid near the crystal-hexatic transition point, as well as anomalous dynamics including superdiffusive motion on intermediate timescales. We also explore the role of interparticle attraction in this system. We demonstrate that attraction drastically changes the phase diagram, which contains two distinct phase-separated regions and is reentrant as a function of propulsion speed. We interpret this complex situation with a simple kinetic model, which builds from the observed microdynamics of individual particles to a full description of the macroscopic phase behavior. We also study active nematics, liquid crystals driven out of equilibrium by energy-dissipating active stresses. The equilibrium nematic state is unstable in these

  14. Sorptive stabilization of organic matter by amorphous Al hydroxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, M. P. W.; Scheel, T.; Mikutta, R.; van Hees, P.; Kaiser, K.; Kalbitz, K.

    2010-03-01

    mineral's occupation by OM, was not a factor in the mineralization of sorbed OM over a wide range of C sorption (0.2-1.1 mg C m -2). This study demonstrates that sorption to am-Al(OH) 3 results in stabilization of OM. The mineral availability as well as the inorganic solution chemistry control sorptive interactions, thereby the properties of sorbed OM, and the stability of OM against microbial decay.

  15. Langley's CSI evolutionary model: Phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horta, Lucas G.; Reaves, Mercedes C.; Elliott, Kenny B.; Belvin, W. Keith; Teter, John E.

    1995-01-01

    Phase 2 testbed is part of a sequence of laboratory models, developed at NASA Langley Research Center, to enhance our understanding on how to model, control, and design structures for space applications. A key problem with structures that must perform in space is the appearance of unwanted vibrations during operations. Instruments, design independently by different scientists, must share the same vehicle causing them to interact with each other. Once in space, these problems are difficult to correct and therefore, prediction via analysis design, and experiments is very important. Phase 2 laboratory model and its predecessors are designed to fill a gap between theory and practice and to aid in understanding important aspects in modeling, sensor and actuator technology, ground testing techniques, and control design issues. This document provides detailed information on the truss structure and its main components, control computer architecture, and structural models generated along with corresponding experimental results.

  16. A simple and reliable stir bar sorptive extraction-liquid chromatography procedure for the determination of chlorpromazine and trifluoperazine in human serum using experimental design methodology.

    PubMed

    Bazhdanzadeh, Shaghayegh; Talebpour, Zahra; Adib, Noushin; Aboul-Enein, Hassan Y

    2011-01-01

    A sensitive and reproducible stir bar sorptive extraction and HPLC-UV detection method was used for the therapeutic drug monitoring of chlorpromazine and trifluoperazine in human serum. The separation was achieved using a C(18) column. The mobile phase consisted of methanol/sodium acetate buffer (pH 4.1; 0.1 M) (95:5, v/v) including 0.5% triethylamine. This miniaturized method can result in faster analysis, lower solvent consumption and less workload per sample while maintaining or even improving sensitivity. In the second part, stir bar sorptive extraction/HPLC-UV method was optimized by a chemometrics approach. An experimental design was therefore used to evaluate the statistically influential and/or interacting factors, among those described in the literature, and to find the best extraction and desorption conditions. Optimal sample volume of 1 mL, extraction time of 24 min at 31°C with pH 8.1 were obtained in a screening 2(5) half fractional factorial design followed by a Box-Behnken design. For the desorption conditions, a Box-Behnken design showed that the best conditions were 150 μL mobile phase for 20 min at 50°C. The optimized method was repeatable (CV<10%, linear (LOQ-500 ng/mL)), with the LOQs equal to 0.7 and 1.5 ng/mL for chlorpromazine and trifluoperazine, respectively.

  17. Phase transitions in Thirring’s model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campa, Alessandro; Casetti, Lapo; Latella, Ivan; Pérez-Madrid, Agustín; Ruffo, Stefano

    2016-07-01

    In his pioneering work on negative specific heat, Walter Thirring introduced a model that is solvable in the microcanonical ensemble. Here, we give a complete description of the phase-diagram of this model in both the microcanonical and the canonical ensemble, highlighting the main features of ensemble inequivalence. In both ensembles, we find a line of first-order phase transitions which ends in a critical point. However, neither the line nor the point have the same location in the phase-diagram of the two ensembles. We also show that the microcanonical and canonical critical points can be analytically related to each other using a Landau expansion of entropy and free energy, respectively, in analogy with what has been done in (Cohen and Mukamel 2012 J. Stat. Mech. P12017). Examples of systems with certain symmetries restricting the Landau expansion have been considered in this reference, while no such restrictions are present in Thirring’s model. This leads to a phase diagram that can be seen as a prototype for what happens in systems of particles with kinematic degrees of freedom dominated by long-range interactions.

  18. Linkage of PRA models. Phase 1, Results

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, C.L.; Knudsen, J.K.; Kelly, D.L.

    1995-12-01

    The goal of the Phase I work of the ``Linkage of PRA Models`` project was to postulate methods of providing guidance for US Nuclear Regulator Commission (NRC) personnel on the selection and usage of probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) models that are best suited to the analysis they are performing. In particular, methods and associated features are provided for (a) the selection of an appropriate PRA model for a particular analysis, (b) complementary evaluation tools for the analysis, and (c) a PRA model cross-referencing method. As part of this work, three areas adjoining ``linking`` analyses to PRA models were investigated: (a) the PRA models that are currently available, (b) the various types of analyses that are performed within the NRC, and (c) the difficulty in trying to provide a ``generic`` classification scheme to groups plants based upon a particular plant attribute.

  19. Phase Transitions in Models of Bird Flocking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christodoulidi, H.; van der Weele, K.; Antonopoulos, Ch. G.; Bountis, T.

    2014-12-01

    The aim of the present paper is to elucidate the transition from collective to random behavior exhibited by various mathematical models of bird flocking. In particular, we compare Vicsek's model [Vicsek et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 75, 1226-1229 (1995)] with one based on topological considerations. The latter model is found to exhibit a first order phase transition from flocking to decoherence, as the "noise parameter" of the problem is increased, whereas Vicsek's model gives a second order transition. Refining the topological model in such a way that birds are influenced mostly by the birds in front of them, less by the ones at their sides and not at all by those behind them (because they do not see them), we find a behavior that lies in between the two models. Finally, we propose a novel mechanism for preserving the flock's cohesion, without imposing artificial boundary conditions or attractive forces.

  20. Theory and modelling of nanocarbon phase stability.

    SciTech Connect

    Barnard, A. S.

    2006-01-01

    The transformation of nanodiamonds into carbon-onions (and vice versa) has been observed experimentally and has been modeled computationally at various levels of sophistication. Also, several analytical theories have been derived to describe the size, temperature and pressure dependence of this phase transition. However, in most cases a pure carbon-onion or nanodiamond is not the final product. More often than not an intermediary is formed, known as a bucky-diamond, with a diamond-like core encased in an onion-like shell. This has prompted a number of studies investigating the relative stability of nanodiamonds, bucky-diamonds, carbon-onions and fullerenes, in various size regimes. Presented here is a review outlining results of numerous theoretical studies examining the phase diagrams and phase stability of carbon nanoparticles, to clarify the complicated relationship between fullerenic and diamond structures at the nanoscale.

  1. The Pliocene Model Intercomparison Project - Phase 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haywood, Alan; Dowsett, Harry; Dolan, Aisling; Rowley, David; Abe-Ouchi, Ayako; Otto-Bliesner, Bette; Chandler, Mark; Lunt, Daniel; Salzmann, Ulrich

    2015-04-01

    The Pliocene Model Intercomparison Project (PlioMIP) is a coordinated international climate modelling initiative designed to understand climate and environments of the Late Pliocene, and their potential relevance in the context of future climate change. PlioMIP operates under the umbrella of the Palaeoclimate Modelling Intercomparison Project (PMIP), which examines multiple intervals in Earth history, the consistency of model predictions in simulating these intervals and their ability to reproduce climate signals preserved in geological climate archives. PlioMIP was initiated in 2008 and is closely aligned with the U.S. Geological Survey project known as PRISM (Pliocene Research Interpretation and Synoptic Mapping). PRISM has spent more than 25 years reconstructing and understanding mid-Pliocene climate (~3.3 to 3 million years ago), as well producing boundary condition data sets suitable for use with numerical climate models. The first phase of the PlioMIP (PlioMIP1: 2008-2014) resulted in the most complete analysis to date of the Pliocene climate. This included examination of large-scale features of global climate, detailed analyses of Pliocene ocean circulation and monsoon behaviour, and the ability of models to reproduce regional climate patterns reconstructed from both marine and terrestrial archives. The lessons learned from PlioMIP1 facilitated a revision of data and modelling approaches towards the understanding of the mid Pliocene. PlioMIP2 has now been launched, and includes significant improvements to many of the Pliocene palaeogeograhic boundary conditions used for driving climate models (new land/sea mask, topography, bathymetry and ice sheet reconstructions). Within Phase 2 modelling groups have the option of using dynamic global vegetation models to predict (rather than prescribe) land cover, and a broader portfolio of model experiments has been proposed to support efforts to better understand the Pliocene, as well as to use the Pliocene as a means

  2. Stochastic modelling of bacterial lag phase.

    PubMed

    Baranyi, József

    2002-03-01

    In order to study the lag distribution of the individual cells in a bacterial population, a stochastic birth model is used in this study. An integral formula is applied to transform the assumed lag distribution into a growth function describing the transition between lag and exponential phase of the cell population. By means of this formula, it is pointed out that traditional viable count curves are not suitable to identify the distribution of individual cells' lag time.

  3. Sol-gel coating of poly(ethylene glycol)-grafted multiwalled carbon nanotubes for stir bar sorptive extraction and its application to the analysis of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in water.

    PubMed

    Ekbatani Amlashi, Nadiya; Hadjmohammadi, Mohammad Reza

    2016-09-01

    Poly(ethylene glycol) grafted onto carboxyl-terminated multi-walled carbon nanotubes were prepared by the sol-gel technique as a stationary phase for stir bars. The analytical methodology included stir bar sorptive extraction with micellar desorption followed by liquid chromatography. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons were used as the model compounds to evaluate the extraction performance. The extraction efficiency, for the determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from water samples, was optimized based on a chemometrics approach. The effect of the experimental parameters on the extraction response was investigated and the optimum extraction conditions were selected. Under the optimum conditions, the proposed method showed a good linearity within the different ranges for different analytes (e.g. 0.05-500 ng/mL for phenanthrene), a square of the correlation coefficient was higher than 0.999, and an appropriate limit of detection in the range of 0.013-0.072 ng/mL. The recoveries in all cases were above 94%, with relative standard deviations below 2.4%.

  4. Phase transition in the ABC model.

    PubMed

    Clincy, M; Derrida, B; Evans, M R

    2003-06-01

    Recent studies have shown that one-dimensional driven systems can exhibit phase separation even if the dynamics is governed by local rules. The ABC model, which comprises three particle species that diffuse asymmetrically around a ring, shows anomalous coarsening into a phase separated steady state. In the limiting case in which the dynamics is symmetric and the parameter q describing the asymmetry tends to one, no phase separation occurs and the steady state of the system is disordered. In the present work, we consider the weak asymmetry regime q=exp(-beta/N), where N is the system size, and study how the disordered state is approached. In the case of equal densities, we find that the system exhibits a second-order phase transition at some nonzero beta(c). The value of beta(c)=2pi square root 3 and the optimal profiles can be obtained by writing the exact large deviation functional. For nonequal densities, we write down mean-field equations and analyze some of their predictions. PMID:16241312

  5. Permeable sorptive walls for treatment of hydrophobic organic contaminant plumes in groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    Grathwohl, P.; Peschik, G.

    1997-12-31

    Highly hydrophobic contaminants are easily adsorbed from aqueous solutions. Since for many of these compounds sorption increases with increasing organic carbon content natural materials such as bituminous shales and coals may be used in permeable sorptive walls. This, however, only applies if sorption is at equilibrium, which may not always be the case in groundwater treatment using a funnel-and-gate system. In contrast to the natural solids, granular activated carbons (GACs) have very high sorption capacities and reasonably fast sorption kinetics. The laboratory results show that application of GACs (e.g. F100) is economically feasible for in situ removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) from groundwater at a former manufactured gas plant site (MGP). For less sorbing compounds (such as benzene, toluene, xylenes) a combination of adsorption and biodegradation is necessary (i.e. sorptive + reactive treatment).

  6. Myriad phases of the Checkerboard Hubbard Model

    SciTech Connect

    Yao, Hong

    2010-04-06

    The zero-temperature phase diagram of the checkerboard Hubbard model is obtained in the solvable limit in which it consists of weakly coupled square plaquettes. As a function of the on-site Coulomb repulsion U and the density of holes per site, x, we demonstrate the existence of at least 16 distinct phases. For instance, at zero doping, the ground state is a novel d-wave Mott insulator (d-Mott), which is not adiabatically continuable to a band insulator; by doping the d-Mott state with holes, depending on the magnitude of U, it gives way to a d-wave superconducting state, a two-flavor spin-1/2 Fermi liquid (FL), or a spin-3/2 FL.

  7. SSME structural dynamic model development, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foley, M. J.; Wilson, V. L.

    1985-01-01

    A set of test correlated mathematical models of the SSME High Pressure Oxygen Turbopump (HPOTP) housing and rotor assembly was produced. New analysis methods within the EISI/EAL and SPAR systems were investigated and runstreams for future use were developed. The LOX pump models have undergone extensive modification since the first phase of this effort was completed. The rotor assembly from the original model was abandoned and a new, more detailed model constructed. A description of the new rotor math model is presented. Also, the pump housing model was continually modified as additional test data have become available. This model is documented along with measured test results. Many of the more advanced features of the EAL/SPAR finite element analysis system were exercised. These included the cyclic symmetry option, the macro-element procedures, and the fluid analysis capability. In addition, a new tool was developed that allows an automated analysis of a disjoint structure in terms of its component modes. A complete description of the implementation of the Craig-Bampton method is given along with two worked examples.

  8. Discrete element weld model, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prakash, C.; Samonds, M.; Singhal, A. K.

    1987-01-01

    A numerical method was developed for analyzing the tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding process. The phenomena being modeled include melting under the arc and the flow in the melt under the action of buoyancy, surface tension, and electromagnetic forces. The latter entails the calculation of the electric potential and the computation of electric current and magnetic field therefrom. Melting may occur at a single temperature or over a temperature range, and the electrical and thermal conductivities can be a function of temperature. Results of sample calculations are presented and discussed at length. A major research contribution has been the development of numerical methodology for the calculation of phase change problems in a fixed grid framework. The model has been implemented on CHAM's general purpose computer code PHOENICS. The inputs to the computer model include: geometric parameters, material properties, and weld process parameters.

  9. Phase diagram of a Schelling segregation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauvin, L.; Vannimenus, J.; Nadal, J.-P.

    2009-07-01

    The collective behavior in a variant of Schelling’s segregation model is characterized with methods borrowed from statistical physics, in a context where their relevance was not conspicuous. A measure of segregation based on cluster geometry is defined and several quantities analogous to those used to describe physical lattice models at equilibrium are introduced. This physical approach allows to distinguish quantitatively several regimes and to characterize the transitions between them, leading to the building of a phase diagram. Some of the transitions evoke empirical sudden ethnic turnovers. We also establish links with ‘spin-1’ models in physics. Our approach provides generic tools to analyze the dynamics of other socio-economic systems.

  10. Weathering products of basic rocks as sorptive materials of natural radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Omelianenko, B.I.; Niconov, B.S.; Ryzhov, B.I.; Shikina, N.D.

    1994-06-01

    The principal requirements for employing natural minerals as buffer and backfill material in high-level waste (HLW) repositories are high sorptive properties, low water permeability, relatively high thermal conductivity, and thermostability. The major task of the buffer is to prevent the penetration of radionuclides into groundwater. The authors of this report examined weathered basic rocks from three regions of Russia in consideration as a suitable radioactive waste barrier.

  11. Modeling the distinct phases of skill acquisition.

    PubMed

    Tenison, Caitlin; Anderson, John R

    2016-05-01

    A focus of early mathematics education is to build fluency through practice. Several models of skill acquisition have sought to explain the increase in fluency because of practice by modeling both the learning mechanisms driving this speedup and the changes in cognitive processes involved in executing the skill (such as transitioning from calculation to retrieval). In the current study, we use hidden Markov modeling to identify transitions in the learning process. This method accounts for the gradual speedup in problem solving and also uncovers abrupt changes in reaction time, which reflect changes in the cognitive processes that participants are using to solve math problems. We find that as participants practice solving math problems they transition through 3 distinct learning states. Each learning state shows some speedup with practice, but the major speedups are produced by transitions between learning states. In examining and comparing the behavioral and neurological profiles of each of these states, we find parallels with the 3 phases of skill acquisition proposed by Fitts and Posner (1967): a cognitive, an associative, and an autonomous phase. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26551626

  12. Modeling the distinct phases of skill acquisition.

    PubMed

    Tenison, Caitlin; Anderson, John R

    2016-05-01

    A focus of early mathematics education is to build fluency through practice. Several models of skill acquisition have sought to explain the increase in fluency because of practice by modeling both the learning mechanisms driving this speedup and the changes in cognitive processes involved in executing the skill (such as transitioning from calculation to retrieval). In the current study, we use hidden Markov modeling to identify transitions in the learning process. This method accounts for the gradual speedup in problem solving and also uncovers abrupt changes in reaction time, which reflect changes in the cognitive processes that participants are using to solve math problems. We find that as participants practice solving math problems they transition through 3 distinct learning states. Each learning state shows some speedup with practice, but the major speedups are produced by transitions between learning states. In examining and comparing the behavioral and neurological profiles of each of these states, we find parallels with the 3 phases of skill acquisition proposed by Fitts and Posner (1967): a cognitive, an associative, and an autonomous phase. (PsycINFO Database Record

  13. Phase-field modeling of hydraulic fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Zachary A.; Landis, Chad M.

    2016-11-01

    In this work a theoretical framework implementing the phase-field approach to fracture is used to couple the physics of flow through porous media and cracks with the mechanics of fracture. The main modeling challenge addressed in this work, which is a challenge for all diffuse crack representations, is on how to allow for the flow of fluid and the action of fluid pressure on the aggregate within the diffuse damage zone of the cracks. The theory is constructed by presenting the general physical balance laws and conducting a consistent thermodynamic analysis to constrain the constitutive relationships. Constitutive equations that reproduce the desired responses at the various limits of the phase-field parameter are proposed in order to capture Darcy-type flow in the intact porous medium and Stokes-type flow within open cracks. A finite element formulation for the solution of the governing model equations is presented and discussed. Finally, the theoretical and numerical model is shown to compare favorably to several important analytical solutions. More complex and interesting calculations are also presented to illustrate some of the advantageous features of the approach.

  14. Space market model development project, phase 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, Peter C.; Hamel, Gary P.

    1989-01-01

    The results of a research project investigating information needs for space commercialization is described. The Space Market Model Development Project (SMMDP) was designed to help NASA identify the information needs of the business community and to explore means to meet those needs. The activity of the SMMDP is reviewed and a report of its operation via three sections is presented. The first part contains a brief historical review of the project since inception. The next part reports results of Phase 3, the most recent stage of activity. Finally, overall conclusions and observations based on the SMMDP research results are presented.

  15. Phase behavior of model ABC triblock copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Joon

    The phase behavior of poly(isoprene-b-styrene- b-ethylene oxide) (ISO), a model ABC triblock copolymer has been studied. This class of materials exhibit self-assembly, forming a large array of ordered morphologies at length scales of 5-100 nm. The formation of stable three-dimensionally continuous network morphologies is of special interest in this study. Since these nanostructures considerably impact the material properties, fundamental knowledge for designing ABC systems have high technological importance for realizing applications in the areas of nanofabrication, nanoporous media, separation membranes, drug delivery and high surface area catalysts. A comprehensive framework was developed to describe the phase behavior of the ISO triblock copolymers at weak to intermediate segregation strengths spanning a wide range of composition. Phases were characterized through a combination of characterization techniques, including small angle x-ray scattering, dynamic mechanical spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and birefringence measurements. Combined with previous investigations on ISO, six different stable ordered state symmetries have been identified: lamellae (LAM), Fddd orthorhombic network (O70), double gyroid (Q230), alternating gyroid (Q214), hexagonal (HEX), and body-centered cubic (BCC). The phase map was found to be somewhat asymmetric around the fI = fO isopleth. This work provides a guide for theoretical studies and gives insight into the intricate effects of various parameters on the self-assembly of ABC triblock copolymers. Experimental SAXS data evaluated with a simple scattering intensity model show that local mixing varies continuously across the phase map between states of two- and three-domain segregation. Strategies of blending homopolymers with ISO triblock copolymer were employed for studying the swelling properties of a lamellar state. Results demonstrate that lamellar domains swell or shrink depending upon the type of homopolymer that

  16. Preon model and cosmological quantum-hyperchromodynamic phase transition

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimura, H.; Hayashi, Y.

    1987-05-15

    From the cosmological viewpoint, we investigate whether or not recent preon models are compatible with the picture of the first-order phase transition from the preon phase to the composite quark-lepton phase. It is shown that the current models accepting the 't Hooft anomaly-matching condition together with quantum hyperchromodynamics are consistent with the cosmological first-order phase transition.

  17. Preon model and cosmological quantum-hyperchromodynamic phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, H.; Hayashi, Y.

    1987-05-01

    From the cosmological viewpoint, we investigate whether or not recent preon models are compatible with the picture of the first-order phase transition from the preon phase to the composite quark-lepton phase. It is shown that the current models accepting the 't Hooft anomaly-matching condition together with quantum hyperchromodynamics are consistent with the cosmological first-order phase transition.

  18. Phase transitions in Hidden Markov Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bechhoefer, John; Lathouwers, Emma

    In Hidden Markov Models (HMMs), a Markov process is not directly accessible. In the simplest case, a two-state Markov model ``emits'' one of two ``symbols'' at each time step. We can think of these symbols as noisy measurements of the underlying state. With some probability, the symbol implies that the system is in one state when it is actually in the other. The ability to judge which state the system is in sets the efficiency of a Maxwell demon that observes state fluctuations in order to extract heat from a coupled reservoir. The state-inference problem is to infer the underlying state from such noisy measurements at each time step. We show that there can be a phase transition in such measurements: for measurement error rates below a certain threshold, the inferred state always matches the observation. For higher error rates, there can be continuous or discontinuous transitions to situations where keeping a memory of past observations improves the state estimate. We can partly understand this behavior by mapping the HMM onto a 1d random-field Ising model at zero temperature. We also present more recent work that explores a larger parameter space and more states. Research funded by NSERC, Canada.

  19. Model-based phase-shifting interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Dong; Zhang, Lei; Shi, Tu; Yang, Yongying; Chong, Shiyao; Miao, Liang; Huang, Wei; Shen, Yibing; Bai, Jian

    2015-10-01

    A model-based phase-shifting interferometer (MPI) is developed, in which a novel calculation technique is proposed instead of the traditional complicated system structure, to achieve versatile, high precision and quantitative surface tests. In the MPI, the partial null lens (PNL) is employed to implement the non-null test. With some alternative PNLs, similar as the transmission spheres in ZYGO interferometers, the MPI provides a flexible test for general spherical and aspherical surfaces. Based on modern computer modeling technique, a reverse iterative optimizing construction (ROR) method is employed for the retrace error correction of non-null test, as well as figure error reconstruction. A self-compiled ray-tracing program is set up for the accurate system modeling and reverse ray tracing. The surface figure error then can be easily extracted from the wavefront data in forms of Zernike polynomials by the ROR method. Experiments of the spherical and aspherical tests are presented to validate the flexibility and accuracy. The test results are compared with those of Zygo interferometer (null tests), which demonstrates the high accuracy of the MPI. With such accuracy and flexibility, the MPI would possess large potential in modern optical shop testing.

  20. Extended phase diagram of the three-dimensional phase field crystal model.

    PubMed

    Jaatinen, A; Ala-Nissila, T

    2010-05-26

    We determine the phase diagram of the phase field crystal model in three dimensions by using numerical free energy minimization methods. Previously published results, based on single mode approximations, have indicated that in addition to the uniform (liquid) phase, there would be regions of stability of body-centered cubic, hexagonal and stripe phases. We find that in addition to these, there are also regions of stability of face-centered cubic and hexagonal close packed structures in this model. PMID:21393705

  1. Evaluation of low-cost disposable polymeric materials for sorptive extraction of organic pollutants in water samples.

    PubMed

    Prieto, Ailette; Rodil, Rosario; Quintana, José Benito; Rodríguez, Isaac; Cela, Rafael; Möder, Monika

    2012-02-24

    The capabilities of four commercially available and low cost polymeric materials for the extraction of polar and non-polar contaminants (logK(ow)=-0.07-6.88, from caffeine to octocrylene, respectively) from water samples was compared. Tested sorbents were polyethersulphone, polypropylene and Kevlar, compared to polydimethylsiloxane as reference material. Parameters that affect the extraction process such as pH and ionic strength of the sample, extraction time and desorption conditions were thoroughly investigated. A set of experimental partition coefficients (K(pw)), at two different experimental conditions, was estimated for the best suited materials and compared with the theoretical octanol-water (K(ow)) partition coefficients of the analytes. Polyethersulphone displayed the largest extraction yields for both polar and non-polar analytes, with higher K(pw) and lower matrix effects than polydimethylsiloxane and polypropylene. Thus, a sorptive microextraction method, followed by large volume injection (LVI) gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS), was proposed using the former sorbent (2 mg) for the simultaneous determination of model compounds in water samples. Good linearity (>0.99) was obtained for most of the analytes, except in the case of 4-nonylphenol (0.9466). Precision (n=4) at 50 and 500 ng L(-1) levels was in the 2-24% and limits of detection (LODs) were in the 0.6-25 ng L(-1) range for all the analytes studied.

  2. Phase Diagram of Symmetric Two-Dimensional Traffic Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishibashi, Yoshihiro; Fukui, Minoru

    2016-10-01

    On the basis of the critical car density line in the phase diagram of the Biham-Middleton-Levine model for symmetric two-dimensional traffic systems, the formula of the flow in the intermediate jam flow phase is hypothesized. The formula is utilized to obtain the phase boundary between the free flow and jam flow phases, where the flow becomes maximum. The validity of this phase boundary has been confirmed by simulations.

  3. Microextraction of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs from waste water samples by rotating-disk sorptive extraction.

    PubMed

    Manzo, Valentina; Honda, Luis; Navarro, Orielle; Ascar, Loreto; Richter, Pablo

    2014-10-01

    In this study, six non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) were extracted from water samples using the rotating-disk sorptive extraction (RDSE) technique. The extraction disk device contains a central cavity that allows for the incorporation of a powdered sorbent phase (Oasis™ HLB). The analytes were extracted from water and pre-concentrated on the sorbent to reach the extraction equilibrium, and then they were desorbed with solvent, derivatized and determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The variables for the extraction were studied using high performance liquid chromatography with a diode array detector (HPLC-DAD) to avoid the derivatization step, and the optimum values were as follows: 60 mg of Oasis™ HLB, a rotation velocity of 3,000 rpm, a pH of 2, a sample volume of 50 mL, and an extraction time of approximately 90-100 min. The recoveries ranged from 71 to 104%, with relative standard deviations (RSD) between 2 and 8%. The detection limits ranged from 0.001 to 0.033 µg L(-1). The described method was applied to the analysis of influents and effluents from wastewater treatment plants (WWTP) in Santiago, Chile. The concentrations of the detected drugs ranged from 1.5 to 13.4 µg L(-1) and from 1.0 to 3.2 µg L(-1) in the influents and effluents, respectively. The samples were extracted by solid phase extraction (SPE). No significant differences were observed in the determined concentrations for most of the NSAIDs, indicating that RDSE is an alternative method for the preparation of water samples.

  4. Effect of selective sorptive agents on leachability of {sup 137}Cs and {sup 90}Sr

    SciTech Connect

    Spence, R.D.

    1998-06-01

    Decades ago it was established that illite effectively improves {sup 137}Cs leach resistance. Subsequently, illite has become a standard ingredient used at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in grouts developed to stabilize {sup 137}Cs. Adding illite improves {sup 137}Cs leach resistance by three orders of magnitude, and increasing the illite concentration can add another order of magnitude improvement. Adding crystalline silicotitanate, a selective sorptive agent developed more recently for {sup 137}Cs, not only improves {sup 137}Cs leach resistance by an order-of-magnitude over that obtained using illite but also improves {sup 85}Sr leach resistance by two orders of magnitude.

  5. A comparison of sorptive extraction techniques coupled to a new quantitative, sensitive, high throughput GC-MS/MS method for methoxypyrazine analysis in wine.

    PubMed

    Hjelmeland, Anna K; Wylie, Philip L; Ebeler, Susan E

    2016-02-01

    Methoxypyrazines are volatile compounds found in plants, microbes, and insects that have potent vegetal and earthy aromas. With sensory detection thresholds in the low ng L(-1) range, modest concentrations of these compounds can profoundly impact the aroma quality of foods and beverages, and high levels can lead to consumer rejection. The wine industry routinely analyzes the most prevalent methoxypyrazine, 2-isobutyl-3-methoxypyrazine (IBMP), to aid in harvest decisions, since concentrations decrease during berry ripening. In addition to IBMP, three other methoxypyrazines IPMP (2-isopropyl-3-methoxypyrazine), SBMP (2-sec-butyl-3-methoxypyrazine), and EMP (2-ethyl-3-methoxypyrazine) have been identified in grapes and/or wine and can impact aroma quality. Despite their routine analysis in the wine industry (mostly IBMP), accurate methoxypyrazine quantitation is hindered by two major challenges: sensitivity and resolution. With extremely low sensory detection thresholds (~8-15 ng L(-1) in wine for IBMP), highly sensitive analytical methods to quantify methoxypyrazines at trace levels are necessary. Here we were able to achieve resolution of IBMP as well as IPMP, EMP, and SBMP from co-eluting compounds using one-dimensional chromatography coupled to positive chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometry. Three extraction techniques HS-SPME (headspace-solid phase microextraction), SBSE (stirbar sorptive extraction), and HSSE (headspace sorptive extraction) were validated and compared. A 30 min extraction time was used for HS-SPME and SBSE extraction techniques, while 120 min was necessary to achieve sufficient sensitivity for HSSE extractions. All extraction methods have limits of quantitation (LOQ) at or below 1 ng L(-1) for all four methoxypyrazines analyzed, i.e., LOQ's at or below reported sensory detection limits in wine. The method is high throughput, with resolution of all compounds possible with a relatively rapid 27 min GC oven program.

  6. A comparison of sorptive extraction techniques coupled to a new quantitative, sensitive, high throughput GC-MS/MS method for methoxypyrazine analysis in wine.

    PubMed

    Hjelmeland, Anna K; Wylie, Philip L; Ebeler, Susan E

    2016-02-01

    Methoxypyrazines are volatile compounds found in plants, microbes, and insects that have potent vegetal and earthy aromas. With sensory detection thresholds in the low ng L(-1) range, modest concentrations of these compounds can profoundly impact the aroma quality of foods and beverages, and high levels can lead to consumer rejection. The wine industry routinely analyzes the most prevalent methoxypyrazine, 2-isobutyl-3-methoxypyrazine (IBMP), to aid in harvest decisions, since concentrations decrease during berry ripening. In addition to IBMP, three other methoxypyrazines IPMP (2-isopropyl-3-methoxypyrazine), SBMP (2-sec-butyl-3-methoxypyrazine), and EMP (2-ethyl-3-methoxypyrazine) have been identified in grapes and/or wine and can impact aroma quality. Despite their routine analysis in the wine industry (mostly IBMP), accurate methoxypyrazine quantitation is hindered by two major challenges: sensitivity and resolution. With extremely low sensory detection thresholds (~8-15 ng L(-1) in wine for IBMP), highly sensitive analytical methods to quantify methoxypyrazines at trace levels are necessary. Here we were able to achieve resolution of IBMP as well as IPMP, EMP, and SBMP from co-eluting compounds using one-dimensional chromatography coupled to positive chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometry. Three extraction techniques HS-SPME (headspace-solid phase microextraction), SBSE (stirbar sorptive extraction), and HSSE (headspace sorptive extraction) were validated and compared. A 30 min extraction time was used for HS-SPME and SBSE extraction techniques, while 120 min was necessary to achieve sufficient sensitivity for HSSE extractions. All extraction methods have limits of quantitation (LOQ) at or below 1 ng L(-1) for all four methoxypyrazines analyzed, i.e., LOQ's at or below reported sensory detection limits in wine. The method is high throughput, with resolution of all compounds possible with a relatively rapid 27 min GC oven program. PMID:26653458

  7. Phase field modeling and simulation of three-phase flow on solid surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qian; Wang, Xiao-Ping

    2016-08-01

    Phase field models are widely used to describe the two-phase system. The evolution of the phase field variables is usually driven by the gradient flow of a total free energy functional. The generalization of the approach to an N phase (N ≥ 3) system requires some extra consistency conditions on the free energy functional in order for the model to give physically relevant results. A projection approach is proposed for the derivation of a consistent free energy functional for the three-phase Cahn-Hilliard equations. The system is then coupled with the Navier-Stokes equations to describe the three-phase flow on solid surfaces with moving contact line. An energy stable scheme is developed for the three-phase flow system. The discrete energy law of the numerical scheme is proved which ensures the stability of the scheme. We also show some numerical results for the dynamics of triple junctions and four phase contact lines.

  8. Implementing a Four-Phase Curriculum Review Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaCursia, Nancy

    2010-01-01

    This article describes how to implement the four-phase curriculum review model, a simplified process for renovating a high school health and physical education curriculum. Although this model was used at a large suburban high school, it could be adapted for use by smaller schools or other disciplines. The four phases of this model are: (1) needs…

  9. Phases and Phase Transitions in the Two-Dimensional Ionic Hubbard Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryant, Tyler; Singh, Rajiv R. P.

    2005-03-01

    We study the two-dimensional Ionic Hubbard model at half filling on a square lattice using linked cluster expansions [1]. The model consists of a Hubbard model with alternating site energies. In one dimension, it is known that there is an intermediate spontaneously dimerized phase separating the band insulator phase from the Mott insulator phase [2,3]. We calculate the ground state energy, local moment, spin-spin correlations, and dimer-dimer correlations to 12th order, starting from the band insulator phase. Using series extrapolation techniques the phase diagram of the model and the nature of the phase transitions is studied.[1] M.P. Gelfand, R.R.P. Singh, Adv. Phys. 49, 93 (2000)[2] C.D. Batista and A.A. Aligia, Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 246405 (2004)[3] S.R. Manmana, V. Meden, R.M. Noack, K. Sch" onhammer, Phys. Rev. B 70, 155115 (2004)

  10. Phase transformations in a model mesenchymal tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, Stuart A.; Forgacs, Gabor; Hinner, Bernhard; Maier, Christian W.; Sackmann, Erich

    2004-06-01

    Connective tissues, the most abundant tissue type of the mature mammalian body, consist of cells suspended in complex microenvironments known as extracellular matrices (ECMs). In the immature connective tissues (mesenchymes) encountered in developmental biology and tissue engineering applications, the ECMs contain varying amounts of randomly arranged fibers, and the physical state of the ECM changes as the fibers secreted by the cells undergo fibril and fiber assembly and organize into networks. In vitro composites consisting of assembling solutions of type I collagen, containing suspended polystyrene latex beads (~6 µm in diameter) with collagen-binding surface properties, provide a simplified model for certain physical aspects of developing mesenchymes. In particular, assembly-dependent topological (i.e., connectivity) transitions within the ECM could change a tissue from one in which cell-sized particles (e.g., latex beads or cells) are mechanically unlinked to one in which the particles are part of a mechanical continuum. Any particle-induced alterations in fiber organization would imply that cells could similarly establish physically distinct microdomains within tissues. Here we show that the presence of beads above a critical number density accelerates the sol-gel transition that takes place during the assembly of collagen into a globally interconnected network of fibers. The presence of this suprathreshold number of beads also dramatically changes the viscoelastic properties of the collagen matrix, but only when the initial concentration of soluble collagen is itself above a critical value. Our studies provide a starting point for the analysis of phase transformations of more complex biomaterials including developing and healing tissues as well as tissue substitutes containing living cells.

  11. Compositions and sorptive properties of crop residue-derived chars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chun, Y.; Sheng, G.; Chiou, G.T.; Xing, B.

    2004-01-01

    Chars originating from the burning or pyrolysis of vegetation may significantly sorb neutral organic contaminants (NOCs). To evaluate the relationship between the char composition and NOC sorption, a series of char samples were generated by pyrolyzing a wheat residue (Triticum aestivum L) for 6 h at temperatures between 300 ??C and 700 ??C and analyzed for their elemental compositions, surface areas, and surface functional groups. The samples were then studied for their abilities to sorb benzene and nitrobenzene from water. A commercial activated carbon was used as a reference carbonaceous sample. The char samples produced at high pyrolytic temperatures (500-700 ??C) were well carbonized and exhibited a relatively high surface area (>300 m2/g), little organic matter (20% oxygen). The char samples exhibited a significant range of surface acidity/basicity because of their different surface polar-group contents, as characterized by the Boehm titration data and the NMR and FTIR spectra. The NOC sorption by high-temperature chars occurred almost exclusively by surface adsorption on carbonized surfaces, whereas the sorption by low-temperature chars resulted from the surface adsorption and the concurrent smaller partition into the residual organic-matter phase. The chars appeared to have a higher surface affinity for a polar solute (nitrobenzene) than for a nonpolar solute (benzene), the difference being related to the surface acidity/basicity of the char samples.

  12. Rotating disk sorptive extraction of triclosan and methyl-triclosan from water samples.

    PubMed

    Jachero, Lourdes; Sepúlveda, Betsabet; Ahumada, Inés; Fuentes, Edwar; Richter, Pablo

    2013-09-01

    A method of sample preparation based on use of rotating disk sorptive extraction (RDSE) has been developed for determination of triclosan (TCS) and methyl-triclosan (MTCS) in water samples. The sorptive and desorptive behavior of the analytes was studied by use of a rotating disk coated with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) on one of its surfaces. Chemical and extraction behavior were studied to establish the best conditions for extraction. The optimum conditions for both analytes were: sample volume 25 mL, pH 4.5, NaCl concentration 6% (w/v), disk rotational velocity 1,250 rpm, and extraction time 80 min. A desorption time of 30 min was used with 5 mL methanol. The detection limits for TCS and MTCS were 46 and 34 ng L(-1), respectively. Recovery was evaluated at two concentrations, 160 and 800 ng L(-1), and the values obtained were between 80 and 100%. The method was applied to analysis of influent water at two treatment plants in Santiago, Chile.

  13. Novel extraction approach for liquid samples: stir cake sorptive extraction using monolith.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiaojia; Chen, Linli; Lin, Fuhua; Yuan, Dongxing

    2011-08-01

    In this study, a new extraction approach for liquid samples--stir cake sorptive extraction using monoliths as extractive medium was developed. The preparation procedure of stir cake is very simple. First, monolithic cake is synthesized according to the in situ polymerization of monolith; then, the cake is inserted in an original unit (holder), which is constructed from a syringe cartridge and allows the magnetic stirring of the cake during the extraction process. The effects of dimension of monolithic cake and unit design on the extraction performance were optimized in detail. To demonstrate the usability of this new extraction approach, poly(vinylimidazole-divinylbenzene) was prepared and acted as the extractive cake. The analysis of steroid hormones in milk samples by the combination of stir cake with high-performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection, was selected as a paradigm for the practical evaluation of stir cake sorptive extraction. Under the optimized extraction conditions, low detection limits (S/N=3) and quantification limits (S/N=10) of the proposed method for the target analytes were achieved within the range between 0.33-0.69 and 1.08-2.28 μg/L, respectively. The method also showed good linearity, repeatability, high feasibility and acceptable recoveries. Because the monolithic cake does not contact with the vessel wall during stirring, there is no friction loss of extractive medium and the stir cake can be used for more than 1000 h.

  14. Two-Phase Model of Combustion in Explosions

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhl, A L; Khasainov, B; Bell, J

    2006-06-19

    A two-phase model for Aluminum particle combustion in explosions is proposed. It combines the gas-dynamic conservation laws for the gas phase with the continuum mechanics laws of multi-phase media, as formulated by Nigmatulin. Inter-phase mass, momentum and energy exchange are prescribed by the Khasainov model. Combustion is specified as material transformations in the Le Chatelier diagram which depicts the locus of thermodynamic states in the internal energy-temperature plane according to Kuhl. Numerical simulations are used to show the evolution of two-phase combustion fields generated by the explosive dissemination of a powdered Al fuel.

  15. Phase unwrapping using region-based markov random field model.

    PubMed

    Dong, Ying; Ji, Jim

    2010-01-01

    Phase unwrapping is a classical problem in Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar and Sonar (InSAR/InSAS), fringe pattern analysis, and spectroscopy. Although many methods have been proposed to address this problem, robust and effective phase unwrapping remains a challenge. This paper presents a novel phase unwrapping method using a region-based Markov Random Field (MRF) model. Specifically, the phase image is segmented into regions within which the phase is not wrapped. Then, the phase image is unwrapped between different regions using an improved Highest Confidence First (HCF) algorithm to optimize the MRF model. The proposed method has desirable theoretical properties as well as an efficient implementation. Simulations and experimental results on MRI images show that the proposed method provides similar or improved phase unwrapping than Phase Unwrapping MAx-flow/min-cut (PUMA) method and ZpM method.

  16. Phase unwrapping using region-based markov random field model.

    PubMed

    Dong, Ying; Ji, Jim

    2010-01-01

    Phase unwrapping is a classical problem in Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar and Sonar (InSAR/InSAS), fringe pattern analysis, and spectroscopy. Although many methods have been proposed to address this problem, robust and effective phase unwrapping remains a challenge. This paper presents a novel phase unwrapping method using a region-based Markov Random Field (MRF) model. Specifically, the phase image is segmented into regions within which the phase is not wrapped. Then, the phase image is unwrapped between different regions using an improved Highest Confidence First (HCF) algorithm to optimize the MRF model. The proposed method has desirable theoretical properties as well as an efficient implementation. Simulations and experimental results on MRI images show that the proposed method provides similar or improved phase unwrapping than Phase Unwrapping MAx-flow/min-cut (PUMA) method and ZpM method. PMID:21096819

  17. Variation in predicted internal concentrations in relation to PBPK model complexity for rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Salmina, E S; Wondrousch, D; Kühne, R; Potemkin, V A; Schüürmann, G

    2016-04-15

    The present study is motivated by the increasing demand to consider internal partitioning into tissues instead of exposure concentrations for the environmental toxicity assessment. To this end, physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models can be applied. We evaluated the variation in accuracy of PBPK model outcomes depending on tissue constituents modeled as sorptive phases and chemical distribution tendencies addressed by molecular descriptors. The model performance was examined using data from 150 experiments for 28 chemicals collected from US EPA databases. The simplest PBPK model is based on the "Kow-lipid content" approach as being traditional for environmental toxicology. The most elaborated one considers five biological sorptive phases (polar and non-polar lipids, water, albumin and the remaining proteins) and makes use of LSER (linear solvation energy relationship) parameters to describe the compound partitioning behavior. The "Kow-lipid content"-based PBPK model shows more than one order of magnitude difference in predicted and measured values for 37% of the studied exposure experiments while for the most elaborated model this happens only for 7%. It is shown that further improvements could be achieved by introducing corrections for metabolic biotransformation and compound transmission hindrance through a cellular membrane. The analysis of the interface distribution tendencies shows that polar tissue constituents, namely water, polar lipids and proteins, play an important role in the accumulation behavior of polar compounds with H-bond donating functional groups. For compounds without H-bond donating fragments preferable accumulation phases are storage lipids and water depending on compound polarity. PMID:26849323

  18. Aerothermal modeling, phase 1. Volume 1: Model assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenworthy, M. J.; Correa, S. M.; Burrus, D. L.

    1983-01-01

    Phase 1 was conducted as part of the overall NASA Hot Section Technology (HOST) Program. The purpose of this effort was to determine the predictive accuracy of and the deficiencies within the various analytical modules comprising the overall combustor aerothermal model used at General Electric, as well as to formulate recommendations for improvement where needed. This effort involved the assembly of a benchmark quality data base from selected available literature, and from General Electric engine and combustor component test data. This data base was supplemented with additional definitive data obtained from an experimental test program conducted as part of the Phase 1 effort. Using selections from this data base, assessment studies were conducted to evaluate the various modules. Assessment of the internal flow module was conducted using 2-D parabolic and ellipitic, as well as 3-D elliptic internal flow calculations of definitive test data selected from the assembled data base. The 2-D assessment provided methodical examination of the mathematical techniques and the physical submodules, while the 3-D assessment focused on usefulness as a design tool. Calculations of combustor linear metal temperatures, pressure loss performance, and airflow distribution were performed using aerothermal modules which were in general use for many years at General Electric. The results of these assessment provided for the identification of deficiencies within the modules. The deficiencies were addressed in some detail providing a foundation on which to formulate a prioritized list of recommendations for improvement.

  19. Rapid estimation of readily leachable triazine residues in soils using automatic kinetic bioaccessibility assays followed by on-line sorptive clean-up as a front-end to liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Vida, Ana C F; Cocovi-Solberg, David J; Zagatto, Elias A G; Miró, Manuel

    2016-08-15

    An automatic batchwise bioaccessibility test was proposed for on-line monitoring of readily mobile pools of ametryn and atrazine residues in agricultural soils with different physicochemical properties. A 0.01molL(-1) CaCl2 solution mimicking rainwater percolation through the soil profiles was used for the herbicide extractions. The extract aliquots were successively sampled at regular time intervals in order to investigate the extraction kinetics. For extract clean-up and retention of freely dissolved target species, 30mg of restricted-access like copolymer were used as in-line sorptive material followed by elution with methanol and on-line heart-cut injection towards a C18 silica reversed-phase monolithic column (100×4.6mm) in a liquid chromatographic system. A mathematical model emphasized that the readily available pools vs time can be in most instances described by a first-order exponential equation, thus an asymptotical value is approached. Consequently, the leaching assays can be performed without attaining chemical equilibrium. Enhancement factors and detection limits were 10.2 and 18.8, and 0.40 and 0.37mgkg(-1) for ametryn and atrazine, respectively. The automatic method features good repeatability for leaching tests (r.s.d.: 11.8-10.2% for sandy and 3.7-6.2% for clayey soil). Reliable data, demonstrated with relative recoveries in the soil leachates ranging from 86 to 104%, were achieved in less than 35min, thus avoiding the need for up to 24h as recommended by standard leaching methods. PMID:27260437

  20. Rapid estimation of readily leachable triazine residues in soils using automatic kinetic bioaccessibility assays followed by on-line sorptive clean-up as a front-end to liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Vida, Ana C F; Cocovi-Solberg, David J; Zagatto, Elias A G; Miró, Manuel

    2016-08-15

    An automatic batchwise bioaccessibility test was proposed for on-line monitoring of readily mobile pools of ametryn and atrazine residues in agricultural soils with different physicochemical properties. A 0.01molL(-1) CaCl2 solution mimicking rainwater percolation through the soil profiles was used for the herbicide extractions. The extract aliquots were successively sampled at regular time intervals in order to investigate the extraction kinetics. For extract clean-up and retention of freely dissolved target species, 30mg of restricted-access like copolymer were used as in-line sorptive material followed by elution with methanol and on-line heart-cut injection towards a C18 silica reversed-phase monolithic column (100×4.6mm) in a liquid chromatographic system. A mathematical model emphasized that the readily available pools vs time can be in most instances described by a first-order exponential equation, thus an asymptotical value is approached. Consequently, the leaching assays can be performed without attaining chemical equilibrium. Enhancement factors and detection limits were 10.2 and 18.8, and 0.40 and 0.37mgkg(-1) for ametryn and atrazine, respectively. The automatic method features good repeatability for leaching tests (r.s.d.: 11.8-10.2% for sandy and 3.7-6.2% for clayey soil). Reliable data, demonstrated with relative recoveries in the soil leachates ranging from 86 to 104%, were achieved in less than 35min, thus avoiding the need for up to 24h as recommended by standard leaching methods.

  1. Simplified analytical model for open-phase operating mode of thyristor-controlled phase angle regulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astashev, M. G.; Novikov, M. A.; Panfilov, D. I.; Rashitov, P. A.; Fedorova, M. I.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, an approach to the development of a simplified analytical model for the analysis of electromagnetic processes of a thyristor-controlled phase angle regulator with an individual phase-controlled thyristor switch is considered. The analytical expressions for the calculation of electrical parameters in symmetrical and open-phase operating mode are obtained. With a concrete example, the verification of the developed analytical model is carried out. It is accomplished by means of comparison between current and voltage calculation results when the thyristor-controlled phase angle regulator is in an open-phase operating mode with the simulation results in the MatLab software environment. Adequacy check of the obtained analytical model is carried out by comparison between the analytical calculation and experimental data received from the actual physical model.

  2. Glassy phases and driven response of the phase-field-crystal model with random pinning.

    PubMed

    Granato, E; Ramos, J A P; Achim, C V; Lehikoinen, J; Ying, S C; Ala-Nissila, T; Elder, K R

    2011-09-01

    We study the structural correlations and the nonlinear response to a driving force of a two-dimensional phase-field-crystal model with random pinning. The model provides an effective continuous description of lattice systems in the presence of disordered external pinning centers, allowing for both elastic and plastic deformations. We find that the phase-field crystal with disorder assumes an amorphous glassy ground state, with only short-ranged positional and orientational correlations, even in the limit of weak disorder. Under increasing driving force, the pinned amorphous-glass phase evolves into a moving plastic-flow phase and then, finally, a moving smectic phase. The transverse response of the moving smectic phase shows a vanishing transverse critical force for increasing system sizes. PMID:22060323

  3. Glassy phases and driven response of the phase-field-crystal model with random pinning.

    PubMed

    Granato, E; Ramos, J A P; Achim, C V; Lehikoinen, J; Ying, S C; Ala-Nissila, T; Elder, K R

    2011-09-01

    We study the structural correlations and the nonlinear response to a driving force of a two-dimensional phase-field-crystal model with random pinning. The model provides an effective continuous description of lattice systems in the presence of disordered external pinning centers, allowing for both elastic and plastic deformations. We find that the phase-field crystal with disorder assumes an amorphous glassy ground state, with only short-ranged positional and orientational correlations, even in the limit of weak disorder. Under increasing driving force, the pinned amorphous-glass phase evolves into a moving plastic-flow phase and then, finally, a moving smectic phase. The transverse response of the moving smectic phase shows a vanishing transverse critical force for increasing system sizes.

  4. Phases and Phase Changes of Mixed Organic/Inorganic Model Systems of Tropospheric Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcolli, C.; Krieger, U. K.; Zardini, A. A.; Zobrist, B.; Zuend, A.; Luo, B. P.; Peter, T.

    2006-12-01

    Knowledge of the physical state of tropospheric aerosols is important for an adequate description of cloud formation, heterogeneous and multiphase chemistry, and the aerosol's radiative properties. We will present and discuss laboratory experiments on bulk aerosol model mixtures and micron-sized particles consisting of polyols, polyethylene glycol or dicarboxylic acids mixed with ammonium sulfate. Depending on the exact composition and relative humidity, these mixtures form liquid-one-phase or two-phase systems plus additional solid phases. Whilst the organic matter in ambient aerosols is expected to be predominantly present in the form of liquid or amorphous phases, the inorganic salts may still undergo deliquescence and efflorescence as a function of relative humidity. Moreover, they may induce phase separations into a predominantly organic and an inorganic aqueous phase. In the absence of solid phases, the water uptake and release of the investigated micron-sized particles was usually well described by the Zdanovskii-Stokes-Robinson (ZSR) approach. However, this model became inaccurate when solid phases were present. Moreover, it is not able to account for liquid-liquid phase separations due to the salting-out effects of the investigated inorganic salts. While most organics participate in liquid phases some organic substances are abundant enough in the particles to form crystalline solids that might act as ice nuclei. We show that this is the case for oxalic acid.

  5. Modelling and theories of alloy phase behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, R.E.; Davenport, J.W.; Weinert, M.; Bennett, L.H.

    1987-01-01

    Many trends in alloy phase formation are readily understood in terms of physically plausible atomic parameters. This has led to the introduction of structural maps where two (or more) such atomic parameters are employed as the coordinates and well-defined regions are observed to be associated with particular crystalline phases. These coordinates sometimes involve the difference in atomic parameters and sometimes involve an average. An alternative approach to the emphasis on atomic parameters has been the consideration of how atoms are packed in some crystal structure and how this controls what the constituent atoms may be. Recently this has led to the utilization of Wigner-Seitz (sometimes called Voronoi or Dirichlet) constructs of the atomic cells in a crystal structure and to the observation that sometimes two crystals which are nominally considered to have the same crystal structure according to normal crystallographic designation should be considered to be different. The Wigner-Seitz cell constructs have also offered a framework for understanding trends in the magnetic and chemical properties of particular phases as well as making coordination between crystalline and glassy structures. Neither of the above approaches provides numerical estimates of quantities of thermodynamic interest such as heats of formation. Such heats are being calculated. 42 refs., 15 figs.

  6. Effective parameterizations of three nonwetting phase relative permeability models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhenlei; Mohanty, Binayak P.

    2015-08-01

    Describing convective nonwetting phase flow in unsaturated porous media requires knowledge of the nonwetting phase relative permeability. This study was conducted to formulate and derive a generalized expression for the nonwetting phase relative permeability via combining with the Kosugi water retention function. This generalized formulation is then used to flexibly investigate the Burdine, Mualem, and Alexander and Skaggs models' prediction accuracy for relative nonwetting phase permeability. The model and data comparison results show that these three permeability models, if used in their original form, but applied to the nonwetting phase, could not predict the experimental data well. The optimum pore tortuosity and connectivity value is thus obtained for the improved prediction of relative nonwetting phase permeability. As a result, the effective parameterization of (α,β,η) parameters in the modified Burdine, modified Mualem, and modified Alexander and Skaggs permeability models were found to be (2.5, 2, 1), (2, 1, 2), and (2.5, 1, 1), respectively. These three suggested models display the highest accuracy among the nine relative permeability models investigated in this study. However, the corresponding discontinuous nonwetting phase and the liquid film flow should be accounted for in future for the improved prediction of nonwetting phase relative permeability at very high and very low water saturation range, respectively.

  7. Employment, Production and Consumption model: Patterns of phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavička, H.; Lin, L.; Novotný, J.

    2010-04-01

    We have simulated the model of Employment, Production and Consumption (EPC) using Monte Carlo. The EPC model is an agent based model that mimics very basic rules of industrial economy. From the perspective of physics, the nature of the interactions in the EPC model represents multi-agent interactions where the relations among agents follow the key laws for circulation of capital and money. Monte Carlo simulations of the stochastic model reveal phase transition in the model economy. The two phases are the phase with full unemployment and the phase with nearly full employment. The economy switches between these two states suddenly as a reaction to a slight variation in the exogenous parameter, thus the system exhibits strong non-linear behavior as a response to the change of the exogenous parameters.

  8. Modeling of the primary rearrangement stage of liquid phase sintering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malik Tahir, Abdul; Malik, Amer; Amberg, Gustav

    2016-10-01

    The dimensional variations during the rearrangement stage of liquid phase sintering could have a detrimental effect on the dimensional tolerances of the sintered product. A numerical approach to model the liquid phase penetration into interparticle boundaries and the accompanied dimensional variations during the primary rearrangement stage of liquid phase sintering is presented. The coupled system of the Cahn–Hilliard and the Navier–Stokes equations is used to model the penetration of the liquid phase, whereas the rearrangement of the solid particles due to capillary forces is modeled using the equilibrium equation for a linear elastic material. The simulations are performed using realistic physical properties of the phases involved and the effect of green density, wettability and amount of liquid phase is also incorporated in the model. In the first step, the kinetics of the liquid phase penetration and the rearrangement of solid particles connected by a liquid bridge is modeled. The predicted and the calculated (analytical) results are compared in order to validate the numerical model. The numerical model is then extended to simulate the dimensional changes during primary rearrangement stage and a qualitative match with the published experimental data is achieved.

  9. MONA: An accurate two-phase well flow model based on phase slippage

    SciTech Connect

    Asheim, H.

    1984-10-01

    In two phase flow, holdup and pressure loss are related to interfacial slippage. A model based on the slippage concept has been developed and tested using production well data from Forties, the Ekofisk area, and flowline data from Prudhoe Bay. The model developed turned out considerably more accurate than the standard models used for comparison.

  10. Appraisal of a cementitious material for waste disposal: Neutron imaging studies of pore structure and sorptivity

    SciTech Connect

    McGlinn, Peter J.; Beer, Frikkie C. de; Aldridge, Laurence P.; Radebe, Mabuti J.; Nshimirimana, Robert; Brew, Daniel R.M.; Payne, Timothy E.; Olufson, Kylie P.

    2010-08-15

    Cementitious materials are conventionally used in conditioning intermediate and low level radioactive waste. In this study a candidate cement-based wasteform has been investigated using neutron imaging to characterise the wasteform for disposal in a repository for radioactive materials. Imaging showed both the pore size distribution and the extent of the cracking that had occurred in the samples. The rate of the water penetration measured both by conventional sorptivity measurements and neutron imaging was greater than in pastes made from Ordinary Portland Cement. The ability of the cracks to distribute the water through the sample in a very short time was also evident. The study highlights the significant potential of neutron imaging in the investigation of cementitious materials. The technique has the advantage of visualising and measuring, non-destructively, material distribution within macroscopic samples and is particularly useful in defining movement of water through the cementitious materials.

  11. Modeling the Distinct Phases of Skill Acquisition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tenison, Caitlin; Anderson, John R.

    2016-01-01

    A focus of early mathematics education is to build fluency through practice. Several models of skill acquisition have sought to explain the increase in fluency because of practice by modeling both the learning mechanisms driving this speedup and the changes in cognitive processes involved in executing the skill (such as transitioning from…

  12. Role of biofilms in sorptive removal of steroidal hormones and 4-nonylphenol compounds from streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Writer, Jeffrey H.; Ryan, Joseph N.; Barber, Larry B.

    2011-01-01

    Stream biofilms play an important role in geochemical processing of organic matter and nutrients, however, the significance of this matrix in sorbing trace organic contaminants is less understood. This study focused on the role of stream biofilms in sorbing steroidal hormones and 4-nonylphenol compounds from surface waters using biofilms colonized in situ on artificial substrata and subsequently transferred to the laboratory for controlled batch sorption experiments. Steroidal hormones and 4-nonylphenol compounds readily sorb to stream biofilms as indicated by organic matter partition coefficients (Kom, L kg-1) for 17β-estradiol (102.5-2.8 L kg-1), 17α-ethynylestradiol (102.5-2.9 L kg-1), 4-nonylphenol (103.4-4.6 L kg-1), 4-nonylphenolmonoethoxylate (103.5-4.0 L kg-1), and 4-nonylphenoldiethoxylate (103.9-4.3 L kg-1). Experiments using water quality differences to induce changes in the relative composition of periphyton and heterotrophic bacteria in the stream biofilm did not significantly affect the sorptive properties of the stream biofilm, providing additional evidence that stream biofilms will sorb trace organic compounds under of variety of environmental conditions. Because sorption of the target compounds to stream biofilms was linearly correlated with organic matter content, hydrophobic partition into organic matter appears to be the dominant mechanism. An analysis of 17β-estradiol and 4-nonylphenol hydrophobic partition into water, biofilm, sediment, and dissolved organic matter matrices at mass/volume ratios typical of smaller rivers showed that the relative importance of the stream biofilm as a sorptive matrix was comparable to bed sediments. Therefore, stream biofilms play a primary role in attenuating these compounds in surface waters. Because the stream biofilm represents the base of the stream ecosystem, accumulation of steroidal hormones and 4-nonylphenol compounds in the stream biofilm may be an exposure pathway for organisms in higher trophic

  13. Role of biofilms in sorptive removal of steroidal hormones and 4-nonylphenol compounds from streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Writer, J.H.; Ryan, J.N.; Barber, L.B.

    2011-01-01

    Stream biofilms play an important role in geochemical processing of organic matter and nutrients, however, the significance of this matrix in sorbing trace organic contaminants is less understood. This study focused on the role of stream biofilms in sorbing steroidal hormones and 4-nonylphenol compounds from surface waters using biofilms colonized in situ on artificial substrata and subsequently transferred to the laboratory for controlled batch sorption experiments. Steroidal hormones and 4-nonylphenol compounds readily sorb to stream biofilms as indicated by organic matter partition coefficients (K om, L kg-1) for 17??-estradiol (102.5-2.8 L kg-1), 17??-ethynylestradiol (102.5-2.9 L kg -1), 4-nonylphenol (103.4-4.6 L kg-1), 4-nonylphenolmonoethoxylate (103.5-4.0 L kg-1), and 4-nonylphenoldiethoxylate (103.9-4.3 L kg-1). Experiments using water quality differences to induce changes in the relative composition of periphyton and heterotrophic bacteria in the stream biofilm did not significantly affect the sorptive properties of the stream biofilm, providing additional evidence that stream biofilms will sorb trace organic compounds under of variety of environmental conditions. Because sorption of the target compounds to stream biofilms was linearly correlated with organic matter content, hydrophobic partition into organic matter appears to be the dominant mechanism. An analysis of 17??-estradiol and 4-nonylphenol hydrophobic partition into water, biofilm, sediment, and dissolved organic matter matrices at mass/volume ratios typical of smaller rivers showed that the relative importance of the stream biofilm as a sorptive matrix was comparable to bed sediments. Therefore, stream biofilms play a primary role in attenuating these compounds in surface waters. Because the stream biofilm represents the base of the stream ecosystem, accumulation of steroidal hormones and 4-nonylphenol compounds in the stream biofilm may be an exposure pathway for organisms in higher trophic

  14. Entanglement driven phase transitions in spin-orbital models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Wen-Long; Oleś, Andrzej M.; Horsch, Peter

    2015-08-01

    To demonstrate the role played by the von Neumann entropy (vNE) spectra in quantum phase transitions we investigate the one-dimensional anisotropic SU(2)\\otimes {XXZ} spin-orbital model with negative exchange parameter. In the case of classical Ising orbital interactions we discover an unexpected novel phase with Majumdar-Ghosh-like spin-singlet dimer correlations triggered by spin-orbital entanglement (SOE) and having k=π /2 orbital correlations, while all the other phases are disentangled. For anisotropic XXZ orbital interactions both SOE and spin-dimer correlations extend to the antiferro-spin/alternating-orbital phase. This quantum phase provides a unique example of two coupled order parameters which change the character of the phase transition from first-order to continuous. Hereby we have established the vNE spectral function as a valuable tool to identify the change of ground state degeneracies and of the SOE of elementary excitations in quantum phase transitions.

  15. Modeling studies of heat transfer and phase distribution in two-phase geothermal reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, C.H.; Bodvarsson, G.S.; Truesdell, A.H. . Earth Sciences Div.)

    1994-02-01

    Phase distribution as well as mass flow and heat transfer behavior in two-phase geothermal systems have been studied by numerical modeling. A two-dimensional porous-slab model was used with a non-uniform heat flux boundary conditions at the bottom. Steady-state solutions are obtained for the phase distribution and heat transfer behavior for cases with different mass of fluid (gas saturation) in place, permeabilities, and capillary pressures. The results obtained show very efficient heat transfer in the vapor-dominated zone due to the development of heat pipes and near-uniform saturations. The phase distribution below the vapor-dominated zone depends on permeability. For relatively high-permeability systems, single-phase liquid zones prevail, with convection providing the energy throughput. For lower permeability systems, a two-phase liquid-dominated zone develops, because single-phase liquid convection is not sufficient to dissipate heat released from the source. These results are consistent with observations from the field, where most high-temperature liquid-dominated two-phase systems have relatively low permeabilities e.g. Krafla, Iceland; Kenya; Baca, New Mexico. The numerical results obtained also show that for high heat flow a high-temperature single-phase vapor zone can develop below a typical (240 C) vapor-dominated zone, as has recently been found at the Geysers, California, and Larderello, Italy.

  16. A phase-field-crystal model for liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Löwen, Hartmut

    2010-09-15

    On the basis of static and dynamical density functional theory, a phase-field-crystal model is derived which involves both the translational density and the orientational degree of ordering as well as a local director field. The model exhibits stable isotropic, nematic, smectic A, columnar, plastic-crystalline and orientationally ordered crystalline phases. As far as the dynamics is concerned, the translational density is a conserved order parameter while the orientational ordering is non-conserved. The derived phase-field-crystal model can serve for use in efficient numerical investigations of various nonequilibrium situations in liquid crystals.

  17. HYTEST Phase I Facility Commissioning and Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Lee P. Shunn; Richard D. Boardman; Shane J. Cherry; Craig G. Rieger

    2009-09-01

    The purpose of this document is to report the first year accomplishments of two coordinated Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) projects that utilize a hybrid energy testing laboratory that couples various reactors to investigate system reactance behavior. This work is the first phase of a series of hybrid energy research and testing stations - referred to hereafter as HYTEST facilities – that are planned for construction and operation at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). A HYTEST Phase I facility was set up and commissioned in Bay 9 of the Bonneville County Technology Center (BCTC). The purpose of this facility is to utilize the hydrogen and oxygen that is produced by the High Temperature Steam Electrolysis test reactors operating in Bay 9 to support the investigation of kinetic phenomena and transient response of integrated reactor components. This facility provides a convenient scale for conducting scoping tests of new reaction concepts, materials performance, new instruments, and real-time data collection and manipulation for advance process controls. An enclosed reactor module was assembled and connected to a new ventilation system equipped with a variable-speed exhaust blower to mitigate hazardous gas exposures, as well as contract with hot surfaces. The module was equipped with a hydrogen gas pump and receiver tank to supply high quality hydrogen to chemical reactors located in the hood.

  18. Intercomparison of the Cloud Water Phase among Global Climate Models

    SciTech Connect

    Komurcu, Muge; Storelvmo, Trude; Tan, Ivy; Lohmann, U.; Yun, Yuxing; Penner, Joyce E.; Wang, Yong; Liu, Xiaohong; Takemura, T.

    2014-03-27

    Mixed-phase clouds (clouds that consist of both cloud droplets and ice crystals) are frequently present in the Earth’s atmosphere and influence the Earth’s energy budget through their radiative properties, which are highly dependent on the cloud water phase. In this study, the phase partitioning of cloud water is compared among six global climate models (GCMs) and with Cloud and Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization retrievals. It is found that the GCMs predict vastly different distributions of cloud phase for a given temperature, and none of them are capable of reproducing the spatial distribution or magnitude of the observed phase partitioning. While some GCMs produced liquid water paths comparable to satellite observations, they all failed to preserve sufficient liquid water at mixed-phase cloud temperatures. Our results suggest that validating GCMs using only the vertically integrated water contents could lead to amplified differences in cloud radiative feedback. The sensitivity of the simulated cloud phase in GCMs to the choice of heterogeneous ice nucleation parameterization is also investigated. The response to a change in ice nucleation is quite different for each GCM, and the implementation of the same ice nucleation parameterization in all models does not reduce the spread in simulated phase among GCMs. The results suggest that processes subsequent to ice nucleation are at least as important in determining phase and should be the focus of future studies aimed at understanding and reducing differences among the models.

  19. Phase transitions for rotational states within an algebraic cluster model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López Moreno, E.; Morales Hernández, G. E.; Hess, P. O.; Yépez Martínez, H.

    2016-07-01

    The ground state and excited, rotational phase transitions are investigated within the Semimicroscopic Algebraic Cluster Model (SACM). The catastrophe theory is used to describe these phase transitions. Short introductions to the SACM and the catastrophe theory are given. We apply the formalism to the case of 16O+α→20Ne.

  20. Effective property models for homogeneous two-phase flows

    SciTech Connect

    Awad, M.M.; Muzychka, Y.S.

    2008-10-15

    Using an analogy between thermal conductivity of porous media and viscosity in two-phase flow, new definitions for two-phase viscosity are proposed. These new definitions satisfy the following two conditions: namely (i) the two-phase viscosity is equal to the liquid viscosity at the mass quality = 0% and (ii) the two-phase viscosity is equal to the gas viscosity at the mass quality = 100%. These new definitions can be used to compute the two-phase frictional pressure gradient using the homogeneous modeling approach. These new models are assessed using published experimental data of two-phase frictional pressure gradient in circular pipes, minichannels and microchannels in the form of Fanning friction factor (f{sub m}) versus Reynolds number (Re{sub m}). The published data include different working fluids such as R-12, R-22, argon (R740), R717, R134a, R410A and propane (R290) at different diameters and different saturation temperatures. Models are assessed on the basis minimizing the root mean square error (e{sub RMS}). It is shown that these new definitions of two-phase viscosity can be used to analyze the experimental data of two-phase frictional pressure gradient in circular pipes, minichannels and microchannels using simple friction models. (author)

  1. Phase-Field Modeling for Intercritical Annealing of a Dual-Phase Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Benqiang; Militzer, Matthias

    2015-03-01

    A phase-field model has been developed to describe microstructure evolution during intercritical annealing of a commercial DP600 dual-phase steel. The simulations emphasize the interaction between ferrite recrystallization and austenite formation from a cold-rolled pearlite/ferrite microstructure at high heating rates. The austenite-ferrite transformations are assumed to occur under conditions where only carbon partitions between the phases by long-range diffusion. A solute drag model has been integrated with the phase-field model to describe the effect of substitutional alloying elements on the migration of the ferrite/austenite interface. Experimental results including recrystallization and transformation kinetics as well as austenite morphology have been successfully described by carefully adjusting both the austenite nucleation scenario and the interface mobilities.

  2. Equivalent-circuit modeling of a MEMS phase detector for phase-locked loop applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Juzheng; Liao, Xiaoping

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents an equivalent-circuit model of a MEMS phase detector and deals with its application in phase-locked loops (PLLs). Due to the dc voltage output of the MEMS phase detector, the low-pass filter which is essential in a conventional PLL can be omitted. Thus, the layout area can be miniaturized and the consumed power can be saved. The signal transmission inside the phase detector is realized in circuit model by waveguide modules while the electric-thermal-electric conversion is illustrated in circuit term based on analogies between thermal and electrical variables. Losses are taken into consideration in the modeling. Measurement verifications for the phase detector model are conducted at different input powers 11, 14 and 17 dBm at 10 GHz. The maximum discrepancies between the simulated and measured results are 0.14, 0.42 and 1.13 mV, respectively. A new structure of PLL is constructed by connecting the presented model directly to a VCO module in the simulation platform. It allows to model the transient behaviors of the PLL at both locked and out of lock conditions. The VCO output frequency is revealed to be synchronized with the reference frequency within the hold range. All the modeling and simulation are performed in Advanced Design System (ADS) software.

  3. Prospects for de novo phasing with de novo protein models

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Rhiju Baker, David

    2009-02-01

    In a first systematic exploration of phasing with Rosetta de novo models, it is shown that all-atom refinement of coarse-grained models significantly improves both the model quality and performance in molecular replacement with the Phaser software. The prospect of phasing diffraction data sets ‘de novo’ for proteins with previously unseen folds is appealing but largely untested. In a first systematic exploration of phasing with Rosetta de novo models, it is shown that all-atom refinement of coarse-grained models significantly improves both the model quality and performance in molecular replacement with the Phaser software. 15 new cases of diffraction data sets that are unambiguously phased with de novo models are presented. These diffraction data sets represent nine space groups and span a large range of solvent contents (33–79%) and asymmetric unit copy numbers (1–4). No correlation is observed between the ease of phasing and the solvent content or asymmetric unit copy number. Instead, a weak correlation is found with the length of the modeled protein: larger proteins required somewhat less accurate models to give successful molecular replacement. Overall, the results of this survey suggest that de novo models can phase diffraction data for approximately one sixth of proteins with sizes of 100 residues or less. However, for many of these cases, ‘de novo phasing with de novo models’ requires significant investment of computational power, much greater than 10{sup 3} CPU days per target. Improvements in conformational search methods will be necessary if molecular replacement with de novo models is to become a practical tool for targets without homology to previously solved protein structures.

  4. Integrability and Quantum Phase Transitions in Interacting Boson Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dukelsky, J.; Arias, J. M.; Garcia-Ramos, J. E.; Pittel, S.

    2004-04-01

    The exact solution of the boson pairing hamiltonian given by Richardson in the sixties is used to study the phenomena of level crossings and quantum phase transitions in the integrable regions of the sd and sdg interacting boson models.

  5. Characterization and Computational Modeling of Minor Phases in Alloy LSHR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jou, Herng-Jeng; Olson, Gregory; Gabb, Timothy; Garg, Anita; Miller, Derek

    2012-01-01

    The minor phases of powder metallurgy disk superalloy LSHR were studied. Samples were consistently heat treated at three different temperatures for long times to approach equilibrium. Additional heat treatments were also performed for shorter times, to assess minor phase kinetics in non-equilibrium conditions. Minor phases including MC carbides, M23C6 carbides, M3B2 borides, and sigma were identified. Their average sizes and total area fractions were determined. CALPHAD thermodynamics databases and PrecipiCalc(TradeMark), a computational precipitation modeling tool, were employed with Ni-base thermodynamics and diffusion databases to model and simulate the phase microstructural evolution observed in the experiments with an objective to identify the model limitations and the directions of model enhancement.

  6. Cirrus Parcel Model Comparison Project. Phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Ruei-Fong; Starr, David O'C.; DeMott, Paul J.; Cotton, Richard; Jensen, Eric; Sassen, Kenneth

    2000-01-01

    The Cirrus Parcel Model Comparison (CPMC) is a project of the GEWEX Cloud System Study Working Group on Cirrus Cloud Systems (GCSS WG2). The primary goal of this project is to identify cirrus model sensitivities to the state of our knowledge of nucleation and microphysics. Furthermore, the common ground of the findings may provide guidelines for models with simpler cirrus microphysics modules. We focus on the nucleation regimes of the warm (parcel starting at -40 C and 340 hPa) and cold (-60 C and 170 hPa) cases studied in the GCSS WG2 Idealized Cirrus Model Comparison Project. Nucleation and ice crystal growth were forced through an externally imposed rate of lift and consequent adiabatic cooling. The background haze particles are assumed to be lognormally-distributed H2SO4 particles. Only the homogeneous nucleation mode is allowed to form ice crystals in the HN-ONLY runs; all nucleation modes are switched on in the ALL-MODE runs. Participants were asked to run the HN-lambda-fixed runs by setting lambda = 2 (lambda is further discussed in section 2) or tailoring the nucleation rate calculation in agreement with lambda = 2 (exp 1). The depth of parcel lift (800 m) was set to assure that parcels underwent complete transition through the nucleation regime to a stage of approximate equilibrium between ice mass growth and vapor supplied by the specified updrafts.

  7. Quantitative phase-field model of alloy solidification.

    PubMed

    Echebarria, Blas; Folch, Roger; Karma, Alain; Plapp, Mathis

    2004-12-01

    We present a detailed derivation and thin interface analysis of a phase-field model that can accurately simulate microstructural pattern formation for low-speed directional solidification of a dilute binary alloy. This advance with respect to previous phase-field models is achieved by the addition of a phenomenological "antitrapping" solute current in the mass conservation relation [Phys. Rev. Lett. 87, 115701 (2001)

  8. Phase transitions in models of human cooperation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perc, Matjaž

    2016-08-01

    If only the fittest survive, why should one cooperate? Why should one sacrifice personal benefits for the common good? Recent research indicates that a comprehensive answer to such questions requires that we look beyond the individual and focus on the collective behavior that emerges as a result of the interactions among individuals, groups, and societies. Although undoubtedly driven also by culture and cognition, human cooperation is just as well an emergent, collective phenomenon in a complex system. Nonequilibrium statistical physics, in particular the collective behavior of interacting particles near phase transitions, has already been recognized as very valuable for understanding counterintuitive evolutionary outcomes. However, unlike pairwise interactions among particles that typically govern solid-state physics systems, interactions among humans often involve group interactions, and they also involve a larger number of possible states even for the most simplified description of reality. Here we briefly review research done in the realm of the public goods game, and we outline future research directions with an emphasis on merging the most recent advances in the social sciences with methods of nonequilibrium statistical physics. By having a firm theoretical grip on human cooperation, we can hope to engineer better social systems and develop more efficient policies for a sustainable and better future.

  9. Quantitative phase-field modeling for boiling phenomena.

    PubMed

    Badillo, Arnoldo

    2012-10-01

    A phase-field model is developed for quantitative simulation of bubble growth in the diffusion-controlled regime. The model accounts for phase change and surface tension effects at the liquid-vapor interface of pure substances with large property contrast. The derivation of the model follows a two-fluid approach, where the diffuse interface is assumed to have an internal microstructure, defined by a sharp interface. Despite the fact that phases within the diffuse interface are considered to have their own velocities and pressures, an averaging procedure at the atomic scale, allows for expressing all the constitutive equations in terms of mixture quantities. From the averaging procedure and asymptotic analysis of the model, nonconventional terms appear in the energy and phase-field equations to compensate for the variation of the properties across the diffuse interface. Without these new terms, no convergence towards the sharp-interface model can be attained. The asymptotic analysis also revealed a very small thermal capillary length for real fluids, such as water, that makes impossible for conventional phase-field models to capture bubble growth in the millimeter range size. For instance, important phenomena such as bubble growth and detachment from a hot surface could not be simulated due to the large number of grids points required to resolve all the scales. Since the shape of the liquid-vapor interface is primarily controlled by the effects of an isotropic surface energy (surface tension), a solution involving the elimination of the curvature from the phase-field equation is devised. The elimination of the curvature from the phase-field equation changes the length scale dominating the phase change from the thermal capillary length to the thickness of the thermal boundary layer, which is several orders of magnitude larger. A detailed analysis of the phase-field equation revealed that a split of this equation into two independent parts is possible for system sizes

  10. Models for a liquid-liquid phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buldyrev, S. V.; Franzese, G.; Giovambattista, N.; Malescio, G.; Sadr-Lahijany, M. R.; Scala, A.; Skibinsky, A.; Stanley, H. E.

    2002-02-01

    We use molecular dynamics simulations to study two- and three-dimensional models with the isotropic double-step potential which in addition to the hard core has a repulsive soft core of larger radius. Our results indicate that the presence of two characteristic repulsive distances (hard core and soft core) is sufficient to explain liquid anomalies and a liquid-liquid phase transition, but these two phenomena may occur independently. Thus liquid-liquid transitions may exist in systems like liquid metals, regardless of the presence of the density anomaly. For 2D, we propose a model with a specific set of hard core and soft core parameters, that qualitatively reproduces the phase diagram and anomalies of liquid water. We identify two solid phases: a square crystal (high density phase), and a triangular crystal (low density phase) and discuss the relation between the anomalies of liquid and the polymorphism of the solid. Similarly to real water, our 2D system may have the second critical point in the metastable liquid phase beyond the freezing line. In 3D, we find several sets of parameters for which two fluid-fluid phase transition lines exist: the first line between gas and liquid and the second line between high-density liquid (HDL) and low-density liquid (LDL). In all cases, the LDL phase shows no density anomaly in 3D. We relate the absence of the density anomaly with the positive slope of the LDL-HDL phase transition line.

  11. Characterization of topological phases in the compass ladder model.

    PubMed

    Haghshenas, R; Langari, A; Rezakhani, A T

    2016-05-01

    The phase diagram of the quantum compass ladder model is investigated through numerical density matrix renormalization group based on infinite matrix product state algorithm and analytic effective perturbation theory. For this model we obtain two symmetry-protected topological phases, protected by a Z2 × Z2 symmetry, and a topologically-trivial Z2-symmetry-breaking phase. The symmetry-protected topological phases--labeled by symmetry fractionalization--belong to different topological classes, where the complex-conjugate symmetry uniquely distinguishes them. An important result of this classification is that, as revealed by the nature of the Z2-symmetry-breaking phase, the associated quantum phase transitions are accompanied by an explicit symmetry breaking, and thus a local-order parameter conclusively identifies the phase diagram of the underlying model. This is in stark contrast to previous studies which require a non-local string order parameter to distinguish the corresponding quantum phase transitions. We numerically examine our results and show that the local-order parameter is related to the magnetization exponent 0.12 ± 0.01. PMID:27023290

  12. Order of lipid phases in model and plasma membranes

    PubMed Central

    Kaiser, Hermann-Josef; Lingwood, Daniel; Levental, Ilya; Sampaio, Julio L.; Kalvodova, Lucie; Rajendran, Lawrence; Simons, Kai

    2009-01-01

    Lipid rafts are nanoscopic assemblies of sphingolipids, cholesterol, and specific membrane proteins that contribute to lateral heterogeneity in eukaryotic membranes. Separation of artificial membranes into liquid-ordered (Lo) and liquid-disordered phases is regarded as a common model for this compartmentalization. However, tight lipid packing in Lo phases seems to conflict with efficient partitioning of raft-associated transmembrane (TM) proteins. To assess membrane order as a component of raft organization, we performed fluorescence spectroscopy and microscopy with the membrane probes Laurdan and C-laurdan. First, we assessed lipid packing in model membranes of various compositions and found cholesterol and acyl chain dependence of membrane order. Then we probed cell membranes by using two novel systems that exhibit inducible phase separation: giant plasma membrane vesicles [Baumgart et al. (2007) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 104:3165–3170] and plasma membrane spheres. Notably, only the latter support selective inclusion of raft TM proteins with the ganglioside GM1 into one phase. We measured comparable small differences in order between the separated phases of both biomembranes. Lateral packing in the ordered phase of giant plasma membrane vesicles resembled the Lo domain of model membranes, whereas the GM1 phase in plasma membrane spheres exhibited considerably lower order, consistent with different partitioning of lipid and TM protein markers. Thus, lipid-mediated coalescence of the GM1 raft domain seems to be distinct from the formation of a Lo phase, suggesting additional interactions between proteins and lipids to be effective. PMID:19805351

  13. Molecular model for the anticlinic smectic-C(A) phase

    PubMed

    Osipov; Fukuda

    2000-09-01

    Both phenomenological and molecular-statistical theories of the anticlinic smectic-C(A) phase (Sm-C(A)) are considered in detail. The anticlinic structure produces antiferroelectricity in the chiral smectic-C(A) phase (Sm-C(A)*). The molecular theory is based on a simple model potential which stabilizes Sm-C(A) with respect to the synclinic smectic-C phase (Sm-C). Conventional dispersion and steric interactions between mesogenic molecules generally do not promote Sm-C(A). It may be stabilized by interlayer orientational correlations between transverse molecular dipoles located in the flexible chains. Such correlations are not sensitive to molecular handedness (chirality), and thus the theory accounts for the formation of the anticlinic phase in racemic mixtures. The model is also confirmed by other experimental data. Finally a simple phase diagram of the perfectly ordered smectic liquid crystal is presented which contains Sm-A, Sm-C, and Sm-C(A).

  14. Topological phase transitions in the gauged BPS baby Skyrme model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, C.; Naya, C.; Romanczukiewicz, T.; Sanchez-Guillen, J.; Wereszczynski, A.

    2015-05-01

    We demonstrate that the gauged BPS baby Skyrme model with a double vacuum potential allows for phase transitions from a non-solitonic to a solitonic phase, where the latter corresponds to a ferromagnetic liquid. Such a transition can be generated by increasing the external pressure P or by turning on an external magnetic field H. As a consequence, the topological phase where gauged BPS baby skyrmions exist, is a higher density phase. For smaller densities, obtained for smaller values of P and H, a phase without solitons is reached. We find the critical line in the P, H parameter space. Furthermore, in the soliton phase, we find the equation of state for the baby skyrmion matter V = V( P,H) at zero temperature, where V is the "volume", i.e., area of the solitons.

  15. Lattice Boltzmann modeling of three-phase incompressible flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, H.; Shi, B. C.; Chai, Z. H.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, based on multicomponent phase-field theory we intend to develop an efficient lattice Boltzmann (LB) model for simulating three-phase incompressible flows. In this model, two LB equations are used to capture the interfaces among three different fluids, and another LB equation is adopted to solve the flow field, where a new distribution function for the forcing term is delicately designed. Different from previous multiphase LB models, the interfacial force is not used in the computation of fluid velocity, which is more reasonable from the perspective of the multiscale analysis. As a result, the computation of fluid velocity can be much simpler. Through the Chapman-Enskog analysis, it is shown that the present model can recover exactly the physical formulations for the three-phase system. Numerical simulations of extensive examples including two circular interfaces, ternary spinodal decomposition, spreading of a liquid lens, and Kelvin-Helmholtz instability are conducted to test the model. It is found that the present model can capture accurate interfaces among three different fluids, which is attributed to its algebraical and dynamical consistency properties with the two-component model. Furthermore, the numerical results of three-phase flows agree well with the theoretical results or some available data, which demonstrates that the present LB model is a reliable and efficient method for simulating three-phase flow problems.

  16. Lattice Boltzmann modeling of three-phase incompressible flows.

    PubMed

    Liang, H; Shi, B C; Chai, Z H

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, based on multicomponent phase-field theory we intend to develop an efficient lattice Boltzmann (LB) model for simulating three-phase incompressible flows. In this model, two LB equations are used to capture the interfaces among three different fluids, and another LB equation is adopted to solve the flow field, where a new distribution function for the forcing term is delicately designed. Different from previous multiphase LB models, the interfacial force is not used in the computation of fluid velocity, which is more reasonable from the perspective of the multiscale analysis. As a result, the computation of fluid velocity can be much simpler. Through the Chapman-Enskog analysis, it is shown that the present model can recover exactly the physical formulations for the three-phase system. Numerical simulations of extensive examples including two circular interfaces, ternary spinodal decomposition, spreading of a liquid lens, and Kelvin-Helmholtz instability are conducted to test the model. It is found that the present model can capture accurate interfaces among three different fluids, which is attributed to its algebraical and dynamical consistency properties with the two-component model. Furthermore, the numerical results of three-phase flows agree well with the theoretical results or some available data, which demonstrates that the present LB model is a reliable and efficient method for simulating three-phase flow problems.

  17. Modified phase-field-crystal model for solid-liquid phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Can; Wang, Jincheng; Wang, Zhijun; Li, Junjie; Guo, Yaolin; Tang, Sai

    2015-07-01

    A modified phase-field-crystal (PFC) model is proposed to describe solid-liquid phase transitions by reconstructing the correlation function. The effects of fitting parameters of our modified PFC model on the bcc-liquid phase diagram, numerical stability, and solid-liquid interface properties during planar interface growth are examined carefully. The results indicate that the increase of the correlation function peak width at k =km will enhance the stability of the ordered phase, while the increase of peak height at k =0 will narrow the two-phase coexistence region. The third-order term in the free-energy function and the short wave-length of the correlation function have significant influences on the numerical stability of the PFC model. During planar interface growth, the increase of peak width at k =km will decrease the interface width and the velocity coefficient C , but increase the anisotropy of C and the interface free energy. Finally, the feasibility of the modified phase-field-crystal model is demonstrated with a numerical example of three-dimensional dendritic growth of a body-centered-cubic structure.

  18. Modified phase-field-crystal model for solid-liquid phase transitions.

    PubMed

    Guo, Can; Wang, Jincheng; Wang, Zhijun; Li, Junjie; Guo, Yaolin; Tang, Sai

    2015-07-01

    A modified phase-field-crystal (PFC) model is proposed to describe solid-liquid phase transitions by reconstructing the correlation function. The effects of fitting parameters of our modified PFC model on the bcc-liquid phase diagram, numerical stability, and solid-liquid interface properties during planar interface growth are examined carefully. The results indicate that the increase of the correlation function peak width at k=k(m) will enhance the stability of the ordered phase, while the increase of peak height at k=0 will narrow the two-phase coexistence region. The third-order term in the free-energy function and the short wave-length of the correlation function have significant influences on the numerical stability of the PFC model. During planar interface growth, the increase of peak width at k=k(m) will decrease the interface width and the velocity coefficient C, but increase the anisotropy of C and the interface free energy. Finally, the feasibility of the modified phase-field-crystal model is demonstrated with a numerical example of three-dimensional dendritic growth of a body-centered-cubic structure. PMID:26274309

  19. The KM phase in semi-realistic heterotic orbifold models

    SciTech Connect

    Giedt, Joel

    2000-07-05

    In string-inspired semi-realistic heterotic orbifolds models with an anomalous U(1){sub X},a nonzero Kobayashi-Masakawa (KM) phase is shown to arise generically from the expectation values of complex scalar fields, which appear in nonrenormalizable quark mass couplings. Modular covariant nonrenormalizable superpotential couplings are constructed. A toy Z{sub 3} orbifold model is analyzed in some detail. Modular symmetries and orbifold selection rules are taken into account and do not lead to a cancellation of the KM phase. We also discuss attempts to obtain the KM phase solely from renormalizable interactions.

  20. Comparative assessment of three-phase oil relative permeability models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranaee, Ehsan; Riva, Monica; Porta, Giovanni M.; Guadagnini, Alberto

    2016-07-01

    We assess the ability of 11 models to reproduce three-phase oil relative permeability (kro) laboratory data obtained in a water-wet sandstone sample. We do so by considering model performance when (i) solely two-phase data are employed to render predictions of kro and (ii) two and three-phase data are jointly used for model calibration. In the latter case, a Maximum Likelihood (ML) approach is used to estimate model parameters. The tested models are selected among (i) classical models routinely employed in practical applications and implemented in commercial reservoir software and (ii) relatively recent models which are considered to allow overcoming some drawbacks of the classical formulations. Among others, the latter set of models includes the formulation recently proposed by Ranaee et al., which has been shown to embed the critical effects of hysteresis, including the reproduction of oil remobilization induced by gas injection in water-wet media. We employ formal model discrimination criteria to rank models according to their skill to reproduce the observed data and use ML Bayesian model averaging to provide model-averaged estimates (and associated uncertainty bounds) of kro by taking advantage of the diverse interpretive abilities of all models analyzed. The occurrence of elliptic regions is also analyzed for selected models in the framework of the classical fractional flow theory of displacement. Our study confirms that model outcomes based on channel flow theory and classical saturation-weighted interpolation models do not generally yield accurate reproduction of kro data, especially in the regime associated with low oil saturations, where water alternating gas injection (WAG) techniques are usually employed for enhanced oil recovery. This negative feature is not observed in the model of Ranaee et al. (2015) due to its ability to embed key effects of pore-scale phase distributions, such as hysteresis effects and cycle dependency, for modeling kro observed

  1. Cupola modeling research: Phase 2 (Year one), Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-11-20

    Objective was to develop a mathematical model of the cupola furnace (cast iron production) in on-line and off-line process control and optimization. In Phase I, the general structure of the heat transfer, fluid flow, and chemical models were laid out, providing reasonable descriptions of cupola behavior with a one-dimensional representation. Work was also initiated on a two-dimensional model. Phase II was focused on perfecting the one-dimensional model. The contributions include these from MIT, Michigan University, and GM.

  2. General single phase wellbore flow model

    SciTech Connect

    Ouyang, Liang-Biao; Arbabi, S.; Aziz, K.

    1997-02-05

    A general wellbore flow model, which incorporates not only frictional, accelerational and gravitational pressure drops, but also the pressure drop caused by inflow, is presented in this report. The new wellbore model is readily applicable to any wellbore perforation patterns and well completions, and can be easily incorporated in reservoir simulators or analytical reservoir inflow models. Three dimensionless numbers, the accelerational to frictional pressure gradient ratio R{sub af}, the gravitational to frictional pressure gradient ratio R{sub gf}, and the inflow-directional to accelerational pressure gradient ratio R{sub da}, have been introduced to quantitatively describe the relative importance of different pressure gradient components. For fluid flow in a production well, it is expected that there may exist up to three different regions of the wellbore: the laminar flow region, the partially-developed turbulent flow region, and the fully-developed turbulent flow region. The laminar flow region is located near the well toe, the partially-turbulent flow region lies in the middle of the wellbore, while the fully-developed turbulent flow region is at the downstream end or the heel of the wellbore. Length of each region depends on fluid properties, wellbore geometry and flow rate. As the distance from the well toe increases, flow rate in the wellbore increases and the ratios R{sub af} and R{sub da} decrease. Consequently accelerational and inflow-directional pressure drops have the greatest impact in the toe region of the wellbore. Near the well heel the local wellbore flow rate becomes large and close to the total well production rate, here R{sub af} and R{sub da} are small, therefore, both the accelerational and inflow-directional pressure drops can be neglected.

  3. Communication: phase transitions, criticality, and three-phase coexistence in constrained cell models.

    PubMed

    Nayhouse, Michael; Kwon, Joseph Sang-Il; Orkoulas, G

    2012-05-28

    In simulation studies of fluid-solid transitions, the solid phase is usually modeled as a constrained system in which each particle is confined to move in a single Wigner-Seitz cell. The constrained cell model has been used in the determination of fluid-solid coexistence via thermodynamic integration and other techniques. In the present work, the phase diagram of such a constrained system of Lennard-Jones particles is determined from constant-pressure simulations. The pressure-density isotherms exhibit inflection points which are interpreted as the mechanical stability limit of the solid phase. The phase diagram of the constrained system contains a critical and a triple point. The temperature and pressure at the critical and the triple point are both higher than those of the unconstrained system due to the reduction in the entropy caused by the single occupancy constraint.

  4. Non-equilibrium model of two-phase porous media flow with phase change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cueto-Felgueroso, L.; Fu, X.; Juanes, R.

    2014-12-01

    The efficient simulation of multi-phase multi-component flow through geologic porous media is challenging and computationally intensive, yet quantitative modeling of these processes is essential in engineering and the geosciences. Multiphase flow with phase change and complex phase behavior arises in numerous applications, including enhanced oil recovery, steam injection in groundwater remediation, geologic CO2 storage and enhanced geothermal energy systems. A challenge of multiphase compositional simulation is that the number of existing phases varies with position and time, and thus the number of state variables in the saturation-based conservation laws is a function of space and time. The tasks of phase-state identification and determination of the composition of the different phases are performed assuming local thermodynamic equilibrium. Here we investigate a thermodynamically consistent formulation for non-isothermal two-phase flow, in systems where the hypothesis of instantaneous local equilibrium does not hold. Non-equilibrium effects are important in coarse-scale simulations where the assumption of complete mixing in each gridblock is not realistic. We apply our model to steam injection in water-saturated porous media.

  5. Characterization of topological phases in the compass ladder model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haghshenas, R.; Langari, A.; Rezakhani, A. T.

    2016-05-01

    The phase diagram of the quantum compass ladder model is investigated through numerical density matrix renormalization group based on infinite matrix product state algorithm and analytic effective perturbation theory. For this model we obtain two symmetry-protected topological phases, protected by a {{Z}2}× {{Z}2} symmetry, and a topologically-trivial Z 2-symmetry-breaking phase. The symmetry-protected topological phases—labeled by symmetry fractionalization—belong to different topological classes, where the complex-conjugate symmetry uniquely distinguishes them. An important result of this classification is that, as revealed by the nature of the Z 2-symmetry-breaking phase, the associated quantum phase transitions are accompanied by an explicit symmetry breaking, and thus a local-order parameter conclusively identifies the phase diagram of the underlying model. This is in stark contrast to previous studies which require a non-local string order parameter to distinguish the corresponding quantum phase transitions. We numerically examine our results and show that the local-order parameter is related to the magnetization exponent 0.12+/- 0.01 .

  6. A SPICE model for a phase-change memory cell based on the analytical conductivity model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yiqun, Wei; Xinnan, Lin; Yuchao, Jia; Xiaole, Cui; Jin, He; Xing, Zhang

    2012-11-01

    By way of periphery circuit design of the phase-change memory, it is necessary to present an accurate compact model of a phase-change memory cell for the circuit simulation. Compared with the present model, the model presented in this work includes an analytical conductivity model, which is deduced by means of the carrier transport theory instead of the fitting model based on the measurement. In addition, this model includes an analytical temperature model based on the 1D heat-transfer equation and the phase-transition dynamic model based on the JMA equation to simulate the phase-change process. The above models for phase-change memory are integrated by using Verilog-A language, and results show that this model is able to simulate the I-V characteristics and the programming characteristics accurately.

  7. Modeling Hysteresis Effect in Three-Phase Relative Permeability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kianinejad, A.; Chen, X.; DiCarlo, D. A.

    2014-12-01

    Simulation and fluid flow prediction of many petroleum enhanced oil recovery methods as well as environmental processes such as carbon dioxide (CO2) geological storage requires accurate modeling and determination of relative permeability under different saturation histories. Based on this critical need, there has been several different three-phase relative permeability models developed to predict the hysteresis effects in relative permeability, most of which requiring many different parameters which introduce extreme complexity to the models for practical purposes. In this work, we experimentally measured three-phase, water/oil/gas, relative permeability in a 1-m long water-wet sand pack, under several different flow histories. We measured the in-situ saturations along the sand pack using a CT scanner. We then determined the relative permeabilities directly from the measured in-situ saturations, using unsteady-state method. Based on our results, good estimation of residual saturations yields in excellent three-phase relative permeability estimations by just using the simple, standard relative permeability models such as, Saturation Weighted Interpolation (SWI), Corey's and Stones. Our results show that, the key parameter to model the hysteresis in three-phase relative permeability (effect of saturation history) is the residual saturations. Once the residual saturations were correctly determined for each specific saturation path, the standard relative permeability models can predict the three-phase relative permeabilities perfectly.

  8. Phase-Field Modeling of Elasticity, Plasticity, and Phase Segregation in Binary Heteroepitaxial Film Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berry, Joel; Elder, Ken; Provatas, Nikolas

    2004-03-01

    A continuum phase field model, adapted from the Phase Field Crystals (PFC) model [1], is applied to the study of strained binary heteroepitaxial systems, with emphasis given to the investigation of 2-D species segregation during liquid phase film growth. In addition to (1) phase segregation, it is shown that this model is capable of incorporating (2) surface morphological evolution and (3) defect nucleation and propagation, as well as the interactions of these three phenomena, over all primary epitaxial growth regimes. Additional highlights of the model include consideration of composition-dependent elastic moduli, differing species mobilities, and mass transport within the bulk film. The spatial nature of the phase segregation and its interaction with film surface morphology and defect nucleation are investigated as functions of various material and process parameters. In particular, the interaction between film surface morphology and compositional segregation is investigated, with attention given to its influence on the asymmetry observed in critical thickness between compressive and tensile strains. [1] K.R. Elder, M. Katakowski, M. Haataja, and M. Grant, Physical Review Letters 88, 245701 (2002).

  9. An SPICE model for phase-change memory simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xi, Li; Zhitang, Song; Daolin, Cai; Xiaogang, Chen; Houpeng, Chen

    2011-09-01

    Along with a series of research works on the physical prototype and properties of the memory cell, an SPICE model for phase-change memory (PCM) simulations based on Verilog-A language is presented. By handling it with the heat distribution algorithm, threshold switching theory and the crystallization kinetic model, the proposed SPICE model can effectively reproduce the physical behaviors of the phase-change memory cell. In particular, it can emulate the cell's temperature curve and crystallinity profile during the programming process, which can enable us to clearly understand the PCM's working principle and program process.

  10. Quantum phase transitions in holographic models of magnetism and superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Iqbal, Nabil; Liu Hong; Mezei, Mark; Si Qimiao

    2010-08-15

    We study a holographic model realizing an 'antiferromagnetic' phase in which a global SU(2) symmetry representing spin is broken down to a U(1) by the presence of a finite electric charge density. This involves the condensation of a neutral scalar field in a charged anti-de Sitter black hole. We observe that the phase transition for both neutral and charged (as in the standard holographic superconductor) order parameters can be driven to zero temperature by a tuning of the UV conformal dimension of the order parameter, resulting in a quantum phase transition of the Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless-type. We also characterize the antiferromagnetic phase and an externally forced ferromagnetic phase by showing that they contain the expected spin waves with linear and quadratic dispersions, respectively.

  11. Phase-field-crystal model of phase and microstructural stability in driven nanocrystalline systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ofori-Opoku, Nana; Hoyt, Jeffrey J.; Provatas, Nikolas

    2012-12-01

    We present a phase-field-crystal model for driven systems which describes competing effects between thermally activated diffusional processes and those driven by externally imposed ballistic events. The model demonstrates how the mesoscopic Enrique and Bellon [Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.84.2885 84, 2885 (2000)] model of externally induced ballistic mixing can be incorporated into the atomistic phase-field-crystal formalism. The combination of the two approaches results in a model capable of describing the microstructural and compositional evolution of a driven system while incorporating elastoplastic effects. The model is applied to the study of grain growth in nanocrystalline materials subjected to an external driving.

  12. Lifshitz Transitions in Magnetic Phases of the Periodic Anderson Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubo, Katsunori

    2015-09-01

    We investigate the reconstruction of a Fermi surface, which is called a Lifshitz transition, in magnetically ordered phases of the periodic Anderson model on a square lattice with a finite Coulomb interaction between f electrons. We apply the variational Monte Carlo method to the model by using the Gutzwiller wavefunctions for the paramagnetic, antiferromagnetic, ferromagnetic, and charge-density-wave states. We find that an antiferromagnetic phase is realized around half-filling and a ferromagnetic phase is realized when the system is far away from half-filling. In both magnetic phases, Lifshitz transitions take place. By analyzing the electronic states, we conclude that the Lifshitz transitions to large ordered-moment states can be regarded as itinerant-localized transitions of the f electrons.

  13. The electroweak phase transition in the Inert Doublet Model

    SciTech Connect

    Blinov, Nikita; Profumo, Stefano; Stefaniak, Tim

    2015-07-21

    We study the strength of a first-order electroweak phase transition in the Inert Doublet Model (IDM), where particle dark matter (DM) is comprised of the lightest neutral inert Higgs boson. We improve over previous studies in the description and treatment of the finite-temperature effective potential and of the electroweak phase transition. We focus on a set of benchmark models inspired by the key mechanisms in the IDM leading to a viable dark matter particle candidate, and illustrate how to enhance the strength of the electroweak phase transition by adjusting the masses of the yet undiscovered IDM Higgs states. We argue that across a variety of DM masses, obtaining a strong enough first-order phase transition is a generic possibility in the IDM. We find that due to direct dark matter searches and collider constraints, a sufficiently strong transition and a thermal relic density matching the universal DM abundance is possible only in the Higgs funnel regime.

  14. Dense Heterogeneous Continuum Model of Two-Phase Explosion Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhl, A L; Bell, J B

    2010-04-07

    A heterogeneous continuum model is proposed to describe the dispersion of a dense Aluminum particle cloud in an explosion. Let {alpha}{sub 1} denote the volume fraction occupied by the gas and {alpha}{sub 2} the fraction occupied by the solid, satisfying the volume conservation relation: {alpha}{sub 1} + {alpha}{sub 2} = 1. When the particle phase occupies a non-negligible volume fraction (i.e., {alpha}{sub 2} > 0), additional terms, proportional to {alpha}{sub 2}, appear in the conservation laws for two-phase flows. These include: (i) a particle pressure (due to particle collisions), (ii) a corresponding sound speed (which produces real eigenvalues for the particle phase system), (iii) an Archimedes force induced on the particle phase (by the gas pressure gradient), and (iv) multi-particle drag effects (which enhance the momentum coupling between phases). These effects modify the accelerations and energy distributions in the phases; we call this the Dense Heterogeneous Continuum Model. A characteristics analysis of the Model equations indicates that the system is hyperbolic with real eigenvalues for the gas phase: {l_brace}v{sub 1}, v{sub 1} {+-} {alpha}{sub 1}{r_brace} and for the 'particle gas' phase: {l_brace}v{sub 2}, v{sub 2} {+-}{alpha}{sub 2}{r_brace} and the particles: {l_brace}v{sub 2}{r_brace}, where v{sub i} and {alpha}{sub i} denote the velocity vector and sound speed of phase i. These can be used to construct a high-order Godunov scheme to integrate the conservation laws of a dense heterogeneous continuum.

  15. Application of headspace sorptive extraction and gas chromatographic/mass spectrometric and chemometric methods to the quantification of pine nuts and pecorino in Pesto Genovese.

    PubMed

    Zunin, Paola; Leardi, Riccardo; Boggia, Raffaella

    2009-01-01

    Headspace sorptive extraction and GC/MS, coupled with chemometric tools, were used to predict the amounts of pine nuts and Pecorino in Pesto Genovese, a typical Italian basil-based pasta sauce. Two groups of samples were prepared at different times and with ingredients from different batches for building the predicting models and testing their performances. Principal component analysis and partial least-squares regression (PLS) were applied to the chromatographic data. The 24 most-predictive variables were selected, and the application of PLS to the training set samples led to two models that explained approximately 70% of the variance in cross-validation, with prediction errors of 0.1 g for Pecorino and 0.6 g for pine nuts, thus confirming the reliability of the analytical method and the predicting ability of the models. The results obtained for the test set samples were not completely satisfactory, with a prediction error and a bias of 5.0 and -4.1 g, respectively, for Pecorino and corresponding values of 4.1 and 2.0 g for pine nuts. This preliminary study shows that the analytical methods used can allow construction of models with high predictive ability only if the great variability of the headspace composition of the ingredients and the effect of Twister are considered.

  16. Modeling liquid-liquid phase transitions and quasicrystal formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skibinsky, Anna

    In this thesis, studies which concern two different subjects related to phase transitions in fluids and crystalline solids are presented. Condensed matter formation, structure, and phase transitions are modeled using molecular dynamics simulations of simple discontinuous potentials with attractive and repulsive interactions. Novel phase diagrams are proposed for quasicrystals, crystals, and liquids. In the first part of the thesis, the formation of a quasicrystal in a two dimensional monodisperse system is investigated using molecular dynamics simulations of hard sphere particles interacting via a two-dimensional square-well potential. It is found that for certain values of the square-well parameters more than one stable crystalline phase can form. By quenching the liquid phase at a very low temperature, an amorphous phase is obtained. When this the amorphous phase is heated, a quasicrystalline structure with five-fold symmetry forms. From estimations of the Helmholtz potentials of the stable crystalline phases and of the quasicrystal, it is concluded that within a specific temperature range, the observed quasicrystal phase can be the stable phase. The second part of the thesis concerns a study of the liquid-liquid phase transition for a single-component system in three dimensions, interacting via an isotropic potential with a repulsive soft-core shoulder at short distance and an attractive well at an intermediate distance. The potential is similar to potentials used to describe such liquid systems as colloids, protein solutions, or liquid metals. It is shown that the phase diagram for such a potential can have two lines of first-order fluid-fluid phase transitions: one separating a gas and a low-density liquid (LDL), and another between the LDL and a high-density liquid (HDL). Both phase transition lines end in a critical point, a gas-LDL critical point and, depending on the potential parameters, either a gas-HDL critical point or a LDL-HDL critical point. A

  17. Advanced geothermal hydraulics model -- Phase 1 final report, Part 2

    SciTech Connect

    W. Zheng; J. Fu; W. C. Maurer

    1999-07-01

    An advanced geothermal well hydraulics model (GEODRIL) is being developed to accurately calculate bottom-hole conditions in these hot wells. In Phase 1, real-time monitoring and other improvements were added to GEODRIL. In Phase 2, GEODRIL will be integrated into Marconi's Intelligent Drilling Monitor (IDM) that will use artificial intelligence to detect lost circulation, fluid influxes and other circulation problems in geothermal wells. This software platform has potential for significantly reducing geothermal drilling costs.

  18. The rich phase structure of a mutator model

    PubMed Central

    Saakian, David B.; Yakushkina, Tatiana; Hu, Chin-Kun

    2016-01-01

    We propose a modification of the Crow-Kimura and Eigen models of biological molecular evolution to include a mutator gene that causes both an increase in the mutation rate and a change in the fitness landscape. This mutator effect relates to a wide range of biomedical problems. There are three possible phases: mutator phase, mixed phase and non-selective phase. We calculate the phase structure, the mean fitness and the fraction of the mutator allele in the population, which can be applied to describe cancer development and RNA viruses. We find that depending on the genome length, either the normal or the mutator allele dominates in the mixed phase. We analytically solve the model for a general fitness function. We conclude that the random fitness landscape is an appropriate choice for describing the observed mutator phenomenon in the case of a small fraction of mutators. It is shown that the increase in the mutation rates in the regular and the mutator parts of the genome should be set independently; only some combinations of these increases can push the complex biomedical system to the non-selective phase, potentially related to the eradication of tumors. PMID:27721395

  19. Passive fathometer reflector identification with phase shift modeling.

    PubMed

    Michalopoulou, Zoi-Heleni; Gerstoft, Peter

    2016-07-01

    In passive fathometer processing, the presence of wavelets in the estimate of the medium's Green's function corresponds to the location of reflectors in the seabed; amplitudes are related to seabed properties. Bayesian methods have been successful in identifying reflectors that define layer interfaces. Further work, however, revealed that phase shifts are occasionally present in the wavelets and hinder accurate layer identification for some reflectors. With a Gibbs sampler that computes probability densities of reflector depths, strengths of the reflections, and wavelet phase shifts, the significance of phase shift modeling in successful estimation of reflectors and their strengths is demonstrated. PMID:27475201

  20. Phase structure in a chiral model of nuclear matter

    SciTech Connect

    Phat, Tran Huu; Anh, Nguyen Tuan; Tam, Dinh Thanh

    2011-08-15

    The phase structure of symmetric nuclear matter in the extended Nambu-Jona-Lasinio (ENJL) model is studied by means of the effective potential in the one-loop approximation. It is found that chiral symmetry gets restored at high nuclear density and a typical first-order phase transition of the liquid-gas transition occurs at zero temperature, T=0, which weakens as T grows and eventually ends up with a second-order critical point at T=20 MeV. This phase transition scenario is confirmed by investigating the evolution of the effective potential versus the effective nucleon mass and the equation of state.

  1. An automated flow injection system for metal determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry involving on-line fabric disk sorptive extraction technique.

    PubMed

    Anthemidis, A; Kazantzi, V; Samanidou, V; Kabir, A; Furton, K G

    2016-08-15

    A novel flow injection-fabric disk sorptive extraction (FI-FDSE) system was developed for automated determination of trace metals. The platform was based on a minicolumn packed with sol-gel coated fabric media in the form of disks, incorporated into an on-line solid-phase extraction system, coupled with flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). This configuration provides minor backpressure, resulting in high loading flow rates and shorter analytical cycles. The potentials of this technique were demonstrated for trace lead and cadmium determination in environmental water samples. The applicability of different sol-gel coated FPSE media was investigated. The on-line formed complex of metal with ammonium pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (APDC) was retained onto the fabric surface and methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK) was used to elute the analytes prior to atomization. For 90s preconcentration time, enrichment factors of 140 and 38 and detection limits (3σ) of 1.8 and 0.4μgL(-1) were achieved for lead and cadmium determination, respectively, with a sampling frequency of 30h(-1). The accuracy of the proposed method was estimated by analyzing standard reference materials and spiked water samples. PMID:27260436

  2. Determination of off-flavor compounds, 2-methylisoborneol and geosmin, in salmon fillets using stir bar sorptive extraction-thermal desorption coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ruan, E D; Aalhus, J L; Summerfelt, S T; Davidson, J; Swift, B; Juárez, M

    2013-12-20

    A sensitive and solvent-less method for the determination of musty and earthy off-flavor compounds, 2-methylisoborneol (MIB) and geosmin (GSM), in salmon tissue was developed using stir bar sorptive extraction-thermal desorption coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (SBSE-TD-GCMS). MIB and GSM were solid phase extracted using polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) coated stir bars, analyzed by gas chromatography, and detected in full scan mode of mass selective detector (MSD). Using this method, the calibration curves of MIB and GSM were linear in the range of 0.3-100ng/L, with a correlation coefficient above 0.999 and RSDs less than 4% (n=4). The limit of detection (LOD, S/N=3, n=6) and limit of quantification (LOQ, S/N=10, n=6) of MIB and GSM were both ∼0.3 and 1ng/L, respectively. The recoveries of MIB and GSM were 22% and 29% by spike in 30ng/L standard compounds, 23% and 30% by spike-in 100ng/L standard compounds in salmon tissue samples with good precision (<8% of RSDs, n=6), respectively. The recoveries of MIB and GSM were better than reported methodologies using SPME fibres (<10%) in fish tissue samples. This method was successfully applied to monitor and characterize depurated salmon fillet samples (0, 3, 6 and 10 days).

  3. Simultaneous determination of parabens and synthetic musks in water by stir-bar sorptive extraction and thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ramírez, Noelia; Borrull, Francesc; Marcé, Rosa Maria

    2012-02-01

    This study focuses on a method for simultaneously determining personal care products in a wide range of polarities in different water matrices. The method is based on stir-bar sorptive extraction followed by thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Prior to extraction, the parabens were acetylated to improve their affinity for the polydimethylsiloxane phase of the stir bar. The method showed good linearity, repeatability and reproducibility between days for all compounds and limits of detection at low ng/L levels (between 0.02 and 0.3 ng/L). The proposed method is also environmentally friendly, because it does not use organic solvents, and reduces the risk of external pollution, due to the minimal manipulation of the sample required. The method developed was successfully applied for the analysis of personal care products in different kinds of water matrices: influents and effluents of urban and industrial wastewater treatment plants, effluents of a reverse osmosis treatment plant and river waters. The influents of urban treatment plants generally showed the highest values for synthetic musks, with concentrations of up to 2219 ng/L of galaxolide, whereas the highest concentrations of parabens were detected in the industrial treatment plants influents.

  4. Modeling scattering in turbid media using the Gegenbauer phase function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calabro, Katherine W.; Cassarly, William

    2015-03-01

    The choice of scattering phase function is critically important in the modeling of photon propagation in turbid media, particularly when the scattering path within the material is on the order of several mean free path lengths. For tissue applications, the single parameter Henyey-Greenstein (HG) phase function is known to underestimate the contribution of backscattering, while phase functions based on Mie theory can be more complex than necessary due to the multitude of parameter inputs. In this work, the two term Gegenbauer phase function is highlighted as an effective compromise between HG and Mie, as demonstrated when fitting the various phase function to measured data from phantom materials. Further comparison against the Modified Henyey-Greenstein (MHG) phase function, another two term function, demonstrates that the Gegenbauer function provides better control of the higher order phase function moments, and hence allows for a wider range of values for the similarity parameter, γ. Wavelength dependence of the Gegenbauer parameters is also investigated using a range of theoretical particle distributions. Finally, extraction of the scattering properties of solid turbid samples from angularly resolved transmission measurements is performed using an iterative Monte Carlo optimization technique. Fitting results using Gegenbauer, HG, MHG, and Mie phase functions are compared.

  5. Phase transition of p-adic Ising λ-model

    SciTech Connect

    Dogan, Mutlay; Akın, Hasan; Mukhamedov, Farrukh

    2015-09-18

    We consider an interaction of the nearest-neighbors and next nearest-neighbors for the mixed type p-adic λ-model with spin values (−1, +1) on a Cayley tree of order two. In the previous work we have proved the existence of the p-adic Gibbs measure for the model. In this work we have proved the existence of the phase transition occurs for the model.

  6. Probing spacetime around Sagittarius A* using modeled VLBI closure phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraga-Encinas, R.; Mościbrodzka, M.; Brinkerink, C.; Falcke, H.

    2016-04-01

    Context. The emission region and black hole shadow of Sagittarius A*, the supermassive black hole at the Galactic Center, can be probed with millimeter Very Long Baseline Interferometry. Aims: Our goal is to probe the geometry of the emitting plasma around Sgr A* by using modeled mm-VLBI closure phase calculations at 1.3 mm and to constrain the observer's inclination angle and position angle of the black hole spin axis. Methods: We have simulated images for three different models of the emission of Sgr A*: an orbiting spot, a disk model, and a jet model. The orbiting spot model was used as a test case scenario, while the disk and jet models are physically driven scenarios based on standard three-dimensional general relativistic magnetohydrodynamic simulations of hot accretion flows. Our results are compared to currently available closure phase observational limits. Results: Our results indicate that more models with closer to edge-on viewing angles are consistent with observational limits. In general, jet and disk geometries can reproduce similar closure phases for different sets of viewing and position angles. Consequently, the favored black hole spin orientation and its magnitude are strongly model dependent. Conclusions: We find that both the jet and the disk models can explain current VLBI limits. We conclude that new observations at 1.3 mm and possibly at longer wavelengths including other triangles of VLBI baselines are necessary to interpret Sgr A* emission and the putative black hole spin parameters.

  7. A MATLAB GUI to study Ising model phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thornton, Curtislee; Datta, Trinanjan

    We have created a MATLAB based graphical user interface (GUI) that simulates the single spin flip Metropolis Monte Carlo algorithm. The GUI has the capability to study temperature and external magnetic field dependence of magnetization, susceptibility, and equilibration behavior of the nearest-neighbor square lattice Ising model. Since the Ising model is a canonical system to study phase transition, the GUI can be used both for teaching and research purposes. The presence of a Monte Carlo code in a GUI format allows easy visualization of the simulation in real time and provides an attractive way to teach the concept of thermal phase transition and critical phenomena. We will also discuss the GUI implementation to study phase transition in a classical spin ice model on the pyrochlore lattice.

  8. Uncertainty of mantle geophysical properties computed from phase equilibrium models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connolly, J. A. D.; Khan, A.

    2016-05-01

    Phase equilibrium models are used routinely to predict geophysically relevant mantle properties. A limitation of this approach is that nonlinearity of the phase equilibrium problem precludes direct assessment of the resultant uncertainties. To overcome this obstacle, we stochastically assess uncertainties along self-consistent mantle adiabats for pyrolitic and basaltic bulk compositions to 2000 km depth. The dominant components of the uncertainty are the identity, composition and elastic properties of the minerals. For P wave speed and density, the latter components vary little, whereas the first is confined to the upper mantle. Consequently, P wave speeds, densities, and adiabatic temperatures and pressures predicted by phase equilibrium models are more uncertain in the upper mantle than in the lower mantle. In contrast, uncertainties in S wave speeds are dominated by the uncertainty in shear moduli and are approximately constant throughout the model depth range.

  9. Phase diagram of the Kane-Mele-Coulomb model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hohenadler, M.; Parisen Toldin, F.; Herbut, I. F.; Assaad, F. F.

    2014-08-01

    We determine the phase diagram of the Kane-Mele model with a long-range Coulomb interaction using an exact quantum Monte Carlo method. Long-range interactions are expected to play a role in honeycomb materials because the vanishing density of states in the semimetallic weak-coupling phase suppresses screening. According to our results, the Kane-Mele-Coulomb model supports the same phases as the Kane-Mele-Hubbard model. The nonlocal part of the interaction promotes short-range sublattice charge fluctuations, which compete with antiferromagnetic order driven by the onsite repulsion. Consequently, the critical interaction for the magnetic transition is significantly larger than for the purely local Hubbard repulsion. Our numerical data are consistent with SU (2) Gross-Neveu universality for the semimetal to antiferromagnet transition, and with 3D XY universality for the quantum spin Hall to antiferromagnet transition.

  10. Phase diagram of a model of the protein amelogenin.

    PubMed

    Haaga, Jason; Pemberton, Elizabeth; Gunton, J D; Rickman, J M

    2016-08-28

    There has been considerable recent interest in the self-assembly and phase behavior of models of colloidal and protein particles with anisotropic interactions. One example of particular interest is amelogenin, an important protein involved in the formation of dental enamel. Amelogenin is primarily hydrophobic with a 25-residue charged C-terminus tail. This protein undergoes a hierarchical assembly process that is crucial to mineral deposition, and experimental work has demonstrated that the deletion of the C-terminus tail prevents this self-assembly. A simplified model of amelogenin has been proposed in which the protein is treated as a hydrophobic sphere, interacting via the Asakura-Oosawa (AO) potential, with a tethered point charge on its surface. In this paper, we examine the effect of the Coulomb interaction between the point charges in altering the phase diagram of the AO model. For the parameter case specific to amelogenin, we find that the previous in vitro experimental and model conditions correspond to the system being near the low-density edge of the metastable region of the phase diagram. Our study illustrates more generally the importance of understanding the phase diagram for proteins, in that the kinetic pathway for self-assembly and the resulting aggregate morphology depends on the location of the initial state in the phase diagram. PMID:27586954

  11. Phase diagram of a model of the protein amelogenin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haaga, Jason; Pemberton, Elizabeth; Gunton, J. D.; Rickman, J. M.

    2016-08-01

    There has been considerable recent interest in the self-assembly and phase behavior of models of colloidal and protein particles with anisotropic interactions. One example of particular interest is amelogenin, an important protein involved in the formation of dental enamel. Amelogenin is primarily hydrophobic with a 25-residue charged C-terminus tail. This protein undergoes a hierarchical assembly process that is crucial to mineral deposition, and experimental work has demonstrated that the deletion of the C-terminus tail prevents this self-assembly. A simplified model of amelogenin has been proposed in which the protein is treated as a hydrophobic sphere, interacting via the Asakura-Oosawa (AO) potential, with a tethered point charge on its surface. In this paper, we examine the effect of the Coulomb interaction between the point charges in altering the phase diagram of the AO model. For the parameter case specific to amelogenin, we find that the previous in vitro experimental and model conditions correspond to the system being near the low-density edge of the metastable region of the phase diagram. Our study illustrates more generally the importance of understanding the phase diagram for proteins, in that the kinetic pathway for self-assembly and the resulting aggregate morphology depends on the location of the initial state in the phase diagram.

  12. Parametric Modeling of Transverse Phase Space of an RF Photoinjector

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, E.; Sayyar-Rodsari, B.; Schweiger, C.A.; Lee, M.J.; Lui, P.; Paterson, Ewan; Schmerge, J.F.; /SLAC

    2008-01-24

    High brightness electron beam sources such as rf photo-injectors as proposed for SASE FELs must consistently produce the desired beam quality. We report the results of a study in which a combined neural network (NN) and first-principles (FP) model is used to model the transverse phase space of the beam as a function of quadrupole strength, while beam charge, solenoid field, accelerator gradient, and linac voltage and phase are kept constant. The parametric transport matrix between the exit of the linac section and the spectrometer screen constitutes the FP component of the combined model. The NN block provides the parameters of the transport matrix as functions of quad current. Using real data from SLAC Gun Test Facility, we will highlight the significance of the constrained training of the NN block and show that the phase space of the beam is accurately modeled by the combined NN and FP model, while variations of beam matrix parameters with the quad current are correctly captured. We plan to extend the combined model in the future to capture the effects of variations in beam charge, solenoid field, and accelerator voltage and phase.

  13. Common world model for unmanned systems: Phase 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dean, Robert M. S.; Oh, Jean; Vinokurov, Jerry

    2014-06-01

    The Robotics Collaborative Technology Alliance (RCTA) seeks to provide adaptive robot capabilities which move beyond traditional metric algorithms to include cognitive capabilities. Key to this effort is the Common World Model, which moves beyond the state-of-the-art by representing the world using semantic and symbolic as well as metric information. It joins these layers of information to define objects in the world. These objects may be reasoned upon jointly using traditional geometric, symbolic cognitive algorithms and new computational nodes formed by the combination of these disciplines to address Symbol Grounding and Uncertainty. The Common World Model must understand how these objects relate to each other. It includes the concept of Self-Information about the robot. By encoding current capability, component status, task execution state, and their histories we track information which enables the robot to reason and adapt its performance using Meta-Cognition and Machine Learning principles. The world model also includes models of how entities in the environment behave which enable prediction of future world states. To manage complexity, we have adopted a phased implementation approach. Phase 1, published in these proceedings in 2013 [1], presented the approach for linking metric with symbolic information and interfaces for traditional planners and cognitive reasoning. Here we discuss the design of "Phase 2" of this world model, which extends the Phase 1 design API, data structures, and reviews the use of the Common World Model as part of a semantic navigation use case.

  14. A Sublattice Model of Appearance of an Incommensurate Phase Sandwiched by Reentrant Commensurate Phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishibashi, Yoshihiro

    1986-12-01

    A two-sublattice model is presented for reproducing the normal(N)-commensurate(C)-incommensurate(IC)-commensurate(C) phase sequence phenomenologically. The temperature dependences of the transition parameters representing the homogeneous ionic displacements and the incommensurate modulated structure are obtained. The temperature dependences of a lattice constant and the soft mode frequencies are also presented.

  15. Multiscale Aspects of Modeling Gas-Phase Nanoparticle Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Buesser, B.; Gröhn, A.J.

    2013-01-01

    Aerosol reactors are utilized to manufacture nanoparticles in industrially relevant quantities. The development, understanding and scale-up of aerosol reactors can be facilitated with models and computer simulations. This review aims to provide an overview of recent developments of models and simulations and discuss their interconnection in a multiscale approach. A short introduction of the various aerosol reactor types and gas-phase particle dynamics is presented as a background for the later discussion of the models and simulations. Models are presented with decreasing time and length scales in sections on continuum, mesoscale, molecular dynamics and quantum mechanics models. PMID:23729992

  16. Biaxial Nematic Phase in Model Bent-Core Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grzybowski, Piotr; Longa, Lech

    2011-07-01

    We determine the bifurcation phase diagrams with isotropic (I), uniaxial (NU) and biaxial (NB) nematic phases for model bent-core mesogens using Onsager-type theory. The molecules comprise two or three Gay-Berne interacting ellipsoids of uniaxial and biaxial shape and a transverse central dipole. The Landau point is found to turn into an I-NB line for the three-center model with a large dipole moment. For the biaxial ellipsoids, a line of Landau points is observed even in the absence of the dipoles.

  17. Alternating-phase focusing: A model to study nonlinear dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Sagalovsky, L.; Delayen, J.R.

    1992-01-01

    We discuss a new model to study alternating-phase focusing (APF). Our approach is based on representing the accelerating electric field with a continuous phase modulated traveling wave. The resulting nonlinear equations of motion can be solved analytically to predict the regions of stable APF motion. We also identify the key parameters which adequately describe the physics of APF. The model is believed to be applicable to low-{beta} ion linacs with short independently-controlled superconducting cavities being developed at ANL.

  18. Alternating-phase focusing: A model to study nonlinear dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Sagalovsky, L.; Delayen, J.R.

    1992-09-01

    We discuss a new model to study alternating-phase focusing (APF). Our approach is based on representing the accelerating electric field with a continuous phase modulated traveling wave. The resulting nonlinear equations of motion can be solved analytically to predict the regions of stable APF motion. We also identify the key parameters which adequately describe the physics of APF. The model is believed to be applicable to low-{beta} ion linacs with short independently-controlled superconducting cavities being developed at ANL.

  19. A Phase-Field Model for Grain Growth

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, L.Q.; Fan, D.N.; Tikare, V.

    1998-12-23

    A phase-field model for grain growth is briefly described. In this model, a poly-crystalline microstructure is represented by multiple structural order parameter fields whose temporal and spatial evolutions follow the time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau (TDGL) equations. Results from phase-field simulations of two-dimensional (2D) grain growth will be summarized and preliminary results on three-dimensional (3D) grain growth will be presented. The physical interpretation of the structural order parameter fields and the efficient and accurate semi-implicit Fourier spectral method for solving the TDGL equations will be briefly discussed.

  20. Modeling of Nickel Hydroxide Electrode Containing Multiple Phases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Timmerman, P.; Ratnakumar, B. V.; Di Stefano, S.

    1996-01-01

    Mathematical models of alkaline rechargeable nickel cell systems (e.g., Ni-Cd, Ni-H(sub 2) and Ni-MH) have so far been developed based on the assumption that the active material at Ni electrode exists primarily in a single phase as Beta-NiOOH -- Beta-Ni(OH)(sub 2), despite enough experimental evidence for the second phase, i.e., Gamma-NiOOH -- Alpha-Ni(OH)(sub 2), especially under conditions of extended coverage. Here, we have incorporated the additional couple of Gamma-NiOOH -- Alpha-Ni(OH)(sub 2) into the modeling of the Ni electrode.

  1. Phase-field model for reconstructed stepped surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Kanna; Margetis, Dionisios

    2013-07-01

    We formulate a phase-field, or diffuse-interface, model for the evolution of stepped surfaces under surface diffusion in the presence of distinct material parameters across nanoscale terraces. In the sharp-interface limit, our model reduces to a Burton-Cabrera-Frank (BCF)-type theory for the motion of noninteracting steps separating inhomogeneous terraces. This setting aims to capture features of reconstructed semiconductor, e.g., Si surfaces below the roughening transition. Our work forms an extension of the phase-field construction by Hu [Physica DPDNPDT0167-278910.1016/j.physd.2011.09.004 241, 77 (2012)].

  2. On a simplified two-phase slug flow model

    SciTech Connect

    Yuwen Wang ); Baushei Pei; Weikeng Lin . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering)

    1994-02-01

    A simplified model of two-phase slug flow is constructed. Model equations containing 11 parameters can describe the characteristics of slug flow completely. These equations can generally be solved by an iterative method within 15 iterations, if the relative error tolerance is chosen to be 0.1%. The model is applicable to two-phase systems with various diameters with a correction in the liquid slug void fraction. The procedures for correcting the liquid slug void fraction and for solving the model equations are also presented. Some experimental time-varying signals of slug flow are selected to be analyzed. Model calculations are compared with both previously published and new experimental data. The comparisons show that the errors in the calculated results are generally within [+-]10%

  3. Computation of drying stresses in red oak using equilibrium and non-equilibrium creep models

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J.H.; Kyanka, G.H.; Smith, W.B.

    1995-12-31

    A comprehensive model which shows the development of drying stresses in red oak is presented. The elastic, visco-elastic and mechano-sorptive mechanisms of strain behavior are all included. The results show the dominant effects of mechano-sorptive creep on stress relaxation and give insights on the effects of temperature on stress. Some of the results indicate that model has value for people who are involved with commerical drying systems.

  4. Development and application of novel clonazepam molecularly imprinted coatings for stir bar sorptive extraction.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoxu; Mei, Xiaoliang; Xu, Lei; Shen, Xin; Zhu, Wanying; Hong, Junli; Zhou, Xuemin

    2016-04-15

    The molecularly imprinted magnetic stir bar coatings were created based on graft-functional Fe3O4 nanoparticles with magnetic field-induced self-assembly. The magnetic complex including clonazepam as template, the graft-functional Fe3O4 nanoparticles and methacrylic acid as monomers was pre-assembled through π-π interaction and hydrogen bonding, then was directionally adsorbed on the surface of magnetic stir bar under the magnetic induction. The molecularly imprinted coating with well-ordered structure was generated by one-step copolymerization based on the cross linking of ethylene glycol dimethacrylate. The molecularly imprinted coating with multiple recognition sites could be manufactured and applied in polar solvents, and showed superior selectivity and fast binding kinetics for benzodiazepines. The analytes in herbal health foods, treated by stir bar sorptive extraction, were determined by HPLC-UV. Good linearity was observed in the range of 0.01-2 μg mL(-1). The content of clonazepam in the herbal health foods was found to be 44 ng g(-1), and the average recoveries were 89.8-103.3% with a relative standard deviation (RSD) <6.5%, demonstrating the successful application in real sample analysis. PMID:26851451

  5. Removal of natural hormones in dairy farm wastewater using reactive and sorptive materials.

    PubMed

    Cai, Kai; Phillips, Debra H; Elliott, Christopher T; Muller, Marc; Scippo, Marie-Louise; Connolly, Lisa

    2013-09-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the oestrogen and androgen hormone removal efficiency of reactive (Connelly zero-valent iron (ZVI), Gotthart Maier ZVI) and sorptive (AquaSorb 101 granular activated carbon (GAC) and OrganoLoc PM-100 organoclay (OC)) materials from HPLC grade water and constructed wetland system (CWS) treated dairy farm wastewater. Batch test studies were performed and hormone concentration analysis carried out using highly sensitive reporter gene assays (RGAs). The results showed that hormonal interaction with these materials is selective for individual classes of hormones. Connelly ZVI and AquaSorb 101 GAC were more efficient in removing testosterone (Te) than 17β-estradiol (E2) and showed faster removal rates of oestrogen and androgen than the other materials. Gotthart Maier ZVI was more efficient in removing E2 than Te. OrganoLoc PM-100 OC achieved the lowest final concentration of E2 equivalent (EEQ) and provided maximum removal of both oestrogens and androgens. PMID:23712110

  6. Preparation of a polar monolithic coating for stir bar sorptive extraction of emerging contaminants from wastewaters.

    PubMed

    Gilart, Núria; Cormack, P A G; Marcé, Rosa Maria; Borrull, Francesc; Fontanals, Núria

    2013-06-21

    A new polar monolith based on poly(poly(ethylene glycol) methacrylate-co-pentaerythritol triacrylate) (poly(PEGMA-co-PETRA)) was first synthesised, after the optimisation of the polymerisation conditions, and applied as a coating for the stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE) of a group of pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) from environmental water samples. Several parameters affecting extraction and liquid desorption in SBSE were investigated to achieve the optimal sorption efficiencies for the studied analytes. Under the optimised experimental conditions, a rapid, simple and sensitive SBSE performance was provided by the in-house monolithic stir bar. Moreover, the in-house coating was able to extract and desorb most of the studied analytes more effectively and quickly, due to its polar behaviour and suitable mechanical and physical properties, in comparison with the recently commercialised polar stir bars (EG Silicone Twister(®) and Acrylate Twister(®)). The analytical methodology, including SBSE followed by liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS), was validated and successfully applied for the determination of a group of PPCPs in wastewater samples.

  7. Sorptive tape extraction in the analysis of the volatile fraction emitted from biological solid matrices.

    PubMed

    Bicchi, C; Cordero, C; Liberto, E; Rubiolo, P; Sgorbini, B; Sandra, P

    2007-05-01

    Sorptive tape extraction (STE) is a recent sorption-based sampling technique in which a flexible polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) tape is used to recover analytes at the surface of a solid matrix by direct contact as well as from the headspace in equilibrium with it. Solutes thus enriched on the inert PDMS material can be recovered either by solvent desorption or by thermo-desorption. The concentration capability of both direct contact and headspace STE was evaluated by sampling (a) aromatic plants to study the reaction of a vegetable matrix submitted to stress, and (b) fruits at the surface of the pulp or inside the pulp; the composition of the volatile fraction released from the skin when a perfume is sprayed on the back of the hand was also studied. The concentration capability of direct contact and headspace STE was compared to that of HSSE with a 20 microL PDMS twister and HS-SPME with a PDMS 100 microm fibre, by determining the relative abundances (RA) of the characterizing components of the aromatic plants under investigation. Repeatability and influence of tape surface on STE recovery were also evaluated.

  8. Removal of natural hormones in dairy farm wastewater using reactive and sorptive materials.

    PubMed

    Cai, Kai; Phillips, Debra H; Elliott, Christopher T; Muller, Marc; Scippo, Marie-Louise; Connolly, Lisa

    2013-09-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the oestrogen and androgen hormone removal efficiency of reactive (Connelly zero-valent iron (ZVI), Gotthart Maier ZVI) and sorptive (AquaSorb 101 granular activated carbon (GAC) and OrganoLoc PM-100 organoclay (OC)) materials from HPLC grade water and constructed wetland system (CWS) treated dairy farm wastewater. Batch test studies were performed and hormone concentration analysis carried out using highly sensitive reporter gene assays (RGAs). The results showed that hormonal interaction with these materials is selective for individual classes of hormones. Connelly ZVI and AquaSorb 101 GAC were more efficient in removing testosterone (Te) than 17β-estradiol (E2) and showed faster removal rates of oestrogen and androgen than the other materials. Gotthart Maier ZVI was more efficient in removing E2 than Te. OrganoLoc PM-100 OC achieved the lowest final concentration of E2 equivalent (EEQ) and provided maximum removal of both oestrogens and androgens.

  9. Sorptivity of rocks and soils of the van Genuchten-Mualem type

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, R.W.; Bodvarsson, G.S.

    1991-06-01

    One hydrological process that will have great relevance to the performance of the proposed underground radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, is that of the absorption of water from a water-filled fracture into the adjacent unsaturated rock formation. The rate at which water is imbibed by a rock depends on the hydrological properties of the rock and on the initial saturation (or initial capillary suction) of the formation. The hydrological properties that affect imbibition are the relative permeability function and the capillary pressure function. These functions are often collectively referred to as the `characteristic functions` of the porous medium. For one-dimensional absorption, it can be shown that, regardless of the details of the characteristic functions, the total amount of water imbibed by the formation, per unit surface area, will be proportional to the square root of the elapsed time. Hence the ability of a rock or soil to imbibe water can be quantified by a parameter known as the sorptivity S, which is defined such that the cumulative volumetric liquid influx per unit area is given by Q = S{radical}t. The paper discusses the simplification of these characteristic functions of porous medium.

  10. Analysis of volatiles in Pinotage wines by stir bar sorptive extraction and chemometric profiling.

    PubMed

    Weldegergis, Berhane T; Crouch, Andrew M

    2008-11-12

    A fast, simple, cost-effective, and reliable method based on stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE) in the headspace mode was used for the analysis of 39 volatile components in Pinotage wines. The method was sensitive, with LODs ranging from 50.0 pg/L to 281 ng/L and LOQs between 180 pg/L and 938 ng/L. Precision was between 6 and 20%. The intermediate precision was within the acceptable range. Moreover, good calibration curves with R(2) > 0.99 for all compounds were achieved. The method was successfully applied for the analysis of 87 young Pinotage wines of vintages 2005 and 2006 collected from various South African regions. To characterize the results based on vintage and origin, the obtained concentrations of the compounds were subjected to chemometric analysis. Exploratory factor analysis (FA), principal component analysis (PCA), and analysis of variance (one-way ANOVA) were consecutively done. The chemometrics approach revealed a reasonable correlation among the volatile components of these wines, as well as with respect to their year of production.

  11. Sorptive uptake of selenium with magnetite and its supported materials onto activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Jae H; Wilson, Lee D; Sammynaiken, R

    2015-11-01

    Kinetic and equilibrium uptake studies of selenite in aqueous solution with synthetic magnetite (Mag-P), commercial magnetite (Mag-C), goethite, activated carbon (AC), and a composite material containing 19% magnetite supported on activated carbon (CM-19) were investigated. Kinetic uptake studies used a one-pot setup at pH 5.26 at variable temperature. Sampling of unbound selenite in-situ was achieved with analytical detection by atomic absorbance. The sorptive uptake at equilibrium and kinetic conditions are listed in descending order: goethite>Mag-P>Mag-C>CM-19. Kinetic uptake parameters reveal that Mag-P showed apparent negative values for the activation energy (E(a)) and the enthalpy of activation (ΔH(‡)), in agreement with a multi-step process for the kinetic uptake of selenite. By contrast, Mag-C, CM-19, and goethite showed positive values for E(a) and ΔH(‡). The uptake properties of the various sorbent materials with selenite are in accordance with the formation of inner- and out-sphere complexes. Leaching of iron from the composite material (CM-19) was attenuated due to the stabilizing effect of the magnetite within the pore sites and the surface of AC. Supported iron oxide nanomaterial composites represent a unique sorbent material with tunable uptake properties toward inorganic selenite in aqueous solution.

  12. Simultaneous analysis of parabens in cosmetic products by stir bar sorptive extraction and liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Melo, Lidervan P; Queiroz, Maria Eugênia C

    2010-06-01

    A sensitive and precise stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE) combined with LC (SBSE/LC) analysis is described for simultaneous determination of methyl, ethyl, propyl, and butyl parabens in commercial cosmetic products in agreement with the European Union Cosmetics Directive 76/768/EEC. Important factors in the optimization of SBSE efficiency are discussed, such as time and temperature of extraction, pH, and ionic strength of the sample, matrix effects, and liquid desorption conditions by different modes (magnetic stirring, ultrasonic). The LOQs of the SBSE/LC method ranged from 30 to 200 ng/mg, with linear response over a dynamic range, from the LOQ to 2.5 microg/mg, with a coefficient of determination higher than 0.993. The interday precision of the SBSE/LC method presented a coefficient of variation lower than 5%. The effectiveness of the proposed method was proven for analysis of commercial cosmetic products such as body creams, antiperspirant creams, and sunscreens. PMID:20491059

  13. Theoretical description of phase coexistence in model C60.

    PubMed

    Costa, D; Pellicane, G; Caccamo, C; Schöll-Paschinger, E; Kahl, G

    2003-08-01

    We have investigated the phase diagram of a pair interaction model of C60 fullerene [L. A. Girifalco, J. Phys. Chem. 96, 858 (1992)], in the framework provided by two integral equation theories of the liquid state, namely, the modified hypernetted chain (MHNC) implemented under a global thermodynamic consistency constraint, and the self-consistent Ornstein-Zernike approximation (SCOZA), and by a perturbation theory (PT) with various degrees of refinement, for the free energy of the solid phase. We present an extended assessment of such theories as set against a recent Monte Carlo study of the same model [D. Costa, G. Pellicane, C. Caccamo, and M. C. Abramo, J. Chem. Phys. 118, 304 (2003)]. We have compared the theoretical predictions with the corresponding simulation results for several thermodynamic properties such as the free energy, the pressure, and the internal energy. Then we have determined the phase diagram of the model, by using either the SCOZA, the MHNC, or the PT predictions for one of the coexisting phases, and the simulation data for the other phase, in order to separately ascertain the accuracy of each theory. It turns out that the overall appearance of the phase portrait is reproduced fairly well by all theories, with remarkable accuracy as for the melting line and the solid-vapor equilibrium. All theories show a more or less pronounced discrepancy with the simulated fluid-solid coexistence pressure, above the triple point. The MHNC and SCOZA results for the liquid-vapor coexistence, as well as for the corresponding critical points, are quite accurate; the SCOZA tends to underestimate the density corresponding to the freezing line. All results are discussed in terms of the basic assumptions underlying each theory. We have then selected the MHNC for the fluid and the first-order PT for the solid phase, as the most accurate tools to investigate the phase behavior of the model in terms of purely theoretical approaches. It emerges that the use of

  14. A two-phase model for smoothly joining disparate growth phases in the macropodid Thylogale billardierii.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Clive R; Buscot, Marie-Jeanne; Wiggins, Natasha L; Collier, Neil; Maindonald, John H; McCallum, Hamish I; Bowman, David M J S

    2011-01-01

    Generally, sigmoid curves are used to describe the growth of animals over their lifetime. However, because growth rates often differ over an animal's lifetime a single curve may not accurately capture the growth. Broken-stick models constrained to pass through a common point have been proposed to describe the different growth phases, but these are often unsatisfactory because essentially there are still two functions that describe the lifetime growth. To provide a single, converged model to age animals with disparate growth phases we developed a smoothly joining two-phase nonlinear function (SJ2P), tailored to provide a more accurate description of lifetime growth of the macropod, the Tasmanian pademelon Thylogale billardierii. The model consists of the Verhulst logistic function, which describes pouch-phase growth--joining smoothly to the Brody function, which describes post-pouch growth. Results from the model demonstrate that male pademelons grew faster and bigger than females. Our approach provides a practical means of ageing wild pademelons for life history studies but given the high variability of the data used to parametrise the second growth phase of the model, the accuracy of ageing of post-weaned animals is low: accuracy might be improved with collection of longitudinal growth data. This study provides a unique, first robust method that can be used to characterise growth over the lifespan of pademelons. The development of this method is relevant to collecting age-specific vital rates from commonly used wildlife management practices to provide crucial insights into the demographic behaviour of animal populations.

  15. Phase-field modeling of shock-induced α- γ phase transformation of RDX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahul, -; de, Suvranu

    2015-06-01

    A thermodynamically consistent continuum phase field model has been developed to investigate the role of shock-induced α- γ phase transition in the sensitivity of RDX. Dislocations and phase transformations are distinguished and modeled within a crystal plasticity framework. The Landau potential is derived for the finite elastic deformation analysis. The response of the shock loaded RDX crystal is obtained by solving the continuum momentum equation along with phase evolution equation using a Helmholtz free energy functional, which consists of elastic potential energy and local interfacial energy that follows from the Cahn-Hilliard formalism. We observe that the orientations for which there is a resolved shear stress along the slip direction, the material absorbs large shear strain through plastic deformation, allowing it to be less sensitive as less mechanical work is available for temperature rise. Therefore, plastic slip should be associated with greater shear relaxation and, hence, decreased sensitivity. For elastic orientations, large shear stress arises from steric hindrance that may provides much more mechanical work to increase the temperature and hence more sensitive to detonation. Our simulations suggest that the α- γ phase transformation in RDX may be associated with the increased temperature rise and hence the shock sensitivity. The authors gratefully acknowledge the support of this work through Office of Naval Research (ONR) Grants N000140810462 and N000141210527 with Dr. Clifford Bedford as the cognizant Program Manager.

  16. Residual phase noise modeling of amplifiers using silicon bipolar transistors.

    PubMed

    Theodoropoulos, Konstantinos; Everard, Jeremy

    2010-03-01

    In this paper, we describe the modeling of residual 1/f phase noise for Si bipolar amplifiers operating in the linear region. We propose that for Si bipolar amplifiers, the 1/f phase noise is largely caused by the base emitter recombination flicker noise. The up-conversion mechanism is described through linear approximation of the phase variation of the amplifier phase response by the variation of the device parameters (C(b)c, C(be), g(m), r(e)) caused by the recombination 1/f noise. The amplifier phase response describes the device over the whole frequency range of operation for which the influence of the poles and zeros is investigated. It is found that for a common emitter amplifier it is sufficient to only incorporate the effect of the device poles to describe the phase noise behavior over most of its operational frequency range. Simulations predict the measurements of others, including the flattening of the PM noise at frequencies beyond f(3dB), not predicted by previous models.

  17. Phase coexistence in partially symmetric q-state models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laanait, Lahoussine; Masaif, Noureddine; Ruiz, Jean

    1993-08-01

    We consider a lattice model whose spins may assume a finite number q of values. The interaction energy between two nearest-neighbor spins takes on the value J 1 + J 2 or J 2, depending on whether the two spins coincide or are different but coincide modulo q1, and it is zero otherwise. This model is a generalization of the Ashkin-Teller model and exhibits the multilayer wetting phenomenon, that is, wetting by one or two or three interfacial layers, depending on the number of phases in coexistence. While we plan to consider interface properties in such a case, here we study the phase diagram of the model. We show that for large values of q 1 and q/q 1, it exhibits, according the value of J 2/ J 1, either a unique first-order temperature-driven phase transition at some point β t where q ordered phases coexist with the disordered one, or two transition temperatures β{t/(1)} and β{t/(2)}, where q1 partially ordered phases coexist with the ordered ones (β{t/(1)}) or with the disordered one (β{t/(2)}), or for a particular value of J 2/ J 1 there is a unique transition temperature where all the previous phases coexist. Proofs are based on the Pirogov-Sinai theory: we perform a random cluster representation of the model (allowing us to consider noninteger values of q 1 and q/q 1) to which we adapt this theory.

  18. Dividing phases in two-phase flow and modeling of interfacial drag

    SciTech Connect

    Narumo, T.; Rajamaeki, M.

    1997-07-01

    Different models intended to describe one-dimensional two-phase flow are considered in this paper. The following models are introduced: conventional six-equation model, conventional model equipped with terms taking into account nonuniform transverse velocity distribution of the phases, several virtual mass models and a model in which the momentum equations have been derived by using the principles of Separation of the Flow According to Velocity (SFAV). The dynamics of the models have been tested by comparing their characteristic velocities to each other and against experimental data. The results show that the SFAV-model makes a hyperbolic system and predicts the propagation velocities of disturbances with the same order of accuracy as the best tested virtual mass models. Furthermore, the momentum interaction terms for the SFAV-model are considered. These consist of the wall friction terms and the interfacial friction term. The authors model wall friction with two independent terms describing the effect of each fluid on the wall separately. In the steady state, a relationship between the slip velocity and friction coefficients can be derived. Hence, the friction coefficients for the SFAV-model can be calculated from existing correlations, viz. from a drift-flux correlation and a wall friction correlation. The friction model was tested by searching steady-state distributions in a partial BWR fuel channel and comparing the relaxed values with the drift-flux correlation, which agreed very well with each other. In addition, response of the flow to a sine-wave disturbance in the water inlet flux was calculated as function of frequency. The results of the models differed from each other already with frequency of order 5 Hz, while the time constant for the relaxation, obtained from steady-state distribution calculation, would have implied significant differences appear not until with frequency of order 50 Hz.

  19. Dynamical phase transition in the open Dicke model

    PubMed Central

    Klinder, Jens; Keßler, Hans; Wolke, Matthias; Mathey, Ludwig; Hemmerich, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    The Dicke model with a weak dissipation channel is realized by coupling a Bose–Einstein condensate to an optical cavity with ultranarrow bandwidth. We explore the dynamical critical properties of the Hepp–Lieb–Dicke phase transition by performing quenches across the phase boundary. We observe hysteresis in the transition between a homogeneous phase and a self-organized collective phase with an enclosed loop area showing power-law scaling with respect to the quench time, which suggests an interpretation within a general framework introduced by Kibble and Zurek. The observed hysteretic dynamics is well reproduced by numerically solving the mean-field equation derived from a generalized Dicke Hamiltonian. Our work promotes the understanding of nonequilibrium physics in open many-body systems with infinite range interactions. PMID:25733892

  20. Topological phase boundary in a generalized Kitaev model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Da-Ping, Liu

    2016-05-01

    We study the effects of the next-nearest-neighbor hopping and nearest-neighbor interactions on topological phases in a one-dimensional generalized Kitaev model. In the noninteracting case, we define a topological number and calculate exactly the phase diagram of the system. With addition of the next-nearest-neighbor hopping, the change of phase boundary between the topological and trivial regions can be described by an effective shift of the chemical potential. In the interacting case, we obtain the entanglement spectrum, the degeneracies of which correspond to the topological edge modes, by using the infinite time-evolving block decimation method. The results show that the interactions change the phase boundary as adding an effective chemical potential which can be explained by the change of the average number of particles. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2012CB921704).

  1. Topological phase transitions in the golden string-net model.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Marc Daniel; Dusuel, Sébastien; Schmidt, Kai Phillip; Vidal, Julien

    2013-04-01

    We examine the zero-temperature phase diagram of the two-dimensional Levin-Wen string-net model with Fibonacci anyons in the presence of competing interactions. Combining high-order series expansions around three exactly solvable points and exact diagonalizations, we find that the non-Abelian doubled Fibonacci topological phase is separated from two nontopological phases by different second-order quantum critical points, the positions of which are computed accurately. These trivial phases are separated by a first-order transition occurring at a fourth exactly solvable point where the ground-state manifold is infinitely many degenerate. The evaluation of critical exponents suggests unusual universality classes. PMID:25167030

  2. Phase transition and surface sublimation of a mobile Potts model.

    PubMed

    Bailly-Reyre, A; Diep, H T; Kaufman, M

    2015-10-01

    We study in this paper the phase transition in a mobile Potts model by the use of Monte Carlo simulation. The mobile Potts model is related to a diluted Potts model, which is also studied here by a mean-field approximation. We consider a lattice where each site is either vacant or occupied by a q-state Potts spin. The Potts spin can move from one site to a nearby vacant site. In order to study the surface sublimation, we consider a system of Potts spins contained in a recipient with a concentration c defined as the ratio of the number of Potts spins N(s) to the total number of lattice sites N(L)=N(x)×N(y)×N(z). Taking into account the attractive interaction between the nearest-neighboring Potts spins, we study the phase transitions as functions of various physical parameters such as the temperature, the shape of the recipient, and the spin concentration. We show that as the temperature increases, surface spins are detached from the solid phase to form a gas in the empty space. Surface order parameters indicate different behaviors depending on the distance to the surface. At high temperatures, if the concentration is high enough, the interior spins undergo a first-order phase transition to an orientationally disordered phase. The mean-field results are shown as functions of temperature, pressure, and chemical potential, which confirm in particular the first-order character of the transition. PMID:26565221

  3. Phase-field modeling of the beta to omega phase transformation in Zr–Nb alloys

    DOE PAGES

    Yeddu, Hemantha Kumar; Lookman, Turab

    2015-05-01

    A three-dimensional elastoplastic phase-field model is developed, using the Finite Element Method (FEM), for modeling the athermal beta to omega phase transformation in Zr–Nb alloys by including plastic deformation and strain hardening of the material. The microstructure evolution during athermal transformation as well as under different stress states, e.g. uni-axial tensile and compressive, bi-axial tensile and compressive, shear and tri-axial loadings, is studied. The effects of plasticity, stress states and the stress loading direction on the microstructure evolution as well as on the mechanical properties are studied. The input data corresponding to a Zr – 8 at.% Nb alloy aremore » acquired from experimental studies as well as by using the CALPHAD method. Our simulations show that the four different omega variants grow as ellipsoidal shaped particles. Our results show that due to stress relaxation, the athermal phase transformation occurs slightly more readily in the presence of plasticity compared to that in its absence. The evolution of omega phase is different under different stress states, which leads to the differences in the mechanical properties of the material. The variant selection mechanism, i.e. formation of different variants under different stress loading directions, is also nicely captured by our model.« less

  4. Phase-field modeling of the beta to omega phase transformation in Zr–Nb alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Yeddu, Hemantha Kumar; Lookman, Turab

    2015-05-01

    A three-dimensional elastoplastic phase-field model is developed, using the Finite Element Method (FEM), for modeling the athermal beta to omega phase transformation in Zr–Nb alloys by including plastic deformation and strain hardening of the material. The microstructure evolution during athermal transformation as well as under different stress states, e.g. uni-axial tensile and compressive, bi-axial tensile and compressive, shear and tri-axial loadings, is studied. The effects of plasticity, stress states and the stress loading direction on the microstructure evolution as well as on the mechanical properties are studied. The input data corresponding to a Zr – 8 at.% Nb alloy are acquired from experimental studies as well as by using the CALPHAD method. Our simulations show that the four different omega variants grow as ellipsoidal shaped particles. Our results show that due to stress relaxation, the athermal phase transformation occurs slightly more readily in the presence of plasticity compared to that in its absence. The evolution of omega phase is different under different stress states, which leads to the differences in the mechanical properties of the material. The variant selection mechanism, i.e. formation of different variants under different stress loading directions, is also nicely captured by our model.

  5. Quantum phase transitions in the Kondo-necklace model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghassemi, Nader; Hemmatiyan, Shayan; Rahimi Movassagh, Mahsa; Kargarian, Mahdi; Rezakhani, Ali T.; Langari, Abdollah

    2015-03-01

    Kondo-necklace model can describe the magnetic low-energy limit of strongly correlated heavy fermion materials. There exist multiple energy scales in this model corresponding to each phase of the system. Here, we study quantum phase transitions between these different phases, and show the effect of anisotropies in terms of quantum information properties and vanishing energy gap. We employ the perturbative unitary transformations to calculate the energy gap and spin-spin correlations for the model one, two, and three spatial dimensions as well as for the spin ladders. In particular, we show that the method, although being perturbative, can predict the expected quantum critical point by imposing the spontaneous symmetry breaking, which is in good agreement with the results of numerical and Green's function analyses. We also use concurrence, a bipartite entanglement measure, to study the criticality of the model. Absence of singularities in the derivative of the concurrence in 2d and 3d in Kondo-necklace model shows this model has multipartite entanglement. We also discuss the crossover from the one-dimensional to the two-dimensional model via the ladder structure. Sharif University of Technology.

  6. Quantitative phase-field modeling for wetting phenomena.

    PubMed

    Badillo, Arnoldo

    2015-03-01

    A new phase-field model is developed for studying partial wetting. The introduction of a third phase representing a solid wall allows for the derivation of a new surface tension force that accounts for energy changes at the contact line. In contrast to other multi-phase-field formulations, the present model does not need the introduction of surface energies for the fluid-wall interactions. Instead, all wetting properties are included in a unique parameter known as the equilibrium contact angle θeq. The model requires the solution of a single elliptic phase-field equation, which, coupled to conservation laws for mass and linear momentum, admits the existence of steady and unsteady compact solutions (compactons). The representation of the wall by an additional phase field allows for the study of wetting phenomena on flat, rough, or patterned surfaces in a straightforward manner. The model contains only two free parameters, a measure of interface thickness W and β, which is used in the definition of the mixture viscosity μ=μlϕl+μvϕv+βμlϕw. The former controls the convergence towards the sharp interface limit and the latter the energy dissipation at the contact line. Simulations on rough surfaces show that by taking values for β higher than 1, the model can reproduce, on average, the effects of pinning events of the contact line during its dynamic motion. The model is able to capture, in good agreement with experimental observations, many physical phenomena fundamental to wetting science, such as the wetting transition on micro-structured surfaces and droplet dynamics on solid substrates. PMID:25871200

  7. Phase transition in the Sznajd model with independence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sznajd-Weron, K.; Tabiszewski, M.; Timpanaro, A. M.

    2011-11-01

    We propose a model of opinion dynamics which describes two major types of social influence —conformity and independence. Conformity in our model is described by the so-called outflow dynamics (known as Sznajd model). According to sociologists' suggestions, we introduce also a second type of social influence, known in social psychology as independence. Various social experiments have shown that the level of conformity depends on the society. We introduce this level as a parameter of the model and show that there is a continuous phase transition between conformity and independence.

  8. Speech enhancement using the Modified Phase-Opponency model

    PubMed Central

    Deshmukh, Om D.; Espy-Wilson, Carol Y.; Carney, Laurel H.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we present a model called the Modified Phase-Opponency (MPO) model for single-channel speech enhancement when the speech is corrupted by additive noise. The MPO model is based on the auditory PO model, proposed for detection of tones in noise. The PO model includes a physiologically realistic mechanism for processing the information in neural discharge times and exploits the frequency-dependent phase properties of the tuned filters in the auditory periphery by using a cross-auditory-nerve-fiber coincidence detection for extracting temporal cues. The MPO model alters the components of the PO model such that the basic functionality of the PO model is maintained but the properties of the model can be analyzed and modified independently. The MPO-based speech enhancement scheme does not need to estimate the noise characteristics nor does it assume that the noise satisfies any statistical model. The MPO technique leads to the lowest value of the LPC-based objective measures and the highest value of the PESQ measure compared to other methods when the speech signals are corrupted by fluctuating noise. Combining the MPO speech enhancement technique with our Aperiodicity, Periodicity and Pitch (APP) detector further improves its performance. PMID:17552735

  9. Fibrin polymerization as a phase transition wave: A mathematical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobanov, A. I.

    2016-06-01

    A mathematical model of fibrin polymerization is described. The problem of the propagation of phase transition wave is reduced to a nonlinear Stefan problem. A one-dimensional discontinuity fitting difference scheme is described, and the results of one-dimensional computations are presented.

  10. Phase-field modeling of dry snow metamorphism.

    PubMed

    Kaempfer, Thomas U; Plapp, Mathis

    2009-03-01

    Snow on the ground is a complex three-dimensional porous medium consisting of an ice matrix formed by sintered snow crystals and a pore space filled with air and water vapor. If a temperature gradient is imposed on the snow, a water vapor gradient in the pore space is induced and the snow microstructure changes due to diffusion, sublimation, and resublimation: the snow metamorphoses. The snow microstructure, in turn, determines macroscopic snow properties such as the thermal conductivity of a snowpack. We develop a phase-field model for snow metamorphism that operates on natural snow microstructures as observed by computed x-ray microtomography. The model takes into account heat and mass diffusion within the ice matrix and pore space, as well as phase changes at the ice-air interfaces. Its construction is inspired by phase-field models for alloy solidification, which allows us to relate the phase-field to a sharp-interface formulation of the problem without performing formal matched asymptotics. To overcome the computational difficulties created by the large difference between diffusional and interface-migration time scales, we introduce a method for accelerating the numerical simulations that formally amounts to reducing the heat- and mass-diffusion coefficients while maintaining the correct interface velocities. The model is validated by simulations for simple one- and two-dimensional test cases. Furthermore, we perform qualitative metamorphism simulations on natural snow structures to demonstrate the potential of the approach.

  11. Typical Phases of Transformative Learning: A Practice-Based Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nohl, Arnd-Michael

    2015-01-01

    Empirical models of transformative learning offer important insights into the core characteristics of this concept. Whereas previous analyses were limited to specific social groups or topical terrains, this article empirically typifies the phases of transformative learning on the basis of a comparative analysis of various social groups and topical…

  12. Phase-field modeling of dry snow metamorphism.

    PubMed

    Kaempfer, Thomas U; Plapp, Mathis

    2009-03-01

    Snow on the ground is a complex three-dimensional porous medium consisting of an ice matrix formed by sintered snow crystals and a pore space filled with air and water vapor. If a temperature gradient is imposed on the snow, a water vapor gradient in the pore space is induced and the snow microstructure changes due to diffusion, sublimation, and resublimation: the snow metamorphoses. The snow microstructure, in turn, determines macroscopic snow properties such as the thermal conductivity of a snowpack. We develop a phase-field model for snow metamorphism that operates on natural snow microstructures as observed by computed x-ray microtomography. The model takes into account heat and mass diffusion within the ice matrix and pore space, as well as phase changes at the ice-air interfaces. Its construction is inspired by phase-field models for alloy solidification, which allows us to relate the phase-field to a sharp-interface formulation of the problem without performing formal matched asymptotics. To overcome the computational difficulties created by the large difference between diffusional and interface-migration time scales, we introduce a method for accelerating the numerical simulations that formally amounts to reducing the heat- and mass-diffusion coefficients while maintaining the correct interface velocities. The model is validated by simulations for simple one- and two-dimensional test cases. Furthermore, we perform qualitative metamorphism simulations on natural snow structures to demonstrate the potential of the approach. PMID:19391945

  13. Modelling and Analysis of a Class of Phase Field Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colli, Pierluigi

    2008-09-01

    A phase transition model based on a reduced energy balance equation will be discussed. The model is derived from free energy and pseudo-potential of dissipation, according to well known thermodynamical laws. We point out analytical results for the related PDE's system. The note reports on a joint work, partly in progress, with ELENA BONETTI, MAURO FABRIZIO and GIANNI GILARDI, to whom I am very grateful for our collaboration.

  14. Beyond in-phase and anti-phase coordination in a model of joint action.

    PubMed

    Avitabile, Daniele; Słowiński, Piotr; Bardy, Benoit; Tsaneva-Atanasova, Krasimira

    2016-06-01

    In 1985, Haken, Kelso and Bunz proposed a system of coupled nonlinear oscillators as a model of rhythmic movement patterns in human bimanual coordination. Since then, the Haken-Kelso-Bunz (HKB) model has become a modelling paradigm applied extensively in all areas of movement science, including interpersonal motor coordination. However, all previous studies have followed a line of analysis based on slowly varying amplitudes and rotating wave approximations. These approximations lead to a reduced system, consisting of a single differential equation representing the evolution of the relative phase of the two coupled oscillators: the HKB model of the relative phase. Here we take a different approach and systematically investigate the behaviour of the HKB model in the full four-dimensional state space and for general coupling strengths. We perform detailed numerical bifurcation analyses and reveal that the HKB model supports previously unreported dynamical regimes as well as bistability between a variety of coordination patterns. Furthermore, we identify the stability boundaries of distinct coordination regimes in the model and discuss the applicability of our findings to interpersonal coordination and other joint action tasks. PMID:27278609

  15. Beyond in-phase and anti-phase coordination in a model of joint action.

    PubMed

    Avitabile, Daniele; Słowiński, Piotr; Bardy, Benoit; Tsaneva-Atanasova, Krasimira

    2016-06-01

    In 1985, Haken, Kelso and Bunz proposed a system of coupled nonlinear oscillators as a model of rhythmic movement patterns in human bimanual coordination. Since then, the Haken-Kelso-Bunz (HKB) model has become a modelling paradigm applied extensively in all areas of movement science, including interpersonal motor coordination. However, all previous studies have followed a line of analysis based on slowly varying amplitudes and rotating wave approximations. These approximations lead to a reduced system, consisting of a single differential equation representing the evolution of the relative phase of the two coupled oscillators: the HKB model of the relative phase. Here we take a different approach and systematically investigate the behaviour of the HKB model in the full four-dimensional state space and for general coupling strengths. We perform detailed numerical bifurcation analyses and reveal that the HKB model supports previously unreported dynamical regimes as well as bistability between a variety of coordination patterns. Furthermore, we identify the stability boundaries of distinct coordination regimes in the model and discuss the applicability of our findings to interpersonal coordination and other joint action tasks.

  16. A phase mixing model for the frequency-doubling illusion.

    PubMed

    Wielaard, James; Smith, R Theodore

    2013-10-01

    We introduce a temporal phase mixing model for a description of the frequency-doubling illusion (FDI). The model is generic in the sense that it can be set to refer to retinal ganglion cells, lateral geniculate cells, as well as simple cells in the primary visual cortex (V1). Model parameters, however, strongly suggest that the FDI originates in the cortex. The model shows how noise in the response phases of cells in V1, or in further processing of these phases, easily produces observed behavior of FDI onset as a function of spatiotemporal frequencies. It also shows how this noise can accommodate physiologically plausible spatial delays in comparing neural signals over a distance. The model offers an explanation for the disappearance of the FDI at sufficiently high spatial frequencies via increasingly correlated coding of neighboring grating stripes. Further, when the FDI is equated to vanishing perceptual discrimination between asynchronous contrast-reversal gratings, the model proposes the possibility that the FDI shows a resonance behavior at sufficiently high spatial frequencies, by which it is alternately perceived and not perceived in sequential temporal frequency bands.

  17. Characterizing Phase Transitions in a Model of Neutral Evolutionary Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Adam; King, Dawn; Bahar, Sonya

    2013-03-01

    An evolutionary model was recently introduced for sympatric, phenotypic evolution over a variable fitness landscape with assortative mating (Dees & Bahar 2010). Organisms in the model are described by coordinates in a two-dimensional phenotype space, born at random coordinates with limited variation from their parents as determined by a mutation parameter, mutability. The model has been extended to include both neutral evolution and asexual reproduction in Scott et al (submitted). It has been demonstrated that a second order, non-equilibrium phase transition occurs for the temporal dynamics as the mutability is varied, for both the original model and for neutral conditions. This transition likely belongs to the directed percolation universality class. In contrast, the spatial dynamics of the model shows characteristics of an ordinary percolation phase transition. Here, we characterize the phase transitions exhibited by this model by determining critical exponents for the relaxation times, characteristic lengths, and cluster (species) mass distributions. Missouri Research Board; J.S. McDonnell Foundation

  18. Stability of liquid crystalline phases in the phase-field-crystal model.

    PubMed

    Achim, Cristian V; Wittkowski, Raphael; Löwen, Hartmut

    2011-06-01

    The phase-field-crystal model for liquid crystals is solved numerically in two spatial dimensions. This model is formulated with three position-dependent order parameters, namely the reduced translational density, the local nematic order parameter, and the mean local direction of the orientations. The equilibrium free-energy functional involves local powers of the order parameters up to fourth order, gradients of the order parameters up to fourth order, and different couplings between the order parameters. The stable phases of the equilibrium free-energy functional are calculated for various coupling parameters. Among the stable liquid crystalline states are the isotropic, nematic, columnar, smectic-A, and plastic crystalline phases. The plastic crystals can have triangular, square, and honeycomb lattices and exhibit orientational patterns with a complex topology involving a sublattice with topological defects. Phase diagrams were obtained by numerical minimization of the free-energy functional. Their main features are qualitatively in line with much simpler one-mode approximations for the order parameters.

  19. Consideration of a Phase Change Model Based on Apparent Phase Equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashiwada, S.; Iga, Y.

    2015-12-01

    It has been known that cavity volume is underestimated and there is a discrepancy between predicted and measured breakdown characteristics for the numerical simulation of unsteady cavitation around a hydrofoil at high angle of attack. Therefore, in this study, in order to predict the cavity volume with high accuracy, the phenomena that gas phase increases even at a pressure higher than saturated vapour pressure which is known as aeration is modelled, and applied to phase change term. It was assumed that the precipitation of dissolved air is promoted by mechanical stimulation such as Reynolds stress in unsteady flow. The effectivity of the proposed model is discussed through the comparison among some kinds of components of the pressure variation.

  20. Phase dynamics modeling of parallel stacks of Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmonov, I. R.; Shukrinov, Yu. M.

    2014-11-01

    The phase dynamics of two parallel connected stacks of intrinsic Josephson junctions (JJs) in high temperature superconductors is numerically investigated. The calculations are based on the system of nonlinear differential equations obtained within the CCJJ + DC model, which allows one to determine the general current-voltage characteristic of the system, as well as each individual stack. The processes with increasing and decreasing base currents are studied. The features in the behavior of the current in each stack of the system due to the switching between the states with rotating and oscillating phases are analyzed.

  1. Phase-field-crystal methodology for modeling of structural transformations.

    PubMed

    Greenwood, Michael; Rottler, Jörg; Provatas, Nikolas

    2011-03-01

    We introduce and characterize free-energy functionals for modeling of solids with different crystallographic symmetries within the phase-field-crystal methodology. The excess free energy responsible for the emergence of periodic phases is inspired by classical density-functional theory, but uses only a minimal description for the modes of the direct correlation function to preserve computational efficiency. We provide a detailed prescription for controlling the crystal structure and introduce parameters for changing temperature and surface energies, so that phase transformations between body-centered-cubic (bcc), face-centered-cubic (fcc), hexagonal-close-packed (hcp), and simple-cubic (sc) lattices can be studied. To illustrate the versatility of our free-energy functional, we compute the phase diagram for fcc-bcc-liquid coexistence in the temperature-density plane. We also demonstrate that our model can be extended to include hcp symmetry by dynamically simulating hcp-liquid coexistence from a seeded crystal nucleus. We further quantify the dependence of the elastic constants on the model control parameters in two and three dimensions, showing how the degree of elastic anisotropy can be tuned from the shape of the direct correlation functions. PMID:21517507

  2. Modeling phase equilibria in mixtures containing hydrogen fluoride and halocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Lencka, M. ); Anderko, A. Polish Academy of Sciences, Warszawa )

    1993-03-01

    Recently, much attention has been focused on the production of environmentally acceptable refrigerants, which not only offer desirable physico-chemical properties, but do not deplete the ozone layer and do not cause the greenhouse effect. The production of such refrigerants involves the separation of multicomponent mixtures containing hydrogen fluoride, hydrogen chloride, and various chlorinated and fluorinated hydrocarbons. Therefore, it is indispensable to know the phase behavior of these mixtures. While the phase behavior of refrigerant mixtures can be adequately modeled in the absence of HF using standard thermodynamic techniques, drastically increases the complexity of the mixture because of its unusually strong association. The association of HF manifests itself in its significantly reduced gas-phase compressibility factor and the strong nonideality of mixtures containing HF and hydrocarbons or halocarbons. In this work, the authors develop an accurate, yet simple, association model for HF and compare it with simulation data. The model is combined with a simple equation of state to yield a closed-form expression that is applicable to both pure fluids and mixtures. In addition to representing the pure-component data for HF, the theory accurately predicts phase equilibria in HF + halocarbon systems.

  3. Phase Transition Behavior in a Neutral Evolution Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Dawn; Scott, Adam; Maric, Nevena; Bahar, Sonya

    2014-03-01

    The complexity of interactions among individuals and between individuals and the environment make agent based modeling ideal for studying emergent speciation. This is a dynamically complex problem that can be characterized via the critical behavior of a continuous phase transition. Concomitant with the main tenets of natural selection, we allow organisms to reproduce, mutate, and die within a neutral phenotype space. Previous work has shown phase transition behavior in an assortative mating model with variable fitness landscapes as the maximum mutation size (μ) was varied (Dees and Bahar, 2010). Similarly, this behavior was recently presented in the work of Scott et al. (2013), even on a completely neutral landscape, for bacterial-like fission as well as for assortative mating. Here we present another neutral model to investigate the `critical' phase transition behavior of three mating types - assortative, bacterial, and random - in a phenotype space as a function of the percentage of random death. Results show two types of phase transitions occurring for the parameters of the population size and the number of clusters (an analogue of species), indicating different evolutionary dynamics for system survival and clustering. This research was supported by funding from: University of Missouri Research Board and James S. McDonnell Foundation.

  4. Network inoculation: Heteroclinics and phase transitions in an epidemic model.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hui; Rogers, Tim; Gross, Thilo

    2016-08-01

    In epidemiological modelling, dynamics on networks, and, in particular, adaptive and heterogeneous networks have recently received much interest. Here, we present a detailed analysis of a previously proposed model that combines heterogeneity in the individuals with adaptive rewiring of the network structure in response to a disease. We show that in this model, qualitative changes in the dynamics occur in two phase transitions. In a macroscopic description, one of these corresponds to a local bifurcation, whereas the other one corresponds to a non-local heteroclinic bifurcation. This model thus provides a rare example of a system where a phase transition is caused by a non-local bifurcation, while both micro- and macro-level dynamics are accessible to mathematical analysis. The bifurcation points mark the onset of a behaviour that we call network inoculation. In the respective parameter region, exposure of the system to a pathogen will lead to an outbreak that collapses but leaves the network in a configuration where the disease cannot reinvade, despite every agent returning to the susceptible class. We argue that this behaviour and the associated phase transitions can be expected to occur in a wide class of models of sufficient complexity. PMID:27586612

  5. Phase-field elasticity model based on mechanical jump conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Daniel; Tschukin, Oleg; Choudhury, Abhik; Selzer, Michael; Böhlke, Thomas; Nestler, Britta

    2015-05-01

    Computational models based on the phase-field method typically operate on a mesoscopic length scale and resolve structural changes of the material and furthermore provide valuable information about microstructure and mechanical property relations. An accurate calculation of the stresses and mechanical energy at the transition region is therefore indispensable. We derive a quantitative phase-field elasticity model based on force balance and Hadamard jump conditions at the interface. Comparing the simulated stress profiles calculated with Voigt/Taylor (Annalen der Physik 274(12):573, 1889), Reuss/Sachs (Z Angew Math Mech 9:49, 1929) and the proposed model with the theoretically predicted stress fields in a plate with a round inclusion under hydrostatic tension, we show the quantitative characteristics of the model. In order to validate the elastic contribution to the driving force for phase transition, we demonstrate the absence of excess energy, calculated by Durga et al. (Model Simul Mater Sci Eng 21(5):055018, 2013), in a one-dimensional equilibrium condition of serial and parallel material chains. To validate the driving force for systems with curved transition regions, we relate simulations to the Gibbs-Thompson equilibrium condition (Johnson and Alexander, J Appl Phys 59(8):2735, 1986).

  6. Network inoculation: Heteroclinics and phase transitions in an epidemic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hui; Rogers, Tim; Gross, Thilo

    2016-08-01

    In epidemiological modelling, dynamics on networks, and, in particular, adaptive and heterogeneous networks have recently received much interest. Here, we present a detailed analysis of a previously proposed model that combines heterogeneity in the individuals with adaptive rewiring of the network structure in response to a disease. We show that in this model, qualitative changes in the dynamics occur in two phase transitions. In a macroscopic description, one of these corresponds to a local bifurcation, whereas the other one corresponds to a non-local heteroclinic bifurcation. This model thus provides a rare example of a system where a phase transition is caused by a non-local bifurcation, while both micro- and macro-level dynamics are accessible to mathematical analysis. The bifurcation points mark the onset of a behaviour that we call network inoculation. In the respective parameter region, exposure of the system to a pathogen will lead to an outbreak that collapses but leaves the network in a configuration where the disease cannot reinvade, despite every agent returning to the susceptible class. We argue that this behaviour and the associated phase transitions can be expected to occur in a wide class of models of sufficient complexity.

  7. Topological phase transition in the Scheidegger model of river networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oppenheim, Jacob N.; Magnasco, Marcelo O.

    2012-08-01

    Transport networks are found at the heart of myriad natural systems, yet are poorly understood, except for the case of river networks. The Scheidegger model, in which rivers are convergent random walks, has been studied only in the case of flat topography, ignoring the variety of curved geometries found in nature. Embedding this model on a cone, we find a convergent and a divergent phase, corresponding to few, long basins and many, short basins, respectively, separated by a singularity, indicating a phase transition. Quantifying basin shape using Hacks law l˜ah gives distinct values for h, providing a method of testing our hypotheses. The generality of our model suggests implications for vascular morphology, in particular, differing number and shapes of arterial and venous trees.

  8. Quantum phase transitions studied within the interacting boson model

    PubMed

    Cejnar; Jolie

    2000-06-01

    We study quasicritical phenomena in transitions between two "quantum phases" of a finite boson system, described by the interacting boson model 1 used in nuclear physics. The model is formulated in the algebraic framework and has a simple geometrical interpretation; the "phases" represented by dynamical symmetries U(5) and SU(3) correspond to spherical and deformed nuclear shapes. The quasicriticality of the U(5)-SU(3) transition is shown to be connected with the following phenomena simultaneously occurring in a narrow parameter region between the symmetries: (a) abrupt structural changes of eigenstates, (b) multiple avoided crossing of levels, (c) peaked density of exceptional points, (d) qualitative changes of the corresponding classical potential. We show that these spectroscopic features influence the dynamics of intersymmetry transitions in the model parameter space if the parameters themselves become dynamical variables. PMID:11088296

  9. Sketch the migration of Dictyostelium discoideum using phase field model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yunsong; Camley, Brian; Rappel, Wouter-Jan; Levine, Herbert

    Cell migration plays an important role in a lot of biological processes, like chemotaxis, wound healing, and cancer metastasis. The fact it is highly integrated has brought great challenges, physical and mathematical, to the modeling efforts. Recently, a phase field model, which couples cellular reaction dynamics, intra-cellular hydrodynamics, cell-substrate adhesions and deformable cell boundaries, has successfully captured some characteristics of moving cells, including morphological change, cytosolic actin flow pattern, periodic migration and so on. Here we apply the phase field model to sketch the migration of Dictyostelium discoideum, which shows a completely different moving pattern from the cells (like fish keratocyte) in our previous attempts. And we will also compare our results with some experimental observations, not only on the cell morphology, but also on the traction force patterns on the substrate.

  10. Quantification approach for assessment of sparkling wine volatiles from different soils, ripening stages, and varieties by stir bar sorptive extraction with liquid desorption.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Elisabete; Coimbra, Manuel A; Nogueira, J M F; Rocha, Sílvia M

    2009-03-01

    Stir bar sorptive extraction with liquid desorption followed by large volume injection coupled to gas chromatography-quadrupole mass spectrometry (SBSE-LD/LVI-GC-qMS) was applied for the quantification of varietal and fermentative volatiles in sparkling wines. The analytical data were performed by using suitable standards of monoterpene hydrocarbons (alpha-pinene), monoterpenols (linalool), sesquiterpenoids (E,E-farnesol, Z-nerolidol, and guaiazulene), C(13) norisoprenoids (beta-ionone), aliphatic and aromatic alcohols (hexanol and 2-phenylethanol), and esters (hexyl acetate and ethyl decanoate) as model compounds. The wine volatiles were quantified using the structurally related standards. The methodology showed good linearity over the concentration range tested, with correlation coefficients ranging from 0.950 to 0.997, and a reproducibility of 9-18%. The SBSE-LD/LVI-GC-qMS methodology allowed, in a single run, the quantification of 71 wine volatiles that can be quantified accurately at levels lower than their respective olfactory thresholds. This methodology was used for assessment of sparkling wine volatiles from different soils, ripening stages, and varieties. The variety and soil influenced significantly the volatile composition of sparkling wines; lower effect was observed for the ripening stage of grapes picked up one week before or after the maturity state.

  11. Molecular level description of the sorptive fractionation of a fulvic acid on aluminum oxide using electrospray ionization Fourier transform mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Galindo, Catherine; Del Nero, Mirella

    2014-07-01

    We addressed here, by means of electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) with ultrahigh resolution, the molecular level fractionation of a reference fulvic acid (SRFA) during its sorption at an alumina surface, taken as a model for surfaces of natural aluminum oxide hydrates. Examination of ESI-MS spectra of a native SRFA solution and of supernatants collected in sorption experiments at acidic pH showed that the ∼5700 compounds identified in the native solution were partitioned between the solution and alumina surface to quite varying degrees. Compounds showing the highest affinity for the surface were aromatic compounds with multiple oxygenated functionalities, polycyclic aromatic compounds depleted of hydrogen and carrying few oxygenated groups, and aliphatic compounds with very high O/C values, highlighting the fact that SRFA constituents were sorbed mainly via chemical sorption involving their oxygenated functionalities. We observed an inverse correlation between the degree of sorption of a molecule within a CH2 series and its number of CH2 groups and a positive correlation between the degree of sorption and the number of CO2 groups in a COO series, which was remarkable. These correlations provide evidence at the molecular scale that molecule acidity is the key parameter governing fulvic acid (FA) sorptive fractionation, and they are useful for predicting sorption of FA at a natural oxide surface.

  12. Phase field modeling of partially saturated deformable porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sciarra, Giulio

    2016-09-01

    A poromechanical model of partially saturated deformable porous media is proposed based on a phase field approach at modeling the behavior of the mixture of liquid water and wet air, which saturates the pore space, the phase field being the saturation (ratio). While the standard retention curve is expected still^ to provide the intrinsic retention properties of the porous skeleton, depending on the porous texture, an enhanced description of surface tension between the wetting (liquid water) and the non-wetting (wet air) fluid, occupying the pore space, is stated considering a regularization of the phase field model based on an additional contribution to the overall free energy depending on the saturation gradient. The aim is to provide a more refined description of surface tension interactions. An enhanced constitutive relation for the capillary pressure is established together with a suitable generalization of Darcy's law, in which the gradient of the capillary pressure is replaced by the gradient of the so-called generalized chemical potential, which also accounts for the "force", associated to the local free energy of the phase field model. A micro-scale heuristic interpretation of the novel constitutive law of capillary pressure is proposed, in order to compare the envisaged model with that one endowed with the concept of average interfacial area. The considered poromechanical model is formulated within the framework of strain gradient theory in order to account for possible effects, at laboratory scale, of the micro-scale hydro-mechanical couplings between highly localized flows (fingering) and localized deformations of the skeleton (fracturing).

  13. A simplified model for two phase face seal design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, S. Y.; Hughes, W. F.; Basu, P.; Beatty, P. A.

    1990-01-01

    A simplified quasi-isothermal low-leakage laminar model for analyzing the stiffness and the stability characteristics of two-phase face seals with real fluids is developed. Sample calculations with this model for low-leakage operations are compared with calculations for high-leakage operations, performed using the adiabatic turbulent model of Beatty and Hughes (1987). It was found that the seal characteristics predicted using the two extreme models tend to overlap with each other, indicating that the simplified laminar model may be a useful tool for seal design. The effect of coning was investigated using the simplified model. The results show that, for the same balance, a coned seal has a higher leakage rate than a parallel face seal.

  14. Modeling PSInSAR time series without phase unwrapping

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhang, L.; Ding, X.; Lu, Zhiming

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a least-squares-based method for multitemporal synthetic aperture radar interferometry that allows one to estimate deformations without the need of phase unwrapping. The method utilizes a series of multimaster wrapped differential interferograms with short baselines and focuses on arcs at which there are no phase ambiguities. An outlier detector is used to identify and remove the arcs with phase ambiguities, and a pseudoinverse of the variancecovariance matrix is used as the weight matrix of the correlated observations. The deformation rates at coherent points are estimated with a least squares model constrained by reference points. The proposed approach is verified with a set of simulated data. ?? 2006 IEEE.

  15. Phases of the infinite U Hubbard model on square lattices.

    PubMed

    Liu, Li; Yao, Hong; Berg, Erez; White, Steven R; Kivelson, Steven A

    2012-03-23

    We apply the density matrix renormalization group to study the phase diagram of the infinite U Hubbard model on 2- to 6-leg ladders. Where the results are largely insensitive to the ladder width, we consider the results representative of the 2D square lattice. We find a fully polarized ferromagnetic Fermi liquid phase when n, the density of electrons per site, is in the range 1>n≳0.800. For n=3/4 we find an unexpected insulating checkerboard phase with coexisting bond-density order with 4 sites per unit cell and block-spin antiferromagnetic order with 8 sites per unit cell. For 3/4>n, all ladders with width >2 have unpolarized ground states. PMID:22540606

  16. Nonequilibrium Dynamics and Phase Transitions in Holographic Models.

    PubMed

    Janik, Romuald A; Jankowski, Jakub; Soltanpanahi, Hesam

    2016-08-26

    We study the poles of the retarded Green's functions of strongly coupled field theories exhibiting a variety of phase structures from a crossover up to a first order phase transition. These theories are modeled by a dual gravitational description. The poles of the holographic Green's functions appear at the frequencies of the quasinormal modes of the dual black hole background. We establish that near the transition, in all cases considered, the applicability of a hydrodynamic description breaks down already at lower momenta than in the conformal case. We establish the appearance of the spinodal region in the case of the first order phase transition at temperatures for which the speed of sound squared is negative. An estimate of the preferential scale attained by the unstable modes is also given. We additionally observe a novel diffusive regime for sound modes for a range of wavelengths. PMID:27610844

  17. Nonequilibrium Dynamics and Phase Transitions in Holographic Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janik, Romuald A.; Jankowski, Jakub; Soltanpanahi, Hesam

    2016-08-01

    We study the poles of the retarded Green's functions of strongly coupled field theories exhibiting a variety of phase structures from a crossover up to a first order phase transition. These theories are modeled by a dual gravitational description. The poles of the holographic Green's functions appear at the frequencies of the quasinormal modes of the dual black hole background. We establish that near the transition, in all cases considered, the applicability of a hydrodynamic description breaks down already at lower momenta than in the conformal case. We establish the appearance of the spinodal region in the case of the first order phase transition at temperatures for which the speed of sound squared is negative. An estimate of the preferential scale attained by the unstable modes is also given. We additionally observe a novel diffusive regime for sound modes for a range of wavelengths.

  18. Investigation of Molecular Marker Lipids in Alpine Ice Cores Via Stir Bar Sorptive Extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makou, M. C.; Eglinton, T. I.; Thompson, L. G.; Hughen, K. A.

    2005-12-01

    Recently developed analytical techniques were employed to identify and quantify organic molecular markers trapped in high-altitude ice. While various compounds represent potentially useful proxies for biomass burning, vegetation type, atmospheric circulation, and anthropogenic activity, prior attempts to measure organic compounds in ice cores have typically required large volumes of sample material that are incompatible with generation of high-resolution paleoclimate records. We employed stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE) and thermal desorption (TD), coupled with gas chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC/TOF-MS), to examine the organic content of small quantities (≤ 30 ml) of ice. To test the utility of the approach, post-industrial ice core samples from the Huascarán and Sajama sites (Andes), the Dasuopu and Puruogangri sites (Tibetan Plateau), and Mt. Kilimanjaro (east Africa) were tested. n-Alkanes, n-alkanoic acids, n-alkyl amides and nitriles, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and various diterpenoids were identified in this suite of cores. These marker compounds suggest inputs from biomass burning, fresh vascular plant material, and anthropogenic activities such as fossil fuel combustion. Differences in distributions of the alkyl amide and nitrile homologues between the different sites suggest a predominantly local or regional supply of organic matter. Pre-industrial samples from the Sajama and Puruogangri ice cores were also analyzed in order to assess the character of biomarker assemblages in the absence of anthropogenic contributions and investigate changes in inputs over time. PAHs and diterpenoids, which may result from biomass burning and were observed in the modern Sajama samples, occurred in two Holocene Sajama samples, but not in a last glacial sample. Enhanced inputs of terrestrial vegetation combustion biomarkers were consistent with periods of enhanced aridity in both cores. This study demonstrates the utility of SBSE, TD

  19. Biochar characteristics produced from food-processing products and their sorptive capacity for mercury and phenanthrene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fotopoulou, Kalliopi N.; Karapanagioti, Hrissi K.; Manariotis, Ioannis D.

    2015-04-01

    Various organic-rich wastes including wood chips, animal manure, and crop residues have been used for biochar production. Biochar is used as an additive to soils to sequester carbon and improve soil fertility but its use as a sorbent for environmental remediation processes is gaining increased attention. Surface properties such as point of zero charge, surface area and pore volume, surface topography, surface functional groups and acid-base behavior are important factors, which affect sorption efficiency. Understanding the surface alteration of biochars increases our understanding of the pollutant-sorbent interaction. The scope of the present work was to evaluate the effect of key characteristics of biochars on their sorptive properties. Raw materials for biochar production were evaluated including byproducts from brewering, coffee, wine, and olive oil industry. The charring process was performed at different temperatures under limited-oxygen conditions using specialized containers. The surface area, the pore volume, and the average pore size of the biochars were determined. Open surface area and micropore volume were determined using t-plot method and Harkins & Jura equation. Raw food-processing waste demonstrates low surface area that increases by 1 order of magnitude by thermal treatment up to 750oC. At temperatures from 750 up to 900oC, pyrolysis results to biochars with surface areas 210-700 m2/g. For the same temperature range, a high percentage (46 to73%) of the pore volume of the biochars is due to micropores. Positive results were obtained when high surface area biochars were tested for their ability to remove organic (i.e. phenanthrene) and inorganic (i.e. mercury) compounds from aqueous solutions. All these properties point to new materials that can effectively be used for environmental remediation.

  20. Relation between Soil Order and Sorptive Capacity for Dissolved Organic Carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Heal, Katherine R; Brandt, Craig C; Mayes, Melanie; Phillips, Jana Randolph; Jardine, Philip M

    2012-01-01

    Soils have historically been considered a temporary sink for organic C, but deeper soils may serve as longer term C sinks due to the sorption of dissolved organic C (DOC) onto Fe- and clay-rich mineral soil particles. This project provides an improved understanding and predictive capability of the physical and chemical properties of deep soils that control their sorptive capacities for DOC. Two hundred thirteen subsurface soil samples (72 series from five orders) were selected from the eastern and central United States. A characterized natural DOC source was added to the soils, and the Langmuir sorption equation was fitted to the observed data by adjusting the maximum DOC sorption capacity (Q{sub max}) and the binding coefficient (k). Different isotherm shapes were observed for Ultisols, Alfisols, and Mollisols due to statistically significant differences in the magnitude of k, while Q{sub max} was statistically invariant among these three orders. Linear regressions were performed on the entire database and as a function of soil order to correlate Langmuir fitted parameters with measured soil properties, e.g., pH, clay content, total organic C (TOC), and total Fe oxide content. Together, textural clay and Fe oxide content accounted for 35% of the variation in Q{sub max} in the database, and clay was most important for Alfisols and Ultisols. The TOC content, however, accounted for 27% of the variation in Q{sub max} in Mollisols. Soil pH accounted for 45% of the variation in k for the entire database, 41% for Mollisols, and 22% for Alfisols. Our findings demonstrate that correlations between Langmuir parameters and soil properties are different for different soil orders and that k is a more sensitive parameter for DOC sorption than is Q{sub max} for temperate soils from the central and eastern United States.

  1. Phase diagram of the half-filled ionic Hubbard model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bag, Soumen; Garg, Arti; Krishnamurthy, H. R.

    2015-06-01

    We study the phase diagram of the ionic Hubbard model (IHM) at half filling on a Bethe lattice of infinite connectivity using dynamical mean-field theory (DMFT), with two impurity solvers, namely, iterated perturbation theory (IPT) and continuous time quantum Monte Carlo (CTQMC). The physics of the IHM is governed by the competition between the staggered ionic potential Δ and the on-site Hubbard U . We find that for a finite Δ and at zero temperature, long-range antiferromagnetic (AFM) order sets in beyond a threshold U =UA F via a first-order phase transition. For U smaller than UA F the system is a correlated band insulator. Both methods show a clear evidence for a quantum transition to a half-metal (HM) phase just after the AFM order is turned on, followed by the formation of an AFM insulator on further increasing U . We show that the results obtained within both methods have good qualitative and quantitative consistency in the intermediate-to-strong-coupling regime at zero temperature as well as at finite temperature. On increasing the temperature, the AFM order is lost via a first-order phase transition at a transition temperature TA F(U ,Δ ) [or, equivalently, on decreasing U below UA F(T ,Δ ) ], within both methods, for weak to intermediate values of U /t . In the strongly correlated regime, where the effective low-energy Hamiltonian is the Heisenberg model, IPT is unable to capture the thermal (Neel) transition from the AFM phase to the paramagnetic phase, but the CTQMC does. At a finite temperature T , DMFT +CTQMC shows a second phase transition (not seen within DMFT +IPT ) on increasing U beyond UA F. At UN>UA F , when the Neel temperature TN for the effective Heisenberg model becomes lower than T , the AFM order is lost via a second-order transition. For U ≫Δ , TN˜t2/U (1 -x2) , where x =2 Δ /U and thus TN increases with increase in Δ /U . In the three-dimensional parameter space of (U /t ,T /t ,andΔ /t ) , as T increases, the surface of first

  2. Phase-aware projection model for steganalysis of JPEG images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holub, Vojtěch; Fridrich, Jessica

    2015-03-01

    State-of-the-art JPEG steganographic algorithms, such as J-UNIWARD, are currently better detected in the spatial domain rather than the JPEG domain. Rich models built from pixel residuals seem to better capture the impact of embedding than features constructed as co-occurrences of quantized JPEG coefficients. However, when steganalyzing JPEG steganographic algorithms in the spatial domain, the pixels' statistical properties vary because of the underlying 8 × 8 pixel grid imposed by the compression. In order to detect JPEG steganography more accurately, we split the statistics of noise residuals based on their phase w.r.t. the 8 × 8 grid. Because of the heterogeneity of pixels in a decompressed image, it also makes sense to keep the kernel size of pixel predictors small as larger kernels mix up qualitatively different statistics more, losing thus on the detection power. Based on these observations, we propose a novel feature set called PHase Aware pRojection Model (PHARM) in which residuals obtained using a small number of small-support kernels are represented using first-order statistics of their random projections as in the projection spatial rich model PSRM. The benefit of making the features "phase-aware" is shown experimentally on selected modern JPEG steganographic algorithms with the biggest improvement seen for J-UNIWARD. Additionally, the PHARM feature vector can be computed at a fraction of computational costs of existing projection rich models.

  3. Investigation of Quantum Phase Transition and Entanglement in Spin Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shik, Hoi Yin

    In this thesis, the critical behaviour of concurrence in spin models and its relationship to quantum phase transitions (QPT) are explored. The relation between the ground state entanglement and excited states, in connection with quantum phase transitions, is studied. Besides, a generalization of the Majumdar-Ghosh model [1, 2], studied in my M.Phil research, to finite temperatures is also studied. Firstly, the relationship between quantum entanglement and QPT is studied. In this thesis, concurrence is chosen as the measure of pairwise entanglement. The quantum phase transitions in the XXZ and J1- J2 models are investigated by examining contributions of excited states to the ground state concurrence. The critical behaviour of the concurrence at the quantum critical points is explained by the excited states' contributions. Also, the dependence of the concurrence at the quantum critical points with lattice size is investigated. Secondly, under open boundary conditions, the different quantum phases in the XXZ and J1-J2 models are distinguished by investigating the responses of the end spins to a small perturbation. Meanwhile, the properties of the concurrence of the spin models under different boundary conditions are compared. Finally, the thermodynamic properties of a spin-half ladder system are studied. We find that a completely dimerized state exists in one kind of twoleg spin-half ladder, which has local anti-ferromagnetic ordering and frustration effect at the same time. The system's low-lying excitations can be obtained exactly and this enables us to calculate thermodynamic quantities at low temperatures. Our results also show that a subset of the energy spectrum is a good approximation to the whole spectrum when used in the calculation of specific heat capacities and magnetic susceptibilities, even for the two-leg spin-half ladder without frustration.

  4. Supporting Universal Prevention Programs: A Two-Phased Coaching Model

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Kimberly D.; Darney, Dana; Domitrovich, Celene; Keperling, Jennifer Pitchford; Ialongo, Nicholas S.

    2013-01-01

    Schools are adopting evidence-based programs designed to enhance students’ emotional and behavioral competencies at increasing rates (Hemmeter, Snyder, & Artman, 2011). At the same time, teachers express the need for increased support surrounding implementation of these evidence-based programs (Carter & Van Norman, 2010). Ongoing professional development in the form of coaching may enhance teacher skills and implementation (Noell et al., 2005; Stormont, Reinke, Newcomer, Darney, & Lewis, 2012). There exists a need for a coaching model that can be applied to a variety of teacher skill levels and one that guides coach decision-making about how best to support teachers. This article provides a detailed account of a two-phased coaching model with empirical support developed and tested with coaches and teachers in urban schools (Becker, Bradshaw, Domitrovich, & Ialongo, 2013). In the initial universal coaching phase, all teachers receive the same coaching elements regardless of their skill level. Then, in the tailored coaching phase, coaching varies according to the strengths and needs of each teacher. Specifically, more intensive coaching strategies are used only with teachers who need additional coaching supports whereas other teachers receive just enough support to consolidate and maintain their strong implementation. Examples of how coaches used the two-phased coaching model when working with teachers who were implementing two universal prevention programs (i.e., the PATHS® curriculum and PAX Good Behavior Game [PAX GBG]) provide illustrations of the application of this model. The potential reach of this coaching model extends to other school-based programs as well as other settings in which coaches partner with interventionists to implement evidence-based programs. PMID:23660973

  5. Phase field modeling of tetragonal to monoclinic phase transformation in zirconia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamivand, Mahmood

    Zirconia based ceramics are strong, hard, inert, and smooth, with low thermal conductivity and good biocompatibility. Such properties made zirconia ceramics an ideal material for different applications form thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) to biomedicine applications like femoral implants and dental bridges. However, this unusual versatility of excellent properties would be mediated by the metastable tetragonal (or cubic) transformation to the stable monoclinic phase after a certain exposure at service temperatures. This transformation from tetragonal to monoclinic, known as LTD (low temperature degradation) in biomedical application, proceeds by propagation of martensite, which corresponds to transformation twinning. As such, tetragonal to monoclinic transformation is highly sensitive to mechanical and chemomechanical stresses. It is known in fact that this transformation is the source of the fracture toughening in stabilized zirconia as it occurs at the stress concentration regions ahead of the crack tip. This dissertation is an attempt to provide a kinetic-based model for tetragonal to monoclinic transformation in zirconia. We used the phase field technique to capture the temporal and spatial evolution of monoclinic phase. In addition to morphological patterns, we were able to calculate the developed internal stresses during tetragonal to monoclinic transformation. The model was started form the two dimensional single crystal then was expanded to the two dimensional polycrystalline and finally to the three dimensional single crystal. The model is able to predict the most physical properties associated with tetragonal to monoclinic transformation in zirconia including: morphological patterns, transformation toughening, shape memory effect, pseudoelasticity, surface uplift, and variants impingement. The model was benched marked with several experimental works. The good agreements between simulation results and experimental data, make the model a reliable tool for

  6. Modeling the Reactions of Energetic Materials in the Condensed Phase

    SciTech Connect

    Fried, L E; Manaa, M R; Lewis, J P

    2003-12-03

    High explosive (HE) materials are unique for having a strong exothermic reactivity, which has made them desirable for both military and commercial applications. Although the history of HE materials is long, condensed-phase properties are poorly understood. Understanding the condensed-phase properties of HE materials is important for determining stability and performance. Information regarding HE material properties (for example, the physical, chemical, and mechanical behaviors of the constituents in plastic-bonded explosive, or PBX, formulations) is necessary in efficiently building the next generation of explosives as the quest for more powerful energetic materials (in terms of energy per volume) moves forward. In addition, understanding the reaction mechanisms has important ramifications in disposing of such materials safely and cheaply, as there exist vast stockpiles of HE materials with corresponding contamination of earth and groundwater at these sites, as well as a military testing sites The ability to model chemical reaction processes in condensed phase energetic materials is rapidly progressing. Chemical equilibrium modeling is a mature technique with some limitations. Progress in this area continues, but is hampered by a lack of knowledge of condensed phase reaction mechanisms and rates. Atomistic modeling is much more computationally intensive, and is currently limited to very short time scales. Nonetheless, this methodology promises to yield the first reliable insights into the condensed phase processes responsible for high explosive detonation. Further work is necessary to extend the timescales involved in atomistic simulations. Recent work in implementing thermostat methods appropriate to shocks may promise to overcome some of these difficulties. Most current work on energetic material reactivity assumes that electronically adiabatic processes dominate. The role of excited states is becoming clearer, however. These states are not accessible in perfect

  7. Phase Resetting and Phase Locking in Hybrid Circuits of One Model and One Biological Neuron

    PubMed Central

    Oprisan, S. A.; Prinz, A. A.; Canavier, C. C.

    2004-01-01

    To determine why elements of central pattern generators phase lock in a particular pattern under some conditions but not others, we tested a theoretical pattern prediction method. The method is based on the tabulated open loop pulsatile interactions of bursting neurons on a cycle-by-cycle basis and was tested in closed loop hybrid circuits composed of one bursting biological neuron and one bursting model neuron coupled using the dynamic clamp. A total of 164 hybrid networks were formed by varying the synaptic conductances. The prediction of 1:1 phase locking agreed qualitatively with the experimental observations, except in three hybrid circuits in which 1:1 locking was predicted but not observed. Correct predictions sometimes required consideration of the second order phase resetting, which measures the change in the timing of the second burst after the perturbation. The method was robust to offsets between the initiation of bursting in the presynaptic neuron and the activation of the synaptic coupling with the postsynaptic neuron. The quantitative accuracy of the predictions fell within the variability (10%) in the experimentally observed intrinsic period and phase resetting curve (PRC), despite changes in the burst duration of the neurons between open and closed loop conditions. PMID:15454430

  8. Three-phase CFD analytical modeling of blood flow.

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, J.; Hassanein, A.; Mathematics and Computer Science

    2008-01-01

    The behavior of blood cells in disturbed flow regions of arteries has significant relevance for understanding atherogenesis. However, their distribution with red blood cells (RBCs) and leukocytes is not so well studied and understood. Our three-phase computational fluid dynamics approach including plasma, RBCs, and leukocytes was used to numerically simulate the local hemodynamics in such a flow regime. This model has tracked the wall shear stress (WSS), phase distributions, and flow patterns for each phase in a concentrated suspension shear flow of blood. Unlike other computational approaches, this approach does not require dispersion coefficients as an input. The non-Newtonian viscosity model was applied to a wide physiological range of hematocrits, including low shear rates. The migration and segregation of blood cells in disturbed flow regions were computed, and the results compared favorably with available experimental data. The predicted higher leukocyte concentration was correlated with relatively low WSS near the stenosis having a high WSS. This behavior was attributed to flow-dependent interactions of the leukocytes with RBCs in pulsatile flow. This three-phase hemodynamic analysis may have application to vulnerable plaque formation in arteries with in vivo complex flow conditions.

  9. Preliminary time-phased TWRS process model results

    SciTech Connect

    Orme, R.M.

    1995-03-24

    This report documents the first phase of efforts to model the retrieval and processing of Hanford tank waste within the constraints of an assumed tank farm configuration. This time-phased approach simulates a first try at a retrieval sequence, the batching of waste through retrieval facilities, the batching of retrieved waste through enhanced sludge washing, the batching of liquids through pretreatment and low-level waste (LLW) vitrification, and the batching of pretreated solids through high-level waste (HLW) vitrification. The results reflect the outcome of an assumed retrieval sequence that has not been tailored with respect to accepted measures of performance. The batch data, composition variability, and final waste volume projects in this report should be regarded as tentative. Nevertheless, the results provide interesting insights into time-phased processing of the tank waste. Inspection of the composition variability, for example, suggests modifications to the retrieval sequence that will further improve the uniformity of feed to the vitrification facilities. This model will be a valuable tool for evaluating suggested retrieval sequences and establishing a time-phased processing baseline. An official recommendation on tank retrieval sequence will be made in September, 1995.

  10. Adsorbed solution model for prediction of normal-phase chromatography process with varying composition of the mobile phase.

    PubMed

    Piatkowski, Wojciech; Petrushka, Igor; Antos, Dorota

    2005-10-21

    The adsorbed solution model has been used to predict competitive adsorption equilibria of the solute and the active component of mobile phase in a normal-phase liquid chromatography system. The inputs to the calculations were the single adsorption isotherms accounting for energetic heterogeneity of the adsorbent surface and non-ideality of the mobile phase solution. The competitive adsorption model has been coupled with a model of the column dynamics and used for simulating of chromatography process at different mobile phase composition. The predictions have been verified by comparing the simulated and experimental chromatograms. The model allowed quantitative prediction of chromatography process on the basis of the pure-species adsorption isotherms.

  11. The ESA Virtual Space Weather Modelling Centre - Phase 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poedts, Stefaan

    The ESA ITT project (AO/1-6738/11/NL/AT) to develop Phase 1 of a Virtual Space Weather Modelling Centre has the following objectives and scope: 1. The construction of a long term (~10 yrs) plan for the future development of a European virtual space weather modelling centre consisting of a new ‘open’ and distributed framework for the coupling of physics based models for space weather phenomena; 2. The assessment of model capabilities and the amount of work required to make them operational by integrating them in this framework and the identification of computing and networking requirements to do so. 3. The design of a system to enable models and other components to be installed locally or geographically distributed and the creation of a validation plan including a system of metrics for testing results. The consortium that took up this challenge involves: 1)the Katholieke Universiteit Leuven (Prime Contractor, coordinator: Prof. S. Poedts); 2) the Belgian Institute for Space Aeronomy (BIRA-IASB); 3) the Royal Observatory of Belgium (ROB); 4) the Von Karman Institute (VKI); 5) DH Consultancy (DHC); 6) Space Applications Services (SAS). The project started on May 14 2012, and will finish in May 2014. Thus, by the time of the meeting, both Phase 1A and Phase 1B (the development of the prototype) will be finished. The final report will be presented incl. the architecture decisions made, the framework, the current models integrated already as well as the model couplers installed. The prototype VSWMC will be demonstrated.

  12. A Phase-tracking Snow Micro-structure Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slaughter, A. E.; Zabaras, N.

    2012-12-01

    Utilizing a methodology derived from models for phase transitions in alloy solidification [1], a 3D finite element (FE) model for snow metamorphism was developed. Avalanches are known to occur due to the existence of a weak-layer of faceted crystals, which form due to temperature gradients within the snow through a process known as kinetic metamorphism [2]. In general, snow models are limited in their ability to model these microstructural changes, especially in three dimensions, and rely on effective properties. To enhance the tools available to avalanche researchers a finite element model was developed capable of tracking vapor deposition within the snow. This is accomplished using a fixed-domain, stabilized finite element solution for the energy, mass, momentum, and transport equations. Using a level-set parameter the domain is separated into either solid or fluid components and along the phase-change boundary a "mushy-zone" is establish [1, 3]. This zone is modeled as porous media that includes the effects of shrinkage and density changes [1]. The basis of the model is the open-source C++ libMesh FE library, as such the model includes adaptive mesh coarsening and refinement and relies on domain decomposition for optimum parallel performance. This work is the initial phase of an ongoing research project that aims to demonstrate the ability to model snow at the micro-structural level and move away from the common coarse, effective property modeling techniques. It will serve as the deterministic basis for a multi-scale, stochastic model of snow that will account for uncertainties such as poorly understood growth properties and measurement variability. Future applications may include the inclusion of liquid melt and include external forces, yielding a comprehensive thermo-mechanical model that could evolve and fracture. [1] D. Samanta, N. Zabaras (2005), Modelling convection in solidification processes using stabilized finite element techniques, J. Numer. Meth. Eng

  13. Interfacial shear modeling in two-phase annular flow

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, R.; Edwards, D.P.

    1996-07-01

    A new interfacial shear stress model called the law of the interface model, based on the law of the wall approach in turbulent flows, has been developed and locally applied in a fully developed, adiabatic, two-phase annular flow in a duct. Numerical results have been obtained using this model in conjunction with other models available in the literature that are required for the closure of the continuity and momentum equations. These results have been compared with droplet velocity data (using laser Doppler velocimetry and hot film anemometry), void fraction data (using gamma densitometry) and pressure drop data obtained in a R-134A refrigerant test facility. Droplet velocity results match the experimental data well, however, the prediction of the void fraction is less accurate. The poor prediction of void fraction, especially for the low void fraction cases, appears to be due to the lack of a good mechanistic model for entrainment.

  14. Interfacial shear modeling in two-phase annular flow

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, R.; Edwards, D.P.

    1996-11-01

    A new interfacial shear stress model called the law of the interface model, based on the law of the wall approach in turbulent flows, has been developed and locally applied in a fully developed, adiabatic, two-phase annular flow in a duct. Numerical results have been obtained using this model in conjunction with other models available in the literature that are required for the closure of the continuity and momentum equations. These results have been compared with droplet velocity data (using laser Doppler velocimetry and hot film anemometry), void fraction data (using gamma densitometry) and pressure drop data obtained in a R-134A refrigerant test facility. Droplet velocity results match the experimental data well, however, the prediction of the void fraction is less accurate. The poor prediction of void fraction, especially for the low void fraction cases, appears to be due to the lack of a good mechanistic model for entrainment.

  15. Modelling a single phase voltage controlled rectifier using Laplace transforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraft, L. Alan; Kankam, M. David

    1992-01-01

    The development of a 20 kHz, AC power system by NASA for large space projects has spurred a need to develop models for the equipment which will be used on these single phase systems. To date, models for the AC source (i.e., inverters) have been developed. It is the intent of this paper to develop a method to model the single phase voltage controlled rectifiers which will be attached to the AC power grid as an interface for connected loads. A modified version of EPRI's HARMFLO program is used as the shell for these models. The results obtained from the model developed in this paper are quite adequate for the analysis of problems such as voltage resonance. The unique technique presented in this paper uses the Laplace transforms to determine the harmonic content of the load current of the rectifier rather than a curve fitting technique. Laplace transforms yield the coefficient of the differential equations which model the line current to the rectifier directly.

  16. Phase transitions in the sdg interacting boson model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Isacker, P.; Bouldjedri, A.; Zerguine, S.

    2010-05-01

    A geometric analysis of the sdg interacting boson model is performed. A coherent state is used in terms of three types of deformation: axial quadrupole ( β), axial hexadecapole ( β) and triaxial ( γ). The phase-transitional structure is established for a schematic sdg Hamiltonian which is intermediate between four dynamical symmetries of U(15), namely the spherical U(5)⊗U(9), the (prolate and oblate) deformed SU(3) and the γ-soft SO(15) limits. For realistic choices of the Hamiltonian parameters the resulting phase diagram has properties close to what is obtained in the sd version of the model and, in particular, no transition towards a stable triaxial shape is found.

  17. Phase transition of the Ising model on a fractal lattice.

    PubMed

    Genzor, Jozef; Gendiar, Andrej; Nishino, Tomotoshi

    2016-01-01

    The phase transition of the Ising model is investigated on a planar lattice that has a fractal structure. On the lattice, the number of bonds that cross the border of a finite area is doubled when the linear size of the area is extended by a factor of 4. The free energy and the spontaneous magnetization of the system are obtained by means of the higher-order tensor renormalization group method. The system exhibits the order-disorder phase transition, where the critical indices are different from those of the square-lattice Ising model. An exponential decay is observed in the density-matrix spectrum even at the critical point. It is possible to interpret that the system is less entangled because of the fractal geometry. PMID:26871057

  18. Excited-state quantum phase transition in the Rabi model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puebla, Ricardo; Hwang, Myung-Joong; Plenio, Martin B.

    2016-08-01

    The Rabi model, a two-level atom coupled to a harmonic oscillator, can undergo a second-order quantum phase transition (QPT) [M.-J. Hwang et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 115, 180404 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.115.180404]. Here we show that the Rabi QPT accompanies critical behavior in the higher-energy excited states, i.e., the excited-state QPT (ESQPT). We derive analytic expressions for the semiclassical density of states, which show a logarithmic divergence at a critical energy eigenvalue in the broken symmetry (superradiant) phase. Moreover, we find that the logarithmic singularities in the density of states lead to singularities in the relevant observables in the system such as photon number and atomic polarization. We corroborate our analytical semiclassical prediction of the ESQPT in the Rabi model with its numerically exact quantum mechanical solution.

  19. Lattice-Boltzmann-based two-phase thermal model for simulating phase change.

    PubMed

    Kamali, M R; Gillissen, J J J; van den Akker, H E A; Sundaresan, Sankaran

    2013-09-01

    A lattice Boltzmann (LB) method is presented for solving the energy conservation equation in two phases when the phase change effects are included in the model. This approach employs multiple distribution functions, one for a pseudotemperature scalar variable and the rest for the various species. A nonideal equation of state (EOS) is introduced by using a pseudopotential LB model. The evolution equation for the pseudotemperature variable is constructed in such a manner that in the continuum limit one recovers the well known macroscopic energy conservation equation for the mixtures. Heats of reaction, the enthalpy change associated with the phase change, and the diffusive transport of enthalpy are all taken into account; but the dependence of enthalpy on pressure, which is usually a small effect in most nonisothermal flows encountered in chemical reaction systems, is ignored. The energy equation is coupled to the LB equations for species transport and pseudopotential interaction forces through the EOS by using the filtered local pseudotemperature field. The proposed scheme is validated against simple test problems for which analytical solutions can readily be obtained.

  20. Nonparaxial multi-Gaussian beam models and measurement models for phased array transducers.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xinyu; Gang, Tie

    2009-01-01

    A nonparaxial multi-Gaussian beam model is proposed in order to overcome the limitation that paraxial Gaussian beam models lose accuracy in simulating the beam steering behavior of phased array transducers. Using this nonparaxial multi-Gaussian beam model, the focusing and steering sound fields generated by an ultrasonic linear phased array transducer are calculated and compared with the corresponding results obtained by paraxial multi-Gaussian beam model and more exact Rayleigh-Sommerfeld integral model. In addition, with help of this novel nonparaxial method, an ultrasonic measurement model is provided to investigate the sensitivity of linear phased array transducers versus steering angles. Also the comparisons of model predictions with experimental results are presented to certify the accuracy of this provided measurement model.

  1. Modeling Gas-Phase Chemistry in Cometary Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boice, D. C.

    Gas-phase chemistry is central to understand the physics and chemistry of comets. Photochemistry is a major source of ions and electrons that further initiate key gas-phase reactions, leading to the plethora of molecules and atoms seen in cometary atmospheres. The relevant physico-chemical processes are identified within a modeling framework to understand observations and in situ measurements of comets (e.g., Halley, Borrelly, Hyakutake, Hale-Bopp, Tempel 1, Wild 2) and to provide valuable insights into the intrinsic properties of their nuclei. Details of these processes are presented, from the collision-dominated inner coma to the solar wind interaction region. This extensive modeling effort to investigate these important cometary processes is highly relevant to ground-based observations of comets and past, on going, and future spacecraft missions to these primitive objects.Gas-phase chemistry is central to understand the physics and chemistry of comets. Photochemistry is a major source of ions and electrons that further initiate key gas-phase reactions, leading to the plethora of molecules and atoms seen in cometary atmospheres. The relevant physico-chemical processes are identified within a modeling framework to understand observations and in situ measurements of comets (e.g., Halley, Borrelly, Hyakutake, Hale-Bopp, Tempel 1, Wild 2) and to provide valuable insights into the intrinsic properties of their nuclei. Details of these processes are presented, from the collision-dominated inner coma to the solar wind interaction region. This extensive modeling effort to investigate these important cometary processes is highly relevant to ground-based observations of comets and past, on going, and future spacecraft missions to these primitive objects.

  2. Modeling dissolved and free phase gas dynamics under decompression.

    PubMed

    Wienke, B R

    1990-04-01

    Dissolved and free gases do not behave the same way in tissue under pressure, and their interaction is complex. Differences are highlighted, particularly with respect to time scales, gradients and transport. Impacts of free phases on diving are described, contrasting increased off-gassing pressures, slower ascent rates, safety stops and reduced repetitive exposures as consistent practical measures within Haldane models (limited supersaturation) which can be played off against buildup of dissolved gas. Simple computations illustrate the points.

  3. Grassmann phase space theory and the Jaynes–Cummings model

    SciTech Connect

    Dalton, B.J.; Garraway, B.M.; Jeffers, J.; Barnett, S.M.

    2013-07-15

    The Jaynes–Cummings model of a two-level atom in a single mode cavity is of fundamental importance both in quantum optics and in quantum physics generally, involving the interaction of two simple quantum systems—one fermionic system (the TLA), the other bosonic (the cavity mode). Depending on the initial conditions a variety of interesting effects occur, ranging from ongoing oscillations of the atomic population difference at the Rabi frequency when the atom is excited and the cavity is in an n-photon Fock state, to collapses and revivals of these oscillations starting with the atom unexcited and the cavity mode in a coherent state. The observation of revivals for Rydberg atoms in a high-Q microwave cavity is key experimental evidence for quantisation of the EM field. Theoretical treatments of the Jaynes–Cummings model based on expanding the state vector in terms of products of atomic and n-photon states and deriving coupled equations for the amplitudes are a well-known and simple method for determining the effects. In quantum optics however, the behaviour of the bosonic quantum EM field is often treated using phase space methods, where the bosonic mode annihilation and creation operators are represented by c-number phase space variables, with the density operator represented by a distribution function of these variables. Fokker–Planck equations for the distribution function are obtained, and either used directly to determine quantities of experimental interest or used to develop c-number Langevin equations for stochastic versions of the phase space variables from which experimental quantities are obtained as stochastic averages. Phase space methods have also been developed to include atomic systems, with the atomic spin operators being represented by c-number phase space variables, and distribution functions involving these variables and those for any bosonic modes being shown to satisfy Fokker–Planck equations from which c-number Langevin equations are

  4. Multi-phase Modeling of Dusty Eruptions on Enceladus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fullerton, K. M.; Paty, C. S.; Dufek, J.; Teolis, B. D.

    2013-12-01

    Fissures at the South Pole of Enceladus have been observed to produce a gas and dust-laden plume that supplies Saturn's E ring. The neutral gas has been quantified in situ by Cassini's Ion and Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS) and via stellar occultations using the UltraViolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS), while the dust particles have been observed in the micron range by the Cosmic Dust Analyzer (CDA) and at the nanometer scale by the Cassini Plasma Spectrometer (CAPS) [Waite et al., 2006; Hansen et al., 2006; Shafiq et al., 2011; Hill et al., 2012]. Geometric [Kriegel et al. 2011] and Monte Carlo [Smith et al. 2010] models of the neutral density distribution in the plume have been validated and constrained using Cassini's Ion and Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS) data observations from several Enceladus encounters. However, such models do not address the distribution of both the neutrals and grains throughout the plume. We present results from applying a multi-phase eruptive model [Dufek et al., 2007] at Enceladus. This model self-consistently solves for the dynamics of gas and particles at the vent. Specifically, particle and gas phase conservation laws are solved, allowing for coupling between the phases. The grain size distributions are tracked as they move away from the source and form the plume structure. The spatial distribution of grain sizes with respect to the vent is examined in the context of discrete grain size observations made by CDA and CAPS. We also compare the modeled neutral distributions with INMS observations from the E3, E5 and E7 encounters as well as the parameterizations of previous models

  5. Modeling the solid-liquid phase transition in saturated triglycerides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pink, David A.; Hanna, Charles B.; Sandt, Christophe; MacDonald, Adam J.; MacEachern, Ronald; Corkery, Robert; Rousseau, Dérick

    2010-02-01

    We investigated theoretically two competing published scenarios for the melting transition of the triglyceride trilaurin (TL): those of (1) Corkery et al. [Langmuir 23, 7241 (2007)], in which the average state of each TL molecule in the liquid phase is a discotic "Y" conformer whose three chains are dynamically twisted, with an average angle of ˜120° between them, and those of (2) Cebula et al. [J. Am. Oil Chem. Soc. 69, 130 (1992)], in which the liquid-state conformation of the TL molecule in the liquid phase is a nematic h∗-conformer whose three chains are in a modified "chair" conformation. We developed two competing models for the two scenarios, in which TL molecules are in a nematic compact-chair (or "h") conformation, with extended, possibly all-trans, chains at low-temperatures, and in either a Y conformation or an h∗ conformation in the liquid state at temperatures higher than the phase-transition temperature, T∗=319 K. We defined an h-Y model as a realization of the proposal of Corkery et al. [Langmuir 23, 7241 (2007)], and explored its predictions by mapping it onto an Ising model in a temperature-dependent field, performing a mean-field approximation, and calculating the transition enthalpy ΔH. We found that the most plausible realization of the h-Y model, as applied to the solid-liquid phase transition in TL, and likely to all saturated triglycerides, gave a value of ΔH in reasonable agreement with the experiment. We then defined an alternative h-h∗ model as a realization of the proposal of Cebula et al. [J. Am. Oil Chem. Soc. 69, 130 (1992)], in which the liquid phase exhibits an average symmetry breaking similar to an h conformation, but with twisted chains, to see whether it could describe the TL phase transition. The h-h∗ model gave a value of ΔH that was too small by a factor of ˜3-4. We also predicted the temperature dependence of the 1132 cm-1 Raman band for both models, and performed measurements of the ratios of three TL Raman

  6. Modeling of Gallium Nitride Hydride Vapor Phase Epitaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyyappan, Meyya; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    A reactor model for the hydride vapor phase epitaxy of GaN is presented. The governing flow, energy, and species conservation equations are solved in two dimensions to examine the growth characteristics as a function of process variables and reactor geometry. The growth rate varies with GaCl composition but independent of NH3 and H2 flow rates. A change in carrier gas for Ga source from H2 to N2 affects the growth rate and uniformity for a fixed reactor configuration. The model predictions are in general agreement with observed experimental behavior.

  7. Excited-state quantum phase transitions in Dicke superradiance models.

    PubMed

    Brandes, Tobias

    2013-09-01

    We derive analytical results for various quantities related to the excited-state quantum phase transitions in a class of Dicke superradiance models in the semiclassical limit. Based on a calculation of a partition sum restricted to Dicke states, we discuss the singular behavior of the derivative of the density of states and find observables such as the mean (atomic) inversion and the boson (photon) number and its fluctuations at arbitrary energies. Criticality depends on energy and a parameter that quantifies the relative weight of rotating versus counterrotating terms, and we find a close analogy to the logarithmic and jump-type nonanalyticities known from the Lipkin-Meshkov-Glick model. PMID:24125239

  8. Phase-field-crystal model for fcc ordering.

    PubMed

    Wu, Kuo-An; Adland, Ari; Karma, Alain

    2010-06-01

    We develop and analyze a two-mode phase-field-crystal model to describe fcc ordering. The model is formulated by coupling two different sets of crystal density waves corresponding to <111> and <200> reciprocal lattice vectors, which are chosen to form triads so as to produce a simple free-energy landscape with coexistence of crystal and liquid phases. The feasibility of the approach is demonstrated with numerical examples of polycrystalline and (111) twin growth. We use a two-mode amplitude expansion to characterize analytically the free-energy landscape of the model, identifying parameter ranges where fcc is stable or metastable with respect to bcc. In addition, we derive analytical expressions for the elastic constants for both fcc and bcc. Those expressions show that a nonvanishing amplitude of [200] density waves is essential to obtain mechanically stable fcc crystals with a nonvanishing tetragonal shear modulus (C11-C12)/2. We determine the model parameters for specific materials by fitting the peak liquid structure factor properties and solid-density wave amplitudes following the approach developed for bcc [K.-A. Wu and A. Karma, Phys. Rev. B 76, 184107 (2007)]. This procedure yields reasonable predictions of elastic constants for both bcc Fe and fcc Ni using input parameters from molecular dynamics simulations. The application of the model to two-dimensional square lattices is also briefly examined.

  9. Sediment calibration strategies of Phase 5 Chesapeake Bay watershed model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wu, J.; Shenk, G.W.; Raffensperger, J.; Moyer, D.; Linker, L.C.; ,

    2005-01-01

    Sediment is a primary constituent of concern for Chesapeake Bay due to its effect on water clarity. Accurate representation of sediment processes and behavior in Chesapeake Bay watershed model is critical for developing sound load reduction strategies. Sediment calibration remains one of the most difficult components of watershed-scale assessment. This is especially true for Chesapeake Bay watershed model given the size of the watershed being modeled and complexity involved in land and stream simulation processes. To obtain the best calibration, the Chesapeake Bay program has developed four different strategies for sediment calibration of Phase 5 watershed model, including 1) comparing observed and simulated sediment rating curves for different parts of the hydrograph; 2) analyzing change of bed depth over time; 3) relating deposition/scour to total annual sediment loads; and 4) calculating "goodness-of-fit' statistics. These strategies allow a more accurate sediment calibration, and also provide some insightful information on sediment processes and behavior in Chesapeake Bay watershed.

  10. Phase coexistence and spatial correlations in reconstituting k -mer models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Amit Kumar; Daga, Bijoy; Mohanty, P. K.

    2016-07-01

    In reconstituting k -mer models, extended objects that occupy several sites on a one-dimensional lattice undergo directed or undirected diffusion, and reconstitute—when in contact—by transferring a single monomer unit from one k -mer to the other; the rates depend on the size of participating k -mers. This polydispersed system has two conserved quantities, the number of k -mers and the packing fraction. We provide a matrix product method to write the steady state of this model and to calculate the spatial correlation functions analytically. We show that for a constant reconstitution rate, the spatial correlation exhibits damped oscillations in some density regions separated, from other regions with exponential decay, by a disorder surface. In a specific limit, this constant-rate reconstitution model is equivalent to a single dimer model and exhibits a phase coexistence similar to the one observed earlier in totally asymmetric simple exclusion process on a ring with a defect.

  11. Self-similarity of phase-space networks of frustrated spin models and lattice gas models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Yi; Wang, Feng; Han, Yilong

    2013-03-01

    We studied the self-similar properties of the phase-spaces of two frustrated spin models and two lattice gas models. The frustrated spin models included (1) the anti-ferromagnetic Ising model on a two-dimensional triangular lattice (1a) at the ground states and (1b) above the ground states and (2) the six-vertex model. The two lattice gas models were (3) the one-dimensional lattice gas model and (4) the two-dimensional lattice gas model. The phase spaces were mapped to networks so that the fractal analysis of complex networks could be applied, i.e. the box-covering method and the cluster-growth method. These phase spaces, in turn, establish new classes of networks with unique self-similar properties. Models 1a, 2, and 3 with long-range power-law correlations in real space exhibit fractal phase spaces, while models 1b and 4 with short-range exponential correlations in real space exhibit nonfractal phase spaces. This behavior agrees with one of untested assumptions in Tsallis nonextensive statistics. Hong Kong GRC grants 601208 and 601911

  12. Computer Simulations of Phase Transitions in Potts Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Challa, Murty S. S.

    Methods are developed to identify and characterize first-order and Kosterlitz-Thouless transitions through computer simulations. Finite-size effects at temperature-driven first -order transitions are analyzed by introducing a double -Gaussian approximation for the probability distribution of the internal energy and predictions are made for various moments of the distribution. It is found that all finite -size effects vary as the volume, L('d). The predictions are tested by simulating the 10-state Potts model in two dimensions which has a known first-order transition in zero-field. Extensive Monte Carlo simulations were performed on the Cyber 205 with L = 18 to 50 and using between 1 x 10('6) and 40 x 10('6) MCS per data point. The results are in good agreement with the Gaussian formalism enabling accurate estimates of various thermodynamic quantities of the model. The analysis is applied to an Ising model with competing interactions on a triangular lattice and the first-order transition in this model is confirmed. The Kosterlitz-Thouless transitions in the 6-state vector Potts model are studied through Monte Carlo simulations on the Cyber 750 using lattices of size 4 x 4 to 72 x 72 and up to 200,000 MCS. Two independent methods--finite -size scaling and a cumulant method--were used to analyze the data. Both methods identify the two Kosterlitz-Thouless transitions separating a low-temperature ordered phase, a high-temperature disordered phase and an intermediate with xy-like phase. The phase transitions occur at kT(,1)/J = 0.68 (+OR-) 0.02 and kT(,2)/J = 0.92 (+OR-) 0.01. The susceptibility is infinite in the intermediate phase and the exponent (eta) varies between 0.100 at T(,1) and 0.275 at T(,2). The results are in good agreement with theoretical predictions and are shown to be more accurate than previous simulational treatments.

  13. ADVANCED COMPUTATIONAL MODEL FOR THREE-PHASE SLURRY REACTORS

    SciTech Connect

    Goodarz Ahmadi

    2001-10-01

    In the second year of the project, the Eulerian-Lagrangian formulation for analyzing three-phase slurry flows in a bubble column is further developed. The approach uses an Eulerian analysis of liquid flows in the bubble column, and makes use of the Lagrangian trajectory analysis for the bubbles and particle motions. An experimental set for studying a two-dimensional bubble column is also developed. The operation of the bubble column is being tested and diagnostic methodology for quantitative measurements is being developed. An Eulerian computational model for the flow condition in the two-dimensional bubble column is also being developed. The liquid and bubble motions are being analyzed and the results are being compared with the experimental setup. Solid-fluid mixture flows in ducts and passages at different angle of orientations were analyzed. The model predictions were compared with the experimental data and good agreement was found. Gravity chute flows of solid-liquid mixtures is also being studied. Further progress was also made in developing a thermodynamically consistent model for multiphase slurry flows with and without chemical reaction in a state of turbulent motion. The balance laws are obtained and the constitutive laws are being developed. Progress was also made in measuring concentration and velocity of particles of different sizes near a wall in a duct flow. The technique of Phase-Doppler anemometry was used in these studies. The general objective of this project is to provide the needed fundamental understanding of three-phase slurry reactors in Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) liquid fuel synthesis. The other main goal is to develop a computational capability for predicting the transport and processing of three-phase coal slurries. The specific objectives are: (1) To develop a thermodynamically consistent rate-dependent anisotropic model for multiphase slurry flows with and without chemical reaction for application to coal liquefaction. Also establish the

  14. Development of the CSI phase-3 evolutionary model testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gronet, M. J.; Davis, D. A.; Tan, M. K.

    1994-01-01

    This report documents the development effort for the reconfiguration of the Controls-Structures Integration (CSI) Evolutionary Model (CEM) Phase-2 testbed into the CEM Phase-3 configuration. This step responds to the need to develop and test CSI technologies associated with typical planned earth science and remote sensing platforms. The primary objective of the CEM Phase-3 ground testbed is to simulate the overall on-orbit dynamic behavior of the EOS AM-1 spacecraft. Key elements of the objective include approximating the low-frequency appendage dynamic interaction of EOS AM-1, allowing for the changeout of components, and simulating the free-free on-orbit environment using an advanced suspension system. The fundamentals of appendage dynamic interaction are reviewed. A new version of the multiple scaling method is used to design the testbed to have the full-scale geometry and dynamics of the EOS AM-1 spacecraft, but at one-tenth the weight. The testbed design is discussed, along with the testing of the solar array, high gain antenna, and strut components. Analytical performance comparisons show that the CEM Phase-3 testbed simulates the EOS AM-1 spacecraft with good fidelity for the important parameters of interest.

  15. Phase behaviors and membrane properties of model liposomes: temperature effect.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hsing-Lun; Sheng, Yu-Jane; Tsao, Heng-Kwong

    2014-09-28

    The phase behaviors and membrane properties of small unilamellar vesicles have been explored at different temperatures by dissipative particle dynamics simulations. The vesicles spontaneously formed by model lipids exhibit pre-transition from gel to ripple phase and main transition from ripple to liquid phase. The vesicle shape exhibits the faceted feature at low temperature, becomes more sphere-like with increasing temperature, but loses its sphericity at high temperature. As the temperature rises, the vesicle size grows but the membrane thickness declines. The main transition (Tm) can be identified by the inflection point. The membrane structural characteristics are analyzed. The inner and outer leaflets are asymmetric. The length of the lipid tail and area density of the lipid head in both leaflets decrease with increasing temperature. However, the mean lipid volume grows at low temperature but declines at high temperature. The membrane mechanical properties are also investigated. The water permeability grows exponentially with increasing T but the membrane tension peaks at Tm. Both the bending and stretching moduli have their minima near Tm. Those results are consistent with the experimental observations, indicating that the main signatures associated with phase transition are clearly observed in small unilamellar vesicles.

  16. Assessment of commercially available polymeric materials for sorptive microextraction of priority and emerging nonpolar organic pollutants in environmental water samples.

    PubMed

    Blanco-Zubiaguirre, Laura; Delgado, Alejandra; Ros, Oihana; Posada-Ureta, Oscar; Vallejo, Asier; Prieto, Ailette; Olivares, Maitane; Etxebarria, Nestor

    2014-10-01

    Among the different organic pollutants, persistent organic pollutants and emerging organic contaminants (EOCs) are of particular concern due to their potentially dangerous effects on the ecosystems and on human health. In the framework of the analysis of some of these organic pollutants in water samples, sorptive extraction devices have proven to be adequate for their monitoring. The efficiency of four commercially available and low-cost polymeric materials [polypropylene, poly(ethylene terephthalate), Raffia, and polyethersulfone (PES)] for the simultaneous extraction of 16 organic compounds from five different families from environmental water samples was evaluated in this work. Firstly, the homogeneity of the sorbent materials was confirmed by means of Raman spectroscopy. After the optimization of the parameters affecting the extraction and the liquid desorption steps, it was found that PES showed the largest efficiencies for slightly polar analytes and, to a lesser extent, for nonpolar analytes. Additionally, Raffia rendered good extraction efficiencies for nonpolar compounds. Thus sorptive extraction methods followed by large volume injection-programmable temperature vaporizer-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry were validated using PES and Raffia as sorbent materials. The validation of the method provided good linearity (0.978 < r (2) < 0.999 for PES and 0.977 < r (2) < 0.999 for Raffia), adequate repeatability (below 19 % and 14 % for PES and Raffia, respectively), and low method detection limits (low ng · l(-1) level). Finally, these materials were applied to the analysis of contaminants in environmental water samples. PMID:24424482

  17. A simple method for the accurate determination of the Henry's law constant for highly sorptive, semivolatile organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong-Hyun; Kim, Ki-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    A novel technique is developed to determine the Henry's law constants (HLCs) of seven volatile fatty acids (VFAs) with significantly high solubility using a combined application of thermal desorber/gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (TD/GC/MS). In light of the strong sorptive properties of these semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs), their HLCs were determined by properly evaluating the fraction lost on the surface of the materials used to induce equilibrium (vial, gas-tight syringe, and sorption tube). To this end, a total of nine repeated experiments were conducted in a closed (static) system at three different gas/liquid volume ratios. The best estimates for HLCs (M/atm) were thus 7,200 (propionic acid), 4,700 (i-butyric acid), 4,400 (n-butyric acid), 2,700 (i-valeric acid), 2,400 (n-valeric acid), 1,000 (hexanoic acid), and 1,500 (heptanoic acid). The differences in the HLC values between this study and previous studies, if assessed in terms of the percent difference, ranged from 9.2% (n-valeric acid) to 55.7% (i-valeric acid). We overcame the main cause of errors encountered in previous studies by performing the proper correction of the sorptive losses of the SVOCs that inevitably took place, particularly on the walls of the equilibration systems (mainly the headspace vial and/or the glass tight syringe). PMID:26577086

  18. Phase-field model for the two-phase lithiation of silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Fangliang; Hong, Wei

    2016-09-01

    As an ideal anode material, silicon has the highest lithium-ion capacity in theory, but the broader application is limited by the huge volumetric strain caused by lithium insertion and extraction. To better understand the physical process and to resolve the related reliability issue, enormous efforts have been made. Recent experiments observed sharp reaction fronts in both crystalline and amorphous silicon during the first lithiation half-cycle. Such a concentration profile indicates that the process is likely to be reaction limited. Based on this postulation, a phase-field model is developed and implemented into a finite-element code to simulate the coupled large inelastic deformation and motion of the reaction front in a silicon electrode. In contrast to most existing models, the model treats both volumetric and deviatoric inelastic deformation in silicon as a direct consequence of the lithiation at the reaction front. The amount of deviatoric deformation is determined by using the recently developed kinetic model of stress-induced anisotropic reaction. By considering the role of stress in the lithiation process, this model successfully recovers the self-limiting phenomenon of silicon electrodes, and relates it to the local geometry of electrodes. The model is also used to evaluate the energy-release rate of the surface crack on a spherical electrode, and the result suggests a critical size of silicon nanoparticles to avert fracture. As examples, the morphology evolution of a silicon disk and a Si nanowire during lithiation are also investigated.

  19. Modeling of two-phase porous flow with damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Z.; Bercovici, D.

    2009-12-01

    Two-phase dynamics has been broadly studied in Earth Science in a convective system. We investigate the basic physics of compaction with damage theory and present preliminary results of both steady state and time-dependent transport when melt migrates through porous medium. In our simple 1-D model, damage would play an important role when we consider the ascent of melt-rich mixture at constant velocity. Melt segregation becomes more difficult so that porosity is larger than that in simple compaction in the steady-state compaction profile. Scaling analysis for compaction equation is performed to predict the behavior of melt segregation with damage. The time-dependent of the compacting system is investigated by looking at solitary wave solutions to the two-phase model. We assume that the additional melt is injected to the fracture material through a single pulse with determined shape and velocity. The existence of damage allows the pulse to keep moving further than that in simple compaction. Therefore more melt could be injected to the two-phase mixture and future application such as carbon dioxide injection is proposed.

  20. Floquet topological semimetal phases of an extended kicked Harper model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bomantara, Raditya Weda; Raghava, Gudapati Naresh; Zhou, Longwen; Gong, Jiangbin

    2016-02-01

    Recent discoveries on topological characterization of gapless systems have attracted interest in both theoretical studies and experimental realizations. Examples of such gapless topological phases are Weyl semimetals, which exhibit three-dimensional (3D) Dirac cones (Weyl points), and nodal line semimetals, which are characterized by line nodes (two bands touching along a line). Inspired by our previous discoveries that the kicked Harper model exhibits many fascinating features of Floquet topological phases, in this paper we consider a generalization of the model, where two additional periodic system parameters are introduced into the Hamiltonian to serve as artificial dimensions, so as to simulate a 3 D periodically driven system. We observe that by increasing the hopping strength and the kicking strength of the system, many new Floquet band touching points at Floquet quasienergies 0 and π will start to appear. Some of them are Weyl points, while the others form line nodes in the parameter space. By taking open boundary conditions along the physical dimension, edge states analogous to Fermi arcs in static Weyl semimetal systems are observed. Finally, by designing an adiabatic pumping scheme, the chirality of the Floquet-band Weyl points and the π Berry phase around Floquet-band line nodes can be manifested.

  1. Floquet topological semimetal phases of an extended kicked Harper model.

    PubMed

    Bomantara, Raditya Weda; Raghava, Gudapati Naresh; Zhou, Longwen; Gong, Jiangbin

    2016-02-01

    Recent discoveries on topological characterization of gapless systems have attracted interest in both theoretical studies and experimental realizations. Examples of such gapless topological phases are Weyl semimetals, which exhibit three-dimensional (3D) Dirac cones (Weyl points), and nodal line semimetals, which are characterized by line nodes (two bands touching along a line). Inspired by our previous discoveries that the kicked Harper model exhibits many fascinating features of Floquet topological phases, in this paper we consider a generalization of the model, where two additional periodic system parameters are introduced into the Hamiltonian to serve as artificial dimensions, so as to simulate a 3D periodically driven system. We observe that by increasing the hopping strength and the kicking strength of the system, many new Floquet band touching points at Floquet quasienergies 0 and π will start to appear. Some of them are Weyl points, while the others form line nodes in the parameter space. By taking open boundary conditions along the physical dimension, edge states analogous to Fermi arcs in static Weyl semimetal systems are observed. Finally, by designing an adiabatic pumping scheme, the chirality of the Floquet-band Weyl points and the π Berry phase around Floquet-band line nodes can be manifested. PMID:26986333

  2. Weyl Phases in a Three Dimensional Network Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hailong; Chong, Yidong; theoretical photonics Team

    We study the topological properties of 3D ``Floquet'' band structures, defined using unitary evolution matrices rather than Hamiltonians. Such band structures can be realized in coherent-wave networks or lattices subjected to time-periodic drives. Previously, 2D Floquet band structures have been shown to exhibit unusual topological behaviors such as topologically-nontrivial zero-Chern-number phases. Here, we analyze the Floquet band structure of a 3D network model, which exhibits an Floquet analogue of a Weyl phase. The surface states exhibit topologically-protected ``Fermi'' arcs, similar to the recently-discovered Weyl semi-metals; however, the Weyl points in different quasi-energy gaps are related by a particle-hole symmetry which is unique to the Floquet system. By tuning the coupling parameters of the network, we can drive a transition between conventional insulator, weak topological insulator, and Weyl phases. Finally, we discuss the possibility of realizing this model using custom-designed electromagnetic networks. GRANT: Supported by Singapore National Research Foundation under Grant No. NRFF2012-02.

  3. Grassmann phase space theory and the Jaynes-Cummings model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalton, B. J.; Garraway, B. M.; Jeffers, J.; Barnett, S. M.

    2013-07-01

    The Jaynes-Cummings model of a two-level atom in a single mode cavity is of fundamental importance both in quantum optics and in quantum physics generally, involving the interaction of two simple quantum systems—one fermionic system (the TLA), the other bosonic (the cavity mode). Depending on the initial conditions a variety of interesting effects occur, ranging from ongoing oscillations of the atomic population difference at the Rabi frequency when the atom is excited and the cavity is in an n-photon Fock state, to collapses and revivals of these oscillations starting with the atom unexcited and the cavity mode in a coherent state. The observation of revivals for Rydberg atoms in a high-Q microwave cavity is key experimental evidence for quantisation of the EM field. Theoretical treatments of the Jaynes-Cummings model based on expanding the state vector in terms of products of atomic and n-photon states and deriving coupled equations for the amplitudes are a well-known and simple method for determining the effects. In quantum optics however, the behaviour of the bosonic quantum EM field is often treated using phase space methods, where the bosonic mode annihilation and creation operators are represented by c-number phase space variables, with the density operator represented by a distribution function of these variables. Fokker-Planck equations for the distribution function are obtained, and either used directly to determine quantities of experimental interest or used to develop c-number Langevin equations for stochastic versions of the phase space variables from which experimental quantities are obtained as stochastic averages. Phase space methods have also been developed to include atomic systems, with the atomic spin operators being represented by c-number phase space variables, and distribution functions involving these variables and those for any bosonic modes being shown to satisfy Fokker-Planck equations from which c-number Langevin equations are often

  4. Determination of organochlorine pesticides and chlorobenzenes in strawberries by using accelerated solvent extraction combined with sorptive enrichment and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wennrich, L; Popp, P; Köller, G; Breuste, J

    2001-01-01

    An analytical scheme for the determination of several organochlorine pesticides like hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCHs) and DDX compounds (p,p'-DDE, p,p'-DDD, and p,p'-DDT) as well as chlorobenzenes in strawberries has been developed. The procedure is based on aqueous accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) followed by solid-phase microextraction (SPME) or stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE) and subsequent thermodesorption-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis. A 65 microm polydimethylsiloxane/ divinylbenzene fiber was chosen for the SPME experiments. Significant SPME and ASE parameters were optimized using spiked water and strawberry samples. For the ASE of the organochlorine compounds, a water-acetone mixture (90 + 10, v/v) as the extraction solvent, an extraction temperature of 120 degrees C, and 2 cycles of 10 min extraction proved optimal. The developed method was evaluated with respect to precision and limits of detection (LOD). The relative standard deviations of replicate ASE-SPME determinations (n = 5) were in the range of 4-24%. LOD values between 1 and 10 microg/kg were achieved with the exception of DDT and DDE (40 microg/kg). Using SBSE, the LOD of these compounds could be improved (2 and 5 microg/kg). The main advantages of this method are the avoidance of cleanup and concentration procedures as well as the significant reduction of the required volume of organic solvents. The described method was applied to the determination of the pollutants in strawberry samples collected from different allotment gardens in a potentially polluted area, the Bitterfeld-Wolfen region (Germany). PMID:11501923

  5. Interfaces between phases in a lattice model of microemulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, K. A.

    1987-02-01

    A lattice model which has recently been developed to aid the study of microemulsions is briefly reviewed. The local-density mean-field equations are presented and the interfacial profiles and surface tensions are computed using a variational method. These density profiles describing the interface between oil rich and water rich phases, both of which are isotropic, are structured and nonmonotonic. Some comments about a perturbation expansion which confirms these conclusions are made. It is possible to compute the surface tension to high numerical accuracy using the variational procedure. This permits discussion of the question of wetting of the oil-water interface by a microemulsion phase. The interfacial tensions along the oil-water-microemulsion coexistence line are ultra-low. The oil-water interface is not wet by microemulsion throughout most of the bicontinuous regime.

  6. Interpolation of phenological phases on a digital elevation model (DEM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schöngaßner, Thomas C.; Scheifinger, Helfried

    2010-05-01

    The main objective of the VegDyn project (a cooperation between Joanneum Research, Institute of Digital Image Processing, LFZ Raumberg-Gumpenstein and ZAMG) consists in quantifying and modelling the relationship between individual growth stages of grassland on the one hand and atmospheric parameters, remotely sensed data and phenological observations on the other. The model simulates the beginning and the end of the vegetation period and the growth stages of grassland with temperature as input variable. Thus it will be possible to explore changes of the timing of the vegetation period and the growth stages of grassland in possible future climate scenarios, which are calculated by climate models. In the context of the VegDyn project we developed methods for the spatial interpolation of phenological phases on a digital elevation model with a 250 m grid resolution in the complex terrain of the Alps. The final result is a series of maps of long term mean entry dates and maps of entry dates of individual years, which can for instance be related with the Net Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) parameter maps from satellite observations. Apart from the yearly input via the conventional observational network based on voluntary observers and the input via the web interface, the Austrian phenological data base is still being supplemented by data from the paper archive. The elevation of the station network ranges from 100 to 1700 m. The station density can reach up to 100 or more stations per phase and season during 1951 - 2009. From more than 280 observed phases including phases from wild (woody and herbaceous) and agricultural plants those have been selected, which are related to cultivated grassland and which can be detected by remote sensing. In order to be selected for spatial interpolation the phase must satisfy a number of criteria: a minimum number of stations and, in order to have a meaningful long term mean entry date, a minimum number of observations per station

  7. Two Spin Liquid phases in the anisotropic triangular Heisenberg model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorella, Sandro

    2005-03-01

    Recently there have been rather clean experimental realizations of the quantum spin 1/2 Heisenberg Hamiltonian on a 2D triangular lattice geometry in systems like Cs2Cu Cl4 and organic compounds like k-(ET)2Cu2(CN)3. These materials are nearly two dimensional and are characterized by an anisotropic antiferromagnetic superexchange. The strength of the spatial anisotropy can increase quantum fluctuations and can destabilize the magnetically ordered state leading to non conventional spin liquid phases. In order to understand these interesting phenomena we have studied, by Quantum Monte Carlo methods, the triangular lattice Heisenberg model as a function of the strength of this anisotropy, represented by the ratio r between the intra-chain nearest neighbor coupling J' and the inter-chain one J. We have found evidence of two spin liquid regions, well represented by projected BCS wave functions[1,2] of the type proposed by P. W. Anderson at the early stages of High temperature superconductivity [3]. The first spin liquid phase is stable for small values of the coupling r 0.6 and appears gapless and fractionalized, whereas the second one is a more conventional spin liquid, very similar to the one realized in the quantum dimer model in the triangular lattice[4]. It is characterized by a spin gap and a finite correlation length, and appears energetically favored in the region 0.6 r 0.9. The various phases are in good agreement with the experimental findings and supports the existence of spin liquid phases in 2D quantum spin-half systems. %%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%% 1cm *[1] L. Capriotti F. Becca A. Parola and S. Sorella , Phys. Rev. Letters 87, 097201 (2001). *[2] S. Yunoki and S. Sorella Phys. Rev. Letters 92, 15003 (2004). *[3] P. W. Anderson, Science 235, 1186 (1987). *[4] P. Fendley, R. Moessner, and S. L. Sondhi Phys. Rev. B 66, 214513 (2002).

  8. Supersolidus Liquid Phase Sintering Modeling of Inconel 718 Superalloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levasseur, David; Brochu, Mathieu

    2016-02-01

    Powder metallurgy of Inconel 718 superalloy is advantageous as a near-net shape process for complex parts to reduce the buy-to-fly ratio and machining cost. However, sintering Inconel 718 requires the assistance of supersolidus liquid formation to achieve near full density and involves the risk of distortion at high temperatures. The present work is focused on modeling the onset of sintering and distortion as a function of temperature, grain size, and part geometry for Inconel 718. Using experimental sintering results and data available in the literature, the supersolidus liquid phase sintering of Inconel 718 was modeled. The model was used to define a processing window where part distortion would be avoided.

  9. ["Trema, apophany, apocalypse"--is Conrad's phase model empirically founded?].

    PubMed

    Hambrecht, M; Häfner, H

    1993-12-01

    Among several phase models of beginning schizophrenia, the study by Conrad ("Die beginnende Schizophrenie. Versuch einer Gestaltanalyse des Wahns") was particularly impressive in German psychiatry. The ABC-Schizophrenia-study with its representative sample of 267 first-admissions and a careful retrospective assessment of emerging symptomatology made it possible to test the empirical basis of Conrad's model. In this operationalization "trema" was confirmed as the frequent first stage of the disease process, whereas Conrad's hypothesized order of the two following phrases (first "apophany", then "apocalypse") could not be validated. Therefore, Conrad's model cannot completely be generalized. Because the methods employed so far have some limitations, analyses of additional data (especially reports by significant others) may control and probably enhance the presented results. PMID:8112705

  10. Gas Phase Model of Surface Reactions for N{2} Afterglows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marković, V. Lj.; Petrović, Z. Lj.; Pejović, M. M.

    1996-07-01

    The adequacy of the homogeneous gas phase model as a representation of the surface losses of diffusing active particles in gas phase is studied. As an example the recent data obtained for the surface recombination coefficients are reanalyzed. The data were obtained by the application of the breakdown delay times which consists of the measurements of the breakdown delay times t_d as a function of the afterglow period tau. It was found that for the conditions of our experiment, the diffusion should not be neglected as the final results are significantly different when obtained by approximate gas phase representation and by exact numerical solution to the diffusion equation. While application of the gas phase effective coefficients to represent surface losses gives an error in the value of the recombination coefficient, it reproduces correctly other characteristics such as order of the process which can be obtained from simple fits to the experimental data. Dans cet article, nous étudions la validité du modèle approximatif représentant les pertes superficielles des particules actives qui diffusent de la phase gazeuse comme pertes dans la phase homogène du gaz. Les données actuelles du coefficient de recombination en surface sont utilisées par cette vérification . Les données experimentales sont obtenues en utilisant la technique qui consiste en la mesure du temps de retard du début de la décharge en fonction de la période de relaxation. Nous avons trouvé que, pour nos conditions expérimentales, la diffusion ne peut être négligée. Aussi, les résultats finals sont considérablement différents quand ils sont obtenus en utilisant le modèle approximatif par comparaison aves les résultats obtenus par la solution numérique exacte de l'équation de la diffusion. L'application des coefficients effectifs dans la phase gaseuse pour la présentation des pertes superficielles donne, pour les coefficients de la recombinaison, des valeurs qui diffèrent en

  11. APPLICATION OF STIR BAR SORPTIVE EXTRACTION TO ANALYSIS OF VOLATILE AND SEMIVOLATILE ORGANIC CHEMICALS OF POTENTIAL CONCERN IN SOLIDS AND AQUEOUS SAMPLES FROM THE HANFORD SITE

    SciTech Connect

    FRYE JM; KUNKEL JM

    2009-03-05

    Stir bar sorptive extraction was applied to aqueous and solid samples for the extraction and analysis of organic compounds from the Hanford chemicals of potential concern list, as identified in the vapor data quality objectives. The 222-S Laboratory analyzed these compounds from vapor samples on thermal desorption tubes as part of the Hanford Site industrial hygiene vapor sampling effort.

  12. Determination of off-flavor compounds, 2-methylisoborneol and geosmin, in salmon fillets using stir bar sorptive extraction–thermal desorption coupled with gas chromatography–mass spectrometry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A sensitive and solvent-less method for the determination of musty and earthy off-flavor compounds, 2-methylisoborneol (MIB) and geosmin (GSM), in salmon tissue was developed using stir bar sorptive extraction -thermal desorption coupled with gas chromatography -mass spectrometry (SBSE -TD -GCMS). M...

  13. Phase diagram of the Gaussian-core model.

    PubMed

    Prestipino, Santi; Saija, Franz; Giaquinta, Paolo V

    2005-05-01

    We trace with high numerical accuracy the phase diagram of the Gaussian-core model, a classical system of point particles interacting via a Gaussian-shaped, purely repulsive potential. This model, which provides a reliable qualitative description of the thermal behavior of interpenetrable globular polymers, is known to exhibit a polymorphic fcc-bcc transition at low densities and reentrant melting at high densities. Extensive Monte Carlo simulations, carried out in conjunction with accurate calculations of the solid free energies, lead to a thermodynamic scenario that is partially modified with respect to previous knowledge. In particular, we find that: (i) the fluid-bcc-fcc triple-point temperature is about one third of the maximum freezing temperature; (ii) upon isothermal compression, the model exhibits a fluid-bcc-fcc-bcc-fluid sequence of phases in a narrow range of temperatures just above the triple point. We discuss these results in relation to the behavior of star-polymer solutions and of other softly repulsive systems. PMID:16089510

  14. IPRT polarized radiative transfer model intercomparison project - Phase A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emde, Claudia; Barlakas, Vasileios; Cornet, Céline; Evans, Frank; Korkin, Sergey; Ota, Yoshifumi; Labonnote, Laurent C.; Lyapustin, Alexei; Macke, Andreas; Mayer, Bernhard; Wendisch, Manfred

    2015-10-01

    The polarization state of electromagnetic radiation scattered by atmospheric particles such as aerosols, cloud droplets, or ice crystals contains much more information about the optical and microphysical properties than the total intensity alone. For this reason an increasing number of polarimetric observations are performed from space, from the ground and from aircraft. Polarized radiative transfer models are required to interpret and analyse these measurements and to develop retrieval algorithms exploiting polarimetric observations. In the last years a large number of new codes have been developed, mostly for specific applications. Benchmark results are available for specific cases, but not for more sophisticated scenarios including polarized surface reflection and multi-layer atmospheres. The International Polarized Radiative Transfer (IPRT) working group of the International Radiation Commission (IRC) has initiated a model intercomparison project in order to fill this gap. This paper presents the results of the first phase A of the IPRT project which includes ten test cases, from simple setups with only one layer and Rayleigh scattering to rather sophisticated setups with a cloud embedded in a standard atmosphere above an ocean surface. All scenarios in the first phase A of the intercomparison project are for a one-dimensional plane-parallel model geometry. The commonly established benchmark results are available at the IPRT website.

  15. Computational studies of competing phases in model Hamiltonians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Mi

    Model Hamiltonians play an important role in our understanding of both quantum and classical systems, such as strongly correlated unconventional superconductivity, quantum magnetism, non-fermi liquid heavy fermion materials and classical magnetic phase transitions. The central problem is how models with many degrees of freedom choose between competing ground states, e.g. magnetic, superconducting, metallic, insulating as the degree of thermal and quantum fluctuations is varied. This dissertation focuses on the numerical investigation of several important model Hamiltonians. Specifically, we used the determinant Quantum Monte Carlo (DQMC) to study three Hubbard-like models: the Fermi-Hubbard model with two regions of different interaction strength, the Fermi-Hubbard model with a spin-dependent band structure, and the related periodic Anderson model (PAM). The first model used was to explore inter-penetration of metallic and Mott insulator physics across a Metal-Mott Insulator interface by computing the magnetic properties and spectral functions. As a minimal model of a half metallic magnet, the second model was used to explore the impact of on-site Hubbard interaction U, finite temperature, and an external (Zeeman) magnetic field on a bilayer tight-binding model with spin-dependent hybridization. We use PAM to study the Knight shift anomaly in heavy fermion materials found in Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments and confirm several predictions of the two-fluid theory accounting for the anomaly. Another application of the Hubbard model described in this dissertation is the investigation on the effects of spin-dependent disorder on s-wave superconductors based on the attractive Hubbard model. Here we used the Bogoliubov-de Gennes (BdG) self-consistent approach instead of quantum simulations. The spin-dependent random potential was shown to induce distinct transitions at which the energy gap and average order parameter vanish, generating an intermediate gapless

  16. Modeling of recombinant yeast cells: reduction of phase space.

    PubMed

    Birol, G; Birol, I; Kirdar, B; Onsan, Z I

    1997-01-01

    The mechanism of starch fermentation by recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae in batch reactor is studied. Experiments were carried in the presence and absence of oxygen, with different initial starch concentrations. A variety of data concerning biotic and abiotic phases are collected. Nonlinear data analysis techniques are used to determine the block diagram of the system under study. Data analysis and processing reported here, are believed to form a basis in further work in structured modeling of biological systems, recombinant yeast cultures in particular. PMID:9603032

  17. Phase equilibria of size-asymmetric primitive model electrolytes.

    PubMed

    Yan, Q; de Pablo, J J

    2001-03-01

    The low-temperature phase coexistence of size-asymmetric primitive model electrolyte solutions has been investigated by means of Monte Carlo simulations. Binodal curves and critical parameters are reported as a function of size ratio lambda = sigma(+)/sigma(-) in the range 0.05 to 1. Both the critical temperature and the critical density are found to decrease as lambda decreases. These trends are in conflict with available theoretical predictions. For highly asymmetric systems, the depression of the critical parameters is accompanied by the formation of large chainlike and ringlike structures, thereby giving rise to considerable finite-size effects.

  18. Quantum phase transition in a pseudo-Hermitian Dicke model

    SciTech Connect

    Deguchi, Tetsuo; Ghosh, Pijush K.

    2009-08-15

    We show that a Dicke-type non-Hermitian Hamiltonian admits entirely real spectra by mapping it to the 'dressed Dicke model' through a similarity transformation. We find a positive-definite metric in the Hilbert space of the non-Hermitian Hamiltonian so that the time evolution is unitary and allows a consistent quantum description. We then show that this non-Hermitian Hamiltonian describing nondissipative quantum processes undergoes quantum phase transition. The exactly solvable limit of the non-Hermitian Hamiltonian has also been discussed.

  19. 4He glass phase: A model for liquid elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tournier, Robert F.; Bossy, Jacques

    2016-08-01

    The specific heat of liquid helium confined under pressure in nanoporous material and the formation, in these conditions, of a glass phase accompanied by latent heat are known. These properties are in good agreement with a recent model predicting, in liquid elements, the formation of ultrastable glass having universal thermodynamic properties. The third law of thermodynamics involves that the specific heat decreases at low temperatures and consequently the effective transition temperature of the glass increases up to the temperature where the frozen enthalpy becomes equal to the predicted value. The glass residual entropy is about 23.6% of the melting entropy.

  20. ADVANCED COMPUTATIONAL MODEL FOR THREE-PHASE SLURRY REACTORS

    SciTech Connect

    Goodarz Ahmadi

    2004-10-01

    In this project, an Eulerian-Lagrangian formulation for analyzing three-phase slurry flows in a bubble column was developed. The approach used an Eulerian analysis of liquid flows in the bubble column, and made use of the Lagrangian trajectory analysis for the bubbles and particle motions. The bubble-bubble and particle-particle collisions are included the model. The model predictions are compared with the experimental data and good agreement was found An experimental setup for studying two-dimensional bubble columns was developed. The multiphase flow conditions in the bubble column were measured using optical image processing and Particle Image Velocimetry techniques (PIV). A simple shear flow device for bubble motion in a constant shear flow field was also developed. The flow conditions in simple shear flow device were studied using PIV method. Concentration and velocity of particles of different sizes near a wall in a duct flow was also measured. The technique of Phase-Doppler anemometry was used in these studies. An Eulerian volume of fluid (VOF) computational model for the flow condition in the two-dimensional bubble column was also developed. The liquid and bubble motions were analyzed and the results were compared with observed flow patterns in the experimental setup. Solid-fluid mixture flows in ducts and passages at different angle of orientations were also analyzed. The model predictions were compared with the experimental data and good agreement was found. Gravity chute flows of solid-liquid mixtures were also studied. The simulation results were compared with the experimental data and discussed A thermodynamically consistent model for multiphase slurry flows with and without chemical reaction in a state of turbulent motion was developed. The balance laws were obtained and the constitutive laws established.

  1. Constitutive modelling of dual phase steel sheet and tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, A. C.; Salisbury, C. P.; Worswick, M. J.; Mayer, R.

    2006-08-01

    Automobile manufacturers are currently striving to improve vehicle fuel efficiency through reduction of vehicle weight. Dual phase steels are good candidates for automotive bodies due to their high strength-to-weight ratio, and good formablity and weldability. As part of a project on the interaction between forming and crashworthiness, constitutive parameters of a dual phase steel were determined for both sheet and tube stock in order to support analysis of the tube response throughout forming processes and in crash simulations. Stress - strain data was collected at a quasi-static rate as well as rates from 0.1 to 1500 s - 1. The intermediate strain rate response was captured using an instrumented falling weight tensile tester (35 100 s - 1), while a tensile split Hopkinson bar (500 1500 s - 1) was used to capture the high-rate response. This range of strain rates is typical of the rates seen in a crash simulation. Tests were also performed at higher temperatures (150°C and 300°C) at rates of 500 and 1500 s - 1 to capture the thermal softening response. The dual phase steel sheet and tube show an appreciable amount of strain rate sensitivity throughout the complete range of strain rates. It also exhibited a large amount of thermal softening. The thermal sensitivity is identical for the sheet and tube. Fits to the Johnson-Cook constitutive model were obtained from the experimental results.

  2. Phase field modeling of grain growth in porous polycrystalline solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Karim E.

    The concurrent evolution of grain size and porosity in porous polycrystalline solids is a technically important problem. All the physical properties of such materials depend strongly on pore fraction and pore and grain sizes and distributions. Theoretical models for the pore-grain boundary interactions during grain growth usually employ restrictive, unrealistic assumptions on the pore and grain shapes and motions to render the problem tractable. However, these assumptions limit the models to be only of qualitative nature and hence cannot be used for predictions. This has motivated us to develop a novel phase field model to investigate the process of grain growth in porous polycrystalline solids. Based on a dynamical system of coupled Cahn-Hilliard and All en-Cahn equations, the model couples the curvature-driven grain boundary motion and the migration of pores via surface diffusion. As such, the model accounts for all possible interactions between the pore and grain boundary, which highly influence the grain growth kinetics. Through a formal asymptotic analysis, the current work demonstrates that the phase field model recovers the corresponding sharp-interface dynamics of the co-evolution of grain boundaries and pores; this analysis also fixes the model kinetic parameters in terms of real materials properties. The model was used to investigate the effect of porosity on the kinetics of grain growth in UO2 and CeO2 in 2D and 3D. It is shown that the model captures the phenomenon of pore breakaway often observed in experiments. Pores on three- and four- grain junctions were found to transform to edge pores (pores on two-grain junction) before complete separation. The simulations demonstrated that inhomogeneous distribution of pores and pore breakaway lead to abnormal grain growth. The simulations also showed that grain growth kinetics in these materials changes from boundary-controlled to pore-controlled as the amount of porosity increases. The kinetic growth

  3. 2013 CEF RUN - PHASE 1 DATA ANALYSIS AND MODEL VALIDATION

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, A.

    2014-05-08

    Phase 1 of the 2013 Cold cap Evaluation Furnace (CEF) test was completed on June 3, 2013 after a 5-day round-the-clock feeding and pouring operation. The main goal of the test was to characterize the CEF off-gas produced from a nitric-formic acid flowsheet feed and confirm whether the CEF platform is capable of producing scalable off-gas data necessary for the revision of the DWPF melter off-gas flammability model; the revised model will be used to define new safety controls on the key operating parameters for the nitric-glycolic acid flowsheet feeds including total organic carbon (TOC). Whether the CEF off-gas data were scalable for the purpose of predicting the potential flammability of the DWPF melter exhaust was determined by comparing the predicted H{sub 2} and CO concentrations using the current DWPF melter off-gas flammability model to those measured during Phase 1; data were deemed scalable if the calculated fractional conversions of TOC-to-H{sub 2} and TOC-to-CO at varying melter vapor space temperatures were found to trend and further bound the respective measured data with some margin of safety. Being scalable thus means that for a given feed chemistry the instantaneous flow rates of H{sub 2} and CO in the DWPF melter exhaust can be estimated with some degree of conservatism by multiplying those of the respective gases from a pilot-scale melter by the feed rate ratio. This report documents the results of the Phase 1 data analysis and the necessary calculations performed to determine the scalability of the CEF off-gas data. A total of six steady state runs were made during Phase 1 under non-bubbled conditions by varying the CEF vapor space temperature from near 700 to below 300°C, as measured in a thermowell (T{sub tw}). At each steady state temperature, the off-gas composition was monitored continuously for two hours using MS, GC, and FTIR in order to track mainly H{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, and organic gases such as CH{sub 4}. The standard

  4. Block voter model: Phase diagram and critical behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sampaio-Filho, C. I. N.; Moreira, F. G. B.

    2011-11-01

    We introduce and study the block voter model with noise on two-dimensional square lattices using Monte Carlo simulations and finite-size scaling techniques. The model is defined by an outflow dynamics where a central set of NPCS spins, here denoted by persuasive cluster spins (PCS), tries to influence the opinion of their neighboring counterparts. We consider the collective behavior of the entire system with varying PCS size. When NPCS>2, the system exhibits an order-disorder phase transition at a critical noise parameter qc which is a monotonically increasing function of the size of the persuasive cluster. We conclude that a larger PCS has more power of persuasion, when compared to a smaller one. It also seems that the resulting critical behavior is Ising-like independent of the range of interaction.

  5. A phase separation model for the nanopatterning of diatom biosilica.

    PubMed

    Sumper, Manfred

    2002-03-29

    Diatoms are encased in an intricately patterned wall that consists of amorphous silica. Species-specific fabrication of this ornate biomineral enables taxonomists to identify thousands of diatom species. The molecular mechanisms that control this nanofabrication and generate the diversity of patterns is not well understood. A simple model is described, in which repeated phase separation events during wall biogenesis are assumed to produce self-similar silica patterns in smaller and smaller scales. On the basis of this single assumption, the apparently complex patterns found in the valves of the diatom genus Coscinodiscus can be predicted. Microscopic analysis of valves in statu nascendi from three different Coscinodiscus species supports the conclusions derived from the model.

  6. Phase-field model of dendritic sidebranching with thermal noise.

    PubMed

    Karma, A; Rappel, W J

    1999-10-01

    We investigate dendritic sidebranching during crystal growth in an undercooled melt by simulation of a phase-field model which incorporates thermal noise of microscopic origin. As a nontrivial quantitative test of this model, we first show that the simulated fluctuation spectrum of a one-dimensional interface in thermal equilibrium agrees with the exact sharp-interface spectrum up to an irrelevant short-wavelength cutoff comparable to the interface thickness. Simulations of dendritic growth are then carried out in two dimensions to compute sidebranching characteristics (root-mean-square amplitude and sidebranch spacing) as a function of distance behind the tip. These quantities are compared quantitatively to the predictions of the existing linear WKB theory of noise amplification. The extension of this study to three dimensions remains needed to determine the origin of noise in experiments.

  7. Interacting agegraphic dark energy models in phase space

    SciTech Connect

    Lemets, O.A.; Yerokhin, D.A.; Zazunov, L.G. E-mail: denyerokhin@gmail.com

    2011-01-01

    Agegraphic dark energy, has been recently proposed, based on the so-called Karolyhazy uncertainty relation, which arises from quantum mechanics together with general relativity. In the first part of the article we study the original agegraphic dark energy model by including the interaction between agegraphic dark energy and pressureless (dark) matter. The phase space analysis was made and the critical points were found, one of which is the attractor corresponding to an accelerated expanding Universe. Recent observations of near supernova show that the acceleration of Universe decreases. This phenomenon is called the transient acceleration. In the second part of Article we consider the 3-component Universe composed of a scalar field, interacting with the dark matter on the agegraphic dark energy background. We show that the transient acceleration appears in frame of such a model. The obtained results agree with the observations.

  8. Block voter model: phase diagram and critical behavior.

    PubMed

    Sampaio-Filho, C I N; Moreira, F G B

    2011-11-01

    We introduce and study the block voter model with noise on two-dimensional square lattices using Monte Carlo simulations and finite-size scaling techniques. The model is defined by an outflow dynamics where a central set of N(PCS) spins, here denoted by persuasive cluster spins (PCS), tries to influence the opinion of their neighboring counterparts. We consider the collective behavior of the entire system with varying PCS size. When N(PCS)>2, the system exhibits an order-disorder phase transition at a critical noise parameter q(c) which is a monotonically increasing function of the size of the persuasive cluster. We conclude that a larger PCS has more power of persuasion, when compared to a smaller one. It also seems that the resulting critical behavior is Ising-like independent of the range of interaction. PMID:22181394

  9. Phase-Field-Crystal Model for Electromigration in Metal Interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Nan; Bevan, Kirk H.; Provatas, Nikolas

    2016-10-01

    We propose an atomistic model of electromigration (EM) in metals based on a recently developed phase-field-crystal (PFC) technique. By coupling the PFC model's atomic density field with an applied electric field through the EM effective charge parameter, EM is successfully captured on diffusive time scales. Our framework reproduces the well-established EM phenomena known as Black's equation and the Blech effect, and also naturally captures commonly observed phenomena such as void nucleation and migration in bulk crystals. A resistivity dipole field arising from electron scattering on void surfaces is shown to contribute significantly to void migration velocity. With an intrinsic time scale set by atomic diffusion rather than atomic oscillations or hopping events, as in conventional atomistic methods, our theoretical approach makes it possible to investigate EM-induced circuit failure at atomic spatial resolution and experimentally relevant time scales.

  10. Modeling of powder behavior: Report for Phase 2 feasibility

    SciTech Connect

    Sinz, K,; Lassila, D.H.; Baum, D.W.

    1996-01-01

    We report on a Phase 2 feasibility study of an effort to compute the mechanical behavior of the incendiary powder RS41 during compaction and release using the experiments conducted at China Lake as a data base. Our simulation, using a prototype material model, develops two-dimensional density gradients in even these simple, uniaxial double-piston experiments. In our view, the computational simulation of the behavior of RS41 while press loading this material into a round and under subsequent launch conditions is feasible within the framework of current technology. For the model development that was conducted as part of this feasibility study, the code of choice was the implicit Lagrangian hydro code NIKE2D. The applicability of the explicit companion code DYNA2D is also discussed.

  11. The Harari Shupe preon model and nonrelativistic quantum phase space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Żenczykowski, P.

    2008-03-01

    We propose that the whole algebraic structure of the Harari-Shupe rishon model originates via a Dirac-like linearization of quadratic form x2 +p2, with position and momentum satisfying standard commutation relations. The scheme does not invoke the concept of preons as spin-1/2 subparticles, thus evading the problem of preon confinement, while fully explaining all symmetries emboded in the Harari-Shupe model. Furthermore, the concept of quark colour is naturally linked to the ordering of rishons. Our scheme leads to group U (1) ⊗ SU (3) combined with SU (2), with two of the SU (2) generators not commuting with reflections. An interpretation of intra-generation quark-lepton transformations in terms of genuine rotations and reflections in phase space is proposed.

  12. Improved Phased Array Imaging of a Model Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dougherty, Robert P.; Podboy, Gary G.

    2010-01-01

    An advanced phased array system, OptiNav Array 48, and a new deconvolution algorithm, TIDY, have been used to make octave band images of supersonic and subsonic jet noise produced by the NASA Glenn Small Hot Jet Acoustic Rig (SHJAR). The results are much more detailed than previous jet noise images. Shock cell structures and the production of screech in an underexpanded supersonic jet are observed directly. Some trends are similar to observations using spherical and elliptic mirrors that partially informed the two-source model of jet noise, but the radial distribution of high frequency noise near the nozzle appears to differ from expectations of this model. The beamforming approach has been validated by agreement between the integrated image results and the conventional microphone data.

  13. An empirical model for gas phase acidity and basicity estimation.

    PubMed

    You, H; Kim, G E; Na, C H; Lee, S; Lee, C J; Cho, K-H; Akiyama, Y; Ishida, T; No, K T

    2014-01-01

    Gas phase acidity and basicity estimation models have been developed for acidic and basic functional groups of amino acid side-chains and also for a number of small organic molecules. The acidic functional groups include aliphatic and aromatic alcohol, and aliphatic and aromatic carboxylic acid, and the basic functional groups include aliphatic, aromatic and hetero-aromatic amines, and also pyridino-, pyrazolo- and imidazolo-groupings. The models are described in terms of a linear combination of descriptors that highly influence reactivity at the reaction centres of the functional groups. In order to describe the chemical environments of the deprotonating and protonating sites, atomic descriptors such as the effective atomic electronegativity and effective atomic polarizability of the atoms in the reaction field and the electrostatic potentials at the reaction sites have been introduced. The coefficient of determination (r(2)) of each model is above 0.8, apart from the imidazole model. The models are readily applicable, ranging from simple organic molecules to proteins.

  14. Phase transitions in Ising models on directed networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipowski, Adam; Ferreira, António Luis; Lipowska, Dorota; Gontarek, Krzysztof

    2015-11-01

    We examine Ising models with heat-bath dynamics on directed networks. Our simulations show that Ising models on directed triangular and simple cubic lattices undergo a phase transition that most likely belongs to the Ising universality class. On the directed square lattice the model remains paramagnetic at any positive temperature as already reported in some previous studies. We also examine random directed graphs and show that contrary to undirected ones, percolation of directed bonds does not guarantee ferromagnetic ordering. Only above a certain threshold can a random directed graph support finite-temperature ferromagnetic ordering. Such behavior is found also for out-homogeneous random graphs, but in this case the analysis of magnetic and percolative properties can be done exactly. Directed random graphs also differ from undirected ones with respect to zero-temperature freezing. Only at low connectivity do they remain trapped in a disordered configuration. Above a certain threshold, however, the zero-temperature dynamics quickly drives the model toward a broken symmetry (magnetized) state. Only above this threshold, which is almost twice as large as the percolation threshold, do we expect the Ising model to have a positive critical temperature. With a very good accuracy, the behavior on directed random graphs is reproduced within a certain approximate scheme.

  15. DAMA/LIBRA-phase1 model independent results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernabei, R.; Belli, P.; D’Angelo, S.; di Marco, A.; Montecchia, F.; D’Angelo, A.; Incicchitti, A.; Prosperi, D.; Cappella, F.; Caracciolo, V.; Cerulli, R.; Dai, C. J.; He, H. L.; Kuang, H. H.; Ma, X. H.; Sheng, X. D.; Wang, R. G.; Ye, Z. P.

    2016-10-01

    Experimental observations and theoretical arguments at Galaxy and larger scales have suggested that a large fraction of the Universe is composed by Dark Matter (DM) particles. This has motivated the DAMA experimental efforts to investigate the presence of such particles in the galactic halo by exploiting a model independent signature with highly radiopure setups deep underground. In this paper, a review of the results obtained with the total exposure of 1.04 ton × yr collected by DAMA/LIBRA-phase1 deep underground at the Gran Sasso National Laboratory (LNGS) of the INFN during seven annual cycles is given. The DAMA/LIBRA-phase1 data give evidence for the presence of DM particles in the galactic halo, on the basis of the exploited model independent DM annual modulation signature by using highly radiopure NaI(Tl) target, at 7.5σ C.L. Including also the data of the first generation DAMA/NaI experiment (cumulative exposure 1.33 ton × yr, corresponding to 14 annual cycles), the C.L. is 9.3σ and the modulation amplitude of the single-hit scintillation events in the (2-6) keV energy interval is: (0.0112 ± 0.0012) cpd/kg/keV; the measured phase is (144 ± 7) days and the measured period is (0.998 ± 0.002) yr, values well in agreement with those expected for DM particles. No systematic or side reaction able to mimic the exploited DM signature has been found or suggested by anyone over more than a decade.

  16. Evaluation of CM5 Charges for Condensed-Phase Modeling.

    PubMed

    Vilseck, Jonah Z; Tirado-Rives, Julian; Jorgensen, William L

    2014-07-01

    The recently developed Charge Model 5 (CM5) is tested for its utility in condensed-phase simulations. The CM5 approach, which derives partial atomic charges from Hirshfeld population analyses, provides excellent results for gas-phase dipole moments and is applicable to all elements of the periodic table. Herein, the adequacy of scaled CM5 charges for use in modeling aqueous solutions has been evaluated by computing free energies of hydration (ΔG hyd) for 42 neutral organic molecules via Monte Carlo statistical mechanics. An optimal scaling factor for the CM5 charges was determined to be 1.27, resulting in a mean unsigned error (MUE) of 1.1 kcal/mol for the free energies of hydration. Testing for an additional 20 molecules gave an MUE of 1.3 kcal/mol. The high precision of the results is confirmed by free energy calculations using both sequential perturbations and complete molecular annihilation. Performance for specific functional groups is discussed; sulfur-containing molecules yield the largest errors. In addition, the scaling factor of 1.27 is shown to be appropriate for CM5 charges derived from a variety of density functional methods and basis sets. Though the average errors from the 1.27*CM5 results are only slightly lower than those using 1.14*CM1A charges, the broader applicability and easier access to CM5 charges via the Gaussian program are additional attractive features. The 1.27*CM5 charge model can be used for an enormous variety of applications in conjunction with many fixed-charge force fields and molecular modeling programs. PMID:25061445

  17. A phase-field model coupled with lattice kinetics solver for modeling crystal growth in furnaces

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Guang; Bao, Jie; Xu, Zhijie; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Henager, Charles H.

    2014-02-02

    In this study, we present a new numerical model for crystal growth in a vertical solidification system. This model takes into account the buoyancy induced convective flow and its effect on the crystal growth process. The evolution of the crystal growth interface is simulated using the phase-field method. Two novel phase-field models are developed to model the crystal growth interface in vertical gradient furnaces with two temperature profile setups: 1) fixed wall temperature profile setup and 2) time-dependent temperature profile setup. A semi-implicit lattice kinetics solver based on the Boltzmann equation is employed to model the unsteady incompressible flow. This model is used to investigate the effect of furnace operational conditions on crystal growth interface profiles and growth velocities. For a simple case of macroscopic radial growth, the phase-field model is validated against an analytical solution. Crystal growth in vertical gradient furnaces with two temperature profile setups have been also investigated using the developed model. The numerical simulations reveal that for a certain set of temperature boundary conditions, the heat transport in the melt near the phase interface is diffusion dominant and advection is suppressed.

  18. Partitioning of Nanoparticles into Organic Phases and Model Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Posner, J.D.; Westerhoff, P.; Hou, W-C.

    2011-08-25

    There is a recognized need to understand and predict the fate, transport and bioavailability of engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) in aquatic and soil ecosystems. Recent research focuses on either collection of empirical data (e.g., removal of a specific NP through water or soil matrices under variable experimental conditions) or precise NP characterization (e.g. size, degree of aggregation, morphology, zeta potential, purity, surface chemistry, and stability). However, it is almost impossible to transition from these precise measurements to models suitable to assess the NP behavior in the environment with complex and heterogeneous matrices. For decades, the USEPA has developed and applies basic partitioning parameters (e.g., octanol-water partition coefficients) and models (e.g., EPI Suite, ECOSAR) to predict the environmental fate, bioavailability, and toxicity of organic pollutants (e.g., pesticides, hydrocarbons, etc.). In this project we have investigated the hypothesis that NP partition coefficients between water and organic phases (octanol or lipid bilayer) is highly dependent on their physiochemical properties, aggregation, and presence of natural constituents in aquatic environments (salts, natural organic matter), which may impact their partitioning into biological matrices (bioaccumulation) and human exposure (bioavailability) as well as the eventual usage in modeling the fate and bioavailability of ENPs. In this report, we use the terminology "partitioning" to operationally define the fraction of ENPs distributed among different phases. The mechanisms leading to this partitioning probably involve both chemical force interactions (hydrophobic association, hydrogen bonding, ligand exchange, etc.) and physical forces that bring the ENPs in close contact with the phase interfaces (diffusion, electrostatic interactions, mixing turbulence, etc.). Our work focuses on partitioning, but also provides insight into the relative behavior of ENPs as either "more like

  19. Cytoplasm dynamics and cell motion: two-phase flow models.

    PubMed

    Alt, W; Dembo, M

    1999-03-01

    The motion of amoeboid cells is characterized by cytoplasmic streaming and by membrane protrusions and retractions which occur even in the absence of interactions with a substratum. Cell translocation requires, in addition, a transmission mechanism wherein the power produced by the cytoplasmic engine is applied to the substratum in a highly controlled fashion through specific adhesion proteins. Here we present a simple mechano-chemical model that tries to capture the physical essence of these complex biomolecular processes. Our model is based on the continuum equations for a viscous and reactive two-phase fluid model with moving boundaries, and on force balance equations that average the stochastic interactions between actin polymers and membrane proteins. In this paper we present a new derivation and analysis of these equations based on minimization of a power functional. This derivation also leads to a clear formulation and classification of the kinds of boundary conditions that should be specified at free surfaces and at the sites of interaction of the cell and the substratum. Numerical simulations of a one-dimensional lamella reveal that even this extremely simplified model is capable of producing several typical features of cell motility. These include periodic 'ruffle' formation, protrusion-retraction cycles, centripetal flow and cell-substratum traction forces. PMID:10204394

  20. Global phase diagram of a doped Kitaev-Heisenberg model

    SciTech Connect

    Okamoto, Satoshi

    2013-01-01

    The global phase diagram of a doped Kitaev-Heisenberg model is studied using an $SU(2)$ slave-boson mean-field method. Near the Kitaev limit, $p$-wave superconducting states which break the time-reversal symmetry are stabilized as reported by You {\\it et al.} [Phys. Rev. B {\\bf 86}, 085145 (2012)] irrespective of the sign of the Kitaev interaction. By further doping, a $d$-wave superconducting state appears when the Kitaev interaction is antiferromagnetic, while another $p$-wave superconducting state appears when the Kitaev interaction is ferromagnetic. This $p$-wave superconducting state does not break the time-reversal symmetry as reported by Hyart {\\it et al.} [Phys. Rev. B {\\bf 85}, 140510 (2012)], and such a superconducting state also appears when the antiferromagnetic Kitaev interaction and the ferromagnetic Heisenberg interaction compete. This work, thus, demonstrates the clear difference between the antiferromagnetic Kitaev model and the ferromagnetic Kitaev model when carriers are doped while these models are equivalent in the undoped limit, and how novel superconducting states emerge when the Kitaev interaction and the Heisenberg interaction compete.

  1. Energy law preserving C{sup 0} finite element schemes for phase field models in two-phase flow computations

    SciTech Connect

    Hua Jinsong; Lin Ping; Liu Chun; Wang Qi

    2011-08-10

    Highlights: {yields} We study phase-field models for multi-phase flow computation. {yields} We develop an energy-law preserving C0 FEM. {yields} We show that the energy-law preserving method work better. {yields} We overcome unphysical oscillation associated with the Cahn-Hilliard model. - Abstract: We use the idea in to develop the energy law preserving method and compute the diffusive interface (phase-field) models of Allen-Cahn and Cahn-Hilliard type, respectively, governing the motion of two-phase incompressible flows. We discretize these two models using a C{sup 0} finite element in space and a modified midpoint scheme in time. To increase the stability in the pressure variable we treat the divergence free condition by a penalty formulation, under which the discrete energy law can still be derived for these diffusive interface models. Through an example we demonstrate that the energy law preserving method is beneficial for computing these multi-phase flow models. We also demonstrate that when applying the energy law preserving method to the model of Cahn-Hilliard type, un-physical interfacial oscillations may occur. We examine the source of such oscillations and a remedy is presented to eliminate the oscillations. A few two-phase incompressible flow examples are computed to show the good performance of our method.

  2. Determination of phthalate esters in polyvinyl chloride infusion bag by stir bar sorptive extraction combined with GC.

    PubMed

    Sun, Meng; Dai, Jinna; Wang, Xiaofan; Zhao, Xu; Bi, Kaishun; Chen, Xiaohui

    2012-12-01

    A novel, efficient, and sensitive stir bar sorptive extraction method coupled with GC for the detection of four kinds of phthalate esters in plasticized polyvinyl chloride infusion bag has been developed and validated. Some experimental parameters including stirring speed, stirring time, pH value, salt concentration, desorption mode, desorption solvents, and desorption time were investigated and optimized. Under optimum condition, the validated assay was found to be linear (r > 0.9945) and LODs were between 1.07 and 2.67 ng for the four analytes. The method exhibited excellent precision with RSD varied from 4.5 to 6.1% (n = 5). The recoveries of the four phthalate esters at two different concentrations ranged from 80.5 to 93.4%. The results showed that the validated method could meet the need of determination of targets and was successfully applied to the analysis of phthalate esters in real samples.

  3. Analysis of free-surface flows through energy considerations: Single-phase versus two-phase modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrone, Salvatore; Colagrossi, Andrea; Di Mascio, Andrea; Le Touzé, David

    2016-05-01

    The study of energetic free-surface flows is challenging because of the large range of interface scales involved due to multiple fragmentations and reconnections of the air-water interface with the formation of drops and bubbles. Because of their complexity the investigation of such phenomena through numerical simulation largely increased during recent years. Actually, in the last decades different numerical models have been developed to study these flows, especially in the context of particle methods. In the latter a single-phase approximation is usually adopted to reduce the computational costs and the model complexity. While it is well known that the role of air largely affects the local flow evolution, it is still not clear whether this single-phase approximation is able to predict global flow features like the evolution of the global mechanical energy dissipation. The present work is dedicated to this topic through the study of a selected problem simulated with both single-phase and two-phase models. It is shown that, interestingly, even though flow evolutions are different, energy evolutions can be similar when including or not the presence of air. This is remarkable since, in the problem considered, with the two-phase model about half of the energy is lost in the air phase while in the one-phase model the energy is mainly dissipated by cavity collapses.

  4. Analysis of free-surface flows through energy considerations: Single-phase versus two-phase modeling.

    PubMed

    Marrone, Salvatore; Colagrossi, Andrea; Di Mascio, Andrea; Le Touzé, David

    2016-05-01

    The study of energetic free-surface flows is challenging because of the large range of interface scales involved due to multiple fragmentations and reconnections of the air-water interface with the formation of drops and bubbles. Because of their complexity the investigation of such phenomena through numerical simulation largely increased during recent years. Actually, in the last decades different numerical models have been developed to study these flows, especially in the context of particle methods. In the latter a single-phase approximation is usually adopted to reduce the computational costs and the model complexity. While it is well known that the role of air largely affects the local flow evolution, it is still not clear whether this single-phase approximation is able to predict global flow features like the evolution of the global mechanical energy dissipation. The present work is dedicated to this topic through the study of a selected problem simulated with both single-phase and two-phase models. It is shown that, interestingly, even though flow evolutions are different, energy evolutions can be similar when including or not the presence of air. This is remarkable since, in the problem considered, with the two-phase model about half of the energy is lost in the air phase while in the one-phase model the energy is mainly dissipated by cavity collapses.

  5. Analysis of free-surface flows through energy considerations: Single-phase versus two-phase modeling.

    PubMed

    Marrone, Salvatore; Colagrossi, Andrea; Di Mascio, Andrea; Le Touzé, David

    2016-05-01

    The study of energetic free-surface flows is challenging because of the large range of interface scales involved due to multiple fragmentations and reconnections of the air-water interface with the formation of drops and bubbles. Because of their complexity the investigation of such phenomena through numerical simulation largely increased during recent years. Actually, in the last decades different numerical models have been developed to study these flows, especially in the context of particle methods. In the latter a single-phase approximation is usually adopted to reduce the computational costs and the model complexity. While it is well known that the role of air largely affects the local flow evolution, it is still not clear whether this single-phase approximation is able to predict global flow features like the evolution of the global mechanical energy dissipation. The present work is dedicated to this topic through the study of a selected problem simulated with both single-phase and two-phase models. It is shown that, interestingly, even though flow evolutions are different, energy evolutions can be similar when including or not the presence of air. This is remarkable since, in the problem considered, with the two-phase model about half of the energy is lost in the air phase while in the one-phase model the energy is mainly dissipated by cavity collapses. PMID:27300984

  6. Mesoscale Modeling During Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Avramov, A.; Harringston, J.Y.; Verlinde, J.

    2005-03-18

    Mixed-phase arctic stratus clouds are the predominant cloud type in the Arctic (Curry et al. 2000) and through various feedback mechanisms exert a strong influence on the Arctic climate. Perhaps one of the most intriguing of their features is that they tend to have liquid tops that precipitate ice. Despite the fact that this situation is colloidally unstable, these cloud systems are quite long lived - from a few days to over a couple of weeks. It has been hypothesized that mixed-phase clouds are maintained through a balance between liquid water condensation resulting from the cloud-top radiative cooling and ice removal by precipitation (Pinto 1998; Harrington et al. 1999). In their modeling study Harrington et al. (1999) found that the maintenance of this balance depends strongly on the ambient concentration of ice forming nucleus (IFN). In a follow-up study, Jiang et al. (2002), using only 30% of IFN concentration predicted by Meyers et al. (1992) IFN parameterization were able to obtain results similar to the observations reported by Pinto (1998). The IFN concentration measurements collected during the Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M-PACE), conducted in October 2004 over the North Slope of Alaska and the Beaufort Sea (Verlinde et al. 2005), also showed much lower values then those predicted (Prenne, pers. comm.) by currently accepted ice nucleation parameterizations (e.g. Meyers et al. 1992). The goal of this study is to use the extensive IFN data taken during M-PACE to examine what effects low IFN concentrations have on mesoscale cloud structure and coastal dynamics.

  7. Approaches to myosin modelling in a two-phase flow model for cell motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimpton, L. S.; Whiteley, J. P.; Waters, S. L.; Oliver, J. M.

    2016-04-01

    A wide range of biological processes rely on the ability of cells to move through their environment. Mathematical models have been developed to improve our understanding of how cells achieve motion. Here we develop models that explicitly track the cell's distribution of myosin within a two-phase flow framework. Myosin is a small motor protein which is important for contracting the cell's actin cytoskeleton and enabling cell motion. The two phases represent the actin network and the cytosol in the cell. We start from a fairly general description of myosin kinetics, advection and diffusion in the two-phase flow framework, then identify a number of sub-limits of the model that may be relevant in practice, two of which we investigate further via linear stability analyses and numerical simulations. We demonstrate that myosin-driven contraction of the actin network destabilizes a stationary steady state leading to cell motion, but that rapid diffusion of myosin and rapid unbinding of myosin from the actin network are stabilizing. We use numerical simulation to investigate travelling-wave solutions relevant to a steadily gliding cell and we consider a reduction of the model in which the cell adheres strongly to the substrate on which it is crawling. This work demonstrates that a number of existing models for the effect of myosin on cell motility can be understood as different sub-limits of our two-phase flow model.

  8. Phase response curves for models of earthquake fault dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franović, Igor; Kostić, Srdjan; Perc, Matjaž; Klinshov, Vladimir; Nekorkin, Vladimir; Kurths, Jürgen

    2016-06-01

    We systematically study effects of external perturbations on models describing earthquake fault dynamics. The latter are based on the framework of the Burridge-Knopoff spring-block system, including the cases of a simple mono-block fault, as well as the paradigmatic complex faults made up of two identical or distinct blocks. The blocks exhibit relaxation oscillations, which are representative for the stick-slip behavior typical for earthquake dynamics. Our analysis is carried out by determining the phase response curves of first and second order. For a mono-block fault, we consider the impact of a single and two successive pulse perturbations, further demonstrating how the profile of phase response curves depends on the fault parameters. For a homogeneous two-block fault, our focus is on the scenario where each of the blocks is influenced by a single pulse, whereas for heterogeneous faults, we analyze how the response of the system depends on whether the stimulus is applied to the block having a shorter or a longer oscillation period.

  9. Phase response curves for models of earthquake fault dynamics.

    PubMed

    Franović, Igor; Kostić, Srdjan; Perc, Matjaž; Klinshov, Vladimir; Nekorkin, Vladimir; Kurths, Jürgen

    2016-06-01

    We systematically study effects of external perturbations on models describing earthquake fault dynamics. The latter are based on the framework of the Burridge-Knopoff spring-block system, including the cases of a simple mono-block fault, as well as the paradigmatic complex faults made up of two identical or distinct blocks. The blocks exhibit relaxation oscillations, which are representative for the stick-slip behavior typical for earthquake dynamics. Our analysis is carried out by determining the phase response curves of first and second order. For a mono-block fault, we consider the impact of a single and two successive pulse perturbations, further demonstrating how the profile of phase response curves depends on the fault parameters. For a homogeneous two-block fault, our focus is on the scenario where each of the blocks is influenced by a single pulse, whereas for heterogeneous faults, we analyze how the response of the system depends on whether the stimulus is applied to the block having a shorter or a longer oscillation period. PMID:27368770

  10. Phase response curves for models of earthquake fault dynamics.

    PubMed

    Franović, Igor; Kostić, Srdjan; Perc, Matjaž; Klinshov, Vladimir; Nekorkin, Vladimir; Kurths, Jürgen

    2016-06-01

    We systematically study effects of external perturbations on models describing earthquake fault dynamics. The latter are based on the framework of the Burridge-Knopoff spring-block system, including the cases of a simple mono-block fault, as well as the paradigmatic complex faults made up of two identical or distinct blocks. The blocks exhibit relaxation oscillations, which are representative for the stick-slip behavior typical for earthquake dynamics. Our analysis is carried out by determining the phase response curves of first and second order. For a mono-block fault, we consider the impact of a single and two successive pulse perturbations, further demonstrating how the profile of phase response curves depends on the fault parameters. For a homogeneous two-block fault, our focus is on the scenario where each of the blocks is influenced by a single pulse, whereas for heterogeneous faults, we analyze how the response of the system depends on whether the stimulus is applied to the block having a shorter or a longer oscillation period.

  11. Nonlinear phase field model for electrodeposition in electrochemical systems

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, Linyun; Chen, Long-Qing

    2014-12-29

    A nonlinear phase-field model has been developed for describing the electrodeposition process in electrochemical systems that are highly out of equilibrium. Main thermodynamic driving forces for the electrode-electrolyte interface (EEI) evolution are limited to local variations of overpotential and ion concentration. Application of the model to Li-ion batteries describes the electrode interface motion and morphology change caused by charge mass transfer in the electrolyte, an electrochemical reaction at the EEI and cation deposition on the electrode surface during the charging operation. The Li electrodeposition rate follows the classical Butler-Volmer kinetics with exponentially and linearly depending on local overpotential and cation concentration at the electrode surface, respectively. Simulation results show that the Li deposit forms a fiber-like shape and grows parallel to the electric field direction. The longer and thicker deposits are observed both for higher current density and larger rate constant where the surface reaction rate is expected to be high. The proposed diffuse interface model well captures the metal electrodeposition phenomena in plenty of non-equilibrium electrochemical systems.

  12. A Computer Model of a Phase Lock Loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shelton, Ralph Paul

    1973-01-01

    A computer model is reported of a PLL (phase-lock loop), preceded by a bandpass filter, which is valid when the bandwidth of the bandpass filter is of the same order of magnitude as the natural frequency of the PLL. New results for the PLL natural frequency equal to the bandpass filter bandwidth are presented for a second order PLL operating with carrier plus noise as the input. However, it is shown that extensions to higher order loops, and to the case of a modulated carrier are straightforward. The new results presented give the cycle skipping rate of the PLL as a function of the input carrier to noise ratio when the PLL natural frequency is equal to the bandpass filter bandwidth. Preliminary results showing the variation of the output noise power and cycle skipping rates of the PLL as a function of the loop damping ratio for the PLL natural frequency equal to the bandpass filter bandwidth are also included.

  13. Semiphenomenological model for gas-liquid phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benilov, E. S.; Benilov, M. S.

    2016-03-01

    We examine a rarefied gas with inter-molecular attraction. It is argued that the attraction force amplifies random density fluctuations by pulling molecules from lower-density regions into high-density regions and thus may give rise to an instability. To describe this effect, we use a kinetic equation where the attraction force is taken into account in a way similar to how electromagnetic forces in plasma are treated in the Vlasov model. It is demonstrated that the instability occurs when the temperature T is lower than a certain threshold value Ts depending on the gas density. It is further shown that, even if T is only marginally lower than Ts, the instability generates clusters with density much higher than that of the gas. These results suggest that the instability should be interpreted as a gas-liquid phase transition, with Ts being the temperature of saturated vapor and the high-density clusters representing liquid droplets.

  14. Phase interface effects in the total enthalpy-based lattice Boltzmann model for solid-liquid phase change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Rongzong; Wu, Huiying

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, phase interface effects, including the differences in thermophysical properties between solid and liquid phases and the numerical diffusion across phase interface, are investigated for the recently developed total enthalpy-based lattice Boltzmann model for solid-liquid phase change, which has high computational efficiency by avoiding iteration procedure and linear equation system solving. For the differences in thermophysical properties (thermal conductivity and specific heat) between solid and liquid phases, a novel reference specific heat is introduced to improve the total enthalpy-based lattice Boltzmann model, which makes the thermal conductivity and specific heat decoupled. Therefore, the differences in thermal conductivity and specific heat can be handled by the dimensionless relaxation time and equilibrium distribution function, respectively. As for the numerical diffusion across phase interface, it is revealed for the first time and found to be induced by solid-liquid phase change. To reduce such numerical diffusion, multiple-relaxation-time collision scheme is exploited, and a special value (one fourth) for the so-called "magic" parameter, a combination of two relaxation parameters, is found. Numerical tests show that the differences in thermophysical properties can be correctly handled and the numerical diffusion across phase interface can be dramatically reduced. Finally, theoretical analyses are carried out to offer insights into the roles of the reference specific heat and "magic" parameter in the treatments of phase interface effects.

  15. Thermodynamic Model Formulations for Inhomogeneous Solids with Application to Non-isothermal Phase Field Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladkov, Svyatoslav; Kochmann, Julian; Reese, Stefanie; Hütter, Markus; Svendsen, Bob

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of the current work is the comparison of thermodynamic model formulations for chemically and structurally inhomogeneous solids at finite deformation based on "standard" non-equilibrium thermodynamics [SNET: e. g. S. de Groot and P. Mazur, Non-equilibrium Thermodynamics, North Holland, 1962] and the general equation for non-equilibrium reversible-irreversible coupling (GENERIC) [H. C. Öttinger, Beyond Equilibrium Thermodynamics, Wiley Interscience, 2005]. In the process, non-isothermal generalizations of standard isothermal conservative [e. g. J. W. Cahn and J. E. Hilliard, Free energy of a non-uniform system. I. Interfacial energy. J. Chem. Phys. 28 (1958), 258-267] and non-conservative [e. g. S. M. Allen and J. W. Cahn, A macroscopic theory for antiphase boundary motion and its application to antiphase domain coarsening. Acta Metall. 27 (1979), 1085-1095; A. G. Khachaturyan, Theory of Structural Transformations in Solids, Wiley, New York, 1983] diffuse interface or "phase-field" models [e. g. P. C. Hohenberg and B. I. Halperin, Theory of dynamic critical phenomena, Rev. Modern Phys. 49 (1977), 435-479; N. Provatas and K. Elder, Phase Field Methods in Material Science and Engineering, Wiley-VCH, 2010.] for solids are obtained. The current treatment is consistent with, and includes, previous works [e. g. O. Penrose and P. C. Fife, Thermodynamically consistent models of phase-field type for the kinetics of phase transitions, Phys. D 43 (1990), 44-62; O. Penrose and P. C. Fife, On the relation between the standard phase-field model and a "thermodynamically consistent" phase-field model. Phys. D 69 (1993), 107-113] on non-isothermal systems as a special case. In the context of no-flux boundary conditions, the SNET- and GENERIC-based approaches are shown to be completely consistent with each other and result in equivalent temperature evolution relations.

  16. Is the Langevin phase equation an efficient model for oscillating neurons?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ota, Keisuke; Tsunoda, Takamasa; Omori, Toshiaki; Watanabe, Shigeo; Miyakawa, Hiroyoshi; Okada, Masato; Aonishi, Toru

    2009-12-01

    The Langevin phase model is an important canonical model for capturing coherent oscillations of neural populations. However, little attention has been given to verifying its applicability. In this paper, we demonstrate that the Langevin phase equation is an efficient model for neural oscillators by using the machine learning method in two steps: (a) Learning of the Langevin phase model. We estimated the parameters of the Langevin phase equation, i.e., a phase response curve and the intensity of white noise from physiological data measured in the hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons. (b) Test of the estimated model. We verified whether a Fokker-Planck equation derived from the Langevin phase equation with the estimated parameters could capture the stochastic oscillatory behavior of the same neurons disturbed by periodic perturbations. The estimated model could predict the neural behavior, so we can say that the Langevin phase equation is an efficient model for oscillating neurons.

  17. The Cirrus Parcel Model Comparison Project. Phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Ruei-Fong; Starr, D.; DeMott, P.; Cotten, R.; Jensen, E.; Sassen, K.

    2000-01-01

    The cirrus Parcel Model Comparison Project involves the systematic comparison of current models of ice crystal nucleation and growth for specified, typical, cirrus cloud environments. In Phase 1 of the project reported here, simulated cirrus cloud microphysical properties are compared for situations of "warm" (-40 C) and "cold" (-60 C) cirrus subject to updrafts of 4, 20 and 100 centimeters per second, respectively. Five models are participating in the project. These models employ explicit microphysical schemes wherein the size distribution of each class of particles (aerosols and ice crystals) is resolved into bins. Simulations are made including both homogeneous and heterogeneous ice nucleation mechanisms. A single initial aerosol population of sulfuric acid particles is prescribed for all simulations. To isolate the treatment of the homogeneous freezing (of haze drops) nucleation process, the heterogeneous nucleation mechanism is disabled for a second parallel set of simulations. Qualitative agreement is found amongst the models for the homogeneous-nucleation-only simulations, e.g., the number density of nucleated ice crystals increases with the strength of the prescribed updraft. However, non-negligible quantitative differences are found. Systematic bias exists between results of a model based on a modified classical theory approach and models using an effective freezing temperature approach to the treatment of nucleation. Each approach is constrained by critical freezing data from laboratory studies. This information is necessary, but not sufficient, to construct consistent formulae for the two approaches. Large haze particles may deviate considerably from equilibrium size in moderate to strong updrafts (20-100 centimeters per second) at -60 C when the commonly invoked equilibrium assumption is lifted. The resulting difference in particle-size-dependent solution concentration of haze particles may significantly affect the ice nucleation rate during the initial

  18. Phase diagram of the bosonic Kondo-Hubbard model

    SciTech Connect

    Foss-Feig, Michael; Rey, Ana Maria

    2011-11-15

    We study a bosonic version of the Kondo lattice model with an onsite repulsion in the conduction band, implemented with alkali-metal atoms in two bands of an optical lattice. Using both weak- and strong-coupling perturbation theory, we find that at unit filling of the conduction bosons the superfluid-to-Mott-insulator transition should be accompanied by a magnetic transition from a ferromagnet (in the superfluid) to a paramagnet (in the Mott insulator). Furthermore, an analytic treatment of Gutzwiller mean-field theory reveals that quantum spin fluctuations induced by the Kondo exchange cause the otherwise continuous superfluid-to-Mott-insulator phase transition to be first order. We show that lattice separability imposes a serious constraint on proposals to exploit excited bands for quantum simulations, and discuss a way to overcome this constraint in the context of our model by using an experimentally realized nonseparable lattice. A method to probe the first-order nature of the transition based on collapses and revivals of the matter-wave field is also discussed.

  19. Phase-field modeling of ferroelectric to paraelectric phase boundary structures in single-crystal barium titanate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woldman, Alexandra Y.; Landis, Chad M.

    2016-03-01

    Ferroelectric perovskite materials have been shown to exhibit a large electrocaloric effect near phase transitions. We develop a computational model based on a phase-field approach to characterize the structure of ferroelectric to paraelectric phase boundaries for planar configurations under generalized plane strain with temperatures near the Curie temperature. A nonlinear finite element method is used to solve for the phase boundary structure of a representative unit cell with a 180° ferroelectric laminate for a range of domain widths. The temperature at which the phase boundary can be found increases with domain width, approaching the Curie temperature asymptotically. The excess free energy density per unit area of the boundary increases with domain width. As expected, closure domains form between the ferroelectric and paraelectric phase, and the shape of the closure domains evolves from triangular to needle-shaped as the domain width increases. The entropy jump across the phase boundary is quantified and is shown to increase with domain width as well. A planar configuration with a 90° ferroelectric laminate is investigated, but shown to be physically unlikely due to the high stress levels required to achieve strain compatibility between the phases. Possible three-dimensional structures of the ferroelectric-paraelectric phase boundary are also discussed.

  20. The Fisher Droplet Model and Physical Clusters at Liquid-Vapor Phase Coexistence with Implications for the Nuclear Phase Diagram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lake, Peter Theodore, Jr.

    The nuclear strong force, which binds the nucleons within an atomic nucleus, is a van der Waals force. A consequence of this is that the phenomenon of liquid-vapor phase coexistence occurs in the nuclear system. The experimental means of constructing the nuclear phase diagrams rely heavily on the thermodynamics of cluster theories, theories that historically have not served in many practical applications. In this thesis I explore the validity of the ideal cluster law and the Fisher droplet model in systems where the phase diagrams are known from traditional means. For molecular fluids, I show that the phase coexistence of a wide variety of systems can be described using the Fisher theory. This study is closely related to the study of an extended principle of corresponding states. These considerations demonstrates the utility of the Fisher droplet model in describing liquid-vapor phase coexistence of van der Waals fluids. For model systems, I show that the physical clusters of the Lennard-Jones model at coexistence can be used to construct the phase diagrams of the fluid. The connection between the physical clusters and the thermodynamic properties of the vapor are established using the ideal cluster law. Furthermore, the cluster concentrations are well described by the Fisher droplet model. These considerations lead to an alternative construction of the phase diagrams for the Lennard-Jones system. The success of cluster theories to describe properties of liquid-vapor coexistence that are already well established demonstrates the validity of applying these concepts to construct the nuclear phase diagrams.

  1. Thermodynamic modeling of phase relations and metasomatism in shear zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goncalves, P.; Oliot, E.; Marquer, D.

    2009-04-01

    Ductile shear zones have been recognized for a long time as privileged sites of intense fluid-rock interactions in the crust. In most cases they induce focused changes in mineralogy and bulk chemical composition (metasomatism) which in turn may control the deformation and fluid-migration processes. Therefore understanding these processes requires in a first step to be able to model phase relations in such open system. In this contribution, emphasizes in placed on metasomatic aspects of the problem. Indeed , in many ductile shear zones reported in metagranites, deformation and fluid-rock interactions are associated with gain in MgO and losses of CaO and Na2O (K2O is also a mobile component but it can be either gained or lost). Although the mineralogical consequences of this so-called Mg-metasomatism are well-documented (replacement of K-feldspar into phengite, breakdown of plagioclase into ab + ep, crystallization of chlorite), the origin of this coupled mass-transfer is still unknown. We have performed a forward modeling of phase relationships using petrogenetic grids and pseudosections that consider variations in chemical potential (μ) of the mobile elements (MgO, CaO, Na2O). Chemical potential gradients being the driving force of mass transfer, μ-μ diagrams are the most appropriate diagrams to model open systems where fluid-rock interactions are prominent. Chemical potential diagrams are equivalent to activity diagrams but our approach differs from previous work because (1) solid solutions are taken into account (2) phase relations are modeled in a more realistic chemical system (Na2O-CaO-K2O-FeO-MgO-Al2O3-SiO2-H2O) and (3) the use of pseudosections allows to predict changes of the mineralogy (modes, composition) for the specific bulk composition studied. A particular attention is paid to the relationships between component concentrations and chemical potentials, which is not obvious in multi-component system. The studied shear zone is located in the Grimsel

  2. A Multi-Phase Equation of State and Strength Model for Tin

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, G. A.

    2006-07-28

    This paper considers a multi-phase equation of state and a multi-phase strength model for tin in the {beta}, {gamma} and liquid phases. At a phase transition there are changes in volume, energy, and properties of a material that should be included in an accurate model. The strength model will also be affected by a solid-solid phase transition. For many materials there is a lack of experimental data for strength at high pressures making the derivation of strength parameters for some phases difficult. In the case of tin there are longitudinal sound speed data on the Hugoniot available that have been used here in conjunction with a multi-phase equation of state to derive strength parameters for the {gamma} phase, a phase which does not exist at room temperature and pressure.

  3. Random-diluted triangular plaquette model: Study of phase transitions in a kinetically constrained model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franz, Silvio; Gradenigo, Giacomo; Spigler, Stefano

    2016-03-01

    We study how the thermodynamic properties of the triangular plaquette model (TPM) are influenced by the addition of extra interactions. The thermodynamics of the original TPM is trivial, while its dynamics is glassy, as usual in kinetically constrained models. As soon as we generalize the model to include additional interactions, a thermodynamic phase transition appears in the system. The additional interactions we consider are either short ranged, forming a regular lattice in the plane, or long ranged of the small-world kind. In the case of long-range interactions we call the new model the random-diluted TPM. We provide arguments that the model so modified should undergo a thermodynamic phase transition, and that in the long-range case this is a glass transition of the "random first-order" kind. Finally, we give support to our conjectures studying the finite-temperature phase diagram of the random-diluted TPM in the Bethe approximation. This corresponds to the exact calculation on the random regular graph, where free energy and configurational entropy can be computed by means of the cavity equations.

  4. Random-diluted triangular plaquette model: Study of phase transitions in a kinetically constrained model.

    PubMed

    Franz, Silvio; Gradenigo, Giacomo; Spigler, Stefano

    2016-03-01

    We study how the thermodynamic properties of the triangular plaquette model (TPM) are influenced by the addition of extra interactions. The thermodynamics of the original TPM is trivial, while its dynamics is glassy, as usual in kinetically constrained models. As soon as we generalize the model to include additional interactions, a thermodynamic phase transition appears in the system. The additional interactions we consider are either short ranged, forming a regular lattice in the plane, or long ranged of the small-world kind. In the case of long-range interactions we call the new model the random-diluted TPM. We provide arguments that the model so modified should undergo a thermodynamic phase transition, and that in the long-range case this is a glass transition of the "random first-order" kind. Finally, we give support to our conjectures studying the finite-temperature phase diagram of the random-diluted TPM in the Bethe approximation. This corresponds to the exact calculation on the random regular graph, where free energy and configurational entropy can be computed by means of the cavity equations. PMID:27078408

  5. Phase transition in a spatial Lotka-Volterra model.

    PubMed

    Szabó, G; Czárán, T

    2001-06-01

    Spatial evolution is investigated in a simulated system of nine competing and mutating bacterium strains, which mimics the biochemical war among bacteria capable of producing two different bacteriocins (toxins) at most. Random sequential dynamics on a square lattice is governed by very symmetrical transition rules for neighborhood invasions of sensitive strains by killers, killers by resistants, and resistants by sensitives. The community of the nine possible toxicity/resistance types undergoes a critical phase transition as the uniform transmutation rates between the types decreases below a critical value P(c) above that all the nine types of strains coexist with equal frequencies. Passing the critical mutation rate from above, the system collapses into one of three topologically identical (degenerated) states, each consisting of three strain types. Of the three possible final states each accrues with equal probability and all three maintain themselves in a self-organizing polydomain structure via cyclic invasions. Our Monte Carlo simulations support that this symmetry-breaking transition belongs to the universality class of the three-state Potts model.

  6. Semiphenomenological model for gas-liquid phase transitions.

    PubMed

    Benilov, E S; Benilov, M S

    2016-03-01

    We examine a rarefied gas with inter-molecular attraction. It is argued that the attraction force amplifies random density fluctuations by pulling molecules from lower-density regions into high-density regions and thus may give rise to an instability. To describe this effect, we use a kinetic equation where the attraction force is taken into account in a way similar to how electromagnetic forces in plasma are treated in the Vlasov model. It is demonstrated that the instability occurs when the temperature T is lower than a certain threshold value T(s) depending on the gas density. It is further shown that, even if T is only marginally lower than T(s), the instability generates clusters with density much higher than that of the gas. These results suggest that the instability should be interpreted as a gas-liquid phase transition, with T(s) being the temperature of saturated vapor and the high-density clusters representing liquid droplets.

  7. Phase transition in a spatial Lotka-Volterra model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szabó, György; Czárán, Tamás

    2001-06-01

    Spatial evolution is investigated in a simulated system of nine competing and mutating bacterium strains, which mimics the biochemical war among bacteria capable of producing two different bacteriocins (toxins) at most. Random sequential dynamics on a square lattice is governed by very symmetrical transition rules for neighborhood invasions of sensitive strains by killers, killers by resistants, and resistants by sensitives. The community of the nine possible toxicity/resistance types undergoes a critical phase transition as the uniform transmutation rates between the types decreases below a critical value Pc above that all the nine types of strains coexist with equal frequencies. Passing the critical mutation rate from above, the system collapses into one of three topologically identical (degenerated) states, each consisting of three strain types. Of the three possible final states each accrues with equal probability and all three maintain themselves in a self-organizing polydomain structure via cyclic invasions. Our Monte Carlo simulations support that this symmetry-breaking transition belongs to the universality class of the three-state Potts model.

  8. Leaching modelling of slurry-phase carbonated steel slag.

    PubMed

    Costa, G; Polettini, A; Pomi, R; Stramazzo, A

    2016-01-25

    In the present work the influence of accelerated mineral carbonation on the leaching behaviour of basic oxygen furnace steel slag was investigated. The environmental behaviour of the material as evaluated through the release of major elements and toxic metals under varying pH conditions was the main focus of the study. Geochemical modelling of the eluates was used to derive a theoretical description of the underlying leaching phenomena for the carbonated material as compared to the original slag. Among the investigated elements, Ca and Si were most appreciably affected by carbonation. A very clear effect of carbonation on leaching was observed for silicate phases, and lower-Ca/Si-ratio minerals were found to control leaching in carbonated slag eluates as compared to the corresponding untreated slag sample as a result of Ca depletion from the residual slag particles. Clear evidence was also gained of solubility control for Ca, Mg and Mn by a number of carbonate minerals, indicating a significant involvement of the original slag constituents in the carbonation process. The release of toxic metals (Zn, V, Cr, Mo) was found to be variously affected by carbonation, owing to different mechanisms including pH changes, dissolution/precipitation of carbonates as well as sorption onto reactive mineral surfaces. The leaching test results were used to derive further considerations on the expected metal release levels on the basis of specific assumptions on the relevant pH domains for the untreated and carbonated slag.

  9. Simplified phase noise model for negative-resistance oscillators and a comparison with feedback oscillator models.

    PubMed

    Everard, Jeremy; Xu, Min; Bale, Simon

    2012-03-01

    This paper describes a greatly simplified model for the prediction of phase noise in oscillators which use a negative resistance as the active element. It is based on a simple circuit consisting of the parallel addition of a noise current, a negative admittance/resistance, and a parallel (Qlimited) resonant circuit. The transfer function is calculated as a forward trans-resistance (VOUT/IIN) and then converted to power. The effect of limiting is incorporated by assuming that the phase noise element of the noise floor is kT/2, i.e., -177 dBm/Hz at room temperature. The result is the same as more complex analyses, but enables a simple, clear insight into the operation of oscillators. The phase noise for a given power in the resonator appears to be lower than in feedback oscillators. The reasons for this are explained. Simulation and experimental results are included.

  10. Predictability of enantiomeric chromatographic behavior on various chiral stationary phases using typical reversed phase modeling software.

    PubMed

    Wagdy, Hebatallah A; Hanafi, Rasha S; El-Nashar, Rasha M; Aboul-Enein, Hassan Y

    2013-09-01

    Pharmaceutical companies worldwide tend to apply chiral chromatographic separation techniques in their mass production strategy rather than asymmetric synthesis. The present work aims to investigate the predictability of chromatographic behavior of enantiomers using DryLab HPLC method development software, which is typically used to predict the effect of changing various chromatographic parameters on resolution in the reversed phase mode. Three different types of chiral stationary phases were tested for predictability: macrocyclic antibiotics-based columns (Chirobiotic V and T), polysaccharide-based chiral column (Chiralpak AD-RH), and protein-based chiral column (Ultron ES-OVM). Preliminary basic runs were implemented, then exported to DryLab after peak tracking was accomplished. Prediction of the effect of % organic mobile phase on separation was possible for separations on Chirobiotic V for several probes: racemic propranolol with 97.80% accuracy; mixture of racemates of propranolol and terbutaline sulphate, as well as, racemates of propranolol and salbutamol sulphate with average 90.46% accuracy for the effect of percent organic mobile phase and average 98.39% for the effect of pH; and racemic warfarin with 93.45% accuracy for the effect of percent organic mobile phase and average 99.64% for the effect of pH. It can be concluded that Chirobiotic V reversed phase retention mechanism follows the solvophobic theory. PMID:23775938

  11. Possible model of an antiferroelectric twist grain boundary phase

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, J. G.; Carlsson, T.; Rudquist, P.; Lagerwall, S. T.; Nobili, M.; Brunet, M.

    2007-07-15

    Using x-ray and optical methods we have probed the structural organization of an antiferroelectric twist grain boundary phase (TGBC{sub a}) lying between the regular antiferroelectric smectic-C (SmC{sub a}{sup *}) and the smectic-Q (SmQ) or isotropic phase. We find that the twist axis is everywhere perpendicular to the local smectic layer normal and that the helical superstructure is incommensurate with the smectic layer structure. The twist grain boundaries consist of a periodic lattice of alternating +1/2 and -1/2 dispirations, i.e., unit screw dislocations in combination with half unit disclinations. The molecular tilt plane is alternatingly parallel and perpendicular to the twist axis. We find that the optically measured tilt angle in the SmC{sub a}{sup *} phase is smaller than that measured by x rays, which is the opposite to what is found in the SmC{sup *} phase. This means that the core part tilts less than the end chains in the SmC{sub a}{sup *} phase, while it tilts more in the SmC{sup *} phase. On entering the TGB phase a clear decrease is measured in the tilt angle. This is explained by the elastic influence from the disclinations, which appear in this phase.

  12. Phase-Field Crystal Modeling of Polycrystalline Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adland, Ari Joel

    In this thesis, we use and further develop the phase-field crystal (PFC) method derived from classical density functional theory to investigate polycyrstalline materials. The PFC method resolves atomistic scale processes by tracking the evolution of the local time averaged crystal density field, thereby naturally describing dislocations and grian boundaries (GBs), but with a phenomenological incorporation of vacancy diffusion that accesses long diffusive time scales beyond the reach of MD simulations. We use the PFC method to investigate two technologically important classes of polycrystalline materials whose properties are strongly influenced by GB equilibrium and non-equilibrium properties. The first are structural polycyrstalline materials such as nickel based superalloys used for turbine blades. Those alloys can develop large defects known as "hot tears'' due to the lack of complete crystal cohesion and strain localization during the late stages of solidification. We investigate the equilibrium structure of symmetric tilt GBs at high homologous temperatures and identify a wide range of misorientation that leads to the formation of nanometer-thick intergranular films with liquid like properties. The phase transition character of this "GB premelting'' phenomenon is investigated through the quantitative computation of a disjoining thermodynamic potential in both pure materials and alloys, using body-centered-cubic Fe as a model system. The analysis of this potential sheds light on the physical origin of attractive and repulsive forces that promote and suppress crystal cohesion, respectively, and are found to be strongly affected by solute addition. Our equilibrium studies also reveal the existence of novel structural transitions of low angle GBs driven by the pairing of dislocations with both screw and edge character. Non-equilibrium PFC simulations in turn characterize the response of GBs to an applied shear stress, showing that intergranular liquid-like films

  13. Multi-phase SPH modelling of violent hydrodynamics on GPUs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokos, Athanasios; Rogers, Benedict D.; Stansby, Peter K.; Domínguez, José M.

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents the acceleration of multi-phase smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) using a graphics processing unit (GPU) enabling large numbers of particles (10-20 million) to be simulated on just a single GPU card. With novel hardware architectures such as a GPU, the optimum approach to implement a multi-phase scheme presents some new challenges. Many more particles must be included in the calculation and there are very different speeds of sound in each phase with the largest speed of sound determining the time step. This requires efficient computation. To take full advantage of the hardware acceleration provided by a single GPU for a multi-phase simulation, four different algorithms are investigated: conditional statements, binary operators, separate particle lists and an intermediate global function. Runtime results show that the optimum approach needs to employ separate cell and neighbour lists for each phase. The profiler shows that this approach leads to a reduction in both memory transactions and arithmetic operations giving significant runtime gains. The four different algorithms are compared to the efficiency of the optimised single-phase GPU code, DualSPHysics, for 2-D and 3-D simulations which indicate that the multi-phase functionality has a significant computational overhead. A comparison with an optimised CPU code shows a speed up of an order of magnitude over an OpenMP simulation with 8 threads and two orders of magnitude over a single thread simulation. A demonstration of the multi-phase SPH GPU code is provided by a 3-D dam break case impacting an obstacle. This shows better agreement with experimental results than an equivalent single-phase code. The multi-phase GPU code enables a convergence study to be undertaken on a single GPU with a large number of particles that otherwise would have required large high performance computing resources.

  14. Discontinuous non-equilibrium phase transition in a threshold Schloegl model for autocatalysis: Generic two-phase coexistence and metastability

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Chi-Jen; Liu, Da-Jiang; Evans, James W.

    2015-04-28

    Threshold versions of Schloegl’s model on a lattice, which involve autocatalytic creation and spontaneous annihilation of particles, can provide a simple prototype for discontinuous non-equilibrium phase transitions. These models are equivalent to so-called threshold contact processes. A discontinuous transition between populated and vacuum states can occur selecting a threshold of N ≥ 2 for the minimum number, N, of neighboring particles enabling autocatalytic creation at an empty site. Fundamental open questions remain given the lack of a thermodynamic framework for analysis. For a square lattice with N = 2, we show that phase coexistence occurs not at a unique value but for a finite range of particle annihilation rate (the natural control parameter). This generic two-phase coexistence also persists when perturbing the model to allow spontaneous particle creation. Such behavior contrasts both the Gibbs phase rule for thermodynamic systems and also previous analysis for this model. We find metastability near the transition corresponding to a non-zero effective line tension, also contrasting previously suggested critical behavior. Mean-field type analysis, extended to treat spatially heterogeneous states, further elucidates model behavior.

  15. Discontinuous non-equilibrium phase transition in a threshold Schloegl model for autocatalysis: Generic two-phase coexistence and metastability

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Chi -Jen; Liu, Da -Jiang; Evans, James W.

    2015-04-28

    Threshold versions of Schloegl’s model on a lattice, which involve autocatalytic creation and spontaneous annihilation of particles, can provide a simple prototype for discontinuous non-equilibrium phase transitions. These models are equivalent to so-called threshold contact processes. A discontinuous transition between populated and vacuum states can occur selecting a threshold of N ≥ 2 for the minimum number, N, of neighboring particles enabling autocatalytic creation at an empty site. Fundamental open questions remain given the lack of a thermodynamic framework for analysis. For a square lattice with N = 2, we show that phase coexistence occurs not at a unique valuemore » but for a finite range of particle annihilation rate (the natural control parameter). This generic two-phase coexistence also persists when perturbing the model to allow spontaneous particle creation. Such behavior contrasts both the Gibbs phase rule for thermodynamic systems and also previous analysis for this model. We find metastability near the transition corresponding to a non-zero effective line tension, also contrasting previously suggested critical behavior. As a result, mean-field type analysis, extended to treat spatially heterogeneous states, further elucidates model behavior.« less

  16. Discontinuous non-equilibrium phase transition in a threshold Schloegl model for autocatalysis: Generic two-phase coexistence and metastability

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Chi -Jen; Liu, Da -Jiang; Evans, James W.

    2015-04-28

    Threshold versions of Schloegl’s model on a lattice, which involve autocatalytic creation and spontaneous annihilation of particles, can provide a simple prototype for discontinuous non-equilibrium phase transitions. These models are equivalent to so-called threshold contact processes. A discontinuous transition between populated and vacuum states can occur selecting a threshold of N ≥ 2 for the minimum number, N, of neighboring particles enabling autocatalytic creation at an empty site. Fundamental open questions remain given the lack of a thermodynamic framework for analysis. For a square lattice with N = 2, we show that phase coexistence occurs not at a unique value but for a finite range of particle annihilation rate (the natural control parameter). This generic two-phase coexistence also persists when perturbing the model to allow spontaneous particle creation. Such behavior contrasts both the Gibbs phase rule for thermodynamic systems and also previous analysis for this model. We find metastability near the transition corresponding to a non-zero effective line tension, also contrasting previously suggested critical behavior. As a result, mean-field type analysis, extended to treat spatially heterogeneous states, further elucidates model behavior.

  17. Coupling of multi-walled carbon nanotubes/polydimethylsiloxane coated stir bar sorptive extraction with pulse glow discharge-ion mobility spectrometry for analysis of triazine herbicides in water and soil samples.

    PubMed

    Zou, Nan; Yuan, Chunhao; Liu, Shaowen; Han, Yongtao; Li, Yanjie; Zhang, Jialei; Xu, Xiang; Li, Xuesheng; Pan, Canping

    2016-07-29

    An analytical method based on stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE) coupled with pulse glow discharge-ion mobility spectrometry (PGD-IMS) was developed for analysis of three triazine pesticide residues in water and soil samples. An injection port with sealing device and stir bars hold device were designed and constructed to directly position the SBSE fiber including the extracted samples into the heating device, making desorption and detection of analytes proceeded simultaneously. The extraction conditions such as SBSE solid phase material, extraction time, extraction temperature, pH value and salt concentration were optimized. Mixture of MWCNTs-COOH and PDMS were shown to be effective in enriching the triazines. The LODs and LOQs of three triazines were found to be 0.006-0.015μgkg(-1) and 0.02-0.05μgkg(-1), and the linear range was 0.05-10μgL(-1) with determination coefficients from 0.9987 to 0.9993. The SBSE-PGD-IMS method was environmentally friendly without organic solvent consumption in the entire experimental procedures, and it was demonstrated to be a commendable rapid analysis technique for analysis of triazine pesticide residues in environmental samples on site. The proposed method was applied for the analysis of real ground water, surface water and soil samples. PMID:27371024

  18. Modulated phases and upsilon points in a spin model with helical ordering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Kazuo

    1992-09-01

    The ground state of a one-dimensional, classical XY model with competing nearest- and next-nearest-neighbor interactions, a sixfold anisotropy, and an external field is studied. The model shows various modulated phases, depending on the values of the model parameters. Evidence is found that the ground-state phase diagram of this model contains upsilon points, multicritical points of a new class recently discussed by Bassler, Sasaki, and Griffiths. The phase diagram has a self-similar structure near these points, filled with multitudes of "mixed phases" whose spin configurations consist of segments of helical and fan structures separated by interfaces between them.

  19. Soil sorption of organic vapors and effects of humidity on sorptive mechanism and capacity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chiou, C.T.; Shoup, T.D.

    1985-01-01

    Vapor sorption isotherms on dry Woodburn soil at 20-30??C were determined for benzene, chlorobenzene, p-dichlorobenzene, m-dichlorobenzene, 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene, and water as single vapors and for benzene, m-dichlorobenzene, and 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene as functions of relative humidity (RH). Isotherms for all compounds on dry soil samples are distinctively nonlinear, with water showing the greatest capacity. Water vapor sharply reduced the sorption capacities of organic compounds with the dry soil; on water-saturated soil, the reduction was about 2 orders of magnitude. The markedly higher sorption of organic vapors at subsaturation humidities is attributed to adsorption on the mineral matter, which predominates over the simultaneous uptake by partition into the organic matter. At about 90% RH, the sorption capacities of organic compounds become comparable to those in aqueous systems. The effect of humidity is attributed to adsorptive displacement by water of organics adsorbed on the mineral matter. A small residual uptake is attributed to the partition into the soil-organic phase that has been postulated in aqueous systems. The results are essentially in keeping with the model that was previously proposed for sorption on the soil from water and from organic solvents.Vapor sorption isotherms on dry Woodburn soil at 20-30 degree C were determined for benzene, chlorobenzene, p-dichlorobenzene, m-dichlorobenzene, 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene, and water as single vapors and for benzene, m-dichlorobenzene, and 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene as functions of relative humidity (RH). Isotherms for all compounds on dry soil samples are distinctively nonlinear, with water showing the greatest capacity. Water vapor sharply reduced the sorption capacities of organic compounds with the dry soil; on water-saturated soil, the reduction was about 2 orders of magnitude. The markedly higher sorption of organic vapors at subsaturation humidities is attributed to adsorption on the mineral matter

  20. The ferroelectric phase transition of calcium barium niobate: experimental evidence of Smolenskii's model for diffuse phase transitions?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heine, Urs; Voelker, Uwe; Betzler, Klaus; Burianek, Manfred; Muehlberg, Manfred

    2009-08-01

    We present investigations on temperature-dependent changes in the size distribution of ferroelectric domains in single crystals of the novel tungsten bronze type calcium barium niobate (CBN). Since its congruently melting composition has a relatively high ferroelectric phase transition temperature of about 265 °C, CBN can be considered as an interesting material for various future applications. Using k-space spectroscopy, both unpoled polydomain crystals and crystals poled at room temperature have been investigated in the vicinity of the ferroelectric phase transition. In unpoled CBN, an intermixture of domain-size dependent phase transitions has been observed, which can be described with the model for diffuse phase transitions established by Smolenskii.

  1. Model of High Temperature Phase Transitions in Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippov, E. S.

    2016-04-01

    On the basis of the assumption of the electron density fluctuation at the band degradation, a calculation parameter (the radius R) of the half-width of the probability distribution over the coordinate R is identified at the level of the maximum electron density fluctuation (at a maximum of the Gaussian function). Based on an analysis of the crystallization process and high polymorphic transformations bcc → fcc, the reasons for the formation of bcc, fcc, hexagonal, and tetragonal structures from the liquid phase, as well as for the high temperature bcc → hcp transition in the solid phase are established using the calculated parameter (the radius R) in the solid and liquid phases.

  2. Modeling of a Two-Phase Jet Pump with Phase Change, Shocks and Temperature-Dependent Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherif, S. A.

    1998-01-01

    One of the primary motivations behind this work is the attempt to understand the physics of a two-phase jet pump which constitutes part of a flow boiling test facility at NASA-Marshall. The flow boiling apparatus is intended to provide data necessary to design highly efficient two-phase thermal control systems for aerospace applications. The facility will also be capable of testing alternative refrigerants and evaluate their performance using various heat exchangers with enhanced surfaces. The test facility is also intended for use in evaluating single-phase performance of systems currently using CFC refrigerants. Literature dealing with jet pumps is abundant and covers a very wide array of application areas. Example application areas include vacuum pumps which are used in the food industry, power station work, and the chemical industry; ejector systems which have applications in the aircraft industry as cabin ventilators and for purposes of jet thrust augmentation; jet pumps which are used in the oil industry for oil well pumping; and steam-jet ejector refrigeration, to just name a few. Examples of work relevant to this investigation includes those of Fairuzov and Bredikhin (1995). While past researchers have been able to model the two-phase flow jet pump using the one-dimensional assumption with no shock waves and no phase change, there is no research known to the author apart from that of Anand (1992) who was able to account for condensation shocks. Thus, one of the objectives of this work is to model the dynamics of fluid interaction between a two-phase primary fluid and a subcooled liquid secondary fluid which is being injected employing atomizing spray injectors. The model developed accounts for phase transformations due to expansion, compression, and mixing. It also accounts for shock waves developing in the different parts of the jet pump as well as temperature and pressure dependencies of the fluid properties for both the primary two-phase mixture and the

  3. Treatment of incest perpetrators: a five-phase model.

    PubMed

    Frenken, J

    1994-04-01

    The author's experiences with treating fathers who committed incest and were sentenced to undergo therapy are discussed in this paper. The treatment consists of five phases. Following crisis intervention and assessment, an analysis is made of the sequence of events, thoughts, moods, and behaviors that precede sexual contact. In the third phase, the client's sense of guilt is brought out and he actively takes responsibility for the sexual abuse of his daughter. In the fourth phase, the origin of the sexual abuse is clarified as it is put into the context of his own problems and the problems within the family. In the fifth phase, strategies for relapse prevention are practiced. In addition there are partner-relationship sessions with the couple as well as family counseling sessions. Up to now none of the clients have recidivized.

  4. [Modeling and simulation of responses from ultrasonic linear phased array].

    PubMed

    He, Wenjing; Zhu, Yuanzhong; Wang, Yufeng; He, Lingli; Lai, Siyu

    2012-10-01

    Phased array transducers are very attractive because the beam generated by the arrays can be electronically focused and steered. The present work characterizes far-field 2D properties of phased array system by functions that are deduced from rectangle source, rectangle line array and phased array based on point source. Results are presented for the distribution of ultrasound intensity on plane xoz and on x-axis by simulation using numerical calculation. It is shown that the shape of response of rectangle line array is modulated by the single array element. It is also demonstrated that the delay time of phased array is the key to steer the beam, sacrificing the value of main lobe and increasing the number of side lobes.

  5. Mathematic model analysis of Gaussian beam propagation through an arbitrary thickness random phase screen.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yuzhen; Guo, Jin; Wang, Rui; Wang, Tingfeng

    2011-09-12

    In order to research the statistical properties of Gaussian beam propagation through an arbitrary thickness random phase screen for adaptive optics and laser communication application in the laboratory, we establish mathematic models of statistical quantities, which are based on the Rytov method and the thin phase screen model, involved in the propagation process. And the analytic results are developed for an arbitrary thickness phase screen based on the Kolmogorov power spectrum. The comparison between the arbitrary thickness phase screen and the thin phase screen shows that it is more suitable for our results to describe the generalized case, especially the scintillation index.

  6. Modeling and Observations of Phase-Mask Trapezoidal Profiles with Grating-Fiber Image Reproduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyons, Donald R.; Lindesay, James V.; Lee, Hyung R.; Ndlela, Zolili U.; Thompso, Erica J.

    2000-01-01

    We report on an investigation of the trapezoidal design and fabrication defects in phase masks used to produce Bragg reflection gratings in optical fibers. We used a direct visualization technique to examine the nonuniformity of the interference patterns generated by several phase masks. Fringe patterns from the phase masks are compared with the analogous patterns resulting from two-beam interference. Atomic force microscope imaging of the actual phase gratings that give rise to anomalous fringe patterns is used to determine input parameters for a general theoretical model. Phase masks with pitches of 0.566 and 1.059 microns are modeled and investigated.

  7. Asymmetric oscillations during phase separation under continuous cooling: A simple model.

    PubMed

    Hayase, Yumino; Kobayashi, Mika; Vollmer, Doris; Pleiner, Harald; Auernhammer, Günter K

    2008-11-14

    We investigate the phase separation of binary mixtures under continuous cooling using the Cahn-Hilliard equation including the effect of gravity. In our simple model, sedimentation is accounted for by instantaneously "removing" droplets from the supersaturated mixture into the coexisting phase once the droplets have reached a defined maximum size. Our model predicts an oscillatory variation of turbidity. Depending on the composition, either both phases oscillate (symmetric oscillations) or only one of the phases oscillates (asymmetric oscillations). In the asymmetric case, droplet sedimentation from the majority phase into the minority phase reduces supersaturation in the minority phase. This inhibits droplet formation in the minority phase. The cooling rate dependence of the period agrees with experimental results. PMID:19045388

  8. Determination of dimethyl trisulfide in rabbit blood using stir bar sorptive extraction gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Manandhar, Erica; Maslamani, Nujud; Petrikovics, Ilona; Rockwood, Gary A; Logue, Brian A

    2016-08-26

    Cyanide poisoning by accidental or intentional exposure poses a severe health risk. The current Food and Drug Administration approved antidotes for cyanide poisoning can be effective, but each suffers from specific major limitations concerning large effective dosage, delayed onset of action, or dependence on enzymes generally confined to specific organs. Dimethyl trisulfide (DMTS), a sulfur donor that detoxifies cyanide by converting it into thiocyanate (a relatively nontoxic cyanide metabolite), is a promising next generation cyanide antidote. Although a validated analytical method to analyze DMTS from any matrix is not currently available, one will be vital for the approval of DMTS as a therapeutic agent against cyanide poisoning. Hence, a stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE) gas chromatography - mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method was developed and validated for the analysis of DMTS from rabbit whole blood. Following acid denaturation of blood, DMTS was extracted into a polydimethylsiloxane-coated stir bar. The DMTS was then thermally desorbed from the stir bar and analyzed by GC-MS. The limit of detection of DMTS using this method was 0.06μM with dynamic range from 0.5-100μM. For quality control standards, the precision, as measured by percent relative standard deviation, was below 10%, and the accuracy was within 15% of the nominal concentration. The method described here will allow further investigations of DMTS as a promising antidote for cyanide poisoning.

  9. [Application of Stir Bar Sorptive Extraction and Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer to the Phthalic Acid Esters Analysis in Seawater].

    PubMed

    Gao, Chen-chen; Li, Feng-min; Lu, Lun; Sun, Yue

    2015-10-01

    For the determination of trace amounts of phthalic acid esters (PAEs) in complex seawater matrix, a stir bar sorptive extraction gas chromatography mass spectrometry (SBSE-GC-MS) method was established. Dimethyl phthalate (DMP), diethyl phthalate (DEP), dibutyl phthalate (DBP), butyl benzyl phthalate (BBP), dibutyl phthalate (2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) and dioctyl phthalate (DOP) were selected as study objects. The effects of extraction time, amount of methanol, amount of sodium chloride, desorption time and desorption solvent were optimized. The method of SBSE-GC-MS was validated through recoveries and relative standard deviation. The optimal extraction time was 2 h. The optimal methanol content was 10%. The optimal sodium chloride content was 5% . The optimal desorption time was 50 min. The optimal desorption solvent was the mixture of methanol to acetonitrile (4:1, volume: volume). The linear relationship between the peak area and the concentration of PAEs was relevant. The correlation coefficients were greater than 0.997. The detection limits were between 0.25 and 174.42 ng x L(-1). The recoveries of different concentrations were between 56.97% and 124.22% . The relative standard deviations were between 0.41% and 14.39%. On the basis of the method, several estuaries water sample of Jiaozhou Bay were detected. DEP was detected in all samples, and the concentration of BBP, DEHP and DOP were much higher than the rest. PMID:26841630

  10. Quantum phase transitions in an interacting atom-molecule boson model

    SciTech Connect

    Santos, G.; Foerster, A.; Mattei, E.; Dahmen, S. R.; Links, J.

    2010-06-15

    We study the quantum phase transitions of a model that describes the interconversion of interacting bosonic atoms and molecules. Using a classical analysis, we identify a threshold coupling line separating a molecular phase and a mixed phase. Through studies of the energy gap, von Neumann entanglement entropy, and fidelity, we give evidence that this line is associated with a boundary line in the ground-state phase diagram of the quantum system.

  11. Study of photometric phase curve with new brightness model: refining phase function system parameters of asteroid (107) Camilla

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yi-Bo; Wang, Xiao-Bin; Wang, Ao

    2016-09-01

    We characterize the morphology of the photometric phase curve model of an asteroid with a three-parameter magnitude phase function H — G1 — G2 system by considering the effect of brightness variation arising from a triaxial ellipsoid representing the asteroid's shape. Applying this new model and a Markov Chain Monte Carlo method, we refine the photometric phase curve of asteroid (107) Camilla and obtain its absolute magnitude H = 7.026-0.054+0.052 mag, and phase function parameters G1 = 0.489-0.044+0.043 and G2 = 0.259-0.023+0.023. Meanwhile, we also determine (107) Camilla's orientation of pole (74.1°-4.5°+4.3°, 50.2°-5.0°+5.4°) with rotational period of 4.843928-0.00001+0.000001 h, and axial ratios a/b = 1.409-0.020+0.020 and b/c = 1.249-0.060+0.063. Furthermore, according to the values of phase function parameters G1 and G2, we infer that asteroid (107) Camilla is an X-type asteroid.

  12. Study of photometric phase curve with new brightness model: refining phase function system parameters of asteroid (107) Camilla

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yi-Bo; Wang, Xiao-Bin; Wang, Ao

    2016-09-01

    We characterize the morphology of the photometric phase curve model of an asteroid with a three-parameter magnitude phase function H — G1 — G2 system by considering the effect of brightness variation arising from a triaxial ellipsoid representing the asteroid's shape. Applying this new model and a Markov Chain Monte Carlo method, we refine the photometric phase curve of asteroid (107) Camilla and obtain its absolute magnitude H = 7.026‑0.054+0.052 mag, and phase function parameters G1 = 0.489‑0.044+0.043 and G2 = 0.259‑0.023+0.023. Meanwhile, we also determine (107) Camilla's orientation of pole (74.1°‑4.5°+4.3°, 50.2°‑5.0°+5.4°) with rotational period of 4.843928‑0.00001+0.000001 h, and axial ratios a/b = 1.409‑0.020+0.020 and b/c = 1.249‑0.060+0.063. Furthermore, according to the values of phase function parameters G1 and G2, we infer that asteroid (107) Camilla is an X-type asteroid.

  13. Phase-field model for multiphase systems with different thermodynamic factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundin, Julia; Siquieri, Ricardo

    2011-03-01

    A modified phase-field model for quantitative simulations of low-speed phase transitions in multiphase systems is proposed, which takes into account the difference between thermodynamic factors in all the phases. The presented model is based on the quantitative phase-field concept developed by Steinbach et al. [I. Steinbach, F. Pezolla, B. Nestler, M. Seeelberg, R. Prieler, G.J. Schmitz, J.L.L. Rezende, A phase field concept for multiphase systems, Physica D 94 (1996) 135] for multiphase systems allowing to consider the multiphase transition as a superposition of pairwise interactions between two phases. We complete this approach and develop a model, which uses parameters derived from chemical free energy functions of individual phases evaluated from experimental data by the CALPHAD method Lukas et al. (2007) [17]. Because the thermodynamic factors are different in various phases we need to evaluate a special form of total chemical free energy function of a multiphase mixture and use it in the phase-field model. It is shown, that for the developed model the thin-interface asymptotic and the anti-trapping term developed previously for the solidification of pure substances can be applied. The model is verified by an example of the Al-Ni system whose peritectic structural morphology during the directional solidification is investigated. The suggested model can be also extended to multicomponent systems.

  14. Modeling of gamma/gamma-prime phase equilibrium in the nickel-aluminum system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanchez, J. M.; Barefoot, J. R.; Jarrett, R. N.; Tien, J. K.

    1984-01-01

    A theoretical model is proposed for the determination of phase equilibrium in alloys, taking into consideration dissimilar lattice parameters. Volume-dependent pair interactions are introduced by means of phenomenological Lennard-Jones potentials and the configurational entropy of the system is treated in the tetrahedron approximation of the cluster variation method. The model is applied to the superalloy-relevant, nickel-rich, gamma/gamma-prime phase region of the Ni-Al phase diagram. The model predicts reasonable values for the lattice parameters and the enthalpy of formation as a function of composition, and the calculated phase diagram closely approximates the experimental diagram.

  15. Generalized Ginzburg-Landau approach to inhomogeneous phases in nonlocal chiral quark models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlomagno, J. P.; Gómez Dumm, D.; Scoccola, N. N.

    2015-05-01

    We analyze the presence of inhomogeneous phases in the QCD phase diagram within the framework of nonlocal chiral quark models. We concentrate in particular in the positions of the tricritical (TCP) and Lifshitz (LP) points, which are studied in a general context using a generalized Ginzburg-Landau approach. We find that for all the phenomenologically acceptable model parametrizations considered the TCP is located at a higher temperature and a lower chemical potential in comparison with the LP. Consequently, these models seem to favor a scenario in which the onset of the first order transition between homogeneous phases is not covered by an inhomogeneous, energetically favored phase.

  16. Phase structure of a Yukawa-like model in the presence of magnetic background and boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abreu, L. M.; Nery, E. S.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we investigate the thermodynamics of a Yukawa-like model, constituted of a complex scalar field interacting with real scalar and vector fields, in the presence of an external magnetic field and boundaries. By making use of mean-field approximation, we analyze the phase structure of this model at effective chemical equilibrium, under change of values of the relevant parameters of the model, focusing on the influence of the boundaries on the phase structure. The findings reveal a strong dependence of the nature of the phase structure on temperature, magnetic background and size of compactified coordinate, with possibility of a two-step phase transition.

  17. Inter-comparison of the phase partitioning of cloud water among global climate models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komurcu, Muge; Storelvmo, Trude; Tan, Ivy; Lohmann, Ulrike; Yun, Yuxing; Penner, Joyce E.; Wang, Yong; Liu, Xiaohong; Takemura, Toshihiko

    2013-05-01

    Cloud water phase partitioning of global climate models is investigated using four different models. Two simulations are done: One with the models' default heterogeneous ice nucleation and another one using a fixed ice nucleation for all models. Results show that heterogeneous ice nucleation can influence the water phase partitioning, however, its influence is not the dominant factor leading to the phase partitioning differences among models. The name of the second author, "Trude Storelvmo" was mistakenly written as "Trude Storevlmo". All online versions of the article have been corrected.

  18. Phase-field model for solidification of a monotectic alloy with convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nestler, B.; Wheeler, A. A.; Ratke, L.; Stöcker, C.

    2000-07-01

    In this paper we discuss two phase-field models for solidification of monotectic alloys, a situation in which a liquid phase L 1 may simultaneously transform into both a new liquid phase L 2 and a solid phase S via the reaction L 1→L 2+S. The first model uses three different phase-fields to characterize the three phases in the system and, in addition, a concentration field. This construction restricts the validity of the model to describe phase transitions within the vicinity of the monotectic temperature. In contrast, the second model distinguishes the two liquid phases by their concentration using a Cahn-Hilliard type model and employs only one phase-field to characterize the system as solid or liquid. This formulation enables the second model to represent a wider temperature range of the phase diagram including the miscibility gap where the spinodal decomposition L→L 1+L 2 occurs. Both our models permit the interfaces to have temperature-dependent surface energies which may induce Marangoni convection at L 1-L 2 interfaces in non-isothermal systems. By deriving a generalized stress tensor including stresses associated with the capillary forces on the diffuse interface, we extend the two monotectic phase-field models to account for convection in both liquid phases. Together with a generalized set of Navier-Stokes equations, we give a complete set of dynamic field equations to describe monotectic systems with fluid flow. Finally, we present numerical simulations of lamellar monotectic growth structures which exhibit wetting phenomena as well as coarsening and particle pushing.

  19. A Theoretical Model for Thin Film Ferroelectric Coupled Microstripline Phase Shifters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romanofsky, R. R.; Quereshi, A. H.

    2000-01-01

    Novel microwave phase shifters consisting of coupled microstriplines on thin ferroelectric films have been demonstrated recently. A theoretical model useful for predicting the propagation characteristics (insertion phase shift, dielectric loss, impedance, and bandwidth) is presented here. The model is based on a variational solution for line capacitance and coupled strip transmission line theory.

  20. Multi phase field model for solid state transformation with elastic strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinbach, I.; Apel, M.

    2006-05-01

    A multi phase field model is presented for the investigation of the effect of transformation strain on the transformation kinetics, morphology and thermodynamic stability in multi phase materials. The model conserves homogeneity of stress in the diffuse interface between elastically inhomogeneous phases, in which respect it differs from previous models. The model is formulated consistently with the multi phase field model for diffusional and surface driven phase transitions [I. Steinbach, F. Pezzolla, B. Nestler, M. Seeßelberg, R. Prieler, G.J. Schmitz, J.L.L. Rezende, A phase field concept for multiphase systems, Physica D 94 (1996) 135-147; J. Tiaden, B. Nestler, H.J. Diepers, I. Steinbach, The multiphase-field model with an integrated concept for modeling solute diffusion, Physica D 115 (1998) 73-86; I. Steinbach, F. Pezzolla, A generalized field method for multiphase transformations using interface fields, Physica D 134 (1999) 385] and gives a consistent description of interfacial tension, multi phase thermodynamics and elastic stress balance in multiple junctions between an arbitrary number of grains and phases. Some aspects of the model are demonstrated with respect to numerical accuracy and the relation between transformation strain, external stress and thermodynamic equilibrium.

  1. Vienna Soil-Organic-Matter Modeler--Generating condensed-phase models of humic substances.

    PubMed

    Sündermann, Axel; Solc, Roland; Tunega, Daniel; Haberhauer, Georg; Gerzabek, Martin H; Oostenbrink, Chris

    2015-11-01

    Humic substances are ubiquitous in the environment and have manifold functions. While their composition is well known, information on the chemical structure and three-dimensional conformation is scarce. Here we describe the Vienna Soil-Organic-Matter Modeler, which is an online tool to generate condensed phase computer models of humic substances (http://somm.boku.ac.at). Many different models can be created that reflect the diversity in composition and conformations of the constituting molecules. To exemplify the modeler, 18 different models are generated based on two experimentally determined compositions, to explicitly study the effect of varying e.g. the amount of water molecules in the models or the pH. Molecular dynamics simulations were performed on the models, which were subsequently analyzed in terms of structure, interactions and dynamics, linking macroscopic observables to the microscopic composition of the systems. We are convinced that this new tool opens the way for a wide range of in silico studies on soil organic matter. PMID:26521208

  2. Vienna Soil-Organic-Matter Modeler--Generating condensed-phase models of humic substances.

    PubMed

    Sündermann, Axel; Solc, Roland; Tunega, Daniel; Haberhauer, Georg; Gerzabek, Martin H; Oostenbrink, Chris

    2015-11-01

    Humic substances are ubiquitous in the environment and have manifold functions. While their composition is well known, information on the chemical structure and three-dimensional conformation is scarce. Here we describe the Vienna Soil-Organic-Matter Modeler, which is an online tool to generate condensed phase computer models of humic substances (http://somm.boku.ac.at). Many different models can be created that reflect the diversity in composition and conformations of the constituting molecules. To exemplify the modeler, 18 different models are generated based on two experimentally determined compositions, to explicitly study the effect of varying e.g. the amount of water molecules in the models or the pH. Molecular dynamics simulations were performed on the models, which were subsequently analyzed in terms of structure, interactions and dynamics, linking macroscopic observables to the microscopic composition of the systems. We are convinced that this new tool opens the way for a wide range of in silico studies on soil organic matter.

  3. Discontinuous phase transition in an annealed multi-state majority-vote model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guofeng; Chen, Hanshuang; Huang, Feng; Shen, Chuansheng

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we generalize the original majority-vote (MV) model with noise from two states to arbitrary q states, where q is an integer no less than two. The main emphasis is paid to the comparison on the nature of phase transitions between the two-state MV (MV2) model and the three-state MV (MV3) model. By extensive Monte Carlo simulation and mean-field analysis, we find that the MV3 model undergoes a discontinuous order-disorder phase transition, in contrast to a continuous phase transition in the MV2 model. A central feature of such a discontinuous transition is a strong hysteresis behavior as noise intensity goes forward and backward. Within the hysteresis region, the disordered phase and ordered phase are coexisting.

  4. A Four-Phase Multidisciplinary Faculty Development Model in Aging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Batsche, Catherine N.; Monoson, Patricia

    1993-01-01

    A faculty development program combining social services, human performance, psychology, nutrition, audiology, and nursing had four phases: study of gerontology theories, practical experience, course development, and test of curriculum materials. Ten faculty developed 50 instructional units; 300 undergraduate students demonstrated significant gains…

  5. Microgravity two-phase fluid flow pattern modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Doojeong; Best, Frederick R.

    1988-01-01

    When gas and liquid mixtures flow in a pipe, the distribution of the two phases may take many forms. A flow pattern, or flow regime, is the characteristic spatial distribution of the phases of flow in a pipe. Because heat transfer and pressure drop are dependent on the characteristic distribution of phases, it is necessary to describe flow patterns in an appropriate manner so that a hydrodynamic or heat transfer theory applicable to that can be chosen. A theoretical two phase flow regime transition map under a microgravity environment was developed on physical concepts. These transitions use four basic flow patterns: dispersed flow, slug flow, stratified flow, and annular flow. The forces considered are body force, surface tension force, inertial force, friction, and the force from eddy turbulent fluctuation. Three dimensionless parameters were developed. Because these transition boundaries were developed based on physical concepts, they should be applicable to flow regimes occurring in various design conditions. Because the flow pattern data from KC-135 experiments are insufficient to verify these theoretical transition lines completely, an adiabatic experiment for flow regime analysis is recommended.

  6. Steady deflagration of HMX with simple kinetics: A gas phase chain reaction model

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, M.J.; Brewster, M.Q.; Son, S.F.

    1998-08-01

    A new approach is presented for modeling steady combustion of energetic solids, in particular HMX. A simplified, global, gas phase chain reaction kinetic mechanism is employed. Specifically, a zero-order, high activation energy thermal decomposition initiation reaction in the condensed phase followed by a second-order, low activation energy chain reaction in the gas phase is assumed. A closed-form solution is obtained, which is based on the activation energy asymptotics analysis of Lengelle in the condensed phase and the assumption of zero activation energy in the gas phase. Comparisons between the model and a variety of experimental observations over a wide range of pressures and initial temperatures are presented and demonstrate the validity of the approach. The model provides excellent agreement with burning rate data (including sensitivity to pressure and initial temperature) and temperature profile data (in particular the gas phase). This suggests that in the realm of simplified, approximate kinetics modeling of energetic solids, the low gas phase activation energy limit is a more appropriate model than the classical high activation energy limit or heuristic flame sheet models. The model also indicates that the condensed phase reaction zone plays an important role in determining the deflagration rate of HMX, underscoring the need for better understanding of the chemistry in this zone.

  7. Geometric entanglement and quantum phase transitions in two-dimensional quantum lattice models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Qian-Qian; Wang, Hong-Lei; Li, Sheng-Hao; Cho, Sam Young; Batchelor, Murray T.; Zhou, Huan-Qiang

    2016-06-01

    Geometric entanglement (GE), as a measure of multipartite entanglement, has been investigated as a universal tool to detect phase transitions in quantum many-body lattice models. In this paper we outline a systematic method to compute GE for two-dimensional (2D) quantum many-body lattice models based on the translational invariant structure of infinite projected entangled pair state (iPEPS) representations. By employing this method, the q -state quantum Potts model on the square lattice with q ∈{2 ,3 ,4 ,5 } is investigated as a prototypical example. Further, we have explored three 2D Heisenberg models: the antiferromagnetic spin-1/2 X X X and anisotropic X Y X models in an external magnetic field, and the antiferromagnetic spin-1 X X Z model. We find that continuous GE does not guarantee a continuous phase transition across a phase transition point. We observe and thus classify three different types of continuous GE across a phase transition point: (i) GE is continuous with maximum value at the transition point and the phase transition is continuous, (ii) GE is continuous with maximum value at the transition point but the phase transition is discontinuous, and (iii) GE is continuous with nonmaximum value at the transition point and the phase transition is continuous. For the models under consideration, we find that the second and the third types are related to a point of dual symmetry and a fully polarized phase, respectively.

  8. Incorporating seismic phase correlations into a probabilistic model of global-scale seismology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arora, Nimar

    2013-04-01

    We present a probabilistic model of seismic phases whereby the attributes of the body-wave phases are correlated to those of the first arriving P phase. This model has been incorporated into NET-VISA (Network processing Vertically Integrated Seismic Analysis) a probabilistic generative model of seismic events, their transmission, and detection on a global seismic network. In the earlier version of NET-VISA, seismic phase were assumed to be independent of each other. Although this didn't affect the quality of the inferred seismic bulletin, for the most part, it did result in a few instances of anomalous phase association. For example, an S phase with a smaller slowness than the corresponding P phase. We demonstrate that the phase attributes are indeed highly correlated, for example the uncertainty in the S phase travel time is significantly reduced given the P phase travel time. Our new model exploits these correlations to produce better calibrated probabilities for the events, as well as fewer anomalous associations.

  9. Climate Model Intercomparisons: Preparing for the Next Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meehl, Gerald A.; Moss, Richard; Taylor, Karl E.; Eyring, Veronika; Stouffer, Ronald J.; Bony, Sandrine; Stevens, Bjorn

    2014-03-01

    Since 1995, the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP) has coordinated climate model experiments involving multiple international modeling teams. Through CMIP, climate modelers and scientists from around the world have analyzed and compared state-of-the-art climate model simulations to gain insights into the processes, mechanisms, and consequences of climate variability and climate change. This has led to a better understanding of past, present, and future climate, and CMIP model experiments have routinely been the basis for future climate change assessments made by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) [e.g., IPCC, 2013, and references therein].

  10. Comparing predictive validity of four ballistic swing phase models of human walking.

    PubMed

    Selles, R W; Bussmann, J B; Wagenaar, R C; Stam, H J

    2001-09-01

    It is unclear to what extent ballistic walking models can be used to qualitatively predict the swing phase at comfortable walking speed. Different study findings regarding the accuracy of the predictions of the swing phase kinematics may have been caused by differences in (1) kinematic input, (2) model characteristics (e.g. the number of segments), and (3) evaluation criteria. In the present study, the predictive validity of four ballistic swing phase models was evaluated and compared, that is, (1) the ballistic walking model as originally introduced by Mochon and McMahon, (2) an extended version of this model in which heel-off of the stance leg is added, (3) a double pendulum model, consisting of a two-segment swing leg with a prescribed hip trajectory, and (4) a shank pendulum model consisting of a shank and rigidly attached foot with a prescribed knee trajectory. The predictive validity was evaluated by comparing the outcome of the model simulations with experimentally derived swing phase kinematics of six healthy subjects. In all models, statistically significant differences were found between model output and experimental data. All models underestimated swing time and step length. In addition, statistically significant differences were found between the output of the different models. The present study shows that although qualitative similarities exist between the ballistic models and normal gait at comfortable walking speed, these models cannot adequately predict swing phase kinematics. PMID:11506787

  11. Thermal modeling with solid/liquid phase change of the thermal energy storage experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skarda, J. Raymond Lee

    1991-01-01

    A thermal model which simulates combined conduction and phase change characteristics of thermal energy storage (TES) materials is presented. Both the model and results are presented for the purpose of benchmarking the conduction and phase change capabilities of recently developed and unvalidated microgravity TES computer programs. Specifically, operation of TES-1 is simulated. A two-dimensional SINDA85 model of the TES experiment in cylindrical coordinates was constructed. The phase change model accounts for latent heat stored in, or released from, a node undergoing melting and freezing.

  12. Superradiance, Berry phase, photon phase diffusion, and number squeezed state in the U(1) Dicke (Tavis-Cummings) model

    SciTech Connect

    Ye Jinwu; Zhang Cunlin

    2011-08-15

    Recently, strong-coupling regimes of superconducting qubits or quantum dots inside a microwave circuit cavity and BEC atoms inside an optical cavity were achieved experimentally. The strong-coupling regimes in these systems were described by the Dicke model. Here, we solve the Dicke model by a 1/N expansion. In the normal state, we find a {radical}(N) behavior of the collective Rabi splitting. In the superradiant phase, we identify an important Berry phase term that has dramatic effects on both the ground state and the excitation spectra of the strongly interacting system. The single photon excitation spectrum has a low-energy quantum phase diffusion mode in imaginary time with a large spectral weight and also a high-energy optical mode with a low spectral weight. The photons are in a number squeezed state that may have wide applications in high sensitive measurements and quantum-information processing. Comparisons with exact diagonalization studies are made. Possible experimental schemes to realize the superradiant phase are briefly discussed.

  13. Phase structure, magnetic monopoles, and vortices in the lattice Abelian Higgs model

    SciTech Connect

    Ranft, J.; Kripfganz, J.; Ranft, G.

    1983-07-15

    We present Monte Carlo calculations of lattice Abelian Higgs models in four dimensions and with charges of the Higgs particles equal to q = 1, 2, and 6. The phase transitions are studied in the plane of the two coupling constants considering separately average plaquette and average link expectation values. The density of topological excitations is studied. In the confinement phase we find finite densities of magnetic-monopole currents, electric currents, and vortex currents. The magnetic-monopole currents vanish exponentially in the Coulomb phase. The density of electric currents and vortex currents is finite in the Coulomb phase and vanishes exponentially in the Higgs phase.

  14. Are upwind techniques in multi-phase flow models necessary?

    SciTech Connect

    Park, C.-H.; Boettcher, N.; Wang, W.; Kolditz, O.

    2011-09-10

    Two alternatives of primary variables are compared for two-phase flow in heterogeneous media by solving fully established benchmarks. The first combination utilizes pressure of the wetting fluid and saturation of the non-wetting fluid as primary variables, while the second employs capillary pressure of the wetting fluid and pressure of the non-wetting fluid. While the standard Galerkin finite element method (SGFEM) is known to fail in the physical reproduction of two-phase flow in heterogeneous media (unless employing a fully upwind correction), the second scheme with capillary pressure as a primary variable without applying an upwind technique produces correct physical fluid behaviour in heterogeneous media, as observed from experiments.

  15. Radar coincidence imaging with phase error using Bayesian hierarchical prior modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xiaoli; Wang, Hongqiang; Cheng, Yongqiang; Qin, Yuliang

    2016-01-01

    Radar coincidence imaging (RCI) is a high-resolution imaging technique without the limitation of relative motion between target and radar. In sparsity-driven RCI, the prior knowledge of imaging model requires to be known accurately. However, the phase error generally exists as a model error, which may cause inaccuracies of the model and defocus the image. The problem is formulated using Bayesian hierarchical prior modeling, and the self-calibration variational message passing (SC-VMP) algorithm is proposed to improve the performance of RCI with phase error. The algorithm determines the phase error as part of the imaging process. The scattering coefficient and phase error are iteratively estimated using VMP and Newton's method, respectively. Simulation results show that the proposed algorithm can estimate the phase error accurately and improve the imaging quality significantly.

  16. Analytical models of the impact of two-phase sorption on subsurface transport of volatile chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Shoemaker, C.A.; Culver, T.B.; Lion, L.W.; Peterson, M.G. )

    1990-04-01

    Unsaturated zone models incorporating the impact of vapor-phase sorption on transport of volatile organic compounds are presented with closed from solutions for one-and two-dimensional cases. In addition to vapor-phase sorption the models incorporate liquid-phase sorption, liquid advection, gaseous diffusion, and volatilization into soil air spaces and to the atmosphere. The motivation for incorporation of vapor-phase sorption arises from recent experimental results by the authors indicating that vapor-phase sorption may be orders of magnitude higher than liquid-phase sorption under certain soil conditions. The sensitivity analysis suggests that there is considerable interaction among the physical and chemical processes involved in transport of volatile organic compounds. Pollutant concentrations are most affected by the Henry's law constant and gaseous diffusion; the speed of movement of the material depends most upon the pore water velocity and vapor-phase sorption. The incorporation of vapor-phase sorption can significantly reduce model predictions of the transport speed and amount of volatile chemical reaching the groundwater under dry soil conditions. This result is of considerable practical significance since models currently used for remediation and regulation do not include vapor-phase sorption.

  17. Phase diagram of a cyclic predator-prey model with neutral-pair exchange.

    PubMed

    Guisoni, Nara C; Loscar, Ernesto S; Girardi, Mauricio

    2013-08-01

    In this paper we obtain the phase diagram of a four-species predator-prey lattice model by using the proposed gradient method. We consider cyclic transitions between consecutive states, representing invasion or predation, and allowed the exchange between neighboring neutral pairs. By applying a gradient in the invasion rate parameter one can see, in the same simulation, the presence of two symmetric absorbing phases, composed by neutral pairs, and an active phase that includes all four species. In this sense, the study of a single-valued interface and its fluctuations give the critical point of the irreversible phase transition and the corresponding universality classes. Also, the consideration of a multivalued interface and its fluctuations bring the percolation threshold. We show that the model presents two lines of irreversible first-order phase transition between the two absorbing phases and the active phase. Depending on the value of the system parameters, these lines can converge into a triple point, which is the beginning of a first-order irreversible line between the two absorbing phases, or end in two critical points belonging to the directed percolation universality class. Standard simulations for some characteristic values of the parameters confirm the order of the transitions as determined by the gradient method. Besides, below the triple point the model presents two standard percolation lines in the active phase and above a first-order percolation transition as already found in other similar models.

  18. Heavy metal removal mechanisms of sorptive filter materials for road runoff treatment and remobilization under de-icing salt applications.

    PubMed

    Huber, Maximilian; Hilbig, Harald; Badenberg, Sophia C; Fassnacht, Julius; Drewes, Jörg E; Helmreich, Brigitte

    2016-10-01

    The objective of this research study was to elucidate the removal and remobilization behaviors of five heavy metals (i.e., Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn) that had been fixed onto sorptive filter materials used in decentralized stormwater treatment systems receiving traffic area runoff. Six filter materials (i.e., granular activated carbon, a mixture of granular activated alumina and porous concrete, granular activated lignite, half-burnt dolomite, and two granular ferric hydroxides) were evaluated in column experiments. First, a simultaneous preloading with the heavy metals was performed for each filter material. Subsequently, the remobilization effect was tested by three de-icing salt experiments in duplicate using pure NaCl, a mixture of NaCl and CaCl2, and a mixture of NaCl and MgCl2. Three layers of each column were separated to specify the attenuation of heavy metals as a function of depth. Cu and Pb were retained best by most of the selected filter materials, and Cu was often released the least of all metals by the three de-icing salts. The mixture of NaCl and CaCl2 resulted in a stronger effect upon remobilization than the other two de-icing salts. For the material with the highest retention, the effect of the preloading level upon remobilization was measured. The removal mechanisms of all filter materials were determined by advanced laboratory methods. For example, the different intrusions of heavy metals into the particles were determined. Findings of this study can result in improved filter materials used in decentralized stormwater treatment systems.

  19. Heavy metal removal mechanisms of sorptive filter materials for road runoff treatment and remobilization under de-icing salt applications.

    PubMed

    Huber, Maximilian; Hilbig, Harald; Badenberg, Sophia C; Fassnacht, Julius; Drewes, Jörg E; Helmreich, Brigitte

    2016-10-01

    The objective of this research study was to elucidate the removal and remobilization behaviors of five heavy metals (i.e., Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn) that had been fixed onto sorptive filter materials used in decentralized stormwater treatment systems receiving traffic area runoff. Six filter materials (i.e., granular activated carbon, a mixture of granular activated alumina and porous concrete, granular activated lignite, half-burnt dolomite, and two granular ferric hydroxides) were evaluated in column experiments. First, a simultaneous preloading with the heavy metals was performed for each filter material. Subsequently, the remobilization effect was tested by three de-icing salt experiments in duplicate using pure NaCl, a mixture of NaCl and CaCl2, and a mixture of NaCl and MgCl2. Three layers of each column were separated to specify the attenuation of heavy metals as a function of depth. Cu and Pb were retained best by most of the selected filter materials, and Cu was often released the least of all metals by the three de-icing salts. The mixture of NaCl and CaCl2 resulted in a stronger effect upon remobilization than the other two de-icing salts. For the material with the highest retention, the effect of the preloading level upon remobilization was measured. The removal mechanisms of all filter materials were determined by advanced laboratory methods. For example, the different intrusions of heavy metals into the particles were determined. Findings of this study can result in improved filter materials used in decentralized stormwater treatment systems. PMID:27423405

  20. Cyromazine imprinted polymers for selective stir bar sorptive extraction of melamine in animal feed and milk samples.

    PubMed

    Fan, Wenying; Gao, Mingqi; He, Man; Chen, Beibei; Hu, Bin

    2015-06-21

    In this work, a molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) coated stir bar was prepared using a self-designed polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) mold and in situ polymerization, with cyromazine as the dummy template for the target melamine. The prepared MIP coated stir bar presented a uniform and porous surface as well as good chemical stability and selectivity for melamine. Based on it, a method of MIP coated stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE) combined with high performance liquid chromatography-ultraviolet detection (HPLC-UV) was developed for the quantification of melamine in food samples. Significant factors affecting the extraction efficiency of melamine by MIP-SBSE, such as the extraction solvent and time, stirring rate, desorption solvent and time, were investigated thoroughly. Under the optimal conditions, the analytical performance of this method was evaluated. The detection limit of the developed method was 0.54 μg L(-1) for melamine with an enrichment factor of 42-fold and the relative standard deviation (RSD) of 6.1% (c = 5 μg L(-1), n = 7), and the linear range was 2-200 μg L(-1). The established method was applied for the determination of melamine in a variety of real samples including cat food, dog food, chicken feed A, chicken feed B and milk powder, and the recoveries for melamine in the spiked samples were in the range of 76.2-98.2%, 80.0-85.5%, 89.5-113%, 85.0-95.5% and 65.0-111%, respectively. The proposed method presented a good specific recognition ability and matrix interference resistance, and was demonstrated to be effective and sensitive for the analysis of melamine in animal food and milk samples.

  1. Plastic pellets sorptive extraction: Low-cost, rapid and efficient extraction of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from environmental waters.

    PubMed

    Nika, Chrysanthi-Elisabeth; Yiantzi, Evangelia; Psillakis, Elefteria

    2016-05-30

    For the first time, plastic pellets, a low-cost and easy to reach industrial raw material, are reported as an efficient sorbent material for the laboratory extraction of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from environmental waters. The proposed methodology, termed plastic pellets sorptive extraction (P2SE), consisted of a two-step procedure whereby target analytes were initially adsorbed onto the surface of three low-density polyethylene (LDPE) pellets and then desorbed using microliters of an organic solvent. Interphase mass transfer was greatly accelerated by means of vortex agitation. Organic extracts were analyzed by means of liquid chromatography-fluorescence detection. Different experimental parameters were controlled and the optimum conditions found were: three LDPE pellets (∼80 mg) added to 20 mL aqueous sample (20% w:v NaCl) followed by vortex agitation at 3000 rpm; for desorption, the three LDPE pellets were immersed in 100 μL of acetonitrile and the mixture was shaken at 3000 rpm for 5 min using the vortex agitator. The calculated calibration curves gave high levels of linearity yielding coefficients of determination (r(2)) greater than 0.9913. The precision of the proposed method was found to be good and the limits of the detection were calculated in the low ng L(-1) level. Matrix effects were determined by applying the proposed method to spiked river water, treated municipal wastewater and seawater samples. To compensate for the low recoveries of the more hydrophobic PAHs in spiked effluent wastewater and seawater samples the standard addition methodology was applied. The proposed method was applied to the determination of target pollutants in real seawater samples using the standard addition method. Overall, the performance of the proposed P2SE method suggests that the use of inexpensive and easy to reach sorbent materials for extracting analytes in the laboratory merits more intensive investigation. PMID:27154829

  2. Probabilistic assessment of contamination using the two-phase flow model.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guan-Zhi; Hsu, Kuo-Chin; Lee, Cheng-Haw

    2003-08-01

    A physically motivated model is indispensable for a successful analysis of the impact of leaching from nuclear waste storage sites on the environment and public health. While most analyses use the single-phase flow model for modelling unsaturated flow and solute transport, the two-phase flow model considering the resistance of gas to water flow is a more realistic one. The effect of the two-phase flow model on the water content is theoretically investigated first in this study. Then, by combining a geostatistical generator using the turning bands method and a multi-phase transport code TOUGH2, an automatic process is used for Monte Carlo simulation of the solute transport. This stochastic approach is applied to a potentially polluted site by low-level nuclear waste in Taiwan. In the simulation, the saturated hydraulic conductivity is treated as the random variable. The stochastic approach provides a probabilistic assessment of contamination. The results show that even though water content from the two-phase flow model is only 1.5% less than the one from the single-phase flow model, the two-phase flow causes a slower movement but a wider lateral spreading of the plume in the unsaturated zone. The stochastic approach provides useful probability information which is not available from the deterministic approach. The probability assessment of groundwater contamination provides the basis for more informed waste management, better environmental assessment and improved evaluation of impact on public health.

  3. Morphological modelling of three-phase microstructures of anode layers using SEM images.

    PubMed

    Abdallah, Bassam; Willot, François; Jeulin, Dominique

    2016-07-01

    A general method is proposed to model 3D microstructures representative of three-phases anode layers used in fuel cells. The models are based on SEM images of cells with varying morphologies. The materials are first characterized using three morphological measurements: (cross-)covariances, granulometry and linear erosion. They are measured on segmented SEM images, for each of the three phases. Second, a generic model for three-phases materials is proposed. The model is based on two independent underlying random sets which are otherwise arbitrary. The validity of this model is verified using the cross-covariance functions of the various phases. In a third step, several types of Boolean random sets and plurigaussian models are considered for the unknown underlying random sets. Overall, good agreement is found between the SEM images and three-phases models based on plurigaussian random sets, for all morphological measurements considered in the present work: covariances, granulometry and linear erosion. The spatial distribution and shapes of the phases produced by the plurigaussian model are visually very close to the real material. Furthermore, the proposed models require no numerical optimization and are straightforward to generate using the covariance functions measured on the SEM images.

  4. Global dust model intercomparison in AeroCom phase I

    SciTech Connect

    Huneeus, N.; Schulz, M.; Balkanski, Y.; Griesfeller, J.; Prospero, J.; Kinne, S.; Bauer, S.; Boucher, O.; Chin, M.; Dentener, F.; Diehl, T.; Easter, R.; Fillmore, D.; Ghan, S.; Ginoux, P.; Grini, A.; Horowitz, L.; Koch, D.; Krol, M. C.; Landing, W.; Liu, X.; Mahowald, N.; Miller, R.; Morcrette, J. -J.; Myhre, G.; Penner, J.; Perlwitz, J.; Stier, P.; Takemura, T.; Zender, C. S.

    2011-08-01

    This study presents the results of a broad intercomparison of a total of 15 global aerosol models within the AeroCom project. Each model is compared to observations related to desert dust aerosols, their direct radiative effect, and their impact on the biogeochemical cycle, i.e., aerosol optical depth (AOD) and dust deposition. Additional comparisons to Angström exponent (AE), coarse mode AOD and dust surface concentrations are included to extend the assessment of model performance and to identify common biases present in models. These data comprise a benchmark dataset that is proposed for model inspection and future dust model development. There are large differences among the global models that simulate the dust cycle and its impact on climate. In general, models simulate the climatology of vertically integrated parameters (AOD and AE) within a factor of two whereas the total deposition and surface concentration are reproduced within a factor of 10. In addition, smaller mean normalized bias and root mean square errors are obtained for the climatology of AOD and AE than for total deposition and surface concentration. Characteristics of the datasets used and their uncertainties may influence these differences. Large uncertainties still exist with respect to the deposition fluxes in the southern oceans. Further measurements and model studies are necessary to assess the general model performance to reproduce dust deposition in ocean regions sensible to iron contributions. Models overestimate the wet deposition in regions dominated by dry deposition. They generally simulate more realistic surface concentration at stations downwind of the main sources than at remote ones. Most models simulate the gradient in AOD and AE between the different dusty regions. However the seasonality and magnitude of both variables is better simulated at African stations than Middle East ones. The models simulate the offshore transport of West Africa throughout the year but they

  5. Stir bar sorptive extraction-liquid desorption applied to the analysis of hop-derived bitter acids in beer by micellar electrokinetic chromatography.

    PubMed

    De Villiers, André; Vanhoenacker, Gerd; Lynen, Fréderic; Sandra, Pat

    2004-02-01

    Stir bar sorptive extraction-liquid desorption (SBSE-LD) has been applied as an efficient sample preparation method for the analysis of beer bitter acids. Extracts free of almost all interfering compounds were obtained, allowing simultaneous analysis of iso-alpha-acids and reduced iso-alpha-acids. A robust micellar electrokinetic chromatography (MEKC) method was developed that enables fast separation of iso-alpha-acids and reduced iso-alpha-acids. Quantitative data are in good agreement with results obtained by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) using direct beer injection.

  6. Modeling spatially localized photonic nanojets from phase diffraction gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geints, Yu. E.; Zemlyanov, A. A.

    2016-04-01

    We investigated numerically the specific spatially localized intense optical structure, a photonic nanojet (PNJ), formed in the near-field scattering of optical radiation at phase diffraction gratings. The finite-difference time-domain technique was employed to study the PNJ key parameters (length, width, focal distance, and intensity) produced by diffraction gratings with the saw-tooth, rectangle, and hemispheric line profiles. Our analysis showed that each type of diffraction gratings produces a photonic jet with unique characteristics. Based on the numerical calculations, we demonstrate that the PNJ could be manipulated in a wide range through the variation of period, duty cycle, and shape of diffraction grating rulings.

  7. Nanoscale phase separation and superconductivity in the one-dimensional Hirsch model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anfossi, Alberto; Degli Esposti Boschi, Cristian; Montorsi, Arianna

    2009-06-01

    We investigate numerically at various fillings the ground state of the one-dimensional Hubbard model with correlated hopping x (Hirsch model). It is found that, for a large range of filling values n around half filling, and for repulsive Coulomb interaction u≤uc(x,n) , phase separation at a nanoscale (NPS phase) between two conducting phases at different densities occurs when x≳2/3 . The NPS phase is accompanied by the opening of a spin gap and the system behaves as a Luther-Emery liquid with dominant superconducting correlations. Close to half filling, an anomalous peak emerges in the charge structure factor related to the density of doubly occupied sites, which determines the size of the droplets in the NPS phase. For 1/2≲x≲2/3 a crossover to a homogeneous phase, still superconducting, takes place.

  8. Acid base properties of cyanobacterial surfaces I: Influences of growth phase and nitrogen metabolism on cell surface reactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lalonde, S. V.; Smith, D. S.; Owttrim, G. W.; Konhauser, K. O.

    2008-03-01

    Significant efforts have been made to elucidate the chemical properties of bacterial surfaces for the purposes of refining surface complexation models that can account for their metal sorptive behavior under diverse conditions. However, the influence of culturing conditions on surface chemical parameters that are modeled from the potentiometric titration of bacterial surfaces has received little regard. While culture age and metabolic pathway have been considered as factors potentially influencing cell surface reactivity, statistical treatments have been incomplete and variability has remained unconfirmed. In this study, we employ potentiometric titrations to evaluate variations in bacterial surface ligand distributions using live cells of the sheathless cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120, grown under a variety of batch culture conditions. We evaluate the ability for a single set of modeled parameters, describing acid-base surface properties averaged over all culture conditions tested, to accurately account for the ligand distributions modeled for each individual culture condition. In addition to considering growth phase, we assess the role of the various assimilatory nitrogen metabolisms available to this organism as potential determinants of surface reactivity. We observe statistically significant variability in site distribution between the majority of conditions assessed. By employing post hoc Tukey-Kramer analysis for all possible pair-wise condition comparisons, we conclude that the average parameters are inadequate for the accurate chemical description of this cyanobacterial surface. It was determined that for this Gram-negative bacterium in batch culture, ligand distributions were influenced to a greater extent by nitrogen assimilation pathway than by growth phase.

  9. Evaluation of automated stir bar sorptive extraction-thermal desorption-gas chromatography electron capture negative ion mass spectrometry for the analysis of PBDEs and PBBs in sheep and human serum.

    PubMed

    Loconto, Paul R

    2009-09-01

    Stir-bar sorptive extraction and automated thermal desorption/cryotrapping interfaced to capillary gas chromatography and electron capture negative ion mass spectrometry is shown to effectively isolate and recover polybrominated diphenyl ethers and polybrominated biphenyls from sheep and human serum. This paper describes the development of the method and demonstrates the feasibility of using Twister with spiked serum. Conditions for conducting stir-bar sorptive extraction and for automated thermal desorption that led to acceptable analyte recoveries were optimized. The approach to sample preparation introduced here significantly reduces tedious labor and solvent consumption associated with conventional liquid-liquid extraction. PMID:19772742

  10. Thermal modeling of phase change solidification in thermal control devices including natural convection effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ukanwa, A. O.; Stermole, F. J.; Golden, J. O.

    1972-01-01

    Natural convection effects in phase change thermal control devices were studied. A mathematical model was developed to evaluate natural convection effects in a phase change test cell undergoing solidification. Although natural convection effects are minimized in flight spacecraft, all phase change devices are ground tested. The mathematical approach to the problem was to first develop a transient two-dimensional conduction heat transfer model for the solidification of a normal paraffin of finite geometry. Next, a transient two-dimensional model was developed for the solidification of the same paraffin by a combined conduction-natural-convection heat transfer model. Throughout the study, n-hexadecane (n-C16H34) was used as the phase-change material in both the theoretical and the experimental work. The models were based on the transient two-dimensional finite difference solutions of the energy, continuity, and momentum equations.

  11. Critical point of gas-liquid type phase transition and phase equilibrium functions in developed two-component plasma model

    SciTech Connect

    Butlitsky, M. A.; Zelener, B. V.

    2014-07-14

    A two-component plasma model, which we called a “shelf Coulomb” model has been developed in this work. A Monte Carlo study has been undertaken to calculate equations of state, pair distribution functions, internal energies, and other thermodynamics properties. A canonical NVT ensemble with periodic boundary conditions was used. The motivation behind the model is also discussed in this work. The “shelf Coulomb” model can be compared to classical two-component (electron-proton) model where charges with zero size interact via a classical Coulomb law. With important difference for interaction of opposite charges: electrons and protons interact via the Coulomb law for large distances between particles, while interaction potential is cut off on small distances. The cut off distance is defined by an arbitrary ε parameter, which depends on system temperature. All the thermodynamics properties of the model depend on dimensionless parameters ε and γ = βe{sup 2}n{sup 1/3} (where β = 1/k{sub B}T, n is the particle's density, k{sub B} is the Boltzmann constant, and T is the temperature) only. In addition, it has been shown that the virial theorem works in this model. All the calculations were carried over a wide range of dimensionless ε and γ parameters in order to find the phase transition region, critical point, spinodal, and binodal lines of a model system. The system is observed to undergo a first order gas-liquid type phase transition with the critical point being in the vicinity of ε{sub crit}≈13(T{sub crit}{sup *}≈0.076),γ{sub crit}≈1.8(v{sub crit}{sup *}≈0.17),P{sub crit}{sup *}≈0.39, where specific volume v* = 1/γ{sup 3} and reduced temperature T{sup *} = ε{sup −1}.

  12. Critical point of gas-liquid type phase transition and phase equilibrium functions in developed two-component plasma model.

    PubMed

    Butlitsky, M A; Zelener, B B; Zelener, B V

    2014-07-14

    A two-component plasma model, which we called a "shelf Coulomb" model has been developed in this work. A Monte Carlo study has been undertaken to calculate equations of state, pair distribution functions, internal energies, and other thermodynamics properties. A canonical NVT ensemble with periodic boundary conditions was used. The motivation behind the model is also discussed in this work. The "shelf Coulomb" model can be compared to classical two-component (electron-proton) model where charges with zero size interact via a classical Coulomb law. With important difference for interaction of opposite charges: electrons and protons interact via the Coulomb law for large distances between particles, while interaction potential is cut off on small distances. The cut off distance is defined by an arbitrary ɛ parameter, which depends on system temperature. All the thermodynamics properties of the model depend on dimensionless parameters ɛ and γ = βe(2)n(1/3) (where β = 1/kBT, n is the particle's density, kB is the Boltzmann constant, and T is the temperature) only. In addition, it has been shown that the virial theorem works in this model. All the calculations were carried over a wide range of dimensionless ɛ and γ parameters in order to find the phase transition region, critical point, spinodal, and binodal lines of a model system. The system is observed to undergo a first order gas-liquid type phase transition with the critical point being in the vicinity of ɛ(crit) ≈ 13(T(*)(crit) ≈ 0.076), γ(crit) ≈ 1.8(v(*)(crit) ≈ 0.17), P(*)(crit) ≈ 0.39, where specific volume v* = 1/γ(3) and reduced temperature T(*) = ɛ(-1). PMID:25028031

  13. Critical point of gas-liquid type phase transition and phase equilibrium functions in developed two-component plasma model.

    PubMed

    Butlitsky, M A; Zelener, B B; Zelener, B V

    2014-07-14

    A two-component plasma model, which we called a "shelf Coulomb" model has been developed in this work. A Monte Carlo study has been undertaken to calculate equations of state, pair distribution functions, internal energies, and other thermodynamics properties. A canonical NVT ensemble with periodic boundary conditions was used. The motivation behind the model is also discussed in this work. The "shelf Coulomb" model can be compared to classical two-component (electron-proton) model where charges with zero size interact via a classical Coulomb law. With important difference for interaction of opposite charges: electrons and protons interact via the Coulomb law for large distances between particles, while interaction potential is cut off on small distances. The cut off distance is defined by an arbitrary ɛ parameter, which depends on system temperature. All the thermodynamics properties of the model depend on dimensionless parameters ɛ and γ = βe(2)n(1/3) (where β = 1/kBT, n is the particle's density, kB is the Boltzmann constant, and T is the temperature) only. In addition, it has been shown that the virial theorem works in this model. All the calculations were carried over a wide range of dimensionless ɛ and γ parameters in order to find the phase transition region, critical point, spinodal, and binodal lines of a model system. The system is observed to undergo a first order gas-liquid type phase transition with the critical point being in the vicinity of ɛ(crit) ≈ 13(T(*)(crit) ≈ 0.076), γ(crit) ≈ 1.8(v(*)(crit) ≈ 0.17), P(*)(crit) ≈ 0.39, where specific volume v* = 1/γ(3) and reduced temperature T(*) = ɛ(-1).

  14. Scattering phase function for particulates-in-water: modeling and validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, Sanjay Kumar; Shanmugam, Palanisamy

    2016-05-01

    Scattering phase function plays a crucial role in studies and calculations based on radiative transfer theory in water as well as atmosphere. A model based on Mie theory is developed for estimating the particulates-in-water scattering phase function for forward angles (0.1° - 90°). Particle size distribution (PSD) slope (ξ) and bulk refractive index (n) are chosen as key inputs for this proposed model. The PSD slope can be estimated from the attenuation spectrum measured directly in-situ and the bulk refractive index can be calculated by an inversion model using measured backscattering ratio (BP) and PSD slope. The attenuation spectrum and backscattering ratio can be easily measured in-situ using commercially available instruments in real time. The entire range of forward angles is divided into two ranges and phase function is modeled separately in the ranges 0.1° - 5° and 5° - 90°, from numerically calculated Volume Scattering Function (VSF) using Mie theory. The division boundary is decided owing to the fact that the scattering phase functions, for different oceanic conditions, exhibit a change in slope at approximately 5°. Performance of the present model is evaluated by comparing with existing empirical and analytical models as well as measured phase functions. The proposed phase function model shows a considerable improvement upon existing models, and will have important applications in remote sensing applications and underwater studies.

  15. Phase field modelling of stressed grain growth: Analytical study and the effect of microstructural length scale

    SciTech Connect

    Jamshidian, M.; Rabczuk, T.

    2014-03-15

    We establish the correlation between the diffuse interface and sharp interface descriptions for stressed grain boundary migration by presenting analytical solutions for stressed migration of a circular grain boundary in a bicrystalline phase field domain. The validity and accuracy of the phase field model is investigated by comparing the phase field simulation results against analytical solutions. The phase field model can reproduce precise boundary kinetics and stress evolution provided that a thermodynamically consistent theory and proper expressions for model parameters in terms of physical material properties are employed. Quantitative phase field simulations are then employed to investigate the effect of microstructural length scale on microstructure and texture evolution by stressed grain growth in an elastically deformed polycrystalline aggregate. The simulation results reveal a transitional behaviour from normal to abnormal grain growth by increasing the microstructural length scale.

  16. Crystal Level Continuum Modeling of Phase Transformations: The (alpha) <--> (epsilon) Transformation in Iron

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, N R; Benson, D J; Becker, R; Bykov, Y; Caplan, M

    2004-10-18

    We present a crystal level model for thermo-mechanical deformation with phase transformation capabilities. The model is formulated to allow for large pressures (on the order of the elastic moduli) and makes use of a multiplicative decomposition of the deformation gradient. Elastic and thermal lattice distortions are combined into a single lattice stretch to allow the model to be used in conjunction with general equation of state relationships. Phase transformations change the mass fractions of the material constituents. The driving force for phase transformations includes terms arising from mechanical work, from the temperature dependent chemical free energy change on transformation, and from interaction energy among the constituents. Deformation results from both these phase transformations and elasto-viscoplastic deformation of the constituents themselves. Simulation results are given for the {alpha} to {epsilon} phase transformation in iron. Results include simulations of shock induced transformation in single crystals and of compression of polycrystals. Results are compared to available experimental data.

  17. Quantitative model of the phase behavior of recombinant pH-responsive elastin-like polypeptides.

    PubMed

    Mackay, J Andrew; Callahan, Daniel J; Fitzgerald, Kelly N; Chilkoti, Ashutosh

    2010-11-01

    Quantitative models are required to engineer biomaterials with environmentally responsive properties. With this goal in mind, we developed a model that describes the pH-dependent phase behavior of a class of stimulus responsive elastin-like polypeptides (ELPs) that undergo reversible phase separation in response to their solution environment. Under isothermal conditions, charged ELPs can undergo phase separation when their charge is neutralized. Optimization of this behavior has been challenging because the pH at which they phase separate, pHt, depends on their composition, molecular weight, concentration, and temperature. To address this problem, we developed a quantitative model to describe the phase behavior of charged ELPs that uses the Henderson-Hasselbalch relationship to describe the effect of side-chain ionization on the phase-transition temperature of an ELP. The model was validated with pH-responsive ELPs that contained either acidic (Glu) or basic (His) residues. The phase separation of both ELPs fit this model across a range of pH. These results have important implications for applications of pH-responsive ELPs because they provide a quantitative model for the rational design of pH-responsive polypeptides whose transition can be triggered at a specified pH.

  18. Modeling the effects of systemic mediators on the inflammatory phase of wound healing.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Racheal L; Segal, Rebecca A; Diegelmann, Robert F; Reynolds, Angela M

    2015-02-21

    The normal wound healing response is characterized by a progression from clot formation, to an inflammatory phase, to a repair phase, and finally, to remodeling. In many chronic wounds there is an extended inflammatory phase that stops this progression. In order to understand the inflammatory phase in more detail, we developed an ordinary differential equation model that accounts for two systemic mediators that are known to modulate this phase, estrogen (a protective hormone during wound healing) and cortisol (a hormone elevated after trauma that slows healing). This model describes the interactions in the wound between wound debris, pathogens, neutrophils and macrophages and the modulation of these interactions by estrogen and cortisol. A collection of parameter sets, which qualitatively match published data on the dynamics of wound healing, was chosen using Latin Hypercube Sampling. This collection of parameter sets represents normal healing in the population as a whole better than one single parameter set. Including the effects of estrogen and cortisol is a necessary step to creating a patient specific model that accounts for gender and trauma. Utilization of math modeling techniques to better understand the wound healing inflammatory phase could lead to new therapeutic strategies for the treatment of chronic wounds. This inflammatory phase model will later become the inflammatory subsystem of our full wound healing model, which includes fibroblast activity, collagen accumulation and remodeling. PMID:25446708

  19. One-dimensional frustrated plaquette compass model: Nematic phase and spontaneous multimerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brzezicki, Wojciech; Oleś, Andrzej M.

    2016-06-01

    We introduce a one-dimensional (1D) pseudospin model on a ladder where the Ising interactions along the legs and along the rungs alternate between XiXi +1 and ZiZi +1 for even/odd bond (rung). We include also the next-nearest-neighbor Ising interactions on plaquettes' diagonals that alternate in such a way that a model where only leg interactions are switched on is equivalent to the one when only the diagonal ones are present. Thus in the absence of rung interactions the model can interpolate between two 1D compass models. The model possesses local symmetries which are the parities within each 2 ×2 cell (plaquette) of the ladder. We find that for different values of the interaction it can realize ground states that differ by the patterns formed by these local parities. By exact diagonalization we derive detailed phase diagrams for small systems of L =4 , 6, and 8 plaquettes, and use next L =12 to identify generic phases that appear in larger systems as well. Among them we find a nematic phase with macroscopic degeneracy when the leg and diagonal interactions are equal and the rung interactions are larger than a critical value. By performing a perturbative expansion around this phase we find indeed a very complex competition around the nematic phase which has to do with releasing frustration in this range of parameters. The nematic phase is similar to the one found in the two-dimensional compass model. For particular parameters the low-energy sector of the present plaquette model reduces to a 1D compass model with spins S =1 which suggests that it realizes peculiar crossovers within the class of compass models. Finally, we show that the model can realize phases with broken translation invariance which can be either dimerized, trimerized, etc., or completely disordered and highly entangled in a well identified window of the phase diagram.

  20. Probabilistic models for reactive behaviour in heterogeneous condensed phase media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baer, M. R.; Gartling, D. K.; DesJardin, P. E.

    2012-02-01

    This work presents statistically-based models to describe reactive behaviour in heterogeneous energetic materials. Mesoscale effects are incorporated in continuum-level reactive flow descriptions using probability density functions (pdfs) that are associated with thermodynamic and mechanical states. A generalised approach is presented that includes multimaterial behaviour by treating the volume fraction as a random kinematic variable. Model simplifications are then sought to reduce the complexity of the description without compromising the statistical approach. Reactive behaviour is first considered for non-deformable media having a random temperature field as an initial state. A pdf transport relationship is derived and an approximate moment approach is incorporated in finite element analysis to model an example application whereby a heated fragment impacts a reactive heterogeneous material which leads to a delayed cook-off event. Modelling is then extended to include deformation effects associated with shock loading of a heterogeneous medium whereby random variables of strain, strain-rate and temperature are considered. A demonstrative mesoscale simulation of a non-ideal explosive is discussed that illustrates the joint statistical nature of the strain and temperature fields during shock loading to motivate the probabilistic approach. This modelling is derived in a Lagrangian framework that can be incorporated in continuum-level shock physics analysis. Future work will consider particle-based methods for a numerical implementation of this modelling approach.

  1. The Lunar Phases Project: A Mental Model-Based Observational Project for Undergraduate Nonscience Majors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Angela Osterman; Mon, Manuel J.; Hibbard, Susan T.

    2011-01-01

    We present our Lunar Phases Project, an ongoing effort utilizing students' actual observations within a mental model building framework to improve student understanding of the causes and process of the lunar phases. We implement this project with a sample of undergraduate, nonscience major students enrolled in a midsized public university located…

  2. MODELING MULTICOMPONENT ORGANIC CHEMICAL TRANSPORT IN THREE FLUID PHASE POROUS MEDIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    A two-dimensional finite-element model was developed to predict coupled transient flow and multicomponent transport of organic chemicals which can partition between nonaqueous phase liquid, water, gas and solid phases in porous media under the assumption of local chemical equilib...

  3. Ehri's Model of Phases of Learning to Read: A Brief Critique

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beech, John R.

    2005-01-01

    A theory of how children progress through different phases of reading should be an asset both to reading researchers and teachers alike. The present paper provides a brief review of Ehri's influential four phases of reading development: pre-alphabetic, partial alphabetic, full alphabetic and consolidated alphabetic. The model is flexible enough to…

  4. Phase Diagram of the Antiferromagnetic Blume-Capel Model on Triangular Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sojeong; Kwak, Wooseop

    2016-08-01

    We perform Monte-Carlo simulations of the anti-ferromagnetic (AF) spin-1 Blume- Capel (BC) model and the AF Ising model on triangular lattice. We estimate the exact critical magnetic fields for both models at zero temperature using the Wang-Landau sampling method. We also show the phase diagrams and the critical lines for the models using the joint density functions. We find that the shapes of critical lines for the models are identical, but the phase transitions across the critical lines are different.

  5. Hierarchy of two-phase flow models for autonomous control of cryogenic loading operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luchinskiy, Dmitry G.; Ponizovskaya-Devine, Ekaterina; Hafiychuk, Vasyl; Kashani, Ali; Khasin, Michael; Timucin, Dogan; Sass, Jared; Perotti, Jose; Brown, Barbara

    2015-12-01

    We report on the development of a hierarchy of models of cryogenic two-phase flow motivated by NASA plans to develop and maturate technology of cryogenic propellant loading on the ground and in space. The solution of this problem requires models that are fast and accurate enough to identify flow conditions, detect faults, and to propose optimal recovery strategy. The hierarchy of models described in this presentation is ranging from homogeneous moving- front approximation to separated non-equilibrium two-phase cryogenic flow. We compare model predictions with experimental data and discuss possible application of these models to on-line integrated health management and control of cryogenic loading operation.

  6. Underground Test Area Subproject Phase I Data Analysis Task. Volume VI - Groundwater Flow Model Documentation Package

    SciTech Connect

    1996-11-01

    Volume VI of the documentation for the Phase I Data Analysis Task performed in support of the current Regional Flow Model, Transport Model, and Risk Assessment for the Nevada Test Site Underground Test Area Subproject contains the groundwater flow model data. Because of the size and complexity of the model area, a considerable quantity of data was collected and analyzed in support of the modeling efforts. The data analysis task was consequently broken into eight subtasks, and descriptions of each subtask's activities are contained in one of the eight volumes that comprise the Phase I Data Analysis Documentation.

  7. Underground Test Area Subproject Phase I Data Analysis Task. Volume VII - Tritium Transport Model Documentation Package

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-01

    Volume VII of the documentation for the Phase I Data Analysis Task performed in support of the current Regional Flow Model, Transport Model, and Risk Assessment for the Nevada Test Site Underground Test Area Subproject contains the tritium transport model documentation. Because of the size and complexity of the model area, a considerable quantity of data was collected and analyzed in support of the modeling efforts. The data analysis task was consequently broken into eight subtasks, and descriptions of each subtask's activities are contained in one of the eight volumes that comprise the Phase I Data Analysis Documentation.

  8. Phase separated membrane bioreactor - Results from model system studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petersen, G. R.; Seshan, P. K.; Dunlop, E. H.

    1989-01-01

    The operation and evaluation of a bioreactor designed for high intensity oxygen transfer in a microgravity environment is described. The reactor itself consists of a zero headspace liquid phase separated from the air supply by a long length of silicone rubber tubing through which the oxygen diffuses in and the carbon dioxide diffuses out. Mass transfer studies show that the oxygen is film diffusion controlled both externally and internally to the tubing and not by diffusion across the tube walls. Methods of upgrading the design to eliminate these resistances are proposed. Cell growth was obtained in the fermenter using Saccharomyces cerevisiae showing that this concept is capable of sustaining cell growth in the terrestrial simulation.

  9. Model system studies with a phase separated membrane bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petersen, G. R.; Seshan, P. K.; Dunlop, Eric H.

    1989-01-01

    The operation and evaluation of a bioreactor designed for high intensity oxygen transfer in a microgravity environment is described. The reactor itself consists of a zero headspace liquid phase separated from the air supply by a long length of silicone rubber tubing through which the oxygen diffuses in and the carbon dioxide diffuses out. Mass transfer studies show that the oxygen is film diffusion controlled both externally and internally to the tubing and not by diffusion across the tube walls. Methods of upgrading the design to eliminate these resistances are proposed. Cell growth was obtained in the fermenter using Saccharomyces cerevisiae showing that this concept is capable of sustaining cell growth in the terrestial simulation.

  10. Dynamics Coefficient for Two-Phase Soil Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wrana, Bogumił

    2015-02-01

    The paper investigates a description of energy dissipation within saturated soils-diffusion of pore-water. Soils are assumed to be two-phase poro-elastic materials, the grain skeleton of which exhibits no irreversible behavior or structural hysteretic damping. Description of motion and deformation of soil is introduced as a system of equations consisting of governing dynamic consolidation equations based on Biot theory. Selected constitutive and kinematic relations for small strains and rotation are used. This paper derives a closed form of analytical solution that characterizes the energy dissipation during steady-state vibrations of nearly and fully saturated poro-elastic columns. Moreover, the paper examines the influence of various physical factors on the fundamental period, maximum amplitude and the fraction of critical damping of the Biot column. Also the so-called dynamic coefficient which shows amplification or attenuation of dynamic response is considered.

  11. Phase separated membrane bioreactor: Results from model system studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, G. R.; Seshan, P. K.; Dunlop, E. H.

    The operation and evaluation of a bioreactor designed for high intensity oxygen transfer in a microgravity environment is described. The reactor itself consists of a zero headspace liquid phase separated from the air supply by a long length of silicone rubber tubing through which the oxygen diffuses in and the carbon dioxide diffuses out. Mass transfer studies show that the oxygen is film diffusion controlled both externally and internally to the tubing and not by diffusion across the tube walls. Methods of upgrading the design to eliminate these resistances are proposed. Cell growth was obtained in the fermenter using Saccharomyces cerevisiae showing that this concept is capable of sustaining cell growth in the terrestial simulation.

  12. A survey study to validate a four phases development model for integrated care in the Netherlands

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The development of integrated care is a complex and long term process. Previous research shows that this development process can be characterised by four phases: the initiative and design phase; the experimental and execution phase; the expansion and monitoring phase and the consolidation and transformation phase. In this article these four phases of the Development Model for Integrated Care (DMIC) are validated in practice for stroke services, acute myocardial infarct (AMI) services and dementia services in the Netherlands. Methods Based on the pre-study about the DMIC, a survey was developed for integrated care coordinators. In total 32 stroke, 9 AMI and 43 dementia services in the Netherlands participated (response 83%). Data were collected on integrated care characteristics, planned and implemented integrated care elements, recognition of the DMIC phases and factors that influence development. Data analysis was done by descriptive statistics, Kappa tests and Pearson’s correlation tests. Results All services positioned their practice in one of the four phases and confirmed the phase descriptions. Of them 93% confirmed to have completed the previous phase. The percentage of implemented elements increased for every further development phase; the percentage of planned elements decreased for every further development phase. Pearson’s correlation was .394 between implemented relevant elements and self-assessed phase, and up to .923 with the calculated phases (p < .001). Elements corresponding to the earlier phases of the model were on average older. Although the integrated care services differed on multiple characteristics, the DMIC phases were confirmed. Conclusions Integrated care development is characterised by a changing focus over time, often starting with a large amount of plans which decrease over time when progress on implementation has been made. More awareness of this phase-wise development of integrated care, could facilitate integrated

  13. The Pliocene Model Intercomparison Project (PlioMIP) Phase 2: scientific objectives and experimental design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haywood, Alan M.; Dowsett, Harry J.; Dolan, Aisling M.; Rowley, David; Abe-Ouchi, Ayako; Otto-Bliesner, Bette; Chandler, Mark A.; Hunter, Stephen J.; Lunt, Daniel J.; Pound, Matthew; Salzmann, Ulrich

    2016-03-01

    The Pliocene Model Intercomparison Project (PlioMIP) is a co-ordinated international climate modelling initiative to study and understand climate and environments of the Late Pliocene, as well as their potential relevance in the context of future climate change. PlioMIP examines the consistency of model predictions in simulating Pliocene climate and their ability to reproduce climate signals preserved by geological climate archives. Here we provide a description of the aim and objectives of the next phase of the model intercomparison project (PlioMIP Phase 2), and we present the experimental design and boundary conditions that will be utilized for climate model experiments in Phase 2. Following on from PlioMIP Phase 1, Phase 2 will continue to be a mechanism for sampling structural uncertainty within climate models. However, Phase 1 demonstrated the requirement to better understand boundary condition uncertainties as well as uncertainty in the methodologies used for data-model comparison. Therefore, our strategy for Phase 2 is to utilize state-of-the-art boundary conditions that have emerged over the last 5 years. These include a new palaeogeographic reconstruction, detailing ocean bathymetry and land-ice surface topography. The ice surface topography is built upon the lessons learned from offline ice sheet modelling studies. Land surface cover has been enhanced by recent additions of Pliocene soils and lakes. Atmospheric reconstructions of palaeo-CO2 are emerging on orbital timescales, and these are also incorporated into PlioMIP Phase 2. New records of surface and sea surface temperature change are being produced that will be more temporally consistent with the boundary conditions and forcings used within models. Finally we have designed a suite of prioritized experiments that tackle issues surrounding the basic understanding of the Pliocene and its relevance in the context of future climate change in a discrete way.

  14. The Pliocene Model Intercomparison Project (PlioMIP) Phase 2: Scientific Objectives and Experimental Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haywood, Alan M.; Dowsett, Harry J.; Dolan, Aisling M.; Rowley, David; Abe-Ouchi, Ayako; Otto-Bliesner, Bette; Chandler, Mark A.; Hunter, Stephen J.; Lunt, Daniel J.; Pound, Matthew; Salzmann, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    The Pliocene Model Intercomparison Project (PlioMIP) is a co-ordinated international climate modelling initiative to study and understand climate and environments of the Late Pliocene, as well as their potential relevance in the context of future climate change. PlioMIP examines the consistency of model predictions in simulating Pliocene climate and their ability to reproduce climate signals preserved by geological climate archives. Here we provide a description of the aim and objectives of the next phase of the model intercomparison project (PlioMIP Phase 2), and we present the experimental design and boundary conditions that will be utilized for climate model experiments in Phase 2. Following on from PlioMIP Phase 1, Phase 2 will continue to be a mechanism for sampling structural uncertainty within climate models. However, Phase 1 demonstrated the requirement to better understand boundary condition uncertainties as well as uncertainty in the methodologies used for data-model comparison. Therefore, our strategy for Phase 2 is to utilize state-of-the-art boundary conditions that have emerged over the last 5 years. These include a new palaeogeographic reconstruction, detailing ocean bathymetry and land-ice surface topography. The ice surface topography is built upon the lessons learned from offline ice sheet modelling studies. Land surface cover has been enhanced by recent additions of Pliocene soils and lakes. Atmospheric reconstructions of palaeo-CO2 are emerging on orbital timescales, and these are also incorporated into PlioMIP Phase 2. New records of surface and sea surface temperature change are being produced that will be more temporally consistent with the boundary conditions and forcings used within models. Finally we have designed a suite of prioritized experiments that tackle issues surrounding the basic understanding of the Pliocene and its relevance in the context of future climate change in a discrete way.

  15. A model-based 3D phase unwrapping algorithm using Gegenbauer polynomials.

    PubMed

    Langley, Jason; Zhao, Qun

    2009-09-01

    The application of a two-dimensional (2D) phase unwrapping algorithm to a three-dimensional (3D) phase map may result in an unwrapped phase map that is discontinuous in the direction normal to the unwrapped plane. This work investigates the problem of phase unwrapping for 3D phase maps. The phase map is modeled as a product of three one-dimensional Gegenbauer polynomials. The orthogonality of Gegenbauer polynomials and their derivatives on the interval [-1, 1] are exploited to calculate the expansion coefficients. The algorithm was implemented using two well-known Gegenbauer polynomials: Chebyshev polynomials of the first kind and Legendre polynomials. Both implementations of the phase unwrapping algorithm were tested on 3D datasets acquired from a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner. The first dataset was acquired from a homogeneous spherical phantom. The second dataset was acquired using the same spherical phantom but magnetic field inhomogeneities were introduced by an external coil placed adjacent to the phantom, which provided an additional burden to the phase unwrapping algorithm. Then Gaussian noise was added to generate a low signal-to-noise ratio dataset. The third dataset was acquired from the brain of a human volunteer. The results showed that Chebyshev implementation and the Legendre implementation of the phase unwrapping algorithm give similar results on the 3D datasets. Both implementations of the phase unwrapping algorithm compare well to PRELUDE 3D, 3D phase unwrapping software well recognized for functional MRI. PMID:19671967

  16. A model-based 3D phase unwrapping algorithm using Gegenbauer polynomials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langley, Jason; Zhao, Qun

    2009-09-01

    The application of a two-dimensional (2D) phase unwrapping algorithm to a three-dimensional (3D) phase map may result in an unwrapped phase map that is discontinuous in the direction normal to the unwrapped plane. This work investigates the problem of phase unwrapping for 3D phase maps. The phase map is modeled as a product of three one-dimensional Gegenbauer polynomials. The orthogonality of Gegenbauer polynomials and their derivatives on the interval [-1, 1] are exploited to calculate the expansion coefficients. The algorithm was implemented using two well-known Gegenbauer polynomials: Chebyshev polynomials of the first kind and Legendre polynomials. Both implementations of the phase unwrapping algorithm were tested on 3D datasets acquired from a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner. The first dataset was acquired from a homogeneous spherical phantom. The second dataset was acquired using the same spherical phantom but magnetic field inhomogeneities were introduced by an external coil placed adjacent to the phantom, which provided an additional burden to the phase unwrapping algorithm. Then Gaussian noise was added to generate a low signal-to-noise ratio dataset. The third dataset was acquired from the brain of a human volunteer. The results showed that Chebyshev implementation and the Legendre implementation of the phase unwrapping algorithm give similar results on the 3D datasets. Both implementations of the phase unwrapping algorithm compare well to PRELUDE 3D, 3D phase unwrapping software well recognized for functional MRI.

  17. Procedural Modeling for Rapid-Prototyping of Multiple Building Phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saldana, M.; Johanson, C.

    2013-02-01

    RomeLab is a multidisciplinary working group at UCLA that uses the city of Rome as a laboratory for the exploration of research approaches and dissemination practices centered on the intersection of space and time in antiquity. In this paper we present a multiplatform workflow for the rapid-prototyping of historical cityscapes through the use of geographic information systems, procedural modeling, and interactive game development. Our workflow begins by aggregating archaeological data in a GIS database. Next, 3D building models are generated from the ArcMap shapefiles in Esri CityEngine using procedural modeling techniques. A GIS-based terrain model is also adjusted in CityEngine to fit the building elevations. Finally, the terrain and city models are combined in Unity, a game engine which we used to produce web-based interactive environments which are linked to the GIS data using keyhole markup language (KML). The goal of our workflow is to demonstrate that knowledge generated within a first-person virtual world experience can inform the evaluation of data derived from textual and archaeological sources, and vice versa.

  18. Chromium(VI) sorptive removal from aqueous solutions by nanocrystalline akaganèite.

    PubMed

    Lazaridis, N K; Bakoyannakis, D N; Deliyanni, E A

    2005-01-01

    In this study, akaganeite (beta-FeO(OH)) an ironoxyhydroxide material, was used as a low-cost potential adsorbent for the removal of hexavalent chromium from aqueous solutions. The influence of agitation speed, solution pH, initial chromium concentration, sorbent concentration and temperature were evaluated at batch kinetic runs. It was shown that the solid diffusion model, in comparison to simple reaction kinetic models, described better the sorption kinetics. Freundlich and Frumkin isotherm best fitted the equilibrium results. Akaganeite presented a sorption capacity approximately 80 mg Cr(VI) g(-1), under the conditions studied. Flotation was used as a downstream process for the effective removal of the loaded material.

  19. Modeling and analysis of pinhole occulter experiment: Initial study phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandervoort, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    The feasibility of using a generic simulation, TREETOPS, to simulate the Pinhole/Occulter Facility (P/OF) to be tested on the space shuttle was demonstrated. The baseline control system was used to determine the pointing performance of the P/OF. The task included modeling the structure as a three body problem (shuttle-instrument pointing system- P/OP) including the flexibility of the 32 meter P/OF boom. Modeling of sensors, actuators, and control algorithms was also required. Detailed mathematical models for the structure, sensors, and actuators are presented, as well as the control algorithm and corresponding design procedure. Closed loop performance using this controller and computer listings for the simulator are also given.

  20. Quantum phase transitional patterns in the SD-pair shell model

    SciTech Connect

    Luo Yanan; Meng Xiangfei; Zhang Yu; Pan Feng; Draayer, Jerry P.

    2009-07-15

    Patterns of shape-phase transition in the proton-neutron coupled systems are studied within the SD-pair shell model. The results show that some transitional patterns in the SD-pair shell model are similar to the U(5)-SU(3) and U(5)-SO(6) transitions with signatures of the critical point symmetry of the interacting boson model.

  1. Brittle fracture phase-field modeling of a short-rod specimen

    SciTech Connect

    Escobar, Ivana; Tupek, Michael R.; Bishop, Joseph E.

    2015-09-01

    Predictive simulation capabilities for modeling fracture evolution provide further insight into quantities of interest in comparison to experimental testing. Based on the variational approach to fracture, the advent of phase-field modeling achieves the goal to robustly model fracture for brittle materials and captures complex crack topologies in three dimensions.

  2. Thermal barrier coating life prediction model development, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meier, Susan Manning; Sheffler, Keith D.; Nissley, David M.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of this program was to generate a life prediction model for electron-beam-physical vapor deposited (EB-PVD) zirconia thermal barrier coating (TBC) on gas turbine engine components. Specific activities involved in development of the EB-PVD life prediction model included measurement of EB-PVD ceramic physical and mechanical properties and adherence strength, measurement of the thermally grown oxide (TGO) growth kinetics, generation of quantitative cyclic thermal spallation life data, and development of a spallation life prediction model. Life data useful for model development was obtained by exposing instrumented, EB-PVD ceramic coated cylindrical specimens in a jet fueled burner rig. Monotonic compression and tensile mechanical tests and physical property tests were conducted to obtain the EB-PVD ceramic behavior required for burner rig specimen analysis. As part of that effort, a nonlinear constitutive model was developed for the EB-PVD ceramic. Spallation failure of the EB-PVD TBC system consistently occurred at the TGO-metal interface. Calculated out-of-plane stresses were a small fraction of that required to statically fail the TGO. Thus, EB-PVD spallation was attributed to the interfacial cracking caused by in-plane TGO strains. Since TGO mechanical properties were not measured in this program, calculation of the burner rig specimen TGO in-plane strains was performed by using alumina properties. A life model based on maximum in-plane TGO tensile mechanical strain and TGO thickness correlated the burner rig specimen EB-PVD ceramic spallation lives within a factor of about plus or minus 2X.

  3. IDC Re-Engineering Phase 2 Data Model to IDC Schema Mapping.

    SciTech Connect

    Hamlet, Benjamin R.; Montoya, Mark Sinclair; Sandoval, Rudy Daniel; Vickers, James Wallace

    2016-01-01

    This initial draft document contains formative data model content for select areas of Re-Engineering Phase 2 IDC System. The purpose of this document is to facilitate discussion among the stakeholders. It is not intended as a definitive proposal.

  4. Degenerate mobilities in phase field models are insufficient to capture surface diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Alpha A.; Münch, Andreas; Süli, Endre

    2015-08-01

    Phase field models frequently provide insight into phase transitions and are robust numerical tools to solve free boundary problems corresponding to the motion of interfaces. A body of prior literature suggests that interface motion via surface diffusion is the long-time, sharp interface limit of microscopic phase field models such as the Cahn-Hilliard equation with a degenerate mobility function. Contrary to this conventional wisdom, we show that the long-time behaviour of degenerate Cahn-Hilliard equation with a polynomial free energy undergoes coarsening, reflecting the presence of bulk diffusion, rather than pure surface diffusion. This reveals an important limitation of phase field models that are frequently used to model surface diffusion.

  5. Micromechanics and constitutive models for soft active materials with phase evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Binglian

    Soft active materials, such as shape memory polymers, liquid crystal elastomers, soft tissues, gels etc., are materials that can deform largely in response to external stimuli. Micromechanics analysis of heterogeneous materials based on finite element method is a typically numerical way to study the thermal-mechanical behaviors of soft active materials with phase evolution. While the constitutive models that can precisely describe the stress and strain fields of materials in the process of phase evolution can not be found in the databases of some commercial finite element analysis (FEA) tools such as ANSYS or Abaqus, even the specific constitutive behavior for each individual phase either the new formed one or the original one has already been well-known. So developing a computationally efficient and general three dimensional (3D) thermal-mechanical constitutive model for soft active materials with phase evolution which can be implemented into FEA is eagerly demanded. This paper first solved this problem theoretically by recording the deformation history of each individual phase in the phase evolution process, and adopted the idea of effectiveness by regarding all the new formed phase as an effective phase with an effective deformation to make this theory computationally efficient. A user material subroutine (UMAT) code based on this theoretical constitutive model has been finished in this work which can be added into the material database in Abaqus or ANSYS and can be easily used for most soft active materials with phase evolution. Model validation also has been done through comparison between micromechanical FEA and experiments on a particular composite material, shape memory elastomeric composite (SMEC) which consisted of an elastomeric matrix and the crystallizable fibre. Results show that the micromechanics and the constitutive models developed in this paper for soft active materials with phase evolution are completely relied on.

  6. Is there an impact of small phase lags in the Kuramoto model?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omel'chenko, Oleh E.; Wolfrum, Matthias

    2016-09-01

    We discuss the influence of small phase lags on the synchronization transitions in the Kuramoto model for a large inhomogeneous population of globally coupled phase oscillators. Without a phase lag, all unimodal distributions of the natural frequencies give rise to a classical synchronization scenario, where above the onset of synchrony at the Kuramoto threshold, there is an increasing synchrony for increasing coupling strength. We show that already for arbitrarily small phase lags, there are certain unimodal distributions of natural frequencies such that for increasing coupling strength synchrony may decrease and even complete incoherence may regain stability. Moreover, our example allows a qualitative understanding of the mechanism for such non-universal synchronization transitions.

  7. Striped Multiferroic Phase in Double-Exchange Model for Quarter-Doped Manganites

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Shuai; Yu, Rong; Liu, J.-M.; Dagotto, Elbio R

    2009-01-01

    The phase diagram of quarter-hole-doped perovskite manganites is investigated using the doubleexchange model. An exotic striped type-II multiferroic phase, where 25% of the nearest-neighbor spin couplings are orthogonal to each other, is found in the narrow-bandwidth region. Comparing with the spiral-spin ordering phase of undoped manganites, the multiferroic Curie temperature of the new phase is estimated to be 4 times higher, while the ferroelectric polarization is similar in magnitude. Our study provides a path for noncollinear spin multiferroics based on electronic self-organization, different from the traditional approach based on superexchange frustration.

  8. Characterization, Modeling, and Energy Harvesting of Phase Transformations in Ferroelectric Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Wenda

    Solid state phase transformations can be induced through mechanical, electrical, and thermal loading in ferroelectric materials that are compositionally close to morphotropic phase boundaries. Large changes in strain, polarization, compliance, permittivity, and coupling properties are typically observed across the phase transformation regions and are phenomena of interest for energy harvesting and transduction applications where increased coupling behavior is desired. This work characterized and modeled solid state phase transformations in ferroelectric materials and assessed the potential of phase transforming materials for energy harvesting applications. Two types of phase transformations were studied. The first type was ferroelectric rhombohedral to ferroelectric orthorhombic observed in lead indium niobate lead magnesium niobate lead titanate (PIN-PMN-PT) and driven by deviatoric stress, temperature, and electric field. The second type of phase transformation is ferroelectric to antiferroelectric observed in lead zirconate titanate (PZT) and driven by pressure, temperature, and electric field. Experimental characterizations of the phase transformations were conducted in both PIN-PMN-PT and PZT in order to understand the thermodynamic characteristics of the phase transformations and map out the phase stability of both materials. The ferroelectric materials were characterized under combinations of stress, electric field, and temperature. Material models of phase transforming materials were developed using a thermodynamic based variant switching technique and thermodynamic observations of the phase transformations. These models replicate the phase transformation behavior of PIN-PMN-PT and PZT under mechanical and electrical loading conditions. The switching model worked in conjunction with linear piezoelectric equations as ferroelectric/ferroelastic constitutive equations within a finite element framework that solved the mechanical and electrical field equations

  9. Thermal barrier coating life prediction model development, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demasi, Jeanine T.; Ortiz, Milton

    1989-01-01

    The objective of this program was to establish a methodology to predict thermal barrier coating (TBC) life on gas turbine engine components. The approach involved experimental life measurement coupled with analytical modeling of relevant degradation modes. Evaluation of experimental and flight service components indicate the predominant failure mode to be thermomechanical spallation of the ceramic coating layer resulting from propagation of a dominant near interface crack. Examination of fractionally exposed specimens indicated that dominant crack formation results from progressive structural damage in the form of subcritical microcrack link-up. Tests conducted to isolate important life drivers have shown MCrAlY oxidation to significantly affect the rate of damage accumulation. Mechanical property testing has shown the plasma deposited ceramic to exhibit a non-linear stress-strain response, creep and fatigue. The fatigue based life prediction model developed accounts for the unusual ceramic behavior and also incorporates an experimentally determined oxide rate model. The model predicts the growth of this oxide scale to influence the intensity of the mechanic driving force, resulting from cyclic strains and stresses caused by thermally induced and externally imposed mechanical loads.

  10. Numerical Modeling of Liquid-Vapor Phase Change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esmaeeli, Asghar; Arpaci, Vedat S.

    2001-01-01

    We implemented a two- and three-dimensional finite difference/front tracking technique to solve liquid-vapor phase change problems. The mathematical and the numerical features of the method were explained in great detail in our previous reports, Briefly, we used a single formula representation which incorporated jump conditions into the governing equations. The interfacial terms were distributed as singular terms using delta functions so that the governing equations would be the same as conventional conservation equations away from the interface and in the vicinity of the interface they would provide correct jump conditions. We used a fixed staggered grid to discretize these equations and an unstructured grid to explicitly track the front. While in two dimensions the front was simply a connection of small line segments, in three dimensions it was represented by a connection of small triangular elements. The equations were written in conservative forms and during the course of computations we used regriding to control the size of the elements of the unstructured grid. Moreover, we implemented a coalescence in two dimensions which allowed the merging of different fronts or two segments of the same front when they were sufficiently close. We used our code to study thermocapillary migration of bubbles, burst of bubbles at a free surface, buoyancy-driven interactions of bubbles, evaporation of drops, rapid evaporation of an interface, planar solidification of an undercooled melt, dendritic solidification, and a host of other problems cited in the reference.

  11. Determination of fluoroquinolones in environmental water and milk samples treated with stir cake sorptive extraction based on a boron-rich monolith.

    PubMed

    Mei, Meng; Huang, Xiaojia

    2016-05-01

    In this study, a new stir cake sorptive extraction using a boron-rich monolith as the adsorbent was prepared by the in situ copolymerization of vinylboronic anhydride pyridine complex and divinylbenzene. The effect of preparation parameters, including the ratio of vinylboronic anhydride pyridine complex and divinylbenzene, monomer mixture, and porogen solvent, on extraction performance was investigated thoroughly. The physicochemical properties of the adsorbent were characterized by infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and mercury intrusion porosimetry. Several conditions affecting the extraction efficiency were investigated in detail. Under the optimized conditions, a convenient and sensitive method for the determination of trace fluoroquinolones residues in water and milk samples was established by coupling stir cake sorptive extraction with high-performance liquid chromatography and diode array detection. The limits of detection for the target compounds were 0.10-0.26 and 0.11-0.22 μg/L for water and milk samples, respectively. In addition, the developed method showed good linearity, repeatability, and precision. Finally, the proposed method was successfully applied for the detection of trace fluoroquinolones residues in environmental water and milk samples. Satisfactory recoveries were obtained for the determination of fluoroquinolones in spiking samples that ranged from 68.8 to 120%, with relative standard deviations below 10% in all cases. PMID:26990593

  12. Determination of fluoroquinolones in environmental water and milk samples treated with stir cake sorptive extraction based on a boron-rich monolith.

    PubMed

    Mei, Meng; Huang, Xiaojia

    2016-05-01

    In this study, a new stir cake sorptive extraction using a boron-rich monolith as the adsorbent was prepared by the in situ copolymerization of vinylboronic anhydride pyridine complex and divinylbenzene. The effect of preparation parameters, including the ratio of vinylboronic anhydride pyridine complex and divinylbenzene, monomer mixture, and porogen solvent, on extraction performance was investigated thoroughly. The physicochemical properties of the adsorbent were characterized by infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and mercury intrusion porosimetry. Several conditions affecting the extraction efficiency were investigated in detail. Under the optimized conditions, a convenient and sensitive method for the determination of trace fluoroquinolones residues in water and milk samples was established by coupling stir cake sorptive extraction with high-performance liquid chromatography and diode array detection. The limits of detection for the target compounds were 0.10-0.26 and 0.11-0.22 μg/L for water and milk samples, respectively. In addition, the developed method showed good linearity, repeatability, and precision. Finally, the proposed method was successfully applied for the detection of trace fluoroquinolones residues in environmental water and milk samples. Satisfactory recoveries were obtained for the determination of fluoroquinolones in spiking samples that ranged from 68.8 to 120%, with relative standard deviations below 10% in all cases.

  13. Sol-gel polydimethylsiloxane/poly(vinylalcohol)-coated stir bar sorptive extraction of organophosphorus pesticides in honey and their determination by large volume injection GC.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chunhe; Hu, Bin

    2009-01-01

    A PDMS/poly(vinylalcohol) (PDMS/PVA) film prepared through a sol-gel process was coated on stir bars for sorptive extraction, followed by liquid desorption and large volume injection-GC-flame photometric detector (LVI-GC-FPD) for the determination of five organophosphorus pesticides (OPPs) (phorate, fenitrothion, malathion, parathion, and quinalphos) in honey. The preparation reproducibility of PDMS/PVA-coated stir bar ranged from 4.3 to 13.4% (n = 4) in one batch, and from 6.0 to 12.6% (n = 4) in batch to batch. And one prepared stir bar can be used for more than 50 times without apparent coating loss. The significant parameters affecting stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE) were investigated and optimized. The LODs for five OPPs ranged from 0.013 (parathion) to 0.081 microg/L (phorate) with the RSDs ranging from 5.3 to 14.2% (c = 1 microg/L, n = 6). The proposed method was successfully applied to the analysis of five OPPs in honey. PMID:19035384

  14. Simultaneous determination of preservatives in beverages, vinegar, aqueous sauces, and quasi-drug drinks by stir-bar sorptive extraction (SBSE) and thermal desorption GC-MS.

    PubMed

    Ochiai, Nobuo; Sasamoto, Kikuo; Takino, Masahiko; Yamashita, Satoru; Daishima, Shigeki; Heiden, Arnd C; Hoffmann, Andreas

    2002-05-01

    A method for the simultaneous determination of seven preservatives - sorbic acid, benzoic acid, and p-hydroxybenzoic acid ethyl, isopropyl, propyl, isobutyl, and butyl esters - in beverages, vinegar, aqueous sauces, and quasi-drug drinks has been developed using the stir-bar sorptive extraction technique then thermal desorption GC-MS analysis. The extraction conditions - pH, sample volume, extraction temperature, salt addition, and extraction time - were examined. d5-Benzoic acid and p-hydroxybenzoic acid sec-butyl ester were added as surrogate internal standards to compensate for the effect of sample matrix and coexisting analytes on the sorptive extraction. The linearity of the method was good over the concentration range from 1 to 1000 microg mL(-1) for sorbic acid, 10-1000 microg mL(-1) for benzoic acid, and 0.1-100 microg mL(-1) for p-hydroxybenzoic acid ethyl, isopropyl, propyl, isobutyl, and butyl esters, and the correlation coefficients were higher than 0.9984. The limit of detection ranged from 0.015 to 3.3 microg mL(-1). The recoveries (95-105%) and precision (RSD: 0.86-6.0%) of the method were examined by analyzing a sparkling soft drink, white wine, red wine, balsamic vinegar, soy sauce, and quasi-drug drink samples fortified at the 5 to 50 microg mL(-1) level.

  15. Sensitive determination of estrogens in environmental waters treated with polymeric ionic liquid-based stir cake sorptive extraction and liquid chromatographic analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lei; Mei, Meng; Huang, Xiaojia; Yuan, Dongxing

    2016-05-15

    A simple, sensitive and environmentally friendly method using polymeric ionic liquid-based stir cake sorptive extraction followed by high performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection (HPLC/DAD) has been developed for efficient quantification of six selected estrogens in environmental waters. To extract trace estrogens effectively, a poly (1-ally-3-vinylimidazolium chloride-co-ethylene dimethacrylate) monolithic cake was prepared and used as the sorbent of stir cake sorptive extraction (SCSE). The effects of preparation conditions of sorbent and extraction parameters of SCSE for estrogens were investigated and optimized. Under optimal conditions, the developed method showed satisfactory analytical performance for targeted analytes. Low limits of detection (S/N=3) and quantification limits (S/N=10) were achieved within the range of 0.024-0.057 µg/L and 0.08-0.19 µg/L, respectively. Good linearity of method was obtained for analytes with the correlation coefficients (R(2)) above 0.99. At the same time, satisfactory method repeatability and reproducibility was achieved in terms of intra- and inter-day precisions, respectively. Finally, the established SCSE-HPLC/DAD method was successfully applied for the determination of estrogens in different environmental water samples. Recoveries obtained for the determination of estrogens in spiked samples ranged from 71.2% to 108%, with RSDs below 10% in all cases.

  16. Visualizing a bosonic symmetry protected topological phase in an interacting fermion model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Han-Qing; He, Yuan-Yao; You, Yi-Zhuang; Yoshida, Tsuneya; Kawakami, Norio; Xu, Cenke; Meng, Zi Yang; Lu, Zhong-Yi

    2016-10-01

    Symmetry protected topological (SPT) phases in free fermion and interacting bosonic systems have been classified, but the physical phenomena of interacting fermionic SPT phases have not been fully explored. Here, employing large-scale quantum Monte Carlo simulation, we investigate the edge physics of a bilayer Kane-Mele-Hubbard model with zigzag ribbon geometry. Our unbiased numerical results show that the fermion edge modes are gapped out by interaction, while the bosonic edge modes remain gapless at the (1 +1 )d boundary, before the bulk quantum phase transition to a topologically trivial phase. Therefore, finite fermion gaps both in the bulk and on the edge, together with the robust gapless bosonic edge modes, prove that our system becomes an emergent bosonic SPT phase at low energy, which is directly observed in an interacting fermion lattice model.

  17. Phase Diagram of the Frustrated Square-Lattice Hubbard Model: Variational Cluster Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misumi, Kazuma; Kaneko, Tatsuya; Ohta, Yukinori

    2016-06-01

    The variational cluster approximation is used to study the frustrated Hubbard model at half filling defined on the two-dimensional square lattice with anisotropic next-nearest-neighbor hopping parameters. We calculate the ground-state phase diagrams of the model in a wide parameter space for a variety of lattice geometries, including square, crossed-square, and triangular lattices. We examine the Mott metal-insulator transition and show that, in the Mott insulating phase, magnetic phases with Néel, collinear, and spiral orders appear in relevant parameter regions, and in an intermediate region between these phases, a nonmagnetic insulating phase caused by the quantum fluctuations in the geometrically frustrated spin degrees of freedom emerges.

  18. Phase transitions in a Bose-Hubbard model with cavity-mediated global-range interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dogra, N.; Brennecke, F.; Huber, S. D.; Donner, T.

    2016-08-01

    We study a system with competing short- and global-range interactions in the framework of the Bose-Hubbard model. Using a mean-field approximation we obtain the phase diagram of the system and observe four different phases: a superfluid, a supersolid, a Mott insulator, and a charge-density wave, where the transitions between the various phases can be either of first or second order. We qualitatively support these results using Monte Carlo simulations. An analysis of the low-energy excitations shows that the second-order phase transition from the charge-density wave to the supersolid is associated with the softening of particle- and holelike excitations which give rise to a gapless mode and an amplitude Higgs mode in the supersolid phase. This amplitude Higgs mode is further transformed into a roton mode which softens at the supersolid to superfluid phase transition.

  19. A new two-phase erosion-deposition model for mass flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pudasaini, Shiva P.; Fischer, Jan-Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Erosion, entrainment and deposition are complex and dominant, but yet poorly understood, mechanical processes in geophysical mass flows. Here, we propose a novel, two-phase, erosion-deposition model capable of adequately describing these complex phenomena commonly observed in landslides, avalanches, debris flows and bedload transports. The model enhances an existing general two-phase mass flow model (Pudasaini, 2012) by introducing a two-phase variably saturated erodible basal morphology. The adaptive basal morphology allows for the evolution of erosion-deposition-depths, incorporating the inherent physical process and rheological changes of the flowing mixture. With rigorous derivation, we show that appropriate incorporation of the mass and momentum productions and losses in conservative model formulation is essential for the physically correct and mathematically consistent description of erosion-entrainment-deposition processes. Simulation indicates a sharp erosion-front and steady-state-rear erosion depth. The model appropriately captures the emergence and propagation of complex frontal surge dynamics associated with the frontal ambient-drag which is a new hypothesis associated with erosion. The novel enhanced real two-phase model also allows for simulating fluid-run-off during the deposition process. The model resembles laboratory experiments for particle-fluid mixture flows and reveals some major aspects of the mechanics associated with erosion, entrainment and deposition. Reference: Shiva P. Pudasaini (2012): A general two-phase debris flow model. J. Geophys. Res., 117, F03010, doi: 10.1029/2011JF002186.

  20. Dynamical phase transitions and Loschmidt echo in the infinite-range XY model.

    PubMed

    Žunkovič, Bojan; Silva, Alessandro; Fabrizio, Michele

    2016-06-13

    We compare two different notions of dynamical phase transitions in closed quantum systems. The first is identified through the time-averaged value of the equilibrium-order parameter, whereas the second corresponds to non-analyticities in the time behaviour of the Loschmidt echo. By exactly solving the dynamics of the infinite-range XY model, we show that in this model non-analyticities of the Loschmidt echo are not connected to standard dynamical phase transitions and are not robust against quantum fluctuations. Furthermore, we show that the existence of either of the two dynamical transitions is not necessarily connected to the equilibrium quantum phase transition.

  1. Model of photo-induced neutral-ionic phase transition in organic charge-transfer salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yartsev, V. M.

    1998-01-01

    One-dimensional donor-acceptor mixed chains are modeled by a periodic DADA tetramer. Electron coupling to intramolecular vibrations are taken into account explicitly. Generalized adiabatic potentials are calculated for the cases of regular and dimerized stacks which are characteristic, respectively, of quasi-neutral (N) and quasi-ionic (I) phases of a tetrathiafulvalene-chloranil compound. A sharp difference in life-times of photo-induced I-states in the N-phase and N-states in the I-phase is discussed within the periodic DADA tetramer model.

  2. Modelling study of magnetic and concentration phase transition in ultrathin antiferromagnetic films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonid, Afremov; Aleksandr, Petrov

    2014-03-01

    Using the method of the "average spin" a modelling study of magnetic and concentration phase transition in ultrathin antiferromagnetic of different crystalline structure has been carried out. It has been shown, that relative change of Neel temperature is subject to the power law with negative index which doesn't depend on the film's crystal kind. The calculation of the dependence of phase transition critical concentration in diluted magnetic material on the film thickness has been made out. The legitimacy of the use of the method developed for modelling of magnetic and concentration phase transition in different nanostructures is certified by accordance between the results of calculations and the experimental data.

  3. Robust phase sensitive inversion recovery imaging using a Markov random field model.

    PubMed

    Garach, Ravindra M; Ji, Jim X; Ying, Lei; Ma, Jingfei

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a novel method for phase sensitive inversion recovery (PSIR) imaging for improved T/sub 1/ contrast. This method models the phase of the complex magnetic resonance image using a statistical model based on Markov random fields. A computationally efficient optimization method is developed. Computer simulations and in-vivo brain imaging experiments show that the proposed method can produce PSIR images with enhanced T/sub 1/ contrast and it is robust against high levels of data noise even when rapid phase variations are presented.

  4. Dynamical phase transitions and Loschmidt echo in the infinite-range XY model.

    PubMed

    Žunkovič, Bojan; Silva, Alessandro; Fabrizio, Michele

    2016-06-13

    We compare two different notions of dynamical phase transitions in closed quantum systems. The first is identified through the time-averaged value of the equilibrium-order parameter, whereas the second corresponds to non-analyticities in the time behaviour of the Loschmidt echo. By exactly solving the dynamics of the infinite-range XY model, we show that in this model non-analyticities of the Loschmidt echo are not connected to standard dynamical phase transitions and are not robust against quantum fluctuations. Furthermore, we show that the existence of either of the two dynamical transitions is not necessarily connected to the equilibrium quantum phase transition. PMID:27140975

  5. 2014 Enhanced LAW Glass Property-Composition Models, Phase 2

    SciTech Connect

    Muller, Isabelle; Pegg, Ian L.; Joseph, Innocent; Gilbo, Konstantin

    2015-10-28

    This report describes the results of testing specified by the Enhanced LAW Glass Property-Composition Models, VSL-13T3050-1, Rev. 0 Test Plan. The work was performed in compliance with the quality assurance requirements specified in the Test Plan. Results required by the Test Plan are reported. The te4st results and this report have been reviewed for correctness, technical adequacy, completeness, and accuracy.

  6. Multi-Phase Modeling of Rainbird Water Injection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vu, Bruce T.; Moss, Nicholas; Sampson, Zoe

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the use of a Volume of Fluid (VOF) multiphase model to simulate the water injected from a rainbird nozzle used in the sound suppression system during launch. The simulations help determine the projectile motion for different water flow rates employed at the pad, as it is critical to know if water will splash on the first-stage rocket engine during liftoff.

  7. Flow interaction experiment. Volume 1: Aerothermal modeling, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nikjooy, M.; Mongia, H. C.; Sullivan, J. P.; Murthy, S. N. B.

    1993-01-01

    An experimental and computational study is reported for the flow of a turbulent jet discharging into a rectangular enclosure. The experimental configurations consisting of primary jets only, annular jets only, and a combination of annular and primary jets are investigated to provide a better understanding of the flow field in an annular combustor. A laser Doppler velocimeter is used to measure mean velocity and Reynolds stress components. Major features of the flow field include recirculation, primary and annular jet interaction, and high turbulence. A significant result from this study is the effect the primary jets have on the flow field. The primary jets are seen to create statistically larger recirculation zones and higher turbulence levels. In addition, a technique called marker nephelometry is used to provide mean concentration values in the model combustor. Computations are performed using three levels of turbulence closures, namely k-epsilon model, algebraic second moment (ASM), and differential second moment (DSM) closure. Two different numerical schemes are applied. One is the lower-order power-law differencing scheme (PLDS) and the other is the higher-order flux-spline differencing scheme (FSDS). A comparison is made of the performance of these schemes. The numerical results are compared with experimental data. For the cases considered in this study, the FSDS is more accurate than the PLDS. For a prescribed accuracy, the flux-spline scheme requires a far fewer number of grid points. Thus, it has the potential for providing a numerical error-free solution, especially for three-dimensional flows, without requiring an excessively fine grid. Although qualitatively good comparison with data was obtained, the deficiencies regarding the modeled dissipation rate (epsilon) equation, pressure-strain correlation model, and the inlet epsilon profile and other critical closure issues need to be resolved before one can achieve the degree of accuracy required to

  8. Flow interaction experiment. Volume 2: Aerothermal modeling, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nikjooy, M.; Mongia, H. C.; Sullivan, J. P.; Murthy, S. N. B.

    1993-01-01

    An experimental and computational study is reported for the flow of a turbulent jet discharging into a rectangular enclosure. The experimental configurations consisting of primary jets only, annular jets only, and a combination of annular and primary jets are investigated to provide a better understanding of the flow field in an annular combustor. A laser Doppler velocimeter is used to measure mean velocity and Reynolds stress components. Major features of the flow field include recirculation, primary and annular jet interaction, and high turbulence. A significant result from this study is the effect the primary jets have on the flow field. The primary jets are seen to create statistically larger recirculation zones and higher turbulence levels. In addition, a technique called marker nephelometry is used to provide mean concentration values in the model combustor. Computations are performed using three levels of turbulence closures, namely k-epsilon model, algebraic second moment (ASM), and differential second moment (DSM) closure. Two different numerical schemes are applied. One is the lower-order power-law differencing scheme (PLDS) and the other is the higher-order flux-spline differencing scheme (FSDS). A comparison is made of the performance of these schemes. The numerical results are compared with experimental data. For the cases considered in this study, the FSDS is more accurate than the PLDS. For a prescribed accuracy, the flux-spline scheme requires a far fewer number of grid points. Thus, it has the potential for providing a numerical error-free solution, especially for three-dimensional flows, without requiring an excessively fine grid. Although qualitatively good comparison with data was obtained, the deficiencies regarding the modeled dissipation rate (epsilon) equation, pressure-strain correlation model, and the inlet epsilon profile and other critical closure issues need to be resolved before one can achieve the degree of accuracy required to

  9. Detecting Gait Phases from RGB-D Images Based on Hidden Markov Model

    PubMed Central

    Heravi, Hamed; Ebrahimi, Afshin; Olyaee, Ehsan

    2016-01-01

    Gait contains important information about the status of the human body and physiological signs. In many medical applications, it is important to monitor and accurately analyze the gait of the patient. Since walking shows the reproducibility signs in several phases, separating these phases can be used for the gait analysis. In this study, a method based on image processing for extracting phases of human gait from RGB-Depth images is presented. The sequence of depth images from the front view has been processed to extract the lower body depth profile and distance features. Feature vector extracted from image is the same as observation vector of hidden Markov model, and the phases of gait are considered as hidden states of the model. After training the model using the images which are randomly selected as training samples, the phase estimation of gait becomes possible using the model. The results confirm the rate of 60–40% of two major phases of the gait and also the mid-stance phase is recognized with 85% precision. PMID:27563572

  10. Detecting Gait Phases from RGB-D Images Based on Hidden Markov Model.

    PubMed

    Heravi, Hamed; Ebrahimi, Afshin; Olyaee, Ehsan

    2016-01-01

    Gait contains important information about the status of the human body and physiological signs. In many medical applications, it is important to monitor and accurately analyze the gait of the patient. Since walking shows the reproducibility signs in several phases, separating these phases can be used for the gait analysis. In this study, a method based on image processing for extracting phases of human gait from RGB-Depth images is presented. The sequence of depth images from the front view has been processed to extract the lower body depth profile and distance features. Feature vector extracted from image is the same as observation vector of hidden Markov model, and the phases of gait are considered as hidden states of the model. After training the model using the images which are randomly selected as training samples, the phase estimation of gait becomes possible using the model. The results confirm the rate of 60-40% of two major phases of the gait and also the mid-stance phase is recognized with 85% precision.

  11. Detecting Gait Phases from RGB-D Images Based on Hidden Markov Model.

    PubMed

    Heravi, Hamed; Ebrahimi, Afshin; Olyaee, Ehsan

    2016-01-01

    Gait contains important information about the status of the human body and physiological signs. In many medical applications, it is important to monitor and accurately analyze the gait of the patient. Since walking shows the reproducibility signs in several phases, separating these phases can be used for the gait analysis. In this study, a method based on image processing for extracting phases of human gait from RGB-Depth images is presented. The sequence of depth images from the front view has been processed to extract the lower body depth profile and distance features. Feature vector extracted from image is the same as observation vector of hidden Markov model, and the phases of gait are considered as hidden states of the model. After training the model using the images which are randomly selected as training samples, the phase estimation of gait becomes possible using the model. The results confirm the rate of 60-40% of two major phases of the gait and also the mid-stance phase is recognized with 85% precision. PMID:27563572

  12. Thermodynamic modeling of oxide phases in the Fe-Mn-O system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Youn-Bae; Jung, In-Ho

    2016-11-01

    A critical evaluation and thermodynamic modeling for thermodynamic properties of all oxide phases and phase diagrams in the Fe-Mn-O system are presented. Optimized Gibbs energy parameters for the thermodynamic models of the oxide phases were obtained which reproduce all available and reliable experimental data within error limits from 298 K to above the liquidus temperatures at all compositions covering from known oxide phases, and oxygen partial pressure from metal saturation to 0.21 bar. The optimized thermodynamic properties and phase diagrams are believed to be the best estimates presently available. Two spinel phases (cubic and tetragonal) were modeled using Compound Energy Formalism (CEF) with the use of physically meaningful parameters. The present Fe-Mn spinel solutions can be integrated into a larger spinel solution database, which has been already developed. The database of the model parameters can be used along with a software for Gibbs energy minimization in order to calculate any type of phase diagram section and thermodynamic properties.

  13. Modeling the cure kinetics of crosslinking free radical polymerizations using the Avrami theory of phase transformation

    SciTech Connect

    Finnegan, G.R.; Shine, A.D.

    1995-12-01

    A model, based on Avrami`s theory of phase transformation, has been developed to describe the cure kinetics of crosslinking free radical polymerizations. The model assumes the growing polymer can be treated as a distinct phase and the nucleation rate is proportional to the initiation rate of the polymerization. The Avrami time exponent was verified to be 4.0. This physically-based, two-parameter model fits vinyl ester resin heat flow data as well as the empirical, four-parameter autocatalytic model, and is capable of describing both neat and fiber-containing resin.

  14. Analytical solution for two-phase flow in a wellbore using the drift-flux model

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, L.; Webb, S.W.; Oldenburg, C.M.

    2011-11-01

    This paper presents analytical solutions for steady-state, compressible two-phase flow through a wellbore under isothermal conditions using the drift flux conceptual model. Although only applicable to highly idealized systems, the analytical solutions are useful for verifying numerical simulation capabilities that can handle much more complicated systems, and can be used in their own right for gaining insight about two-phase flow processes in wells. The analytical solutions are obtained by solving the mixture momentum equation of steady-state, two-phase flow with an assumption that the two phases are immiscible. These analytical solutions describe the steady-state behavior of two-phase flow in the wellbore, including profiles of phase saturation, phase velocities, and pressure gradients, as affected by the total mass flow rate, phase mass fraction, and drift velocity (i.e., the slip between two phases). Close matching between the analytical solutions and numerical solutions for a hypothetical CO{sub 2} leakage problem as well as to field data from a CO{sub 2} production well indicates that the analytical solution is capable of capturing the major features of steady-state two-phase flow through an open wellbore, and that the related assumptions and simplifications are justified for many actual systems. In addition, we demonstrate the utility of the analytical solution to evaluate how the bottomhole pressure in a well in which CO{sub 2} is leaking upward responds to the mass flow rate of CO{sub 2}-water mixture.

  15. The radial growth phase of malignant melanoma: multi-phase modelling, numerical simulations and linear stability analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ciarletta, P.; Foret, L.; Ben Amar, M.

    2011-01-01

    Cutaneous melanoma is disproportionately lethal despite its relatively low incidence and its potential for cure in the early stages. The aim of this study is to foster understanding of the role of microstructure on the occurrence of morphological changes in diseased skin during melanoma evolution. The authors propose a biomechanical analysis of its radial growth phase, investigating the role of intercellular/stromal connections on the initial stages of epidermis invasion. The radial growth phase of a primary melanoma is modelled within the multi-phase theory of mixtures, reproducing the mechanical behaviour of the skin layers and of the epidermal–dermal junction. The theoretical analysis takes into account those cellular processes that have been experimentally observed to disrupt homeostasis in normal epidermis. Numerical simulations demonstrate that the loss of adhesiveness of the melanoma cells both to the basal laminae, caused by deregulation mechanisms of adherent junctions, and to adjacent keratynocytes, consequent to a downregulation of E-cadherin, are the fundamental biomechanical features for promoting tumour initiation. Finally, the authors provide the mathematical proof of a long wavelength instability of the tumour front during the early stages of melanoma invasion. These results open the perspective to correlate the early morphology of a growing melanoma with the biomechanical characteristics of its micro-environment. PMID:20656740

  16. Parallel phase model : a programming model for high-end parallel machines with manycores.

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Junfeng; Wen, Zhaofang; Heroux, Michael Allen; Brightwell, Ronald Brian

    2009-04-01

    This paper presents a parallel programming model, Parallel Phase Model (PPM), for next-generation high-end parallel machines based on a distributed memory architecture consisting of a networked cluster of nodes with a large number of cores on each node. PPM has a unified high-level programming abstraction that facilitates the design and implementation of parallel algorithms to exploit both the parallelism of the many cores and the parallelism at the cluster level. The programming abstraction will be suitable for expressing both fine-grained and coarse-grained parallelism. It includes a few high-level parallel programming language constructs that can be added as an extension to an existing (sequential or parallel) programming language such as C; and the implementation of PPM also includes a light-weight runtime library that runs on top of an existing network communication software layer (e.g. MPI). Design philosophy of PPM and details of the programming abstraction are also presented. Several unstructured applications that inherently require high-volume random fine-grained data accesses have been implemented in PPM with very promising results.

  17. Use of experimental design in the investigation of stir bar sorptive extraction followed by ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry for the analysis of explosives in water samples.

    PubMed

    Schramm, Sébastien; Vailhen, Dominique; Bridoux, Maxime Cyril

    2016-02-12

    A method for the sensitive quantification of trace amounts of organic explosives in water samples was developed by using stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE) followed by liquid desorption and ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS). The proposed method was developed and optimized using a statistical design of experiment approach. Use of experimental designs allowed a complete study of 10 factors and 8 analytes including nitro-aromatics, amino-nitro-aromatics and nitric esters. The liquid desorption study was performed using a full factorial experimental design followed by a kinetic study. Four different variables were tested here: the liquid desorption mode (stirring or sonication), the chemical nature of the stir bar (PDMS or PDMS-PEG), the composition of the liquid desorption phase and finally, the volume of solvent used for the liquid desorption. On the other hand, the SBSE extraction study was performed using a Doehlert design. SBSE extraction conditions such as extraction time profiles, sample volume, modifier addition, and acetic acid addition were examined. After optimization of the experimental parameters, sensitivity was improved by a factor 5-30, depending on the compound studied, due to the enrichment factors reached using the SBSE method. Limits of detection were in the ng/L level for all analytes studied. Reproducibility of the extraction with different stir bars was close to the reproducibility of the analytical method (RSD between 4 and 16%). Extractions in various water sample matrices (spring, mineral and underground water) have shown similar enrichment compared to ultrapure water, revealing very low matrix effects.

  18. Use of experimental design in the investigation of stir bar sorptive extraction followed by ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry for the analysis of explosives in water samples.

    PubMed

    Schramm, Sébastien; Vailhen, Dominique; Bridoux, Maxime Cyril

    2016-02-12

    A method for the sensitive quantification of trace amounts of organic explosives in water samples was developed by using stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE) followed by liquid desorption and ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS). The proposed method was developed and optimized using a statistical design of experiment approach. Use of experimental designs allowed a complete study of 10 factors and 8 analytes including nitro-aromatics, amino-nitro-aromatics and nitric esters. The liquid desorption study was performed using a full factorial experimental design followed by a kinetic study. Four different variables were tested here: the liquid desorption mode (stirring or sonication), the chemical nature of the stir bar (PDMS or PDMS-PEG), the composition of the liquid desorption phase and finally, the volume of solvent used for the liquid desorption. On the other hand, the SBSE extraction study was performed using a Doehlert design. SBSE extraction conditions such as extraction time profiles, sample volume, modifier addition, and acetic acid addition were examined. After optimization of the experimental parameters, sensitivity was improved by a factor 5-30, depending on the compound studied, due to the enrichment factors reached using the SBSE method. Limits of detection were in the ng/L level for all analytes studied. Reproducibility of the extraction with different stir bars was close to the reproducibility of the analytical method (RSD between 4 and 16%). Extractions in various water sample matrices (spring, mineral and underground water) have shown similar enrichment compared to ultrapure water, revealing very low matrix effects. PMID:26777783

  19. A two-phase mechanical model for rock-ice avalanches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pudasaini, Shiva P.; Krautblatter, Michael

    2014-10-01

    Rock-ice avalanche events are among the most hazardous natural disasters in the last century. In contrast to rock avalanches, the solid phase (ice) can transform to fluid during the course of the rock-ice avalanche and fundamentally alter mechanical processes. A real two-phase debris flow model could better address the dynamic interaction of solid (rock and ice) and fluid (water, snow, slurry, and fine particles) than presently used single-phase Voellmy- or Coulomb-type models. We present a two-phase model capable of performing dynamic strength weakening due to internal fluidization and basal lubrication and internal mass and momentum exchanges between the phases. Effective basal and internal friction angles are variable and correspond to evolving effective solid volume fraction, friction factors, volume fraction of the ice, true friction coefficients, and lubrication and fluidization factors. Benchmark numerical simulations demonstrate that the two-phase model can explain dynamically changing frictional properties of rock-ice avalanches that occur internally and along the flow path. The interphase mass and momentum exchanges are capable of demonstrating the mechanics of frontal surge head and multiple other surges in the debris body. This is an observed phenomenon in a real two-phase debris flow, but newly simulated here by applying the two-phase mass flow model. Mass and momentum exchanges between the phases and the associated internal and basal strength weakening control the exceptional long runout distances, provide a more realistic simulation especially during the critical initial and propagation stages of avalanche, and explain the exceptionally high and dynamically changing mobility of rock-ice avalanches.

  20. Two-phase viscous modeling of compaction of granular materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powers, Joseph M.

    2004-08-01

    An inviscid model for deflagration-to-detonation transition in granular energetic materials is extended by addition of explicit intraphase momenta and energy diffusion so as to (1) enable the use of a straightforward numerical scheme, (2) avoid prediction of structures with smaller length scales than the component grains, and (3) have a model prepared to describe long time scale transients that are present in some slow processes which can lead to detonation. The model is shown to be parabolic, frame invariant, and dissipative. Consideration of the characteristics for cases with and without intraphase diffusion indicate what boundary conditions are necessary for a well posed problem. A simple numerical method, based on a method of lines applied to the nonconservative form of the equations, is shown to predict convergence at the proper rate to unique solutions which agree well with known solutions for an unsteady inviscid shock tube and a steady piston-driven viscous shock. A series of simulations of inert piston-driven subsonic compaction waves in which the additional mechanisms of interphase compaction, drag, and heat transfer are systematically introduced at an order of magnitude suggested by experiments reveals that interphase drag and heat transfer equilibrate velocities and temperatures, and that compaction equilibrates solid and configurational stresses. At higher piston velocities, supersonic shock and compaction waves are induced; comparison of predictions with and without viscosity demonstrate some of the computational advantages of explicit inclusion of diffusion. The local dissipation rates for each mechanism are quantified, and it is seen that dissipation due to compaction dominates that due to intraphase and interphase transport of linear momenta and energy, suggesting that compaction is the key mechanism in inducing the transition to detonation in piston-driven experiments.