Science.gov

Sample records for model space generation

  1. Structural Modeling of the Next Generation Space Telescope's Primary Mirror

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boulet, J. A. M.

    1998-01-01

    In recent years, astronomical observations made with space telescopes have dramatically increased our understanding of the history of the universe. In particular, the cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) and the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) have yielded observations that cannot be achieved at ground-based observatories. We now have views of the universe before galaxies existed (from COBE) and views of young galaxies (from HST). But none of the existing observatories can provide views of the period in which the galaxies were born, about 100 million to one billion years after the "big bang". NASA expects the Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST) to fill this gap. An investigation into the structural modeling of the primary mirror of the NGST, its methodology and results are presented.

  2. LISP based simulation generators for modeling complex space processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tseng, Fan T.; Schroer, Bernard J.; Dwan, Wen-Shing

    1987-01-01

    The development of a simulation assistant for modeling discrete event processes is presented. Included are an overview of the system, a description of the simulation generators, and a sample process generated using the simulation assistant.

  3. Marshall Space Flight Center surface modeling and grid generation applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Robert W.; Benjamin, Theodore G.; Cornelison, Joni W.

    1995-03-01

    The Solid Rocket Motors (SRM) used by NASA to propel the Space Shuttle employ gimballing nozzles as a means for vehicular guidance during launch and ascent. Gimballing a nozzle renders the pressure field of the exhaust gases nonaxisymmetric. This has two effects: (1) it exerts a torque and side load on the nozzle; and (2) the exhaust gases flow circumferentially in the aft-dome region, thermally loading the flexible boot, case-to-nozzle joint, and casing insulation. The use of CFD models to simulate such flows is imperative in order to assess SRM design. The grids for these problems were constructed by obtaining information from drawings and tabulated coordinates. The 2D axisymmetric grids were designed and generated using the EZ-Surf and GEN2D surface and grid generation codes. These 2D grids were solved using codes such as FDNS, GASP, and MINT. These axisymmetric grids were rotated around the center-line to form 3D nongimballed grids. These were then gimballed around the pivot point and the gaps or overlaps resurfaced to obtain the final domains, which contained approximately 366,000 grid points. The 2D solutions were then rotated and manipulated as appropriate for geometry and used as initial guesses in the final solution. The analyses were used in answering questions about flight criteria.

  4. Marshall Space Flight Center surface modeling and grid generation applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Robert W.; Benjamin, Theodore G.; Cornelison, Joni W.

    1995-01-01

    The Solid Rocket Motors (SRM) used by NASA to propel the Space Shuttle employ gimballing nozzles as a means for vehicular guidance during launch and ascent. Gimballing a nozzle renders the pressure field of the exhaust gases nonaxisymmetric. This has two effects: (1) it exerts a torque and side load on the nozzle; and (2) the exhaust gases flow circumferentially in the aft-dome region, thermally loading the flexible boot, case-to-nozzle joint, and casing insulation. The use of CFD models to simulate such flows is imperative in order to assess SRM design. The grids for these problems were constructed by obtaining information from drawings and tabulated coordinates. The 2D axisymmetric grids were designed and generated using the EZ-Surf and GEN2D surface and grid generation codes. These 2D grids were solved using codes such as FDNS, GASP, and MINT. These axisymmetric grids were rotated around the center-line to form 3D nongimballed grids. These were then gimballed around the pivot point and the gaps or overlaps resurfaced to obtain the final domains, which contained approximately 366,000 grid points. The 2D solutions were then rotated and manipulated as appropriate for geometry and used as initial guesses in the final solution. The analyses were used in answering questions about flight criteria.

  5. Satellite Stereo Based Digital Surface Model Generation Using Semi Global Matching in Object and Image Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghuffar, S.

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents methodology and evaluation of Digital Surface Models (DSM) generated from satellite stereo imagery using Semi Global Matching (SGM) applied in image space and georeferenced voxel space. SGM is a well known algorithm, used widely for DSM generation from airborne and satellite imagery. SGM is typically applied in the image space to compute disparity map corresponding to a stereo image pair. As a different approach, SGM can be applied directly to the georeferenced voxel space similar to the approach of volumetric multi-view reconstruction techniques. The matching in voxel space simplifies the DSM generation pipeline because the stereo rectification and triangulation steps are not required. For a comparison, the complete pipeline for generation of DSM from satellite pushbroom sensors is also presented. The results on the ISPRS satellite stereo benchmark using Worldview stereo imagery of 0.5m resolution shows that the SGM applied in image space produce slightly better results than its object space counterpart. Furthermore, a qualitative analysis of the results on Worldview-3 stereo and Pleiades tri-stereo images are presented.

  6. Next generation space robot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iwata, Tsutomu; Oda, Mitsushige; Imai, Ryoichi

    1989-01-01

    The recent research effort on the next generation space robots is presented. The goals of this research are to develop the fundamental technologies and to acquire the design parameters of the next generation space robot. Visual sensing and perception, dexterous manipulation, man machine interface and artificial intelligence techniques such as task planning are identified as the key technologies.

  7. Distributed state-space generation of discrete-state stochastic models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ciardo, Gianfranco; Gluckman, Joshua; Nicol, David

    1995-01-01

    High-level formalisms such as stochastic Petri nets can be used to model complex systems. Analysis of logical and numerical properties of these models of ten requires the generation and storage of the entire underlying state space. This imposes practical limitations on the types of systems which can be modeled. Because of the vast amount of memory consumed, we investigate distributed algorithms for the generation of state space graphs. The distributed construction allows us to take advantage of the combined memory readily available on a network of workstations. The key technical problem is to find effective methods for on-the-fly partitioning, so that the state space is evenly distributed among processors. In this paper we report on the implementation of a distributed state-space generator that may be linked to a number of existing system modeling tools. We discuss partitioning strategies in the context of Petri net models, and report on performance observed on a network of workstations, as well as on a distributed memory multi-computer.

  8. The NASA Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC) Next Generation Space Weather Data Warehouse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maddox, M. M.; Kuznetsova, M. M.; Pulkkinen, A. A.; Zheng, Y.; Rastaetter, L.; Chulaki, A.; Pembroke, A. D.; Wiegand, C.; Mullinix, R.; Boblitt, J.; Mendoza, A. M. M.; Swindell, M. J., IV; Bakshi, S. S.; Mays, M. L.; Shim, J. S.; Hesse, M.; Collado-Vega, Y. M.; Taktakishvili, A.; MacNeice, P. J.

    2014-12-01

    The Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC) at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables, supports, and performs research and development for next generation space science and space weather models. The CCMC currently hosts a large and expanding collection of state-or-the-art, physics-based space weather models that have been developed by the international research community. There are many tools and services provided by the CCMC that are currently available world-wide, along with the ongoing development of new innovative systems and software for research, discovery, validation, visualization, and forecasting. Over the history of the CCMC's existence, there has been one constant engineering challenge - describing, managing, and disseminating data. To address the challenges that accompany an ever-expanding number of models to support, along with a growing catalog of simulation output - the CCMC is currently developing a flexible and extensible space weather data warehouse to support both internal and external systems and applications. This paper intends to chronicle the evolution and future of the CCMC's data infrastructure, and the current infrastructure re-engineering activities that seek to leverage existing community data model standards like SPASE and the IMPEx Simulation Data Model.

  9. Next Generation Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mather, John; Stockman, H. S.; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST), planned for launch in 2009, will be an 8-m class radiatively cooled infrared telescope at the Lagrange point L2. It will cover the wavelength range from 0.6 to 28 microns with cameras and spectrometers, to observe the first luminous objects after the Big Bang, and the formation, growth, clustering, and evolution of galaxies, stars, and protoplanetary clouds, leading to better understanding of our own Origins. It will seek evidence of the cosmic dark matter through its gravitational effects. With an aperture three times greater than the Hubble Space Telescope, it will provide extraordinary advances in capabilities and enable the discovery of many new phenomena. It is a joint project of the NASA, ESA, and CSA, and scientific operations will be provided by the Space Telescope Science Institute.

  10. Trajectory generation of space telerobots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lumia, R.; Wavering, A. J.

    1989-01-01

    The purpose is to review a variety of trajectory generation techniques which may be applied to space telerobots and to identify problems which need to be addressed in future telerobot motion control systems. As a starting point for the development of motion generation systems for space telerobots, the operation and limitations of traditional path-oriented trajectory generation approaches are discussed. This discussion leads to a description of more advanced techniques which have been demonstrated in research laboratories, and their potential applicability to space telerobots. Examples of this work include systems that incorporate sensory-interactive motion capability and optimal motion planning. Additional considerations which need to be addressed for motion control of a space telerobot are described, such as redundancy resolution and the description and generation of constrained and multi-armed cooperative motions. A task decomposition module for a hierarchical telerobot control system which will serve as a testbed for trajectory generation approaches which address these issues is also discussed briefly.

  11. Animated computer graphics models of space and earth sciences data generated via the massively parallel processor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Treinish, Lloyd A.; Gough, Michael L.; Wildenhain, W. David

    1987-01-01

    The capability was developed of rapidly producing visual representations of large, complex, multi-dimensional space and earth sciences data sets via the implementation of computer graphics modeling techniques on the Massively Parallel Processor (MPP) by employing techniques recently developed for typically non-scientific applications. Such capabilities can provide a new and valuable tool for the understanding of complex scientific data, and a new application of parallel computing via the MPP. A prototype system with such capabilities was developed and integrated into the National Space Science Data Center's (NSSDC) Pilot Climate Data System (PCDS) data-independent environment for computer graphics data display to provide easy access to users. While developing these capabilities, several problems had to be solved independently of the actual use of the MPP, all of which are outlined.

  12. Computational modeling of Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTG) for interplanetary and deep space travel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nejat, Cyrus; Nejat, Narsis; Nejat, Najmeh

    2014-06-01

    This research project is part of Narsis Nejat Master of Science thesis project that it is done at Shiraz University. The goals of this research are to make a computer model to evaluate the thermal power, electrical power, amount of emitted/absorbed dose, and amount of emitted/absorbed dose rate for static Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTG)s that is include a comprehensive study of the types of RTG systems and in particular RTG’s fuel resulting from both natural and artificial isotopes, calculation of the permissible dose radioisotope selected from the above, and conceptual design modeling and comparison between several NASA made RTGs with the project computer model pointing out the strong and weakness points for using this model in nuclear industries for simulation. The heat is being converted to electricity by two major methods in RTGs: static conversion and dynamic conversion. The model that is created for this project is for RTGs that heat is being converted to electricity statically. The model approximates good results as being compared with SNAP-3, SNAP-19, MHW, and GPHS RTGs in terms of electrical power, efficiency, specific power, and types of the mission and amount of fuel mass that is required to accomplish the mission.

  13. Recursive Generation of Space-Times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marks, Dennis

    2015-04-01

    Space-times can be generated recursively from a time-like unit basis vector T and a space-like one S. T is unique up to sign, corresponding to particles and antiparticles. S has the form of qubits. Qubits can make quantum transitions, suggesting spontaneous generation of space-time. Recursive generation leads from 2 dimensions to 4, with grades of the resulting algebra corresponding to space-time, spin-area, momentum-energy, and action. Dimensions can be open (like space-time) or closed. A closed time-like dimension has the symmetry of electromagnetism; 3 closed space-like dimensions have the symmetry of the weak force. The 4 open dimensions and the 4 closed dimensions produce an 8-dimensional space with a symmetry that is the product of the Yang regularization of the Heisenberg-Poincaré group and the GUT regularization of the Standard Model. After 8 dimensions, the pattern of real geometric algebras repeats itself, producing a recursive lattice of spontaneously expanding space-time with the physics of the Standard Model at each point of the lattice, implying conservation laws by Noether's theorem. The laws of nature are not preexistent; rather, they are consequences of the uniformity of space-time. The uniformity of space-time is a consequence of its recursive generation.

  14. Quantifying the VNIR Effects of Nanophase Iron Generated through the Space Weathering of Silicates: Reconciling Modeled Data with Laboratory Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legett, C., IV; Glotch, T. D.; Lucey, P. G.

    2015-12-01

    Space weathering is a diverse set of processes that occur on the surfaces of airless bodies due to exposure to the space environment. One of the effects of space weathering is the generation of nanophase iron particles in glassy rims on mineral grains due to sputtering of iron-bearing minerals. These particles have a size-dependent effect on visible and near infrared (VNIR) reflectance spectra with smaller diameter particles (< 50 nm) causing both reddening and darkening of the spectra with respect to unweathered material (Britt-Pieters particle behavior), while larger particles (> 300 nm) darken without reddening. Between these two sizes, a gradual shift between these two behaviors occurs. In this work, we present results from the Multiple Sphere T-Matrix (MSTM) scattering model in combination with Hapke theory to explore the particle size and iron content parameter spaces with respect to VNIR (700-1700 nm) spectral slope. Previous work has shown that the MSTM-Hapke hybrid model offers improvements over Mie-Hapke models. Virtual particles are constructed out of an arbitrary number of spheres, and each sphere is assigned a refractive index and extinction coefficient for each wavelength of interest. The model then directly solves Maxwell's Equations at every wave-particle interface to predict the scattering, extinction and absorption efficiencies. These are then put into a simplified Hapke bidirectional reflectance model that yields a predicted reflectance. Preliminary results show an area of maximum slopes for iron particle diameters < 80 nm and iron concentrations of ~1-10wt% in an amorphous silica matrix. Further model runs are planned to better refine the extent of this region. Companion laboratory work using mixtures of powdered aerogel and nanophase iron particles provides a point of comparison to modeling efforts. The effects on reflectance and emissivity values due to particle size in a nearly ideal scatterer (aerogel) are also observed with comparisons to

  15. An algorithm to generate input data from meteorological and space shuttle observations to validate a CH4-CO model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, L. K.; Yamanis, J.

    1981-01-01

    Objective procedures to analyze data from meteorological and space shuttle observations to validate a three dimensional model were investigated. The transport and chemistry of carbon monoxide and methane in the troposphere were studied. Four aspects were examined: (1) detailed evaluation of the variational calculus procedure, with the equation of continuity as a strong constraint, for adjustment of global tropospheric wind fields; (2) reduction of the National Meteorological Center (NMC) data tapes for data input to the OSTA-1/MAPS Experiment; (3) interpolation of the NMC Data for input to the CH4-CO model; and (4) temporal and spatial interpolation procedures of the CO measurements from the OSTA-1/MAPS Experiment to generate usable contours of the data.

  16. Modeling Electrostatic Fields Generated by Internal Charging of Materials in Space Radiation Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minow, Joseph I.

    2011-01-01

    Internal charging is a risk to spacecraft in energetic electron environments. DICTAT, NU MIT computational codes are the most widely used engineering tools for evaluating internal charging of insulator materials exposed to these environments. Engineering tools are designed for rapid evaluation of ESD threats, but there is a need for more physics based models for investigating the science of materials interactions with energetic electron environments. Current tools are limited by the physics included in the models and ease of user implementation .... additional development work is needed to improve models.

  17. The Next Generation Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bely, Pierre-Yves (Editor); Burrows,, Christopher J. (Editor); Illingworth,, Garth D.

    1989-01-01

    In Space Science in the Twenty-First Century, the Space Science Board of the National Research Council identified high-resolution-interferometry and high-throughput instruments as the imperative new initiatives for NASA in astronomy for the two decades spanning 1995 to 2015. In the optical range, the study recommended an 8 to 16-meter space telescope, destined to be the successor of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), and to complement the ground-based 8 to 10-meter-class telescopes presently under construction. It might seem too early to start planning for a successor to HST. In fact, we are late. The lead time for such major missions is typically 25 years, and HST has been in the making even longer with its inception dating back to the early 1960s. The maturity of space technology and a more substantial technological base may lead to a shorter time scale for the development of the Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST). Optimistically, one could therefore anticipate that NGST be flown as early as 2010. On the other hand, the planned lifetime of HST is 15 years. So, even under the best circumstances, there will be a five year gap between the end of HST and the start of NGST. The purpose of this first workshop dedicated to NGST was to survey its scientific potential and technical challenges. The three-day meeting brought together 130 astronomers and engineers from government, industry and universities. Participants explored the technologies needed for building and operating the observatory, reviewed the current status and future prospects for astronomical instrumentation, and discussed the launch and space support capabilities likely to be available in the next decade. To focus discussion, the invited speakers were asked to base their presentations on two nominal concepts, a 10-meter telescope in space in high earth orbit, and a 16-meter telescope on the moon. The workshop closed with a panel discussion focused mainly on the scientific case, siting, and the

  18. New generation of space TWTAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, G. C.; Sosa, E. N.

    1992-03-01

    A new generation of space qualified traveling wave tube amplifiers has been developed and is ready for system application. This new generation of hardware satisfies the system designer's desire for higher efficiency, lighter weight and smaller size hardware at no degradation of life, reliability and performance. Recent developments in TWTA technology is available for both regulated and unregulated bus spacecraft. EPC efficiencies in excess of 95 percent and TWT efficiencies above 60 percent are a reality. Weight reductions are achieved with new packaging techniques. Additionally, single (one TWT/one EPC) and dual (two TWT's/one EPC) TWTA trade-offs are discussed for system consideration. Finally, currently available options such as linearization and automatic restart capability are presented.

  19. Integrated modeling environment for systems-level performance analysis of the Next-Generation Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosier, Gary E.; Femiano, Michael; Ha, Kong; Bely, Pierre Y.; Burg, Richard; Redding, David C.; Kissil, Andrew; Rakoczy, John; Craig, Larry

    1998-08-01

    All current concepts for the NGST are innovative designs which present unique systems-level challenges. The goals are to outperform existing observatories at a fraction of the current price/performance ratio. Standard practices for developing systems error budgets, such as the 'root-sum-of- squares' error tree, are insufficient for designs of this complexity. Simulation and optimization are the tools needed for this project; in particular tools that integrate controls, optics, thermal and structural analysis, and design optimization. This paper describes such an environment which allows sub-system performance specifications to be analyzed parametrically, and includes optimizing metrics that capture the science requirements. The resulting systems-level design trades are greatly facilitated, and significant cost savings can be realized. This modeling environment, built around a tightly integrated combination of commercial off-the-shelf and in-house- developed codes, provides the foundation for linear and non- linear analysis on both the time and frequency-domains, statistical analysis, and design optimization. It features an interactive user interface and integrated graphics that allow highly-effective, real-time work to be done by multidisciplinary design teams. For the NGST, it has been applied to issues such as pointing control, dynamic isolation of spacecraft disturbances, wavefront sensing and control, on-orbit thermal stability of the optics, and development of systems-level error budgets. In this paper, results are presented from parametric trade studies that assess requirements for pointing control, structural dynamics, reaction wheel dynamic disturbances, and vibration isolation. These studies attempt to define requirements bounds such that the resulting design is optimized at the systems level, without attempting to optimize each subsystem individually. The performance metrics are defined in terms of image quality, specifically centroiding error and RMS

  20. Using SpaceClaimTD Direct for Modeling Components with Complex Geometries for the Thermal Desktop-Based Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fabanich, William A., Jr.

    2014-01-01

    SpaceClaim/TD Direct has been used extensively in the development of the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) thermal model. This paper outlines the workflow for that aspect of the task and includes proposed best practices and lessons learned. The ASRG thermal model was developed to predict component temperatures and power output and to provide insight into the prime contractor's thermal modeling efforts. The insulation blocks, heat collectors, and cold side adapter flanges (CSAFs) were modeled with this approach. The model was constructed using mostly TD finite difference (FD) surfaces/solids. However, some complex geometry could not be reproduced with TD primitives while maintaining the desired degree of geometric fidelity. Using SpaceClaim permitted the import of original CAD files and enabled the defeaturing/repair of those geometries. TD Direct (a SpaceClaim add-on from CRTech) adds features that allowed the "mark-up" of that geometry. These so-called "mark-ups" control how finite element (FE) meshes are to be generated through the "tagging" of features (e.g. edges, solids, surfaces). These tags represent parameters that include: submodels, material properties, material orienters, optical properties, and radiation analysis groups. TD aliases were used for most tags to allow analysis to be performed with a variety of parameter values. "Domain-tags" were also attached to individual and groups of surfaces and solids to allow them to be used later within TD to populate objects like, for example, heaters and contactors. These tools allow the user to make changes to the geometry in SpaceClaim and then easily synchronize the mesh in TD without having to redefine the objects each time as one would if using TDMesher. The use of SpaceClaim/TD Direct helps simplify the process for importing existing geometries and in the creation of high fidelity FE meshes to represent complex parts. It also saves time and effort in the subsequent analysis.

  1. Using SpaceClaim/TD Direct for Modeling Components with Complex Geometries for the Thermal Desktop-Based Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fabanich, William

    2014-01-01

    SpaceClaim/TD Direct has been used extensively in the development of the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) thermal model. This paper outlines the workflow for that aspect of the task and includes proposed best practices and lessons learned. The ASRG thermal model was developed to predict component temperatures and power output and to provide insight into the prime contractors thermal modeling efforts. The insulation blocks, heat collectors, and cold side adapter flanges (CSAFs) were modeled with this approach. The model was constructed using mostly TD finite difference (FD) surfaces solids. However, some complex geometry could not be reproduced with TD primitives while maintaining the desired degree of geometric fidelity. Using SpaceClaim permitted the import of original CAD files and enabled the defeaturing repair of those geometries. TD Direct (a SpaceClaim add-on from CRTech) adds features that allowed the mark-up of that geometry. These so-called mark-ups control how finite element (FE) meshes were generated and allowed the tagging of features (e.g. edges, solids, surfaces). These tags represent parameters that include: submodels, material properties, material orienters, optical properties, and radiation analysis groups. TD aliases were used for most tags to allow analysis to be performed with a variety of parameter values. Domain-tags were also attached to individual and groups of surfaces and solids to allow them to be used later within TD to populate objects like, for example, heaters and contactors. These tools allow the user to make changes to the geometry in SpaceClaim and then easily synchronize the mesh in TD without having to redefine these objects each time as one would if using TD Mesher.The use of SpaceClaim/TD Direct has helped simplify the process for importing existing geometries and in the creation of high fidelity FE meshes to represent complex parts. It has also saved time and effort in the subsequent analysis.

  2. Modeling and space vector control of a novel multilevel matrix converter for variable-speed wind power generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Naseem, Osama Abdulrahman

    -quadrant switches used in a conventional matrix converter. This increase in power handling capability is due to the doubling of the number of devices in a multilevel matrix converter switch cell. Scaling up the power handling capability is accomplished by cascading more than one switch cell per branch. Control of the new converter is achieved through space vector modulation in which three-phase ac voltages are transformed to the d-q reference frame and compared with a set of space vectors prior to modulation. Since it has 19683 different switching combinations, control can be difficult and complex. Nevertheless, the multilevel matrix converter has been modeled and controlled through simulation. Simulation results show the possibility of operating the converter to produce the desired voltage waveforms with universal input and output power factors and maintain constant capacitor voltages simultaneously. Also in this dissertation is the derivation of an analytical averaged equivalent circuit model of a PWM converter. This model reveals how dominant loss mechanisms vary with converter operating point. The model is based on the operational characteristics of power diodes and IGBTs. Laboratory experiments support the derived model and confirm that IGBT current tailing and diode reverse-recovery are indeed the most critical losses in a PWM converter. These losses are more significant at light load, hence reducing the energy capture capability of converters used in wind generation. The results suggest that multilevel conversion, which has been employed in the novel multilevel matrix converter, could improve the low-wind converter efficiency.

  3. Johnson Space Center CFD grid generation requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Fred

    1993-01-01

    Topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: heavy lift launch vehicles, space shuttles, space transportation system, grid generation, computational fluid dynamics, space station, and flow distribution.

  4. Next Generation NASA Initiative for Space Geodesy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merkowitz, S. M.; Desai, S.; Gross, R. S.; Hilliard, L.; Lemoine, F. G.; Long, J. L.; Ma, C.; McGarry J. F.; Murphy, D.; Noll, C. E.; hide

    2012-01-01

    Space geodesy measurement requirements have become more and more stringent as our understanding of the physical processes and our modeling techniques have improved. In addition, current and future spacecraft will have ever-increasing measurement capability and will lead to increasingly sophisticated models of changes in the Earth system. Ground-based space geodesy networks with enhanced measurement capability will be essential to meeting these oncoming requirements and properly interpreting the sate1!ite data. These networks must be globally distributed and built for longevity, to provide the robust data necessary to generate improved models for proper interpretation ofthe observed geophysical signals. These requirements have been articulated by the Global Geodetic Observing System (GGOS). The NASA Space Geodesy Project (SGP) is developing a prototype core site as the basis for a next generation Space Geodetic Network (SGN) that would be NASA's contribution to a global network designed to produce the higher quality data required to maintain the Terrestrial Reference Frame and provide information essential for fully realizing the measurement potential of the current and coming generation of Earth Observing spacecraft. Each of the sites in the SGN would include co-located, state of-the-art systems from all four space geodetic observing techniques (GNSS, SLR, VLBI, and DORIS). The prototype core site is being developed at NASA's Geophysical and Astronomical Observatory at Goddard Space Flight Center. The project commenced in 2011 and is scheduled for completion in late 2013. In January 2012, two multiconstellation GNSS receivers, GODS and GODN, were established at the prototype site as part of the local geodetic network. Development and testing are also underway on the next generation SLR and VLBI systems along with a modern DORIS station. An automated survey system is being developed to measure inter-technique vector ties, and network design studies are being

  5. NASA's Next Generation Space Geodesy Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearlman, M. R.; Frey, H. V.; Gross, R. S.; Lemoine, F. G.; Long, J. L.; Ma, C.; McGarry J. F.; Merkowitz, S. M.; Noll, C. E.; Pavilis, E. C.; Stowers, D. A.; Webb, F. H.; Zagwodski, T. W.

    2012-01-01

    Requirements for the ITRF have increased dramatically since the 1980s. The most stringent requirement comes from critical sea level monitoring programs: a global accuracy of 1.0 mm, and 0.1mm/yr stability, a factor of 10 to 20 beyond current capability. Other requirements for the ITRF coming from ice mass change, ground motion, and mass transport studies are similar. Current and future satellite missions will have ever-increasing measurement capability and will lead to increasingly sophisticated models of these and other changes in the Earth system. Ground space geodesy networks with enhanced measurement capability will be essential to meeting the ITRF requirements and properly interpreting the satellite data. These networks must be globally distributed and built for longevity, to provide the robust data necessary to generate improved models for proper interpretation of the observed geophysical signals. NASA has embarked on a Space Geodesy Program with a long-range goal to build, deploy and operate a next generation NASA Space Geodetic Network (SGN). The plan is to build integrated, multi-technique next-generation space geodetic observing systems as the core contribution to a global network designed to produce the higher quality data required to maintain the Terrestrial Reference Frame and provide information essential for fully realizing the measurement potential of the current and coming generation of Earth Observing spacecraft. Phase 1 of this project has been funded to (1) Establish and demonstrate a next-generation prototype integrated Space Geodetic Station at Goddard s Geophysical and Astronomical Observatory (GGAO), including next-generation SLR and VLBI systems along with modern GNSS and DORIS; (2) Complete ongoing Network Design Studies that describe the appropriate number and distribution of next-generation Space Geodetic Stations for an improved global network; (3) Upgrade analysis capability to handle the next-generation data; (4) Implement a modern

  6. NASA's Next Generation Space Geodesy Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merkowitz, S. M.; Desai, S. D.; Gross, R. S.; Hillard, L. M.; Lemoine, F. G.; Long, J. L.; Ma, C.; McGarry, J. F.; Murphy, D.; Noll, C. E.; Pavlis, E. C.; Pearlman, M. R.; Stowers, D. A.; Webb, F. H.

    2012-01-01

    Requirements for the ITRF have increased dramatically since the 1980s. The most stringent requirement comes from critical sea level monitoring programs: a global accuracy of 1.0 mm, and 0.1mm/yr stability, a factor of 10 to 20 beyond current capability. Other requirements for the ITRF coming from ice mass change, ground motion, and mass transport studies are similar. Current and future satellite missions will have ever-increasing measurement capability and will lead to increasingly sophisticated models of these and other changes in the Earth system. Ground space geodesy networks with enhanced measurement capability will be essential to meeting the ITRF requirements and properly interpreting the satellite data. These networks must be globally distributed and built for longevity, to provide the robust data necessary to generate improved models for proper interpretation of the observed geophysical signals. NASA has embarked on a Space Geodesy Program with a long-range goal to build, deploy and operate a next generation NASA Space Geodetic Network (SGN). The plan is to build integrated, multi-technique next-generation space geodetic observing systems as the core contribution to a global network designed to produce the higher quality data required to maintain the Terrestrial Reference Frame and provide information essential for fully realizing the measurement potential of the current and coming generation of Earth Observing spacecraft. Phase 1 of this project has been funded to (1) Establish and demonstrate a next-generation prototype integrated Space Geodetic Station at Goddard's Geophysical and Astronomical Observatory (GGAO), including next-generation SLR and VLBI systems along with modern GNSS and DORIS; (2) Complete ongoing Network Design Studies that describe the appropriate number and distribution of next-generation Space Geodetic Stations for an improved global network; (3) Upgrade analysis capability to handle the next-generation data; (4) Implement a modern

  7. Explorations in Space and Time: Computer-Generated Astronomy Films

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meeks, M. L.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the use of the computer animation technique to travel through space and time and watch models of astronomical systems in motion. Included is a list of eight computer-generated demonstration films entitled Explorations in Space and Time.'' (CC)

  8. Explorations in Space and Time: Computer-Generated Astronomy Films

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meeks, M. L.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the use of the computer animation technique to travel through space and time and watch models of astronomical systems in motion. Included is a list of eight computer-generated demonstration films entitled Explorations in Space and Time.'' (CC)

  9. Modeling and dynamic simulation of astronaut's upper limb motions considering counter torques generated by the space suit.

    PubMed

    Li, Jingwen; Ye, Qing; Ding, Li; Liao, Qianfang

    2017-07-01

    Extravehicular activity (EVA) is an inevitable task for astronauts to maintain proper functions of both the spacecraft and the space station. Both experimental research in a microgravity simulator (e.g. neutral buoyancy tank, zero-g aircraft or a drop tower/tube) and mathematical modeling were used to study EVA to provide guidance for the training on Earth and task design in space. Modeling has become more and more promising because of its efficiency. Based on the task analysis, almost 90% of EVA activity is accomplished through upper limb motions. Therefore, focusing on upper limb models of the body and space suit is valuable to this effort. In previous modeling studies, some multi-rigid-body systems were developed to simplify the human musculoskeletal system, and the space suit was mostly considered as a part of the astronaut body. With the aim to improve the reality of the models, we developed an astronauts' upper limb model, including a torque model and a muscle-force model, with the counter torques from the space suit being considered as a boundary condition. Inverse kinematics and the Maggi-Kane's method was applied to calculate the joint angles, joint torques and muscle force given that the terminal trajectory of upper limb motion was known. Also, we validated the muscle-force model using electromyogram (EMG) data collected in a validation experiment. Muscle force calculated from our model presented a similar trend with the EMG data, supporting the effectiveness and feasibility of the muscle-force model we established, and also, partially validating the joint model in kinematics aspect.

  10. Subdifferential calculus in Asplund generated spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabian, Marian; Loewen, Philip D.; Mordukhovich, Boris S.

    2006-10-01

    We extend the definition of the limiting Frechet subdifferential and the limiting Frechet normal cone from Asplund spaces to Asplund generated spaces. Then we prove a sum rule, a mean value theorem, and other statements for this concept.

  11. Natural Atmospheric Environment Model Development for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Second Generation Reusable Launch Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Barry C.; Leahy, Frank; Overbey, Glenn; Batts, Glen W.; Parker, Nelson (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) recently began development of a new reusable launch vehicle. The program office is located at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and is called the Second Generation Reusable Launch Vehicle (2GRLV). The purpose of the program is to improve upon the safety and reliability of the first generation reusable launch vehicle, the Space Shuttle. Specifically, the goals are to reduce the risk of crew loss to less than 1-in-10,000 missions and decreased costs by a factor of 10 to approximately $1,000 per pound of payload launched to low Earth orbit. The program is currently in the very early stages of development and many two-stage vehicle concepts will be evaluated. Risk reduction activities are also taking place. These activities include developing new technologies and advancing current technologies to be used by the vehicle. The Environments Group at MSFC is tasked by the 2GRLV Program to develop and maintain an extensive series of analytical tools and environmental databases which enable it to provide detailed atmospheric studies in support of structural, guidance, navigation and control, and operation of the 2GRLV.

  12. Finite Element Modeling of a Semi-Rigid Hybrid Mirror and a Highly Actuated Membrane Mirror as Candidates for the Next Generation Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craig, Larry; Jacobson, Dave; Mosier, Gary; Nein, Max; Page, Timothy; Redding, Dave; Sutherlin, Steve; Wilkerson, Gary

    2000-01-01

    Advanced space telescopes, which will eventually replace the Hubble Space Telescope (HTS), will have apertures of 8 - 20 n. Primary mirrors of these dimensions will have to be foldable to fit into the space launcher. By necessity these mirrors will be extremely light weight and flexible and the historical approaches to mirror designs, where the mirror is made as rigid as possible to maintain figure and to serve as the anchor for the entire telescope, cannot be applied any longer. New design concepts and verifications will depend entirely on analytical methods to predict optical performance. Finite element modeling of the structural and thermal behavior of such mirrors is becoming the tool for advanced space mirror designs. This paper discusses some of the preliminary tasks and study results, which are currently the basis for the design studies of the Next Generation Space Telescope.

  13. Surface grid generation in a parameter space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samareh-Abolhassani, Jamshid; Stewart, John E.

    1994-07-01

    A robust and efficient technique is discussed for surface-grid generation on a general curvilinear surface. This technique is based on a nonuniform parameter space and allows for the generation of surface grids on highly skewed and nonuniform spaced background surface-grids. This method has been successfully integrated into the GRIDGEN software system.

  14. Surface Grid Generation in a Parameter Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samareh-Abolhassani, Jamshid; Stewart, John E.

    1994-07-01

    A robust and efficient technique is discussed for surface-grid generation on a general curvilinear surface. This technique is based on a non-uniform parameter space and allows for the generation of surface grids on highly skewed and nonuniform spaced background surface-grids. This method has been successfully integrated into the GRIDGEN software system.

  15. Surface grid generation in a parameter space

    SciTech Connect

    Samareh-Abolhassani, J.; Stewart, J.E. )

    1994-07-01

    A robust and efficient technique is discussed for surface-grid generation on a general curvilinear surface. This technique is based on a nonuniform parameter space and allows for the generation of surface grids on highly skewed and nonuniform spaced background surface-grids. This method has been successfully integrated into the GRIDGEN software system. 8 refs., 6 figs.

  16. Surface grid generation in a parameter space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samareh-Abolhassani, Jamshid; Stewart, John E.

    1994-01-01

    A robust and efficient technique is discussed for surface-grid generation on a general curvilinear surface. This technique is based on a nonuniform parameter space and allows for the generation of surface grids on highly skewed and nonuniform spaced background surface-grids. This method has been successfully integrated into the GRIDGEN software system.

  17. Advanced LMMHD space power generation concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Vincent; Wong, Albert; Kim, Kilyoo; Dhir, Vijay

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) power generation concept has been proposed and studied worldwide as one of the future power generation sources. An advanced one fluid two phase liquid metal (LM) MHD power generation concept was developed for space nuclear power generation design. The concept employs a nozzle to accelerate the liquid metal coolant to an acceptable velocity with Mach number greater than unity. Such nozzle and the MHD power generator replace the turbogenerator of a high temperature Rankine turboelectric cycle concept. As a result, the power generation system contains no movable parts. This provides high reliability, which is a very important factor in space application.

  18. Space Station Freedom solar dynamic power generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Springer, T.; Friefeld, Jerry M.

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs on Space Station Freedom solar dynamic power generation are presented. Topics covered include: prime contract activity; key solar dynamic power module requirements; solar dynamic heat receiver technology; and solar concentrator advanced development.

  19. Space Station Freedom solar dynamic power generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Springer, T.; Friefeld, Jerry M.

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs on Space Station Freedom solar dynamic power generation are presented. Topics covered include: prime contract activity; key solar dynamic power module requirements; solar dynamic heat receiver technology; and solar concentrator advanced development.

  20. The Next Generation of Space Communications

    NASA Image and Video Library

    NASA is looking for the next generation of space communications technology and Laser Comm may be the answer. Optical communications provide higher bandwidth, which allows for faster data flow and e...

  1. Space market model development project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, Peter C.

    1987-01-01

    The objectives of the research program, Space Market Model Development Project, (Phase 1) were: (1) to study the need for business information in the commercial development of space; and (2) to propose a design for an information system to meet the identified needs. Three simultaneous research strategies were used in proceeding toward this goal: (1) to describe the space business information which currently exists; (2) to survey government and business representatives on the information they would like to have; and (3) to investigate the feasibility of generating new economical information about the space industry.

  2. Low cost space power generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, Randall B.

    1991-01-01

    The success of this study has given a method of fabricating durable copolymer films without size limitations. Previously, only compression molded samples were durable enough to generate electrical energy. The strengthened specimens are very long lived materials. The lifetime was enhanced at least a factor of 1,300 in full pyroelectric conversion cycle experiments compared with extruded, non-strengthened film. The new techniques proved so successful that the lifetime of the resultant copolymer samples was not fully characterized. The lifetime of these new materials is so long that accelerated tests were devised to probe their durability. After a total of more than 67 million high voltage electrical cycles at 100 C, the electrical properties of a copolymer sample remained stable. The test was terminated without any detectable degradation to allow for other experiments. One must be cautious in extrapolating to power cycle performance, but 67 million electrical cycles correspond to 2 years of pyroelectric cycling at 1 Hz. In another series of experiments at reduced temperature and electrical stress, a specimen survived over one-third of a billion electrical cycles during nearly three months of continuous testing. The radiation-limited lifetimes of the copolymer were shown to range from several years to millions of years for most earth orbits. Thus, the pyroelectric copolymer has become a strong candidate for serious consideration for future spacecraft power supplies.

  3. Reliability model generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McMann, Catherine M. (Inventor); Cohen, Gerald C. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    An improved method and system for automatically generating reliability models for use with a reliability evaluation tool is described. The reliability model generator of the present invention includes means for storing a plurality of low level reliability models which represent the reliability characteristics for low level system components. In addition, the present invention includes means for defining the interconnection of the low level reliability models via a system architecture description. In accordance with the principles of the present invention, a reliability model for the entire system is automatically generated by aggregating the low level reliability models based on the system architecture description.

  4. Hydrazine Gas Generator Program. [space shuttles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kusak, L.; Marcy, R. D.

    1975-01-01

    The design and fabrication of a flight gas generator for the space shuttle were investigated. Critical performance parameters and stability criteria were evaluated as well as a scaling laws that could be applied in designing the flight gas generator. A test program to provide the necessary design information was included. A structural design, including thermal and stress analysis, and two gas generators were fabricated based on the results. Conclusions are presented.

  5. Virasoro model space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La, Hoseong; Nelson, Philip; Schwarz, A. S.

    1990-12-01

    The representations of a compact Lie group G can be studied via the construction of an associated “model space.” This space has the property that when geometrically quantized its Hilbert space contains every irreducible representation of G just once. We construct an analogous space for the group Diff S 1. It is naturally a complex manifold with a holomorphic, free action of Diff S 1 preserving a family of pseudo-Kahler structures. All of the “good” coadjoint orbits are obtained from our space by Hamiltonian constraint reduction. We briefly discuss the connection to the work of Alekseev and Shatashvili.

  6. Distributed generation systems model

    SciTech Connect

    Barklund, C.R.

    1994-12-31

    A slide presentation is given on a distributed generation systems model developed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, and its application to a situation within the Idaho Power Company`s service territory. The objectives of the work were to develop a screening model for distributed generation alternatives, to develop a better understanding of distributed generation as a utility resource, and to further INEL`s understanding of utility concerns in implementing technological change.

  7. Generative Models of Disfluency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Timothy A.

    2010-01-01

    This thesis describes a generative model for representing disfluent phenomena in human speech. This model makes use of observed syntactic structure present in disfluent speech, and uses a right-corner transform on syntax trees to model this structure in a very natural way. Specifically, the phenomenon of speech repair is modeled by explicitly…

  8. Generative Topographic Mapping of Conformational Space.

    PubMed

    Horvath, Dragos; Baskin, Igor; Marcou, Gilles; Varnek, Alexandre

    2017-10-01

    Herein, Generative Topographic Mapping (GTM) was challenged to produce planar projections of the high-dimensional conformational space of complex molecules (the 1LE1 peptide). GTM is a probability-based mapping strategy, and its capacity to support property prediction models serves to objectively assess map quality (in terms of regression statistics). The properties to predict were total, non-bonded and contact energies, surface area and fingerprint darkness. Map building and selection was controlled by a previously introduced evolutionary strategy allowed to choose the best-suited conformational descriptors, options including classical terms and novel atom-centric autocorrellograms. The latter condensate interatomic distance patterns into descriptors of rather low dimensionality, yet precise enough to differentiate between close favorable contacts and atom clashes. A subset of 20 K conformers of the 1LE1 peptide, randomly selected from a pool of 2 M geometries (generated by the S4MPLE tool) was employed for map building and cross-validation of property regression models. The GTM build-up challenge reached robust three-fold cross-validated determination coefficients of Q(2) =0.7…0.8, for all modeled properties. Mapping of the full 2 M conformer set produced intuitive and information-rich property landscapes. Functional and folding subspaces appear as well-separated zones, even though RMSD with respect to the PDB structure was never used as a selection criterion of the maps. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Solar Power Generation in Extreme Space Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliott, Frederick W.; Piszczor, Michael F.

    2016-01-01

    The exploration of space requires power for guidance, navigation, and control; instrumentation; thermal control; communications and data handling; and many subsystems and activities. Generating sufficient and reliable power in deep space through the use of solar arrays becomes even more challenging as solar intensity decreases and high radiation levels begin to degrade the performance of photovoltaic devices. The Extreme Environments Solar Power (EESP) project goal is to develop advanced photovoltaic technology to address these challenges.

  10. Towards the Next Generation of Space Environment Prediction Capabilities.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsova, M. M.

    2015-12-01

    Since its establishment more than 15 years ago, the Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC, http://ccmc.gsfc.nasa.gov) is serving as an assess point to expanding collection of state-of-the-art space environment models and frameworks as well as a hub for collaborative development of next generation space weather forecasting systems. In partnership with model developers and international research and operational communities the CCMC integrates new data streams and models from diverse sources into end-to-end space weather impacts predictive systems, identifies week links in data-model & model-model coupling and leads community efforts to fill those gaps. The presentation will highlight latest developments, progress in CCMC-led community-wide projects on testing, prototyping, and validation of models, forecasting techniques and procedures and outline ideas on accelerating implementation of new capabilities in space weather operations.

  11. NASA's Next Generation Space Geodesy Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desai, S. D.; Gross, R. S.; Hilliard, L.; Lemoine, F. G.; Long, J. L.; Ma, C.; McGarry, J. F.; Merkowitz, S. M.; Murphy, D.; Noll, C. E.; hide

    2012-01-01

    NASA's Space Geodesy Project (SGP) is developing a prototype core site for a next generation Space Geodetic Network (SGN). Each of the sites in this planned network co-locate current state-of-the-art stations from all four space geodetic observing systems, GNSS, SLR, VLBI, and DORIS, with the goal of achieving modern requirements for the International Terrestrial Reference Frame (ITRF). In particular, the driving ITRF requirements for this network are 1.0 mm in accuracy and 0.1 mm/yr in stability, a factor of 10-20 beyond current capabilities. Development of the prototype core site, located at NASA's Geophysical and Astronomical Observatory at the Goddard Space Flight Center, started in 2011 and will be completed by the end of 2013. In January 2012, two operational GNSS stations, GODS and GOON, were established at the prototype site within 100 m of each other. Both stations are being proposed for inclusion into the IGS network. In addition, work is underway for the inclusion of next generation SLR and VLBI stations along with a modern DORIS station. An automated survey system is being developed to measure inter-technique vectorties, and network design studies are being performed to define the appropriate number and distribution of these next generation space geodetic core sites that are required to achieve the driving ITRF requirements. We present the status of this prototype next generation space geodetic core site, results from the analysis of data from the established geodetic stations, and results from the ongoing network design studies.

  12. Reliability model generator specification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Gerald C.; Mccann, Catherine

    1990-01-01

    The Reliability Model Generator (RMG), a program which produces reliability models from block diagrams for ASSIST, the interface for the reliability evaluation tool SURE is described. An account is given of motivation for RMG and the implemented algorithms are discussed. The appendices contain the algorithms and two detailed traces of examples.

  13. Orbiting Space Interferometer (OSI): A first generation space interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shao, Michael

    1992-01-01

    The technical requirements and performance of a first generation space interferometer is discussed. The performance of an interferometer, sensitivity, field of view, dynamic range, astrometric accuracy, etc, in space is set by what cannot be achieved for a ground-based instrument. For the Orbiting Space Interferometer (OSI), the nominal performance parameters are 20 mag sensitivity, field of view of approximately 500*500 pixels, a 1000:1 dynamic range in the image with one milliarcsec resolution, and an astrometric accuracy of 0.1 milliarcsec for wide angle astrometry and 10 microarcsec accuracy for narrow field astrometry (few degrees). OSI is a fully phased interferometer where all critical optical paths are controlled to 0.05 wavelengths. The instrument uses two guide interferometers locked on bright stars several degrees away to provide the spacecraft attitude information needed to keep the fringes from the faint science object stable on the detector.

  14. Next generation SAR demonstration on space station

    SciTech Connect

    Edelstein, Wendy; Kim, Yunjin; Freeman, Anthony; Jordan, Rolando

    1999-01-22

    This paper describes the next generation synthetic aperture radar (SAR) that enables future low cost space-borne radar missions. In order to realize these missions, we propose to use an inflatable, membrane, microstrip antenna that is particularly suitable for low frequency science radar missions. In order to mitigate risks associated with this revolutionary technology, the space station demonstration will be very useful to test the long-term survivability of the proposed antenna. This experiment will demonstrate several critical technology challenges associated with space-inflatable technologies. Among these include space-rigidization of inflatable structures, controlled inflation deployment, flatness and uniform separation of thin-film membranes and RF performance of membrane microstrip antennas. This mission will also verify the in-space performance of lightweight, high performance advanced SAR electronics. Characteristics of this SAR instrument include a capability for high resolution polarimetric imaging. The mission will acquire high quality scientific data using this advanced SAR to demonstrate the utility of these advanced technologies. We will present an inflatable L-band SAR concept for commercial and science applications and a P-band design concept to validate the Biomass SAR mission concept. The ionospheric effects on P-band SAR images will also be examined using the acquired data.

  15. Pore-space alteration in source rock (shales) during hydrocarbons generation: X-ray microtomography and pore-scale modelling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korost, Dmitry; Gerke, Kirill; Akhmanov, Grigory; Vasilyev, Roman; Čapek, Pavel; Karsanina, Marina; Nadezhkin, Dmitry

    2013-04-01

    Hydrocarbons (HC) are generated from solid organic matter (kerogen) due to thermocatalytic reactions. The rate of such reactions shows direct correlation with temperature and depends on the depth of source rock burial. Burial of sedimentary rock is also inevitably accompanied by its structural alteration owing to compaction, dehydration and re-crystallization. Processes of HC generation, primary migration and structural changes are inaccessible for direct observation in nature, but they can be studied in laboratory experiments. Modern technical facilities of laboratories make it possible to carry out experiments on HC generation from the organic-rich rocks at a completely new level (Kobchenko et al., 2011). Some new technologies, including X-ray microtomography and pore-scale modeling, allow us to carry out a step-by-step description of such processes and their development, and to study their reflection in alterations of rock structure. Experiments were carried out with a clayey-carbonate rock sample of the Domanic Formaition taken at a depth of 1939 m from borehole drilled in the central part of the Melekes depression (West Tatar arch, Russia). The rock chosen fits the very essential requirements for studying HC generation under laboratory conditions - high organic matter content and its low metamorphic grade. Our work aimed such a study in an undisturbed rock sample by heating it in nitrogen atmosphere based on a specified temperature regime in a RockEval6 analyzer and monitoring alterations in the pore space structure. Observations were carried out with a SkyScan-1172 X-ray microtomography scanner (resulting scan resolution of 1 µm). A cylinder, 4 mm in diameter, was prepared from the rock sample for the pyrolitic and microtomographic analyses. Scanning procedures were carried out in 5 runs. Temperature interval for each run had to match the most important stage of HC generation in the source rock, namely: (1) original structure; (2) 100-300˚? - discharge of

  16. Space station contamination modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, T. D.

    1989-01-01

    Current plans for the operation of Space Station Freedom allow the orbit to decay to approximately an altitude of 200 km before reboosting to approximately 450 km. The Space Station will encounter dramatically increasing ambient and induced environmental effects as the orbit decays. Unfortunately, Shuttle docking, which has been of concern as a high contamination period, will likely occur during the time when the station is in the lowest orbit. The combination of ambient and induced environments along with the presence of the docked Shuttle could cause very severe contamination conditions at the lower orbital altitudes prior to Space Station reboost. The purpose here is to determine the effects on the induced external environment of Space Station Freedom with regard to the proposed changes in altitude. The change in the induced environment will be manifest in several parameters. The ambient density buildup in front of ram facing surfaces will change. The source of such contaminants can be outgassing/offgassing surfaces, leakage from the pressurized modules or experiments, purposeful venting, and thruster firings. The third induced environment parameter with altitude dependence is the glow. In order to determine the altitude dependence of the induced environment parameters, researchers used the integrated Spacecraft Environment Model (ISEM) which was developed for Marshall Space Flight Center. The analysis required numerous ISEM runs. The assumptions and limitations for the ISEM runs are described.

  17. Thermophotovoltaic (TPV) applications to space power generation

    SciTech Connect

    Vicente, F.A.; Kelly, C.E.; Loughin, S.

    1996-12-31

    Examined is a Thermophotovoltaic (TPV) converter using an advanced quaternary III--V cell with an integral filter coupled to isotope (GPHS) and nuclear reactor heat sources. Results presented indicate the merits of TPV conversion for meeting a wide range of space power requirements. The authors find that TPV offers both a reduction in the cost of building the converter for an electric generator driven by a radioisotope or nuclear reactor, as well as appreciable fuel savings. On the basis of cost, they find that isotope powered TPV systems enjoy considerable advantage over solar arrays or interplanetary exploration missions beyond the asteroid belt. For space reactor power systems the analysis indicates that TPV conversion has a mass advantage over thermoelectrics (T/E) for systems below 50 kWe.

  18. Space habitat contamination model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgenthaler, George W.

    1990-01-01

    When one considers the missions that are involved in Space Exploration Initiative (SEI), a continuous Lunar Base at which astronauts will perform scientific experiments as well as being the center for Lunar resource exploitation, a human visit to the surface of Mars, and, later, the development of a Mars base, one recognizes that we have entered a new realm of space exploration activity. During the SEI era, human beings who are involved in such missions will be away from Earth for extended periods of time, even for years. For example, the classical Hohmann transfer round trip mission to Mars would involve a flight of 31 months, including the stay time in the vicinity of Mars. Of course, other Mars trips such as the Venus Fly-By mission (22 months) and the Mars Sprint mission (15 months) pose much less taxing problems, but still problems which put human space presence in a domain where human survival has not yet been tested and thoroughly understood. Humans have never before been placed into an isolated, low-gravity, hermetically sealed, contaminant-prone environment for periods well in excess of one year and then been expected to function normally upon return to Earth. This presentation develops a systems model to help analyze the space habitat containment growth problem and to indicate the thresholds of astronaut risk, astronaut operational impairment, and methods of risk mitigation. The model inputs were discussed with toxicology experts at the University of Colorado Health Services Center and the University of Rochester.

  19. Maturing Technologies for Stirling Space Power Generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Scott D.; Nowlin, Brentley C.; Dobbs, Michael W.; Schmitz, Paul; Huth, James

    2016-01-01

    Stirling Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) are being developed as an option to provide power on future space science missions where robotic spacecraft will orbit, flyby, land or rove. A Stirling Radioisotope Generator (SRG) could offer space missions a more efficient power system that uses one fourth of the nuclear fuel and decreases the thermal footprint of the current state of the art. The RPS Program Office, working in collaboration with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), manages projects to develop thermoelectric and dynamic power systems, including Stirling Radioisotope Generators (SRGs). The Stirling Cycle Technology Development (SCTD) Project, located at Glenn Research Center (GRC), is developing Stirling-based subsystems, including convertors and controllers. The SCTD Project also performs research that focuses on a wide variety of objectives, including increasing convertor temperature capability to enable new environments, improving system reliability or fault tolerance, reducing mass or size, and developing advanced concepts that are mission enabling. Research activity includes maturing subsystems, assemblies, and components to prepare them for infusion into future convertor and generator designs. The status of several technology development efforts are described here. As part of the maturation process, technologies are assessed for readiness in higher-level subsystems. To assess the readiness level of the Dual Convertor Controller (DCC), a Technology Readiness Assessment (TRA) was performed and the process and results are shown. Stirling technology research is being performed by the SCTD Project for NASA's RPS Program Office, where tasks focus on maturation of Stirling-based systems and subsystems for future space science missions.

  20. Maturing Technologies for Stirling Space Power Generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Scott D.; Nowlin, Brentley C.; Dobbs, Michael W.; Schmitz, Paul C.; Huth, James

    2016-01-01

    Stirling Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) are being developed as an option to provide power on future space science missions where robotic spacecraft will orbit, flyby, land or rove. A Stirling Radioisotope Generator (SRG) could offer space missions a more efficient power system that uses one fourth of the nuclear fuel and decreases the thermal footprint of the current state of the art. The RPS Program Office, working in collaboration with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), manages projects to develop thermoelectric and dynamic power systems, including Stirling Radioisotope Generators (SRGs). The Stirling Cycle Technology Development (SCTD) Project, located at Glenn Research Center (GRC), is developing Stirling-based subsystems, including convertors and controllers. The SCTD Project also performs research that focuses on a wide variety of objectives, including increasing convertor temperature capability to enable new environments, improving system reliability or fault tolerance, reducing mass or size, and developing advanced concepts that are mission enabling. Research activity includes maturing subsystems, assemblies, and components to prepare them for infusion into future convertor and generator designs. The status of several technology development efforts are described here. As part of the maturation process, technologies are assessed for readiness in higher-level subsystems. To assess the readiness level of the Dual Convertor Controller (DCC), a Technology Readiness Assessment (TRA) was performed and the process and results are shown. Stirling technology research is being performed by the SCTD Project for NASA's RPS Program Office, where tasks focus on maturation of Stirling-based systems and subsystems for future space science missions.

  1. Edison - The next generation infrared space observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thronson, H. A., Jr.; Davies, J. K.; Hackwell, J.; Hawarden, T. G.; Knacke, R. F.; Lester, D.; Mountain, C. M.

    1992-01-01

    Edison, a large-aperture, radiatively-cooled telescope, is proposed as the major international mission to follow the current generation of cryogenically-cooled infrared space telescopes. It is being studied at present as a 2.5-3.5 m mixed radiatively- and mechanically-cooled facility optimized to investigate the wavelength range 3-100+ microns. This paper outlines the status of the project, discusses some aspects of a smaller-aperture 'precursor' mission, and describes a portion of the baseline science mission.

  2. The sixth generation robot in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butcher, A.; Das, A.; Reddy, Y. V.; Singh, H.

    1990-01-01

    The knowledge based simulator developed in the artificial intelligence laboratory has become a working test bed for experimenting with intelligent reasoning architectures. With this simulator, recently, small experiments have been done with an aim to simulate robot behavior to avoid colliding paths. An automatic extension of such experiments to intelligently planning robots in space demands advanced reasoning architectures. One such architecture for general purpose problem solving is explored. The robot, seen as a knowledge base machine, goes via predesigned abstraction mechanism for problem understanding and response generation. The three phases in one such abstraction scheme are: abstraction for representation, abstraction for evaluation, and abstraction for resolution. Such abstractions require multimodality. This multimodality requires the use of intensional variables to deal with beliefs in the system. Abstraction mechanisms help in synthesizing possible propagating lattices for such beliefs. The machine controller enters into a sixth generation paradigm.

  3. Practical Results from the Application of Model Checking and Test Generation from UML/SysML Models of On-Board Space Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faria, J. M.; Mahomad, S.; Silva, N.

    2009-05-01

    The deployment of complex safety-critical applications requires rigorous techniques and powerful tools both for the development and V&V stages. Model-based technologies are increasingly being used to develop safety-critical software, and arguably, turning to them can bring significant benefits to such processes, however, along with new challenges. This paper presents the results of a research project where we tried to extend current V&V methodologies to be applied on UML/SysML models and aiming at answering the demands related to validation issues. Two quite different but complementary approaches were investigated: (i) model checking and the (ii) extraction of robustness test-cases from the same models. These two approaches don't overlap and when combined provide a wider reaching model/design validation ability than each one alone thus offering improved safety assurance. Results are very encouraging, even though they either fell short of the desired outcome as shown for model checking, or still appear as not fully matured as shown for robustness test case extraction. In the case of model checking, it was verified that the automatic model validation process can become fully operational and even expanded in scope once tool vendors help (inevitably) to improve the XMI standard interoperability situation. For the robustness test case extraction methodology, the early approach produced interesting results but need further systematisation and consolidation effort in order to produce results in a more predictable fashion and reduce reliance on expert's heuristics. Finally, further improvements and innovation research projects were immediately apparent for both investigated approaches, which point to either circumventing current limitations in XMI interoperability on one hand and bringing test case specification onto the same graphical level as the models themselves and then attempting to automate the generation of executable test cases from its standard UML notation.

  4. Generation of Java code from Alvis model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matyasik, Piotr; Szpyrka, Marcin; Wypych, Michał

    2015-12-01

    Alvis is a formal language that combines graphical modelling of interconnections between system entities (called agents) and a high level programming language to describe behaviour of any individual agent. An Alvis model can be verified formally with model checking techniques applied to the model LTS graph that represents the model state space. This paper presents transformation of an Alvis model into executable Java code. Thus, the approach provides a method of automatic generation of a Java application from formally verified Alvis model.

  5. Next-Generation Space Ambitions Keep Rolling

    NASA Image and Video Library

    As space shuttle Atlantis rolled to its new home at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex earlier this month, NASA and its commercial crew partners reflected on the Space Shuttle Program's treme...

  6. 2-D Signal Generation Using State-Space Formulation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-12-01

    published that have established nonoptical .~ -~ Iimage processing as a viable area of research. A large portion of this research emphasizes the linear...research and the study of time-discrete linear systems. This thesis develops the discrete model of Roesser [Ref. 5] for linear image processing which... THESIS 2-D SIGNAL GENERATION USING STATE-SPACE FORMULATION - • by (.) Evangelos Theofilou December 1985 • Thesis Advisor: Sydney R. Parker Approved

  7. Space-based laser-driven MHD generator: Feasibility study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, S. H.

    1986-01-01

    The feasibility of a laser-driven MHD generator, as a candidate receiver for a space-based laser power transmission system, was investigated. On the basis of reasonable parameters obtained in the literature, a model of the laser-driven MHD generator was developed with the assumptions of a steady, turbulent, two-dimensional flow. These assumptions were based on the continuous and steady generation of plasmas by the exposure of the continuous wave laser beam thus inducing a steady back pressure that enables the medium to flow steadily. The model considered here took the turbulent nature of plasmas into account in the two-dimensional geometry of the generator. For these conditions with the plasma parameters defining the thermal conductivity, viscosity, electrical conductivity for the plasma flow, a generator efficiency of 53.3% was calculated. If turbulent effects and nonequilibrium ionization are taken into account, the efficiency is 43.2%. The study shows that the laser-driven MHD system has potential as a laser power receiver for space applications because of its high energy conversion efficiency, high energy density and relatively simple mechanism as compared to other energy conversion cycles.

  8. Space Awareness: Inspiring A New Generation of Space Explorers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo, Pedro

    2016-10-01

    Space Awareness (EUSPACE-AWE) will use the excitement of space to attract young people into science and technology and stimulate European and global citizenship. Our main goal is to increase the number of young people that choose space-related careers.

  9. Next Generation Space Surveillance System-of-Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McShane, B.

    2014-09-01

    International economic and military dependence on space assets is pervasive and ever-growing in an environment that is now congested, contested, and competitive. There are a number of natural and man-made risks that need to be monitored and characterized to protect and preserve the space environment and the assets within it. Unfortunately, today's space surveillance network (SSN) has gaps in coverage, is not resilient, and has a growing number of objects that get lost. Risks can be efficiently and effectively mitigated, gaps closed, resiliency improved, and performance increased within a next generation space surveillance network implemented as a system-of-systems with modern information architectures and analytic techniques. This also includes consideration for the newest SSN sensors (e.g. Space Fence) which are born Net-Centric out-of-the-box and able to seamlessly interface with the JSpOC Mission System, global information grid, and future unanticipated users. Significant opportunity exists to integrate legacy, traditional, and non-traditional sensors into a larger space system-of-systems (including command and control centers) for multiple clients through low cost sustainment, modification, and modernization efforts. Clients include operations centers (e.g. JSpOC, USSTRATCOM, CANSPOC), Intelligence centers (e.g. NASIC), space surveillance sensor sites (e.g. AMOS, GEODSS), international governments (e.g. Germany, UK), space agencies (e.g. NASA), and academic institutions. Each has differing priorities, networks, data needs, timeliness, security, accuracy requirements and formats. Enabling processes and technologies include: Standardized and type accredited methods for secure connections to multiple networks, machine-to-machine interfaces for near real-time data sharing and tip-and-queue activities, common data models for analytical processing across multiple radar and optical sensor types, an efficient way to automatically translate between differing client and

  10. Validation of Space Weather Models at Community Coordinated Modeling Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuznetsova, M. M.; Pulkkinen, A.; Rastaetter, L.; Hesse, M.; Chulaki, A.; Maddox, M.

    2011-01-01

    The Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC) is a multiagency partnership, which aims at the creation of next generation space weather modes. CCMC goal is to support the research and developmental work necessary to substantially increase space weather modeling capabilities and to facilitate advanced models deployment in forecasting operations. The CCMC conducts unbiased model testing and validation and evaluates model readiness for operational environment. The presentation will demonstrate the recent progress in CCMC metrics and validation activities.

  11. Space market model space industry input-output model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodgin, Robert F.; Marchesini, Roberto

    1987-01-01

    The goal of the Space Market Model (SMM) is to develop an information resource for the space industry. The SMM is intended to contain information appropriate for decision making in the space industry. The objectives of the SMM are to: (1) assemble information related to the development of the space business; (2) construct an adequate description of the emerging space market; (3) disseminate the information on the space market to forecasts and planners in government agencies and private corporations; and (4) provide timely analyses and forecasts of critical elements of the space market. An Input-Output model of market activity is proposed which are capable of transforming raw data into useful information for decision makers and policy makers dealing with the space sector.

  12. Space Weather: Measurements, Models and Predictions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-21

    innovative research and analysis programs to understand the fundamental solar and magnetospheric processes and mechanisms that drive and control the...and analysis programs to understand the fundamental solar and magnetospheric processes and mechanisms that drive and control the Earth’s space...3.2 Space Particle Modeling: The Next Generation Trapped Electron and Proton Models The radiation belts and plasma in the Earth’s magnetosphere pose

  13. Multivariant function model generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The development of computer programs applicable to space vehicle guidance was conducted. The subjects discussed are as follows: (1) determination of optimum reentry trajectories, (2) development of equations for performance of trajectory computation, (3) vehicle control for fuel optimization, (4) development of equations for performance trajectory computations, (5) applications and solution of Hamilton-Jacobi equation, and (6) stresses in dome shaped shells with discontinuities at the apex.

  14. Cost Modeling for Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2011-01-01

    Parametric cost models are an important tool for planning missions, compare concepts and justify technology investments. This paper presents on-going efforts to develop single variable and multi-variable cost models for space telescope optical telescope assembly (OTA). These models are based on data collected from historical space telescope missions. Standard statistical methods are used to derive CERs for OTA cost versus aperture diameter and mass. The results are compared with previously published models.

  15. Second Generation RLV Space Vehicle Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Michelle; Daniel, Charles; Throckmorton, David A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    NASA has a long history of conducting development programs and projects in a consistent fashion. Systems Engineering within those programs and projects has also followed a given method outlined by such documents as the NASA Systems Engineering Handbook. The relatively new NASA Space Launch Initiative (SLI) is taking a new approach to developing a space vehicle, with innovative management methods as well as new Systems Engineering processes. With the program less than a year into its life cycle, the efficacy of these new processes has yet to be proven or disproven. At $776M for phase 1, SLI represents a major portion of the NASA focus; however, the new processes being incorporated are not reflected in the training provided by NASA to its engineers. The NASA Academy of Program and Project Leadership (APPL) offers core classes in program and project management and systems engineering to NASA employees with the purpose of creating a "knowledge community where ideas, skills, and experiences are exchanged to increase each other's capacity for strong leadership". The SLI program is, in one sense, a combination of a conceptual design program and a technology program. The program as a whole doesn't map into the generic systems engineering project cycle as currently, and for some time, taught. For example, the NASA APPL Systems Engineering training course teaches that the "first step in developing an architecture is to define the external boundaries of the system", which will require definition of the interfaces with other systems and the next step will be to "define all the components that make up the next lower level of the system hierarchy" where fundamental requirements are allocated to each component. Whereas, the SLI technology risk reduction approach develops architecture subsystem technologies prior to developing architectures. The higher level architecture requirements are not allowed to fully develop and undergo decomposition and allocation down to the subsystems

  16. Second Generation RLV Space Vehicle Concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, M. D.; Daniel, C. C.

    2002-01-01

    NASA has a long history of conducting development programs and projects in a consistant fashion. Systems Engineering within those programs and projects has also followed a given method outlined by such documents as the NASA Systems Engineering Handbook. The relatively new NASA Space Launch Initiative (SLI) is taking a new approach to developing a space vehicle, with innovative management methods as well as new Systems Engineering processes. With the program less than a year into its life cycle, the efficacy of these new processes has yet to be proven or disproven. At 776M for phase I, SLI represents a major portion of the NASA focus; however, the new processes being incorporated are not reflected in the training provided by NASA to its engineers. The NASA Academy of Program and Project Leadership (APPL) offers core classes in program and project management and systems engineering to NASA employees with the purpose of creating a "knowledge community where ideas, skills, and experiences are exchanged to increase each other's capacity for strong leadership". The SLI program is, in one sense, a combination of a conceptual design program and a technology program. The program as a whole doesn't map into the generic systems engineering project cycle as currently, and for some time, taught. For example, the NASA APPL Systems Engineering training course teaches that the "first step in developing an architecture is to define the external boundaries of the system", which will require definition of the interfaces with other systems and the next step will be to "define all the components that make up the next lower level of the system hierarchy" where fundamental requirements are allocated to each component. Whereas, the SLI technology risk reduction approach develops architecture subsystem technologies prior to developing architectures. The higher level architecture requirements are not allowed to fully develop and undergo decomposition and allocation down to the subsystems

  17. Scientific and Technical Development of the Next Generation Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burg, Richard

    2003-01-01

    The Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST) is part of the Origins program and is the key mission to discover the origins of galaxies in the Universe. It is essential that scientific requirements be translated into technical specifications at the beginning of the program and that there is technical participation by astronomers in the design and modeling of the observatory. During the active time period of this grant, the PI participated in the NGST program at GSFC by participating in the development of the Design Reference Mission, the development of the full end-to-end model of the observatory, the design trade-off based on the modeling, the Science Instrument Module definition and modeling, the study of proto-mission and test-bed development, and by participating in meetings including quarterly reviews and support of the NGST SWG. This work was documented in a series of NGST Monographs that are available on the NGST web site.

  18. Formal Verification for a Next-Generation Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Stacy D.; Pecheur, Charles; Koga, Dennis (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This paper discusses the verification and validation (V&2) of advanced software used for integrated vehicle health monitoring (IVHM), in the context of NASA's next-generation space shuttle. We survey the current VBCV practice and standards used in selected NASA projects, review applicable formal verification techniques, and discuss their integration info existing development practice and standards. We also describe two verification tools, JMPL2SMV and Livingstone PathFinder, that can be used to thoroughly verify diagnosis applications that use model-based reasoning, such as the Livingstone system.

  19. PUS Services Software Building Block Automatic Generation for Space Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Candia, S.; Sgaramella, F.; Mele, G.

    2008-08-01

    The Packet Utilization Standard (PUS) has been specified by the European Committee for Space Standardization (ECSS) and issued as ECSS-E-70-41A to define the application-level interface between Ground Segments and Space Segments. The ECSS-E- 70-41A complements the ECSS-E-50 and the Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems (CCSDS) recommendations for packet telemetry and telecommand. The ECSS-E-70-41A characterizes the identified PUS Services from a functional point of view and the ECSS-E-70-31 standard specifies the rules for their mission-specific tailoring. The current on-board software design for a space mission implies the production of several PUS terminals, each providing a specific tailoring of the PUS services. The associated on-board software building blocks are developed independently, leading to very different design choices and implementations even when the mission tailoring requires very similar services (from the Ground operative perspective). In this scenario, the automatic production of the PUS services building blocks for a mission would be a way to optimize the overall mission economy and improve the robusteness and reliability of the on-board software and of the Ground-Space interactions. This paper presents the Space Software Italia (SSI) activities for the development of an integrated environment to support: the PUS services tailoring activity for a specific mission. the mission-specific PUS services configuration. the generation the UML model of the software building block implementing the mission-specific PUS services and the related source code, support documentation (software requirements, software architecture, test plans/procedures, operational manuals), and the TM/TC database. The paper deals with: (a) the project objectives, (b) the tailoring, configuration, and generation process, (c) the description of the environments supporting the process phases, (d) the characterization of the meta-model used for the generation, (e) the

  20. Space Flight Cable Model Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spak, Kaitlin

    2013-01-01

    This work concentrates the modeling efforts presented in last year's VSGC conference paper, "Model Development for Cable-Harnessed Beams." The focus is narrowed to modeling of space-flight cables only, as a reliable damped cable model is not yet readily available and is necessary to continue modeling cable-harnessed space structures. New experimental data is presented, eliminating the low-frequency noise that plagued the first year's efforts. The distributed transfer function method is applied to a single section of space flight cable for Euler-Bernoulli and shear beams. The work presented here will be developed into a damped cable model that can be incorporated into an interconnected beam-cable system. The overall goal of this work is to accurately predict natural frequencies and modal damping ratios for cabled space structures.

  1. Thermospheric Space Weather Modeling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-01

    atmospheric temperature V = satellite velocity relative to the ambient gas ’ Senior physicist, Space Weather Center of Excellence, Mail Stop: VSBXT; Member...where temperature rises drastically to -600 - 2000 K. The density and hence drag in this region is driven mainly by two solar influences: directly by EUV...bulge that drives winds to transport heat away from the hot dayside toward the Earth’s cold nightside. Temperatures on the dayside are typically 30

  2. Short range forecasting of sea breeze generated thunderstorms at the Kennedy Space Center: A real-time experiment using a primitive equation mesoscale numerical model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyons, Walter A.; Schuh, Jerome A.; Moon, Dennis; Pielke, Roger A.; Cotton, William; Arritt, Raymond

    1987-01-01

    The operational efficiency of using guidance from a mesoscale numerical model to improve sea breeze thunderstorm forecasts at and around the Shuttle landing strip was assessed. The Prognostic Three-Dimensional Mesoscale (P3DM) model, developed as a sea breeze model, reveals a strong correlation between regions of mesoscale convergence and the triggering of sea breeze convection thunderstorms. The P3DM was modified to generate stability parameters familiar to the operational forecaster. In addition to the mesoscale fields of wind, vertical motion, moisture, temperature, a stability indicator, a combination of model-predicted K and Lifted Indices and the maximum grid cell vertical motion, were proposed and tested. Results of blind tests indicate that a forecaster, provided with guidance derived from model output, could improve local thunderstorm forecasts.

  3. Short range forecasting of sea breeze generated thunderstorms at the Kennedy Space Center: A real-time experiment using a primitive equation mesoscale numerical model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyons, Walter A.; Schuh, Jerome A.; Moon, Dennis; Pielke, Roger A.; Cotton, William; Arritt, Raymond

    1987-01-01

    The operational efficiency of using guidance from a mesoscale numerical model to improve sea breeze thunderstorm forecasts at and around the Shuttle landing strip was assessed. The Prognostic Three-Dimensional Mesoscale (P3DM) model, developed as a sea breeze model, reveals a strong correlation between regions of mesoscale convergence and the triggering of sea breeze convection thunderstorms. The P3DM was modified to generate stability parameters familiar to the operational forecaster. In addition to the mesoscale fields of wind, vertical motion, moisture, temperature, a stability indicator, a combination of model-predicted K and Lifted Indices and the maximum grid cell vertical motion, were proposed and tested. Results of blind tests indicate that a forecaster, provided with guidance derived from model output, could improve local thunderstorm forecasts.

  4. Developing Fault Models for Space Mission Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nikora, Allen P.; Munson, John C.

    2003-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on the development of fault models for space mission software is shown. The topics include: 1) Goal: Improve Understanding of Technology Fault Generation Process; 2) Required Measurement; 3) Measuring Structural Evolution; 4) Module Attributes; 5) Principal Components of Raw Metrics; 6) The Measurement Process; 7) View of Structural Evolution at the System and Module Level; 8) Identifying and Counting Faults; 9) Fault Enumeration; 10) Modeling Fault Content; 11) Modeling Results; 12) Current and Future Work; and 13) Discussion and Conclusions.

  5. Generative models of conformational dynamics.

    PubMed

    Langmead, Christopher James

    2014-01-01

    Atomistic simulations of the conformational dynamics of proteins can be performed using either Molecular Dynamics or Monte Carlo procedures. The ensembles of three-dimensional structures produced during simulation can be analyzed in a number of ways to elucidate the thermodynamic and kinetic properties of the system. The goal of this chapter is to review both traditional and emerging methods for learning generative models from atomistic simulation data. Here, the term 'generative' refers to a model of the joint probability distribution over the behaviors of the constituent atoms. In the context of molecular modeling, generative models reveal the correlation structure between the atoms, and may be used to predict how the system will respond to structural perturbations. We begin by discussing traditional methods, which produce multivariate Gaussian models. We then discuss GAMELAN (GRAPHICAL MODELS OF ENERGY LANDSCAPES), which produces generative models of complex, non-Gaussian conformational dynamics (e.g., allostery, binding, folding, etc.) from long timescale simulation data.

  6. Next Generation of Launcher & Space Vehicles Batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laroye, J. F.; Brochard, P.; Grassien, J.-Y.; Masgrangeas, D.

    2008-09-01

    This paper presents several examples of Saft lithium batteries in use onboard launchers & space vehicles: ATV primary lithium manganese dioxide (LiMnO2) batteries and Rosetta primary lithium thionyl chloride (LiSOCl2) batteries as well as the VEGA rechargeable lithium-ion (Li-ion) avionics & thrust vector control (TVC) batteries.It gives an overview of possible chemistries and tradeoff to address these needs.

  7. Zone generator for Large Space Telescope technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, K. E.

    1974-01-01

    A concept is presented for monitoring the optical adjustment and performance of a Large Space Telescope which consists of a 1.2m diameter turntable with a laser stylus to operate at speeds up to 30 rpm. The focus of the laser stylus is under closed loop control. A technique for scribing zones of suitable depth, width, and uniformity applicable to large telescope mirrors is also reported.

  8. Noncommutative spaces from matrix models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Lei

    Noncommutative (NC) spaces commonly arise as solutions to matrix model equations of motion. They are natural generalizations of the ordinary commutative spacetime. Such spaces may provide insights into physics close to the Planck scale, where quantum gravity becomes relevant. Although there has been much research in the literature, aspects of these NC spaces need further investigation. In this dissertation, we focus on properties of NC spaces in several different contexts. In particular, we study exact NC spaces which result from solutions to matrix model equations of motion. These spaces are associated with finite-dimensional Lie-algebras. More specifically, they are two-dimensional fuzzy spaces that arise from a three-dimensional Yang-Mills type matrix model, four-dimensional tensor-product fuzzy spaces from a tensorial matrix model, and Snyder algebra from a five-dimensional tensorial matrix model. In the first part of this dissertation, we study two-dimensional NC solutions to matrix equations of motion of extended IKKT-type matrix models in three-space-time dimensions. Perturbations around the NC solutions lead to NC field theories living on a two-dimensional space-time. The commutative limit of the solutions are smooth manifolds which can be associated with closed, open and static two-dimensional cosmologies. One particular solution is a Lorentzian fuzzy sphere, which leads to essentially a fuzzy sphere in the Minkowski space-time. In the commutative limit, this solution leads to an induced metric that does not have a fixed signature, and have a non-constant negative scalar curvature, along with singularities at two fixed latitudes. The singularities are absent in the matrix solution which provides a toy model for resolving the singularities of General relativity. We also discussed the two-dimensional fuzzy de Sitter space-time, which has irreducible representations of su(1,1) Lie-algebra in terms of principal, complementary and discrete series. Field

  9. Space debris: modeling and detectability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiedemann, C.; Lorenz, J.; Radtke, J.; Kebschull, C.; Horstmann, A.; Stoll, E.

    2017-01-01

    High precision orbit determination is required for the detection and removal of space debris. Knowledge of the distribution of debris objects in orbit is necessary for orbit determination by active or passive sensors. The results can be used to investigate the orbits on which objects of a certain size at a certain frequency can be found. The knowledge of the orbital distribution of the objects as well as their properties in accordance with sensor performance models provide the basis for estimating the expected detection rates. Comprehensive modeling of the space debris environment is required for this. This paper provides an overview of the current state of knowledge about the space debris environment. In particular non-cataloged small objects are evaluated. Furthermore, improvements concerning the update of the current space debris model are addressed. The model of the space debris environment is based on the simulation of historical events, such as fragmentations due to explosions and collisions that actually occurred in Earth orbits. The orbital distribution of debris is simulated by propagating the orbits considering all perturbing forces up to a reference epoch. The modeled object population is compared with measured data and validated. The model provides a statistical distribution of space objects, according to their size and number. This distribution is based on the correct consideration of orbital mechanics. This allows for a realistic description of the space debris environment. Subsequently, a realistic prediction can be provided concerning the question, how many pieces of debris can be expected on certain orbits. To validate the model, a software tool has been developed which allows the simulation of the observation behavior of ground-based or space-based sensors. Thus, it is possible to compare the results of published measurement data with simulated detections. This tool can also be used for the simulation of sensor measurement campaigns. It is

  10. Data-Generating Program for ASKA Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karimi-Dechesh, A.; Cheng, T. K.

    1985-01-01

    Carrier plate assemblies of NASA Space Shuttle thermal protection system provided for easy access to protected vital parts of Shuttle. Each assembly mounted on substructure with fasteners through holes in protective tiles. Automatic System of Kinematic Analysis (ASKA) finite-element program evaluates these assemblies. PLATEFORT computer program developed as data generator for ASKA modeling. PLATEFORT greatly reduces amount of time and data required for building ASKA model of these assemblies.

  11. Instance-Based Generative Biological Shape Modeling.

    PubMed

    Peng, Tao; Wang, Wei; Rohde, Gustavo K; Murphy, Robert F

    2009-01-01

    Biological shape modeling is an essential task that is required for systems biology efforts to simulate complex cell behaviors. Statistical learning methods have been used to build generative shape models based on reconstructive shape parameters extracted from microscope image collections. However, such parametric modeling approaches are usually limited to simple shapes and easily-modeled parameter distributions. Moreover, to maximize the reconstruction accuracy, significant effort is required to design models for specific datasets or patterns. We have therefore developed an instance-based approach to model biological shapes within a shape space built upon diffeomorphic measurement. We also designed a recursive interpolation algorithm to probabilistically synthesize new shape instances using the shape space model and the original instances. The method is quite generalizable and therefore can be applied to most nuclear, cell and protein object shapes, in both 2D and 3D.

  12. Model space of economic events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanovsky, M. Yu.

    A method for constructing the model or virtual space of economic events when economic objects can be considered as material ones is suggested. We describe change of share rates in time at stock markets as the potential difference of attracted bodies in time in this virtual space. Each share of each enterprise is displayed by a single particle with a unit “charge”. It is shown that the random value of potential difference at the origin of coordinates measured at a definite time interval has the probability density coinciding with the known distribution of “Levy flights” or “Levy walks”. A distribution of alteration in time of the “Standard and Poor” index value obtained by Mantegna and Stanley (they shown that it is the “Levy walks” distribution too) (Mantegna and Stanley, Nature 376 (1995) 46) is used for determination of the introduced potential dependence on coordinates in the model space. A simple phenomenological model of interaction potential is introduced. The potential law of each particle turns out to be closed to r-2.14 in the minimum possible three-dimensional model space. This model permits calculation of time of random potential correlations at a certain point of the model space. These correlations could characterize the time period of making a decision by an investor at stock exchange. It is shown that this time is notably shorter in unstable periods (1987). A “microscopical” model of interaction in the virtual space is also discussed.

  13. Japanese photovoltaic power generation for space application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saga, T.; Kiyota, Y.; Matsutani, T.; Suzuki, A.; Kawasaki, O.; Hisamatsu, T.; Matsuda, S.

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes Japanese activities on mainly silicon solar cell research development and applications. The high efficiency thin silicon solar cells and the same kinds of solar cells with integrated bypass function (IBF cells) were developed and qualified for space applications. The most efficient cells (NRS/LBSF cells) showed average 18% at AMO and 28 C conditions. After electron irradiation, NRS/BSF cells showed higher efficiency than NRS/LBSF cells. The IBF cells do not suffer high reverse voltage and can survive from shadowing. The designs and characteristics of these solar cells are presented. In the last section, our future plan for the solar cell calibration is presented.

  14. Japanese photovoltaic power generation for space application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saga, T.; Kiyota, Y.; Matsutani, T.; Suzuki, A.; Kawasaki, O.; Hisamatsu, T.; Matsuda, S.

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes Japanese activities on mainly silicon solar cell research development and applications. The high efficiency thin silicon solar cells and the same kinds of solar cells with integrated bypass function (IBF cells) were developed and qualified for space applications. The most efficient cells (NRS/LBSF cells) showed average 18% at AMO and 28 C conditions. After electron irradiation, NRS/BSF cells showed higher efficiency than NRS/LBSF cells. The IBF cells do not suffer high reverse voltage and can survive from shadowing. The designs and characteristics of these solar cells are presented. In the last section, our future plan for the solar cell calibration is presented.

  15. Automatic mathematical modeling for space application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Caroline K.

    1987-01-01

    A methodology for automatic mathematical modeling is described. The major objective is to create a very friendly environment for engineers to design, maintain and verify their model and also automatically convert the mathematical model into FORTRAN code for conventional computation. A demonstration program was designed for modeling the Space Shuttle Main Engine simulation mathematical model called Propulsion System Automatic Modeling (PSAM). PSAM provides a very friendly and well organized environment for engineers to build a knowledge base for base equations and general information. PSAM contains an initial set of component process elements for the Space Shuttle Main Engine simulation and a questionnaire that allows the engineer to answer a set of questions to specify a particular model. PSAM is then able to automatically generate the model and the FORTRAN code. A future goal is to download the FORTRAN code to the VAX/VMS system for conventional computation.

  16. Orthogonal grid generation in two dimensional space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theodoropoulos, T.; Bergeles, G.; Athanassiadis, N.

    A generalization of a numerical technique for orthogonal mapping, used by Ryskin and Leal (1983) for the construction of boundary-fitted curvilinear coordinate systems in two-dimensional space, is proposed. The boundary-fitted orthogonal curvilinear coordinates are assumed to transform to Cartesian coordinates by Laplace equations. The scale factors involved in the Laplace equations are computed on boundaries and estimated on internal points by means of an interpolation formula. Three types of boundary conditions have been tested: Dirichlet, Cauchy-Riemann, and pseudo-Dirichlet. It is shown that, using this method, grids appropriate for the calculation of flow fields over sharp edges, complex boundary shapes, etc., can be easily constructed. Examples on various geometries are presented, together with a convenient method to check the orthogonality of the resulting meshes.

  17. Bridging the Worlds of Entertainment and Space - One Element of the Space Generation Foundation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hildago, L.

    2002-01-01

    Programme on Space Applications, SGSabstracts@unsgac.org/fax +1(281)244-7478 The Space Generation Foundation, founder of ISU, is the current home for Space Rocks!, Yuri's Night, and other space projects focused on education, outreach, and sustainable development worldwide. One particular area of success in 2001/2002 has been the involvement of the entertainment community in space events. Yuri's Night brought together musicians, DJs, artists, and the public to celebrate space. Space Rocks will do the same on a much larger scale, employing film, theatre, poetry, music, art, advertising firms, and other unconventional media to communicate space to the public. We will present about the aims and future plans of the Foundation. The Space Generation Advisory Council in support of the United Nations Programme on Space Applications has as its main focus Space education and outreach. Since the Space Generation Forum in 1999, successful global education and outreach projects have been implemented by young people around the world. These and new ideas are being further developed at the Space Generation Summit (SGS), an event at World Space Congress (WSC) that will unite international students and young professionals to develop a youth vision and strategy for the peaceful uses of space. SGS, endorsed by the United Nations, will take place from October 11-13th, during which the 200 delegates will discuss ongoing youth space activities, particularly those stemming from the UNISPACE- III/SGF and taken forward by the Space Generation Advisory Council. Delegates will address a variety of topics with the goal of devising new recommendations according to the theme, 'Accelerating Our Pace in Space'. The material presented here and in other technical sessions throughout WSC includes the results of these discussions.

  18. International Space Station (ISS) Addition of Hardware - Computer Generated Art

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    This computer generated scene of the International Space Station (ISS) represents the first addition of hardware following the completion of Phase II. The 8-A Phase shows the addition of the S-9 truss.

  19. Hydrazine gas generator performance on Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, I. J.; Swink, D. G.

    1983-01-01

    The design, functions, performance, and applications of the hydrazine gas generators (GG) on the STS are detailed. The GGs provide gas horse power for the APUs that drive the hydraulic pumps on the SRBs, which have two cross-linked systems. The Orbiter has three-cross-linked APU systems, used for gimballing the main engine and booster nozzles, actuating the main engine fuel valves and the ET umbilical disconnect, actuation of the control surfaces, and powering the landing gear, brakes, and nose wheel steering. The major design components of the Orbiter GGs are an injector, a catalyst bed, a decomposition chamber, an exhaust nozzle, and an interface structure, with the main structural material being Hasteloy B. Hydrazine injected and dispersed into the catalyst bed decomposes into gas and exits for expansion in an APU turbine. Twenty-six GGs have flown on missions STS-1 through STS-6 with over three tons of hydrazine having been expended over 44 hr of operations, as no refurbishment to that point was necessary.

  20. Modeling arcjet space thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhodes, Robert; Keefer, Dennis

    1991-01-01

    The UTSI arcjet model is used to compare the performance of a hydrogen and an ammonia arcjet in the same configuration and at the same electrical power. The predicted specific impulse is 50 percent higher for the hydrogen propellant. Numerical studies made of the effect of transport properties on the performance of a hydrogen arcjet indicate that diffusive transport is very significant even in the supersonic part of the flow, and that relatively small changes in transport properties can have a significant effect on performance. These studies also show that nonequilibrium recombination chemistry can have a large effect on the transport coefficients. This leads to the conclusion that finite rate chemical calculations are necessary if accurate arcjet performance is to be calculated.

  1. Modelling gas generation for landfill.

    PubMed

    Chakma, Sumedha; Mathur, Shashi

    2016-09-27

    A methodology was developed to predict the optimum long-term spatial and temporal generation of landfill gases such as methane, carbon dioxide, ammonia, and hydrogen sulphide on post-closure landfill. The model incorporated the chemical and the biochemical processes responsible for the degradation of the municipal solid waste. The developed model also takes into account the effects of heterogeneity with different layers as observed at the site of landfills' morphology. The important parameters for gas generation due to biodegradation such as temperature, pH, and moisture content were incorporated. The maximum and the minimum generations of methane and hydrogen sulphide were observed. The rate of gas generation was found almost same throughout the depth after 30 years of landfill closure. The proposed model would be very useful for landfill engineering in the mining landfill gas and proper design for landfill gas management systems.

  2. Modeling the Space Radiation Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xapsos, Michael A.

    2006-01-01

    There has been a renaissance of interest in space radiation environment modeling. This has been fueled by the growing need to replace long time standard AP-9 and AE-8 trapped particle models, the interplanetary exploration initiative, the modern satellite instrumentation that has led to unprecedented measurement accuracy, and the pervasive use of Commercial off the Shelf (COTS) microelectronics that require more accurate predictive capabilities. The objective of this viewgraph presentation was to provide basic understanding of the components of the space radiation environment and their variations, review traditional radiation effects application models, and present recent developments.

  3. Beyond the Hubble Space Telescope: Early Development of the Next Generation Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Robert W.; Patrick McCray, W.

    In this paper we investigate the early history of what was at first called the Next Generation Space Telescope, later to be renamed the James Webb Space Telescope. We argue that the initial ideas for such a Next Generation Space Telescope were developed in the context of the planning for a successor to the Hubble Space Telescope. Much the most important group of astronomers and engineers examining such a successor was based at the Space Telescope Science Institute in Baltimore. By the late 1980s, they had fashioned concepts for a successor that would work in optical, ultraviolet and infrared wavelengths, concepts that would later be regarded as politically unrealistic given the costs associated with them. We also explore how the fortunes of the planned Next Generation Space Telescope were intimately linked to that of its "parent," the Hubble Space Telescope.

  4. Computational Modeling of Space Physiology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewandowski, Beth E.; Griffin, Devon W.

    2016-01-01

    The Digital Astronaut Project (DAP), within NASAs Human Research Program, develops and implements computational modeling for use in the mitigation of human health and performance risks associated with long duration spaceflight. Over the past decade, DAP developed models to provide insights into space flight related changes to the central nervous system, cardiovascular system and the musculoskeletal system. Examples of the models and their applications include biomechanical models applied to advanced exercise device development, bone fracture risk quantification for mission planning, accident investigation, bone health standards development, and occupant protection. The International Space Station (ISS), in its role as a testing ground for long duration spaceflight, has been an important platform for obtaining human spaceflight data. DAP has used preflight, in-flight and post-flight data from short and long duration astronauts for computational model development and validation. Examples include preflight and post-flight bone mineral density data, muscle cross-sectional area, and muscle strength measurements. Results from computational modeling supplement space physiology research by informing experimental design. Using these computational models, DAP personnel can easily identify both important factors associated with a phenomenon and areas where data are lacking. This presentation will provide examples of DAP computational models, the data used in model development and validation, and applications of the model.

  5. Space Weather Modeling at the Community Coordinated Modeling Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hesse M.

    2005-01-01

    The Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC) is a multi-agency partnership, which aims at the creation of next generation space weather models. The goal of the CCMC is to support the research and developmental work necessary to substantially increase the present-day modeling capability for space weather purposes, and to provide models for transition to the rapid prototyping centers at the space weather forecast centers. This goal requires dose collaborations with and substantial involvement of the research community. The physical regions to be addressed by CCMC-related activities range from the solar atmosphere to the Earth's upper atmosphere. The CCMC is an integral part of the National Space Weather Program Implementation Plan, of NASA's Living With a Star (LWS) initiative, and of the Department of Defense Space Weather Transition Plan. CCMC includes a facility at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, as well as distributed computing facilities provided by the US Air Force. CCMC also provides, to the research community, access to state-of-the-art space research models. In this paper we will provide updates on CCMC status, on current plans, research and development accomplishments and goals, and on the model testing and validation process undertaken as part of the CCMC mandate. Special emphasis will be on solar and heliospheric models currently residing at CCMC, and on plans for validation and verification.

  6. Space Weather Modeling Services at the Community Coordinated Modeling Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hesse, Michael

    2006-01-01

    The Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC) is a multi-agency partnership, which aims at the creation of next generation space weather models. The goal of the CCMC is to support the research and developmental work necessary to substantially increase the present-day modeling capability for space weather purposes, and to provide models for transition to the Rapid Prototyping Centers at the space weather forecast centers. This goal requires close collaborations with and substantial involvement of the research community. The physical regions to be addressed by CCMC-related activities range from the solar atmosphere to the Earth's upper atmosphere. The CCMC is an integral part of the National Space Weather Program Implementation Plan, of NASA's Living With a Star (LWS) initiative, and of the Department of Defense Space Weather Transition Plan. CCMC includes a facility at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. CCMC also provides, to the research community, access to state-of-the-art space research models. In this paper we will provide a description of the current CCMC status, discuss current plans, research and development accomplishments and goals, and describe the model testing and validation process undertaken as part of the CCMC mandate. Special emphasis will be on solar and heliospheric models currently residing at CCMC, and on plans for validation and verification.

  7. Space Weather Modeling at the Community Coordinated Modeling Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hesse M.

    2005-01-01

    The Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC) is a multi-agency partnership, which aims at the creation of next generation space weather models. The goal of the CCMC is to support the research and developmental work necessary to substantially increase the present-day modeling capability for space weather purposes, and to provide models for transition to the rapid prototyping centers at the space weather forecast centers. This goal requires dose collaborations with and substantial involvement of the research community. The physical regions to be addressed by CCMC-related activities range from the solar atmosphere to the Earth's upper atmosphere. The CCMC is an integral part of the National Space Weather Program Implementation Plan, of NASA's Living With a Star (LWS) initiative, and of the Department of Defense Space Weather Transition Plan. CCMC includes a facility at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, as well as distributed computing facilities provided by the US Air Force. CCMC also provides, to the research community, access to state-of-the-art space research models. In this paper we will provide updates on CCMC status, on current plans, research and development accomplishments and goals, and on the model testing and validation process undertaken as part of the CCMC mandate. Special emphasis will be on solar and heliospheric models currently residing at CCMC, and on plans for validation and verification.

  8. Space Weather Modeling Services at the Community Coordinated Modeling Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hesse, Michael

    2006-01-01

    The Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC) is a multi-agency partnership, which aims at the creation of next generation space weather models. The goal of the CCMC is to support the research and developmental work necessary to substantially increase the present-day modeling capability for space weather purposes, and to provide models for transition to the Rapid Prototyping Centers at the space weather forecast centers. This goal requires close collaborations with and substantial involvement of the research community. The physical regions to be addressed by CCMC-related activities range from the solar atmosphere to the Earth's upper atmosphere. The CCMC is an integral part of the National Space Weather Program Implementation Plan, of NASA's Living With a Star (LWS) initiative, and of the Department of Defense Space Weather Transition Plan. CCMC includes a facility at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. CCMC also provides, to the research community, access to state-of-the-art space research models. In this paper we will provide a description of the current CCMC status, discuss current plans, research and development accomplishments and goals, and describe the model testing and validation process undertaken as part of the CCMC mandate. Special emphasis will be on solar and heliospheric models currently residing at CCMC, and on plans for validation and verification.

  9. Enabling the 2nd Generation in Space: Building Blocks for Large Scale Space Endeavours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnhardt, D.; Garretson, P.; Will, P.

    Today the world operates within a "first generation" space industrial enterprise, i.e. all industry is on Earth, all value from space is from bits (data essentially), and the focus is Earth-centric, with very limited parts of our population and industry participating in space. We are limited in access, manoeuvring, on-orbit servicing, in-space power, in-space manufacturing and assembly. The transition to a "Starship culture" requires the Earth to progress to a "second generation" space industrial base, which implies the need to expand the economic sphere of activity of mankind outside of an Earth-centric zone and into CIS-lunar space and beyond, with an equal ability to tap the indigenous resources in space (energy, location, materials) that will contribute to an expanding space economy. Right now, there is no comfortable place for space applications that are not discovery science, exploration, military, or established earth bound services. For the most part, space applications leave out -- or at least leave nebulous, unconsolidated, and without a critical mass -- programs and development efforts for infrastructure, industrialization, space resources (survey and process maturation), non-traditional and persistent security situational awareness, and global utilities -- all of which, to a far greater extent than a discovery and exploration program, may help determine the elements of a 2nd generation space capability. We propose a focus to seed the pre-competitive research that will enable global industry to develop the necessary competencies that we currently lack to build large scale space structures on-orbit, that in turn would lay the foundation for long duration spacecraft travel (i.e. key technologies in access, manoeuvrability, etc.). This paper will posit a vision-to-reality for a step wise approach to the types of activities the US and global space providers could embark upon to lay the foundation for the 2nd generation of Earth in space.

  10. Future Developments of the Next Generation Manned Space Platforms (European and Russian Space Students Perspectives)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Douglas K. R.

    2002-01-01

    The opportunities for research made available by in-orbit manned space platforms is extensive. Research topics from space life science and biotechnology to material science and structural mechanics, from Astrophysics to the Low Earth Orbit environment to name a few. The list is long and has been growing steadily since the launch of Salyut 1 in 1971 till the present day ISS. With the construction of the ISS now into its final phase, what is the future of such research platforms? What will the "Next Generation" space station comprise of? What of manned research platforms beyond LEO and what constraints are foreseen after ISS. This paper presents current issues concerning the conceptual design of the "Next Generation" manned space platforms, the obstacles that are predicted concerning major subsystems of such platforms and also predictions of where the foci of research will concentrate. Future developments of the next generation manned space platforms presents research by the author in both his previous academic institutions1, personal opinions and the opinions of other young space research students and space professionals including Super Aero (France), Leicester University and Space Research Centre (UK) and Moscow State University (Russia). Here the author will detail the areas in which the contributors (representing the next generation space professionals) believe manned space platform architectures will be evolved, new technological developments and barriers to be overcome. In addition, new methods of Spacecraft design will also be presented, referring in the main to the Space Station Design Workshop 2002 (ESTEC Concurrent Design Facility) a week long workshop where a group of 30 young space professionals where brought together to design a conceptual space station. Future developments of the next generation manned space platforms has been composed with two aims. Firstly, to convey to both young space enthusiasts and more mature space professionals the ideas

  11. Generative Models of Conformational Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Langmead, Christopher James

    2014-01-01

    Atomistic simulations of the conformational dynamics of proteins can be performed using either Molecular Dynamics or Monte Carlo procedures. The ensembles of three-dimensional structures produced during simulation can be analyzed in a number of ways to elucidate the thermodynamic and kinetic properties of the system. The goal of this chapter is to review both traditional and emerging methods for learning generative models from atomistic simulation data. Here, the term ‘generative’ refers to a model of the joint probability distribution over the behaviors of the constituent atoms. In the context of molecular modeling, generative models reveal the correlation structure between the atoms, and may be used to predict how the system will respond to structural perturbations. We begin by discussing traditional methods, which produce multivariate Gaussian models. We then discuss GAMELAN (GrAphical Models of Energy LANdscapes), which produces generative models of complex, non-Gaussian conformational dynamics (e.g., allostery, binding, folding, etc) from long timescale simulation data. PMID:24446358

  12. Simulation of MEMS for the Next Generation Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mott, Brent; Kuhn, Jonathan; Broduer, Steve (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) is developing optical micro-electromechanical system (MEMS) components for potential application in Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST) science instruments. In this work, we present an overview of the electro-mechanical simulation of three MEMS components for NGST, which include a reflective micro-mirror array and transmissive microshutter array for aperture control for a near infrared (NIR) multi-object spectrometer and a large aperture MEMS Fabry-Perot tunable filter for a NIR wide field camera. In all cases the device must operate at cryogenic temperatures with low power consumption and low, complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) compatible, voltages. The goal of our simulation efforts is to adequately predict both the performance and the reliability of the devices during ground handling, launch, and operation to prevent failures late in the development process and during flight. This goal requires detailed modeling and validation of complex electro-thermal-mechanical interactions and very large non-linear deformations, often involving surface contact. Various parameters such as spatial dimensions and device response are often difficult to measure reliably at these small scales. In addition, these devices are fabricated from a wide variety of materials including surface micro-machined aluminum, reactive ion etched (RIE) silicon nitride, and deep reactive ion etched (DRIE) bulk single crystal silicon. The above broad set of conditions combine to be a formidable challenge for space flight qualification analysis. These simulations represent NASA/GSFC's first attempts at implementing a comprehensive strategy to address complex MEMS structures.

  13. Simulation of MEMS for the Next Generation Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mott, Brent; Kuhn, Jonathan; Broduer, Steve (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) is developing optical micro-electromechanical system (MEMS) components for potential application in Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST) science instruments. In this work, we present an overview of the electro-mechanical simulation of three MEMS components for NGST, which include a reflective micro-mirror array and transmissive microshutter array for aperture control for a near infrared (NIR) multi-object spectrometer and a large aperture MEMS Fabry-Perot tunable filter for a NIR wide field camera. In all cases the device must operate at cryogenic temperatures with low power consumption and low, complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) compatible, voltages. The goal of our simulation efforts is to adequately predict both the performance and the reliability of the devices during ground handling, launch, and operation to prevent failures late in the development process and during flight. This goal requires detailed modeling and validation of complex electro-thermal-mechanical interactions and very large non-linear deformations, often involving surface contact. Various parameters such as spatial dimensions and device response are often difficult to measure reliably at these small scales. In addition, these devices are fabricated from a wide variety of materials including surface micro-machined aluminum, reactive ion etched (RIE) silicon nitride, and deep reactive ion etched (DRIE) bulk single crystal silicon. The above broad set of conditions combine to be a formidable challenge for space flight qualification analysis. These simulations represent NASA/GSFC's first attempts at implementing a comprehensive strategy to address complex MEMS structures.

  14. Preservation of Near-Earth Space for Future Generations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, John A.

    2007-05-01

    debris - current status Howard A. Baker; 22. Who should regulate the space environment: the laissez-faire, national and multinational options Diane P. Wood; Part VI. A Multilateral Treaty: 23. Orbital debris: prospects for international cooperation Jeffrey Maclure and William C. Bartley; 24. Preservation of near Earth space for future generations: current initiatives on space debris in the United Nations Stephen Gorove; 25. A legal regime for orbital debris: elements of a multilateral treaty Pamela L. Meredith; Part VII. Panel Discussions: 26. Panel discussion led by Diane Wood; 27. Panel discussion led by Paul Uhlir; 28. Suggested further reading on orbital debris.

  15. Space Debris Modeling at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Nicholas L.

    2001-01-01

    Since the Second European Conference on Space Debris in 1997, the Orbital Debris Program Office at the NASA Johnson Space Center has undertaken a major effort to update and improve the principal software tools employed to model the space debris environment and to evaluate mission risks. NASA's orbital debris engineering model, ORDEM, represents the current and near-term Earth orbital debris population from the largest spacecraft to the smallest debris in a manner which permits spacecraft engineers and experimenters to estimate the frequency and velocity with which a satellite may be struck by debris of different sizes. Using expanded databases and a new program design, ORDEM2000 provides a more accurate environment definition combined with a much broader array of output products in comparison with its predecessor, ORDEM96. Studies of the potential long-term space debris environment are now conducted with EVOLVE 4.0, which incorporates significant advances in debris characterization and breakup modeling. An adjunct to EVOLVE 4.0, GEO EVOLVE has been created to examine debris issues near the geosynchronous orbital regime. In support of NASA Safety Standard 1740.14, which establishes debris mitigation guidelines for all NASA space programs, a set of evaluation tools called the Debris Assessment Software (DAS) is specifically designed for program offices to determine whether they are in compliance with NASA debris mitigation guidelines. DAS 1.5 has recently been released with improved WINDOWS compatibility and graphics functions. DAS 2.0 will incorporate guideline changes in a forthcoming revision to NASA Safety Standard 1740.14. Whereas DAS contains a simplified model to calculate possible risks associated with satellite reentries, NASA's higher fidelity Object Reentry Survival Analysis Tool (ORSAT) has been upgraded to Version 5.0. With the growing awareness of the potential risks posed by uncontrolled satellite reentries to people and property on Earth, the

  16. Space Weather Products at the Community Coordinated Modeling Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hesse, Michael; Kuznetsova, M.; Pulkkinen, A.; Maddox, M.; Rastaetter, L.; Berrios, D.; MacNeice, P.

    2010-01-01

    The Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC) is a US inter-agency activity aiming at research in support of the generation of advanced space weather models. As one of its main functions, the CCMC provides to researchers the use of space science models, even if they are not model owners themselves. The second CCMC activity is to support Space Weather forecasting at national Space Weather Forecasting Centers. This second activity involves model evaluations, model transitions to operations, and the development of space weather forecasting tools. Owing to the pace of development in the science community, new model capabilities emerge frequently. Consequently, space weather products and tools involve not only increased validity, but often entirely new capabilities. This presentation will review the present state of space weather tools as well as point out emerging future capabilities.

  17. ISSLIVE! Bringing the Space Station to Every Generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Philip D.; Price, Jennifer B.; Severance, Mark; Blue, Regina; Khan, Ahmed; Healy, Matthew D.; Ehlinger, Jesse B.

    2011-01-01

    Just 200 miles above us, the International Space Station (ISS) is orbiting. Each day, the astronauts on board perform a variety of activities from exercise, science experiments, and maintenance. Yet, many on the ground don?t know about these daily activities. ISSLive! - an education project - is working to bridge this knowledge gap with traditional education channels such as schools, but also non-traditional channels with the non-technical everyday public. ISSLive! provides a website that seamlessly integrates planning and telemetry data, video feeds, 3D models, and iOS and android applications. Through the site, users are able to view astronauts? daily schedules, in plain English alongside the original data. As an example, when an astronaut is working with a science experiment, a user will be able to read about the activity and for more detailed activities follow provided links to view more information -- all integrated into the same site. Live telemetry data from a predefined set can also be provided alongside the activities. For users to learn more, 3D models of the external and internal parts of the ISS are available, allowing users to explore the station and even select sensors, such as temperature, and view a real-time chart of the data. Even ground operations are modelled with a 3D mission control center, providing users information on the various flight control disciplines and showing live data that they would be monitoring. Some unique activities are also highlighted, and have dedicated spaces to explore in more detail. Education is the focus of ISSLive!, even from the beginning when university students participated in the development process as part of their master?s projects. Focus groups at a Houston school showed interest in the project, and excitement towards including ISSLive! in their classroom. Through this inclusion, student?s knowledge can be assessed with projects, oral presentations, and other assignments. For the public citizens outside of the

  18. Knowledge Generation Model for Visual Analytics.

    PubMed

    Sacha, Dominik; Stoffel, Andreas; Stoffel, Florian; Kwon, Bum Chul; Ellis, Geoffrey; Keim, Daniel A

    2014-12-01

    Visual analytics enables us to analyze huge information spaces in order to support complex decision making and data exploration. Humans play a central role in generating knowledge from the snippets of evidence emerging from visual data analysis. Although prior research provides frameworks that generalize this process, their scope is often narrowly focused so they do not encompass different perspectives at different levels. This paper proposes a knowledge generation model for visual analytics that ties together these diverse frameworks, yet retains previously developed models (e.g., KDD process) to describe individual segments of the overall visual analytic processes. To test its utility, a real world visual analytics system is compared against the model, demonstrating that the knowledge generation process model provides a useful guideline when developing and evaluating such systems. The model is used to effectively compare different data analysis systems. Furthermore, the model provides a common language and description of visual analytic processes, which can be used for communication between researchers. At the end, our model reflects areas of research that future researchers can embark on.

  19. Model verification of large structural systems. [space shuttle model response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, L. T.; Hasselman, T. K.

    1978-01-01

    A computer program for the application of parameter identification on the structural dynamic models of space shuttle and other large models with hundreds of degrees of freedom is described. Finite element, dynamic, analytic, and modal models are used to represent the structural system. The interface with math models is such that output from any structural analysis program applied to any structural configuration can be used directly. Processed data from either sine-sweep tests or resonant dwell tests are directly usable. The program uses measured modal data to condition the prior analystic model so as to improve the frequency match between model and test. A Bayesian estimator generates an improved analytical model and a linear estimator is used in an iterative fashion on highly nonlinear equations. Mass and stiffness scaling parameters are generated for an improved finite element model, and the optimum set of parameters is obtained in one step.

  20. Space debris modeling at NASA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Nicholas L.

    2001-10-01

    Since the Second European Conference on Space Debris in 1997, the Orbital Debris Program Office at the NASA Johnson Space Center has undertaken a major effort to update and improve the principal software tools employed to model the space debris environment and to evaluate mission risks. NASA's orbital debris engineering model, ORDEM, represents the current and near-term Earth orbital debris population from the largest spacecraft to the smallest debris in a manner which permits spacecraft engineers and experimenters to estimate the frequency and velocity with which a satellite may be struck by debris of different sizes. Using expanded databases and a new program design, ORDEM2000 provides a more accurate environment definition combined with a much broader array of output products in comparison with its predecessor, ORDEM96. Studies of the potential long-term space debris environment are now conducted with EVOVLE 4.0, which incorporates significant advances in debris characterization and breakup modeling. An adjunct to EVOLVE 4.0, GEO EVOLVE has been created to examine debris issues near the geosynchronous orbital regime. In support of NASA Safety Standard (NSS) 1740.14, which establishes debris mitigation guidelines for all NASA space programs, a set of evaluation tools called the Debris Assessment Software (DAS) is specifically designed for program offices to determine whether they are in compliance with NASA debris mitigation guidelines. DAS 1.5 has recently been completed with improved WINDOWS compatibility and graphics functions. DAS 2.0 will incorporate guideline changes in a forthcoming revision to NSS 1740.14. Whereas DAS contains a simplified model to calculate possible risks associated with satellite reentries, NASA's higher fidelity Object Reentry Survival Analysis Tool (ORSAT) has been upgraded to Version 5.0. With the growing awareness of the potential risks posed by uncontrolled satellite reentries to people and property on Earth, the application of

  1. Modeling and Analysis of Space Based Transceivers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinhart, Richard C.; Liebetreu, John; Moore, Michael S.; Price, Jeremy C.; Abbott, Ben

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents the tool chain, methodology, and initial results of a study to provide a thorough, objective, and quantitative analysis of the design alternatives for space Software Defined Radio (SDR) transceivers. The approach taken was to develop a set of models and tools for describing communications requirements, the algorithm resource requirements, the available hardware, and the alternative software architectures, and generate analysis data necessary to compare alternative designs. The Space Transceiver Analysis Tool (STAT) was developed to help users identify and select representative designs, calculate the analysis data, and perform a comparative analysis of the representative designs. The tool allows the design space to be searched quickly while permitting incremental refinement in regions of higher payoff.

  2. Modeling and Analysis of Space Based Transceivers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Michael S.; Price, Jeremy C.; Abbott, Ben; Liebetreu, John; Reinhart, Richard C.; Kacpura, Thomas J.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents the tool chain, methodology, and initial results of a study to provide a thorough, objective, and quantitative analysis of the design alternatives for space Software Defined Radio (SDR) transceivers. The approach taken was to develop a set of models and tools for describing communications requirements, the algorithm resource requirements, the available hardware, and the alternative software architectures, and generate analysis data necessary to compare alternative designs. The Space Transceiver Analysis Tool (STAT) was developed to help users identify and select representative designs, calculate the analysis data, and perform a comparative analysis of the representative designs. The tool allows the design space to be searched quickly while permitting incremental refinement in regions of higher payoff.

  3. A grid spacing control technique for algebraic grid generation methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, R. E.; Kudlinski, R. A.; Everton, E. L.

    1982-01-01

    A technique which controls the spacing of grid points in algebraically defined coordinate transformations is described. The technique is based on the generation of control functions which map a uniformly distributed computational grid onto parametric variables defining the physical grid. The control functions are smoothed cubic splines. Sets of control points are input for each coordinate directions to outline the control functions. Smoothed cubic spline functions are then generated to approximate the input data. The technique works best in an interactive graphics environment where control inputs and grid displays are nearly instantaneous. The technique is illustrated with the two-boundary grid generation algorithm.

  4. Next generation: In-space transportation system(s)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huffaker, Fredrick; Redus, Jerry; Kelley, David L.

    1991-01-01

    The development of the next generation In-Space Transportation System presents a unique challenge to the design of a propulsion system for the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI). Never before have the requirements for long-life, multiple mission use, space basing, high reliability, man-rating, and minimum maintenance come together with performance in one system that must protect the lives of space travelers, support the mission logistics needs, and do so at an acceptable cost. The challenge that is presented is to quantify the bounds of these requirements. The issue is one of degree. The length of acceptable life in space, the time it takes for reuse to pay off, and the degree to which space basing is practical (full, partial, or expended) are the issues that determine the reusable bounds of a design and include dependability, contingency capabilities, resilency, and minimum dependence on a maintenance node in preparation for and during a mission. Missions to planet earth, other non-NASA missions, and planetary missions will provide important but less demanding requirements for the transportation systems of the future. The mission proposed for the SEI require a family of transportation vehicles to meet the requirements for establishing a permanent human presence on the Moon and eventually on Mars. Specialized vehicles are needed to accomplish the different phases of each mission. These large scale missions require assembly in space and will provide the greatest usage of the planned integrated transportation system. The current approach to defining the In-Space Transportation System for the SEI Moon missions with later Mars mission applications is presented. Several system development options, propulsion concepts, current/proposed activities are reviewed, and key propulsion design criteria, issues, and technology challenges for the next generation In-Space Transportation System(s) are outlined.

  5. Landslide-Generated Tsunami model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franz, Martin; Take, Andy; Mulligan, Ryan; Jaboyedoff, Michel; Podladchikov, Yury

    2017-04-01

    The landslide-generated tsunamis are known to have catastrophic potential consequences on the infrastructures and populations on the shore of the water body. One way to assess this risk is by the mean of predictive models. Such models are often based on shallow water equations as they are fast and relatively easy to implement. Nevertheless, the run-up simulation and the generation of the wave by the penetration of the landslide mass in the water still remains a big concern. In this study, we focus on the wave generation. In order to investigate this topic, we tried to reproduce numerically physical experiments. These latter were performed on a large flume where granular material is released downslope. The thickness, the velocity of the granular flow and the slide deposit, its position and shape are well detailed. The induced wave amplitude and shape are recorder along its path. The initial material volume and the water depth, including dry case, undergo variations. The numerical model for the granular flow is based on the shallow water equations and several rheology laws can be chosen (such as Voelmy, Coulomb). The tsunami model is also based on the shallow water equations and uses the Lax-Friedrichs scheme. The wave is not only generated by the topographic change, but also by the transfer of the granular flow momentum. The numerical simulations are firstly conducted on the propagation of the granular flow (dry case) implementing different initial volumes. The results show good correspondence regarding the velocity and the thickness of the flow. The position and the shape of the deposit also match the observed data. Secondly, the numerical simulation incorporates various still water depths. The results fit well the measured data, in terms of landslide deposit and wave amplitude.

  6. Next Generation Lightweight Mirror Modeling Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, William R., Sr.; Fitzgerald, Mathew; Rosa, Rubin Jaca; Stahl, H. Philip

    2013-01-01

    The advances in manufacturing techniques for lightweight mirrors, such as EXELSIS deep core low temperature fusion, Corning's continued improvements in the Frit bonding process and the ability to cast large complex designs, combined with water-jet and conventional diamond machining of glasses and ceramics has created the need for more efficient means of generating finite element models of these structures. Traditional methods of assembling 400,000 + element models can take weeks of effort, severely limiting the range of possible optimization variables. This paper will introduce model generation software developed under NASA sponsorship for the design of both terrestrial and space based mirrors. The software deals with any current mirror manufacturing technique, single substrates, multiple arrays of substrates, as well as the ability to merge submodels into a single large model. The modeler generates both mirror and suspension system elements, suspensions can be created either for each individual petal or the whole mirror. A typical model generation of 250,000 nodes and 450,000 elements only takes 5-10 minutes, much of that time being variable input time. The program can create input decks for ANSYS, ABAQUS and NASTRAN. An archive/retrieval system permits creation of complete trade studies, varying cell size, depth, and petal size, suspension geometry with the ability to recall a particular set of parameters and make small or large changes with ease. The input decks created by the modeler are text files which can be modified by any editor, all the key shell thickness parameters are accessible and comments in deck identify which groups of elements are associated with these parameters. This again makes optimization easier. With ANSYS decks, the nodes representing support attachments are grouped into components; in ABAQUS these are SETS and in NASTRAN as GRIDPOINT SETS, this make integration of these models into large telescope or satellite models easier.

  7. Next Generation Lightweight Mirror Modeling Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, William; Fitzgerald, Matthew; Stahl, Philip

    2013-01-01

    The advances in manufacturing techniques for lightweight mirrors, such as EXELSIS deep core low temperature fusion, Corning's continued improvements in the Frit bonding process and the ability to cast large complex designs, combined with water-jet and conventional diamond machining of glasses and ceramics has created the need for more efficient means of generating finite element models of these structures. Traditional methods of assembling 400,000 + element models can take weeks of effort, severely limiting the range of possible optimization variables. This paper will introduce model generation software developed under NASA sponsorship for the design of both terrestrial and space based mirrors. The software deals with any current mirror manufacturing technique, single substrates, multiple arrays of substrates, as well as the ability to merge submodels into a single large model. The modeler generates both mirror and suspension system elements, suspensions can be created either for each individual petal or the whole mirror. A typical model generation of 250,000 nodes and 450,000 elements only takes 5-10 minutes, much of that time being variable input time. The program can create input decks for ANSYS, ABAQUS and NASTRAN. An archive/retrieval system permits creation of complete trade studies, varying cell size, depth, and petal size, suspension geometry with the ability to recall a particular set of parameters and make small or large changes with ease. The input decks created by the modeler are text files which can be modified by any editor, all the key shell thickness parameters are accessible and comments in deck identify which groups of elements are associated with these parameters. This again makes optimization easier. With ANSYS decks, the nodes representing support attachments are grouped into components; in ABAQUS these are SETS and in NASTRAN as GRIDPOINT SETS, this make integration of these models into large telescope or satellite models possible.

  8. Next-Generation Lightweight Mirror Modeling Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, William R., Sr.; Fitzgerald, Mathew; Rosa, Rubin Jaca; Stahl, Phil

    2013-01-01

    The advances in manufacturing techniques for lightweight mirrors, such as EXELSIS deep core low temperature fusion, Corning's continued improvements in the Frit bonding process and the ability to cast large complex designs, combined with water-jet and conventional diamond machining of glasses and ceramics has created the need for more efficient means of generating finite element models of these structures. Traditional methods of assembling 400,000 + element models can take weeks of effort, severely limiting the range of possible optimization variables. This paper will introduce model generation software developed under NASA sponsorship for the design of both terrestrial and space based mirrors. The software deals with any current mirror manufacturing technique, single substrates, multiple arrays of substrates, as well as the ability to merge submodels into a single large model. The modeler generates both mirror and suspension system elements, suspensions can be created either for each individual petal or the whole mirror. A typical model generation of 250,000 nodes and 450,000 elements only takes 5-10 minutes, much of that time being variable input time. The program can create input decks for ANSYS, ABAQUS and NASTRAN. An archive/retrieval system permits creation of complete trade studies, varying cell size, depth, and petal size, suspension geometry with the ability to recall a particular set of parameters and make small or large changes with ease. The input decks created by the modeler are text files which can be modified by any editor, all the key shell thickness parameters are accessible and comments in deck identify which groups of elements are associated with these parameters. This again makes optimization easier. With ANSYS decks, the nodes representing support attachments are grouped into components; in ABAQUS these are SETS and in NASTRAN as GRIDPOINT SETS, this make integration of these models into large telescope or satellite models possible

  9. On trajectory generation for flexible space crane: Inverse dynamics analysis by LATDYN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, G.-S.; Housner, J. M.; Wu, S.-C.; Chang, C.-W.

    1989-01-01

    For future in-space construction facility, one or more space cranes capable of manipulating and positioning large and massive spacecraft components will be needed. Inverse dynamics was extensively studied as a basis for trajectory generation and control of robot manipulators. The focus here is on trajectory generation in the gross-motion phase of space crane operation. Inverse dynamics of the flexible crane body is much more complex and intricate as compared with rigid robot link. To model and solve the space crane's inverse dynamics problem, LATDYN program which employs a three-dimensional finite element formulation for the multibody truss-type structures will be used. The formulation is oriented toward a joint dominated structure which is suitable for the proposed space crane concept. To track a planned trajectory, procedures will be developed to obtain the actuation profile and dynamics envelope which are pertinent to the design and performance requirements of the space crane concept.

  10. SpaceNet: Modeling and Simulating Space Logistics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Gene; Jordan, Elizabeth; Shishko, Robert; de Weck, Olivier; Armar, Nii; Siddiqi, Afreen

    2008-01-01

    This paper summarizes the current state of the art in interplanetary supply chain modeling and discusses SpaceNet as one particular method and tool to address space logistics modeling and simulation challenges. Fundamental upgrades to the interplanetary supply chain framework such as process groups, nested elements, and cargo sharing, enabled SpaceNet to model an integrated set of missions as a campaign. The capabilities and uses of SpaceNet are demonstrated by a step-by-step modeling and simulation of a lunar campaign.

  11. SpaceNet: Modeling and Simulating Space Logistics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Gene; Jordan, Elizabeth; Shishko, Robert; de Weck, Olivier; Armar, Nii; Siddiqi, Afreen

    2008-01-01

    This paper summarizes the current state of the art in interplanetary supply chain modeling and discusses SpaceNet as one particular method and tool to address space logistics modeling and simulation challenges. Fundamental upgrades to the interplanetary supply chain framework such as process groups, nested elements, and cargo sharing, enabled SpaceNet to model an integrated set of missions as a campaign. The capabilities and uses of SpaceNet are demonstrated by a step-by-step modeling and simulation of a lunar campaign.

  12. Fine pointing control for a Next-Generation Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosier, Gary E.; Femiano, Michael; Ha, Kong; Bely, Pierre Y.; Burg, Richard; Redding, David C.; Kissil, Andrew; Rakoczy, John; Craig, Larry

    1998-08-01

    The Next Generation Space Telescope will provide at least ten times the collecting area of the Hubble Space Telescope in a package that fits into the shroud of an expendable launch vehicle. The resulting large, flexible structure provides a challenge to the design of a pointing control system for which the requirements are at the milli-arcsecond level. This paper describes a design concept in which pointing stability is achieved by means of a nested-loop design involving an inertial attitude control system (ACS) and a fast steering mirror (FSM). A key to the integrated control design is that the ACS controllers has a bandwidth well below known structural modes and the FSM uses a rotationally balanced mechanism which should not interact with the flexible modes that are within its control bandwidth. The ACS controller provides stable pointing of the spacecraft bus with star trackers and gyros. This low bandwidth loop uses nearly co-located sensors and actuators to slew and acquire faint guide stars in the NIR camera. This controller provides a payload reference stable to the arcsecond level. Low-frequency pointing errors due to sensor noise and dynamic disturbances are suppressed by a 2-axis gimbaled FSM locate din the instrument module. The FSM servo bandwidth of 6 Hz is intended to keep the guide star position stable in the NIR focal plane to the required milli-arcsecond level. The mirror is kept centered in its range of travel by a low-bandwidth loop closed around the ACS. This paper presents the result of parametric trade studies designed to assess the performance of this control design in the presence of modeled reaction wheel disturbances, assumed to be the principle source of vibration for the NGST, and variations in structural dynamics. Additionally, requirements for reaction wheel disturbance levels and potential vibration isolation subsystems were developed.

  13. Phase-Space Reconstruction: a Path Towards the Next Generation of Nonlinear Differential Equation Based Models and Its Implications Towards Non-Uniform Sampling Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Charles R. Tolle; Mark Pengitore

    2009-08-01

    This paper explores the overlaps between the Control community’s work on System Identification (SysID) and the Physics, Mathematics, Chaos, and Complexity communities’ work on phase-space reconstruction via time-delay embedding. There are numerous overlaps between the goals of each community. Nevertheless, the Controls community can gain new insight as well as some new very powerful tools for SysID from the latest developments within the Physics, Mathematics, Chaos, and Complexity communities. These insights are gained via the work on phase-space reconstruction of non-linear dynamics. New methods for discovering non-linear differential based equations that evolved from embedding operations can shed new light on hybrid-systems theory, Nyquest-Shannon’s Theories, and network based control theory. This paper strives to guide the Controls community towards a closer inspection of the tools and additional insights being developed within the Physics, Mathematics, Chaos, and Complexity communities for discovery of system dynamics, the first step in control system development. The paper introduces the concepts of phase-space reconstruction via time-delay embedding (made famous byWhitney, Takens, and Sauer’s Thoreoms), intergrate-and-fire embedding, and non-linear differential equation discovery based on Perona’s method.

  14. Benchmarking Ionizing Space Environment Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourdarie, S.; Inguimbert, C.; Standarovski, D.; Vaillé, J.-R.; Sicard-Piet, A.; Falguere, D.; Ecoffet, R.; Poivey, C.; Lorfèvre, E.

    2017-08-01

    In-flight feedback data are collected, such as displacement damage doses, ionizing doses, and cumulated Single Event upset (SEU) on board various space vehicles and are compared to predictions performed with: 1) proton measurements performed with spectrometers data on board the same spacecraft if any and 2) protons spectrum predicted by the legacy AP8min model and the AP9 and Onera Proton Altitude Low models. When an accurate representation of the 3-D spacecraft shielding as well as appropriate ground calibrations are considered in the calculations, such comparisons provide powerful metrics to investigate engineering model accuracy. To describe >30 MeV trapped protons fluxes, the AP8 min model is found to provide closer predictions to observations than AP9 V1.30.001 (mean and perturbed mean).

  15. Assessing Smart Phones for Generating Life-space Indicators.

    PubMed

    Wan, Neng; Qu, Wenyu; Whittington, Jackie; Witbrodt, Bradley C; Henderson, Mary Pearl; Goulding, Evan H; Schenk, A Katrin; Bonasera, Stephen J; Lin, Ge

    2013-04-01

    Life-space is a promising method for estimating older adults' functional status. However, traditional life-space measures are costly and time consuming because they often rely on active subject participation. This study assesses the feasibility of using the global positioning system (GPS) function of smart phones to generate life-space indicators. We first evaluated the location accuracy of smart phone collected GPS points versus those acquired by a commercial GPS unit. We then assessed the specificity of the smart phone processed life-space information against the traditional diary method. Our results suggested comparable location accuracy between the smart phone and the standard GPS unit in most outdoor situations. In addition, the smart phone method revealed more comprehensive life-space information than the diary method, which leads to higher and more consistent life-space scores. We conclude that the smart phone method is more reliable than traditional methods for measuring life-space. Further improvements will be required to develop a robust application of this method that is suitable for health-related practices.

  16. Advanced Space Shuttle simulation model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tatom, F. B.; Smith, S. R.

    1982-01-01

    A non-recursive model (based on von Karman spectra) for atmospheric turbulence along the flight path of the shuttle orbiter was developed. It provides for simulation of instantaneous vertical and horizontal gusts at the vehicle center-of-gravity, and also for simulation of instantaneous gusts gradients. Based on this model the time series for both gusts and gust gradients were generated and stored on a series of magnetic tapes, entitled Shuttle Simulation Turbulence Tapes (SSTT). The time series are designed to represent atmospheric turbulence from ground level to an altitude of 120,000 meters. A description of the turbulence generation procedure is provided. The results of validating the simulated turbulence are described. Conclusions and recommendations are presented. One-dimensional von Karman spectra are tabulated, while a discussion of the minimum frequency simulated is provided. The results of spectral and statistical analyses of the SSTT are presented.

  17. ACES: An Enabling Technology for Next Generation Space Transportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crocker, Andrew M.; Wuerl, Adam M.; Andrews, Jason E.; Andrews, Dana G.

    2004-02-01

    Andrews Space has developed the ``Alchemist'' Air Collection and Enrichment System (ACES), a dual-mode propulsion system that enables safe, economical launch systems that take off and land horizontally. Alchemist generates liquid oxygen through separation of atmospheric air using the refrigeration capacity of liquid hydrogen. The key benefit of Alchemist is that it minimizes vehicle takeoff weight. All internal and NASA-funded activities have shown that ACES, previously proposed for hypersonic combined cycle RLVs, is a higher payoff, lower-risk technology if LOX generation is performed while the vehicle cruises subsonically. Andrews Space has developed the Alchemist concept from a small system study to viable Next Generation launch system technology, conducting not only feasibility studies but also related hardware tests, and it has planned a detailed risk reduction program which employs an experienced, proven contractor team. Andrews also has participated in preliminary studies of an evolvable Next Generation vehicle architecture-enabled by Alchemist ACES-which could meet civil, military, and commercial space requirements within two decades.

  18. Determining state-space models from sequential output data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Jiguan Gene

    1988-01-01

    This talk focuses on the determination of state-space models for large space systems using only the output data. The output data could be generated by the unknown or deliberate initial conditions of the space structure in question. We shall review some relevant fundamental work on the state-space modeling of sequential output data that is potentially applicable to large space structures. If formulated in terms of some generalized Markov parameters, this approach is in some sense similar to, but much simpler than, the Juang-Pappa Eigensystem Realization Algorithm (ERA) and the Ho-Kalman construction procedure.

  19. Future Photovoltaic Power Generation for Space-Based Power Utilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, S.; Landis, G.; Raffaelle, R.; Hepp, A.

    2002-01-01

    A recent NASA program, Space Solar Power Exploratory Research and Technology (SERT), investigated the technologies needed to provide cost-competitive ground baseload electrical power from space based solar energy conversion. This goal mandated low cost, light weight gigawatt (GW) power generation. Investment in solar power generation technologies would also benefit high power military, commercial and science missions. These missions are generally those involving solar electric propulsion, surface power systems to sustain an outpost or a permanent colony on the surface of the moon or mars, space based lasers or radar, or as large earth orbiting power stations which can serve as central utilities for other orbiting spacecraft, or as in the SERT program, potentially beaming power to the earth itself. This paper will discuss requirements for the two latter options, the current state of the art of space solar cells, and a variety of both evolving thin film cells as well as new technologies which may impact the future choice of space solar cells for a high power mission application. The space world has primarily transitioned to commercially available III-V (GaInP/GaAs/Ge) cells with 24-26% air mass zero (AMO) efficiencies. Research in the III-V multi-junction solar cells has focused on fabricating either lattice-mismatched materials with optimum stacking bandgaps or new lattice matched materials with optimum bandgaps. In the near term this will yield a 30% commercially available space cell and in the far term possibly a 40% cell. Cost reduction would be achieved if these cells could be grown on a silicon rather than a germanium substrate since the substrate is ~65% of the cell cost or, better yet, on a polyimide or possibly a ceramic substrate. An overview of multi-junction cell characteristics will be presented here. Thin film cells require substantially less material and have promised the advantage of large area, low cost manufacturing. However, space cell requirements

  20. Modeling volatility using state space models.

    PubMed

    Timmer, J; Weigend, A S

    1997-08-01

    In time series problems, noise can be divided into two categories: dynamic noise which drives the process, and observational noise which is added in the measurement process, but does not influence future values of the system. In this framework, we show that empirical volatilities (the squared relative returns of prices) exhibit a significant amount of observational noise. To model and predict their time evolution adequately, we estimate state space models that explicitly include observational noise. We obtain relaxation times for shocks in the logarithm of volatility ranging from three weeks (for foreign exchange) to three to five months (for stock indices). In most cases, a two-dimensional hidden state is required to yield residuals that are consistent with white noise. We compare these results with ordinary autoregressive models (without a hidden state) and find that autoregressive models underestimate the relaxation times by about two orders of magnitude since they do not distinguish between observational and dynamic noise. This new interpretation of the dynamics of volatility in terms of relaxators in a state space model carries over to stochastic volatility models and to GARCH models, and is useful for several problems in finance, including risk management and the pricing of derivative securities. Data sets used: Olsen & Associates high frequency DEM/USD foreign exchange rates (8 years). Nikkei 225 index (40 years). Dow Jones Industrial Average (25 years).

  1. The Space Laser Business Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Creating long-duration, high-powered lasers, for satellites, that can withstand the type of optical misalignment and damage dished out by the unforgiving environment of space, is work that is unique to NASA. It is complicated, specific work, where each step forward is into uncharted territory. In the 1990s, as this technology was first being created, NASA gave free reign to a group of "laser jocks" to develop their own business model and supply the Space Agency with the technology it needed. It was still to be a part of NASA as a division of Goddard Space Flight Center, but would operate independently out of a remote office. The idea for this satellite laboratory was based on the Skunk Works concept at Lockheed Martin Corporation. Formerly known as the Lockheed Corporation, in 1943, the aerospace firm, realizing that the type of advanced research it needed done could not be performed within the confines of a larger company, allowed a group of researchers and engineers to essentially run their own microbusiness without the corporate oversight. The Skunk Works project, in Burbank, California, produced America s first jet fighter, the world s most successful spy plane (U-2), the first 3-times-the-speed-of-sound surveillance aircraft, and the F-117A Nighthawk Stealth Fighter. Boeing followed suit with its Phantom Works, an advanced research and development branch of the company that operates independent of the larger unit and is responsible for a great deal of its most cutting-edge research. NASA s version of this advanced business model was the Space Lidar Technology Center (SLTC), just south of Goddard, in College Park, Maryland. Established in 1998 under a Cooperative Agreement between Goddard and the University of Maryland s A. James Clark School of Engineering, it was a high-tech laser shop where a small group of specialists, never more than 20 employees, worked all hours of the day and night to create the cutting- edge technology the Agency required of them. Drs

  2. Third Generation Multifractal Models and Geophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovejoy, S.; Schertzer, D.

    2004-05-01

    Geophysical fields typically display extreme variability over huge ranges of scale. The simplest assumption about the corresponding dynamical mechanism is that it respects a scaling symmetry; the process is multifractal. In such processes, the variability is produced by the scale by scale repetition of a cascade-like mechanism. This is the phenomenological basis of the cascade models. In some cases, notably for cloud radiances and for the topography, the isotropic horizontal statistics can be shown to be multiscaling from planetary scales down kilometers or less to within 1-2% per octave in scale. The first generation multifractal models were the discrete (in scale) models introduced in the turbulence literature in the 1960's and 1970's. While these were useful in advancing research into scaling and intermittency, they had ugly (and unrealistic) construction lines, artifacts of the fact that that their scaling was only exactly valid for integer powers of integer scale ratios. The second generation models were introduced in the 1980's: these were continuous in scale (their generators were infinitely divisible processes), in the 1990's they were rendered anisotropic and causal (for space-time modeling). Since they were based on the exponentiation of fractionally integrated Levy noises, they are very sensitive to problems of numerical stability; this is particulary true of the strongly anisotropic models of geophysical interest. Such strong anisotropy is needed for example in modeling stratification in flows and rock strata as well as filamentary and rotating structures such as those commonly observed in clouds, or highly elongated structures such as mountain ranges. In this talk, we describe a series of technical improvements which promise to make multifractal models a standard element in the geophysicists' toolbox.

  3. Static and dynamic high power, space nuclear electric generating systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wetch, J. R.; Begg, L. L.; Koester, J. K.

    1985-01-01

    Space nuclear electric generating systems concepts have been assessed for their potential in satisfying future spacecraft high power (several megawatt) requirements. Conceptual designs have been prepared for reactor power systems using the most promising static (thermionic) and the most promising dynamic conversion processes. Component and system layouts, along with system mass and envelope requirements have been made. Key development problems have been identified and the impact of the conversion process selection upon thermal management and upon system and vehicle configuration is addressed.

  4. A Robot Emotion Generation Mechanism Based on PAD Emotion Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qingji, Gao; Kai, Wang; Haijuan, Liu

    A robot emotion generation mechanism is presented in this paper, in which emotion is described in PAD emotion space. In this mechanism, emotion is affected by the robot personality, the robot task and the emotion origin, so the robot emotion will change naturally when it senses the extern stimuli. We also experiment on Fuwa robot, and demonstrate that this mechanism can make the robot's emotion change be more easily accepted by people and is good for human-robot interaction.

  5. NASDA next generation Aquatic Habitat for Space Shuttle and ISS.

    PubMed

    Masukawa, M; Ochiai, T; Kamigaichi, S; Ishioka, N; Uchida, S; Kono, Y; Sakimura, T

    2003-01-01

    The National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA) has more than 20 years of experience developing aquatic animal experiment facilities. We are now studying the next-generation aquatic animal experiment facility or the Aquatic Habitat (AQH) for both Space Shuttle and International Space Station use. A prototype breeding system was designed and tested. Medaka adult fish were able to mate and spawn in this closed circulatory breeding system, and the larvae grew to adult fish and spawned on the 45th day after hatching. The water quality-control system using nitrifying bacteria worked well throughout the medaka breeding test. For amphibians, we also conducted the African clawed toad (Xenopus laevis) breeding test with the same specimen chambers, although a part of circulation loop was opened to air. Xenopus larvae grew and completed metamorphosis successfully in the small specimen chamber. The first metamorphic climax started on the 30th day and was completed on the 38th day.

  6. NASDA next generation aquatic habitat for space shuttle and ISS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masukawa, M.; Ochiai, T.; Kamigaichi, S.; Ishioka, N.; Uchida, S.; Kono, Y.; Sakimura, T.

    2003-10-01

    The National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA) has more than 20 years of experience developing aquatic animal experiment facilities. We are now studying the next-generation aquatic animal experiment facility or the Aquatic Habitat (AQH) for both Space Shuttle and International Space Station use. A prototype breeding system was designed and tested. Medaka adult fish were able to mate and spawn in this closed circulatory breeding system, and the larvae grewto adult fish and spawned on the 45th day after hatching. The water quality-control system using nitrifying bacteria worked well throughout the medaka breeding test. For amphibians, we also conducted the African clawed toad ( Xenopus laevis) breeding test with the same specimen chambers, although a part of circulation loop was opened to air. Xenopus larvae grew and completed metamorphosis successfully in the small specimen chamber. The first metamorphic climax started on the 30th day and was completed on the 38th day.

  7. Models of space averaged energetics of plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bouthier, O. M.; Bernhard, R. J.

    1990-01-01

    The analysis of high frequency vibrations in plates is of particular interest in the study of structure borne noise in aircrafts. The current methods of analysis are either too expensive (finite element method) or may have a confidence band wider than desirable (Statistical Energy Analysis). An alternative technique to model the space and time averaged response of structural acoustics problems with enough detail to include all significant mechanisms of energy generation, transmission, and absorption is highly desirable. The focus of this paper is the development of a set of equations which govern the space and time averaged energy density in plates. To solve this equation, a new type of boundary value problem must be treated in terms of energy density variables using energy and intensity boundary conditions. A computer simulation verification study of the energy governing equation is performed. A finite element formulation of the new equations is also implemented and several test cases are analyzed and compared to analytical solutions.

  8. Community Coordinated Modeling Center: A Powerful Resource in Space Science and Space Weather Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chulaki, A.; Kuznetsova, M. M.; Rastaetter, L.; MacNeice, P. J.; Shim, J. S.; Pulkkinen, A. A.; Taktakishvili, A.; Mays, M. L.; Mendoza, A. M. M.; Zheng, Y.; Mullinix, R.; Collado-Vega, Y. M.; Maddox, M. M.; Pembroke, A. D.; Wiegand, C.

    2015-12-01

    Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC) is a NASA affiliated interagency partnership with the primary goal of aiding the transition of modern space science models into space weather forecasting while supporting space science research. Additionally, over the past ten years it has established itself as a global space science education resource supporting undergraduate and graduate education and research, and spreading space weather awareness worldwide. A unique combination of assets, capabilities and close ties to the scientific and educational communities enable this small group to serve as a hub for raising generations of young space scientists and engineers. CCMC resources are publicly available online, providing unprecedented global access to the largest collection of modern space science models (developed by the international research community). CCMC has revolutionized the way simulations are utilized in classrooms settings, student projects, and scientific labs and serves hundreds of educators, students and researchers every year. Another major CCMC asset is an expert space weather prototyping team primarily serving NASA's interplanetary space weather needs. Capitalizing on its unrivaled capabilities and experiences, the team provides in-depth space weather training to students and professionals worldwide, and offers an amazing opportunity for undergraduates to engage in real-time space weather monitoring, analysis, forecasting and research. In-house development of state-of-the-art space weather tools and applications provides exciting opportunities to students majoring in computer science and computer engineering fields to intern with the software engineers at the CCMC while also learning about the space weather from the NASA scientists.

  9. IR image generation of space target based on OpenGL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Tongsheng; Guo, Ming; Wang, Chenggang

    2007-11-01

    IR Scene simulation has been an important way to design and assess the IR sensor, and the key of simulation is the generation of IR scene image. Based on OpenGL, the method of IR image generation is proposed. The geometry model is constructed with professional CAD software, and the observer location is determined after scene transformation. The full infrared model of space target is built based on infrared physics and heat transfer, which includes the radiation, convection, conduction between different parts of the space target, and which also includes the radiation, convection of environment. Radiance of space target is converted to gray value, and properties of scene are defined according to the gray level. After a series of processing, dynamic IR images are generated with the technology of double buffering.

  10. A Model of Classical Space-Times.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maudlin, Tim

    1989-01-01

    Discusses some historically important reference systems including those by Newton, Leibniz, and Galileo. Provides models illustrating space-time relationship of the reference systems. Describes building models. (YP)

  11. A Model of Classical Space-Times.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maudlin, Tim

    1989-01-01

    Discusses some historically important reference systems including those by Newton, Leibniz, and Galileo. Provides models illustrating space-time relationship of the reference systems. Describes building models. (YP)

  12. Optical modeling in Testbed Environment for Space Situational Awareness (TESSA).

    PubMed

    Nikolaev, Sergei

    2011-08-01

    We describe optical systems modeling in the Testbed Environment for Space Situational Awareness (TESSA) simulator. We begin by presenting a brief outline of the overall TESSA architecture and focus on components for modeling optical sensors. Both image generation and image processing stages are described in detail, highlighting the differences in modeling ground- and space-based sensors. We conclude by outlining the applicability domains for the TESSA simulator, including potential real-life scenarios.

  13. Anomaly Detection for Next-Generation Space Launch Ground Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spirkovska, Lilly; Iverson, David L.; Hall, David R.; Taylor, William M.; Patterson-Hine, Ann; Brown, Barbara; Ferrell, Bob A.; Waterman, Robert D.

    2010-01-01

    NASA is developing new capabilities that will enable future human exploration missions while reducing mission risk and cost. The Fault Detection, Isolation, and Recovery (FDIR) project aims to demonstrate the utility of integrated vehicle health management (IVHM) tools in the domain of ground support equipment (GSE) to be used for the next generation launch vehicles. In addition to demonstrating the utility of IVHM tools for GSE, FDIR aims to mature promising tools for use on future missions and document the level of effort - and hence cost - required to implement an application with each selected tool. One of the FDIR capabilities is anomaly detection, i.e., detecting off-nominal behavior. The tool we selected for this task uses a data-driven approach. Unlike rule-based and model-based systems that require manual extraction of system knowledge, data-driven systems take a radically different approach to reasoning. At the basic level, they start with data that represent nominal functioning of the system and automatically learn expected system behavior. The behavior is encoded in a knowledge base that represents "in-family" system operations. During real-time system monitoring or during post-flight analysis, incoming data is compared to that nominal system operating behavior knowledge base; a distance representing deviation from nominal is computed, providing a measure of how far "out of family" current behavior is. We describe the selected tool for FDIR anomaly detection - Inductive Monitoring System (IMS), how it fits into the FDIR architecture, the operations concept for the GSE anomaly monitoring, and some preliminary results of applying IMS to a Space Shuttle GSE anomaly.

  14. Modeling UHMWPE wear debris generation.

    PubMed

    Baudriller, H; Chabrand, P; Moukoko, D

    2007-02-01

    It is widely recognized that polyethylene wear debris is one of the main causes of long-term prosthesis loosening. The noxious bioreactivity associated with this debris is determined by its size, shape, and quantity. The aim of this study was to develop a numerical tool that can be used to investigate the primary polyethylene wear mechanisms involved. This model illustrates the formation of varying flow of polyethylene debris with various shapes and sizes caused by elementary mechanical processes. Instead of using the classical continuum mechanics formulation for this purpose, we used a divided materials approach to simulate debris production and release. This approach involves complex nonlinear bulk behaviors, frictional adhesive contact, and characterizes material damage as a loss of adhesion. All the associated models were validated with various benchmark tests. The examples given show the ability of the numerical model to generate debris of various shapes and sizes such as those observed in implant retrieval studies. Most of wear mechanisms such as abrasion, adhesion, and the shearing off of micro-asperities can be described using this approach. Furthermore, it could be applied to study the effects of friction couples, macroscopic geometries, and material processing (e.g. irradiation) on wear. (c) 2006 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. The Next-Generation Infrared Space Mission Spica: Project Updates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakagawa, Takao; Shibai, Hiroshi; Kaneda, Hidehiro; Kohno, Kotaro; Matsuhara, Hideo; Ogawa, Hiroyuki; Onaka, Takashi; Roelfsema, Peter; SPICA Team

    2017-03-01

    We present project updates of the next-generation infrared space mission SPICA (Space Infrared Telescope for Cosmology and Astrophysics) as of November 2015. SPICA is optimized for mid- and far-infrared astronomy with unprecedented sensitivity, which will be achieved with a cryogenically cooled (below 8 K), large (2.5~m) telescope. SPICA is expected to address a number of key questions in various fields of astrophysics, ranging from studies of the star-formation history in the universe to the formation and evolution of planetary systems. The international collaboration framework of SPICA has been revisited. SPICA under the new framework passed the Mission Definition Review by JAXA in 2015. A proposal under the new framework to ESA is being prepared. The target launch year in the new framework is 2027/28.

  16. Laser-powered MHD generators for space application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jalufka, N. W.

    1986-01-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) energy conversion systems of the pulsed laser-supported detonation (LSD) wave, plasma MHD, and liquid-metal MHD (LMMHD) types are assessed for their potential as space-based laser-to-electrical power converters. These systems offer several advantages as energy converters relative to the present chemical, nuclear, and solar devices, including high conversion efficiency, simple design, high-temperature operation, high power density, and high reliability. Of these systems, the Brayton cycle liquid-metal MHD system appears to be the most attractive. The LMMHD technology base is well established for terrestrial applications, particularly with regard to the generator, mixer, and other system components. However, further research is required to extend this technology base to space applications and to establish the technology required to couple the laser energy into the system most efficiently. Continued research on each of the three system types is recommended.

  17. Modeling Nonstationarity in Space and Time

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Summary We propose to model a spatio-temporal random field that has nonstationary covariance structure in both space and time domains by applying the concept of the dimension expansion method in Bornn et al. (2012). Simulations are conducted for both separable and nonseparable space-time covariance models, and the model is also illustrated with a streamflow dataset. Both simulation and data analyses show that modeling nonstationarity in both space and time can improve the predictive performance over stationary covariance models or models that are nonstationary in space but stationary in time. PMID:28134977

  18. Modeling nonstationarity in space and time.

    PubMed

    Shand, Lyndsay; Li, Bo

    2017-09-01

    We propose to model a spatio-temporal random field that has nonstationary covariance structure in both space and time domains by applying the concept of the dimension expansion method in Bornn et al. (2012). Simulations are conducted for both separable and nonseparable space-time covariance models, and the model is also illustrated with a streamflow dataset. Both simulation and data analyses show that modeling nonstationarity in both space and time can improve the predictive performance over stationary covariance models or models that are nonstationary in space but stationary in time. © 2017, The International Biometric Society.

  19. Simulation of a cascaded longitudinal space charge amplifier for coherent radiation generation

    DOE PAGES

    Halavanau, A.; Piot, P.

    2016-03-03

    Longitudinal space charge (LSC) effects are generally considered as harmful in free-electron lasers as they can seed unfavorable energy modulations that can result in density modulations with associated emittance dilution. It was pointed out, however, that such \\micro-bunching instabilities" could be potentially useful to support the generation of broadband coherent radiation. Therefore there has been an increasing interest in devising accelerator beam lines capable of controlling LSC induced density modulations. In the present paper we augment these previous investigations by combining a grid-less space charge algorithm with the popular particle-tracking program elegant. This high-fidelity model of the space charge ismore » used to benchmark conventional LSC models. We then employ the developed model to optimize the performance of a cascaded longitudinal space charge amplifier using beam parameters comparable to the ones achievable at Fermilab Accelerator Science & Technology (FAST) facility currently under commissioning at Fermilab.« less

  20. Simulation of a cascaded longitudinal space charge amplifier for coherent radiation generation

    SciTech Connect

    Halavanau, A.; Piot, P.

    2016-03-03

    Longitudinal space charge (LSC) effects are generally considered as harmful in free-electron lasers as they can seed unfavorable energy modulations that can result in density modulations with associated emittance dilution. It was pointed out, however, that such \\micro-bunching instabilities" could be potentially useful to support the generation of broadband coherent radiation. Therefore there has been an increasing interest in devising accelerator beam lines capable of controlling LSC induced density modulations. In the present paper we augment these previous investigations by combining a grid-less space charge algorithm with the popular particle-tracking program elegant. This high-fidelity model of the space charge is used to benchmark conventional LSC models. We then employ the developed model to optimize the performance of a cascaded longitudinal space charge amplifier using beam parameters comparable to the ones achievable at Fermilab Accelerator Science & Technology (FAST) facility currently under commissioning at Fermilab.

  1. Next generation of space based sensor for application in the SSA space weather domain.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansen, Frank; Kudela, Karel; Behrens, Joerg

    Next generation of space based sensor for application in the SSA space weather domain. F. Jansen1, K. Kudela2, J. Behrens1 and NESTEC consortium3 1DLR, Bremen, Germany 2IEP SAS Kosice, Slovakia 3NESTEC consortium members (DLR Bremen, DESY Hamburg, MPS Katlenburg-Lindau, CTU Prague, University of Twente, IEP-SAS Kosice, UCL/MSSL, University of Manchester, University of Surrey, Hermanus Magnetic Observatory, North-West University Potchefsroom, University of Montreal) High energy solar and galactic cosmic rays have twofold importance for the SSA space weather domain. Cosmic rays have dangerous effects for space, air and ground based assets, but on the other side cosmic rays are direct measure tools for real time space weather warning. A review of space weather related SSA results from operating global cosmic ray networks (especially those by neutron monitors and by muon directional telescopes), its limitations and main questions to be solved, is presented. Especially those recent results, received in real time and with high temporal resolution, are reviewed and discussed. In addition the relevance of these monitors and telescopes in forecasting geomagnetic disturbances are checked. Based on this study result, a next generation of highly miniaturized hybrid silicon pixel device (Medipix sensor) will be described for the following, beyond state-of-the-art application: a SSA satellite for high energy solar and galactic cosmic ray spectrum measurement, with a space plasma environment data package and CME real time imaging by means of cosmic rays. All data management and processing will be carried out on the satellite in real time. Insofar a high reduction of data and transmission to ground station of finalized space weather relevant data and images are foreseen.

  2. Analysis of a combined refrigerator-generator space power system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klann, J. L.

    1973-01-01

    Description of a single-shaft and a two-shaft rotating machinery arrangements using neon for application in a combined refrigerator-generator power system for space missions. The arrangements consist of combined assemblies of a power turbine, alternator, compressor, and cry-turbine with a single-stage radial-flow design. A computer program was prepared to study the thermodynamics of the dual system in the evaluation of its cryocooling/electric capacity and appropriate weight. A preliminary analysis showed that a two-shaft arrangement of the power- and refrigeration-loop rotating machinery provided better output capacities than a single-shaft arrangement, without prohibitive operating compromises.

  3. Informed maintenance for next generation space transportation systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, Jack J.

    2001-02-01

    system software. This paper will summarize NASA's long-term strategy, development, and implementation plans for Informed Maintenance for next generation RLVs. This will be done through a convergence into a single IM vision the work being performed throughout NASA, industry and academia. Additionally, a current status of IM development throughout NASA programs such as the Space Shuttle, X-33, X-34 and X-37 will be provided and will conclude with an overview of near-term work that is being initiated in FY00 to support NASA's 2nd Generation Reusable Launch Vehicle Program. .

  4. Rejoinder: Sifting through model space

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heisey, Dennis M.; Osnas, Erik E.; Cross, Paul C.; Joly, Damien O.; Langenberg, Julia A.; Miller, Michael W.

    2010-01-01

    Observational data sets generated by complex processes are common in ecology. Traditionally these have been very challenging to analyze because of the limitations of available statistical tools. This seems to be changing, and these are exciting times to be involved with ecological statistics, not just because of the neo-Bayesian revival but also because of the proliferation of computationally intensive methods in general. It is now possible to fit much richer models to observational data than in the relatively recent past, which in turn has stimulated much interest in how to evaluate and compare such models. In such an immature, vibrant, and rapidly growing field, not everyone is going to agree on the best way to do things. This is reflected in the contrast of opinions offered by the discussants. Each offers a thoughtful and thought-provoking critique of our work that reflects the current thinking in a non-negligible segment of the ecological data analysis community. We want to thank them for their insights.

  5. Software Defined Radio Architecture Contributions to Next Generation Space Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kacpura, Thomas J.; Eddy, Wesley M.; Smith, Carl R.; Liebetreu, John

    2015-01-01

    systems, as well as those communications and navigation systems operated by international space agencies and civilian and government agencies. In this paper, we review the philosophies, technologies, architectural attributes, mission services, and communications capabilities that form the structure of candidate next-generation integrated communication architectures for space communications and navigation. A key area that this paper explores is from the development and operation of the software defined radio for the NASA Space Communications and Navigation (SCaN) Testbed currently on the International Space Station (ISS). Evaluating the lessons learned from development and operation feed back into the communications architecture. Leveraging the reconfigurability provides a change in the way that operations are done and must be considered. Quantifying the impact on the NASA Space Telecommunications Radio System (STRS) software defined radio architecture provides feedback to keep the standard useful and up to date. NASA is not the only customer of these radios. Software defined radios are developed for other applications, and taking advantage of these developments promotes an architecture that is cost effective and sustainable. Developments in the following areas such as an updated operating environment, higher data rates, networking and security can be leveraged. The ability to sustain an architecture that uses radios for multiple markets can lower costs and keep new technology infused.

  6. Algebraic surface grid generation in three-dimensional space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warsi, Saif

    1992-01-01

    An interactive program for algebraic generation of structured surface grids in three dimensional space was developed on the IRIS4D series workstations. Interactive tools are available to ease construction of edge curves and surfaces in 3-D space. Addition, removal, or redistribution of points at arbitrary locations on a general 3-D surface or curve is possible. Also, redistribution of surface grid points may be accomplished through use of conventional surface splines or a method called 'surface constrained transfinite interpolation'. This method allows the user to redistribute the grid points on the edges of a surface patch; the effect of the redistribution is then propagated to the remainder of the surface through a transfinite interpolation procedure where the grid points will be constrained to lie on the surface. The program was written to be highly functional and easy to use. A host of utilities are available to ease the grid generation process. Generality of the program allows the creation of single and multizonal surface grids according to the user requirements. The program communicates with the user through popup menus, windows, and the mouse.

  7. Source Rock (shales) Pore Space Transformation during Hydrocarbon Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giliazetdinova, D. R.; Korost, D. V.; Sudin, V. V.

    2015-12-01

    The main objective of this investigations is to study the factors controlling changes in rock structure during catagenetic transformation of organic matter. Hydrocarbon generation and primary migration can be controlled by numerous parameters; the most important are temperature, pressure, hydrocarbon composition, and organic matter type and content. Several experimental studies focused on the influence of these main parameters. However few dedicated works investigated how the primary structure characteristic and organic matter content affects the pore space transformation of rocks. For this purpose we simulated the primary migration processes in laboratory conditions (pyrolises and CT scanning) in order to observe the dynamics of pore space transformation. Our experiments demonstrate that after each stage of heating the rocks change their original morphology with the formation of new pores and conduits connecting the primary voids. The samples with relatively low content in organic matter revealed fewer changes in pore space morphology, in contrast to rocks rich in organic content. Our results also highlight that the newly formed pore structures are directly related with the original structure of the unaltered rocks and the primary connectivity of the organics. Most of the structural changes were observed during the sequential heating between 260 - 430 ° C; within this interval also occur the most intense reactions for hydrocarbons formation.

  8. Optical Communications Study for the Next Generation Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ceniceros, Juan M.

    2000-01-01

    The Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST), part of NASA's Origins program, is a follow on to the Hubble Space Telescope expected to provide timely new science along with answering fundamental questions. NGST is a large diameter, infrared optimized telescope with imaging and spectrographic detectors which will be used to help study the origin of galaxies. Due to the large data NGST will collect, Goddard Space Flight Center has considered the use of optical communications for data downlink. The Optical Communications Group at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory has performed a study on optical communications systems for NGST. The objective of the study was to evaluate the benefits gained through the use of optical communication technologies. Studies were performed for each of four proposed NGST orbits. The orbits considered were an elliptical orbit about the semi stable second Lagrangian point, a 1 by 3 AU elliptic orbit around the sun, a 1 AU drift orbit, and a 1 AU drift orbit at a 15 degree incline to the ecliptic plane. An appropriate optical communications system was determined for each orbit. Systems were evaluated in terms of mass, power consumption, size, and cost for each of the four proposed orbits.

  9. Browsing Space Weather Data and Models with the Integrated Space Weather Analysis (iSWA) System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maddox, Marlo M.; Mullinix, Richard E.; Berrios, David H.; Hesse, Michael; Rastaetter, Lutz; Pulkkinen, Antti; Hourcle, Joseph A.; Thompson, Barbara J.

    2011-01-01

    The Integrated Space Weather Analysis (iSWA) System is a comprehensive web-based platform for space weather information that combines data from solar, heliospheric and geospace observatories with forecasts based on the most advanced space weather models. The iSWA system collects, generates, and presents a wide array of space weather resources in an intuitive, user-configurable, and adaptable format - thus enabling users to respond to current and future space weather impacts as well as enabling post-impact analysis. iSWA currently provides over 200 data and modeling products, and features a variety of tools that allow the user to browse, combine, and examine data and models from various sources. This presentation will consist of a summary of the iSWA products and an overview of the customizable user interfaces, and will feature several tutorial demonstrations highlighting the interactive tools and advanced capabilities.

  10. Modeling missing data in knowledge space theory.

    PubMed

    de Chiusole, Debora; Stefanutti, Luca; Anselmi, Pasquale; Robusto, Egidio

    2015-12-01

    Missing data are a well known issue in statistical inference, because some responses may be missing, even when data are collected carefully. The problem that arises in these cases is how to deal with missing data. In this article, the missingness is analyzed in knowledge space theory, and in particular when the basic local independence model (BLIM) is applied to the data. Two extensions of the BLIM to missing data are proposed: The former, called ignorable missing BLIM (IMBLIM), assumes that missing data are missing completely at random; the latter, called missing BLIM (MissBLIM), introduces specific dependencies of the missing data on the knowledge states, thus assuming that the missing data are missing not at random. The IMBLIM and the MissBLIM modeled the missingness in a satisfactory way, in both a simulation study and an empirical application, depending on the process that generates the missingness: If the missing data-generating process is of type missing completely at random, then either IMBLIM or MissBLIM provide adequate fit to the data. However, if the pattern of missingness is functionally dependent upon unobservable features of the data (e.g., missing answers are more likely to be wrong), then only a correctly specified model of the missingness distribution provides an adequate fit to the data.

  11. Target space pseudoduality in supersymmetric sigma models on symmetric spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarisaman, Mustafa

    We discuss the target space pseudoduality in supersymmetric sigma models on symmetric spaces. We first consider the case where sigma models based on real compact connected Lie groups of the same dimensionality and give examples using three dimensional models on target spaces. We show explicit construction of nonlocal conserved currents on the pseudodual manifold. We then switch the Lie group valued pseudoduality equations to Lie algebra valued ones, which leads to an infinite number of pseudoduality equations. We obtain an infinite number of conserved currents on the tangent bundle of the pseudo-dual manifold. Since pseudoduality imposes the condition that sigma models pseudodual to each other are based on symmetric spaces with opposite curvatures (i.e. dual symmetric spaces), we investigate pseudoduality transformation on the symmetric space sigma models in the third chapter. We see that there can be mixing of decomposed spaces with each other, which leads to mixings of the following expressions. We obtain the pseudodual conserved currents which are viewed as the orthonormal frame on the pullback bundle of the tangent space of G˜ which is the Lie group on which the pseudodual model based. Hence we obtain the mixing forms of curvature relations and one loop renormalization group beta function by means of these currents. In chapter four, we generalize the classical construction of pseudoduality transformation to supersymmetric case. We perform this both by component expansion method on manifold M and by orthonormal coframe method on manifold SO( M). The component method produces the result that pseudoduality transformation is not invertible at all points and occurs from all points on one manifold to only one point where riemann normal coordinates valid on the second manifold. Torsion of the sigma model on M must vanish while it is nonvanishing on M˜, and curvatures of the manifolds must be constant and the same because of anticommuting grassmann numbers. We obtain

  12. A Hybrid 3D Indoor Space Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamali, Ali; Rahman, Alias Abdul; Boguslawski, Pawel

    2016-10-01

    GIS integrates spatial information and spatial analysis. An important example of such integration is for emergency response which requires route planning inside and outside of a building. Route planning requires detailed information related to indoor and outdoor environment. Indoor navigation network models including Geometric Network Model (GNM), Navigable Space Model, sub-division model and regular-grid model lack indoor data sources and abstraction methods. In this paper, a hybrid indoor space model is proposed. In the proposed method, 3D modeling of indoor navigation network is based on surveying control points and it is less dependent on the 3D geometrical building model. This research proposes a method of indoor space modeling for the buildings which do not have proper 2D/3D geometrical models or they lack semantic or topological information. The proposed hybrid model consists of topological, geometrical and semantical space.

  13. Integrated Space Asset Management Database and Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacLeod, Todd; Gagliano, Larry; Percy, Thomas; Mason, Shane

    2015-01-01

    Effective Space Asset Management is one key to addressing the ever-growing issue of space congestion. It is imperative that agencies around the world have access to data regarding the numerous active assets and pieces of space junk currently tracked in orbit around the Earth. At the center of this issues is the effective management of data of many types related to orbiting objects. As the population of tracked objects grows, so too should the data management structure used to catalog technical specifications, orbital information, and metadata related to those populations. Marshall Space Flight Center's Space Asset Management Database (SAM-D) was implemented in order to effectively catalog a broad set of data related to known objects in space by ingesting information from a variety of database and processing that data into useful technical information. Using the universal NORAD number as a unique identifier, the SAM-D processes two-line element data into orbital characteristics and cross-references this technical data with metadata related to functional status, country of ownership, and application category. The SAM-D began as an Excel spreadsheet and was later upgraded to an Access database. While SAM-D performs its task very well, it is limited by its current platform and is not available outside of the local user base. Further, while modeling and simulation can be powerful tools to exploit the information contained in SAM-D, the current system does not allow proper integration options for combining the data with both legacy and new M&S tools. This paper provides a summary of SAM-D development efforts to date and outlines a proposed data management infrastructure that extends SAM-D to support the larger data sets to be generated. A service-oriented architecture model using an information sharing platform named SIMON will allow it to easily expand to incorporate new capabilities, including advanced analytics, M&S tools, fusion techniques and user interface for

  14. Chiral invariant phase space event generator. Deep inelastic lepto-nucleon reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kossov, M. V.

    2007-12-01

    The Geant4 quark level CHIPS (CHiral Invariant Phase Space) model simulates nuclear reactions assuming asymptotic freedom of massless quarks uniformly distributed over invariant phase space. Electro-nuclear reactions are simulated generating low-Q2 equivalent photons. In this paper generalisation of the model for high Q2 is made to describe neutrino-nuclear reactions, where the low-Q2 contribution is suppressed by the W -boson mass. The proposed non-perturbative approximation of structure functions fits high-energy lepto-nucleon reactions with high-Q2 and neutrino-nucleon reactions starting from the threshold.

  15. M-Brane Models and Loop Spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sämann, Christian

    2012-06-01

    I review an extension of the ADHMN construction of monopoles to M-brane models. This extended construction gives a map from solutions to the Basu-Harvey equation to solutions to the self-dual string equation transgressed to loop space. Loop spaces appear in fact quite naturally in M-brane models. This is demonstrated by translating a recently proposed M5-brane model to loop space. Finally, I comment on some recent developments related to the loop space approach to M-brane models.

  16. Models for multimegawatt space power systems

    SciTech Connect

    Edenburn, M.W.

    1990-06-01

    This report describes models for multimegawatt, space power systems which Sandia's Advanced Power Systems Division has constructed to help evaluate space power systems for SDI's Space Power Office. Five system models and models for associated components are presented for both open (power system waste products are exhausted into space) and closed (no waste products) systems: open, burst mode, hydrogen cooled nuclear reactor -- turboalternator system; open, hydrogen-oxygen combustion turboalternator system; closed, nuclear reactor powered Brayton cycle system; closed, liquid metal Rankine cycle system; and closed, in-core, reactor therminonic system. The models estimate performance and mass for the components in each of these systems. 17 refs., 8 figs., 15 tabs.

  17. Model Spaces of Regularity Structures for Space-Fractional SPDEs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berglund, Nils; Kuehn, Christian

    2017-07-01

    We study model spaces, in the sense of Hairer, for stochastic partial differential equations involving the fractional Laplacian. We prove that the fractional Laplacian is a singular kernel suitable to apply the theory of regularity structures. Our main contribution is to study the dependence of the model space for a regularity structure on the three-parameter problem involving the spatial dimension, the polynomial order of the nonlinearity, and the exponent of the fractional Laplacian. The goal is to investigate the growth of the model space under parameter variation. In particular, we prove several results in the approaching subcriticality limit leading to universal growth exponents of the regularity structure. A key role is played by the viewpoint that model spaces can be identified with families of rooted trees. Our proofs are based upon a geometrical construction similar to Newton polygons for classical Taylor series and various combinatorial arguments. We also present several explicit examples listing all elements with negative homogeneity by implementing a new symbolic software package to work with regularity structures. We use this package to illustrate our analytical results and to obtain new conjectures regarding coarse-grained network measures for model spaces.

  18. Advancing Space Weather Modeling Capabilities at the CCMC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mays, M. Leila; Kuznetsova, Maria; Boblitt, Justin; Chulaki, Anna; MacNeice, Peter; Mendoza, Michelle; Mullinix, Richard; Pembroke, Asher; Pulkkinen, Antti; Rastaetter, Lutz; Shim, Ja Soon; Taktakishvili, Aleksandre; Wiegand, Chiu; Zheng, Yihua

    2016-04-01

    The Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC, http://ccmc.gsfc.nasa.gov) serves as a community access point to an expanding collection of state-of-the-art space environment models and as a hub for collaborative development on next generation of space weather forecasting systems. In partnership with model developers and the international research and operational communities, the CCMC integrates new data streams and models from diverse sources into end-to-end space weather predictive systems, identifies weak links in data-model & model-model coupling and leads community efforts to fill those gaps. The presentation will focus on the latest model installations at the CCMC and advances in CCMC-led community-wide model validation projects.

  19. Space Missions Trade Space Generation and Assessment Using JPL Rapid Mission Architecture (RMA) Team Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moeller, Robert C.; Borden, Chester; Spilker, Thomas; Smythe, William; Lock, Robert

    2011-01-01

    The JPL Rapid Mission Architecture (RMA) capability is a novel collaborative team-based approach to generate new mission architectures, explore broad trade space options, and conduct architecture-level analyses. RMA studies address feasibility and identify best candidates to proceed to further detailed design studies. Development of RMA first began at JPL in 2007 and has evolved to address the need for rapid, effective early mission architectural development and trade space exploration as a precursor to traditional point design evaluations. The RMA approach integrates a small team of architecture-level experts (typically 6-10 people) to generate and explore a wide-ranging trade space of mission architectures driven by the mission science (or technology) objectives. Group brainstorming and trade space analyses are conducted at a higher level of assessment across multiple mission architectures and systems to enable rapid assessment of a set of diverse, innovative concepts. This paper describes the overall JPL RMA team, process, and high-level approach. Some illustrative results from previous JPL RMA studies are discussed.

  20. Space Missions Trade Space Generation and Assessment Using JPL Rapid Mission Architecture (RMA) Team Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moeller, Robert C.; Borden, Chester; Spilker, Thomas; Smythe, William; Lock, Robert

    2011-01-01

    The JPL Rapid Mission Architecture (RMA) capability is a novel collaborative team-based approach to generate new mission architectures, explore broad trade space options, and conduct architecture-level analyses. RMA studies address feasibility and identify best candidates to proceed to further detailed design studies. Development of RMA first began at JPL in 2007 and has evolved to address the need for rapid, effective early mission architectural development and trade space exploration as a precursor to traditional point design evaluations. The RMA approach integrates a small team of architecture-level experts (typically 6-10 people) to generate and explore a wide-ranging trade space of mission architectures driven by the mission science (or technology) objectives. Group brainstorming and trade space analyses are conducted at a higher level of assessment across multiple mission architectures and systems to enable rapid assessment of a set of diverse, innovative concepts. This paper describes the overall JPL RMA team, process, and high-level approach. Some illustrative results from previous JPL RMA studies are discussed.

  1. Modeling and generating input processes

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, M.E.

    1987-01-01

    This tutorial paper provides information relevant to the selection and generation of stochastic inputs to simulation studies. The primary area considered is multivariate but much of the philosophy at least is relevant to univariate inputs as well. 14 refs.

  2. Space shuttle thermal scale modeling application study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, K. N.; Foster, W. G.

    1973-01-01

    The critical thermal control problems and verification of thermal mathematical model results for the space shuttle concept are discussed. The use of a small scale thermal model of the space shuttle is proposed. It was determined that a one-third scale model of the space shuttle would serve as a useful tool throughout the entire thermal design and verification program. The major considerations in modeling the conduction-radiation-convection fields, the level of detail for modeling various systems, preliminary test requirements, and potential applications of the thermal scale model are summarized.

  3. Preliminary Cost Model for Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip; Prince, F. Andrew; Smart, Christian; Stephens, Kyle; Henrichs, Todd

    2009-01-01

    Parametric cost models are routinely used to plan missions, compare concepts and justify technology investments. However, great care is required. Some space telescope cost models, such as those based only on mass, lack sufficient detail to support such analysis and may lead to inaccurate conclusions. Similarly, using ground based telescope models which include the dome cost will also lead to inaccurate conclusions. This paper reviews current and historical models. Then, based on data from 22 different NASA space telescopes, this paper tests those models and presents preliminary analysis of single and multi-variable space telescope cost models.

  4. Development of Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator for Space Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Jack; Wood, J. Gary; Schreiber, Jeffrey G.

    2007-01-01

    Under the joint sponsorship of the Department of Energy and NASA, a radioisotope power system utilizing Stirling power conversion technology is being developed for potential future space missions. The higher conversion efficiency of the Stirling cycle compared with that of Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) used in previous missions (Viking, Pioneer, Voyager, Galileo, Ulysses, Cassini, and New Horizons) offers the advantage of a four-fold reduction in PuO2 fuel, thereby saving cost and reducing radiation exposure to support personnel. With the advancement of state-of-the-art Stirling technology development under the NASA Research Announcement (NRA) project, the Stirling Radioisotope Generator program has evolved to incorporate the advanced Stirling convertor (ASC), provided by Sunpower, into an engineering unit. Due to the reduced envelope and lighter mass of the ASC compared to the previous Stirling convertor, the specific power of the flight generator is projected to increase from 3.5 to 7 We/kg, along with a 25 percent reduction in generator length. Modifications are being made to the ASC design to incorporate features for thermal, mechanical, and electrical integration with the engineering unit. These include the heat collector for hot end interface, cold-side flange for waste heat removal and structural attachment, and piston position sensor for ASC control and power factor correction. A single-fault tolerant, active power factor correction controller is used to synchronize the Stirling convertors, condition the electrical power from AC to DC, and to control the ASCs to maintain operation within temperature and piston stroke limits. Development activities at Sunpower and NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) are also being conducted on the ASC to demonstrate the capability for long life, high reliability, and flight qualification needed for use in future missions.

  5. Development of Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator for Space Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Jack; Wood, J. Gary; Schreiber, Jeffrey G.

    2007-01-01

    Under the joint sponsorship of the Department of Energy and NASA, a radioisotope power system utilizing Stirling power conversion technology is being developed for potential future space missions. The higher conversion efficiency of the Stirling cycle compared with that of Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) used in previous missions (Viking, Pioneer, Voyager, Galileo, Ulysses, Cassini, and New Horizons) offers the advantage of a four-fold reduction in PuO2 fuel, thereby saving cost and reducing radiation exposure to support personnel. With the advancement of state-of-the-art Stirling technology development under the NASA Research Announcement (NRA) project, the Stirling Radioisotope Generator program has evolved to incorporate the advanced Stirling convertor (ASC), provided by Sunpower, into an engineering unit. Due to the reduced envelope and lighter mass of the ASC compared to the previous Stirling convertor, the specific power of the flight generator is projected to increase from 3.5 We/kg to 7 We/kg, along with a 25% reduction in generator length. Modifications are being made to the ASC design to incorporate features for thermal, mechanical, and electrical integration with the engineering unit. These include the heat collector for hot end interface, cold-side flange for waste heat removal and structural attachment, and piston position sensor for ASC control and power factor correction. A single-fault tolerant, active power factor correction controller is used to synchronize the Stirling convertors, condition the electrical power from AC to DC, and to control the ASCs to maintain operation within temperature and piston stroke limits. Development activities at Sunpower and NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) are also being conducted on the ASC to demonstrate the capability for long life, high reliability, and flight qualification needed for use in future missions.

  6. Next-Generation Space Telescope design reference mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Eric P.; Mather, John C.; Stockman, Hervey S.; Bely, Pierre Y.; Stiavelli, Massimo; Burg, Richard

    1998-08-01

    The Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST) Design Reference Mission (DRM) represents a suite of potential astronomical programs and targets along with their expected physical properties, and desired observation modes. This broad science program is being used to drive the observatory design in a way as fundamental as traditional engineering parameters. Astronomers use the DRM to communicate their desires in a quantitative fashion to the engineers who will eventually construct the observatory. The DRM is also the primary tool used to measure the relative value of NGST mission architectures and technological readiness of the program. Specifically, the fraction of the DRM completed by a given observatory configuration in a given time is, to first order, a measure of the value of the design. Those designs which complete a higher fraction of the observations listed below are more capable than those complete lesser fractions.

  7. Space shuttle electrical power generation and reactant supply system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, W. E.

    1985-01-01

    The design philosophy and development experience of fuel cell power generation and cryogenic reactant supply systems are reviewed, beginning with the state of technology at the conclusion of the Apollo Program. Technology advancements span a period of 10 years from initial definition phase to the most recent space transportation system (STS) flights. The development program encompassed prototype, verification, and qualification hardware, as well as post-STS-1 design improvements. Focus is on the problems encountered, the scientific and engineering approaches employed to meet the technological challenges, and the results obtained. Major technology barriers are discussed, and the evolving technology development paths are traced from their conceptual beginnings to the fully man-rated systems which are now an integral part of the shuttle vehicle.

  8. Simulation of a cascaded longitudinal space charge amplifier for coherent radiation generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halavanau, A.; Piot, P.

    2016-05-01

    Longitudinal space charge (LSC) effects are generally considered as harmful in free-electron lasers as they can seed unfavorable energy modulations that can result in density modulations with associated emittance dilution. This "micro-bunching instabilities" is naturally broadband and could possibly support the generation of coherent radiation over a broad region of the spectrum. Therefore there has been an increasing interest in devising accelerator beam lines capable of controlling LSC induced density modulations. In the present paper we refine these previous investigations by combining a grid-less space charge algorithm with the popular particle-tracking program ELEGANT. This high-fidelity model of the space charge is used to benchmark conventional LSC models. We finally employ the developed model to investigate the performance of a cascaded LSC amplifier using beam parameters comparable to the ones achievable at Fermilab Accelerator Science & Technology (FAST) facility currently under commissioning at Fermilab.

  9. Space Particle Hazard Measurement and Modeling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-01

    AFRL-RV-PS- AFRL-RV-PS- TR-2016-0120 TR-2016-0120 SPACE PARTICLE HAZARD MEASUREMENT AND MODELING Adrian Wheelock 01 September 2016 Final Report...APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE; DISTRIBUTION IS UNLIMITED. AIR FORCE RESEARCH LABORATORY Space Vehicles Directorate 3550 Aberdeen Ave SE AIR FORCE...AND SUBTITLE Space Particle Hazard Measurement and Modeling 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 62601F 6. AUTHOR(S

  10. Design concepts of solar thermoelectric generators in space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raag, V.; Hankins, L.; Swerdling, M.

    1978-01-01

    Several thermoelectric technologies have been examined as to their suitability for use in a solar thermoelectric generator (STG) as a nonpropulsive power source for space applications. The results show that of all the presently available thermoelectric technologies, i.e., lead telluride, bismuth telluride, selenide, and silicon-germanium alloys, the latter type provides the optimum STG. Detailed results are presented on the performance and configurational characteristics of various silicon-germanium alloy STGs, including the performance of such STGs as a function of time in a Mercury orbit and the orbit of Mercury around the sun. It is shown that an STG design based on the use of silicon germanium alloy thermoelectric material, using multiple high voltage thermopiles with individual solar concentrators, presents the optimum combination of technology and configuration for minimizing power source mass. Additional concepts studied and discussed are the flat plate individual thermopile type and single concentrator compact thermopile type. The STG possesses an attractive potential for this application and represents a useful addition to the family of power sources for consideration in various space applications.

  11. New generation high-energy space observatory GAMMA-400

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topchiev, Nikolay

    Space gamma radiation gives unique information on high-energy processes in our Universe. Gammas are not deflected by magnetic field and mainly come to the vicinity of the Earth with the same direction and energy as they were generated in astrophysical objects. GAMMA-400 is the gamma-ray space observatory planned to be launched in 2019 to the high-elliptical orbit with an apogee of 300000 km. The observatory carries two instruments onboard: the gamma-ray burst monitor KONUS and the high-energy gamma-ray telescope GAMMA-400 for the energy range from 100 MeV to 3000 GeV. The main goal of the project is to study high-energy gamma radiation and also electrons+positrons. Having both angular and energy resolution 5-10 times better than achieved present instruments, GAMMA-400 will make a new step in gamma-ray astronomy. Expected advances are: searching for signatures of dark matter, studying the center of Galaxy, identifying numerous unassociated gamma-ray sources.

  12. Near-Earth Space Radiation Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xapsos, Michael A.; O'Neill, Patrick M.; O'Brien, T. Paul

    2012-01-01

    Review of models of the near-Earth space radiation environment is presented, including recent developments in trapped proton and electron, galactic cosmic ray and solar particle event models geared toward spacecraft electronics applications.

  13. (abstract) The Nest Generation of Space Flight Computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alkalaj, Leon; Panwar, Ramesh

    1993-01-01

    To meet new design objectives for drastic reductions in mass, size, and power consumption, the Flight Computer Development Group at JPL is participating in a design study and development of a light-weight, small-sized, low-power 3-D Space Flight Computer. In this paper, we will present a detailed design and tradeoff study of the proposed computer. We will also discuss a complete design of the multichip modules and their size, weight, and power consumption. Prelimimary thermal models will also be discussed.

  14. (abstract) The Nest Generation of Space Flight Computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alkalaj, Leon; Panwar, Ramesh

    1993-01-01

    To meet new design objectives for drastic reductions in mass, size, and power consumption, the Flight Computer Development Group at JPL is participating in a design study and development of a light-weight, small-sized, low-power 3-D Space Flight Computer. In this paper, we will present a detailed design and tradeoff study of the proposed computer. We will also discuss a complete design of the multichip modules and their size, weight, and power consumption. Prelimimary thermal models will also be discussed.

  15. The Space Thermal Signature Model: Principles And Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Agostino, John A.

    1987-09-01

    The SPACE (Sun, Precipitation, Atmosphere, Clouds, Earth) Thermal Signature Model has been developed by XonTech as a tool to be used in the accurate prediction of military thermal signatures. Currently this model has been optimized to address 8-12 micrometer signatures of armored ground targets in natural background settings. With somewhat lesser accuracy the current model design can address the 3-5 micrometer spectral region. With some model modifications, air and space targets could be addressed. The model is based entirely on first principles with respect to the thermal signature components induced by the natural environment. However, self-heating effects such as those caused by a tank engine or by friction require empirical input data which must be derived from pre-existing thermal measurements. The SPACE model has been programmed in compiled Microsoft BASIC to run on PC-compatible computers. Some generic target and background descriptions are part of the model ensemble. The development of additional descriptive data bases to cover specific target/background scenarios is possible using related utility software which has been developed for this purpose. The SPACE model is currently being used both by Government and industry to support model comparison studies, the prediction of target-to-background thermal contrast signatures, and the generation of synthetic infrared thermal imagery. It is the purpose of this paper to provide a brief tutorial on the modeling principles behind SPACE, a description of the SPACE software architecture and operation, and some example problems.

  16. Integrated Space Asset Management Database and Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagliano, L.; MacLeod, T.; Mason, S.; Percy, T.; Prescott, J.

    The Space Asset Management Database (SAM-D) was implemented in order to effectively track known objects in space by ingesting information from a variety of databases and performing calculations to determine the expected position of the object at a specified time. While SAM-D performs this task very well, it is limited by technology and is not available outside of the local user base. Modeling and simulation can be powerful tools to exploit the information contained in SAM-D. However, the current system does not allow proper integration options for combining the data with both legacy and new M&S tools. A more capable data management infrastructure would extend SAM-D to support the larger data sets to be generated by the COI. A service-oriented architecture model will allow it to easily expand to incorporate new capabilities, including advanced analytics, M&S tools, fusion techniques and user interface for visualizations. Based on a web-centric approach, the entire COI will be able to access the data and related analytics. In addition, tight control of information sharing policy will increase confidence in the system, which would encourage industry partners to provide commercial data. SIMON is a Government off the Shelf information sharing platform in use throughout DoD and DHS information sharing and situation awareness communities. SIMON providing fine grained control to data owners allowing them to determine exactly how and when their data is shared. SIMON supports a micro-service approach to system development, meaning M&S and analytic services can be easily built or adapted. It is uniquely positioned to fill this need as an information-sharing platform with a proven track record of successful situational awareness system deployments. Combined with the integration of new and legacy M&S tools, a SIMON-based architecture will provide a robust SA environment for the NASA SA COI that can be extended and expanded indefinitely. First Results of Coherent Uplink from a

  17. A Simulation and Modeling Framework for Space Situational Awareness

    SciTech Connect

    Olivier, S S

    2008-09-15

    This paper describes the development and initial demonstration of a new, integrated modeling and simulation framework, encompassing the space situational awareness enterprise, for quantitatively assessing the benefit of specific sensor systems, technologies and data analysis techniques. The framework is based on a flexible, scalable architecture to enable efficient, physics-based simulation of the current SSA enterprise, and to accommodate future advancements in SSA systems. In particular, the code is designed to take advantage of massively parallel computer systems available, for example, at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The details of the modeling and simulation framework are described, including hydrodynamic models of satellite intercept and debris generation, orbital propagation algorithms, radar cross section calculations, optical brightness calculations, generic radar system models, generic optical system models, specific Space Surveillance Network models, object detection algorithms, orbit determination algorithms, and visualization tools. The use of this integrated simulation and modeling framework on a specific scenario involving space debris is demonstrated.

  18. Contamination Control Considerations for the Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wooldridge, Eve M.

    1998-01-01

    The NASA Space Science Program, in its ongoing mission to study the universe, has begun planning for a telescope that will carry on the Hubble Space Telescope's exploration. This telescope, the 'Next Generation Space Telescope' (NGST), will be 6-8 meters in diameter, will be radiatively cooled to 30-60 Kelvin in order to enable extremely deep exposures at near infrared wavelengths, and will operate for a lifetime of 5-10 years. The requirement will be to measure wavelengths from 1-5 microns, with a goal to measure wavelengths from 0.6-30 microns. As such, NGST will present a new contamination control challenge. The Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) performed one of three preliminary feasibility studies for the NGST, presenting a telescope with an 8 meter, deployable primary mirror and a deployable secondary mirror. The telescope would be radiatively cooled, with the optical telescope assembly (OTA) and the science instrument module (SIM) isolated from the warmer spacecraft support module (SSM). The OTA and the SIM would also be shielded from sunlight with an enormous, inflatable sun-shield. The GSFC telescope was designed for launch on an Atlas HAS, which would require launching the telescope in a stowed configuration, with the SSM, antennae, sun-shield, primary mirror 'petals', and secondary mirror deployed once on-orbit. The launch configuration and deployment scenario of an exposed telescope measuring near infrared and cooled to 30-60 K are the factors presenting contamination hazards to the NGST mission. Preliminary science requirements established are: less than 20% reflectance decrease on optical surfaces over the wavelength range, and less than 0.3% obscuration of optical surfaces. In order to meet these requirements, NGST must be built and launched with careful attention to contamination control. Initial contamination control design options include strict selecting of materials and baking out of hardware down to the component level, minimizing or

  19. Ocean foam generation and modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, R. A.; Bechis, K. P.

    1976-01-01

    A laboratory investigation was conducted to determine the physical and microwave properties of ocean foam. Special foam generators were designed and fabricated, using porous glass sheets, known as glass frits, as the principal element. The glass frit was sealed into a water-tight vertical box, a few centimeters from the bottom. Compressed air, applied to the lower chamber, created ocean foam from sea water lying on the frit. Foam heights of 30 cm were readily achieved, with relatively low air pressures. Special photographic techniques and analytical procedures were employed to determine foam bubble size distributions. In addition, the percentage water content of ocean foam was determined with the aid of a particulate sampling procedure. A glass frit foam generator, with pore diameters in the range 70 - 100 micrometers, produced foam with bubble distributions very similar to those found on the surface of natural ocean foam patches.

  20. Leading Generative Groups: A Conceptual Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    London, Manuel; Sobel-Lojeski, Karen A.; Reilly, Richard R.

    2012-01-01

    This article presents a conceptual model of leadership in generative groups. Generative groups have diverse team members who are expected to develop innovative solutions to complex, unstructured problems. The challenge for leaders of generative groups is to balance (a) establishing shared goals with recognizing members' vested interests, (b)…

  1. Next Generation Transport Phenomenology Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strickland, Douglas J.; Knight, Harold; Evans, J. Scott

    2004-01-01

    This report describes the progress made in Quarter 3 of Contract Year 3 on the development of Aeronomy Phenomenology Modeling Tool (APMT), an open-source, component-based, client-server architecture for distributed modeling, analysis, and simulation activities focused on electron and photon transport for general atmospheres. In the past quarter, column emission rate computations were implemented in Java, preexisting Fortran programs for computing synthetic spectra were embedded into APMT through Java wrappers, and work began on a web-based user interface for setting input parameters and running the photoelectron and auroral electron transport models.

  2. Next Generation Transport Phenomenology Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strickland, Douglas J.; Knight, Harold; Evans, J. Scott

    2004-01-01

    This report describes the progress made in Quarter 3 of Contract Year 3 on the development of Aeronomy Phenomenology Modeling Tool (APMT), an open-source, component-based, client-server architecture for distributed modeling, analysis, and simulation activities focused on electron and photon transport for general atmospheres. In the past quarter, column emission rate computations were implemented in Java, preexisting Fortran programs for computing synthetic spectra were embedded into APMT through Java wrappers, and work began on a web-based user interface for setting input parameters and running the photoelectron and auroral electron transport models.

  3. Evolutionary Industrial Physical Model Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrascal, Alberto; Alberdi, Amaia

    Both complexity and lack of knowledge associated to physical processes makes physical models design an arduous task. Frequently, the only available information about the physical processes are the heuristic data obtained from experiments or at best a rough idea on what are the physical principles and laws that underlie considered physical processes. Then the problem is converted to find a mathematical expression which fits data. There exist traditional approaches to tackle the inductive model search process from data, such as regression, interpolation, finite element method, etc. Nevertheless, these methods either are only able to solve a reduced number of simple model typologies, or the given black-box solution does not contribute to clarify the analyzed physical process. In this paper a hybrid evolutionary approach to search complex physical models is proposed. Tests carried out on a real-world industrial physical process (abrasive water jet machining) demonstrate the validity of this approach.

  4. Modelling of Tethered Space-Web Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenzie, D. J.; Cartnell, M. P.

    Large structures in space are an essential milestone in the path of many projects, from solar power collectors to space stations. In space, as on Earth, these large projects may be split up into more manageable sections, dividing the task into multiple replicable parts. Specially constructed spider robots could assemble these structures piece by piece over a membrane or space- web, giving a method for building a structure while on orbit. The modelling and applications of these space-webs are discussed, along with the derivation of the equations of motion of the structure. The presentation of some preliminary results from the solution of these equations will show that space-webs can take a variety of different forms, and give some guidelines for configuring the space-web system.

  5. Modelling with stakeholders - Next generation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Voinov, Alexey; Kolagani, Nagesh; McCall, Michael K; Glynn, Pierre D.; Kragt, Marit E; Ostermann, Frank O; Pierce, Suzanne A; Ramu, Palaniappan

    2016-01-01

    This paper updates and builds on ‘Modelling with Stakeholders’ Voinov and Bousquet, 2010 which demonstrated the importance of, and demand for, stakeholder participation in resource and environmental modelling. This position paper returns to the concepts of that publication and reviews the progress made since 2010. A new development is the wide introduction and acceptance of social media and web applications, which dramatically changes the context and scale of stakeholder interactions and participation. Technology advances make it easier to incorporate information in interactive formats via visualization and games to augment participatory experiences. Citizens as stakeholders are increasingly demanding to be engaged in planning decisions that affect them and their communities, at scales from local to global. How people interact with and access models and data is rapidly evolving. In turn, this requires changes in how models are built, packaged, and disseminated: citizens are less in awe of experts and external authorities, and they are increasingly aware of their own capabilities to provide inputs to planning processes, including models. The continued acceleration of environmental degradation and natural resource depletion accompanies these societal changes, even as there is a growing acceptance of the need to transition to alternative, possibly very different, life styles. Substantive transitions cannot occur without significant changes in human behaviour and perceptions. The important and diverse roles that models can play in guiding human behaviour, and in disseminating and increasing societal knowledge, are a feature of stakeholder processes today.

  6. Space Vehicle Reliability Modeling in DIORAMA

    SciTech Connect

    Tornga, Shawn Robert

    2016-07-12

    When modeling system performance of space based detection systems it is important to consider spacecraft reliability. As space vehicles age the components become prone to failure for a variety of reasons such as radiation damage. Additionally, some vehicles may lose the ability to maneuver once they exhaust fuel supplies. Typically failure is divided into two categories: engineering mistakes and technology surprise. This document will report on a method of simulating space vehicle reliability in the DIORAMA framework.

  7. Emulating a flexible space structure: Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waites, H. B.; Rice, S. C.; Jones, V. L.

    1988-01-01

    Control Dynamics, in conjunction with Marshall Space Flight Center, has participated in the modeling and testing of Flexible Space Structures. Through the series of configurations tested and the many techniques used for collecting, analyzing, and modeling the data, many valuable insights have been gained and important lessons learned. This paper discusses the background of the Large Space Structure program, Control Dynamics' involvement in testing and modeling of the configurations (especially the Active Control Technique Evaluation for Spacecraft (ACES) configuration), the results from these two processes, and insights gained from this work.

  8. Momentum-space Harper-Hofstadter model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozawa, Tomoki; Price, Hannah M.; Carusotto, Iacopo

    2015-08-01

    We show how the weakly trapped Harper-Hofstadter model can be mapped onto a Harper-Hofstadter model in momentum space. In this momentum-space model, the band dispersion plays the role of the periodic potential, the Berry curvature plays the role of an effective magnetic field, the real-space harmonic trap provides the momentum-space kinetic energy responsible for the hopping, and the trap position sets the boundary conditions around the magnetic Brillouin zone. Spatially local interactions translate into nonlocal interactions in momentum space: within a mean-field approximation, we show that increasing interparticle interactions leads to a structural change of the ground state, from a single rotationally symmetric ground state to degenerate ground states that spontaneously break rotational symmetry.

  9. 3D space analysis of dental models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuah, Joon H.; Ong, Sim Heng; Kondo, Toshiaki; Foong, Kelvin W. C.; Yong, Than F.

    2001-05-01

    Space analysis is an important procedure by orthodontists to determine the amount of space available and required for teeth alignment during treatment planning. Traditional manual methods of space analysis are tedious and often inaccurate. Computer-based space analysis methods that work on 2D images have been reported. However, as the space problems in the dental arch exist in all three planes of space, a full 3D analysis of the problems is necessary. This paper describes a visualization and measurement system that analyses 3D images of dental plaster models. Algorithms were developed to determine dental arches. The system is able to record the depths of the Curve of Spee, and quantify space liabilities arising from a non-planar Curve of Spee, malalignment and overjet. Furthermore, the difference between total arch space available and the space required to arrange the teeth in ideal occlusion can be accurately computed. The system for 3D space analysis of the dental arch is an accurate, comprehensive, rapid and repeatable method of space analysis to facilitate proper orthodontic diagnosis and treatment planning.

  10. Generative model for feedback networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Douglas R.; Kejžar, Nataša; Tsallis, Constantino; Farmer, Doyne; White, Scott

    2006-01-01

    We propose a model for network formation and study some of its statistical properties. The motivation for the model comes from the growth of several kinds of real networks (i.e., kinship and trading networks, networks of corporate alliances, networks of autocatalytic chemical reactions). These networks grow either by establishing closer connections by adding links in the existing network or by adding new nodes. A node in these networks lacks the information of the entire network. In order to establish a closer connection to other nodes it starts a search in the neighboring part of the network and waits for a possible feedback from a distant node that received the “searching signal.” Our model imitates this behavior by growing the network via the addition of a link that creates a cycle in the network or via the addition of a new node with a link to the network. The forming of a cycle creates feedback between the two ending nodes. After choosing a starting node, a search is made for another node at a suitable distance; if such a node is found, a link is established between this and the starting node, otherwise (such a node cannot be found) a new node is added and is linked to the starting node. We simulate this algorithm and find that we cannot reject the hypothesis that the empirical degree distribution is a q -exponential function, which has been used to model long-range processes in nonequilibrium statistical mechanics.

  11. Next Generation Space Telescope Integrated Science Module Data System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schnurr, Richard G.; Greenhouse, Matthew A.; Jurotich, Matthew M.; Whitley, Raymond; Kalinowski, Keith J.; Love, Bruce W.; Travis, Jeffrey W.; Long, Knox S.

    1999-01-01

    The Data system for the Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST) Integrated Science Module (ISIM) is the primary data interface between the spacecraft, telescope, and science instrument systems. This poster includes block diagrams of the ISIM data system and its components derived during the pre-phase A Yardstick feasibility study. The poster details the hardware and software components used to acquire and process science data for the Yardstick instrument compliment, and depicts the baseline external interfaces to science instruments and other systems. This baseline data system is a fully redundant, high performance computing system. Each redundant computer contains three 150 MHz power PC processors. All processors execute a commercially available real time multi-tasking operating system supporting, preemptive multi-tasking, file management and network interfaces. These six processors in the system are networked together. The spacecraft interface baseline is an extension of the network, which links the six processors. The final selection for Processor busses, processor chips, network interfaces, and high-speed data interfaces will be made during mid 2002.

  12. Next Generation Space Telescope Integrated Science Module Data System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schnurr, Richard G.; Greenhouse, Matthew A.; Jurotich, Matthew M.; Whitley, Raymond; Kalinowski, Keith J.; Love, Bruce W.; Travis, Jeffrey W.; Long, Knox S.

    1999-01-01

    The Data system for the Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST) Integrated Science Module (ISIM) is the primary data interface between the spacecraft, telescope, and science instrument systems. This poster includes block diagrams of the ISIM data system and its components derived during the pre-phase A Yardstick feasibility study. The poster details the hardware and software components used to acquire and process science data for the Yardstick instrument compliment, and depicts the baseline external interfaces to science instruments and other systems. This baseline data system is a fully redundant, high performance computing system. Each redundant computer contains three 150 MHz power PC processors. All processors execute a commercially available real time multi-tasking operating system supporting, preemptive multi-tasking, file management and network interfaces. These six processors in the system are networked together. The spacecraft interface baseline is an extension of the network, which links the six processors. The final selection for Processor busses, processor chips, network interfaces, and high-speed data interfaces will be made during mid 2002.

  13. Space-based solar power generation using a distributed network of satellites and methods for efficient space power transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLinko, Ryan M.; Sagar, Basant V.

    2009-12-01

    . The only satellites that are constrained to a significant mass are the beam-down satellites, which still require significant transmission arrays to sufficiently focus the beams targeting corresponding ground stations. With robust design and inherent redundancy built-in, power generation and transmission will not be interrupted in the event of mishaps like space debris collision. Furthermore, the "plug and play" nature of this system significantly reduces the cost, complexity, and risk of upgrading the system. The distributed nature of smallsat clusters maximizes the use of economies of scale. This approach retains some problems of older designs and introduces additional ones. Mitigations will be explored further. For example, the distributed nature of the system requires very precise coordination between and among satellites and a mature attitude control and determination system. Such a design incorporates multiple beaming stages, which has the potential to reduce overall system efficiency. Although this design eliminates the need for space assembly, it retains the challenge of significant on-orbit deployment of solar and transmission arrays. Space power "beaming" is a three step process that involves: 1) conversion of dc power generated by solar cells on the satellite into an electromagnetic wave of suitable frequency, 2) transmission of that wave to power stations on ground, and 3) conversion of the radio waves back into dc power. A great deal of research has been done on the use of microwaves for this purpose. Various factors that affect efficient power generation and transmission will be analyzed in this paper. Based on relevant theory and performance and optimization models, the paper proposes solutions that will help make space-based solar power generation a practical and viable option for addressing the world's growing energy needs.

  14. Parametric Cost Models for Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2010-01-01

    A study is in-process to develop a multivariable parametric cost model for space telescopes. Cost and engineering parametric data has been collected on 30 different space telescopes. Statistical correlations have been developed between 19 variables of 59 variables sampled. Single Variable and Multi-Variable Cost Estimating Relationships have been developed. Results are being published.

  15. Student Involvement in Space Exploration: The Next Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagenal, F.; Horanyi, M.

    2017-02-01

    Involvement of students in space missions exposes them to the technical realities of space exploration – delivers deep learning experience and feeds the professional pipeline. Give students the opportunity to explore every corner of the solar system.

  16. In situ experimental study of carbon monoxide generation by gasoline-powered electric generator in an enclosed space.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liangzhu; Emmerich, Steven J; Persily, Andrew K

    2010-12-01

    On the basis of currently available data, approximately 97% of generator-related carbon monoxide (CO) fatalities are caused by operating currently marketed, carbureted spark-ignited gasoline-powered generators (not equipped with emission controls) in enclosed spaces. To better understand and to reduce the occurrence of these fatalities, research is needed to quantify CO generation rates, develop and test CO emission control devices, and evaluate CO transport and exposure when operating a generator in an enclosed space. As a first step in these efforts, this paper presents measured CO generation rates from a generator without any emission control devices operating in an enclosed space under real weather conditions. This study expands on previously published information from the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission. Thirteen separate tests were conducted under different weather conditions at half and full generator load settings. It was found that the CO level in the shed reached a maximum value of 29,300 +/- 580 mg/m3, whereas the oxygen (O2) was depleted to a minimum level of 16.2 +/- 0.02% by volume. For the test conditions of real weather and generator operation, the CO generation and the O2 consumption could be expressed as time-averaged generation/consumption rates. It was also found that the CO generation and O2 consumption rates can be correlated to the O2 levels in the space and the actual load output from the generator. These correlations are shown to agree well with the measurements.

  17. Mode excitation in a generator of diffraction radiation with a multistage interaction space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miroshnichenko, V. S.; Senkevich, E. B.; Pivovarova, A. G.; Yudintsev, D. V.

    2010-08-01

    We present the results of studying theoretically and experimentally the peculiarities of mode excitation in a generator of diffraction radiation with the two- and three-cascade interaction space in one open resonator. To describe the multistage interaction mechanism, the theoretical model used considers the excitation of the TEM0nq modes, which have n in-phase field “spots,” i.e., cascades, along the direction of the electron beam motion. It is shown that even the use of the two-cascade interaction space with the TEM01q modes allows one to reduce the starting current of the generator by 1.91 times. The results of studying experimentally the two-cascade generator in the 5 and 1.5-mm wavelength ranges are presented. The in-phase property of the electron beam with the resonance field was achieved by disrupting the periodicity of the lattice slots at the center of the interaction space. The output power of the two-stage generator of 5-mm diffraction radiation in the TEM013 mode ranged from 3 to 5 W. We also observed a 4-5-fold increase in the starting current for the regime of surface waves.

  18. PREFACE: Acceleration and radiation generation in space and laboratory plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bingham, R.; Katsouleas, T.; Dawson, J. M.; Stenflo, L.

    1994-01-01

    Sixty-six leading researchers from ten nations gathered in the Homeric village of Kardamyli, on the southern coast of mainland Greece, from August 29-September 4, 1993 for the International Workshop on Acceleration and Radiation Generation in Space and Laboratory Plasmas. This Special Issue represents a cross-section of the presentations made at and the research stimulated by that meeting. According to the Iliad, King Agamemnon used Kardamyli as a dowry offering in order to draw a sulking Achilles into the Trojan War. 3000 years later, Kardamyli is no less seductive. Its remoteness and tranquility made it an ideal venue for promoting the free exchange of ideas between various disciplines that do not normally interact. Through invited presen tations, informal poster discussions and working group sessions, the Workshop brought together leaders from the laboratory and space/astrophysics communities working on common problems of acceleration and radiation generation in plasmas. It was clear from the presentation and discussion sessions that there is a great deal of common ground between these disciplines which is not at first obvious due to the differing terminologies and types of observations available to each community. All of the papers in this Special Issue highlight the role collective plasma processes play in accelerating particles or generating radiation. Some are state-of-the-art presentations of the latest research in a single discipline, while others investi gate the applicability of known laboratory mechanisms to explain observations in natural plasmas. Notable among the latter are the papers by Marshall et al. on kHz radiation in the magnetosphere ; Barletta et al. on collective acceleration in solar flares; and by Dendy et al. on ion cyclotron emission. The papers in this Issue are organized as follows: In Section 1 are four general papers by Dawson, Galeev, Bingham et al. and Mon which serves as an introduction to the physical mechanisms of acceleration

  19. Negative-permittivity plasma generation in negative-permeability space with high-energy metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, Osamu; Nakamura, Yoshihiro; Iwai, Akinori; Iio, Satoshi

    2016-10-01

    Plasma generation by electromagnetic waves in negative-permeability space is analyzed using experimental results and theoretical models. Installation of negative-permeability metamaterials triggers drastic changes to the propagation of electromagnetic waves. Unlike usual cases in which permeability is  +1, negative permeability induces evanescent modes in a space without plasma. However, if permittivity becomes negative due to high-electron-density or overdense plasma, electromagnetic waves can propagate because negative-refractive-index states emerge. In this study, reviewing our previous experimental data, we study the underlying physical processes in plasma generation in terms of wave propagation and parameters of wave media. We confirm nonlinear (transition) processes in the phase of density evolution up to the negative permittivity state and negative-refractive-index states in the quasi-steady phase. We also note that such energetic metamaterials are built up when we use plasma, unlike conventional metamaterials composed of solid-state materials.

  20. Dilaton stabilization in three-generation heterotic string model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beye, Florian; Kobayashi, Tatsuo; Kuwakino, Shogo

    2016-09-01

    We study dilaton stabilization in heterotic string models. By utilizing the asymmetric orbifold construction, we construct an explicit three-generation model whose matter content in the visible sector is the supersymmetric standard model with additional vectorlike matter. This model does not contain any geometric moduli fields except the dilaton field. Model building at a symmetry enhancement point in moduli space enlarges the rank of the hidden gauge group. By analyzing multiple hidden gauge sectors, the dilaton field is stabilized by the racetrack mechanism. We also discuss a supersymmetry breaking scenario and F-term uplifting.

  1. Parametric Cost Models for Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip; Henrichs, Todd; Dollinger, Courtney

    2010-01-01

    Multivariable parametric cost models for space telescopes provide several benefits to designers and space system project managers. They identify major architectural cost drivers and allow high-level design trades. They enable cost-benefit analysis for technology development investment. And, they provide a basis for estimating total project cost. A survey of historical models found that there is no definitive space telescope cost model. In fact, published models vary greatly [1]. Thus, there is a need for parametric space telescopes cost models. An effort is underway to develop single variable [2] and multi-variable [3] parametric space telescope cost models based on the latest available data and applying rigorous analytical techniques. Specific cost estimating relationships (CERs) have been developed which show that aperture diameter is the primary cost driver for large space telescopes; technology development as a function of time reduces cost at the rate of 50% per 17 years; it costs less per square meter of collecting aperture to build a large telescope than a small telescope; and increasing mass reduces cost.

  2. Transforming Community Access to Space Science Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacNeice, Peter; Heese, Michael; Kunetsova, Maria; Maddox, Marlo; Rastaetter, Lutz; Berrios, David; Pulkkinen, Antti

    2012-01-01

    Researching and forecasting the ever changing space environment (often referred to as space weather) and its influence on humans and their activities are model-intensive disciplines. This is true because the physical processes involved are complex, but, in contrast to terrestrial weather, the supporting observations are typically sparse. Models play a vital role in establishing a physically meaningful context for interpreting limited observations, testing theory, and producing both nowcasts and forecasts. For example, with accurate forecasting of hazardous space weather conditions, spacecraft operators can place sensitive systems in safe modes, and power utilities can protect critical network components from damage caused by large currents induced in transmission lines by geomagnetic storms.

  3. Validation of Space Weather Models at Community Coordinated Modeling Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuznetsova, M. M.; Hesse, M.; Pulkkinen, A.; Maddox, M.; Rastaetter, L.; Berrios, D.; Zheng, Y.; MacNeice, P. J.; Shim, J.; Taktakishvili, A.; Chulaki, A.

    2011-01-01

    The Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC) is a multi-agency partnership to support the research and developmental work necessary to substantially increase space weather modeling capabilities and to facilitate advanced models deployment in forecasting operations. Space weather models and coupled model chains hosted at the CCMC range from the solar corona to the Earth's upper atmosphere. CCMC has developed a number of real-time modeling systems, as well as a large number of modeling and data products tailored to address the space weather needs of NASA's robotic missions. The CCMC conducts unbiased model testing and validation and evaluates model readiness for operational environment. CCMC has been leading recent comprehensive modeling challenges under GEM, CEDAR and SHINE programs. The presentation will focus on experience in carrying out comprehensive and systematic validation of large sets of. space weather models

  4. Generation of a Solar Wind Ensemble for Space Weather Forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, E.; Morley, S.; Steinberg, J. T.

    2015-12-01

    Knowing the upstream solar wind conditions is essential in forecasting the variations in the geomangetic field and the status of the Earth's ionosphere. Most data-driven simulations or data-assimilation codes, used for space weather forecasting, are based on the solar wind measurements at 1 AU, or more specifically at the first Lagrangian orbit (L1), such as observations from the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE). However, L1 measurements may not represent the solar wind conditions just outside the magnetosphere. As a result, time-series measurements from L1 by themselves are not adequate to run simulations to derive probabilistic forecasts of the magnetosphere and ionosphere. To obtain confidence levels and uncertainty estimates, a solar wind ensemble data set is desirable. Therefore we used three years of measurements atACE advected using the flat delay method to the Interplanetary Monitoring Platform (IMP8) spacecraft location. Then, we compared both measurements to establish Kernel Density Estimation (KDE) functions for IMP8 measurements based on ACE measurements. In addition, we used a 4-categorization scheme to sort the incoming solar wind into ejecta, coronal-hole-origin, sector-reversal-regions, and streamer-belt-origin categories at both ACE and IMP8. We established the KDE functions for each category and compared with the uncategorized KDE functions. The location of the IMP8 spacecraft allows us to use these KDE functions to generate ensemble of solar wind data close to Earth's magnetopause. The ensemble can then be used to forecast the state of the geomagnetic field and the ionosphere.

  5. Modelling of space debris and meteoroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandeville, J. C.; Alby, F.

    1997-05-01

    Since several years, CNES has undertaken studies in the field of debris and meteoroids since the knowledge of this environment is of prime importance for space activities and will be a growing concern in the future. In the frame of this study, the main available models concerning space debris and meteoroids have been analysed: origin, principle of modelization, limits and evolution as a function of time. A reference model has been choosen and evaluated through comparisons with available data, coming from in flight experiments such as LDEF, EURECA, MIR and HUBBLE. This work will lead in the future to improve the models, particularly for the small size debris.

  6. AX-5 space suit reliability model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinhardt, AL; Magistad, John

    1990-01-01

    The AX-5 is an all metal Extra-vehicular (EVA) space suit currently under consideration for use on Space Station Freedom. A reliability model was developed based on the suit's unique design and on projected joint cycle requirements. Three AX-5 space suit component joints were cycled under simulated load conditions in accordance with NASA's advanced space suit evaluation plan. This paper will describe the reliability model developed, the results of the cycle testing, and an interpretation of the model and test results in terms of projected Mean Time Between Failure for the AX-5. A discussion of the maintenance implications and life cycle for the AX-5 based on this projection is also included.

  7. A Generative Model of Mathematics Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wittrock, M. C.

    1974-01-01

    The learning of mathematics is presented as a cognitive process rather than as a behavioristic one. A generative model of mathematics learning is described. Learning with understanding can occur with discovery or reception treatments. Relevant empirical research is discussed and implications for teaching mathematics as a generative process are…

  8. Space Environments and Effects: Trapped Proton Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huston, S. L.; Kauffman, W. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    An improved model of the Earth's trapped proton environment has been developed. This model, designated Trapped Proton Model version 1 (TPM-1), determines the omnidirectional flux of protons with energy between 1 and 100 MeV throughout near-Earth space. The model also incorporates a true solar cycle dependence. The model consists of several data files and computer software to read them. There are three versions of the mo'del: a FORTRAN-Callable library, a stand-alone model, and a Web-based model.

  9. An introduction to Space Weather Integrated Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, D.; Feng, X.

    2012-12-01

    The need for a software toolkit that integrates space weather models and data is one of many challenges we are facing with when applying the models to space weather forecasting. To meet this challenge, we have developed Space Weather Integrated Modeling (SWIM) that is capable of analysis and visualizations of the results from a diverse set of space weather models. SWIM has a modular design and is written in Python, by using NumPy, matplotlib, and the Visualization ToolKit (VTK). SWIM provides data management module to read a variety of spacecraft data products and a specific data format of Solar-Interplanetary Conservation Element/Solution Element MHD model (SIP-CESE MHD model) for the study of solar-terrestrial phenomena. Data analysis, visualization and graphic user interface modules are also presented in a user-friendly way to run the integrated models and visualize the 2-D and 3-D data sets interactively. With these tools we can locally or remotely analysis the model result rapidly, such as extraction of data on specific location in time-sequence data sets, plotting interplanetary magnetic field lines, multi-slicing of solar wind speed, volume rendering of solar wind density, animation of time-sequence data sets, comparing between model result and observational data. To speed-up the analysis, an in-situ visualization interface is used to support visualizing the data 'on-the-fly'. We also modified some critical time-consuming analysis and visualization methods with the aid of GPU and multi-core CPU. We have used this tool to visualize the data of SIP-CESE MHD model in real time, and integrated the Database Model of shock arrival, Shock Propagation Model, Dst forecasting model and SIP-CESE MHD model developed by SIGMA Weather Group at State Key Laboratory of Space Weather/CAS.

  10. Scientific and Mission Requirements of Next-generation Space Infrared Space Telescope SPICA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuhara, Hideo; Nakagawa, Takao; Ichikawa, Takashi; Takami, Michihiro; Sakon, Itsuki

    SPICA (Space Infrared Telescope for Cosmology Astrophysics) is a next-generation space tele-scope for mid-and far-infrared astronomy, based on the heritage of AKARI, Spitzer, and Her-schel, Here we introduce Mission Requirement Document (MRD), where scientific and mission requirement of SPICA are described. The MRD clarifies the objectives of the SPICA mission. These objectives are more concretely expressed by various scientific targets, and based on these targets, the mission requirements, such as required specifications of the mission instrumenta-tions, scientific operations etc. are defined. Also the success criteria, by which the evaluation of the mission achievement will be addressed, are clearly described. The mission requirements described here will give the baseline of the study of the system requirements. In the future, The MRD will also be used to confirm the development status, system performance, and operational results on orbit etc. are well in-line with the mission requirements. To summarize, the most important mission requirement of SPICA is to realize a large, mono-lithic (not segmented) 3-m class or larger mirror cooled down below 6K, in order to perform extremely deep imaging and spectroscopy at 5-210µm.

  11. Deep space network software cost estimation model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tausworthe, R. C.

    1981-01-01

    A parametric software cost estimation model prepared for Jet PRopulsion Laboratory (JPL) Deep Space Network (DSN) Data System implementation tasks is described. The resource estimation mdel modifies and combines a number of existing models. The model calibrates the task magnitude and difficulty, development environment, and software technology effects through prompted responses to a set of approximately 50 questions. Parameters in the model are adjusted to fit JPL software life-cycle statistics.

  12. String Fragmentation Model in Space Radiation Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, Alfred; Johnson, Eloise (Editor); Norbury, John W.; Tripathi, R. K.

    2002-01-01

    String fragmentation models such as the Lund Model fit experimental particle production cross sections very well in the high-energy limit. This paper gives an introduction of the massless relativistic string in the Lund Model and shows how it can be modified with a simple assumption to produce formulas for meson production cross sections for space radiation research. The results of the string model are compared with inclusive pion production data from proton-proton collision experiments.

  13. Preliminary Multivariable Cost Model for Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2010-01-01

    Parametric cost models are routinely used to plan missions, compare concepts and justify technology investments. Previously, the authors published two single variable cost models based on 19 flight missions. The current paper presents the development of a multi-variable space telescopes cost model. The validity of previously published models are tested. Cost estimating relationships which are and are not significant cost drivers are identified. And, interrelationships between variables are explored

  14. Population Coding of Visual Space: Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Lehky, Sidney R.; Sereno, Anne B.

    2011-01-01

    We examine how the representation of space is affected by receptive field (RF) characteristics of the encoding population. Spatial responses were defined by overlapping Gaussian RFs. These responses were analyzed using multidimensional scaling to extract the representation of global space implicit in population activity. Spatial representations were based purely on firing rates, which were not labeled with RF characteristics (tuning curve peak location, for example), differentiating this approach from many other population coding models. Because responses were unlabeled, this model represents space using intrinsic coding, extracting relative positions amongst stimuli, rather than extrinsic coding where known RF characteristics provide a reference frame for extracting absolute positions. Two parameters were particularly important: RF diameter and RF dispersion, where dispersion indicates how broadly RF centers are spread out from the fovea. For large RFs, the model was able to form metrically accurate representations of physical space on low-dimensional manifolds embedded within the high-dimensional neural population response space, suggesting that in some cases the neural representation of space may be dimensionally isomorphic with 3D physical space. Smaller RF sizes degraded and distorted the spatial representation, with the smallest RF sizes (present in early visual areas) being unable to recover even a topologically consistent rendition of space on low-dimensional manifolds. Finally, although positional invariance of stimulus responses has long been associated with large RFs in object recognition models, we found RF dispersion rather than RF diameter to be the critical parameter. In fact, at a population level, the modeling suggests that higher ventral stream areas with highly restricted RF dispersion would be unable to achieve positionally-invariant representations beyond this narrow region around fixation. PMID:21344012

  15. National Space Science Data Center Information Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, E. V.; McCaslin, P.; Grayzeck, E.; McLaughlin, S. A.; Kodis, J. M.; Morgan, T. H.; Williams, D. R.; Russell, J. L.

    2013-12-01

    The National Space Science Data Center (NSSDC) was established by NASA in 1964 to provide for the preservation and dissemination of scientific data from NASA missions. It has evolved to support distributed, active archives that were established in the Planetary, Astrophysics, and Heliophysics disciplines through a series of Memoranda of Understanding. The disciplines took over responsibility for working with new projects to acquire and distribute data for community researchers while the NSSDC remained vital as a deep archive. Since 2000, NSSDC has been using the Archive Information Package to preserve data over the long term. As part of its effort to streamline the ingest of data into the deep archive, the NSSDC developed and implemented a data model of desired and required metadata in XML. This process, in use for roughly five years now, has been successfully used to support the identification and ingest of data into the NSSDC archive, most notably those data from the Planetary Data System (PDS) submitted under PDS3. A series of software packages (X-ware) were developed to handle the submission of data from the PDS nodes utilizing a volume structure. An XML submission manifest is generated at the PDS provider site prior to delivery to NSSDC. The manifest ensures the fidelity of PDS data delivered to NSSDC. Preservation metadata is captured in an XML object when NSSDC archives the data. With the recent adoption by the PDS of the XML-based PDS4 data model, there is an opportunity for the NSSDC to provide additional services to the PDS such as the preservation, tracking, and restoration of individual products (e.g., a specific data file or document), which was unfeasible in the previous PDS3 system. The NSSDC is modifying and further streamlining its data ingest process to take advantage of the PDS4 model, an important consideration given the ever-increasing amount of data being generated and archived by orbiting missions at the Moon and Mars, other active projects

  16. Preservation of Near-Earth Space for Future Generations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, John Alexander

    1994-06-01

    What will happen to the near-Earth space environment? How can we ensure the survival of future scientific, commercial and military satellites and space stations? This book addresses the questions that must be asked as debris in space around the Earth--from dust particles to rocket casings, and even radioactive materials--becomes a critical problem. In this volume, many specialists from around the world address the issues, problems, and policies concerned with the preservation of near-Earth space. Their articles cover the technical aspects, and the economic and legal issues concerned, including the enforcement and monitoring of international agreements and the resolution of disputes. This clearly written and well illustrated survey offers the professional and concerned nonspecialist an authoritative and comprehensive review of the problems with and solutions to space debris.

  17. In-Space Chemical Propulsion System Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byers, David C.; Woodcock, Gordon; Benfield, Michael P. J.

    2004-01-01

    Multiple, new technologies for chemical systems are becoming available and include high temperature rockets, very light propellant tanks and structures, new bipropellant and monopropellant options, lower mass propellant control components, and zero boil off subsystems. Such technologies offer promise of increasing the performance of in-space chemical propulsion for energetic space missions. A mass model for pressure-fed, Earth and space-storable, advanced chemical propulsion systems (ACPS) was developed in support of the NASA MSFC In-Space Propulsion Program. Data from flight systems and studies defined baseline system architectures and subsystems and analyses were formulated for parametric scaling relationships for all ACPS subsystem. The paper will first provide summary descriptions of the approaches used for the systems and the subsystems and then present selected analyses to illustrate use of the model for missions with characteristics of current interest.

  18. In-Space Chemical Propulsion System Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byers, David C.; Woodcock, Gordon; Benfield, M. P. J.

    2004-01-01

    Multiple, new technologies for chemical systems are becoming available and include high temperature rockets, very light propellant tanks and structures, new bipropellant and monopropellant options, lower mass propellant control components, and zero boil off subsystems. Such technologies offer promise of increasing the performance of in-space chemical propulsion for energetic space missions. A mass model for pressure-fed, Earth and space-storable, advanced chemical propulsion systems (ACPS) was developed in support of the NASA MSFC In-Space Propulsion Program. Data from flight systems and studies defined baseline system architectures and subsystems and analyses were formulated for parametric scaling relationships for all ACPS subsystems. The paper will first provide summary descriptions of the approaches used for the systems and the subsystems and then present selected analyses to illustrate use of the model for missions with characteristics of current interest.

  19. A growing social network model in geographical space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonioni, Alberto; Tomassini, Marco

    2017-09-01

    In this work we propose a new model for the generation of social networks that includes their often ignored spatial aspects. The model is a growing one and links are created either taking space into account, or disregarding space and only considering the degree of target nodes. These two effects can be mixed linearly in arbitrary proportions through a parameter. We numerically show that for a given range of the combination parameter, and for given mean degree, the generated network class shares many important statistical features with those observed in actual social networks, including the spatial dependence of connections. Moreover, we show that the model provides a good qualitative fit to some measured social networks.

  20. Developing Viable Financing Models for Space Tourism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eilingsfeld, F.; Schaetzler, D.

    2002-01-01

    Increasing commercialization of space services and the impending release of government's control of space access promise to make space ventures more attractive. Still, many investors shy away from going into the space tourism market as long as they do not feel secure that their return expectations will be met. First and foremost, attracting investors from the capital markets requires qualifying financing models. Based on earlier research on the cost of capital for space tourism, this paper gives a brief run-through of commercial, technical and financial due diligence aspects. After that, a closer look is taken at different valuation techniques as well as alternative ways of streamlining financials. Experience from earlier ventures has shown that the high cost of capital represents a significant challenge. Thus, the sophistication and professionalism of business plans and financial models needs to be very high. Special emphasis is given to the optimization of the debt-to-equity ratio over time. The different roles of equity and debt over a venture's life cycle are explained. Based on the latter, guidelines for the design of an optimized loan structure are given. These are then applied to simulating the financial performance of a typical space tourism venture over time, including the calculation of Weighted Average Cost of Capital (WACC) and Net Present Value (NPV). Based on a concluding sensitivity analysis, the lessons learned are presented. If applied properly, these will help to make space tourism economically viable.

  1. Prediction of magnetic substorms using a state space model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unnikrishnan, K.

    2012-02-01

    Nonlinear dynamical models of the magnetosphere derived from observational time series data using phase space reconstruction techniques have yielded new advances in the understanding of its dynamics. Considering the solar wind-magnetosphere interaction to be a natural input-output system its dynamical features can be reconstructed on the storm time scale by using the method of time delay embedding. Here, fourteen magnetic storm intervals belonging to low/moderate and high solar activity periods are considered and a suitable state space model has designed by performing training and validation tests, for which dawn to dusk electric field (VBz) is chosen as the input, and the AL time series as the output. The percentage of the output variations that is reproduced by the model is termed as fit_model and a higher number of fit_model means a better model. The number of components m used in the state space model is varied from 1-9 and the best prediction is obtained when m=4. The fit_model values of time series used for validation are 67.96, 67.2, 72.44, and 70.89, with m=4. In the present study most of the storms considered are having Dstmax in between -100 and -300 nT, and they can be predicted well with this procedure. To reveal the prediction capability of the proposed state space model the 30 steps ahead outputs for the storm events are generated, which reasonably reproduce the observed values.

  2. A space transportation system operations model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, W. Douglas; White, Nancy H.

    1987-01-01

    Presented is a description of a computer program which permits assessment of the operational support requirements of space transportation systems functioning in both a ground- and space-based environment. The scenario depicted provides for the delivery of payloads from Earth to a space station and beyond using upper stages based at the station. Model results are scenario dependent and rely on the input definitions of delivery requirements, task times, and available resources. Output is in terms of flight rate capabilities, resource requirements, and facility utilization. A general program description, program listing, input requirements, and sample output are included.

  3. Contradictory Problems and Space-Element Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Wang; Guang-Tian, Zou

    Large numbers of contradictory problems generally consist in the design of the architectural interior space. It is very necessary to study the measure to solve the contradictory problems consist in spatial form from the contradictory problems. The basic theory of Extenics provides the thesis extension leading idea of transformation and one of the tools of matter-element theory. On the base of these theories, the thesis tries to set up space-element model to describe the contradictory problems in the architectural inner space, and even guide the theory and practice for the future, tries to provide the methods to solve the contradictory problems intellectualized.

  4. Sigma-Model Solitons on Noncommutative Spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabrowski, Ludwik; Landi, Giovanni; Luef, Franz

    2015-12-01

    We use results from time-frequency analysis and Gabor analysis to construct new classes of sigma-model solitons over the Moyal plane and over noncommutative tori, taken as source spaces, with a target space made of two points. A natural action functional leads to self-duality equations for projections in the source algebra. Solutions, having nontrivial topological content, are constructed via suitable Morita duality bimodules.

  5. Qualitative models for space system engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forbus, Kenneth D.

    1990-01-01

    The objectives of this project were: (1) to investigate the implications of qualitative modeling techniques for problems arising in the monitoring, diagnosis, and design of Space Station subsystems and procedures; (2) to identify the issues involved in using qualitative models to enhance and automate engineering functions. These issues include representing operational criteria, fault models, alternate ontologies, and modeling continuous signals at a functional level of description; and (3) to develop a prototype collection of qualitative models for fluid and thermal systems commonly found in Space Station subsystems. Potential applications of qualitative modeling to space-systems engineering, including the notion of intelligent computer-aided engineering are summarized. Emphasis is given to determining which systems of the proposed Space Station provide the most leverage for study, given the current state of the art. Progress on using qualitative models, including development of the molecular collection ontology for reasoning about fluids, the interaction of qualitative and quantitative knowledge in analyzing thermodynamic cycles, and an experiment on building a natural language interface to qualitative reasoning is reported. Finally, some recommendations are made for future research.

  6. Qualitative models for space system engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forbus, Kenneth D.

    1990-06-01

    The objectives of this project were: (1) to investigate the implications of qualitative modeling techniques for problems arising in the monitoring, diagnosis, and design of Space Station subsystems and procedures; (2) to identify the issues involved in using qualitative models to enhance and automate engineering functions. These issues include representing operational criteria, fault models, alternate ontologies, and modeling continuous signals at a functional level of description; and (3) to develop a prototype collection of qualitative models for fluid and thermal systems commonly found in Space Station subsystems. Potential applications of qualitative modeling to space-systems engineering, including the notion of intelligent computer-aided engineering are summarized. Emphasis is given to determining which systems of the proposed Space Station provide the most leverage for study, given the current state of the art. Progress on using qualitative models, including development of the molecular collection ontology for reasoning about fluids, the interaction of qualitative and quantitative knowledge in analyzing thermodynamic cycles, and an experiment on building a natural language interface to qualitative reasoning is reported. Finally, some recommendations are made for future research.

  7. Deep space network software cost estimation model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tausworthe, R. C.

    1981-01-01

    A parametric software cost estimation model prepared for Deep Space Network (DSN) Data Systems implementation tasks is presented. The resource estimation model incorporates principles and data from a number of existing models. The model calibrates task magnitude and difficulty, development environment, and software technology effects through prompted responses to a set of approximately 50 questions. Parameters in the model are adjusted to fit DSN software life cycle statistics. The estimation model output scales a standard DSN Work Breakdown Structure skeleton, which is then input into a PERT/CPM system, producing a detailed schedule and resource budget for the project being planned.

  8. A New Model that Generates Lotka's Law.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huber, John C.

    2002-01-01

    Develops a new model for a process that generates Lotka's Law. Topics include measuring scientific productivity through the number of publications; rate of production; career duration; randomness; Poisson distribution; computer simulations; goodness-of-fit; theoretical support for the model; and future research. (Author/LRW)

  9. Modeling Rule-Based Item Generation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geerlings, Hanneke; Glas, Cees A. W.; van der Linden, Wim J.

    2011-01-01

    An application of a hierarchical IRT model for items in families generated through the application of different combinations of design rules is discussed. Within the families, the items are assumed to differ only in surface features. The parameters of the model are estimated in a Bayesian framework, using a data-augmented Gibbs sampler. An obvious…

  10. Generate an Argument: An Instructional Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sampson, Victor; Grooms, Jonathon

    2010-01-01

    The Generate an Argument instructional model was designed to engage students in scientific argumentation. By using this model, students develop complex reasoning and critical-thinking skills, understand the nature and development of scientific knowledge, and improve their communication skills (Duschl and Osborne 2002). This article describes the…

  11. A Configuration-Space Equatorial Spread F Structure Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rino, C. L.; Carrano, C. S.; Retterer, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    Configuration-space models address the intermediate scale ESF structure range from hundreds of kilometers to hundreds of meters. It is well known that ESF structure is comprised of highly-elongated field-aligned striations. Striations are generated by physics-based ESF codes. Moreover, they are visually observable in twilight barium releases and air glow. Configuration-space models are derived from ensembles of field-aligned striations with specified radial profile functions, distributions of scale sizes, and distributions of clustered field-line starting locations. The model is intimately tied to underlying physics. The scale-dependent evolution of a field-aligned local plasma enhancement is a well posed plasma-physics problem. Local striation creation, evolution, and intensity is driven by the convective instability process. Successive bifurcation is often used to describe the Rayleigh-Taylor mechanism. The model makes no prior assumptions that ensure standard spectral decompositions. Indeed, the model shows that there is no possibility of constructing a consistent three-dimensional structure spectrum. The model does show that in planes intersecting field lines well removed from the meridian plane two-dimensional spectra can be constructed. There is a one-to-one relation between the striation size distribution and the index of the corresponding power-law segments. The profile shape controls the texture of the realizations. A critical number of randomly located striations are required to support a well-defined spectral characterization. The configuration space model is defined by a much smaller number of random variables than required to generate a realization of a process with specified spectral characteristics. Thus, it is feasible to generate a three-dimensional realization that can be used to simulate ESF and to interpret planned space-time Cubsat measurements. The theory will be reviewed and examples of model applications presented.

  12. Space and energy. [space systems for energy generation, distribution and control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bekey, I.

    1976-01-01

    Potential contributions of space to energy-related activities are discussed. Advanced concepts presented include worldwide energy distribution to substation-sized users using low-altitude space reflectors; powering large numbers of large aircraft worldwide using laser beams reflected from space mirror complexes; providing night illumination via sunlight-reflecting space mirrors; fine-scale power programming and monitoring in transmission networks by monitoring millions of network points from space; prevention of undetected hijacking of nuclear reactor fuels by space tracking of signals from tagging transmitters on all such materials; and disposal of nuclear power plant radioactive wastes in space.

  13. Space and energy. [space systems for energy generation, distribution and control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bekey, I.

    1976-01-01

    Potential contributions of space to energy-related activities are discussed. Advanced concepts presented include worldwide energy distribution to substation-sized users using low-altitude space reflectors; powering large numbers of large aircraft worldwide using laser beams reflected from space mirror complexes; providing night illumination via sunlight-reflecting space mirrors; fine-scale power programming and monitoring in transmission networks by monitoring millions of network points from space; prevention of undetected hijacking of nuclear reactor fuels by space tracking of signals from tagging transmitters on all such materials; and disposal of nuclear power plant radioactive wastes in space.

  14. The Radar Image Generation (RIG) model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenger, Anthony J.

    1993-01-01

    RIG is a modeling system which creates synthetic aperture radar (SAR) and inverse SAR images from 3-D faceted data bases. RIG is based on a physical optics model and includes the effects of multiple reflections. Both conducting and dielectric surfaces can be modeled; each surface is labeled with a material code which is an index into a data base of electromagnetic properties. The inputs to the program include the radar processing parameters, the target orientation, the sensor velocity, and (for inverse SAR) the target angle rates. The current version of RIG can be run on any workstation, however, it is not a real-time model. We are considering several approaches to enable the program to generate realtime radar imagery. In addition to its image generation function, RIG can also generate radar cross-section (RCS) plots as well as range and doppler radar return profiles.

  15. Cognitive engineering models in space systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, Christine M.

    1992-01-01

    NASA space systems, including mission operations on the ground and in space, are complex, dynamic, predominantly automated systems in which the human operator is a supervisory controller. The human operator monitors and fine-tunes computer-based control systems and is responsible for ensuring safe and efficient system operation. In such systems, the potential consequences of human mistakes and errors may be very large, and low probability of such events is likely. Thus, models of cognitive functions in complex systems are needed to describe human performance and form the theoretical basis of operator workstation design, including displays, controls, and decision support aids. The operator function model represents normative operator behavior-expected operator activities given current system state. The extension of the theoretical structure of the operator function model and its application to NASA Johnson mission operations and space station applications is discussed.

  16. Dynamical real space renormalization group applied to sandpile models.

    PubMed

    Ivashkevich, E V; Povolotsky, A M; Vespignani, A; Zapperi, S

    1999-08-01

    A general framework for the renormalization group analysis of self-organized critical sandpile models is formulated. The usual real space renormalization scheme for lattice models when applied to nonequilibrium dynamical models must be supplemented by feedback relations coming from the stationarity conditions. On the basis of these ideas the dynamically driven renormalization group is applied to describe the boundary and bulk critical behavior of sandpile models. A detailed description of the branching nature of sandpile avalanches is given in terms of the generating functions of the underlying branching process.

  17. Future Photovoltaic Power Generation for Space-Based Power Utilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Sheila; Landis, Geoffrey; Hepp, Aloysius; Raffaelle, Ryne

    2002-01-01

    This paper discusses requirements for large earth orbiting power stations that can serve as central utilities for other orbiting spacecraft, or for beaming power to the earth itself. The current state of the art of space solar cells, and a variety of both evolving thin film cells as well as new technologies that may impact the future choice of space solar cells for high power mission applications are addressed.

  18. Model reduction for flexible space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gawronski, Wodek; Williams, Trevor

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents the conditions under which modal truncation yields a near-optimal reduced-order model for a flexible structure. Next, a robust model reduction technique to cope with the damping uncertainties typical of flexible space structure is developed. Finally, a flexible truss and the COFS-1 structure are used to give realistic applications for the model reduction techniques studied in the paper.

  19. Maximizing photovoltaic power generation of a space-dart configured satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dae Young; Cutler, James W.; Mancewicz, Joe; Ridley, Aaron J.

    2015-06-01

    Many small satellites are power constrained due to their minimal solar panel area and the eclipse environment of low-Earth orbit. As with larger satellites, these small satellites, including CubeSats, use deployable power arrays to increase power production. This presents a design opportunity to develop various objective functions related to energy management and methods for optimizing these functions over a satellite design. A novel power generation model was created, and a simulation system was developed to evaluate various objective functions describing energy management for complex satellite designs. The model uses a spacecraft-body-fixed spherical coordinate system to analyze the complex geometry of a satellite's self-induced shadowing with computation provided by the Open Graphics Library. As an example design problem, a CubeSat configured as a space-dart with four deployable panels is optimized. Due to the fast computation speed of the solution, an exhaustive search over the design space is used to find the solar panel deployment angles which maximize total power generation. Simulation results are presented for a variety of orbit scenarios. The method is extendable to a variety of complex satellite geometries and power generation systems.

  20. Inspiring the Next Generation: The International Space Station Education Accomplishments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alleyne, Camille W.; Hasbrook, Pete; Knowles, Carolyn; Chicoine, Ruth Ann; Miyagawa, Yayoi; Koyama, Masato; Savage, Nigel; Zell, Martin; Biryukova, Nataliya; Pinchuk, Vladimir; hide

    2014-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) has a unique ability to capture the imagination of both students and teachers worldwide. Since 2000, the presence of humans onboard ISS has provided a foundation for numerous educational activities aimed at capturing that interest and motivating study in the sciences, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM). Over 43 million students around the world have participated in ISS-related educational activities. Projects such as YouTube Space Lab, Sally Ride Earth Knowledge-based Acquired by Middle Schools (EarthKAM), SPHERES (Synchronized Position Hold Engage and Reorient Experimental Satellites) Zero-Robotics, Tomatosphere, and MAI-75 events among others have allowed for global student, teacher and public access to space through student classroom investigations and real-time audio and video contacts with crewmembers. Educational activities are not limited to STEM but encompass all aspects of the human condition. This is well illustrated in the Uchu Renshi project, a chain poem initiated by an astronaut while in space and continued and completed by people on Earth. With ISS operations now extended to 2024, projects like these and their accompanying educational materials are available to more students around the world. From very early on in the program's history, students have been provided with a unique opportunity to get involved and participate in science and engineering projects. Many of these projects support inquiry-based learning that allows students to ask questions, develop hypothesis-derived experiments, obtain supporting evidence and identify solutions or explanations. This approach to learning is well-published as one of the most effective ways to inspire students to pursue careers in scientific and technology fields. Ever since the first space station element was launched, a wide range of student experiments and educational activities have been performed, both individually and collaboratively, by all the

  1. Generation and analysis of large reliability models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palumbo, Daniel L.; Nicol, David M.

    1990-01-01

    An effort has been underway for several years at NASA's Langley Research Center to extend the capability of Markov modeling techniques for reliability analysis to the designers of highly reliable avionic systems. This effort has been focused in the areas of increased model abstraction and increased computational capability. The reliability model generator (RMG), a software tool which uses as input a graphical, object-oriented block diagram of the system, is discussed. RMG uses an automated failure modes-effects analysis algorithm to produce the reliability model from the graphical description. Also considered is the ASSURE software tool, a parallel processing program which uses the ASSIST modeling language and SURE semi-Markov solution technique. An executable failure modes-effects analysis is used by ASSURE. The successful combination of the power of graphical representation, automated model generation, and parallel computation leads to the conclusion that large system architectures can now be analyzed.

  2. Inspiring the Next Generation in Space Life Sciences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayes, Judith

    2010-01-01

    Competitive summer internships in space life sciences at NASA are awarded to college students every summer. Each student is aligned with a NASA mentor and project that match his or her skills and interests, working on individual projects in ongoing research activities. The interns consist of undergraduate, graduate, and medical students in various majors and disciplines from across the United States. To augment their internship experience, students participate in the Space Life Sciences Summer Institute (SLSSI). The purpose of the Institute is to offer a unique learning environment that focuses on the current biomedical issues associated with human spaceflight; providing an introduction of the paradigms, problems, and technologies of modern spaceflight cast within the framework of life sciences. The Institute faculty includes NASA scientists, physicians, flight controllers, engineers, managers, and astronauts; and fosters a multi-disciplinary science approach to learning with a particular emphasis on stimulating experimental creativity and innovation within an operational environment. This program brings together scientists and students to discuss cutting-edge solutions to problems in space physiology, environmental health, and medicine; and provides a familiarization of the various aspects of space physiology and environments. In addition to the lecture series, behind-the-scenes tours are offered that include the Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory, Mission Control Center, space vehicle training mockups, and a hands-on demonstration of the Space Shuttle Advanced Crew Escape Suit. While the SLSSI is managed and operated at the Johnson Space Center in Texas, student interns from the other NASA centers (Glenn and Ames Research Centers, in Ohio and California) also participate through webcast distance learning capabilities.

  3. Next Generation Space Telescope Ultra-Lightweight Mirror Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilbro, James W.

    1998-01-01

    The Next Generation Space Telescope is currently envisioned as a eight meter diameter cryogenic deployable telescope that will operate at the earth sun libration point L2. A number of different designs are being examined within NASA and under industry studies by Ball Aerospace, Lockheed-Martin and TRW. Although these designs differ in many respects, they all require significant advancements in the state-of-the-art with respect to large diameter, ultra-lightweight, mirrors. The purpose of this paper is to provide insight into the current status of the mirror development program NGST is a tremendously ambitious undertaking that sets the mark for new NASA missions. In order to achieve the weight, cost and performance requirements of NGST, the primary mirror must be made lighter, cheaper and better than anything that has ever been done. In order to accomplish this an aggressive technology program has been put in place. The scope of the program was determined by examining historically what has been accomplished; assessing recent technological advances in fabrication and testing; and evaluating the effect of these advances relative to enabling the manufacture of lightweight mirrors that meet NGST requirements. As it is currently envisioned, the primary mirror for NGST is on the order of eight meters in diameter, it is to be diffraction limited at a wave length of 2 microns and has an overall weight requirement of 15 kilograms per square meter. Two large scale demonstration projects are under way along with a number of smaller scale demonstrations on a variety of mirror materials and concepts. The University of Arizona (UA) mirror concept is based around a 2mm thick Borosilicate glass face sheet mounted to a composite backplane structure via actuators for mirror figure correction. The Composite Optics Inc.(COI) concept consists of a 3.2mm thick Zerodur face sheet bonded to a composite support structure which in turn is mounted to a composite backplane structure via

  4. Next Generation Space Telescope Ultra-Lightweight Mirror Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilbro, James W.

    1998-01-01

    The Next Generation Space Telescope is currently envisioned as a eight meter diameter cryogenic deployable telescope that will operate at the earth sun libration point L2. A number of different designs are being examined within NASA and under industry studies by Ball Aerospace, Lockheed-Martin and TRW. Although these designs differ in many respects, they all require significant advancements in the state-of-the-art with respect to large diameter, ultra-lightweight, mirrors. The purpose of this paper is to provide insight into the current status of the mirror development program NGST is a tremendously ambitious undertaking that sets the mark for new NASA missions. In order to achieve the weight, cost and performance requirements of NGST, the primary mirror must be made lighter, cheaper and better than anything that has ever been done. In order to accomplish this an aggressive technology program has been put in place. The scope of the program was determined by examining historically what has been accomplished; assessing recent technological advances in fabrication and testing; and evaluating the effect of these advances relative to enabling the manufacture of lightweight mirrors that meet NGST requirements. As it is currently envisioned, the primary mirror for NGST is on the order of eight meters in diameter, it is to be diffraction limited at a wave length of 2 microns and has an overall weight requirement of 15 kilograms per square meter. Two large scale demonstration projects are under way along with a number of smaller scale demonstrations on a variety of mirror materials and concepts. The University of Arizona (UA) mirror concept is based around a 2mm thick Borosilicate glass face sheet mounted to a composite backplane structure via actuators for mirror figure correction. The Composite Optics Inc.(COI) concept consists of a 3.2mm thick Zerodur face sheet bonded to a composite support structure which in turn is mounted to a composite backplane structure via

  5. Vortex Generator Model Developed for Turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chima, Rodrick V.

    2002-01-01

    A computational model was developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center to investigate possible uses of vortex generators (VG's) for improving the performance of turbomachinery. A vortex generator is a small, winglike device that generates vortices at its tip. The vortices mix high-speed core flow with low-speed boundary layer flow and, thus, can be used to delay flow separation. VG's also turn the flow near the walls and, thus, can be used to control flow incidence into a turbomachinery blade row or to control secondary flows.

  6. Reliability Model Generator for fault-tolerant systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccann, Catherine M.; Palumbo, Daniel L.

    1988-01-01

    An analysis tool that reasons from structural and functional system design specifications to generate a reliability model for the system under investigation is presented. The resultant model defines a system state space sufficient to characterize the effects of single and multiple component failures, and the model may then be examined using the Semi-Markov Unreliability Range Evaluator to compute numerical bounds for system reliability. A separation of the component functions from the structural specifications allows easy modification for analysis of alternative architectures. The use of a hierarchical system description paradigm promotes multiple abstractions.

  7. Modelling the generation of Haida Eddies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Lorenzo, E.; Foreman, M. G. G.; Crawford, W. R.

    2005-04-01

    A numerical model forced with average annual cycles of climatological winds, surface heat flux, and temperature and salinity along the open boundaries is used to demonstrate that Haida Eddies are typically generated each winter off Cape St. James, at the southern tip of the Queen Charlotte Islands of western Canada. Annual cycles of sea-surface elevation measured at coastal tide gauges and TOPEX/POSEIDON crossover locations are reproduced with reasonable accuracy. Model sensitivity studies show that Haida Eddies are baroclinic in nature and are generated by the merging of several smaller eddies that have been formed to the west of Cape St. James. The generation mechanism does not require the existence of instability processes and is associated with the mean advection of warmer and fresher water masses around the cape from Hecate Strait and from the southeast. These advected water masses generate plumes of buoyant flow, which intensify and sustain small patches of anticyclonic circulation immediately to the northwest of the cape. When the flow is stronger, several of these smaller eddies can merge to generate a larger eddy, the Haida Eddy. Similar to observations, a typical generation-shedding cycle for larger Haida Eddies in the model is 3-4 months. Consistent with previous in situ water property measurements, these experiments show that the eddies are generally comprised of mixed-layer water from Hecate Strait, Queen Charlotte Sound, and the continental shelves off northern Vancouver Island. Their vertical extent during the mature stage is roughly 1000 m.

  8. The Space Elevator and Its Promise for Next Generation Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laubscher, Bryan E.

    2006-01-01

    Bryan E. Laubscher received his Ph.D. in physics in 1994 from the University of New Mexico with a concentration in astrophysics. He is currently on entrepreneurial leave from Los Alamos National Laboratory where he is a project leader and he has worked in various capacities for 16 years. His past projects include LANL's portion of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, Magdalena Ridge Observatory and a project developing concepts and technologies for space situational awareness. Over the years Bryan has participated in research in astronomy, lidar, non-linear optics, space mission design, space-borne instrumentation design and construction, spacecraft design, novel electromagnetic detection concepts and technologies, detector/receiver system development, spectrometer development, interferometry and participated in many field experiments. Bryan led space elevator development at LANL until going on entrepreneurial leave in 2006. On entrepreneurial leave, Bryan is starting a company to build the strongest materials ever created. These materials are based upon carbon nanotubes, the strongest structures known in nature and the first material identified with sufficient strength-to-weight properties to build a space elevator.

  9. Mouse infection models for space flight immunology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapes, Stephen Keith; Ganta, Roman Reddy; Chapers, S. K. (Principal Investigator)

    2005-01-01

    Several immunological processes can be affected by space flight. However, there is little evidence to suggest that flight-induced immunological deficits lead to illness. Therefore, one of our goals has been to define models to examine host resistance during space flight. Our working hypothesis is that space flight crews will come from a heterogeneous population; the immune response gene make-up will be quite varied. It is unknown how much the immune response gene variation contributes to the potential threat from infectious organisms, allergic responses or other long term health problems (e.g. cancer). This article details recent efforts of the Kansas State University gravitational immunology group to assess how population heterogeneity impacts host health, either in laboratory experimental situations and/or using the skeletal unloading model of space-flight stress. This paper details our use of several mouse strains with several different genotypes. In particular, mice with varying MHCII allotypes and mice on the C57BL background with different genetic defects have been particularly useful tools with which to study infections by Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella typhimurium, Pasteurella pneumotropica and Ehrlichia chaffeensis. We propose that some of these experimental challenge models will be useful to assess the effects of space flight on host resistance to infection.

  10. Mouse infection models for space flight immunology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapes, Stephen Keith; Ganta, Roman Reddy; Chapers, S. K. (Principal Investigator)

    2005-01-01

    Several immunological processes can be affected by space flight. However, there is little evidence to suggest that flight-induced immunological deficits lead to illness. Therefore, one of our goals has been to define models to examine host resistance during space flight. Our working hypothesis is that space flight crews will come from a heterogeneous population; the immune response gene make-up will be quite varied. It is unknown how much the immune response gene variation contributes to the potential threat from infectious organisms, allergic responses or other long term health problems (e.g. cancer). This article details recent efforts of the Kansas State University gravitational immunology group to assess how population heterogeneity impacts host health, either in laboratory experimental situations and/or using the skeletal unloading model of space-flight stress. This paper details our use of several mouse strains with several different genotypes. In particular, mice with varying MHCII allotypes and mice on the C57BL background with different genetic defects have been particularly useful tools with which to study infections by Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella typhimurium, Pasteurella pneumotropica and Ehrlichia chaffeensis. We propose that some of these experimental challenge models will be useful to assess the effects of space flight on host resistance to infection.

  11. Mouse infection models for space flight immunology.

    PubMed

    Chapes, Stephen Keith; Ganta, Roman Reddy

    2005-01-01

    Several immunological processes can be affected by space flight. However, there is little evidence to suggest that flight-induced immunological deficits lead to illness. Therefore, one of our goals has been to define models to examine host resistance during space flight. Our working hypothesis is that space flight crews will come from a heterogeneous population; the immune response gene make-up will be quite varied. It is unknown how much the immune response gene variation contributes to the potential threat from infectious organisms, allergic responses or other long term health problems (e.g. cancer). This article details recent efforts of the Kansas State University gravitational immunology group to assess how population heterogeneity impacts host health, either in laboratory experimental situations and/or using the skeletal unloading model of space-flight stress. This paper details our use of several mouse strains with several different genotypes. In particular, mice with varying MHCII allotypes and mice on the C57BL background with different genetic defects have been particularly useful tools with which to study infections by Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella typhimurium, Pasteurella pneumotropica and Ehrlichia chaffeensis. We propose that some of these experimental challenge models will be useful to assess the effects of space flight on host resistance to infection.

  12. Design of Large Lightweight Space Telescope Optical Systems for the Next Generation Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, Dave; Craig, Larry; Schunk, Greg; Shapiro, Alan; Cloyd, Dick; Ricks, Ed; Vacarro, Mark; Redding, Dave; Hadaway, James; Bely, Pierre

    1998-01-01

    The Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST) is currently in a Pre Phase A study effort to prove feasibility of design and to show that the design can be implemented within cost constraint guidelines and meet the requirements of the science community. In an effort to achieve the science communities goals as outlined in "HST and Beyond" the NGST team has developed a government "yardstick" design of an eight meter diameter segmented telescope which would be launched in an Atlas IIAS launch vehicle to a L2 (Lagrange Point) orbit. This paper will discuss the design of the Optical Telescope Assembly (OTA) and the various issues and complications of designing lightweight optics to be placed in the environment that the NGST will encounter both during launch and during its operational mission at L2. The OTA must be lightweight but structurally must withstand the launch environment and transfer to its final L2 orbit. The OTA must be stable at L2 to provide high quality science at the cryogenic temperatures it will experience. The OTA segmented petal concept is to develop lightweight optics which can either be manipulated to achieve and maintain a desired figure or be rigid enough so that change in shape is only necessary for phasing and alignment. The secondary mirror structural mast must also be rigid with frequency responses which are not coupled to spacecraft modes in order to maintain and decenter and despace requirements.

  13. Learning generative models of natural images.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jiann-Ming; Lin, Zheng-Han

    2002-04-01

    This work proposes an unsupervised learning process for analysis of natural images. The derivation is based on a generative model, a stochastic coin-flip process directly operating on many disjoint multivariate Gaussian distributions. Following the maximal likelihood principle and using the Potts encoding, the goodness-of-fit of the generative model to tremendous patches randomly sampled from natural images is quantitatively expressed by an objective function subject to a set of constraints. By further combination of the objective function and the minimal wiring criterion, we achieve a mixed integer and linear programming. A hybrid of the mean field annealing and the gradient descent method is applied to the mathematical framework and produces three sets of interactive dynamics for the learning process. Numerical simulations show that the learning process is effective for extraction of orientation, localization and bandpass features and the generative model can make an ensemble of a sparse code for natural images.

  14. The Next Generation of Space Cells for Diverse Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Sheila; Landis, Geoffrey; Raffaelle, Ryne

    2002-01-01

    Future science, military and commercial space missions are incredibly diverse. Military and commercial missions range from large arrays of hundreds of kilowatt to small arrays of ten watts in various Earth orbits. While science missions also have small to very large power needs there are additional unique requirements to provide power for near-sun missions and planetary exploration including orbiters, landers and rovers both to the inner planets and the outer planets with a major emphasis in the near term on Mars. These mission requirements demand cells for low intensity, low temperature applications, high intensity, high temperature applications, dusty environments and often high radiation environments. This paper discusses mission requirements, the current state of the art of space solar cells, and a variety of both evolving thin-film cells as well as new technologies that may impact the future choice of space solar cells for a specific mission application.

  15. NASA's Next Generation Space Telescope Marks Key Milestone

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-27

    NASA image release April 14, 2011 NASA engineer Ernie Wright looks on as the first six flight ready James Webb Space Telescope's primary mirror segments are prepped to begin final cryogenic testing at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala. Credit: NASA/MSFC/David Higginbotham To read more go to: www.nasa.gov/centers/marshall/news/jwst/11-111.html NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Join us on Facebook

  16. Learning generative models for protein fold families.

    PubMed

    Balakrishnan, Sivaraman; Kamisetty, Hetunandan; Carbonell, Jaime G; Lee, Su-In; Langmead, Christopher James

    2011-04-01

    We introduce a new approach to learning statistical models from multiple sequence alignments (MSA) of proteins. Our method, called GREMLIN (Generative REgularized ModeLs of proteINs), learns an undirected probabilistic graphical model of the amino acid composition within the MSA. The resulting model encodes both the position-specific conservation statistics and the correlated mutation statistics between sequential and long-range pairs of residues. Existing techniques for learning graphical models from MSA either make strong, and often inappropriate assumptions about the conditional independencies within the MSA (e.g., Hidden Markov Models), or else use suboptimal algorithms to learn the parameters of the model. In contrast, GREMLIN makes no a priori assumptions about the conditional independencies within the MSA. We formulate and solve a convex optimization problem, thus guaranteeing that we find a globally optimal model at convergence. The resulting model is also generative, allowing for the design of new protein sequences that have the same statistical properties as those in the MSA. We perform a detailed analysis of covariation statistics on the extensively studied WW and PDZ domains and show that our method out-performs an existing algorithm for learning undirected probabilistic graphical models from MSA. We then apply our approach to 71 additional families from the PFAM database and demonstrate that the resulting models significantly out-perform Hidden Markov Models in terms of predictive accuracy.

  17. Automatic Building Information Model Query Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Yufei; Yu, Nan; Ming, Jiang; Lee, Sanghoon; DeGraw, Jason; Yen, John; Messner, John I.; Wu, Dinghao

    2015-12-01

    Energy efficient building design and construction calls for extensive collaboration between different subfields of the Architecture, Engineering and Construction (AEC) community. Performing building design and construction engineering raises challenges on data integration and software interoperability. Using Building Information Modeling (BIM) data hub to host and integrate building models is a promising solution to address those challenges, which can ease building design information management. However, the partial model query mechanism of current BIM data hub collaboration model has several limitations, which prevents designers and engineers to take advantage of BIM. To address this problem, we propose a general and effective approach to generate query code based on a Model View Definition (MVD). This approach is demonstrated through a software prototype called QueryGenerator. By demonstrating a case study using multi-zone air flow analysis, we show how our approach and tool can help domain experts to use BIM to drive building design with less labour and lower overhead cost.

  18. Automatic building information model query generation

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Yufei; Yu, Nan; Ming, Jiang; Lee, Sanghoon; DeGraw, Jason; Yen, John; Messner, John I.; Wu, Dinghao

    2015-12-01

    Energy efficient building design and construction calls for extensive collaboration between different subfields of the Architecture, Engineering and Construction (AEC) community. Performing building design and construction engineering raises challenges on data integration and software interoperability. Using Building Information Modeling (BIM) data hub to host and integrate building models is a promising solution to address those challenges, which can ease building design information management. However, the partial model query mechanism of current BIM data hub collaboration model has several limitations, which prevents designers and engineers to take advantage of BIM. To address this problem, we propose a general and effective approach to generate query code based on a Model View Definition (MVD). This approach is demonstrated through a software prototype called QueryGenerator. In conclusion, by demonstrating a case study using multi-zone air flow analysis, we show how our approach and tool can help domain experts to use BIM to drive building design with less labour and lower overhead cost.

  19. Thermoregulatory models of space shuttle and space station activities.

    PubMed

    Pisacane, Vincent L; Kuznetz, Lawrence H; Logan, James S; Clark, Johnathan B; Wissler, Eugene H

    2007-04-01

    Thermoregulation is critical for survival in space, especially during contingencies demanding of human cognitive and physical performance. A review of the negative feedback human thermoregulatory system is provided. The Advanced Crew Escape Suit is worn by astronauts during ascent and descent on the Space Shuttle to provide active cooling for nominal and contingency operations and protection from loss of cabin pressure mishaps. Failure of a thermal system control element during a recent Shuttle flight resulted in a single point failure that could have elevated cabin temperature, possibly resulting in cognitive deficits of the pilot during the reentry and landing phases. The efficacy of the existing cooling equipment and procedures for maintaining crew thermal comfort in the event of such a failure was assessed. The Wissler and 41-node thermoregulatory models were used to conduct a parametric study of Shuttle cabin temperatures and resulting thermal effects on crew. Under high metabolic loads, crewmember core temperatures and heat storage are shown to increase beyond allowable limits using this analysis. Resulting levels of thermal stress may exceed standardized limits, after which cognitive performance and manual tracking ability are diminished. The operational procedure for entry and landing during this failure scenario may result in significant thermal compromise to crewmembers, including cognitive and manual performance deficits. Revision of the flight rule governing crew actions during compromise of cabin thermal control has been undertaken to minimize thermal stress on returning Shuttle crewmembers. Modifications to the crew thermal protection system for the Shuttle are suggested.

  20. Application of real image display and generation technique in space optical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Ruicong; Lin, Li

    2014-11-01

    In space optical system, image display and generation can be influenced by various factors such as stray light, space distance, orbit parameters and so on. To acquire accurate and clear image, these factors should be considered. Before acquiring the real image, simulation is necessary. Through comparing the simulated image with the real one, accuracy can be proved. This paper focuses on building a three-dimensional (3D) model of a satellite and simulating its orbit according to the real data. The 3D images of the satellite should be acquired in specific positions and postures from a camera on another satellite. 3D Studio Max is the software used in the process to build models, simulate and generate images. It is a 3D computer graphics program for making 3D animations, models, and images. Also in the paper, stray light relevant to the satellite surfaces is analyzed. Tracepro is the software used in the stray light analyze to trace the light on the surfaces. It is an optical engineering software program for designing and analyzing optical and illumination systems. Stray light analyzing result is addicted to the 3D images, so that the images are more precise. Therefore, the final images can be complete images including light intensity information of the satellite surfaces which makes the images more real.

  1. Electric Power Generation Systems for Use in Space

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1960-07-20

    Unlike the chemical battery, however, the fuel cell is in a preliminary development stage. (2) Electromechanical conversion devices utilize a heat engine ...to drive an electric generator. Currently, the principal type of heat engine under con- sideration is the steady-flow turbine using a working fluid...primary propulsion power for the first flight test of an experimental ion engine . In addition to the nuclear systems, two solar-powered turbine-generator

  2. Automatic Generation of Indoor Navigable Space Using a Point Cloud and its Scanner Trajectory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staats, B. R.; Diakité, A. A.; Voûte, R. L.; Zlatanova, S.

    2017-09-01

    Automatic generation of indoor navigable models is mostly based on 2D floor plans. However, in many cases the floor plans are out of date. Buildings are not always built according to their blue prints, interiors might change after a few years because of modified walls and doors, and furniture may be repositioned to the user's preferences. Therefore, new approaches for the quick recording of indoor environments should be investigated. This paper concentrates on laser scanning with a Mobile Laser Scanner (MLS) device. The MLS device stores a point cloud and its trajectory. If the MLS device is operated by a human, the trajectory contains information which can be used to distinguish different surfaces. In this paper a method is presented for the identification of walkable surfaces based on the analysis of the point cloud and the trajectory of the MLS scanner. This method consists of several steps. First, the point cloud is voxelized. Second, the trajectory is analysing and projecting to acquire seed voxels. Third, these seed voxels are generated into floor regions by the use of a region growing process. By identifying dynamic objects, doors and furniture, these floor regions can be modified so that each region represents a specific navigable space inside a building as a free navigable voxel space. By combining the point cloud and its corresponding trajectory, the walkable space can be identified for any type of building even if the interior is scanned during business hours.

  3. VentureStar Space Station Docking - Computer generated graphic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    This 42-second clip has the cargo bay doors of the hypothetical future reusable launch vehicle VentureStar opening to reveal the bay door radiators and docking module then slowly approaching the International Space Station and finally docking at Pressurized Mating Adapter #2 attached to node two of the Station.

  4. VentureStar Space Station Docking - Computer generated graphic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    This 42-second clip has the cargo bay doors of the hypothetical future reusable launch vehicle VentureStar opening to reveal the bay door radiators and docking module then slowly approaching the International Space Station and finally docking at Pressurized Mating Adapter #2 attached to node two of the Station.

  5. Next Generation Image Restoration for Space Situational Awareness

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-09

    Institute for Astronomy 34 Ohia Ku St.. Pukalani. Hawaii 96768-8288 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING/MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND...Lloyd-Hart, M., Hinz, P., Hege, E. K., Jefferies, S. M. and Hope, D. A., "Observing deep-space satellites with the MMT and Large Binocular

  6. Space-time modeling of timber prices

    Treesearch

    Mo Zhou; Joseph Buongriorno

    2006-01-01

    A space-time econometric model was developed for pine sawtimber timber prices of 21 geographically contiguous regions in the southern United States. The correlations between prices in neighboring regions helped predict future prices. The impulse response analysis showed that although southern pine sawtimber markets were not globally integrated, local supply and demand...

  7. New Skeletal-Space-Filling Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, Frank H.

    1977-01-01

    Describes plastic, skeletal molecular models that are color-coded and can illustrate both the conformation and overall shape of small molecules. They can also be converted to space-filling counterparts by the additions of color-coded polystyrene spheres. (MLH)

  8. New Skeletal-Space-Filling Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, Frank H.

    1977-01-01

    Describes plastic, skeletal molecular models that are color-coded and can illustrate both the conformation and overall shape of small molecules. They can also be converted to space-filling counterparts by the additions of color-coded polystyrene spheres. (MLH)

  9. Pseudoabsence Generation Strategies for Species Distribution Models

    PubMed Central

    Hanberry, Brice B.; He, Hong S.; Palik, Brian J.

    2012-01-01

    Background Species distribution models require selection of species, study extent and spatial unit, statistical methods, variables, and assessment metrics. If absence data are not available, another important consideration is pseudoabsence generation. Different strategies for pseudoabsence generation can produce varying spatial representation of species. Methodology We considered model outcomes from four different strategies for generating pseudoabsences. We generating pseudoabsences randomly by 1) selection from the entire study extent, 2) a two-step process of selection first from the entire study extent, followed by selection for pseudoabsences from areas with predicted probability <25%, 3) selection from plots surveyed without detection of species presence, 4) a two-step process of selection first for pseudoabsences from plots surveyed without detection of species presence, followed by selection for pseudoabsences from the areas with predicted probability <25%. We used Random Forests as our statistical method and sixteen predictor variables to model tree species with at least 150 records from Forest Inventory and Analysis surveys in the Laurentian Mixed Forest province of Minnesota. Conclusions Pseudoabsence generation strategy completely affected the area predicted as present for species distribution models and may be one of the most influential determinants of models. All the pseudoabsence strategies produced mean AUC values of at least 0.87. More importantly than accuracy metrics, the two-step strategies over-predicted species presence, due to too much environmental distance between the pseudoabsences and recorded presences, whereas models based on random pseudoabsences under-predicted species presence, due to too little environmental distance between the pseudoabsences and recorded presences. Models using pseudoabsences from surveyed plots produced a balance between areas with high and low predicted probabilities and the strongest relationship between

  10. Pseudoabsence generation strategies for species distribution models.

    PubMed

    Hanberry, Brice B; He, Hong S; Palik, Brian J

    2012-01-01

    Species distribution models require selection of species, study extent and spatial unit, statistical methods, variables, and assessment metrics. If absence data are not available, another important consideration is pseudoabsence generation. Different strategies for pseudoabsence generation can produce varying spatial representation of species. We considered model outcomes from four different strategies for generating pseudoabsences. We generating pseudoabsences randomly by 1) selection from the entire study extent, 2) a two-step process of selection first from the entire study extent, followed by selection for pseudoabsences from areas with predicted probability <25%, 3) selection from plots surveyed without detection of species presence, 4) a two-step process of selection first for pseudoabsences from plots surveyed without detection of species presence, followed by selection for pseudoabsences from the areas with predicted probability <25%. We used Random Forests as our statistical method and sixteen predictor variables to model tree species with at least 150 records from Forest Inventory and Analysis surveys in the Laurentian Mixed Forest province of Minnesota. Pseudoabsence generation strategy completely affected the area predicted as present for species distribution models and may be one of the most influential determinants of models. All the pseudoabsence strategies produced mean AUC values of at least 0.87. More importantly than accuracy metrics, the two-step strategies over-predicted species presence, due to too much environmental distance between the pseudoabsences and recorded presences, whereas models based on random pseudoabsences under-predicted species presence, due to too little environmental distance between the pseudoabsences and recorded presences. Models using pseudoabsences from surveyed plots produced a balance between areas with high and low predicted probabilities and the strongest relationship between density and area with predicted

  11. Generative models of the human connectome

    PubMed Central

    Betzel, Richard F.; Avena-Koenigsberger, Andrea; Goñi, Joaquín; He, Ye; de Reus, Marcel A.; Griffa, Alessandra; Vértes, Petra E.; Mišic, Bratislav; Thiran, Jean-Philippe; Hagmann, Patric; van den Heuvel, Martijn; Zuo, Xi-Nian; Bullmore, Edward T.; Sporns, Olaf

    2016-01-01

    The human connectome represents a network map of the brain's wiring diagram and the pattern into which its connections are organized is thought to play an important role in cognitive function. The generative rules that shape the topology of the human connectome remain incompletely understood. Earlier work in model organisms has suggested that wiring rules based on geometric relationships (distance) can account for many but likely not all topological features. Here we systematically explore a family of generative models of the human connectome that yield synthetic networks designed according to different wiring rules combining geometric and a broad range of topological factors. We find that a combination of geometric constraints with a homophilic attachment mechanism can create synthetic networks that closely match many topological characteristics of individual human connectomes, including features that were not included in the optimization of the generative model itself. We use these models to investigate a lifespan dataset and show that, with age, the model parameters undergo progressive changes, suggesting a rebalancing of the generative factors underlying the connectome across the lifespan. PMID:26427642

  12. Benchmark Generation using Domain Specific Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Bui, Ngoc B.; Zhu, Liming; Gorton, Ian; Liu, Yan

    2007-08-01

    Performance benchmarks are domain specific applications that are specialized to a certain set of technologies and platforms. The development of a benchmark application requires mapping the performance specific domain concepts to an implementation and producing complex technology and platform specific code. Domain Specific Modeling (DSM) promises to bridge the gap between application domains and implementations by allowing designers to specify solutions in domain-specific abstractions and semantics through Domain Specific Languages (DSL). This allows generation of a final implementation automatically from high level models. The modeling and task automation benefits obtained from this approach usually justify the upfront cost involved. This paper employs a DSM based approach to invent a new DSL, DSLBench, for benchmark generation. DSLBench and its associated code generation facilities allow the design and generation of a completely deployable benchmark application for performance testing from a high level model. DSLBench is implemented using Microsoft Domain Specific Language toolkit. It is integrated with the Visual Studio 2005 Team Suite as a plug-in to provide extra modeling capabilities for performance testing. We illustrate the approach using a case study based on .Net and C#.

  13. Improvements in the Space Weather Modeling Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridley, A. J.; Liemohn, M.; Dezeeuw, D.; Ilie, R.; Sokolov, I.; Toth, G.; Yu, Y.

    2008-12-01

    The magnetosphere within the Space Weather Modeling Framework (SWMF) has been represented by a global magnetosphere model (BATSRUS), an inner magnetosphere model (the Rice Convection Model) and a model of the ionospheric electrodynamics. We present significant improvements in the SWMF: (1) We have implemented a spherical grid within BATSRUS and have utilized this for modeling the magnetosphere; (2) We have significantly improved the physics of the auroral oval within the ionospheric electrodynamics code, modeling a self-consistent diffuse and discrete auroral oval; (3) We utilize the multifluid MHD code within BATSRUS to allow for more accurate specification and differentiation of the density within the magnetosphere; and (4) we have incorporated the Hot Electron and Ion Drift Integrator (HEIDI) ring current code within the SWMF. We will present these improvements and show the quantitative differences within the model results when comparing to a suite of measurements for a number of different intervals.

  14. Habitability Concept Models for Living in Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrino, M.

    2002-01-01

    As growing trends show, living in "space" has acquired new meanings, especially considering the utilization of the International Space Station (ISS) with regard to group interaction as well as individual needs in terms of time, space and crew accommodations. In fact, for the crew, the Spaced Station is a combined Laboratory-Office/Home and embodies ethical, social, and cultural aspects as additional parameters to be assessed to achieve a user centered architectural design of crew workspace. Habitability Concept Models can improve the methods and techniques used to support the interior design and layout of space architectures and at the same time guarantee a human focused approach. This paper discusses and illustrates some of the results obtained for the interior design of a Habitation Module for the ISS. In this work, two different but complementary approaches are followed. The first is "object oriented" and based on Video Data (American and Russian) supported by Proxemic methods (Edward T. Hall, 1963 and Francesca Pregnolato, 1998). This approach offers flexible and adaptive design solutions. The second is "subject oriented" and based on a Virtual Reality environment. With this approach human perception and cognitive aspects related to a specific crew task are considered. Data obtained from these two approaches are used to verify requirements and advance the design of the Habitation Module for aspects related to man machine interfaces (MMI), ergonomics, work and free-time. It is expected that the results achieved can be applied to future space related projects.

  15. Worms in space? A model biological dosimeter.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yang; Johnsen, Robert; Baillie, David; Rose, Ann

    2005-06-01

    Although it is well known that radiation causes mutational damage, little is known about the biological effects of long-term exposure to radiation in space. Exposure to radiation can result in serious heritable defects in experimental animals, and in humans, susceptibility to cancer, radiation-sickness, and death at high dosages. It is possible to do ground controlled studies of different types of radiation on experimental animals and to physically measure radiation on the space station or on space probes. However, the actual biological affects of long-term exposure to the full range of space radiation have not been studied, and little information is available about the biological consequences of solar flares. Biological systems are not simply passive recording instruments. They respond differently under different conditions, and thus it is important to be able to collect data from a living animal. There are technical difficulties that restrict the placement of an experimental organism in a space environment for long periods of time, in a manner that allows for the recovery of genetic data. Use of the self-fertilizing hermaphroditic nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans offers potential for the design of a biological dosimeter. In this paper, we describe the advantages of this model system and review the literature of C. elegans in space.

  16. QSAR modeling and chemical space analysis of antimalarial compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidorov, Pavel; Viira, Birgit; Davioud-Charvet, Elisabeth; Maran, Uko; Marcou, Gilles; Horvath, Dragos; Varnek, Alexandre

    2017-05-01

    Generative topographic mapping (GTM) has been used to visualize and analyze the chemical space of antimalarial compounds as well as to build predictive models linking structure of molecules with their antimalarial activity. For this, a database, including 3000 molecules tested in one or several of 17 anti- Plasmodium activity assessment protocols, has been compiled by assembling experimental data from in-house and ChEMBL databases. GTM classification models built on subsets corresponding to individual bioassays perform similarly to the earlier reported SVM models. Zones preferentially populated by active and inactive molecules, respectively, clearly emerge in the class landscapes supported by the GTM model. Their analysis resulted in identification of privileged structural motifs of potential antimalarial compounds. Projection of marketed antimalarial drugs on this map allowed us to delineate several areas in the chemical space corresponding to different mechanisms of antimalarial activity. This helped us to make a suggestion about the mode of action of the molecules populating these zones.

  17. QSAR modeling and chemical space analysis of antimalarial compounds.

    PubMed

    Sidorov, Pavel; Viira, Birgit; Davioud-Charvet, Elisabeth; Maran, Uko; Marcou, Gilles; Horvath, Dragos; Varnek, Alexandre

    2017-04-03

    Generative topographic mapping (GTM) has been used to visualize and analyze the chemical space of antimalarial compounds as well as to build predictive models linking structure of molecules with their antimalarial activity. For this, a database, including ~3000 molecules tested in one or several of 17 anti-Plasmodium activity assessment protocols, has been compiled by assembling experimental data from in-house and ChEMBL databases. GTM classification models built on subsets corresponding to individual bioassays perform similarly to the earlier reported SVM models. Zones preferentially populated by active and inactive molecules, respectively, clearly emerge in the class landscapes supported by the GTM model. Their analysis resulted in identification of privileged structural motifs of potential antimalarial compounds. Projection of marketed antimalarial drugs on this map allowed us to delineate several areas in the chemical space corresponding to different mechanisms of antimalarial activity. This helped us to make a suggestion about the mode of action of the molecules populating these zones.

  18. Space shuttle main engine plume radiation model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reardon, J. E.; Lee, Y. C.

    1978-01-01

    The methods are described which are used in predicting the thermal radiation received by space shuttles, from the plumes of the main engines. Radiation to representative surface locations were predicted using the NASA gaseous plume radiation GASRAD program. The plume model is used with the radiative view factor (RAVFAC) program to predict sea level radiation at specified body points. The GASRAD program is described along with the predictions. The RAVFAC model is also discussed.

  19. Cost Modeling for Space Optical Telescope Assemblies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip; Henrichs, Todd; Luedtke, Alexander; West, Miranda

    2011-01-01

    Parametric cost models are used to plan missions, compare concepts and justify technology investments. This paper reviews an on-going effort to develop cost modes for space telescopes. This paper summarizes the methodology used to develop cost models and documents how changes to the database have changed previously published preliminary cost models. While the cost models are evolving, the previously published findings remain valid: it costs less per square meter of collecting aperture to build a large telescope than a small telescope; technology development as a function of time reduces cost; and lower areal density telescopes cost more than more massive telescopes.

  20. Hubble Space Telescope electrical power system model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baggett, Randy; Miller, Jim; Leisgang, Tom

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes one of the most comprehensive models ever developed for a spacecraft electrical power system (EPS). The model was developed for the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) to evaluate vehicle power system performance and to assist in scheduling maintenance and refurbishment missions by providing data needed to forecast EPS power and energy margins for the mission phases being planned. The EPS model requires a specific mission phase description as the input driver and uses a high granularity database to produce a multi-orbit power system performance report. The EPS model accurately predicts the power system response to various mission timelines over the entire operational life of the spacecraft.

  1. Next-generation concurrent engineering: developing models to complement point designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morse, Elizabeth; Leavens, Tracy; Cohanim, Barbak; Harmon, Corey; Mahr, Eric; Lewis, Brian

    2006-01-01

    Concurrent Engineering Design teams have made routine the rapid development of point designs for space missions. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Team X is now evolving into a next generation CED; nin addition to a point design, the team develops a model of the local trade space. The process is a balance between the power of model-developing tools and the creativity of human experts, enabling the development of a variety of trade models for any space mission.

  2. Next-generation concurrent engineering: developing models to complement point designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morse, Elizabeth; Leavens, Tracy; Cohanim, Barbak; Harmon, Corey; Mahr, Eric; Lewis, Brian

    2006-01-01

    Concurrent Engineering Design teams have made routine the rapid development of point designs for space missions. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Team X is now evolving into a next generation CED; nin addition to a point design, the team develops a model of the local trade space. The process is a balance between the power of model-developing tools and the creativity of human experts, enabling the development of a variety of trade models for any space mission.

  3. MEGen: A Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Model Generator

    PubMed Central

    Loizou, George; Hogg, Alex

    2011-01-01

    Physiologically based pharmacokinetic models are being used in an increasing number of different areas. However, they are perceived as complex, data hungry, resource intensive, and time consuming. In addition, model validation and verification are hindered by the relative complexity of the equations. To begin to address these issues a web application called MEGen for the rapid construction and documentation of bespoke deterministic PBPK model code is under development. MEGen comprises a parameter database and a model code generator that produces code for use in several commercial software packages and one that is freely available. Here we present an overview of the current capabilities of MEGen, and discuss future developments. PMID:22084631

  4. Multiresolutional models of uncertainty generation and reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meystel, A.

    1989-01-01

    Kolmogorov's axiomatic principles of the probability theory, are reconsidered in the scope of their applicability to the processes of knowledge acquisition and interpretation. The model of uncertainty generation is modified in order to reflect the reality of engineering problems, particularly in the area of intelligent control. This model implies algorithms of learning which are organized in three groups which reflect the degree of conceptualization of the knowledge the system is dealing with. It is essential that these algorithms are motivated by and consistent with the multiresolutional model of knowledge representation which is reflected in the structure of models and the algorithms of learning.

  5. Generation of droplet arrays with rational number spacing patterns driven by a periodic energy landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinberg, Anatoly; Katsikis, Georgios; Prakash, Manu

    2017-09-01

    The generation of droplets at low Reynolds numbers is driven by nonlinear dynamics that give rise to complex patterns concerning both the droplet-to-droplet spacing and the individual droplet sizes. Here we demonstrate an experimental system in which a time-varying energy landscape provides a periodic magnetic force that generates an array of droplets from an immiscible mixture of ferrofluid and silicone oil. The resulting droplet patterns are periodic, owing to the nature of the magnetic force, yet the droplet spacing and size can vary greatly by tuning a single bias pressure applied on the ferrofluid phase; for a given cycle period of the magnetic force, droplets can be generated either at integer multiples (1, 2, ...), or at rational fractions (3/2, 5/3, 5/2, ...) of this period with mono- or multidisperse droplet sizes. We develop a discrete-time dynamical systems model not only to reproduce the phenotypes of the observed patterns but also to provide a framework for understanding systems driven by such periodic energy landscapes.

  6. Next Generation Space Interconnect Standard (NGSIS): a modular open standards approach for high performance interconnects for space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collier, Charles Patrick

    2017-04-01

    The Next Generation Space Interconnect Standard (NGSIS) effort is a Government-Industry collaboration effort to define a set of standards for interconnects between space system components with the goal of cost effectively removing bandwidth as a constraint for future space systems. The NGSIS team has selected the ANSI/VITA 65 OpenVPXTM standard family for the physical baseline. The RapidIO protocol has been selected as the basis for the digital data transport. The NGSIS standards are developed to provide sufficient flexibility to enable users to implement a variety of system configurations, while meeting goals for interoperability and robustness for space. The NGSIS approach and effort represents a radical departure from past approaches to achieve a Modular Open System Architecture (MOSA) for space systems and serves as an exemplar for the civil, commercial, and military Space communities as well as a broader high reliability terrestrial market.

  7. Automated Environment Generation for Software Model Checking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tkachuk, Oksana; Dwyer, Matthew B.; Pasareanu, Corina S.

    2003-01-01

    A key problem in model checking open systems is environment modeling (i.e., representing the behavior of the execution context of the system under analysis). Software systems are fundamentally open since their behavior is dependent on patterns of invocation of system components and values defined outside the system but referenced within the system. Whether reasoning about the behavior of whole programs or about program components, an abstract model of the environment can be essential in enabling sufficiently precise yet tractable verification. In this paper, we describe an approach to generating environments of Java program fragments. This approach integrates formally specified assumptions about environment behavior with sound abstractions of environment implementations to form a model of the environment. The approach is implemented in the Bandera Environment Generator (BEG) which we describe along with our experience using BEG to reason about properties of several non-trivial concurrent Java programs.

  8. A Deep Generative Deconvolutional Image Model

    SciTech Connect

    Pu, Yunchen; Yuan, Xin; Stevens, Andrew J.; Li, Chunyuan; Carin, Lawrence

    2016-05-09

    A deep generative model is developed for representation and analysis of images, based on a hierarchical convolutional dictionary-learning framework. Stochastic unpooling is employed to link consecutive layers in the model, yielding top-down image generation. A Bayesian support vector machine is linked to the top-layer features, yielding max-margin discrimination. Deep deconvolutional inference is employed when testing, to infer the latent features, and the top-layer features are connected with the max-margin classifier for discrimination tasks. The model is efficiently trained using a Monte Carlo expectation-maximization (MCEM) algorithm; the algorithm is implemented on graphical processor units (GPU) to enable large-scale learning, and fast testing. Excellent results are obtained on several benchmark datasets, including ImageNet, demonstrating that the proposed model achieves results that are highly competitive with similarly sized convolutional neural networks.

  9. Dynamic modelling and analysis of space webs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yang; Baoyin, HeXi; Li, JunFeng

    2011-04-01

    Future space missions demand operations on large flexible structures, for example, space webs, the lightweight cable nets deployable in space, which can serve as platforms for very large structures or be used to capture orbital objects. The interest in research on space webs is likely to increase in the future with the development of promising applications such as Furoshiki sat-ellite of JAXA, Robotic Geostationary Orbit Restorer (ROGER) of ESA and Grapple, Retrieve And Secure Payload (GRASP) of NASA. Unlike high-tensioned nets in civil engineering, space webs may be low-tensioned or tensionless, and extremely flexible, owing to the microgravity in the orbit and the lack of support components, which may cause computational difficulties. Mathematical models are necessary in the analysis of space webs, especially in the conceptual design and evaluation for prototypes. A full three-dimensional finite element (FE) model was developed in this work. Trivial truss elements were adopted to reduce the computational complexity. Considering cable is a compression-free material and its tensile stiffness is also variable, we introduced the cable material constitutive relationship to work out an accurate and feasible model for prototype analysis and design. In the static analysis, the stress distribution and global deformation of the webs were discussed to get access to the knowledge of strength of webs with different types of meshes. In the dynamic analysis, special attention was paid to the impact problem. The max stress and global deformation were investigated. The simulation results indicate the interesting phenomenon which may be worth further research.

  10. Tests of the space gamma spectrometer prototype at the JINR experimental facility with different types of neutron generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litvak, M. L.; Vostrukhin, A. A.; Golovin, D. V.; Dubasov, P. V.; Zontikov, A. O.; Kozyrev, A. S.; Krylov, A. R.; Krylov, V. A.; Mitrofanov, I. G.; Mokrousov, M. I.; Repkin, A. N.; Timoshenko, G. N.; Udovichenko, K. V.; Shvetsov, V. N.

    2017-07-01

    The results of the tests of the HPGe gamma spectrometer performed with a planetary soil model and different types of pulse neutron generators are presented. All measurements have been performed at the experimental nuclear planetary science facility (Joint Institute for Nuclear Research) for the physical calibration of active gamma and neutron spectrometers. The aim of the study is to model a space experiment on determining the elemental composition of Martian planetary matter by neutron-induced gamma spectroscopy. The advantages and disadvantages of a gas-filled neutron generator in comparison with a vacuum-tube neutron generator are examined.

  11. Generative models for discovering sparse distributed representations.

    PubMed

    Hinton, G E; Ghahramani, Z

    1997-08-29

    We describe a hierarchical, generative model that can be viewed as a nonlinear generalization of factor analysis and can be implemented in a neural network. The model uses bottom-up, top-down and lateral connections to perform Bayesian perceptual inference correctly. Once perceptual inference has been performed the connection strengths can be updated using a very simple learning rule that only requires locally available information. We demonstrate that the network learns to extract sparse, distributed, hierarchical representations.

  12. Space market model development project, phase 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, Peter C.; Hamel, Gary P.

    1989-01-01

    The results of a research project investigating information needs for space commercialization is described. The Space Market Model Development Project (SMMDP) was designed to help NASA identify the information needs of the business community and to explore means to meet those needs. The activity of the SMMDP is reviewed and a report of its operation via three sections is presented. The first part contains a brief historical review of the project since inception. The next part reports results of Phase 3, the most recent stage of activity. Finally, overall conclusions and observations based on the SMMDP research results are presented.

  13. Space Object Tracking Method with Snake Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Z. W.; Wang, X.

    2015-05-01

    Aimed at the unstable tracking problem of low-orbit variable and bright space objects, an active contour model is accepted, and a refined GVF-Snake algorithm is proposed to realize the real-time searching of the real contour of objects on CCD image in this paper. Combined with the Kalman filter for prediction, a new adaptive tracking approach is proposed for space objects. Experiments show that the method can overcome the tracking difficulty brought by a fixed window, and improve the tracking robustness.

  14. Policy model for space economy infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komerath, Narayanan; Nally, James; Zilin Tang, Elizabeth

    2007-12-01

    Extraterrestrial infrastructure is key to the development of a space economy. Means for accelerating transition from today's isolated projects to a broad-based economy are considered. A large system integration approach is proposed. The beginnings of an economic simulation model are presented, along with examples of how interactions and coordination bring down costs. A global organization focused on space infrastructure and economic expansion is proposed to plan, coordinate, fund and implement infrastructure construction. This entity also opens a way to raise low-cost capital and solve the legal and public policy issues of access to extraterrestrial resources.

  15. A Generational Model for Professional Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caverly, David C.; Peterson, Cynthia L.; Mandeville, Thomas F.

    1997-01-01

    Describes a social-constructivist model of professional development arising from a collaboration between Southwest Texas State University's education department and New Braunfels (Texas) Independent School District. Teachers learn technology integration techniques from an instructionally strong "first-generation" of teachers trained at a…

  16. Modeling of space environment impact on nanostructured materials. General principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voronina, Ekaterina; Novikov, Lev

    2016-07-01

    In accordance with the resolution of ISO TC20/SC14 WG4/WG6 joint meeting, Technical Specification (TS) 'Modeling of space environment impact on nanostructured materials. General principles' which describes computer simulation methods of space environment impact on nanostructured materials is being prepared. Nanomaterials surpass traditional materials for space applications in many aspects due to their unique properties associated with nanoscale size of their constituents. This superiority in mechanical, thermal, electrical and optical properties will evidently inspire a wide range of applications in the next generation spacecraft intended for the long-term (~15-20 years) operation in near-Earth orbits and the automatic and manned interplanetary missions. Currently, ISO activity on developing standards concerning different issues of nanomaterials manufacturing and applications is high enough. Most such standards are related to production and characterization of nanostructures, however there is no ISO documents concerning nanomaterials behavior in different environmental conditions, including the space environment. The given TS deals with the peculiarities of the space environment impact on nanostructured materials (i.e. materials with structured objects which size in at least one dimension lies within 1-100 nm). The basic purpose of the document is the general description of the methodology of applying computer simulation methods which relate to different space and time scale to modeling processes occurring in nanostructured materials under the space environment impact. This document will emphasize the necessity of applying multiscale simulation approach and present the recommendations for the choice of the most appropriate methods (or a group of methods) for computer modeling of various processes that can occur in nanostructured materials under the influence of different space environment components. In addition, TS includes the description of possible

  17. The CCSDS Next Generation Space Data Link Protocol (NGSLP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazz, Greg J.; Greenberg, Edward

    2014-01-01

    The CCSDS space link protocols i.e., Telemetry (TM), Telecommand (TC), Advanced Orbiting Systems (AOS) were developed in the early growth period of the space program. They were designed to meet the needs of the early missions, be compatible with the available technology and focused on the specific link environments. Digital technology was in its infancy and spacecraft power and mass issues enforced severe constraints on flight implementations. Therefore the Telecommand protocol was designed around a simple Bose, Hocquenghem, Chaudhuri (BCH) code that provided little coding gain and limited error detection but was relatively simple to decode on board. The infusion of the concatenated Convolutional and Reed-Solomon codes5 for telemetry was a major milestone and transformed telemetry applications by providing them the ability to more efficiently utilize the telemetry link and its ability to deliver user data. The ability to significantly lower the error rates on the telemetry links enabled the use of packet telemetry and data compression. The infusion of the high performance codes for telemetry was enabled by the advent of digital processing, but it was limited to earth based systems supporting telemetry. The latest CCSDS space link protocol, Proximity-1 was developed in early 2000 to meet the needs of short-range, bi-directional, fixed or mobile radio links characterized by short time delays, moderate but not weak signals, and short independent sessions. Proximity-1 has been successfully deployed on both NASA and ESA missions at Mars and is planned to be utilized by all Mars missions in development. A new age has arisen, one that now provides the means to perform advanced digital processing in spacecraft systems enabling the use of improved transponders, digital correlators, and high performance forward error correcting codes for all communications links. Flight transponders utilizing digital technology have emerged and can efficiently provide the means to make the

  18. The CCSDS Next Generation Space Data Link Protocol (NGSLP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazz, Greg J.; Greenberg, Edward

    2014-01-01

    The CCSDS space link protocols i.e., Telemetry (TM), Telecommand (TC), Advanced Orbiting Systems (AOS) were developed in the early growth period of the space program. They were designed to meet the needs of the early missions, be compatible with the available technology and focused on the specific link environments. Digital technology was in its infancy and spacecraft power and mass issues enforced severe constraints on flight implementations. Therefore the Telecommand protocol was designed around a simple Bose, Hocquenghem, Chaudhuri (BCH) code that provided little coding gain and limited error detection but was relatively simple to decode on board. The infusion of the concatenated Convolutional and Reed-Solomon codes5 for telemetry was a major milestone and transformed telemetry applications by providing them the ability to more efficiently utilize the telemetry link and its ability to deliver user data. The ability to significantly lower the error rates on the telemetry links enabled the use of packet telemetry and data compression. The infusion of the high performance codes for telemetry was enabled by the advent of digital processing, but it was limited to earth based systems supporting telemetry. The latest CCSDS space link protocol, Proximity-1 was developed in early 2000 to meet the needs of short-range, bi-directional, fixed or mobile radio links characterized by short time delays, moderate but not weak signals, and short independent sessions. Proximity-1 has been successfully deployed on both NASA and ESA missions at Mars and is planned to be utilized by all Mars missions in development. A new age has arisen, one that now provides the means to perform advanced digital processing in spacecraft systems enabling the use of improved transponders, digital correlators, and high performance forward error correcting codes for all communications links. Flight transponders utilizing digital technology have emerged and can efficiently provide the means to make the

  19. A Knowledge Generation Model via the Hypernetwork

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jian-Guo; Yang, Guang-Yong; Hu, Zhao-Long

    2014-01-01

    The influence of the statistical properties of the network on the knowledge diffusion has been extensively studied. However, the structure evolution and the knowledge generation processes are always integrated simultaneously. By introducing the Cobb-Douglas production function and treating the knowledge growth as a cooperative production of knowledge, in this paper, we present two knowledge-generation dynamic evolving models based on different evolving mechanisms. The first model, named “HDPH model,” adopts the hyperedge growth and the hyperdegree preferential attachment mechanisms. The second model, named “KSPH model,” adopts the hyperedge growth and the knowledge stock preferential attachment mechanisms. We investigate the effect of the parameters on the total knowledge stock of the two models. The hyperdegree distribution of the HDPH model can be theoretically analyzed by the mean-field theory. The analytic result indicates that the hyperdegree distribution of the HDPH model obeys the power-law distribution and the exponent is . Furthermore, we present the distributions of the knowledge stock for different parameters . The findings indicate that our proposed models could be helpful for deeply understanding the scientific research cooperation. PMID:24626143

  20. A knowledge generation model via the hypernetwork.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jian-Guo; Yang, Guang-Yong; Hu, Zhao-Long

    2014-01-01

    The influence of the statistical properties of the network on the knowledge diffusion has been extensively studied. However, the structure evolution and the knowledge generation processes are always integrated simultaneously. By introducing the Cobb-Douglas production function and treating the knowledge growth as a cooperative production of knowledge, in this paper, we present two knowledge-generation dynamic evolving models based on different evolving mechanisms. The first model, named "HDPH model," adopts the hyperedge growth and the hyperdegree preferential attachment mechanisms. The second model, named "KSPH model," adopts the hyperedge growth and the knowledge stock preferential attachment mechanisms. We investigate the effect of the parameters (α,β) on the total knowledge stock of the two models. The hyperdegree distribution of the HDPH model can be theoretically analyzed by the mean-field theory. The analytic result indicates that the hyperdegree distribution of the HDPH model obeys the power-law distribution and the exponent is γ = 2 + 1/m. Furthermore, we present the distributions of the knowledge stock for different parameters (α,β). The findings indicate that our proposed models could be helpful for deeply understanding the scientific research cooperation.

  1. Generating log-normal mock catalog of galaxies in redshift space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, Aniket; Makiya, Ryu; Chiang, Chi-Ting; Jeong, Donghui; Saito, Shun; Komatsu, Eiichiro

    2017-10-01

    We present a public code to generate a mock galaxy catalog in redshift space assuming a log-normal probability density function (PDF) of galaxy and matter density fields. We draw galaxies by Poisson-sampling the log-normal field, and calculate the velocity field from the linearised continuity equation of matter fields, assuming zero vorticity. This procedure yields a PDF of the pairwise velocity fields that is qualitatively similar to that of N-body simulations. We check fidelity of the catalog, showing that the measured two-point correlation function and power spectrum in real space agree with the input precisely. We find that a linear bias relation in the power spectrum does not guarantee a linear bias relation in the density contrasts, leading to a cross-correlation coefficient of matter and galaxies deviating from unity on small scales. We also find that linearising the Jacobian of the real-to-redshift space mapping provides a poor model for the two-point statistics in redshift space. That is, non-linear redshift-space distortion is dominated by non-linearity in the Jacobian. The power spectrum in redshift space shows a damping on small scales that is qualitatively similar to that of the well-known Fingers-of-God (FoG) effect due to random velocities, except that the log-normal mock does not include random velocities. This damping is a consequence of non-linearity in the Jacobian, and thus attributing the damping of the power spectrum solely to FoG, as commonly done in the literature, is misleading.

  2. Second Generation Crop Yield Models Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodges, T. (Principal Investigator)

    1982-01-01

    Second generation yield models, including crop growth simulation models and plant process models, may be suitable for large area crop yield forecasting in the yield model development project. Subjective and objective criteria for model selection are defined and models which might be selected are reviewed. Models may be selected to provide submodels as input to other models; for further development and testing; or for immediate testing as forecasting tools. A plant process model may range in complexity from several dozen submodels simulating (1) energy, carbohydrates, and minerals; (2) change in biomass of various organs; and (3) initiation and development of plant organs, to a few submodels simulating key physiological processes. The most complex models cannot be used directly in large area forecasting but may provide submodels which can be simplified for inclusion into simpler plant process models. Both published and unpublished models which may be used for development or testing are reviewed. Several other models, currently under development, may become available at a later date.

  3. Architecture for the silver generation: exploring the meaning of appropriate space for ageing in a Swedish municipality.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Jonas E

    2011-03-01

    This paper focuses on an architecture competition for the silver generation, namely those aged 65 years and older. Twenty-seven Swedish informants were interviewed using an interviewing guide that included a photographic survey. The informants emphasised aesthetic dimensions in architecture for the prolongation of ageing in place and independent living in a residential home. This study highlights the individual adjustment of space, and the integrated location in existing urban settings near nature. Based on the findings, a habitational model for exploring the appropriate space for ageing is formulated. It suggests that architecture through location and spatial features needs to generate positive associations with the users.

  4. Modeling Space Radiation with Radiomimetic Agent Bleomycin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Tao

    2017-01-01

    Space radiation consists of proton and helium from solar particle events (SPE) and high energy heavy ions from galactic cosmic ray (GCR). This mixture of radiation with particles at different energy levels has different effects on biological systems. Currently, majority studies of radiation effects on human were based on single-source radiation due to the limitation of available method to model effects of space radiation on living organisms. While NASA Space Radiation Laboratory is working on advanced switches to make it possible to have a mixed field radiation with particles of different energies, the radiation source will be limited. Development of an easily available experimental model for studying effects of mixed field radiation could greatly speed up our progress in our understanding the molecular mechanisms of damage and responses from exposure to space radiation, and facilitate the discovery of protection and countermeasures against space radiation, which is critical for the mission to Mars. Bleomycin, a radiomimetic agent, has been widely used to study radiation induced DNA damage and cellular responses. Previously, bleomycin was often compared to low low Linear Energy Transfer (LET) gamma radiation without defined characteristics. Our recent work demonstrated that bleomycin could induce complex clustered DNA damage in human fibroblasts that is similar to DNA damage induced by high LET radiation. These type of DNA damage is difficult to repair and can be visualized by gamma-H2Ax staining weeks after the initial insult. The survival ratio between early and late plating of human fibroblasts after bleomycin treatment is between low LET and high LET radiation. Our results suggest that bleomycin induces DNA damage and other cellular stresses resembling those resulted from mixed field radiation with both low and high LET particles. We hypothesize that bleomycin could be used to mimic space radiation in biological systems. Potential advantages and limitations of

  5. Learning generative models of molecular dynamics

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    We introduce three algorithms for learning generative models of molecular structures from molecular dynamics simulations. The first algorithm learns a Bayesian-optimal undirected probabilistic model over user-specified covariates (e.g., fluctuations, distances, angles, etc). L1 reg-ularization is used to ensure sparse models and thus reduce the risk of over-fitting the data. The topology of the resulting model reveals important couplings between different parts of the protein, thus aiding in the analysis of molecular motions. The generative nature of the model makes it well-suited to making predictions about the global effects of local structural changes (e.g., the binding of an allosteric regulator). Additionally, the model can be used to sample new conformations. The second algorithm learns a time-varying graphical model where the topology and parameters change smoothly along the trajectory, revealing the conformational sub-states. The last algorithm learns a Markov Chain over undirected graphical models which can be used to study and simulate kinetics. We demonstrate our algorithms on multiple molecular dynamics trajectories. PMID:22369071

  6. Learning generative models of molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Razavian, Narges Sharif; Kamisetty, Hetunandan; Langmead, Christopher J

    2012-01-01

    We introduce three algorithms for learning generative models of molecular structures from molecular dynamics simulations. The first algorithm learns a Bayesian-optimal undirected probabilistic model over user-specified covariates (e.g., fluctuations, distances, angles, etc). L1 regularization is used to ensure sparse models and thus reduce the risk of over-fitting the data. The topology of the resulting model reveals important couplings between different parts of the protein, thus aiding in the analysis of molecular motions. The generative nature of the model makes it well-suited to making predictions about the global effects of local structural changes (e.g., the binding of an allosteric regulator). Additionally, the model can be used to sample new conformations. The second algorithm learns a time-varying graphical model where the topology and parameters change smoothly along the trajectory, revealing the conformational sub-states. The last algorithm learns a Markov Chain over undirected graphical models which can be used to study and simulate kinetics. We demonstrate our algorithms on multiple molecular dynamics trajectories.

  7. Generalized model of brushless dc generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vadher, V. V.; Kettleborough, J. Gordon; Smith, I. R.; Gerges, Wahid R.

    1989-07-01

    A generalized model is described for a brushless dc machine consisting of a multiphase synchronous machine with a full-wave bridge rectifier connected to its output terminals. The state-variable equations for the machine are suitable for numerical integration on a digital computer, and are assembled in a form which permits investigations to be made on the effects of different numbers of armature phase windings and different winding connections. The model has been used in both steady-state and transient studies on a number of generating units, with the detailed information which is provided being beneficial to design engineers. Comparisons presented between predicted and measured results illustrate the validity of the model and the mathematical techniques adopted, and confirm that accurate information on the performance of a brushless generator may be obtained prior to manufacture.

  8. Neural decoding with hierarchical generative models.

    PubMed

    van Gerven, Marcel A J; de Lange, Floris P; Heskes, Tom

    2010-12-01

    Recent research has shown that reconstruction of perceived images based on hemodynamic response as measured with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is starting to become feasible. In this letter, we explore reconstruction based on a learned hierarchy of features by employing a hierarchical generative model that consists of conditional restricted Boltzmann machines. In an unsupervised phase, we learn a hierarchy of features from data, and in a supervised phase, we learn how brain activity predicts the states of those features. Reconstruction is achieved by sampling from the model, conditioned on brain activity. We show that by using the hierarchical generative model, we can obtain good-quality reconstructions of visual images of handwritten digits presented during an fMRI scanning session.

  9. Moving Target Tracking for a Next Generation Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skillman, David R.

    1989-01-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope required a complex method for tracking targets in motion in the solar system, due mostly to atmospheric drag effects. A NGST in high earth orbit, or on the Moon, would not suffer these drag effects, thus mitigating the tracking problem. Many of the HST problems arise from the "open-loop" nature of the tracking method. An NGST would be better off if it could use "closed-loop" tracking of all targets, both fixed and moving. A method to accomplish this is proposed. Methods to reduce the jitter and lower the ambient temperature of the optics via a tethered optical system are proposed.

  10. Some aspects of generating unit availability models

    SciTech Connect

    Debnath, K.; Billinton, R.

    1989-03-01

    This paper presents a comparison of some of the basic generating unit performance data from the North American Electric Reliability Council - Generating Availability Data System (NERC-GADS) and the Canadian Electrical Association - Equipment Reliability Information System (CEA-ERIS) reporting procedures. The paper also illustrates some of the additional information which can be produced from the continuous state monitoring procedure used by the CEA. This is illustrated by Weibull analysis of state residence time distributions, consideration of the effect of low operating factors for conventional fossil units and modified models for peaking units.

  11. Adaptive Numerical Algorithms in Space Weather Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toth, Gabor; vanderHolst, Bart; Sokolov, Igor V.; DeZeeuw, Darren; Gombosi, Tamas I.; Fang, Fang; Manchester, Ward B.; Meng, Xing; Nakib, Dalal; Powell, Kenneth G.; Stout, Quentin F.; Glocer, Alex; Ma, Ying-Juan; Opher, Merav

    2010-01-01

    Space weather describes the various processes in the Sun-Earth system that present danger to human health and technology. The goal of space weather forecasting is to provide an opportunity to mitigate these negative effects. Physics-based space weather modeling is characterized by disparate temporal and spatial scales as well as by different physics in different domains. A multi-physics system can be modeled by a software framework comprising of several components. Each component corresponds to a physics domain, and each component is represented by one or more numerical models. The publicly available Space Weather Modeling Framework (SWMF) can execute and couple together several components distributed over a parallel machine in a flexible and efficient manner. The framework also allows resolving disparate spatial and temporal scales with independent spatial and temporal discretizations in the various models. Several of the computationally most expensive domains of the framework are modeled by the Block-Adaptive Tree Solar wind Roe Upwind Scheme (BATS-R-US) code that can solve various forms of the magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) equations, including Hall, semi-relativistic, multi-species and multi-fluid MHD, anisotropic pressure, radiative transport and heat conduction. Modeling disparate scales within BATS-R-US is achieved by a block-adaptive mesh both in Cartesian and generalized coordinates. Most recently we have created a new core for BATS-R-US: the Block-Adaptive Tree Library (BATL) that provides a general toolkit for creating, load balancing and message passing in a 1, 2 or 3 dimensional block-adaptive grid. We describe the algorithms of BATL and demonstrate its efficiency and scaling properties for various problems. BATS-R-US uses several time-integration schemes to address multiple time-scales: explicit time stepping with fixed or local time steps, partially steady-state evolution, point-implicit, semi-implicit, explicit/implicit, and fully implicit numerical

  12. Adaptive numerical algorithms in space weather modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tóth, Gábor; van der Holst, Bart; Sokolov, Igor V.; De Zeeuw, Darren L.; Gombosi, Tamas I.; Fang, Fang; Manchester, Ward B.; Meng, Xing; Najib, Dalal; Powell, Kenneth G.; Stout, Quentin F.; Glocer, Alex; Ma, Ying-Juan; Opher, Merav

    2012-02-01

    Space weather describes the various processes in the Sun-Earth system that present danger to human health and technology. The goal of space weather forecasting is to provide an opportunity to mitigate these negative effects. Physics-based space weather modeling is characterized by disparate temporal and spatial scales as well as by different relevant physics in different domains. A multi-physics system can be modeled by a software framework comprising several components. Each component corresponds to a physics domain, and each component is represented by one or more numerical models. The publicly available Space Weather Modeling Framework (SWMF) can execute and couple together several components distributed over a parallel machine in a flexible and efficient manner. The framework also allows resolving disparate spatial and temporal scales with independent spatial and temporal discretizations in the various models. Several of the computationally most expensive domains of the framework are modeled by the Block-Adaptive Tree Solarwind Roe-type Upwind Scheme (BATS-R-US) code that can solve various forms of the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations, including Hall, semi-relativistic, multi-species and multi-fluid MHD, anisotropic pressure, radiative transport and heat conduction. Modeling disparate scales within BATS-R-US is achieved by a block-adaptive mesh both in Cartesian and generalized coordinates. Most recently we have created a new core for BATS-R-US: the Block-Adaptive Tree Library (BATL) that provides a general toolkit for creating, load balancing and message passing in a 1, 2 or 3 dimensional block-adaptive grid. We describe the algorithms of BATL and demonstrate its efficiency and scaling properties for various problems. BATS-R-US uses several time-integration schemes to address multiple time-scales: explicit time stepping with fixed or local time steps, partially steady-state evolution, point-implicit, semi-implicit, explicit/implicit, and fully implicit

  13. Using MapReduce to Improve the Power Generation of the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchetto, William R., II

    The International Space Station (ISS) spends approximately 98% of its time in orbits that experience Earth eclipse. Since the station's solar arrays produce no power when in Earth's shadow, the total power generated decreases substantially, lowering the power budget available to experimental payloads. Therefore, increasing the power output during these eclipsed orbits would be of great benefit to the space station's scientific endeavors. The ISS's current solar array configuration tracks the Sun throughout each orbit, keeping each of its 16 solar panels perpendicular to the Sun at all times. While this is the optimal orientation for solar panels with unobstructed views of the Sun, the space station's solar arrays experience shadowing from the spacecraft's structure as well as from the other solar panels. Deviating from the Sun-tracking scheme at strategic points in certain orbits can provide an increase in power output. The goal of this research was to provide a programmatic solution that increases the power generation capabilities of the ISS in orbits experiencing Earth-eclipse without requiring any physical modifications to the space station's structure. To achieve this goal, a simulator was developed to model the ISS-Earth-Sun environment and calculate the power output of the station's solar arrays based on each panel's orientation and shadowing. Many combinations of array configurations were analyzed, taking into account the physical constraints of the gimbals responsible for rotating the solar panels. The power output of the ISS was improved for the subset of Earth-eclipsed orbits that experience a high degree of shadowing from the station's structure, resulting in an average energy increase of 1.08 kWh per orbit. The power gains were achieved by quickly rotating the solar arrays through the points in each orbit that experienced the highest degree of shadowing.

  14. Silicon photomultipliers for next generation high-energy space telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacombe, K.; Knödlseder, J.; Delaigue, S.; Galliano, M.; Houret, B.; Ramon, P.; Rouaix, G.; Virmontois, C.

    2015-08-01

    Photon detection is a central element of any high-energy astronomy instrumentation. One classical setup that has proven successful in many missions is the combination of photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) with scintillators, converting incoming high-energy photons into visible light, which in turn is converted in an electrical impulse. Although being extremely sensitive and rapid, PMTs have the drawback of being bulky, fragile, and are requiring a high-voltage power supply of up to several thousand volts. Recent technological advances in the development of silicon photomultipliers (SiPM) make them a promising alternative to PMTs in essentially all their applications. We have started an R and D program to assess the possibility of using SiPMs for space-based applications in the domain of high-energy astronomy. We have setup a test bench using a vacuum vessel to reproduce a space-representative environment in our lab. We will present our test bench as well as first results of a characterization campaign of SiPM detectors from 3 different suppliers. We have planned to select after the characterization campaign one baseline detector for which we will design a dedicated front-end electronics and mechanical system. Furthermore, we plan to develop a specific low noise voltage power supply that ensures the stability of the SiPMs. Our ultimate goal is to qualify the system for a Technical Readiness Level of 5.

  15. Next Generation Simulation Framework for Robotic and Human Space Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cameron, Jonathan M.; Balaram, J.; Jain, Abhinandan; Kuo, Calvin; Lim, Christopher; Myint, Steven

    2012-01-01

    The Dartslab team at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) has a long history of developing physics-based simulations based on the Darts/Dshell simulation framework that have been used to simulate many planetary robotic missions, such as the Cassini spacecraft and the rovers that are currently driving on Mars. Recent collaboration efforts between the Dartslab team at JPL and the Mission Operations Directorate (MOD) at NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) have led to significant enhancements to the Dartslab DSENDS (Dynamics Simulator for Entry, Descent and Surface landing) software framework. The new version of DSENDS is now being used for new planetary mission simulations at JPL. JSC is using DSENDS as the foundation for a suite of software known as COMPASS (Core Operations, Mission Planning, and Analysis Spacecraft Simulation) that is the basis for their new human space mission simulations and analysis. In this paper, we will describe the collaborative process with the JPL Dartslab and the JSC MOD team that resulted in the redesign and enhancement of the DSENDS software. We will outline the improvements in DSENDS that simplify creation of new high-fidelity robotic/spacecraft simulations. We will illustrate how DSENDS simulations are assembled and show results from several mission simulations.

  16. Next Generation Simulation Framework for Robotic and Human Space Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cameron, Jonathan M.; Balaram, J.; Jain, Abhinandan; Kuo, Calvin; Lim, Christopher; Myint, Steven

    2012-01-01

    The Dartslab team at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) has a long history of developing physics-based simulations based on the Darts/Dshell simulation framework that have been used to simulate many planetary robotic missions, such as the Cassini spacecraft and the rovers that are currently driving on Mars. Recent collaboration efforts between the Dartslab team at JPL and the Mission Operations Directorate (MOD) at NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) have led to significant enhancements to the Dartslab DSENDS (Dynamics Simulator for Entry, Descent and Surface landing) software framework. The new version of DSENDS is now being used for new planetary mission simulations at JPL. JSC is using DSENDS as the foundation for a suite of software known as COMPASS (Core Operations, Mission Planning, and Analysis Spacecraft Simulation) that is the basis for their new human space mission simulations and analysis. In this paper, we will describe the collaborative process with the JPL Dartslab and the JSC MOD team that resulted in the redesign and enhancement of the DSENDS software. We will outline the improvements in DSENDS that simplify creation of new high-fidelity robotic/spacecraft simulations. We will illustrate how DSENDS simulations are assembled and show results from several mission simulations.

  17. [A dynamic model of the extravehicular (correction of extravehicuar) activity space suit].

    PubMed

    Yang, Feng; Yuan, Xiu-gan

    2002-12-01

    Objective. To establish a dynamic model of the space suit base on the particular configuration of the space suit. Method. The mass of the space suit components, moment of inertia, mobility of the joints of space suit, as well as the suit-generated torques, were considered in this model. The expressions to calculate the moment of inertia were developed by simplifying the geometry of the space suit. A modified Preisach model was used to mathematically describe the hysteretic torque characteristics of joints in a pressurized space suit, and it was implemented numerically basing on the observed suit parameters. Result. A dynamic model considering mass, moment of inertia and suit-generated torques was established. Conclusion. This dynamic model provides some elements for the dynamic simulation of the astronaut extravehicular activity.

  18. Modeling the membrane potential generation of bacteriorhodopsin.

    PubMed

    del Rosario, Ricardo C H; Oppawsky, Christoph; Tittor, Jörg; Oesterhelt, Dieter

    2010-05-01

    The archaeon Halobacterium salinarum can grow phototrophically with only light as its energy source. It uses the retinal containing and light-driven proton pump bacteriorhodopsin to enhance the membrane potential which drives the ATP synthase. Therefore, a model of the membrane potential generation of bacteriorhodopsin is of central importance to the development of a mathematical model of the bioenergetics of H. salinarum. To measure the current produced by bacteriorhodopsin at different light intensities and clamped voltages, we expressed the gene in Xenopus laevis oocytes. We present current-voltage measurements and a mathematical model of the current-voltage relationship of bacteriorhodopsin and its generation of the membrane potential. The model consists of three intermediate states, the BR, L, and M states, and comparisons between model predictions and experimental data show that the L to M reaction must be inhibited by the membrane potential. The model is not able to fit the current-voltage measurements when only the M to BR phase is membrane potential dependent, while it is able to do so when either only the L to M reaction or both reactions (L to M and M to BR) are membrane potential dependent. We also show that a decay term is necessary for modeling the rate of change of the membrane potential. 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Sequential state generation by model neural networks.

    PubMed Central

    Kleinfeld, D

    1986-01-01

    Sequential patterns of neural output activity form the basis of many biological processes, such as the cyclic pattern of outputs that control locomotion. I show how such sequences can be generated by a class of model neural networks that make defined sets of transitions between selected memory states. Sequence-generating networks depend upon the interplay between two sets of synaptic connections. One set acts to stabilize the network in its current memory state, while the second set, whose action is delayed in time, causes the network to make specified transitions between the memories. The dynamic properties of these networks are described in terms of motion along an energy surface. The performance of the networks, both with intact connections and with noisy or missing connections, is illustrated by numerical examples. In addition, I present a scheme for the recognition of externally generated sequences by these networks. PMID:3467316

  20. Modelling early failures in Space Station Freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Navard, Sharon E.

    1993-01-01

    A major problem encountered in planning for Space Station Freedom is the amount of maintenance that will be required. To predict the failure rates of components and systems aboard Space Station Freedom, the logical approach is to use data obtained from previously flown spacecraft. In order to determine the mechanisms that are driving the failures, models can be proposed, and then checked to see if they adequately fit the observed failure data obtained from a large variety of satellites. For this particular study, failure data and truncation times were available for satellites launched between 1976 and 1984; no data past 1984 was available. The study was limited to electrical subsystems and assemblies, which were studied to determine if they followed a model resulting from a mixture of exponential distributions.

  1. Access Nets: Modeling Access to Physical Spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frohardt, Robert; Chang, Bor-Yuh Evan; Sankaranarayanan, Sriram

    Electronic, software-managed mechanisms using, for example, radio-frequency identification (RFID) cards, enable great flexibility in specifying access control policies to physical spaces. For example, access rights may vary based on time of day or could differ in normal versus emergency situations. With such fine-grained control, understanding and reasoning about what a policy permits becomes surprisingly difficult requiring knowledge of permission levels, spatial layout, and time. In this paper, we present a formal modeling framework, called AccessNets, suitable for describing a combination of access permissions, physical spaces, and temporal constraints. Furthermore, we provide evidence that model checking techniques are effective in reasoning about physical access control policies. We describe our results from a tool that uses reachability analysis to validate security policies.

  2. A generative model for predicting terrorist incidents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Dinesh C.; Verma, Archit; Felmlee, Diane; Pearson, Gavin; Whitaker, Roger

    2017-05-01

    A major concern in coalition peace-support operations is the incidence of terrorist activity. In this paper, we propose a generative model for the occurrence of the terrorist incidents, and illustrate that an increase in diversity, as measured by the number of different social groups to which that an individual belongs, is inversely correlated with the likelihood of a terrorist incident in the society. A generative model is one that can predict the likelihood of events in new contexts, as opposed to statistical models which are used to predict the future incidents based on the history of the incidents in an existing context. Generative models can be useful in planning for persistent Information Surveillance and Reconnaissance (ISR) since they allow an estimation of regions in the theater of operation where terrorist incidents may arise, and thus can be used to better allocate the assignment and deployment of ISR assets. In this paper, we present a taxonomy of terrorist incidents, identify factors related to occurrence of terrorist incidents, and provide a mathematical analysis calculating the likelihood of occurrence of terrorist incidents in three common real-life scenarios arising in peace-keeping operations

  3. Short-term hydroelectric generation model. Model documentation report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-01

    The purpose of this report is to define the objectives of the Energy Information Administration`s (EIA) Short-Term Hydroelectric Generation Model (STHGM), describe its basic approach, and to provide details on the model structure. This report is intended as a reference document for model analysts, users, and the general public. Documentation of the model is in accordance with the EIA`s legal obligation to provide adequate documentation in support of its models.

  4. Data Model Management for Space Information Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, J. Steven; Crichton, Daniel J.; Ramirez, Paul; Mattmann, chris

    2006-01-01

    The Reference Architecture for Space Information Management (RASIM) suggests the separation of the data model from software components to promote the development of flexible information management systems. RASIM allows the data model to evolve independently from the software components and results in a robust implementation that remains viable as the domain changes. However, the development and management of data models within RASIM are difficult and time consuming tasks involving the choice of a notation, the capture of the model, its validation for consistency, and the export of the model for implementation. Current limitations to this approach include the lack of ability to capture comprehensive domain knowledge, the loss of significant modeling information during implementation, the lack of model visualization and documentation capabilities, and exports being limited to one or two schema types. The advent of the Semantic Web and its demand for sophisticated data models has addressed this situation by providing a new level of data model management in the form of ontology tools. In this paper we describe the use of a representative ontology tool to capture and manage a data model for a space information system. The resulting ontology is implementation independent. Novel on-line visualization and documentation capabilities are available automatically, and the ability to export to various schemas can be added through tool plug-ins. In addition, the ingestion of data instances into the ontology allows validation of the ontology and results in a domain knowledge base. Semantic browsers are easily configured for the knowledge base. For example the export of the knowledge base to RDF/XML and RDFS/XML and the use of open source metadata browsers provide ready-made user interfaces that support both text- and facet-based search. This paper will present the Planetary Data System (PDS) data model as a use case and describe the import of the data model into an ontology tool

  5. Data Model Management for Space Information Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, J. Steven; Crichton, Daniel J.; Ramirez, Paul; Mattmann, chris

    2006-01-01

    The Reference Architecture for Space Information Management (RASIM) suggests the separation of the data model from software components to promote the development of flexible information management systems. RASIM allows the data model to evolve independently from the software components and results in a robust implementation that remains viable as the domain changes. However, the development and management of data models within RASIM are difficult and time consuming tasks involving the choice of a notation, the capture of the model, its validation for consistency, and the export of the model for implementation. Current limitations to this approach include the lack of ability to capture comprehensive domain knowledge, the loss of significant modeling information during implementation, the lack of model visualization and documentation capabilities, and exports being limited to one or two schema types. The advent of the Semantic Web and its demand for sophisticated data models has addressed this situation by providing a new level of data model management in the form of ontology tools. In this paper we describe the use of a representative ontology tool to capture and manage a data model for a space information system. The resulting ontology is implementation independent. Novel on-line visualization and documentation capabilities are available automatically, and the ability to export to various schemas can be added through tool plug-ins. In addition, the ingestion of data instances into the ontology allows validation of the ontology and results in a domain knowledge base. Semantic browsers are easily configured for the knowledge base. For example the export of the knowledge base to RDF/XML and RDFS/XML and the use of open source metadata browsers provide ready-made user interfaces that support both text- and facet-based search. This paper will present the Planetary Data System (PDS) data model as a use case and describe the import of the data model into an ontology tool

  6. A survey of space cost models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harwick, W. Thomas

    1998-01-01

    How do cost models help in making economic decisions about space transportation vehicles? To what extent do cost models illuminate the cost impact of decisions due to management, technical, engineering and manufacturing, and cultural factors? What types of cost explanatory variables are used and what are their impacts? We shall first identify cost drivers across several space cost models: PRICE-H, SEER-H, TRANSCOST, and NAFCOM, and then classify them by using a management cost reduction matrix. Second, we shall review cost explanatory variables for vehicle structure, engine system, and process and technical parameters. Third, we will present a simple baseline, consisting of a launch vehicle structure and engine and discuss methodology to develop the inter-model comparison of cost drivers. Fourth, we will present the economic properties of the cost models which include economies of size, schedule, learning curve and process improvement, and economic externalities. The concluding section lists the most important cost drivers and comments on each cost model's strengths.

  7. International Space Station United States Oxygen Generator Development Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, Robert J.; Mason, Richard K.

    2000-01-01

    A life test of a liquid anode feed oxygen generator assembly (OGA) using SPE(R) (United Technologies Corporation, Hamilton Sundstrand Division) membrane technology was terminated in June of 1999. In the total 15,658 hours of operation at MSFC since delivery in 1995, the OGA has produced 2,103 kilograms (kg) (4,632 pounds mass (lbm)) of oxygen, and 263 kg (579 lbm) of hydrogen. Evaluation of cell stack characteristics and oxygen and hydrogen hydrophilic/hydrophobic membrane separators will be discussed.

  8. The Next Generation UV-Visible-IR Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Illingworth, Garth D.

    1990-01-01

    A large 10-16 m passively-cooled, diffraction-limited, filled-aperture space telescope would have unprecedented power for tackling a wide range of the most fundamental astrophysical problems, from the detection of earth-like planets to the structure of galaxies and protogalaxies at redshifts z > 1. The telescope would have a lightweight, segmented primary with active wavefront sensing and control for diffraction-limited performance into the UV. The structure and optics would be passively-cooled to 100 K, lowering the background in the 3-4 micron zodiacal "window" to less than 10-6 of that from the ground. State-of-the-art mosaics of detectors would give diffraction-limited imaging and spectroscopy over a field of > 2 arcmin from 0.3 microns to beyond 10 microns, and nearly 1 arcmin in the UV. The observatory would combine remarkable imaging performance, with resolutions ranging from a few mas in the UV to some 40-60 mas in the zodiacal "window" at 3 microns, and with even greater capability for spectrographic observations of faint and/or low surface brightness objects at the highest spatial resolution. The rationale for such an observatory is discussed in the light of HST and the other Great Observatories, and of expected gains in ground-based telescopes and computing capability. The importance of moving into concept development, and to technology development and evaluation programs, is highlighted within the context of the very long lead times for such missions to come to fruition. The importance of the new optics and structures technologies in breaking away from our current cost curve for large missions, and the potential gains from an enhanced national commitment to space are noted.

  9. Mathematical model of a flexible space shuttle vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, C. A.

    1972-01-01

    The development of a mathematical model of the lateral motion of a flexible space shuttle vehicle during ascent is described. The model was developed to perform control system synthesis using stochastic constrained optimization techniques. The goals of the control system synthesis are to demonstrate the applicability of the techniques and to discover any problems peculiar to the flexible nature of a shuttle vehicle. The equations of motion are derived. A brief description of the generation of numerical data is given. Explicit definitions and numerical values of trajectory data and coefficients appearing in the equations of motion are included.

  10. Nucleosome Spacing Generated by ISWI and CHD1 Remodelers Is Constant Regardless of Nucleosome Density

    PubMed Central

    Lieleg, Corinna; Ketterer, Philip; Nuebler, Johannes; Ludwigsen, Johanna; Gerland, Ulrich; Dietz, Hendrik

    2015-01-01

    Arrays of regularly spaced nucleosomes are a hallmark of chromatin, but it remains unclear how they are generated. Recent genome-wide studies, in vitro and in vivo, showed constant nucleosome spacing even if the histone concentration was experimentally reduced. This counters the long-held assumption that nucleosome density determines spacing and calls for factors keeping spacing constant regardless of nucleosome density. We call this a clamping activity. Here, we show in a purified system that ISWI- and CHD1-type nucleosome remodelers have a clamping activity such that they not only generate regularly spaced nucleosome arrays but also generate constant spacing regardless of nucleosome density. This points to a functionally attractive nucleosome interaction that could be mediated either directly by nucleosome-nucleosome contacts or indirectly through the remodelers. Mutant Drosophila melanogaster ISWI without the HAND-SANT-SLIDE (HSS) domain had no detectable spacing activity even though it is known to remodel and slide nucleosomes. This suggests that the role of ISWI remodelers in generating constant spacing is not just to mediate nucleosome sliding; they actively contribute to the attractive interaction. Additional factors are necessary to set physiological spacing in absolute terms. PMID:25733687

  11. Nucleosome spacing generated by ISWI and CHD1 remodelers is constant regardless of nucleosome density.

    PubMed

    Lieleg, Corinna; Ketterer, Philip; Nuebler, Johannes; Ludwigsen, Johanna; Gerland, Ulrich; Dietz, Hendrik; Mueller-Planitz, Felix; Korber, Philipp

    2015-05-01

    Arrays of regularly spaced nucleosomes are a hallmark of chromatin, but it remains unclear how they are generated. Recent genome-wide studies, in vitro and in vivo, showed constant nucleosome spacing even if the histone concentration was experimentally reduced. This counters the long-held assumption that nucleosome density determines spacing and calls for factors keeping spacing constant regardless of nucleosome density. We call this a clamping activity. Here, we show in a purified system that ISWI- and CHD1-type nucleosome remodelers have a clamping activity such that they not only generate regularly spaced nucleosome arrays but also generate constant spacing regardless of nucleosome density. This points to a functionally attractive nucleosome interaction that could be mediated either directly by nucleosome-nucleosome contacts or indirectly through the remodelers. Mutant Drosophila melanogaster ISWI without the Hand-Sant-Slide (HSS) domain had no detectable spacing activity even though it is known to remodel and slide nucleosomes. This suggests that the role of ISWI remodelers in generating constant spacing is not just to mediate nucleosome sliding; they actively contribute to the attractive interaction. Additional factors are necessary to set physiological spacing in absolute terms.

  12. Entropy Generation/Availability Energy Loss Analysis Inside MIT Gas Spring and "Two Space" Test Rigs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ebiana, Asuquo B.; Savadekar, Rupesh T.; Patel, Kaushal V.

    2006-01-01

    The results of the entropy generation and availability energy loss analysis under conditions of oscillating pressure and oscillating helium gas flow in two Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) test rigs piston-cylinder and piston-cylinder-heat exchanger are presented. Two solution domains, the gas spring (single-space) in the piston-cylinder test rig and the gas spring + heat exchanger (two-space) in the piston-cylinder-heat exchanger test rig are of interest. Sage and CFD-ACE+ commercial numerical codes are used to obtain 1-D and 2-D computer models, respectively, of each of the two solution domains and to simulate the oscillating gas flow and heat transfer effects in these domains. Second law analysis is used to characterize the entropy generation and availability energy losses inside the two solution domains. Internal and external entropy generation and availability energy loss results predicted by Sage and CFD-ACE+ are compared. Thermodynamic loss analysis of simple systems such as the MIT test rigs are often useful to understand some important features of complex pattern forming processes in more complex systems like the Stirling engine. This study is aimed at improving numerical codes for the prediction of thermodynamic losses via the development of a loss post-processor. The incorporation of loss post-processors in Stirling engine numerical codes will facilitate Stirling engine performance optimization. Loss analysis using entropy-generation rates due to heat and fluid flow is a relatively new technique for assessing component performance. It offers a deep insight into the flow phenomena, allows a more exact calculation of losses than is possible with traditional means involving the application of loss correlations and provides an effective tool for improving component and overall system performance.

  13. Space Laboratory on a Table Top: A Next Generative ECLSS design and diagnostic tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramachandran, N.

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the development plan for a comprehensive research and diagnostic tool for aspects of advanced life support systems in space-based laboratories. Specifically it aims to build a high fidelity tabletop model that can be used for the purpose of risk mitigation, failure mode analysis, contamination tracking, and testing reliability. We envision a comprehensive approach involving experimental work coupled with numerical simulation to develop this diagnostic tool. It envisions a 10% scale transparent model of a space platform such as the International Space Station that operates with water or a specific matched index of refraction liquid as the working fluid. This allows the scaling of a 10 ft x 10 ft x 10 ft room with air flow to 1 ft x 1 ft x 1 ft tabletop model with water/liquid flow. Dynamic similitude for this length scale dictates model velocities to be 67% of full-scale and thereby the time scale of the model to represent 15% of the full- scale system; meaning identical processes in the model are completed in 15% of the full- scale-time. The use of an index matching fluid (fluid that matches the refractive index of cast acrylic, the model material) allows making the entire model (with complex internal geometry) transparent and hence conducive to non-intrusive optical diagnostics. So using such a system one can test environment control parameters such as core flows (axial flows), cross flows (from registers and diffusers), potential problem areas such as flow short circuits, inadequate oxygen content, build up of other gases beyond desirable levels, test mixing processes within the system at local nodes or compartments and assess the overall system performance. The system allows quantitative measurements of contaminants introduced in the system and allows testing and optimizing the tracking process and removal of contaminants. The envisaged system will be modular and hence flexible for quick configuration change and subsequent testing. The data

  14. Space Laboratory on a Table Top: A Next Generative ECLSS design and diagnostic tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramachandran, N.

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the development plan for a comprehensive research and diagnostic tool for aspects of advanced life support systems in space-based laboratories. Specifically it aims to build a high fidelity tabletop model that can be used for the purpose of risk mitigation, failure mode analysis, contamination tracking, and testing reliability. We envision a comprehensive approach involving experimental work coupled with numerical simulation to develop this diagnostic tool. It envisions a 10% scale transparent model of a space platform such as the International Space Station that operates with water or a specific matched index of refraction liquid as the working fluid. This allows the scaling of a 10 ft x 10 ft x 10 ft room with air flow to 1 ft x 1 ft x 1 ft tabletop model with water/liquid flow. Dynamic similitude for this length scale dictates model velocities to be 67% of full-scale and thereby the time scale of the model to represent 15% of the full- scale system; meaning identical processes in the model are completed in 15% of the full- scale-time. The use of an index matching fluid (fluid that matches the refractive index of cast acrylic, the model material) allows making the entire model (with complex internal geometry) transparent and hence conducive to non-intrusive optical diagnostics. So using such a system one can test environment control parameters such as core flows (axial flows), cross flows (from registers and diffusers), potential problem areas such as flow short circuits, inadequate oxygen content, build up of other gases beyond desirable levels, test mixing processes within the system at local nodes or compartments and assess the overall system performance. The system allows quantitative measurements of contaminants introduced in the system and allows testing and optimizing the tracking process and removal of contaminants. The envisaged system will be modular and hence flexible for quick configuration change and subsequent testing. The data

  15. Recommendations to Improve Space Projection Models and University Space Usage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stigall, Sam W.

    2007-01-01

    In today"s economy, public university administrators need to reflect on current practices for reporting and projecting space requirements to government entities as the cost of constructing new facilities or renovating space rises while income from legislative appropriations diminishes. As stewards of public buildings and funds, institutions…

  16. Recommendations to Improve Space Projection Models and University Space Usage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stigall, Sam W.

    2007-01-01

    In today"s economy, public university administrators need to reflect on current practices for reporting and projecting space requirements to government entities as the cost of constructing new facilities or renovating space rises while income from legislative appropriations diminishes. As stewards of public buildings and funds, institutions…

  17. Computer modeling of thermoelectric generator performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chmielewski, A. B.; Shields, V.

    1982-01-01

    Features of the DEGRA 2 computer code for simulating the operations of a spacecraft thermoelectric generator are described. The code models the physical processes occurring during operation. Input variables include the thermoelectric couple geometry and composition, the thermoelectric materials' properties, interfaces and insulation in the thermopile, the heat source characteristics, mission trajectory, and generator electrical requirements. Time steps can be specified and sublimation of the leg and hot shoe is accounted for, as are shorts between legs. Calculations are performed for conduction, Peltier, Thomson, and Joule heating, the cold junction can be adjusted for solar radition, and the legs of the thermoelectric couple are segmented to enhance the approximation accuracy. A trial run covering 18 couple modules yielded data with 0.3% accuracy with regard to test data. The model has been successful with selenide materials, SiGe, and SiN4, with output of all critical operational variables.

  18. Computer modeling of thermoelectric generator performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chmielewski, A. B.; Shields, V.

    1982-01-01

    Features of the DEGRA 2 computer code for simulating the operations of a spacecraft thermoelectric generator are described. The code models the physical processes occurring during operation. Input variables include the thermoelectric couple geometry and composition, the thermoelectric materials' properties, interfaces and insulation in the thermopile, the heat source characteristics, mission trajectory, and generator electrical requirements. Time steps can be specified and sublimation of the leg and hot shoe is accounted for, as are shorts between legs. Calculations are performed for conduction, Peltier, Thomson, and Joule heating, the cold junction can be adjusted for solar radition, and the legs of the thermoelectric couple are segmented to enhance the approximation accuracy. A trial run covering 18 couple modules yielded data with 0.3% accuracy with regard to test data. The model has been successful with selenide materials, SiGe, and SiN4, with output of all critical operational variables.

  19. A Multistep Chaotic Model for Municipal Solid Waste Generation Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jingwei; He, Jiaying

    2014-01-01

    Abstract In this study, a univariate local chaotic model is proposed to make one-step and multistep forecasts for daily municipal solid waste (MSW) generation in Seattle, Washington. For MSW generation prediction with long history data, this forecasting model was created based on a nonlinear dynamic method called phase-space reconstruction. Compared with other nonlinear predictive models, such as artificial neural network (ANN) and partial least square–support vector machine (PLS-SVM), and a commonly used linear seasonal autoregressive integrated moving average (sARIMA) model, this method has demonstrated better prediction accuracy from 1-step ahead prediction to 14-step ahead prediction assessed by both mean absolute percentage error (MAPE) and root mean square error (RMSE). Max error, MAPE, and RMSE show that chaotic models were more reliable than the other three models. As chaotic models do not involve random walk, their performance does not vary while ANN and PLS-SVM make different forecasts in each trial. Moreover, this chaotic model was less time consuming than ANN and PLS-SVM models. PMID:25125942

  20. Modeling the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waluschka, Eugene; Pedersen, Trace R.; McNamara, Paul

    2005-01-01

    Creating an optical model of the Laser Interferometer Space antenna which can be used to predict optical sensitivities and set tolerances sufficiently well such that picometer level displacements can be reliably seen poses certain challenges. In part, because the distances between key optical elements, the proof masses, are constantly changing, at speeds of meters/second, the separation between them is about 5 million kilometers and a contributing factor to optical jitter is the self-gravity of the spacecraft. A discussion of the current state and future approach(s) to the creation of such an optical model will be presented.

  1. Cosmological model from emergence of space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zi-Liang; Ai, Wen-Yuan; Chen, Hua; Deng, Jian-Bo

    2015-07-01

    Many studies have been carried out since Padmanabhan proposed that the cosmic acceleration can be understood from the perspective that spacetime dynamics is an emergent phenomenon. Motivated by such a new paradigm, we first study the de Sitter universe from emergence of space. Next, we investigate general universes and then narrow down our discussion to one universe, with a detailed discussion of the possibility of describing our real universe classically. Furthermore, a constraint on H t and an estimated value of Ω˜Λ (caused by ρvac) can be derived from our model; a comparison with experiments is also presented. The results show the validity of our model.

  2. Design-Tradeoff Model For Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlain, Robert G.; Smith, Jeffrey L.; Borden, Chester S.; Deshpande, Govind K.; Fox, George; Duquette, William H.; Dilullo, Larry A.; Seeley, Larry; Shishko, Robert

    1990-01-01

    System Design Tradeoff Model (SDTM) computer program produces information which helps to enforce consistency of design objectives throughout system. Mathematical model of set of possible designs for Space Station Freedom. Program finds particular design enabling station to provide specified amounts of resources to users at lowest total (or life-cycle) cost. Compares alternative design concepts by changing set of possible designs, while holding specified services to users constant, and then comparing costs. Finally, both costs and services varied simultaneously when comparing different designs. Written in Turbo C 2.0.

  3. On the Universal Generation of Mobility Models

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-14

    topological vi- sualizations; (2) a simulation environment ( OPNET [11], NS [19] etc.) to enable the application of UMMF-based models for studying and...automatic parameter generation, and parameter range calibra- tion; (e) expanding UMMF interfaces to simulation environ- ments such as NS and OPNET ...10] R. Ierusalimschy. Programming in Lua. Lua.org, 2006. [11] O. Inc. Opnet simulator. http://www.opnet.com/. [12] A. P. Jardosh, E. M. Belding

  4. Models Required to Mitigate Impacts of Space Weather on Space Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barth, Janet L.

    2003-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation attempts to develop a model of factors which need to be considered in the design and construction of spacecraft to lessen the effects of space weather on these vehicles. Topics considered include: space environments and effects, radiation environments and effects, space weather drivers, space weather models, climate models, solar proton activity and mission design for the GOES mission. The authors conclude that space environment models need to address issues from mission planning through operations and a program to develop and validate authoritative space environment models for application to spacecraft design does not exist at this time.

  5. [Biomechanical modelling of cerebral aneurysm generation].

    PubMed

    Munteanu, Fl; Poeată, I

    2009-01-01

    The mechanisms of production for these aneurysms were not very well explained, therefore, the paper presents the conditions and steps in this vascular deficiency generation. The physiological overpressures were evaluated and the role of the compliance and hydraulic strength was determined by using windkessel model. The mathematical model was performed on the internal carotid artery and it reveals the role of blood vessel compliance and the increasing of hydraulic vascular-parietal resistance, caused by the contractile dysfunctions of pre-capillary sphincters during the appearance of sac-like and physiological forms of aneurisms.

  6. Gas Foil Bearings for Space Propulsion Nuclear Electric Power Generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Samuel A.; DellaCorte, Christopher

    2006-01-01

    The choice of power conversion technology is critical in directing the design of a space vehicle for the future NASA mission to Mars. One candidate design consists of a foil bearing supported turbo alternator driven by a helium-xenon gas mixture heated by a nuclear reactor. The system is a closed-loop, meaning there is a constant volume of process fluid that is sealed from the environment. Therefore, foil bearings are proposed due to their ability to use the process gas as a lubricant. As such, the rotor dynamics of a foil bearing supported rotor is an important factor in the eventual design. The current work describes a rotor dynamic analysis to assess the viability of such a system. A brief technology background, assumptions, analyses, and conclusions are discussed in this report. The results indicate that a foil bearing supported turbo alternator is possible, although more work will be needed to gain knowledge about foil bearing behavior in helium-xenon gas.

  7. AURORA: The Next Generation Space Weather Sensor for NPOESS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paxton, L.; Morrison, D.; Santo, A.; Ogorzalek, B.; Goldsten, J.; Boldt, J.; Kil, H.; Zhang, Y.; Demajistre, R.; Wolven, B.; Meng, C.

    2005-12-01

    The AURORA sensor slated for flight on the NPOESS satellites represents the culmination of over 20 years of experience at JHU/APL in the design, manufacture, flight, operation and analysis of compact, cost-effective far ultraviolet sensors for space weather data collection. The far ultraviolet covers the spectral range from about 115 to 185 nm. This region is ideal for observations of the upper atmosphere because, at these wavelengths, the lower atmosphere and Earth's surface are black. AURORA will observe the mid- and low-latitude F-region ionosphere, the auroral E-region ionosphere, the day thermosphere composition, auroral energy deposition and map ionospheric irregularities. AURORA implements the flight-proven design derived from SSUSI on the DMSP Block 5D spacecraft and GUVI on the NASA TIMED spacecraft. These instruments have provided the instrument and algorithm heritage for NPOESS/AURORA. In this talk the performance capabilities of the AURORA instrument will be summarized along with the design of the instrument and algorithms. Example products will be shown for each of the measurement regimes. We acknowldge support from DMSP and NASA and the collaboration with our science colleagues at the Aerospace Corporation (Paul Straus, Jim Hecht, Dave McKenzie, and Andy Christensen) and Computational Physics (Doug Strickland, Hal Knight, and Scott Evans) and Naval Research Laboratory (Robert Meier, Mike Picone, Stefan Thonnard, Pat Dandenault, and Andy Stefan) and our colleagues at APL (Michele Weiss, Doug Holland, Bill Wood, and Jim Eichert) among others.

  8. Automatic building information model query generation

    DOE PAGES

    Jiang, Yufei; Yu, Nan; Ming, Jiang; ...

    2015-12-01

    Energy efficient building design and construction calls for extensive collaboration between different subfields of the Architecture, Engineering and Construction (AEC) community. Performing building design and construction engineering raises challenges on data integration and software interoperability. Using Building Information Modeling (BIM) data hub to host and integrate building models is a promising solution to address those challenges, which can ease building design information management. However, the partial model query mechanism of current BIM data hub collaboration model has several limitations, which prevents designers and engineers to take advantage of BIM. To address this problem, we propose a general and effective approachmore » to generate query code based on a Model View Definition (MVD). This approach is demonstrated through a software prototype called QueryGenerator. In conclusion, by demonstrating a case study using multi-zone air flow analysis, we show how our approach and tool can help domain experts to use BIM to drive building design with less labour and lower overhead cost.« less

  9. Computational Modeling of Vortex Generators for Turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chima, R. V.

    2002-01-01

    In this work computational models were developed and used to investigate applications of vortex generators (VGs) to turbomachinery. The work was aimed at increasing the efficiency of compressor components designed for the NASA Ultra Efficient Engine Technology (UEET) program. Initial calculations were used to investigate the physical behavior of VGs. A parametric study of the effects of VG height was done using 3-D calculations of isolated VGs. A body force model was developed to simulate the effects of VGs without requiring complicated grids. The model was calibrated using 2-D calculations of the VG vanes and was validated using the 3-D results. Then three applications of VGs to a compressor rotor and stator were investigated: 1) The results of the 3-D calculations were used to simulate the use of small casing VGs used to generate rotor preswirl or counterswirl. Computed performance maps were used to evaluate the effects of VGs. 2) The body force model was used to simulate large part-span splitters on the casing ahead of the stator. Computed loss buckets showed the effects of the VGs. 3) The body force model was also used to investigate the use of tiny VGs on the stator suction surface for controlling secondary flows. Near-surface particle traces and exit loss profiles were used to evaluate the effects of the VGs.

  10. Generating scientific models of knowledge using arcs.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jinshil; Pressler, Susan J; Jones, Josette; Graves, Judith R

    2008-01-01

    Systematic approaches are needed to review literature on nutrition in heart failure for its scientific merit, relevance, and usefulness and identify directions for future research. To evaluate the feasibility of arcs (J.R.G., Indianapolis, Indiana), a computer program for managing data from literature and modeling knowledge, the objectives were to conduct an integrative review of 10 studies of nutrition in heart failure and generate scientific models of knowledge using arcs. A unit of knowledge in arcs is 2 variables linked by a statistical relationship. The computer program arcs categorized variables and relationships found in the 10 explanatory observational studies. It also provided a scientific model for further empirical testing. The computer program arcs aggregated the following: 104 dependent and 93 independent operational variables and 60 associational, 16 predictive, 15 structural, 1 descriptive, and 85 difference relationships. A direct model produced by arcs postulated a structural relationship between cachexia and 18-month mortality, independent of age or New York Heart Association classification, which can be tested as a path theoretical model. The computer program arcs appeared to be feasible for conducting an integrative review of nutrition in heart failure. A larger, representative set of literature will enable generation of knowledge and identification of gaps and inconsistencies in findings.

  11. Study of optical inter-orbit communication technology for next generation space data-relay satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanada, Tatsuyuki; Yamakawa, Shiro; Kohata, Hiroki

    2011-03-01

    JAXA has made efforts to build the next generation space data relay network. The inter-orbit optical links are essential segments for such a network in order to fulfill requirements of high resolution earth observation satellite applications (such as Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS) follow-on missions by JAXA) and manned space flight missions. JAXA's R&D activities for advanced optical communication terminals are introduced. The target of the terminals is to establish the optical data relay link between the LEO user satellite and the GEO data relay satellite up to 2.5 Gbps of data-rate. JAXA has started the development of a Bread Board Model (BBM) of the terminal in order to evaluate the feasibility of the terminal. The terminal is aimed to be small and light-weighted, which is helpful for an onboard capability of the LEO satellite. Furthermore, the modulation of carrier and the acquisition and tracking sequence are selected in order to achieve the interoperability of optical space communication systems. We recently study the feasibility of the acquisition and tracking sensor, the waveguide high power amplifier for a transmitter and the homodyne coherent receiver etc. in the development of BBM.

  12. Computerized design and generation of space-variant holographic filters. II - Applications of space-variant filters to optical computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ambs, P.; Fainman, Y.; Esener, S.; Lee, S. H.

    1988-01-01

    Holographic optical elements (HOEs) of space-variant impulse response have been designed and generated using a computerized optical system. HOEs made of dichromated gelatin have been produced and used for spatial light modulator defect removal and optical interconnects. Experimental performance and characteristics are presented.

  13. Modeling and Grid Generation of Iced Airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vickerman, Mary B.; Baez, Marivell; Braun, Donald C.; Hackenberg, Anthony W.; Pennline, James A.; Schilling, Herbert W.

    2007-01-01

    SmaggIce Version 2.0 is a software toolkit for geometric modeling and grid generation for two-dimensional, singleand multi-element, clean and iced airfoils. A previous version of SmaggIce was described in Preparing and Analyzing Iced Airfoils, NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 28, No. 8 (August 2004), page 32. To recapitulate: Ice shapes make it difficult to generate quality grids around airfoils, yet these grids are essential for predicting ice-induced complex flow. This software efficiently creates high-quality structured grids with tools that are uniquely tailored for various ice shapes. SmaggIce Version 2.0 significantly enhances the previous version primarily by adding the capability to generate grids for multi-element airfoils. This version of the software is an important step in streamlining the aeronautical analysis of ice airfoils using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) tools. The user may prepare the ice shape, define the flow domain, decompose it into blocks, generate grids, modify/divide/merge blocks, and control grid density and smoothness. All these steps may be performed efficiently even for the difficult glaze and rime ice shapes. Providing the means to generate highly controlled grids near rough ice, the software includes the creation of a wrap-around block (called the "viscous sublayer block"), which is a thin, C-type block around the wake line and iced airfoil. For multi-element airfoils, the software makes use of grids that wrap around and fill in the areas between the viscous sub-layer blocks for all elements that make up the airfoil. A scripting feature records the history of interactive steps, which can be edited and replayed later to produce other grids. Using this version of SmaggIce, ice shape handling and grid generation can become a practical engineering process, rather than a laborious research effort.

  14. Space station architectural elements model study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, T. C.; Spencer, J. S.; Rocha, C. J.; Kahn, E.; Cliffton, E.; Carr, C.

    1987-01-01

    The worksphere, a user controlled computer workstation enclosure, was expanded in scope to an engineering workstation suitable for use on the Space Station as a crewmember desk in orbit. The concept was also explored as a module control station capable of enclosing enough equipment to control the station from each module. The concept has commercial potential for the Space Station and surface workstation applications. The central triangular beam interior configuration was expanded and refined to seven different beam configurations. These included triangular on center, triangular off center, square, hexagonal small, hexagonal medium, hexagonal large and the H beam. Each was explored with some considerations as to the utilities and a suggested evaluation factor methodology was presented. Scale models of each concept were made. The models were helpful in researching the seven beam configurations and determining the negative residual (unused) volume of each configuration. A flexible hardware evaluation factor concept is proposed which could be helpful in evaluating interior space volumes from a human factors point of view. A magnetic version with all the graphics is available from the author or the technical monitor.

  15. Generating Solid Models from Topographical Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, John W.

    2005-01-01

    A method of generating solid models of terrain involves the conversion of topographical data into a form useable by a rapid-prototyping (RP) machine. The method was developed to enable the use of the RP machine to make solid models of Martian terrain from Mars Orbiter laser-altimeter topographical data. The method is equally applicable to the generation of models of the terrains of other astronomical bodies, including other planets, asteroids, and Earth. Topographical data describe a terrain in terms of a set of three-dimensional coordinates [e.g., Cartesian (x,y,z) or polar (latitude, longitude, radius) coordinates] of points or nodes on the terrain surface. The input data for the RP machines are required to provide a three-dimensional description, not of a single surface, but of a volume in this case, a ground volume that underlies the terrain surface. The description is required to be in the form of triangular elements that connect the nodes of all the surfaces and that completely bound the volume, with no open areas, no overlap of triangles, and no extraneous geometric elements. The software used in the present model-generation method was written in IDL - an advanced programming language that affords a number of tools, including subroutines that triangularize surfaces. The software creates a volume from the topographical surface data by adding sides to the edges of the terrain surface and joining the sides with a bottom surface. Each of the sides is triangularized by use of IDL subroutines, and then the software searches for extraneous elements and removes them. Topographical data are usually presented in a grid corresponding to polar coordinates, so that a model generated from such data is equivalent to a topographical map in Mercator projection. However an RP machine is fully capable of including the curvature of a planetary body in a model that it makes. Therefore, the software also offers a capability to transform the topographical data to a projection onto

  16. Next Generation Carbon-Nitrogen Dynamics Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, C.; Fisher, R. A.; Vrugt, J. A.; Wullschleger, S. D.; McDowell, N. G.

    2012-12-01

    Nitrogen is a key regulator of vegetation dynamics, soil carbon release, and terrestrial carbon cycles. Thus, to assess energy impacts on the global carbon cycle and future climates, it is critical that we have a mechanism-based and data-calibrated nitrogen model that simulates nitrogen limitation upon both above and belowground carbon dynamics. In this study, we developed a next generation nitrogen-carbon dynamic model within the NCAR Community Earth System Model (CESM). This next generation nitrogen-carbon dynamic model utilized 1) a mechanistic model of nitrogen limitation on photosynthesis with nitrogen trade-offs among light absorption, electron transport, carboxylation, respiration and storage; 2) an optimal leaf nitrogen model that links soil nitrogen availability and leaf nitrogen content; and 3) an ecosystem demography (ED) model that simulates the growth and light competition of tree cohorts and is currently coupled to CLM. Our three test cases with changes in CO2 concentration, growing temperature and radiation demonstrate the model's ability to predict the impact of altered environmental conditions on nitrogen allocations. Currently, we are testing the model against different datasets including soil fertilization and Free Air CO2 enrichment (FACE) experiments across different forest types. We expect that our calibrated model will considerably improve our understanding and predictability of vegetation-climate interactions.itrogen allocation model evaluations. The figure shows the scatter plots of predicted and measured Vc,max and Jmax scaled to 25 oC (i.e.,Vc,max25 and Jmax25) at elevated CO2 (570 ppm, test case one), reduced radiation in canopy (0.1-0.9 of the radiation at the top of canopy, test case two) and reduced growing temperature (15oC, test case three). The model is first calibrated using control data under ambient CO2 (370 ppm), radiation at the top of the canopy (621 μmol photon/m2/s), the normal growing temperature (30oC). The fitted model

  17. Geant4 models for space radiation environment.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivantchenko, Anton; Nieminen, Petteri; Incerti, Sebastien; Santin, Giovanni; Ivantchenko, Vladimir; Grichine, Vladimir; Allison, John

    The space radiation environment includes wide varieties of particles from electrons to heavy ions. In order to correctly predict the dose received by astronauts and devices the simulation models must have good applicability and produce accurate results from 10 MeV/u up to 10 GeV/u, where the most radioactive hazardous particles are present in the spectra. Appropriate models should also provide a good description of electromagnetic interactions down to very low energies (10 eV/u - 10 MeV/u) for understanding the damage mechanisms due to long-term low doses. Predictions of biological dose during long interplanetary journeys also need models for hadronic interactions of energetic heavy ions extending higher energies (10 GeV/u - 100 GeV/u, but possibly up to 1 TeV/u). Geant4 is a powerful toolkit, which in some areas well surpasses the needs from space radiation studies, while in other areas is being developed and/or validated to properly cover the modelling requirements outlined above. Our activities in ESA projects deal with the research and development of both Geant4 hadronic and electromagnetic physics. Recently the scope of verification tests and benchmarks has been extended. Hadronic tests and benchmarks run proton, pion, and ion interactions with matter at various energies. In the Geant4 hadronic sub-libraries, the most accurate cross sections have been identified and selected as a default for all particle types relevant to space applications. Significant developments were carried out for ion/ion interaction models. These now allow one to perform Geant4 simulations for all particle types and energies relevant to space applications. For the validation of ion models the hadronic testing suite for ion interactions was significantly extended. In this work the results of benchmarking versus data in a wide energy range for projectile protons and ions will be shown and discussed. Here we show results of the tests runs and their precision. Recommendations for Geant4

  18. Modeling utilization distributions in space and time

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Keating, K.A.; Cherry, S.

    2009-01-01

    W. Van Winkle defined the utilization distribution (UD) as a probability density that gives an animal's relative frequency of occurrence in a two-dimensional (x, y) plane. We extend Van Winkle's work by redefining the UD as the relative frequency distribution of an animal's occurrence in all four dimensions of space and time. We then describe a product kernel model estimation method, devising a novel kernel from the wrapped Cauchy distribution to handle circularly distributed temporal covariates, such as day of year. Using Monte Carlo simulations of animal movements in space and time, we assess estimator performance. Although not unbiased, the product kernel method yields models highly correlated (Pearson's r - 0.975) with true probabilities of occurrence and successfully captures temporal variations in density of occurrence. In an empirical example, we estimate the expected UD in three dimensions (x, y, and t) for animals belonging to each of two distinct bighorn sheep {Ovis canadensis) social groups in Glacier National Park, Montana, USA. Results show the method can yield ecologically informative models that successfully depict temporal variations in density of occurrence for a seasonally migratory species. Some implications of this new approach to UD modeling are discussed. ?? 2009 by the Ecological Society of America.

  19. Model reduction for Space Station Freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Trevor

    1992-01-01

    Model reduction is an important practical problem in the control of flexible spacecraft, and a considerable amount of work has been carried out on this topic. Two of the best known methods developed are modal truncation and internal balancing. Modal truncation is simple to implement but can give poor results when the structure possesses clustered natural frequencies, as often occurs in practice. Balancing avoids this problem but has the disadvantages of high computational cost, possible numerical sensitivity problems, and no physical interpretation for the resulting balanced 'modes'. The purpose of this work is to examine the performance of the subsystem balancing technique developed by the investigator when tested on a realistic flexible space structure, in this case a model of the Permanently Manned Configuration (PMC) of Space Station Freedom. This method retains the desirable properties of standard balancing while overcoming the three difficulties listed above. It achieves this by first decomposing the structural model into subsystems of highly correlated modes. Each subsystem is approximately uncorrelated from all others, so balancing them separately and then combining yields comparable results to balancing the entire structure directly. The operation count reduction obtained by the new technique is considerable: a factor of roughly r(exp 2) if the system decomposes into r equal subsystems. Numerical accuracy is also improved significantly, as the matrices being operated on are of reduced dimension, and the modes of the reduced-order model now have a clear physical interpretation; they are, to first order, linear combinations of repeated-frequency modes.

  20. Modeling utilization distributions in space and time.

    PubMed

    Keating, Kim A; Cherry, Steve

    2009-07-01

    W. Van Winkle defined the utilization distribution (UD) as a probability density that gives an animal's relative frequency of occurrence in a two-dimensional (x, y) plane. We extend Van Winkle's work by redefining the UD as the relative frequency distribution of an animal's occurrence in all four dimensions of space and time. We then describe a product kernel model estimation method, devising a novel kernel from the wrapped Cauchy distribution to handle circularly distributed temporal covariates, such as day of year. Using Monte Carlo simulations of animal movements in space and time, we assess estimator performance. Although not unbiased, the product kernel method yields models highly correlated (Pearson's r = 0.975) with true probabilities of occurrence and successfully captures temporal variations in density of occurrence. In an empirical example, we estimate the expected UD in three dimensions (x, y, and t) for animals belonging to each of two distinct bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis) social groups in Glacier National Park, Montana, USA. Results show the method can yield ecologically informative models that successfully depict temporal variations in density of occurrence for a seasonally migratory species. Some implications of this new approach to UD modeling are discussed.

  1. Mathematical models for space shuttle ground systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tory, E. G.

    1985-01-01

    Math models are a series of algorithms, comprised of algebraic equations and Boolean Logic. At Kennedy Space Center, math models for the Space Shuttle Systems are performed utilizing the Honeywell 66/80 digital computers, Modcomp II/45 Minicomputers and special purpose hardware simulators (MicroComputers). The Shuttle Ground Operations Simulator operating system provides the language formats, subroutines, queueing schemes, execution modes and support software to write, maintain and execute the models. The ground systems presented consist primarily of the Liquid Oxygen and Liquid Hydrogen Cryogenic Propellant Systems, as well as liquid oxygen External Tank Gaseous Oxygen Vent Hood/Arm and the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) High Bay Cells. The purpose of math modeling is to simulate the ground hardware systems and to provide an environment for testing in a benign mode. This capability allows the engineers to check out application software for loading and launching the vehicle, and to verify the Checkout, Control, & Monitor Subsystem within the Launch Processing System. It is also used to train operators and to predict system response and status in various configurations (normal operations, emergency and contingent operations), including untried configurations or those too dangerous to try under real conditions, i.e., failure modes.

  2. Dynamic Model Averaging in Large Model Spaces Using Dynamic Occam's Window.

    PubMed

    Onorante, Luca; Raftery, Adrian E

    2016-01-01

    Bayesian model averaging has become a widely used approach to accounting for uncertainty about the structural form of the model generating the data. When data arrive sequentially and the generating model can change over time, Dynamic Model Averaging (DMA) extends model averaging to deal with this situation. Often in macroeconomics, however, many candidate explanatory variables are available and the number of possible models becomes too large for DMA to be applied in its original form. We propose a new method for this situation which allows us to perform DMA without considering the whole model space, but using a subset of models and dynamically optimizing the choice of models at each point in time. This yields a dynamic form of Occam's window. We evaluate the method in the context of the problem of nowcasting GDP in the Euro area. We find that its forecasting performance compares well with that of other methods.

  3. Dynamic Model Averaging in Large Model Spaces Using Dynamic Occam’s Window*

    PubMed Central

    Onorante, Luca; Raftery, Adrian E.

    2015-01-01

    Bayesian model averaging has become a widely used approach to accounting for uncertainty about the structural form of the model generating the data. When data arrive sequentially and the generating model can change over time, Dynamic Model Averaging (DMA) extends model averaging to deal with this situation. Often in macroeconomics, however, many candidate explanatory variables are available and the number of possible models becomes too large for DMA to be applied in its original form. We propose a new method for this situation which allows us to perform DMA without considering the whole model space, but using a subset of models and dynamically optimizing the choice of models at each point in time. This yields a dynamic form of Occam’s window. We evaluate the method in the context of the problem of nowcasting GDP in the Euro area. We find that its forecasting performance compares well with that of other methods. PMID:26917859

  4. Space Station - A model for future cooperation in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raney, W. P.

    1986-01-01

    Advances in the ability to operate in, and thus to exploit, space have come more rapidly than almost anything else that has been done. From the beginning, nations have engaged in both cooperation and competition, from the stage of adventurous exploration to the current routine commercial activity. The Space Station program serves as a focus for the free world to move forward together, sharing both risks and benefits during the initial, formative period of an entirely new level of capability.

  5. Model documentation report: Short-Term Hydroelectric Generation Model

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    The purpose of this report is to define the objectives of the Short- Term Hydroelectric Generation Model (STHGM), describe its basic approach, and to provide details on the model structure. This report is intended as a reference document for model analysts, users, and the general public. Documentation of the model is in accordance with the Energy Information Administration`s (AYE) legal obligation to provide adequate documentation in support of its models (Public Law 94-385, Section 57.b.2). The STHGM performs a short-term (18 to 27- month) forecast of hydroelectric generation in the United States using an autoregressive integrated moving average (UREMIA) time series model with precipitation as an explanatory variable. The model results are used as input for the short-term Energy Outlook.

  6. Computer image generation: Reconfigurability as a strategy in high fidelity space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartholomew, Michael J.

    1989-01-01

    The demand for realistic, high fidelity, computer image generation systems to support space simulation is well established. However, as the number and diversity of space applications increase, the complexity and cost of computer image generation systems also increase. One strategy used to harmonize cost with varied requirements is establishment of a reconfigurable image generation system that can be adapted rapidly and easily to meet new and changing requirements. The reconfigurability strategy through the life cycle of system conception, specification, design, implementation, operation, and support for high fidelity computer image generation systems are discussed. The discussion is limited to those issues directly associated with reconfigurability and adaptability of a specialized scene generation system in a multi-faceted space applications environment. Examples and insights gained through the recent development and installation of the Improved Multi-function Scene Generation System at Johnson Space Center, Systems Engineering Simulator are reviewed and compared with current simulator industry practices. The results are clear; the strategy of reconfigurability applied to space simulation requirements provides a viable path to supporting diverse applications with an adaptable computer image generation system.

  7. Cognitive engineering models in space systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, Christine M.

    1993-01-01

    NASA space systems, including mission operations on the ground and in space, are complex, dynamic, predominantly automated systems in which the human operator is a supervisory controller. Models of cognitive functions in complex systems are needed to describe human performance and form the theoretical basis of operator workstation design, including displays, controls, and decision aids. Currently, there several candidate modeling methodologies. They include the Rasmussen abstraction/aggregation hierarchy and decision ladder, the goal-means network, the problem behavior graph, and the operator function model. The research conducted under the sponsorship of this grant focuses on the extension of the theoretical structure of the operator function model and its application to NASA Johnson mission operations and space station applications. The initial portion of this research consists of two parts. The first is a series of technical exchanges between NASA Johnson and Georgia Tech researchers. The purpose is to identify candidate applications for the current operator function model; prospects include mission operations and the Data Management System Testbed. The second portion will address extensions of the operator function model to tailor it to the specific needs of Johnson applications. At this point, we have accomplished two things. During a series of conversations with JSC researchers, we have defined the technical goal of the research supported by this grant to be the structural definition of the operator function model and its computer implementation, OFMspert. Both the OFM and OFMspert have matured to the point that they require infrastructure to facilitate use by researchers not involved in the evolution of the tools. The second accomplishment this year was the identification of the Payload Deployment and Retrieval System (PDRS) as a candidate system for the case study. In conjunction with government and contractor personnel in the Human-Computer Interaction Lab

  8. Space Partitioning for Privacy Enabled 3D City Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippovska, Y.; Wichmann, A.; Kada, M.

    2016-10-01

    Due to recent technological progress, data capturing and processing of highly detailed (3D) data has become extensive. And despite all prospects of potential uses, data that includes personal living spaces and public buildings can also be considered as a serious intrusion into people's privacy and a threat to security. It becomes especially critical if data is visible by the general public. Thus, a compromise is needed between open access to data and privacy requirements which can be very different for each application. As privacy is a complex and versatile topic, the focus of this work particularly lies on the visualization of 3D urban data sets. For the purpose of privacy enabled visualizations of 3D city models, we propose to partition the (living) spaces into privacy regions, each featuring its own level of anonymity. Within each region, the depicted 2D and 3D geometry and imagery is anonymized with cartographic generalization techniques. The underlying spatial partitioning is realized as a 2D map generated as a straight skeleton of the open space between buildings. The resulting privacy cells are then merged according to the privacy requirements associated with each building to form larger regions, their borderlines smoothed, and transition zones established between privacy regions to have a harmonious visual appearance. It is exemplarily demonstrated how the proposed method generates privacy enabled 3D city models.

  9. Symbolic regression of generative network models

    PubMed Central

    Menezes, Telmo; Roth, Camille

    2014-01-01

    Networks are a powerful abstraction with applicability to a variety of scientific fields. Models explaining their morphology and growth processes permit a wide range of phenomena to be more systematically analysed and understood. At the same time, creating such models is often challenging and requires insights that may be counter-intuitive. Yet there currently exists no general method to arrive at better models. We have developed an approach to automatically detect realistic decentralised network growth models from empirical data, employing a machine learning technique inspired by natural selection and defining a unified formalism to describe such models as computer programs. As the proposed method is completely general and does not assume any pre-existing models, it can be applied “out of the box” to any given network. To validate our approach empirically, we systematically rediscover pre-defined growth laws underlying several canonical network generation models and credible laws for diverse real-world networks. We were able to find programs that are simple enough to lead to an actual understanding of the mechanisms proposed, namely for a simple brain and a social network. PMID:25190000

  10. Numerical Modeling of Ophthalmic Response to Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, E. S.; Myers, J. G.; Mulugeta, L.; Vera, J.; Raykin, J.; Feola, A.; Gleason, R.; Samuels, B.; Ethier, C. R.

    2015-01-01

    To investigate ophthalmic changes in spaceflight, we would like to predict the impact of blood dysregulation and elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) on Intraocular Pressure (IOP). Unlike other physiological systems, there are very few lumped parameter models of the eye. The eye model described here is novel in its inclusion of the human choroid and retrobulbar subarachnoid space (rSAS), which are key elements in investigating the impact of increased ICP and ocular blood volume. Some ingenuity was required in modeling the blood and rSAS compartments due to the lack of quantitative data on essential hydrodynamic quantities, such as net choroidal volume and blood flowrate, inlet and exit pressures, and material properties, such as compliances between compartments.

  11. Modeling gene expression in time and space.

    PubMed

    Rué, Pau; Garcia-Ojalvo, Jordi

    2013-01-01

    Cell populations rarely exhibit gene-expression profiles that are homogeneous in time and space. In the temporal domain, dynamical behaviors such as oscillations and pulses of protein production pervade cell biology, underlying phenomena as diverse as circadian rhythmicity, cell cycle control, stress and damage responses, and stem-cell pluripotency. In multicellular populations, spatial heterogeneities are crucial for decision making and development, among many other functions. Cells need to exquisitely coordinate this temporal and spatial variation to survive. Although the spatiotemporal character of gene expression is challenging to quantify experimentally at the level of individual cells, it is beneficial from the modeling viewpoint, because it provides strong constraints that can be probed by theoretically analyzing mathematical models of candidate gene and protein circuits. Here, we review recent examples of temporal dynamics and spatial patterning in gene expression to show how modeling such phenomenology can help us unravel the molecular mechanisms of cellular function.

  12. Project trades model for complex space missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Girerd, Andre R.; Shishko, Roberto

    2003-01-01

    A Project Trades Model (PTM) is a collection of tools/simulations linked together to rapidly perform integrated system trade studies of performance, cost, risk, and mission effectiveness. An operating PTM captures the interactions between various targeted systems and subsystems through an exchange of computed variables of the constituent models. Selection and implementation of the order, method of interaction, model type, and envisioned operation of the ensemble of tools rpresents the key system engineering challenge of the approach. This paper describes an approach to building a PTM and using it to perform top-level system trades for a complex space mission. In particular, the PTM discussed here is for a future Mars mission involving a large rover.

  13. Model-based vision for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaconas, Karen; Nashman, Marilyn; Lumia, Ronald

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes a method for tracking moving image features by combining spatial and temporal edge information with model based feature information. The algorithm updates the two-dimensional position of object features by correlating predicted model features with current image data. The results of the correlation process are used to compute an updated model. The algorithm makes use of a high temporal sampling rate with respect to spatial changes of the image features and operates in a real-time multiprocessing environment. Preliminary results demonstrate successful tracking for image feature velocities between 1.1 and 4.5 pixels every image frame. This work has applications for docking, assembly, retrieval of floating objects and a host of other space-related tasks.

  14. A discrete-space urban model with environmental amenities

    Treesearch

    Liaila Tajibaeva; Robert G. Haight; Stephen Polasky

    2008-01-01

    This paper analyzes the effects of providing environmental amenities associated with open space in a discrete-space urban model and characterizes optimal provision of open space across a metropolitan area. The discrete-space model assumes distinct neighborhoods in which developable land is homogeneous within a neighborhood but heterogeneous across neighborhoods. Open...

  15. Modeling Natural Space Ionizing Radiation Effects on External Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alstatt, Richard L.; Edwards, David L.; Parker, Nelson C. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Predicting the effective life of materials for space applications has become increasingly critical with the drive to reduce mission cost. Programs have considered many solutions to reduce launch costs including novel, low mass materials and thin thermal blankets to reduce spacecraft mass. Determining the long-term survivability of these materials before launch is critical for mission success. This presentation will describe an analysis performed on the outer layer of the passive thermal control blanket of the Hubble Space Telescope. This layer had degraded for unknown reasons during the mission, however ionizing radiation (IR) induced embrittlement was suspected. A methodology was developed which allowed direct comparison between the energy deposition of the natural environment and that of the laboratory generated environment. Commercial codes were used to predict the natural space IR environment model energy deposition in the material from both natural and laboratory IR sources, and design the most efficient test. Results were optimized for total and local energy deposition with an iterative spreadsheet. This method has been used successfully for several laboratory tests at the Marshall Space Flight Center. The study showed that the natural space IR environment, by itself, did not cause the premature degradation observed in the thermal blanket.

  16. Discontinuous space variant sub-wavelength structures for generating radially polarized light in visible region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghadyani, Z.; Dmitriev, S.; Lindlein, N.; Leuchs, G.; Rusina, O.; Harder, I.

    2011-08-01

    A discontinuous space variant sub-wavelength dielectric grating is designed and fabricated for generating radially polarized light in visible region (l = 632.8 nm). The design is based on sub-wavelength silicon nitride structures introducing a retardation of p/2 by form birefringence, with space variant orientation of the optical axis. The pattern is divided into concentric ring segments with constant structural parameters, therefore reducing electron-beam writing time significantly. The design avoids the technological challenges encountered in the generation of a continuous space variant grating while maintaining good quality of the resulting polarization mode.

  17. Approximate Methods for State-Space Models.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Shinsuke; Pérez-Bolde, Lucia Castellanos; Shalizi, Cosma Rohilla; Kass, Robert E

    2010-03-01

    State-space models provide an important body of techniques for analyzing time-series, but their use requires estimating unobserved states. The optimal estimate of the state is its conditional expectation given the observation histories, and computing this expectation is hard when there are nonlinearities. Existing filtering methods, including sequential Monte Carlo, tend to be either inaccurate or slow. In this paper, we study a nonlinear filter for nonlinear/non-Gaussian state-space models, which uses Laplace's method, an asymptotic series expansion, to approximate the state's conditional mean and variance, together with a Gaussian conditional distribution. This Laplace-Gaussian filter (LGF) gives fast, recursive, deterministic state estimates, with an error which is set by the stochastic characteristics of the model and is, we show, stable over time. We illustrate the estimation ability of the LGF by applying it to the problem of neural decoding and compare it to sequential Monte Carlo both in simulations and with real data. We find that the LGF can deliver superior results in a small fraction of the computing time.

  18. Fermilab booster modeling and space charge study

    SciTech Connect

    Weiren Chou et al.

    2003-06-04

    The Fermilab Booster is a bottleneck limiting the proton beam intensity in the accelerator complex. A study group has been formed in order to have a better understanding of this old machine and seek possible improvements. The work includes lattice modeling, numerical simulations, bench measurements and beam studies. Based on newly obtained information, it has been found that the machine acceptance is severely compromised by the orbit bump and dogleg magnets. This, accompanied by emittance dilution from space charge at injection, is a major cause of the large beam loss at the early stage of the cycle. Measures to tackle this problem are being pursued.

  19. Model reduction results for flexible space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Trevor; Mostarshedi, Masoud

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes the novel subsystem balancing technique for obtaining reduced-order models of flexible structures, and investigates its properties fully. This method can be regarded as a combination of the best features of modal truncation (efficiency) and internal balancing (accuracy); it is particularly well suited to the typical practical case of structures which possess clusters of close modes. Numerical results are then presented demonstrating the results obtained by applying subsystem balancing to the Air Force Phillips Laboratory ASTREX testbed, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory antenna facility, and the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center ACES structure.

  20. State-space reduction and equivalence class sampling for a molecular self-assembly model.

    PubMed

    Packwood, Daniel M; Han, Patrick; Hitosugi, Taro

    2016-07-01

    Direct simulation of a model with a large state space will generate enormous volumes of data, much of which is not relevant to the questions under study. In this paper, we consider a molecular self-assembly model as a typical example of a large state-space model, and present a method for selectively retrieving 'target information' from this model. This method partitions the state space into equivalence classes, as identified by an appropriate equivalence relation. The set of equivalence classes H, which serves as a reduced state space, contains none of the superfluous information of the original model. After construction and characterization of a Markov chain with state space H, the target information is efficiently retrieved via Markov chain Monte Carlo sampling. This approach represents a new breed of simulation techniques which are highly optimized for studying molecular self-assembly and, moreover, serves as a valuable guideline for analysis of other large state-space models.

  1. Tools and Products of Real-Time Modeling: Opportunities for Space Weather Forecasting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hesse, Michael

    2009-01-01

    The Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC) is a US inter-agency activity aiming at research in support of the generation of advanced space weather models. As one of its main functions, the CCMC provides to researchers the use of space science models, even if they are not model owners themselves. The second CCMC activity is to support Space Weather forecasting at national Space Weather Forecasting Centers. This second activity involves model evaluations, model transitions to operations, and the development of draft Space Weather forecasting tools. This presentation will focus on the last element. Specifically, we will discuss present capabilities, and the potential to derive further tools. These capabilities will be interpreted in the context of a broad-based, bootstrapping activity for modern Space Weather forecasting.

  2. A Generative Control Capability for a Model-based Executive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Brian C.; Nayak, P. Pandurang

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes Burton, a core element of a new generation of goal-directed model-based autonomous executives. This executive makes extensive use of component-based declarative models to analyze novel situations and generate novel control actions both at the goal and hardware levels. It uses an extremely efficient online propositional inference engine to efficiently determine likely states consistent with current observations and optimal target states that achieve high level goals. It incorporates a flexible generative control sequencing algorithm within the reactive loop to bridge the gap between current and target states. The system is able to detect and avoid damaging and irreversible situations, After every control action it uses its model and sensors to detect anomalous situations and immediately take corrective action. Efficiency is achieved through a series of model compilation and online policy construction methods, and by exploiting general conventions of hardware design that permit a divide and conquer approach to planning. The paper presents a formal characterization of Burton's capability, develops efficient algorithms, and reports on experience with the implementation in the domain of spacecraft autonomy. Burton is being incorporated as one of the key elements of the Remote Agent core autonomy architecture for Deep Space One, the first spacecraft for NASA's New Millenium program.

  3. State-space based modeling for imaging system identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Balvinder; Hixson, Jonathan G.

    2017-05-01

    State-space (SS) based modeling for imaging electro-optical (EO) systems representing various states facilitates a method for system estimation. Traditionally linear shift-invariant (LSI) systems are modeled using Fourier analysis (FA). However, models based on FA may not have a clear insight too the instability reasons, whereas SS based models with system poles and zeros have a clear insight to the system stability information. In this paper, we introduce three methods to estimate system parameters for LSI EO imaging systems using SS based modeling. These methods include batch processing version of least squares (LS) estimation, recursive version of LS estimation, and sliding window LS estimation. The accuracy of the developed methods was tested using input and output signals of simulated LSI systems. First, LSI systems with various system parameters (poles and zeros) were simulated, which were then used to generate output signals for a set of random input signals, with each input signal value representing the average of an image. Then, these input and output signals were used to estimate systems employing SS and FA based modeling. Further, the estimated systems were used to generate output signals for a new set of input signals. For any given input signal, output signals generated by both systems were compared for similarities and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Results show that SS based models generate output signals that have higher SNR values. In addition, developed methods were tested against the simulated data and results show promise for development of models for estimating more complicated systems (e.g., non-linear system).

  4. A New Generation of Standard Solar Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinyoles, Núria; Serenelli, Aldo M.; Villante, Francesco L.; Basu, Sarbani; Bergström, Johannes; Gonzalez-Garcia, M. C.; Maltoni, Michele; Peña-Garay, Carlos; Song, Ningqiang

    2017-02-01

    We compute a new generation of standard solar models (SSMs) that includes recent updates on some important nuclear reaction rates and a more consistent treatment of the equation of state. Models also include a novel and flexible treatment of opacity uncertainties based on opacity kernels, required in light of recent theoretical and experimental works on radiative opacity. Two large sets of SSMs, each based on a different canonical set of solar abundances with high and low metallicity (Z), are computed to determine model uncertainties and correlations among different observables. We present detailed comparisons of high- and low-Z models against different ensembles of solar observables, including solar neutrinos, surface helium abundance, depth of the convective envelope, and sound speed profile. A global comparison, including all observables, yields a p-value of 2.7σ for the high-Z model and 4.7σ for the low-Z one. When the sound speed differences in the narrow region of 0.65< r/{R}ȯ < 0.70 are excluded from the analysis, results are 0.9σ and 3.0σ for high- and low-Z models respectively. These results show that high-Z models agree well with solar data but have a systematic problem right below the bottom of the convective envelope linked to steepness of molecular weight and temperature gradients, and that low-Z models lead to a much more general disagreement with solar data. We also show that, while simple parametrizations of opacity uncertainties can strongly alleviate the solar abundance problem, they are insufficient to substantially improve the agreement of SSMs with helioseismic data beyond that obtained for high-Z models due to the intrinsic correlations of theoretical predictions.

  5. Prevention of Spacecraft Anomalies: The Role of Space Climate and Space Weather Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barth, Janet L.

    2003-01-01

    Space-based systems are developing into critical infrastructure to support the quality of life on Earth. Mission requirements along with rapidly evolving technologies have outpaced efforts to accommodate detrimental space environment impacts on systems. This chapter describes approaches to accommodate space climate and space weather impacts on systems and notes areas where gaps in model development limit our ability to prevent spacecraft anomalies.

  6. Model-Based Trade Space Exploration for Near-Earth Space Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Ronald H.; Boncyk, Wayne; Brutocao, James; Beveridge, Iain

    2005-01-01

    We developed a capability for model-based trade space exploration to be used in the conceptual design of Earth-orbiting space missions. We have created a set of reusable software components to model various subsystems and aspects of space missions. Several example mission models were created to test the tools and process. This technique and toolset has demonstrated itself to be valuable for space mission architectural design.

  7. Space Weather Model of July 22-23, 2012 CME

    NASA Image and Video Library

    NASA's Space Weather Research Center modeled the July 23, 2012 CME using a modeling program called ENLIL. The CME can be seen to expand dramatically as it travels through space. By comparing how we...

  8. On the generation of point groups in spaces of various dimensions.

    PubMed

    Pokorny, A; Herzig, P; Altmann, S L

    2001-09-01

    In this paper the use of Clifford algebra in the parametrization of point groups in spaces of various dimensions is shown. Higher-dimensional spaces are of great interest especially when modulated crystals or quasicrystals are studied. While the quaternion units, which are useful to parametrize rotations in 3 dimensions, can be identified with rotations, the basic Clifford units may be regarded as mirrors from which all proper and improper symmetry operations can be generated. The practical implementation of this method of parametrization is demonstrated for the group of the hypercube in the 4-dimensional space, and generalisations to spaces of dimensions higher than 4 are suggested.

  9. Grid generation and surface modeling for CFD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, Stuart D.; Sober, Janet S.; Lamson, Scott H.

    1995-01-01

    When computing the flow around complex three dimensional configurations, the generation of the mesh is the most time consuming part of any calculation. With some meshing technologies this can take of the order of a man month or more. The requirement for a number of design iterations coupled with ever decreasing time allocated for design leads to the need for a significant acceleration of this process. Of the two competing approaches, block-structured and unstructured, only the unstructured approach will allow fully automatic mesh generation directly from a CAD model. Using this approach coupled with the techniques described in this paper, it is possible to reduce the mesh generation time from man months to a few hours on a workstation. The desire to closely couple a CFD code with a design or optimization algorithm requires that the changes to the geometry be performed quickly and in a smooth manner. This need for smoothness necessitates the use of Bezier polynomials in place of the more usual NURBS or cubic splines. A two dimensional Bezier polynomial based design system is described.

  10. New Space Weather Forecasting at NOAA with Michigan's Geospace Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singer, H. J.; Millward, G. H.; Balch, C. C.; Cash, M. D.; Onsager, T. G.; Toth, G.; Welling, D. T.; Gombosi, T. I.

    2016-12-01

    We will present first results from the University of Michigan's Geospace model that is transitioning, during 2016, from a research capability into operations at the NOAA Space Weather Prediction Center. The first generation of space weather products from this model will be described. These initial products will support power grid operators, as well as other users, with both global and regional, short-term predictions of geomagnetic activity. The Geospace model is a coupled system including three components: the BATS-R-US magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model of the magnetosphere; the Ridley ionosphere electrodynamics model (RIM); and the Rice Convection Model (RCM), an inner magnetosphere ring-current model developed at Rice University. The model is driven by solar wind data from a satellite at L1 (now NOAA's DSCOVR satellite) and F10.7, a proxy for solar extreme ultra-violet radiation. The Geospace model runs continuously, driven by the 1-minute cadence real-time L1 data that is propagated to the inflow boundary of the MHD code. The model steps back to an earlier time and then continues forward if high-speed solar wind overtakes slower solar wind. This mode of operation is unique among the models at NOAA's National Center for Environment Prediction's Central Operations (NCO), and it is also different from the typical scientific simulation mode. All of this work has involved 3D graphical model displays and validation tools that are being developed to support forecasters and web-based external users. Lessons learned during the transition process will be described, as well as the iterative process that occurs between Research and Operations and the scientific challenges for future model and product improvements.

  11. On-Orbit Measurement of Next Generation Space Solar Cell Technology on the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolford, David S.; Myers, Matthew G.; Prokop, Norman F.; Krasowski, Michael J.; Parker, David S.; Cassidy, Justin C.; Davies, William E.; Vorreiter, Janelle O.; Piszczor, Michael F.; McNatt, Jeremiah S.

    2015-01-01

    Measurement is essential for the evaluation of new photovoltaic (PV) technology for space solar cells. NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) is in the process of measuring several solar cells in a supplemental experiment on NASA Goddard Space Flight Center's (GSFC) Robotic Refueling Mission's (RRM) Task Board 4 (TB4). Four industry and government partners have provided advanced PV devices for measurement and orbital environment testing. The experiment will be on-orbit for approximately 18 months. It is completely self-contained and will provide its own power and internal data storage. Several new cell technologies including four- junction (4J) Inverted Metamorphic Multijunction (IMM) cells will be evaluated and the results compared to ground-based measurements.

  12. Microstructure Modeling of Third Generation Disk Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jou, Herng-Jeng

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this program was to model, validate, and predict the precipitation microstructure evolution, using PrecipiCalc (QuesTek Innovations LLC) software, for 3rd generation Ni-based gas turbine disc superalloys during processing and service, with a set of logical and consistent experiments and characterizations. Furthermore, within this program, the originally research-oriented microstructure simulation tool was to be further improved and implemented to be a useful and user-friendly engineering tool. In this report, the key accomplishments achieved during the third year (2009) of the program are summarized. The activities of this year included: Further development of multistep precipitation simulation framework for gamma prime microstructure evolution during heat treatment; Calibration and validation of gamma prime microstructure modeling with supersolvus heat treated LSHR; Modeling of the microstructure evolution of the minor phases, particularly carbides, during isothermal aging, representing the long term microstructure stability during thermal exposure; and the implementation of software tools. During the research and development efforts to extend the precipitation microstructure modeling and prediction capability in this 3-year program, we identified a hurdle, related to slow gamma prime coarsening rate, with no satisfactory scientific explanation currently available. It is desirable to raise this issue to the Ni-based superalloys research community, with hope that in future there will be a mechanistic understanding and physics-based treatment to overcome the hurdle. In the mean time, an empirical correction factor was developed in this modeling effort to capture the experimental observations.

  13. Modeling Bivariate Longitudinal Hormone Profiles by Hierarchical State Space Models.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ziyue; Cappola, Anne R; Crofford, Leslie J; Guo, Wensheng

    2014-01-01

    The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis is crucial in coping with stress and maintaining homeostasis. Hormones produced by the HPA axis exhibit both complex univariate longitudinal profiles and complex relationships among different hormones. Consequently, modeling these multivariate longitudinal hormone profiles is a challenging task. In this paper, we propose a bivariate hierarchical state space model, in which each hormone profile is modeled by a hierarchical state space model, with both population-average and subject-specific components. The bivariate model is constructed by concatenating the univariate models based on the hypothesized relationship. Because of the flexible framework of state space form, the resultant models not only can handle complex individual profiles, but also can incorporate complex relationships between two hormones, including both concurrent and feedback relationship. Estimation and inference are based on marginal likelihood and posterior means and variances. Computationally efficient Kalman filtering and smoothing algorithms are used for implementation. Application of the proposed method to a study of chronic fatigue syndrome and fibromyalgia reveals that the relationships between adrenocorticotropic hormone and cortisol in the patient group are weaker than in healthy controls.

  14. Modeling Physarum space exploration using memristors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ntinas, V.; Vourkas, I.; Sirakoulis, G. Ch; Adamatzky, A. I.

    2017-05-01

    Slime mold Physarum polycephalum optimizes its foraging behaviour by minimizing the distances between the sources of nutrients it spans. When two sources of nutrients are present, the slime mold connects the sources, with its protoplasmic tubes, along the shortest path. We present a two-dimensional mesh grid memristor based model as an approach to emulate Physarum’s foraging strategy, which includes space exploration and reinforcement of the optimally formed interconnection network in the presence of multiple aliment sources. The proposed algorithmic approach utilizes memristors and LC contours and is tested in two of the most popular computational challenges for Physarum, namely maze and transportation networks. Furthermore, the presented model is enriched with the notion of noise presence, which positively contributes to a collective behavior and enables us to move from deterministic to robust results. Consequently, the corresponding simulation results manage to reproduce, in a much better qualitative way, the expected transportation networks.

  15. Modeling of linear viscoelastic space structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McTavish, D. J.; Hughes, P. C.

    1993-01-01

    The GHM Method provides viscoelastic finite elements derived from the commonly used elastic finite elements. Moreover, these GHM elements are used directly and conveniently in second-order structural models just like their elastic counterparts. The forms of the GHM element matrices preserve the definiteness properties usually associated with finite element matrices (the mass matrix is positive definite, the stiffness matrix is nonnegative definite, and the damping matrix is positive semidefinite). In the Laplace domain, material properties are modeled phenomenologically as a sum of second-order rational functions dubbed 'minioscillator' terms. Developed originally as a tool for the analysis of damping in large flexible space structures, the GHM method is applicable to any structure which incorporates viscoelastic materials.

  16. Space Station Active Thermal Control System modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hye, Abdul; Lin, Chin H.

    1988-01-01

    The Space Station Active Thermal Control System (ATCS) has been modeled using modified SINDA/SINFLO programs to solve two-phase Thermo-fluid problems. The modifications include changes in several subroutines to incorporate implicit solution which allows larger time step as compared to that for explicit solutions. Larger time step saves computer time but involves larger computational error. Several runs were made using various time steps for the ATCS model. It has been found that for a reasonable approach, three times larger time step as compared to that used in explicit method is a good value which will reduce the computer time by approximately 50 percent and still maintain the accuracy of the output data to within 90 percent of the explicit values.

  17. Numerical modeling of landslide generated seismic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favreau, P.; Mangeney, A.; Lucas, A.; Shapiro, N. M.; Crosta, G. B.; Bouchut, F.; Hungr, O.

    2009-12-01

    Gravitational instabilities such as debris flows, landslides or avalanches play a key role in erosion processes at the surface of the Earth and other telluric planets. On Earth, they represent one of the major natural hazards threatening population and infrastructure in volcanic, mountainous, seismic and coastal areas. One of the main issues in terms of risk assessment is to produce tools for detection of natural instabilities and for prediction of velocity and runout extent of rapid landslides. The lack of field measurements of the dynamics of natural landslides due to their unpredictability and destructive power, prevents investigating the mechanical properties of the flowing material that appears to be very different from experimental granular flows in the laboratory. In this context, the analysis of the seismic signal generated by natural instabilities provides a unique paradigm to study flow dynamics and discriminate the physical processes at play during their emplacement along the slope. Potentially, it is possible to infer information about the “landslide source” from the seismic signal produced during the initial collapse and the subsequent flow along the natural terrain. However, the process of reverse dynamic analysis is complex and must take into consideration the role of topography, mass of the landslide, flow dynamics, and wave propagation on the recorded signal. We use here numerical modeling of the landslide and of the generated seismic waves to address this issue. We show that (i) numerical simulation of landslide and generated seismic waves well match the observed low frequency seismic signal, (ii) topography effects on landslide dynamics play a key role in the observed seismic signal, (iii) simulation of the seismic wave makes it possible to discriminate between the alternative possible scenario of flow dynamics and to provide estimates of the rheological parameters during the flow. As a result, unique data on natural flow dynamics could be

  18. Granger causality for state-space models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnett, Lionel; Seth, Anil K.

    2015-04-01

    Granger causality has long been a prominent method for inferring causal interactions between stochastic variables for a broad range of complex physical systems. However, it has been recognized that a moving average (MA) component in the data presents a serious confound to Granger causal analysis, as routinely performed via autoregressive (AR) modeling. We solve this problem by demonstrating that Granger causality may be calculated simply and efficiently from the parameters of a state-space (SS) model. Since SS models are equivalent to autoregressive moving average models, Granger causality estimated in this fashion is not degraded by the presence of a MA component. This is of particular significance when the data has been filtered, downsampled, observed with noise, or is a subprocess of a higher dimensional process, since all of these operations—commonplace in application domains as diverse as climate science, econometrics, and the neurosciences—induce a MA component. We show how Granger causality, conditional and unconditional, in both time and frequency domains, may be calculated directly from SS model parameters via solution of a discrete algebraic Riccati equation. Numerical simulations demonstrate that Granger causality estimators thus derived have greater statistical power and smaller bias than AR estimators. We also discuss how the SS approach facilitates relaxation of the assumptions of linearity, stationarity, and homoscedasticity underlying current AR methods, thus opening up potentially significant new areas of research in Granger causal analysis.

  19. Granger causality for state-space models.

    PubMed

    Barnett, Lionel; Seth, Anil K

    2015-04-01

    Granger causality has long been a prominent method for inferring causal interactions between stochastic variables for a broad range of complex physical systems. However, it has been recognized that a moving average (MA) component in the data presents a serious confound to Granger causal analysis, as routinely performed via autoregressive (AR) modeling. We solve this problem by demonstrating that Granger causality may be calculated simply and efficiently from the parameters of a state-space (SS) model. Since SS models are equivalent to autoregressive moving average models, Granger causality estimated in this fashion is not degraded by the presence of a MA component. This is of particular significance when the data has been filtered, downsampled, observed with noise, or is a subprocess of a higher dimensional process, since all of these operations-commonplace in application domains as diverse as climate science, econometrics, and the neurosciences-induce a MA component. We show how Granger causality, conditional and unconditional, in both time and frequency domains, may be calculated directly from SS model parameters via solution of a discrete algebraic Riccati equation. Numerical simulations demonstrate that Granger causality estimators thus derived have greater statistical power and smaller bias than AR estimators. We also discuss how the SS approach facilitates relaxation of the assumptions of linearity, stationarity, and homoscedasticity underlying current AR methods, thus opening up potentially significant new areas of research in Granger causal analysis.

  20. Modeling a Wireless Network for International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alena, Richard; Yaprak, Ece; Lamouri, Saad

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes the application of wireless local area network (LAN) simulation modeling methods to the hybrid LAN architecture designed for supporting crew-computing tools aboard the International Space Station (ISS). These crew-computing tools, such as wearable computers and portable advisory systems, will provide crew members with real-time vehicle and payload status information and access to digital technical and scientific libraries, significantly enhancing human capabilities in space. A wireless network, therefore, will provide wearable computer and remote instruments with the high performance computational power needed by next-generation 'intelligent' software applications. Wireless network performance in such simulated environments is characterized by the sustainable throughput of data under different traffic conditions. This data will be used to help plan the addition of more access points supporting new modules and more nodes for increased network capacity as the ISS grows.

  1. Next-Generation Global Adjoint Tomography Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozdag, E.; Lefebvre, M. P.; Lei, W.; Peter, D. B.; Ruan, Y.; Smith, J. A.; Komatitsch, D.; Tromp, J.

    2016-12-01

    We constructed the "first-generation" global adjoint tomographic model with transversely isotropic upper mantle, GLAD-M15, based on GPU-accelerated spectral-element simulations of global wave propagation on ORNL's Cray XK7 "Titan". GLAD-M15 is the result of 15 conjugate-gradient iterations where no approximations, other than the use of a spectral-element method for wave propagation, are made in either forward or adjoint simulations. It naturally unifies crust and mantle by their simultaneous inversion avoiding the widely used "crustal corrections". The iterations were initiated by combining 30 s body and 60 s surface waves and the last 4 iterations were performed with all minor- and major-arc body & surface waves with minimum periods of 17 s & 45 s, respectively. Despite of using a limited dataset of 253 earthquakes and performing 15 iterations only, GLAD-M15 highlights the well-known slabs, a tantalisingly enhanced Tahiti plume and its likely interaction with the Tonga slab, in addition to various other hotspots & plumes, i.e., Yellowstone, Galapagos, Erebus, etc. All these anomalies are also supported by Vp/Vs ratios and transverse isotropy. Point-spread function tests (Fichtner & Trampert 2011) demonstrate that we are approaching the resolution of continental-scale studies in areas with good data coverage, for example underneath North America. While in a complementary effort we increase the database to 1200 earthquakes, ultimately to use all global CMT events (5.5 ≤ Mw ≤ 7.0), we continue our iterations with 253 events addressing more general parameterisations. The "second-generation" model include azimuthal anisotropy to facilitate better tectonic interpretations, e.g., with regards to crust-lithosphere-asthenosphere interactions. The "third-generation" model will involve 3D anelasticity. Meanwhile, we investigate and implement improved misfit functions to increase the amount of information in inversions and reduce possible source-related errors by using

  2. SECOND GENERATION MODEL | Science Inventory | US ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    One of the environmental and economic models that the U.S. EPA uses to assess climate change policies is the Second Generation Model (SGM). SGM is a 13 region, 24 sector computable general equilibrium (CGE) model of the world that can be used to estimate the domestic and international economic impacts of policies designed to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. SGM was developed by Jae Edmonds and others at the Joint Global Change Research Institute (JGCRI) of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and the University of Maryland. One of SGM's primary purposes is to provide an integrated assessment of a portfolio of greenhouse gas mitigation strategies. The SGM projects economic activity, energy transformation and consumption, and greenhouse gas emissions for each region of the globe in five-year time steps from 1990 through 2050. The model has been used extensively over the last decade to assess U.S. policy options to achieve greenhouse gas mitigation goals. The SGM is one of EPA's primary tools for analyses of climate change policies. It was used extensively by the the U.S. government to analyze the impact of the Kyoto Protocol. Moreover, the SGM has been used by EPA during the current Administration for analyses of the climate components of various multi-emissions bills.

  3. Modeling Aerodynamically Generated Sound of Helicopter Rotors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brentner, Kenneth S.; Farassat, F.

    2002-01-01

    A great deal of progress has been made in the modeling of aerodynamically generated sound of rotors over the past decade. Although the modeling effort has focused on helicopter main rotors, the theory is generally valid for a wide range of rotor configurations. The Ffowcs Williams Hawkings (FW-H) equation has been the foundation for much of the development. The monopole and dipole source terms of the FW-H equation account for the thickness and loading noise, respectively. Bladevortex-interaction noise and broadband noise are important types of loading noise, hence much research has been directed toward the accurate modeling of these noise mechanisms. Both subsonic and supersonic quadrupole noise formulations have been developed for the prediction of high-speed impulsive noise. In an effort to eliminate the need to compute the quadrupole contribution, the FW-H equation has also been utilized on permeable surfaces surrounding all physical noise sources. Comparisons of the Kirchhoff formulation for moving surfaces with the FW-H equation have shown that the Kirchhoff formulation for moving surfaces can give erroneous results for aeroacoustic problems. Finally, significant progress has been made incorporating the rotor noise models into full vehicle noise prediction tools.

  4. SECOND GENERATION MODEL | Science Inventory | US ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    One of the environmental and economic models that the U.S. EPA uses to assess climate change policies is the Second Generation Model (SGM). SGM is a 13 region, 24 sector computable general equilibrium (CGE) model of the world that can be used to estimate the domestic and international economic impacts of policies designed to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. SGM was developed by Jae Edmonds and others at the Joint Global Change Research Institute (JGCRI) of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and the University of Maryland. One of SGM's primary purposes is to provide an integrated assessment of a portfolio of greenhouse gas mitigation strategies. The SGM projects economic activity, energy transformation and consumption, and greenhouse gas emissions for each region of the globe in five-year time steps from 1990 through 2050. The model has been used extensively over the last decade to assess U.S. policy options to achieve greenhouse gas mitigation goals. The SGM is one of EPA's primary tools for analyses of climate change policies. It was used extensively by the the U.S. government to analyze the impact of the Kyoto Protocol. Moreover, the SGM has been used by EPA during the current Administration for analyses of the climate components of various multi-emissions bills.

  5. Foresight Model of Turkey's Defense Industries' Space Studies until 2040

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuksel, Nurdan; Cifci, Hasan; Cakir, Serhat

    2016-07-01

    Being advanced in science and technology is inevitable reality in order to be able to have a voice in the globalized world. Therefore, for the countries, making policies in consistent with their societies' intellectual, economic and political infrastructure and attributing them to the vision having been embraced by all parties of the society is quite crucial for the success. The generated policies are supposed to ensure the usage of countries' resources in the most effective and fastest way, determine the priorities and needs of society and set their goals and related roadmaps. In this sense, technology foresight studies based on justified forecasting in science and technology have critical roles in the process of developing policies. In this article, Foresight Model of Turkey's Defense Industries' Space Studies, which is turned out to be the important part of community life and fundamental background of most technologies, up to 2040 is presented. Turkey got late in space technology studies. Hence, for being fast and efficient to use its national resources in a cost effective way and within national and international collaboration, it should be directed to its pre-set goals. By taking all these factors into consideration, the technology foresight model of Turkey's Defense Industry's Space Studies was presented in the study. In the model, the present condition of space studies in the World and Turkey was analyzed; literature survey and PEST analysis were made. PEST analysis will be the inputs of SWOT analysis and Delphi questionnaire will be used in the study. A two-round Delphi survey will be applied to the participants from universities, public and private organizations operating in space studies at Defense Industry. Critical space technologies will be distinguished according to critical technology measures determined by expert survey; space technology fields and goals will be established according to their importance and feasibility indexes. Finally, for the

  6. On-Orbit Measurement of Next Generation Space Solar Cell Technology on the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolford, David S.; Myers, Matthew G.; Prokop, Norman F.; Krasowski, Michael J.; Parker, David S.; Cassidy, Justin C.; Davies, William E.; Vorreiter, Janelle O.; Piszczor, Michael F.; McNatt, Jeremiah S.

    2014-01-01

    On-orbit measurements of new photovoltaic (PV) technologies for space power are an essential step in the development and qualification of advanced solar cells. NASA Glenn Research Center will fly and measure several solar cells attached to NASA Goddards Robotic Refueling Mission (RRM), expected to be launched in 2014. Industry and government partners have provided advanced PV devices for evaluation of performance and environmental durability. The experiment is completely self-contained, providing its own power and internal data storage. Several new cell technologies including Inverted Metamorphic Multi-junction and four-junction cells will be tested.

  7. Generation and comparison of globally isotropic space-filling truss structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lake, Mark S.; Klang, Eric C.

    1992-01-01

    The purposes of this paper are to present a rationale for obtaining space-filling truss structures that behave like a globally isotropic continuum and to use continuum modeling to investigate their relative structural efficiencies (e.g., modulus-to-density, strength-to-density, and part-count-to-volume ratios). The trusses considered herein are generated by replication of a characteristic truss cell uniformly through space. The characteristic cells are categorized by one of a set of possible geometric symmetry groups derived using the techniques of crystallography. The implied elastic symmetry associated with each geometric symmetry group is identified to simplify the task of determining stiffness tailoring rules for guaranteeing global isotropy. Four truss geometries are analyzed to determine stiffness tailoring necessary for isotropy. All geometries exhibit equivalent isotropic Poisson's ratios of 1/4 and equivalent modulus-to-density ratios of 1/6 times the modulus-to-density ratio of the material used in their members. The truss configuration that has the lowest percent difference in member lengths is shown to have the lowest component part-count-to-volume ratios of all geometries considered when compared on a basis of equal stiffness, equal strength, and equal mass.

  8. Selection of the Ground Segment for the Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST) Flight Demonstrator (Nexus)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gal-Edd, Jonathan; Steck, Jane A.; Isaacs, John C., III; Bredeck, Martin J.; Fatig, Curtis Clyde; Zepp, Robert H.; Power, Edward (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Nexus was a technology demonstrator project that was designed to bridge from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) to its successor, the Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST). This paper focuses on the process used in designing the ground segment for Nexus and the lessons learned in its development. Ground station cost drivers were: (1) Contact time, (2) Cost of transporting data between the ground stations and control center, and (3) Cost savings via ground automation. We found that reducing the communication requirement in just the first 100 days could have reduced the total ground station cost by 40%. Contact time cost dwarfed the cost trade between automation development and off-shift operations personnel. Real-time Telemetry and Control (T&C) system analysis was divided into: (1) Potential reuse of the Nexus real-time (T&C) system for NGST, (2) Feasibility of using a 'Finite State-Based Modeling' product, and (3) Selecting a Commercial Off the Shelf (COTS) versus Government Off The Shelf (GOTS) products. We found that each of the products evaluated in detail (ASIST, EPOCH 2000, and ITOS) could adequately support basic mission requirements. Lessons learned were: (1) Include operations at the beginning of the mission, and (2) Develop an operations concept as soon as possible.

  9. Space market model development project, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, Peter C.

    1988-01-01

    The results of the prototype operations of the Space Business Information Center are presented. A clearinghouse for space business information for members of the U.S. space industry composed of public, private, and academic sectors was conducted. Behavioral and evaluation statistics were recorded from the clearinghouse and the conclusions from these statistics are presented. Business guidebooks on major markets in space business are discussed. Proprietary research and briefings for firms and agencies in the space industry are also discussed.

  10. Space Power System Modeling with EBAL

    SciTech Connect

    Zillmer, Andrew; Hanks, David; Wen-Hsiung 'Tony' Tu

    2006-07-01

    Pratt and Whitney Rocket dyne's Engine Balance (EBAL) thermal/fluid system code has been expanded to model nuclear power closed Brayton cycle (CBC) power conversion systems. EBAL was originally developed to perform design analysis of hypersonic vehicle propellant and thermal management systems analysis. Later, it was adapted to rocket engine cycles. The new version of EBAL includes detailed, physics-based models of all key CBC system components. Some component examples are turbo-alternators, heat exchangers, heat pipe radiators, and liquid metal pumps. A liquid metal cooled reactor is included and a gas cooled reactor model is in work. Both thermodynamic and structural analyses are performed for each component. EBAL performs steady-state design analysis with optimization as well as off-design performance analysis. Design optimization is performed both at the component level by the component models and on the system level with a global optimizer. The user has the option to manually drive the optimization process or run parametric analysis to better understand system trade-off. Although recent EBAL developments have focused on a CBC conversion system, the code is easily extendible to other power conversion cycles. This new, more powerful version of EBAL allows for rapid design analysis and optimization of space power systems. A notional example of EBAL's capabilities is included. (authors)

  11. Numerical Modeling of Ocular Dysfunction in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Emily S.; Mulugeta, Lealem; Vera, J.; Myers, J. G.; Raykin, J.; Feola, A. J.; Gleason, R.; Samuels, B.; Ethier, C. R.

    2014-01-01

    Upon introduction to microgravity, the near-loss of hydrostatic pressure causes a marked cephalic (headward) shift of fluid in an astronaut's body. The fluid shift, along with other factors of spaceflight, induces a cascade of interdependent physiological responses which occur at varying time scales. Long-duration missions carry an increased risk for the development of the Visual Impairment and Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) syndrome, a spectrum of ophthalmic changes including posterior globe flattening, choroidal folds, distension of the optic nerve sheath, kinking of the optic nerve and potentially permanent degradation of visual function. In the cases of VIIP found to date, the initial onset of symptoms occurred after several weeks to several months of spaceflight, by which time the gross bodily fluid distribution is well established. We are developing a suite of numerical models to simulate the effects of fluid shift on the cardiovascular, central nervous and ocular systems. These models calculate the modified mean volumes, flow rates and pressures that are characteristic of the altered quasi-homeostatic state in microgravity, including intracranial and intraocular pressures. The results of the lumped models provide initial and boundary data to a 3D finite element biomechanics simulation of the globe, optic nerve head and retrobulbar subarachnoid space. The integrated set of models will be used to investigate the evolution of the biomechanical stress state in the ocular tissues due to long-term exposure to microgravity.

  12. Modeling, Analysis, and Optimization Issues for Large Space Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinson, L. D. (Compiler); Amos, A. K. (Compiler); Venkayya, V. B. (Compiler)

    1983-01-01

    Topics concerning the modeling, analysis, and optimization of large space structures are discussed including structure-control interaction, structural and structural dynamics modeling, thermal analysis, testing, and design.

  13. Next-generation concurrent engineering: developing models to complement point designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morse, Elizabeth; Leavens, Tracy; Cohanim, Babak; Harmon, Corey; Mahr, Eric; Lewis, Brian

    2006-01-01

    Concurrent Engineering Design (CED) teams have made routine the rapid development of point designs for space missions. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Team X is now evolving into a 'next-generation CED; in addition to a point design, the Team develops a model of the local trade space. The process is a balance between the power of a model developing tools and the creativity of humal experts, enabling the development of a variety of trade models for any space mission. This paper reviews the modeling method and its practical implementation in the ED environment. Example results illustrate the benefit of this approach.

  14. Next-generation concurrent engineering: developing models to complement point designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morse, Elizabeth; Leavens, Tracy; Cohanim, Babak; Harmon, Corey; Mahr, Eric; Lewis, Brian

    2006-01-01

    Concurrent Engineering Design (CED) teams have made routine the rapid development of point designs for space missions. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Team X is now evolving into a 'next-generation CED; in addition to a point design, the Team develops a model of the local trade space. The process is a balance between the power of a model developing tools and the creativity of humal experts, enabling the development of a variety of trade models for any space mission. This paper reviews the modeling method and its practical implementation in the ED environment. Example results illustrate the benefit of this approach.

  15. Global Adjoint Tomography: Next-Generation Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozdag, Ebru; Lefebvre, Matthieu; Lei, Wenjie; Orsvuran, Ridvan; Peter, Daniel; Ruan, Youyi; Smith, James; Komatitsch, Dimitri; Tromp, Jeroen

    2017-04-01

    The first-generation global adjoint tomography model GLAD-M15 (Bozdag et al. 2016) is the result of 15 conjugate-gradient iterations based on GPU-accelerated spectral-element simulations of 3D wave propagation and Fréchet kernels. For simplicity, GLAD-M15 was constructed as an elastic model with transverse isotropy confined to the upper mantle. However, Earth's mantle and crust show significant evidence of anisotropy as a result of its composition and deformation. There may be different sources of seismic anisotropy affecting both body and surface waves. As a first attempt, we initially tackle with surface-wave anisotropy and proceed iterations using the same 253 earthquake data set used in GLAD-M15 with an emphasize on upper-mantle. Furthermore, we explore new misfits, such as double-difference measurements (Yuan et al. 2016), to better deal with the possible artifacts of the uneven distribution of seismic stations globally and minimize source uncertainties in structural inversions. We will present our observations with the initial results of azimuthally anisotropic inversions and also discuss the next generation global models with various parametrizations. Meanwhile our goal is to use all available seismic data in imaging. This however requires a solid framework to perform iterative adjoint tomography workflows with big data on supercomputers. We will talk about developments in adjoint tomography workflow from the need of defining new seismic and computational data formats (e.g., ASDF by Krischer et al. 2016, ADIOS by Liu et al. 2011) to developing new pre- and post-processing tools together with experimenting workflow management tools, such as Pegasus (Deelman et al. 2015). All our simulations are performed on Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Cray XK7 "Titan" system. Our ultimate aim is to get ready to harness ORNL's next-generation supercomputer "Summit", an IBM with Power-9 CPUs and NVIDIA Volta GPU accelerators, to be ready by 2018 which will enable us to

  16. Modeling Distributed Electricity Generation in the NEMS Buildings Models

    EIA Publications

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the modeling methodology, projected market penetration, and impact of distributed generation with respect to offsetting future electricity needs and carbon dioxide emissions in the residential and commercial buildings sector in the Annual Energy Outlook 2000 (AEO2000) reference case.

  17. Economic analysis of open space box model utilization in spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammad, Atif F.; Straub, Jeremy

    2015-05-01

    It is a known fact that the amount of data about space that is stored is getting larger on an everyday basis. However, the utilization of Big Data and related tools to perform ETL (Extract, Transform and Load) applications will soon be pervasive in the space sciences. We have entered in a crucial time where using Big Data can be the difference (for terrestrial applications) between organizations underperforming and outperforming their peers. The same is true for NASA and other space agencies, as well as for individual missions and the highly-competitive process of mission data analysis and publication. In most industries, conventional opponents and new candidates alike will influence data-driven approaches to revolutionize and capture the value of Big Data archives. The Open Space Box Model is poised to take the proverbial "giant leap", as it provides autonomic data processing and communications for spacecraft. We can find economic value generated from such use of data processing in our earthly organizations in every sector, such as healthcare, retail. We also can easily find retailers, performing research on Big Data, by utilizing sensors driven embedded data in products within their stores and warehouses to determine how these products are actually used in the real world.

  18. Why We Explore: The Value of Space Exploration for Future Generations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Stephen A.; Armstrong, Robert C., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and its industry partners are making measurable progress toward delivering new human space transportation capabilities to serve as the catalyst for a new era of discovery, as directed by the U.S. Vision for Space Exploration. In the interest of ensuring prolonged support, the Agency encourages space advocates of all stripes to accurately portray both the tangible and intangible benefits of space exploration, especially its value for future generations. This may be done not only by emphasizing the nation's return on its aerospace investment, but also by highlighting enabling security features and by promoting the scientific and technological benefits that accrue from the human exploration of space. As America embarks on a new era of leadership and international partnership on the next frontier, we are poised to master space by living off-planet on the Moon to prepare astronauts for longer journeys to Mars. These and other relevant facts should be clearly in the view of influential decision-makers and the American taxpayers, and we must increasingly involve those on whom the long-term sustainability of space exploration ultimately depends: America's youth. This paper will examine three areas of concrete benefits for future generations: fundamental security, economic enterprise, and high-technology advancements spurred by the innovation that scientific discovery demands.

  19. Tls Models Generation Assisted by Uav Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiabrando, F.; Di Pietra, V.; Lingua, A.; Maschio, P.; Noardo, F.; Sammartano, G.; Spanò, A.

    2016-06-01

    (TLS, Terrestrial Laser Scanning), and large scale mapping derived by UAV (Unmanned Aerial Vehicle) survey. This paper refers an example of 3D survey and reality based modelling applied on landscape and architectural assets. The choice of methods for documentation, in terms of survey techniques, depends primarily on issues and features of the area. The achieved experience, allow to consider that the easy handling of TLS has enabled the use in limited spaces among buildings and collapsed roofs, but the topographic measure of GCPs (Ground Control Points), neither by total station nor by GPS/RTK technique, was easily feasible. Even more than proving the ability of the integration of TLS and UAV photogrammetry to achieve a multi-source and multi-scale whole model of a village, the experience has been a test to experiment the registration of terrestrial clouds with the support of control points derived by UAV survey and finally, a comparison among different strategies of clouds registration is reported. Analysing for each approach a number of parameters (number of clouds registration, number of needed points, processing time, overall accuracy) the further comparisons have been achieved. The test revealed that it is possible to decrease the large number of terrestrial control points when their determination by topographical measures is difficult, and it is possible to combine the techniques not only for the integration of the final 3Dmodel, but also to solve and make the initial stage of the drafting process more effective.

  20. The Structure of Finitely Generated Shift-Invariant Spaces in L2(IR(d))

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-02-01

    whenever possible, to present our arguments via the generator(s) of the space rather than the range function, since, as a rule, in practical problems...generator. Theorem 2.21. Lel q5 E L2 (IRa d) and S := S(’k). Then the function q0, defined via its Fourier transform by is a quasi-orthogonal generator for...measurable) partition of a(S). We define now g via its Fourier transform by Since X., is 2r-periodic and bounded, each X,¢j is in S(Oj), hence in S

  1. International Space Station Centrifuge Rotor Models A Comparison of the Euler-Lagrange and the Bond Graph Modeling Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Louis H.; Ramakrishnan, Jayant; Granda, Jose J.

    2006-01-01

    The assembly and operation of the International Space Station (ISS) require extensive testing and engineering analysis to verify that the Space Station system of systems would work together without any adverse interactions. Since the dynamic behavior of an entire Space Station cannot be tested on earth, math models of the Space Station structures and mechanical systems have to be built and integrated in computer simulations and analysis tools to analyze and predict what will happen in space. The ISS Centrifuge Rotor (CR) is one of many mechanical systems that need to be modeled and analyzed to verify the ISS integrated system performance on-orbit. This study investigates using Bond Graph modeling techniques as quick and simplified ways to generate models of the ISS Centrifuge Rotor. This paper outlines the steps used to generate simple and more complex models of the CR using Bond Graph Computer Aided Modeling Program with Graphical Input (CAMP-G). Comparisons of the Bond Graph CR models with those derived from Euler-Lagrange equations in MATLAB and those developed using multibody dynamic simulation at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Johnson Space Center (JSC) are presented to demonstrate the usefulness of the Bond Graph modeling approach for aeronautics and space applications.

  2. Development of the Next Generation Gas Trap for the Space Station Internal Thermal Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leimkuehler, Thomas O.; Spelbring, Chris; Reeves, Daniel R.; Holt, James M.

    2003-01-01

    The current dual-membrane gas trap is designed to remove non-condensed gases (NCG) from the Internal Thermal Control System (ITCS) coolant on board the International Space Station (ISS). To date it has successfully served its purpose of preventing depriming, overspeed, and shutdown of the ITCS pump. However, contamination in the ITCS coolant has adversely affected the gas venting rate and lifetime of the gas trap, warranting a development effort for a next-generation gas trap. Design goals are to meet or exceed the current requirements to (1) include greater operating ranges and conditions, (2) eliminate reliance on the current hydrophilic tube fabrication process, and (3) increase operational life and tolerance to particulate and microbial growth fouling. In addition, the next generation gas trap will essentially be a 'dropin" design such that no modifications to the ITCS pump package assembly (PPA) will be required, and the implementation of the new design will not affect changes to the ITCS operational conditions, interfaces, or software. This paper will present the initial membrane module design and development work which has included (1) a trade study among several conceptual designs, (2) performance modeling of a hydrophobic-only design, and (3) small-scale development test data for the hydrophobic-only design. Testing has shown that the hydrophobic-only design is capable of performing even better than the current dual-membrane design for both steady-state gas removal and gas slug removal.

  3. Development of the Next Generation Gas Trap for the Space Station Internal Thermal Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leimkuehler, Thomas O.; Spelbring, Chris; Reeves, Daniel R.; Holt, James M.

    2003-01-01

    The current dual-membrane gas trap is designed to remove non-condensed gases (NCG) from the Internal Thermal Control System (ITCS) coolant on board the International Space Station (ISS). To date it has successfully served its purpose of preventing depriming, overspeed, and shutdown of the ITCS pump. However, contamination in the ITCS coolant has adversely affected the gas venting rate and lifetime of the gas trap, warranting a development effort for a next-generation gas trap. Design goals are to meet or exceed the current requirements to (1) include greater operating ranges and conditions, (2) eliminate reliance on the current hydrophilic tube fabrication process, and (3) increase operational life and tolerance to particulate and microbial growth fouling. In addition, the next generation gas trap will essentially be a 'dropin" design such that no modifications to the ITCS pump package assembly (PPA) will be required, and the implementation of the new design will not affect changes to the ITCS operational conditions, interfaces, or software. This paper will present the initial membrane module design and development work which has included (1) a trade study among several conceptual designs, (2) performance modeling of a hydrophobic-only design, and (3) small-scale development test data for the hydrophobic-only design. Testing has shown that the hydrophobic-only design is capable of performing even better than the current dual-membrane design for both steady-state gas removal and gas slug removal.

  4. Saturation: An efficient iteration strategy for symbolic state-space generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ciardo, Gianfranco; Luettgen, Gerald; Siminiceanu, Radu; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents a novel algorithm for generating state spaces of asynchronous systems using Multi-valued Decision Diagrams. In contrast to related work, the next-state function of a system is not encoded as a single Boolean function, but as cross-products of integer functions. This permits the application of various iteration strategies to build a system's state space. In particular, this paper introduces a new elegant strategy, called saturation, and implements it in the tool SMART. On top of usually performing several orders of magnitude faster than existing BDD-based state-space generators, the algorithm's required peak memory is often close to the nal memory needed for storing the overall state spaces.

  5. Aeras: A next generation global atmosphere model

    DOE PAGES

    Spotz, William F.; Smith, Thomas M.; Demeshko, Irina P.; ...

    2015-06-01

    Sandia National Laboratories is developing a new global atmosphere model named Aeras that is performance portable and supports the quantification of uncertainties. These next-generation capabilities are enabled by building Aeras on top of Albany, a code base that supports the rapid development of scientific application codes while leveraging Sandia's foundational mathematics and computer science packages in Trilinos and Dakota. Embedded uncertainty quantification (UQ) is an original design capability of Albany, and performance portability is a recent upgrade. Other required features, such as shell-type elements, spectral elements, efficient explicit and semi-implicit time-stepping, transient sensitivity analysis, and concurrent ensembles, were not componentsmore » of Albany as the project began, and have been (or are being) added by the Aeras team. We present early UQ and performance portability results for the shallow water equations.« less

  6. Aeras: A next generation global atmosphere model

    SciTech Connect

    Spotz, William F.; Smith, Thomas M.; Demeshko, Irina P.; Fike, Jeffrey A.

    2015-06-01

    Sandia National Laboratories is developing a new global atmosphere model named Aeras that is performance portable and supports the quantification of uncertainties. These next-generation capabilities are enabled by building Aeras on top of Albany, a code base that supports the rapid development of scientific application codes while leveraging Sandia's foundational mathematics and computer science packages in Trilinos and Dakota. Embedded uncertainty quantification (UQ) is an original design capability of Albany, and performance portability is a recent upgrade. Other required features, such as shell-type elements, spectral elements, efficient explicit and semi-implicit time-stepping, transient sensitivity analysis, and concurrent ensembles, were not components of Albany as the project began, and have been (or are being) added by the Aeras team. We present early UQ and performance portability results for the shallow water equations.

  7. Model space diabatization for quantum photochemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Shaohong L.; Truhlar, Donald G.; Schmidt, Michael W.; Gordon, Mark S.

    2015-02-14

    Diabatization is a procedure that transforms multiple adiabatic electronic states to a new representation in which the potential energy surfaces and the couplings between states due to the electronic Hamiltonian operator are smooth, and the couplings due to nuclear momentum are negligible. In this work, we propose a simple and general diabatization strategy, called model space diabatization, that is applicable to multi-configuration quasidegenerate perturbation theory (MC-QDPT) or its extended version (XMC-QDPT). An advantage over previous diabatization schemes is that dynamical correlation calculations are based on standard post-multi-configurational self-consistent field (MCSCF) multi-state methods even though the diabatization is based on state-averaged MCSCF results. The strategy is illustrated here by applications to LiH, LiF, and thioanisole, with the fourfold-way diabatization and XMC-QDPT, and the results illustrate its validity.

  8. Global adjoint tomography: First-generation model

    DOE PAGES

    Bozdag, Ebru; Peter, Daniel; Lefebvre, Matthieu; ...

    2016-09-22

    We present the first-generation global tomographic model constructed based on adjoint tomography, an iterative full-waveform inversion technique. Synthetic seismograms were calculated using GPU-accelerated spectral-element simulations of global seismic wave propagation, accommodating effects due to 3-D anelastic crust & mantle structure, topography & bathymetry, the ocean load, ellipticity, rotation, and self-gravitation. Fréchet derivatives were calculated in 3-D anelastic models based on an adjoint-state method. The simulations were performed on the Cray XK7 named ‘Titan’, a computer with 18 688 GPU accelerators housed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The transversely isotropic global model is the result of 15 tomographic iterations, which systematicallymore » reduced differences between observed and simulated three-component seismograms. Our starting model combined 3-D mantle model S362ANI with 3-D crustal model Crust2.0. We simultaneously inverted for structure in the crust and mantle, thereby eliminating the need for widely used ‘crustal corrections’. We used data from 253 earthquakes in the magnitude range 5.8 ≤ Mw ≤ 7.0. We started inversions by combining ~30 s body-wave data with ~60 s surface-wave data. The shortest period of the surface waves was gradually decreased, and in the last three iterations we combined ~17 s body waves with ~45 s surface waves. We started using 180 min long seismograms after the 12th iteration and assimilated minor- and major-arc body and surface waves. The 15th iteration model features enhancements of well-known slabs, an enhanced image of the Samoa/Tahiti plume, as well as various other plumes and hotspots, such as Caroline, Galapagos, Yellowstone and Erebus. Furthermore, we see clear improvements in slab resolution along the Hellenic and Japan Arcs, as well as subduction along the East of Scotia Plate, which does not exist in the starting model. Point-spread function tests demonstrate that we are approaching

  9. Global adjoint tomography: First-generation model

    SciTech Connect

    Bozdag, Ebru; Peter, Daniel; Lefebvre, Matthieu; Komatitsch, Dimitri; Tromp, Jeroen; Hill, Judith C.; Podhorszki, Norbert; Pugmire, David

    2016-09-22

    We present the first-generation global tomographic model constructed based on adjoint tomography, an iterative full-waveform inversion technique. Synthetic seismograms were calculated using GPU-accelerated spectral-element simulations of global seismic wave propagation, accommodating effects due to 3-D anelastic crust & mantle structure, topography & bathymetry, the ocean load, ellipticity, rotation, and self-gravitation. Fréchet derivatives were calculated in 3-D anelastic models based on an adjoint-state method. The simulations were performed on the Cray XK7 named ‘Titan’, a computer with 18 688 GPU accelerators housed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The transversely isotropic global model is the result of 15 tomographic iterations, which systematically reduced differences between observed and simulated three-component seismograms. Our starting model combined 3-D mantle model S362ANI with 3-D crustal model Crust2.0. We simultaneously inverted for structure in the crust and mantle, thereby eliminating the need for widely used ‘crustal corrections’. We used data from 253 earthquakes in the magnitude range 5.8 ≤ Mw ≤ 7.0. We started inversions by combining ~30 s body-wave data with ~60 s surface-wave data. The shortest period of the surface waves was gradually decreased, and in the last three iterations we combined ~17 s body waves with ~45 s surface waves. We started using 180 min long seismograms after the 12th iteration and assimilated minor- and major-arc body and surface waves. The 15th iteration model features enhancements of well-known slabs, an enhanced image of the Samoa/Tahiti plume, as well as various other plumes and hotspots, such as Caroline, Galapagos, Yellowstone and Erebus. Furthermore, we see clear improvements in slab resolution along the Hellenic and Japan Arcs, as well as subduction along the East of Scotia Plate, which does not exist in the starting model. Point-spread function tests demonstrate that we are approaching

  10. Global adjoint tomography: First-generation model

    SciTech Connect

    Bozdag, Ebru; Peter, Daniel; Lefebvre, Matthieu; Komatitsch, Dimitri; Tromp, Jeroen; Hill, Judith C.; Podhorszki, Norbert; Pugmire, David

    2016-09-22

    We present the first-generation global tomographic model constructed based on adjoint tomography, an iterative full-waveform inversion technique. Synthetic seismograms were calculated using GPU-accelerated spectral-element simulations of global seismic wave propagation, accommodating effects due to 3-D anelastic crust & mantle structure, topography & bathymetry, the ocean load, ellipticity, rotation, and self-gravitation. Fréchet derivatives were calculated in 3-D anelastic models based on an adjoint-state method. The simulations were performed on the Cray XK7 named ‘Titan’, a computer with 18 688 GPU accelerators housed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The transversely isotropic global model is the result of 15 tomographic iterations, which systematically reduced differences between observed and simulated three-component seismograms. Our starting model combined 3-D mantle model S362ANI with 3-D crustal model Crust2.0. We simultaneously inverted for structure in the crust and mantle, thereby eliminating the need for widely used ‘crustal corrections’. We used data from 253 earthquakes in the magnitude range 5.8 ≤ Mw ≤ 7.0. We started inversions by combining ~30 s body-wave data with ~60 s surface-wave data. The shortest period of the surface waves was gradually decreased, and in the last three iterations we combined ~17 s body waves with ~45 s surface waves. We started using 180 min long seismograms after the 12th iteration and assimilated minor- and major-arc body and surface waves. The 15th iteration model features enhancements of well-known slabs, an enhanced image of the Samoa/Tahiti plume, as well as various other plumes and hotspots, such as Caroline, Galapagos, Yellowstone and Erebus. Furthermore, we see clear improvements in slab resolution along the Hellenic and Japan Arcs, as well as subduction along the East of Scotia Plate, which does not exist in the starting model. Point-spread function tests demonstrate that we are approaching

  11. Global adjoint tomography: first-generation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozdağ, Ebru; Peter, Daniel; Lefebvre, Matthieu; Komatitsch, Dimitri; Tromp, Jeroen; Hill, Judith; Podhorszki, Norbert; Pugmire, David

    2016-12-01

    We present the first-generation global tomographic model constructed based on adjoint tomography, an iterative full-waveform inversion technique. Synthetic seismograms were calculated using GPU-accelerated spectral-element simulations of global seismic wave propagation, accommodating effects due to 3-D anelastic crust & mantle structure, topography & bathymetry, the ocean load, ellipticity, rotation, and self-gravitation. Fréchet derivatives were calculated in 3-D anelastic models based on an adjoint-state method. The simulations were performed on the Cray XK7 named `Titan', a computer with 18 688 GPU accelerators housed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The transversely isotropic global model is the result of 15 tomographic iterations, which systematically reduced differences between observed and simulated three-component seismograms. Our starting model combined 3-D mantle model S362ANI with 3-D crustal model Crust2.0. We simultaneously inverted for structure in the crust and mantle, thereby eliminating the need for widely used `crustal corrections'. We used data from 253 earthquakes in the magnitude range 5.8 ≤ Mw ≤ 7.0. We started inversions by combining ˜30 s body-wave data with ˜60 s surface-wave data. The shortest period of the surface waves was gradually decreased, and in the last three iterations we combined ˜17 s body waves with ˜45 s surface waves. We started using 180 min long seismograms after the 12th iteration and assimilated minor- and major-arc body and surface waves. The 15th iteration model features enhancements of well-known slabs, an enhanced image of the Samoa/Tahiti plume, as well as various other plumes and hotspots, such as Caroline, Galapagos, Yellowstone and Erebus. Furthermore, we see clear improvements in slab resolution along the Hellenic and Japan Arcs, as well as subduction along the East of Scotia Plate, which does not exist in the starting model. Point-spread function tests demonstrate that we are approaching the resolution

  12. National Space Biomedical Research Institute Education and Public Outreach Program: Education for the next generation of space explorers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLeish, Marlene Y.; Thomson, William A.; Moreno, Nancy; Gannon, Patrick J.; Smith, Roland B.; Houston, Clifford W.; Coulter, Gary; Vogt, Gregory L.

    2007-02-01

    The National Space Biomedical Research Institute (NSBRI) Education and Public Outreach Program (EPOP) is supporting the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) new vision for space exploration by educating and inspiring the next generation of students through a seamless pipeline of kindergarten through postdoctoral education programs. NSBRI EPOP initiatives are designed to train scientists and to communicate the significance of NSBRI science, as well as other space exploration science, to schools, families and lay audiences. The NSBRI EPOP team is comprised of eight main partners: Baylor College of Medicine (BCM), Binghamton University-State University of New York (BUSUNY), Colorado Consortium for Earth and Space Science Education (CCESSE), Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Morehouse School of Medicine (MSM), Mount Sinai School of Medicine (MSSM), Rice University and the University of Texas Medical Branch (RU-UTMB), and Texas A&M University (TAMU). The current kindergarten through undergraduate college (K-16) team, which was funded through an open national competition in 2004, consolidates the past 7 years of K-16 education activities and expands the team's outreach activities to more museums and science centers across the nation. NSBRI also recently expanded its education mission to include doctoral and postdoctoral level programs. This paper describes select K-16 EPOP activities and products developed over the past 7 years, and reports on new activities planned for the next 3 years. The paper also describes plans for a doctoral program and reports on 1st-year outcomes of the new postdoctoral program.

  13. Modeling the reconstructed BAO in Fourier space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Hee-Jong; Beutler, Florian; Ross, Ashley J.; Saito, Shun

    2016-08-01

    The density field reconstruction technique, which partially reverses the non-linear degradation of the Baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) feature in the galaxy redshift surveys, has been successful in substantially improving the cosmology constraints from recent surveys such as Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). We estimate the efficiency of the method as a function of various reconstruction details. To directly quantify the BAO information in non-linear density fields before and after reconstruction, we calculate the cross-correlations (i.e. propagators) of the pre(post)-reconstructed density field with the initial linear field using a mock sample that mimics the clustering of the BOSS galaxies. The results directly provide the BAO damping as a function of wavenumber that can be implemented into the Fisher matrix analysis. We focus on investigating the dependence of the propagator on a choice of smoothing filters and on two major different conventions of the redshift-space density field reconstruction that have been used in literature. By estimating the BAO signal to noise for each case, we predict constraints on the angular diameter distance and Hubble parameter using the Fisher matrix analysis. We thus determine an optimal Gaussian smoothing filter scale for the signal-to-noise level of the BOSS CMASS. We also present appropriate BAO fitting models for different reconstruction methods based on the first- and second-order Lagrangian perturbation theory in Fourier space. Using the mock data, we show that the modified BAO fitting model can substantially improve the accuracy of the BAO position in the best fits as well as the goodness of the fits.

  14. Space Station crew safety - Human factors model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, M. M.; Junge, M. K.

    1984-01-01

    A model of the various human factors issues and interactions that might affect crew safety is developed. The first step addressed systematically the central question: How is this Space Station different from all other spacecraft? A wide range of possible issue was identified and researched. Five major topics of human factors issues that interacted with crew safety resulted: Protocols, Critical Habitability, Work Related Issues, Crew Incapacitation and Personal Choice. Second, an interaction model was developed that would show some degree of cause and effect between objective environmental or operational conditions and the creation of potential safety hazards. The intermediary steps between these two extremes of causality were the effects on human performance and the results of degraded performance. The model contains three milestones: stressor, human performance (degraded) and safety hazard threshold. Between these milestones are two countermeasure intervention points. The first opportunity for intervention is the countermeasure against stress. If this countermeasure fails, performance degrades. The second opportunity for intervention is the countermeasure against error. If this second countermeasure fails, the threshold of a potential safety hazard may be crossed.

  15. Space Station crew safety - Human factors model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, M. M.; Junge, M. K.

    1984-01-01

    A model of the various human factors issues and interactions that might affect crew safety is developed. The first step addressed systematically the central question: How is this Space Station different from all other spacecraft? A wide range of possible issue was identified and researched. Five major topics of human factors issues that interacted with crew safety resulted: Protocols, Critical Habitability, Work Related Issues, Crew Incapacitation and Personal Choice. Second, an interaction model was developed that would show some degree of cause and effect between objective environmental or operational conditions and the creation of potential safety hazards. The intermediary steps between these two extremes of causality were the effects on human performance and the results of degraded performance. The model contains three milestones: stressor, human performance (degraded) and safety hazard threshold. Between these milestones are two countermeasure intervention points. The first opportunity for intervention is the countermeasure against stress. If this countermeasure fails, performance degrades. The second opportunity for intervention is the countermeasure against error. If this second countermeasure fails, the threshold of a potential safety hazard may be crossed.

  16. Improving the physics models in the Space Weather Modeling Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toth, G.; Fang, F.; Frazin, R. A.; Gombosi, T. I.; Ilie, R.; Liemohn, M. W.; Manchester, W. B.; Meng, X.; Pawlowski, D. J.; Ridley, A. J.; Sokolov, I.; van der Holst, B.; Vichare, G.; Yigit, E.; Yu, Y.; Buzulukova, N.; Fok, M. H.; Glocer, A.; Jordanova, V. K.; Welling, D. T.; Zaharia, S. G.

    2010-12-01

    The success of physics based space weather forecasting depends on several factors: we need sufficient amount and quality of timely observational data, we have to understand the physics of the Sun-Earth system well enough, we need sophisticated computational models, and the models have to run faster than real time on the available computational resources. This presentation will focus on a single ingredient, the recent improvements of the mathematical and numerical models in the Space Weather Modeling Framework. We have developed a new physics based CME initiation code using flux emergence from the convection zone solving the equations of radiative magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). Our new lower corona and solar corona models use electron heat conduction, Alfven wave heating, and boundary conditions based on solar tomography. We can obtain a physically consistent solar wind model from the surface of the Sun all the way to the L1 point without artificially changing the polytropic index. The global magnetosphere model can now solve the multi-ion MHD equations and take into account the oxygen outflow from the polar wind model. We have also added the options of solving for Hall MHD and anisotropic pressure. Several new inner magnetosphere models have been added to the framework: CRCM, HEIDI and RAM-SCB. These new models resolve the pitch angle distribution of the trapped particles. The upper atmosphere model GITM has been improved by including a self-consistent equatorial electrodynamics and the effects of solar flares. This presentation will very briefly describe the developments and highlight some results obtained with the improved and new models.

  17. Generation and transport of space charge waves in the University of Maryland Electron Ring (UMER)

    SciTech Connect

    Thangaraj, Jayakar C. T.; Beaudoin, Brian; Feldman, Donald; Kishek, Rami; Bernal, Santiago; Sutter, David; Reiser, Martin; O'Shea, Patrick

    2009-01-22

    An experimental study of longitudinal dynamics of space charge dominated beams is presented. We use drive-laser driven perturbations to study the evolution of space charge waves on an intese electron beam. Collective effects like propagation of space charge waves, superposition of waves and crossing of waves are presented and verified with 1-D cold fluid model theory. Multi-turn transport and other collective effects in UMER are discussed.

  18. Dynamic Gate Product and Artifact Generation from System Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Maddalena; Delp, Christopher; Bindschadler, Duane; Sarrel, Marc; Wollaeger, Ryan; Lam, Doris

    2011-01-01

    Model Based Systems Engineering (MBSE) is gaining acceptance as a way to formalize systems engineering practice through the use of models. The traditional method of producing and managing a plethora of disjointed documents and presentations ("Power-Point Engineering") has proven both costly and limiting as a means to manage the complex and sophisticated specifications of modern space systems. We have developed a tool and method to produce sophisticated artifacts as views and by-products of integrated models, allowing us to minimize the practice of "Power-Point Engineering" from model-based projects and demonstrate the ability of MBSE to work within and supersede traditional engineering practices. This paper describes how we have created and successfully used model-based document generation techniques to extract paper artifacts from complex SysML and UML models in support of successful project reviews. Use of formal SysML and UML models for architecture and system design enables production of review documents, textual artifacts, and analyses that are consistent with one-another and require virtually no labor-intensive maintenance across small-scale design changes and multiple authors. This effort thus enables approaches that focus more on rigorous engineering work and less on "PowerPoint engineering" and production of paper-based documents or their "office-productivity" file equivalents.

  19. Dynamic Gate Product and Artifact Generation from System Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Maddalena; Delp, Christopher; Bindschadler, Duane; Sarrel, Marc; Wollaeger, Ryan; Lam, Doris

    2011-01-01

    Model Based Systems Engineering (MBSE) is gaining acceptance as a way to formalize systems engineering practice through the use of models. The traditional method of producing and managing a plethora of disjointed documents and presentations ("Power-Point Engineering") has proven both costly and limiting as a means to manage the complex and sophisticated specifications of modern space systems. We have developed a tool and method to produce sophisticated artifacts as views and by-products of integrated models, allowing us to minimize the practice of "Power-Point Engineering" from model-based projects and demonstrate the ability of MBSE to work within and supersede traditional engineering practices. This paper describes how we have created and successfully used model-based document generation techniques to extract paper artifacts from complex SysML and UML models in support of successful project reviews. Use of formal SysML and UML models for architecture and system design enables production of review documents, textual artifacts, and analyses that are consistent with one-another and require virtually no labor-intensive maintenance across small-scale design changes and multiple authors. This effort thus enables approaches that focus more on rigorous engineering work and less on "PowerPoint engineering" and production of paper-based documents or their "office-productivity" file equivalents.

  20. Reusable Space Vehicle Ground Operations Baseline Conceptual Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-03-01

    REUSABLE SPACE VEHICLE GROUND OPERATIONS BASELINE CONCEPTUAL MODEL THESIS DENNIS R...United States Air Force, Department of Defense, or the United States Government. AFIT/GLM/ENS/04-12 REUSABLE SPACE VEHICLE GROUND...for the next launch. v AFIT/GLM/ENS/04-12 REUSABLE SPACE VEHICLE GROUND OPERATIONS BASELINE CONCEPTUAL MODEL DENNIS R. MAYNARD

  1. Modelling and Simulation of Electromagnetic Effects in Space Mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebold, F.; Allegranza, C.; Seiler, R.; Junge, A.

    2015-09-01

    When developing electromagnetic devices, modelling and simulation techniques have become powerful tools to facilitate and accelerate the engineering process. This is particularly relevant for space applications in science and Earth observation where the requirements on mechanisms equipment tend to be very mission specific, so that commercial off-the-shelf items cannot be used. With custom designs, the effort on hardware breadboarding and development models might be limited. Therefore there is a high potential to reduce overall development effort and associated cost by an early start of a model assisted approach.The paper discusses the model generation process in a Finite Element Analysis (FEA) environment, including the representation of mechanism components e.g. electric motors and bearings, as well as the external environment in order to cover far-field effects. Particular attention is given to magnetic shielding as currently investigated for future ESA missions, for instance, Solar Orbiter. An approach to correlate the analysis results with test data is outlined, and the necessary test facilities are briefly described. Further electromagnetic effects relevant for space mechanisms comprise eddy current induced losses and magnetic hysteresis where future investigations are planned in order to minimise undesired effects or to optimize performance.

  2. [Analysis of the 4th generation outer space bred Angelica dahurica by FTIR spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yan-ying; Wu, Peng-le; Liu, Mei-yi; Wang, Zhi-zhou; Guo, Xi-hua; Guan, Ying

    2012-03-01

    The major components of the 4th generation outer space bred angelica and the ground group were determined and analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and second derivative spectrum, considering the large mutation of the plants with space mutagenesis. The results show that the content of the coumarin (1741 cm(-1)), which is the main active components of the space angelica dahurica increased, and the content of the protein (1 459, 1 419 cm(-1)) and the fat (930 cm(-1)) increased slightly, whereas the content of the starch and the dietary fiber reduced drastically. There are obvious differences between the peak values of the second derivative spectra of the plants, revealing that the outer space angelica dahurica contained amine component at 1 279 cm(-1). Space mutation breeding is favor of breeding angelica with better idiosyncrasy.

  3. Modelling harmonic generation measurements in solids.

    PubMed

    Best, S R; Croxford, A J; Neild, S A

    2014-02-01

    Harmonic generation measurements typically make use of the plane wave result when extracting values for the nonlinearity parameter, β, from experimental measurements. This approach, however, ignores the effects of diffraction, attenuation, and receiver integration which are common features in a typical experiment. Our aim is to determine the importance of these effects when making measurements of β over different sample dimensions, or using different input frequencies. We describe a three-dimensional numerical model designed to accurately predict the results of a typical experiment, based on a quasi-linear assumption. An experiment is designed to measure the axial variation of the fundamental and second harmonic amplitude components in an ultrasonic beam, and the results are compared with those predicted by the model. The absolute β values are then extracted from the experimental data using both the simulation and the standard plane wave result. A difference is observed between the values returned by the two methods, which varies with axial range and input frequency.

  4. Monitoring of facial stress during space flight: Optical computer recognition combining discriminative and generative methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinges, David F.; Venkataraman, Sundara; McGlinchey, Eleanor L.; Metaxas, Dimitris N.

    2007-02-01

    Astronauts are required to perform mission-critical tasks at a high level of functional capability throughout spaceflight. Stressors can compromise their ability to do so, making early objective detection of neurobehavioral problems in spaceflight a priority. Computer optical approaches offer a completely unobtrusive way to detect distress during critical operations in space flight. A methodology was developed and a study completed to determine whether optical computer recognition algorithms could be used to discriminate facial expressions during stress induced by performance demands. Stress recognition from a facial image sequence is a subject that has not received much attention although it is an important problem for many applications beyond space flight (security, human-computer interaction, etc.). This paper proposes a comprehensive method to detect stress from facial image sequences by using a model-based tracker. The image sequences were captured as subjects underwent a battery of psychological tests under high- and low-stress conditions. A cue integration-based tracking system accurately captured the rigid and non-rigid parameters of different parts of the face (eyebrows, lips). The labeled sequences were used to train the recognition system, which consisted of generative (hidden Markov model) and discriminative (support vector machine) parts that yield results superior to using either approach individually. The current optical algorithm methods performed at a 68% accuracy rate in an experimental study of 60 healthy adults undergoing periods of high-stress versus low-stress performance demands. Accuracy and practical feasibility of the technique is being improved further with automatic multi-resolution selection for the discretization of the mask, and automated face detection and mask initialization algorithms.

  5. Space-Time Areal Mixture Model: Relabeling Algorithm and Model Selection Issues.

    PubMed

    Hossain, M M; Lawson, A B; Cai, B; Choi, J; Liu, J; Kirby, R S

    2014-03-01

    With the growing popularity of spatial mixture models in cluster analysis, model selection criteria have become an established tool in the search for parsimony. However, the label-switching problem is often inherent in Bayesian implementation of mixture models and a variety of relabeling algorithms have been proposed. We use a space-time mixture of Poisson regression models with homogeneous covariate effects to illustrate that the best model selected by using model selection criteria does not always support the model that is chosen by the optimal relabeling algorithm. The results are illustrated for real and simulated datasets. The objective is to make the reader aware that if the purpose of statistical modeling is to identify clusters, applying a relabeling algorithm to the model with the best fit may not generate the optimal relabeling.

  6. A geometric model of defensive peripersonal space.

    PubMed

    Bufacchi, R J; Liang, M; Griffin, L D; Iannetti, G D

    2016-01-01

    Potentially harmful stimuli occurring within the defensive peripersonal space (DPPS), a protective area surrounding the body, elicit stronger defensive reactions. The spatial features of the DPPS are poorly defined and limited to descriptive estimates of its extent along a single dimension. Here we postulated a family of geometric models of the DPPS, to address two important questions with respect to its spatial features: What is its fine-grained topography? How does the nervous system represent the body area to be defended? As a measure of the DPPS, we used the strength of the defensive blink reflex elicited by electrical stimulation of the hand (hand-blink reflex, HBR), which is reliably modulated by the position of the stimulated hand in egocentric coordinates. We tested the goodness of fit of the postulated models to HBR data from six experiments in which we systematically explored the HBR modulation by hand position in both head-centered and body-centered coordinates. The best-fitting model indicated that 1) the nervous system's representation of the body area defended by the HBR can be approximated by a half-ellipsoid centered on the face and 2) the DPPS extending from this area has the shape of a bubble elongated along the vertical axis. Finally, the empirical observation that the HBR is modulated by hand position in head-centered coordinates indicates that the DPPS is anchored to the face. The modeling approach described in this article can be generalized to describe the spatial modulation of any defensive response. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  7. Concatenated shift registers generating maximally spaced phase shifts of PN-sequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurd, W. J.; Welch, L. R.

    1977-01-01

    A large class of linearly concatenated shift registers is shown to generate approximately maximally spaced phase shifts of pn-sequences, for use in pseudorandom number generation. A constructive method is presented for finding members of this class, for almost all degrees for which primitive trinomials exist. The sequences which result are not normally characterized by trinomial recursions, which is desirable since trinomial sequences can have some undesirable randomness properties.

  8. International Space Station Radiation Shielding Model Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Qualls, G. D.; Wilson, J. W.; Sandridge, C.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Nealy, J. E.; Heinbockel, J. H.; Hugger, C. P.; Verhage, J.; Anderson, B. M.; Atwell, W.

    2001-01-01

    The projected radiation levels within the International Space Station (ISS) have been criticized by the Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel in their report to the NASA Administrator. Methods for optimal reconfiguration and augmentation of the ISS shielding are now being developed. The initial steps are to develop reconfigurable and realistic radiation shield models of the ISS modules, develop computational procedures for the highly anisotropic radiation environment, and implement parametric and organizational optimization procedures. The targets of the redesign process are the crew quarters where the astronauts sleep and determining the effects of ISS shadow shielding of an astronaut in a spacesuit. The ISS model as developed will be reconfigurable to follow the ISS. Swapping internal equipment rack assemblies via location mapping tables will be one option for shield optimization. Lightweight shield augmentation materials will be optimally fit to crew quarter areas using parametric optimization procedures to minimize the augmentation shield mass. The optimization process is being integrated into the Intelligence Synthesis Environment s (ISE s) immersive simulation facility at the Langley Research Center and will rely on High Performance Computing and Communication (HPCC) for rapid evaluation of shield parameter gradients.

  9. International Space Station Radiation Shielding Model Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Qualls, G. D.; Wilson, J. W.; Sandridge, C.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Nealy, J. E.; Heinbockel, J. H.; Hugger, C. P.; Verhage, J.; Anderson, B. M.; Atwell, W.

    2001-01-01

    The projected radiation levels within the International Space Station (ISS) have been criticized by the Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel in their report to the NASA Administrator. Methods for optimal reconfiguration and augmentation of the ISS shielding are now being developed. The initial steps are to develop reconfigurable and realistic radiation shield models of the ISS modules, develop computational procedures for the highly anisotropic radiation environment, and implement parametric and organizational optimization procedures. The targets of the redesign process are the crew quarters where the astronauts sleep and determining the effects of ISS shadow shielding of an astronaut in a spacesuit. The ISS model as developed will be reconfigurable to follow the ISS. Swapping internal equipment rack assemblies via location mapping tables will be one option for shield optimization. Lightweight shield augmentation materials will be optimally fit to crew quarter areas using parametric optimization procedures to minimize the augmentation shield mass. The optimization process is being integrated into the Intelligence Synthesis Environment s (ISE s) immersive simulation facility at the Langley Research Center and will rely on High Performance Computing and Communication (HPCC) for rapid evaluation of shield parameter gradients.

  10. Attribute classification for generating GPR facies models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tronicke, Jens; Allroggen, Niklas

    2017-04-01

    Ground-penetrating radar (GPR) is an established geophysical tool to explore near-surface sedimentary environments. It has been successfully used, for example, to reconstruct past depositional environments, to investigate sedimentary processes, to aid hydrogeological investigations, and to assist in hydrocarbon reservoir analog studies. Interpreting such 2D/3D GPR data, usually relies on concepts known as GPR facies analysis, in which GPR facies are defined as units composed of characteristic reflection patterns (in terms of reflection amplitude, continuity, geometry, and internal configuration). The resulting facies models are then interpreted in terms of depositional processes, sedimentary environments, litho-, and hydrofacies. Typically, such GPR facies analyses are implemented in a manual workflow being laborious and rather inefficient especially for 3D data sets. In addition, such a subjective strategy bears the potential of inconsistency because the outcome depends on the expertise and experience of the interpreter. In this presentation, we investigate the feasibility of delineating GPR facies in an objective and largely automated manner. Our proposed workflow relies on a three-step procedure. First, we calculate a variety of geometrical and physical attributes from processed 2D and 3D GPR data sets. Then, we analyze and evaluate this attribute data base (e.g., using statistical tools such as principal component analysis) to reduce its dimensionality and to avoid redundant information, respectively. Finally, we integrate the reduced data base using tools such as composite imaging, cluster analysis, and neural networks. Using field examples that have been acquired across different depositional environments, we demonstrate that the resulting 2D/3D facies models ease and improve the interpretation of GPR data. We conclude that our interpretation strategy allows to generate GPR facies models in a consistent and largely automated manner and might be helpful in

  11. CFD Modeling Activities at the NASA Stennis Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allgood, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on NASA Stennis Space Center's Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Modeling activities is shown. The topics include: 1) Overview of NASA Stennis Space Center; 2) Role of Computational Modeling at NASA-SSC; 3) Computational Modeling Tools and Resources; and 4) CFD Modeling Applications.

  12. MEMOPS: data modelling and automatic code generation.

    PubMed

    Fogh, Rasmus H; Boucher, Wayne; Ionides, John M C; Vranken, Wim F; Stevens, Tim J; Laue, Ernest D

    2010-03-25

    In recent years the amount of biological data has exploded to the point where much useful information can only be extracted by complex computational analyses. Such analyses are greatly facilitated by metadata standards, both in terms of the ability to compare data originating from different sources, and in terms of exchanging data in standard forms, e.g. when running processes on a distributed computing infrastructure. However, standards thrive on stability whereas science tends to constantly move, with new methods being developed and old ones modified. Therefore maintaining both metadata standards, and all the code that is required to make them useful, is a non-trivial problem. Memops is a framework that uses an abstract definition of the metadata (described in UML) to generate internal data structures and subroutine libraries for data access (application programming interfaces--APIs--currently in Python, C and Java) and data storage (in XML files or databases). For the individual project these libraries obviate the need for writing code for input parsing, validity checking or output. Memops also ensures that the code is always internally consistent, massively reducing the need for code reorganisation. Across a scientific domain a Memops-supported data model makes it easier to support complex standards that can capture all the data produced in a scientific area, share them among all programs in a complex software pipeline, and carry them forward to deposition in an archive. The principles behind the Memops generation code will be presented, along with example applications in Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and structural biology.

  13. Modeling and control of fuel cell based distributed generation systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Jin Woo

    This dissertation presents circuit models and control algorithms of fuel cell based distributed generation systems (DGS) for two DGS topologies. In the first topology, each DGS unit utilizes a battery in parallel to the fuel cell in a standalone AC power plant and a grid-interconnection. In the second topology, a Z-source converter, which employs both the L and C passive components and shoot-through zero vectors instead of the conventional DC/DC boost power converter in order to step up the DC-link voltage, is adopted for a standalone AC power supply. In Topology 1, two applications are studied: a standalone power generation (Single DGS Unit and Two DGS Units) and a grid-interconnection. First, dynamic model of the fuel cell is given based on electrochemical process. Second, two full-bridge DC to DC converters are adopted and their controllers are designed: an unidirectional full-bridge DC to DC boost converter for the fuel cell and a bidirectional full-bridge DC to DC buck/boost converter for the battery. Third, for a three-phase DC to AC inverter without or with a Delta/Y transformer, a discrete-time state space circuit model is given and two discrete-time feedback controllers are designed: voltage controller in the outer loop and current controller in the inner loop. And last, for load sharing of two DGS units and power flow control of two DGS units or the DGS connected to the grid, real and reactive power controllers are proposed. Particularly, for the grid-connected DGS application, a synchronization issue between an islanding mode and a paralleling mode to the grid is investigated, and two case studies are performed. To demonstrate the proposed circuit models and control strategies, simulation test-beds using Matlab/Simulink are constructed for each configuration of the fuel cell based DGS with a three-phase AC 120 V (L-N)/60 Hz/50 kVA and various simulation results are presented. In Topology 2, this dissertation presents system modeling, modified space

  14. Models of anxiety: responses of rats to novelty in an open space and an enclosed space.

    PubMed

    Ennaceur, A; Michalikova, S; Chazot, P L

    2006-07-15

    Exposure to novelty has been shown to induce anxiety responses in a variety of behavioural paradigms. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether exposition of naïve rats to novelty would result in a comparable or a different pattern of responses in an open space versus enclosed space with or without the presence of an object in the centre of the field. Lewis and Wistar rats of both genders were used to illustrate and discuss the value and validity of these anxiety paradigms. We examined a wide range of measures, which cover several aspects of animals' responses. The results of this study revealed significant differences between the behaviour of animals in an open space and in the enclosed space. It also revealed significant differences in animal's responses to the presence and absence of an object in the open space and in the enclosed space. In the enclosed space, rats spent most of their time in the outer area with lower number of exits and avoided the object area except when there was an object, while in the open space rats displayed frequent short duration re-entries in the outer area and spent longer time in the object area in presence of an object. The time spent in the inner area (away from the outer area and the object area) was significantly longer and the number of faecal boli was significantly higher in the open space than in the enclosed space. In the present report, we will discuss the fundamental differences between enclosed space and open space models, and we will examine some methodological issues related to the current animal models of human behaviour in anxiety. In the enclosed space, animals can avoid the potential threat associated with the centre area of a box and chose the safety of walls and corners, whereas, in the open space animals have to avoid every parts of the field from which there was no safe escape. The response of animals to novelty in an open space model appears more relevant to anxiety than in an enclosed space

  15. Enabling Future Science and Human Exploration with NASA's Next Generation near Earth and Deep Space Communications and Navigation Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinhart, Richard C.; Schier, James S.; Israel, David J.; Tai, Wallace; Liebrecht, Philip E.; Townes, Stephen A.

    2017-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is studying alternatives for the United States space communications architecture through the 2040 timeframe. This architecture provides communication and navigation services to both human exploration and science missions throughout the solar system. Several of NASA's key space assets are approaching their end of design life and major systems are in need of replacement. The changes envisioned in the relay satellite architecture and capabilities around both Earth and Mars are significant undertakings and occur only once or twice each generation, and therefore is referred to as NASA's next generation space communications architecture. NASA's next generation architecture will benefit from technology and services developed over recent years. These innovations will provide missions with new operations concepts, increased performance, and new business and operating models. Advancements in optical communications will enable high-speed data channels and the use of new and more complex science instruments. Modern multiple beam/multiple access technologies such as those employed on commercial high throughput satellites will enable enhanced capabilities for on-demand service, and with new protocols will help provide Internet-like connectivity for cooperative spacecraft to improve data return and coordinate joint mission objectives. On-board processing with autonomous and cognitive networking will play larger roles to help manage system complexity. Spacecraft and ground systems will coordinate among themselves to establish communications, negotiate link connectivity, and learn to share spectrum to optimize resource allocation. Spacecraft will autonomously navigate, plan trajectories, and handle off-nominal events. NASA intends to leverage the ever-expanding capabilities of the satellite communications industry and foster its continued growth. NASA's technology development will complement and extend commercial capabilities

  16. Entanglement generation due to the background electric field and curvature of space-time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebadi, Zahra; Mirza, Behrouz

    2015-02-01

    In Schwinger effect, quantum vacuum instability under the influence of an electric field leads to decay of vacuum into pairs of charged particles. We consider the entanglement of pair produced particles. We will show that the measure of entanglement depends on the geometry of space-time. Using the Schwinger pair production in curved space-time, dS2 and AdS2, we propose and demonstrate that the electric field can generate entanglement. In dS2 space-time, we study entanglement for scalar particles with zero spin in the absence and presence of a constant electric field. We show that the entanglement entropy depends on the choice of the α-vacua. But, for some values of the related parameters (mass, charge, scalar curvature, electric field), the entanglement entropy is independent of α. Also, we consider the generation of entanglement in the presence of a constant electric field for anti-de Sitter space-time. We will show that the positive (negative) curvature of space-time upgrades (degrades) the generated entanglement.

  17. Process Improvement for Next Generation Space Flight Vehicles: MSFC Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Housch, Helen

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the lessons learned from process improvement for Next Generation Space Flight Vehicles. The contents include: 1) Organizational profile; 2) Process Improvement History; 3) Appraisal Preparation; 4) The Appraisal Experience; 5) Useful Tools; and 6) Is CMMI working?

  18. The Effects of Space Charge in a Hypersonic Magnetohydrodynamic Power Generator

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-01

    MHD Power Demonstration – HVEPS Project Overview,” AIAA-2006-8010, 14th AIAA/ AHI International Space Planes and Hypersonic Systems and Technologies...Magnetohydrodynamic Generator Design”, AFRL-PR-WP-TR-2006-2072, February 2006. Electronic Publications 30. Martinez, Marty, “General Atomics Scores Power

  19. The Next Generation Special Sensor Ultraviolet Limb Imager (SSULI+) for Operational Defense Space Weather Monitoring and Forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholas, A. C.; Budzien, S. A.; Dymond, K.; Coker, C.; Chua, D. H.; Walker, P. W.

    2013-05-01

    The Special Sensor Ultraviolet Limb Imager (SSULI) sensors aboard the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) Block-5D3 satellites have successfully demonstrated both space weather sensing of the thermosphere and ionosphere and the high impact potential of UV remote sensing upon global assimilative operational ionosphere and thermosphere models. NRL is currently developing next-generation SSULI+ space weather sensors to maintain operational space weather sensing capability beyond the DMSP program. Applying recent technological innovations to update the proven heritage design provides SSULI+ with 10X higher effective sensitivity, robust rejection of environmental ion noise, and added measurement capability while reducing size, weight, and power requirements. We present data product improvements expected for the new SSULI+ sensor design and discuss the positive impact upon operational applications.

  20. The Next Generation Special Sensor Ultraviolet Limb Imager (SSULI+) for Operational Defense Space Weather Monitoring and Forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budzien, S. A.; Nicholas, A. C.; Coker, C.; Dymond, K.; Chua, D. H.; Walker, P. W.

    2012-12-01

    The Special Sensor Ultraviolet Limb Imager (SSULI) sensors aboard the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) Block-5D3 satellites have successfully demonstrated both space weather sensing of the thermosphere and ionosphere and the high impact potential of UV remote sensing upon global assimilative operational ionosphere and thermosphere models. NRL is currently developing next-generation SSULI+ space weather sensors to maintain operational space weather sensing capability beyond the DMSP program. Applying recent technological innovations to update the proven heritage design provides SSULI+ with 10X higher sensitivity, robust rejection of environmental ion noise, and added measurement capability while reducing size, weight, and power requirements. We present data product improvements expected for the new SSULI+ sensor design and discuss the positive impact upon operational applications.

  1. Calculation reduction method for color digital holography and computer-generated hologram using color space conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimobaba, Tomoyoshi; Nagahama, Yuki; Kakue, Takashi; Takada, Naoki; Okada, Naohisa; Endo, Yutaka; Hirayama, Ryuji; Hiyama, Daisuke; Ito, Tomoyoshi

    2014-02-01

    A calculation reduction method for color digital holography (DH) and computer-generated holograms (CGHs) using color space conversion is reported. Color DH and color CGHs are generally calculated on RGB space. We calculate color DH and CGHs in other color spaces for accelerating the calculation (e.g., YCbCr color space). In YCbCr color space, a RGB image or RGB hologram is converted to the luminance component (Y), blue-difference chroma (Cb), and red-difference chroma (Cr) components. In terms of the human eye, although the negligible difference of the luminance component is well recognized, the difference of the other components is not. In this method, the luminance component is normal sampled and the chroma components are down-sampled. The down-sampling allows us to accelerate the calculation of the color DH and CGHs. We compute diffraction calculations from the components, and then we convert the diffracted results in YCbCr color space to RGB color space. The proposed method, which is possible to accelerate the calculations up to a factor of 3 in theory, accelerates the calculation over two times faster than the ones in RGB color space.

  2. Status of the International Space Station Regenerative ECLSS Water Recovery and Oxygen Generation Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bagdigian, Robert M.; Cloud, Dale

    2005-01-01

    NASA is developing three racks containing regenerative water recovery and oxygen generation systems (WRS and OGS) for deployment on the International Space Station (ISS). The major assemblies included in these racks are the Water Processor Assembly (WPA), Urine Processor Assembly (UPA), Oxygen Generation Assembly (OGA), and the Power Supply Module (PSM) supporting the OGA. The WPA and OGA are provided by Hamilton Sundstrand Space Systems International (HSSSI), Inc., while the UPA and PSM are developed in- house by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The assemblies have completed the manufacturing phase and are in various stages of testing and integration into the flight racks. This paper summarizes the status as of April 2005 and describes some of the technical challenges encountered and lessons learned over the past year.

  3. Fronts from two-dimensional dispersal kernels: Beyond the nonoverlapping-generations model.

    PubMed

    Amor, Daniel R; Fort, Joaquim

    2009-11-01

    Most integrodifference models of biological invasions are based on the nonoverlapping-generations approximation. However, the effect of multiple reproduction events (overlapping generations) on the front speed can be very important (especially for species with a long life spam). Only in one-dimensional space has this approximation been relaxed previously, although almost all biological invasions take place in two dimensions. Here we present a model that takes into account the overlapping generations effect (or, more generally, the stage structure of the population), and we analyze the main differences with the corresponding nonoverlapping-generations results.

  4. Evolving the NASA Near Earth Network for the Next Generation of Human Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Christopher J.; Carter, David L.; Hudiburg, John J.; Tye, Robert N.; Celeste, Peter B.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present the planned development and evolution of the NASA Near Earth Network (NEN) launch communications services in support of the next generation of human space flight programs. Following the final space shuttle mission in 2011, the two NEN launch communications stations were decommissioned. Today, NASA is developing the next generation of human space flight systems focused on exploration missions beyond low-earth orbit, and supporting the emerging market for commercial crew and cargo human space flight services. The NEN is leading a major initiative to develop a modern high data rate launch communications ground architecture with support from the Kennedy Space Center Ground Systems Development and Operations Program and in partnership with the U.S. Air Force (USAF) Eastern Range. This initiative, the NEN Launch Communications Stations (LCS) development project, successfully completed its System Requirements Review in November 2013. This paper provides an overview of the LCS project and a summary of its progress. The LCS ground architecture, concept of operations, and driving requirements to support the new heavy-lift Space Launch System and Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle for Exploration Mission-1 are presented. Finally, potential future extensions to the ground architecture beyond EM-1 are discussed.

  5. Model Based Analysis and Test Generation for Flight Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pasareanu, Corina S.; Schumann, Johann M.; Mehlitz, Peter C.; Lowry, Mike R.; Karsai, Gabor; Nine, Harmon; Neema, Sandeep

    2009-01-01

    We describe a framework for model-based analysis and test case generation in the context of a heterogeneous model-based development paradigm that uses and combines Math- Works and UML 2.0 models and the associated code generation tools. This paradigm poses novel challenges to analysis and test case generation that, to the best of our knowledge, have not been addressed before. The framework is based on a common intermediate representation for different modeling formalisms and leverages and extends model checking and symbolic execution tools for model analysis and test case generation, respectively. We discuss the application of our framework to software models for a NASA flight mission.

  6. Markov models of molecular kinetics: generation and validation.

    PubMed

    Prinz, Jan-Hendrik; Wu, Hao; Sarich, Marco; Keller, Bettina; Senne, Martin; Held, Martin; Chodera, John D; Schütte, Christof; Noé, Frank

    2011-05-07

    Markov state models of molecular kinetics (MSMs), in which the long-time statistical dynamics of a molecule is approximated by a Markov chain on a discrete partition of configuration space, have seen widespread use in recent years. This approach has many appealing characteristics compared to straightforward molecular dynamics simulation and analysis, including the potential to mitigate the sampling problem by extracting long-time kinetic information from short trajectories and the ability to straightforwardly calculate expectation values and statistical uncertainties of various stationary and dynamical molecular observables. In this paper, we summarize the current state of the art in generation and validation of MSMs and give some important new results. We describe an upper bound for the approximation error made by modeling molecular dynamics with a MSM and we show that this error can be made arbitrarily small with surprisingly little effort. In contrast to previous practice, it becomes clear that the best MSM is not obtained by the most metastable discretization, but the MSM can be much improved if non-metastable states are introduced near the transition states. Moreover, we show that it is not necessary to resolve all slow processes by the state space partitioning, but individual dynamical processes of interest can be resolved separately. We also present an efficient estimator for reversible transition matrices and a robust test to validate that a MSM reproduces the kinetics of the molecular dynamics data.

  7. Macro Level Simulation Model Of Space Shuttle Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The contents include: 1) Space Shuttle Processing Simulation Model; 2) Knowledge Acquisition; 3) Simulation Input Analysis; 4) Model Applications in Current Shuttle Environment; and 5) Model Applications for Future Reusable Launch Vehicles (RLV's). This paper is presented in viewgraph form.

  8. An Approach to Integrate a Space-Time GIS Data Model with High Performance Computers

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Dali; Zhao, Ziliang; Shaw, Shih-Lung

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we describe an approach to integrate a Space-Time GIS data model on a high performance computing platform. The Space-Time GIS data model has been developed on a desktop computing environment. We use the Space-Time GIS data model to generate GIS module, which organizes a series of remote sensing data. We are in the process of porting the GIS module into an HPC environment, in which the GIS modules handle large dataset directly via parallel file system. Although it is an ongoing project, authors hope this effort can inspire further discussions on the integration of GIS on high performance computing platforms.

  9. Process modelling for Space Station experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, J. Iwan D.; Rosenberger, Franz; Nadarajah, Arunan; Ouazzani, Jalil; Amiroudine, Sakir

    1990-01-01

    Examined here is the sensitivity of a variety of space experiments to residual accelerations. In all the cases discussed the sensitivity is related to the dynamic response of a fluid. In some cases the sensitivity can be defined by the magnitude of the response of the velocity field. This response may involve motion of the fluid associated with internal density gradients, or the motion of a free liquid surface. For fluids with internal density gradients, the type of acceleration to which the experiment is sensitive will depend on whether buoyancy driven convection must be small in comparison to other types of fluid motion, or fluid motion must be suppressed or eliminated. In the latter case, the experiments are sensitive to steady and low frequency accelerations. For experiments such as the directional solidification of melts with two or more components, determination of the velocity response alone is insufficient to assess the sensitivity. The effect of the velocity on the composition and temperature field must be considered, particularly in the vicinity of the melt-crystal interface. As far as the response to transient disturbances is concerned, the sensitivity is determined by both the magnitude and frequency of the acceleration and the characteristic momentum and solute diffusion times. The microgravity environment, a numerical analysis of low gravity tolerance of the Bridgman-Stockbarger technique, and modeling crystal growth by physical vapor transport in closed ampoules are discussed.

  10. An Exploratory Study of Thermoelectrostatic Power Generation for Space Flight Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beam, Benjamin H.

    1960-01-01

    A study has been made of a process in which a solar heating cycle is combined with an electrostatic cycle for generating electrical power for space vehicle applications. The power unit, referred to as a thermoelectrostatic generator, is a thin film, solid dielectric capacitor alternately heated by solar radiation and cooled by radiant emission. The theory of operation to extract electrical power is presented. Results of an experiment to illustrate the principle are described. Estimates of the performance of this type of device in space in the vicinity of earth are included. Values of specific power of several kilowatts per kilogram of generator weight are calculated for such a device employing polyethylene terephthalate dielectric.

  11. A MODEL FOR PROJECTING COSTS OF SPACE EXPLORATION,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    A model was developed for determining the costs of advanced space hardware and for assessing the budgetary implications of integrated space ... exploration plans. The model has three basic characteristics: (1) it is a longrange planning model; (2) it estimates the resource implications of

  12. Valuation of financial models with non-linear state spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webber, Nick

    2001-02-01

    A common assumption in valuation models for derivative securities is that the underlying state variables take values in a linear state space. We discuss numerical implementation issues in an interest rate model with a simple non-linear state space, formulating and comparing Monte Carlo, finite difference and lattice numerical solution methods. We conclude that, at least in low dimensional spaces, non-linear interest rate models may be viable.

  13. Process Model for Defining Space Sensing and Situational Awareness Requirements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-04-01

    process model for defining systems for space sensing and space situational awareness is presented. The paper concentrates on eight steps for determining the requirements to include: decision maker needs, system requirements, exploitation methods and vulnerabilities, critical capabilities, and identify attack scenarios. Utilization of the USAF anti-tamper (AT) implementation process as a process model departure point for the space sensing and situational awareness (SSSA...is presented. The AT implementation process model , as an

  14. Pore-space alteration in source rock (shales) during hydrocarbons generation: laboratory experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giliazetdinova, D. R.; Korost, D. V.; Nadezhkin, D. V.

    2013-12-01

    Hydrocarbons (HC) are generated from solid organic matter (kerogen) due to thermocatalytic reactions. The rate of such reactions shows direct correlation with temperature and depends on the depth of source rock burial. Burial of sedimentary rock is also inevitably accompanied by its structural alteration owing to compaction, dehydration and re-crystallization. Processes of HC generation, primary migration and structural changes are inaccessible for direct observation in nature, but they can be studied in laboratory experiments. Experiment was carried out with a clayey-carbonate rock sample of the Domanik Horizon taken from boreholes drilled in the northeastern part of the south Tatar arch. The rock chosen fits the very essential requirements - high organic matter content and its low metamorphic grade. Our work aimed at laboratory modeling of HC generation in an undisturbed rock sample by its heating in nitrogen atmosphere based on a specified temperature regime and monitoring alterations in the pore space structure. Observations were carried out with a SkyScan-1172 X-ray microtomography scanner (resulting scan resolution of 1 μm). A cylinder, 44 mm in diameter, was prepared from the rock sample for the pyrolitic and microtomographic analyses. Scanning procedures were carried out in 5 runs. Temperature interval for each run had to match the most important stage of HC generation in the source rock, namely: (1) original structure; (2) 100-300°C - discharge of free and adsorbed HC and water; (3) 300-400°C - initial stage of HC formation owing to high-temperature pyrolysis of the solid organic matter and discharge of the chemically bound water; (4) 400-470°C - temperature interval fitting the most intense stage of HC formation; (5) 470-510°C - final stage of HC formation. Maximum sample heating in the experiment was determined as temperature of the onset of active decomposition of carbonates, i.e., in essence, irreversible metamorphism of the rock. Additional

  15. Advancing Space Sciences through Undergraduate Research Experiences at UC Berkeley's Space Sciences Laboratory - a novel approach to undergraduate internships for first generation community college students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raftery, C. L.; Davis, H. B.; Peticolas, L. M.; Paglierani, R.

    2015-12-01

    The Space Sciences Laboratory at UC Berkeley launched an NSF-funded Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) program in the summer of 2015. The "Advancing Space Sciences through Undergraduate Research Experiences" (ASSURE) program recruited heavily from local community colleges and universities, and provided a multi-tiered mentorship program for students in the fields of space science and engineering. The program was focussed on providing a supportive environment for 2nd and 3rd year undergraduates, many of whom were first generation and underrepresented students. This model provides three levels of mentorship support for the participating interns: 1) the primary research advisor provides academic and professional support. 2) The program coordinator, who meets with the interns multiple times per week, provides personal support and helps the interns to assimilate into the highly competitive environment of the research laboratory. 3) Returning undergraduate interns provided peer support and guidance to the new cohort of students. The impacts of this program on the first generation students and the research mentors, as well as the lessons learned will be discussed.

  16. Generative Learning Management: A Hypothetical Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osterberg, Peter

    2004-01-01

    It is proposed that to reach a state of generative learning, an organization requires a "generative learning manager": a person who understands the importance of development and directing of knowledge. The purpose of this study was, therefore, both to explain mechanisms like knowledge distribution, goal setting and symbolic convergence from a…

  17. A Model for Generative Harmonic Dictation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bales, W. Kenton

    This BASIC computer program designed to help music theory students practice harmonic dictation generates examples for students to use in a drill and practice approach in developing aural skills. To facilitate the implementation of effective generative algorithms, the author has used a non-linear analytical technique similar to the chord symbol…

  18. In-space production of large space systems from extraterrestrial materials: A program implementation model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vontiesenhausen, G. F.

    1977-01-01

    A program implementation model is presented which covers the in-space construction of certain large space systems from extraterrestrial materials. The model includes descriptions of major program elements and subelements and their operational requirements and technology readiness requirements. It provides a structure for future analysis and development.

  19. A Model for E-Education: Extended Teaching Spaces and Extended Learning Spaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jung, Insung; Latchem, Colin

    2011-01-01

    The paper proposes a model for e-education in instruction, training, initiation and induction based upon the concept of extended teaching spaces involving execution, facilitation and liberation, and extended learning spaces used for acquisition, application and construction cemented by dialogue and reflection. The proposed model is based upon…

  20. Simulation Modeling and Performance Evaluation of Space Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jennings, Esther H.; Segui, John

    2006-01-01

    In space exploration missions, the coordinated use of spacecraft as communication relays increases the efficiency of the endeavors. To conduct trade-off studies of the performance and resource usage of different communication protocols and network designs, JPL designed a comprehensive extendable tool, the Multi-mission Advanced Communications Hybrid Environment for Test and Evaluation (MACHETE). The design and development of MACHETE began in 2000 and is constantly evolving. Currently, MACHETE contains Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems (CCSDS) protocol standards such as Proximity-1, Advanced Orbiting Systems (AOS), Packet Telemetry/Telecommand, Space Communications Protocol Specification (SCPS), and the CCSDS File Delivery Protocol (CFDP). MACHETE uses the Aerospace Corporation s Satellite Orbital Analysis Program (SOAP) to generate the orbital geometry information and contact opportunities. Matlab scripts provide the link characteristics. At the core of MACHETE is a discrete event simulator, QualNet. Delay Tolerant Networking (DTN) is an end-to-end architecture providing communication in and/or through highly stressed networking environments. Stressed networking environments include those with intermittent connectivity, large and/or variable delays, and high bit error rates. To provide its services, the DTN protocols reside at the application layer of the constituent internets, forming a store-and-forward overlay network. The key capabilities of the bundling protocols include custody-based reliability, ability to cope with intermittent connectivity, ability to take advantage of scheduled and opportunistic connectivity, and late binding of names to addresses. In this presentation, we report on the addition of MACHETE models needed to support DTN, namely: the Bundle Protocol (BP) model. To illustrate the use of MACHETE with the additional DTN model, we provide an example simulation to benchmark its performance. We demonstrate the use of the DTN protocol