Science.gov

Sample records for modeling 304l stainless

  1. Experiments for calibration and validation of plasticity and failure material modeling: 304L stainless steel.

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Kenneth L.; Korellis, John S.; McFadden, Sam X.

    2006-01-01

    Experimental data for material plasticity and failure model calibration and validation were obtained from 304L stainless steel. Model calibration data were taken from smooth tension, notched tension, and compression tests. Model validation data were provided from experiments using thin-walled tube specimens subjected to path dependent combinations of internal pressure, extension, and torsion.

  2. Numerical Simulation and Artificial Neural Network Modeling for Predicting Welding-Induced Distortion in Butt-Welded 304L Stainless Steel Plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanareddy, V. V.; Chandrasekhar, N.; Vasudevan, M.; Muthukumaran, S.; Vasantharaja, P.

    2016-02-01

    In the present study, artificial neural network modeling has been employed for predicting welding-induced angular distortions in autogenous butt-welded 304L stainless steel plates. The input data for the neural network have been obtained from a series of three-dimensional finite element simulations of TIG welding for a wide range of plate dimensions. Thermo-elasto-plastic analysis was carried out for 304L stainless steel plates during autogenous TIG welding employing double ellipsoidal heat source. The simulated thermal cycles were validated by measuring thermal cycles using thermocouples at predetermined positions, and the simulated distortion values were validated by measuring distortion using vertical height gauge for three cases. There was a good agreement between the model predictions and the measured values. Then, a multilayer feed-forward back propagation neural network has been developed using the numerically simulated data. Artificial neural network model developed in the present study predicted the angular distortion accurately.

  3. Vapor deposition of copper on stainless steel 304L

    SciTech Connect

    Vasofsky, R.W.

    1993-08-17

    Y-12 Plant is seeking to minimize the generation of hazardous wastes in its operations. The standard procedure for electroplating a thin layer of copper on type 304L stainless steel requires several aqueous pretreatment steps which generate Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) hazardous wastes. We have evaluated a more environmentally acceptable procedure. Copper was vacuum deposited onto 304L coupons under differing deposition conditions and properties of coatings produced, including microstructure and adhesive strength, were examined. Results indicated that a noncolumnar, fine grain copper coating with high adhesion can be produced using this environmentally more acceptable approach.

  4. Microstructures of laser deposited 304L austenitic stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    BROOKS,JOHN A.; HEADLEY,THOMAS J.; ROBINO,CHARLES V.

    2000-05-22

    Laser deposits fabricated from two different compositions of 304L stainless steel powder were characterized to determine the nature of the solidification and solid state transformations. One of the goals of this work was to determine to what extent novel microstructure consisting of single-phase austenite could be achieved with the thermal conditions of the LENS [Laser Engineered Net Shape] process. Although ferrite-free deposits were not obtained, structures with very low ferrite content were achieved. It appeared that, with slight changes in alloy composition, this goal could be met via two different solidification and transformation mechanisms.

  5. Abnormal grain growth in AISI 304L stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Shirdel, M.; Mirzadeh, H.; Parsa, M.H.

    2014-11-15

    The microstructural evolution during abnormal grain growth (secondary recrystallization) in 304L stainless steel was studied in a wide range of annealing temperatures and times. At relatively low temperatures, the grain growth mode was identified as normal. However, at homologous temperatures between 0.65 (850 °C) and 0.7 (900 °C), the observed transition in grain growth mode from normal to abnormal, which was also evident from the bimodality in grain size distribution histograms, was detected to be caused by the dissolution/coarsening of carbides. The microstructural features such as dispersed carbides were characterized by optical metallography, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray analysis, and microhardness. Continued annealing to a long time led to the completion of secondary recrystallization and the subsequent reappearance of normal growth mode. Another instance of abnormal grain growth was observed at homologous temperatures higher than 0.8, which may be attributed to the grain boundary faceting/defaceting phenomenon. It was also found that when the size of abnormal grains reached a critical value, their size will not change too much and the grain growth behavior becomes practically stagnant. - Highlights: • Abnormal grain growth (secondary recrystallization) in AISI 304L stainless steel • Exaggerated grain growth due to dissolution/coarsening of carbides • The enrichment of carbide particles by titanium • Abnormal grain growth due to grain boundary faceting at very high temperatures • The stagnancy of abnormal grain growth by annealing beyond a critical time.

  6. Dynamic Strength of 304L stainless steel under impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werdiger, Meir; Bakshi, Lior; Glam, Benny; Pistinner, Shlomi

    2011-06-01

    We use the Asay self consistent technique to analyze the effects of pressure hardening and strain hardening on SS304L. Previously unloading experiment has been used to infer the strength of this material at high pressure, and recently the Johnson-Cook (JC) model has been calibrated at low strain rate. Release and reshock experiments with impact velocity range of 300-1700 m/s were preformed. We used VISAR to extract the particle velocity of the SS304L- LiF window interface. The velocity profile compared to hydrodynamic simulation using JC model. Our unloading experiments have clearly demonstrate that the material yield but does not fail. Thus infer substantial effect of pressure hardening.

  7. Weld solidification cracking in 304 to 304L stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Hochanadel, Patrick W; Lienert, Thomas J; Martinez, Jesse N; Martinez, Raymond J; Johnson, Matthew Q

    2010-01-01

    A series of annulus welds were made between 304 and 304L stainless steel coaxial tubes using both pulsed laser beam welding (LBW) and pulsed gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW). In this application, a change in process from pulsed LBW to pulsed gas tungsten arc welding was proposed to limit the possibility of weld solidification cracking since weldability diagrams developed for GTAW display a greater range of compositions that are not crack susceptible relative to those developed for pulsed LBW. Contrary to the predictions of the GTAW weldability diagram, cracking was found. This result was rationalized in terms of the more rapid solidification rate of the pulsed gas tungsten arc welds. In addition, for the pulsed LBW conditions, the material compositions were predicted to be, by themselves, 'weldable' according to the pulsed LBW weldability diagram. However, the composition range along the tie line connecting the two compositions passed through the crack susceptible range. Microstructurally, the primary solidification mode (PSM) of the material processed with higher power LBW was determined to be austenite (A), while solidification mode of the materials processed with lower power LBW apparently exhibited a dual PSM of both austenite (A) and ferrite-austenite (FA) within the same weld. The materials processed by pulsed GT A W showed mostly primary austenite solidification, with some regions of either primary austenite-second phase ferrite (AF) solidification or primary ferrite-second phase austenite (FA) solidification. This work demonstrates that variations in crack susceptibility may be realized when welding different heats of 'weldable' materials together, and that slight variations in processing can also contribute to crack susceptibility.

  8. Microbiological influenced corrosion resistance characteristics of a 304L-Cu stainless steel against Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Nan, Li; Xu, Dake; Gu, Tingyue; Song, Xiu; Yang, Ke

    2015-03-01

    Cu-bearing antibacterial stainless steels have been gaining popularity in recent years due to their strong antibacterial performances. However, only a few studies were reported for their actual performances against microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC). In this study, electrochemical methods and surface analytical techniques were applied to study the MIC resistance characteristics of a 304L-Cu stainless steel (SS) against Escherichia coli in comparison with 304L SS as control. Corrosion tests for specimens after a 21-day exposure to a Luria-Bertani (LB) culture medium with E. coli demonstrated that the 304L-Cu SS considerably reduced the maximum MIC pit depth and the specific weight loss compared with 304L SS (8.3μm and 0.2mg/cm(2) vs. 13.4μm and 0.6mg/cm(2)). Potentiodynamic polarization tests showed that the corrosion current density of the 304L-Cu SS was as much as 4 times lower than that of the 304L SS, indicating that the 304L-Cu SS is a better choice for applications in MIC-prone environments.

  9. HYDROGEN-ASSISTED FRACTURE IN FORGED TYPE 304L AUSTENITIC STAINLESS STEEL

    SciTech Connect

    Switzner, Nathan; Neidt, Ted; Hollenbeck, John; Knutson, J.; Everhart, Wes; Hanlin, R.; Bergen, R.; Balch, D. K.

    2012-09-06

    Austenitic stainless steels generally have good resistance to hydrogen-assisted fracture; however, structural designs for high-pressure gaseous hydrogen are constrained by the low strength of this class of material. Forging is used to increase the low strength of austenitic stainless steels, thus improving the efficiency of structural designs. Hydrogen-assisted racture, however, depends on microstructural details associated with manufacturing. In this study, hydrogen-assisted fracture of forged type 304L austenitic stainless steel is investigated. Microstructural variation in multi-step forged 304L was achieved by forging at different rates and temperatures, and by process annealing. High internal hydrogen content in forged type 304L austenitic stainless steel is achieved by thermal precharging in gaseous hydrogen and results in as much as 50% reduction of tensile ductility.

  10. Surface working of 304L stainless steel: Impact on microstructure, electrochemical behavior and SCC resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Acharyya, S.G.; Khandelwal, A.; Kain, V.; Kumar, A.; Samajdar, I.

    2012-10-15

    The effect of surface working operations on the microstructure, electrochemical behavior and stress corrosion cracking resistance of 304L stainless steel (SS) was investigated in this study. The material was subjected to (a) solution annealing (b) machining and (c) grinding operations. Microstructural characterization was done using stereo microscopy and electron back scattered diffraction (EBSD) technique. The electrochemical nature of the surfaces in machined, ground and solution annealed condition were studied using potentiodynamic polarization and scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) in borate buffer solution. The stress corrosion cracking resistance of 304L SS in different conditions was studied by exposing the samples to boiling MgCl{sub 2} environment. Results revealed that the heavy plastic deformation and residual stresses present near the surface due to machining and grinding operations make 304L SS electrochemically more active and susceptible to stress corrosion cracking. Ground sample showed highest magnitude of current density in the passive potential range followed by machined and solution annealed 304L SS. Micro-electrochemical studies established that surface working promotes localized corrosion along the surface asperities which could lead to crack initiation. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Machining/grinding produce extensive grain fragmentation near the surface of 304L SS. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Machining/grinding result in martensitic transformation near the surface of 304L SS. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Machining/grinding drastically reduce the SCC resistance of 304L SS in chloride. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Machining/grinding make the surface of 304L SS electrochemically much more active. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SECM study reveal that preferential dissolution takes place along surface asperities.

  11. Mitigation of Stress Corrosion Cracking Susceptibility of Machined 304L Stainless Steel Through Laser Peening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundar, R.; Ganesh, P.; Kumar, B. Sunil; Gupta, R. K.; Nagpure, D. C.; Kaul, R.; Ranganathan, K.; Bindra, K. S.; Kain, V.; Oak, S. M.; Singh, Bijendra

    2016-09-01

    The paper describes an experimental study aimed at suppressing stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of machined 304L stainless steel specimens through laser shock peening. The study also evaluates a new approach of oblique laser shock peening to suppress stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of internal surface of type 304L stainless steel tube. The results of the study, performed with an indigenously developed 2.5 J/7 ns Nd:YAG laser, demonstrated that laser shock peening effectively suppresses chloride stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of machined surface of type 304L stainless steel. In the investigated range of incident laser power density (3.2-6.4 GW/cm2), machined specimens peened with power density of 4.5 and 6.4 GW/cm2 displayed lower stress corrosion cracking susceptibility considerably than those treated with 3.2 and 3.6 GW/cm2 in boiling magnesium chloride test. Oblique laser shock peening, performed on machined internal surface of a type 304L stainless steel tube (OD = 111 mm; ID = 101 mm), was successful in introducing residual compressive surface stresses which brought about significant suppression of its stress corrosion cracking susceptibility. The technique of oblique laser shock peening, in spite of its inherent limitations on the length of peened region being limited by tube internal diameter and the need for access from both the sides, presents a simplified approach for peening internal surface of small tubular components.

  12. Metallurgical analysis of a 304L stainless steel canister from the Spent Fuel Test - Climax

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, H.; Van Konynenburg, R.A.; McCright, R.D.

    1985-04-23

    Results of a metallurgical examination of a type 304L stainless steel canister that had been used to store spent nuclear fuel in an underground granite formation for about three years are reported. No observable corrosion or cracking were found. The results are applied to waste packages in a potential high level nuclear waste repository in tuff. 10 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Mitigation of Stress Corrosion Cracking Susceptibility of Machined 304L Stainless Steel Through Laser Peening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundar, R.; Ganesh, P.; Kumar, B. Sunil; Gupta, R. K.; Nagpure, D. C.; Kaul, R.; Ranganathan, K.; Bindra, K. S.; Kain, V.; Oak, S. M.; Singh, Bijendra

    2016-07-01

    The paper describes an experimental study aimed at suppressing stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of machined 304L stainless steel specimens through laser shock peening. The study also evaluates a new approach of oblique laser shock peening to suppress stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of internal surface of type 304L stainless steel tube. The results of the study, performed with an indigenously developed 2.5 J/7 ns Nd:YAG laser, demonstrated that laser shock peening effectively suppresses chloride stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of machined surface of type 304L stainless steel. In the investigated range of incident laser power density (3.2-6.4 GW/cm2), machined specimens peened with power density of 4.5 and 6.4 GW/cm2 displayed lower stress corrosion cracking susceptibility considerably than those treated with 3.2 and 3.6 GW/cm2 in boiling magnesium chloride test. Oblique laser shock peening, performed on machined internal surface of a type 304L stainless steel tube (OD = 111 mm; ID = 101 mm), was successful in introducing residual compressive surface stresses which brought about significant suppression of its stress corrosion cracking susceptibility. The technique of oblique laser shock peening, in spite of its inherent limitations on the length of peened region being limited by tube internal diameter and the need for access from both the sides, presents a simplified approach for peening internal surface of small tubular components.

  14. HYDROGEN EFFECTS ON THE BURST PROPERTIES OF TYPE 304L STAINLESS STEEL FLAWED VESSELS

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, M; Monica Hall, M; Ps Lam, P; Dean Thompson, D

    2008-03-27

    The effect of hydrogen on the burst properties Type 304L stainless steel vessels was investigated. The purpose of the study was to compare the burst properties of hydrogen-exposed stainless steel vessels burst with different media: water, helium gas, or deuterium gas. A second purpose of the tests was to provide data for the development of a predictive finite-element model. The burst tests were conducted on hydrogen-exposed and unexposed axially-flawed cylindrical vessels. The results indicate that samples burst pneumatically had lower volume ductility than those tested hydraulically. Deuterium gas tests had slightly lower ductility than helium gas tests. Burst pressures were not affected by burst media. Hydrogen-charged samples had lower volume ductility and slightly higher burst pressures than uncharged samples. Samples burst with deuterium gas fractured by quasi-cleavage near the inside wall. The results of the tests were used to improve a previously developed predictive finite-element model. The results show that predicting burst behavior requires as a material input the effect of hydrogen on the plastic strain to fracture from tensile tests. The burst test model shows that a reduction in the plastic strain to fracture of the material will result in lower volume ductility without a reduction in burst pressure which is in agreement with the burst results.

  15. Stress corrosion cracking of type 304L stainless steel core shroud welds.

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, H. M.; Park, J.-H.; Sanecki, J. E.; Zaluzec, N. J.; Yu, M. S.; Yang, T. T.

    1999-10-26

    Microstructural analyses by advanced metallographic techniques were conducted on mockup welds and a cracked BWR core shroud weld fabricated from Type 304L stainless steel. heat-affected zones of the shroud weld and mockup shielded-metal-arc welds were free of grain-boundary carbide, martensite, delta ferrite, or Cr depletion near grain boundaries. However, as a result of exposure to welding fumes, the heat-affected zones of the welds were significantly contaminated by fluorine and oxygen which migrate to grain boundaries. Significant oxygen contamination promotes fluorine contamination and suppresses classical thermal sensitization, even in Type 304 steels. Results of slow-strain-rate tensile tests indicate that fluorine exacerbates the susceptibility of irradiated steels to intergranular stress corrosion cracking. These observations, combined with previous reports on the strong influence of weld flux, indicate that oxygen and fluorine contamination and fluorine-catalyzed stress corrosion play a major role in cracking of Type 304L stainless steel core shroud welds.

  16. TESTING OF 304L STAINLESS STEEL IN NITRIC ACID ENVIRONMENTS WITH FLUORIDES AND CHLORIDES

    SciTech Connect

    Mickalonis, J.

    2010-10-04

    Impure radioactive material processed in nitric acid solutions resulted in the presence of chlorides in a dissolver fabricated from 304L stainless steel. An experimental program was conducted to study the effects of chloride in nitric acid/fluoride solutions on the corrosion of 304L stainless steel. The test variables included temperature (80, 95, and 110 C) and the concentrations of nitric acid (6, 12, and 14 M), fluoride (0.01, 0.1, and 0.2 M) and chloride (100, 350, 1000, and 2000 ppm). The impact of welding was also investigated. Results showed that the chloride concentration alone was not a dominant variable affecting the corrosion, but rather the interaction of chloride with fluoride significantly affected corrosion.

  17. A Hybrid Laser Surface Treatment for Refurbishment of Stress Corrosion Cracking Damaged 304L Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, R. K.; Sundar, R.; Kumar, B. Sunil; Ganesh, P.; Kaul, R.; Ranganathan, K.; Bindra, K. S.; Kain, V.; Oak, S. M.; Kukreja, L. M.

    2015-06-01

    The paper describes a new hybrid laser surface treatment approach, combining laser surface melting and laser shock peening treatments, for refurbishment stress corrosion cracking damaged type 304L stainless steel specimens. Hybrid laser surface treatment produced crack-free compressively stressed surface. With respect to as-machined specimens, laser-rejuvenated specimens demonstrated significantly reduced susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking in chloride environment with minor increase in mean surface roughness. The results of the study, although particularly applicable to shallow stress corrosion cracking damage, are important for life extension of in-service stainless steel components operating in corrosive chloride environment.

  18. Comparison of Stress Corrosion Cracking Susceptibility of Laser Machined and Milled 304 L Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, R. K.; Kumar, Aniruddha; Nagpure, D. C.; Rai, S. K.; Singh, M. K.; Khooha, Ajay; Singh, A. K.; Singh, Amrendra; Tiwari, M. K.; Ganesh, P.; Kaul, R.; Singh, B.

    2016-07-01

    Machining of austenitic stainless steel components is known to introduce significant enhancement in their susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking. The paper compares stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of laser machined 304 L stainless steel specimens with conventionally milled counterpart in chloride environment. With respect to conventionally milled specimens, laser machined specimens displayed more than 12 times longer crack initiation time in accelerated stress corrosion cracking test in boiling magnesium chloride as per ASTM G36. Reduced stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of laser machined surface is attributed to its predominantly ferritic duplex microstructure in which anodic ferrite phase was under compressive stress with respect to cathodic austenite.

  19. Thermomechanical history measurements on Type 304L stainless steel pipe girth welds

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Ming; Atteridge, D.G.; Anderson, W.E.; Turpin, R.; West, S.L.

    1993-12-31

    Thermal and strain histories were recorded for three 40-cm-diameter (16 inch), Type 304L stainless steel (SS), schedule 40 (1.27 cm thickness) pipe girth welds. Two weld groove preparations were standard V grooves while the third was a narrow groove configuration. The welding parameters for the three pipe welds simulated expected field practice as closely as possible. The narrow gap weld was completed in four continuous passes while the other two welds required six and nine (discontinuous) passes, due to the use of different weld wire diameters. Thermomechanical history measurements were taken on the inner counterbore surface, encompassing the weld centerline and heat-affected zone (HAZ), as well as 10 cm of inner counterbore surface on either side of the weld centerline; a total of 47 data acquisition instruments were used for each weld. These instruments monitored: (1) weld shrinkages parallel to the pipe axis; (2) surface temperatures; (3) surface strains parallel to weld centerline; and (4) radial deformations. Results show that the weld and HAZ experienced cyclic deformation in the radial direction during welding, indicating that the final residual stress distribution in multi-pass pipe weldments is not axisymmetric. Measured radial and axial deformations were smaller for the narrow gap groove than for the standard V grooves, suggesting that the narrow gap groove weldment may have lower residual stress levels than the standard V groove weldments. This study provides the experimental database and a guideline for further computational modeling work.

  20. Finite-element modelling of low-temperature autofrettage of thick-walled tubes of the austenitic stainless steel AISI 304 L: Part II. Thick-walled tube with cross-bore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, H.; Donth, B.; Mughrabi, H.

    1998-01-01

    In part I, the autofrettage of a smooth thick-walled tube of the austenitic stainless steel AISI 304 L was studied by finite-element (FE) modelling. It was shown that low- temperature autofrettage is more efficient than autofrettage at room temperature, since it produces a larger beneficial compressive residual tangential (hoop) stress at the inner bore of the tube and hence permits a more significant enhancement of the fatigue resistance against pulsating internal pressure. The objective of the present study (part II) was to investigate the technically more relevant case of a thick-walled tube with a cross-bore made of the same steel. For this purpose, three-dimensional FE calculations were performed in order to characterize the influences of the autofrettage pressure and temperature on the stress and strain changes, in particular at the site of the cross-bore, also taking into account the effects of work hardening and reverse yielding. The results indicate that low-temperature autofrettage can also be applied advantageously in the case of thick-walled tubes with a cross-bore by virtue of the significantly larger residual compressive stresses, compared to room temperature autofrettage. From the quantitative FE calculations, the optimal combination of autofrettage temperature and pressure were concluded to lie in the range of 0965-0393/6/1/007/img1 to 0965-0393/6/1/007/img2, respectively. The calculated results were found to be in fair agreement with the measured values.

  1. Finite-element modelling of low-temperature autofrettage of thick-walled tubes of the austenitic stainless steel AISI 304 L: Part I. Smooth thick-walled tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, H.; Mughrabi, H.; Donth, B.

    1998-01-01

    The stresses and strains introduced by low-temperature autofrettage of smooth thick-walled tubes made of the austenitic stainless steel AISI 304 L were modelled by the finite-element (FE) method. The objective was to show that low-temperature autofrettage is much more efficient than autofrettage at room temperature in enhancing the fatigue resistance by introducing a higher beneficial tangential (hoop) residual compressive stress at the inner part of the tube. Attention was paid to the influences of the autofrettage temperature and pressure, the work hardening and the reverse yielding on the residual stress components and on the total strain components of the tube. The FE calculations confirmed that more beneficial residual stress patterns can be attained by autofrettage at low rather than at room temperature. From the quantitative calculations, the optimal autofrettage temperature and pressure of the tube were concluded to be about 0965-0393/6/1/006/img1 and 4000 bar, respectively. The results of the calculations were shown to be in good agreement with recently measured data.

  2. Comparison of SCC Behavior of 304L Stainless Steels With and Without Boron Addition in Acidic Chloride Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivai Bharasi, N.; Pujar, M. G.; Nirmal, S.; Mallika, C.; Kamachi Mudali, U.; Angelo, P. C.

    2016-07-01

    The stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of 304L B4 grade borated stainless steel (SS) as well as 304L SS was investigated by constant load and slow strain rate testing (SSRT) techniques. The microstructure, pitting, and SCC behavior of borated SS in the as-received, sensitized, and solution-annealed conditions were analyzed. Potentiodynamic anodic polarization and double loop electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation (DLEPR) experiments were carried out to find out pitting corrosion resistance and degree of sensitization (DOS). The number of boride particles (composed of Cr, Fe, and B) were highest for the specimen solution annealed at 1423 K/2 h. Solution-annealing treatment at 1423 K/4 h was found to be beneficial in improving the corrosion resistance of borated 304L SS. Although the borated 304L SS exhibited a higher DOS, it showed improved pitting corrosion resistance compared to 304L SS. Constant load experiments revealed the time to failure to be the highest for the specimen solution annealed at 1423 K/4 h. SCC susceptibility index (Iscc) values obtained from SSRT tests were lower for solution-annealed borated 304L SS compared to the as-received and sensitized conditions. The improved SCC resistance of borated 304L SS was attributed not only to the solution-annealing treatment but also the higher stacking fault energy (SFE) value compared to 304L SS.

  3. Texture and Yield Stress of Pre-Strained 304L Stainless Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, K.; Von Dreele, B.; Gray, G.T. III; Chen, S.R.

    1997-06-23

    The evolution of texture and yield stress in 304L stainless steel is investigated as a function of deformation to large plastic strains. Steel bars quasi-statically upset forged at a strain rate of 0.001s{sup -1} to true strains of 0, 0.5, 1.0 and 1.8 were found to acquire their texture ({approximately}3.0 m.r.d.) in the first 0.5 strain with (110) poles highly aligned parallel to the compression direction independent of whether the pre-forged starting material was in a cold worked or annealed (1050 C for 1 hour) condition. The same bars, when strained at room temperature show an incremental yield with pre-strain regardless of strain rate (10{sup -1} or 10{sup -3}s{sup -1}) or thermal history, though annealed bars yield at slightly lower stresses. At 77 K and strain rate 10{sup -3}s{sup -1}, the annealed 304L exhibits more pronounced strain-hardening behavior than the 304L forged in a cold-worked condition.

  4. Comparative Shock Response of Additively Manufactured Versus Conventionally Wrought 304L Stainless Steel*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wise, J. L.; Adams, D. P.; Nishida, E. E.; Song, B.; Maguire, M. C.; Carroll, J.; Reedlunn, B.; Bishop, J. E.

    2015-06-01

    Gas-gun experiments have probed the compression and release behavior of impact-loaded 304L stainless steel specimens machined from additively manufactured (AM) blocks as well as baseline ingot-derived bar stock. The AM technology allows direct fabrication of metal parts. For the present study, a velocity interferometer (VISAR) measured the time-resolved motion of samples subjected to one-dimensional (i.e., uniaxial strain) shock compression to peak stresses ranging from 0.2 to 7.5 GPa. The acquired wave-profile data have been analyzed to determine the comparative Hugoniot Elastic Limit (HEL), Hugoniot equation of state, spall strength, and high-pressure yield strength of the AM and conventional materials. Observed differences in shock loading and unloading characteristics for the two 304L source variants have been correlated to complementary Kolsky bar results for compressive and tensile testing at lower strain rates. The effects of composition, porosity, microstructure (e.g., grain size and morphology), residual stress, and sample axis orientation relative to the additive manufacturing deposition trajectory have been assessed to explain differences between the AM and baseline 304L dynamic mechanical properties. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  5. Corrosion testing of type 304L stainless steel in tuff groundwater environments

    SciTech Connect

    Westerman, R.E.; Pitman, S.G.; Haberman, J.H.

    1987-11-01

    The stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) resistance of Type 304L stainless steel (SS) to elevated temperatures in tuff rock and tuff groundwater environments was determined under irradiated and nonirradiated conditions using U-bend specimens and slow-strain-rate tests. The steel was tested both in the solution-annealed condition and after sensitization heat treatments. The material was found to be susceptible to SCC in both the solution-annealed and solution-annealed-and-sensitized conditions when exposed to an irradiated crushed tuff rock environment containing air and water vapor at 90{sup 0}C. A similar exposure at 50{sup 0}C did not result in failure after a 25-month test duration. Specimens of sensitized 304 SS conditioned with a variety of sensitization heat treatments resisted failure during a test of 1-year duration in which a nonirradiated environment of tuff rock and groundwater held at 200{sup 0}C was allowed to boil to dryness on a cyclical basis. All specimens of sensitized 304 SS exposed to this environment failed. Slow-strain-rate studies were performed on 304L, 304, and 316L SS specimens. The 304L SS was tested in J-13 well water at 150{sup 0}C, and the 316L SS at 95{sup 0}C. Neither material showed evidence of SCC in these tests. Sensitized 304 SS did exhibit SCC in J-13 well water in tests conducted at 150{sup 0}C. 12 refs., 27 figs., 13 tabs.

  6. Material Corrosion and Plate-Out Test of Types 304L and 316L Stainless Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Zapp, P.E.

    2001-02-06

    Corrosion and plate-out tests were performed on 304L and 316L stainless steel in pretreated Envelope B and Envelope C solutions. Flat coupons of the two stainless steels were exposed to 100 degrees C liquid and to 74 degrees C and 88 degrees C vapor above the solutions for 61 days. No significant corrosion was observed either by weight-loss measurements or by microscopic examination. Most coupons had small weight gains due to plate-out of solids, which remained to some extent even after 24-hour immersion in 1 N nitric acid at room temperature. Plate-out was more significant in the Envelope B coupons, with film thickness from less than 0.001 in. to 0.003-inches.

  7. HYDROGEN EFFECTS ON STRAIN-INDUCED MARTENSITE FORMATION IN TYPE 304L STAINLESS STEEL

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, M; Ps Lam, P

    2008-12-11

    Unstable austenitic stainless steels undergo a strain-induced martensite transformation. The effect of hydrogen on this transformation is not well understood. Some researchers believe that hydrogen makes the transformation to martensite more difficult because hydrogen is an austenite stabilizer. Others believe that hydrogen has little or no effect at all on the transformation and claim that the transformation is simply a function of strain and temperature. Still other researchers believe that hydrogen should increase the ability of the metal to transform due to hydrogen-enhanced dislocation mobility and slip planarity. While the role of hydrogen on the martensite transformation is still debated, it has been experimentally verified that this transformation does occur in hydrogen-charged materials. What is the effect of strain-induced martensite on hydrogen embrittlement? Martensite near crack-tips or other highly strained regions could provide much higher hydrogen diffusivity and allow for quicker hydrogen concentration. Martensite may be more intrinsically brittle than austenite and has been shown to be severely embrittled by hydrogen. However, it does not appear to be a necessary condition for embrittlement since Type 21-6-9 stainless steel is more stable than Type 304L stainless steel but susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement. In this study, the effect of hydrogen on strain-induced martensite formation in Type 304L stainless steel was investigated by monitoring the formation of martensite during tensile tests of as-received and hydrogen-charged samples and metallographically examining specimens from interrupted tensile tests after increasing levels of strain. The effect of hydrogen on the fracture mechanisms was also studied by examining the fracture features of as-received and hydrogen-charged specimens and relating them to the stress-strain behavior.

  8. Environmental resistance of oxide tags fabricated on 304L stainless steel via nanosecond pulsed laser irradiation

    DOE PAGES

    Lawrence, Samantha Kay; Adams, David P.; Bahr, David F.; Moody, Neville R.

    2015-11-14

    Nanosecond pulsed laser irradiation was used to fabricate colored, mechanically robust oxide “tags” on 304L stainless steel. Immersion in simulated seawater solution, salt fog exposure, and anodic polarization in a 3.5% NaCl solution were employed to evaluate the environmental resistance of these oxide tags. Single layer oxides outside a narrow thickness range (~ 100–150 nm) are susceptible to dissolution in chloride containing environments. The 304L substrates immediately beneath the oxides corrode severely—attributed to Cr-depletion in the melt zone during laser processing. For the first time, multilayered oxides were fabricated with pulsed laser irradiation in an effort to expand the protectivemore » thickness range while also increasing the variety of film colors attainable in this range. Layered films grown using a laser scan rate of 475 mm/s are more resistant to both localized and general corrosion than oxides fabricated at 550 mm/s. Furthermore, in the absence of pre-processing to mitigate Cr-depletion, layered films can enhance environmental stability of the system.« less

  9. Irradiation creep of SA 304L and CW 316 stainless steels: Mechanical behaviour and microstructural aspects. Part II: Numerical simulation and test of SIPA model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garnier, J.; Bréchet, Y.; Delnondedieu, M.; Renault, A.; Pokor, C.; Dubuisson, P.; Massoud, J.-P.

    2011-06-01

    A cluster dynamic model has been adapted to test the Stress Induced Preferential Absorption of Defect (SIPA) on Frank loops hypothesis concerning irradiation creep, to reproduce quantitatively both microstructure evolution and its stress induced anisotropy and macroscopic creep rate. It is concluded that SIPA on Frank loops model can account for the observed defects structure, but is unable to reproduce quantitatively the creep rate.

  10. Grain boundary character modification employing thermo-mechanical processing in type 304L stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, S. K.; Mandal, S.

    2016-02-01

    Grain boundary engineering (GBE) approach has been employed to modify the boundaries character of a type 304L stainless steel through thermo-mechanical processing (TMP) route, which combined a low level of cold deformation (5, 10 and 15%) followed by annealing at 1173K and 1273K for 1hour. Employing Electron Back Scatter Diffraction based Orientation Imaging Microscopy, the fraction and distribution of low ∑ CSL boundaries (∑≤ 29) and its effect on random high-angle grain boundaries connectivity and triple junction distribution of as-received (AR) and GBE specimens were evaluated. It was possible to increase the fraction of low ∑ CSL boundaries up to 75% following GBE treatment (as compared to 50% in AR specimen). The GBE specimens also contained maximum number of percolation resistant triple junctions which could render better resistance against percolation related phenomena.

  11. Superior radiation-resistant nanoengineered austenitic 304L stainless steel for applications in extreme radiation environments

    DOE PAGES

    Sun, C.; Zheng, S.; Wei, C. C.; Wu, Y.; Shao, L.; Yang, Y.; Hartwig, K. T.; Maloy, S. A.; Zinkle, S. J.; Allen, T. R.; et al

    2015-01-15

    Nuclear energy provides more than 10% of electrical power internationally, and the increasing engagement of nuclear energy is essential to meet the rapid worldwide increase in energy demand. A paramount challenge in the development of advanced nuclear reactors is the discovery of advanced structural materials that can endure extreme environments, such as severe neutron irradiation damage at high temperatures. It has been known for decades that high dose radiation can introduce significant void swelling accompanied by precipitation in austenitic stainless steel (SS). Here we report, however, that through nanoengineering, ultra-fine grained (UFG) 304L SS with an average grain size ofmore » ~100 nm, can withstand Fe ion irradiation at 500°C to 80 displacements-per-atom (dpa) with moderate grain coarsening. Compared to coarse grained (CG) counterparts, swelling resistance of UFG SS is improved by nearly an order of magnitude and swelling rate is reduced by a factor of 5. M₂₃C₆ precipitates, abundant in irradiated CG SS, are largely absent in UFG SS. This study provides a nanoengineering approach to design and discover radiation tolerant metallic materials for applications in extreme radiation environments.« less

  12. Superior radiation-resistant nanoengineered austenitic 304L stainless steel for applications in extreme radiation environments

    PubMed Central

    Sun, C.; Zheng, S.; Wei, C. C.; Wu, Y.; Shao, L.; Yang, Y.; Hartwig, K. T.; Maloy, S. A.; Zinkle, S. J.; Allen, T. R.; Wang, H.; Zhang, X.

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear energy provides more than 10% of electrical power internationally, and the increasing engagement of nuclear energy is essential to meet the rapid worldwide increase in energy demand. A paramount challenge in the development of advanced nuclear reactors is the discovery of advanced structural materials that can endure extreme environments, such as severe neutron irradiation damage at high temperatures. It has been known for decades that high dose radiation can introduce significant void swelling accompanied by precipitation in austenitic stainless steel (SS). Here we report, however, that through nanoengineering, ultra-fine grained (UFG) 304L SS with an average grain size of ~100 nm, can withstand Fe ion irradiation at 500°C to 80 displacements-per-atom (dpa) with moderate grain coarsening. Compared to coarse grained (CG) counterparts, swelling resistance of UFG SS is improved by nearly an order of magnitude and swelling rate is reduced by a factor of 5. M23C6 precipitates, abundant in irradiated CG SS, are largely absent in UFG SS. This study provides a nanoengineering approach to design and discover radiation tolerant metallic materials for applications in extreme radiation environments. PMID:25588326

  13. High temperature oxidation behavior of AISI 304L stainless steel-Effect of surface working operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Swati; Kumar, M. Kiran; Kain, Vivekanand

    2013-01-01

    The oxidation behavior of grade 304L stainless steel (SS) subjected to different surface finishing (machining and grinding) operations was followed in situ by contact electric resistance (CER) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements using controlled distance electrochemistry (CDE) technique in high purity water (conductivity < 0.1 μS cm-1) at 300 °C and 10 MPa in an autoclave connected to a recirculation loop system. The results highlight the distinct differences in the oxidation behavior of surface worked material as compared to solution annealed material in terms of specific resistivity and low frequency Warburg impedance. The resultant oxide layer was characterized for (a) elemental analyses by glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy (GDOES) and (b) morphology by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Oxide layers with higher specific resistivity and chromium content were formed in case of machined and ground conditions. Presence of an additional ionic transport process has also been identified for the ground condition at the metal/oxide interface. These differences in electrochemical properties and distinct morphological features of the oxide layer as a result of surface working were attributed to the prevalence of heavily fragmented grain structure and presence of martensite.

  14. Investigation of high temperature corrosion behavior on 304L austenite stainless steel in corrosive environments

    SciTech Connect

    Sahri, M. I.; Othman, N. K.; Samsu, Z.; Daud, A. R.

    2014-09-03

    In this work, 304L stainless steel samples were exposed at 700 °C for 10hrs in different corrosive environments; dry oxygen, molten salt, and molten salt + dry oxygen. The corrosion behavior of samples was analyzed using weight change measurement technique, optical microscope (OM) and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) equipped with Energy Dispersive X-ray (EDX). The existence phases of corroded sample were determined using X-ray Diffraction (XRD). The lowest corrosion rate was recorded in dry oxygen while the highest was in molten salt + dry oxygen environments with the value of 0.0062 mg/cm{sup 2} and −13.5225 mg/cm{sup 2} respectively. The surface morphology of sample in presence of salt mixture showed scale spallation. Oxide scales of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} were the main phases developed and detected by XRD technique. Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} was not developed in every sample as protective layers but chromate-rich oxide was developed. The cross-section analysis found the oxide scales were in porous, thick and non-adherent that would not an effective barrier to prevent from further degradation of alloy. EDX analysis also showed the Cr-element was low compared to Fe-element at the oxide scale region.

  15. Superior radiation-resistant nanoengineered austenitic 304L stainless steel for applications in extreme radiation environments

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, C.; Zheng, S.; Wei, C. C.; Wu, Y.; Shao, L.; Yang, Y.; Hartwig, K. T.; Maloy, S. A.; Zinkle, S. J.; Allen, T. R.; Wang, H.; Zhang, X.

    2015-01-15

    Nuclear energy provides more than 10% of electrical power internationally, and the increasing engagement of nuclear energy is essential to meet the rapid worldwide increase in energy demand. A paramount challenge in the development of advanced nuclear reactors is the discovery of advanced structural materials that can endure extreme environments, such as severe neutron irradiation damage at high temperatures. It has been known for decades that high dose radiation can introduce significant void swelling accompanied by precipitation in austenitic stainless steel (SS). Here we report, however, that through nanoengineering, ultra-fine grained (UFG) 304L SS with an average grain size of ~100 nm, can withstand Fe ion irradiation at 500°C to 80 displacements-per-atom (dpa) with moderate grain coarsening. Compared to coarse grained (CG) counterparts, swelling resistance of UFG SS is improved by nearly an order of magnitude and swelling rate is reduced by a factor of 5. M₂₃C₆ precipitates, abundant in irradiated CG SS, are largely absent in UFG SS. This study provides a nanoengineering approach to design and discover radiation tolerant metallic materials for applications in extreme radiation environments.

  16. Superior radiation-resistant nanoengineered austenitic 304L stainless steel for applications in extreme radiation environments.

    PubMed

    Sun, C; Zheng, S; Wei, C C; Wu, Y; Shao, L; Yang, Y; Hartwig, K T; Maloy, S A; Zinkle, S J; Allen, T R; Wang, H; Zhang, X

    2015-01-15

    Nuclear energy provides more than 10% of electrical power internationally, and the increasing engagement of nuclear energy is essential to meet the rapid worldwide increase in energy demand. A paramount challenge in the development of advanced nuclear reactors is the discovery of advanced structural materials that can endure extreme environments, such as severe neutron irradiation damage at high temperatures. It has been known for decades that high dose radiation can introduce significant void swelling accompanied by precipitation in austenitic stainless steel (SS). Here we report, however, that through nanoengineering, ultra-fine grained (UFG) 304 L SS with an average grain size of ~100 nm, can withstand Fe ion irradiation at 500 °C to 80 displacements-per-atom (dpa) with moderate grain coarsening. Compared to coarse grained (CG) counterparts, swelling resistance of UFG SS is improved by nearly an order of magnitude and swelling rate is reduced by a factor of 5. M(23)C(6) precipitates, abundant in irradiated CG SS, are largely absent in UFG SS. This study provides a nanoengineering approach to design and discover radiation tolerant metallic materials for applications in extreme radiation environments.

  17. On the dynamic strength of 304l stainless steel under impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werdiger, Meir; Glam, Benny; Bakshi, Lior; Moshe, Ella; Horovitz, Yossef; Pistinner, Shlomi Levi

    2012-03-01

    Uniaxial strain plane impact (300-1700 m/s), loading and reloading experiments carried out on SS304L are reported. The aim of these experiments was to measure the material strength properties under shock compression. Most of the experiments reported here show a viscous type elastic precursor. The experimental results are compared to numerical simulations performed using a 1D code. The input physics to the simulations are the Steinberg equation of state and Johnson-Cook strength model. This model has been previously calibrated under uniaxial stress conditions in the rangee ɛ =1-5×103 s-1. Our experiments extended the data into the regione ɛ =105 -106 s-1. In spite of this extrapolation, there is a general agreement between simulations and experiments. However, differences in some details still exist.

  18. Solidification Behavior and Weldability of Dissimilar Welds Between a Cr-Free, Ni-Cu Welding Consumable and Type 304L Austenitic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sowards, Jeffrey W.; Liang, Dong; Alexandrov, Boian T.; Frankel, Gerald S.; Lippold, John C.

    2012-04-01

    The solidification behavior of a Cr-free welding consumable based on the Ni-Cu system was evaluated in conjunction with Type 304L stainless steel. The weld metal microstructure evolution was evaluated with optical and secondary electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, button melting, and thermodynamic (CALPHAD-based) modeling. Solidification partitioning patterns showed that higher dilutions of the filler metal by Type 304L increased segregation of Ti, Cu, and Si to interdendritic regions. Button melting experiments showed a widening of the solidification temperature range with increasing dilution because of the expansion of the austenite solidification range and formation of Ti(C,N) via a eutectic reaction. The model predictions showed good correlation with button melting experiments and were used to evaluate the nature of the Ti(C,N) precipitation reaction. Solidification cracking susceptibility of the weld metal was shown to increase with dilution of 304L stainless steel based on testing conducted with the cast pin tear test. The increase in cracking susceptibility is associated with expansion of the solidification temperature range and the presence of eutectic liquid at the end of solidification that wets solidification grain boundaries.

  19. Finite Element Modeling and Validation of Residual Stresses in 304 L Girth Welds

    SciTech Connect

    Dike, J.J.; Ortega, A.R.; Cadden, C.H.; Rangaswamy, P. Brown, D.

    1998-06-01

    Three dimensional finite element simulations of thermal and mechanical response of a 304 L stainless steel pipe subjected to a circumferential autogenous gas tungsten arc weld were used to predict residual stresses in the pipe. Energy is input into the thermal model using a volumetric heat source. Temperature histories from the thermal analysis are used as loads in the mechanical analyses. In the mechanical analyses, a state variable constitutive model was used to describe the material behavior. The model accounts for strain rate, temperature, and load path histories. The predicted stresses are compared with x-ray diffraction determinations of residual stress in the hoop and circumferential directions on the outside surface of the pipe. Calculated stress profiles fell within the measured data. Reasons for observed scatter in measured stresses are discussed.

  20. Irradiation creep of SA 304L and CW 316 stainless steels: Mechanical behaviour and microstructural aspects. Part I: Experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garnier, J.; Bréchet, Y.; Delnondedieu, M.; Pokor, C.; Dubuisson, P.; Renault, A.; Averty, X.; Massoud, J. P.

    2011-06-01

    Solution annealed 304L (SA 304L) and cold work 316 (CW 316) austenitic stainless steel irradiation creep behaviour have been studied thoroughly. Irradiations were carried out in fast breeder reactors BOR-60 (at 330 °C, up to 120 dpa) and EBR-II (at 375 °C, up to 10.5 dpa), and in the OSIRIS mixed spectrum reactor (at 330 °C, up to 9.8 dpa). After an incubation threshold, the irradiation creep of the austenitic stainless steels is linear in stress and in dose. Creep appears to be athermal in this temperature range. A significant difference in the behaviour is measured between the creep of SA 304L and CW 316. In order to study the anisotropy of loop population, which would be the signature of a possible stress induced preferential absorption (SIPA) mechanism for irradiation creep, special attention was given to the measurement of anisotropy of loop distribution between the four families. The anisotropy induced by an applied stress has been shown to be in the range of the statistical scatter in the situation where no stress is applied. TEM microstructural analyses performed on this sample show slight difference between the microstructure of specimens deformed under irradiation and the microstructure of specimens irradiated without stress under the same irradiation conditions.

  1. Effects of hydrogen water chemistry on corrosion fatigue behavior of cold-worked 304L stainless steel in simulated BWR coolant environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, M. F.; Young, M. C.; Huang, J. Y.

    2011-04-01

    Corrosion fatigue behavior of stainless steel 304L (SS304L) in a simulated BWR coolant with hydrogen injection was investigated. Hydrogen water chemistry slightly mitigated the corrosion fatigue degradation of the as-received SS304L specimens, but, on the contrary, it slightly increased the corrosion fatigue crack growth rates (CFCGRs) of the cold-worked specimens. All the CFCGR-tested specimens showed similar fracture features, except for the amounts of deposited corrosion debris. The results indicated that decreasing the oxygen concentration of water environment is not an effective measure to suppress the fatigue crack growth rate of cold-worked SS304L. The CFCGRs of the SS304L were determined by an interaction between corrosion, oxide-induced crack closure and cold work in corrosive environments. At a specific level of reduction, cold work could enhance the corrosion fatigue resistance of SS304 both in the air-saturated and HWC coolant environments.

  2. Evaluation of stress corrosion cracking of irradiated 304L stainless steel in PWR environment using heavy ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, J.; Hure, J.; Tanguy, B.; Laffont, L.; Lafont, M.-C.; Andrieu, E.

    2016-08-01

    IASCC has been a major concern regarding the structural and functional integrity of core internals of PWR's, especially baffle-to-former bolts. Despite numerous studies over the past few decades, additional evaluation of the parameters influencing IASCC is still needed for an accurate understanding and modeling of this phenomenon. In this study, Fe irradiation at 450 °C was used to study the cracking susceptibility of 304 L austenitic stainless steel. After 10 MeV Fe irradiation to 5 dpa, irradiation-induced damage in the microstructure was characterized and quantified along with nano-hardness measurements. After 4% plastic strain in a PWR environment, quantitative information on the degree of strain localization, as determined by slip-line spacing, was obtained using SEM. Fe-irradiated material strained to 4% in a PWR environment exhibited crack initiation sites that were similar to those that occur in neutron- and proton-irradiated materials, which suggests that Fe irradiation may be a representative means for studying IASCC susceptibility. Fe-irradiated material subjected to 4% plastic strain in an inert argon environment did not exhibit any cracking, which suggests that localized deformation is not in itself sufficient for initiating cracking for the irradiation conditions used in this study.

  3. Corrosion of high Ni-Cr alloys and Type 304L stainless steel in HNO/sub 3/-HF

    SciTech Connect

    Ondrejcin, R.S.; McLaughlin, B.D.

    1980-04-01

    Nineteen alloys were evaluated as possible materials of construction for steam heating coils, the dissolver vessel, and the off-gas system of proposed facilities to process thorium and uranium fuels. Commercially available alloys were found that are satisfactory for all applications. With thorium fuel, which requires HNO/sub 3/-HF for dissolution, the best alloy for service at 130/sup 0/C when complexing agents for fluoride are used is Inconel 690; with no complexing agents at 130/sup 0/C, Inconel 671 is best. At 95/sup 0/C, six other alloys tested would be adequate: Haynes 25, Ferralium, Inconel 625, Type 304L stainless steel, Incoloy 825, and Haynes 20 (in order of decreasing preference); based on composition, six untested alloys would also be adequate. The ions most effective in reducing fluoride corrosion were the complexing agents Zr/sup 4 +/ and Th/sup 4 +/; Al/sup 3 +/ was less effective. With uranium fuel, modestly priced Type 304L stainless steel is adequate. Corrosion will be most severe in HNO/sub 3/-HF used occasionally for flushing and in solutions of HNO/sub 3/ and corrosion products (ferric and dichromate ions). HF corrosion can be minimized by complexing the fluoride ion and by passivation of the steel with strong nitric acid. Corrosion caused by corrosion products can be minimized by operating at lower temperatures.

  4. Effects of Low Temperature on Hydrogen-Assisted Crack Growth in Forged 304L Austenitic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Heather; San Marchi, Chris; Balch, Dorian; Somerday, Brian; Michael, Joseph

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate effects of low temperature on hydrogen-assisted crack propagation in forged 304L austenitic stainless steel. Fracture initiation toughness and crack-growth resistance curves were measured using fracture mechanics specimens that were thermally precharged with 140 wppm hydrogen and tested at 293 K or 223 K (20 °C or -50 °C). Fracture initiation toughness for hydrogen-precharged forgings decreased by at least 50 to 80 pct relative to non-charged forgings. With hydrogen, low-temperature fracture initiation toughness decreased by 35 to 50 pct relative to room-temperature toughness. Crack growth without hydrogen at both temperatures was microstructure-independent and indistinguishable from blunting, while with hydrogen microcracks formed by growth and coalescence of microvoids. Initiation of microvoids in the presence of hydrogen occurred where localized deformation bands intersected grain boundaries and other deformation bands. Low temperature additionally promoted fracture initiation at annealing twin boundaries in the presence of hydrogen, which competed with deformation band intersections and grain boundaries as sites of microvoid formation and fracture initiation. A common ingredient for fracture initiation was stress concentration that arose from the intersection of deformation bands with these microstructural obstacles. The localized deformation responsible for producing stress concentrations at obstacles was intensified by low temperature and hydrogen. Crack orientation and forging strength were found to have a minor effect on fracture initiation toughness of hydrogen-supersaturated 304L forgings.

  5. Environmental resistance of oxide tags fabricated on 304L stainless steel via nanosecond pulsed laser irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence, Samantha Kay; Adams, David P.; Bahr, David F.; Moody, Neville R.

    2015-11-14

    Nanosecond pulsed laser irradiation was used to fabricate colored, mechanically robust oxide “tags” on 304L stainless steel. Immersion in simulated seawater solution, salt fog exposure, and anodic polarization in a 3.5% NaCl solution were employed to evaluate the environmental resistance of these oxide tags. Single layer oxides outside a narrow thickness range (~ 100–150 nm) are susceptible to dissolution in chloride containing environments. The 304L substrates immediately beneath the oxides corrode severely—attributed to Cr-depletion in the melt zone during laser processing. For the first time, multilayered oxides were fabricated with pulsed laser irradiation in an effort to expand the protective thickness range while also increasing the variety of film colors attainable in this range. Layered films grown using a laser scan rate of 475 mm/s are more resistant to both localized and general corrosion than oxides fabricated at 550 mm/s. Furthermore, in the absence of pre-processing to mitigate Cr-depletion, layered films can enhance environmental stability of the system.

  6. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Plasma Arc Brazed AISI 304L Stainless Steel and Galvanized Steel Plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Yajuan; Li, Ruifeng; Yu, Zhishui; Wang, Yu

    2016-04-01

    Plasma arc brazing is used to join the AISI 304L stainless steel and galvanized steel plate butt joints with the CuSi3Mn1 filler wire. The effect of parameters on weld surface appearance, interfacial microstructure, and composition distribution in the joint was studied. The microhardness and mechanical tests were conducted to determine the mechanical properties of the welded specimens. The results indicated that good appearance, bead shape, and sufficient metallurgical bonding could be obtained when the brazing process was performed with a wire feeding speed of 0.8 m/min, plasma gas flow rate of 3.0 l/min, welding current of 100 A, and welding speed of 27 cm/min. During plasma arc brazing process, the top corner of the stainless steel and galvanized steel plate were heated and melted, and the melted quantity of stainless steel was much more than that of the galvanized steel due to the thermal conductivity coefficient difference between the dissimilar materials. The microhardness test results shows that the microhardness value gradually increased from the side of the galvanized steel to the stainless steel in the joint, and it is good for improving the mechanical properties of joint. The tensile strength was a little higher than that of the brazing filler, and the fracture position of weld joint was at the base metal of galvanized steel plate.

  7. The effects of surface pretreatment and nitrogen tetroxide purification on the corrosion rate of Type 304L stainless steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blue, G. D.; Moran, C. M.

    1985-01-01

    Corrosion rates of 304L stainless steel coupons in MON-1 oxidizer have been measured as a function of cleaning procedures employed, surface layer positions, propellant impurity levels, and short-term exposure durations (14 to 90 days). Of special interest was propellant contamination by buildup of soluble iron, which may cause flow decay. Surface treatments employed were combinations of cleaning, pickling, and passivation procedures. Propellants used were MIL-SPEC MON-1 and several types of purified NTO (i.e., low water, low chloride) which may, at a later time, be specified as spacecraft grade. Pretest coupon surface analysis by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS-ESCA) has revealed important differences, for the different cleaning procedures, in the make-up of the surface layer, both in composition and state of chemical combination of the elements involved. Comparisons will be made of XPS/ESCA data, for different cleaning procedures, for specimens before and after propellant exposure.

  8. Flux effect on the ion-beam nitriding of austenitic stainless-steel AISI 304L

    SciTech Connect

    Abrasonis, G.; Riviere, J.P.; Templier, C.; Pranevicius, L.; Barradas, N.P.

    2005-06-15

    The effect of flux and Ar pretreatment during ion-beam nitriding of austenitic stainless steel is investigated. The ion energy and temperature were 1.2 keV and 400 deg. C, respectively, the ion current densities were 0.5, 0.67, and 0.83 mA cm{sup -2}. The nitrogen distribution profiles were measured using nuclear reaction analysis. The obtained nitrogen distribution profiles were analyzed by the means of the nitrided layer thickness evolution due to sputtering and diffusion and the model of trapping-detrapping. Both approaches could fit well the experimental results, however, different diffusion coefficients have to be assumed for each current density. In addition, the diffusion coefficients are higher for higher current densities. On the other hand, it is shown that the pretreatment with Ar-ion beam at nitriding temperatures produces only a thermal effect without any other influence on the following nitrogen diffusion. The results are discussed in relation with surface and temperature effects and atomic transport mechanisms.

  9. Corrosion study of stainless steel SS304L in molten molybdates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usami, T.; Uruga, K.; Tsukada, T.; Miura, Y.; Komamine, S.; Ochi, E.

    2016-04-01

    Depending on operating conditions of the vitrification process of high-level liquid waste, molten salt mainly composed of sodium and molybdenum can be generated, and poured into stainless steel canisters. In this work, the possible reaction between the molten molybdate and stainless steel was investigated using multi-component molybdate and simple Na2MoO4 - MoO3 molybdate. In the experiments using multi-component molybdates, no significant reaction is observed between the mixed molybdates and the stainless steel specimens at 700 °C in 4 h. The reaction rate of the stainless steel with the multi-component molybdate increases in proportion to exp(-1/T). The depth of the most reacted area is about 300 μm even at 1000 °C, and was much smaller than the 6 mm thickness of the canister. In the simple Na2MoO4 - MoO3 molybdate, the reaction rate was proportional to the MoO3 concentration. The essence of the reaction is oxidation of metals by Mo6+ - > Mo4+. Part of the reaction product mainly composed of Fe is dissolved into the molybdate, while the other part mainly composed of Cr sloughs and forms a banded layer.

  10. Reactor Materials Program: Mechanical properties of irradiated Types 304 and 304L stainless steel weldment components

    SciTech Connect

    Sindelar, R.L.; Caskey, G.R. Jr.

    1991-12-01

    The vessels (reactor tanks) of the Savannah River Site nuclear production reactors constructed in the 1950's are comprised of Type 304 stainless steel with Type 308 stainless steel weld filler. Irradiation exposure to the reactor tank sidewalls through reactor operation has caused a change in the mechanical properties of these materials. A database of as-irradiated mechanical properties for site-specific materials and irradiation conditions has been produced for reactor tank structural analyses and to quantify the effects of radiation-induced materials degradation for evaluating reactor service life. The data has been collected from the SRL Reactor Materials Program (RMP) irradiations and testing of archival stainless steel weldment components and from previous SRL programs to measure properties of irradiated reactor Thermal Shield weldments and reactor tank (R-tank) sidewall material. Irradiation programs of the RMP are designed to quantify mechanical properties at tank operating temperatures following irradiation to present and future tank wall maximum exposure conditions. The exposure conditions are characterized in terms of fast neutron fluence (E{sub n} > 0.1 MeV) and displacements per atom (dpa){sup 3}. Tensile properties, Charpy-V notch toughness, and elastic-plastic fracture toughness were measured for base, weld, and weld heat-affected zone (HAZ) weldment components from archival piping specimens following a Screening Irradiation in the University of Buffalo Reactor (UBR) and following a Full-Term Irradiation in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR).

  11. Reactor Materials Program: Mechanical properties of irradiated Types 304 and 304L stainless steel weldment components

    SciTech Connect

    Sindelar, R.L.; Caskey, G.R. Jr.

    1991-12-01

    The vessels (reactor tanks) of the Savannah River Site nuclear production reactors constructed in the 1950`s are comprised of Type 304 stainless steel with Type 308 stainless steel weld filler. Irradiation exposure to the reactor tank sidewalls through reactor operation has caused a change in the mechanical properties of these materials. A database of as-irradiated mechanical properties for site-specific materials and irradiation conditions has been produced for reactor tank structural analyses and to quantify the effects of radiation-induced materials degradation for evaluating reactor service life. The data has been collected from the SRL Reactor Materials Program (RMP) irradiations and testing of archival stainless steel weldment components and from previous SRL programs to measure properties of irradiated reactor Thermal Shield weldments and reactor tank (R-tank) sidewall material. Irradiation programs of the RMP are designed to quantify mechanical properties at tank operating temperatures following irradiation to present and future tank wall maximum exposure conditions. The exposure conditions are characterized in terms of fast neutron fluence (E{sub n} > 0.1 MeV) and displacements per atom (dpa){sup 3}. Tensile properties, Charpy-V notch toughness, and elastic-plastic fracture toughness were measured for base, weld, and weld heat-affected zone (HAZ) weldment components from archival piping specimens following a Screening Irradiation in the University of Buffalo Reactor (UBR) and following a Full-Term Irradiation in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR).

  12. Effect of forging strain rate and deformation temperature on the mechanical properties of warm-worked 304L stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Switzner, N. T.; Van Tyne, C. J.; Mataya, M. C.

    2010-01-25

    Stainless steel 304L forgings were produced with four different types of production forging equipment – hydraulic press, mechanical press, screw press, and high-energy rate forging (HERF). Each machine imparted a different nominal strain rate during the deformation. The final forgings were done at the warm working (low hot working) temperatures of 816 °C, 843°C, and 871°C. The objectives of the study were to characterize and understand the effect of industrial strain rates (i.e. processing equipment), and deformation temperature on the mechanical properties for the final component. Some of the components were produced with an anneal prior to the final forging while others were deformed without the anneal. The results indicate that lower strain rates produced lower strength and higher ductility components, but the lower strain rate processes were more sensitive to deformation temperature variation and resulted in more within-part property variation. The highest strain rate process, HERF, resulted in slightly lower yield strength due to internal heating. Lower processing temperatures increased strength, decreased ductility but decreased within-part property variation. The anneal prior to the final forging produced a decrease in strength, a small increase in ductility, and a small decrease of within-part property variation.

  13. Effect of heat input on the microstructure, residual stresses and corrosion resistance of 304L austenitic stainless steel weldments

    SciTech Connect

    Unnikrishnan, Rahul; Idury, K.S.N. Satish; Ismail, T.P.; Bhadauria, Alok; Shekhawat, S.K.; Khatirkar, Rajesh K.; Sapate, Sanjay G.

    2014-07-01

    Austenitic stainless steels are widely used in high performance pressure vessels, nuclear, chemical, process and medical industry due to their very good corrosion resistance and superior mechanical properties. However, austenitic stainless steels are prone to sensitization when subjected to higher temperatures (673 K to 1173 K) during the manufacturing process (e.g. welding) and/or certain applications (e.g. pressure vessels). During sensitization, chromium in the matrix precipitates out as carbides and intermetallic compounds (sigma, chi and Laves phases) decreasing the corrosion resistance and mechanical properties. In the present investigation, 304L austenitic stainless steel was subjected to different heat inputs by shielded metal arc welding process using a standard 308L electrode. The microstructural developments were characterized by using optical microscopy and electron backscattered diffraction, while the residual stresses were measured by X-ray diffraction using the sin{sup 2}ψ method. It was observed that even at the highest heat input, shielded metal arc welding process does not result in significant precipitation of carbides or intermetallic phases. The ferrite content and grain size increased with increase in heat input. The grain size variation in the fusion zone/heat affected zone was not effectively captured by optical microscopy. This study shows that electron backscattered diffraction is necessary to bring out changes in the grain size quantitatively in the fusion zone/heat affected zone as it can consider twin boundaries as a part of grain in the calculation of grain size. The residual stresses were compressive in nature for the lowest heat input, while they were tensile at the highest heat input near the weld bead. The significant feature of the welded region and the base metal was the presence of a very strong texture. The texture in the heat affected zone was almost random. - Highlights: • Effect of heat input on microstructure, residual

  14. Investigation of micro-structure and micro-hardness properties of 304L stainless steel treated in a hot cathode arc discharge plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Malik, Hitendra K.; Singh, Omveer; Dahiya, Raj P.

    2015-08-28

    We have established a hot cathode arc discharge plasma system, where different stainless steel samples can be treated by monitoring the plasma parameters and nitriding parameters independently. In the present work, a mixture of 70% N{sub 2} and 30% H{sub 2} gases was fed into the plasma chamber and the treatment time and substrate temperature were optimized for treating 304L Stainless Steel samples. Various physical techniques such as x-ray diffraction, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and micro-vickers hardness tester were employed to determine the structural, surface composition and surface hardness of the treated samples.

  15. Heat transfer and fluid flow during keyhole mode laser welding of tantalum, Ti 6Al 4V, 304L stainless steel and vanadium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, R.; Elmer, J. W.; Palmer, T. A.; Roy, T. Deb

    2007-09-01

    Because of the complexity of several simultaneous physical processes, most heat transfer models of keyhole mode laser welding require some simplifications to make the calculations tractable. The simplifications often limit the applicability of each model to the specific materials systems for which the model is developed. In this work, a rigorous, yet computationally efficient, keyhole model is developed and tested on tantalum, Ti-6Al-4V, 304L stainless steel and vanadium. Unlike previous models, this one combines an existing model to calculate keyhole shape and size with numerical fluid flow and heat transfer calculations in the weld pool. The calculations of the keyhole profile involved a point-by-point heat balance at the keyhole walls considering multiple reflections of the laser beam in the vapour cavity. The equations of conservation of mass, momentum and energy are then solved in three dimensions assuming that the temperatures at the keyhole wall reach the boiling point of the different metals or alloys. A turbulence model based on Prandtl's mixing length hypothesis was used to estimate the effective viscosity and thermal conductivity in the liquid region. The calculated weld cross-sections agreed well with the experimental results for each metal and alloy system examined here. In each case, the weld pool geometry was affected by the thermal diffusivity, absorption coefficient, and the melting and boiling points, among the various physical properties of the alloy. The model was also used to better understand solidification phenomena and calculate the solidification parameters at the trailing edge of the weld pool. These calculations indicate that the solidification structure became less dendritic and coarser with decreasing weld velocities over the range of speeds investigated in this study. Overall, the keyhole weld model provides satisfactory simulations of the weld geometries and solidification sub-structures for diverse engineering metals and alloys.

  16. Materials Reliability Program: Environmental Fatigue Testing of Type 304L Stainless Steel U-Bends in Simulated PWR Primary Water (MRP-137)

    SciTech Connect

    R.Kilian

    2004-12-01

    Laboratory data generated in the past decade indicate a significant reduction in component fatigue life when reactor water environmental effects are experimentally simulated. However, these laboratory data have not been supported by nuclear power plant component operating experience. In recent comprehensive review of laboratory, component and structural test data performed through the EPRI Materials Reliability Program, flow rate was identified as a critical variable that was generally not considered in laboratory studies but applicable in plant operating environments. Available data for carbon/low-alloy steel piping components suggest that high flow is beneficial regarding the effects of a reactor water environment. Similar information is lacking for stainless steel piping materials. This report documents progress made to date in an extensive testing program underway to evaluate the effects of flow rate on the corrosion fatigue of 304L stainless steel under simulated PWR primary water environmental conditions.

  17. Analyses of oxide films grown on AISI 304L stainless steel and Incoloy 800HT exposed to supercritical water environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fulger, Manuela; Mihalache, Maria; Ohai, Dumitru; Fulger, Stefan; Valeca, Serban Constantin

    2011-08-01

    Supercritical water (SCW) is being considered as a cooling medium for the next generation nuclear reactors because it provides high thermal efficiency and plant simplification. However, materials corrosion has been identified as a critical problem due to the oxidative nature of supercritical water. Thus, for safety using of these nuclear reactor systems a systematic study of candidate materials corrosion is needed. As in other high temperature environments, corrosion in SCW occurs by the growth of an oxide layer on the materials surface. The current work aims to evaluate oxidation behavior of AISI 304L SS and Incoloy 800HT in water at supercritical temperatures in the range 723-873 K under a pressure of 25 MPa for up to 1680 h. After exposure to deaerated supercritical water, the samples were investigated using gravimetry, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Oxide films grown on these materials have a layered structure with an outer layer consisting of a mixture of iron oxide/iron-nickel spinel oxides and an inner layer consisting of chromium oxide in the case of Incoloy 800HT and nickel-chromium spinel oxide in the case of AISI 304L SS. The mass gains for Incoloy 800HT at all temperatures were small, while comparatively with AISI 304L SS which exhibited higher oxidation rates. In the same time the results obtained by EIS indicate the best corrosion resistance of oxides grown on Incoloy 800HT surface.

  18. Influence of low-temperature nitriding on the strain-induced martensite and laser-quenched austenite in a magnetic encoder made from 304L stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Leskovšek, Vojteh; Godec, Matjaž; Kogej, Peter

    2016-01-01

    We have investigated the possibility of producing a magnetic encoder by an innovative process. Instead of turning grooves in the encoder bar for precise positioning, we incorporated the information in 304L stainless steel by transforming the austenite to martensite after bar extrusion in liquid nitrogen and marking it with a laser, which caused a local transformation of martensite back into austenite. 304L has an excellent corrosion resistance, but a low hardness and poor wear resistance, which limits its range of applications. However, nitriding is a very promising way to enhance the mechanical and magnetic properties. After low-temperature nitriding at 400 °C it is clear that both ε- and α'-martensite are present in the deformed microstructure, indicating the simultaneous stress-induced and strain-induced transformations of the austenite. The effects of a laser surface treatment and the consequent appearance of a non-magnetic phase due to the α' → γ transformation were investigated. The EDS maps show a high concentration of nitrogen in the alternating hard surface layers of γN and α'N (expanded austenite and martensite), but no significantly higher concentration of chromium or iron was detected. The high surface hardness of this nitride layer will lead to steels and encoders with better wear and corrosion resistance. PMID:27492862

  19. Ion-beam profiling of /sup 3/He in tritium-exposed type 304L and type 21-6-9 stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Meyers, S.M.; Caskey, G.R.; Rawl, D.E.; Sisson, R.D.

    1983-11-01

    The nuclear reaction /sup 3/He (d,p) /sup 4/He was used to determine /sup 3/He depth profiles in high-energy-rateforged Type 304L and Type 21-6-9 stainless steels following exposure to tritium. A sensitivity to /sup 3/He better than 1 atomic ppm and a depth resolution of about 0.5 ..mu..m were achieved. The /sup 3/He decay product provides an essentially immobile trace of the diffusing tritium, and as a result tritium diffusivity and solubility may be calculated from the measured /sup 3/He distribution. Tritium exposure in these experiments occurred at 343 K under 45 MPa partial pressure. The diffusion coefficient obtained at 343 K was (1.6 + or - 0.3) X 10/sup -9/ mm/sup 2/ per second in both steels, while the solubility at 45 MPa partial pressure was 3700 + or - 900 atomic ppm for Type 304L and 7500 + or - 1900 atomic ppm for Type 21-6-9.

  20. Influence of low-temperature nitriding on the strain-induced martensite and laser-quenched austenite in a magnetic encoder made from 304L stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Leskovšek, Vojteh; Godec, Matjaž; Kogej, Peter

    2016-08-05

    We have investigated the possibility of producing a magnetic encoder by an innovative process. Instead of turning grooves in the encoder bar for precise positioning, we incorporated the information in 304L stainless steel by transforming the austenite to martensite after bar extrusion in liquid nitrogen and marking it with a laser, which caused a local transformation of martensite back into austenite. 304L has an excellent corrosion resistance, but a low hardness and poor wear resistance, which limits its range of applications. However, nitriding is a very promising way to enhance the mechanical and magnetic properties. After low-temperature nitriding at 400 °C it is clear that both ε- and α'-martensite are present in the deformed microstructure, indicating the simultaneous stress-induced and strain-induced transformations of the austenite. The effects of a laser surface treatment and the consequent appearance of a non-magnetic phase due to the α' → γ transformation were investigated. The EDS maps show a high concentration of nitrogen in the alternating hard surface layers of γN and α'N (expanded austenite and martensite), but no significantly higher concentration of chromium or iron was detected. The high surface hardness of this nitride layer will lead to steels and encoders with better wear and corrosion resistance.

  1. Influence of low-temperature nitriding on the strain-induced martensite and laser-quenched austenite in a magnetic encoder made from 304L stainless steel

    PubMed Central

    Leskovšek, Vojteh; Godec, Matjaž; Kogej, Peter

    2016-01-01

    We have investigated the possibility of producing a magnetic encoder by an innovative process. Instead of turning grooves in the encoder bar for precise positioning, we incorporated the information in 304L stainless steel by transforming the austenite to martensite after bar extrusion in liquid nitrogen and marking it with a laser, which caused a local transformation of martensite back into austenite. 304L has an excellent corrosion resistance, but a low hardness and poor wear resistance, which limits its range of applications. However, nitriding is a very promising way to enhance the mechanical and magnetic properties. After low-temperature nitriding at 400 °C it is clear that both ε- and α′-martensite are present in the deformed microstructure, indicating the simultaneous stress-induced and strain-induced transformations of the austenite. The effects of a laser surface treatment and the consequent appearance of a non-magnetic phase due to the α′ → γ transformation were investigated. The EDS maps show a high concentration of nitrogen in the alternating hard surface layers of γN and α′N (expanded austenite and martensite), but no significantly higher concentration of chromium or iron was detected. The high surface hardness of this nitride layer will lead to steels and encoders with better wear and corrosion resistance. PMID:27492862

  2. Influence of low-temperature nitriding on the strain-induced martensite and laser-quenched austenite in a magnetic encoder made from 304L stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leskovšek, Vojteh; Godec, Matjaž; Kogej, Peter

    2016-08-01

    We have investigated the possibility of producing a magnetic encoder by an innovative process. Instead of turning grooves in the encoder bar for precise positioning, we incorporated the information in 304L stainless steel by transforming the austenite to martensite after bar extrusion in liquid nitrogen and marking it with a laser, which caused a local transformation of martensite back into austenite. 304L has an excellent corrosion resistance, but a low hardness and poor wear resistance, which limits its range of applications. However, nitriding is a very promising way to enhance the mechanical and magnetic properties. After low-temperature nitriding at 400 °C it is clear that both ε- and α‧-martensite are present in the deformed microstructure, indicating the simultaneous stress-induced and strain-induced transformations of the austenite. The effects of a laser surface treatment and the consequent appearance of a non-magnetic phase due to the α‧ → γ transformation were investigated. The EDS maps show a high concentration of nitrogen in the alternating hard surface layers of γN and α‧N (expanded austenite and martensite), but no significantly higher concentration of chromium or iron was detected. The high surface hardness of this nitride layer will lead to steels and encoders with better wear and corrosion resistance.

  3. Tritium and decay helium effects on the fracture toughness properties of types 316L, 304L and 21Cr-6Ni-9Mn stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, M.J.; Tosten, M.H

    1994-10-01

    J-integral fracture mechanics techniques and electron microscopy observations were used to investigate the effects of tritium and its radioactive decay product, {sup 3}He, on Types 316L, 304L and 21Cr-6Ni-9Mn stainless steels. Tritium-exposed-and-aged steels had lower fracture-toughness values and shallower sloped crack-growth-resistance curves than unexposed steels. Both fracture-toughness parameters decreased with increasing concentrations of {sup 3}He. The fracture-toughness reductions were accompanied by a change in fracture mode from microvoid-nucleation-and-growth processes in control samples to grain-and-twin-boundary fracture in tritium-charged-and-aged samples. Type 316L stainless steel had the highest fracture-toughness values and Type 21Cr-6Ni-9Mn had the lowest. Samples containing {sup 3}He but degassed of tritium had fracture toughness properties that were similar to uncharged samples. The results indicate that helium bubbles enhance the embrittlement effects of hydrogen by affecting the deformation properties and by increasing localized hydrogen concentrations through trapping effects.

  4. A Microstructural Study on the Observed Differences in Charpy Impact Behavior Between Hot Isostatically Pressed and Forged 304L and 316L Austenitic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Adam J.; Cooper, Norman I.; Bell, Andrew; Dhers, Jean; Sherry, Andrew H.

    2015-11-01

    With near-net shape technology becoming a more desirable route toward component manufacture due to its ability to reduce machining time and associated costs, it is important to demonstrate that components fabricated via Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP) are able to perform to similar standards as those set by equivalent forged materials. This paper describes the results of a series of Charpy tests from HIP'd and forged 304L and 316L austenitic stainless steel, and assesses the differences in toughness values observed. The pre-test and post-test microstructures were examined to develop an understanding of the underlying reasons for the differences observed. The as-received microstructure of HIP'd material was found to contain micro-pores, which was not observed in the forged material. In tested specimens, martensite was detectable within close proximity to the fracture surface of Charpy specimens tested at 77 K (-196 °C), and not detected in locations remote from the fracture surface, nor was martensite observed in specimens tested at ambient temperatures. The results suggest that the observed changes in the Charpy toughness are most likely to arise due to differences in as-received microstructures of HIP'd vs forged stainless steel.

  5. Correlation of radiation-induced changes in microstructure/microchemistry, density and thermo-electric power of type 304L and 316 stainless steels irradiated in the Phénix reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renault Laborne, Alexandra; Gavoille, Pierre; Malaplate, Joël; Pokor, Cédric; Tanguy, Benoît

    2015-05-01

    Annealed specimens of type 304L and 316 stainless steel and cold-worked 316 specimens were irradiated in the Phénix reactor in the temperature range 381-394 °C and to different damage doses up to 39 dpa. The microstructure and microchemistry of both 304L and 316 have been examined using the combination of the different techniques of TEM to establish the void swelling and precipitation behavior under neutron irradiation. TEM observations are compared with results of measurements of immersion density and thermo-electric power obtained on the same irradiated stainless steels. The similarities and differences in their behavior on different scales are used to understand the factors in terms of the chemical composition and metallurgical state of steels, affecting the precipitation under irradiation and the swelling behavior. Irradiation induces the formation of some precipitate phases (e.g., M6C and M23C6-type carbides, and γ'- and G-phases), Frank loops and cavities. According to the metallurgical state and chemical composition of the steel, the amount of each type of radiation-induced defects is not the same, affecting their density and thermo-electric power.

  6. Microstructural origins of radiation-induced changes in mechanical properties of 316 L and 304 L austenitic stainless steels irradiated with mixed spectra of high-energy protons and spallation neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sencer, B. H.; Bond, G. M.; Hamilton, M. L.; Garner, F. A.; Maloy, S. A.; Sommer, W. F.

    2001-07-01

    A number of candidate alloys were exposed to a particle flux and spectrum at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) that closely match the mixed high-energy proton/neutron spectra expected in accelerator production of tritium (APT) window and blanket applications. Austenitic stainless steels 316 L and 304 L are two of these candidate alloys possessing attractive strength and corrosion resistance for APT applications. This paper describes the dose dependence of the irradiation-induced microstructural evolution of SS 316 L and 304 L in the temperature range 30-60°C and consequent changes in mechanical properties. It was observed that the microstructural evolution during irradiation was essentially identical in the two alloys, a behavior mirrored in their changes in mechanical properties. With one expection, it was possible to correlate all changes in mechanical properties with visible microstructural features. A late-term second abrupt decrease in uniform elongation was not associated with visible microstructure, but is postulated to be a consequence of large levels of retained hydrogen measured in the specimens. In spite of large amounts of both helium and hydrogen retained, approaching 1 at.% at the highest exposures, no visible cavities were formed, indicating that the gas atoms were either in solution or in subresolvable clusters.

  7. Corrosion of 304L and 316 in gadolinium nitrate neutron poison solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Chandler, G.T.; Anderson, M.H.

    1991-12-31

    Pitting corrosion has occurred on AISI Type 304L stainless steel (304L) conductivity probes used to monitor liquid levels of gadolinium nitrate neutron poison solutions (GPS). An electrochemical and immersion test program has led to a better understanding of the cause of corrosion of 304L probes. Results indicate that the alternating voltage applied to the probes to monitor contact with solution is the primary factor in the corrosion of the probes. A chloride-containing dye and low pH also contribute to the corrosion process, but appear to play a secondary role. AISI Type 316 stainless steel (316) was found to behave similarly to 304L in GPS, while nickel-based alloys such as Hastelloy G30, Hastelloy C22, and Inconel 625 were found to be more susceptible to corrosion as compared to 304L.

  8. Corrosion of 304L and 316 in gadolinium nitrate neutron poison solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Chandler, G.T.; Anderson, M.H.

    1991-01-01

    Pitting corrosion has occurred on AISI Type 304L stainless steel (304L) conductivity probes used to monitor liquid levels of gadolinium nitrate neutron poison solutions (GPS). An electrochemical and immersion test program has led to a better understanding of the cause of corrosion of 304L probes. Results indicate that the alternating voltage applied to the probes to monitor contact with solution is the primary factor in the corrosion of the probes. A chloride-containing dye and low pH also contribute to the corrosion process, but appear to play a secondary role. AISI Type 316 stainless steel (316) was found to behave similarly to 304L in GPS, while nickel-based alloys such as Hastelloy G30, Hastelloy C22, and Inconel 625 were found to be more susceptible to corrosion as compared to 304L.

  9. Upset welded 304L and 316L vessels for storage tests

    SciTech Connect

    Kanne, W.R. Jr.

    1996-04-01

    Two sets of vessels for tritium storage tests were fabricated using upset welding. A solid-state resistance upset weld was used to join the two halves of each vessel at the girth. The vessels differ from production reservoirs in design, material, and fabrication process. One set was made from forged 304L stainless steel and the other from forged 316L stainless steel. Six vessels of each type were loaded with a tritium mix in November 1995 and placed in storage at 71 C. This memo describes and documents the fabrication of the twelve vessels.

  10. Multitechnique characterisation of 304L surface states oxidised at high temperature in steam and air atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamede, Anne-Sophie; Nuns, Nicolas; Cristol, Anne-Lise; Cantrel, Laurent; Souvi, Sidi; Cristol, Sylvain; Paul, Jean-François

    2016-04-01

    In case of a severe accident occurring in a nuclear reactor, surfaces of the reactor coolant system (RCS), made of stainless steel (304L) rich in Cr (>10%) and Ni (8-12%), are oxidised. Fission products (FPs) are released from melt fuel and flow through the RCS. A part of them is deposited onto surfaces either by vapour condensation or by aerosol deposition mechanisms. To be able to understand the nature of interactions between these FPs and the RCS surfaces, a preliminary step is to characterize the RSC surface states in steam and air atmosphere at high temperatures. Pieces of 304L stainless steel have been treated in a flow reactor at two different temperatures (750 °C and 950 °C) for two different exposition times (24 h and 72 h). After surfaces analysing by a unique combination of surface analysis techniques (XPS, ToF-SIMS and LEIS), for 304L, the results show a deep oxide scale with multi layers and the outer layer is composed of chromium and manganese oxides. Oxide profiles differ in air or steam atmosphere. Fe2O3 oxide is observed but in minor proportion and in all cases no nickel is detected near the surface. Results obtained are discussed and compared with the literature data.

  11. Ferromagnetic properties of cold rolled AISI 304L steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavares, S. S. M.; da Silva, M. R.; Neto, J. M.; Miraglia, S.; Fruchart, D.

    2002-04-01

    The ferromagnetic properties (coercive force, residual and saturation magnetisation) of a cold rolled AISI 304L stainless steel were measured as function of the applied deformation, using a vibrating sample magnetometer. The martensite volume fraction produced by deformation was calculated through the magnetisation saturation ( σs) value. A maximum amount of martensite (81%) was obtained by applying a true deformation ɛ=2.41 and a heat treatment at 400°C after rolling. The residual induction ( Br) and the squareness (=ratio between residual ( Br) and saturation ( Bs) inductions) increased, while the coercive field ( Hc) decreased with the amount of deformation. The heat treatment at 400°C promotes as well the increase of both Br and Br/ Bs and the decrease of Hc. The magnetic properties obtained in the most severely deformed samples ( Hc=23.08-23.63 kJ/m 3, Br=1.01-1.20 T and Bs=1.12-1.28 T) are comparable to that of some hard and semi-hard alloys used as magnets. The stability of the ferromagnetic martensite ( α') was investigated by thermomagnetic analysis. The starting ( As) and final ( Af) temperatures of the martensite phase ( α') transformation into austenite during heating were determined to As=430-440°C and Af=610-616°C.

  12. Sealing 304L to lithia-alumina-silica (LAS) glass-ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Moddeman, W.E.; Pence, R.E.; Massey, R.T.; Cassidy, R.T.; Kramer, D.P.

    1989-12-31

    The formation of a crack-free between 300 series stainless steel and a glass-ceramic is difficult owing to the high coefficients of thermal expansion of the stainless steels. Lithia-alumina-silica (LAS) glass-ceramics were successfully developed and sealed to 304L stainless steel. These crack-free seals were fabricated by two techniques: by adjusting the parent glass composition (reducing the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} content), or by adjusting the sealing/crystallization cycle. All seals were hermetic, with leak rates < 10{sup -8} cc/sec STP helium. CTE and alloy yield strengths are given which show the feasibility of using these materials to make feedthroughs, pyrotechnic components, etc. Metallography, SEM, and wavelength dispersive spectroscopy show the quality and integrity of the glass-ceramic/stainless steel interface. These data are compared to those on the Inconel 718/LAS-glass seal system.

  13. Reverse Transformation of Deformation-Induced Phases and Associated Changes in the Microstructure of Explosively Clad Ti-5Ta-2Nb and 304L SS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasanthi, T. N.; Sudha, C.; Murugesan, S.; Thomas Paul, V.; Saroja, S.

    2015-10-01

    Ti-5Ta-2Nb alloy was joined to 304L austenitic stainless steel by explosive cladding technique. Explosive cladding resulted in the formation of deformation-induced martensite in 304L SS and fcc phase of Ti in the Ti-5Ta-2Nb side of the joint. The stability of these metastable phases was systematically studied using high-temperature X-ray diffraction technique and transmission electron microscopy, which enabled the optimization of the temperature window for post-cladding heat treatments.

  14. Casting Stainless-Steel Models Around Pressure Tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasquez, Peter; Micol, John R.

    1992-01-01

    Survivability of thin-wall stainless-steel tubing increased to nearly 100 percent. Improves state of art in pressure-model castings and reduces cost associated with machining complete model from stainless-steel blank.

  15. Effects of beam offset on mechanical properties and corrosion resistance of Alloy 690-SUS 304L EBW joints for nuclear power plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yong-Ding; Lee, Hwa-Teng; Kuo, Tsung-Yuan; Jeng, Sheng-Long; Wu, Jia-Lin

    2010-06-01

    The current study investigates the effect of the beam offset (BOF) on the microstructure, mechanical properties, and the corrosion resistance of the fusion zone (FZ) of Alloy 690-SUS 304L stainless steel (SS) dissimilar metal butt joints formed by electron beam welding (EBW). The experimental results showed that as the value of the BOF increased from 0 to 0.30 mm, i.e. the electron beam shifted progressively toward the Alloy 690 base metal (BM), the tensile strength of the FZ fell from 582.1 to 541.2 MPa. However, the modified Huey test results indicated that the interdendritic corrosion resistance of the FZ was significantly enhanced. Pit nucleation potential value ( Enp) was raised from 385 to 1050 mV. An offset of 0.30 mm appears to be the optimal BOF setting when fabricating Alloy 690-SUS 304L SS dissimilar metal butt joints using the EBW technique.

  16. Result of International Round Robin Test on Young's Modulus Measurement of 304L and 316L Steels at Cryogenic Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, K.; Ogata, T.; Nyilas, A.; Walsh, R. P.; Millet, M. F.; Shindo, Y.; Fujii, H.; Ishio, K.; Nakajima, H.; Mitterbacher, H.; Toplosky, V. J.; Ohmiya, S.; Takano, K.; Gigante, P.

    2006-03-01

    Ogata et al. reported in 1996 results of international Round Robin tests on mechanical property measurement of several metals at cryogenic temperatures. Following the report, the standard deviation of Young's modulus of 316L steel is much larger than those of yield and tensile strengths, that is, 4.6 % of the mean value for Young's modulus, while 1.4 % and 1.6 % of the mean values for yield and for tensile strengths, respectively. Therefore, an international Round Robin test on Young's modulus of two austenitic stainless steels at cryogenic temperatures under the participation often institutes from four nations has been initiated within these two years. As a result, the ratios of standard deviation to the mean values are 4.2 % for 304L and 3.6 % for 316L. Such a drop in the standard deviation is attributable to the decrease in the number of institute owing to the application of single extensometer or direct strain gage technique.

  17. Corrosion Resistance of 304L SS Spray Coated with Zirconia Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maheswari, A. Uma; Sivakumar, M.; Indhumathi, N.; Mohan, Sreedevi R.

    2016-09-01

    Influence of substrate temperature on corrosion (in 3.5% NaCl) and wear resistance of nanostructured zirconia thin film coated 304L SS substrates are studied by electrochemical and nano-indentation methods. This analysis shows 304L SS substrate spray coated with nanostructured zirconia at substrate temperature closer to the boiling point of the spray solvent ethanol exhibited good corrosion and wear resistance behaviour. This is because of the compressive stress developed during film fabrication at lower substrate temperature (∼50 °C) and hence constrains the indentation plasticity, which leads to higher indentation load than the bare 304L SS.

  18. Irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking of model austenitic stainless steel.

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, H. M.; Ruther, W. E.; Strain, R. V.; Shack, W. J.; Karlsen, T. M.

    1999-10-26

    Slow-strain-rate tensile (SSRT) tests were conducted on model austenitic stainless steel (SS) alloys that were irradiated at 289 C in He. After irradiation to {approx}0.3 x 10{sup 21} n {center_dot} cm{sup 2} and {approx} 0.9 x 10{sup 21} n {center_dot} cm{sup -2} (E > 1 MeV), significant heat-to-heat variations in the degree of intergranular and transgranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC and TGSCC) were observed. At {approx}0.3 x 10{sup 21} n {center_dot} cm{sup -2}, a high-purity heat of Type 316L SS that contains a very low concentration of Si exhibited the highest susceptibility to IGSCC. In unirradiated state, Types 304 and 304L SS did not exhibit a systematic effect of Si content on alloy strength. However, at {approx}0.3 x 10{sup 21} n {center_dot} cm{sup -2}, yield and maximum strengths decreased significantly as Si content was increased to >0.9 wt.%. Among alloys that contain low concentrations of C and N, ductility and resistance to TGSCC and IGSCC were significantly greater for alloys with >0.9 wt.% Si than for alloys with <0.47 wt.% Si. Initial data at {approx}0.9 x 10{sup 21} n {center_dot} cm{sup -2} were also consistent with the beneficial effect of high Si content. This indicates that to delay onset of and reduce susceptibility to irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC), at least at low fluence levels, it is helpful to ensure a certain minimum concentration of Si. High concentrations of Cr were also beneficial; alloys that contain <15.5 wt.% Cr exhibited greater susceptibility to IASCC than alloys with {approx}18 wt.% Cr, whereas an alloy that contains >21 wt.% Cr exhibited less susceptibility than the lower-Cr alloys under similar conditions.

  19. Deep drawing of 304 L Steel Sheet using Vegetable oils as Forming Lubricants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shashidhara, Y. M.; Jayaram, S. R.

    2012-12-01

    The study involves the evaluation of deep drawing process using two non edible oils, Pongam (Pongammia pinnata) and Jatropha (Jatropha carcass) as metal forming lubricants. Experiments are conducted on 304L steel sheets under the raw and modified oils with suitable punch and die on a hydraulic press of 200 ton capacity. The punch load, draw-in-length and wall thickness distribution for deep drawn cups are observed. The drawn cups are scanned using laser scanning technique and 3D models are generated using modeling package. The wall thickness profiles of cups at different sections (or height) are measured using CAD package. Among the two raw oils, the drawn cups under Jatropha oil, have uniform wall thickness profile compared to Pongam oil. Uneven flow of material and cup rupturing is observed under methyl esters of Pongam and Jatropha oil lubricated conditions. However, the results are observed under epoxidised Jatropha oil with uniform metal flow and wall thicknesses compared to mineral and other versions of vegetable oils.

  20. Mechanisms-based viscoplasticity: Theoretical approach and experimental validation for steel 304L

    PubMed Central

    Zubelewicz, Aleksander; Oliferuk, Wiera

    2016-01-01

    We propose a mechanisms-based viscoplasticity approach for metals and alloys. First, we derive a stochastic model for thermally-activated motion of dislocations and, then, introduce power-law flow rules. The overall plastic deformation includes local plastic slip events taken with an appropriate weight assigned to each angle of the plane misorientation from the direction of maximum shear stress. As deformation progresses, the material experiences successive reorganizations of the slip systems. The microstructural evolution causes that a portion of energy expended on plastic deformation is dissipated and the rest is stored in the defect structures. We show that the reorganizations are stable in a homogeneously deformed material. The concept is tested for steel 304L, where we reproduce experimentally obtained stress-strain responses, we construct the Frost-Ashby deformation map and predict the rate of the energy storage. The storage is assessed in terms of synchronized measurements of temperature and displacement distributions on the specimen surface during tensile loading. PMID:27026209

  1. Mechanisms-based viscoplasticity: Theoretical approach and experimental validation for steel 304L.

    PubMed

    Zubelewicz, Aleksander; Oliferuk, Wiera

    2016-01-01

    We propose a mechanisms-based viscoplasticity approach for metals and alloys. First, we derive a stochastic model for thermally-activated motion of dislocations and, then, introduce power-law flow rules. The overall plastic deformation includes local plastic slip events taken with an appropriate weight assigned to each angle of the plane misorientation from the direction of maximum shear stress. As deformation progresses, the material experiences successive reorganizations of the slip systems. The microstructural evolution causes that a portion of energy expended on plastic deformation is dissipated and the rest is stored in the defect structures. We show that the reorganizations are stable in a homogeneously deformed material. The concept is tested for steel 304L, where we reproduce experimentally obtained stress-strain responses, we construct the Frost-Ashby deformation map and predict the rate of the energy storage. The storage is assessed in terms of synchronized measurements of temperature and displacement distributions on the specimen surface during tensile loading. PMID:27026209

  2. Mechanisms-based viscoplasticity: Theoretical approach and experimental validation for steel 304L

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zubelewicz, Aleksander; Oliferuk, Wiera

    2016-03-01

    We propose a mechanisms-based viscoplasticity approach for metals and alloys. First, we derive a stochastic model for thermally-activated motion of dislocations and, then, introduce power-law flow rules. The overall plastic deformation includes local plastic slip events taken with an appropriate weight assigned to each angle of the plane misorientation from the direction of maximum shear stress. As deformation progresses, the material experiences successive reorganizations of the slip systems. The microstructural evolution causes that a portion of energy expended on plastic deformation is dissipated and the rest is stored in the defect structures. We show that the reorganizations are stable in a homogeneously deformed material. The concept is tested for steel 304L, where we reproduce experimentally obtained stress-strain responses, we construct the Frost-Ashby deformation map and predict the rate of the energy storage. The storage is assessed in terms of synchronized measurements of temperature and displacement distributions on the specimen surface during tensile loading.

  3. Attenuation of shock waves in copper and stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, W.B.

    1986-06-01

    By using shock pins, data were gathered on the trajectories of shock waves in stainless steel (SS-304L) and oxygen-free-high-conductivity copper (OFHC-Cu). Shock pressures were generated in these materials by impacting the appropriate target with thin (approx.1.5 mm) flying plates. The flying plates in these experiments were accelerated to high velocities (approx.4 km/s) by high explosives. Six experiments were conducted, three using SS-304L as the target material and three experiments using OFHC-Cu as the target material. Peak shock pressures generated in the steel experiments were approximately 109, 130, and 147 GPa and in the copper experiments, the peak shock pressures were approximately 111, 132, and 143 GPa. In each experiment, an attenuation of the shock wave by a following release wave was clearly observed. An extensive effort using two characteristic codes (described in this work) to theoretically calculate the attenuation of the shock waves was made. The efficacy of several different constitutive equations to successfully model the experiments was studied by comparing the calculated shock trajectories to the experimental data. Based on such comparisons, the conclusion can be drawn that OFHC-Cu enters a melt phase at about 130 GPa on the principal Hugoniot. There was no sign of phase changes in the stainless-steel experiments. In order to match the observed attenuation of the shock waves in the SS-304L experiments, it was necessary to include strength effects in the calculations. It was found that the values for the parameters in the strength equations were dependent on the equation of state used in the modeling of the experiments. 66 refs., 194 figs., 77 tabs.

  4. Stainless Steel Permeability

    SciTech Connect

    Buchenauer, Dean A.; Karnesky, Richard A.

    2015-09-01

    An understanding of the behavior of hydrogen isotopes in materials is critical to predicting tritium transport in structural metals (at high pressure), estimating tritium losses during production (fission environment), and predicting in-vessel inventory for future fusion devices (plasma driven permeation). Current models often assume equilibrium diffusivity and solubility for a class of materials (e.g. stainless steels or aluminum alloys), neglecting trapping effects or, at best, considering a single population of trapping sites. Permeation and trapping studies of the particular castings and forgings enable greater confidence and reduced margins in the models. For FY15, we have continued our investigation of the role of ferrite in permeation for steels of interest to GTS, through measurements of the duplex steel 2507. We also initiated an investigation of the permeability in work hardened materials, to follow up on earlier observations of unusual permeability in a particular region of 304L forgings. Samples were prepared and characterized for ferrite content and coated with palladium to prevent oxidation. Issues with the poor reproducibility of measurements at low permeability were overcome, although the techniques in use are tedious. Funding through TPBAR and GTS were secured for a research grade quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) and replacement turbo pumps, which should improve the fidelity and throughput of measurements in FY16.

  5. Effect of Ga on the Wettability of CuGa10 on 304L Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silze, Frank; Wiehl, Gunther; Kaban, Ivan; Kühn, Uta; Eckert, Jürgen; Pauly, Simon

    2015-08-01

    In the present work, the effect of Ga on the wetting behavior of the Cu-rich braze filler CuGa10 (wt pct, Cu90.8Ga9.2 at. pct) on the steel 304L was investigated. For this, the macroscopic and microscopic effects governing the wetting of pure Ga, pure Cu, and CuGa10 alloy (wt pct) on the austenitic steel were analyzed and compared. Contact angle and surface tension measurements were carried out by means of the sessile drop technique, and, in addition, the phase formation at the interface was determined. Pure liquid Ga spreads on 304L, which supposedly is related to the formation of intermetallic Fe-Ga phases growing into the liquid Ga. Depending on the annealing time, FeGa3 and Fe14.5Ga12 were identified. In contrast, CuGa10 as well as pure Cu shows secondary wetting on the steel surface. Especially, liquid Cu prefers spreading laterally and vertically along the grain boundaries of the steel substrate. In spite of rather similar mechanisms, CuGa10 wets 304L steel at lower rate than pure Cu above the liquidus temperature.

  6. Evaluation of the stress corrosion behavior of selected stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Dorning, R.E. II

    1983-11-05

    The objective of this investigation was to determine the stress corrosion behavior of selected stainless steels in several fluorinating environments. The possibility of stress corrosion cracking or pitting which could substantially reduce the serviceability of the stainless steels was the primary concern. Laboratory testing indicated that stress corrosion cracking or other forms of localized attack of the austenitic stainless steels tested (304, 304-L, 316, and 316-L) would not occur in the dry gas environments investigated. AISI 316 and 316-L stainless steels exhibited no significant corrosion in any of the test environments. Stressed 304 and 304-L stainless steels exhibited increased general corrosion and pitting when moisture was added to the fluorinating environment. 3 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  7. Impact Testing of Stainless Steel Materials

    SciTech Connect

    R. K. Blandford; D. K. Morton; T. E. Rahl; S. D. Snow

    2005-07-01

    Stainless steels are used for the construction of numerous spent nuclear fuel or radioactive material containers that may be subjected to high strains and moderate strain rates (10 to 200 per second) during accidental drop events. Mechanical characteristics of these materials under dynamic (impact) loads in the strain rate range of concern are not well documented. The goal of the work presented in this paper was to improve understanding of moderate strain rate phenomena on these materials. Utilizing a drop-weight impact test machine and relatively large test specimens (1/2-inch thick), initial test efforts focused on the tensile behavior of specific stainless steel materials during impact loading. Impact tests of 304L and 316L stainless steel test specimens at two different strain rates, 25 per second (304L and 316L material) and 50 per second (304L material) were performed for comparison to their quasi-static tensile test properties. Elevated strain rate stress-strain curves for the two materials were determined using the impact test machine and a “total impact energy” approach. This approach considered the deformation energy required to strain the specimens at a given strain rate. The material data developed was then utilized in analytical simulations to validate the final elevated stress-strain curves. The procedures used during testing and the results obtained are described in this paper.

  8. On the interface between LENS deposited stainless steel 304L repair geometry and cast or machined components.

    SciTech Connect

    Smugeresky, John E.; Harris, Marc F.; Griffith, Michelle Lynn; Gill, David Dennis; Robino, Charles Victor

    2004-12-01

    Laser Engineered Net Shaping (LENS) is being evaluated for use as a metal component repair/modification process for the NWC. An aspect of the evaluation is to better understand the characteristics of the interface between LENS deposited material and the substrate on which it is deposited. A processing and metallurgical evaluation was made on LENS processed material fabricated for component qualification tests. A process parameter evaluation was used to determine optimum build parameters and these parameters were used in the fabrication of tensile test specimens to study the characteristics of the interface between LENS deposited material and several types of substrates. Analyses of the interface included mechanical properties, microstructure, and metallurgical integrity. Test samples were determined for a variety of geometric configurations associated with interfaces between LENS deposited material and both wrought base material and previously deposited LENS material. Thirteen different interface configurations were fabricated for evaluation representing a spectrum of deposition conditions from complete part build, to hybrid substrate-LENS builds, to repair builds for damaged or re-designed housings. Good mechanical properties and full density were observed for all configurations. When tested to failure, fracture occurred by ductile microvoid coalescence. The repair and hybrid interfaces showed the same metallurgical integrity as, and had properties similar to, monolithic LENS deposits.

  9. Comparison Between Keyhole Weld Model and Laser Welding Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, B C; Palmer, T A; Elmer, J W

    2002-09-23

    A series of laser welds were performed using a high-power diode-pumped continuous-wave Nd:YAG laser welder. In a previous study, the experimental results of those welds were examined, and the effects that changes in incident power and various welding parameters had on weld geometry were investigated. In this report, the fusion zones of the laser welds are compared with those predicted from a laser keyhole weld simulation model for stainless steels (304L and 21-6-9), vanadium, and tantalum. The calculated keyhole depths for the vanadium and 304L stainless steel samples fit the experimental data to within acceptable error, demonstrating the predictive power of numerical simulation for welds in these two materials. Calculations for the tantalum and 21-6-9 stainless steel were a poorer match to the experimental values. Accuracy in materials properties proved extremely important in predicting weld behavior, as minor changes in certain properties had a significant effect on calculated keyhole depth. For each of the materials tested, the correlation between simulated and experimental keyhole depths deviated as the laser power was increased. Using the model as a simulation tool, we conclude that the optical absorptivity of the material is the most influential factor in determining the keyhole depth. Future work will be performed to further investigate these effects and to develop a better match between the model and the experimental results for 21-6-9 stainless steel and tantalum.

  10. Modeling the Flow Curve of AISI 410 Martensitic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Momeni, A.; Dehghani, K.; Heidari, M.; Vaseghi, M.

    2012-11-01

    In the present study, hot deformation behavior of AISI 410 martensitic stainless steel was investigated and modeled after conducting compression tests at the temperature range of 900-1150 °C and strain rate range of 0.001-1 s-1. At the studied temperature and strain rates, the flow curves were typical of dynamic recrystallization (DRX) showing a hardening peak followed by a softening one, and a steady state. The flow curves up to the peaks were modeled using the Estrin and Mecking equation. The softening due to DRX was also considered to increase the consistency of the developed model. The experimental equation proposed by Cingara and McQueen was also used to model the work hardening region. The results showed that the phenomenological model based on the Estrin and Mecking equation resulted in a better model for the work hardening region. Based on the Avrami equation, a model was developed to estimate the flow softening due to DRX between the peak and the starting point of steady state. The average value of the Avrami exponent was determined as 2.2, and it decreased with the increasing Zener-Hollomon parameter.

  11. Impact Testing of Stainless Steel Material at Cold Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer D. Snow; D. Keith Morton; Robert K. Blandford

    2008-07-01

    Stainless steels are used for the construction of numerous spent nuclear fuel or radioactive material containers that may be subjected to high strains and moderate strain rates during accidental drop events. Mechanical characteristics of these base materials and their welds under dynamic loads in the strain rate range of concern are not well documented. However, a previous paper [1] reported on impact testing and analysis results performed at the Idaho National Laboratory using 304/304L and 316/316L stainless steel base material specimens at room and elevated temperatures. The goal of the work presented herein is to add recently completed impact tensile testing results at -20 degrees F conditions for dual-marked 304/304L and 316/316L stainless steel material specimens (hereafter referred to as 304L and 316L, respectively). Recently completed welded material impact testing at -20 degrees F, room, 300 degrees F, and 600 degrees F is also reported. Utilizing a drop-weight impact test machine and 1/4-inch to 1/2-inch thick dog-bone shaped test specimens, the impact tests achieved strain rates in the 4 to 40 per second range, depending upon the material temperature. Elevated true stress-strain curves for these materials reflecting varying strain rates and temperatures are presented herein.

  12. Dislocation characterization in cold rolled stainless steel using nonlinear ultrasonic techniques: A comprehensive model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jianfeng; Xuan, Fu-zhen; Xiang, Yanxun

    2013-09-01

    Both dislocation density and character in cold rolled stainless steel cause the change of acoustic nonlinearity. An analytical model considering the different oscillating motion of edge and screw dislocations is presented for the generation of ultrasonic harmonic wave during the process of multiplication and motion of dislocation. Results reveal that the edge dislocation induces stronger acoustic nonlinearity response than screw dislocation. The new model is certified by the application to the cold rolled stainless steel.

  13. Optimization of Heat Treatments for Reversion of Strain-Induced Martensite in 304L SS Explosive Clad

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasanthi, T. N.; Sudha, C.; Parida, P. K.; Dasgupta, Arup; Saroja, S.

    2016-02-01

    Explosive clad joints of 304L SS and Ti-5Ta-2Nb alloy, fabricated for an important application in the spent nuclear fuel reprocessing industry showed formation of deformation induced metastable α' martensite and fcc Ti phase in SS and TiTaNb alloy respectively. A biphasic structure consisting of metastable phases is not preferred for industrial applications due to degradation of corrosion and mechanical properties of the structural materials during service. Hence, it is essential to carry out post cladding heat treatments. The results reported in this paper provide evidence for the presence of α' phase in 304L SS in `as clad' joints and its reversion process during thermal exposure. The temperature window in the range of 400-700 °C and time was optimized based on complete transformation of the metastable phases to parent phases, and avoiding the formation of brittle Fe-Ti intermetallics at the interface. A systematic increase in the fraction of austenite phase associated with the reversion phenomena has been studied using electron back scattered diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. Orientation relationship between product fcc and parent bcc phases was found to obey the K-S relationship. The reverted γ phase was found to nucleate within the martensite laths. A temperature of 550 °C for duration of about 10 h was found to be optimum for the post cladding treatments of the explosive clad joints.

  14. Sealing 304L to lithia-alumina-silica (LAS) glass-ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Moddeman, W.E.; Pence, R.E.; Massey, R.T.; Cassidy, R.T.; Kramer, D.P.

    1989-10-01

    Lithia-alumina-silica (LAS) glass-ceramics have been developed whose high coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) allows the formation of stress-free seals with 300-series stainless steels, by adjusting either the parent glass composition or the sealing/crystallization cycle used in forming seals between LAS glass-ceramics and Ni-base alloys. CTE value and alloy yield strength data are presented which demonstrate the feasibility of feedthroughs and pyrotechnic components based on these materials; the integrity of the glass/steel interfaces is indicated by TEM, metallographic, and wavelength-dispersive spectroscopy results. 10 refs.

  15. The effect of anisotropy on the intermediate and final form in deep drawing of SS304L, with high draw ratios: Experimentation and numerical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qayyum, F.; Shah, M.; Muqeet, A.; Afzal, J.

    2016-08-01

    High deep draw ratio of metal sheets is often required in industry to produce complex structural components and is considered to be problematic beyond a draw ratio of 1.7. In addition, anisotropy of material plays a great role in the final form of deep drawn products. In this research AISI SS304 L high draw ratio deep drawing (HDR) cups have been developed by using multiple intermediate annealing steps. The form of flange produced at each draw step is recorded, Numerical simulation of the process is carried out using ABAQUS StandardTM. Accurate modelling of the process requires anisotropic parameters. Tensile tests at 0o, 15o, 30o, 45o, 60o, 75o, 90o to the rolling direction are carried out to determine the Lankford coefficients and hardening coefficients in each direction. The detailed material data obtained is then applied to simulate the HDR process. The forms recorded experimentally are compared with simulation results and conclusion is drawn as to the accuracy of the simulation.

  16. Effect of internal heating during hot compression testing on the stress-strain behavior and hot working characteristics of Alloy 304L

    SciTech Connect

    Mataya, M.C.; Sackschewsky, V.E.

    1993-05-01

    Temperature change from conversion of deformation to internal heat, and its effect on stress-strain behavior of alloy 304L was investigated by initially isothermal (temperature of specimen, compression dies, environment equilibrated at initiation of test) uniaxial compression. Strain rate was varied 0.01 s{sup {minus}1} to 1 s{sup {minus}1} (thermal state of specimen varied from nearly isothermal to nearly adiabatic). Specimens were deformed at 750 to 1150 to a strain of 1. Change in temperature with strain was calculated via finite element analysis from measured stress-strain data and predictions were confirmed with thermocouples to verify the model. Temperature increased nearly linearly at the highest strain rate, consistent with temperature rise being a linear function of strain (adiabatic). As strain rate was lowered, heat transfer from superheated specimen to cooler dies caused sample temperature to increase and then decrease with strain as the sample thinned and specimen-die contact area increased. As-measured stress was corrected. Resulting isothermal flow curves were compared to predictions of a simplified method suggested by Thomas and Shrinivasan and differences are discussed. Strain rate sensitivity, activation energy for deformation, and flow curve peak associated with onset of dynamic recrystallization were determined from both as-measured and isothermal stress-strain data and found to vary widely. The impact of utilizing as-measured stress-strain data, not corrected for internal heating, on results of a number of published investigations is discussed.

  17. Microstructural and solidification cracking evaluation of electron beam welds in 304L

    SciTech Connect

    Sturgill, P.L.; Campbell, R.D.; Henningsen, J.L.

    1991-01-01

    Weld hot cracking of stainless steels is a major materials-related problem in the welding industry. This present investigation evaluates the crack susceptibility of highly-constrained EB welds made in materials whose DeLong ferrite potentials range from zero to nine FN. In addition, the effect of piece part strength level on cracking is examined. This study has revealed that these deep penetration EB welds have regions that solidify as primary austenite, even when the DeLong ferrite potential is as high as 9 FN. This points out the critical role that solidification rate plays in the crack susceptibility of these highly restrained welds. In addition, 0 FN to 0 FN welds had primarily transverse cracks while 6 FN to 0 FN welds had primarily centerline cracks. Of particular interest is the observation that cracks still occur if a high ferrite (greater than 6 FN) component is welded to a zero FN component. Cracking is always associated with regions which solidify as primary austenite and these cracks occur because there are areas in the weld which do not mix. Thus it is not a recommended production practice to compensate for low ferrite in one piece part with high ferrite in its mate. Finally, it is shown that a DeLong FN threshold of 4 to prevent cracking in EB welds in not valid. 21 refs., 16 figs.

  18. Influence of high pressure hydrogen environment on tensile and fatigue properties of stainless steels at low temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogata, T.

    2012-06-01

    Hydrogen environment embrittlement (HEE) of stainless steels in the environment of high pressure and low temperature hydrogen gas was evaluated using a very simple mechanical properties testing procedure. In the method, the high-pressure hydrogen environment is produced just inside the hole in the specimen. In this work, the effects of HEE on fatigue properties for austenitic stainless steels SUS304L and SUS316L were evaluated at 298 and 190 K. The effects of HEE on the tensile properties of higher strength stainless steels, such as strain-hardened 316, SUS630, and other alloys, SUH660 and Alloy 718 were also examined. The less effect of HEE on fatigue properties of SUS316L and tensile properties of strain-hardened 316 were observed compared with SUS304L and other steels at room temperature and 190 K.

  19. Corrosion of stainless steel piping in a high manganese fresh water

    SciTech Connect

    Avery, R.E.; Lutey, R.W.; Musick, J.; Pinnow, K.E.; Tuthill, A.H.

    1996-07-01

    In March of 1993, about two years after startup in early 1991, pinhole leaks were found in the 16 in. (406 mm) type 304L stainless steel (UNS S30403) raw water piping at the Brunswick-Topsham Water District (BTWD) Potable Water Treatment Plant (PWTP) in Brunswick, Maine. The low chloride manganese-containing well water is chlorinated in the pump house. After reaching the plant, the raw water is handled in type 304L stainless steel (UNS S30403) piping. It was initially felt that the corrosion might be the microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) type corrosion described by Tverberg, Pinnow, and Redmerski. Investigation showed that the role of manganese and chlorine differed, in important respects, from that described by Tverberg et. al., and that heat tint scale may have played a significant role in the corrosion that occurred at the BTWD plant.

  20. Mathematical model for strip surface roughness of stainless steel in cold rolling process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jinshan; Li, Changsheng; Zhu, Tao; Han, Wenlong; Cao, Yong

    2013-05-01

    Surface roughness control is one of the most important subjects during producing stainless steel strips. In this paper, under the conditions of introducing to the concepts of transferring ratio and genetic factor and through the further theoretical analysis, a set of theoretical models about strip surface roughness were put forward in stainless steel cold tandem rolling. Meanwhile, the lubrication experiment in cold rolling process of SUS430 stainless steel strip was carried out in order to comprehensively study surface roughness. The effect of main factors on transferring ratio and genetic factor was analyzed quantitatively, such as reduction, initial thickness, deformation resistance, emulsion technological parameters and so on. Attenuation function equations used for describing roll surface roughness were set up, and also strip surface roughness at the entry of last mill was solved approximately. Ultimately, mathematical model on strip surface roughness for cold tandem rolling of stainless steel was built, and then it was used into the practical production. A great number of statistical results show that experimental data is in excellent agreement with the given regression equations, and exactly, the relative deviation on roughness between calculated and measured is less than 6.34%.

  1. Accurate modelling of anisotropic effects in austenitic stainless steel welds

    SciTech Connect

    Nowers, O. D.; Duxbury, D. J.; Drinkwater, B. W.

    2014-02-18

    The ultrasonic inspection of austenitic steel welds is challenging due to the formation of highly anisotropic and heterogeneous structures post-welding. This is due to the intrinsic crystallographic structure of austenitic steel, driving the formation of dendritic grain structures on cooling. The anisotropy is manifested as both a ‘steering’ of the ultrasonic beam and the back-scatter of energy due to the macroscopic granular structure of the weld. However, the quantitative effects and relative impacts of these phenomena are not well-understood. A semi-analytical simulation framework has been developed to allow the study of anisotropic effects in austenitic stainless steel welds. Frequency-dependent scatterers are allocated to a weld-region to approximate the coarse grain-structures observed within austenitic welds and imaged using a simulated array. The simulated A-scans are compared against an equivalent experimental setup demonstrating excellent agreement of the Signal to Noise (S/N) ratio. Comparison of images of the simulated and experimental data generated using the Total Focusing Method (TFM) indicate a prominent layered effect in the simulated data. A superior grain allocation routine is required to improve upon this.

  2. A creep model for austenitic stainless steels incorporating cavitation and wedge cracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahesh, S.; Alur, K. C.; Mathew, M. D.

    2011-01-01

    A model of damage evolution in austenitic stainless steels under creep loading at elevated temperatures is proposed. The initial microstructure is idealized as a space-tiling aggregate of identical rhombic dodecahedral grains, which undergo power-law creep deformation. Damage evolution in the form of cavitation and wedge cracking on grain-boundary facets is considered. Both diffusion- and deformation-driven grain-boundary cavity growth are treated. Cavity and wedge-crack length evolution are derived from an energy balance argument that combines and extends the models of Cottrell (1961 Trans. AIME 212 191-203), Williams (1967 Phil. Mag. 15 1289-91) and Evans (1971 Phil Mag. 23 1101-12). The time to rupture predicted by the model is in good agreement with published experimental data for a type 316 austenitic stainless steel under uniaxial creep loading. Deformation and damage evolution at the microscale predicted by the present model are also discussed.

  3. Ion-nitriding of austenitic stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Pacheco, O.; Hertz, D.; Lebrun, J.P.; Michel, H.

    1995-12-31

    Although ion-nitriding is an extensively industrialized process enabling steel surfaces to be hardened by nitrogen diffusion, with a resulting increase in wear, seizure and fatigue resistance, its direct application to stainless steels, while enhancing their mechanical properties, also causes a marked degradation in their oxidation resistance. However, by adaption of the nitriding process, it is possible to maintain the improved wear resistant properties while retaining the oxidation resistance of the stainless steel. The controlled diffusion permits the growth of a nitrogen supersaturated austenite layer on parts made of stainless steel (AISI 304L and 316L) without chromium nitride precipitation. The diffusion layer remains stable during post heat treatments up to 650 F for 5,000 hrs and maintains a hardness of 900 HV. A very low and stable friction coefficient is achieved which provides good wear resistance against stainless steels under diverse conditions. Electrochemical and chemical tests in various media confirm the preservation of the stainless steel characteristics. An example of the application of this process is the treatment of Reactor Control Rod Cluster Assemblies (RCCAs) for Pressurized Water Nuclear Reactors.

  4. Development of a robust modeling tool for radiation-induced segregation in austenitic stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Ying; Field, Kevin G; Allen, Todd R.; Busby, Jeremy T

    2015-09-01

    Irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) of austenitic stainless steels in Light Water Reactor (LWR) components has been linked to changes in grain boundary composition due to irradiation induced segregation (RIS). This work developed a robust RIS modeling tool to account for thermodynamics and kinetics of the atom and defect transportation under combined thermal and radiation conditions. The diffusion flux equations were based on the Perks model formulated through the linear theory of the thermodynamics of irreversible processes. Both cross and non-cross phenomenological diffusion coefficients in the flux equations were considered and correlated to tracer diffusion coefficients through Manning’s relation. The preferential atomvacancy coupling was described by the mobility model, whereas the preferential atom-interstitial coupling was described by the interstitial binding model. The composition dependence of the thermodynamic factor was modeled using the CALPHAD approach. Detailed analysis on the diffusion fluxes near and at grain boundaries of irradiated austenitic stainless steels suggested the dominant diffusion mechanism for chromium and iron is via vacancy, while that for nickel can swing from the vacancy to the interstitial dominant mechanism. The diffusion flux in the vicinity of a grain boundary was found to be greatly influenced by the composition gradient formed from the transient state, leading to the oscillatory behavior of alloy compositions in this region. This work confirms that both vacancy and interstitial diffusion, and segregation itself, have important roles in determining the microchemistry of Fe, Cr, and Ni at irradiated grain boundaries in austenitic stainless steels.

  5. Analytical and Electrochemical Study of Passive Films in Stainless Steels Subjected to Aqueous Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahangiribabavi, Negin

    The objective of this research is to study the corrosion behavior of the stainless steel centrifugal contactor used in the spent nuclear fuel treatment process called UREX+ process. AISI type 304L stainless steel was suggested as the material of construction for this contactor. Corrosion of 304L stainless steel in three acidic aqueous solutions of 5.0M HNO3, 5.0M HNO 3 + 0.1M HF, and 5.0M HNO3 + 0.1M HF + 0.1M Zr4+ was studied. Immersion, potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) corrosion tests were conducted at test temperatures of 25, 40, and 80°C and three different rotational speeds (0, 1000, 2000 rpm) in order to mimic the operating conditions of the centrifugal contactor. The results showed that the 5.0M HNO3 + 0.1M HF solution was the most corrosive environment as the fluoride ions dissolved the passive film present on the surface of the stainless steel. The addition of 0.1M Zr 4+ ions to this acidic mixture reduced the corrosion caused by HF to levels similar to those found in HNO3 solutions and allowed the stainless steel to preserve its passive film. Further addition of zirconium ion did not result in better corrosion resistance of the stainless steel. Besides, higher corrosion rates were obtained as the solutions temperatures increased while the hydrodynamic conditions had less significant effect on corrosion rates.

  6. Corrosion Performance of Stainless Steels in a Simulated Launch Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, Luz Marina; Vinje, Rubiela D.; MacDowell, Louis

    2004-01-01

    At the Kennedy Space Center, NASA relies on stainless steel (SS) tubing to supply the gases and fluids required to launch the Space Shuttle. 300 series SS tubing has been used for decades but the highly corrosive environment at the launch pad has proven to be detrimental to these alloys. An upgrade with higher alloy content materials has become necessary in order to provide a safer and long lasting launch facility. In the effort to find the most suitable material to replace the existing AISI 304L SS ([iNS S30403) and AISI 316L SS (UNS S31603) shuttle tubing, a study involving atmospheric exposure at the corrosion test site near the launch pads and electrochemical measurements is being conducted. This paper presents the results of an investigation in which stainless steels of the 300 series, 304L, 316L, and AISI 317L SS (UNS S31703) as well as highly alloyed stainless steels 254-SMO (UNS S32154), AL-6XN (N08367) and AL29-4C ([iNS S44735) were evaluated using direct current (DC) electrochemical techniques under conditions designed to simulate those found at the Space Shuttle Launch pad. The electrochemical results were compared to the atmospheric exposure data and evaluated for their ability to predict the long-term corrosion performance of the alloys.

  7. Controlled powder morphology experiments in megabar 304 stainless steel compaction

    SciTech Connect

    Staudhammer, K.P.; Johnson, K.A.

    1985-01-01

    Experiments with controlled morphology including shape, size, and size distribution were made on 304L stainless steel powders. These experiments involved not only the powder variables but pressure variables of 0.08 to 1.0 Mbar. Also included are measured container strain on the material ranging from 1.5% to 26%. Using a new strain controllable design it was possible to seperate and control, independently, strain and pressure. Results indicate that powder morphology, size distribution, packing density are among the pertinent parameters in predicting compaction of these powders.

  8. High Strength Stainless Steel Properties that Affect Resistance Welding

    SciTech Connect

    Kanne, W.R.

    2001-08-01

    This report discusses results of a study on selected high strength stainless steel alloy properties that affect resistance welding. The austenitic alloys A-286, JBK-75 (Modified A-286), 21-6-9, 22-13-5, 316 and 304L were investigated and compared. The former two are age hardenable, and the latter four obtain their strength through work hardening. Properties investigated include corrosion and its relationship to chemical cleaning, the effects of heat treatment on strength and surface condition, and the effect of mechanical properties on strength and weldability.

  9. The effects of tritium and decay helium on the fracture toughness properties of stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, M.J.

    1991-01-01

    J-integral fracture mechanics techniques and scanning electron microscopy observations were used to investigate the effects of tritium and its decay product, helium-3, on Types 304L, 316L, 21-6-9, A286, and JBK-75 (Modified A286) stainless steels. Tritium-exposed samples of each steel had lower fracture toughness values and less resistance to stable crack growth than control samples. Type 316L stainless steel was more resistant to the embrittling effects of tritium and decay helium than the other steels.

  10. The effects of tritium and decay helium on the fracture toughness properties of stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, M.J.

    1991-12-31

    J-integral fracture mechanics techniques and scanning electron microscopy observations were used to investigate the effects of tritium and its decay product, helium-3, on Types 304L, 316L, 21-6-9, A286, and JBK-75 (Modified A286) stainless steels. Tritium-exposed samples of each steel had lower fracture toughness values and less resistance to stable crack growth than control samples. Type 316L stainless steel was more resistant to the embrittling effects of tritium and decay helium than the other steels.

  11. A model for prediction of possibility of localized corrosion attack of stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Hakkarainen, T.J.

    1996-10-01

    Empirical or semi-empirical relations were developed to express the dependence of the possibility (probability) of localized corrosion attack of various stainless steels on environmental factors. Only chloride induced attack within the range 0--100 C (32--212 F) is considered. The environmental variables considered include temperature, pH, chloride content, sulfate content, presence of oxidizing agents, crevices and deposits, flow rate and possibility of concentration of solution by evaporation. Common mathematical operations are used to formulate the trends into equations. Examples of the predictions of the model are given for type AISI 316 stainless steel in two environments: Baltic Sea water at 25 C and a solution containing 300 mg/l of chloride ions at 70 C.

  12. RESULTS OF EXPERIMENT TO DETERMINE CORROSION RATES FOR 304L IN HB-LINE DISSOLVER VESSEL VENTILATION SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Mickalonis, J; Kathryn Counts, K

    2008-02-22

    Radioactive material being processed as part of the DE3013 program for HB-Line will result in the presence of chlorides, and in some cases fluorides, in the dissolver. Material Science and Technology developed an experimental plan to evaluate the impact of chloride on corrosion of the dissolver vessel ventilation system. The plan set test variables from the proposed operating parameters, previous test results, and a desired maximum chloride concentration for processing. The test variables included concentrations of nitric acid, fluorides and chlorides, and the presence of a welded and stressed metal coupon. Table 1 contains expected general corrosion rates in the HB-Line vessel vent system from dissolution of 3013 contents of varying nitric acid and chloride content. These general corrosion rates were measured upstream of the condenser in the experiment's offgas system near the entrance to the dissolver. However, they could apply elsewhere in the offgas system, depending on factors not simulated in the testing, including offgas system temperatures and airflow. Localized corrosion was significant in Tests One, Two, and Three. This corrosion is significant because it will probably be the first mode of penetration of the 304L steel in several places in the system. See Table 2. For Tests One and Three, the penetration rate of localized corrosion was much higher than that for general corrosion. It was approximately four times higher in Test One and at least 45 times higher in Test Three, penetrating an entire coupon thickness of 54 mils in 186 hours or less. There was no significant difference in corrosion between welded areas and un-welded areas on coupons. There was also no significant attack on stressed portions of coupons. It is probable that the lack of corrosion was because the stressed areas were facing downwards and offered no place for condensation or deposits to form. Had deposits formed, pitting may have occurred and led to stress corrosion cracking. The

  13. Modelling grain-scattered ultrasound in austenitic stainless-steel welds: A hybrid model

    SciTech Connect

    Nowers, O.; Duxbury, D. J.; Velichko, A.; Drinkwater, B. W.

    2015-03-31

    The ultrasonic inspection of austenitic stainless steel welds can be challenging due to their coarse grain structure, charaterised by preferentially oriented, elongated grains. The anisotropy of the weld is manifested as both a ‘steering’ of the beam and the back-scatter of energy due to the macroscopic granular structure of the weld. However, the influence of weld properties, such as mean grain size and orientation distribution, on the magnitude of scattered ultrasound is not well understood. A hybrid model has been developed to allow the study of grain-scatter effects in austenitic welds. An efficient 2D Finite Element (FE) method is used to calculate the complete scattering response from a single elliptical austenitic grain of arbitrary length and width as a function of the specific inspection frequency. A grain allocation model of the weld is presented to approximate the characteristic structures observed in austenitic welds and the complete scattering behaviour of each grain calculated. This model is incorporated into a semi-analytical framework for a single-element inspection of a typical weld in immersion. Experimental validation evidence is demonstrated indicating excellent qualitative agreement of SNR as a function of frequency and a minimum SNR difference of 2 dB at a centre frequency of 2.25 MHz. Additionally, an example Monte-Carlo study is presented detailing the variation of SNR as a function of the anisotropy distribution of the weld, and the application of confidence analysis to inform inspection development.

  14. Modelling grain-scattered ultrasound in austenitic stainless-steel welds: A hybrid model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowers, O.; Duxbury, D. J.; Velichko, A.; Drinkwater, B. W.

    2015-03-01

    The ultrasonic inspection of austenitic stainless steel welds can be challenging due to their coarse grain structure, charaterised by preferentially oriented, elongated grains. The anisotropy of the weld is manifested as both a `steering' of the beam and the back-scatter of energy due to the macroscopic granular structure of the weld. However, the influence of weld properties, such as mean grain size and orientation distribution, on the magnitude of scattered ultrasound is not well understood. A hybrid model has been developed to allow the study of grain-scatter effects in austenitic welds. An efficient 2D Finite Element (FE) method is used to calculate the complete scattering response from a single elliptical austenitic grain of arbitrary length and width as a function of the specific inspection frequency. A grain allocation model of the weld is presented to approximate the characteristic structures observed in austenitic welds and the complete scattering behaviour of each grain calculated. This model is incorporated into a semi-analytical framework for a single-element inspection of a typical weld in immersion. Experimental validation evidence is demonstrated indicating excellent qualitative agreement of SNR as a function of frequency and a minimum SNR difference of 2 dB at a centre frequency of 2.25 MHz. Additionally, an example Monte-Carlo study is presented detailing the variation of SNR as a function of the anisotropy distribution of the weld, and the application of confidence analysis to inform inspection development.

  15. On the constitutive model of nitrogen-containing austenitic stainless steel 316LN at elevated temperature.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Feng, Xiao; Wang, Xin; Liu, Changyong

    2014-01-01

    The nitrogen-containing austenitic stainless steel 316LN has been chosen as the material for nuclear main-pipe, which is one of the key parts in 3rd generation nuclear power plants. In this research, a constitutive model of nitrogen-containing austenitic stainless steel is developed. The true stress-true strain curves obtained from isothermal hot compression tests over a wide range of temperatures (900-1250°C) and strain rates (10(-3)-10 s(-1)), were employed to study the dynamic deformational behavior of and recrystallization in 316LN steels. The constitutive model is developed through multiple linear regressions performed on the experimental data and based on an Arrhenius-type equation and Zener-Hollomon theory. The influence of strain was incorporated in the developed constitutive equation by considering the effect of strain on the various material constants. The reliability and accuracy of the model is verified through the comparison of predicted flow stress curves and experimental curves. Possible reasons for deviation are also discussed based on the characteristics of modeling process.

  16. On the Constitutive Model of Nitrogen-Containing Austenitic Stainless Steel 316LN at Elevated Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lei; Feng, Xiao; Wang, Xin; Liu, Changyong

    2014-01-01

    The nitrogen-containing austenitic stainless steel 316LN has been chosen as the material for nuclear main-pipe, which is one of the key parts in 3rd generation nuclear power plants. In this research, a constitutive model of nitrogen-containing austenitic stainless steel is developed. The true stress-true strain curves obtained from isothermal hot compression tests over a wide range of temperatures (900–1250°C) and strain rates (10−3–10 s−1), were employed to study the dynamic deformational behavior of and recrystallization in 316LN steels. The constitutive model is developed through multiple linear regressions performed on the experimental data and based on an Arrhenius-type equation and Zener-Hollomon theory. The influence of strain was incorporated in the developed constitutive equation by considering the effect of strain on the various material constants. The reliability and accuracy of the model is verified through the comparison of predicted flow stress curves and experimental curves. Possible reasons for deviation are also discussed based on the characteristics of modeling process. PMID:25375345

  17. Localized weld metal corrosion in stainless steel water tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Strum, M.J.

    1995-05-25

    The rapidly developed leaks within the TFC and TFD tanks (LLNL groundwater treatment facilities) were caused by localized corrosion within the resolidified weld metal. The corrosion was initiated by the severe oxidation of the backsides of the welds which left the exposed surfaces in a condition highly susceptible to aqueous corrosion. The propagation of surface corrosion through the thickness of the welds occurred by localized corrosive attack. This localized attack was promoted by the presence of shielded aqueous environments provided by crevices at the root of the partial penetration welds. In addition to rapid corrosion of oxidized surfaces, calcium carbonate precipitation provided an additional source of physical shielding from the bulk tank environment. Qualification testing of alternate weld procedures showed that corrosion damage can be prevented in 304L stainless steel GTA welds by welding from both sides while preventing oxidation of the tank interior through the use of an inert backing gas such as argon. Corrosion resistance was also satisfactory in GMA welds in which oxidized surfaces were postweld cleaned by wire brushing and chemically passivated in nitric acid. Further improvements in corrosion resistance are expected from a Mo-containing grade of stainless steel such as type 316L, although test results were similar for type 304L sheet welded with type 308L filler metal and type 316L sheet welded with type 316L filler metal.

  18. Composite model of microstructural evolution in austenitic stainless steel under fast neutron irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Stoller, R.E.; Odette, G.R.

    1986-01-01

    A rate-theory-based model has been developed which includes the simultaneous evolution of the dislocation and cavity components of the microstructure of irradiated austenitic stainless steels. Previous work has generally focused on developing models for void swelling while neglecting the time dependence of the dislocation structure. These models have broadened our understanding of the physical processes that give rise to swelling, e.g., the role of helium and void formation from critically-sized bubbles. That work has also demonstrated some predictive capability by successful calibration to fit the results of fast reactor swelling data. However, considerable uncertainty about the values of key parameters in these models limits their usefulness as predictive tools. Hence the use of such models to extrapolate fission reactor swelling data to fusion reactor conditions is compromised.

  19. A process model for the heat-affected zone microstructure evolution in duplex stainless steel weldments: Part I. The model

    SciTech Connect

    Hemmer, H.; Grong, O.

    1999-11-01

    The present investigation is concerned with modeling of the microstructure evolution in duplex stainless steels under thermal conditions applicable to welding. The important reactions that have been modeled are the dissolution of austenite during heating, subsequent grain growth in the delta ferrite regime, and finally, the decomposition of the delta ferrite to austenite during cooling. As a starting point, a differential formulation of the underlying diffusion problem is presented, based on the internal-state variable approach. These solutions are later manipulated and expressed in terms of the Scheil integral in the cases where the evolution equation is separable or can be made separable by a simple change of variables. The models have then been applied to describe the heat-affected zone microstructure evolution during both thick-plate and thin-plate welding of three commercial duplex stainless steel grades: 2205, 2304, and 2507. The results may conveniently be presented in the form of novel process diagrams, which display contours of constant delta ferrite grain size along with information about dissolution and reprecipitation of austenite for different combinations of weld input energy and peak temperature. These diagrams are well suited for quantitative readings and illustrate, in a condensed manner, the competition between the different variables that lead to structural changes during welding of duplex stainless steels.

  20. A process model for the heat-affected zone microstructure evolution in duplex stainless steel weldments: Part I. the model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemmer, H.; Grong, Ø.

    1999-11-01

    The present investigation is concerned with modeling of the microstructure evolution in duplex stainless steels under thermal conditions applicable to welding. The important reactions that have been modeled are the dissolution of austenite during heating, subsequent grain growth in the delta ferrite regime, and finally, the decomposition of the delta ferrite to austenite during cooling. As a starting point, a differential formulation of the underlying diffusion problem is presented, based on the internal-state variable approach. These solutions are later manipulated and expressed in terms of the Scheil integral in the cases where the evolution equation is separable or can be made separable by a simple change of variables. The models have then been applied to describe the heat-affected zone microstructure evolution during both thick-plate and thin-plate welding of three commercial duplex stainless steel grades: 2205, 2304, and 2507. The results may conveniently be presented in the form of novel process diagrams, which display contours of constant delta ferrite grain size along with information about dissolution and reprecipitation of austenite for different combinations of weld input energy and peak temperature. These diagrams are well suited for quantitative readings and illustrate, in a condensed manner, the competition between the different variables that lead to structural changes during welding of duplex stainless steels.

  1. Reliability of thickness of oxide layer of stainless steels with chromium using cellular automaton model

    SciTech Connect

    Lan, K. C.; Chen, Y.; Yu, G. P.; Hung, T. C.

    2012-07-01

    A cellular automaton (CA) model based on the stochastic approach was proposed to simulate the process of oxidation and corrosion of stainless steels with different contents of chromium in-flowing lead bismuth eutectic (LBE). Chromium is a crucial alloying element added in stainless steels and nickel based alloys which have been proposed to be used in advanced nuclear reactors to improve resistance of the oxidation and corrosion. To verify the reliability of the thickness of the oxide layer by CA model, the influence of the stochastic character on the simulating results was investigated as changing parameter of chromium content of structure material in this study. Ten independent simulations were run for each specific environment. A stable and reasonable results were obtained according to the chi-square of goodness-of-fit test, the chi-square of the thickness of oxide layer for each case were significant smaller than critical chi-square value with a confidence level of 95% ({Chi}{sup 2}{alpha}, v = {Chi}{sup 2} 0.05,9 = 16.92). (authors)

  2. External Corrosion Analysis of Model 9975 Packaging Container

    SciTech Connect

    Vormelker, P.

    1999-02-23

    The Materials Consultation Group of SRTC has completed an external corrosion analysis of the Model 9975 packaging container for storage in K Reactor under ambient conditions for a period of 12 years. The 12-year storage period includes two years for shipping and ten years for storage. Based on review of existing literature and stated building storage conditions, corrosion degradation of the 304L Stainless Steel (SS) packaging container (drum and vessels) should be minimal during the 12 year time period. There may be visible corrosion on the galvanized carbon steel pallet due to initial drum handling. The visible corrosion will not be sufficient to cause significant degradation during the 12-year storage period. The Materials Consultation Group concludes that there are sufficient data to establish the technical basis for safe storage of the Model 9975 container in the 105-K building for up to 10 years following the 2-year shipping period. The data are sufficient to allow the 304L SS containers to be stored for a total period of 15 years.

  3. Determination of creep compliance and creep-swelling coupling coefficients for neutron-irradiated titanium-modified stainless steel at @400 degree C

    SciTech Connect

    Toloczko, M.B. ); Garner, F.A. ); Eiholzer, C.R. )

    1991-11-01

    Irradiation creep data from FFTF-MOTA at {approximately}400{degrees}C were analyzed for nine 20% cold-worked titanium-modified type 316 stainless steels, each of which exhibits a different duration for the transient regime of swelling. One of these steels was the fusion prime candidate alloy designated PCA. The others were various developmental breeder reactor heats. The analysis was based on the assumption that the B{sub 0} + DS creep model applies to these steels at this temperature. This assumption was found to be valid. A creep-swelling coupling coefficient of D {approx} 0.6 {times} 10{sup {minus}2} MPa{sup {minus}1} was found for all steels that had developed a significant level of swelling. This result is in excellent agreement with the results of earlier studies conducted in EBR-II using annealed AISI 304L and also 10% and 20% cold-worked AISI 316 stainless steels. There appears to be some enhancement of swelling by stress, contradicting an important assumption in the analysis and leading to an apparent but misleading nonlinearity of creep with respect to stress.

  4. Determination of creep compliance and creep-swelling coupling coefficients for neutron-irradiated titanium-modified stainless steel at {approximately}400{degree}C

    SciTech Connect

    Toloczko, M.B.; Garner, F.A.; Eiholzer, C.R.

    1991-11-01

    Irradiation creep data from FFTF-MOTA at {approximately}400{degrees}C were analyzed for nine 20% cold-worked titanium-modified type 316 stainless steels, each of which exhibits a different duration for the transient regime of swelling. One of these steels was the fusion prime candidate alloy designated PCA. The others were various developmental breeder reactor heats. The analysis was based on the assumption that the B{sub 0} + DS creep model applies to these steels at this temperature. This assumption was found to be valid. A creep-swelling coupling coefficient of D {approx} 0.6 {times} 10{sup {minus}2} MPa{sup {minus}1} was found for all steels that had developed a significant level of swelling. This result is in excellent agreement with the results of earlier studies conducted in EBR-II using annealed AISI 304L and also 10% and 20% cold-worked AISI 316 stainless steels. There appears to be some enhancement of swelling by stress, contradicting an important assumption in the analysis and leading to an apparent but misleading nonlinearity of creep with respect to stress.

  5. Effect of Specimen Diameter on Tensile Properties of Austenitic Stainless Steels in Liquid Hydrogen and Gaseous Helium at 20K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, H.; Ohmiya, S.; Shibata, K.; Ogata, T.

    2006-03-01

    Tensile tests using round bar type specimens of 3, 5 and 7 mm in diameter were conducted at 20K in liquid hydrogen and also in gaseous helium at the same temperature for three major austenitic stainless steels, JIS SUS304L, 316L and 316LN, extensively used for cryogenic applications including liquid hydrogen transportation and storage vessels. Stress-strain curves were considerably different between circumstances and also specimen diameter, resulting in differences of strength and ductility. In liquid hydrogen, serrated deformation appeared after considerable work hardening and more active in specimens with larger diameter. Meanwhile serrated deformation was observed from the early stage of plastic deformation in gaseous helium at 20 K and serration was more frequent in specimens with smaller diameter. The serrated deformation behaviors were numerically simulated for 304L steel with taking thermal properties such as thermal conductivity, specific heat, heat transfer from specimens to cryogenic media into account, and some agreement with the experiments was obtained.

  6. Three dimensional observations and modelling of intergranular stress corrosion cracking in austenitic stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrow, T. J.; Babout, L.; Jivkov, A. P.; Wood, P.; Engelberg, D.; Stevens, N.; Withers, P. J.; Newman, R. C.

    2006-06-01

    Stress corrosion cracking is a life-limiting factor in many components of nuclear power plant in which failure of structural components presents a substantial hazard to both safety and economic performance. Uncertainties in the kinetics of short crack behaviour can have a strong influence on lifetime prediction, and arise due both to the complexity of the underlying mechanisms and to the difficulties of making experimental observations. This paper reports on an on-going research programme into the dynamics and morphology of intergranular stress corrosion cracking in austenitic stainless steels in simulated light water environments, which makes use of recent advances in high resolution X-ray microtomography. In particular in situ, three dimensional X-ray tomographic images of intergranular stress corrosion crack nucleation and growth in sensitised austenitic stainless steel provide evidence for the development of crack bridging ligaments, caused by the resistance of non-sensitised special grain boundaries. In parallel a simple grain bridging model, introduced to quantify the effect of crack bridging on crack development, has been assessed for thermo-mechanically processed microstructures via statically loaded room temperature simulant solution tests and as well as high temperature/pressure autoclave studies. Thermo-mechanical treatments have been used to modify the grain size, grain boundary character and triple junction distributions, with a consequent effect on crack behaviour. Preliminary three-dimensional finite element models of intergranular crack propagation have been developed, with the aim of investigating the development of crack bridging and its effects on crack propagation and crack coalescence.

  7. Statistical Models of Mean Stress and Water Environment Effects on the Fatigue Behavior of 304 Stainless Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Leax, T.R.

    1999-12-01

    Recent research efforts have focused on characterizing the effects of light water reactor environments on the fatigue behavior of austenitic stainless steels. In conjunction with these experimental programs, there has been a significant effort at Argonne National Laboratory to develop statistical models for predicting the fatigue behavior of austenitic stainless steels in air and water environments at prototypical temperatures and loading rates. Some recent testing has also been concerned with the effect of mean stress on the fatigue behavior of 304 stainless steel in air. The ultimate goal of all these efforts is to allow development of fatigue design curves and design procedures that will assure adequate margin to fatigue crack initiation under prototypical operating conditions. In this paper, a best-fit strain-life curve for 304 stainless steel in air that takes into account the effect of mean stress is developed using the Smith-Watson-Topper equivalent strain parameter. A model for predicting the effect of water environments on fatigue life in both low and high oxygen water environments for a range of temperatures and loading rates is also described. Additional effort is required to develop the most appropriate way to develop a fatigue design curve from the mean stress and water effects models.

  8. Material Modeling and Springback Prediction of Ultra Thin Austenitic Stainless Steel Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Rahul K.; Murakoso, Satoko; Chung, Kwansoo; Kuwabara, Toshihiko

    2010-06-01

    The constitutive model with combined isotropic-kinematic hardening along with hardening stagnation (or permanent softening) [Verma, Kuwabara, Chung, Haldar: Int. J. Plasticity (submitted)] was used here for modeling the tension-compression behaviors of a 0.1 mm thick austenitic stainless steel sheet (SUS304), which was observed in a recent work [Kuwabara and Murakoso: Proc. CIRP 2010 Conf. (submitted)]. Springback was also experimentally measured for a shallow drawn rectangular cup here and it was verified using the above model. It was found that this model can successfully predict the Bauschinger effect and hardening stagnation. As for springback, it was found that in this particular case it depends on, other than the material model, factors like boundary conditions, in the finite element analysis (FEA), during unloading. It was also observed that incorporation of the Bauschinger effect and permanent softening is a key for accurate springback prediction and, therefore, the present model performs better than the one which is based only on isotropic hardening without any hardening stagnation.

  9. Influence of cold plastic deformation on critical pitting potential of AISI 316 L and 304 L steels in an artificial physiological solution simulating the aggressiveness of the human body.

    PubMed

    Cigada, A; Mazza, B; Pedeferri, P; Sinigaglia, D

    1977-07-01

    The effect of cold working on critical pitting potential of AISI 316 L and 304 L steels in a buffered physiological solution has been studied. In particular, the importance of deformation degree, orientation of the specimen surface to the deformation direction, and cold working temperature in lowering the critical pitting potential is shown. PMID:873942

  10. Linear Friction Welding Process Model for Carpenter Custom 465 Precipitation-Hardened Martensitic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grujicic, M.; Yavari, R.; Snipes, J. S.; Ramaswami, S.; Yen, C.-F.; Cheeseman, B. A.

    2014-06-01

    An Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian finite-element analysis is combined with thermo-mechanical material constitutive models for Carpenter Custom 465 precipitation-hardened martensitic stainless steel to develop a linear friction welding (LFW) process model for this material. The main effort was directed toward developing reliable material constitutive models for Carpenter Custom 465 and toward improving functional relations and parameterization of the workpiece/workpiece contact-interaction models. The LFW process model is then used to predict thermo-mechanical response of Carpenter Custom 465 during LFW. Specifically, temporal evolutions and spatial distribution of temperature within, and expulsion of the workpiece material from, the weld region are examined as a function of the basic LFW process parameters, i.e., (a) contact-pressure history, (b) reciprocation frequency, and (c) reciprocation amplitude. Examination of the results obtained clearly revealed the presence of three zones within the weld, i.e., (a) Contact-interface region, (b) Thermo-mechanically affected zone, and (c) heat-affected zone. While there are no publicly available reports related to Carpenter Custom 465 LFW behavior, to allow an experiment/computation comparison, these findings are consistent with the results of our ongoing companion experimental investigation.

  11. Impact Testing of Stainless Steel Material at Room and Elevated Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Dana K. Morton; Spencer D. Snow; Tom E. Rahl; Robert K. Blandford

    2007-07-01

    Stainless steels are used for the construction of numerous spent nuclear fuel or radioactive material containers that may be subjected to high strains and moderate strain rates during accidental drop events. Mechanical characteristics of these base materials and their welds under dynamic loads in the strain rate range of concern are not well documented. However, three previous papers [1, 2, 3] reported on impact testing and analysis results performed at the Idaho National Laboratory using 304/304L and 316/316L stainless steel base material specimens that began the investigation of these characteristics. The goal of the work presented herein is to add the results of additional tensile impact testing for 304/304L and 316/316L stainless steel material specimens. Utilizing a drop-weight impact test machine and 1/4-inch to 1/2-inch thick dog-bone shaped test specimens, additional tests achieved target strain rates of 5, 10, and 22 per second at room temperature, 300, and 600 degrees Fahrenheit. Elevated true stress-strain curves for these materials at each designated strain rate and temperature are presented herein.

  12. Porosity in millimeter-scale welds of stainless steel : three-dimensional characterization.

    SciTech Connect

    Aagesen, Larry K.; Madison, Jonathan D.

    2012-05-01

    A variety of edge joints utilizing a continuous wave Nd:YAG laser have been produced and examined in a 304-L stainless steel to advance fundamental understanding of the linkage between processing and resultant microstructure in high-rate solidification events. Acquisition of three-dimensional reconstructions via micro-computed tomography combined with traditional metallography has allowed for qualitative and quantitative characterization of weld joints in a material system of wide use and broad applicability. The presence, variability and distribution of porosity, has been examined for average values, spatial distributions and morphology and then related back to fundamental processing parameters such as weld speed, weld power and laser focal length.

  13. Modeling the Flow Curve Characteristics of 410 Martensitic Stainless Steel Under Hot Working Condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Momeni, Amir; Dehghani, Kamran; Ebrahimi, Golam Reza; Keshmiri, Hamid

    2010-11-01

    The hot deformation behavior of AISI 410 martensitic stainless steel was investigated by conducting hot compression tests between 1173 K (900 °C) and 1423 K (1150 °C) and between strain rates of 0.001 s-1 to 1 s-1. The hyperbolic sine function described the relation well between flow stress at a given strain and the Zener-Hollomon parameter ( Z). The variation of flow stress with deformation temperature gave the average value of apparent activation energy as 448 kJ/mol. The strain and stress corresponding to two important points associated with flow curve ( i.e., peak strain and the onset of steady-state flow) were related to the Z parameter using power-law equations. A model also was proposed based on the Johnson-Mehl-Avrami-Kolmogorov (JMAK) equation to estimate the fractional softening of dynamic recrystallization at any given strain. This model can be used readily for the prediction of flow stress. The values of n and k, material constants in the JMAK equation, were determined for the studied material. The strains regarding the peak and the onset of steady-state flow were formulated in term of applied strain rate and the constants of the JMAK equation. A good agreement was found between the predicted strains and those obtained by the experimental work.

  14. Thermodynamic modeling and kinetics simulation of precipitate phases in AISI 316 stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Y.; Busby, J. T.

    2014-05-01

    This work aims at utilizing modern computational microstructural modeling tools to accelerate the understanding of phase stability in austenitic steels under extended thermal aging. Using the CALPHAD approach, a thermodynamic database OCTANT (ORNL Computational Thermodynamics for Applied Nuclear Technology), including elements of Fe, C, Cr, Ni, Mn, Mo, Si, and Ti, has been developed with a focus on reliable thermodynamic modeling of precipitate phases in AISI 316 austenitic stainless steels. The thermodynamic database was validated by comparing the calculated results with experimental data from commercial 316 austenitic steels. The developed computational thermodynamics was then coupled with precipitation kinetics simulation to understand the temporal evolution of precipitates in austenitic steels under long-term thermal aging (up to 600,000 h) at a temperature regime from 300 to 900 °C. This study discusses the effect of dislocation density and difusion coefficients on the precipitation kinetics at low temperatures, which shed a light on investigating the phase stability and transformation in austenitic steels used in light water reactors.

  15. Numerical Modeling of Ti Deformation for the Development of a Titanium and Stainless Steel Transition Joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, A. B.; Kapoor, R.; Thota, M. K.; Chakravartty, J. K.

    2016-07-01

    Finite element analysis (FEA) was used to model the joining of titanium grade 2 (Ti) to AISI 321 stainless steel (SS) transition joint of lap configuration with grooves at the interface on SS side. The hot forming of Ti for filling the grooves without defects was simulated. FEA involving large plastic flow with sticking friction condition was initially validated using compression test on cylindrical specimen at 900 °C. The barreled shape and a no-deformation zone in the sample predicted by FEA matched with those of the compression experiments. For the joining process, FEA computed the distribution of strain and hydrostatic stress in Ti and the minimum ram load required for a defect-free joint. The hot forming parameters for Ti to fill the grooves without defects and any geometrical distortion of the die were found to be 0.001 s-1 at 900 °C. Using these conditions a defect-free Ti-SS joint was experimentally produced.

  16. A Hierarchical Upscaling Method for Predicting Strength of Materials under Thermal, Radiation and Mechanical loading - Irradiation Strengthening Mechanisms in Stainless Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Dongsheng; Zbib, Hussein M.; Garmestani, Hamid; Sun, Xin; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2011-07-01

    Stainless steels based on Fe-Cr-Ni alloys are the most popular structural materials used in reactors. High energy particle irradiation of in this kind of polycrystalline structural materials usually produces irradiation hardening and embrittlement. The development of predictive capability for the influence of irradiation on mechanical behavior is very important in materials design for next-generation reactors. Irradiation hardening is related to structural information crossing different length scale, such as composition, dislocation, crystal orientation distribution and so on. To predict the effective hardening, the influence factors along different length scales should be considered. A multiscale approach was implemented in this work to predict irradiation hardening of iron based structural materials. Three length scales are involved in this multiscale model: nanometer, micrometer and millimeter. In the microscale, molecular dynamics (MD) was utilized to predict on the edge dislocation mobility in body centered cubic (bcc) Fe and its Ni and Cr alloys. On the mesoscale, dislocation dynamics (DD) models were used to predict the critical resolved shear stress from the evolution of local dislocation and defects. In the macroscale, a viscoplastic self-consistent (VPSC) model was applied to predict the irradiation hardening in samples with changes in texture. The effects of defect density and texture were investigated. Simulated evolution of yield strength with irradiation agrees well with the experimental data of irradiation strengthening of stainless steel 304L, 316L and T91. This multiscale model we developed in this project can provide a guidance tool in performance evaluation of structural materials for next-generation nuclear reactors. Combining with other tools developed in the Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) program, the models developed will have more impact in improving the reliability of current reactors and affordability of new

  17. Role of nanocrystalline cerium oxide coatings on austenitic stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Haiying

    Protective nanocrystalline cerium oxide coating has been applied to ASTM grade 304L and 304 austenitic stainless steels to improve its oxidation resistance at elevated temperatures. Experimentally, the selected alloy was exposed to 800°C/1000°C under dry air conditions. Weight changes (DeltaW/A) were monitored as a function of time and the results were compared with uncoated alloys tested under similar conditions. It was found that the oxidation resistances of 304L and 304 stainless steels were significantly improved. A comparison of the oxidation rates indicated that the nanocrystalline cerium oxide coating reduced the rate of oxidation by more than two orders of magnitude. Nevertheless, a comprehensive understanding of the mechanisms responsible for the reduction in the oxidation rate is not clear. Consequently, this work is aimed at investigating the mechanisms involved during scale growth in the presence or absence of nanocrystalline coatings. For this purpose, density functional theory was carried out in order to predict oxygen and iron diffusion microscopic activation energies and reveal the intrinsic characteristics of nanocrystalline coatings. A numerical simulation of corrosion process has also been conducted to predict the corrosion rates of alloys with and without coatings. Hence, the results from simulations are compared with the experimental outcome, and possible explanations are given to account for the reduction in the exhibited oxidation rates. The simulation results will provide a highly valuable tool for the realization of functional nanostructures and architectures "by design", particularly in the development of novel coatings, and a new approach of life assessment.

  18. HYDROGEN EFFECTS ON THE FRACTURE TOUGHNESS PROPERTIES OF FORGED STAINLESS STEELS

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, M

    2008-03-28

    The effect of hydrogen on the fracture toughness properties of Types 304L, 316L and 21-6-9 forged stainless steels was investigated. Fracture toughness samples were fabricated from forward-extruded forgings. Samples were uniformly saturated with hydrogen after exposure to hydrogen gas at 34 MPa or 69 and 623 K prior to testing. The fracture toughness properties were characterized by measuring the J-R behavior at ambient temperature in air. The results show that the hydrogen-charged steels have fracture toughness values that were about 50-60% of the values measured for the unexposed steels. The reduction in fracture toughness was accompanied by a change in fracture appearance. Both uncharged and hydrogen-charged samples failed by microvoid nucleation and coalescence, but the fracture surfaces of the hydrogen-charged steels had smaller microvoids. Type 316L stainless steel had the highest fracture toughness properties and the greatest resistance to hydrogen degradation.

  19. Hydrogen Environment Embrittlement on Austenitic Stainless Steels from Room Temperature to Low Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogata, Toshio

    2015-12-01

    Hydrogen environment embrittlement (HEE) on austenitic stainless steels SUS304, 304L, and 316L in the high pressure hydrogen gas was evaluated from ambient temperature to 20 K using a very simple mechanical properties testing procedure. In the method, the high- pressure hydrogen environment is produced just inside the hole in the specimen and the specimen is cooled in a cooled-alcohol dewar and a cryostat with a GM refrigerator. The effect of HEE was observed in tensile properties, especially at lower temperatures, and fatigue properties at higher stress level but almost no effect around the stress level of yield strength where almost no strain-induced martensite was produced. So, no effect of HEE on austenitic stainless steels unless the amount of the ferrite phase is small.

  20. The role of dislocation channeling in IASCC initiation of neutron irradiated austenitic stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephenson, Kale Jennings

    The objective of this study was to understand the role of dislocation channeling in the initiation of irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) of neutron irradiated austenitic stainless steel using a novel four-point bend test. Stainless steels used in this study were irradiated in the BOR-60 fast reactor at 320 °C, and included a commercial purity 304L stainless steel irradiated to 5.5, 10.2, and 47.5 dpa, and two high purity stainless steels, Fe-18Cr-12Ni and Fe-18Cr-25Ni, irradiated to ~10 dpa. The four-point bend test produced the same relative IASCC susceptibility as constant extension rate tensile (CERT) experiments performed on the same irradiated alloys in boiling water reactor normal water chemistry. The cracking susceptibility of the CP 304L alloy was high at all irradiation dose levels, enhanced by the presence of MnS inclusions in the alloy microstructure, which dissolve in the NWC environment. Dissolution of the MnS inclusion results in formation of an oxide cap that occludes the inclusion site, creating a crevice condition with a high propensity for crack initiation. Crack initiation at these locations was induced by stress concentration at the intersecting grain boundary, resulting from the intersection of a discontinuous dislocation channels (DC). Stress to initiate an IASCC crack decreased with dose due earlier DC initiation. The HP Fe-18Cr-12Ni alloy had low susceptibility to IASCC, while the high Ni alloy exhibited no cracking susceptibility. The difference in susceptibility among these conditions was attributed to the propensity for DCs to transmit across grain boundaries, which controls stress accumulation at DC -- grain boundary intersections.

  1. Corrosion of stainless steel during acetate production

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, J.S.; Lester, G.C.

    1996-07-01

    Corrosion of types 304, 304L, 316, and 316L stainless steel (SS) during the esterification of acetic acid and alcohol or glycol ether was investigated. The catalyst for this reaction, sulfuric acid or para-toluene sulfonic acid (PTSA), was shown to cause more corrosion on reactor equipment than CH{sub 3}COOH under the process conditions commonly practiced in industry. The corrosive action of the catalyst occurred only in the presence of water. Thus, for the batch processes, corrosion occurred mostly during the initial stage of esterification, where water produced by the reaction created an aqueous environment. After water was distilled off, the corrosion rate declined to a negligible value. The corrosion inhibitor copper sulfate, often used in industrial acetate processes, was found to work well for a low-temperature process (< 95 C) such as in production of butyl acetate, but it accelerated corrosion in the glycol ether acetate processes where temperatures were > 108 C. Process conditions that imparted low corrosion rates were determined.

  2. Experiment and numerical simulation on cross-die forming of SUS304 metastable austenitic stainless using a modified Johnson-Cook model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xifeng; Ding, Wei; Ye, Liyan; Chen, Jun

    2013-12-01

    True stress-strain curves of SUS304 metastable austenitic stainless steel at various strain rates were fitted by a modified Johnson-Cook material model. The effect of blank-holder force on Cross-die forming of SUS304 stainless steel was studied. The forming process was also simulated by the software Marc based on this model. Major strain distribution, thickness distribution and load-displacement were compared between experiment and simulation. The results indicated the modified Johnson-Cook model could well predict the deformation behavior of SUS304 stainless steel. The martensitie volume fraction at different positions of the formed part was in good agreement with what can be expected.

  3. Carbon diffusion and phase transformations during gas carburizing of high-alloyed stainless steels: Experimental study and theoretical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turpin, T.; Dulcy, J.; Gantois, M.

    2005-10-01

    Gas carburizing of high-alloyed stainless steels increases surface hardness, as well as the overall mechanical characteristics of the surface. The growth of chromium-rich carbides during carbon transfer into the steel causes precipitation hardening in the surface, but decreases the chromium content in solid solution. In order to maintain a good corrosion resistance in the carburized layer, the stainless steel composition and the carburizing process need to be optimized. To limit the experimental work, a methodology using software for modeling the thermodynamic and kinetic properties in order to simulate carbon diffusion and phase transformations during gas carburizing is presented. Thermodynamic calculations are initially used to find the optimum parameters ( T, carbon wt pct, etc.) in order to maintain the highest Cr and Mo contents in the austenitic solid solution. In a second step, kinetic calculations using the diffusion-controlled transformations (DICTRA) software are used to predict how the amount of the different phases varies and how the carbon profile in the steel changes as a function of time during the process. Experimental carbon profiles were determined using a wavelength-dispersive spectrometer for electron-probe microanalysis (WDS-EPMA), while carbide compositions were measured by energy-dispersive spectroscopy_X (EDS_X) analyses. A good agreement between calculated and experimental values was observed for the Fe-13Cr-5Co-3Ni-2Mo-0.07C and the Fe-12Cr-2Ni-2Mo-0.12C (wt pct) martensitic stainless steels at 955 °C and 980 °C.

  4. Effects of Cold Rolling and Strain-Induced Martensite Formation in a SAF 2205 Duplex Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breda, Marco; Brunelli, Katya; Grazzi, Francesco; Scherillo, Antonella; Calliari, Irene

    2015-02-01

    Duplex stainless steels (DSSs) are biphasic steels having a ferritic-austenitic microstructure that allows them to combine good mechanical and corrosion-resistance properties. However, these steels are sensitive to microstructural modifications, such as ferrite decomposition at high temperatures and the possibility of strain-induced martensite (SIM) formation from cold-worked austenite, which can significantly alter their interesting features. In the present work, the effects of cold rolling on the developed microstructural features in a cold-rolled SAF 2205 DSS and the onset of martensitic transformation are discussed. The material was deformed at room temperature from 3 to 85 pct thickness reduction, and several characterization techniques (scanning and transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, hardness measurements, and time-of-flight-neutron diffraction) were employed in order to fully describe the microstructural behavior of the steel. Despite the low stacking fault energy of DSS austenite, which contributed to SIM formation, the steel was found to be more stable than other stainless steel grades, such as AISI 304L. Rolling textures were similar to those pertaining to single-phase materials, but the presence of the biphasic (Duplex) microstructure imposed deformation constraints that affected the developed microstructural features, owing to phases interactions. Moreover, even if an intensification of the strain field in austenite was revealed, retarded SIM transformation kinetics and lower martensite amounts with respect to AISI 304L were observed.

  5. Cyclic uniaxial and biaxial hardening of type 304 stainless steel modeled by the viscoplasticity theory based on overstress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yao, David; Krempl, Erhard

    1988-01-01

    The isotropic theory of viscoplasticity based on overstress does not use a yield surface or a loading and unloading criterion. The inelastic strain rate depends on overstress, the difference between the stress and the equilibrium stress, and is assumed to be rate dependent. Special attention is paid to the modeling of elastic regions. For the modeling of cyclic hardening, such as observed in annealed Type 304 stainless steel, and additional growth law for a scalar quantity which represents the rate independent asymptotic value of the equilibrium stress is added. It is made to increase with inelastic deformation using a new scalar measure which differentiates between nonproportional and proportional loading. The theory is applied to correlate uniaxial data under two step amplitude loading including the effect of further hardening at the high amplitude and proportional and nonproportional cyclic loadings. Results are compared with corresponding experiments.

  6. Constitutive modeling of hot horming of austenitic stainless steel 316LN by accounting for recrystallization in the dislocation evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kooiker, H.; Perdahcioğlu, E. S.; van den Boogaard, A. H.

    2016-08-01

    Hot compression test data taken from Zhang [1] of metastable austenitic stainless steel AISI 316LN over a range of strain rates and temperatures shows typical dynamic recovery and recrystallization behavior. It is proposed to model this behavior by incorporating not only the hardening and recovery into the Bergstrom dislocation evolution equation, but also the recrystallization. It is shown that the initial mechanical response before recrystallization can be accurately represented by assuming that the mean free path evolves as the microstructure evolves from homogeneously spaced dislocations to cell-pattern. Results show that this novel continuum mechanical model can predict the observed behavior, showing a good match to the experimental data and capturing the transition from recrystallization to (almost) no recrystallization.

  7. Modeling phase transformation behavior during thermal cycling in the heat-affected zone of stainless steel welds

    SciTech Connect

    Vitek, J.M.; Iskander, Y.S.; David, S.A.

    1995-12-31

    An implicit finite-difference analysis was used to model the diffusion-controlled transformation behavior in a ternary system. The present analysis extends earlier work by examining the transformation behavior under the influence of multiple thermal cycles. The analysis was applied to the Fe-Cr-Ni ternary system to simulate the microstructural development in austenitic stainless steel welds. The ferrite-to-austenite transformation was studied in an effort to model the response of the heat-affected zone to multiple thermal cycles experienced during multipass welding. Results show that under some conditions, a transformation ``inertia`` exists that delays the system`s response when changing from cooling to heating. Conditions under which this ``inertia`` is most influential were examined. It was also found that under some conditions, the transformation behavior does not follow the equilibrium behavior as a function of temperature. Results also provide some insight into effect of composition distribution on transformation behavior.

  8. LOCALIZED CORROSION OF AUSTENITIC STAINLESS STEELEXPOSED TO MIXTURES OF PLUTONIUM OXIDE AND CHLORIDE SALTS

    SciTech Connect

    Zapp, P; Kerry Dunn, K; Jonathan Duffey, J; Ron Livingston, R; Zane Nelson, Z

    2008-11-21

    Laboratory corrosion tests were conducted to investigate the corrosivity of moist plutonium oxide/chloride (PuO{sub 2}/Cl-) salt mixtures on 304L and 316L stainless steel coupons. The tests exposed flat coupons for pitting evaluation and 'teardrop' stressed coupons for stress corrosion cracking (SCC) evaluation at room temperature to various mixtures of PuO{sub 2} and chloride-bearing salts for periods up to 500 days. The two flat coupons were placed so that the solid oxide/salt mixture contacted about one half of the coupon surface. One teardrop coupon was placed in contact with solid mixture; the second teardrop was in contact with the headspace gas only. The mixtures were loaded with nominally 0.5 wt % water under a helium atmosphere. Observations of corrosion ranged from superficial staining to pitting and SCC. The extent of corrosion depended on the total salt concentration and on the composition of the salt. The most significant corrosion was found in coupons that were exposed to 98 wt % PuO{sub 2}, 2 wt % chloride salt mixtures that contained calcium chloride. SCC was observed in two 304L stainless steel teardrop coupons exposed in solid contact to a mixture of 98 wt % PuO{sub 2}, 0.9 wt % NaCl, 0.9 wt % KCl, and 0.2 wt % CaCl{sub 2}. The cracking was associated with the heat-affected zone of an autogenous weld that ran across the center of the coupon. Cracking was not observed in coupons exposed to the headspace gas, nor in coupons exposed to other mixtures with either 0.92 wt% CaCl{sub 2} or no CaCl{sub 2}. The corrosion results point to the significance of the interaction between water loading and the concentration of the hydrating salt CaCl{sub 2} in the susceptibility of austenitic stainless steels to corrosion.

  9. Crack growth rates of irradiated austenitic stainless steel weld heat affected zone in BWR environments.

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O. K.; Alexandreanu, B.; Gruber, E. E.; Daum, R. S.; Shack, W. J.; Energy Technology

    2006-01-31

    Austenitic stainless steels (SSs) are used extensively as structural alloys in the internal components of reactor pressure vessels because of their superior fracture toughness. However, exposure to high levels of neutron irradiation for extended periods can exacerbate the corrosion fatigue and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of these steels by affecting the material microchemistry, material microstructure, and water chemistry. Experimental data are presented on crack growth rates of the heat affected zone (HAZ) in Types 304L and 304 SS weld specimens before and after they were irradiated to a fluence of 5.0 x 10{sup 20} n/cm{sup 2} (E > 1 MeV) ({approx} 0.75 dpa) at {approx}288 C. Crack growth tests were conducted under cycling loading and long hold time trapezoidal loading in simulated boiling water reactor environments on Type 304L SS HAZ of the H5 weld from the Grand Gulf reactor core shroud and on Type 304 SS HAZ of a laboratory-prepared weld. The effects of material composition, irradiation, and water chemistry on growth rates are discussed.

  10. Defect microstructures in neutron-irradiated copper and stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Zinkle, S.J.; Sindelar, R.L.

    1987-09-01

    The defect microstructures of copper and type 304L austenitic stainless steel have been examined following neutron irradiation under widely different conditions. Less than 0.2% of the defect clusters in steel irradiated at 120/sup 0/C with moderated fission neutrons were resolvable as stacking fault tetrahedra (SFT). The fraction of defect clusters identified as SFT in copper varied from approx.10% for a low-dose 14-MeV neutron irradiation at 25/sup 0/C to approx.50% for copper irradiated to 1.3 dpa in a moderated fission spectrum at 182/sup 0/C. The mean cluster size in copper was about 2.6 nm for both cases, despite the large differences in irradiation conditions. The mean defect cluster size in the irradiated steel was about 1.8 nm. The absence of SFT in stainless steel may be due to the generation of 35 appm He during the irradiation, which caused the vacancies to form helium-filled cavities instead of SFT. 20 refs.

  11. Microstructural evolution in a ferritic-martensitic stainless steel and its relation to high-temperature deformation and rupture models

    SciTech Connect

    DiMelfi, R.J.; Gruber, E.E.; Kramer, J.M.

    1991-01-01

    The ferritic-martensitic stainless steel HT-9 exhibits an anomalously high creep strength in comparison to its high-temperature flow strength from tensile tests performed at moderate rates. A constitutive relation describing its high-temperature tensile behavior over a wide range of conditions has been developed. When applied to creep conditions the model predicts deformation rates orders of magnitude higher than observed. To account for the observed creep strength, a fine distribution of precipitates is postulated to evolve over time during creep. The precipitate density is calculated at each temperature and stress to give the observed creep rate. The apparent precipitation kinetics thereby extracted from this analysis is used in a model for the rupture-time kinetics that compares favorably with observation. Properly austenitized and tempered material was aged over times comparable to creep conditions, and in a way consistent with the precipitation kinetics from the model. Microstructural observations support the postulates and results of the model system. 16 refs., 10 figs.

  12. Activity plan for activity E-20-81: development and experimental validation of crevice corrosion models

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J C

    1999-12-28

    Alloy 22 [UNS N06022] is now being considered for construction of high level waste containers to be emplaced at the potential repository at Yucca Mountain or elsewhere. In essence, this alloy is 21% Cr, 13% Mo, 4% Fe, 3% W, 2% Co, with the balance being Ni. Variants without tungsten are also being considered. Detailed mechanistic models are being developed to account for the corrosion of Alloy 22 surfaces in crevices that will inevitably form. Such occluded areas experience substantial decreases in pH, with corresponding elevations in chloride concentration. Other relevant materials will also be investigated: nickel-based alloys such as Alloys 825, 625, C-4, C-276 and 59; titanium-based alloys such as Grades 12, 7 and 16, carbon steels such as A516 Grade 55; stainless steels such as 304, 304L, 316, 316L and 316NG; various copper-based alloys; and any materials that would serve as crevice formers (rock, thermally-sprayed ceramics, etc.). Experimental work has been undertaken to validate the crevice corrosion model, including parallel studies with 304 stainless steel. The crevice corrosion model is described in detail in scientific notebooks of the Principal Investigator, as well as other publications. Codes will be prepared in accordance with the YMP QP entitled ''Software Quality Assurance'' (033-YMP-QP 12.0).

  13. Assessment of electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation tests to qualify stainless steel for nitric acid service

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, A.R.; Dillon, J.J.; Peters, A.H.; Clift, T.L.

    1986-12-31

    To minimize the costs and delivery time delays associated with purchasing type 304L stainless steel materials for service in nitric-acid-containing media, an alternative to the current Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant requirement of testing in accordance with American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) A 262, Practice C (the boiling nitric acid test), is being sought. A possible candidate is the electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation (EPR) test being developed for the nuclear industry and under consideration for acceptance as an ASTM standard. Based on a review of the literature and some limited screening tests, this test, as currently proposed, is not a suitable substitute for the nitric acid test. However, with additional development the EPR test is a likely candidate for providing a quantitative substitute for the current qualitative oxalic acid etching (ASTM A 282, Practice A) often used to accept, but not reject, materials for use in a nitric acid medium.

  14. Stress corrosion cracking behavior of irradiated model austenitic stainless steel alloys.

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, H. M.; Karlsen, T. M.; Ruther, W. E.; Shack, W. J.; Strain, R. V.

    1999-07-16

    Slow-strain-rate tensile tests (SSRTs) and posttest fractographic analyses by scanning electron microscopy were conducted on 16 austenitic stainless steel (SS) alloys that were irradiated at 289 C in He. After irradiation to {approx}0.3 x 10{sup 21} n{center_dot}cm{sup {minus}2} and {approx}0.9 x 10{sup 21} n{center_dot}cm{sup {minus}2} (E >1 MeV), significant heat-to-heat variations in the degree of intergranular and transgranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC and TGSCC) were observed. Following irradiation to a fluence of {approx}0.3 x 10{sup 21} n{center_dot}cm{sup {minus}2}, a high-purity laboratory heat of Type 316L SS (Si {approx} 0.024 wt%) exhibited the highest susceptibility to IGSCC. The other 15 alloys exhibited negligible susceptibility to IGSCC at this low fluence. The percentage of TGSCC on the fracture surfaces of SSRT specimens of the 16 alloys at {approx}0.3 x 10{sup 21} n{center_dot}cm{sup {minus}2} (E > 1 MeV) could be correlated well with N and Si concentrations; all alloys that contained <0.01 wt.% N and <1.0 wt. % Si were susceptible, whereas all alloys that contained >0.01 wt.% N or >1.0 wt.% Si were relatively resistant. High concentrations of Cr were beneficial. Alloys that contain <15.5 wt.% Cr exhibited greater percentages of TGSCC and IGSCC than those alloys with {approx}18 wt.% Cr, whereas an alloy that contains >21 wt.% Cr exhibited less susceptibility than the lower-Cr alloys under similar conditions.

  15. 2D Radiation MHD K-shell Modeling of Single Wire Array Stainless Steel Experiments on the Z Machine

    SciTech Connect

    Thornhill, J. W.; Giuliani, J. L.; Apruzese, J. P.; Chong, Y. K.; Davis, J.; Dasgupta, A.; Whitney, K. G.; Clark, R. W.; Jones, B.; Coverdale, C. A.; Ampleford, D. J.; Cuneo, M. E.; Deeney, C.

    2009-01-21

    Many physical effects can produce unstable plasma behavior that affect K-shell emission from arrays. Such effects include: asymmetry in the initial density profile, asymmetry in power flow, thermal conduction at the boundaries, and non-uniform wire ablation. Here we consider how asymmetry in the radiation field also contributes to the generation of multidimensional plasma behavior that affects K-shell power and yield. To model this radiation asymmetry, we have incorporated into the MACH2 r-z MHD code a self-consistent calculation of the non-LTE population kinetics based on radiation transport using multi-dimensional ray tracing. Such methodology is necessary for modeling the enhanced radiative cooling that occurs at the anode and cathode ends of the pinch during the run-in phase of the implosion. This enhanced radiative cooling is due to reduced optical depth at these locations producing an asymmetric flow of radiative energy that leads to substantial disruption of large initial diameter (>5 cm) pinches and drives 1D into 2D fluid (i.e., Rayleigh-Taylor like) flows. The impact of this 2D behavior on K-shell power and yield is investigated by comparing 1D and 2D model results with data obtained from a series of single wire array stainless steel experiments performed on the Z generator.

  16. Modelling the attenuation in the ATHENA finite elements code for the ultrasonic testing of austenitic stainless steel welds.

    PubMed

    Chassignole, B; Duwig, V; Ploix, M-A; Guy, P; El Guerjouma, R

    2009-12-01

    Multipass welds made in austenitic stainless steel, in the primary circuit of nuclear power plants with pressurized water reactors, are characterized by an anisotropic and heterogeneous structure that disturbs the ultrasonic propagation and makes ultrasonic non-destructive testing difficult. The ATHENA 2D finite element simulation code was developed to help understand the various physical phenomena at play. In this paper, we shall describe the attenuation model implemented in this code to give an account of wave scattering phenomenon through polycrystalline materials. This model is in particular based on the optimization of two tensors that characterize this material on the basis of experimental values of ultrasonic velocities attenuation coefficients. Three experimental configurations, two of which are representative of the industrial welds assessment case, are studied in view of validating the model through comparison with the simulation results. We shall thus provide a quantitative proof that taking into account the attenuation in the ATHENA code dramatically improves the results in terms of the amplitude of the echoes. The association of the code and detailed characterization of a weld's structure constitutes a remarkable breakthrough in the interpretation of the ultrasonic testing on this type of component.

  17. Modeling of ultrasonic propagation in heavy-walled centrifugally cast austenitic stainless steel based on EBSD analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yao; Luo, Zhongbing; Zhou, Quan; Zou, Longjiang; Lin, Li

    2015-05-01

    The ultrasonic inspection of heavy-walled centrifugally cast austenitic stainless steel (CCASS) is challenging due to the complex metallurgical structure. Numerical modeling could provide quantitative information on ultrasonic propagation and plays an important role in developing advanced and reliable ultrasonic inspection techniques. But the fundamental obstacle is the accurate description of the complex metallurgical structure. To overcome this difficulty, a crystal orientation map of a CCASS specimen in the 96 mm × 12 mm radial-axial cross section was acquired based on the electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) technique and it was used to describe the coarse-grained structure and grain orientation. A model of ultrasonic propagation for CCASS was built according to the EBSD map. The ultrasonic responses of the CCASS sample were also tested. Some experimental phenomena such as structural noise and signal distortion were reproduced. The simulated results showed a good consistence with the experiments. The modeling method is expected to be effective for the precise interpretation of ultrasonic propagation in the polycrystalline structures of CCASS.

  18. Interfacial modification to optimize stainless steel photoanode design for flexible dye sensitized solar cells: an experimental and numerical modeling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salehi Taleghani, Sara; Zamani Meymian, Mohammad Reza; Ameri, Mohsen

    2016-10-01

    In the present research, we report fabrication, experimental characterization and theoretical analysis of semi and full flexible dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) manufactured on the basis of bare and roughened stainless steel type 304 (SS304) substrates. The morphological, optical and electrical characterizations confirm the advantage of roughened SS304 over bare and even common transparent conducting oxides (TCOs). A significant enhancement of about 51% in power conversion efficiency is obtained for flexible device (5.51%) based on roughened SS304 substrate compared to the bare SS304. The effect of roughening the SS304 substrates on electrical transport characteristics is also investigated by means of numerical modeling with regard to metal-semiconductor and interfacial resistance arising from the metallic substrate and nanocrystalline semiconductor contact. The numerical modeling results provide a reliable theoretical backbone to be combined with experimental implications. It highlights the stronger effect of series resistance compared to schottky barrier in lowering the fill factor of the SS304-based DSSCs. The findings of the present study nominate roughened SS304 as a promising replacement for conventional DSSCs substrates as well as introducing a highly accurate modeling framework to design and diagnose treated metallic or non-metallic based DSSCs.

  19. Modeling of ultrasonic propagation in heavy-walled centrifugally cast austenitic stainless steel based on EBSD analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yao; Luo, Zhongbing; Zhou, Quan; Zou, Longjiang; Lin, Li

    2015-05-01

    The ultrasonic inspection of heavy-walled centrifugally cast austenitic stainless steel (CCASS) is challenging due to the complex metallurgical structure. Numerical modeling could provide quantitative information on ultrasonic propagation and plays an important role in developing advanced and reliable ultrasonic inspection techniques. But the fundamental obstacle is the accurate description of the complex metallurgical structure. To overcome this difficulty, a crystal orientation map of a CCASS specimen in the 96 mm × 12 mm radial-axial cross section was acquired based on the electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) technique and it was used to describe the coarse-grained structure and grain orientation. A model of ultrasonic propagation for CCASS was built according to the EBSD map. The ultrasonic responses of the CCASS sample were also tested. Some experimental phenomena such as structural noise and signal distortion were reproduced. The simulated results showed a good consistence with the experiments. The modeling method is expected to be effective for the precise interpretation of ultrasonic propagation in the polycrystalline structures of CCASS. PMID:25670411

  20. Cluster dynamics modeling of the effect of high dose irradiation and helium on the microstructure of austenitic stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brimbal, Daniel; Fournier, Lionel; Barbu, Alain

    2016-01-01

    A mean field cluster dynamics model has been developed in order to study the effect of high dose irradiation and helium on the microstructural evolution of metals. In this model, self-interstitial clusters, stacking-fault tetrahedra and helium-vacancy clusters are taken into account, in a configuration well adapted to austenitic stainless steels. For small helium-vacancy cluster sizes, the densities of each small cluster are calculated. However, for large sizes, only the mean number of helium atoms per cluster size is calculated. This aspect allows us to calculate the evolution of the microstructural features up to high irradiation doses in a few minutes. It is shown that the presence of stacking-fault tetrahedra notably reduces cavity sizes below 400 °C, but they have little influence on the microstructure above this temperature. The binding energies of vacancies to cavities are calculated using a new method essentially based on ab initio data. It is shown that helium has little effect on the cavity microstructure at 300 °C. However, at higher temperatures, even small helium production rates such as those typical of sodium-fast-reactors induce a notable increase in cavity density compared to an irradiation without helium.

  1. Measurement of ultrasonic scattering attenuation in austenitic stainless steel welds: realistic input data for NDT numerical modeling.

    PubMed

    Ploix, Marie-Aude; Guy, Philippe; Chassignole, Bertrand; Moysan, Joseph; Corneloup, Gilles; El Guerjouma, Rachid

    2014-09-01

    Multipass welds made of 316L stainless steel are specific welds of the primary circuit of pressurized water reactors in nuclear power plants. Because of their strong heterogeneous and anisotropic nature due to grain growth during solidification, ultrasonic waves may be greatly deviated, split and attenuated. Thus, ultrasonic assessment of the structural integrity of such welds is quite complicated. Numerical codes exist that simulate ultrasonic propagation through such structures, but they require precise and realistic input data, as attenuation coefficients. This paper presents rigorous measurements of attenuation in austenitic weld as a function of grain orientation. In fact attenuation is here mainly caused by grain scattering. Measurements are based on the decomposition of experimental beams into plane-wave angular spectra and on the modeling of the ultrasonic propagation through the material. For this, the transmission coefficients are calculated for any incident plane wave on an anisotropic plate. Two different hypotheses on the welded material are tested: first it is considered as monoclinic, and then as triclinic. Results are analyzed, and validated through comparison to theoretical predictions of related literature. They underline the great importance of well-describing the anisotropic structure of austenitic welds for UT modeling issues.

  2. A process model for the heat-affected zone microstructure evolution in duplex stainless steel weldments: Part II. Application to electron beam welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemmer, H.; Grong, Ø.; Klokkehaug, S.

    2000-03-01

    In the present investigation, a process model for electron beam (EB) welding of different grades of duplex stainless steels (i.e. SAF 2205 and 2507) has been developed. A number of attractive features are built into the original finite element code, including (1) a separate module for prediction of the penetration depth and distribution of the heat source into the plate, (2) adaptive refinement of the three-dimensional (3-D) element mesh for quick and reliable solution of the differential heat flow equation, and (3) special subroutines for calculation of the heat-affected zone (HAZ) microstructure evolution. The process model has been validated by comparison with experimental data obtained from in situ thermocouple measurements and optical microscope examinations. Subsequently, its aptness to alloy design and optimization of welding conditions for duplex stainless steels is illustrated in different numerical examples and case studies pertaining to EB welding of tubular joints.

  3. Low-Temperature Nitriding of Deformed Austenitic Stainless Steels with Various Nitrogen Contents Obtained by Prior High-Temperature Solution Nitriding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottoli, Federico; Winther, Grethe; Christiansen, Thomas L.; Dahl, Kristian Vinter; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2016-08-01

    In the past decades, high nitrogen steels (HNS) have been regarded as substitutes for conventional austenitic stainless steels because of their superior mechanical and corrosion properties. However, the main limitation to their wider application is their expensive production process. As an alternative, high-temperature solution nitriding has been applied to produce HNS from three commercially available stainless steel grades (AISI 304L, AISI 316, and EN 1.4369). The nitrogen content in each steel alloy is varied and its influence on the mechanical properties and the stability of the austenite investigated. Both hardness and yield stress increase and the alloys remain ductile. In addition, strain-induced transformation of austenite to martensite is suppressed, which is beneficial for subsequent low-temperature nitriding of the surface of deformed alloys. The combination of high- and low-temperature nitriding results in improved properties of both bulk and surface.

  4. Modeling of microstructure evolution in austenitic stainless steels irradiated under light water reactor condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, J.; Was, G. S.; Stoller, R. E.

    2001-10-01

    A model for microstructure development in austenitic alloys under light water reactor irradiation conditions is described. The model is derived from the model developed by Stoller and Odette to describe microstructural evolution under fast neutron or fusion reactor irradiation conditions. The model is benchmarked against microstructure measurements in 304 and 316 SS irradiated in a boiling water reactor core using one material-dependent and three irradiation-based parameters. The model is also adapted for proton irradiation at higher dose rate and higher temperature and is calibrated against microstructure measurements for proton irradiation. The model calculations show that for both neutron and proton irradiations, in-cascade interstitial clustering is the driving mechanism for loop nucleation. The loss of interstitial clusters to sinks by interstitial cluster diffusion was found to be an important factor in determining the loop density. The model also explains how proton irradiation can produce an irradiated dislocation microstructure similar to that in neutron irradiation.

  5. Modeling precipitation thermodynamics and kinetics in type 316 austenitic stainless steels with varying composition as an initial step toward predicting phase stability during irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shim, Jae-Hyeok; Povoden-Karadeniz, Erwin; Kozeschnik, Ernst; Wirth, Brian D.

    2015-07-01

    The long-term evolution of precipitates in type 316 austenitic stainless steels at 400 °C has been simulated using a numerical model based on classical nucleation theory and the thermodynamic extremum principle. Particular attention has been paid to the precipitation of radiation-induced phases such as γ‧ and G phases. In addition to the original compositions, the compositions for radiation-induced segregation at a dose level of 5, 10 or 20 dpa have been used in the simulation. In a 316 austenitic stainless steel, γ‧ appears as the main precipitate with a small amount of G phase forming at 10 and 20 dpa. On the other hand, G phase becomes relatively dominant over γ‧ at the same dose levels in a Ti-stabilized 316 austenitic stainless steel, which tends to suppress the formation of γ‧. Among the segregated alloying elements, the concentration of Si seems to be the most critical for the formation of radiation-induced phases. An increase in dislocation density as well as increased diffusivity of Mn and Si significantly enhances the precipitation kinetics of the radiation-induced phases within this model.

  6. Stress corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steel core internal welds.

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, H. M.; Park, J.-H.; Ruther, W. E.; Sanecki, J. E.; Strain, R. V.; Zaluzec, N. J.

    1999-04-14

    Microstructural analyses by several advanced metallographic techniques were conducted on austenitic stainless steel mockup and core shroud welds that had cracked in boiling water reactors. Contrary to previous beliefs, heat-affected zones of the cracked Type 304L, as well as 304 SS core shroud welds and mockup shielded-metal-arc welds, were free of grain-boundary carbides, which shows that core shroud failure cannot be explained by classical intergranular stress corrosion cracking. Neither martensite nor delta-ferrite films were present on the grain boundaries. However, as a result of exposure to welding fumes, the heat-affected zones of the core shroud welds were significantly contaminated by oxygen and fluorine, which migrate to grain boundaries. Significant oxygen contamination seems to promote fluorine contamination and suppress thermal sensitization. Results of slow-strain-rate tensile tests also indicate that fluorine exacerbates the susceptibility of irradiated steels to intergranular stress corrosion cracking. These observations, combined with previous reports on the strong influence of weld flux, indicate that oxygen and fluorine contamination and fluorine-catalyzed stress corrosion play a major role in cracking of core shroud welds.

  7. Tritium Effects on Fracture Toughness of Stainless Steel Weldments

    SciTech Connect

    MORGAN, MICHAEL; CHAPMAN, G. K.; TOSTEN, M. H.; WEST, S. L.

    2005-05-12

    The effects of tritium on the fracture toughness properties of Type 304L and Type 21-6-9 stainless steel weldments were measured. Weldments were tritium-charged-and-aged and then tested in order to measure the effect of the increasing decay helium content on toughness. The results were compared to uncharged and hydrogen-charged samples. For unexposed weldments having 8-12 volume percent retained delta ferrite, fracture toughness was higher than base metal toughness. At higher levels of weld ferrite, the fracture toughness decreased to values below that of the base metal. Hydrogen-charged and tritium-charged weldments had lower toughness values than similarly charged base metals and toughness decreased further with increasing weld ferrite content. The effect of decay helium content was inconclusive because of tritium off-gassing losses during handling, storage and testing. Fracture modes were dominated by the dimpled rupture process in unexposed weldments. In hydrogen and tritium-exposed weldments, the fracture modes depended on the weld ferrite content. At high ferrite contents, hydrogen-induced transgranular fracture of the weld ferrite phase was observed.

  8. Twinning and martensite in a 304 austenitic stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Yongfeng; Li, Xi; Sun, Xin; Wang, Y. D.; Zuo, Liang

    2012-08-30

    The microstructure characteristics and deformation behavior of 304L stainless steel during tensile deformation at two different strain rates have been investigated by means of interrupted tensile tests, electron-backscatter-diffraction (EBSD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques. The volume fractions of transformed martensite and deformation twins at different stages of the deformation process were measured using X-ray diffraction method and TEM observations. It is found that the volume fraction of martensite monotonically increases with increasing strain but decreases with increasing strain rate. On the other hand, the volume fraction of twins increases with increasing strain for strain level less than 57%. Beyond that, the volume fraction of twins decreases with increasing strain. Careful TEM observations show that stacking faults (SFs) and twins preferentially occur before the nucleation of martensite. Meanwhile, both {var_epsilon}-martensite and {alpha}{prime}-martensite are observed in the deformation microstructures, indicating the co-existence of stress induced- transformation and strain-induced-transformation. We also discussed the effects of twinning and martensite transformation on work-hardening as well as the relationship between stacking faults, twinning and martensite transformation.

  9. Flow Behavior Modeling of a Nitrogen-Alloyed Ultralow Carbon Stainless Steel During Hot Deformation: A Comparative Study of Constitutive Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Xuekun; He, An; Wang, Yanli; Yang, Xiaoya; Zhang, Hailong; Wang, Xitao

    2015-10-01

    The present study focuses on comparison of accuracy of Johnson-Cook, modified Johnson-Cook, and modified Zerilli-Armstrong constitutive models to predict flow behavior of a nitrogen-alloyed ultralow carbon stainless steel at evaluated temperature. True strain-true stress data obtained from hot compression experiments performed with temperatures of 1223-1423 K and strain rates of 0.001-10 s-1 on a Gleeble-3500 thermal-simulator were employed to develop these three models. Furthermore, the ability of the three models to predict the outcomes was evaluated by comparing the correlation coefficient, absolute average related error, ability to track the experimental flow stress, numbers of material constants, and computational time required to develop models. The results show that the modified Johnson-Cook has a better description of the flow behaviors of the studied steel than the other two models. However, under certain conditions, the modified Zerilli-Armstrong model has accuracy comparable to the modified Johnson-Cook model.

  10. The effects of 800 MeV proton irradiation on the corrosion of tungsten, tantalum, stainless steel, and gold

    SciTech Connect

    Lillard, R.S.; Butt, D.P.; Kanner, G.; Daemen, L.

    1997-12-01

    Real time electrochemical data were acquired for tungsten, tantalum, stainless steel 304L, and gold targets during proton irradiation at the LANSCE Weapons Neutron Research Facility. The goal of this research was to establish a better understanding of the corrosion properties of materials as a function of proton irradiation and gain insight into the mechanism of the observed phenomena. The following electrochemical observations were made during proton irradiation of W, Ta, SS304, and Au: (1) the open circuit potential of all materials increased with increasing proton fluence; (2) the corrosion rate (at the OCP) of W and SS304 increased with increasing proton fluence; (3) the passive dissolution rate for SS304 and Ta decreased with increasing proton fluence; (4) the anodic dissolution rate for W increased with increasing proton fluence; (5) the pitting potential for SS304 increased with proton fluence, which is an indication that the material is less susceptible to pitting attack during irradiation.

  11. Impact Tensile Testing of Stainless Steels at Various Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    D. K. Morton

    2008-03-01

    Stainless steels are used for the construction of numerous spent nuclear fuel or radioactive material containers that may be subjected to high strains and moderate strain rates during accidental drop events. Mechanical characteristics of these base materials and their welds under dynamic loads in the strain rate range of concern (1 to 300 per second) are not well documented. However, research is being performed at the Idaho National Laboratory to quantify these characteristics. The work presented herein discusses tensile impact testing of dual-marked 304/304L and 316/316L stainless steel material specimens. Both base material and welded material specimens were tested at -20 oF, room temperature, 300 oF, and 600 oF conditions. Utilizing a drop weight impact test machine and 1/4-inch and 1/2-inch thick dog bone-shaped test specimens, a strain rate range of approximately 4 to 40 per second (depending on initial temperature conditions) was achieved. Factors were determined that reflect the amount of increased strain energy the material can absorb due to strain rate effects. Using the factors, elevated true stress-strain curves for these materials at various strain rates and temperatures were generated. By incorporating the strain rate elevated true stress-strain material curves into an inelastic finite element computer program as the defined material input, significant improvement in the accuracy of the computer analyses was attained. However, additional impact testing is necessary to achieve higher strain rates (up to 300 per second) before complete definition of strain rate effects can be made for accidental drop events and other similar energy-limited impulsive loads. This research approach, using impact testing and a total energy analysis methodology to quantify strain rate effects, can be applied to many other materials used in government and industry.

  12. Modeling of Crevice Corrosion Stability of a NiCrMo Alloy and Stainless Steel

    SciTech Connect

    F.J. Presuel-Moreno; F. Bocher; J.R. Scully; R.G. Kelly

    2006-05-19

    Damage of structural significance from crevice corrosion of corrosion resistant alloys requires that at least a portion of the creviced area remain active over a sufficiently long period. Stifling results shen the aggressive chemistry required inside the crevice to keep the material depassivated, i.e., actively corroding, cannot be maintained. This loss of critical chemistry occurs when the rate of mass transport out of the crevice exceeds the rate of dissolution and subsequent hydrolysis of metal ions inside the crevice. For the treatment considered here, the mass transport conditions are constant for a given geometry and potential. What then controls the stability of the internal chemistry is the interaction between the electrochemical kinetics at the interface and the crevice chemistry composition. This work focuses on the parameters that control the stability of crevice corrosion by modeling the evolution of the chemical and electrochemical conditions within a crevice open only at one end (e.g. the mouth) in which the entire crevice is initially filled with the Critical Chemistry Solution (CCS) or filled with chemistries slightly less or more aggressive than the CCS. The crevice mouth is in contact with a weak acid solution (pH 3) that provides the boundary conditions at the crevice mouth. The potential at the mouth was held constant at +0.1 V{sub sce} in most instances with selected cases held at 0.0 V{sub sce}. The material selected was Ni-22Cr-6Mo alloy. The electrochemical kinetics at the pH values of interest have been recently characterized via potentiodynamic polarization. Figure 1 shows the polarization curves for Ni-22Cr-6Mo samples tested at room temperature in various HCl solutions. These data were used in all calculations. That is as the pH changed, a new polarization curve was applied to the position in the crevice. E, pH was calculated at each position and from this data, current at each position was determined. The effects of the crevice gap and

  13. Microstructural-Scale Model for Surfaces Spreading of Intergranular Corrosion in Sensitized Stainless Steels and Aluminum-Magnesium (AA5XXX) Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Swati

    Components from AA5XXX (Al-Mg alloys with more than 3 wt% Mg) alloys are X attractive due to availability of low cost, high strength to weight ratio and good weldability. Therefore, these alloys have potential applications in Naval ships. However, these alloys become susceptible to IGC (intergranular corrosion) due to beta-phase precipitation due to improper heat treatment or inadvertent thermal exposure. Stainless steels may also become susceptible due to carbide precipitation and chromium depletion on grain boundaries. IGC susceptibility depends on the interplay between the metallurgical conditions, electrochemical conditions, and chemical conditions. Specific combinations cause IGC while others do not. The objective of this study is to investigate the conditions which bring about surface spreading of IGC in these alloy classes. To accomplish this goal, a microstructure scale model was developed with experimental inputs to understand the 2-D IGC spreading in stainless steels and AA5XXX alloys. The conditions strongly affecting IGC spreading were elucidated. Upon natural and artificial aging, the stainless steels become susceptible to intergranular corrosion because of chromium depletion in the grain boundaries. After aging Al-Mg (AA5XXX) alloys show susceptibility due to the precipitation of the beta-phase (Al3Mg7) in the grain boundaries. Chromium depleted grain boundaries in stainless steels are anodically more active as compared to the interior of the grains. (3-phase rich grain boundaries have lower OCP (open circuit potential) and pitting potentials as compared to the Al-Mg solid solutions. A new approach to modeling the IGC surface spreading in polycrystalline materials that is presented. This model is the first to couple several factors into one granular scale model that illustrates the way in which they interact and IGC occurs. It sheds new information on conditions which cause IGC spreading in two alloy classes and describes a new theory for the critical

  14. Task 1 Final Report, Theoretical/Mathematical Modeling of Ultrasonic Wave Propagation in Anisotropic Polycrystalline Stainless Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, Salahuddin; Anderson, Michael T.

    2009-04-20

    One of the tasks of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission-sponsored project titled "Reliability of Nondestructive Examination (NDE) for Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) Inservice Examination (ISI)" is to provide collaborative assistance to Commissariat à l’Energie Atomique (CEA) in France through theoretical predictions of ultrasonic scattering by grains of cast stainless steels (CASS) components. More specifically, a mathematical treatment of ultrasonic scattering in media having duplex micro¬structure is sought because cast stainless steel components often contains larger-scale macrograins that are composed of sub-grains/colonies. In this report, we present formal mathematical theories for ultrasonic wave propagation in polycrystalline aggregates having both simple (composed of grains only) and complex microstructures (having macrograins and sub-grains/colonies). Computations based on these theories are then carried out for ultrasonic backscatter power, attenuation due to scattering, and phase velocity dispersions. Specifically, numerical results are presented for backscatter coefficient for plane longitudinal wave propagating in duplex steel containing macrograins and colonies. Furthermore, the expected propagation characteristics (attenuation coefficient and phase velocity) are computed and described in this report for plane longitudinal waves propagating in (1) steels composed of randomly oriented grains, (2) [001] aligned grains encountered in austenitic stainless steel welds and casts, and (3) duplex steels.

  15. Corrosion experiments on stainless steels used in dry storage canisters of spent nuclear fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Ryskamp, J.M.; Adams, J.P.; Faw, E.M.; Anderson, P.A.

    1996-09-01

    Nonradioactive (cold) experiments have been set up in the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP)-1634, and radioactive (hot) experiments have been set up in the Irradiated Fuel Storage Facility (IFSF) at ICPP. The objective of these experiments is to provide information on the interactions (corrosion) between the spent nuclear fuel currently stored at the ICPP and the dry storage canisters and containment materials in which this spent fuel will be stored for the next several decades. This information will be used to help select canister materials that will retain structural integrity over this period within economic, criticality, and other constraints. The two purposes for Dual Purpose Canisters (DPCs) are for interim storage of spent nuclear fuel and for shipment to a final geological repository. Information on how corrosion products, sediments, and degraded spent nuclear fuel may corrode DPCs will be required before the DPCs will be allowed to be shipped out of the State of Idaho. The information will also be required by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to support the licensing of DPCs. Stainless steels 304L and 316L are the most likely materials for dry interim storage canisters. Welded stainless steel coupons are used to represent the canisters in both hot and cold experiments.

  16. Irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking behavior of austenitic stainless steels applicable to LWR core internals.

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, H. M.; Shack, W. J.; Energy Technology

    2006-01-31

    This report summarizes work performed at Argonne National Laboratory on irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) of austenitic stainless steels that were irradiated in the Halden reactor in simulation of irradiation-induced degradation of boiling water reactor (BWR) core internal components. Slow-strain-rate tensile tests in BWR-like oxidizing water were conducted on 27 austenitic stainless steel alloys that were irradiated at 288 C in helium to 0.4, 1.3, and 3.0 dpa. Fractographic analysis was conducted to determine the fracture surface morphology. Microchemical analysis by Auger electron spectroscopy was performed on BWR neutron absorber tubes to characterize grain-boundary segregation of important elements under BWR conditions. At 0.4 and 1.4 dpa, transgranular fracture was mixed with intergranular fracture. At 3 dpa, transgranular cracking was negligible, and fracture surface was either dominantly intergranular, as in field-cracked core internals, or dominantly ductile or mixed. This behavior indicates that percent intergranular stress corrosion cracking determined at {approx}3 dpa is a good measure of IASCC susceptibility. At {approx}1.4 dpa, a beneficial effect of a high concentration of Si (0.8-1.5 wt.%) was observed. At {approx}3 dpa, however, such effect was obscured by a deleterious effect of S. Excellent resistance to IASCC was observed up to {approx}3 dpa for eight heats of Types 304, 316, and 348 steel that contain very low concentrations of S. Susceptibility of Types 304 and 316 steels that contain >0.003 wt.% S increased drastically. This indicates that a sulfur related critical phenomenon plays an important role in IASCC. A sulfur content of <0.002 wt.% is the primary material factor necessary to ensure good resistance to IASCC. However, for Types 304L and 316L steel and their high-purity counterparts, a sulfur content of <0.002 wt.% alone is not a sufficient condition to ensure good resistance to IASCC. This is in distinct contrast to

  17. Theoretical study of nonadiabatic boundary-layer stabilization times in a cryogenic wind tunnel for typical stainless steel wing and fuselage models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, C. B.

    1980-01-01

    The time varying effect of nonadiabatic wall conditions on boundary layer properties was studied for a two dimensional wing section and an axisymmetric fuselage. The wing and fuselage sections are representative of the wing root chord and fuselage of a typical transport model for the National Transonic Facility. The analysis was made with a solid wing and three fuselage configurations (one solid and two hollow with varying skin thicknesses) all made from AISI type 310S stainless steel. The displacement thickness and local skin friction were investigated at a station on the model in terms of the time required for these two boundary layer properties to reach an adiabatic wall condition after a 50 K step change in total temperature. The analysis was made for a free stream Mach number of 0.85, a total temperature of 117 K, and stagnation pressures of 2, 6, and 9 atm.

  18. Weld solidification cracking in 304 to 204L stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Hochanadel, Patrick W; Lienert, Thomas J; Martinez, Jesse N; Johnson, Matthew Q

    2010-09-15

    A series of annulus welds were made between 304 and 304L stainless steel coaxial tubes using both pulsed laser beam welding (LBW) and pulsed gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW). In this application, a change in process from pulsed LBW to pulsed gas tungsten arc welding was proposed to limit the possibility of weld solidification cracking since weldability diagrams developed for GTAW display a greater range of compositions that are not crack susceptible relative to those developed for pulsed LBW. Contrary to the predictions of the GTAW weldability diagram, cracking was found.This result was rationalized in terms of the more rapid solidification rate of the pulsed gas tungsten arc welds. In addition, for the pulsed LBW conditions, the material compositions were predicted to be, by themselves, 'weldable' according to the pulsed LBW weldability diagram. However, the composition range along the tie line connecting the two compositions passed through the crack susceptible range. Microstructurally, the primary solidification mode (PSM) of the material processed with higher power LBW was determined to be austenite (A), while solidification mode of the materials processed with lower power LBW apparently exhibited a dual PSM of both austenite (A) and ferrite-austenite (FA) within the same weld. The materials processed by pulsed GTAW showed mostly primary austenite solidification, with some regions of either primary austenite-second phase ferrite (AF) solidification or primary ferrite-second phase austenite (FA) solidification. This work demonstrates that variations in crack susceptibility may be realized when welding different heats of 'weldable' materials together, and that slight variations in processing can also contribute to crack susceptibility.

  19. Relative Humidity and the Susceptibility of Austenitic Stainless Steel to Stress Corrosion Cracking in an impure Plutonium Oxide Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Zapp, P.; Duffey, J.; Lam, P.; Dunn, K.

    2010-05-05

    Laboratory tests to investigate the corrosivity of moist plutonium oxide/chloride salt mixtures on 304L and 316L stainless steel coupons showed that corrosion occurred in selected samples. The tests exposed flat coupons for pitting evaluation and 'teardrop' stressed coupons for stress corrosion cracking (SCC) evaluation at room temperature to various mixtures of PuO{sub 2} and chloride-bearing salts for periods up to 500 days. The exposures were conducted in sealed containers in which the oxide-salt mixtures were loaded with about 0.6 wt % water from a humidified helium atmosphere. Observations of corrosion ranged from superficial staining to pitting and SCC. The extent of corrosion depended on the total salt concentration, the composition of the salt and the moisture present in the test environment. The most significant corrosion was found in coupons that were exposed to 98 wt % PuO{sub 2}, 2 wt % chloride salt mixtures that contained calcium chloride and 0.6 wt% water. SCC was observed in two 304L stainless steel teardrop coupons exposed in solid contact to a mixture of 98 wt % PuO{sub 2}, 0.9 wt % NaCl, 0.9 wt % KCl, and 0.2 wt % CaCl{sub 2}. The cracking was associated with the heat-affected zone of an autogenous weld that ran across the center of the coupon. Cracking was not observed in coupons exposed to the headspace gas above the solid mixture, or in coupons exposed to other mixtures with either no CaCl{sub 2} or 0.92 wt% CaCl{sub 2}. SCC was present where the 0.6 wt % water content exceeded the value needed to fully hydrate the available CaCl{sub 2}, but was absent where the water content was insufficient. These results reveal the significance of the relative humidity in the austenitic stainless steels environment to their susceptibility to corrosion. The relative humidity in the test environment was controlled by the water loading and the concentration of the hydrating salts such as CaCl{sub 2}. For each salt or salt mixture there is a threshold relative

  20. Prevention of pin tract infection in external stainless steel fixator frames using electric current in a goat model.

    PubMed

    van der Borden, Arnout J; Maathuis, Patrick G M; Engels, Eefje; Rakhorst, Gerhard; van der Mei, Henny C; Busscher, Henk J; Sharma, Prashant Kumar

    2007-04-01

    Pin tract infections of external fixators used in orthopaedic reconstructive bone surgery are serious complications that can eventually lead to periostitis and osteomyelitis. In vitro experiments have demonstrated that bacteria adhering to stainless steel in a biofilm mode of growth detach under the influence of small electric currents, while remaining bacteria become less viable upon current application. Therefore, we have investigated whether a 100microA electric current can prevent signs of clinical infection around percutaneous pins, implanted in the tibia of goats. Three pins were inserted into the lateral right tibia of nine goats, of which one served for additional frame support. Two pins were infected with a Staphylococcus epidermidis strain of which one pin was subjected to electric current, while the other pin was used as control. Pin sites were examined daily. The wound electrical resistance decreased with worsening of the infection from a dry condition to a purulent stage. After 21 days, animals were sacrificed and the pins taken out. Infection developed in 89% of the control pin sites, whereas only 11% of the pin sites in the current group showed infection. These results show that infection of percutaneous pin sites of external fixators in reconstructive bone surgery can be prevented by the application of a small DC electric current.

  1. Articles comprising ferritic stainless steels

    DOEpatents

    Rakowski, James M.

    2016-06-28

    An article of manufacture comprises a ferritic stainless steel that includes a near-surface region depleted of silicon relative to a remainder of the ferritic stainless steel. The article has a reduced tendency to form an electrically resistive silica layer including silicon derived from the steel when the article is subjected to high temperature oxidizing conditions. The ferritic stainless steel is selected from the group comprising AISI Type 430 stainless steel, AISI Type 439 stainless steel, AISI Type 441 stainless steel, AISI Type 444 stainless steel, and E-BRITE.RTM. alloy, also known as UNS 44627 stainless steel. In certain embodiments, the article of manufacture is a fuel cell interconnect for a solid oxide fuel cell.

  2. Chromium-Makes stainless steel stainless

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kropschot, S.J.; Doebrich, Jeff

    2010-01-01

    Chromium, a steely-gray, lustrous, hard metal that takes a high polish and has a high melting point, is a silvery white, hard, and bright metal plating on steel and other material. Commonly known as chrome, it is one of the most important and indispensable industrial metals because of its hardness and resistance to corrosion. But it is used for more than the production of stainless steel and nonferrous alloys; it is also used to create pigments and chemicals used to process leather.

  3. Examination of stainless steel-clad Connecticut Yankee fuel assembly S004 after storage in borated water

    SciTech Connect

    Langstaff, D.C.; Bailey, W.J.; Johnson, A.B. Jr.; Landow, M.P.; Pasupathi, V.; Klingensmith, R.W.

    1982-09-01

    A Connecticut Yankee fuel assembly (S004) was tested nondestructively and destructively. It was concluded that no obvious degradation of the 304L stainless steel-clad spent fuel from assembly S004 occurred during 5 y of storage in borated water. Furthermore, no obvious degradation due to the pool environment occurred on 304 stainless steel-clad rods in assemblies H07 and G11, which were stored for shorter periods but contained operationally induced cladding defects. The seam welds in the cladding on fuel rods from assembly S004, H07, and G11 were similar in that they showed a wrought microstructure with grains noticeably smaller than those in the cladding base metal. The end cap welds showed a dendritically cored structure, typical of rapidly quenched austenitic weld metal. Some intergranular melting may have occurred in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) in the cladding adjacent to the end cap welds in rods from assemblies S004 and H07. However, the weld areas did not show evidence of corrosion-induced degradation.

  4. Sensitization of stainless steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagy, James P.

    1990-01-01

    The objective of this experiment is to determine the corrosion rates of 18-8 stainless steels that have been sensitized at various temperatures and to show the application of phase diagrams. The laboratory instructor will assign each student a temperature, ranging from 550 C to 1050 C, to which the sample will be heated. Further details of the experimental procedure are detailed.

  5. Welding of Stainless Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bull, H; Johnson, Lawrence

    1929-01-01

    It would appear that welds in some stainless steels, heat-treated in some practicable way, will probably be found to have all the resistance to corrosion that is required for aircraft. Certainly these structures are not subjected to the severe conditions that are found in chemical plants.

  6. TRITIUM AND DECAY HELIUM EFFECTS ON THE FRACTURE TOUGHNESS PROPERTIES OF STAINLESS STEEL WELDMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, M; Scott West, S; Michael Tosten, M

    2007-08-31

    J-Integral fracture toughness tests were conducted on tritium-exposed-and-aged Types 304L and 21-6-9 stainless steel weldments in order to measure the combined effects of tritium and its decay product, helium-3 on the fracture toughness properties. Initially, weldments have fracture toughness values about three times higher than base-metal values. Delta-ferrite phase in the weld microstructure improved toughness provided no tritium was present in the microstructure. After a tritium-exposure-and-aging treatment that resulted in {approx}1400 atomic parts per million (appm) dissolved tritium, both weldments and base metals had their fracture toughness values reduced to about the same level. The tritium effect was greater in weldments (67 % reduction vs. 37% reduction) largely because the ductile discontinuous delta-ferrite interfaces were embrittled by tritium and decay helium. Fracture toughness values decreased for both base metals and weldments with increasing decay helium content in the range tested (50-200 appm).

  7. Effect of cold work on low-temperature sensitization behaviour of austenitic stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kain, V.; Chandra, K.; Adhe, K. N.; De, P. K.

    2004-09-01

    The effects of cold work and low-temperature sensitization heat treatment of non-sensitized austenitic stainless steels have been investigated and related to the cracking in nuclear power reactors. Types 304, 304L and 304LN developed martensite after 15% cold working. Heat treatment of these cold worked steels at 500 °C led to sensitization of grain boundaries and the matrix and a desensitization effect was seen in 11 days due to fast diffusion rate of chromium in martensite. Types 316L and 316LN did not develop martensite upon cold rolling due to its chemical composition suppressing the martensite transformation (due to deformation) temperature, hence these were not sensitized at 500 °C. The sensitization of the martensite phase was always accompanied by a hump in the reactivation current peak in the double loop electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation test, thus providing a test to detect such sensitization. It was shown that bending does not produce martensite and therefore, is a better method to simulate weld heat affected zone. Bending and heating at 500 °C for 11 days led to fresh precipitation due to increased retained strain and desensitization of 304LN due to faster diffusion rate of chromium along dislocations. The as received or solution annealed 304 and 304LN with 0.15% nitrogen showed increased sensitization after heat treatment at 500 °C, indicating the presence of carbides/nitrides.

  8. Angle-dependent lubricated tribological properties of stainless steel by femtosecond laser surface texturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhuo; Li, Yang-Bo; Bai, Feng; Wang, Cheng-Wei; Zhao, Quan-Zhong

    2016-07-01

    Lubricated tribological properties of stainless steel were investigated by femtosecond laser surface texturing. Regular-arranged micro-grooved textures with different spacing and micro-groove inclination angles (between micro-groove path and sliding direction) were produced on AISI 304L steel surfaces by an 800 nm femtosecond laser. The spacing of micro-groove was varied from 25 to 300 μm, and the inclination angles of micro-groove were measured as 90° and 45°. The tribological properties of the smooth and textured surfaces with micro-grooves were investigated by reciprocating ball-on-flat tests against Al2O3 ceramic balls under starved oil lubricated conditions. Results showed that the spacing of micro-grooves significantly affected the tribological property. With the increase of micro-groove spacing, the average friction coefficients and wear rates of textured surfaces initially decreased then increased. The tribological performance also depended on the inclination angles of micro-grooves. Among the investigated patterns, the micro-grooves perpendicular to the sliding direction exhibited the lowest average friction coefficient and wear rate to a certain extent. Femtosecond laser-induced surface texturing may remarkably improve friction and wear properties if the micro-grooves were properly distributed.

  9. High stored-energy breakdown tests on electrodes made of stainless steel, copper, titanium and molybdenum

    SciTech Connect

    Esch, H. P. L. de Simonin, A.; Grand, C.

    2015-04-08

    IRFM have conducted resilience tests on electrodes made of Cu, stainless steel 304L, Ti and Mo against breakdowns up to 170 kV and 300 J. The tests of the 10×10 cm{sup 2} electrodes have been performed at an electrode distance d=11 mm under vacuum (P∼5×10{sup −6} mbar). No great difference in voltage holding between the materials could be identified; all materials could reach a voltage holding between 140 and 170 kV over the 11 mm gap, i.e. results scatter within a ±10% band. After exposure to ∼10000 seconds of high-voltage (HV) on-time, having accumulated ∼1000 breakdowns, the electrodes were inspected. The anodes were covered with large and small craters. The rugosity of the anodes had increased substantially, that of the cathodes to a lesser extent. The molybdenum electrodes are least affected, but this does not show in their voltage holding capability. It is hypothesized that penetrating high-energy electrons from the breakdown project heat below the surface of the anode and cause a micro-explosion of material when melting point is exceeded. Polished electrodes have also been tested. The polishing results in a substantially reduced breakdown rate in the beginning, but after having suffered a relatively small number (∼100) of breakdowns, the polished electrodes behaved the same as the unpolished ones.

  10. Upset Resistance Welding of Carbon Steel to Austenitic Stainless Steel Narrow Rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozlati, Ashkaan; Movahedi, Mojtaba; Mohammadkamal, Helia

    2016-09-01

    Effects of welding current (at the range of 2-4 kA) on the microstructure and mechanical properties of upset resistance welds of AISI-1035 carbon steel to AISI-304L austenitic stainless steel rods were investigated. The results showed that the joint strength first increased by raising the welding current up to 3 kA and then decreased beyond it. Increasing trend was related to more plastic deformation, accelerated diffusion, reduction of defects and formation of mechanical locks at the joint interface. For currents more than 3 kA, decrease in the joint strength was mainly caused by formation of hot spots. Using the optimum welding current of 3 kA, tensile strength of the joint reached to ~76% of the carbon steel base metal strength. Microstructural observations and microhardness results confirmed that there was no hard phase, i.e., martensite or bainite, at the weld zone. Moreover, a fully austenitic transition layer related to carbon diffusion from carbon steel was observed at the weld interface.

  11. Anomalous mass transport in Au/304 stainless steel powder under shock loading

    SciTech Connect

    Staudhammer, Karl P.

    2004-01-01

    Dynamic deformation experiments on gold plated 304L stainless steel powders were undertaken using a axial symmetrical implosion geometry. These experiments utilized pressures of 0.08 to 1.0 Mbar and contained a symmetric radial melt region along the central axis of the sample holder. To understand the role of deformation in a porous material, the pressure, and temperature as well as the deformation heat and associated defects must be accounted for. Using a strain controllable shock loading design it was possible to separate and control independently strain and pressure. Thus enabling the ability to control the added heat from the deformation process undergoing compaction/consolidation of the powder. When the added heat of consolidation deformation exceeds the melt temperature of the 304 powders, a melt zone results that can consume large regions of the compact. It is within these regions that very high diffusion of gold into the powder occurs. These anomalous increases have been observed via optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and EDAX measurements. Values exceeding 1200 m/sec have been measured and correlated to the powder sizes, size distribution and packing density, concomitant with sample container strains ranging from 2.0% to 26%.

  12. The Effect of Heat Treatments and Coatings on the Outgassing Rate of Stainless Steel Chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Mamum, Md Abdullah A.; Elmustafa, Abdelmageed A,; Stutzman, Marcy L.; Adderley, Philip A.; Poelker, Matthew

    2014-03-01

    The outgassing rates of four nominally identical 304L stainless steel vacuum chambers were measured to determine the effect of chamber coatings and heat treatments. One chamber was coated with titanium nitride (TiN) and one with amorphous silicon (a-Si) immediately following fabrication. One chamber remained uncoated throughout, and the last chamber was first tested without any coating, and then coated with a-Si following a series of heat treatments. The outgassing rate of each chamber was measured at room temperatures between 15 and 30 deg C following bakes at temperatures between 90 and 400 deg C. Measurements for bare steel showed a significant reduction in the outgassing rate by more than a factor of 20 after a 400 deg C heat treatment (3.5 x 10{sup 12} TorrL s{sup -1}cm{sup -2} prior to heat treatment, reduced to 1.7 x 10{ sup -13} TorrL s{sup -1}cm{sup -2} following heat treatment). The chambers that were coated with a-Si showed minimal change in outgassing rates with heat treatment, though an outgassing rate reduced by heat treatments prior to a-Si coating was successfully preserved throughout a series of bakes. The TiN coated chamber exhibited remarkably low outgassing rates, up to four orders of magnitude lower than the uncoated stainless steel. An evaluation of coating composition suggests the presence of elemental titanium which could provide pumping and lead to an artificially low outgassing rate. The outgassing results are discussed in terms of diffusion-limited versus recombination-limited processes.

  13. Eddy sensors for small diameter stainless steel tubes.

    SciTech Connect

    Skinner, Jack L.; Morales, Alfredo Martin; Grant, J. Brian; Korellis, Henry James; LaFord, Marianne Elizabeth; Van Blarigan, Benjamin; Andersen, Lisa E.

    2011-08-01

    The goal of this project was to develop non-destructive, minimally disruptive eddy sensors to inspect small diameter stainless steel metal tubes. Modifications to Sandia's Emphasis/EIGER code allowed for the modeling of eddy current bobbin sensors near or around 1/8-inch outer diameter stainless steel tubing. Modeling results indicated that an eddy sensor based on a single axial coil could effectively detect changes in the inner diameter of a stainless steel tubing. Based on the modeling results, sensor coils capable of detecting small changes in the inner diameter of a stainless steel tube were designed, built and tested. The observed sensor response agreed with the results of the modeling and with eddy sensor theory. A separate limited distribution SAND report is being issued demonstrating the application of this sensor.

  14. Comparison of Short-Term Oxidation Behavior of Model and Commercial Chromia-Forming Ferritic Stainless Steels in Air with Water Vapor

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, Michael P; Keiser, James R; More, Karren Leslie; Fayek, Mostafa; Walker, Larry R; Meisner, Roberta Ann; Anovitz, Lawrence {Larry} M; Wesolowski, David J; Cole, David R

    2012-01-01

    A high-purity Fe-20Cr and commercial type 430 ferritic stainless steel were exposed at 700 and 800 C in dry air and air with 10% water vapor (wet air) and characterized by SEM, XRD, STEM, SIMS, and EPMA. The Fe-20Cr alloy formed a fast growing Fe-rich oxide scale at 700 C in wet air after 24 h exposure, but formed a thin chromia scale at 700 C in dry air and at 800 C in both dry air and wet air. In contrast, thin spinel + chromia base scales with a discontinuous silica subscale were formed on 430 stainless steel under all conditions studied. Extensive void formation was observed at the alloy-oxide interface for the Fe-20Cr in both dry and wet conditions, but not for the 430 stainless steel. The Fe-20Cr alloy was found to exhibit a greater relative extent of subsurface Cr depletion than the 430 stainless steel, despite the former's higher Cr content. Depletion of Cr in the Fe-20Cr after 24 h exposure was also greater at 700 C than 800 C. The relative differences in oxidation behavior are discussed in terms of the coarse alloy grain size of the high-purity Fe-20Cr material, and the effects of Mn, Si, and C on the oxide scale formed on the 430 stainless steel.

  15. A mechanism-based approach to modeling ductile fracture.

    SciTech Connect

    Bammann, Douglas J.; Hammi, Youssef; Antoun, Bonnie R.; Klein, Patrick A.; Foulk, James W., III; McFadden, Sam X.

    2004-01-01

    Ductile fracture in metals has been observed to result from the nucleation, growth, and coalescence of voids. The evolution of this damage is inherently history dependent, affected by how time-varying stresses drive the formation of defect structures in the material. At some critically damaged state, the softening response of the material leads to strain localization across a surface that, under continued loading, becomes the faces of a crack in the material. Modeling localization of strain requires introduction of a length scale to make the energy dissipated in the localized zone well-defined. In this work, a cohesive zone approach is used to describe the post-bifurcation evolution of material within the localized zone. The relations are developed within a thermodynamically consistent framework that incorporates temperature and rate-dependent evolution relationships motivated by dislocation mechanics. As such, we do not prescribe the evolution of tractions with opening displacements across the localized zone a priori. The evolution of tractions is itself an outcome of the solution of particular, initial boundary value problems. The stress and internal state of the material at the point of bifurcation provides the initial conditions for the subsequent evolution of the cohesive zone. The models we develop are motivated by in-situ scanning electron microscopy of three-point bending experiments using 6061-T6 aluminum and 304L stainless steel, The in situ observations of the initiation and evolution of fracture zones reveal the scale over which the failure mechanisms act. In addition, these observations are essential for motivating the micromechanically-based models of the decohesion process that incorporate the effects of loading mode mixity, temperature, and loading rate. The response of these new cohesive zone relations is demonstrated by modeling the three-point bending configuration used for the experiments. In addition, we survey other methods with the potential

  16. Parameters optimization of hybrid fiber laser-arc butt welding on 316L stainless steel using Kriging model and GA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Zhongmei; Shao, Xinyu; Jiang, Ping; Cao, Longchao; Zhou, Qi; Yue, Chen; Liu, Yang; Wang, Chunming

    2016-09-01

    It is of great significance to select appropriate welding process parameters for obtaining optimal weld geometry in hybrid laser-arc welding. An integrated optimization approach by combining Kriging model and GA is proposed to optimize process parameters. A four-factor, five-level experiment using Taguchi L25 is conducted considering laser power (P), welding current (A), distance between laser and arc (D) and traveling speed (V). Kriging model is adopted to approximate the relationship between process parameters and weld geometry, namely depth of penetration (DP), bead width (BW) and bead reinforcement (BR). The constructed Kriging model was used for parameters optimization by GA to maximize DP, minimize BW and ensure BR at a desired value. The effects of process parameters on weld geometry are analyzed. Microstructure and micro-hardness are also discussed. Verification experiments demonstrate that the obtained optimum values are in good agreement with experimental results.

  17. Initial stage sintering model of 316L stainless steel with application to three dimensionally printed (3DP(TM)) components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, Scott R.

    The design phase of manufacturing has become increasingly dependent upon computers for geometric and functional analysis of design concepts [1]. The ability to manufacture final components directly from computer images has been made possible by recent developments in rapid prototyping technologies and improvements in material processing, namely rapid manufacturing. Three Dimensional Printing (3DP(TM)) is a powder metallurgical rapid pro-totyping technique that incorporates initial stage sintering within the rapid manufacturing process. Initial stage sintering is characterized by neck growth between powder particles resulting in a light cohesive strengthening bond while preserving dimensionality. This study involved a detailed look into the theoretical mechanisms that produce material transport via diffusion methods to produce a quantitative dimensional sintering strain model. Here, we modify the accepted isothermal theoretical model describing initial stage sintering presented by German [2] and Ashby [3] to support a non-isothermal load history. Isothermal theoretical models have defined sintering in terms of surface and bulk mechanisms, where literature assumes that surface mechanisms do not produce interparticle approach for the ideal two-particle geometry. An expansion of the two-particle neck geometry from isothermal sintering theory to non-isothermal is performed by defining both the neck geometry and sintering mechanisms in terms of three geometric parameters. A quantitative sintering model is developed by introducing a volume constraint on the geometry and enforcing the assumption that surface sintering mechanisms do not produce inter-particle approach (no sintering strain). The sintering model produces quantitative strain results which are accurate to within 20% experimentally obtained final sintering strains. A qualitative strength model based on empirical data is also developed based on the amount of the final sintering strain. Modeling efforts were

  18. Progress report on the behavior and modeling of copper alloy to stainless steel joints for ITER first wall applications

    SciTech Connect

    Min, J.; Stubbins, J.; Collins, J.; Rowcliffe, A.F.

    1998-09-01

    The stress states that lead to failure of joints between GlidCop{trademark} CuAl25 and 316L SS were examined using finite element modeling techniques to explain experimental observations of behavior of those joints. The joints were formed by hot isostatic pressing (HIP) and bend bar specimens were fabricated with the joint inclined 45{degree} to the major axis of the specimen. The lower surface of the bend bar was notched in order to help induce a precrack for subsequent loading in bending. The precrack was intended to localize a high stress concentration in close proximity to the interface so that its behavior could be examined without complicating factors from the bulk materials and the specimen configuration. Preparatory work to grow acceptable precracks caused the specimen to fail prematurely while the precrack was still progressing into the specimen toward the interface. This prompted the finite element model calculations to help understand the reasons for this behavior from examination of the stress states throughout the specimen. An additional benefit sought from the finite element modeling effort was to understand if the stress states in this non-conventional specimen were representative of those that might be experienced during operation in ITER.

  19. Modeling of helium bubble nucleation and growth in austenitic stainless steels using an Object Kinetic Monte Carlo method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Backer, A.; Adjanor, G.; Domain, C.; Lescoat, M. L.; Jublot-Leclerc, S.; Fortuna, F.; Gentils, A.; Ortiz, C. J.; Souidi, A.; Becquart, C. S.

    2015-06-01

    Implantation of 10 keV helium in 316L steel thin foils was performed in JANNuS-Orsay facility and modeled using a multiscale approach. Density Functional Theory (DFT) atomistic calculations [1] were used to obtain the properties of He and He-vacancy clusters, and the Binary Collision Approximation based code MARLOWE was applied to determine the damage and He-ion depth profiles as in [2,3]. The processes involved in the homogeneous He bubble nucleation and growth were defined and implemented in the Object Kinetic Monte Carlo code LAKIMOCA [4]. In particular as the He to dpa ratio was high, self-trapping of He clusters and the trap mutation of He-vacancy clusters had to be taken into account. With this multiscale approach, the formation of bubbles was modeled up to nanometer-scale size, where bubbles can be observed by Transmission Electron Microscopy. Their densities and sizes were studied as functions of fluence (up to 5 × 1019 He/m2) at two temperatures (473 and 723 K) and for different sample thicknesses (25-250 nm). It appears that the damage is not only due to the collision cascades but is also strongly controlled by the He accumulation in pressurized bubbles. Comparison with experimental data is discussed and sensible agreement is achieved.

  20. Determination of the Lower Temperature Limit of Void Swelling of Stainless Steels at Relatively Low Displacement Rates

    SciTech Connect

    Porollo, S. I.; Konobeev, Yu V.; Dvoriashin, Alexander M.; Krigan, V. M.; Garner, Francis A.

    2002-03-31

    An issue of current interest to PWRs is the possibility that void swelling of austenitic near-core internal components may exert some deleterious effect on component functionality, particularly during extended operation to 60 years. A similar concern has also been raised for water-cooled fusion devices. One question of particular interest is the range of temperature over which void swelling can occur, since the internal components experience temperatures from ~290 to perhaps as high as 390 degrees C in some limited locations. This question was addressed using a flow restrictor component from the low-flux breeder zone of the BN-350 fast reactor in Kazakhstan. This component was constructed of annealed 12X18H10T, an alloy similar to AISI 321 which is used in Russian reactors for applications where AISI 304L would be used in comparable Western and Japanese reactors. Extensive sectioning to produce 114 separate specimens, followed by examination of the radiation-induced microstructure showed that void swelling in the range of temperatures and dpa rates of PWR interest occurs down to ~305 degrees C. At 330 degrees C the swelling reached ~1% at 20 dpa. Comparison of these data with other published results from Russian LWR reactors at <10 dpa confirms that the lowest temperature that stainless steels can begin swelling appears to be ~300 degrees C. Since fusion and PWR spectra generate similar levels of hydrogen and helium, it is expected that these conclusions are also application to fusion devices operating at comparable dpa rates.

  1. Welding tritium exposed stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Kanne, W.R. Jr.

    1994-11-01

    Stainless steels that are exposed to tritium become unweldable by conventional methods due to buildup of decay helium within the metal matrix. With longer service lives expected for tritium containment systems, methods for welding on tritium exposed material will become important for repair or modification of the systems. Solid-state resistance welding and low-penetration overlay welding have been shown to mitigate helium embrittlement cracking in tritium exposed 304 stainless steel. These processes can also be used on stainless steel containing helium from neutron irradiation, such as occurs in nuclear reactors.

  2. X-ray attenuation properties of stainless steel (u)

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lily L; Berry, Phillip C

    2009-01-01

    Stainless steel vessels are used to enclose solid materials for studying x-ray radiolysis that involves gas release from the materials. Commercially available stainless steel components are easily adapted to form a static or a dynamic condition to monitor the gas evolved from the solid materials during and after the x-ray irradiation. Experimental data published on the x-ray attenuation properties of stainless steel, however, are very scarce, especially over a wide range of x-ray energies. The objective of this work was to obtain experimental data that will be used to determine how a poly-energetic x-ray beam is attenuated by the stainless steel container wall. The data will also be used in conjunction with MCNP (Monte Carlos Nuclear Particle) modeling to develop an accurate method for determining energy absorbed in known solid samples contained in stainless steel vessels. In this study, experiments to measure the attenuation properties of stainless steel were performed for a range of bremsstrahlung x-ray beams with a maximum energy ranging from 150 keV to 10 MeV. Bremsstrahlung x-ray beams of these energies are commonly used in radiography of engineering and weapon components. The weapon surveillance community has a great interest in understanding how the x-rays in radiography affect short-term and long-term properties of weapon materials.

  3. Brazing titanium to stainless steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batista, R. I.

    1980-01-01

    Titanium and stainless-steel members are usually joined mechanically for lack of any other effective method. New approach using different brazing alloy and plating steel member with nickel resolves problem. Process must be carried out in inert atmosphere.

  4. Strain induced grain boundary migration effects on grain growth of an austenitic stainless steel during static and metadynamic recrystallization

    SciTech Connect

    Paggi, A.; Angella, G.; Donnini, R.

    2015-09-15

    Static and metadynamic recrystallization of an AISI 304L austenitic stainless steel was investigated at 1100 °C and 10{sup −} {sup 2} s{sup −} {sup 1} strain rate. The kinetics of recrystallization was determined through double hit compression tests. Two strain levels were selected for the first compression hit: ε{sub f} = 0.15 for static recrystallization (SRX) and 0.25 for metadynamic recrystallization (MDRX). Both the as-deformed and the recrystallized microstructures were investigated through optical microscopy and electron back-scattered diffraction (EBSD) technique. During deformation, strain induced grain boundary migration appeared to be significant, producing a square-like grain boundary structure aligned along the directions of the maximum shear stresses in compression. EBSD analysis revealed to be as a fundamental technique that the dislocation density was distributed heterogeneously in the deformed grains. Grain growth driven by surface energy reduction was also investigated, finding that it was too slow to explain the experimental data. Based on microstructural results, it was concluded that saturation of the nucleation sites occurred in the first stages of recrystallization, while grain growth driven by strain induced grain boundary migration (SIGBM) dominated the subsequent stages. - Highlights: • Recrystallization behavior of a stainless steel was investigated at 1100 °C. • EBSD revealed that the dislocation density distribution was heterogeneous during deformation. • Saturation of nucleation sites occurred in the first stages of recrystallization. • Strain induced grain boundary migration (SIGBM) effects were significant. • Grain growth driven by SIGBM dominated the subsequent stages.

  5. Long-term aging of type 308 stainless steel welds: Effects on properties and microstructure

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, D.J.; Vitek, J.M.; David, S.A.

    1994-09-01

    Multipass gas tungsten arc welds with type 308 stainless steel filler metal in type 304L base plate have been aged at 400, 475, or 550{degrees}C for times up to 5,000 h. The changes in mechanical properties as a result of these agings have been followed with tensile, impact, and fracture toughness testing, using subsize tensile, half-size Charpy, and 0.45T compact specimens, respectively. The changes in the microstructure were evaluated with optical and transmission electron microscopy. Relatively little change was observed in the tensile properties for any of the aging treatments, but significant embrittlement was observed in the impact and fracture toughness testing. The transition temperatures increased rapidly for aging at 475 or 550{degrees}C, and more slowly for aging at 400{degrees}C. The upper-shelf energies and the fracture toughness showed similar responses, with only a small decrease for 400{degrees}C aging, but much greater and rapid decreases with aging at 475 or 550{degrees}C. Aging at 400 or 475{degrees}C resulted in the spinodal decomposition of the ferrite phase in the weld metal into iron-rich alpha and chromium-enriched alpha prime. In addition, at 475{degrees}C G-phase precipitates formed homogeneously in the ferrite and also at dislocations. At 550{degrees}C carbides formed and grew at the ferrite-austenite interfaces, and some ferrite transformed to sigma phase. These changes must all be considered in determining the effect of aging on the fracture properties.

  6. Nano/ultrafine grained austenitic stainless steel through the formation and reversion of deformation-induced martensite: Mechanisms, microstructures, mechanical properties, and TRIP effect

    SciTech Connect

    Shirdel, M.; Mirzadeh, H.; Parsa, M.H.

    2015-05-15

    A comprehensive study was carried out on the strain-induced martensitic transformation, its reversion to austenite, the resultant grain refinement, and the enhancement of strength and strain-hardening ability through the transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP) effect in a commercial austenitic 304L stainless steel with emphasis on the mechanisms and the microstructural evolution. A straightforward magnetic measurement device, which is based on the measurement of the saturation magnetization, for evaluating the amount of strain-induced martensite after cold rolling and reversion annealing in metastable austenitic stainless steels was used, which its results were in good consistency with those of the X-ray diffraction (XRD) method. A new parameter called the effective reduction in thickness was introduced, which corresponds to the reasonable upper bound on the obtainable martensite fraction based on the saturation in the martensitic transformation. By means of thermodynamics calculations, the reversion mechanisms were estimated and subsequently validated by experimental results. The signs of thermal martensitic transformation at cooling stage after reversion at 850 °C were found, which was attributed to the rise in the martensite start temperature due to the carbide precipitation. After the reversion treatment, the average grain sizes were around 500 nm and the nanometric grains of the size of ~ 65 nm were also detected. The intense grain refinement led to the enhanced mechanical properties and observation of the change in the work-hardening capacity and TRIP effect behavior. A practical map as a guidance for grain refining and characterizing the stability against grain growth was proposed, which shows the limitation of the reversion mechanism for refinement of grain size. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • Nano/ultrafine grained austenitic stainless steel through martensite treatment • A parameter descriptive of a reasonable upper bound on

  7. Constitutive Model for the Time-Dependent Mechanical Behavior of 430 Stainless Steel and FeCrAlY Foams in Sulfur-Bearing Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Hemrick, James Gordon; Lara-Curzio, Edgar

    2013-01-01

    The mechanical behavior of 430 stainless steel and pre-oxidized FeCrAlY open-cell foam materials of various densities was evaluated in compression at temperatures between 450 C and 600 C in an environment containing hydrogen sulfide and water vapor. Both materials showed negligible corrosion due to the gaseous atmosphere for up to 168 hours. The monotonic stress-strain response of these materials was found to be dependent on both the strain rate and their density, and the 430 stainless steel foam materials exhibited less stress relaxation than FeCrAlY for similar experimental conditions. Using the results from multiple hardening-relaxation and monotonic tests, an empirical constitutive equation was derived to predict the stress-strain behavior of FeCrAlY foams as a function of temperature and strain rate. These results are discussed in the context of using these materials in a black liquor gasifier to accommodate the chemical expansion of the refractory liner resulting from its reaction with the soda in the black liquor.

  8. Constitutive Model for the Time-Dependent Mechanical Behavior of 430 Stainless Steel and FeCrAlY Foams in Sulfur-Bearing Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemrick, James G.; Lara-Curzio, Edgar

    2013-03-01

    The mechanical behavior of 430 stainless steel and pre-oxidized FeCrAlY open-cell foam materials of various densities was evaluated in compression at temperatures between 450°C and 600°C in an environment containing hydrogen sulfide and water vapor. Both materials showed negligible corrosion due to the gaseous atmosphere for up to 168 h. The monotonic stress-strain response of these materials was found to be dependent on both the strain rate and their density, and the 430 stainless steel foam materials exhibited less stress relaxation than the FeCrAlY for similar experimental conditions. Using the results from multiple hardening-relaxation and monotonic tests, an empirical constitutive equation was derived to predict the stress-strain behavior of FeCrAlY foams as a function of temperature, and strain rate. These results are discussed in the context of using these materials in a black liquor gasifier to accommodate the chemical expansion of the refractory liner resulting from its reaction with the soda in the black liquor.

  9. TRITIUM AGING EFFECTS ON THE FRACTURE TOUGHNESS PROPERTIES OF STAINLESS STEEL BASE METAL AND WELDS

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, M.

    2009-07-30

    -energy-rate forged are needed for designing and establishing longer tritium-reservoir lifetimes, ranking materials, and, potentially, for qualifying new forging vendors or processes. Measurements on the effects of tritium and decay helium on the fracture toughness properties of CF stainless steels having similar composition, grain size, and mechanical properties to previously studied HERF steels are needed and have not been conducted until now. The compatibility of stainless steel welds with tritium represents another concern for long-term reservoir performance. Weldments have not been well-characterized with respect to tritium embrittlement, although a recent study was completed on the effect of tritium and decay helium on the fracture toughness properties of Type 304L weldments. This study expands the characterization of weldments through measurements of tritium and decay helium effects on the fracture toughness properties of Type 21-6-9 stainless steel. The purpose of this study was to measure and compare the fracture toughness properties of Type 21-6-9 stainless steel for conventional forgings and weldments in the non-charged, hydrogen-charged and tritium-charged-and-aged conditions.

  10. Proposed Testing to Assess the Accuracy of Glass-To-Metal Seal Stress Analyses.

    SciTech Connect

    Chambers, Robert S.; Emery, John M; Tandon, Rajan; Antoun, Bonnie R.; Stavig, Mark E.; Newton, Clay S.; Gibson, Cory S; Bencoe, Denise N.

    2014-09-01

    The material characterization tests conducted on 304L VAR stainless steel and Schott 8061 glass have provided higher fidelity data for calibration of material models used in Glass - T o - Metal (GTM) seal analyses. Specifically, a Thermo - Multi - Linear Elastic Plastic ( thermo - MLEP) material model has be en defined for S S304L and the Simplified Potential Energy Clock nonlinear visc oelastic model has been calibrated for the S8061 glass. To assess the accuracy of finite element stress analyses of GTM seals, a suite of tests are proposed to provide data for comparison to mo del predictions.

  11. Preformed posterior stainless steel crowns: an update.

    PubMed

    Croll, T P

    1999-02-01

    For almost 50 years, dentists have used stainless steel crowns for primary and permanent posterior teeth. No other type of restoration offers the convenience, low cost, durability, and reliability of such crowns when interim full-coronal coverage is required. Preformed stainless steel crowns have improved over the years. Better luting cements have been developed and different methods of crown manipulation have evolved. This article reviews stainless steel crown procedures for primary and permanent posterior teeth. Step-by-step placement of a primary molar stainless steel crown is documented and permanent molar stainless steel crown restoration is described. A method for repairing a worn-through crown also is reviewed.

  12. Improving the performance of stainless-steel DC high voltage photoelectron gun cathode electrodes via gas conditioning with helium or krypton

    SciTech Connect

    BastaniNejad, M.; Elmustafa, A. A.; Forman, E.; Clark, J.; Covert, S.; Grames, J.; Hansknecht, J.; Hernandez-Garcia, C.; Poelker, M.; Suleiman, R.

    2014-10-01

    Gas conditioning was shown to eliminate field emission from cathode electrodes used inside DC high voltage photoelectron guns, thus providing a reliable means to operate photoguns at higher voltages and field strengths. Measurements and simulation results indicate that gas conditioning eliminates field emission from cathode electrodes via two mechanisms: sputtering and implantation, with the benefits of implantation reversed by heating the electrode. We have studied five stainless steel electrodes (304L and 316LN) that were polished to approximately 20 nm surface roughness using diamond grit, and evaluated inside a high voltage apparatus to determine the onset of field emission as a function of voltage and field strength. The field emission characteristics of each electrode varied significantly upon the initial application of voltage but improved to nearly the same level after gas conditioning using either helium or krypton, exhibiting less than 10 pA field emission at -225 kV bias voltage with a 50 mm cathode/anode gap, corresponding to a field strength of ~13 MV/m. Finally, field emission could be reduced with either gas, but there were conditions related to gas choice, voltage and field strength that were more favorable than others.

  13. Modelling survival kinetics of Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli O157:H7 on stainless steel surfaces soiled with different substrates under static conditions of temperature and relative humidity.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Rodríguez, F; Posada-Izquierdo, G D; Valero, A; García-Gimeno, R M; Zurera, G

    2013-04-01

    The survival of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Staphylococcus aureus on stainless steel surfaces with Saline Solution (SS), Tryptone Soy Broth (TSB) and meat purge was studied, and based on results, mathematical models describing survival of pathogens as a function of time were proposed. Results indicated that S. aureus was able to survive longer than E. coli O157:H7 in all substrates. The type of substrate had a greater impact on the survival of E. coli O157:H7. This microorganism only remained viable for 8 and 50 h (hours) on surfaces with SS and TSB, respectively while on meat purge, the microorganism could be recovered after 200 h. For S. aureus, SS and TSB led to similar survival times (250 h) whereas on meat purge, survival capacity increased to 800 h. Survival data for S. aureus could be well described by a log-linear model or a Weibull model depending on the type of substrate (R(2) > 0.85). E. coli O157:H7 displayed an evident tail zone which made the Weibull model more appropriate (R(2) > 0.94). These survival models may be used in quantitative risk assessment to produce more accurate risk estimates. Finally, the results highlight the importance of performing effective cleaning procedures to prevent cross contamination.

  14. Analytical modeling of the thermomechanical behavior of ASTM F-1586 high nitrogen austenitic stainless steel used as a biomaterial under multipass deformation.

    PubMed

    Bernardes, Fabiano R; Rodrigues, Samuel F; Silva, Eden S; Reis, Gedeon S; Silva, Mariana B R; Junior, Alberto M J; Balancin, Oscar

    2015-06-01

    Precipitation-recrystallization interactions in ASTM F-1586 austenitic stainless steel were studied by means of hot torsion tests with multipass deformation under continuous cooling, simulating an industrial laminating process. Samples were deformed at 0.2 and 0.3 at a strain rate of 1.0s(-1), in a temperature range of 900 to 1200°C and interpass times varying from 5 to 80s. The tests indicate that the stress level depends on deformation temperature and the slope of the equivalent mean stress (EMS) vs. 1/T presents two distinct behaviors, with a transition at around 1100°C, the non-recrystallization temperature (Tnr). Below the Tnr, strain-induced precipitation of Z-phase (NbCrN) occurs in short interpass times (tpass<30s), inhibiting recrystallization and promoting stepwise stress build-up with strong recovery, which is responsible for increasing the Tnr. At interpass times longer than 30s, the coalescence and dissolution of precipitates promote a decrease in the Tnr and favor the formation of recrystallized grains. Based on this evidence, the physical simulation of controlled processing allows for a domain refined grain with better mechanical properties.

  15. Analytical modeling of the thermomechanical behavior of ASTM F-1586 high nitrogen austenitic stainless steel used as a biomaterial under multipass deformation.

    PubMed

    Bernardes, Fabiano R; Rodrigues, Samuel F; Silva, Eden S; Reis, Gedeon S; Silva, Mariana B R; Junior, Alberto M J; Balancin, Oscar

    2015-06-01

    Precipitation-recrystallization interactions in ASTM F-1586 austenitic stainless steel were studied by means of hot torsion tests with multipass deformation under continuous cooling, simulating an industrial laminating process. Samples were deformed at 0.2 and 0.3 at a strain rate of 1.0s(-1), in a temperature range of 900 to 1200°C and interpass times varying from 5 to 80s. The tests indicate that the stress level depends on deformation temperature and the slope of the equivalent mean stress (EMS) vs. 1/T presents two distinct behaviors, with a transition at around 1100°C, the non-recrystallization temperature (Tnr). Below the Tnr, strain-induced precipitation of Z-phase (NbCrN) occurs in short interpass times (tpass<30s), inhibiting recrystallization and promoting stepwise stress build-up with strong recovery, which is responsible for increasing the Tnr. At interpass times longer than 30s, the coalescence and dissolution of precipitates promote a decrease in the Tnr and favor the formation of recrystallized grains. Based on this evidence, the physical simulation of controlled processing allows for a domain refined grain with better mechanical properties. PMID:25842112

  16. Contribution à la modélisation du soudage TIG des tôles minces d'acier austénitique 304L par un modèle source bi-elliptique, avec confrontation expérimentale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aissani, M.; Maza, H.; Belkessa, B.; Maamache, B.

    2005-05-01

    Ce travail contribue dans la modélisation du phénomène du soudage de l'acier inoxydable Austénitique 304L, afin d'étudier le comportement thermique d'un joint de soudure, obtenu par le procédé de soudage à l'arc électrique TIG (Tungsten-Inert-Gas). Le modèle simulant la source d'énergie de soudage, utilise une distribution surfacique Gaussienne du flux de chaleur provenant de l'arc électrique. La forme de cette source est supposée circulaire pour un premier cas et de forme bi-elliptique pour un second cas, tout en procédant à l'évaluation des champs et cycles thermiques à chaque instant, pour déterminer l'étendu des zones à risque, et l'effet de la vitesse de soudage sur ces dernières. Permettant ainsi de remonter par la suite, aux problèmes de contraintes résiduelles et déformations générées dans l'assemblage soudé. L'équation de chaleur régissant le problème est discrétisée par la méthode des volumes finis. Les calculs sont effectués en considérant que les propriétés physiques et thermiques ainsi que les conditions aux limites de convection et rayonnement, sont dépendante de la température. Pour évaluer la précision du modèle, une comparaison avec des mesures expérimentales de température d'un essai de soudage a été effectuée, les résultats indiquent un bon accord.

  17. Precipitate behavior in self-ion irradiated stainless steels at high doses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Z.; Was, G. S.

    2014-06-01

    To study radiation-induced precipitation at high doses, solution annealed 304L SS and cold worked 316 SS were irradiated to 46 and 260 dpa at 380 °C using 5 MeV Fe++ and the radiation-induced precipitates were examined using atom probe tomography. Ni/Si-rich clusters were observed in all examined conditions. G-phase precipitates were observed in 316 SS at 46 dpa but only appeared in 304L SS at 260 dpa. Using the neutron irradiation to 46 dpa at 320 °C as a reference, the temperature shift for cold worked 316 SS appeared to be smaller than that of solution annealed 304L SS, probably due to the high density of dislocations, which served as defect sinks and mitigated the effect of high dose rate.

  18. Nano-composite stainless steel

    DOEpatents

    Dehoff, Ryan R.; Blue, Craig A.; Peter, William H.; Chen, Wei; Aprigliano, Louis F.

    2015-07-14

    A composite stainless steel composition is composed essentially of, in terms of wt. % ranges: 25 to 28 Cr; 11 to 13 Ni; 7 to 8 W; 3.5 to 4 Mo; 3 to 3.5 B; 2 to 2.5 Mn; 1 to 1.5 Si; 0.3 to 1.7 C; up to 2 O; balance Fe. The composition has an austenitic matrix phase and a particulate, crystalline dispersed phase.

  19. Nickel: makes stainless steel strong

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boland, Maeve A.

    2012-01-01

    Nickel is a silvery-white metal that is used mainly to make stainless steel and other alloys stronger and better able to withstand extreme temperatures and corrosive environments. Nickel was first identified as a unique element in 1751 by Baron Axel Fredrik Cronstedt, a Swedish mineralogist and chemist. He originally called the element kupfernickel because it was found in rock that looked like copper (kupfer) ore and because miners thought that "bad spirits" (nickel) in the rock were making it difficult for them to extract copper from it. Approximately 80 percent of the primary (not recycled) nickel consumed in the United States in 2011 was used in alloys, such as stainless steel and superalloys. Because nickel increases an alloy's resistance to corrosion and its ability to withstand extreme temperatures, equipment and parts made of nickel-bearing alloys are often used in harsh environments, such as those in chemical plants, petroleum refineries, jet engines, power generation facilities, and offshore installations. Medical equipment, cookware, and cutlery are often made of stainless steel because it is easy to clean and sterilize. All U.S. circulating coins except the penny are made of alloys that contain nickel. Nickel alloys are increasingly being used in making rechargeable batteries for portable computers, power tools, and hybrid and electric vehicles. Nickel is also plated onto such items as bathroom fixtures to reduce corrosion and provide an attractive finish.

  20. CFD modeling and experimental verification of a single-stage coaxial Stirling-type pulse tube cryocooler without either double-inlet or multi-bypass operating at 30-35 K using mixed stainless steel mesh regenerator matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dang, Haizheng; Zhao, Yibo

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents the CFD modeling and experimental verifications of a single-stage inertance tube coaxial Stirling-type pulse tube cryocooler operating at 30-35 K using mixed stainless steel mesh regenerator matrices without either double-inlet or multi-bypass. A two-dimensional axis-symmetric CFD model with the thermal non-equilibrium mode is developed to simulate the internal process, and the underlying mechanism of significantly reducing the regenerator losses with mixed matrices is discussed in detail based on the given six cases. The modeling also indicates that the combination of the given different mesh segments can be optimized to achieve the highest cooling efficiency or the largest exergy ratio, and then the verification experiments are conducted in which the satisfactory agreements between simulated and tested results are observed. The experiments achieve a no-load temperature of 27.2 K and the cooling power of 0.78 W at 35 K, or 0.29 W at 30 K, with an input electric power of 220 W and a reject temperature of 300 K.

  1. Welding Metallurgy and Weldability of Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lippold, John C.; Kotecki, Damian J.

    2005-03-01

    Welding Metallurgy and Weldability of Stainless Steels, the first book in over twenty years to address welding metallurgy and weldability issues associated with stainless steel, offers the most up-to-date and comprehensive treatment of these topics currently available. The authors emphasize fundamental metallurgical principles governing microstructure evolution and property development of stainless steels, including martensistic, ferric, austenitic, duplex, and precipitation hardening grades. They present a logical and well-organized look at the history, evolution, and primary uses of each stainless steel, including detailed descriptions of the associated weldability issues.

  2. METHOD FOR JOINING ALUMINUM TO STAINLESS STEEL

    DOEpatents

    Lemon, L.C.

    1960-05-24

    Aluminum may be joined to stainless steel without the use of flux by tinning the aluminum with a tin solder containing 1% silver and 1% lead, tinning the stainless steel with a 50% lead 50% tin solder, and then sweating the tinned surfaces together.

  3. Interaction between stainless steel and plutonium metal

    SciTech Connect

    Dunwoody, John T; Mason, Richard E; Freibert, Franz J; Willson, Stephen P; Veirs, Douglas K; Worl, Laura A; Archuleta, Alonso; Conger, Donald J

    2010-01-01

    Long-term storage of excess plutonium is of great concern in the U.S. as well as abroad. The current accepted configuration involves intimate contact between the stored material and an iron-bearing container such as stainless steel. While many safety scenario studies have been conducted and used in the acceptance of stainless steel containers, little information is available on the physical interaction at elevated temperatures between certain forms of stored material and the container itself. The bulk of the safety studies has focused on the ability of a package to keep the primary stainless steel containment below the plutonium-iron eutectic temperature of approximately 410 C. However, the interactions of plutonium metal with stainless steel have been of continuing interest. This paper reports on a scoping study investigating the interaction between stainless steel and plutonium metal in a pseudo diffusion couple at temperatures above the eutectic melt-point.

  4. The comparison of frictional resistance in titanium, self-ligating stainless steel, and stainless steel brackets using stainless steel and TMA archwires: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Khalid, Syed Altaf; Kumar, Vadivel; Jayaram, Prithviraj

    2012-01-01

    Aim: The aim of the study was to compare the frictional resistance of titanium, self-ligating stainless steel, and conventional stainless steel brackets, using stainless steel and titanium molybdenum alloy (TMA) archwires. Materials and Methods: We compared the frictional resistance in 0.018 slot and 0.022 slot of the three brackets – titanium, self-ligating stainless steel, and conventional stainless steel – using stainless steel archwires and TMA archwires. An in vitro study of simulated canine retraction was undertaken to evaluate the difference in frictional resistance between titanium, self-ligating stainless steel, and stainless steel brackets, using stainless steel and TMA archwires. Results and Conclusion: We compared the frictional resistance of titanium, self-ligating stainless steel, and conventional stainless steel brackets, using stainless steel and TMA archwires, with the help of Instron Universal Testing Machine. One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), Student's “t” test, and post hoc multiple range test at level of <0.05 showed statistically significant difference in the mean values of all groups. Results demonstrated that the titanium, self-ligating stainless steel, and stainless steel brackets of 0.018-inch and 0.022-inch slot had no significant variations in frictional résistance. The self-ligating bracket with TMA archwires showed relatively less frictional resistance compared with the other groups. The titanium bracket with TMA archwires showed relatively less frictional resistance compared with the stainless steel brackets. PMID:23066253

  5. Development of New Stainless Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Robert F. Buck

    2005-08-30

    A new family of innovative martensitic stainless steels, 521-A, 521-B, and 521-C has been developed by Advanced Steel Technology, LLC (Trafford, PA) as high strength fastener (bolt) materials for use at moderate temperatures in turbine engines, including steam turbines, gas turbines, and aircraft engines. The primary objective of the development program was to create a martensitic stainless steel with high strength at moderate temperatures, and which could replace the expensive nickel-based superalloy IN 718 in some fasteners applications. A secondary objective was to replace conventional 12Cr steels such as AISI 422 used as blades, buckets and shafts that operate at intermediate temperatures in turbine engines with stronger steel. The composition of the new alloys was specifically designed to produce excellent mechanical properties while integrating heat treatment steps into production to reduce energy consumption during manufacturing. As a result, production costs and energy consumption during production of rolled bar products is significantly lower than conventional materials. Successful commercialization of the new alloys would permit the installed cost of certain turbine engines to be reduced without sacrificing high availability or operational flexibility, thereby enhancing the global competitiveness of U.S. turbine engine manufacturers. Moreover, the domestic specialty steel industry would also benefit through increased productivity and reduced operating costs, while increasing their share of the international market for turbine engine fasteners, blades, buckets and shafts.

  6. Foamability of stainless steelmaking slags in an EAF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerr, James John

    Foaming in electric furnace steelmaking is desirable to allow for a longer arc and subsequently higher power operation in order to reduce the tap to tap time and consequently increase productivity. Stainless steelmaking slags do not foam as well as carbon steelmaking slags. To produce foam, the foamability or foam index of a slag and the gas generation rate must be adequate. The possible causes for the poor foamability of stainless steelmaking slags were examined in this research. Specifically the foam index of a simulated stainless steelmaking slag containing chrome oxide was measured and the rate at which carbon reacts with Cr2O3, CrO, and FeO was also measured. The experimental results show that the foam index of stainless steelmaking slags is comparable to carbon steelmaking slags provided that the amount of solid chrome oxide particles or complexes is not excessive. This indicates the low foamability is not due to a poor foam index. Gas is normally generated by cycling carbon into the slag, which produces CO by reducing oxides in the slag. The experimental results demonstrate that the reaction rate of carbon with CrO dissolved in the slag and hence the generation of CO is significantly slower than for the reaction rate of carbon with FeO dissolved in slags. Therefore, the lack of FeO or other reducible oxides in stainless steelmaking slags is a primary reason for the poor foamability. Experimental results indicate that limestone, nickel oxide, calcium nitrate, and waste oxide briquettes generate gas at sufficient rates to induce foaming when added to the stainless steelmaking slag. Heat transfer most likely controls the rate of CO2 generated by limestone and NiO reduction is controlled by mass transfer of NiO to the carbon in the slag. WOBs generate gas very rapidly due to intimate mixing of the carbon and iron oxides at unit activity. Calcium nitrate generates gas by dissociation and heat transfer likely controls the dissociation rate. Simple models are

  7. Fatigue crack propagation behavior of stainless steel welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusko, Chad S.

    The fatigue crack propagation behavior of austenitic and duplex stainless steel base and weld metals has been investigated using various fatigue crack growth test procedures, ferrite measurement techniques, light optical microscopy, stereomicroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and optical profilometry. The compliance offset method has been incorporated to measure crack closure during testing in order to determine a stress ratio at which such closure is overcome. Based on this method, an empirically determined stress ratio of 0.60 has been shown to be very successful in overcoming crack closure for all da/dN for gas metal arc and laser welds. This empirically-determined stress ratio of 0.60 has been applied to testing of stainless steel base metal and weld metal to understand the influence of microstructure. Regarding the base metal investigation, for 316L and AL6XN base metals, grain size and grain plus twin size have been shown to influence resulting crack growth behavior. The cyclic plastic zone size model has been applied to accurately model crack growth behavior for austenitic stainless steels when the average grain plus twin size is considered. Additionally, the effect of the tortuous crack paths observed for the larger grain size base metals can be explained by a literature model for crack deflection. Constant Delta K testing has been used to characterize the crack growth behavior across various regions of the gas metal arc and laser welds at the empirically determined stress ratio of 0.60. Despite an extensive range of stainless steel weld metal FN and delta-ferrite morphologies, neither delta-ferrite morphology significantly influence the room temperature crack growth behavior. However, variations in weld metal da/dN can be explained by local surface roughness resulting from large columnar grains and tortuous crack paths in the weld metal.

  8. Biological effects of sol-gel derived ZrO2 and SiO2/ZrO2 coatings on stainless steel surface--In vitro model using mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Smieszek, Agnieszka; Donesz-Sikorska, Anna; Grzesiak, Jakub; Krzak, Justyna; Marycz, Krzysztof

    2014-11-01

    The objective of this study was to determine biocompatibility of zirconia-based coatings obtained by the sol-gel method. Two matrices, ZrO2 and SiO2/ZrO2, were created and applied on stainless steel type 316L with dip-coating technique. The morphology and topography of biomaterials' surface were characterized using energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy, while chemical composition was analyzed by Raman spectroscopy. Additionally, wettability and surface free energy were characterized. Biocompatibility of obtained biomaterials was evaluated using an in vitro model employing mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) of adipose and bone marrow origin. Biological analysis included determination of proliferation activity and morphology of MSCs in cultures on synthesized biomaterials. Osteoinductive properties of biomaterials were determined both in non-osteogenic, as well as osteogenic conditions. The results showed that investigated biomaterials exerted different impact on MSCs. Biomaterial with ZrO2 layer was more biocompatible for adipose-derived MSCs, while SiO2/ZrO2 layer promoted proliferation of bone marrow derived MSCs. Moreover, hybrid coating exhibited greater osteoinductive properties than ZrO2 coating, both on cultures with adipose-derived stromal (stem) cells and bone marrow stromal cells. Observed biological effects may result not only from different chemical composition, but also from diverse wettability. The ZrO2 coating was characterized as hydrophobic layer, while SiO2/ZrO2 exhibited hydrophilic properties. The results obtained suggest that behavior of MSCs in response to the biomaterial may vary depending on their origin, therefore we postulate, that screening analysis of implants' biocompatibility, should incorporate model applying both adipose- and bone marrow derived MSCs.

  9. Two-Phase Master Sintering Curve for 17-4 PH Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Im Doo; Ha, Sangyul; Park, Seong Jin; Blaine, Deborah C.; Bollina, Ravi; German, Randall M.

    2016-11-01

    The sintering behavior of 17-4 PH stainless steel has been efficiently characterized by a two-phase master sintering curve model (MSC). The activation energy for the sintering of gas-atomized and water-atomized 17-4 PH powders is derived using the mean residual method, and the relative density of both powders is well predicted by the two-phase MSC model. The average error between dilatometry data and MSC model has been reduced by 68 pct for gas-atomized powder and by 45 pct for water-atomized powder through the consideration of phase transformation of 17-4 PH in MSC model. The effect of δ-ferrite is considered in the two-phase MSC model, leading to excellent explanation of the sintering behavior for 17-4 PH stainless steel. The suggested model is useful in predicting the densification and phase change phenomenon during sintering of 17-4 PH stainless steel.

  10. Two-Phase Master Sintering Curve for 17-4 PH Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Im Doo; Ha, Sangyul; Park, Seong Jin; Blaine, Deborah C.; Bollina, Ravi; German, Randall M.

    2016-08-01

    The sintering behavior of 17-4 PH stainless steel has been efficiently characterized by a two-phase master sintering curve model (MSC). The activation energy for the sintering of gas-atomized and water-atomized 17-4 PH powders is derived using the mean residual method, and the relative density of both powders is well predicted by the two-phase MSC model. The average error between dilatometry data and MSC model has been reduced by 68 pct for gas-atomized powder and by 45 pct for water-atomized powder through the consideration of phase transformation of 17-4 PH in MSC model. The effect of δ-ferrite is considered in the two-phase MSC model, leading to excellent explanation of the sintering behavior for 17-4 PH stainless steel. The suggested model is useful in predicting the densification and phase change phenomenon during sintering of 17-4 PH stainless steel.

  11. 60 Years of duplex stainless steel applications

    SciTech Connect

    Olsson, J.; Liljas, M.

    1994-12-31

    In this paper the history of wrought duplex stainless steel development and applications is described. Ferritic-austenitic stainless steels were introduced only a few decades after stainless steels were developed. The paper gives details from the first duplex stainless steels in the 1930`s to the super duplex stainless steel development during the 1980`s. During the years much effort has been devoted to production and welding metallurgy as well as corrosion research of the duplex stainless steels. Therefore, duplex stainless steels are to-day established in a wide product range. Numerous important applications are exemplified. In most cases the selection of a duplex steel has been a result of the combination high strength excellent corrosion resistance. In the pulp and paper industry the most interesting use is as vessel material in digesters. For chemical process industry, the duplex steels are currently used in heat exchangers. The largest application of duplex steels exists in the oil and gas/offshore industry. Hundreds of kms of pipelines are installed and are still being installed. An increased use of duplex steels is foreseen in areas where the strength is of prime importance.

  12. Modeling of heat transfer and fluid flow in keyhole mode welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, Rohit

    In this work, computationally efficient numerical models have been developed for linear keyhole mode LBW and EBW processes. The models combine an energy balance based model for keyhole geometry calculation with a well tested 3D heat transfer and fluid flow model. For LBW, keyhole wall temperatures are assumed to be equal to the boiling point of the alloy at 1 atm pressure. Keyhole wall temperatures in EBW are calculated from the equilibrium vapor pressure versus temperature relation for the work-piece material. The vapor pressure is, in turn, calculated from a force balance at the keyhole walls between the surface tension, vapor pressure and hydrostatic forces. A turbulence model is used to estimate the effective values of viscosity and thermal conductivity to account for the enhanced heat and mass transport in the turbulent weld pool due to the fluctuating components of velocities in both LBW and EBW. The proposed model for LBW has been tested for materials with wide ranging thermo-physical properties under varying input powers and welding speeds covering both partial and full penetration welds. The tested materials include Al 5754 alloy, A131 steel, 304L stainless steel, Ti-6Al-4V, tantalum, and vanadium. These materials vary significantly in their thermo-physical properties, including boiling point, thermal conductivity, and specific heat. The EBW model was tested for 21Cr-6Ni-9Mn steel, 304L stainless steel, and Ti-6Al-4V for different input powers and power density distributions. To improve the agreement between the calculated and experimental results, a methodology is presented to estimate the values of uncertain input parameters like absorption coefficient and beam radius using a genetic algorithm with the numerical model and limited amount of experimental data. Finally, a genetic algorithm is used with the numerical model to prescribe welding conditions that would result in a desired weld attribute. The computed weld cross-sectional geometries and thermal

  13. Tritiated Water Interaction with Stainless Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Glen R. Longhurst

    2007-05-01

    Experiments conducted to study tritium permeation of stainless steel at ambient and elevated temperatures revealed that HT converts relatively quickly to HTO. Further, the HTO partial pressure contributes essentially equally with elemental tritium gas in driving permeation through the stainless steel. Such permeation appears to be due to dissociation of the water molecule on the hot stainless steel surface. There is an equilibrium concentration of HTO vapor above adsorbed gas on the walls of the experimental apparatus evident from freezing transients. The uptake process of tritium from the carrier gas involves both surface adsorption and isotopic exchange with surface bound water.

  14. Adsorption of ammonia on treated stainless steel and polymer surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaittinen, O.; Metsälä, M.; Persijn, S.; Vainio, M.; Halonen, L.

    2014-05-01

    Adsorption of dynamically diluted ammonia at part-per-billion to low part-per-million concentrations in dry nitrogen was studied with treated and non-treated stainless steel and polymer test tubes. The treatments included electropolishing and two types of coatings based on amorphous silicon. Cavity ring-down spectroscopy with an external cavity diode laser operating in the near-infrared wavelength range was used to monitor the adsorption process in real time in continuous-flow conditions to obtain quantitative assessment of the adsorptive properties of the studied surfaces. The investigated polymers were all less adsorptive than any of the treated or non-treated stainless steel surfaces. Some of the commercial coatings reduced the adsorption loss of stainless steel by a factor of ten or more. Polyvinylidene fluoride was found to be superior (less adsorption) to the four other studied polymer coatings. The number of adsorbed ammonia molecules per surface area obtained at different ammonia gas phase concentrations was modeled with Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms. The time behavior of the adsorption-desorption process occurring in the time scale of seconds and minutes was simulated with a simple kinetic model.

  15. Stainless steel to titanium bimetallic transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaluzny, J. A.; Grimm, C.; Passarelli, D.

    2015-12-01

    In order to use stainless steel piping in an LCLS-II (Linac Coherent Light Source Upgrade) cryomodule, stainless steel to titanium bimetallic transitions are needed to connect the stainless steel piping to the titanium cavity helium vessel. Explosion bonded stainless steel to titanium transition pieces and bimetallic transition material samples have been tested. A sample transition tube was subjected to tests and x-ray examinations between tests. Samples of the bonded joint material were impact and tensile tested at room temperature as well as liquid helium temperature. The joint has been used successfully in horizontal tests of LCLS-II cavity helium vessels and is planned to be used in LCLS-II cryomodules. Results of material sample and transition tube tests will be presented. Operated by Fermi Research Alliance, LLC under Contract No. De-AC02-07CH11359 with the United States Department of Energy.

  16. Development of a carburizing stainless steel alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Wert, D.E. )

    1994-06-01

    A new carburizing stainless steel alloy that resists corrosion, heat, and fatigue has been developed for bearing and gear applications. Pyrowear 675 Stainless alloy is vacuum induction melted and vacuum arc remelted (VIM/VAR) for aircraft-quality cleanliness. Test results show that it has corrosion resistance similar to that of AISI Type 440-C stainless, and its rolling fatigue resistance is superior to that of AISI M50 (UNS K88165). In contrast to alloy gear steels and Type 440C, Pyrowear 675 maintains case hardness of HRC 60 at operating temperatures up to 200 C (400 F). Impact and fracture toughness are superior to that of other stainless bearing steels, which typically are relatively brittle and can break under severe service. Toughness is also comparable or superior to conventional noncorrosion-resistant carburizing bearing steels, such as SAE Types 8620 and 9310.

  17. Hydrogen compatibility handbook for stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Caskey, G.R. Jr.

    1983-06-01

    This handbook compiles data on the effects of hydrogen on the mechanical properties of stainless steels and discusses this data within the context of current understanding of hydrogen compatibility of metals. All of the tabulated data derives from continuing studies of hydrogen effects on materials that have been conducted at the Savannah River Laboratory over the past fifteen years. Supplementary data from other sources are included in the discussion. Austenitic, ferritic, martensitic, and precipitation hardenable stainless steels have been studied. Damage caused by helium generated from decay of tritium is a distinctive effect that occurs in addition to the hydrogen isotopes protium and deuterium. The handbook defines the scope of our current knowledge of hydrogen effects in stainless steels and serves as a guide to selection of stainless steels for service in hydrogen.

  18. Precise carbon control of fabricated stainless steel

    DOEpatents

    Nilsen, R.J.

    1975-12-01

    A process is described for controlling the carbon content of fabricated stainless steel components including the steps of heat treating the component in hydrogen atmospheres of varying dewpoints and carbon potentials.

  19. Stainless Steel to Titanium Bimetallic Transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Kaluzny, J. A.; Grimm, C.; Passarelli, D.

    2015-01-01

    In order to use stainless steel piping in an LCLS-II (Linac Coherent Light Source Upgrade) cryomodule, stainless steel to titanium bimetallic transitions are needed to connect the stainless steel piping to the titanium cavity helium vessel. Explosion bonded stainless steel to titanium transition pieces and bimetallic transition material samples have been tested. A sample transition tube was subjected to tests and x-ray examinations between tests. Samples of the bonded joint material were impact and tensile tested at room temperature as well as liquid helium temperature. The joint has been used successfully in horizontal tests of LCLS-II cavity helium vessels and is planned to be used in LCLS-II cryomodules. Results of material sample and transition tube tests will be presented.

  20. Thermal Aging Phenomena in Cast Duplex Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byun, T. S.; Yang, Y.; Overman, N. R.; Busby, J. T.

    2016-02-01

    Cast stainless steels (CASSs) have been extensively used for the large components of light water reactor (LWR) power plants such as primary coolant piping and pump casing. The thermal embrittlement of CASS components is one of the most serious concerns related to the extended-term operation of nuclear power plants. Many past researches have concluded that the formation of Cr-rich α'-phase by Spinodal decomposition of δ-ferrite phase is the primary mechanism for the thermal embrittlement. Cracking mechanism in the thermally-embrittled duplex stainless steels consists of the formation of cleavage at ferrite and its propagation via separation of ferrite-austenite interphase. This article intends to provide an introductory overview on the thermal aging phenomena in LWR-relevant conditions. Firstly, the thermal aging effect on toughness is discussed in terms of the cause of embrittlement and influential parameters. An approximate analysis of thermal reaction using Arrhenius equation was carried out to scope the aging temperatures for the accelerated aging experiments to simulate the 60 and 80 years of services. Further, an equilibrium precipitation calculation was performed for model CASS alloys using the CALPHAD program, and the results are used to describe the precipitation behaviors in duplex stainless steels. These results are also to be used to guide an on-going research aiming to provide knowledge-based conclusive prediction for the integrity of the CASS components of LWR power plants during the service life extended up to and beyond 60 years.

  1. Thermal Aging Phenomena in Cast Duplex Stainless Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Byun, T. S.; Yang, Y.; Overman, N. R.; Busby, J. T.

    2015-11-12

    We used cast stainless steels (CASSs)for the large components of light water reactor (LWR) power plants such as primary coolant piping and pump casing. The thermal embrittlement of CASS components is one of the most serious concerns related to the extended-term operation of nuclear power plants. Many past researches have concluded that the formation of Cr-rich alpha-phase by Spinodal decomposition of delta-ferrite phase is the primary mechanism for the thermal embrittlement. Cracking mechanism in the thermally-embrittled duplex stainless steels consists of the formation of cleavage at ferrite and its propagation via separation of ferrite-austenite interphase. This article intends to provide an introductory overview on the thermal aging phenomena in LWR-relevant conditions. Firstly, the thermal aging effect on toughness is discussed in terms of the cause of embrittlement and influential parameters. Moreover, an approximate analysis of thermal reaction using Arrhenius equation was carried out to scope the aging temperatures for the accelerated aging experiments to simulate the 60 and 80 years of services. Further, an equilibrium precipitation calculation was performed for model CASS alloys using the CALPHAD program, and the results are used to describe the precipitation behaviors in duplex stainless steels. Our results are also to be used to guide an on-going research aiming to provide knowledge-based conclusive prediction for the integrity of the CASS components of LWR power plants during the service life extended up to and beyond 60 years.

  2. Surface interactions of cesium and boric acid with stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Grossman-Canfield, N.

    1995-08-01

    In this report, the effects of cesium hydroxide and boric acid on oxidized stainless steel surfaces at high temperatures and near one atmosphere of pressure are investigated. This is the first experimental investigation of this chemical system. The experimental investigations were performed using a mass spectrometer and a mass electrobalance. Surfaces from the different experiments were examined using a scanning electron microscope to identify the presence of deposited species, and electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis to identify the species deposited on the surface. A better understanding of the equilibrium thermodynamics, the kinetics of the steam-accelerated volatilizations, and the release kinetics are gained by these experiments. The release rate is characterized by bulk vaporization/gas-phase mass transfer data. The analysis couples vaporization, deposition, and desorption of the compounds formed by cesium hydroxide and boric acid under conditions similar to what is expected during certain nuclear reactor accidents. This study shows that cesium deposits on an oxidized stainless steel surface at temperatures between 1000 and 1200 Kelvin. Cesium also deposits on stainless steel surfaces coated with boric oxide in the same temperature ranges. The mechanism for cesium deposition onto the oxide layer was found to involve the chemical reaction between cesium and chromate. Some revaporization in the cesium hydroxide-boric acid system was observed. It has been found that under the conditions given, boric acid will react with cesium hydroxide to form cesium metaborate. A model is proposed for this chemical reaction.

  3. Ductile Damage Evolution Assessment in High Purity Copper and Stainless Steel Subjected to Different Shock-Loading Profiles Using Cohesive Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggiero, A.; Bonora, N.; Esposito, L.; Gray, G. T.

    2009-12-01

    The calculated energy dissipation associated with the pull-back signal amplitude in plate impact experiment is usually larger than that obtained by accounting the contributions of the estimated plastic work at continuum scale and that due to ductile damage. As a possible explanation, it is proposed that the drop in the stress triaxiality, due to the formation of free surfaces as a result of the first appearance of the damage in form of voids, allows the matrix material to exhibit much larger plastic deformation. In order to verify this proposition, a numerical investigation based on the use of cohesive finite elements has been performed. The proposed numerical model has been used to predict the damage development and the rear pressure profile in a flyer plate impact test on 99.99% Cu and 316 L SS under flat top and triangular pressure wave profile.

  4. Equation of state and electrical conductivity of stainless steel.

    SciTech Connect

    Desjarlais, Michael Paul; Mattsson, Thomas Kjell Rene

    2004-11-01

    Warm dense matter is the region in phase space of density and temperature where the thermal, Fermi, and Coulomb energies are approximately equal. The lack of a dominating scale and physical behavior makes it challenging to model the physics to high fidelity. For Sandia, a fundamental understanding of the region is of importance because of the needs of our experimental HEDP programs for high fidelity descriptive and predictive modeling. We show that multi-scale simulations of macroscopic physical phenomena now have predictive capability also for difficult but ubiquitous materials such as stainless steel, a transition metal alloy.

  5. High Mn austenitic stainless steel

    DOEpatents

    Yamamoto, Yukinori [Oak Ridge, TN; Santella, Michael L [Knoxville, TN; Brady, Michael P [Oak Ridge, TN; Maziasz, Philip J [Oak Ridge, TN; Liu, Chain-tsuan [Knoxville, TN

    2010-07-13

    An austenitic stainless steel alloy includes, in weight percent: >4 to 15 Mn; 8 to 15 Ni; 14 to 16 Cr; 2.4 to 3 Al; 0.4 to 1 total of at least one of Nb and Ta; 0.05 to 0.2 C; 0.01 to 0.02 B; no more than 0.3 of combined Ti+V; up to 3 Mo; up to 3 Co; up to 1W; up to 3 Cu; up to 1 Si; up to 0.05 P; up to 1 total of at least one of Y, La, Ce, Hf, and Zr; less than 0.05 N; and base Fe, wherein the weight percent Fe is greater than the weight percent Ni, and wherein the alloy forms an external continuous scale including alumina, nanometer scale sized particles distributed throughout the microstructure, the particles including at least one of NbC and TaC, and a stable essentially single phase FCC austenitic matrix microstructure that is essentially delta-ferrite-free and essentially BCC-phase-free.

  6. The Underground Corrosion of Selected Type 300 Stainless Steels After 34 Years

    SciTech Connect

    T. S. Yoder; M. K. Adler Flitton

    2009-03-01

    Recently, interest in long-term underground corrosion has greatly increased because of the ongoing need to dispose of nuclear waste. Additionally, the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 requires disposal of high-level nuclear waste in an underground repository. Current contaminant release and transport models use limited available short-term underground corrosion rates when considering container and waste form degradation. Consequently, the resulting models oversimplify the complex mechanisms of underground metal corrosion. The complexity of stainless steel corrosion mechanisms and the processes by which corrosion products migrate from their source are not well depicted by a corrosion rate based on general attack. The research presented here is the analysis of austenitic stainless steels after 33½ years of burial. In this research, the corrosion specimens were analyzed using applicable ASTM standards as well as microscopic and X-ray examination to determine the mechanisms of underground stainless steel corrosion. As presented, the differences in the corrosion mechanisms vary with the type of stainless steel and the treatment of the samples. The uniqueness of the long sampling time allows for further understanding of the actual stainless steel corrosion mechanisms, and when applied back into predictive models, will assist in reduction of the uncertainty in parameters for predicting long-term fate and transport.

  7. Effects of Nitrogen on Passivity of Nickel-Free Stainless Steels by Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xinqiang; Fu, Yao; Ke, Wei; Xu, Song; Feng, Bing; Hu, Botao

    2015-09-01

    The effects of different nitrogen contents on the passivity of nickel-free stainless steels in 0.5 M sulfuric acid + 0.5 M sodium chloride solution were investigated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy in the potential ranges of active dissolution and active-passive transition. A simplified reaction model containing adsorbed intermediates involved dissolution process, and passivation process was proposed to explain the impedance characteristics. Based on both equivalent circuit and mathematical model analysis, the effects of nitrogen on the passivity of stainless steels are discussed.

  8. Eddy Current Assessment of the Cold Rolled Deformation Behavior of AISI 321 Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kunpeng; Zhao, Zihua; Zhang, Zheng

    2012-08-01

    Applicability of the eddy current (EC) technique in assessing martensite phase transformation during cold reduction in AISI 321 stainless steel was investigated. An empirical model based on measured EC parameters was developed for predicting the volume fraction of strain-induced martensite. Good agreement was found between the model-predicted and the experimental data.

  9. Superplastic forming of stainless steel automotive components

    SciTech Connect

    Bridges, B.; Elmer, J.; Carol, L.

    1997-02-06

    Exhaust emission standards are governmentally controlled standards, which are increasingly stringent, forcing alternate strategies to meet these standards. One approach to improve the efficiency of the exhaust emission equipment is to decrease the time required to get the catalytic converter to optimum operating temperature. To accomplish this, automotive manufacturers are using double wall stainless steel exhaust manifolds to reduce heat loss of the exhaust gases to the converter. The current method to manufacture double wall stainless steel exhaust components is to use a low-cost alloy with good forming properties and extensively form, cut, assemble, and weld the pieces. Superplastic forming (SPF) technology along with alloy improvements has potential at making this process more cost effective. Lockheed Martin Energy Systems (LMES), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and USCAR Low Emission Partnership (LEP) worked under a Cooperative Research And Development Agreement (CRADA) to evaluate material properties, SPF behavior, and welding behavior of duplex stainless steel alloy for automotive component manufacturing. Battelle Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has a separate CRADA with the LEP to use SPF technology to manufacture a double wall stainless steel exhaust component. As a team these CRADAs developed and demonstrated a technical plan to accomplish making double wall stainless steel exhaust manifolds.

  10. Aging degradation of cast stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O.K.; Chung, H.M.

    1985-10-01

    A program is being conducted to investigate the significance of in-service embrittlement of cast-duplex stainless steels under light-water reactor operating conditions. Data from room-temperature Charpy-impact tests for several heats of cast stainless steel aged up to 10,000 h at 350, 400, and 450/sup 0/C are presented and compared with results from other studies. Microstructures of cast-duplex stainless steels subjected to long-term aging either in the laboratory or in reactor service have been characterized. The results indicate that at least two processes contribute to the low-temperature embrittleent of duplex stainless steels, viz., weakening of the ferrite/austenite phase boundary by carbide precipitation and embrittlement of ferrite matrix by the formation of additional phases such as G-phase, Type X, or the ..cap alpha..' phase. Carbide precipitation has a significant effect on the onset of embrittlement of CF-8 and -8M grades of stainless steels aged at 400 or 450/sup 0/C. The existing correlations do not accurately represent the embrittlement behavior over the temperature range 300 to 450/sup 0/C. 18 refs., 13 figs.

  11. 79 FR 60188 - Nonmetallic Thermal Insulation for Austenitic Stainless Steel

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2014-10-06

    ... COMMISSION Nonmetallic Thermal Insulation for Austenitic Stainless Steel AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory... of the NRC considers acceptable when selecting and using nonmetallic thermal insulation in the..., ``Nonmetallic Thermal Insulation for Austenitic Stainless Steel,'' is temporarily identified by its task...

  12. Ultrasonic Spectroscopy of Stainless Steel Sandwich Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cosgriff, Laura M.; Lerch, Bradley A.; Hebsur, Mohan G.; Baaklini, George Y.; Ghosn, Louis J.

    2003-01-01

    Enhanced, lightweight material systems, such as 17-4PH stainless steel sandwich panels are being developed for use as fan blades and fan containment material systems for next generation engines. In order to improve the production for these systems, nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques, such as ultrasonic spectroscopy, are being utilized to evaluate the brazing quality between the 17-4PH stainless steel face plates and the 17-4PH stainless steel foam core. Based on NDE data, shear tests are performed on sections representing various levels of brazing quality from an initial batch of these sandwich structures. Metallographic characterization of brazing is done to corroborate NDE findings and the observed shear failure mechanisms.

  13. Laser Welding of Large Scale Stainless Steel Aircraft Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reitemeyer, D.; Schultz, V.; Syassen, F.; Seefeld, T.; Vollertsen, F.

    In this paper a welding process for large scale stainless steel structures is presented. The process was developed according to the requirements of an aircraft application. Therefore, stringers are welded on a skin sheet in a t-joint configuration. The 0.6 mm thickness parts are welded with a thin disc laser, seam length up to 1920 mm are demonstrated. The welding process causes angular distortions of the skin sheet which are compensated by a subsequent laser straightening process. Based on a model straightening process parameters matching the induced welding distortion are predicted. The process combination is successfully applied to stringer stiffened specimens.

  14. Characterization & Modeling of Materials in Glass-To-Metal Seals: Part I

    SciTech Connect

    Chambers, Robert S.; Emery, John M.; Tandon, Rajan; Antoun, Bonnie R.; Stavig, Mark E.; Newton, Clay S.

    2014-01-01

    To support higher fidelity modeling of residual stresses in glass-to-metal (GTM) seals and to demonstrate the accuracy of finite element analysis predictions, characterization and validation data have been collected for Sandia’s commonly used compression seal materials. The temperature dependence of the storage moduli, the shear relaxation modulus master curve and structural relaxation of the Schott 8061 glass were measured and stress-strain curves were generated for SS304L VAR in small strain regimes typical of GTM seal applications spanning temperatures from 20 to 500 C. Material models were calibrated and finite element predictions are being compared to measured data to assess the accuracy of predictions.

  15. Stainless Steel Microstructure and Mechanical Properties Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Switzner, Nathan T

    2010-06-01

    A nitrogen strengthened 21-6-9 stainless steel plate was spinformed into hemispherical test shapes. A battery of laboratory tests was used to characterize the hemispheres. The laboratory tests show that near the pole (axis) of a spinformed hemisphere the yield strength is the lowest because this area endures the least “cold-work” strengthening, i.e., the least deformation. The characterization indicated that stress-relief annealing spinformed stainless steel hemispheres does not degrade mechanical properties. Stress-relief annealing reduces residual stresses while maintaining relatively high mechanical properties. Full annealing completely eliminates residual stresses, but reduces yield strength by about 30%.

  16. Friction Drilling of Stainless Steels Pipes

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, A.; Lopez de Lacalle, L. N.; Lamikiz, A.

    2011-01-17

    This work describes the experimental study of the friction drilling process in stainless steel by means of an optimization of the machining conditions. For such purpose austenitic stainless steel with different thicknesses were analyzed through controlled tests at different rotation speeds and feed rates. On one hand, the torque and the thrust force were computed and monitorized. On the other hand, the dimensional tolerances of the holes were evaluated, mainly the accuracy of the hole diameter and the burr thickness at different depths. Another topic of interest inherent to this special technique is the temperature level reached during the friction process which is crucial when it comes to development of microstructural transformations.

  17. 21 CFR 872.3350 - Gold or stainless steel cusp.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Gold or stainless steel cusp. 872.3350 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3350 Gold or stainless steel cusp. (a) Identification. A gold or stainless steel cusp is a prefabricated device made of austenitic alloys or...

  18. 21 CFR 872.3350 - Gold or stainless steel cusp.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Gold or stainless steel cusp. 872.3350 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3350 Gold or stainless steel cusp. (a) Identification. A gold or stainless steel cusp is a prefabricated device made of austenitic alloys or...

  19. 21 CFR 872.3350 - Gold or stainless steel cusp.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Gold or stainless steel cusp. 872.3350 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3350 Gold or stainless steel cusp. (a) Identification. A gold or stainless steel cusp is a prefabricated device made of austenitic alloys or...

  20. 21 CFR 872.3350 - Gold or stainless steel cusp.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Gold or stainless steel cusp. 872.3350 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3350 Gold or stainless steel cusp. (a) Identification. A gold or stainless steel cusp is a prefabricated device made of austenitic alloys or...

  1. Disinfection of Preexisting Contamination of BACILLUS CEREUS on Stainless Steel when Using Glycoconjugate Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavan, Casey; Tarasenko, Olga

    2011-06-01

    Stainless steel is ubiquitous in our modern world, however it can become contaminated. This can endanger our health. The aim of our study is to disinfect stainless steel using Bacillus cereus as a model organism. Bacillus cereus is a microbe that is ubiquitous in nature, specifically soil. B. cereus is known to cause illness in humans. To prevent this, we propose to use a glycoconjugate solution (GS) for disinfection of stainless steel after it is contamination by B. cereus spores. In this study, two GS (9, 10) were tested for disinfection effectiveness on B. cereus spores on the surface of stainless steel foil (AISI-Series 200/300/400, THERMA-FOIL, Dayville, CT 0241). The disinfection rate of each GS was assessed by exposing the steel surface to B. cereus spores first and allowing them to settle for 24 hours. GS was used to treat the contaminated surface. The steel is washed and the resulting solution is plated on tryptic soy agar (TSA) plates. The GS with the fewest colony forming unit (CFU) formed on TSA is determined to be the most efficient during disinfection. Results show that both GS demonstrate a strong ability to disinfect B. cereus spores. Between the two, GS 9 shows the highest disinfection efficacy by killing approximately 99.5% of spores. This is a drastic improvement over the 0-20% disinfection of the control. Based on this we find that studied GS do have the capacity to act as a disinfectant on stainless steel.

  2. Disinfection of preexisting contamination of bacillus cereus on stainless steel when using glycoconjugate solution

    SciTech Connect

    Pavan, Casey; Tarasenko, Olga

    2011-06-10

    Stainless steel is ubiquitous in our modern world, however it can become contaminated. This can endanger our health. The aim of our study is to disinfect stainless steel using Bacillus cereus as a model organism. Bacillus cereus is a microbe that is ubiquitous in nature, specifically soil. B. cereus is known to cause illness in humans. To prevent this, we propose to use a glycoconjugate solution (GS) for disinfection of stainless steel after it is contamination by B. cereus spores. In this study, two GS (9, 10) were tested for disinfection effectiveness on B. cereus spores on the surface of stainless steel foil (AISI-Series 200/300/400, THERMA-FOIL, Dayville, CT 0241). The disinfection rate of each GS was assessed by exposing the steel surface to B. cereus spores first and allowing them to settle for 24 hours. GS was used to treat the contaminated surface. The steel is washed and the resulting solution is plated on tryptic soy agar (TSA) plates. The GS with the fewest colony forming unit (CFU) formed on TSA is determined to be the most efficient during disinfection. Results show that both GS demonstrate a strong ability to disinfect B. cereus spores. Between the two, GS 9 shows the highest disinfection efficacy by killing approximately 99.5% of spores. This is a drastic improvement over the 0-20% disinfection of the control. Based on this we find that studied GS do have the capacity to act as a disinfectant on stainless steel.

  3. Corrosion Behavior of Stainless Steels in Neutral and Acidified Sodium Chloride Solutions by Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, L. M.; Kolady, M. R.; Vinje, R. D.

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this work was to evaluate the corrosion performance of three alloys by Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) and to compare the results with those obtained during a two-year atmospheric exposure study.' Three alloys: AL6XN (UNS N08367), 254SM0 (UNS S32154), and 304L (UNS S30403) were included in the study. 304L was included as a control. The alloys were tested in three electrolyte solutions which consisted of neutral 3.55% NaC1, 3.55% NaC1 in 0.lN HC1, and 3.55% NaC1 in 1.ON HC1. These conditions were expected to be less severe, similar, and more severe respectively than the conditions at NASA's Kennedy Space Center launch pads.

  4. Radiation Hydrodynamics of Stainless Steel Wire Arrays on the Z Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, J.; Dasgupta, A.; Thornhill, J. W.; Giuliani, J.; Clark, R. W.; Whitney, K.; Coverdale, C. A.; Lepell, D.; Jones, B.; Deeney, C.

    2009-01-21

    Experiments on the Z accelerator with nested stainless steel wire arrays produced K-shell x-ray yields exceeding 50 kJ in the energy range 5.5 to 8 keV. Stainless steel (Z = 24-28) can barely be ionized to the K-shell on Z, and the spectra are therefore sensitive to the details of the implosion. We have simulated the implosion dynamics of stainless steel wire arrays with diameters ranging from 4.5 to 8.0 centimeters using a detailed configuration non-LTE radiation hydrodynamics model. Reasonable agreement with total and K-shell experimental yields was obtained for the various array configurations. A comparison is made between the 1-D and 2-D simulations for shot Z-578.

  5. Fatigue crack growth in metastable austenitic stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Mei, Z.; Chang, G.; Morris, J.W. Jr.

    1988-06-01

    The research reported here is an investigation of the influence of the mechanically induced martensitic transformation on the fatigue crack growth rate in 304-type steels. The alloys 304L and 304LN were used to test the influence of composition, the testing temperatures 298 K and 77 K were used to study the influence of test temperature, and various load ratios (R) were used to determine the influence of the load ratio. It was found that decreasing the mechanical stability of the austenite by changing composition or lowering temperature decreases the fatigue crack growth rate. The R-ratio effect is more subtle. The fatigue crack growth rate increases with increasing R-ratio, even though this change increases the martensite transformation. Transformation-induced crack closure can explain the results in the threshold regime, but cannot explain the R-ratio effect at higher cyclic stress intensities. 26 refs., 6 figs.

  6. Bondable Stainless Surface Coats Protect Against Rust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, G. D.; Shaffer, D. K.; Clearfield, H. M.; Nagle, D.; Groff, G.

    1995-01-01

    Report describes tests conducted to assess use of bondable stainless surface (BOSS) coating materials to protect steel cases of solid-fuel rocket motors against corrosion and to provide surface microstructure and chemistry suitable for bonding to insulating material. Eliminates need to cover cases with grease to prevent corrosion and degreasing immediately prior to use.

  7. Forming "dynamic" membranes on stainless steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandon, C. A.; Gaddis, J. L.

    1979-01-01

    "Dynamic" zirconium polyacrylic membrane is formed directly on stainless steel substrate without excessive corrosion of steel. Membrane is potentially useful in removal of contaminated chemicals from solution through reversed osmosis. Application includes use in filtration and desalination equipment, and in textile industry for separation of dyes from aqueous solvents.

  8. Stabilizing stainless steel components for cryogenic service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holden, C. F.

    1967-01-01

    Warpage and creep in stainless steel valve components are decreased by a procedure in which components are machined to a semifinish and then cold soaked in a bath of cryogenic liquid. After the treatment they are returned to ambient temperature and machine finished to the final drawing dimensions.

  9. Proof Testing Of Stainless-Steel Bolts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsieh, Cheng H.; Hendrickson, James A.; Bamford, Robert M.

    1992-01-01

    Report describes study of development of method for nondestructive proof testing of bolts made of A286 stainless steel. Based on concept that the higher load bolt survives, the smaller the largest flaw and, therefore, the longer its fatigue life after test. Calculations and experiments increase confidence in nondestructive proof tests.

  10. Austenitic stainless steels for cryogenic service

    SciTech Connect

    Dalder, E.N.C.; Juhas, M.C.

    1985-09-19

    Presently available information on austenitic Fe-Cr-Ni stainless steel plate, welds, and castings for service below 77 K are reviewed with the intent (1) of developing systematic relationships between mechanical properties, composition, microstructure, and processing, and (2) of assessing the adequacy of these data bases in the design, fabrication, and operation of engineering systems at 4 K.

  11. Materials data handbooks on stainless steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muraca, R. F.; Whittick, J. S.

    1973-01-01

    Two handbooks which summarize latest available data have been published. Two types of stainless steels, alloy A-286 and Type 301, are described. Each handbook is divided into twelve chapters. Scope of information presented includes physical- and mechanical-property data at cryogenic, ambient, and elevated temperatures.

  12. Materials data handbook: Stainless steel type 301

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muraca, R. F.; Whittick, J. S.

    1972-01-01

    A summary of the materials property information for stainless steel type 301 is presented. The scope of the information includes physical and mechanical properties at cryogenic, ambient, and elevated temperatures. Information on material procurement, metallurgy of the alloy, corrosion, environmental effects, fabrication, and bonding is developed.

  13. Aging and Embrittlement of High Fluence Stainless Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Was, gary; Jiao, Zhijie; der ven, Anton Van; Bruemmer, Stephen; Edwards, Dan

    2012-12-31

    Irradiation of austenitic stainless steels results in the formation of dislocation loops, stacking fault tetrahedral, Ni-Si clusters and radiation-induced segregation (RIS). Of these features, it is the formation of precipitates which is most likely to impact the mechanical integrity at high dose. Unlike dislocation loops and RIS, precipitates exhibit an incubation period that can extend from 10 to 46 dpa, above which the cluster composition changes and a separate phase, (G-phase) forms. Both neutron and heavy ion irradiation showed that these clusters develop slowly and continue to evolve beyond 100 dpa. Overall, this work shows that the irradiated microstructure features produced by heavy ion irradiation are remarkably comparable in nature to those produced by neutron irradiation at much lower dose rates. The use of a temperature shift to account for the higher damage rate in heavy ion irradiation results in a fairly good match in the dislocation loop microstructure and the precipitate microstructure in austenitic stainless steels. Both irradiations also show segregation of the same elements and in the same directions, but to achieve comparable magnitudes, heavy ion irradiation must be conducted at a much higher temperature than that which produces a match with loops and precipitates. First-principles modeling has confirmed that the formation of Ni-Si precipitates under irradiation is likely caused by supersaturation of solute to defect sinks caused by highly correlated diffusion of Ni and Si. Thus, the formation and evolution of Ni-Si precipitates at high dose in austenitic stainless steels containing Si is inevitable.

  14. Thermal Aging Phenomena in Cast Duplex Stainless Steels

    DOE PAGES

    Byun, T. S.; Yang, Y.; Overman, N. R.; Busby, J. T.

    2015-11-12

    We used cast stainless steels (CASSs)for the large components of light water reactor (LWR) power plants such as primary coolant piping and pump casing. The thermal embrittlement of CASS components is one of the most serious concerns related to the extended-term operation of nuclear power plants. Many past researches have concluded that the formation of Cr-rich alpha-phase by Spinodal decomposition of delta-ferrite phase is the primary mechanism for the thermal embrittlement. Cracking mechanism in the thermally-embrittled duplex stainless steels consists of the formation of cleavage at ferrite and its propagation via separation of ferrite-austenite interphase. This article intends to providemore » an introductory overview on the thermal aging phenomena in LWR-relevant conditions. Firstly, the thermal aging effect on toughness is discussed in terms of the cause of embrittlement and influential parameters. Moreover, an approximate analysis of thermal reaction using Arrhenius equation was carried out to scope the aging temperatures for the accelerated aging experiments to simulate the 60 and 80 years of services. Further, an equilibrium precipitation calculation was performed for model CASS alloys using the CALPHAD program, and the results are used to describe the precipitation behaviors in duplex stainless steels. Our results are also to be used to guide an on-going research aiming to provide knowledge-based conclusive prediction for the integrity of the CASS components of LWR power plants during the service life extended up to and beyond 60 years.« less

  15. Quantitative techniques for the measurement and analysis of biofouling on stainless steel

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A model of wet-processing conditions tested the effects of corrosive treatment on bacterial attachment to stainless steel with different surface finishes. Electropolished samples resisted surface oxidation, corresponding with the visual observation of lower discoloration than the other samples. The ...

  16. Phase Transformation in Cast Superaustenitic Stainless Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Lee Phillips, Nathaniel Steven

    2006-01-01

    Superaustenitic stainless steels constitute a group of Fe-based alloys that are compositionally balanced to have a purely austenitic matrix and exhibit favorable pitting and crevice corrosion resistant properties and mechanical strength. However, intermetallic precipitates such as sigma and Laves can form during casting or exposure to high-temperature processing, which degrade the corrosion and mechanical properties of the material. The goal of this study was to accurately characterize the solid-solid phase transformations seen in cast superaustenitic stainless steels. Heat treatments were performed to understand the time and temperature ranges for intermetallic phase formations in alloys CN3MN and CK3MCuN. Microstructures were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and energy and wavelength dispersive spectroscopy (EDS, WDS). The equilibrium microstructures, composed primarily of sigma and Laves within purely austenitic matrices, showed slow transformation kinetics. Factors that determine the extent of transformation, including diffusion, nucleation, and growth, are discussed.

  17. Microleakage of cements for stainless steel crowns.

    PubMed

    Shiflett, K; White, S N

    1997-01-01

    Microleakage is related to recurrent decay, inflammation of vital pulps, and reinfection of previously treated root canals. The purpose of this investigation was to compare the abilities of new adhesive cements and conventional nonadhesive controls to prevent microleakage under stainless steel crowns on primary anterior teeth. Standardized preparations were made, and stainless steel crowns were adapted. Specimens were assigned randomly to cement groups: zinc phosphate (ZP), polycarboxylate (PC), glass-ionomer (GI), resin-modified glass-ionomer (RMGI), RMGI with a dentin bonding agent (RMGI + DBA), adhesive composite resin (ACR) and zinc oxide eugenol (ZOE). Specimens were stored in water, aged artificially, stained, embedded, and sectioned, and the microleakage was measured. Group means and standard errors were calculated. ANOVA discerned differences among groups (P < 0.0001), and Turkey's multiple comparisons testing (P < 0.05) ranked the groups from least to most microleakage as follows: [RMGI + DBA, RMGI, ACR, GI], [ZP], and [PC, ZOE]. The adhesive cements significantly reduced microleakage.

  18. Tritium Depth Profiles in 316 Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torikai, Yuji; Murata, Daiju; Penzhorn, Ralf-Dieter; Akaishi, Kenya; Watanabe, Kuniaki; Matsuyama, Masao

    To investigate the behavior of hydrogen uptake and release by 316 stainless steel (SS316), as-received and finely polished stainless steel specimens were exposed at 573 K to tritium gas diluted with hydrogen. Then tritium concentration in the exposed specimens was measured as a function of depth using a chemical etching method. All the tritium concentration profiles showed a sharp drop in the range of 10 μm from the top surface up to the bulk. The amount of tritium absorbed into the polished specimens was three times larger than that into the as-received specimen. However, the polishing effects disappeared by exposing to the air for a long time.

  19. Weldability of Additive Manufactured Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matilainen, Ville-Pekka; Pekkarinen, Joonas; Salminen, Antti

    Part size in additive manufacturing is limited by the size of building area of AM equipment. Occasionally, larger constructions that AM machines are able to produce, are needed, and this creates demand for welding AM parts together. However there is very little information on welding of additive manufactured stainless steels. The aim of this study was to investigate the weldability aspects of AM material. In this study, comparison of the bead on plate welds between AM parts and sheet metal parts is done. Used material was 316L stainless steel, AM and sheet metal, and parts were welded with laser welding. Weld quality was evaluated visually from macroscopic images. Results show that there are certain differences in the welds in AM parts compared to the welds in sheet metal parts. Differences were found in penetration depths and in type of welding defects. Nevertheless, this study presents that laser welding is suitable process for welding AM parts.

  20. Softened-Stainless-Steel O-Rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marquis, G. A.; Waters, William I.

    1993-01-01

    In fabrication of O-ring of new type, tube of 304 stainless steel bent around mandril into circle and welded closed into ring. Ring annealed in furnace to make it soft and highly ductile. In this condition, used as crushable, deformable O-ring seal. O-ring replacements used in variety of atmospheres and temperatures, relatively inexpensive, fabricated with minimum amount of work, amenable to one-of-a-kind production, reusable, and environmentally benign.

  1. Pitting corrosion resistant austenite stainless steel

    DOEpatents

    van Rooyen, D.; Bandy, R.

    A pitting corrosion resistant austenite stainless steel comprises 17 to 28 wt. % chromium, 15 to 26 wt. % nickel, 5 to 8 wt. % molybdenum, and 0.3 to 0.5 wt. % nitrogen, the balance being iron, unavoidable impurities, minor additions made in the normal course of melting and casting alloys of this type, and may optionally include up to 10 wt. % of manganese, up to 5 wt. % of silicon, and up to 0.08 wt. % of carbon.

  2. Properties of cryogenically worked metals. [stainless steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartzberg, F. R.; Kiefer, T. F.

    1975-01-01

    A program was conducted to determine whether the mechanical properties of cryogenically worked 17-7PH stainless steel are suitable for service from ambient to cryogenic temperatures. It was determined that the stress corrosion resistance of the cryo-worked material is quite adequate for structural service. The tensile properties and fracture toughness at room temperature were comparable to titanium alloy 6Al-4V. However, at cryogenic temperatures, the properties were not sufficient to recommend consideration for structural service.

  3. Cast Stainless Steel Ferrite and Grain Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Ruud, Clayton O.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Meyer, Ryan M.; Mathews, Royce; Diaz, Aaron A.; Anderson, Michael T.

    2012-09-01

    In-service inspection requirements dictate that piping welds in the primary pressure boundary of light-water reactors be subject to a volumetric examination based on the rules contained within the American Society of Mechanical Engineers Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Section XI. The purpose of the inspection is the reliable detection and accurate sizing of service-induced degradation and/or material flaws introduced during fabrication. The volumetric inspection is usually carried out using ultrasonic testing (UT) methods. However, the varied metallurgical macrostructures and microstructures of cast austenitic stainless steel piping and fittings, including statically cast stainless steel and centrifugally cast stainless steel (CCSS), introduce significant variations in the propagation and attenuation of ultrasonic energy. These variations complicate interpretation of the UT responses and may compromise the reliability of UT inspection. A review of the literature indicated that a correlation may exist between the microstructure and the delta ferrite content of the casting alloy. This paper discusses the results of a recent study where the goal was to determine if a correlation existed between measured and/or calculated ferrite content and grain structure in CCSS pipe.

  4. SRS stainless steel beneficial reuse program

    SciTech Connect

    Boettinger, W.L.

    1997-02-01

    The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) has thousands of tons of stainless steel radioactive scrap metal (RSNI). Much of the metal is volumetrically contaminated. There is no {open_quotes}de minimis{close_quotes} free release level for volumetric material, and therefore no way to recycle the metal into the normal commercial market. If declared waste, the metal would qualify as low level radioactive waste (LLW) and ultimately be dispositioned through shallow land buried at a cost of millions of dollars. The metal however could be recycled in a {open_quotes}controlled release{close_quote} manner, in the form of containers to hold other types of radioactive waste. This form of recycle is generally referred to as {open_quotes}Beneficial Reuse{close_quotes}. Beneficial reuse reduces the amount of disposal space needed and reduces the need for virgin containers which would themselves become contaminated. Stainless steel is particularly suited for long term storage because of its resistance to corrosion. To assess the practicality of stainless steel RSM recycle the SRS Benficial Reuse Program began a demonstration in 1994, funded by the DOE Office of Science and Technology. This paper discusses the experiences gained in this program.

  5. Antimicrobial Cu-bearing stainless steel scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiang; Ren, Ling; Li, Xiaopeng; Zhang, Shuyuan; Sercombe, Timothy B; Yang, Ke

    2016-11-01

    Copper-bearing stainless steel scaffolds with two different structures (Body Centered Cubic and Gyroid labyrinth) at two solid fractions (25% and 40%) were fabricated from both 316L powder and a mixture of 316L and elemental Cu powder using selective laser melting, and relative 316L scaffolds were served as control group. After processing, the antimicrobial testing demonstrated that the 316L-Cu scaffolds presented excellent antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus, and the cell viability assay indicated that there was no cytotoxic effect of 316L-Cu scaffolds on rat marrow mesenchymal stem cells. As such, these have the potential to reduce implant-associated infections. The Cu was also found to homogeneously distribute within the microstructure by scanning electronic microcopy. The addition of Cu would not significantly affect its strength and stiffness compared to 316L scaffold, and the stiffness of all the scaffolds (3-20GPa) is similar to that of bone and much less than that of bulk stainless steel. Consequently, fabrication of such low stiffness porous structures, especially coupled with the addition of antimicrobial Cu, may provide a new direction for medical stainless steels. PMID:27524049

  6. Decontaminating and Melt Recycling Tritium Contaminated Stainless Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, E.A.

    1995-04-03

    The Westinghouse Savannah River Company, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, and several university and industrial partners are evaluating recycling radioactively contaminated stainless steel. The goal of this program is to recycle contaminated stainless steel scrap from US Department of Energy national defense facilities. There is a large quantity of stainless steel at the DOE Savannah River Site from retired heavy water moderated Nuclear material production reactors (for example heat exchangers and process water piping), that will be used in pilot studies of potential recycle processes. These parts are contaminated by fission products, activated species, and tritium generated by neutron irradiation of the primary reactor coolant, which is heavy (deuterated) water. This report reviews current understanding of tritium contamination of stainless steel and previous studies of decontaminating tritium exposed stainless steel. It also outlines stainless steel refining methods, and proposes recommendations based on this review.

  7. CO disintegration of stainless steel fiber-reinforced refractory castables

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, C.; Brown, J.J. Jr.

    1986-07-01

    The effects of stainless steel fiber additions on the resistance of refractory castables to CO and steam were investigated. A series of high and intermediate alumina calcium aluminate-bonded castables was prepared containing several commercial stainless steel fibers. Compressive strength and abrasion resistance of the castables following exposure to high pressure carbon monoxide and steam at 500/sup 0/C were comparable to those of samples without stainless steel fibers. The addition of stainless steel fibers to refractory castables did not change the CO resistance of the castables unless they were fired in air before CO exposure. Airfiring creates oxide layer so the fibers which ultimately causes castable disintegration.

  8. Stainless Steel Leaches Nickel and Chromium into Foods During Cooking

    PubMed Central

    Kamerud, Kristin L.; Hobbie, Kevin A.; Anderson, Kim A.

    2014-01-01

    Toxicological studies show that oral doses of nickel and chromium can cause cutaneous adverse reactions such as dermatitis. Additional dietary sources, such as leaching from stainless steel cookware during food preparation, are not well characterized. This study examined stainless steel grades, cooking time, repetitive cooking cycles, and multiple types of tomato sauces for their effects on nickel and chromium leaching. Trials included three types of stainless steels and a stainless steel saucepan; cooking times of 2 to 20 hours, ten consecutive cooking cycles, and four commercial tomato sauces. After a simulated cooking process, samples were analyzed by ICP-MS for Ni and Cr. After six hours of cooking, Ni and Cr concentrations in tomato sauce increased up to 26- and 7-fold respectively, depending on the grade of stainless steel. Longer cooking durations resulted in additional increases in metal leaching, where Ni concentrations increased 34 fold and Cr increased approximately 35 fold from sauces cooked without stainless steel. Cooking with new stainless steel resulted in the largest increases. Metal leaching decreases with sequential cooking cycles and stabilized after the sixth cooking cycle, though significant metal contributions to foods were still observed. The tenth cooking cycle, resulted in an average of 88 μg of Ni and 86 μg of Cr leached per 126 g serving of tomato sauce. Stainless steel cookware can be an overlooked source of nickel and chromium, where the contribution is dependent on stainless steel grade, cooking time, and cookware usage. PMID:23984718

  9. Stainless steel leaches nickel and chromium into foods during cooking.

    PubMed

    Kamerud, Kristin L; Hobbie, Kevin A; Anderson, Kim A

    2013-10-01

    Toxicological studies show that oral doses of nickel and chromium can cause cutaneous adverse reactions such as dermatitis. Additional dietary sources, such as leaching from stainless steel cookware during food preparation, are not well characterized. This study examined stainless steel grades, cooking time, repetitive cooking cycles, and multiple types of tomato sauces for their effects on nickel and chromium leaching. Trials included three types of stainless steels and a stainless steel saucepan, cooking times of 2-20 h, 10 consecutive cooking cycles, and four commercial tomato sauces. After a simulated cooking process, samples were analyzed by ICP-MS for Ni and Cr. After 6 h of cooking, Ni and Cr concentrations in tomato sauce increased up to 26- and 7-fold, respectively, depending on the grade of stainless steel. Longer cooking durations resulted in additional increases in metal leaching, where Ni concentrations increased 34-fold and Cr increased approximately 35-fold from sauces cooked without stainless steel. Cooking with new stainless steel resulted in the largest increases. Metal leaching decreases with sequential cooking cycles and stabilized after the sixth cooking cycle, although significant metal contributions to foods were still observed. The tenth cooking cycle resulted in an average of 88 μg of Ni and 86 μg of Cr leached per 126 g serving of tomato sauce. Stainless steel cookware can be an overlooked source of nickel and chromium, where the contribution is dependent on stainless steel grade, cooking time, and cookware usage.

  10. Formability analysis of austenitic stainless steel-304 under warm conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lade, Jayahari; Singh, Swadesh Kumar; Banoth, Balu Naik; Gupta, Amit Kumar

    2013-12-01

    A warm deep drawing process of austenitic stainless steel-304 (ASS-304) of circular blanks with coupled ther mal analysis is studied in this article. 65 mm blanks were deep drawn at different temperatures and thickness distribution is experimentally measured after cutting the drawn component into two halves. The process is simulated using explicit fin ite element code LS-DYNA. A Barlat 3 parameter model is used in the simulation, as the material is anisotropic up to 30 0°C. Material properties for the simulation are determined at different temperatures using a 5 T UTM coupled with a furn ace. In this analysis constant punch speed and variable blank holder force (BHF) is applied to draw cups without wrinkle.

  11. Spatially Resolved Synthetic Spectra from 2D Simulations of Stainless Steel Wire Array Implosions

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, R. W.; Giuliani, J. L.; Thornhill, J. W.; Chong, Y. K.; Dasgupta, A.; Davis, J.

    2009-01-21

    A 2D radiation MHD model has been developed to investigate stainless steel wire array implosion experiments on the Z and refurbished Z machines. This model incorporates within the Mach2 MHD code a self-consistent calculation of the non-LTE kinetics and ray trace based radiation transport. Such a method is necessary in order to account for opacity effects in conjunction with ionization kinetics of K-shell emitting plasmas. Here the model is used to investigate multi-dimensional effects of stainless steel wire implosions. In particular, we are developing techniques to produce non-LTE, axially and/or radially resolved synthetic spectra based upon snapshots of our 2D simulations. Comparisons between experimental spectra and these synthetic spectra will allow us to better determine the state of the experimental pinches.

  12. 77 FR 28568 - Grant of Authority for Subzone Status; North American Stainless, (Stainless Steel), Ghent, KY

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-15

    ... public comment has been given in the Federal Register (76 FR 66684-66685, 10-27-2011) and the application... Steel), Ghent, KY Pursuant to its authority under the Foreign-Trade Zones Act of June 18, 1934, as... authority to establish a special-purpose subzone at the stainless steel mill of North American...

  13. Stain-less staining for computed histopathology

    PubMed Central

    Mayerich, David; Walsh, Michael J.; Kadjacsy-Balla, Andre; Ray, Partha S.; Hewitt, Stephen M.; Bhargava, Rohit

    2015-01-01

    Dyes such as hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) and immunohistochemical stains have been increasingly used to visualize tissue composition in research and clinical practice. We present an alternative approach to obtain the same information using stain-free chemical imaging. Relying on Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopic imaging and computation, stainless computed histopathology can enable a rapid, digital, quantitative and non-perturbing visualization of morphology and multiple molecular epitopes simultaneously in a variety of research and clinical pathology applications. PMID:26029735

  14. Gas Atomization of Stainless Steel - Slow Motion

    SciTech Connect

    2011-01-01

    Stainless steel liquid atomized by supersonic argon gas into a spray of droplets at ~1800ºC. Atomization of metal requires high pressure gas and specialized chambers for cooling and collecting the powders without contamination. The critical step for morphological control is the impingement of the gas on the melt stream. The video is a black and white high speed video of a liquid metal stream being atomized by high pressure gas. This material was atomized at the Ames Laboratory's Materials Preparation Center http://www.mpc.ameslab.gov

  15. Formability Limits of a SPIFed Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radu, Crina; Thibaud, Sebastian

    2011-05-01

    Single point incremental forming (SPIF) is a new cheep, flexible solution for manufacturing rapid prototypes and products with shorts series. Besides, it has been experimentally proven by different researchers that SPIF assures a higher formability than conventional sheet forming processes, enlarging thus its applicability. The aim of this paper is to examine the forming limits of a stainless steel when it is processed by SPIF. Since sheet thickness has an important role in this process, the analysis is performed for three different thicknesses of metal sheet: 0.8, 1 and 1.2 mm respectively.

  16. Characterization of particle exposure in ferrochromium and stainless steel production.

    PubMed

    Järvelä, Merja; Huvinen, Markku; Viitanen, Anna-Kaisa; Kanerva, Tomi; Vanhala, Esa; Uitti, Jukka; Koivisto, Antti J; Junttila, Sakari; Luukkonen, Ritva; Tuomi, Timo

    2016-07-01

    This study describes workers' exposure to fine and ultrafine particles in the production chain of ferrochromium and stainless steel during sintering, ferrochromium smelting, stainless steel melting, and hot and cold rolling operations. Workers' personal exposure to inhalable dust was assessed using IOM sampler with a cellulose acetate filter (AAWP, diameter 25 mm; Millipore, Bedford, MA). Filter sampling methods were used to measure particle mass concentrations in fixed locations. Particle number concentrations and size distributions were examined using an SMPS+C sequential mobile particle sizer and counter (series 5.400, Grimm Aerosol Technik, Ainring, Germany), and a hand-held condensation particle counter (CPC, model 3007, TSI Incorporated, MN). The structure and elemental composition of particles were analyzed using TEM-EDXA (TEM: JEM-1220, JEOL, Tokyo, Japan; EDXA: Noran System Six, Thermo Fisher Scientific Inc., Madison,WI). Workers' personal exposure to inhalable dust averaged 1.87, 1.40, 2.34, 0.30, and 0.17 mg m(-3) in sintering plant, ferrochromium smelter, stainless steel melting shop, hot rolling mill, and the cold rolling mill, respectively. Particle number concentrations measured using SMPS+C varied from 58 × 10(3) to 662 × 10(3) cm(-3) in the production areas, whereas concentrations measured using SMPS+C and CPC3007 in control rooms ranged from 24 × 10(3) to 243 × 10(3) cm(-3) and 5.1 × 10(3) to 97 × 10(3) cm(-3), respectively. The elemental composition and the structure of particles in different production phases varied. In the cold-rolling mill non-process particles were abundant. In other sites, chromium and iron originating from ore and recycled steel scrap were the most common elements in the particles studied. Particle mass concentrations were at the same level as that reported earlier. However, particle number measurements showed a high amount of ultrafine particles, especially in sintering, alloy smelting and melting, and tapping

  17. Characterization of particle exposure in ferrochromium and stainless steel production.

    PubMed

    Järvelä, Merja; Huvinen, Markku; Viitanen, Anna-Kaisa; Kanerva, Tomi; Vanhala, Esa; Uitti, Jukka; Koivisto, Antti J; Junttila, Sakari; Luukkonen, Ritva; Tuomi, Timo

    2016-07-01

    This study describes workers' exposure to fine and ultrafine particles in the production chain of ferrochromium and stainless steel during sintering, ferrochromium smelting, stainless steel melting, and hot and cold rolling operations. Workers' personal exposure to inhalable dust was assessed using IOM sampler with a cellulose acetate filter (AAWP, diameter 25 mm; Millipore, Bedford, MA). Filter sampling methods were used to measure particle mass concentrations in fixed locations. Particle number concentrations and size distributions were examined using an SMPS+C sequential mobile particle sizer and counter (series 5.400, Grimm Aerosol Technik, Ainring, Germany), and a hand-held condensation particle counter (CPC, model 3007, TSI Incorporated, MN). The structure and elemental composition of particles were analyzed using TEM-EDXA (TEM: JEM-1220, JEOL, Tokyo, Japan; EDXA: Noran System Six, Thermo Fisher Scientific Inc., Madison,WI). Workers' personal exposure to inhalable dust averaged 1.87, 1.40, 2.34, 0.30, and 0.17 mg m(-3) in sintering plant, ferrochromium smelter, stainless steel melting shop, hot rolling mill, and the cold rolling mill, respectively. Particle number concentrations measured using SMPS+C varied from 58 × 10(3) to 662 × 10(3) cm(-3) in the production areas, whereas concentrations measured using SMPS+C and CPC3007 in control rooms ranged from 24 × 10(3) to 243 × 10(3) cm(-3) and 5.1 × 10(3) to 97 × 10(3) cm(-3), respectively. The elemental composition and the structure of particles in different production phases varied. In the cold-rolling mill non-process particles were abundant. In other sites, chromium and iron originating from ore and recycled steel scrap were the most common elements in the particles studied. Particle mass concentrations were at the same level as that reported earlier. However, particle number measurements showed a high amount of ultrafine particles, especially in sintering, alloy smelting and melting, and tapping

  18. VIEW OF PRECISION EQUIPMENT USED IN STAINLESS COMPONENT MANUFACTURING. THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF PRECISION EQUIPMENT USED IN STAINLESS COMPONENT MANUFACTURING. THE FACILITY WAS DESCRIBED AS THE MOST MODERN NON-NUCLEAR MANUFACTURING BUILDING IN THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY COMPLEX, WITH MANY PRECISION INSTRUMENTS. (9/21/83) - Rocky Flats Plant, Stainless Steel & Non-Nuclear Components Manufacturing, Southeast corner of intersection of Cottonwood & Third Avenues, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  19. 21 CFR 872.3350 - Gold or stainless steel cusp.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Gold or stainless steel cusp. 872.3350 Section 872.3350 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3350 Gold or stainless steel cusp....

  20. New Method For Joining Stainless Steel to Titanium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emanuel, W. H.

    1982-01-01

    In new process, edge of stainless-steel sheet is perforated, and joined to titanium by resistance seam welding. Titanium flows into perforations, forming a strong interlocking joint. Process creates a quasi-metallurgical bond between the thin sheets of stainless steel and titanium.

  1. 21 CFR 878.4495 - Stainless steel suture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Stainless steel suture. 878.4495 Section 878.4495 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4495 Stainless steel suture....

  2. 21 CFR 878.4495 - Stainless steel suture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Stainless steel suture. 878.4495 Section 878.4495 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4495 Stainless steel suture....

  3. 21 CFR 878.4495 - Stainless steel suture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Stainless steel suture. 878.4495 Section 878.4495 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4495 Stainless steel suture....

  4. 21 CFR 878.4495 - Stainless steel suture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Stainless steel suture. 878.4495 Section 878.4495 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4495 Stainless steel suture....

  5. 21 CFR 878.4495 - Stainless steel suture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Stainless steel suture. 878.4495 Section 878.4495 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4495 Stainless steel suture....

  6. 78 FR 21417 - Drawn Stainless Steel Sinks From China

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-10

    ..., Washington, DC, and by publishing the notice in the Federal Register on October 22, 2012 (77 FR 64545). The... COMMISSION Drawn Stainless Steel Sinks From China Determinations On the basis of the record \\1\\ developed in... drawn stainless steel sinks from China, provided for in subheading 7324.10.00 of the Harmonized...

  7. 77 FR 23752 - Drawn Stainless Steel Sinks From China

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-20

    ... the notice in the Federal Register of March 7, 2012 (77 FR 13631). The conference was held in... COMMISSION Drawn Stainless Steel Sinks From China Determinations On the basis of the record \\1\\ developed in... (April 2012), entitled Drawn Stainless Steel Sinks from China: Investigation Nos. 701-TA-489 and...

  8. 6. DETAIL VIEW OF SPIN FORM FURNACE FOR STAINLESS STEEL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. DETAIL VIEW OF SPIN FORM FURNACE FOR STAINLESS STEEL FABRICATION. STAINLESS STEEL WAS MACHINED IN SIDE A OF THE BUILDING, BEGINNING IN 1957. (4/24/78) - Rocky Flats Plant, Uranium Rolling & Forming Operations, Southeast section of plant, southeast quadrant of intersection of Central Avenue & Eighth Street, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  9. Tensile-property characterization of thermally aged cast stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Michaud, W.F.; Toben, P.T.; Soppet, W.K.; Chopra, O.K.

    1994-02-01

    The effect of thermal aging on tensile properties of cast stainless steels during service in light water reactors has been evaluated. Tensile data for several experimental and commercial heats of cast stainless steels are presented. Thermal aging increases the tensile strength of these steels. The high-C Mo-bearing CF-8M steels are more susceptible to thermal aging than the Mo-free CF-3 or CF-8 steels. A procedure and correlations are presented for predicting the change in tensile flow and yield stresses and engineering stress-vs.-strain curve of cast stainless steel as a function of time and temperature of service. The tensile properties of aged cast stainless steel are estimated from known material information, i.e., chemical composition and the initial tensile strength of the steel. The correlations described in this report may be used for assessing thermal embrittlement of cast stainless steel components.

  10. Citric Acid Passivation of Stainless Steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yasensky, David; Reali, John; Larson, Chris; Carl, Chad

    2009-01-01

    Passivation is a process for cleaning and providing corrosion protection for stainless steel. Currently, on Kennedy Space Center (KSC), only parts passivated with nitric acid are acceptable for use. KSC disposes of approximately 125gal of concentrated nitric acid per year, and receives many parts from vendors who must also dispose of used nitric acid. Unfortunately, nitric acid presents health and environmental hazards. As a result, several recent industry studies have examined citric acid as an alternative. Implementing a citric acid-based passivation procedure would improve the health and environmental safety aspects of passivation process. However although there is a lack of published studies that conclusively prove citric acid is a technically sound passivation agent. In 2007, NASA's KSC Materials Advisory Working Group requested the evaluation of citric acid in place of nitric acid for passivation of parts at KSC. United Space Alliance Materials & Processes engineers have developed a three-phase test plan to evaluate citric acid as an alternative to nitric acid on three stainless steels commonly used at KSC: UNS S30400, S41000, and S17400. Phases 1 and 2 will produce an optimized citric acid treatment based on results from atmospheric exposure at NASA's Beach Corrosion Facility. Phase 3 will compare the optimized solution(s) with nitric acid treatments. If the results indicate that citric acid passivates as well or better than nitric acid, NASA intends to approve this method for parts used at the Kennedy Space Center.

  11. Stainless steel 4003 in the transportation industry

    SciTech Connect

    Kovacs, H.; Stoeckl, M.

    1998-12-31

    The world today sees a dramatic increase in the number of people and the quantities of articles and products which are to be transported. This results in an ever-increasing demand in the steels used in the transportation industry. Key factors are environmental regulations, safety, and life expectancy and product cost in determining which types steel to use. Especially the ferritic 12% chromium stainless steels has seen a significant development and usage in recent years. Compared to typical carbon steels high strength/low alloy steels and structural steels the 12% chromium steels offers improvement in corrosion and wear resistance and weldability outlining advantages in light weight construction and an overall saving. The paper presents the chemical composition and mechanical properties of grade 4003 which is increasingly used worldwide in areas of public transportation, rail transportation, mining industry and sugar industry, among others. The impact of corrosion and abrasion of this stainless steel versus the standard carbon grades and cost efficiency are discussed.

  12. Weldment for austenitic stainless steel and method

    DOEpatents

    Bagnall, Christopher; McBride, Marvin A.

    1985-01-01

    For making defect-free welds for joining two austenitic stainless steel mers, using gas tungsten-arc welding, a thin foil-like iron member is placed between the two steel members to be joined, prior to making the weld, with the foil-like iron member having a higher melting point than the stainless steel members. When the weld is formed, there results a weld nugget comprising melted and then solidified portions of the joined members with small portions of the foil-like iron member projecting into the solidified weld nugget. The portions of the weld nugget proximate the small portions of the foil-like iron member which project into the weld nugget are relatively rich in iron. This causes these iron-rich nugget portions to display substantial delta ferrite during solidification of the weld nugget which eliminates weld defects which could otherwise occur. This is especially useful for joining austenitic steel members which, when just below the solidus temperature, include at most only a very minor proportion of delta ferrite.

  13. Cast alumina forming austenitic stainless steels

    DOEpatents

    Muralidharan, Govindarajan; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Brady, Michael P

    2013-04-30

    An austenitic stainless steel alloy consisting essentially of, in terms of weight percent ranges 0.15-0.5C; 8-37Ni; 10-25Cr; 2.5-5Al; greater than 0.6, up to 2.5 total of at least one element selected from the group consisting of Nb and Ta; up to 3Mo; up to 3Co; up to 1W; up to 3Cu; up to 15Mn; up to 2Si; up to 0.15B; up to 0.05P; up to 1 total of at least one element selected from the group consisting of Y, La, Ce, Hf, and Zr; <0.3Ti+V; <0.03N; and, balance Fe, where the weight percent Fe is greater than the weight percent Ni, and wherein the alloy forms an external continuous scale comprising alumina, and a stable essentially single phase FCC austenitic matrix microstructure, the austenitic matrix being essentially delta-ferrite free and essentially BCC-phase-free. A method of making austenitic stainless steel alloys is also disclosed.

  14. Low Temperature Surface Carburization of Stainless Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, Sunniva R; Heuer, Arthur H; Sikka, Vinod K

    2007-12-07

    Low-temperature colossal supersaturation (LTCSS) is a novel surface hardening method for carburization of austenitic stainless steels (SS) without the precipitation of carbides. The formation of carbides is kinetically suppressed, enabling extremely high or colossal carbon supersaturation. As a result, surface carbon concentrations in excess of 12 at. % are routinely achieved. This treatment increases the surface hardness by a factor of four to five, improving resistance to wear, corrosion, and fatigue, with significant retained ductility. LTCSS is a diffusional surface hardening process that provides a uniform and conformal hardened gradient surface with no risk of delamination or peeling. The treatment retains the austenitic phase and is completely non-magnetic. In addition, because parts are treated at low temperature, they do not distort or change dimensions. During this treatment, carbon diffusion proceeds into the metal at temperatures that constrain substitutional diffusion or mobility between the metal alloy elements. Though immobilized and unable to assemble to form carbides, chromium and similar alloying elements nonetheless draw enormous amounts of carbon into their interstitial spaces. The carbon in the interstitial spaces of the alloy crystals makes the surface harder than ever achieved before by more conventional heat treating or diffusion process. The carbon solid solution manifests a Vickers hardness often exceeding 1000 HV (equivalent to 70 HRC). This project objective was to extend the LTCSS treatment to other austenitic alloys, and to quantify improvements in fatigue, corrosion, and wear resistance. Highlights from the research include the following: • Extension of the applicability of the LTCSS process to a broad range of austenitic and duplex grades of steels • Demonstration of LTCSS ability for a variety of different component shapes and sizes • Detailed microstructural characterization of LTCSS-treated samples of 316L and other alloys

  15. Surface Relief and Internal Structure in Fatigued Stainless Sanicro 25 Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polák, Jaroslav; Mazánová, Veronika; Kuběna, Ivo; Heczko, Milan; Man, Jiří

    2016-05-01

    High-resolution images of persistent slip markings developed on the surface of Sanicro 25 stainless steel during cyclic loading obtained from the FIB-produced surface lamella in TEM simultaneously with the underlying dislocation structure are reported. Extrusions, intrusions, incipient cracks, and the dislocation arrangement corresponding to the bands of intensive cyclic slip are documented and discussed in relation to the models of surface relief formation in cyclic loading.

  16. Experimental and Numerical Study on the Effect of ZDDP Films on Sticking During Hot Rolling of Ferritic Stainless Steel Strip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Liang; Jiang, Zhengyi; Wei, Dongbin; Gong, Dianyao; Cheng, Xiawei; Zhao, Jingwei; Luo, Suzhen; Jiang, Laizhu

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of zinc dialkyl dithio phosphate (ZDDP) films on sticking during hot rolling of a ferritic stainless steel strip. The surface characterization and crack propagation of the oxide scale are very important for understanding the mechanism of the sticking. The high-temperature oxidation of one typical ferritic stainless was conducted at 1373 K (1100 °C) for understanding its microstructure and surface morphology. Hot-rolling tests of a ferritic stainless steel strip show that no obvious cracks among the oxide scale were observed with the application of ZDDP. A finite element method model was constructed with taking into consideration different crack size ratios among the oxide scale, surface profile, and ZDDP films. The simulation results show that the width of the crack tends to be reduced with the introduction of ZDDP films, which is beneficial for improving sticking.

  17. Experimental and Numerical Study on the Effect of ZDDP Films on Sticking During Hot Rolling of Ferritic Stainless Steel Strip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Liang; Jiang, Zhengyi; Wei, Dongbin; Gong, Dianyao; Cheng, Xiawei; Zhao, Jingwei; Luo, Suzhen; Jiang, Laizhu

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of zinc dialkyl dithio phosphate (ZDDP) films on sticking during hot rolling of a ferritic stainless steel strip. The surface characterization and crack propagation of the oxide scale are very important for understanding the mechanism of the sticking. The high-temperature oxidation of one typical ferritic stainless was conducted at 1373 K (1100 °C) for understanding its microstructure and surface morphology. Hot-rolling tests of a ferritic stainless steel strip show that no obvious cracks among the oxide scale were observed with the application of ZDDP. A finite element method model was constructed with taking into consideration different crack size ratios among the oxide scale, surface profile, and ZDDP films. The simulation results show that the width of the crack tends to be reduced with the introduction of ZDDP films, which is beneficial for improving sticking.

  18. Co-Doped Polypyrrole Coatings for Stainless Steel Protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prissanaroon, W.; Brack, N.; Pigram, P. J.; Liesegang, J.

    Polypyrrole (PPy) films have been successfully electrodeposited on stainless steel substrates in aqueous solution. In this work, three systems of electrolytes were studied: oxalic acid, dodecylbenzenesulfonic acid (DBSA) and a mixture of oxalic acid and DBSA. A combination of XPS and TOF-SIMS revealed the formation of an iron oxalate layer at the interface between the oxalic acid-doped PPy (PPy(Ox)) and stainless steel and a thin layer of DBSA was observed at the interface between DBSA-doped PPy (PPy(DBSA)) and stainless steel. Similar to the PPy(Ox) system, an iron oxalate was also present at the co-doped PPy/stainless steel interface. Cyclic voltammetry indicated that an iron oxalate layer initially formed at the surface of the stainless steel when the co-doping system was used. The adhesion strength and corrosion performance of the PPy coating on stainless steel were evaluated by lap shear tests and an anodic potentiodynamic polarization technique, respectively. The co-doped PPy-coated stainless steel exhibited the best adhesion and a significant shift of corrosion potential to the positive direction. This finding opens the possibility for the co-doped PPy coating to be deployed as a strongly adherent corrosion inhibitor by using a simple one-step electropolymerization process.

  19. Stainless Steel Round Robin Test: Centrifugally cast stainless steel screening phase

    SciTech Connect

    Bates, D.J.; Doctor, S.R.; Heasler, P.G.; Burck, E.

    1987-10-01

    This report presents the results of the Centrifugally Cast Stainless Steel Round Robin Test (CCSSRRT). The CCSSRRT is the first phase of an effort to investigate and improve the capability and reliability of NDE inspections of light water reactor piping systems. This phase was a screening test to identify the most promising procedures presently available for CCSS. The next phase will be an in-depth program to evaluate the capability and reliability of inservice inspections (ISI) for piping. In the CCSSRRT, 15 centrifugally cast stainless steel pipe sections containing welds and laboratory-grown thermal fatigue cracks in both columnar and equiaxed base material were used. These pipe specimens were inspected by a total of 18 teams from Europe and the United States using a variety of NDE techniques, mostly ultrasonic (UT). The inspections were carried out at the team's facilities and included inspections from both sides of the weld and inspections restricted to one side of the weld. The results of the CCSSRRT make it apparent that a more detailed study on the capability and reliability of procedures to inspect stainless steel materials is needed to better understand the specific material and flaw properties and how they affect the outcome of an inspection.

  20. Surface electrical properties of stainless steel fibres: An AFM-based study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Jun; D'Haese, Cécile; Nysten, Bernard

    2015-03-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) electrical modes were used to study the surface electrical properties of stainless steel fibres. The surface electrical conductivity was studied by current sensing AFM and I-V spectroscopy. Kelvin probe force microscopy was used to measure the surface contact potential. The oxide film, known as passivation layer, covering the fibre surface gives rise to the observation of an apparently semiconducting behaviour. The passivation layer generally exhibits a p-type semiconducting behaviour, which is attributed to the predominant formation of chromium oxide on the surface of the stainless steel fibres. At the nanoscale, different behaviours are observed from points to points, which may be attributed to local variations of the chemical composition and/or thickness of the passivation layer. I-V curves are well fitted with an electron tunnelling model, indicating that electron tunnelling may be the predominant mechanism for electron transport.

  1. Automatic welding of stainless steel tubing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clautice, W. E.

    1978-01-01

    The use of automatic welding for making girth welds in stainless steel tubing was investigated as well as the reduction in fabrication costs resulting from the elimination of radiographic inspection. Test methodology, materials, and techniques are discussed, and data sheets for individual tests are included. Process variables studied include welding amperes, revolutions per minute, and shielding gas flow. Strip chart recordings, as a definitive method of insuring weld quality, are studied. Test results, determined by both radiographic and visual inspection, are presented and indicate that once optimum welding procedures for specific sizes of tubing are established, and the welding machine operations are certified, then the automatic tube welding process produces good quality welds repeatedly, with a high degree of reliability. Revised specifications for welding tubing using the automatic process and weld visual inspection requirements at the Kennedy Space Center are enumerated.

  2. Magnetic characterisation of duplex stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mészáros, I.

    2006-02-01

    Heat treatment-induced microstructural processes were studied by different non-destructive magnetic and mechanical material testing methods in the present work. A commercial SAF 2507 type superduplex stainless steel was investigated. This alloy contains about 40% metastable ferrite which can decompose to a sigma phase and secondary austenite due to heat treatment. All the mechanical, corrosion resistance and magnetic properties are strongly influenced by this microstructural changes. This study had two aims: to understand better the kinetics of the ferrite decomposition process and to study the application possibilities of the applied magnetic measurements. This paper presents an application possibility of the nonlinear harmonics analysis measurement and demonstrates the possibility to find a quantitative correlation between measured harmonics and mechanical properties obtained from destructive tests.

  3. Radiation resistant austenitic stainless steel alloys

    DOEpatents

    Maziasz, P.J.; Braski, D.N.; Rowcliffe, A.F.

    1987-02-11

    An austenitic stainless steel alloy, with improved resistance to radiation-induced swelling and helium embrittlement, and improved resistance to thermal creep at high temperatures, consisting essentially of, by weight percent: from 16 to 18% nickel; from 13 to 17% chromium; from 2 to 3% molybdenum; from 1.5 to 2.5% manganese; from 0.01 to 0.5% silicon; from 0.2 to 0.4% titanium; from 0.1 to 0.2% niobium; from 0.1 to 0.6% vanadium; from 0.06 to 0.12% carbon; from 0.01 to 0.03% nitrogen; from 0.03 to 0.08% phosphorus; from 0.005 to 0.01% boron; and the balance iron, and wherein the alloy may be thermomechanically treated to enhance physical and mechanical properties. 4 figs.

  4. Radiation resistant austenitic stainless steel alloys

    DOEpatents

    Maziasz, Philip J.; Braski, David N.; Rowcliffe, Arthur F.

    1989-01-01

    An austenitic stainless steel alloy, with improved resistance to radiation-induced swelling and helium embrittlement, and improved resistance to thermal creep at high temperatures, consisting essentially of, by weight percent: from 16 to 18% nickel; from 13 to 17% chromium; from 2 to 3% molybdenum; from 1.5 to 2.5% manganese; from 0.01 to 0.5% silicon; from 0.2 to 0.4% titanium; from 0.1 to 0.2% niobium; from 0.1 to 0.6% vanadium; from 0.06 to 0.12% carbon; from 0.01% to 0.03% nitrogen; from 0.03 to 0.08% phosphorus; from 0.005 to 0.01% boron; and the balance iron, and wherein the alloy may be thermomechanically treated to enhance physical and mechanical properties.

  5. THE CLEANING OF 303 STAINLESS STEEL

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, T H

    2004-04-20

    The sulfur found on the surfaces of stainless steel 303 (SS303) after nitric acid passivation originated from the MnS inclusions in the steel. The nitric acid attacked and dissolved these MnS inclusions, and redeposited micron-sized elemental sulfur particles back to the surface. To develop an alternative passivation procedure for SS303, citric and phosphoric acids have been evaluated. The experimental results show neither acid causes a significant amount of sulfur deposit. Thus, these two acids can be used as alternatives to nitric acid passivation for NIF applications. For SS303 previously passivated by nitric acid, NaOH soak can be used as a remedial cleaning process to effectively remove the sulfur deposits.

  6. Automatic Welding of Stainless Steel Tubing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clautice, W. E.

    1978-01-01

    To determine if the use of automatic welding would allow reduction of the radiographic inspection requirement, and thereby reduce fabrication costs, a series of welding tests were performed. In these tests an automatic welder was used on stainless steel tubing of 1/2, 3/4, and 1/2 inch diameter size. The optimum parameters were investigated to determine how much variation from optimum in machine settings could be tolerate and still result in a good quality weld. The process variables studied were the welding amperes, the revolutions per minute as a function of the circumferential weld travel speed, and the shielding gas flow. The investigation showed that the close control of process variables in conjunction with a thorough visual inspection of welds can be relied upon as an acceptable quality assurance procedure, thus permitting the radiographic inspection to be reduced by a large percentage when using the automatic process.

  7. Wear evaluation of high interstitial stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Rawers, J.C.; Tylczak, J.H.

    2008-07-01

    A new series of high nitrogen-carbon manganese stainless steel alloys are studied for their wear resistance. High nitrogen and carbon concentrations were obtained by melting elemental iron-chromium-manganese (several with minor alloy additions of nickel, silicon, and molybdenum) in a nitrogen atmosphere and adding elemental graphite. The improvement in material properties (hardness and strength) with increasing nitrogen and carbon interstitial concentration was consistent with previously reported improvements in similar material properties alloyed with nitrogen only. Wear tests included: scratch, pin-on-disk, sand-rubber-wheel, impeller, and jet erosion. Additions of interstitial nitrogen and carbon as well as interstitial nitrogen and carbide precipitates were found to greatly improve material properties. In general, with increasing nitrogen and carbon concentrations, strength, hardness, and wear resistance increased.

  8. Materials compatibility of hydride storage materials with austenitic stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, E.A.

    1992-09-21

    This task evaluated the materials compatibility of LaNi{sub 5-x}Al{sub x} (x= 0.3, 0.75) hydrides and palladium coated kieselguhr with austenitic stainless steel in hydrogen and tritium process environments. Based on observations of retired prototype hydride storage beds and materials exposure testing samples designed for this study, no materials compatibility problem was indicated. Scanning electron microscopy observations of features on stainless steel surfaces after exposure to hydrides are also commonly found on as-received materials before hydriding. These features are caused by either normal heat treating and acid cleaning of stainless steel or reflect the final machining operation.

  9. Materials compatibility of hydride storage materials with austenitic stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, E.A.

    1992-09-21

    This task evaluated the materials compatibility of LaNi[sub 5-x]Al[sub x] (x= 0.3, 0.75) hydrides and palladium coated kieselguhr with austenitic stainless steel in hydrogen and tritium process environments. Based on observations of retired prototype hydride storage beds and materials exposure testing samples designed for this study, no materials compatibility problem was indicated. Scanning electron microscopy observations of features on stainless steel surfaces after exposure to hydrides are also commonly found on as-received materials before hydriding. These features are caused by either normal heat treating and acid cleaning of stainless steel or reflect the final machining operation.

  10. A preliminary ferritic-martensitic stainless steel constitution diagram

    SciTech Connect

    Balmforth, M.C.; Lippold, J.C.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes preliminary research to develop a constitution diagram that will more accurately predict the microstructure of ferritic and martensitic stainless steel weld deposits. A button melting technique was used to produce a wide range of compositions using mixtures of conventional ferritic and martensitic stainless steels, including types 403, 409, 410, 430, 439 and 444. These samples were prepared metallographically, and the vol-% ferrite and martensite was determined quantitatively. In addition, the hardness and ferrite number (FN) were measured. Using this data, a preliminary constitution diagram is proposed that provides a more accurate method for predicting the microstructures of arc welds in ferritic and martensitic stainless steels.

  11. Electrochemical and microbiological characterization of biofilm formation on stainless steels in Baltic seawater

    SciTech Connect

    Carpen, L.; Raaska, L.; Mattila, K.; Salkinoja-Salonen, M.; Hakkarainen, T.

    1997-08-01

    Electrochemical and microbiological effects of biofilms formed on different types of stainless steels in natural sea water were studied. A flow-through model ecosystem was used to generate biofilms in the laboratory. The ecosystem was modeled to maintain the levels of organic and inorganic carbon close to those in the sea by periodical illumination. Natural brackish water was used. The open circuit potentials in the laboratory were recorded for 6 to 10 weeks. The biofilms formed were analyzed by microbial cultivation, measurement of Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and by different microscopical methods (epifluorescence and scanning electron microscopy). Four field tests were performed in Baltic Sea during the period of May 1993 to April 1996. Ennoblement of the all stainless steels studied occurred in Baltic Sea at the depth of 15 m irrespective of the season and the temperature of the sea water. Only when immersed close to the surface (at the depth of 0.4 m) the increase of open circuit potential of material S31600 was not observed. One reason for that might be the dominance of algae in the biofilm. The experiments showed that the ennoblement of stainless steels occurred in the laboratory reproducibly and similarly to that observed in the field provided that the flow rate was sufficiently high (5 to 30 mm/s). These laboratory tests did not indicate an enhancement of corrosion due to potential ennoblement.

  12. Dislocation loop evolution under ion irradiation in austenitic stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etienne, A.; Hernández-Mayoral, M.; Genevois, C.; Radiguet, B.; Pareige, P.

    2010-05-01

    A solution annealed 304 and a cold worked 316 austenitic stainless steels were irradiated from 0.36 to 5 dpa at 350 °C using 160 keV Fe ions. Irradiated microstructures were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Observations after irradiation revealed the presence of a high number density of Frank loops. Size and number density of Frank loops have been measured. Results are in good agreement with those observed in the literature and show that ion irradiation is able to simulate dislocation loop microstructure obtained after neutron irradiation. Experimental results and data from literature were compared with predictions from the cluster dynamic model, MFVIC (Mean Field Vacancy and Interstitial Clustering). It is able to reproduce dislocation loop population for neutron irradiation. Effects of dose rate and temperature on the loop number density are simulated by the model. Calculations for ion irradiations show that simulation results are consistent with experimental observations. However, results also show the model limitations due to the lack of accurate parameters.

  13. Investigations on the Predictability of Coining Stainless Steel AISI 410

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grobbink, S. J.; Klaseboer, G.; Post, J.; Huetink, J.

    2010-06-01

    Due to the increasing trend towards miniaturization, various industries demand the knowledge of materials forming on microscale. Forming has many advantages above machining such as high accuracy, low costs and strengthening by cold-working. However, a drawback of microforming is that it leads to problems caused by so-called size effects. A lot of research has been done on this topic, but only a minor part deals with the forming of high strength materials. In this study two channels with 0.25 mm width and 4.5 mm length are formed in stainless steel sheet AISI 410 with an initial sheet thickness 0.5 mm. The channels are formed by the coining process. The experiments have been repeated in which all dimensions are scaled down by a factor two, in order to check if size effects occur. Ring compression tests are used to determine a shear friction coefficient. A finite element model was build up and solved with MSC.Marc in order to gain a better understanding of the coining process. A size dependent material model known from literature and a conventional material model is used for the simulations. Both results are compared with the experimental results.

  14. Recrystallization and modification of the stainless-steel surface relief under photonic heat load in powerful plasma discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Budaev, V. P. Martynenko, Yu. V.; Khimchenko, L. N.; Zhitlukhin, A. M.; Klimov, N. S.; Pitts, R. A.; Linke, J.; Bazylev, B.; Belova, N. E.; Karpov, A. V.; Kovalenko, D. V.; Podkovyrov, V. L.; Yaroshevskaya, A. D.

    2013-11-15

    Targets made of ITER-grade 316L(N)-IG stainless steel and Russian-grade 12Cr18Ni10Ti stainless steel with a close composition were exposed at the QSPA-T plasma gun to plasma photonic radiation pulses simulating conditions of disruption mitigation in ITER. After a large number of pulses, modification of the stainless-steel surface was observed, such as the formation of a wavy structure, irregular roughness, and cracks on the target surface. X-ray and optic microscopic analyses of targets revealed changes in the orientation and dimensions of crystallites (grains) over a depth of up to 20 μm for 316L(N)-IG stainless steel after 200 pulses and up to 40 μm for 12Cr18Ni10Ti stainless steel after 50 pulses, which is significantly larger than the depth of the layer melted in one pulse (∼10 μm). In a series of 200 tests of ITER-grade 316L(N)-IG ITER stainless steel, a linear increase in the height of irregularity (roughness) with increasing number of pulses at a rate of up to ∼1 μm per pulse was observed. No alteration in the chemical composition of the stainless-steel surface in the series of tests was revealed. A model is developed that describes the formation of wavy irregularities on the melted metal surface with allowance for the nonlinear stage of instability of the melted layer with a vapor/plasma flow above it. A decisive factor in this case is the viscous flow of the melted metal from the troughs to tops of the wavy structure. The model predicts saturation of the growth of the wavy structure when its amplitude becomes comparable with its wavelength. Approaches to describing the observed stochastic relief and roughness of the stainless-steel surface formed in the series of tests are considered. The recurrence of the melting-solidification process in which mechanisms of the hill growth compete with the spreading of the material from the hills can result in the formation of a stochastic relief.

  15. Stainless steel anodes for alkaline water electrolysis and methods of making

    SciTech Connect

    Soloveichik, Grigorii Lev

    2014-01-21

    The corrosion resistance of stainless steel anodes for use in alkaline water electrolysis was increased by immersion of the stainless steel anode into a caustic solution prior to electrolysis. Also disclosed herein are electrolyzers employing the so-treated stainless steel anodes. The pre-treatment process provides a stainless steel anode that has a higher corrosion resistance than an untreated stainless steel anode of the same composition.

  16. Fabrication of stainless steel clad tubing. [gas pressure bonding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kovach, C. W.

    1978-01-01

    The feasibility of producing stainless steel clad carbon steel tubing by a gas pressure bonding process was evaluated. Such a tube product could provide substantial chromium savings over monolithic stainless tubing in the event of a serious chromium shortage. The process consists of the initial assembly of three component tubesets from conventionally produced tubing, the formation of a strong metallurgical bond between the three components by gas pressure bonding, and conventional cold draw and anneal processing to final size. The quality of the tubes produced was excellent from the standpoint of bond strength, mechanical, and forming properties. The only significant quality problem encountered was carburization of the stainless clad by the carbon steel core which can be overcome by further refinement through at least three different approaches. The estimated cost of clad tubing produced by this process is greater than that for monolithic stainless tubing, but not so high as to make the process impractical as a chromium conservation method.

  17. Stress corrosion cracking evaluation of precipitation-hardening stainless steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphries, T. S.; Nelson, E. E.

    1970-01-01

    Accelerated test program results show which precipitation hardening stainless steels are resistant to stress corrosion cracking. In certain cases stress corrosion susceptibility was found to be associated with the process procedure.

  18. 3. INTERIOR VIEW OF SMOKEHOUSE UNIT; NOTE STAINLESS STEEL NOZZLES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. INTERIOR VIEW OF SMOKEHOUSE UNIT; NOTE STAINLESS STEEL NOZZLES THAT INTRODUCED SMOKE INTO UNIT; FLOOR IS UNPAINTED STEEL - Rath Packing Company, Smokehouse-Hog Chilling Building, Sycamore Street between Elm & Eighteenth Streets, Waterloo, Black Hawk County, IA

  19. Ultrasonics permits brazing complex stainless steel assembly without flux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, W. H.

    1967-01-01

    Ultrasonic vibration of an assembly of stainless steel instrumentation tubes ensures brazing without flux. Vibration with an ultrasonic transducer permits the brazing material to flow down each tube in contact with a seal plug installed in a pressure vessel wall.

  20. Compressive Strength of Stainless-Steel Sandwiches at Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathauser, Eldon E.; Pride, Richard A.

    1959-01-01

    Experimental results are presented from crippling tests of stainless-steel sandwich specimens in the temperature range from 80 F to 1,200 F. The specimens included resistance-welded 17-7 PH stainless-steel sandwiches with single-corrugated cores, type 301 stainless-steel sandwiches with double-corrugated cores, and brazed 17-7 PH stainless-steel sandwiches with honeycomb cores. The experimental strengths are compared with predicted buckling and crippling strengths. The crippling strengths were predicted from the calculated maximum strength of the individual plate elements of the sandwiches and from a correlation procedure which gives the elevated-temperature crippling strength when the experimental room-temperature crippling strengths are known. Photographs of some of the tested specimens are included to show the modes of failure.

  1. 27. STAINLESS STEEL FERMENTING CASKS MADE BY ZERO MANG OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    27. STAINLESS STEEL FERMENTING CASKS MADE BY ZERO MANG OF WASHINGTON, MISSOURI. VIEW LOOKING NORTH TOWARD VAULT OF THE TWELVE APOSTLES - Stone Hill Winery, 401 West Twelfth Street, Hermann, Gasconade County, MO

  2. Stress-Corrosion Cracking in Martensitic PH Stainless Steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphries, T.; Nelson, E.

    1984-01-01

    Precipitation-hardening alloys evaluated in marine environment tests. Report describes marine-environment stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) tests of three martensitic precipitation hardening (PH) stainless-steel alloys.

  3. Surface modified stainless steels for PEM fuel cell bipolar plates

    DOEpatents

    Brady, Michael P [Oak Ridge, TN; Wang, Heli [Littleton, CO; Turner, John A [Littleton, CO

    2007-07-24

    A nitridation treated stainless steel article (such as a bipolar plate for a proton exchange membrane fuel cell) having lower interfacial contact electrical resistance and better corrosion resistance than an untreated stainless steel article is disclosed. The treated stainless steel article has a surface layer including nitrogen-modified chromium-base oxide and precipitates of chromium nitride formed during nitridation wherein oxygen is present in the surface layer at a greater concentration than nitrogen. The surface layer may further include precipitates of titanium nitride and/or aluminum oxide. The surface layer in the treated article is chemically heterogeneous surface rather than a uniform or semi-uniform surface layer exclusively rich in chromium, titanium or aluminum. The precipitates of titanium nitride and/or aluminum oxide are formed by the nitriding treatment wherein titanium and/or aluminum in the stainless steel are segregated to the surface layer in forms that exhibit a low contact resistance and good corrosion resistance.

  4. Respiratory status of stainless steel and mild steel welders.

    PubMed

    Kalliomäki, P L; Kalliomäki, K; Korhonen, O; Nordman, H; Rahkonen, E; Vaaranen, V

    1982-01-01

    Eighty-three full-time stainless steel and 29 mild steel welders from one shipyard were examined clinically, and their lung function was measured. The stainless steel welders had used both tungsten inert-gas (low-fume concentration) and manual metal-arc (MMA) (high-fume concentration) welding methods. The individual exposure of the welders was estimated based on the time spent doing MMA welding, the amount of retained contaminants in the lungs (magnetopulmography), and urinary chromium excretion. The results suggest that there is a greater prevalence of small airway disease among shipyard mild steel MMA welders than among stainless steel welders. Among the stainless steel welders the impairment of lung function parameters was associated with the MMA welding method. The type of welding, then, is important when the health hazards of welders are studied, and welders cannot be regarded as a single, homogeneous group. PMID:7100838

  5. Measurement of intergranular attack in stainless steel using ultrasonic energy

    DOEpatents

    Mott, Gerry; Attaar, Mustan; Rishel, Rick D.

    1989-08-08

    Ultrasonic test methods are used to measure the depth of intergranular attack (IGA) in a stainless steel specimen. The ultrasonic test methods include a pitch-catch surface wave technique and a through-wall pulse-echo technique. When used in combination, these techniques can establish the extent of IGA on both the front and back surfaces of a stainless steel specimen from measurements made on only one surface.

  6. Procedure for flaw detection in cast stainless steel

    DOEpatents

    Kupperman, David S.

    1988-01-01

    A method of ultrasonic flaw detection in cast stainless steel components incorporating the steps of determining the nature of the microstructure of the cast stainless steel at the site of the flaw detection measurements by ultrasonic elements independent of the component thickness at the site; choosing from a plurality of flaw detection techniques, one such technique appropriate to the nature of the microstructure as determined and detecting flaws by use of the chosen technique.

  7. Decomposition of energetic chemicals contaminated with iron or stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Chervin, Sima; Bodman, Glenn T; Barnhart, Richard W

    2006-03-17

    Contamination of chemicals or reaction mixtures with iron or stainless steel is likely to take place during chemical processing. If energetic and thermally unstable chemicals are involved in a manufacturing process, contamination with iron or stainless steel can impact the decomposition characteristics of these chemicals and, subsequently, the safety of the processes, and should be investigated. The goal of this project was to undertake a systematic approach to study the impact of iron or stainless steel contamination on the decomposition characteristics of different chemical classes. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) was used to study the decomposition reaction by testing each chemical pure, and in mixtures with iron and stainless steel. The following classes of energetic chemicals were investigated: nitrobenzenes, tetrazoles, hydrazines, hydroxylamines and oximes, sulfonic acid derivatives and monomers. The following non-energetic groups were investigated for contributing effects: halogens, hydroxyls, amines, amides, nitriles, sulfonic acid esters, carbonyl halides and salts of hydrochloric acid. Based on the results obtained, conclusions were drawn regarding the sensitivity of the decomposition reaction to contamination with iron and stainless steel for the chemical classes listed above. It was demonstrated that the most sensitive classes are hydrazines and hydroxylamines/oximes. Contamination of these chemicals with iron or stainless steel not only destabilizes them, leading to decomposition at significantly lower temperatures, but also sometimes causes increased severity of the decomposition. The sensitivity of nitrobenzenes to contamination with iron or stainless steel depended upon the presence of other contributing groups: the presence of such groups as acid chlorides or chlorine/fluorine significantly increased the effect of contamination on decomposition characteristics of nitrobenzenes. The decomposition of sulfonic acid derivatives and tetrazoles

  8. Weak ferromagnetism in `non-magnetic' austenitic stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crangle, John; Fogarty, A.; Taylor, M. J.

    1992-06-01

    The magnetization and susceptability of the non-magnetic stainless steels AISI 304 and AISI 316 have been measured at low temperatures using a SQUID magnetometer. A small but stable ferromagnetic component is always present. Field cooling shows the effects of exchange anisotropy. Another stainless steel AISI 321 is non-magnetic at room temperature but it transforms irreversibly to a partially ferromagnetic state when it is cooled below 280 K.

  9. Cumulative creep fatigue damage in 316 stainless steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgaw, Michael A.

    1989-01-01

    The cumulative creep-fatigue damage behavior of 316 stainless steel at 1500 F was experimentally established for the two-level loading cases of fatigue followed by fatigue, creep fatigue followed by fatigue, and fatigue followed by creep fatigue. The two-level loadings were conducted such that the lower life (high strain) cycling was applied first for a controlled number of cycles and the higher life (low strain) cycling was conducted as the second level to failure. The target life levels in this study were 100 cycles to failure for both the fatigue and creep-fatigue lowlife loading, 5000 cycles to failure for the higher life fatigue loading and 10,000 cycles to failure for the higher life creep-fatigue loading. The failed specimens are being examined both fractographically and metallographically to ascertain the nature of the damaging mechanisms that produced failure. Models of creep-fatigue damage accumulation are being evaluated and knowledge of the various damaging mechanisms is necessary to ensure that predictive capability is instilled in the final failure model.

  10. The influence of grain size on the ductility of micro-scale stainless steel stent struts.

    PubMed

    Murphy, B P; Cuddy, H; Harewood, F J; Connolley, T; McHugh, P E

    2006-01-01

    Vascular stents are used to restore blood flow in stenotic arteries, and at present the implantation of a stent is the preferred revascularisation method for treating coronary artery disease, as the introduction of drug eluting stents (DESs) has lead to a significant improvement in the clinical outcome of coronary stenting. However the mechanical limits of stents are being tested when they are deployed in severe cases. In this study we aimed to show (by a combination of experimental tests and crystal plasticity finite element models) that the ductility of stainless steel stent struts can be increased by optimising the grain structure within micro-scale stainless steel stent struts. The results of the study show that within the specimen size range 55 to 190 microm ductility was not dependent on the size of the stent strut when the grain size maximised. For values of the ratio of cross sectional area to characteristic grain length less than 1,000, ductility was at a minimum irrespective of specimen size. However, when the ratio of cross sectional area to characteristic grain length becomes greater than 1,000 an improvement in ductility occurs, reaching a plateau when the ratio approaches a value characteristic of bulk material properties. In conclusion the ductility of micro-scale stainless steel stent struts is sensitive to microstructure and can be improved by reducing the grain size.

  11. In vivo evaluation of immediately loaded stainless steel and titanium orthodontic screws in a growing bone.

    PubMed

    Gritsch, Kerstin; Laroche, Norbert; Bonnet, Jeanne-Marie; Exbrayat, Patrick; Morgon, Laurent; Rabilloud, Muriel; Grosgogeat, Brigitte

    2013-01-01

    The present work intends to evaluate the use of immediate loaded orthodontic screws in a growing model, and to study the specific bone response. Thirty-two screws (half of stainless steel and half of titanium) were inserted in the alveolar bone of 8 growing pigs. The devices were immediately loaded with a 100 g orthodontic force. Two loading periods were assessed: 4 and 12 weeks. Both systems of screws were clinically assessed. Histological observations and histomorphometric analysis evaluated the percent of "bone-to-implant contact" and static and dynamic bone parameters in the vicinity of the devices (test zone) and in a bone area located 1.5 cm posterior to the devices (control zone). Both systems exhibit similar responses for the survival rate; 87.5% and 81.3% for stainless steel and titanium respectively (p = 0.64; 4-week period), and 62.5% and 50.0% for stainless steel and titanium respectively (p = 0.09; 12-week period). No significant differences between the devices were found regarding the percent of "bone-to-implant contact" (p = 0.1) or the static and dynamic bone parameters. However, the 5% threshold of "bone-to-implant contact" was obtained after 4 weeks with the stainless steel devices, leading to increased survival rate values. Bone in the vicinity of the miniscrew implants showed evidence of a significant increase in bone trabecular thickness when compared to bone in the control zone (p = 0.05). In our study, it is likely that increased trabecular thickness is a way for low density bone to respond to the stress induced by loading. PMID:24124540

  12. Phase Transformations in Cast Duplex Stainless Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Yoon-Jun

    2004-01-01

    Duplex stainless steels (DSS) constitute both ferrite and austenite as a matrix. Such a microstructure confers a high corrosion resistance with favorable mechanical properties. However, intermetallic phases such as σ and χ can also form during casting or high-temperature processing and can degrade the properties of the DSS. This research was initiated to develop time-temperature-transformation (TTT) and continuous-cooling-transformation (CCT) diagrams of two types of cast duplex stainless steels, CD3MN (Fe-22Cr-5Ni-Mo-N) and CD3MWCuN (Fe-25Cr-7Ni-Mo-W-Cu-N), in order to understand the time and temperature ranges for intermetallic phase formation. The alloys were heat treated isothermally or under controlled cooling conditions and then characterized using conventional metallographic methods that included tint etching, and also using electron microscopy (SEM, TEM) and wavelength dispersive spectroscopy (WDS). The kinetics of intermetallic-phase (σ + χ) formation were analyzed using the Johnson-Mehl-Avrami (MA) equation in the case of isothermal transformations and a modified form of this equation in the case of continuous cooling transformations. The rate of intermetallic-phase formation was found to be much faster in CD3MWCuN than CD3MN due mainly to differences in the major alloying contents such as Cr, Ni and Mo. To examine in more detail the effects of these elements of the phase stabilities; a series of eight steel castings was designed with the Cr, Ni and Mo contents systematically varied with respect to the nominal composition of CD3MN. The effects of varying the contents of alloying additions on the formation of intermetallic phases were also studied computationally using the commercial thermodynamic software package, Thermo-Calc. In general, σ was stabilized with increasing Cr addition and χ by increasing Mo addition. However, a delicate balance among Ni and other minor elements such as N and Si also exists. Phase equilibria in DSS can be affected by

  13. NanoComposite Stainless Steel Powder Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    DeHoff, R.; Glasgow, C.

    2012-07-25

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory has been investigating a new class of Fe-based amorphous material stemming from a DARPA, Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency initiative in structural amorphous metals. Further engineering of the original SAM materials such as chemistry modifications and manufacturing processes, has led to the development of a class of Fe based amorphous materials that upon processing, devitrify into a nearly homogeneous distribution of nano sized complex metal carbides and borides. The powder material is produced through the gas atomization process and subsequently utilized by several methods; laser fusing as a coating to existing components or bulk consolidated into new components through various powder metallurgy techniques (vacuum hot pressing, Dynaforge, and hot isostatic pressing). The unique fine scale distribution of microstructural features yields a material with high hardness and wear resistance compared to material produced through conventional processing techniques such as casting while maintaining adequate fracture toughness. Several compositions have been examined including those specifically designed for high hardness and wear resistance and a composition specifically tailored to devitrify into an austenitic matrix (similar to a stainless steel) which poses improved corrosion behavior.

  14. Weldable, age hardenable, austenitic stainless steel

    DOEpatents

    Brooks, J.A.; Krenzer, R.W.

    1975-07-22

    An age hardenable, austenitic stainless steel having superior weldability properties as well as resistance to degradation of properties in a hydrogen atmosphere is described. It has a composition of from about 24.0 to about 34.0 weight percent (w/o) nickel, from about 13.5 to about 16.0 w/o chromium, from about 1.9 to about 2.3 w/o titanium, from about 1.0 to about 1.5 w/ o molybdenum, from about 0.01 to about 0.05 w/o carbon, from about 0 to about 0.25 w/o manganese, from about 0 to about 0.01 w/o phosphorous and preferably about 0.005 w/o maximum, from about 0 to about 0.010 w/o sulfur and preferably about 0.005 w/o maximum, from about 0 to about 0.25 w/o silicon, from about 0.1 to about 0.35 w/o aluminum, from about 0.10 to about 0.50 w/o vanadium, from about 0 to about 0.0015 w/o boron, and the balance essentially iron. (auth)

  15. Weldability of neutron irradiated austenitic stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asano, Kyoichi; Nishimura, Seiji; Saito, Yoshiaki; Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Yamada, Yuji; Kato, Takahiko; Hashimoto, Tsuneyuki

    1999-01-01

    Degradation of weldability in neutron irradiated austenitic stainless steel is an important issue to be addressed in the planning of proactive maintenance of light water reactor core internals. In this work, samples selected from reactor internal components which had been irradiated to fluence from 8.5 × 10 22 to 1.4 × 10 26 n/m 2 ( E > 1 MeV) corresponding to helium content from 0.11 to 103 appm, respectively, were subjected to tungsten inert gas arc (TIG) welding with heat input ranged 0.6-16 kJ/cm. The weld defects were characterized by penetrant test and cross-sectional metallography. The integrity of the weld was better when there were less helium and at lower heat input. Tensile properties of weld joint containing 0.6 appm of helium fulfilled the requirement for unirradiated base metal. Repeated thermal cycles were found to be very hazardous. The results showed the combination of material helium content and weld heat input where materials can be welded with little concern to invite cracking. Also, the importance of using properly selected welding procedures to minimize thermal cycling was recognized.

  16. Welding Behavior of Free Machining Stainless Steel

    SciTech Connect

    BROOKS,JOHN A.; ROBINO,CHARLES V.; HEADLEY,THOMAS J.; MICHAEL,JOSEPH R.

    2000-07-24

    The weld solidification and cracking behavior of sulfur bearing free machining austenitic stainless steel was investigated for both gas-tungsten arc (GTA) and pulsed laser beam weld processes. The GTA weld solidification was consistent with those predicted with existing solidification diagrams and the cracking response was controlled primarily by solidification mode. The solidification behavior of the pulsed laser welds was complex, and often contained regions of primary ferrite and primary austenite solidification, although in all cases the welds were found to be completely austenite at room temperature. Electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) pattern analysis indicated that the nature of the base metal at the time of solidification plays a primary role in initial solidification. The solid state transformation of austenite to ferrite at the fusion zone boundary, and ferrite to austenite on cooling may both be massive in nature. A range of alloy compositions that exhibited good resistance to solidification cracking and was compatible with both welding processes was identified. The compositional range is bounded by laser weldability at lower Cr{sub eq}/Ni{sub eq} ratios and by the GTA weldability at higher ratios. It was found with both processes that the limiting ratios were somewhat dependent upon sulfur content.

  17. Instabilities in stabilized austenitic stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayer, Raghavan; Klein, C. F.; Marzinsky, C. N.

    1992-09-01

    The effect of aging on the precipitation of grain boundary phases in three austenitic stainless steels (AISI 347, 347AP, and an experimental steel stabilized with hafnium) was investigated. Aging was performed both on bulk steels as well as on samples which were subjected to a thermal treatment to simulate the coarse grain region of the heat affected zone (HAZ) during welding. Aging of the bulk steels at 866 K for 8000 hours resulted in the precipitation of Cr23C6 carbides, σ, and Fe2Nb phases; the propensity for precipitation was least for the hafnium-stabilized steel. Weld simulation of the HAZ resulted in dissolution of the phases present in the as-received 347 and 347AP steels, leading to grain coarsening. Subsequent aging caused extensive grain boundary Cr23C6 carbides and inhomogeneous matrix precipitation. In addition, steel 347AP formed a precipitate free zone (PFZ) along the grain boundaries. The steel containing hafnium showed the best microstructural stability to aging and welding.

  18. Austenitic stainless steel for high temperature applications

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Gerald D.; Powell, Roger W.

    1985-01-01

    This invention describes a composition for an austenitic stainless steel which has been found to exhibit improved high temperature stress rupture properties. The composition of this alloy is about (in wt. %): 12.5 to 14.5 Cr; 14.5 to 16.5 Ni; 1.5 to 2.5 Mo; 1.5 to 2.5 Mn; 0.1 to 0.4 Ti; 0.02 to 0.08 C; 0.5 to 1.0 Si; 0.01 maximum, N; 0.02 to 0.08 P; 0.002 to 0.008 B; 0.004-0.010 S; 0.02-0.05 Nb; 0.01-0.05 V; 0.005-0.02 Ta; 0.02-0.05 Al; 0.01-0.04 Cu; 0.02-0.05 Co; 0.03 maximum, As; 0.01 maximum, O; 0.01 maximum, Zr; and with the balance of the alloy being essentially iron. The carbon content of the alloy is adjusted such that wt. % Ti/(wt. % C+wt. % N) is between 4 and 6, and most preferably about 5. In addition the sum of the wt. % P+wt. % B+wt. % S is at least 0.03 wt. %. This alloy is believed to be particularly well suited for use as fast breeder reactor fuel element cladding.

  19. Tension bending ratcheting tests of 304 stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, L.D.; Jones, D.P.; Rapp, D.G.

    1996-12-31

    This paper discusses results of an experimental program conducted to investigate the strain ratcheting behavior of 304 stainless steel under various combinations of applied membrane load and displacement controlled cyclic bending strain. Tests were performed on uniaxial specimens at temperatures of 70 F (21 C) and 550 F (288 C). Bending strain, ratchet strain and axial displacement of the specimens were monitored throughout the tests. Membrane stress to monotonic yield stress ratios of 2/3, 1/2, and 1/3 were tested with pseudo-elastic bending stress to yield stress ratios ranging from 1.4 to 10.7. Test output was in the form of plots of cumulative axial membrane strain versus cycles up to the point of shakedown, i.e., the point at which no additional progressive strain was observed. Shakedown was demonstrated in the 500 F tests but not the room temperature tests. The 550 F results are shown in terms of shakedown membrane strain versus equivalent bending stress ratio for each of the tested membrane stress ratios. The cyclic and monotonic stress-strain curves for the test materials are presented to enable the use of various models for predicting the ratcheting and shakedown behavior. The results may be used to develop improved ratcheting and shakedown rules permitting a relaxation of the traditional ratcheting rules in the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code.

  20. Tensile and creep data on type 316 stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Sikka, V. K.; Booker, B. L.P.; Booker, M. K.; McEnerney, J. W.

    1980-01-01

    This report summarizes tensile and creep data on 13 heats of type 316 stainless steel. It includes ten different product forms (three plates, four pipes, and three bars) of the reference heat tested at ORNL. Tensile data are presented in tabular form and analyzed as a function of temperature by the heat centering method. This method yielded a measure of variations within a single heat as well as among different heats. The upper and lower scatter bands developed by this method were wider at the lower temperatures than at the high temperatures (for strength properties), a trend reflected by the experimental data. The creep data on both unaged and aged specimens are presented in tabular form along with creep curves for each test. The rupture time data are compared with the ASME Code Case minimum curve at each test temperature in the range from 538 to 704{sup 0}C. The experimental rupture time data are also compared with the values predicted by using the rupture model based on elevated-temperature ultimate tensile strength. A creep ductility trend curve was developed on the basis of the reference heat data and those published in the literature on nitrogen effects. To characterize the data fully, information was also supplied on vendor, product form, fabrication method, material condition (mill-annealed vs laboratory annealed and aged), grain size, and chemical composition for various heats. Test procedures used for tensile and creep results are also discussed.

  1. Solidification microstructures in single-crystal stainless steel melt pools

    SciTech Connect

    Sipf, J.B.; Boatner, L.A.; David, S.A.

    1994-03-01

    Development of microstructure of stationary melt pools of oriented stainless steel single crystals (70%Fe-15%Ni-15%Cr was analyzed. Stationary melt pools were formed by electron-beam and gas-tungsten-arc heating on (001), (011), and (111) oriented planes of the austenitic, fcc-alloy crystals. Characterization and analysis of resulting microstructure was carried out for each crystallographic plane and welding method. Results showed that crystallography which favors ``easy growth`` along the <100> family of directions is a controlling factor in the microstructural formation along with the melt-pool shape. The microstructure was found to depend on the melting method, since each method forms a unique melt-pool shape. These results are used in making a three-dimensional reconstruction of the microstructure for each plane and melting method employed. This investigation also suggests avenues for future research into the microstructural properties of electron-beam welds as well as providing an experimental basis for mathematical models for the prediction of solidification microstructures.

  2. Nonlinear dynamic analysis of hydrodynamically-coupled stainless steel structures

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Y.

    1996-12-01

    Spent nuclear fuel is usually stored temporarily on the site of nuclear power plants. The spent fuel storage racks are nuclear-safety-related stainless steel structures required to be analyzed for seismic loads. When the storage pool is subjected to three-dimensional (3-D) floor seismic excitations, rack modules, stored fuel bundles, adjacent racks and pool walls, and surrounding water are hydrodynamically coupled. Hydrodynamic coupling (HC) significantly affects the dynamic responses of the racks that are free-standing and submerged in water within the pool. A nonlinear time-history dynamic analysis is usually needed to describe the motion behavior of the racks that are both geometrically nonlinear and material nonlinear in nature. The nonlinearities include the friction resistance between the rack supporting legs and the pool floor, and various potential impacts of fuel-rack, rack-rack, and rack-pool wall. The HC induced should be included in the nonlinear dynamic analysis using the added-hydrodynamic-mass concept based on potential theory per the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) acceptance criteria. To this end, a finite element analysis constitutes a feasible and effective tool. However, most people perform somewhat simplified 1-D, or 2-D, or 3-D single rack and 2-D multiple rack analyses. These analyses are incomplete because a 3-D single rack model behaves quite differently from a 2-D mode. Furthermore, a 3-D whole pool multi-rack model behaves differently than a 3-D single rack model, especially when the strong HC effects are unsymmetrical. In this paper 3-D nonlinear dynamic time-history analyses were performed in a more quantitative manner using sophisticated finite element models developed for a single rack as well as all twelve racks in the whole-pool. Typical response results due to different HC effects are determined and discussed.

  3. Stainless steel tube-based cell cryopreservation containers.

    PubMed

    Shih, Wei-Hung; Yu, Zong-Yan; Wu, Wei-Te

    2013-12-01

    This study focused on increasing the freezing rate in cell vitrification cryopreservation by using a cryopreservation container possessing rigid mechanical properties and high heat-transfer efficiency. Applying a fast freezing rate in vitrification cryopreservation causes a rapid temperature change in the cryopreservation container and has a substantial impact on mechanical properties; therefore, a highly rigid cryopreservation container that possesses a fast freezing rate must be developed. To produce a highly rigid cryopreservation container possessing superior heat transfer efficiency, this study applies an electrochemical machining (ECM) method to an ANSI 316L stainless steel tube to treat the surface material by polishing and roughening, thereby increasing the freezing rate and reducing the probability of ice crystal formation. The results indicated that the ECM method provided high-quality surface treatment of the stainless steel tube. This method can reduce internal surface roughness in the stainless steel tube, thereby reducing the probability of ice crystal formation, and increase external surface roughness, consequently raising convection heat-transfer efficiency. In addition, by thinning the stainless steel tube, this method reduces heat capacity and thermal resistance, thereby increasing the freezing rate. The freezing rate (3399 ± 197 °C/min) of a stainless steel tube after interior and exterior polishing and exterior etching by applying ECM compared with the freezing rate (1818 ± 54 °C/min) of an original stainless steel tube was increased by 87%, which also exceeds the freezing rate (2015 ± 49 °C/min) of an original quartz tube that has a 20% lower heat capacity. However, the results indicated that increasing heat-transferring surface areas and reducing heat capacities cannot effectively increase the freezing rate of a stainless steel tube if only one method is applied; instead, both techniques must be implemented concurrently to improve the

  4. Stainless steel tube-based cell cryopreservation containers.

    PubMed

    Shih, Wei-Hung; Yu, Zong-Yan; Wu, Wei-Te

    2013-12-01

    This study focused on increasing the freezing rate in cell vitrification cryopreservation by using a cryopreservation container possessing rigid mechanical properties and high heat-transfer efficiency. Applying a fast freezing rate in vitrification cryopreservation causes a rapid temperature change in the cryopreservation container and has a substantial impact on mechanical properties; therefore, a highly rigid cryopreservation container that possesses a fast freezing rate must be developed. To produce a highly rigid cryopreservation container possessing superior heat transfer efficiency, this study applies an electrochemical machining (ECM) method to an ANSI 316L stainless steel tube to treat the surface material by polishing and roughening, thereby increasing the freezing rate and reducing the probability of ice crystal formation. The results indicated that the ECM method provided high-quality surface treatment of the stainless steel tube. This method can reduce internal surface roughness in the stainless steel tube, thereby reducing the probability of ice crystal formation, and increase external surface roughness, consequently raising convection heat-transfer efficiency. In addition, by thinning the stainless steel tube, this method reduces heat capacity and thermal resistance, thereby increasing the freezing rate. The freezing rate (3399 ± 197 °C/min) of a stainless steel tube after interior and exterior polishing and exterior etching by applying ECM compared with the freezing rate (1818 ± 54 °C/min) of an original stainless steel tube was increased by 87%, which also exceeds the freezing rate (2015 ± 49 °C/min) of an original quartz tube that has a 20% lower heat capacity. However, the results indicated that increasing heat-transferring surface areas and reducing heat capacities cannot effectively increase the freezing rate of a stainless steel tube if only one method is applied; instead, both techniques must be implemented concurrently to improve the

  5. Microstructural evolution in fast-neutron-irradiated austenitic stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Stoller, R.E.

    1987-12-01

    The present work has focused on the specific problem of fast-neutron-induced radiation damage to austenitic stainless steels. These steels are used as structural materials in current fast fission reactors and are proposed for use in future fusion reactors. Two primary components of the radiation damage are atomic displacements (in units of displacements per atom, or dpa) and the generation of helium by nuclear transmutation reactions. The radiation environment can be characterized by the ratio of helium to displacement production, the so-called He/dpa ratio. Radiation damage is evidenced microscopically by a complex microstructural evolution and macroscopically by density changes and altered mechanical properties. The purpose of this work was to provide additional understanding about mechanisms that determine microstructural evolution in current fast reactor environments and to identify the sensitivity of this evolution to changes in the He/dpa ratio. This latter sensitivity is of interest because the He/dpa ratio in a fusion reactor first wall will be about 30 times that in fast reactor fuel cladding. The approach followed in the present work was to use a combination of theoretical and experimental analysis. The experimental component of the work primarily involved the examination by transmission electron microscopy of specimens of a model austenitic alloy that had been irradiated in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor. A major aspect of the theoretical work was the development of a comprehensive model of microstructural evolution. This included explicit models for the evolution of the major extended defects observed in neutron irradiated steels: cavities, Frank faulted loops and the dislocation network. 340 refs., 95 figs., 18 tabs.

  6. Antibacterial effect of silver nanofilm modified stainless steel surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, F.; Kennedy, J.; Dhillon, M.; Flint, S.

    2015-03-01

    Bacteria can attach to stainless steel surfaces, resulting in the colonization of the surface known as biofilms. The release of bacteria from biofilms can cause contamination of food such as dairy products in manufacturing plants. This study aimed to modify stainless steel surfaces with silver nanofilms and to examine the antibacterial effectiveness of the modified surface. Ion implantation was applied to produce silver nanofilms on stainless steel surfaces. 35 keV Ag ions were implanted with various fluences of 1 × 1015 to 1 × 1017 ions•cm-2 at room temperature. Representative atomic force microscopy characterizations of the modified stainless steel are presented. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry spectra revealed the implanted atoms were located in the near-surface region. Both unmodified and modified stainless steel coupons were then exposed to two types of bacteria, Pseudomonas fluorescens and Streptococcus thermophilus, to determine the effect of the surface modification on bacterial attachment and biofilm development. The silver modified coupon surface fluoresced red over most of the surface area implying that most bacteria on coupon surface were dead. This study indicates that the silver nanofilm fabricated by the ion implantation method is a promising way of reducing the attachment of bacteria and delay biofilm formation.

  7. Work of adhesion of dairy products on stainless steel surface

    PubMed Central

    Bernardes, Patrícia Campos; Araújo, Emiliane Andrade; dos Santos Pires, Ana Clarissa; Queiroz Fialho Júnior, José Felício; Lelis, Carini Aparecida; de Andrade, Nélio José

    2012-01-01

    The adhesion of the solids presents in food can difficult the process of surface cleaning and promotes the bacterial adhesion process and can trigger health problems. In our study, we used UHT whole milk, chocolate based milk and infant formula to evaluate the adhesion of Enterobacter sakazakii on stainless steel coupons, and we determine the work of adhesion by measuring the contact angle as well as measured the interfacial tension of the samples. In addition we evaluated the hydrophobicity of stainless steel after pre-conditioning with milk samples mentioned. E. sakazakii was able to adhere to stainless steel in large numbers in the presence of dairy products. The chocolate based milk obtained the lower contact angle with stainless steel surface, higher interfacial tension and consequently higher adhesion work. It was verified a tendency of decreasing the interfacial tension as a function of the increasing of protein content. The preconditioning of the stainless steel coupons with milk samples changed the hydrophobic characteristics of the surfaces and became them hydrophilic. Therefore, variations in the composition of the milk products affect parameters important that can influence the procedure of hygiene in surface used in food industry. PMID:24031951

  8. A stainless steel bracket for orthodontic application.

    PubMed

    Oh, Keun-Taek; Choo, Sung-Uk; Kim, Kwang-Mahn; Kim, Kyoung-Nam

    2005-06-01

    Aesthetics has become an essential element when choosing orthodontic fixed appliances. Most metallic brackets used in orthodontic therapy are made from stainless steel (SS) with the appropriate physical properties and good corrosion resistance, and are available as types 304, 316 and 17-4 PH SS. However, localized corrosion of these materials can frequently occur in the oral environment. This study was undertaken to evaluate the accuracy of sizing, microstructure, hardness, corrosion resistance, frictional resistance and cytotoxicity of commercially available Mini-diamond (S17400), Archist (S30403) and experimentally manufactured SR-50A (S32050) brackets. The size accuracy of Mini-diamond was the highest at all locations except for the external horizontal width of the tie wing (P < 0.05). Micrographs of the Mini-diamond and Archist showed precipitates in the grains and around their boundaries. SR-50A showed the only austenitic phase and the highest polarization resistance of the tested samples. SR-50A also had the highest corrosion resistance [SR-50A, Mini-diamond and Archist were 0.9 x 10(-3), 3.7 x 10(-3), and 7.4 x 10(-3) mm per year (mpy), respectively], in the artificial saliva. The frictional force of SR-50A decreased over time, but that of Mini-diamond and Archist increased. Therefore, SR-50A is believed to have better frictional properties to orthodontic wire than Mini-diamond and Archist. Cytotoxic results showed that the response index of SR-50A was 0/1 (mild), Mini-diamond 1/1 (mild+), and Archist 1/2 (mild+). SR-50A showed greater biocompatibility than either Mini-diamond or Archist. It is concluded that the SR-50A bracket has good frictional property, corrosion resistance and biocompatibility with a lower probability of allergic reaction, compared with conventionally used SS brackets. PMID:15947222

  9. A stainless steel bracket for orthodontic application.

    PubMed

    Oh, Keun-Taek; Choo, Sung-Uk; Kim, Kwang-Mahn; Kim, Kyoung-Nam

    2005-06-01

    Aesthetics has become an essential element when choosing orthodontic fixed appliances. Most metallic brackets used in orthodontic therapy are made from stainless steel (SS) with the appropriate physical properties and good corrosion resistance, and are available as types 304, 316 and 17-4 PH SS. However, localized corrosion of these materials can frequently occur in the oral environment. This study was undertaken to evaluate the accuracy of sizing, microstructure, hardness, corrosion resistance, frictional resistance and cytotoxicity of commercially available Mini-diamond (S17400), Archist (S30403) and experimentally manufactured SR-50A (S32050) brackets. The size accuracy of Mini-diamond was the highest at all locations except for the external horizontal width of the tie wing (P < 0.05). Micrographs of the Mini-diamond and Archist showed precipitates in the grains and around their boundaries. SR-50A showed the only austenitic phase and the highest polarization resistance of the tested samples. SR-50A also had the highest corrosion resistance [SR-50A, Mini-diamond and Archist were 0.9 x 10(-3), 3.7 x 10(-3), and 7.4 x 10(-3) mm per year (mpy), respectively], in the artificial saliva. The frictional force of SR-50A decreased over time, but that of Mini-diamond and Archist increased. Therefore, SR-50A is believed to have better frictional properties to orthodontic wire than Mini-diamond and Archist. Cytotoxic results showed that the response index of SR-50A was 0/1 (mild), Mini-diamond 1/1 (mild+), and Archist 1/2 (mild+). SR-50A showed greater biocompatibility than either Mini-diamond or Archist. It is concluded that the SR-50A bracket has good frictional property, corrosion resistance and biocompatibility with a lower probability of allergic reaction, compared with conventionally used SS brackets.

  10. Determining Experimental Parameters for Thermal-Mechanical Forming Simulation considering Martensite Formation in Austenitic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, Philipp; Liewald, Mathias

    2011-08-01

    The forming behavior of metastable austenitic stainless steel is mainly dominated by the temperature-dependent TRIP effect (transformation induced plasticity). Of course, the high dependency of material properties on the temperature level during forming means the temperature must be considered during the FE analysis. The strain-induced formation of α'-martensite from austenite can be represented by using finite element programs utilizing suitable models such as the Haensel-model. This paper discusses the determination of parameters for a completely thermal-mechanical forming simulation in LS-DYNA based on the material model of Haensel. The measurement of the martensite evolution in non-isothermal tensile tests was performed with metastable austenitic stainless steel EN 1.4301 at different rolling directions between 0° and 90 °. This allows an estimation of the influence of the rolling direction to the martensite formation. Of specific importance is the accuracy of the martensite content measured by magnetic induction methods (Feritscope). The observation of different factors, such as stress dependence of the magnetisation, blank thickness and numerous calibration curves discloses a substantial important influence on the parameter determination for the material models. The parameters obtained for use of Haensel model and temperature-dependent friction coefficients are used to simulate forming process of a real component and to validate its implementation in the commercial code LS-DYNA.

  11. Machinability of a Stainless Steel by Electrochemical Discharge Microdrilling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coteaţǎ, Margareta; Schulze, Hans-Peter; Pop, Nicolae; Beşliu, Irina; Slǎtineanu, Laurenţiu

    2011-05-01

    Due to the chemical elements included in their structure for ensuring an increased resistance to the environment action, the stainless steels are characterized by a low machinability when classical machining methods are applied. For this reason, sometimes non-traditional machining methods are applied, one of these being the electrochemical discharge machining. To obtain microholes and to evaluate the machinability by electrochemical discharge microdrilling, test pieces of stainless steel were used for experimental research. The electrolyte was an aqueous solution of sodium silicate with different densities. A complete factorial plan was designed to highlight the influence of some input variables on the sizes of the considered machinability indexes (electrode tool wear, material removal rate, depth of the machined hole). By mathematically processing of experimental data, empirical functions were established both for stainless steel and carbon steel. Graphical representations were used to obtain more suggestive vision concerning the influence exerted by the considered input variables on the size of the machinability indexes.

  12. Machinability of a Stainless Steel by Electrochemical Discharge Microdrilling

    SciTech Connect

    Coteata, Margareta; Pop, Nicolae; Slatineanu, Laurentiu; Schulze, Hans-Peter; Besliu, Irina

    2011-05-04

    Due to the chemical elements included in their structure for ensuring an increased resistance to the environment action, the stainless steels are characterized by a low machinability when classical machining methods are applied. For this reason, sometimes non-traditional machining methods are applied, one of these being the electrochemical discharge machining. To obtain microholes and to evaluate the machinability by electrochemical discharge microdrilling, test pieces of stainless steel were used for experimental research. The electrolyte was an aqueous solution of sodium silicate with different densities. A complete factorial plan was designed to highlight the influence of some input variables on the sizes of the considered machinability indexes (electrode tool wear, material removal rate, depth of the machined hole). By mathematically processing of experimental data, empirical functions were established both for stainless steel and carbon steel. Graphical representations were used to obtain more suggestive vision concerning the influence exerted by the considered input variables on the size of the machinability indexes.

  13. Bacterial adhesion on ion-implanted stainless steel surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Q.; Liu, Y.; Wang, C.; Wang, S.; Peng, N.; Jeynes, C.

    2007-08-01

    Stainless steel disks were implanted with N +, O + and SiF 3+, respectively at the Surrey Ion Beam Centre. The surface properties of the implanted surfaces were analyzed, including surface chemical composition, surface topography, surface roughness and surface free energy. Bacterial adhesion of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus aureus, which frequently cause medical device-associated infections was evaluated under static condition and laminar flow condition. The effect of contact time, growth media and surface properties of the ion-implanted steels on bacterial adhesion was investigated. The experimental results showed that SiF 3+-implanted stainless steel performed much better than N +-implanted steel, O +-implanted steel and untreated stainless steel control on reducing bacterial attachment under identical experimental conditions.

  14. Anisotropic Properties of Stainless Steel—Clad Aluminum Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Daeyong; Hwang, Bum Kyu; Lee, Young Seon; Kim, Ji Hoon; Kim, Min-Joong

    2010-06-01

    The production of a stainless steel—clad aluminum sheet by the cold rolling process is a more efficient and economical approach compared with the other types of processes utilized for the production of such sheets. Because both the stainless steel and aluminum sheets show the highly anisotropic behavior, it is necessary to investigate anisotropic properties of clad sheets for the design of process. In this paper, to investigate the anisotropic properties of stainless steel—clad aluminum sheet, two kinds of clad sheets were considered: STS439/AA3003 and STS439/AA1050/STS304 clad sheets. The uni-axial tension tests at 0, 45 and 90 degrees for the rolling direction were performed to obtained yield stresses and R values. The strain ratio at balanced biaxial tension state was measured from compression disk test. In order to describe the anisotropic behavior of the clad sheet, nonquadratic anisotropic yield function Yld2000-2d was utilized.

  15. Primary incisor restoration using resin-veneered stainless steel crowns.

    PubMed

    Croll, T P

    1998-01-01

    The restoration of primary incisors with extensive caries lesions is a clinical challenge of severe dimensions. Not only are these teeth difficult to restore, but the patient's behavior can affect the treatment negatively. Requirements for an acceptable restoration include natural color; durability; adhesive cementation that is biocompatible with the pulp; easily and rapidly placed; requires only one treatment visit. Compared to other options, stainless steel crowns are the easiest to place. The most attractive restoration for these cases today is the adhesively bonded resin-composite crown, made by using acetate crown-form matrices, but this is being surpassed by the stainless steel crown forms (3M Unitek) that can be preveneered. This article describes a step-by-step method of placing preveneered stainless steel crowns for primary incisors. PMID:9617447

  16. 316L stainless steel tubes corrosion influenced by SRB in sea water

    SciTech Connect

    Yoffe, P.

    1997-08-01

    A tube made from SS316L was attacked by stagnated sea water. The typical onion form of the pits were obscured in welded and unwelded sectors of the tube. Iron sulfides FeS{sub 1{minus}x} and FeS{sub 2} (in pyrite form) were observed on effected surface of the tube, in addition to iron chloride and oxide/hydroxide. Theoretical investigation was based on cluster model of alloy and thermodynamic/kinetic characterization of possible reactions. It was concluded that microbially influenced sulfidizing played an accelerating role in the failure that exhibited the typical characteristics for stagnated sea water effect to chromium-nickel stainless steel.

  17. Large-strain cyclic response and martensitic transformation of austenitic stainless steel at elevated temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamasaki, H.; Nakano, T.; Ishimaru, E.; Yoshida, F.

    2016-08-01

    Cyclic tension-compression tests were carried out for austenitic stainless steel (SUS304) at elevated temperatures. The significant Bauschinger effect was found in the obtained stress-strain curve. In addition, stagnation of deformation induced martensitic transformation was observed just after stress reversal until the equivalent stress reached the maximum value in the course of experiment. The constitutive model for SUS304 at room temperature was developed, in which homogenized stress of SUS304 was expressed by the weighed summation of stresses of austenite and martensite phases. The calculated stress-strain curves and predicted martensite volume fraction were well correlated with those experimental results.

  18. Dependence of Microelastic-plastic Nonlinearity of Martensitic Stainless Steel on Fatigue Damage Accumulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantrell, John H.

    2006-01-01

    Self-organized substructural arrangements of dislocations formed in wavy slip metals during cyclic stress-induced fatigue produce substantial changes in the material microelastic-plastic nonlinearity, a quantitative measure of which is the nonlinearity parameter Beta extracted from acoustic harmonic generation measurements. The contributions to Beta from the substructural evolution of dislocations and crack growth for fatigued martensitic 410Cb stainless steel are calculated from the Cantrell model as a function of percent full fatigue life to fracture. A wave interaction factor f(sub WI) is introduced into the model to account experimentally for the relative volume of material fatigue damage included in the volume of material swept out by an interrogating acoustic wave. For cyclic stress-controlled loading at 551 MPa and f(sub WI) = 0.013 the model predicts a monotonic increase in Beta from dislocation substructures of almost 100 percent from the virgin state to roughly 95 percent full life. Negligible contributions from cracks are predicted in this range of fatigue life. However, over the last five percent of fatigue life the model predicts a rapid monotonic increase of Beta by several thousand percent that is dominated by crack growth. The theoretical predictions are in good agreement with experimental measurements of 410Cb stainless steel samples fatigued in uniaxial, stress-controlled cyclic loading at 551 MPa from zero to full tensile load with a measured f(sub WI) of 0.013.

  19. Dependence of microelastic-plastic nonlinearity of martensitic stainless steel on fatigue damage accumulation

    SciTech Connect

    Cantrell, John H.

    2006-09-15

    Self-organized substructural arrangements of dislocations formed during cyclic stress-induced fatigue of metals produce substantial changes in the material microelastic-plastic nonlinearity, a quantitative measure of which is the nonlinearity parameter {beta} extracted from acoustic harmonic generation measurements. The contributions to {beta} from the substructural evolution of dislocations and crack growth for fatigued martensitic 410Cb stainless steel are calculated from the Cantrell model [Proc. R. Soc. London, Ser. A 460, 757 (2004)] as a function of percent full fatigue life to fracture. A wave interaction factor f{sub WI} is introduced into the model to account experimentally for the relative volume of fatigue damage included in the total volume of material swept out by an interrogating acoustic wave. For cyclic stress-controlled loading at 551 MPa and f{sub WI}=0.013 the model predicts a monotonic increase in {beta} from dislocation substructures of almost 100% from the virgin state to roughly 95% full life. Negligible contributions from cracks are predicted in this range of fatigue life. However, during the last 5% of fatigue life the model predicts a rapid monotonic increase of {beta} by several thousand percent that is dominated by crack growth. The theoretical predictions are in good agreement with experimental measurements of 410Cb stainless steel samples fatigued in uniaxial, stress-controlled cyclic loading at 551 MPa from zero to full tensile load with a measured f{sub WI} of 0.013.

  20. Corrosion induced by cathodic hydrogen in 2205 duplex stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michalska, J.

    2011-05-01

    In this work new results about the influence of cathodic hydrogen on passivity and corrosion resistance of 2205 duplex stainless steel are described. The results were discussed by taking into account hydrogen charged samples and without hydrogen. The corrosion resistance to pitting was qualified with the polarization curves. The conclusion is that, hydrogen deteriorated the passive film stability and corrosion resistance to pitting of 2205 duplex stainless steel. The presence of hydrogen in passive films increases corrosion current density and decreases the potential of the film breakdown. It was also found that degree of susceptibility to hydrogen action was dependent on the hydrogen charging conditions.

  1. From flint to stainless steel: observations on surgical instrument composition.

    PubMed Central

    Kirkup, J.

    1993-01-01

    Man's failure to extract deeply embedded thorns and arrowheads, with bare hands and teeth, stimulated 'instrument substitutes' mimicking these appendages. Evidence from primitive communities suggest animal, plant and mineral items were employed, both before and after metal became the standard material of today's armamentarium. Changing surgical instrument composition has mirrored concurrent technology and manufacturing methods both of which are reviewed. Particular significance is accorded flint, bronze, crucible steel, thermal sterilisation, nickel-plate, stainless steel and disposable plastics. The paper is based on an exhibition From Flint to Stainless Steel on display at the College. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8215156

  2. Transmission electron microscopy of undermined passive films on stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Isaacs, H.S.; Zhu, Y.; Sabatini, R.L.; Ryan, M.P.

    1999-06-01

    A study has been made of the passive film remaining over pits on stainless steel using a high resolution transmission electron microscope. Type 305 stainless steel was passivated in a borate buffer solution and pitted in ferric chloride. Passive films formed at 0.2 V relative to a saturated calomel electrode were found to be amorphous. Films formed at higher potentials showed only broad diffraction rings. The passive film was found to cover a remnant lacy structure formed over pits passivated at 0.8 V. The metallic strands of the lace were roughly hemitubular in shape with the curved surface facing the center of the pit.

  3. Oxidation of tritium atoms at a stainless steel surface

    SciTech Connect

    Finn, P.A.; VanDeventer, E.H.

    1986-10-01

    The dynamic reaction of oxygen and tritium on a stainless steel surface was studied for low oxygen concentrations (less than 1 ppM oxygen in helium). The oxygen was swept over a stainless surface through which 20 to 90 ..mu..Ci/d of tritium permeated. Dynamic conditions were maintained for three to five days with gas flow rates maintained at 40 to 100 mL/min. The ratio between the tritiated water collected and the tritium gas collected was less than one. At oxygen levels greater than 50 ppM, the ratio of tritiated water to tritium gas appears to be greater than 10.

  4. Ozone decay on stainless steel and sugarcane bagasse surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souza-Corrêa, Jorge A.; Oliveira, Carlos; Amorim, Jayr

    2013-07-01

    Ozone was generated using dielectric barrier discharges at atmospheric pressure to treat sugarcane bagasse for bioethanol production. It was shown that interaction of ozone molecules with the pretreatment reactor wall (stainless steel) needs to be considered during bagasse oxidation in order to evaluate the pretreatment efficiency. The decomposition coefficients for ozone on both materials were determined to be (3.3 ± 0.2) × 10-8 for stainless steel and (2.0 ± 0.3) × 10-7 for bagasse. The results have indicated that ozone decomposition has occurred more efficiently on the biomass material.

  5. 77 FR 60478 - Control of Ferrite Content in Stainless Steel Weld Metal

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-03

    ... COMMISSION Control of Ferrite Content in Stainless Steel Weld Metal AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission... Ferrite Content in Stainless Steel Weld Metal.'' This guide describes a method that the NRC staff considers acceptable for controlling ferrite content in stainless steel weld metal. Revision 4 updates...

  6. 77 FR 3231 - Certain Stainless Steel Wire Rods From India: Continuation of Antidumping Duty Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-23

    ... (``Sunset'') Review, 76 FR 38613 (July 1, 2011); see also Stainless Steel Wire Rod From India; Institution..., 76 FR 38686 (July 1, 2011). \\1\\ Antidumping Duty Order: Certain Stainless Steel Wire Rods from India... the United States within a reasonably foreseeable time. See Stainless Steel Wire Rod From India, 77...

  7. 77 FR 27815 - Aging Management of Stainless Steel Structures and Components in Treated Borated Water

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-11

    ... COMMISSION Aging Management of Stainless Steel Structures and Components in Treated Borated Water AGENCY..., ``Aging Management of Stainless Steel Structures and Components in Treated Borated Water.'' This LR-ISG... stainless steel structures and components exposed to treated borated water. The NRC published Revision 2...

  8. 76 FR 31585 - Forged Stainless Steel Flanges From India: Notice of Rescission of Antidumping Duty...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-01

    ... International Trade Administration Forged Stainless Steel Flanges From India: Notice of Rescission of... stainless steel flanges from India. The period of review is February 1, 2010, through January 22, 2011... stainless steel flanges from India. See Antidumping or Countervailing Duty Order, Finding, or...

  9. 77 FR 31578 - Stainless Steel Bar From Japan: Initiation and Preliminary Results of Antidumping Duty Changed...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-29

    ... Stainless, Outokumpu Stainless Bar, Inc., Universal Stainless & Alloy Products, Inc., and Valbruna Slater..., and Japan, 60 FR 9661 (Feb. 21, 1995). \\6\\ See generally Suruga's Letter to the Department, dated... Revocation in Part, and Deferral of Administrative Review, 77 FR 19179 (March 30, 2012). \\10\\ See id. at...

  10. 46 CFR 151.55-1 - General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... liquid. (Equivalent to § 151.56-1(a) and (b).) (g) Aluminum, stainless steel, or steel covered with a... stainless steel shall be used as materials of construction. For concentrations of less than 98 percent, 304L or 316 stainless steel shall be used as materials of construction. (j) Zinc, alloys that have...

  11. 49 CFR 178.358-5 - Required markings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... inner shell is constructed of stainless steel, additional marking such as “304L-SS” are to be marked on the outside of the overpack to indicate the type of stainless steel used. (2) For Specification 21PF-1... 11 inches wide × 15 inches long (28 cm × 38 cm), fabricated of 16 to 20 gauge stainless steel...

  12. 49 CFR 178.358-5 - Required markings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... inner shell is constructed of stainless steel, additional marking such as “304L-SS” are to be marked on the outside of the overpack to indicate the type of stainless steel used. (2) For Specification 21PF-1... 11 inches wide × 15 inches long (28 cm × 38 cm), fabricated of 16 to 20 gauge stainless steel...

  13. 49 CFR 178.358-5 - Required markings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... inner shell is constructed of stainless steel, additional marking such as “304L-SS” are to be marked on the outside of the overpack to indicate the type of stainless steel used. (2) For Specification 21PF-1... 11 inches wide × 15 inches long (28 cm × 38 cm), fabricated of 16 to 20 gauge stainless steel...

  14. A study of chromium carbide precipitation at interphase boundaries in stainless steel welds

    SciTech Connect

    Willis, C.F.

    1990-04-01

    Sensitization is a deleterious process which can occur in stainless steels. It is caused by grain boundary or phase boundary precipitation of chromium carbides and the resulting formation of a chromium depleted zone adjacent to these boundaries. The carbides in question actually have the composition (Cr,Fe){sub 23}C{sub 6} (usually written M{sub 23}C{sub 6}), and precipitate in the temperature range 450--900{degree}C. Since a minimum chromium content is required to maintain the passive film necessary for resistance to electrochemical attack, the result of chromium depletion is that the steel becomes sensitized'' to possible intergranular corrosion. Sensitization often occurs as a result of welding operations. The material close to the fusion line reaches temperatures within the sensitization range. This region is called the heat affected zone (HAZ). Since many welds are multi-pass welds, the actual weld bead of one pass may lie in the heat affected zone of the next pass. The weld bead of the first pass might therefore be sensitized. Furthermore there are applications where welds will be exposed to sensitizing temperatures for very long periods of time, such as welded labels on retrievable nuclear waste containers. For these reasons the sensitization behavior of the actual weld-bead microstructures must be understood. It has been known for many years that duplex stainless steels (steels with both ferrite and austenite phases present at room temperature) have superior resistance to intergranular corrosion. A model has been proposed to explain the sensitization behavior of these alloys. This work will be concerned with testing the validity of aspects of this model using transmission electron microscopy and further understanding of the sensitization process in duplex stainless steel welds. 52 refs., 23 figs.

  15. A multi-level code for metallurgical effects in metal-forming processes

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, P.A.; Silling, S.A.; Hughes, D.A.; Bammann, D.J.; Chiesa, M.L.

    1997-08-01

    The authors present the final report on a Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project, A Multi-level Code for Metallurgical Effects in metal-Forming Processes, performed during the fiscal years 1995 and 1996. The project focused on the development of new modeling capabilities for simulating forging and extrusion processes that typically display phenomenology occurring on two different length scales. In support of model fitting and code validation, ring compression and extrusion experiments were performed on 304L stainless steel, a material of interest in DOE nuclear weapons applications.

  16. Thermomechanical behavior of an austenitic stainless steel powder during hot isostatic pressing

    SciTech Connect

    Bouaziz, O.; Baccino, R.; Dellis, C.; Moret, F.

    1996-12-31

    Near-net-shape Hot Isostatic Pressing of powder can be an alternative technique to manufacture complex stainless steel parts for nuclear industry that are produced today by casting. Such a development requires the use of a numerical modelling code in order to predict the exact shape of the densified part. CEA/CEREM has developed a FEM code including Abouaf`s model to simulate the powder thermomechanical behavior. An extensive experimental program has been defined to determine Abouaf`s model parameters for a gas atomized austenitic stainless steel powder (AISI 316LN). In contrast to previous experimental works that were essentially focused on densification at stabilized forming temperature (1,125 C in the authors` case), this study was also concerned by the temperature and pressure raising stage in which the major deformations occur. This paper presents, in a first part, the HIP and uniaxial compression tests results in a very large temperature range from 800 to 1,125 C. The second part is devoted to the microstructural evolution of the material with temperature, pressure and density.

  17. Synergistic Computational and Microstructural Design of Next- Generation High-Temperature Austenitic Stainless Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Karaman, Ibrahim; Arroyave, Raymundo

    2015-07-31

    -forming austenitic stainless steel, is fully austenitic, but possesses carbides that were not dissolvable and could not be controlled. This alloy also did not show deformation twinning. Alloy 2 was designed based on alloy 1, but was not fully austenitic and had significant traces of uncontrollable precipitates as well. Alloy 3, also designed based on alloy 1, was mainly austenitic with evolution of a second phase along the grain boundaries, but also had precipitates that were not controllable. Based on the knowledge gained from the first generation of the designed steels, two more steels, called PGAA1 and PGAA2, were proposed using genetic algorithms that, based on the modelling, were supposed to exhibit alumina-scale formation. PGAA1, however, did not demonstrate a fully austenitic structure. PGAA2 could achieve a mostly austenitic structure through thermo-mechanical processing, and was then used for oxidation tests. The oxidation tests of PGAA2, with and without nitrogen impurities, along with alloy 1, suggested that PGAA2 can form alumina-scale similar to alloy 1, but N impurity will prevent formation of such a scale, probably through formation of aluminum nitrides. For the above mentioned genetic algorithm framework of alloy design, separate models were developed for specific design criteria. For prediction of alumina formation in stainless steels, a model was constructed based off of two criteria – effective valence and third element effect. These criteria capture the thermodynamics and kinetics of alumina formation in steels. To test the efficacy and robustness of this model, they were tested against alloys in the literature which had been experimentally verified to exhibit alumina formation and the predictions were in excellent agreement with the experiments. Another meta-model for prediction of twinning in unknown steel compositions was developed by an informatics based machine learning/data mining approach. Stacking Fault Energy data was captured from the literature for a

  18. Effect of ultrafine grain on tensile behaviour and corrosion resistance of the duplex stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Jinlong, Lv; Tongxiang, Liang; Chen, Wang; Limin, Dong

    2016-05-01

    The ultrafine grained 2205 duplex stainless steel was obtained by cold rolling and annealing. The tensile properties were investigated at room temperature. Comparing with coarse grained stainless steel, ultrafine grained sample showed higher strength and plasticity. In addition, grain size changed deformation orientation. The strain induced α'-martensite was observed in coarse grained 2205 duplex stainless steel with large strain. However, the grain refinement inhibited the transformation of α'-martensite;nevertheless, more deformation twins improved the strength and plasticity of ultrafine grained 2205 duplex stainless steel. In addition, the grain refinement improved corrosion resistance of the 2205 duplex stainless steel in sodium chloride solution. PMID:26952459

  19. Effect of ultrafine grain on tensile behaviour and corrosion resistance of the duplex stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Jinlong, Lv; Tongxiang, Liang; Chen, Wang; Limin, Dong

    2016-05-01

    The ultrafine grained 2205 duplex stainless steel was obtained by cold rolling and annealing. The tensile properties were investigated at room temperature. Comparing with coarse grained stainless steel, ultrafine grained sample showed higher strength and plasticity. In addition, grain size changed deformation orientation. The strain induced α'-martensite was observed in coarse grained 2205 duplex stainless steel with large strain. However, the grain refinement inhibited the transformation of α'-martensite;nevertheless, more deformation twins improved the strength and plasticity of ultrafine grained 2205 duplex stainless steel. In addition, the grain refinement improved corrosion resistance of the 2205 duplex stainless steel in sodium chloride solution.

  20. 73. View of line of stainless steel coolant storage tanks ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    73. View of line of stainless steel coolant storage tanks for bi-sodium sulfate/water coolant solution at first floor of transmitter building no. 102. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  1. Metal release from stainless steel in biological environments: A review.

    PubMed

    Hedberg, Yolanda S; Odnevall Wallinder, Inger

    2016-03-01

    Due to its beneficial corrosion resistance, stainless steel is widely used in, e.g., biomedical applications, as surfaces in food contact, and for products intended to come into skin contact. Low levels of metals can be released from the stainless steel surface into solution, even for these highly corrosion resistant alloys. This needs to be considered in risk assessment and management. This review aims to compile the different metal release mechanisms that are relevant for stainless steel when used in different biological settings. These mechanisms include corrosion-induced metal release, dissolution of the surface oxide, friction-induced metal release, and their combinations. The influence of important physicochemical surface properties, different organic species and proteins in solution, and of biofilm formation on corrosion-induced metal release is discussed. Chemical and electrochemical dissolution mechanisms of the surface oxides of stainless steel are presented with a focus on protonation, complexation/ligand-induced dissolution, and reductive dissolution by applying a perspective on surface adsorption of complexing or reducing ligands and proteins. The influence of alloy composition, microstructure, route of manufacture, and surface finish on the metal release process is furthermore discussed as well as the chemical speciation of released metals. Typical metal release patterns are summarized. PMID:26514345

  2. Electrochemically induced annealing of stainless-steel surfaces.

    PubMed

    Burstein, G T; Hutchings, I M; Sasaki, K

    2000-10-19

    Modification of the surface properties of metals without affecting their bulk properties is of technological interest in demanding applications where surface stability and hardness are important. When austenitic stainless steel is heavily plastically deformed by grinding or rolling, a martensitic phase transformation occurs that causes significant changes in the bulk and surface mechanical properties of the alloy. This martensitic phase can also be generated in stainless-steel surfaces by cathodic charging, as a consequence of lattice strain generated by absorbed hydrogen. Heat treatment of the steel to temperatures of several hundred degrees can result in loss of the martensitic structure, but this alters the bulk properties of the alloy. Here we show that martensitic structures in stainless steel can be removed by appropriate electrochemical treatment in aqueous solutions at much lower temperature than conventional annealing treatments. This electrochemically induced annealing process allows the hardness of cold-worked stainless steels to be maintained, while eliminating the brittle martensitic phase from the surface. Using this approach, we are able to anneal the surface and near-surface regions of specimens that contain rolling-induced martensite throughout their bulk, as well as those containing surface martensite induced by grinding. Although the origin of the electrochemical annealing process still needs further clarification, we expect that this treatment will lead to further development in enhancing the surface properties of metals.

  3. Electrochemically induced annealing of stainless-steel surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burstein, G. T.; Hutchings, I. M.; Sasaki, K.

    2000-10-01

    Modification of the surface properties of metals without affecting their bulk properties is of technological interest in demanding applications where surface stability and hardness are important. When austenitic stainless steel is heavily plastically deformed by grinding or rolling, a martensitic phase transformation occurs that causes significant changes in the bulk and surface mechanical properties of the alloy. This martensitic phase can also be generated in stainless-steel surfaces by cathodic charging, as a consequence of lattice strain generated by absorbed hydrogen. Heat treatment of the steel to temperatures of several hundred degrees can result in loss of the martensitic structure, but this alters the bulk properties of the alloy. Here we show that martensitic structures in stainless steel can be removed by appropriate electrochemical treatment in aqueous solutions at much lower temperature than conventional annealing treatments. This electrochemically induced annealing process allows the hardness of cold-worked stainless steels to be maintained, while eliminating the brittle martensitic phase from the surface. Using this approach, we are able to anneal the surface and near-surface regions of specimens that contain rolling-induced martensite throughout their bulk, as well as those containing surface martensite induced by grinding. Although the origin of the electrochemical annealing process still needs further clarification, we expect that this treatment will lead to further development in enhancing the surface properties of metals.

  4. Materials data handbook: Stainless steel alloy A-286

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muraca, R. F.; Whittick, J. S.

    1972-01-01

    A summary of the materials property information for stainless steel alloy A-286 is presented. The scope of the information includes physical and mechanical properties at cryogenic, ambient, and elevated temperatures. Information on material procurement, metallurgy of the alloy, corrosion, environmental effects, fabrication, and bonding is developed.

  5. Pitting corrosion of low-Cr austenitic stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Bullard, Sophie J.; Covino, Bernard S. Jr.

    1996-01-01

    The Albany Research Center has investigated the pitting corrosion resistance of experimental low-Cr stainless steels and several commercial stainless steels in chloride-containing aqueous and atmospheric environments. Previous research had shown the experimental alloys to be as corrosion resistant as commercial stainless steels in chloride-free acid environments. The alloys studied were Fe-8Cr-16Ni-5.5Si-1Cu-(0-1)Mo, 304 SS, and 316 SS. These alloys were examined by immersion and electrochemical tests in 3.5 wt. pct. NaCl and 6 wt.pct.FeCl{sub 3}. Results of these tests showed that the addition of one weight percent Mo improved the pitting resistance of the low-Cr alloy and that the Mo-containing experimental alloy was as resistant to pitting as the commercial alloys. Electrochemical tests did, however, show the experimental alloys to be slightly less resistant to pitting than the commercial alloys. Because of these results, the low-Cr alloy with one weight percent Mo and 304 SS were exposed for one year to a marine atmospheric environment on the coast of Oregon. The marine atmospheric corrosion resistance of the low-Cr alloy was found to be comparable to that for type 304 stainless steel.

  6. 77 FR 1504 - Stainless Steel Wire Rod From India

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-10

    ... Commission instituted this review on July 1, 2011 (76 FR 38686) and determined on October 4, 2011, that it would conduct an expedited review (76 FR 64105, October 17, 2011). The Commission transmitted its... COMMISSION Stainless Steel Wire Rod From India Determination On the basis of the record \\1\\ developed in...

  7. Failure Assessment Diagram for Brazed 304 Stainless Steel Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flom, Yory

    2011-01-01

    Interaction equations were proposed earlier to predict failure in Albemet 162 brazed joints. Present study demonstrates that the same interaction equations can be used for lower bound estimate of the failure criterion in 304 stainless steel joints brazed with silver-based filler metals as well as for construction of the Failure Assessment Diagrams (FAD).

  8. Method of forming dynamic membrane on stainless steel support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaddis, Joseph L. (Inventor); Brandon, Craig A. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    A suitable member formed from sintered, powdered, stainless steel is contacted with a nitrate solution of a soluble alkali metal nitrate and a metal such as zirconium in a pH range and for a time sufficient to effect the formation of a membrane of zirconium oxide preferably including an organic polymeric material such as polyacrylic acid.

  9. Metal release from stainless steel in biological environments: A review.

    PubMed

    Hedberg, Yolanda S; Odnevall Wallinder, Inger

    2015-03-29

    Due to its beneficial corrosion resistance, stainless steel is widely used in, e.g., biomedical applications, as surfaces in food contact, and for products intended to come into skin contact. Low levels of metals can be released from the stainless steel surface into solution, even for these highly corrosion resistant alloys. This needs to be considered in risk assessment and management. This review aims to compile the different metal release mechanisms that are relevant for stainless steel when used in different biological settings. These mechanisms include corrosion-induced metal release, dissolution of the surface oxide, friction-induced metal release, and their combinations. The influence of important physicochemical surface properties, different organic species and proteins in solution, and of biofilm formation on corrosion-induced metal release is discussed. Chemical and electrochemical dissolution mechanisms of the surface oxides of stainless steel are presented with a focus on protonation, complexation/ligand-induced dissolution, and reductive dissolution by applying a perspective on surface adsorption of complexing or reducing ligands and proteins. The influence of alloy composition, microstructure, route of manufacture, and surface finish on the metal release process is furthermore discussed as well as the chemical speciation of released metals. Typical metal release patterns are summarized.

  10. 2. GENERAL VIEW OF STAINLESS STEEL SMOKEHOUSES ON LEVEL 6, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. GENERAL VIEW OF STAINLESS STEEL SMOKEHOUSES ON LEVEL 6, LOOKING EAST; SMOKEHOUSE UNITS WERE BUILT BY DRYING SYSTEMS COMPANY, DIVISION OF MICHIGAN OVEN COMPANY, MORTON GROVE, ILLINOIS - Rath Packing Company, Smokehouse-Hog Chilling Building, Sycamore Street between Elm & Eighteenth Streets, Waterloo, Black Hawk County, IA

  11. 6. DETAIL OF STAINLESS STEEL VISCERA CHUTE IN SOUTHEAST CORNER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. DETAIL OF STAINLESS STEEL VISCERA CHUTE IN SOUTHEAST CORNER OF LEVEL4; ENTRAILS WERE DROPPED INTO CHUTE, THEN PASSED THROUGH THE FLOOR TO THE GUT SHANTY ON LEVEL 3 TO BE SORTED AND CLEANED - Rath Packing Company, Hog Dressing Building, Sycamore Street between Elm & Eighteenth Streets, Waterloo, Black Hawk County, IA

  12. Alternative to Nitric Acid for Passivation of Stainless Steel Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Pattie L.; Kolody, Mark; Curran, Jerry

    2013-01-01

    Corrosion is an extensive problem that affects the Department of Defense (DoD) and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The deleterious effects of corrosion result in steep costs, asset downtime affecting mission readiness, and safety risks to personnel. Consequently, it is vital to reduce corrosion costs and risks in a sustainable manner. The DoD and NASA have numerous structures and equipment that are fabricated from stainless steel. The standard practice for protection of stainless steel is a process called passivation. Typical passivation procedures call for the use of nitric acid; however, there are a number of environmental, worker safety, and operational issues associated with its use. Citric acid offers a variety of benefits including increased safety for personnel, reduced environmental impact, and reduced operational cost. DoD and NASA agreed to collaborate to validate citric acid as an acceptable passivating agent for stainless steel. This paper details our investigation of prior work developing the citric acid passivation process, development of the test plan, optimization of the process for specific stainless steel alloys, ongoing and planned testing to elucidate the process' resistance to corrosion in comparison to nitric acid, and preliminary results.

  13. Cataract Section Across Temporary Stainless-Steel Sutures

    PubMed Central

    MacDonald, R. Keith

    1965-01-01

    The purpose of the technique described was to combine the advantages of a cleanedged Graefe-knife incision with those of safety and near-perfect apposition offered by preplaced sutures: a preliminary to cataract extraction. Uncuttable preplaced 2-mm. stainless steel sutures were finally replaced after completion of the incision by attached braided silk for closure purposes. PMID:14291461

  14. Battery and fuel cell electrodes containing stainless steel charging additive

    DOEpatents

    Zuckerbrod, David; Gibney, Ann

    1984-01-01

    An electrode for use in electrochemical energy cells is made, comprising a hydrophilic layer and a hydrophobic layer, where the hydrophilic layer comprises a hydrophilic composite which includes: (i) carbon particles; (ii) stainless steel particles; (iii) a nonwetting agent; and (iv) a catalyst, where at least one current collector contacts said composite.

  15. 80 FR 29350 - Nonmetallic Thermal Insulation for Austenitic Stainless Steel

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2015-05-21

    ... Doc No: 2015-12292] NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [NRC-2014-0209] Nonmetallic Thermal Insulation for..., ``Nonmetallic Thermal Insulation for Austenitic Stainless Steel.'' The RG describes methods and procedures that... using nonmetallic thermal insulation to minimize any contamination that could promote stress-...

  16. 2012 ACCOMPLISHMENTS - TRITIUM AGING STUDIES ON STAINLESS STEELS

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, M.

    2013-01-31

    This report summarizes the research and development accomplishments during FY12 for the tritium effects on materials program. The tritium effects on materials program is designed to measure the long-term effects of tritium and its radioactive decay product, helium-3, on the structural properties of forged stainless steels which are used as the materials of construction for tritium reservoirs. The FY12 R&D accomplishments include: (1) Fabricated and Thermally-Charged 150 Forged Stainless Steel Samples with Tritium for Future Aging Studies; (2) Developed an Experimental Plan for Measuring Cracking Thresholds of Tritium-Charged-and-Aged Steels in High Pressure Hydrogen Gas; (3) Calculated Sample Tritium Contents For Laboratory Inventory Requirements and Environmental Release Estimates; (4) Published report on “Cracking Thresholds and Fracture Toughness Properties of Tritium-Charged-and-Aged Stainless Steels”; and, (5) Published report on “The Effects of Hydrogen, Tritium, and Heat Treatment on the Deformation and Fracture Toughness Properties of Stainless Steels”. These accomplishments are highlighted here and references given to additional reports for more detailed information.

  17. Bactericidal behavior of Cu-containing stainless steel surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiangyu; Huang, Xiaobo; Ma, Yong; Lin, Naiming; Fan, Ailan; Tang, Bin

    2012-10-01

    Stainless steels are one of the most common materials used in health care environments. However, the lack of antibacterial advantage has limited their use in practical application. In this paper, antibacterial stainless steel surfaces with different Cu contents have been prepared by plasma surface alloying technology (PSAT). The steel surface with Cu content 90 wt.% (Cu-SS) exhibits strong bactericidal activity against Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) within 3 h. Although the Cu-containing surface with Cu content 2.5 wt.% (CuNi-SS) can also kill all tested bacteria, this process needs 12 h. SEM observation of the bacterial morphology and an agarose gel electrophoresis were performed to study the antibacterial mechanism of Cu-containing stainless steel surfaces against E. coli. The results indicated that Cu ions are released when the Cu-containing surfaces are in contact with bacterial and disrupt the cell membranes, killing the bacteria. The toxicity of Cu-alloyed surfaces does not cause damage to the bacterial DNA. These results provide a scientific explanation for the antimicrobial applications of Cu-containing stainless steel. The surfaces with different antibacterial abilities could be used as hygienic surfaces in healthcare-associated settings according to the diverse requirement of bactericidal activities.

  18. Phase formation at bonded vanadium and stainless steel interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Summers, T.S.E.

    1992-01-01

    The interface between vanadium bonded to stainless steel was studies to determine whether a brittle phase formed during three joining operations. Inertia friction welds between V and 21-6-9 stainless steel were examined using TEM. In the as-welded condition, a continuous, polygranular intermetallic layer about 0.25 {mu}m thick was present at the interface. This layer grew to about 50 {mu}m thick during heat treatment at 1000{degrees}C for two hours. Analysis of electron diffraction patterns confirmed that this intermetallic was the {omega} phase. The interface between vanadium and type 304, SANDVIK SAF 2205, and 21-6-9 stainless steel bonded by a co-extrusion process had intermetallic particles at the interface in the as-extruded condition. Heat treatment at 1000{degrees}C for two hours caused these particles to grow into continuous layers in all three cases. Based on the appearance, composition and hardness of this interfacial intermetallic, it was also concluded to be {omega} phase. Bonding V to type 430 stainless steel by co-extrusion caused V-rich carbides to form at the interface due to the higher concentration of C in the type 430 than in the other stainless steels investigated. The carbide particles initially present grew into a continuous layer during a two-hour heat treatment at 1000{degrees}C. Co-hipping 21-6-9 stainless steel tubing with V rod resulted in slightly more concentric specimens than the co-extruded ones, but a continuous layer of the {omega} phase formed during the hipping operation. This brittle layer could initiate failure during subsequent forming operations. The vanadium near the stainless steel interface in the co-extruded and co-hipped tubing in some cases was harder than before heat treatment. It was concluded that this hardening was due to thermal straining during cooling following heat treatment and that thermal strains might present a greater problem than seen here when longer tubes are used in actual applications.

  19. Development of a chromium-free consumable for joining stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sowards, Jeffrey William

    effective weld strengtheners. Varestraint testing revealed that weld deposits have a higher solidification cracking susceptibility than stainless steel consumables used to join Type 304. Higher cracking susceptibility was attributed to austenitic solidification of the weld metal resulting in increased weld segregation and stabilization of a TiC eutectic reaction at the end of solidification. No solidification cracks were observed in actual weld deposits. Evaluation of weld microsegregation patterns showed higher dilutions of Type 304 increased segregation of Ti, promoting a TiC eutectic reaction at the end of solidification. Thermodynamic modeling techniques were used to describe the solidification the Ni-Cu weld deposits as a function of dilution with Type 304. Solidification cracking susceptibility was shown to increase with dilution during evaluation with the Cast Pin Tear Test indicating high dilution welds should be avoided to minimize solidification cracking during welding. The Strain-to-fracture test was used to examine DDC cracking susceptibility, and revealed that this alloy has a higher susceptibility to solid-state weld cracking than austenitic stainless alloys such as 304. Threshold strain levels necessary to initiate cracking in the weld deposits were in the range of 2 to 3%. These values are comparable to other Ni-base alloys with a moderate to high susceptibility to DDC. Fume generation rates (FGR) of the new consumable were measured and bulk fume phases were analyzed with X-ray diffraction. FGR values were found to be similar to current SMAW and flux cored arc welding consumables. No chromium bearing compounds were observed during X-ray diffraction measurements, and the bulk fume consisted primarily of halides and metallic-oxides. Fume generated by the new consumable was subjected to colorimetric testing showing hexavalent Cr content (0.02 wt-%) was reduced by two orders of magnitude compared to E308-16 (2.6 wt-%). The source of this hexavalent chromium was

  20. Stainless steel cookware as a significant source of nickel, chromium, and iron.

    PubMed

    Kuligowski, J; Halperin, K M

    1992-08-01

    Stainless steels are widely used materials in food preparation and in home and commercial cookware. Stainless is readily attacked by organic acids, particularly at cooking temperatures; hence iron, chromium, and nickel should be released from the material into the food. Nickel is implicated in numerous health problems, notably allergic contact dermatitis. Conversely, chromium and iron are essential nutrients for which stainless could be a useful source. Home cookware was examined by atomic absorption spectroscopy: seven different stainless utensils as well as cast iron, mild steel, aluminum and enamelled steel. The materials were exposed to mildly acidic conditions at boiling temperature. Nickel was a major corrosion product from stainless steel utensils; chromium and iron were also detected. It is recommended that nickel-sensitive patients switch to a material other than stainless, and that the stainless steel cookware industry seriously consider switching to a non-nickel formulation.

  1. Simulations of spall experiments in 316L stainless steel conducted with square and triangular waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seaman, Lynn; Gray, G. T.(Rusty), III

    2005-07-01

    Triangular stress waves are more like those from applications (laser, explosives, nuclear) but laboratory experiments for studying spall damage generally provide square-topped waves. Gray et al (2003) performed four impact experiments in 316L stainless steel, two with square waves and two with triangular, achieving void damage in all but the lower-stress (6.6 GPa) triangular-wave sample. Simulations with the nucleation-and-growth model DFRACT exhibit fair correspondence with the damage in those tests showing damage, but also indicate damage in the triangular-wave test showing no damage. We are examining mechanisms which may delay the initiation of void damage or otherwise alter the expected damage processes in the model. Reference: G.T. (Rusty) Gray III, N. K. Bourne, B.L. Henrie, and J.C.F. Millet, Influence of Shock-Wave Profile Shape (Triangular ``Taylor-Wave'' versus Square-Topped) on the Spallation Response of 316L Stainless Steel, J. Phys. IV France 110 (2003), page 773-778,

  2. The effect of martensitic stainless steel microstructure on the ultrasonic inspection of turbine runner joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boukani, Hamid Habibzadeh; Chentouf, Samir Mourad; Viens, Martin; Tahan, Antoine; Gagnon, Martin

    2015-03-01

    Martensitic stainless steel runners are widely used in the hydroelectric turbine industry because of their good mechanical properties, cavitation and corrosion resistance. The high downtime cost and limited in-service inspection possibility of these turbine runners increase the need for accurate fatigue models to estimate the life of these equipment. One of the key inputs of these models is the distribution of flaw size and their location near highly stressed area. The critical area is generally located near the welded joint and flaw sizes are estimated using the outcome of nondestructive inspection. In such case, more reliable NDT results will lead to less uncertainty in the life estimation and hence unfavorable consequences, such as unexpected failure during service or non-essential down time for unnecessary inspections, are avoided. Turbine runner welded joints are inspected using ultrasonic refracted shear waves. Considering the dependence of the refracted angle to the shear wave velocity in the material as well as the role of this angle in the precision of defects' localization, the martensitic microstructure effect on sound wave velocity needs to be accurately known. Furthermore, attenuation coefficient, which affects reflected signal amplitude, is an essential data for the evaluation of defect size which is also dependent on microstructure. In this context, dependence of ultrasonic shear wave properties on metallurgical characteristics of martensitic stainless steel was studied. Our objective is to obtain better POD from a more accurate characterization of received indications.

  3. In vitro biocompatibility of plasma-aided surface-modified 316L stainless steel for intracoronary stents.

    PubMed

    Bayram, Cem; Mizrak, Alpay Koray; Aktürk, Selçuk; Kurşaklioğlu, Hurkan; Iyisoy, Atila; Ifran, Ahmet; Denkbaş, Emir Baki

    2010-10-01

    316L-type stainless steel is a raw material mostly used for manufacturing metallic coronary stents. The purpose of this study was to examine the chemical, wettability, cytotoxic and haemocompatibility properties of 316L stainless steel stents which were modified by plasma polymerization. Six different polymeric compounds, polyethylene glycol, 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate, ethylenediamine, acrylic acid, hexamethyldisilane and hexamethyldisiloxane, were used in a radio frequency glow discharge plasma polymerization system. As a model antiproliferative drug, mitomycin-C was chosen for covalent coupling onto the stent surface. Modified SS 316L stents were characterized by water contact angle measurements (goniometer) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. C1s binding energies showed a good correlation with the literature. Haemocompatibility tests of coated SS 316L stents showed significant latency (t-test, p < 0.05) with respect to SS 316L and control groups in each test. PMID:20844318

  4. Study on hierarchical structured PDMS for surface super-hydrophobicity using imprinting with ultrafast laser structured models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bin; Wang, Wenjun; Jiang, Gedong; Mei, Xuesong; Wang, Zibao; Wang, Kedian; Cui, Jianlei

    2016-02-01

    We report a simple and inexpensive method for producing super-hydrophobic surfaces through direct replication of micro/nano-structures on polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) from a replication master prepared by ultrafast-laser texturing process. Gratings were obtained on 304L stainless steel plate using picosecond laser ablation. It has been used as a master with grating areas of different structural features. PDMS negative replica was prepared from the masters, and PDMS positive replica was prepared from the negative replica thereafter. Wettability of samples of the steel master, negative and positive replicas was distinguished using the apparent contact angle (CA) of water drop. Relationships between the CAs on three kinds of samples and structural features were presented. Super-hydrophobic behavior with self-cleaning, exhibited by a water contact angle of 164.5° and sliding angle of 8.44°, was observed on the PDMS negative replica surface. The negative and positive replicas were sputtered on gold films, which were used to metalized PDMS and eliminate the submicron/nano-structures in hierarchical structures. Results prove that submicro/nano-structures of hierarchical structures enhance the hydrophobicity of material surface remarkably. This replication method can be applied for large scale production of micro/nano textured super-hydrophobic surfaces for commercial applications.

  5. Residual stress in the cylindrical drawing cup of SUS304 stainless steel evaluated by split-ring test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Liang-Hong; Yuan, Dao-He; Xiang, Jun-Zhong; Liu, Jin-Gang; Zhou, Yi-Chun

    2016-02-01

    The residual stresses in the wall of a SUS304 stainless steel cylindrical drawing cup were evaluated by split-ring tests, and the influences of stamping die parameters on the residual stress were investigated. A new theoretical model of a split-ring test was developed to evaluate the residual stress in a ring, which was verified to be reasonable and reliable by numerical simulations with ABAQUS code and by nanoindentation tests. Seven groups of split-ring tests were completed, and the residual stresses were calculated according to the theoretical model. The split-ring test results showed that the circumferential residual stress in the wall of the SUS304 stainless steel cylindrical drawing cup was very large and did not change with the different die corner radius. The circumferential residual stress first increased with the increase of drawing punch-die clearance, then was almost unchanged when the clearance increased greater than blank thickness 1 mm. Thus, a smaller clearance was suggested to be chosen to reduce the residual stress in the wall of the SUS304 stainless steel drawing cup.

  6. Residual Stresses in LENS-Deposited AISI 410 Stainless Steel Plates

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, L; Felicellli, S D; Pratt, Phillip R

    2008-01-01

    The residual stress in thin plate components deposited by the laser engineered net shaping (LENS{reg_sign}) process was investigated experimentally and numerically. Neutron diffraction mapping was used to characterize the residual stress in LENS-deposited AISI 410 stainless steel thin wall plates. Using the commercial welding software SYSWELD, a thermo-mechanical three-dimensional finite element model was developed, which considers also the effect of metallurgical phase transformations. The model was employed to predict the temperature history and the residual stress field during the LENS process. Several simulations were performed with the geometry and process parameters that were used to build the experimental samples. The origin of the residual stress distribution is discussed based on the thermal histories of the samples, and the modeling results are compared with measurements obtained by neutron diffraction mapping.

  7. Corrosion resistance of lithium/iodine batteries fabricated in an extremely dry environment

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, W.R.; Holmes, C.F.; Stinebring, R.C.

    1981-10-01

    Early lithium/iodine pacemaker batteries employed considerable amounts of inert plastic materials to encase the active ingredients inside the stainless steel case. Several years ago the Wilson Greatbatch Ltd. (WGL) Model 755 cell was introduced and represented a significant change in lithium/iodine battery construction. In this design (1) the iodinepolyvinylpyridine (PVP) depolarizer material was placed in direct contact with the 304L stainless steel case and much of the inert material was eliminated. This change resulted in obtaining substantially more depolarizer in the battery thereby greatly increasing the electrical capacity for the same cell volume. A study was instituted to evaluate possible corrosion effects between the iodine in the depolarizer and the stainless steel case.

  8. Accelerated corrosion of stainless steel in thiocyanate-containing solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Pistorius, P Chris; Li, Wen

    2012-09-19

    It is known that reduced sulfur compounds (such as thiocyanate and thiosulfate) can accelerate active corrosion of austenitic stainless steel in acid solutions, but before we started this project the mechanism of acceleration was largely unclear. This work combined electrochemical measurements and analysis using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray photo-electron spectroscopy (XPS), which provided a comprehensive understanding of the catalytic effect of reduced sulfur species on the active corrosion of stainless steel. Both the behavior of the pure elements and the steel were studied and the work focused on the interaction between the pure elements of the steel, which is the least understood area. Upon completion of this work, several aspects are now much clearer. The main results from this work can be summarized as follows: The presence of low concentrations (around 0.1 mM) of thiocyanate or tetrathionate in dilute sulfuric acid greatly accelerates the anodic dissolution of chromium and nickel, but has an even stronger effect on stainless steels (iron-chromium-nickel alloys). Electrochemical measurements and surface analyses are in agreement with the suggestion that accelerated dissolution really results from suppressed passivation. Even well below the passivation potential, the electrochemical signature of passivation is evident in the electrode impedance; the electrode impedance shows clearly that this pre-passivation is suppressed in the presence of thiocyanate. For the stainless steels, remarkable changes in the morphology of the corroded metal surface and in the surface concentration of chromium support the suggestion that pre-passivation of stainless steels is suppressed because dissolution of chromium is accelerated. Surface analysis confirmed that adsorbed sulfur / sulfide forms on the metal surfaces upon exposure to solutions containing thiocyanate or thiosulfate. For pure nickel, and steels containing nickel (and residual copper), bulk sulfide

  9. Elastic property ratios of a triple-stranded stainless steel arch wire.

    PubMed

    Kusy, R P; Dilley, G J

    1984-09-01

    The general elastic property ratio equations for nth-stranded wires are derived and then specified for the case of a triple-stranded arch wire. Several parameters are defined, including the modulus of elasticity (E) and the helical spring (kappa) and bending plane (lambda) shape factors. Thereafter, the elastic property ratios of a wide range of compositional/configurational combinations are determined, using a representative triple-stranded 0.0175 inch (3 X 0.008 inch) stainless steel wire as the base line. These results show that the particular 3 X 0.008 inch wire studied possesses the stiffness of an 0.010 inch stainless steel wire but has at least 20% more strength and range. Furthermore, the stiffness of the 3 X 0.008 inch multistranded wire is similar to an 0.016 inch nickel-titanium wire but only 40% that of an 0.016 inch beta titanium wire. When these elastic property ratios are compared with the previous results reported by Thurow, Burstone, and Kusy, differences are noted which can be explained on the basis of the mechanical property values and/or the geometric modeling assumed.

  10. Effect of Austenitizing Heat Treatment on the Microstructure and Hardness of Martensitic Stainless Steel AISI 420

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barlow, L. D.; Du Toit, M.

    2012-07-01

    The effect of austenitizing on the microstructure and hardness of two martensitic stainless steels was examined with the aim of supplying heat-treatment guidelines to the user that will ensure a martensitic structure with minimal retained austenite, evenly dispersed carbides and a hardness of between 610 and 740 HV (Vickers hardness) after quenching and tempering. The steels examined during the course of this examination conform in composition to medium-carbon AISI 420 martensitic stainless steel, except for the addition of 0.13% vanadium and 0.62% molybdenum to one of the alloys. Steel samples were austenitized at temperatures between 1000 and 1200 °C, followed by oil quenching. The as-quenched microstructures were found to range from almost fully martensitic structures to martensite with up to 35% retained austenite after quenching, with varying amounts of carbides. Optical and scanning electron microscopy was used to characterize the microstructures, and X-ray diffraction was employed to identify the carbide present in the as-quenched structures and to quantify the retained austenite contents. Hardness tests were performed to determine the effect of heat treatment on mechanical properties. As-quenched hardness values ranged from 700 to 270 HV, depending on the amount of retained austenite. Thermodynamic predictions (using the CALPHAD™ model) were employed to explain these microstructures based on the solubility of the carbide particles at various austenitizing temperatures.

  11. Mechanism and estimation of fatigue crack initiation in austenitic stainless steels in LWR environments.

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O. K.; Energy Technology

    2002-08-01

    The ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code provides rules for the construction of nuclear power plant components. Figures I-9.1 through I-9.6 of Appendix I to Section III of the Code specify fatigue design curves for structural materials. However, the effects of light water reactor (LWR) coolant environments are not explicitly addressed by the Code design curves. Existing fatigue strain-vs.-life ({var_epsilon}-N) data illustrate potentially significant effects of LWR coolant environments on the fatigue resistance of pressure vessel and piping steels. This report provides an overview of fatigue crack initiation in austenitic stainless steels in LWR coolant environments. The existing fatigue {var_epsilon}-N data have been evaluated to establish the effects of key material, loading, and environmental parameters (such as steel type, strain range, strain rate, temperature, dissolved-oxygen level in water, and flow rate) on the fatigue lives of these steels. Statistical models are presented for estimating the fatigue {var_epsilon}-N curves for austenitic stainless steels as a function of the material, loading, and environmental parameters. Two methods for incorporating environmental effects into the ASME Code fatigue evaluations are presented. The influence of reactor environments on the mechanism of fatigue crack initiation in these steels is also discussed.

  12. Characterization of the thrombogenic potential of surface oxides on stainless steel for implant purposes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, Chun-Che; Shih, Chun-Ming; Su, Yea-Yang; Chang, Mau-Song; Lin, Shing-Jong

    2003-12-01

    Marketed stents are manufactured from various metals and passivated with different degrees of surface oxidation. The functional surface oxides on the degree of antithrombotic potential were explored through a canine femoral extracorporeal circuit model. Related properties of these oxide films were studied by open-circuit potential, current density detected at open-circuit potential, the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, Auger spectroscopy (AES), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and scanning electron microscopy. Experimental evidences showed that blood clot weight after a 30-min follow-up was significantly lower for the stainless steel wire passivated with amorphous oxide (AO) compared to the wire passivated with polycrystalline oxide (PO) or commercial as-received wire coils (AS). Surface characterizations showed that a stable negative current density at open-circuit potential and a significant lower potential were found for the wire surface passivated with AO than for the surface passivated with PO. Time constant of AO is about 25 times larger than that of polycrystalline oxide. Significant difference in oxide grain sizes was found between PO and AO. Surface chemistries revealed by the AES and XPS spectra indicated the presence of a Cr- and oxygen-rich surface oxide for AO, and a Fe-rich and oxygen-lean surface oxide for PO. These remarkable characteristics of AO surface film might have a potential to provide for excellent antithrombotic characteristics for the 316L stainless steel stents.

  13. Analysis of tensile deformation and failure in austenitic stainless steels: Part II - Irradiation dose dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jin Weon; Byun, Thak Sang

    2010-01-01

    Irradiation effects on the stable and unstable deformation and fracture behavior of austenitic stainless steels (SSs) have been studied in detail based on the equivalent true stress versus true strain curves. An iterative finite element simulation technique was used to obtain the equivalent true stress-true strain data from experimental tensile curves. The simulation result showed that the austenitic stainless steels retained high strain hardening rate during unstable deformation even after significant irradiation. The strain hardening rate was independent of irradiation dose up to the initiation of a localized necking. Similarly, the equivalent fracture stress was nearly independent of dose before the damage (embrittlement) mechanism changed. The fracture strain and tensile fracture energy decreased with dose mostly in the low dose range <˜2 dpa and reached nearly saturation values at higher doses. It was also found that the fracture properties for EC316LN SS were less sensitive to irradiation than those for 316 SS, although their uniform tensile properties showed almost the same dose dependencies. It was confirmed that the dose dependence of tensile fracture properties evaluated by the linear approximation model for nominal stress was accurate enough for practical use without elaborate calculations.

  14. Solution Fabrication of a Superconducting MgB2 Coated Conductor on Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yin-Bo; Chen, Li-Ping; Zhang, Chen; Wang, Yue; Guo, Zheng-Shan; Chen, Yi-Ling; Feng, Qing-Rong; Gan, Zi-Zhao

    2012-04-01

    We report the solution fabrication of a MgB2 coated conductor on a stainless steel substrate. The precursor solution of Mg(BH4)2 diethyl ether is initially synthesized by refluxing the milled mixture of NaBH4 and MgCl2 in diethyl ether. Then the Mg(BH4)2 diethyl ether is spin coated on a stainless steel substrate and annealed in Mg vapor, which yields a homogeneous MgB2 coated conductor. X-ray diffraction indicates that the grown MgB2 coated conductor is polycrystalline. It has a superconducting transition temperature of 34-37 K. The slope of the upper critical field HC2 increases with decreasing temperature, and the extrapolated value of HC2(0) reaches ~28 T. The critical current density estimated by the Bean model is JC(25K, 0T)~106 A·cm-2. These parameters indicate that the solution method is potentially able to produce MgB2 coated conductors that can satisfy application purposes.

  15. Development of the novel coating formulations for skin vaccination using stainless steel microneedle.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seong-Jin; Shin, Ju-Hyung; Noh, Jin-Yong; Song, Chang-Seon; Kim, Yeu-Chun

    2016-10-01

    This study focused on the development of novel coating formulations for stainless steel microneedles against influenza A virus. With in vitro studies, various viscosity enhancers and stabilizers were screened based on the hemagglutination activity of the vaccine, which was coated and dried onto a stainless steel chip at room temperature for 1 day. Following the long-term storage test, the hemagglutination activity and particle size of the vaccine, which was formulated with conventional or methylcellulose or hydroxyethyl cellulose and dried onto the microneedle, were monitored. Next, to evaluate the in vivo immunogenicity and protection effect of each dried vaccine formulation, mice were immunized by the antigen-coated microneedle, which had either the conventional or the proposed formulation. Two novel formulations were chosen in the preliminary screening, and in further evaluations, they exhibited a 20 % higher HA activity during storage for 3 months, and no aggregation was observed during storage after drying. In a mouse model, the microneedle with the novel formulation elicited a higher level of IgG and IgG2a was more prevalent in the IgG isotype profile. In addition, mice immunized with the HEC-coated microneedle survived with small weight loss (>90 %) against lethal challenge infection. Overall, the novel formulation hydroxyethyl cellulose preserved significantly higher HA activity during the production and storage of the microneedle as well as improved the in vivo immunogenicity of the vaccine. PMID:27519363

  16. Strain hardening and plastic instability properties of austenitic stainless steels after proton and neutron irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byun, T. S.; Farrell, K.; Lee, E. H.; Hunn, J. D.; Mansur, L. K.

    2001-10-01

    Strain hardening and plastic instability properties were analyzed for EC316LN, HTUPS316, and AL6XN austenitic stainless steels after combined 800 MeV proton and spallation neutron irradiation to doses up to 10.7 dpa. The steels retained good strain-hardening rates after irradiation, which resulted in significant uniform strains. It was found that the instability stress, the stress at the onset of necking, had little dependence on the irradiation dose. Tensile fracture stress and strain were calculated from the stress-strain curve data and were used to estimate fracture toughness using an existing model. The doses to plastic instability and fracture, the accumulated doses at which the yield stress reaches instability stress or fracture stress, were predicted by extrapolation of the yield stress, instability stress, and fracture stress to higher dose. The EC316LN alloy required the highest doses for plastic instability and fracture. Plastic deformation mechanisms are discussed in relation to the strain-hardening properties of the austenitic stainless steels.

  17. Effect of welding parameters on the heat-affected zone of AISI409 ferritic stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranjbarnodeh, Eslam; Hanke, Stefanie; Weiss, Sabine; Fischer, Alfons

    2012-10-01

    One of the main problems during the welding of ferritic stainless steels is severe grain growth within the heat-affected zone (HAZ). In the present study, the microstructural characteristics of tungsten inert gas (TIG) welded AISI409 ferritic stainless steel were investigated by electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD), and the effects of welding parameters on the grain size, local misorientation, and low-angle grain boundaries were studied. A 3-D finite element model (FEM) was developed to predict the effects of welding parameters on the holding time of the HAZ above the critical temperature of grain growth. It is found that the base metal is not fully recrystallized. During the welding, complete recrystallization is followed by severe grain growth. A decrease in the number of low-angle grain boundaries is observed within the HAZ. FEM results show that the final state of residual strains is caused by competition between welding plastic strains and their release by recrystallization. Still, the decisive factor for grain growth is heat input.

  18. Isothermal Calorimetric Observations of the Affect of Welding on Compatibility of Stainless Steels with High-Test Hydrogen Peroxide Propellant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gostowski, Rudy C.

    2002-01-01

    Compatibility is determined by the surface area, the chemical constituency and the surface finish of a material. In this investigation exposed area is obviously not a factor as the welded samples had a slightly smaller surface than the unwelded, but were more reactive. The chemical makeup of welded CRES 316L and welded CRES 304L have been observed in the literature to change from the parent material as chromium and iron are segregated in zones. In particular, the ratio of chromium to iron in CRES 316L increased from 0.260 to 0.79 in the heat affected zone (HAZ) of the weld and to 1.52 in the weld bead itself. In CRES 304L the ratio of chromium to iron increased from 0.280 to 0.44 in the HAZ and to 0.33 in the weld bead. It is possible that the increased reactivity of the welded samples and of those welded without purge gas is due to this segregation phenomenon. Likewise the reactivity increased in keeping with the greater roughness of the welded and welded without purge gas samples. Therefore enhanced roughness may also be responsible for the increased reactivity.

  19. Milling and Drilling Evaluation of Stainless Steel Powder Metallurgy Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Lazarus, L.J.

    2001-12-10

    Near-net-shape components can be made with powder metallurgy (PM) processes. Only secondary operations such as milling and drilling are required to complete these components. In the past and currently production components are made from powder metallurgy (PM) stainless steel alloys. process engineers are unfamiliar with the difference in machining properties of wrought versus PM alloys and have had to make parts to develop the machining parameters. Design engineers are not generally aware that some PM alloy variations can be furnished with machining additives that greatly increase tool life. Specimens from a MANTEC PM alloy property study were made available. This study was undertaken to determine the machining properties of a number of stainless steel wrought and PM alloys under the same conditions so that comparisons of their machining properties could be made and relative tool life determined.

  20. Tensile properties of the modified 13Cr martensitic stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mabruri, Efendi; Anwar, Moch. Syaiful; Prifiharni, Siska; Romijarso, Toni B.; Adjiantoro, Bintang

    2016-04-01

    This paper reports the influence of Mo and Ni on the tensile properties of the modified 13Cr martensitic stainless steels in tempered condition. Four steels with different content of Mo and Ni were prepared by induction melting followed by hot forging, quenching and tempering. The experimental results showed that the addition of about 1% and 3% Mo has a beneficial effect to increase both the tensile strength and the elongation of the steels. On the contrary, the addition of about 3% Ni into the martensitic stainless steel results in decreasing of both the tensile strength and the elongation. Among the alloys investigated the 13Cr3Mo type steel exhibited largest tensile strength of 1348 MPa and largest elongation of 12%. The observation on the tensile fractured surfaces by using scanning electron microscope supported these findings.

  1. Spray etching 2 µm features in 304 stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Sudipta; Ujihara, Motoki; Lee, Dong Gun; Chen, Jerry; Lei, Stanley; Carman, Greg P.

    2006-12-01

    304 stainless steel samples were patterned with either a photoresist (PR) mask or a silicon nitride (Si3Ni4) mask and then subjected to either wet immersion etching or spray etching techniques with ferric chloride (FeCl3). The silicon nitride mask provides much better adhesion to the stainless steel substrate resulting in less undercut compared to the PR mask. When a silicon nitride mask was subjected to spray etching, better adhesion and less undercut enabled features as small as 1.8 µm with an etch depth of 5.6 µm. This is an order of magnitude smaller than current spray etching techniques (20-50 µm) used in the steel industry. This procedure will allow spray etching features for batch fabrication for a variety of metals including steels, aluminum, nickel-based alloys and copper-based alloys with microscale resolution.

  2. Electrochemical Corrosion Testing of Borated Stainless Steel Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    lister, tedd e; Mizia, Ronald E

    2007-09-01

    The Department of Energy Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management has specified borated stainless steel manufactured to the requirements of ASTM A 887-89, Grade A, UNS S30464, to be the material used for the fabrication of the fuel basket internals of the preliminary transportation, aging, and disposal canister system preliminary design. The long-term corrosion resistance performance of this class of borated materials must be verified when exposed to expected YMP repository conditions after a waste package breach. Electrochemical corrosion tests were performed on crevice corrosion coupons of Type 304 B4 and Type 304 B5 borated stainless steels exposed to single postulated in-package chemistry at 60°C. The results show low corrosion rates for the test period

  3. Electrochemical Corrosion Testing of Borated Stainless Steel Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    lister, tedd e; Mizia, Ronald E

    2007-05-01

    The Department of Energy Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management has specified borated stainless steel manufactured to the requirements of ASTM A 887-89, Grade A, UNS S30464, to be the material used for the fabrication of the fuel basket internals of the preliminary transportation, aging, and disposal canister system preliminary design. The long-term corrosion resistance performance of this class of borated materials must be verified when exposed to expected YMP repository conditions after a waste package breach. Electrochemical corrosion tests were performed on crevice corrosion coupons of Type 304 B4 and Type 304 B5 borated stainless steels exposed to single postulated in-package chemistry at 60°C. The results show low corrosion rates for the test period

  4. Long-Term Underground Corrosion of Stainless Steels

    SciTech Connect

    M. K. Adler Flitton; T. S. Yoder

    2007-03-01

    In 1970, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) implemented the most ambitious and comprehensive long-term corrosion behavior test to date for stainless steels in soil environments. Over thirty years later, one of the six test sites was targeted to research subsurface contamination and transport processes in the vadose and saturated zones. This research directly applies to environmental management operational corrosion issues and long term stewardship scientific needs for understanding the behavior of waste forms and their near-field contaminant transport of chemical and radiological contaminants at nuclear disposal sites. This paper briefly describes the ongoing research and the corrosion analysis results of the stainless steel plate specimens recovered from the partial recovery of the first test site.

  5. Achievement of a superpolish on bare stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Howells, M.R.; Casstevens, J.

    1997-08-01

    We report the achievement of a superpolished surface, suitable for x-ray reflection, on bare stainless steel. The rms roughness obtained on various samples varied from 2.2 to 4.2 {angstrom}, as measured by an optical profiler with a bandwidth 0.29-100 mm{sup -1}. The type 17-4 PH precipitation-hardening stainless steel used to make the mirrors is also capable of ultrastability and has good manufactureability. This combination of properties makes it an excellent candidate material for mirror substrates. We describe the successful utilization of this type of steel in making elliptical-cylinder mirrors for a soft-x-ray microprobe system at the Advanced Light Source, and discuss possible for its unusual stability and polishability.

  6. Duplex stainless steels for the pulp and paper industry

    SciTech Connect

    Alfonsson, E.; Olsson, J.

    1999-07-01

    The metallurgy and corrosion resistance of duplex stainless steel, particularly with regards to applications in the pulp and paper industry, are described. Practical experiences from pressure vessel installations in cooking plants and bleach plants as well as from non-pressurized items in different parts along the fiber line, are given. The paper also reviews corrosion test results presented previously and compares these with recent test data and the practical experiences. Though most of the installations have been successful, some cases of corrosion attacks on duplex stainless steel have been reported, although these are very limited in number: one digester, one calorifier, two pulp storage towers, and two bleach plant filter washers, of a total of more than 700 identified installations.

  7. Investigation of Laser Peening Effects on Hydrogen Charged Stainless Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Zaleski, Tania M.

    2008-10-30

    Hydrogen-rich environments such as fuel cell reactors can exhibit damage caused by hydrogen permeation in the form of corrosion cracking by lowering tensile strength and decreasing material ductility. Coatings and liners have been investigated, but there were few shot-peening or laser peening studies referenced in the literature with respect to preventing hydrogen embrittlement. The surface compressive residual stress induced by laser peening had shown success in preventing stress corrosion cracking (SCC) for stainless steels in power plants. The question arose if the residual stresses induced by laser peening could delay the effects of hydrogen in a material. This study investigated the effect of laser peening on hydrogen penetration into metal alloys. Three areas were studied: laser peening, hydrogenation, and hydrogen detection. This study demonstrated that laser peening does not reduce the hydrogen permeation into a stainless steel surface nor does it prevent hydrogen embrittlement. The effect of laser peening to reduce hydrogen-assisted fatigue was unclear.

  8. Precipitation and cavity formation in austenitic stainless steels during irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, E.H.; Rowcliffe, A.F.; Mansur, L.K.

    1981-01-01

    Microstructural evolution in austenitic stainless steels subjected to displacement damage at high temperature is strongly influenced by the interactions between helium atoms and second phase particles. Cavity nucleation occurs by the trapping of helium at partially coherent particle-matrix interfaces. The recent precipitate point defect collector theory describes the more rapid growth of precipitate-attached cavities compared to matrix cavities where the precipitate-matrix interface collects point defects to augment the normal point deflect flux to the cavitry. Data are presented which support these ideas. It is shown that during nickel ion irradiation of a titanium-modified stainless steel at 675/sup 0/C the rate of injection of helium has a strong effect on the total swelling and also on the nature and distribution of precipitate phases.

  9. New hermetic sealing material for vacuum brazing of stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hildebrandt, S.; Wiehl, G.; Silze, F.

    2016-03-01

    For vacuum brazing applications such as in vacuum interrupter industry Hermetic Sealing Materials (HSM) with low partial pressure are widely used. AgCu28 dominates the hermetic sealing market, as it has a very good wetting behavior on copper and metallized ceramics. Within recent decades wetting on stainless steel has become more and more important. However, today the silver content of HSMs is more in focus than in the past decades, because it has the biggest impact on the material prices. Umicore Technical Materials has developed a new copper based HSM, CuAg40Ga10. The wettability on stainless steel is significantly improved compared to AgCu28 and the total silver content is reduced by almost 44%. In this article the physical properties of the alloy and its brazed joints will be presented compared to AgCu28.

  10. Cathodic properties of different stainless steels in natural seawater

    SciTech Connect

    Johnsen, R.; Bardal, E.

    1985-05-01

    The cathodic properties of a number of stainless steels, which were exposed to natural seawater flowing at 0 to 2.5 m/s and polarized to potentials from -300 to -950 mV SCE, have been studied. The current density development at constant potential and the free corrosion potential during the exposure time were recorded continuously. At the end of the exposure period, after approximately 28 to 36 days of exposure, polarization curves were determined. After one to three weeks of exposure, depending on the water velocity, microbiological activity on the surface caused an increase in the current density requirement of the specimen. An explanation for the mechanism behind the current density increase caused by slime production from marine bacteria may be increased exchange current density, i/sub 0/. There was no measurable calcareous deposit on the stainless steel surfaces at the end of the exposure periods.

  11. Lifetest investigations with stainless steel/water heat pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muenzel, W. D.; Kraehling, H.

    Life tests were conducted on water heat pipes, made from four different alloys of stainless steel, at operation temperatures of 120, 160, 220, and 320 C in a reflux boiler mode for more than 20,000 hr. Other parameters varied during the tests included capillary structure, pretreatment and cleaning of the components, additional oxidation of the inner surface, filling procedures, amoung of liquid change, the number of ventings, and the duration of the reaction runs. The best results were obtained with pipes containing stainless steels with molybdenum alloy additions and with carbon contents of greater than 0.03%; with components which formed a protective surface layer; with the use of double-distilled water that had been ultrasonically degassed; with repeated ventings during the initial reaction run of 500 hr minimum duration; and with the addition of gaseous oxygen into the heat pipe during the reaction run with subsequent venting.

  12. Corrosion testing of stainless steel-zirconium metal waste forms

    SciTech Connect

    Abraham, D.P.; Simpson, L.J.; Devries, M.J.; McDeavitt, S.M.

    1999-07-01

    Stainless steel-zirconium (SS-Zr) alloys have been developed as waste forms for the disposal of metallic waste generated during the electrometallurgical treatment of spent nuclear fuel. The waste forms incorporate irradiated cladding hulls, components of the alloy fuel, noble metal fission products, and actinide elements. The baseline waste form is a stainless steel-15 wt% zirconium (SS-15Zr) alloy. This article presents microstructures and some of the corrosion studies being conducted on the waste form alloys. Electrochemical corrosion, immersion corrosion, and vapor hydration tests have been performed on various alloy compositions to evaluate corrosion behavior and resistance to selective leaching of simulated fission products. The SS-Zr waste forms immobilize and retain fission products very effectively and show potential for acceptance as high-level nuclear waste forms.

  13. Corrosion behavior of stainless steel-zirconium alloy waste forms

    SciTech Connect

    Abraham, D.P.; Simpson, L.J.; DeVries, M.J.; Callahan, D.E.

    1999-07-01

    Stainless steel-zirconium (SS-Zr) alloys are being considered as waste forms for the disposal of metallic waste generated during the electrometallurgical treatment of spent nuclear fuel. The baseline waste form for spent fuels from the EBR-11 reactor is a stainless steel-15 wt.% zirconium (SS-15Zr) alloy. This article briefly reviews the microstructure of various SS-Zr waste form alloys and presents results of immersion corrosion and electrochemical corrosion tests performed on these alloys. The electrochemical tests show that the corrosion behavior of SS-Zr alloys is comparable to those of other alloys being considered for the Yucca Mountain geologic repository. The immersion tests demonstrate that the SS-Zr alloys are resistant to selective leaching of fission product elements and, hence, suitable as candidates for high-level nuclear waste forms.

  14. Cavitation Erosion of Sensitized UNS S31803 Duplex Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitelea, Ion; Micu, Lavinia Mădălina; Bordeaşu, Ilare; Crăciunescu, Corneliu Marius

    2016-05-01

    During processing or use, duplex steels can be subjected to heating at high temperatures that can affect their behavior. This work aims to correlate the influence of the sensitization treatment on the ultrasonic cavitation erosion behavior of a UNS S31803 (X2CrNiMoN22-5-3) duplex stainless steel. Duplex stainless steels, formed as a result of rapid cooling after solution annealing, are sensitized at temperatures of 475 and 850 °C, respectively, leading to hardening and embrittlement due to the spinodal decomposition of the ferrite and the precipitation of secondary phases. The ultrasonic cavitation erosion experiments showed that the sensitization at 850 °C reduced the mean depth of erosion by about 11% and the mean depth of erosion rate by 28%. By contrast, the sensitization at 475 °C deteriorates the cavitation erosion resistance, increasing the erosion parameters by up to 22%, compared to the solution annealed state.

  15. Failure Assessment of Stainless Steel and Titanium Brazed Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flom, Yury A.

    2012-01-01

    Following successful application of Coulomb-Mohr and interaction equations for evaluation of safety margins in Albemet 162 brazed joints, two additional base metal/filler metal systems were investigated. Specimens consisting of stainless steel brazed with silver-base filler metal and titanium brazed with 1100 Al alloy were tested to failure under combined action of tensile, shear, bending and torsion loads. Finite Element Analysis (FEA), hand calculations and digital image comparison (DIC) techniques were used to estimate failure stresses and construct Failure Assessment Diagrams (FAD). This study confirms that interaction equation R(sub sigma) + R(sub tau) = 1, where R(sub sigma) and R(sub t u) are normal and shear stress ratios, can be used as conservative lower bound estimate of the failure criterion in stainless steel and titanium brazed joints.

  16. Carbon/PEEK composite materials as an alternative for stainless steel/titanium hip prosthesis: a finite element study.

    PubMed

    Rezaei, Farshid; Hassani, Kamran; Solhjoei, Nosratollah; Karimi, Alireza

    2015-12-01

    Total hip replacement (THR) has been ranked within the most typical surgical processes in the world. The durability of the prosthesis and loosening of prosthesis are the main concerns that mostly reported after THR surgeries. In THR, the femoral prosthesis can be fixed by either cement or cementless methods in the patient's bones. In both procedures, the stability of the prosthesis in the hosted bone has a key asset in its long-term durability and performance. This study aimed to execute a comparative finite element simulation to assess the load transfer between the prosthesis, which is made of carbon/PEEK composite and stainless steel/titanium, and the femur bone. The mechanical behavior of the cortical bone was assumed as a linear transverse isotropic while the spongy bone was modeled like a linear isotropic material. The implants were made of stainless steel (316L) and titanium alloy as they are common materials for implants. The results showed that the carbon/PEEK composites provide a flatter load transfer from the upper body to the leg compared to the stainless steel/titanium prosthesis. Furthermore, the results showed that the von Mises stress, principal stress, and the strain in the carbon/PEEK composites prosthesis were significantly lower than that made of the stainless steel/titanium. The results also imply that the carbon/PEEK composites can be applied to introduce a new optimum design for femoral prosthesis with adjustable stiffness, which can decrease the stress shielding and interface stress. These findings will help clinicians and biomedical experts to increase their knowledge about the hip replacement.

  17. Carbon/PEEK composite materials as an alternative for stainless steel/titanium hip prosthesis: a finite element study.

    PubMed

    Rezaei, Farshid; Hassani, Kamran; Solhjoei, Nosratollah; Karimi, Alireza

    2015-12-01

    Total hip replacement (THR) has been ranked within the most typical surgical processes in the world. The durability of the prosthesis and loosening of prosthesis are the main concerns that mostly reported after THR surgeries. In THR, the femoral prosthesis can be fixed by either cement or cementless methods in the patient's bones. In both procedures, the stability of the prosthesis in the hosted bone has a key asset in its long-term durability and performance. This study aimed to execute a comparative finite element simulation to assess the load transfer between the prosthesis, which is made of carbon/PEEK composite and stainless steel/titanium, and the femur bone. The mechanical behavior of the cortical bone was assumed as a linear transverse isotropic while the spongy bone was modeled like a linear isotropic material. The implants were made of stainless steel (316L) and titanium alloy as they are common materials for implants. The results showed that the carbon/PEEK composites provide a flatter load transfer from the upper body to the leg compared to the stainless steel/titanium prosthesis. Furthermore, the results showed that the von Mises stress, principal stress, and the strain in the carbon/PEEK composites prosthesis were significantly lower than that made of the stainless steel/titanium. The results also imply that the carbon/PEEK composites can be applied to introduce a new optimum design for femoral prosthesis with adjustable stiffness, which can decrease the stress shielding and interface stress. These findings will help clinicians and biomedical experts to increase their knowledge about the hip replacement. PMID:26462678

  18. 37. REDUCTION PLANT DRYER Stainless steel screen cylinder, encased ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    37. REDUCTION PLANT - DRYER Stainless steel screen cylinder, encased within an outer steel shell (top half missing). As fish were tumbled by the rotating screen, they were cooked and dried by live steam piped into the dryer through overhead pipes. The dryer is mounted on a slight angle, aiding the process by moving the drying fish towards the exhaust end of the dryer. - Hovden Cannery, 886 Cannery Row, Monterey, Monterey County, CA

  19. Attack polish for nickel-base alloys and stainless steels

    DOEpatents

    Steeves, Arthur F.; Buono, Donald P.

    1983-01-01

    A chemical attack polish and polishing procedure for use on metal surfaces such as nickel base alloys and stainless steels. The chemical attack polish comprises Fe(NO.sub.3).sub.3, concentrated CH.sub.3 COOH, concentrated H.sub.2 SO.sub.4 and H.sub.2 O. The polishing procedure includes saturating a polishing cloth with the chemical attack polish and submicron abrasive particles and buffing the metal surface.

  20. Attack polish for nickel-base alloys and stainless steels

    DOEpatents

    Not Available

    1980-05-28

    A chemical attack polish and polishing procedure for use on metal surfaces such as nickel base alloys and stainless steels is described. The chemical attack polich comprises FeNO/sub 3/, concentrated CH/sub 3/COOH, concentrated H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ and H/sub 2/O. The polishing procedure includes saturating a polishing cloth with the chemical attack polish and submicron abrasive particles and buffing the metal surface.

  1. Method of polishing nickel-base alloys and stainless steels

    DOEpatents

    Steeves, Arthur F.; Buono, Donald P.

    1981-01-01

    A chemical attack polish and polishing procedure for use on metal surfaces such as nickel base alloys and stainless steels. The chemical attack polish comprises Fe(NO.sub.3).sub.3, concentrated CH.sub.3 COOH, concentrated H.sub.2 SO.sub.4 and H.sub.2 O. The polishing procedure includes saturating a polishing cloth with the chemical attack polish and submicron abrasive particles and buffing the metal surface.

  2. Superhard Nanocrystalline Homometallic Stainless Steel on Steel for Seamless Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tobin, Eric J.; Hafley, R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this work is to deposit nanocrystalline stainless steel onto steel substrates (homometallic) for enhanced wear and corrosion resistance. Homometallic coatings provide superior adhesion, and it has been shown that ultrafine-grained materials exhibit the increased hardness and decreased permeability desired for protective coatings. Nanocrystals will be produced by controlling nucleation and growth and use of an ion beam during deposition by e-beam evaporation or sputtering. Phase I is depositing 31 6L nanocrystalline stainless steel onto 31 6L stainless steel substrates. These coatings exhibit hardnesses comparable to those normally obtained for ceramic coatings such ZrO2, and possess the superior adhesion of seamless, homometallic coatings. Hardening the surface with a similar material also enhances adhesion, by avoiding problems associated with thermal and lattice mismatch. So far we have deposited nanocrystalline homometallic 316L stainless steel coatings by varying the ions and the current density of the ion beams. For all deposition conditions we have produced smooth, uniform, superhard coatings. All coatings exhibit hardness of at least 200% harder than that of bulk materials. Our measurements indicate that there is a direct relationship between nanohardness and the current density of the ion beam. Stress measurements indicate that stress in the films is increasingly proportional to current density of the ion beam. TEM, XPS, and XRD results indicate that the coated layers consist of FCC structure nanocrystallites with a dimension of about 10 to 20 nm. The Ni and Mo concentration of these coating are lower than those of bulk 316L but the concentration of Cr is higher.

  3. Mechanical properties of low-nickel stainless steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montano, J. W.

    1978-01-01

    Demand for improved corrosion-resistant steels, coupled with increased emphasis on conserving strategic metals, has led to development of family of stainless steels in which manganese and nitrogen are substituted for portion of usual nickel content. Advantages are approximately-doubled yield strength in annealed condition, better resistance to stress-corrosion cracking, retention of low magnetic permeability even after severe cold working, excellent strength and ductility at cryogenic temperatures, superior resistance to wear and galling, and excellent high-temperature properties.

  4. Ion beam nitriding of single and polycrystalline austenitic stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Abrasonis, G.; Riviere, J.P.; Templier, C.; Declemy, A.; Pranevicius, L.; Milhet, X.

    2005-04-15

    Polycrystalline and single crystalline [orientations (001) and (011)] AISI 316L austenitic stainless steel was implanted at 400 deg. C with 1.2 keV nitrogen ions using a high current density of 0.5 mA cm{sup -2}. The nitrogen distribution profiles were determined using nuclear reaction analysis (NRA). The structure of nitrided polycrystalline stainless steel samples was analyzed using glancing incidence and symmetric x-ray diffraction (XRD) while the structure of the nitrided single crystalline stainless steel samples was analyzed using x-ray diffraction mapping of the reciprocal space. For identical treatment conditions, it is observed that the nitrogen penetration depth is larger for the polycrystalline samples than for the single crystalline ones. The nitrogen penetration depth depends on the orientation, the <001> being more preferential for nitrogen diffusion than <011>. In both type of samples, XRD analysis shows the presence of the phase usually called 'expanded' austenite or {gamma}{sub N} phase. The lattice expansion depends on the crystallographic plane family, the (001) planes showing an anomalously large expansion. The reciprocal lattice maps of the nitrided single crystalline stainless steel demonstrate that during nitriding lattice rotation takes place simultaneously with lattice expansion. The analysis of the results based on the presence of stacking faults, residual compressive stress induced by the lattice expansion, and nitrogen concentration gradient indicates that the average lattice parameter increases with the nitrided layer depth. A possible explanation of the anomalous expansion of the (001) planes is presented, which is based on the combination of faster nitriding rate in the (001) oriented grains and the role of stacking faults and compressive stress.

  5. Manganese-stabilized austenitic stainless steels for fusion applications

    DOEpatents

    Klueh, Ronald L.; Maziasz, Philip J.

    1990-01-01

    An austenitic stainless steel that is comprised of Fe, Cr, Mn, C but no Ni or Nb and minimum N. To enhance strength and fabricability minor alloying additions of Ti, W, V, B and P are made. The resulting alloy is one that can be used in fusion reactor environments because the half-lives of the elements are sufficiently short to allow for handling and disposal.

  6. Manganese-stabilized austenitic stainless steels for fusion applications

    DOEpatents

    Klueh, Ronald L.; Maziasz, Philip J.

    1990-08-07

    An austenitic stainless steel that is comprised of Fe, Cr, Mn, C but no Ni or Nb and minimum N. To enhance strength and fabricability minor alloying additions of Ti, W, V, B and P are made. The resulting alloy is one that can be used in fusion reactor environments because the half-lives of the elements are sufficiently short to allow for handling and disposal.

  7. Pitting of stainless steel in an emergency service water system

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, D.J.; Willertz, L.E.

    1994-12-31

    Pitting of AISI 321 grade stainless steel flex-hoses in an emergency service water system has been experienced recently, after 13 years of successful service. Failures of new hoses have occurred in as little as 4 months. This paper presents the authors analysis of the failures and discusses the primary suspected mechanisms, underdeposit pitting and microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC). It also presents their approach for investigating suspected causes and developing an integrated plan to minimize its recurrence.

  8. Microstructural evolution of type 304 and 316 stainless steels under neutron irradiation at LWR relevant conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Lizhen; Stoller, Roger E.; Field, Kevin G.; Yang, Ying; Morgan, Dane; Wirth, Brian D.; Gussev, Maxim N.; Busby, Jeremy T.; Nam, H.

    2015-12-11

    Extension of light water reactors' useful life will expose austenitic internal core components to irradiation damage levels beyond 100 displacements per atom (dpa), which will lead to profound microstructural evolution and consequent degradation of macroscopic properties. Microstructural evolution, including Frank loops, cavities, precipitates, and segregation at boundaries and the resultant radiation hardening in type 304 and 316 stainless steel (SS) variants, were studied in this work via experimental characterization and multiple simulation methods. Experimental data for up to 40 heats of type 304SS and 316SS variants irradiated in different reactors to 0.6–120 dpa at 275–375°C were either generated from this work or collected from literature reports. These experimental data were then combined with models of Frank loop and cavity evolution, computational thermodynamics and precipitation, and ab initio and rate theory integrated radiation-induced segregation models to provide insights into microstructural evolution and degradation at higher radiation doses.

  9. Impact of Dielectronic Recombination on Ionization Dynamics and Spectroscopy of Z-pinch Stainless Steel Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Dasgupta, A.; Davis, J.; Thornhill, J. W.; Giuliani, J. L.; Chong, Y. K.; Clark, R. W.; Whitney, K. G.

    2009-01-21

    The implosion dynamics of an array of stainless steel (SS) wires on the Z and/or ZR accelerator produces an abundance of radiation from the K- and L-shell ionization stages. As the plasma assembles on axis, a number of time resolved snapshots provide temperature and density profiles and size of the emitting region. The non-LTE populations will be obtained by using detailed atomic models that include all important excitation, ionization, and recombination processes. In particular, we will investigate the effects of dielectronic recombination (DR) which is the most important recombination process for moderate to high Z plasma such as iron at moderate densities. We will analyze the ionization dynamics and generate K- and L-shell spectra using the temperature and density conditions generated in the Z and/or ZR accelerator describing the implosion with a 1-D non-LTE radiation hydrodynamics model.

  10. Microstructural Evolution of Type 304 and 316 Stainless Steels Under Neutron Irradiation at LWR Relevant Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, L.; Stoller, R. E.; Field, K. G.; Yang, Y.; Nam, H.; Morgan, D.; Wirth, B. D.; Gussev, M. N.; Busby, J. T.

    2016-02-01

    Life extension of light water reactors will expose austenitic internal core components to irradiation damage levels beyond 100 displacements per atom (dpa), leading to profound microstructural evolution and consequent degradation of macroscopic properties. Microstructural evolution, including Frank loops, cavities, precipitates, and segregation at boundaries and the resultant radiation hardening in type 304 and 316 stainless steel (SS) variants were studied in this work via experimental characterization and multiple simulation methods. Experimental data for up to 40 heats of type 304SS and 316SS variants irradiated in different reactors to 0.6-120 dpa at 275-375°C were generated from this work or collected from literature reports. These experimental data were then combined with models of Frank loop and cavity evolution, computational thermodynamics and precipitation, and ab initio and rate theory integrated radiation-induced segregation models to provide insights into microstructural evolution and degradation at higher doses.

  11. [Clinical evaluation of gingival tissue restored with stainless steel crown].

    PubMed

    Chao, D D; Tsai, T P; Chen, T C

    1992-12-01

    The use of stainless steel crown for the restoration of primary molars is widely accepted in pediatric dentistry. There has been a concern regarding their effect on the health of the gingival tissue. It is a possibility that the preformed crown may be a contributing cause of gingivitis. This study evaluated one hundred and thirty-seven crowns in forty-five patients who had received pedodontic treatment at Chang Gung Memorial Hospital. The results indicated that the majority of stainless steel crowns had one or more defects, with crown crimping being the most common error. According to what the paired t-test showed, non-ideal crowns indicated that the gingival index was significantly higher than the entire mouth and control teeth. However the supragingival plaque accumulation of these teeth was significant lower than the entire mouth and control teeth. There was only a moderate positive correlation between supragingival plaque and gingivitis. The operator is necessary to adapt the stainless steel crown margin as closely as possible to the tooth and to avoid the mechanical defect of a crown. It minimizes the irritation of gingival tissue and diminishes the bacterial adherence of subgingival plaque, therefore preserving the health of gingival tissue.

  12. Characterization of blasted austenitic stainless steel and its corrosion resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otsubo, F.; Kishitake, K.; Akiyama, T.; Terasaki, T.

    2003-12-01

    It is known that the corrosion resistance of stainless steel is deteriorated by blasting, but the reason for this deterioration is not clear. A blasted austenitic stainless steel plate (JIS-SUS304) has been characterized with comparison to the scraped and non-blasted specimens. The surface roughness of the blasted specimen is larger than that of materials finished with #180 paper. A martensite phase is formed in the surface layer of both blasted and scraped specimens. Compressive residual stress is generated in the blasted specimen and the maximum residual stress is formed at 50 100 µm from the surface. The corrosion potentials of the blasted specimen and subsequently solution treated specimen are lower than that of the non-blasted specimen. The passivation current densities of the blasted specimens are higher those of the non-blasted specimen. The blasted specimen and the subsequently solution treated specimen exhibit rust in 5% sodium chloride (NaCl) solution, while the non-blasted specimen and ground specimen do not rust in the solution. It is concluded that the deterioration of corrosion resistance of austenitic stainless steel through blasting is caused by the roughed morphology of the surface.

  13. Stress corrosion cracking evaluation of martensitic precipitation hardening stainless steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphries, T. S.; Nelson, E. E.

    1980-01-01

    The resistance of the martensitic precipitation hardening stainless steels PH13-8Mo, 15-5PH, and 17-4PH to stress corrosion cracking was investigated. Round tensile and c-ring type specimens taken from several heats of the three alloys were stressed up to 100 percent of their yield strengths and exposed to alternate immersion in salt water, to salt spray, and to a seacoast environment. The results indicate that 15-5PH is highly resistant to stress corrosion cracking in conditions H1000 and H1050 and is moderately resistant in condition H900. The stress corrosion cracking resistance of PH13-8Mo and 17-4PH stainless steels in conditions H1000 and H1050 was sensitive to mill heats and ranged from low to high among the several heats included in the tests. Based on a comparison with data from seacoast environmental tests, it is apparent that alternate immersion in 3.5 percent salt water is not a suitable medium for accelerated stress corrosion testing of these pH stainless steels.

  14. Austenitic stainless steel patterning by plasma assisted diffusion treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czerwiec, T.; Marcos, G.; Thiriet, T.; Guo, Y.; Belmonte, T.

    2009-09-01

    The new concept of surface texturing or surface patterning on austenitic stainless steel by plasma assisted diffusion treatment is presented in this paper. It allows the creation of uniform micro or nano relief with regularly shaped asperities or depressions. Plasma assisted diffusion treatments are based on the diffusion of nitrogen and/or carbon in a metallic material at moderate to elevated temperatures. Below 420°C, a plasma assisted nitriding treatment of austenitic stainless steel produces a phase usually called expanded austenite. Expanded austenite is a metastable nitrogen supersaturated solid solution with a disordered fcc structure and a distorted lattice. The nitrided layer with the expanded austenite is highly enriched in nitrogen (from 10 to 35 at%) and submitted to high compressive residual stresses. From mechanical consideration, it is shown that the only possible deformation occurs in the direction perpendicular to the surface. Such an expansion of the layer from the initial surface of the substrate to the gas phase is used here for surface patterning of stainless steel parts. The surface patterning is performed by using masks (TEM grid) and multi-dipolar plasmas.

  15. Mechanical Properties of Austenitic Stainless Steel Made by Additive Manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Luecke, William E; Slotwinski, John A

    2014-01-01

    Using uniaxial tensile and hardness testing, we evaluated the variability and anisotropy of the mechanical properties of an austenitic stainless steel, UNS S17400, manufactured by an additive process, selective laser melting. Like wrought materials, the mechanical properties depend on the orientation introduced by the processing. The recommended stress-relief heat treatment increases the tensile strength, reduces the yield strength, and decreases the extent of the discontinuous yielding. The mechanical properties, assessed by hardness, are very uniform across the build plate, but the stress-relief heat treatment introduced a small non-uniformity that had no correlation to position on the build plate. Analysis of the mechanical property behavior resulted in four conclusions. (1) The within-build and build-to-build tensile properties of the UNS S17400 stainless steel are less repeatable than mature engineering structural alloys, but similar to other structural alloys made by additive manufacturing. (2) The anisotropy of the mechanical properties of the UNS S17400 material of this study is larger than that of mature structural alloys, but is similar to other structural alloys made by additive manufacturing. (3) The tensile mechanical properties of the UNS S17400 material fabricated by selective laser melting are very different from those of wrought, heat-treated 17-4PH stainless steel. (4) The large discontinuous yielding strain in all tests resulted from the formation and propagation of Lüders bands.

  16. Iodine susceptibility of pseudomonads grown attached to stainless steel surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pyle, B. H.; McFeters, G. A.

    1990-01-01

    Pseudomonads were adapted to grow in phosphate-buffered water and on stainless steel surfaces to study the iodine sensitivity of attached and planktonic cells. Cultures adapted to low nutrient growth were incubated at room temperature in a circulating reactor system with stainless steel coupons to allow biofilm formation on the metal surfaces. In some experiments, the reactor was partially emptied and refilled with buffer at each sampling time to simulate a "fill-and-draw" water system. Biofilms of attached bacteria, resuspended biofilm bacteria, and reactor suspension, were exposed to 1 mg l-1 iodine for 2 min. Attached bacterial populations which established on coupons within 3 to 5 days displayed a significant increase in resistance to iodine. Increased resistance was also observed for resuspended cells from the biofilm and planktonic bacteria in the system suspension. Generally, intact biofilms and resuspended biofilm cells were most resistant, followed by planktonic bacteria and phosphate buffer cultures. Thus, biofilm formation on stainless steel surfaces within water systems can result in significantly increased disinfection resistance of commonly-occurring water-borne bacteria that may enhance their ability to colonise water treatment and distribution systems.

  17. Thermo-mechanical behavior of stainless steel knitted structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamdani, Syed Talha Ali; Fernando, Anura; Maqsood, Muhammad

    2016-09-01

    Heating fabric is an advanced textile material that is extensively researched by the industrialists and the scientists alike. Ability to create highly flexible and drapeable heating fabrics has many applications in everyday life. This paper presents a study conducted on the comparison of heatability of knitted fabric made of stainless steel yarn. The purpose of the study is to find a suitable material for protective clothing against cold environments. In the current research the ampacity of stainless steel yarn is observed in order to prevent the overheating of the heating fabrics. The behavior of the knitted structure is studied for different levels of supply voltage. Infrared temperature sensing is used to measure the heat generated from the fabrics in order to measure the temperature of the fabrics without physical contact. It is concluded that interlock structure is one of the most suited structures for knitted heating fabrics. As learnt through this research, fabrics made of stainless steel yarn are capable of producing a higher level of heating compared to that of knitted fabric made using silver coated polymeric yarn at the same supply voltage.

  18. Mechanical Properties of Austenitic Stainless Steel Made by Additive Manufacturing

    PubMed Central

    Luecke, William E; Slotwinski, John A

    2014-01-01

    Using uniaxial tensile and hardness testing, we evaluated the variability and anisotropy of the mechanical properties of an austenitic stainless steel, UNS S17400, manufactured by an additive process, selective laser melting. Like wrought materials, the mechanical properties depend on the orientation introduced by the processing. The recommended stress-relief heat treatment increases the tensile strength, reduces the yield strength, and decreases the extent of the discontinuous yielding. The mechanical properties, assessed by hardness, are very uniform across the build plate, but the stress-relief heat treatment introduced a small non-uniformity that had no correlation to position on the build plate. Analysis of the mechanical property behavior resulted in four conclusions. (1) The within-build and build-to-build tensile properties of the UNS S17400 stainless steel are less repeatable than mature engineering structural alloys, but similar to other structural alloys made by additive manufacturing. (2) The anisotropy of the mechanical properties of the UNS S17400 material of this study is larger than that of mature structural alloys, but is similar to other structural alloys made by additive manufacturing. (3) The tensile mechanical properties of the UNS S17400 material fabricated by selective laser melting are very different from those of wrought, heat-treated 17-4PH stainless steel. (4) The large discontinuous yielding strain in all tests resulted from the formation and propagation of Lüders bands. PMID:26601037

  19. Reducing tool wear when machining austenitic stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Magee, J.H.; Kosa, T.

    1998-07-01

    Austenitic stainless steels are considered more difficult to machine than carbon steels due to their high work hardening rate, large spread between yield and ultimate tensile strength, high toughness and ductility, and low thermal conductivity. These characteristics can result in a built-up edge or excessive tool wear during machining, especially when the cutting speed is too high. The practical solution is to lower the cutting speed until tool life reaches an acceptable level. However, lower machining speed negatively impacts productivity. Thus, in order to overcome tool wear at relatively high machining speeds for these alloys, on-going research is being performed to improve cutting fluids, develop more wear-resistant tools, and to modify stainless steels to make them less likely to cause tool wear. This paper discusses compositional modifications to the two most commonly machined austenitic stainless steels (Type 303 and 304) which reduced their susceptibility to tool wear, and allowed these grades to be machined at higher cutting speeds.

  20. High specialty stainless steels and nickel alloys for FGD dampers

    SciTech Connect

    Herda, W.R.; Rockel, M.B.; Grossmann, G.K.; Starke, K.

    1997-08-01

    Because of process design and construction, FGD installations normally have bypass ducts, which necessitates use of dampers. Due to corrosion from acid dew resulting from interaction of hot acidic flue gases and colder outside environments, carbon steel cannot be used as construction material under these specific conditions. In the past, commercial stainless steels have suffered by pitting and crevice corrosion and occasionally failed by stress corrosion cracking. Only high alloy specialty super-austenitic stainless steels with 6.5% Mo should be used and considered for this application. Experience in Germany and Europe has shown that with regard to safety and life cycle cost analysis as well as providing a long time warranty, a new specialty stainless steel, alloy 31--UNS N08031--(31 Ni, 27 Cr, 6.5 Mo, 0.2 N) has proven to be the best and most economical choice. Hundreds of tons in forms of sheet, rod and bar, as well as strip (for damper seals) have been used and installed in many FGD installations throughout Europe. Under extremely corrosive conditions, the new advanced Ni-Cr-Mo alloy 59--UNS N06059--(59 Ni, 23 Cr, 16 Mo) should be used. This paper describes qualification and workability of these alloys as pertains to damper applications. Some case histories are also provided.

  1. Mechanical Properties of Austenitic Stainless Steel Made by Additive Manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Luecke, William E; Slotwinski, John A

    2014-01-01

    Using uniaxial tensile and hardness testing, we evaluated the variability and anisotropy of the mechanical properties of an austenitic stainless steel, UNS S17400, manufactured by an additive process, selective laser melting. Like wrought materials, the mechanical properties depend on the orientation introduced by the processing. The recommended stress-relief heat treatment increases the tensile strength, reduces the yield strength, and decreases the extent of the discontinuous yielding. The mechanical properties, assessed by hardness, are very uniform across the build plate, but the stress-relief heat treatment introduced a small non-uniformity that had no correlation to position on the build plate. Analysis of the mechanical property behavior resulted in four conclusions. (1) The within-build and build-to-build tensile properties of the UNS S17400 stainless steel are less repeatable than mature engineering structural alloys, but similar to other structural alloys made by additive manufacturing. (2) The anisotropy of the mechanical properties of the UNS S17400 material of this study is larger than that of mature structural alloys, but is similar to other structural alloys made by additive manufacturing. (3) The tensile mechanical properties of the UNS S17400 material fabricated by selective laser melting are very different from those of wrought, heat-treated 17-4PH stainless steel. (4) The large discontinuous yielding strain in all tests resulted from the formation and propagation of Lüders bands. PMID:26601037

  2. Compatibility Assessment of Advanced Stainless Steels in Sodium

    SciTech Connect

    Pawel, Steven J

    2012-01-01

    Type 316L stainless steel capsules containing commercially pure sodium and miniature tensile specimens of HT-UPS (austenitic, 14Cr-16Ni), NF-616 (ferritic/martensitic, 9Cr-2W-0.5Mo), or 316L (austenitic, 17Cr-10Ni-2Mo) stainless steel were exposed at 600 or 700 C for 100 and 400 h as a screening test for compatibility. Using weight change, tensile testing, and metallographic analysis, HT-UPS and 316L were found to be largely immune to changes resulting from sodium exposure, but NF-616 was found susceptible to substantial decarburization at 700 C. Subsequently, two thermal convection loops (TCLs) constructed of 316L and loaded with commercially pure sodium and miniature tensile specimens of HT-UPS and 316L were operated for 2000 h each one between 500 and 650 C, the other between 565 and 725 C at a flow rate of about 1.5 cm/s. Changes in specimen appearance, weight, and tensile properties were observed to be very minor in all cases, and there was no metallographic evidence of microstructure changes, composition gradients, or mass transfer resulting from prolonged exposure in a TCL. Thus, it appears that HT-UPS and 316L stainless steels are similarly compatible with commercially pure sodium under these exposure conditions.

  3. Ultrasonic characterization of centrifugally cast stainless steel: Topical report

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, P.

    1987-06-01

    Ultrasonic wave propagation in centrifugally cast stainless steel (CCSS) was investigated. The difficulties of inspecting CCSS material stem from elastic anisotropy that hampers defect location and severe attenuation caused by coarse grains within the structure that makes defect detection difficult. During this investigation, grain effects on ultrasonic wave propagation were investigated, techniques for identifying different grain structures were developed, and compensation methods for grain effects were addressed. Each step is explained analytically based on relevant theory and proven experimentally. Experiments were conducted on specially designed test specimens: angled blocks, polygonal blocks, wedge blocks, and calibration blocks. Wave parameters such as phase velocity, skew angle, energy velocity, attenuation, beam width, amplitude variation patterns, and frequency dependence on grain structures were all measured with these specimens. CCSS grain structures investigated were equiaxed-fine grains, columnar-dendritic grains, and coarse grains. For comparison purposes, additional types of material such as static-cast stainless steel, forged stainless steel, and carbon steel materials were also investigated. Longitudinal wave, horizontally and vertically polarized shear wave modes were all considered in experiments. The use of an automated ultrasonic system was also demonstrated for grain structure identification.

  4. Evaluation of manual ultrasonic inspection of cast stainless steel piping

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, T.T.

    1984-05-01

    Two studies have attempted to determine the degree of inspectability of centrifugally cast stainless steel (CCSS) pipe. In one study, Westinghouse examined the reliability of ultrasonic test methods in the detection of mechanical fatigue cracks. The second study was an NRC-sponsored Pipe Inspection Round Robin (PIRR) test conducted at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The Westinghouse study reported that 80% detection was achieved for mechanical fatigue cracks having 20% throughwall depth. The PNL study reported that less than 30% detection was achieved for thermal fatigue cracks ranging from 5% to 50% through-wall. A cooperative program between PNL and Westinghouse was conducted to resolve the differences between the two studies. The program was designed as a limited round robin. Detection experiments were performed on samples from both the PNL and Westinghouse studies. The data reported here indicate that flaw type (thermal fatigue versus mechanical fatigue) was a significant factor in detection. Mechanical fatigue cracks were more easily detected than thermal fatigue cracks. The data conclusively show that manual ultrasonic inspection cannot size flaws in cast stainless steel material. The study recommends that ultrasonic inspection of cast stainless steel pipe be continued because cracks caused by some failure mechanisms (i.e., mechanical fatigue cracks) have proven to be detectable.

  5. 76 FR 87 - Grant of Authority for Subzone Status; ThyssenKrupp Steel and Stainless USA, LLC; (Stainless and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-03

    ...-2008); Whereas, notice inviting public comment has been given in the Federal Register (73 FR 58535-58536, 10-7-08; 74 FR 38401, 8-3-09; 74 FR 47921, 9-18-09; 75 FR 17692-17693, 4-7-2010) and the... Foreign-Trade Zones Board Grant of Authority for Subzone Status; ThyssenKrupp Steel and Stainless USA,...

  6. Exposure to stainless steel welding fumes and lung cancer: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Sjögren, B; Hansen, K S; Kjuus, H; Persson, P G

    1994-05-01

    Stainless steel welding is associated with exposure to metals including hexavalent chromium and nickel. This study is a meta-analysis of five studies of stainless steel welders and the occurrence of lung cancer. Asbestos exposure and smoking habits have been taken into account. The calculated pooled relative risk estimate was 1.94 with a 95% confidence interval of 1.28-2.93. This result suggests a causal relation between exposure to stainless steel welding and lung cancer.

  7. Particle Impact Ignition Test Data on a Stainless Steel Hand Valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peralta, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the particle impact ignition test of a stainless steel hand valve. The impact of particles is a real fire hazard with stainless steel hand valves, however 100 mg of particulate can be tolerated. Since it is unlikely that 100 mg of stainless steel contaminant particles can be simultaneously released into this type of valve in the WSTF configuration, this is acceptable and within statistical confidence as demonstrated by testing.

  8. Evaluation of stainless steel cladding for use in current design LWRs. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Strasser, A.; Santucci, J.; Lindquist, K.; Yario, W.; Stern, G.; Goldstein, L.; Joseph, L.

    1982-12-01

    The design of stainless steel-clad LWR fuel and its performance at steady-state, transient, and accident conditions were reviewed. The objective was to evaluate the potential benefits and disadvantages of substituting stainless steel-clad fuel for the currently used Zircaloy-clad fuel. For a large, modern PWR, the technology and the fuel-cycle costs of stainless steel- and Zircaloy-clad fuels were compared.

  9. Exposure to stainless steel welding fumes and lung cancer: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Sjögren, B; Hansen, K S; Kjuus, H; Persson, P G

    1994-01-01

    Stainless steel welding is associated with exposure to metals including hexavalent chromium and nickel. This study is a meta-analysis of five studies of stainless steel welders and the occurrence of lung cancer. Asbestos exposure and smoking habits have been taken into account. The calculated pooled relative risk estimate was 1.94 with a 95% confidence interval of 1.28-2.93. This result suggests a causal relation between exposure to stainless steel welding and lung cancer. PMID:8199684

  10. Liquid Metal Corrosion of 316L Stainless Steel, 410 Stainless Steel, and 1015 Carbon Steel in a Molten Zinc Bath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jing; Bright, Mark A.; Liu, Xingbo; Barbero, Ever

    2007-11-01

    Corrosion tests of 1015 low-carbon steel and two stainless steels (410 and 316L) were conducted in a pure zinc bath (99.98 wt pct Zn) in order to better understand the reaction mechanisms that occur during the degradation of submerged hardware at industrial general (batch) galvanizing operations. Through this testing, it was found that, in general, 316L stainless steel showed the best dissolution resistance among these three alloys, while 1015 carbon steel provided a lower solubility than 410 stainless steel. Investigating the failure mechanisms, both metallurgical composition and lattice structure played important roles in the molten metal corrosion behaviors of these alloys. High contents of nickel combined with the influence of chromium improved the resistance to molten zinc corrosion. Moreover, a face-centered-cubic (fcc) structure was more corrosion resistant than body-centered-cubic (bcc) possibly due to the compactness of the atomic structure. Analogously, the body-centered-tetragonal (bct) martensite lattice structure possessed enhanced susceptibility to zinc corrosion as a result of the greater atomic spacing and high strain energy. Finally, an increased bath temperature played an important role in molten metal corrosion by accelerating the dissolution process and changing the nature of intermetallic layers.

  11. Electrochemical and passivation behavior investigation of ferritic stainless steel in simulated concrete pore media.

    PubMed

    Luo, Hong; Su, Huaizhi; Dong, Chaofang; Xiao, Kui; Li, Xiaogang

    2015-12-01

    The applications of stainless steel are one of the most reliable solutions in concrete structures to reduce chloride-induced corrosion problems and increase the structures service life, however, due to high prices of nickel, especially in many civil engineering projects, the austenitic stainless steel is replaced by the ferritic stainless steels. Compared with austenite stainless steel, the ferritic stainless steel is known to be extremely resistant of stress corrosion cracking and other properties. The good corrosion resistance of the stainless steel is due to the formation of passive film. While, there is little literature about the electrochemical and passive behavior of ferritic stainless steel in the concrete environments. So, here, we present the several corrosion testing methods, such as the potentiodynamic measurements, EIS and Mott-Schottky approach, and the surface analysis methods like XPS and AES to display the passivation behavior of 430 ferritic stainless steel in alkaline solution with the presence of chloride ions. These research results illustrated a simple and facile approach for studying the electrochemical and passivation behavior of stainless steel in the concrete pore environments. PMID:26501086

  12. Effect of Sputtered AlY Coating on High-Temperature Oxidation Behavior of Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Guangyan; Xie, Huanzhang; Su, Yong; Qi, Zeyan; Hou, Qiang

    2016-08-01

    AlY coating on 1Cr18Ni9Ti stainless steel was prepared by magnetron sputtering method and some of them were pre-oxidized or vacuum diffusion annealed at 600°C, and the effect of the coating with different treatments on the oxidation behavior of the stainless steel was studied at 1,100°C in air. Results show that the order of the 24-h oxidation mass gain for the specimens is the stainless steel without coating > the stainless steel with coating but without any pre-treatment > the stainless steel with AlY coating after pre-oxidation treatment > the stainless steel with AlY coating after vacuum diffusion annealing. After oxidation, a thick and loose Fe2O3/Cr2O3 film is formed on the stainless steel without coating, while thinner Fe2O3/Cr2O3 film is formed on the stainless steel with AlY coating. Compared to the oxidation film formed on the steel with pre-oxidized coating, the one formed on the steel with vacuum diffusion annealed coating is thinner and denser. The rare earth Y and its oxides Y2O3 in the coating produce reactive element effect and improve the ductility/adhesion of the oxide film, which enhances the oxidation resistance of the stainless steel, especially in the vacuum diffusion annealed AlY coating.

  13. Electrochemical and passivation behavior investigation of ferritic stainless steel in simulated concrete pore media.

    PubMed

    Luo, Hong; Su, Huaizhi; Dong, Chaofang; Xiao, Kui; Li, Xiaogang

    2015-12-01

    The applications of stainless steel are one of the most reliable solutions in concrete structures to reduce chloride-induced corrosion problems and increase the structures service life, however, due to high prices of nickel, especially in many civil engineering projects, the austenitic stainless steel is replaced by the ferritic stainless steels. Compared with austenite stainless steel, the ferritic stainless steel is known to be extremely resistant of stress corrosion cracking and other properties. The good corrosion resistance of the stainless steel is due to the formation of passive film. While, there is little literature about the electrochemical and passive behavior of ferritic stainless steel in the concrete environments. So, here, we present the several corrosion testing methods, such as the potentiodynamic measurements, EIS and Mott-Schottky approach, and the surface analysis methods like XPS and AES to display the passivation behavior of 430 ferritic stainless steel in alkaline solution with the presence of chloride ions. These research results illustrated a simple and facile approach for studying the electrochemical and passivation behavior of stainless steel in the concrete pore environments.

  14. General and Localized corrosion of Austenitic and Borated Stainless Steels in Simulated Concentrated Ground Waters

    SciTech Connect

    D. Fix; J. Estill; L. Wong; R. Rebak

    2004-05-28

    Boron containing stainless steels are used in the nuclear industry for applications such as spent fuel storage, control rods and shielding. It was of interest to compare the corrosion resistance of three borated stainless steels with standard austenitic alloy materials such as type 304 and 316 stainless steels. Tests were conducted in three simulated concentrated ground waters at 90 C. Results show that the borated stainless were less resistant to corrosion than the witness austenitic materials. An acidic concentrated ground water was more aggressive than an alkaline concentrated ground water.

  15. General and Localized Corrosion of Austenitic And Borated Stainless Steels in Simulated Concentrated Ground Waters

    SciTech Connect

    Estill, J C; Rebak, R B; Fix, D V; Wong, L L

    2004-03-11

    Boron containing stainless steels are used in the nuclear industry for applications such as spent fuel storage, control rods and shielding. It was of interest to compare the corrosion resistance of three borated stainless steels with standard austenitic alloy materials such as type 304 and 316 stainless steels. Tests were conducted in three simulated concentrated ground waters at 90 C. Results show that the borated stainless were less resistant to corrosion than the witness austenitic materials. An acidic concentrated ground water was more aggressive than an alkaline concentrated ground water.

  16. Electrochemical and passivation behavior investigation of ferritic stainless steel in simulated concrete pore media

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Hong; Su, Huaizhi; Dong, Chaofang; Xiao, Kui; Li, Xiaogang

    2015-01-01

    The applications of stainless steel are one of the most reliable solutions in concrete structures to reduce chloride-induced corrosion problems and increase the structures service life, however, due to high prices of nickel, especially in many civil engineering projects, the austenitic stainless steel is replaced by the ferritic stainless steels. Compared with austenite stainless steel, the ferritic stainless steel is known to be extremely resistant of stress corrosion cracking and other properties. The good corrosion resistance of the stainless steel is due to the formation of passive film. While, there is little literature about the electrochemical and passive behavior of ferritic stainless steel in the concrete environments. So, here, we present the several corrosion testing methods, such as the potentiodynamic measurements, EIS and Mott–Schottky approach, and the surface analysis methods like XPS and AES to display the passivation behavior of 430 ferritic stainless steel in alkaline solution with the presence of chloride ions. These research results illustrated a simple and facile approach for studying the electrochemical and passivation behavior of stainless steel in the concrete pore environments. PMID:26501086

  17. Antibacterial activity against Porphyromonas gingivalis and biological characteristics of antibacterial stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dan; Ren, Ling; Zhang, Yang; Xue, Nan; Yang, Ke; Zhong, Ming

    2013-05-01

    To evaluate the possibility of an alternative to the traditional orthodontic stainless steel implants, the antibacterial activity against Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis) and the related cytotoxicity of a type 304 Cu bearing antibacterial stainless steel were studied. The results indicated that the antibacterial stainless steel showed excellent antibacterial property against P. gingivalis, compared with the control steel (a purchased medical grade 304 stainless steel). Compared to the control steel, there were fewer bacteria on the surface of the antibacterial stainless steel, with significant difference in morphology. The cytotoxicities of the antibacterial stainless steel to both MG-63 and KB cells were all grade 1, the same as those of the control steel. There were no significant differences in the apoptosis rates on MG-63 and KB cells between the antibacterial stainless steel and the control steel. This study demonstrates that the antibacterial stainless steel is possible to reduce the incidence of implant-related infections and can be a more suitable material for the micro-implant than the conventional stainless steel in orthodontic treatment.

  18. Improved corrosion resistance of 316L stainless steel by nanocrystalline and electrochemical nitridation in artificial saliva solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Jinlong; Liang, Tongxiang

    2015-12-01

    The fluoride ion in artificial saliva significantly changed semiconductor characteristic of the passive film formed on the surface of 316L stainless steels. The electrochemical results showed that nanocrystalline α‧-martensite improved corrosion resistance of the stainless steel in a typical artificial saliva compared with coarse grained stainless steel. Moreover, comparing with nitrided coarse grained stainless steel, corrosion resistance of the nitrided nanocrystalline stainless steel was also improved significantly, even in artificial saliva solution containing fluoride ion. The present study showed that the cryogenic cold rolling and electrochemical nitridation improved corrosion resistance of 316L stainless steel for the dental application.

  19. Retentive strength of luting cements for stainless steel crowns: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, Priya; Kondae, Sapna; Gupta, Kamal Kishore

    2010-01-01

    The present study evaluated and compared the retentive strength of three luting cements. A total of forty five freshly extracted human primary molars were used in this study. The teeth were prepared to receive stainless steel crowns. They were then randomly divided into three groups, of fifteen teeth each, so as to receive the three different luting cements: conventional glass ionomer resin modified glass ionomer and adhesive resin. The teeth were then stored in artificial saliva for twenty four hours. The retentive strength of the crowns was determined by using a specially designed Instron Universal Testing Machine (Model 1011). The data was statistically analyzed using ANOVA to evaluate retentive strength for each cement and Tukey test for pair wise comparison. It was concluded that retentive strength of adhesive resin cement and resin modified glass ionomer cement was significantly higher than that of the conventional glass ionomer cement.

  20. 1D Scaling with Ablation for K-Shell Radiation from Stainless Steel Wire Arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Giuliani, J. L.; Thornhill, J. W.; Dasgupta, A.; Davis, J.; Clark, R. W.; Jones, B.; Cuneo, M.; Coverdale, C. A.; Deeney, C.

    2009-01-21

    A 1D Lagrangian magnetohydrodynamic z-pinch simulation code is extended to include wire ablation. The plasma transport coefficients are calibrated to reproduce the K-shell yields measured on the Z generator for three stainless steel arrays of diameter 55 mm and masses ranging from 1.8 to 2.7 mg. The resulting 1D scaling model is applied to a larger SS array (65 mm and 2.5 mg) on the refurbished Z machine. Simulation results predict a maximum K-shell yield of 77 kJ for an 82 kV charging voltage. This maximum drops to 42 kJ at 75 kV charging. Neglecting the ablation precursor leads to a {approx}10% change in the calculated yield.